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Sample records for constitutively active gpcr

  1. A knockout mutation of a constitutive GPCR in Tetrahymena decreases both G-protein activity and chemoattraction.

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    Thomas J Lampert

    Full Text Available Although G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs are a common element in many chemosensory transduction pathways in eukaryotic cells, no GPCR or regulated G-protein activity has yet been shown in any ciliate. To study the possible role for a GPCR in the chemoresponses of the ciliate Tetrahymena, we have generated a number of macronuclear gene knockouts of putative GPCRs found in the Tetrahymena Genome database. One of these knockout mutants, called G6, is a complete knockout of a gene that we call GPCR6 (TTHERM_00925490. Based on sequence comparisons, the Gpcr6p protein belongs to the Rhodopsin Family of GPCRs. Notably, Gpcr6p shares highest amino acid sequence homologies to GPCRs from Paramecium and several plants. One of the phenotypes of the G6 mutant is a decreased responsiveness to the depolarizing ions Ba²⁺ and K⁺, suggesting a decrease in basal excitability (decrease in Ca²⁺ channel activity. The other major phenotype of G6 is a loss of chemoattraction to lysophosphatidic acid (LPA and proteose peptone (PP, two known chemoattractants in Tetrahymena. Using microsomal [³⁵S]GTPγS binding assays, we found that wild-type (CU427 have a prominent basal G-protein activity. This activity is decreased to the same level by pertussis toxin (a G-protein inhibitor, addition of chemoattractants, or the G6 mutant. Since the basal G-protein activity is decreased by the GPCR6 knockout, it is likely that this gene codes for a constitutively active GPCR in Tetrahymena. We propose that chemoattractants like LPA and PP cause attraction in Tetrahymena by decreasing the basal G-protein stimulating activity of Gpcr6p. This leads to decreased excitability in wild-type and longer runs of smooth forward swimming (less interrupted by direction changes towards the attractant. Therefore, these attractants may work as inverse agonists through the constitutively active Gpcr6p coupled to a pertussis-sensitive G-protein.

  2. New Insights into Modes of GPCR Activation.

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    Wang, Wenjing; Qiao, Yuhui; Li, Zijian

    2018-01-30

    In classical G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) activation, GPCRs couple to a variety of heterotrimeric G proteins on the membrane and then activate downstream signaling pathways. More recently, GPCRs have been found to couple to different effector proteins, including different G protein subtypes and regulatory proteins, such as arrestins. Some novel modes of GPCR activation have been proposed to explain their complex behaviors. In this review, we summarize the main novel modes of GPCR activation, including biased activation, intracellular activation, dimerization activation, transactivation, and biphasic activation. In addition, we also discuss the relationship among the five modes to show the complex picture of GPCR activation. The complex activation modes regulate precisely GPCR downstream signaling, including physiological and pathological signaling. Thus, there is the potential to develop GPCR precision drugs that target precise GPCR activation modes to accurately strengthen their beneficial functions and block specific pathological processes. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Relevance of rhodopsin studies for GPCR activation.

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    Deupi, Xavier

    2014-05-01

    Rhodopsin, the dim-light photoreceptor present in the rod cells of the retina, is both a retinal-binding protein and a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). Due to this conjunction, it benefits from an arsenal of spectroscopy techniques that can be used for its characterization, while being a model system for the important family of Class A (also referred to as "rhodopsin-like") GPCRs. For instance, rhodopsin has been a crucial player in the field of GPCR structural biology. Until 2007, it was the only GPCR for which a high-resolution crystal structure was available, so all structure-activity analyses on GPCRs, from structure-based drug discovery to studies of structural changes upon activation, were based on rhodopsin. At present, about a third of currently available GPCR structures are still from rhodopsin. In this review, I show some examples of how these structures can still be used to gain insight into general aspects of GPCR activation. First, the analysis of the third intracellular loop in rhodopsin structures allows us to gain an understanding of the structural and dynamic properties of this region, which is absent (due to protein engineering or poor electron density) in most of the currently available GPCR structures. Second, a detailed analysis of the structure of the transmembrane domains in inactive, intermediate and active rhodopsin structures allows us to detect early conformational changes in the process of ligand-induced GPCR activation. Finally, the analysis of a conserved ligand-activated transmission switch in the transmembrane bundle of GPCRs in the context of the rhodopsin activation cycle, allows us to suggest that the structures of many of the currently available agonist-bound GPCRs may correspond to intermediate active states. While the focus in GPCR structural biology is inevitably moving away from rhodopsin, in other aspects rhodopsin is still at the forefront. For instance, the first studies of the structural basis of disease mutants in

  4. Rapid kinetic BRET measurements to monitor G protein activation by GPCR and non-GPCR proteins.

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    Maziarz, Marcin; Garcia-Marcos, Mikel

    2017-01-01

    Heterotrimeric G proteins are central hubs of signal transduction whose activity is controlled by G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) as well as by a complex network of regulatory proteins. Recently, bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET)-based assays have been used to monitor real-time activation of heterotrimeric G proteins in cells. Here we describe the use of a previously established BRET assay to monitor G protein activation upon GPCR stimulation and its adaptation to measure G protein activation by non-GPCR proteins, such as by cytoplasmic guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) like GIV/Girdin. The BRET assay monitors the release of free Gβγ from Gα-Gβγ heterotrimers as a readout of G protein activation, which is readily observable upon agonist stimulation of GPCRs. To control the signal input for non-GPCR activators, we describe the use of a chemically induced dimerization strategy to promote rapid membrane translocation of proteins containing the Gα-binding and -activating (GBA) motif found in some nonreceptor GEFs. The assay described here allows the kinetic measurement of G protein activation with subsecond temporal resolution and to compare the levels of activation induced by GPCR agonists vs those induced by the membrane recruitment of nonreceptor G protein signaling activators. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Salt bridge integrates GPCR activation with protein trafficking.

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    Janovick, Jo Ann; Conn, P Michael

    2010-03-02

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) play central roles in almost all physiological functions; mutations in GPCRs are responsible for more than 30 disorders. There is a great deal of information about GPCR structure but little information that directly relates structure to protein trafficking or to activation. The gonadotropin releasing hormone receptor, because of its small size among GPCRs, is amenable to preparation of mutants and was used in this study to establish the relation among a salt bridge, protein trafficking, and receptor activation. This bridge, between residues E(90) [located in transmembrane segment (TM) 2] and K(121) (TM3), is associated with correct trafficking to the plasma membrane. Agonists, but not antagonists, interact with residue K(121), and destabilize the TM2-TM3 association of the receptor in the plasma membrane. The hGnRHR mutant E(90)K has a broken salt bridge, which also destabilizes the TM2-TM3 association and is typically retained in the endoplasmic reticulum. We show that this mutant, if rescued to the plasma membrane by either of two different means, has constitutive activity and shows modified ligand specificity, revealing a role for the salt bridge in receptor activation, ligand specificity, trafficking, and structure. The data indicate that destabilizing the TM2-TM3 relation for receptor activation, while requiring an intact salt bridge for correct trafficking, provides a mechanism that protects the cell from plasma membrane expression of constitutive activity.

  6. Elastic network normal mode dynamics reveal the GPCR activation mechanism.

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    Kolan, Dikla; Fonar, Gennadiy; Samson, Abraham O

    2014-04-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) are a family of membrane-embedded metabotropic receptors which translate extracellular ligand binding into an intracellular response. Here, we calculate the motion of several GPCR family members such as the M2 and M3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, the A2A adenosine receptor, the β2 -adrenergic receptor, and the CXCR4 chemokine receptor using elastic network normal modes. The normal modes reveal a dilation and a contraction of the GPCR vestibule associated with ligand passage, and activation, respectively. Contraction of the vestibule on the extracellular side is correlated with cavity formation of the G-protein binding pocket on the intracellular side, which initiates intracellular signaling. Interestingly, the normal modes of rhodopsin do not correlate well with the motion of other GPCR family members. Electrostatic potential calculation of the GPCRs reveal a negatively charged field around the ligand binding site acting as a siphon to draw-in positively charged ligands on the membrane surface. Altogether, these results expose the GPCR activation mechanism and show how conformational changes on the cell surface side of the receptor are allosterically translated into structural changes on the inside. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Uncovering the intimate relationship between lipids, cholesterol and GPCR activation.

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    Oates, Joanne; Watts, Anthony

    2011-12-01

    The membrane bilayer has a significant influence over the proteins embedded within it. G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) form a large group of membrane proteins with a vast array of critical functions, and direct and indirect interactions with the bilayer are thought to control various essential aspects of receptor function. The presence of cholesterol, in particular, has been the focus of a number of recent studies, with varying receptor-dependent effects reported. However, the possibility of specific cholesterol binding sites on GPCRs remains debatable at present. A deeper structural and mechanistic understanding of the complex and delicately balanced nature of GPCR-bilayer interactions has only been revealed so far in studies with the non-ligand binding, class A GPCR, rhodopsin. Further investigations are essential if we are to appreciate fully the role of the bilayer composition in GPCR activation and signalling; indeed, recent improvements in GPCR expression and purification, along with development of novel reconstitution methods should make these types of biophysical investigations much more accessible. In this review we highlight the latest research on GPCR-membrane interactions and some of the tools available for more detailed studies. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Minireview: Targeting GPCR Activated ERK Pathways for Drug Discovery.

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    Eishingdrelo, Haifeng; Kongsamut, Sathapana

    2013-01-01

    It has become clear in recent years that multiple signal transduction pathways are employed upon GPCR activation. One of the major cellular effectors activated by GPCRs is extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). Both G-protein and β-arrestin mediated signaling pathways can lead to ERK activation. However, depending on activation pathway, the subcellular destination of activated ERK1/2 may be different. G-protein -dependent ERK activation results in the translocation of active ERK to the nucleus, whereas ERK activated via an arrestin-dependent mechanism remains largely in the cytoplasm. The subcellular location of activated ERK1/2 determines the downstream signaling cascade. Many substrates of ERK1/2 are found in the nucleus: nuclear transcription factors that participate in gene transcription, cell proliferation and differentiation. ERK1/2 substrates are also found in cytosol and other cellular organelles: they may play roles in translation, mitosis, apoptosis and cross-talk with other signaling pathways. Therefore, determining specific subcellular locations of activated ERK1/2 mediated by GPCR ligands would be important in correlating signaling pathways with cellular physiological functions. While GPCR-stimulated selective ERK pathway activation has been studied in several receptor systems, exploitation of these different signaling cascades for therapeutics has not yet been seriously pursued. Many old drug candidates were identified from screens based on G-protein signaling assays, and their activity on β-arrestin signaling pathways being mostly unknown, especially regarding their subcellular ERK pathways. With today's knowledge of complicated GPCR signaling pathways, drug discovery can no longer rely on single-pathway approaches. Since ERK activation is an important signaling pathway and associated with many physiological functions, targeting the ERK pathway, especially specific subcellular activation pathways should provide new avenues for GPCR drug

  9. Measurement of GPCR-G protein activity in living cells.

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    Ratnayake, Kasun; Kankanamge, Dinesh; Senarath, Kanishka; Siripurapu, Praneeth; Weis, Nicole; Tennakoon, Mithila; Payton, John L; Karunarathne, Ajith

    2017-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the largest family of cell surface receptors in eukaryotic genomes. They control a variety of cellular and physiological processes such as hormone secretion and heart rate, and therefore are associated with a majority of pathological conditions including cancer and heart diseases. Currently established assays to measure ligand-induced activation of GPCRs and G proteins possess limitations such as being time consuming, indirect, and expensive. Thus, an efficient method to measure GPCR-G protein activation is required to identify novel pharmacological modulators to control them and gain insights about molecular underpinnings of the associated pathways. Activation of GPCRs induces dissociation of G protein heterotrimers to form GαGTP and free Gβγ. Free Gβγ subunits have been shown to translocate reversibly from the plasma membrane to internal membranes. Gβγ translocation therefore represents the GPCR-G protein activation, and thus, imaging of this process can be used to quantify the kinetics and magnitude of the pathway activation-deactivation in real time in living cells. The objective of this chapter is to elaborate the protocols of (i) generation and optimization of the required sensor constructs; (ii) development of cell culture, transient transfection, imaging, and optogenetic procedures; (iii) imaging and data analysis methods; and (iv) stable cell line generation, pertaining to this assay to measure GPCR-G protein activation. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Class-B GPCR activation: is ligand helix-capping the key?

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    Neumann, Jean-Michel; Couvineau, Alain; Murail, Samuel; Lacapère, Jean-Jacques; Jamin, Nadège; Laburthe, Marc

    2008-07-01

    The class B family of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) regulates essential physiological functions such as exocrine and endocrine secretions, feeding behaviour, metabolism, growth, and neuro- and immuno-modulations. These receptors are activated by endogenous peptide hormones including secretin, glucagon, vasoactive intestinal peptide, corticotropin-releasing factor and parathyroid hormone. We have identified a common structural motif that is encoded in all class B GPCR-ligand N-terminal sequences. We propose that this local structure, a helix N-capping motif, is formed upon receptor binding and constitutes a key element underlying class B GPCR activation. The folded backbone conformation imposed by the capping structure could serve as a template for a rational design of drugs targeting class B GPCRs in several diseases.

  11. Reporter gene assays for investigating GPCR signaling.

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    Azimzadeh, Pedram; Olson, John A; Balenga, Nariman

    2017-01-01

    Luciferase-based assays are applied to evaluate various cellular processes due to their sensitivity and feasibility. The field of GPCR research has also benefited from this enzymatic reaction both in deorphanization campaigns and in delineation of the signaling pathways. Here, we describe the details of this assay in GPCR studies in 96-well format and will provide examples where the assay can show constitutive activity of an orphan GPCR and demonstrate the impact of cell type on the efficacy and potency of ligands. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Tumorigenesis induced by the HHV8-encoded chemokine receptor requires ligand modulation of high constitutive activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, P J; Rosenkilde, M M; Manfra, D

    2001-01-01

    ORF74 (or KSHV-vGPCR) is a highly constitutively active G protein-coupled receptor encoded by HHV8 that is regulated both positively and negatively by endogenous chemokines. When expressed in transgenic mice, this chemokine receptor induces an angioproliferative disease closely resembling Kaposi...

  13. Structural Waters Define a Functional Channel Mediating Activation of the GPCR, rhodopsin

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    Angel, T.; Gupta, S; Jastrzebska, B; Palczewski, K; Chance, M

    2009-01-01

    Structural water molecules may act as prosthetic groups indispensable for proper protein function. In the case of allosteric activation of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), water likely imparts structural plasticity required for agonist-induced signal transmission. Inspection of structures of GPCR superfamily members reveals the presence of conserved embedded water molecules likely important to GPCR function. Coupling radiolytic hydroxyl radical labeling with rapid H2O18 solvent mixing, we observed no exchange of these structural waters with bulk solvent in either ground state or for the Meta II or opsin states. However, the radiolysis approach permitted labeling of selected side chain residues within the transmembrane helices and revealed activation-induced changes in local structural constraints likely mediated by dynamics of both water and protein. These results suggest both a possible general mechanism for water-dependent communication in family A GPCRs based on structural conservation, and a strategy for probing membrane protein structure.

  14. Search for Active-State Conformation of Drug Target GPCR Using Real-Coded Genetic Algorithm

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    Ishino, Yoko; Harada, Takanori; Aida, Misako

    G-Protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) comprise a large superfamily of proteins and are a target for nearly 50% of drugs in clinical use today. GPCRs have a unique structural motif, seven transmembrane helices, and it is known that agonists and antagonists dock with a GPCR in its ``active'' and ``inactive'' condition, respectively. Knowing conformations of both states is eagerly anticipated for elucidation of drug action mechanism. Since GPCRs are difficult to crystallize, the 3D structures of these receptors have not yet been determined by X-ray crystallography, except the inactive-state conformation of two proteins. The conformation of them enabled the inactive form of other GPCRs to be modeled by computer-aided homology modeling. However, to date, the active form of GPCRs has not been solved. This paper describes a novel method to predict the 3D structure of an active-state GPCR aiming at molecular docking-based virtual screening using real-coded genetic algorithm (real-coded GA), receptor-ligand docking simulations, and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The basic idea of the method is that the MD is first used to calculate an average 3D coordinates of all atoms of a GPCR protein against heat fluctuation on the pico- or nano- second time scale, and then real-coded GA involving receptor-ligand docking simulations functions to determine the rotation angle of each helix as a movement on wider time scale. The method was validated using human leukotriene B4 receptor BLT1 as a sample GPCR. Our study demonstrated that the established evolutionary search for the active state of the leukotriene receptor provided the appropriate 3D structure of the receptor to dock with its agonists.

  15. PKCβ phosphorylates PI3Kγ to activate it and release it from GPCR control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romy Walser

    Full Text Available All class I phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3Ks associate tightly with regulatory subunits through interactions that have been thought to be constitutive. PI3Kγ is key to the regulation of immune cell responses activated by G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs. Remarkably we find that PKCβ phosphorylates Ser582 in the helical domain of the PI3Kγ catalytic subunit p110γ in response to clustering of the high-affinity IgE receptor (FcεRI and/or store-operated Ca²⁺- influx in mast cells. Phosphorylation of p110γ correlates with the release of the p84 PI3Kγ adapter subunit from the p84-p110γ complex. Ser582 phospho-mimicking mutants show increased p110γ activity and a reduced binding to the p84 adapter subunit. As functional p84-p110γ is key to GPCR-mediated p110γ signaling, this suggests that PKCβ-mediated p110γ phosphorylation disconnects PI3Kγ from its canonical inputs from trimeric G proteins, and enables p110γ to operate downstream of Ca²⁺ and PKCβ. Hydrogen deuterium exchange mass spectrometry shows that the p84 adaptor subunit interacts with the p110γ helical domain, and reveals an unexpected mechanism of PI3Kγ regulation. Our data show that the interaction of p110γ with its adapter subunit is vulnerable to phosphorylation, and outline a novel level of PI3K control.

  16. Structure-Based Simulations Reveal Concerted Dynamics of GPCR Activation

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    Leioatts, Nicholas; Suresh, Pooja; Romo, Tod D.; Grossfield, Alan

    2014-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are a vital class of proteins that transduce biological signals across the cell membrane. However, their allosteric activation mechanism is not fully understood; crystal structures of active and inactive receptors have been reported, but the functional pathway between these two states remains elusive. Here, we employ structure-based (Gō-like) models to simulate activation of two GPCRs, rhodopsin and the β2 adrenergic receptor (β2AR). We used data-derived re...

  17. GPR182 is a novel marker for sinusoidal endothelial differentiation with distinct GPCR signaling activity in vitro.

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    Schmid, Christian David; Schledzewski, Kai; Mogler, Carolin; Waldburger, Nina; Kalna, Viktoria; Marx, Alexander; Randi, Anna Maria; Géraud, Cyrill; Goerdt, Sergij; Koch, Philipp-Sebastian

    2018-02-01

    Endothelial cells (EC) along the vascular tree exhibit organ-specific angiodiversity. Compared to most other ECs, liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSEC) that constitute the organ-specific microvasculature of the liver are morphologically and functionally unique. Previously, we showed that transcription factor Gata4 acts as a master regulator controlling LSEC differentiation. Upon analysis of the molecular signature of LSEC, we identified GPR182 as a potential LSEC-specific orphan G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR). Here, we demonstrate that GPR182 is expressed by LSEC and by EC with sinusoidal differentiation in spleen, lymph node and bone marrow in healthy human tissues. In a tissue microarray analysis of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) samples, endothelial GPR182 expression was significantly reduced in tumor samples compared to peritumoral liver tissue samples (p = 0.0105). Loss of endothelial GPR182 expression was also seen in fibrotic and cirrhotic liver tissues. In vitro, GPR182 differentially regulated canonical GPCR signaling pathways as shown using reporter luciferase assays in HEK293T cells. Whereas ERK and RhoA signaling were inhibited, CREB and Calcium signaling were activated by ectopic GPR182 overexpression. Our data demonstrate that GPR182 is an endothelial subtype-specific marker for human sinusoidal EC of the liver, spleen, lymph node and bone marrow. In addition, we provide evidence for GPR182-dependent downstream signaling via ERK and SRF pathways that may be involved in regulating endothelial subtype-specific sinusoidal differentiation and sinusoidal functions such as permeability. Copyright © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Decay of an active GPCR: Conformational dynamics govern agonist rebinding and persistence of an active, yet empty, receptor state.

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    Schafer, Christopher T; Fay, Jonathan F; Janz, Jay M; Farrens, David L

    2016-10-18

    Here, we describe two insights into the role of receptor conformational dynamics during agonist release (all-trans retinal, ATR) from the visual G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) rhodopsin. First, we show that, after light activation, ATR can continually release and rebind to any receptor remaining in an active-like conformation. As with other GPCRs, we observe that this equilibrium can be shifted by either promoting the active-like population or increasing the agonist concentration. Second, we find that during decay of the signaling state an active-like, yet empty, receptor conformation can transiently persist after retinal release, before the receptor ultimately collapses into an inactive conformation. The latter conclusion is based on time-resolved, site-directed fluorescence labeling experiments that show a small, but reproducible, lag between the retinal leaving the protein and return of transmembrane helix 6 (TM6) to the inactive conformation, as determined from tryptophan-induced quenching studies. Accelerating Schiff base hydrolysis and subsequent ATR dissociation, either by addition of hydroxylamine or introduction of mutations, further increased the time lag between ATR release and TM6 movement. These observations show that rhodopsin can bind its agonist in equilibrium like a traditional GPCR, provide evidence that an active GPCR conformation can persist even after agonist release, and raise the possibility of targeting this key photoreceptor protein by traditional pharmaceutical-based treatments.

  19. Uncovering the triggers for GPCR activation using solid-state NMR spectroscopy

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    Kimata, Naoki; Reeves, Philip J.; Smith, Steven O.

    2015-04-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) span cell membranes with seven transmembrane helices and respond to a diverse array of extracellular signals. Crystal structures of GPCRs have provided key insights into the architecture of these receptors and the role of conserved residues. However, the question of how ligand binding induces the conformational changes that are essential for activation remains largely unanswered. Since the extracellular sequences and structures of GPCRs are not conserved between receptor subfamilies, it is likely that the initial molecular triggers for activation vary depending on the specific type of ligand and receptor. In this article, we describe NMR studies on the rhodopsin subfamily of GPCRs and propose a mechanism for how retinal isomerization switches the receptor to the active conformation. These results suggest a general approach for determining the triggers for activation in other GPCR subfamilies using NMR spectroscopy.

  20. Calcium Imaging of GPCR Activation Using Arrays of Reverse Transfected HEK293 Cells in a Microfluidic System.

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    Roelse, Margriet; Henquet, Maurice G L; Verhoeven, Harrie A; de Ruijter, Norbert C A; Wehrens, Ron; van Lenthe, Marco S; Witkamp, Renger F; Hall, Robert D; Jongsma, Maarten A

    2018-02-16

    Reverse-transfected cell arrays in microfluidic systems have great potential to perform large-scale parallel screening of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) activation. Here, we report the preparation of a novel platform using reverse transfection of HEK293 cells, imaging by stereo-fluorescence microscopy in a flowcell format, real-time monitoring of cytosolic calcium ion fluctuations using the fluorescent protein Cameleon and analysis of GPCR responses to sequential sample exposures. To determine the relationship between DNA concentration and gene expression, we analyzed cell arrays made with variable concentrations of plasmid DNA encoding fluorescent proteins and the Neurokinin 1 (NK1) receptor. We observed pronounced effects on gene expression of both the specific and total DNA concentration. Reverse transfected spots with NK1 plasmid DNA at 1% of total DNA still resulted in detectable NK1 activation when exposed to its ligand. By varying the GPCR DNA concentration in reverse transfection, the sensitivity and robustness of the receptor response for sequential sample exposures was optimized. An injection series is shown for an array containing the NK1 receptor, bitter receptor TAS2R8 and controls. Both receptors were exposed 14 times to alternating samples of two ligands. Specific responses remained reproducible. This platform introduces new opportunities for high throughput screening of GPCR libraries.

  1. Conformational entropic maps of functional coupling domains in GPCR activation: A case study with beta2 adrenergic receptor

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    Liu, Fan; Abrol, Ravinder; Goddard, William, III; Dougherty, Dennis

    2014-03-01

    Entropic effect in GPCR activation is poorly understood. Based on the recent solved structures, researchers in the GPCR structural biology field have proposed several ``local activating switches'' that consisted of a few number of conserved residues, but have long ignored the collective dynamical effect (conformational entropy) of a domain comprised of an ensemble of residues. A new paradigm has been proposed recently that a GPCR can be viewed as a composition of several functional coupling domains, each of which undergoes order-to-disorder or disorder-to-order transitions upon activation. Here we identified and studied these functional coupling domains by comparing the local entropy changes of each residue between the inactive and active states of the β2 adrenergic receptor from computational simulation. We found that agonist and G-protein binding increases the heterogeneity of the entropy distribution in the receptor. This new activation paradigm and computational entropy analysis scheme provides novel ways to design functionally modified mutant and identify new allosteric sites for GPCRs. The authors thank NIH and Sanofi for funding this project.

  2. Reversible G Protein βγ9 Distribution-Based Assay Reveals Molecular Underpinnings in Subcellular, Single-Cell, and Multicellular GPCR and G Protein Activity.

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    Senarath, Kanishka; Ratnayake, Kasun; Siripurapu, Praneeth; Payton, John L; Karunarathne, Ajith

    2016-12-06

    Current assays to measure the activation of G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) and G proteins are time-consuming, indirect, and expensive. Therefore, an efficient method which directly measures the ability of a ligand to govern GPCR-G protein interactions can help to understand the molecular underpinnings of the associated signaling. A live cell imaging-based approach is presented here to directly measure ligand-induced GPCR and G protein activity in real time. The number of active GPCRs governs G protein heterotrimer (αβγ) dissociation, thereby controlling the concentration of free βγ subunits. The described γ9 assay measures the GPCR activation-induced extent of the reversible βγ9 subunit exchange between the plasma membrane (PM) and internal membranes (IMs). Confocal microscopy-based γ9 assay quantitatively determines the concentration dependency of ligands on GPCR activation. Demonstrating the high-throughput screening (HTS) adaptability, the γ9 assay performed using an imaging plate reader measures the ligand-induced GPCR activation. This suggests that the γ9 assay can be employed to screen libraries of compounds for their ability to activate GPCRs. Together with subcellular optogenetics, the spatiotemporal sensitivity of the γ9 assay permits experimental determination of the limits of spatially restricted activation of GPCRs and G proteins in subcellular regions of single cells. This assay works effectively for GPCRs coupled to αi/o and αs heterotrimers, including light-sensitive GPCRs. In addition, computational modeling of experimental data from the assay is used to decipher intricate molecular details of the GPCR-G protein activation process. Overall, the γ9 assay provides a robust strategy for quantitative as well as qualitative determination of GPCR and G protein function on a single-cell, multicell, and subcellular level. This assay not only provides information about the inner workings of the signaling pathway, but it also strengthens

  3. The GPCR heterotetramer: challenging classical pharmacology.

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    Ferré, Sergi

    2015-03-01

    Two concepts are gaining increasing acceptance in G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) pharmacology: (i) pre-coupling of GPCRs with their preferred signaling molecules, and (ii) GPCR oligomerization. This is begging for the introduction of new models such as GPCR oligomer-containing signaling complexes with GPCR homodimers as functional building blocks. This model favors the formation of GPCR heterotetramers - heteromers of homodimers coupled to their cognate G protein. The GPCR heterotetramer offers an optimal framework for a canonical antagonistic interaction between activated Gs and Gi proteins, which can simultaneously bind to their respective preferred receptors and to adenylyl cyclase (AC) catalytic units. This review addresses the current evidence for pre-coupling of the various specific components that provide the very elaborate signaling machinery exemplified by the Gs-Gi-AC-coupled GPCR heterotetramer. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Amplification of the angiogenic signal through the activation of the TSC/mTOR/HIF axis by the KSHV vGPCR in Kaposi's sarcoma.

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    Bruno C Jham

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Kaposi's sarcoma (KS is a vascular neoplasm characterized by the dysregulated expression of angiogenic and inflammatory cytokines. The driving force of the KS lesion, the KSHV-infected spindle cell, secretes elevated levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, essential for KS development. However, the origin of VEGF in this tumor remains unclear.Here we report that the KSHV G protein-coupled receptor (vGPCR upregulates VEGF in KS through an intricate paracrine mechanism. The cytokines secreted by the few vGPCR-expressing tumor cells activate in neighboring cells multiple pathways (including AKT, ERK, p38 and IKKβ that, in turn, converge on TSC1/2, promoting mTOR activation, HIF upregulation, and VEGF secretion. Conditioned media from vGPCR-expressing cells lead to an mTOR-dependent increase in HIF-1α and HIF-2α protein levels and VEGF upregulation. In a mouse allograft model for KS, specific inhibition of the paracrine activation of mTOR in non-vGPCR-expressing cells was sufficient to inhibit HIF upregulation in these cells, and abolished the ability of the vGPCR-expressing cells to promote tumor formation in vivo. Similarly, pharmacologic inhibition of HIF in this model blocked VEGF secretion and also lead to tumor regression.Our findings provide a compelling explanation for how the few tumor cells expressing vGPCR can contribute to the dramatic amplification of VEGF secretion in KS, and further provide a molecular mechanism for how cytokine dysregulation in KS fuels angiogenesis and tumor development. These data further suggest that activation of HIF by vGPCR may be a vulnerable target for the treatment of patients with KS.

  5. GPCR sorting at multivesicular endosomes.

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    Dores, Michael Robert; Trejo, JoAnn

    2015-01-01

    The lysosomal degradation of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is essential for receptor signaling and down regulation. Once internalized, GPCRs are sorted within the endocytic pathway and packaged into intraluminal vesicles (ILVs) that bud inward to form the multivesicular endosome (MVE). The mechanisms that control GPCR sorting and ILV formation are poorly understood. Quantitative strategies are important for evaluating the function of adaptor and scaffold proteins that regulate sorting of GPCRs at MVEs. In this chapter, we outline two strategies for the quantification and visualization of GPCR sorting into the lumen of MVEs. The first protocol utilizes a biochemical approach to assay the sorting of GPCRs in a population of cells, whereas the second strategy examines GPCR sorting in individual cells using immunofluorescence confocal microscopy. Combined, these assays can be used to establish the kinetics of activated GPCR lysosomal trafficking in response to specific ligands, as well as evaluate the contribution of endosomal adaptors to GPCR sorting at MVEs. The protocols presented in this chapter can be adapted to analyze GPCR sorting in a myriad of cell types and tissues, and expanded to analyze the mechanisms that regulate MVE sorting of other cargoes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. A physiologically required G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR)-regulator of G protein signaling (RGS) interaction that compartmentalizes RGS activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croft, Wayne; Hill, Claire; McCann, Eilish; Bond, Michael; Esparza-Franco, Manuel; Bennett, Jeannette; Rand, David; Davey, John; Ladds, Graham

    2013-09-20

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) can interact with regulator of G protein signaling (RGS) proteins. However, the effects of such interactions on signal transduction and their physiological relevance have been largely undetermined. Ligand-bound GPCRs initiate by promoting exchange of GDP for GTP on the Gα subunit of heterotrimeric G proteins. Signaling is terminated by hydrolysis of GTP to GDP through intrinsic GTPase activity of the Gα subunit, a reaction catalyzed by RGS proteins. Using yeast as a tool to study GPCR signaling in isolation, we define an interaction between the cognate GPCR (Mam2) and RGS (Rgs1), mapping the interaction domains. This reaction tethers Rgs1 at the plasma membrane and is essential for physiological signaling response. In vivo quantitative data inform the development of a kinetic model of the GTPase cycle, which extends previous attempts by including GPCR-RGS interactions. In vivo and in silico data confirm that GPCR-RGS interactions can impose an additional layer of regulation through mediating RGS subcellular localization to compartmentalize RGS activity within a cell, thus highlighting their importance as potential targets to modulate GPCR signaling pathways.

  7. Subcellular Organization of GPCR Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichel, Kelsie; von Zastrow, Mark

    2018-02-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) comprise a large and diverse class of signal-transducing receptors that undergo dynamic and isoform-specific membrane trafficking. GPCRs thus have an inherent potential to initiate or regulate signaling reactions from multiple membrane locations. This review discusses emerging insights into the subcellular organization of GPCR function in mammalian cells, focusing on signaling transduced by heterotrimeric G proteins and β-arrestins. We summarize recent evidence indicating that GPCR-mediated activation of G proteins occurs not only from the plasma membrane (PM) but also from endosomes and Golgi membranes and that β-arrestin-dependent signaling can be transduced from the PM by β-arrestin trafficking to clathrin-coated pits (CCPs) after dissociation from a ligand-activated GPCR. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Analgesic tone conferred by constitutively active mu opioid receptors in mice lacking β-arrestin 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hales Tim G

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hedonic reward, dependence and addiction are unwanted effects of opioid analgesics, linked to the phasic cycle of μ opioid receptor activation, tolerance and withdrawal. In vitro studies of recombinant G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs over expressed in cell lines reveal an alternative tonic signaling mechanism that is independent of agonist. Such studies demonstrate that constitutive GPCR signaling can be inhibited by inverse agonists but not by neutral antagonists. However, ligand-independent activity has been difficult to examine in vivo, at the systems level, due to relatively low levels of constitutive activity of most GPCRs including μ receptors, often necessitating mutagenesis or pharmacological manipulation to enhance basal signaling. We previously demonstrated that the absence of β-arrestin 2 (β-arr2 augments the constitutive coupling of μ receptors to voltage-activated Ca2+ channels in primary afferent dorsal root ganglion neurons from β-arr2-/- mice. We used this in vitro approach to characterize neutral competitive antagonists and inverse agonists of the constitutively active wild type μ receptors in neurons. We administered these agents to β-arr2-/- mice to explore the role of constitutive μ receptor activity in nociception and hedonic tone. This study demonstrates that the induction of constitutive μ receptor activity in vivo in β-arr2-/- mice prolongs tail withdrawal from noxious heat, a phenomenon that was reversed by inverse agonists, but not by antagonists that lack negative efficacy. By contrast, the aversive effects of inverse agonists were similar in β-arr2-/- and β-arr2+/+ mice, suggesting that hedonic tone was unaffected.

  9. Application of an Integrated GPCR SAR-Modeling Platform To Explain the Activation Selectivity of Human 5-HT2C over 5-HT2B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heifetz, Alexander; Storer, R Ian; McMurray, Gordon; James, Tim; Morao, Inaki; Aldeghi, Matteo; Bodkin, Mike J; Biggin, Philip C

    2016-05-20

    Agonism of the 5-HT2C serotonin receptor has been associated with the treatment of a number of diseases including obesity, psychiatric disorders, sexual health, and urology. However, the development of effective 5-HT2C agonists has been hampered by the difficulty in obtaining selectivity over the closely related 5-HT2B receptor, agonism of which is associated with irreversible cardiac valvulopathy. Understanding how to design selective agonists requires exploration of the structural features governing the functional uniqueness of the target receptor relative to related off targets. X-ray crystallography, the major experimental source of structural information, is a slow and challenging process for integral membrane proteins, and so is currently not feasible for every GPCR or GPCR-ligand complex. Therefore, the integration of existing ligand SAR data with GPCR modeling can be a practical alternative to provide this essential structural insight. To demonstrate this, we integrated SAR data from 39 azepine series 5-HT2C agonists, comprising both selective and unselective examples, with our hierarchical GPCR modeling protocol (HGMP). Through this work we have been able to demonstrate how relatively small differences in the amino acid sequences of GPCRs can lead to significant differences in secondary structure and function, as supported by experimental data. In particular, this study suggests that conformational differences in the tilt of TM7 between 5-HT2B and 5-HT2C, which result from differences in interhelical interactions, may be the major source of selectivity in G-protein activation between these two receptors. Our approach also demonstrates how the use of GPCR models in conjunction with SAR data can be used to explain activity cliffs.

  10. Pharmacogenomic and structural analysis of constitutive g protein-coupled receptor activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, M.J.; Vischer, H.F.; Bakker, R.A.; Jongejan, A.; Timmerman, H.; Pardo, L.M.; Leurs, R.

    2007-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) respond to a chemically diverse plethora of signal transduction molecules. The notion that GPCRs also signal without an external chemical trigger, i.e., in a constitutive or spontaneous manner, resulted in a paradigm shift in the field of GPCR pharmacology. The

  11. Tactical Approaches to Interconverting GPCR Agonists and Antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dosa, Peter I; Amin, Elizabeth Ambrose

    2016-02-11

    There are many reported examples of small structural modifications to GPCR-targeted ligands leading to major changes in their functional activity, converting agonists into antagonists or vice versa. These shifts in functional activity are often accompanied by negligible changes in binding affinity. The current perspective focuses on outlining and analyzing various approaches that have been used to interconvert GPCR agonists, partial agonists, and antagonists in order to achieve the intended functional activity at a GPCR of therapeutic interest. An improved understanding of specific structural modifications that are likely to alter the functional activity of a GPCR ligand may be of use to researchers designing GPCR-targeted drugs and/or probe compounds, specifically in cases where a particular ligand exhibits good potency but not the preferred functional activity at the GPCR of choice.

  12. Functional competence of a partially engaged GPCR-β-arrestin complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Punita; Srivastava, Ashish; Banerjee, Ramanuj; Ghosh, Eshan; Gupta, Pragya; Ranjan, Ravi; Chen, Xin; Gupta, Bhagyashri; Gupta, Charu; Jaiman, Deepika; Shukla, Arun K

    2016-11-09

    G Protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute the largest family of cell surface receptors and drug targets. GPCR signalling and desensitization is critically regulated by β-arrestins (βarr). GPCR-βarr interaction is biphasic where the phosphorylated carboxyl terminus of GPCRs docks to the N-domain of βarr first and then seven transmembrane core of the receptor engages with βarr. It is currently unknown whether fully engaged GPCR-βarr complex is essential for functional outcomes or partially engaged complex can also be functionally competent. Here we assemble partially and fully engaged complexes of a chimeric β 2 V 2 R with βarr1, and discover that the core interaction is dispensable for receptor endocytosis, ERK MAP kinase binding and activation. Furthermore, we observe that carvedilol, a βarr biased ligand, does not promote detectable engagement between βarr1 and the receptor core. These findings uncover a previously unknown aspect of GPCR-βarr interaction and provide novel insights into GPCR signalling and regulatory paradigms.

  13. GPCR Homology Model Generation for Lead Optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tautermann, Christofer S

    2018-01-01

    The vast increase of recently solved GPCR X-ray structures forms the basis for GPCR homology modeling to atomistic accuracy. Nowadays, homology models can be employed for GPCR-ligand optimization and have been reported as invaluable tools for drug design in the last few years. Elucidation of the complex GPCR pharmacology and the associated GPCR conformations made clear that different homology models have to be constructed for different activation states of the GPCRs. Therefore, templates have to be chosen accordingly to their sequence homology as well as to their activation state. The subsequent ligand placement is nontrivial, as some recent X-ray structures show very unusual ligand binding sites and solvent involvement, expanding the space of the putative ligand binding site from the generic retinal binding pocket to the whole receptor. In the present study, a workflow is presented starting from the selection of the target sequence, guiding through the GPCR modeling process, and finishing with ligand placement and pose validation.

  14. Barcoding of GPCR trafficking and signaling through the various trafficking roadmaps by compartmentalized signaling networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahouth, Suleiman W; Nooh, Mohammed M

    2017-08-01

    Proper signaling by G protein coupled receptors (GPCR) is dependent on the specific repertoire of transducing, enzymatic and regulatory kinases and phosphatases that shape its signaling output. Activation and signaling of the GPCR through its cognate G protein is impacted by G protein-coupled receptor kinase (GRK)-imprinted "barcodes" that recruit β-arrestins to regulate subsequent desensitization, biased signaling and endocytosis of the GPCR. The outcome of agonist-internalized GPCR in endosomes is also regulated by sequence motifs or "barcodes" within the GPCR that mediate its recycling to the plasma membrane or retention and eventual degradation as well as its subsequent signaling in endosomes. Given the vast number of diverse sequences in GPCR, several trafficking mechanisms for endosomal GPCR have been described. The majority of recycling GPCR, are sorted out of endosomes in a "sequence-dependent pathway" anchored around a type-1 PDZ-binding module found in their C-tails. For a subset of these GPCR, a second "barcode" imprinted onto specific GPCR serine/threonine residues by compartmentalized kinase networks was required for their efficient recycling through the "sequence-dependent pathway". Mutating the serine/threonine residues involved, produced dramatic effects on GPCR trafficking, indicating that they played a major role in setting the trafficking itinerary of these GPCR. While endosomal SNX27, retromer/WASH complexes and actin were required for efficient sorting and budding of all these GPCR, additional proteins were required for GPCR sorting via the second "barcode". Here we will review recent developments in GPCR trafficking in general and the human β 1 -adrenergic receptor in particular across the various trafficking roadmaps. In addition, we will discuss the role of GPCR trafficking in regulating endosomal GPCR signaling, which promote biochemical and physiological effects that are distinct from those generated by the GPCR signal transduction

  15. Cloud-based simulations on Google Exacycle reveal ligand modulation of GPCR activation pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohlhoff, Kai J.; Shukla, Diwakar; Lawrenz, Morgan; Bowman, Gregory R.; Konerding, David E.; Belov, Dan; Altman, Russ B.; Pande, Vijay S.

    2014-01-01

    Simulations can provide tremendous insight into the atomistic details of biological mechanisms, but micro- to millisecond timescales are historically only accessible on dedicated supercomputers. We demonstrate that cloud computing is a viable alternative that brings long-timescale processes within reach of a broader community. We used Google's Exacycle cloud-computing platform to simulate two milliseconds of dynamics of a major drug target, the G-protein-coupled receptor β2AR. Markov state models aggregate independent simulations into a single statistical model that is validated by previous computational and experimental results. Moreover, our models provide an atomistic description of the activation of a G-protein-coupled receptor and reveal multiple activation pathways. Agonists and inverse agonists interact differentially with these pathways, with profound implications for drug design.

  16. The morphology and composition of cholesterol-rich micellar nanostructures determine transmembrane protein (GPCR) activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Malley, Michelle A; Helgeson, Matthew E; Wagner, Norman J; Robinson, Anne S

    2011-01-19

    We examined model mixed micelles consisting of the nonionic surfactant n-dodecyl-β-D-maltoside, 3-(3-cholamidopropyl)-dimethylammoniopropane sulfonate, and the cholesterol derivative cholesteryl hemisuccinate (CHS) to identify micellar properties that are correlated with the in vitro conformational stability and activity of the human adenosine A₂a receptor, a G-protein coupled receptor. Small-angle neutron scattering was used to determine micellar structure and composition as a function of concentration of the various components, and radioligand binding was used as a sensitive probe for receptor activity. Micelles adopted an oblate ellipsoidal morphology and exhibited a reduction in size and change in curvature upon addition of CHS. Our results show a strong correlation between the number of CHS monomers per micelle and the activity of the receptor reconstituted in those micelles. Micelles that yield optimal human adenosine A₂a receptor stability closely mimic the cholesterol composition and thickness of mammalian membranes. Thus, successful reconstitution of the receptor is dependent on both specific lipid-protein interactions and the geometry of the micelle environment. Copyright © 2011 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Integrating structural and mutagenesis data to elucidate GPCR ligand binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Christian; Harpsøe, Kasper; Hauser, Alexander S

    2016-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) represent the largest family of human membrane proteins, as well as drug targets. A recent boom in GPCR structural biology has provided detailed images of receptor ligand binding sites and interactions on the molecular level. An ever-increasing number of ligands...... elucidate new GPCR ligand binding sites, and ultimately design drugs with tailored pharmacological activity....

  18. Water permeation through the internal water pathway in activated GPCR rhodopsin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsufumi Tomobe

    Full Text Available Rhodopsin is a light-driven G-protein-coupled receptor that mediates signal transduction in eyes. Internal water molecules mediate activation of the receptor in a rhodopsin cascade reaction and contribute to conformational stability of the receptor. However, it remains unclear how internal water molecules exchange between the bulk and protein inside, in particular through a putative solvent pore on the cytoplasmic. Using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, we identified the solvent pore on cytoplasmic side in both the Meta II state and the Opsin. On the other hand, the solvent pore does not exist in the dark-adapted rhodopsin. We revealed two characteristic narrow regions located within the solvent pore in the Meta II state. The narrow regions distinguish bulk and the internal hydration sites, one of which is adjacent to the conserved structural motif "NPxxY". Water molecules in the solvent pore diffuse by pushing or sometimes jumping a preceding water molecule due to the geometry of the solvent pore. These findings revealed a total water flux between the bulk and the protein inside in the Meta II state, and suggested that these pathways provide water molecules to the crucial sites of the activated rhodopsin.

  19. GPCR desensitization: Acute and prolonged phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajagopal, Sudarshan; Shenoy, Sudha K

    2018-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) transduce a wide array of extracellular signals and regulate virtually every aspect of physiology. While GPCR signaling is essential, overstimulation can be deleterious, resulting in cellular toxicity or uncontrolled cellular growth. Accordingly, nature has developed a number of mechanisms for limiting GPCR signaling, which are broadly referred to as desensitization, and refer to a decrease in response to repeated or continuous stimulation. Short-term desensitization occurs over minutes, and is primarily associated with β-arrestins preventing G protein interaction with a GPCR. Longer-term desensitization, referred to as downregulation, occurs over hours to days, and involves receptor internalization into vesicles, degradation in lysosomes and decreased receptor mRNA levels through unclear mechanisms. Phosphorylation of the receptor by GPCR kinases (GRKs) and the recruitment of β-arrestins is critical to both these short- and long-term desensitization mechanisms. In addition to phosphorylation, both the GPCR and β-arrestins are modified post-translationally in several ways, including by ubiquitination. For many GPCRs, receptor ubiquitination promotes degradation of agonist-activated receptors in the lysosomes. Other proteins also play important roles in desensitization, including phosphodiesterases, RGS family proteins and A-kinase-anchoring proteins. Together, this intricate network of kinases, ubiquitin ligases, and adaptor proteins orchestrate the acute and prolonged desensitization of GPCRs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Single-Molecule Imaging of GPCR Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calebiro, Davide; Sungkaworn, Titiwat

    2018-02-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute the largest family of membrane receptors and are of great interest as pharmacological targets. Although the occurrence of GPCR signaling nanodomains has long been hypothesized based on indirect evidence, this and other fundamental aspects of GPCR signaling have been difficult to prove. The advent of single-molecule microscopy methods, which allow direct visualization of individual membrane proteins with unprecedented spatiotemporal resolution, provides unique opportunities to address several of these open questions. Indeed, recent single-molecule studies have revealed that GPCRs and G proteins transiently interact with each other as well as with structural components of the plasma membrane, leading to the formation of dynamic complexes and 'hot spots' for GPCR signaling. Whereas we are only beginning to understand the implications of this unexpected level of complexity, single-molecule approaches are likely to play a crucial role to further dissect the protein-protein interactions that are at the heart of GPCR signaling. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Structural mechanism of GPCR-arrestin interaction: recent breakthroughs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ji Young; Lee, Su Youn; Kim, Hee Ryung; Seo, Min-Duk; Chung, Ka Young

    2016-03-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are a major membrane receptor family with important physiological and pathological functions. In the classical signaling pathway, ligand-activated GPCRs couple to G proteins, thereby inducing G protein-dependent signaling pathways and phosphorylation by G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs). This leads to an interaction with arrestins, which results in GPCR desensitization. Recently, non-classical GPCR signaling pathways, mediated by GPCR-bound arrestins, have been identified. Consequently, arrestins play important roles in GPCR signaling not only with respect to desensitization but also in relation to G protein-independent signal transduction. These findings have led to efforts to develop functionally biased (i.e. signal transduction biased) GPCR-targeting drugs. One of these efforts is aimed at understanding the structural mechanism of functionally biased GPCR signaling, which includes understanding the G protein-selectivity or arrestin-selectivity of GPCRs. This goal has not yet been achieved; however, great progress has been made during the last 3 years toward understanding the structural mechanism of GPCR-mediated arrestin activation. This review will discuss the recent breakthroughs in the conformational understanding of GPCR-arrestin interaction.

  2. Nomad Biosensors: A New Multiplexed Technology for the Screening of GPCR Ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mella, Rosa M; Kortazar, Danel; Roura-Ferrer, Meritxell; Salado, Clarisa; Valcárcel, María; Castilla, Amaia; Villacé, Patricia

    2018-02-01

    Nomad Technology (Innoprot [Innovative Technologies in Biological Systems], Derio, Spain), a novel tool for multiplexing high-throughput cell-based G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) assays, is described in this work. This new technology comprises a family of fluorescent biosensors called Nomad Biosensors that allow for the measurement of responses mediated by G proteins through their interactions with second-messenger transduction proteins. GPCRs are one of the largest protein families of receptors in eukaryotes, and their signaling mediates important physiological processes within cells. Thus, GPCRs are associated with a wide variety of diseases, and considered major targets in therapeutic research. Nomad constitutes a novel tool for unraveling the mechanism of GPCR signal transduction by simultaneously tracing different pathways. GPCR activation changes the structural folding of the biosensor and promotes its vesicularization, as well as an increase in the fluorescence intensity. Based on this technology, the MPX Nomad cellular model was developed to discriminate between the Ca 2+ -mediated pathway and the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-mediated pathway. To validate this model, endothelin receptor B (ET B R) was coexpressed into the MPX Nomad cell line and assessed with a specific agonist, an antagonist, and a chemical library of compounds. Nomad Technology optimizes the identification of novel GPCR ligands and enables the testing of large numbers of compounds.

  3. Conformational biosensors reveal GPCR signalling from endosomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Irannejad, R; Tomshine, Jin C; Tomshine, Jon R

    2013-01-01

    -domain antibodies (nanobodies) to directly probe activation of the β2-adrenoceptor, a prototypical GPCR, and its cognate G protein, Gs (ref. 12), in living mammalian cells. We show that the adrenergic agonist isoprenaline promotes receptor and G protein activation in the plasma membrane as expected, but also...

  4. Priming GPCR signaling through the synergistic effect of two G proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupte, Tejas M; Malik, Rabia U; Sommese, Ruth F; Ritt, Michael; Sivaramakrishnan, Sivaraj

    2017-04-04

    Although individual G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are known to activate one or more G proteins, the GPCR-G-protein interaction is viewed as a bimolecular event involving the formation of a ternary ligand-GPCR-G-protein complex. Here, we present evidence that individual GPCR-G-protein interactions can reinforce each other to enhance signaling through canonical downstream second messengers, a phenomenon we term "GPCR priming." Specifically, we find that the presence of noncognate Gq protein enhances cAMP stimulated by two Gs-coupled receptors, β2-adrenergic receptor (β2-AR) and D 1 dopamine receptor (D 1 -R). Reciprocally, Gs enhances IP 1 through vasopressin receptor (V 1A -R) but not α1 adrenergic receptor (α1-AR), suggesting that GPCR priming is a receptor-specific phenomenon. The C terminus of either the Gαs or Gαq subunit is sufficient to enhance Gα subunit activation and cAMP levels. Interaction of Gαs or Gαq C termini with the GPCR increases signaling potency, suggesting an altered GPCR conformation as the underlying basis for GPCR priming. We propose three parallel mechanisms involving ( i ) sequential G-protein interactions at the cognate site, ( ii ) G-protein interactions at distinct allosteric and cognate sites on the GPCR, and ( iii ) asymmetric GPCR dimers. GPCR priming suggests another layer of regulation in the classic GPCR ternary-complex model, with broad implications for the multiplicity inherent in signaling networks.

  5. Structural Aspects of GPCR-G Protein Coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Ka Young

    2013-09-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are membrane receptors; approximately 40% of drugs on the market target GPCRs. A precise understanding of the activation mechanism of GPCRs would facilitate the development of more effective and less toxic drugs. Heterotrimeric G proteins are important molecular switches in GPCR-mediated signal transduction. An agonist-activated receptor interacts with specific sites on G proteins and promotes the release of GDP from the Gα subunit. Because of the important biological role of the GPCR-G protein coupling, conformational changes in the G protein upon receptor coupling have been of great interest. One of the most important questions was the interface between the GPCR and G proteins and the structural mechanism of GPCR-induced G protein activation. A number of biochemical and biophysical studies have been performed since the late 80s to address these questions; there was a significant breakthrough in 2011 when the crystal structure of a GPCR-G protein complex was solved. This review discusses the structural aspects of GPCR-G protein coupling by comparing the results of previous biochemical and biophysical studies to the GPCR-G protein crystal structure.

  6. [Novel achievements in development and application of GPCR-peptides].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shpakov, A O; Derkach, K V

    2015-01-01

    One of the approaches to creating the regulators of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) is the development of peptides that structurally correspond to the functionally important regions of the intracellular extracellular loops of the receptors. GPCR-peptides can selectively regulate the functional activity of homologous receptor and affect the hormonal signal transduction via the receptor. Among the peptides corresponding to the intracellular regions of GPCR, their derivatives modified with hydrophobic radicals exhibit the highest activity and selectivity of action in vitro and in vivo. Ample evidence demonstrates that lipophilic GPCR-peptides may be used to treat diseases and various abnormalities that depend on the functional activity of receptors homologous to them. In turn, the peptides corresponding to the extracellular regions of GPCR can be used as functional probes for studying the specific interaction between the receptors and their ligands, as well as for studying the etiology and pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases caused by the production of antibodies to GPCR antigenic determinants that are localized in the receptor extracellular loops. The present review focuses on the recent achievements in development and application of GPCR-peptides and on the prospects for their further use in medicine and fundamental biology.

  7. Constitutively activated ERK sensitizes cancer cells to doxorubicin ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-02-03

    Feb 3, 2017 ... Constitutively activated ERK sensitizes cancer cells to doxorubicin: Involvement of p53-EGFR-ERK pathway. RATNA KUMARI. 1,†. , SURBHI CHOUHAN. 1,†. , SNAHLATA SINGH. 1,†. , RISHI RAJ CHHIPA. 2. ,. AMRENDRA KUMAR AJAY. 3 and MANOJ KUMAR BHAT*. National Centre for Cell Science, ...

  8. Helix 11 Dynamics is Critical for Constitutive Androstane Receptor Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Wright, Edward; Busby, Scott A.; Wisecarver, Sarah; Vincent, Jeremy; Griffin, Patrick R.; Fernandez, Elias J.

    2011-01-01

    The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) transactivation can occur in the absence of exogenous ligand and this activity is enhanced by agonists TCPOBOP and meclizine. We use biophysical and cell-based assays to show that increased activity of CAR(TCPOBOP) relative to CAR(meclizine) corresponds to a higher affinity of CAR(TCPOBOP) for the steroid receptor coactivator-1. Additionally, steady-state fluorescence spectra suggest conformational differences between CAR(TCPOBOP):RXR and CAR(meclizi...

  9. Receptor sequestration in response to β-arrestin-2 phosphorylation by ERK1/2 governs steady-state levels of GPCR cell-surface expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradis, Justine S; Ly, Stevenson; Blondel-Tepaz, Élodie; Galan, Jacob A; Beautrait, Alexandre; Scott, Mark G H; Enslen, Hervé; Marullo, Stefano; Roux, Philippe P; Bouvier, Michel

    2015-09-15

    MAPKs are activated in response to G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) stimulation and play essential roles in regulating cellular processes downstream of these receptors. However, very little is known about the reciprocal effect of MAPK activation on GPCRs. To investigate possible crosstalk between the MAPK and GPCRs, we assessed the effect of ERK1/2 on the activity of several GPCR family members. We found that ERK1/2 activation leads to a reduction in the steady-state cell-surface expression of many GPCRs because of their intracellular sequestration. This subcellular redistribution resulted in a global dampening of cell responsiveness, as illustrated by reduced ligand-mediated G-protein activation and second-messenger generation as well as blunted GPCR kinases and β-arrestin recruitment. This ERK1/2-mediated regulatory process was observed for GPCRs that can interact with β-arrestins, such as type-2 vasopressin, type-1 angiotensin, and CXC type-4 chemokine receptors, but not for the prostaglandin F receptor that cannot interact with β-arrestin, implicating this scaffolding protein in the receptor's subcellular redistribution. Complementation experiments in mouse embryonic fibroblasts lacking β-arrestins combined with in vitro kinase assays revealed that β-arrestin-2 phosphorylation on Ser14 and Thr276 is essential for the ERK1/2-promoted GPCR sequestration. This previously unidentified regulatory mechanism was observed after constitutive activation as well as after receptor tyrosine kinase- or GPCR-mediated activation of ERK1/2, suggesting that it is a central node in the tonic regulation of cell responsiveness to GPCR stimulation, acting both as an effector and a negative regulator.

  10. Regulation of GPCR Trafficking by Ubiquitin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Justine E; Marchese, Adriano

    2015-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR)-promoted signaling mediates cellular responses to a variety of stimuli involved in diverse physiological processes. In addition, GPCRs are also the largest class of target for many drugs used to treat a variety of diseases. Despite the role of GPCR signaling in health and disease, the molecular mechanisms governing GPCR signaling remain poorly understanding. Classically, GPCR signaling is tightly regulated by GPCR kinases and β-arrestins, which act in a concerted fashion to govern GPCR desensitization and also GPCR trafficking. Ubiquitination has now emerged as an important posttranslational modification that has multiple roles, either directly or indirectly, in governing GPCR trafficking. Recent studies have revealed a mechanistic link between GPCR phosphorylation, β-arrestins, and ubiquitination. Here, we review recent developments in our understanding of how ubiquitin regulates GPCR trafficking within the endocytic pathway. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Catecholamine receptors: prototypes for GPCR-based drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emery, Andrew C

    2013-01-01

    Drugs acting at G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute ~40% of those in current clinical use. GPCR-based drug discovery remains at the forefront of drug development, especially for new treatments for psychiatric illness and neurological disease. Here, the basic framework of GPCR signaling learned through the elucidation of catecholamine receptor signaling through G proteins and β-arrestins, and X-ray crystallographic structure determination is reviewed. In silico docking studies developed in tandem with confirmatory empirical data gathering from binding and signaling experiments have allowed this basic framework to be expanded to drug hunting through predictive in silico searching as well as high-throughput and high-content screening approaches. For efforts moving forward for the deployment of new GPCR-acting drugs, collaborative efforts between industry and government/academic research in target validation at the molecular and cellular levels have become progressively more common. Polypharmacological approaches have become increasingly available for learning more about the mechanisms of GPCR-targeted drugs, based on interaction not with a single, but with a wide range of GPCR targets. These approaches are likely to aid in drug repurposing efforts, yield valuable insight on the side effects of currently employed drugs, and allow for a clearer picture of the actual targets of "atypical" drugs used in a variety of therapeutic contexts. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Measurement of intracellular Ca2+mobilization to study GPCR signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashokan, Anisha; Aradhyam, Gopala K

    2017-01-01

    Understanding G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) structure-function relationship and its activation mechanism has been broadly explored using mutational strategy due to problems in GPCR crystallization. Probing into GPCR: effector (G protein/β-arrestin) interactions and downstream signaling are important aspects of GPCR research. Among the G proteins, though there are some approaches to investigate G q -mediated signaling, they involve the use of radioactivity and are qualitative in nature. Our method described here makes use of the cell permeable nature of fluorescent Ca 2+ indicator dye, fura2AM, that binds with the Ca 2+ released in response to GPCR: G q interaction on ligand treatment. Using this spectrophotometric method, EC 50 values of the GPCR: ligand binding can be calculated and the binding affinity can be analyzed. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. New constitutive latex osmotin-like proteins lacking antifungal activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Cleverson D T; Silva, Maria Z R; Bruno-Moreno, Frederico; Monteiro-Moreira, Ana C O; Moreira, Renato A; Ramos, Márcio V

    2015-11-01

    Proteins that share similar primary sequences to the protein originally described in salt-stressed tobacco cells have been named osmotins. So far, only two osmotin-like proteins were purified and characterized of latex fluids. Osmotin from Carica papaya latex is an inducible protein lacking antifungal activity, whereas the Calotropis procera latex osmotin is a constitutive antifungal protein. To get additional insights into this subject, we investigated osmotins in latex fluids of five species. Two potential osmotin-like proteins in Cryptostegia grandiflora and Plumeria rubra latex were detected by immunological cross-reactivity with polyclonal antibodies produced against the C. procera latex osmotin (CpOsm) by ELISA, Dot Blot and Western Blot assays. Osmotin-like proteins were not detected in the latex of Thevetia peruviana, Himatanthus drasticus and healthy Carica papaya fruits. Later, the two new osmotin-like proteins were purified through immunoaffinity chromatography with anti-CpOsm immobilized antibodies. Worth noting the chromatographic efficiency allowed for the purification of the osmotin-like protein belonging to H. drasticus latex, which was not detectable by immunoassays. The identification of the purified proteins was confirmed after MS/MS analyses of their tryptic digests. It is concluded that the constitutive osmotin-like proteins reported here share structural similarities to CpOsm. However, unlike CpOsm, they did not exhibit antifungal activity against Fusarium solani and Colletotrichum gloeosporioides. These results suggest that osmotins of different latex sources may be involved in distinct physiological or defensive events. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Compartmentalization of GPCR signalling controls unique cellular responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellisdon, Andrew M; Halls, Michelle L

    2016-04-15

    With >800 members, G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the largest class of cell-surface signalling proteins, and their activation mediates diverse physiological processes. GPCRs are ubiquitously distributed across all cell types, involved in many diseases and are major drug targets. However, GPCR drug discovery is still characterized by very high attrition rates. New avenues for GPCR drug discovery may be provided by a recent shift away from the traditional view of signal transduction as a simple chain of events initiated from the plasma membrane. It is now apparent that GPCR signalling is restricted to highly organized compartments within the cell, and that GPCRs activate distinct signalling pathways once internalized. A high-resolution understanding of how compartmentalized signalling is controlled will probably provide unique opportunities to selectively and therapeutically target GPCRs. © 2016 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  15. Structure and dynamics of GPCR signaling complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilger, Daniel; Masureel, Matthieu; Kobilka, Brian K

    2018-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) relay numerous extracellular signals by triggering intracellular signaling through coupling with G proteins and arrestins. Recent breakthroughs in the structural determination of GPCRs and GPCR-transducer complexes represent important steps toward deciphering GPCR signal transduction at a molecular level. A full understanding of the molecular basis of GPCR-mediated signaling requires elucidation of the dynamics of receptors and their transducer complexes as well as their energy landscapes and conformational transition rates. Here, we summarize current insights into the structural plasticity of GPCR-G-protein and GPCR-arrestin complexes that underlies the regulation of the receptor's intracellular signaling profile.

  16. Ganglionic GFAP + glial Gq-GPCR signaling enhances heart functions in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Alison Xiaoqiao; Lee, Jakovin J; McCarthy, Ken D

    2017-01-26

    The sympathetic nervous system (SNS) accelerates heart rate, increases cardiac contractility, and constricts resistance vessels. The activity of SNS efferent nerves is generated by a complex neural network containing neurons and glia. Gq G protein-coupled receptor (Gq-GPCR) signaling in glial fibrillary acidic protein-expressing (GFAP + ) glia in the central nervous system supports neuronal function and regulates neuronal activity. It is unclear how Gq-GPCR signaling in GFAP + glia affects the activity of sympathetic neurons or contributes to SNS-regulated cardiovascular functions. In this study, we investigated whether Gq-GPCR activation in GFAP + glia modulates the regulatory effect of the SNS on the heart; transgenic mice expressing Gq-coupled DREADD (designer receptors exclusively activated by designer drugs) (hM3Dq) selectively in GFAP + glia were used to address this question in vivo. We found that acute Gq-GPCR activation in peripheral GFAP + glia significantly accelerated heart rate and increased left ventricle contraction. Pharmacological experiments suggest that the glial-induced cardiac changes were due to Gq-GPCR activation in satellite glial cells within the sympathetic ganglion; this activation led to increased norepinephrine (NE) release and beta-1 adrenergic receptor activation within the heart. Chronic glial Gq-GPCR activation led to hypotension in female Gfap -hM3Dq mice. This study provides direct evidence that Gq-GPCR activation in peripheral GFAP + glia regulates cardiovascular functions in vivo.

  17. Advances in GPCR modeling evaluated by the GPCR Dock 2013 assessment: meeting new challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kufareva, Irina; Katritch, Vsevolod; Stevens, Raymond C; Abagyan, Ruben

    2014-08-05

    Despite tremendous successes of GPCR crystallography, the receptors with available structures represent only a small fraction of human GPCRs. An important role of the modeling community is to maximize structural insights for the remaining receptors and complexes. The community-wide GPCR Dock assessment was established to stimulate and monitor the progress in molecular modeling and ligand docking for GPCRs. The four targets in the present third assessment round presented new and diverse challenges for modelers, including prediction of allosteric ligand interaction and activation states in 5-hydroxytryptamine receptors 1B and 2B, and modeling by extremely distant homology for smoothened receptor. Forty-four modeling groups participated in the assessment. State-of-the-art modeling approaches achieved close-to-experimental accuracy for small rigid orthosteric ligands and models built by close homology, and they correctly predicted protein fold for distant homology targets. Predictions of long loops and GPCR activation states remain unsolved problems. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Downregulation of a GPCR by β-Arrestin2-Mediated Switch from an Endosomal to a TGN Recycling Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Nazish; Beg, Muheeb; Soares, David; Dittman, Jeremy S; McGraw, Timothy E

    2016-12-13

    Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) is an incretin hormone involved in nutrient homeostasis. GIP receptor (GIPR) is constitutively internalized and returned to the plasma membrane, atypical behavior for a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). GIP promotes GIPR downregulation from the plasma membrane by inhibiting recycling without affecting internalization. This transient desensitization is achieved by altered intracellular trafficking of activated GIPR. GIP stimulation induces a switch in GIPR recycling from a rapid endosomal to a slow trans-Golgi network (TGN) pathway. GPCR kinases and β-arrestin2 are required for this switch in recycling. A coding sequence variant of GIPR, which has been associated with metabolic alterations, has altered post-activation trafficking characterized by enhanced downregulation and prolonged desensitization. Downregulation of the variant requires β-arrestin2 targeting to the TGN but is independent of GPCR kinases. The single amino acid substitution in the variant biases the receptor to promote GIP-stimulated β-arrestin2 recruitment without receptor phosphorylation, thereby enhancing downregulation. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Ice breaking in GPCR structural biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qiang; Wu, Bei-li

    2012-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are one of the most challenging targets in structural biology. To successfully solve a high-resolution GPCR structure, several experimental obstacles must be overcome, including expression, extraction, purification, and crystallization. As a result, there are only a handful of unique structures reported from this protein superfamily, which consists of over 800 members. In the past few years, however, there has been an increase in the amount of solved GPCR structures, and a few high-impact structures have been determined: the peptide receptor CXCR4, the agonist bound receptors, and the GPCR-G protein complex. The dramatic progress in GPCR structural studies is not due to the development of any single technique, but a combination of new techniques, new tools and new concepts. Here, we summarize the progress made for GPCR expression, purification, and crystallization, and we highlight the technical advances that will facilitate the future determination of GPCR structures. PMID:22286917

  20. Constitutive activity of the acetylcholine-activated potassium current IK,ACh in cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, Niels; Abu-Taha, Issam; Heijman, Jordi; Dobrev, Dobromir

    2014-01-01

    Stimulation of the vagal nerve slows the heart rate and leads to shorter action potential duration in the atria. These effects are mainly mediated by binding of the vagal neurotransmitter acetylcholine to muscarinic type 2 receptors resulting in dissociation of Gi proteins and subsequent activation of IK,ACh-K(+) channels due to binding of Gβγ-subunits. Even though agonist-independent (constitutive) IK,ACh activity is considered negligible in the healthy heart, constitutive IK,ACh activity has been shown to contribute to remodeling processes associated with cardiac diseases such as atrial fibrillation. In this review, we summarize possible mechanisms, which may contribute to the development of constitutively active IK,ACh. For example, an increased availability of Gβγ-subunits within the IK,ACh channel complex could contribute to receptor-independent IK,ACh activation. Accordingly, reduced expression of Gα-subunits, which act as Gβγ-scavengers within the channel complex, and increased activity of nucleoside diphosphate kinases, which activate G proteins in a receptor-independent manner, are likely contributors to constitutively active IK,ACh. In addition, alterations of the IK,ACh channel composition or phosphorylation may also be involved in abnormal IK,ACh current activity. Finally, we discuss possible therapeutic applications of pharmacological IK,ACh modulators, which may represent future drug targets against cardiac diseases such as atrial fibrillation. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. GPCR-ModSim: A comprehensive web based solution for modeling G-protein coupled receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esguerra, Mauricio; Siretskiy, Alexey; Bello, Xabier; Sallander, Jessica; Gutiérrez-de-Terán, Hugo

    2016-07-08

    GPCR-ModSim (http://open.gpcr-modsim.org) is a centralized and easy to use service dedicated to the structural modeling of G-protein Coupled Receptors (GPCRs). 3D molecular models can be generated from amino acid sequence by homology-modeling techniques, considering different receptor conformations. GPCR-ModSim includes a membrane insertion and molecular dynamics (MD) equilibration protocol, which can be used to refine the generated model or any GPCR structure uploaded to the server, including if desired non-protein elements such as orthosteric or allosteric ligands, structural waters or ions. We herein revise the main characteristics of GPCR-ModSim and present new functionalities. The templates used for homology modeling have been updated considering the latest structural data, with separate profile structural alignments built for inactive, partially-active and active groups of templates. We have also added the possibility to perform multiple-template homology modeling in a unique and flexible way. Finally, our new MD protocol considers a series of distance restraints derived from a recently identified conserved network of helical contacts, allowing for a smoother refinement of the generated models which is particularly advised when there is low homology to the available templates. GPCR- ModSim has been tested on the GPCR Dock 2013 competition with satisfactory results. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  2. Increased platelet activation and thrombosis in transgenic mice expressing constitutively active P2Y12 receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y.; Ye, J.; Hu, L.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, S.H.; Li, Y.; Kunapuli, S.P.; Ding, Z.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background In our previous in vitro study we reported a constitutively active chimeric P2Y12 receptor (cP2Y12) and found AR-C78511 is a potent inverse agonist at this receptor. The role of this cP2Y12 receptor in platelet activation and thrombosis is not clear. Objectives To investigate the physiological implications of the constitutively active P2Y12 receptor in platelet activation, thrombus formulation and evaluate the antiplatelet activity of AR-C78511 as an inverse agonist. Methods and Results We generated transgenic mice conditionally and platelet-specifically expressing cP2Y12. High expression of cP2Y12 receptor in platelets increased platelet reactivity as evidenced by increased platelet aggregation in response to multiple platelet agonists. Moreover, transgenic mice displayed shortened bleeding time, more rapid and stable thrombus formation in mesenteric artery injured with FeCl3. The constitutive activity of cP2Y12 in platelets was confirmed by decreased platelet cAMP levels and constitutive Akt phosphorylation in the absence of agonists. AR-C78511 reversed the cAMP decrease in transgenic mouse platelets, and exhibited superior antiplatelet effect over AR-C69931MX in transgenic mice. Conclusions These findings further emphasize the importance of P2Y12 in platelet activation, hemostasis and thrombosis, as well as the prothrombotic role of constitutive activity of P2Y12. Our data also validates the in vivo inverse agonist activity of AR-C78511 and confirms its superior antiplatelet activity over neutral antagonist. PMID:22906019

  3. GLASS: a comprehensive database for experimentally validated GPCR-ligand associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Wallace K B; Zhang, Hongjiu; Yang, Jianyi; Brender, Jeffrey R; Hur, Junguk; Özgür, Arzucan; Zhang, Yang

    2015-09-15

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are probably the most attractive drug target membrane proteins, which constitute nearly half of drug targets in the contemporary drug discovery industry. While the majority of drug discovery studies employ existing GPCR and ligand interactions to identify new compounds, there remains a shortage of specific databases with precisely annotated GPCR-ligand associations. We have developed a new database, GLASS, which aims to provide a comprehensive, manually curated resource for experimentally validated GPCR-ligand associations. A new text-mining algorithm was proposed to collect GPCR-ligand interactions from the biomedical literature, which is then crosschecked with five primary pharmacological datasets, to enhance the coverage and accuracy of GPCR-ligand association data identifications. A special architecture has been designed to allow users for making homologous ligand search with flexible bioactivity parameters. The current database contains ∼500 000 unique entries, of which the vast majority stems from ligand associations with rhodopsin- and secretin-like receptors. The GLASS database should find its most useful application in various in silico GPCR screening and functional annotation studies. The website of GLASS database is freely available at http://zhanglab.ccmb.med.umich.edu/GLASS/. zhng@umich.edu Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Biased agonism: An emerging paradigm in GPCR drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankovic, Zoran; Brust, Tarsis F; Bohn, Laura M

    2016-01-15

    G protein coupled receptors have historically been one of the most druggable classes of cellular proteins. The members of this large receptor gene family couple to primary effectors, G proteins, that have built in mechanisms for regeneration and amplification of signaling with each engagement of receptor and ligand, a kinetic event in itself. In recent years GPCRs, have been found to interact with arrestin proteins to initiate signal propagation in the absence of G protein interactions. This pinnacle observation has changed a previously held notion of the linear spectrum of GPCR efficacy and uncovered a new paradigm in GPCR research and drug discovery that relies on multidimensionality of GPCR signaling. Ligands were found that selectively confer activity in one pathway over another, and this phenomenon has been referred to as 'biased agonism' or 'functional selectivity'. While great strides in the understanding of this phenomenon have been made in recent years, two critical questions still dominate the field: How can we rationally design biased GPCR ligands, and ultimately, which physiological responses are due to G protein versus arrestin interactions? This review will discuss the current understanding of some of the key aspects of biased signaling that are related to these questions, including mechanistic insights in the nature of biased signaling and methods for measuring ligand bias, as well as relevant examples of drug discovery applications and medicinal chemistry strategies that highlight the challenges and opportunities in this rapidly evolving field. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Cardiac GPCR-Mediated EGFR Transactivation: Impact and Therapeutic Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grisanti, Laurel A; Guo, Shuchi; Tilley, Douglas G

    2017-07-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) remain primary therapeutic targets for numerous cardiovascular disorders, including heart failure (HF), because of their influence on cardiac remodeling in response to elevated neurohormone signaling. GPCR blockers have proven to be beneficial in the treatment of HF by reducing chronic G protein activation and cardiac remodeling, thereby extending the lifespan of patients with HF. Unfortunately, this effect does not persist indefinitely, thus next-generation therapeutics aim to selectively block harmful GPCR-mediated pathways while simultaneously promoting beneficial signaling. Transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has been shown to be mediated by an expanding repertoire of GPCRs in the heart, and promotes cardiomyocyte survival, thus may offer a new avenue of HF therapeutics. However, GPCR-dependent EGFR transactivation has also been shown to regulate cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis by different GPCRs and through distinct molecular mechanisms. Here, we discuss the mechanisms and impact of GPCR-mediated EGFR transactivation in the heart, focusing on angiotensin II, urotensin II, and β-adrenergic receptor systems, and highlight areas of research that will help us to determine whether this pathway can be engaged as future therapeutic strategy.

  6. Discovery of GPCR ligands for probing signal transduction pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brogi, Simone; Tafi, Andrea; Désaubry, Laurent; Nebigil, Canan G

    2014-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are seven integral transmembrane proteins that are the primary targets of almost 30% of approved drugs and continue to represent a major focus of pharmaceutical research. All of GPCR targeted medicines were discovered by classical medicinal chemistry approaches. After the first GPCR crystal structures were determined, the docking screens using these structures lead to discovery of more novel and potent ligands. There are over 360 pharmaceutically relevant GPCRs in the human genome and to date about only 30 of structures have been determined. For these reasons, computational techniques such as homology modeling and molecular dynamics simulations have proven their usefulness to explore the structure and function of GPCRs. Furthermore, structure-based drug design and in silico screening (High Throughput Docking) are still the most common computational procedures in GPCRs drug discovery. Moreover, ligand-based methods such as three-dimensional quantitative structure-selectivity relationships, are the ideal molecular modeling approaches to rationalize the activity of tested GPCR ligands and identify novel GPCR ligands. In this review, we discuss the most recent advances for the computational approaches to effectively guide selectivity and affinity of ligands. We also describe novel approaches in medicinal chemistry, such as the development of biased agonists, allosteric modulators, and bivalent ligands for class A GPCRs. Furthermore, we highlight some knockout mice models in discovering biased signaling selectivity.

  7. Discovery of GPCR ligands for probing signal transduction pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brogi, Simone; Tafi, Andrea; Désaubry, Laurent; Nebigil, Canan G.

    2014-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are seven integral transmembrane proteins that are the primary targets of almost 30% of approved drugs and continue to represent a major focus of pharmaceutical research. All of GPCR targeted medicines were discovered by classical medicinal chemistry approaches. After the first GPCR crystal structures were determined, the docking screens using these structures lead to discovery of more novel and potent ligands. There are over 360 pharmaceutically relevant GPCRs in the human genome and to date about only 30 of structures have been determined. For these reasons, computational techniques such as homology modeling and molecular dynamics simulations have proven their usefulness to explore the structure and function of GPCRs. Furthermore, structure-based drug design and in silico screening (High Throughput Docking) are still the most common computational procedures in GPCRs drug discovery. Moreover, ligand-based methods such as three-dimensional quantitative structure–selectivity relationships, are the ideal molecular modeling approaches to rationalize the activity of tested GPCR ligands and identify novel GPCR ligands. In this review, we discuss the most recent advances for the computational approaches to effectively guide selectivity and affinity of ligands. We also describe novel approaches in medicinal chemistry, such as the development of biased agonists, allosteric modulators, and bivalent ligands for class A GPCRs. Furthermore, we highlight some knockout mice models in discovering biased signaling selectivity. PMID:25506327

  8. GPCR crystal structures: Medicinal chemistry in the pocket.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shonberg, Jeremy; Kling, Ralf C; Gmeiner, Peter; Löber, Stefan

    2015-07-15

    Recent breakthroughs in GPCR structural biology have significantly increased our understanding of drug action at these therapeutically relevant receptors, and this will undoubtedly lead to the design of better therapeutics. In recent years, crystal structures of GPCRs from classes A, B, C and F have been solved, unveiling a precise snapshot of ligand-receptor interactions. Furthermore, some receptors have been crystallized in different functional states in complex with antagonists, partial agonists, full agonists, biased agonists and allosteric modulators, providing further insight into the mechanisms of ligand-induced GPCR activation. It is now obvious that there is enormous diversity in the size, shape and position of the ligand binding pockets in GPCRs. In this review, we summarise the current state of solved GPCR structures, with a particular focus on ligand-receptor interactions in the binding pocket, and how this can contribute to the design of GPCR ligands with better affinity, subtype selectivity or efficacy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Constitutive Activity among Orphan Class-A G Protein Coupled Receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, Adam L.; Steurer, Michael A.; Aronstam, Robert S.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the extent of constitutive activity among orphan class-A G protein coupled receptors within the cAMP signaling pathway. Constitutive signaling was revealed by changes in gene expression under control of the cAMP response element. Gene expression was measured in Chinese hamster ovary cells transiently co-transfected with plasmids containing a luciferase reporter and orphan receptor. Criteria adopted for defining constitutive activation were: 1) 200% el...

  10. Structural analyses of a constitutively active mutant of exchange protein directly activated by cAMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Mark A; Li, Sheng; Tsalkova, Tamara; Mei, Fang C; Liu, Tong; Woods, Virgil L; Cheng, Xiaodong

    2012-01-01

    Exchange proteins directly activated by cAMP (EPACs) are important allosteric regulators of cAMP-mediated signal transduction pathways. To understand the molecular mechanism of EPAC activation, we have combined site-directed mutagenesis, X-ray crystallography, and peptide amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (DXMS) to probe the structural and conformational dynamics of EPAC2-F435G, a constitutively active EPAC2 mutant. Our study demonstrates that conformational dynamics plays a critical role in cAMP-induced EPAC activation. A glycine mutation at 435 position shifts the equilibrium of conformational dynamics towards the extended active conformation.

  11. Structural analyses of a constitutively active mutant of exchange protein directly activated by cAMP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A White

    Full Text Available Exchange proteins directly activated by cAMP (EPACs are important allosteric regulators of cAMP-mediated signal transduction pathways. To understand the molecular mechanism of EPAC activation, we have combined site-directed mutagenesis, X-ray crystallography, and peptide amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (DXMS to probe the structural and conformational dynamics of EPAC2-F435G, a constitutively active EPAC2 mutant. Our study demonstrates that conformational dynamics plays a critical role in cAMP-induced EPAC activation. A glycine mutation at 435 position shifts the equilibrium of conformational dynamics towards the extended active conformation.

  12. β-Arrestin drives MAP kinase signalling from clathrin-coated structures after GPCR dissociation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichel, K; Jullié, D; von Zastrow, M

    2016-03-01

    β-Arrestins critically regulate G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signalling, not only 'arresting' the G protein signal but also modulating endocytosis and initiating a discrete G-protein-independent signal through MAP kinase. Despite enormous recent progress towards understanding biophysical aspects of arrestin function, arrestin cell biology remains relatively poorly understood. Two key tenets underlie the prevailing current view: β-arrestin accumulates in clathrin-coated structures (CCSs) exclusively in physical complex with its activating GPCR, and MAP kinase activation requires endocytosis of formed GPCR-β-arrestin complexes. We show here, using β1-adrenergic receptors, that β-arrestin-2 (arrestin 3) accumulates robustly in CCSs after dissociating from its activating GPCR and transduces the MAP kinase signal from CCSs. Moreover, inhibiting subsequent endocytosis of CCSs enhances the clathrin- and β-arrestin-dependent MAP kinase signal. These results demonstrate β-arrestin 'activation at a distance', after dissociating from its activating GPCR, and signalling from CCSs. We propose a β-arrestin signalling cycle that is catalytically activated by the GPCR and energetically coupled to the endocytic machinery.

  13. Biophysical characterization of GPCR oligomerization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiasen, Signe

    The biophysical characterization of the fundamental molecular mechanisms behind G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) oligomerization is proposed to be paramount for understanding the pharmacological consequence of receptor self-association. Here we developed an in vitro assay that allowed a quanti......The biophysical characterization of the fundamental molecular mechanisms behind G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) oligomerization is proposed to be paramount for understanding the pharmacological consequence of receptor self-association. Here we developed an in vitro assay that allowed...... a quantitative characterization of GPCR oligomerization. The assay provided the first quantification of the association energy of the β2 Adrenergic Receptor (β2AR), a prototypical GPCR. Furthermore we directly observed the time-dependent dimerization of β2AR and Cannabinoid receptor 1 at the single molecule...... level, and revealed the existence of several dimerization interfaces, each with specific kinetics. Finally we investigated how a property of the membrane solubilizing GPCRs affected oligomerization. We observed a dramatic decrease in oligomer stability with increasing geometrical membrane curvature. We...

  14. Towards selective lysophospholipid GPCR modulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archbold, Julia K; Martin, Jennifer L; Sweet, Matthew J

    2014-05-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) that recognize the lysophospholipids (LPLs) are grouped into two phylogenetically distinct families: the endothelial differentiation gene (Edg) and non-Edg GPCRs. Owing to their more recent identification, and hindered by a lack of selective pharmacological tools, our understanding of the functions and signaling pathways of the non-Edg GPCRs is still in its infancy. Targeting the non-conserved allosteric binding sites of the LPL GPCRs shows particular promise for the development of selective modulators by structure-based drug design. However, only one Edg GPCR (S1PR1) structure has been determined to date, and it has low sequence identity with the non-Edg GPCRs (structure of a non-Edg GPCR remains a pressing objective for selective structure-based drug design. Obtaining selective modulators targeting the non-Edg receptors would help to unravel the biology behind these novel GPCRs and potentially will support therapeutic treatment of diseases such as cancer, inflammation, and neuropsychiatric disorders. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Transgenic mice expressing constitutive active MAPKAPK5 display gender-dependent differences in exploration and activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moens Ugo

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mitogen-activated protein kinases, MAPKs for short, constitute cascades of signalling pathways involved in the regulation of several cellular processes that include cell proliferation, differentiation and motility. They also intervene in neurological processes like fear conditioning and memory. Since little remains known about the MAPK-Activated Protein Kinase, MAPKAPK5, we constructed the first MAPKAPK knockin mouse model, using a constitutive active variant of MAPKAPK5 and analyzed the resulting mice for changes in anxiety-related behaviour. Methods We performed primary SHIRPA observations during background breeding into the C57BL/6 background and assessed the behaviour of the background-bred animals on the elevated plus maze and in the light-dark test. Our results were analyzed using Chi-square tests and homo- and heteroscedatic T-tests. Results Female transgenic mice displayed increased amounts of head dips and open arm time on the maze, compared to littermate controls. In addition, they also explored further into the open arm on the elevated plus maze and were less active in the closed arm compared to littermate controls. Male transgenic mice displayed no differences in anxiety, but their locomotor activity increased compared to non-transgenic littermates. Conclusion Our results revealed anxiety-related traits and locomotor differences between transgenic mice expressing constitutive active MAPKAPK5 and control littermates.

  16. Constitutive law for thermally-activated plasticity of recrystallized tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinovev, Aleksandr; Terentyev, Dmitry; Dubinko, Andrii; Delannay, Laurent

    2017-12-01

    A physically-based constitutive law relevant for ITER-specification tungsten grade in as-recrystallized state is proposed. The material demonstrates stages III and IV of the plastic deformation, in which hardening rate does not drop to zero with the increase of applied stress. Despite the classical Kocks-Mecking model, valid at stage III, the strain hardening asymptotically decreases resembling a hyperbolic function. The material parameters are fitted by relying on tensile test data and by requiring that the strain and stress at the onset of diffuse necking (uniform elongation and ultimate tensile strength correspondingly) as well as the yield stress be reproduced. The model is then validated in the temperature range 300-600 °C with the help of finite element analysis of tensile tests which confirms the reproducibility of the experimental engineering curves up to the onset of diffuse necking, beyond which the development of ductile damage accelerates the material failure. This temperature range represents the low temperature application window for tungsten as divertor material in fusion reactor ITER.

  17. Morphine withdrawal enhances constitutive μ-opioid receptor activity in the ventral tegmental area

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meye, F.J.; van Zessen, R.; Smidt, M.P.; Adan, R.A.H.; Ramakers, G.M.J.

    2012-01-01

    μ-opioid receptors (MORs) in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) are pivotally involved in addictive behavior. While MORs are typically activated by opioids, they can also become constitutively active in the absence of any agonist. In the current study, we present evidence that MOR constitutive

  18. New paradigms in GPCR drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Kenneth A

    2015-12-15

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) remain a major domain of pharmaceutical discovery. The identification of GPCR lead compounds and their optimization are now structure-based, thanks to advances in X-ray crystallography, molecular modeling, protein engineering and biophysical techniques. In silico screening provides useful hit molecules. New pharmacological approaches to tuning the pleotropic action of GPCRs include: allosteric modulators, biased ligands, GPCR heterodimer-targeted compounds, manipulation of polypharmacology, receptor antibodies and tailoring of drug molecules to fit GPCR pharmacogenomics. Measurements of kinetics and drug efficacy are factors influencing clinical success. With the exception of inhibitors of GPCR kinases, targeting of intracellular GPCR signaling or receptor cycling for therapeutic purposes remains a futuristic concept. New assay approaches are more efficient and multidimensional: cell-based, label-free, fluorescence-based assays, and biosensors. Tailoring GPCR drugs to a patient's genetic background is now being considered. Chemoinformatic tools can predict ADME-tox properties. New imaging technology visualizes drug action in vivo. Thus, there is reason to be optimistic that new technology for GPCR ligand discovery will help reverse the current narrowing of the pharmaceutical pipeline. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Nutrition, activity behavior and body constitution in primary school children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Carandente

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Child and adolescent obesity currently affects at least 10-25�0of the paediatric population in most developed countries. The BMI value is one of the most appropriate method of defining obesity and has a strong association with body fatness and health risk. Two main environmental factors, nutrition and physical activity, could influence paediatric obesity development. This paper studies the relationship between sedentariness, snack and soft drink intake and overweight or obesity in children. 1194 primary school children (age 8-10 participated in the study. For all the subjects we measured the anthropometric data to calculate the BMI. The overweight and obesity prevalence was estimated using age-specific BMI cutoffs. A questionaire was also submitted to all the children by a single interviewer to obtain data about: a Weekly Physical Activity, b Weekly Sedentary Activity, c Alimentary Style. Spearman rank correlation and the Student’s t-test were used. The data demonstrated that 23.2�0of the children is overweight and the 4.8�0obese. BMI is inversely correlated to the physical activity, while there is positive correlation between BMI and number of double portions. Statistically significant positive correlation is present among eating snacks and hours of sedentariness, while there is a negative correlation between physical activity and TV hours. Physical activity in the childhood could be an important tool to prevent obesity development and adult-onset chronic diseases. It is important to encourage an active lifestyle in order to reduce sedentariness.

  20. Novel Structural Insights into GPCR-β-Arrestin Interaction and Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjan, Ravi; Dwivedi, Hemlata; Baidya, Mithu; Kumar, Mohit; Shukla, Arun K

    2017-11-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are major signal recognition and transmission units in the plasma membrane. The interaction of activated and phosphorylated GPCRs with the multifunctional adaptor proteins β-arrestins (βarrs) is crucial for regulation of their signaling and functional outcomes. Over the past few years, a range of structural, biochemical, and cellular studies have revealed novel insights into GPCR-βarr interaction and signaling. Some of these findings have come as a surprise and therefore have the potential to significantly refine the conceptual framework of the GPCR-βarr system. Here we discuss these recent advances with particular emphasis on biphasic GPCR-βarr interaction, the formation of GPCR-G-protein-βarr supercomplexes, and receptor-specific conformational signatures in βarrs. We also underline the emerging research areas that are likely to be at the center stage of investigations in the coming years. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Methods for the development of in silico GPCR models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Paula; Hurst, Dow P.; Reggio, Patricia H.

    2018-01-01

    The Reggio group has constructed computer models of the inactive and G-protein activated states of the cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors, as well, several orphan receptors that recognize a sub-set of cannabinoid compounds, including GPR55 and GPR18. These models have been used to design ligands, mutations and covalent labeling studies. The resultant second generation models have been used to design ligands with improved affinity, efficacy and sub-type selectivity. Herein, we provide a guide for the development of GPCR models using the most recent orphan receptor studied in our lab, GPR3. GPR3 is an orphan receptor that belongs to the Class A family of G-Protein Coupled Receptors. It shares high sequence similarity with GPR6, GPR12, the lysophospholipid receptors, and the cannabinoid receptors. GPR3 is predominantly expressed in mammalian brain and oocytes and it is known as a Gαs-coupled receptor activated constitutively in cells. GPR3 represents a possible target for the treatment of different pathological conditions such as Alzheimer’s disease, oocyte maturation or neuropathic pain. However, the lack of potent and selective GPR3 ligands is delaying the exploitation of this promising therapeutic target. In this context, we aim to develop a homology model that helps us to elucidate the structural determinants governing ligand-receptor interactions at GPR3. In this chapter, we detail the methods and rationale behind the construction of the GPR3 active and inactive state models. These homology models will enable the rational design of novel ligands, which may serve as research tools for further understanding of the biological role of GPR3. PMID:28750813

  2. Constitutively activated ERK sensitizes cancer cells to doxorubicin ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-02-03

    Feb 3, 2017 ... The tumour suppressor gene p53 is mutated in approximately 50% of the human cancers. p53 is involved in genotoxic stress-induced cellular responses. The role of EGFR and ERK in DNA-damage-induced apoptosis is well known. We investigated the involvement of activation of ERK signalling as a ...

  3. Constitutively activated ERK sensitizes cancer cells to doxorubicin ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The tumour suppressor gene p53 is mutated in approximately 50% of the human cancers. p53 is involved in genotoxicstress-induced cellular responses. The role of EGFR and ERK in DNA-damage-induced apoptosis is well known. Weinvestigated the involvement of activation of ERK signalling as a consequence of ...

  4. Student Initiated Religious Activity: Constitutional Argument or Psychological Inquiry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossow, Lawrence F.; Rossow, Nancy D.

    1990-01-01

    Traces the legal history of prayer clubs and related religious activities in schools. Cites psychological arguments that high school students are generally independent and capable of critical thinking; contends that research is needed in determining whether high school students can specifically perceive religious neutrality. (MLF)

  5. Tumorigenesis induced by the HHV8-encoded chemokine receptor requires ligand modulation of high constitutive activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, P J; Rosenkilde, M M; Manfra, D

    2001-01-01

    sarcoma (KS). Here we demonstrate that several lines of mice carrying mutated receptors deficient in either constitutive activity or chemokine regulation fail to develop KS-like disease. In addition, animals expressing a receptor that preserves chemokine binding and constitutive activity but that does...... not respond to agonist stimulation have a much lower incidence of angiogenic lesions and tumors. These results indicate that induction of the KS-like disease in transgenic mice by ORF74 requires not only high constitutive signaling activity but also modulation of this activity by endogenous chemokines....

  6. Common structural basis for constitutive activity of the ghrelin receptor family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Birgitte; Holliday, Nicholas D; Bach, Anders

    2004-01-01

    activity through the inositol phosphate and cAMP response element pathways. In contrast, GPR39 signaled with the highest constitutive activity in respect of activation of serum response element-dependent transcription, in part, possibly, through G(12/13) and Rho kinase. Antibody feeding experiments...... demonstrated that the epitope-tagged ghrelin receptor was constitutively internalized but could be trapped at the cell surface by an inverse agonist, whereas GPR39 remained at the cell surface. Mutational analysis showed that the constitutive activity of both the ghrelin receptor and GPR39 could systematically...

  7. Pharmacogenomics of GPCR Drug Targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauser, Alexander Sebastian; Chavali, Sreenivas; Masuho, Ikuo

    2018-01-01

    Natural genetic variation in the human genome is a cause of individual differences in responses to medications and is an underappreciated burden on public health. Although 108 G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the targets of 475 (∼34%) Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs...... and account for a global sales volume of over 180 billion US dollars annually, the prevalence of genetic variation among GPCRs targeted by drugs is unknown. By analyzing data from 68,496 individuals, we find that GPCRs targeted by drugs show genetic variation within functional regions such as drug......- and effector-binding sites in the human population. We experimentally show that certain variants of μ-opioid and Cholecystokinin-A receptors could lead to altered or adverse drug response. By analyzing UK National Health Service drug prescription and sales data, we suggest that characterizing GPCR variants...

  8. GPCR Interaction: 309 [GRIPDB[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Predicted interfaces of Angiotensin type 1 by using the SCD with the alignment provided in GPCR...DB A Angiotensin Angiotensin type 1 Angiotensin type 1 ... Prediction ... 15593372 SCD for GPCRDB subtype 001_002_001_001 ...

  9. GPCR Interaction: 398 [GRIPDB[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Predicted interfaces of Other 511 by using the SCD with the alignment provided in GPCR...DB A Class A Other Other 511 Other 511 ... Prediction ... 15593372 SCD for GPCRDB subtype 001_999_500_011 ...

  10. GPCR Interaction: 333 [GRIPDB[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Predicted interfaces of Melanocortin type 4 by using the SCD with the alignment provided in GPCR...DB A Melanocortin Melanocortin type 4 Melanocortin type 4 ... Prediction ... 15593372 SCD for GPCRDB subtype 001_002_011_004 ...

  11. GPCR Interaction: 349 [GRIPDB[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Predicted interfaces of Opioid type X by using the SCD with the alignment provided in GPCR...DB A Opioid Opioid type X Opioid type X ... Prediction ... 15593372 SCD for GPCRDB subtype 001_002_016_004 ...

  12. GPCR Interaction: 290 [GRIPDB[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Predicted interfaces of Histamine type 2 by using the SCD with the alignment provided in GPCR...DB A Histamine Histamine type 2 Histamine type 2 ... Prediction ... 15593372 SCD for GPCRDB subtype 001_001_004_002 ...

  13. GPCR Interaction: 297 [GRIPDB[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Predicted interfaces of Octopamine type 2 by using the SCD with the alignment provided in GPCR...DB A Octopamine Octopamine type 2 Octopamine type 2 ... Prediction ... 15593372 SCD for GPCRDB subtype 001_001_006_002 ...

  14. GPCR Interaction: 334 [GRIPDB[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Predicted interfaces of Melanocortin type 5 by using the SCD with the alignment provided in GPCR...DB A Melanocortin Melanocortin type 5 Melanocortin type 5 ... Prediction ... 15593372 SCD for GPCRDB subtype 001_002_011_005 ...

  15. GPCR Interaction: 380 [GRIPDB[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Predicted interfaces of Vertebrate Peropsin by using the SCD with the alignment provided in GPCR...DB A Rhodopsin Vertebrate Vertebrate Peropsin Vertebrate Peropsin ... Prediction ... 15593372 SCD for GPCRDB subtype 001_004_001_012 ...

  16. GPCR Interaction: 346 [GRIPDB[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Predicted interfaces of Opioid type D by using the SCD with the alignment provided in GPCR...DB A Opioid Opioid type D Opioid type D ... Prediction ... 15593372 SCD for GPCRDB subtype 001_002_016_001 ...

  17. GPCR Interaction: 360 [GRIPDB[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Predicted interfaces of Vasotocin by using the SCD with the alignment provided in GPCR...DB A Vasopressin-like Vasotocin Vasotocin ... Prediction ... 15593372 SCD for GPCRDB subtype 001_002_020_004 ...

  18. GPCR Interaction: 330 [GRIPDB[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Predicted interfaces of Endothelin type B by using the SCD with the alignment provided in GPCR...DB A Endothelin Endothelin type B Endothelin type B ... Prediction ... 15593372 SCD for GPCRDB subtype 001_002_010_002 ...

  19. GPCR Interaction: 345 [GRIPDB[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Predicted interfaces of Neurotensin type 1 by using the SCD with the alignment provided in GPCR...DB A Neurotensin Neurotensin type 1 Neurotensin type 1 ... Prediction ... 15593372 SCD for GPCRDB subtype 001_002_015_001 ...

  20. GPCR Interaction: 358 [GRIPDB[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Predicted interfaces of Tachykinin like 2 by using the SCD with the alignment provided in GPCR...DB A Tachykinin Tachykinin like 2 Tachykinin like 2 ... Prediction ... 15593372 SCD for GPCRDB subtype 001_002_018_005 ...

  1. GPCR Interaction: 353 [GRIPDB[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Predicted interfaces of Somatostatin type ... 4 by using the SCD with the alignment provided in GPCR...DB A Somatostatin Somatostatin type ... 4 Somatostatin type ... 4 ... Prediction ... 15593372 SCD for GPCRDB subtype 001_002_017_004 ...

  2. GPCR Interaction: 295 [GRIPDB[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Predicted interfaces of Serotonin Insect by using the SCD with the alignment provided in GPCR...DB A Serotonin Serotonin Insect Serotonin Insect ... Prediction ... 15593372 SCD for GPCRDB subtype 001_001_005_999 ...

  3. GPCR Interaction: 326 [GRIPDB[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Predicted interfaces of XC Chemokine by using the SCD with the alignment provided in GPCR...DB A Chemokine XC Chemokine XC Chemokine ... Prediction ... 15593372 SCD for GPCRDB subtype 001_002_008_004 ...

  4. Understanding the Structural Basis of Adhesion GPCR Functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araç, Demet; Sträter, Norbert; Seiradake, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Unlike conventional G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), adhesion GPCRs (aGPCRs) have large extracellular regions that are autoproteolytically cleaved from their membrane-embedded seven-pass transmembrane helices. Autoproteolysis occurs within the conserved GPCR-Autoproteolysis INducing (GAIN) domain that is juxtaposed to the transmembrane domain and cleaves the last beta strand of the GAIN domain. The other domains of the extracellular region are variable and specific to each aGPCR and are likely involved in adhering to various ligands. Emerging evidence suggest that extracellular regions may modulate receptor function and that ligand binding to the extracellular regions may induce receptor activation via multiple mechanisms. Here, we summarize current knowledge about the structural understanding for the extracellular regions of aGPCRs and discuss their possible functional roles that emerge from the available structural information.

  5. Structure-based design in the GPCR target space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontoyianni, M; Liu, Z

    2012-01-01

    The G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are membrane proteins that transmit signals via G-protein coupling. They have long been the target of small molecule therapeutics accounting for 30% of the launched drug targets. They are subdivided into several classes, with rhodopsins corresponding to the largest class. Furthermore, a high number of new rhodopsin-like GPCR proteins are included in the druggable genome, thus they are projected to continue being of value to the pharmaceutical and biotechnology sectors. We present a comprehensive review of the structural information pertaining to GPCRs, in light of the most recently deposited crystal structures, along with comparisons of the available to-date structures at different activation states. Finally, computational approaches to GPCR modeling are discussed in conjunction with critical perspectives regarding feasibility and limitations.

  6. Tango assay for ligand-induced GPCR-β-arrestin2 interaction: Application in drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogra, Shalini; Sona, Chandan; Kumar, Ajeet; Yadav, Prem N

    2016-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are widely known to modulate almost all physiological functions and have been demonstrated over the time as therapeutic targets for wide gamut of diseases. The design and implementation of high-throughput GPCR-based assays that permit the efficient screening of large compound libraries to discover novel drug candidates are essential for a successful drug discovery endeavor. Usually, GPCR-based functional assays depend primarily on the measurement of G protein-mediated second messenger generation. However, with advent of advanced molecular biology tools and increased understanding of GPCR signal transduction, many G protein-independent pathways such as β-arrestin translocation are being utilized to detect the activity of GPCRs. These assays provide additional information on functional selectivity (also known as biased agonism) of compounds that could be harnessed to develop pathway-selective drug candidates to reduce the adverse effects associated with given GPCR target. In this chapter, we describe the basic principle, detailed methodologies and assay setup, result analysis and data interpretations of the β-arrestin2 Tango assay, and its comparison with cell-based G protein-dependent GPCR assays, which could be employed in a simple academic setup to facilitate GPCR-based drug discovery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Single-cell profiling reveals GPCR heterogeneity and functional patterning during neuroinflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tischner, Denise; Grimm, Myriam; Kaur, Harmandeep; Staudenraus, Daniel; Carvalho, Jorge; Looso, Mario; Günther, Stefan; Wanke, Florian; Moos, Sonja; Siller, Nelly; Breuer, Johanna; Schwab, Nicholas; Zipp, Frauke; Waisman, Ari; Kurschus, Florian C; Offermanns, Stefan; Wettschureck, Nina

    2017-08-03

    GPCR expression was intensively studied in bulk cDNA of leukocyte populations, but limited data are available with respect to expression in individual cells. Here, we show a microfluidic-based single-cell GPCR expression analysis in primary T cells, myeloid cells, and endothelial cells under naive conditions and during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, the mouse model of multiple sclerosis. We found that neuroinflammation induces characteristic changes in GPCR heterogeneity and patterning, and we identify various functionally relevant subgroups with specific GPCR profiles among spinal cord-infiltrating CD4 T cells, macrophages, microglia, or endothelial cells. Using GPCRs CXCR4, S1P1, and LPHN2 as examples, we show how this information can be used to develop new strategies for the functional modulation of Th17 cells and activated endothelial cells. Taken together, single-cell GPCR expression analysis identifies functionally relevant subpopulations with specific GPCR repertoires and provides a basis for the development of new therapeutic strategies in immune disorders.

  8. Measuring the Conformational Distance of GPCR-related Proteins Using a Joint-based Descriptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thangappan, Jayaraman; Madan, Bharat; Wu, Sangwook; Lee, Sun-Gu

    2017-11-09

    Joint-based descriptor is a new level of macroscopic descriptor for protein structure using joints of secondary structures as a basic element. Here, we propose how the joint-based descriptor can be applied to examine the conformational distances or differences of transmembrane (TM) proteins. Specifically, we performed three independent studies that measured the global and conformational distances between GPCR A family and its related structures. First, the conformational distances of GPCR A family and other 7TM proteins were evaluated. This provided the information on the distant and close families or superfamilies to GPCR A family and permitted the identification of conserved local conformations. Second, computational models of GPCR A family proteins were validated, which enabled us to estimate how much they reproduce the native conformation of GPCR A proteins at global and local conformational level. Finally, the conformational distances between active and inactive states of GPCR proteins were estimated, which identified the difference of local conformation. The proposed macroscopic joint-based approach is expected to allow us to investigate structural features, evolutionary relationships, computational models and conformational changes of TM proteins in a more simplistic manner.

  9. Single-cell profiling reveals heterogeneity and functional patterning of GPCR expression in the vascular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, H; Carvalho, J; Looso, M; Singh, P; Chennupati, R; Preussner, J; Günther, S; Albarrán-Juárez, J; Tischner, D; Classen, S; Offermanns, S; Wettschureck, N

    2017-06-16

    G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) expression is extensively studied in bulk cDNA, but heterogeneity and functional patterning of GPCR expression in individual vascular cells is poorly understood. Here, we perform a microfluidic-based single-cell GPCR expression analysis in primary smooth muscle cells (SMC) and endothelial cells (EC). GPCR expression is highly heterogeneous in all cell types, which is confirmed in reporter mice, on the protein level and in human cells. Inflammatory activation in murine models of sepsis or atherosclerosis results in characteristic changes in the GPCR repertoire, and we identify functionally relevant subgroups of cells that are characterized by specific GPCR patterns. We further show that dedifferentiating SMC upregulate GPCRs such as Gpr39, Gprc5b, Gprc5c or Gpr124, and that selective targeting of Gprc5b modulates their differentiation state. Taken together, single-cell profiling identifies receptors expressed on pathologically relevant subpopulations and provides a basis for the development of new therapeutic strategies in vascular diseases.

  10. Bioinformatics tools for predicting GPCR gene functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwa, Makiko

    2014-01-01

    The automatic classification of GPCRs by bioinformatics methodology can provide functional information for new GPCRs in the whole 'GPCR proteome' and this information is important for the development of novel drugs. Since GPCR proteome is classified hierarchically, general ways for GPCR function prediction are based on hierarchical classification. Various computational tools have been developed to predict GPCR functions; those tools use not simple sequence searches but more powerful methods, such as alignment-free methods, statistical model methods, and machine learning methods used in protein sequence analysis, based on learning datasets. The first stage of hierarchical function prediction involves the discrimination of GPCRs from non-GPCRs and the second stage involves the classification of the predicted GPCR candidates into family, subfamily, and sub-subfamily levels. Then, further classification is performed according to their protein-protein interaction type: binding G-protein type, oligomerized partner type, etc. Those methods have achieved predictive accuracies of around 90 %. Finally, I described the future subject of research of the bioinformatics technique about functional prediction of GPCR.

  11. Advances in GPCR Modeling Evaluated by the GPCR Dock 2013 Assessment : Meeting New Challenges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kufareva, I.; Katritch, V.; Westen, van G.J.P.; Lenselink, E.B.; Overington, J.P.; Participants, of GPCR Dock 2013; Stevens, RC Abagyan R

    2014-01-01

    Despite tremendous successes of GPCR crystallography, the receptors with available structures represent only a small fraction of human GPCRs. An important role of the modeling community is to maximize structural insights for the remaining receptors and complexes. The community-wide GPCR Dock

  12. Advances in GPCR modeling evaluated by the GPCR Dock 2013 assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kufareva, Irina; Katritch, Vsevolod; Biggin, Phil

    2014-01-01

    Despite tremendous successes of GPCR crystallography, the receptors with available structures represent only a small fraction of human GPCRs. An important role of the modeling community is to maximize structural insights for the remaining receptors and complexes. The community-wide GPCR Dock asse...

  13. Structured and disordered facets of the GPCR fold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatakrishnan, A J; Flock, Tilman; Prado, Daniel Estévez; Oates, Matt E; Gough, Julian; Madan Babu, M

    2014-08-01

    The seven-transmembrane (7TM) helix fold of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) has been adapted for a wide variety of physiologically important signaling functions. Here, we discuss the diversity in the structured and disordered regions of GPCRs based on the recently published crystal structures and sequence analysis of all human GPCRs. A comparison of the structures of rhodopsin-like receptors (class A), secretin-like receptors (class B), metabotropic receptors (class C) and frizzled receptors (class F) shows that the relative arrangement of the transmembrane helices is conserved across all four GPCR classes although individual receptors can be activated by ligand binding at varying positions within and around the transmembrane helical bundle. A systematic analysis of GPCR sequences reveals the presence of disordered segments in the cytoplasmic side, abundant post-translational modification sites, evidence for alternative splicing and several putative linear peptide motifs that have the potential to mediate interactions with cytosolic proteins. While the structured regions permit the receptor to bind diverse ligands, the disordered regions appear to have an underappreciated role in modulating downstream signaling in response to the cellular state. An integrated paradigm combining the knowledge of structured and disordered regions is imperative for gaining a holistic understanding of the GPCR (un)structure-function relationship. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. GPCR homomers and heteromers: a better choice as targets for drug development than GPCR monomers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casadó, Vicent; Cortés, Antoni; Mallol, Josefa; Pérez-Capote, Kamil; Ferré, Sergi; Lluis, Carmen; Franco, Rafael; Canela, Enric I

    2009-11-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) are targeted by many therapeutic drugs marketed to fight against a variety of diseases. Selection of novel lead compounds are based on pharmacological parameters obtained assuming that GPCR are monomers. However, many GPCR are expressed as dimers/oligomers. Therefore, drug development may consider GPCR as homo- and hetero-oligomers. A two-state dimer receptor model is now available to understand GPCR operation and to interpret data obtained from drugs interacting with dimers, and even from mixtures of monomers and dimers. Heteromers are distinct entities and therefore a given drug is expected to have different affinities and different efficacies depending on the heteromer. All these concepts would lead to broaden the therapeutic potential of drugs targeting GPCRs, including receptor heteromer-selective drugs with a lower incidence of side effects, or to identify novel pharmacological profiles using cell models expressing receptor heteromers.

  15. An update on the physiological and therapeutic relevance of GPCR oligomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farran, Batoul

    2017-03-01

    The traditional view on GPCRs held that they function as single monomeric units composed of identical subunits. This notion was overturned by the discovery that GPCRs can form homo- and hetero-oligomers, some of which are obligatory, and can further assemble into receptor mosaics consisting of three or more protomers. Oligomerisation exerts significant impacts on receptor function and physiology, offering a platform for the diversification of receptor signalling, pharmacology, regulation, crosstalk, internalization and trafficking. Given their involvement in the modulation of crucial physiological processes, heteromers could constitute important therapeutic targets for a wide range of diseases, including schizophrenia, Parkinson's disease, substance abuse or obesity. This review aims at depicting the current developments in GPCR oligomerisation research, documenting various class A, B and C GPCR heteromers detected in vitro and in vivo using biochemical and biophysical approaches, as well as recently identified higher-order oligomeric complexes. It explores the current understanding of dimerization dynamics and the possible interaction interfaces that drive oligomerisation. Most importantly, it provides an inventory of the wide range of physiological processes and pathophysiological conditions to which GPCR oligomers contribute, surveying some of the oligomers that constitute potential drug targets. Finally, it delineates the efforts to develop novel classes of ligands that specifically target and tether to receptor oligomers instead of a single monomeric entity, thus ameliorating their ability to modulate GPCR function. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Active G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR), matrix metalloproteinases 2/9 (MMP2/9), heparin-binding epidermal growth factor (hbEGF), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), erbB2, and insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-1R) are necessary for trenbolone acetate-induced alterations in protein turnover rate of fused bovine satellite cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, K J; Kamanga-Sollo, E; White, M E; Dayton, W R

    2016-06-01

    Trenbolone acetate (TBA), a testosterone analog, increases protein synthesis and decreases protein degradation in fused bovine satellite cell (BSC) cultures. However, the mechanism through which TBA alters these processes remains unknown. Recent studies indicate that androgens improve rate and extent of muscle growth through a nongenomic mechanism involving G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR), matrix metalloproteinases (MMP), heparin-binding epidermal growth factor (hbEGF), the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), erbB2, and the insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R). We hypothesized that TBA activates GPCR, resulting in activation of MMP2/9 that releases hbEGF, which activates the EGFR and/or erbB2. To determine whether the proposed nongenomic pathway is involved in TBA-mediated alterations in protein turnover, fused BSC cultures were treated with TBA in the presence or absence of inhibitors for GPCR, MMP2/9, hbEGF, EGFR, erbB2, or IGF-1R, and resultant protein synthesis and degradation rates were analyzed. Assays were replicated at least 9 times for each inhibitor experiment utilizing BSC cultures obtained from at least 3 different steers that had no previous exposure to steroid compounds. As expected, fused BSC cultures treated with 10 n TBA exhibited increased ( GPCR, MMP2/9, hbEGF, EGFR, erbB2, or IGF-1R suppressed ( GPCR, MMP2/9, hbEGF, EGFR, erbB2, or IGF-1R in the presence of 10 n TBA each had no ( > 0.05) effect on TBA-mediated decreases in protein degradation. However, inhibition of both EGFR and erbB2 in the presence of 10 n TBA resulted in decreased ( GPCR, MMP2/9, hbEGF, EGFR, erbB2, and IGF-1R. However, the mechanism through which TBA mediates changes in protein degradation is different and appears to involve only the EGFR and erbB2. Furthermore, it appears the protein kinase B pathway is involved in TBA's effects on fused BSC cultures.

  17. Morphine withdrawal enhances constitutive μ-opioid receptor activity in the ventral tegmental area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meye, Frank J; van Zessen, Ruud; Smidt, Marten P; Adan, Roger A H; Ramakers, Geert M J

    2012-11-14

    μ-Opioid receptors (MORs) in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) are pivotally involved in addictive behavior. While MORs are typically activated by opioids, they can also become constitutively active in the absence of any agonist. In the current study, we present evidence that MOR constitutive activity is highly relevant in the mouse VTA, as it regulates GABAergic input to dopamine neurons. Specifically, suppression of MOR constitutive activity with the inverse agonist KC-2-009 enhanced GABAergic neurotransmission onto VTA dopamine neurons. This inverse agonistic effect was fully blocked by the specific MOR neutral antagonist CTOP, which had no effect on GABAergic transmission itself. We next show that withdrawal from chronic morphine further increases the magnitude of inverse agonistic effects at the MOR, suggesting enhanced MOR constitutive activity. We demonstrate that this increase can be an adaptive response to the detrimental elevation in cAMP levels known to occur during morphine withdrawal. These findings offer important insights in the physiological occurrence and function of MOR constitutive activity, and have important implications for therapeutic strategies aimed at normalizing MOR signaling during addiction and opioid overdose.

  18. Molecular pharmacological phenotyping of EBI2. An orphan seven-transmembrane receptor with constitutive activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, Mette M; Benned-Jensen, Tau; Holst, Peter J

    2006-01-01

    -mediated inhibition of forskolin-induced cAMP production and an induction of the serum response element-driven transcriptional activity in a pertussis toxin-sensitive manner. Galpha(s) and Galpha(q) were not activated constitutively as determined by the lack of cAMP production, the lack of inositol phosphate turnover...

  19. In silico study of in vitro GPCR assays by QSAR modeling ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. EPA is screening thousands of chemicals of environmental interest in hundreds of in vitro high-throughput screening (HTS) assays (the ToxCast program). One goal is to prioritize chemicals for more detailed analyses based on activity in molecular initiating events (MIE) of adverse outcome pathways (AOPs). However, the chemical space of interest for environmental exposure is much wider than this set of chemicals. Thus, there is a need to fill data gaps with in silico methods, and quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) are a proven and cost effective approach to predict biological activity. ToxCast in turn provides relatively large datasets that are ideal for training and testing QSAR models. The overall goal of the study described here was to develop QSAR models to fill the data gaps in a larger environmental database of ~32k structures. The specific aim of the current work was to build QSAR models for 18 G-Protein Coupled Receptor (GPCR) assays, part of the aminergic category. Two QSAR modeling strategies were adopted: classification models were developed to separate chemicals into active/non-active classes, and then regression models were built to predict the potency values of the bioassays for the active chemicals. Multiple software programs were used to calculate constitutional, topological and substructural molecular descriptors from two-dimensional (2D) chemical structures. Model-fitting methods included PLSDA (partial least squares d

  20. Transgenic Expression of Constitutively Active RAC1 Disrupts Mouse Rod Morphogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hongman; Bush, Ronald A.; Vijayasarathy, Camasamudram; Fariss, Robert N.; Kjellstrom, Sten; Sieving, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Dominant-active RAC1 rescues photoreceptor structure in Drosophila rhodopsin-null mutants, indicating an important role in morphogenesis. This report assesses the morphogenetic effect of activated RAC1 during mammalian rod photoreceptor development using transgenic mice that express constitutively active (CA) RAC1. Methods. Transgenic mice were generated by expressing CA RAC1 under control of the Rhodopsin promoter, and morphological features of the photoreceptors were evaluated by histology, immunohistochemistry, and transmission electron microscopy. Function was evaluated by electroretinography. Potential protein partners of CA RAC1 were identified by co-immunoprecipitation of retinal extracts. Results. Constitutively active RAC1 expression in differentiating rods disrupted outer retinal lamination as early as postnatal day (P)6, and many photoreceptor cell nuclei were displaced apically into the presumptive subretinal space. These photoreceptors did not develop normal inner and outer segments and had abnormal placement of synaptic elements. Some photoreceptor nuclei were also mislocalized into the inner nuclear layer. Extensive photoreceptor degeneration was subsequently observed in the adult animal. Constitutively active RAC1 formed a complex with the polarity protein PAR6 and with microtubule motor dynein in mouse retina. The normal localization of the PAR6 complex was disrupted in CA RAC1-expressing rod photoreceptors. Conclusions. Constitutively active RAC1 had a profound negative effect on mouse rod cell viability and development. Rod photoreceptors in the CA RAC1 retina exhibited a defect in polarity and migration. Constitutively active RAC1 disrupted rod morphogenesis and gave a phenotype resembling that found in the Crumbs mutant. PAR6 and dynein are two potential downstream effectors that may be involved in CA RAC1-mediated defective mouse photoreceptor morphogenesis. PMID:24651551

  1. An overview of Ca2+mobilization assays in GPCR drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Qiang; Ye, Lingyan; Liu, Hongxia; Shi, Ying; Zhou, Naiming

    2017-05-01

    Calcium ions (Ca 2+ ) serve as a second messenger or universal signal transducer implicated in the regulation of a wide range of physiological processes. A change in the concentration of intracellular Ca 2+ is an important step in intracellular signal transduction. G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), the largest and most versatile group of cell surface receptors, transduce extracellular signals into intracellular responses via their coupling to heterotrimeric G proteins. Since Ca 2+ plays a crucial role in GPCR-induced signaling, measurement of intracellular Ca 2+ has attracted more and more attention in GPCR-targeted drug discovery. Areas covered: This review focuses on the most popular functional assays measuring GPCRs-induced intracellular Ca 2+ signaling. These include photoprotein-based, synthetic fluorescent indicator-based and genetically encoded calcium indicator (GECI)-based Ca 2+ mobilization assays. A brief discussion of the design strategy of fluorescent probes in GPCR studies is also presented. Expert opinion: GPCR-mediated intracellular signaling is multidimensional. There is an urgent need for the development of multiple-readout screening assays capable of simultaneous detection of biased signaling and screening of both agonists and antagonists in the same assay. It is also necessary to develop GECIs offering low cost and consistent assays suitable for investigating GPCR activation in vivo.

  2. Introduction: History of the Adhesion GPCR Field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamann, Jörg; Petrenko, Alexander G.

    2016-01-01

    Development of the aGPCR scientific field based on PubMed-listed research articles and selected key findings Since the discovery of adhesion G-protein-coupled receptors (aGPCRs) 20 years ago, reverse genetics approaches have dominated the elucidation of their function and work mechanisms. Seminal

  3. Visualizing the GPCR Network: Classification and Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Geng-Ming; Mai, Te-Lun; Chen, Chi-Ming

    2017-11-14

    In this study, we delineate an unsupervised clustering algorithm, minimum span clustering (MSC), and apply it to detect G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) sequences and to study the GPCR network using a base dataset of 2770 GPCR and 652 non-GPCR sequences. High detection accuracy can be achieved with a proper dataset. The clustering results of GPCRs derived from MSC show a strong correlation between their sequences and functions. By comparing our level 1 MSC results with the GPCRdb classification, the consistency is 87.9% for the fourth level of GPCRdb, 89.2% for the third level, 98.4% for the second level, and 100% for the top level (the lowest resolution level of GPCRdb). The MSC results of GPCRs can be well explained by estimating the selective pressure of GPCRs, as exemplified by investigating the largest two subfamilies, peptide receptors (PRs) and olfactory receptors (ORs), in class A GPCRs. PRs are decomposed into three groups due to a positive selective pressure, whilst ORs remain as a single group due to a negative selective pressure. Finally, we construct and compare phylogenetic trees using distance-based and character-based methods, a combination of which could convey more comprehensive information about the evolution of GPCRs.

  4. GPCR Interaction: 343 [GRIPDB[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Predicted interfaces of GPR74 like by using the SCD with the alignment provided in GPCR...DB A Neuropeptide Y GPR74 like GPR74 like ... Prediction ... 15593372 SCD for GPCRDB subtype 001_002_014_101 ...

  5. GPCR Interaction: 316 [GRIPDB[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Predicted interfaces of Bradykinin type B2 by using the SCD with the alignment provided in GPCR...DB A Bradykinin Bradykinin type B2 Bradykinin type B2 ... Prediction ... 15593372 SCD for GPCRDB subtype 001_002_003_002 ...

  6. GPCR Interaction: 336 [GRIPDB[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Predicted interfaces of Neuropeptide Y type 2 by using the SCD with the alignment provided in GPCR...DB A Neuropeptide Y Neuropeptide Y type 2 Neuropeptide Y type 2 ... Prediction ... 15593372 SCD for GPCRDB subtype 001_002_014_002 ...

  7. GPCR Interaction: 363 [GRIPDB[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Predicted interfaces of Galanin type 3 by using the SCD with the alignment provided in GPCR...DB A Galanin like Galanin type 3 Galanin type 3 ... Prediction ... 15593372 SCD for GPCRDB subtype 001_002_021_003 ...

  8. GPCR Interaction: 406 [GRIPDB[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Predicted interfaces of GABA-B like 5 by using the SCD with the alignment provided in GPCR...DB C GABA-B like GABA-B like 5 GABA-B like 5 ... Prediction ... 15593372 SCD for GPCRDB subtype 003_004_004_005 ...

  9. GPCR Interaction: 282 [GRIPDB[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Predicted interfaces of Dopamine Vertebrate type 1 by using the SCD with the alignment provided in GPCR...DB A Dopamine Dopamine Vertebrate type 1 Dopamine Vertebrate type 1 ... Prediction ... 15593372 SCD for GPCRDB subtype 001_001_003_001 ...

  10. GPCR Interaction: 319 [GRIPDB[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Predicted interfaces of C3a anaphylatoxin by using the SCD with the alignment provided in GPCR...DB A Anaphylatoxin C3a anaphylatoxin C3a anaphylatoxin ... Prediction ... 15593372 SCD for GPCRDB subtype 001_002_004_003 ...

  11. GPCR Interaction: 372 [GRIPDB[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Predicted interfaces of Chemokine receptor-like 2 by using the SCD with the alignment provided in GPCR...DB A Chemokine receptor-like Chemokine receptor-like 2 Chemokine receptor-like 2 ... Prediction ... 15593372 SCD for GPCRDB subtype 001_002_027_002 ...

  12. GPCR Interaction: 373 [GRIPDB[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Predicted interfaces of Relaxin-3 type 1 by using the SCD with the alignment provided in GPCR...DB A Somatostatin- and angiogenin-like peptide Relaxin-3 type 1 Relaxin-3 type 1 ... Prediction ... 15593372 SCD for GPCRDB subtype 001_002_029_001 ...

  13. GPCR Interaction: 286 [GRIPDB[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Predicted interfaces of Dopamine Insect type 2 by using the SCD with the alignment provided in GPCR...DB A Dopamine Dopamine Insect type 2 Dopamine Insect type 2 ... Prediction ... 15593372 SCD for GPCRDB subtype 001_001_003_101 ...

  14. GPCR Interaction: 318 [GRIPDB[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Predicted interfaces of C5a anaphylatoxin C5L2 by using the SCD with the alignment provided in GPCR...DB A Anaphylatoxin C5a anaphylatoxin C5L2 C5a anaphylatoxin C5L2 ... Prediction ... 15593372 SCD for GPCRDB subtype 001_002_004_002 ...

  15. GPCR Interaction: 385 [GRIPDB[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Predicted interfaces of Prostaglandin F2-alpha by using the SCD with the alignment provided in GPCR...DB A Prostaglandin Prostaglandin F2-alpha Prostaglandin F2-alpha ... Prediction ... 15593372 SCD for GPCRDB subtype 001_006_001_005 ...

  16. GPCR Interaction: 361 [GRIPDB[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Predicted interfaces of Galanin type 1 by using the SCD with the alignment provided in GPCR...DB A Galanin like Galanin type 1 Galanin type 1 ... Prediction ... 15593372 SCD for GPCRDB subtype 001_002_021_001 ...

  17. GPCR Interaction: 303 [GRIPDB[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Predicted interfaces of Trace amine type 4 by using the SCD with the alignment provided in GPCR...DB A Trace amine Trace amine type 4 Trace amine type 4 ... Prediction ... 15593372 SCD for GPCRDB subtype 001_001_007_004 ...

  18. GPCR Interaction: 306 [GRIPDB[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Predicted interfaces of Trace amine type 8 by using the SCD with the alignment provided in GPCR...DB A Trace amine Trace amine type 8 Trace amine type 8 ... Prediction ... 15593372 SCD for GPCRDB subtype 001_001_007_008 ...

  19. GPCR Interaction: 321 [GRIPDB[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Predicted interfaces of APJ like Non Vertebrate type 1 by using the SCD with the alignment provided in GPCR...DB A APJ like APJ like Non Vertebrate type 1 APJ like Non Vertebrate type 1 ... Prediction ... 15593372 SCD for GPCRDB subtype 001_002_006_002 ...

  20. GPCR Interaction: 283 [GRIPDB[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Predicted interfaces of Dopamine Vertebrate type 2 by using the SCD with the alignment provided in GPCR...DB A Dopamine Dopamine Vertebrate type 2 Dopamine Vertebrate type 2 ... Prediction ... 15593372 SCD for GPCRDB subtype 001_001_003_002 ...

  1. GPCR Interaction: 307 [GRIPDB[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Predicted interfaces of Trace amine type 15 by using the SCD with the alignment provided in GPCR...DB A Trace amine Trace amine type 15 Trace amine type 15 ... Prediction ... 15593372 SCD for GPCRDB subtype 001_001_007_015 ...

  2. Characterizing common substructures of ligands for GPCR protein subfamilies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erguner, Bekir; Hattori, Masahiro; Goto, Susumu; Kanehisa, Minoru

    2010-01-01

    The G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) superfamily is the largest class of proteins with therapeutic value. More than 40% of present prescription drugs are GPCR ligands. The high therapeutic value of GPCR proteins and recent advancements in virtual screening methods gave rise to many virtual screening studies for GPCR ligands. However, in spite of vast amounts of research studying their functions and characteristics, 3D structures of most GPCRs are still unknown. This makes target-based virtual screenings of GPCR ligands extremely difficult, and successful virtual screening techniques rely heavily on ligand information. These virtual screening methods focus on specific features of ligands on GPCR protein level, and common features of ligands on higher levels of GPCR classification are yet to be studied. Here we extracted common substructures of GPCR ligands of GPCR protein subfamilies. We used the SIMCOMP, a graph-based chemical structure comparison program, and hierarchical clustering to reveal common substructures. We applied our method to 850 GPCR ligands and we found 53 common substructures covering 439 ligands. These substructures contribute to deeper understanding of structural features of GPCR ligands which can be used in new drug discovery methods.

  3. Global medicinal chemistry and GPCR conference: interview with Stevan Djuric.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djuric, Stevan

    2018-04-01

    Stevan Djuric speaks to Benjamin Walden, Commissioning Editor. Stevan Djuric is head of the global Medicinal Chemistry Leadership Team at AbbVie and is also Vice President of the Discovery Chemistry and Technology organization within their Discovery organization and chemistry outsourcing activities. He spoke at the Global-Medicinal-Chemistry and GPCR summit on the imperative to develop chemistry related technology that can reduce cycle time, cost of goods and improve probability of success. To this end, he discussed his efforts in the chemistry technology area with a focus on integrated synthesis-purification bioassay, and flow photochemistry and high temperature chemistry platforms.

  4. Biased ligands: pathway validation for novel GPCR therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rominger, David H; Cowan, Conrad L; Gowen-MacDonald, William; Violin, Jonathan D

    2014-06-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), in recent years, have been shown to signal via multiple distinct pathways. Furthermore, biased ligands for some receptors can differentially stimulate or inhibit these pathways versus unbiased endogenous ligands or drugs. Biased ligands can be used to gain a deeper understanding of the molecular targets and cellular responses associated with a GPCR, and may be developed into therapeutics with improved efficacy, safety and/or tolerability. Here we review examples and approaches to pathway validation that establish the relevance and therapeutic potential of distinct pathways that can be selectively activated or blocked by biased ligands. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Detection of G protein-selective G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) conformations in live cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Rabia U; Ritt, Michael; DeVree, Brian T; Neubig, Richard R; Sunahara, Roger K; Sivaramakrishnan, Sivaraj

    2013-06-14

    Although several recent studies have reported that GPCRs adopt multiple conformations, it remains unclear how subtle conformational changes are translated into divergent downstream responses. In this study, we report on a novel class of FRET-based sensors that can detect the ligand/mutagenic stabilization of GPCR conformations that promote interactions with G proteins in live cells. These sensors rely on the well characterized interaction between a GPCR and the C terminus of a Gα subunit. We use these sensors to elucidate the influence of the highly conserved (E/D)RY motif on GPCR conformation. Specifically, Glu/Asp but not Arg mutants of the (E/D)RY motif are known to enhance basal GPCR signaling. Hence, it is unclear whether ionic interactions formed by the (E/D)RY motif (ionic lock) are necessary to stabilize basal GPCR states. We find that mutagenesis of the β2-AR (E/D)RY ionic lock enhances interaction with Gs. However, only Glu/Asp but not Arg mutants increase G protein activation. In contrast, mutagenesis of the opsin (E/D)RY ionic lock does not alter its interaction with transducin. Instead, opsin-specific ionic interactions centered on residue Lys-296 are both necessary and sufficient to promote interactions with transducin. Effective suppression of β2-AR basal activity by inverse agonist ICI 118,551 requires ionic interactions formed by the (E/D)RY motif. In contrast, the inverse agonist metoprolol suppresses interactions with Gs and promotes Gi binding, with concomitant pertussis toxin-sensitive inhibition of adenylyl cyclase activity. Taken together, these studies validate the use of the new FRET sensors while revealing distinct structural mechanisms for ligand-dependent GPCR function.

  6. Anomalous constitutive Src kinase activity promotes B lymphoma survival and growth

    OpenAIRE

    Ke, Jiyuan; Chelvarajan, R Lakshman; Sindhava, Vishal; Robertson, Darrell A; Lekakis, Lazaros; Jennings, C Darrell; Bondada, Subbarao

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Previously we have shown that B cell receptor (BCR) expression and B cell receptor signaling pathways are important for the basal growth of B lymphoma cells. In particular we have shown that the activation of Syk, a non-src family protein tyrosine kinase and the mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPK), ERK and JNK that mediate BCR signals are required for the constitutive growth of B lymphoma cells. Since src family protein tyrosine kinases (SFKs) like Lyn are known to be...

  7. Quantitative Measurement of GPCR Endocytosis via Pulse-Chase Covalent Labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai, Hidetoshi; Ikeda, Yuichi; Motozawa, Yoshihiro; Fujishiro, Mitsuhiro; Okamura, Tomohisa; Fujio, Keishi; Okazaki, Hiroaki; Nomura, Seitaro; Takeda, Norifumi; Harada, Mutsuo; Toko, Haruhiro; Takimoto, Eiki; Akazawa, Hiroshi; Morita, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Jun-ichi; Yamazaki, Tsutomu; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko; Komuro, Issei; Yanagisawa, Masashi

    2015-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) play a critical role in many physiological systems and represent one of the largest families of signal-transducing receptors. The number of GPCRs at the cell surface regulates cellular responsiveness to their cognate ligands, and the number of GPCRs, in turn, is dynamically controlled by receptor endocytosis. Recent studies have demonstrated that GPCR endocytosis, in addition to affecting receptor desensitization and resensitization, contributes to acute G protein-mediated signaling. Thus, endocytic GPCR behavior has a significant impact on various aspects of physiology. In this study, we developed a novel GPCR internalization assay to facilitate characterization of endocytic GPCR behavior. We genetically engineered chimeric GPCRs by fusing HaloTag (a catalytically inactive derivative of a bacterial hydrolase) to the N-terminal end of the receptor (HT-GPCR). HaloTag has the ability to form a stable covalent bond with synthetic HaloTag ligands that contain fluorophores or a high-affinity handle (such as biotin) and the HaloTag reactive linker. We selectively labeled HT-GPCRs at the cell surface with a HaloTag PEG ligand, and this pulse-chase covalent labeling allowed us to directly monitor the relative number of internalized GPCRs after agonist stimulation. Because the endocytic activities of GPCR ligands are not necessarily correlated with their agonistic activities, applying this novel methodology to orphan GPCRs, or even to already characterized GPCRs, will increase the likelihood of identifying currently unknown ligands that have been missed by conventional pharmacological assays.

  8. Constitutive stimulatory G protein activity in limb mesenchyme impairs bone growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaca, Anara; Malladi, Vijayram Reddy; Zhu, Yan; Tafaj, Olta; Paltrinieri, Elena; Wu, Joy Y; He, Qing; Bastepe, Murat

    2018-05-01

    GNAS mutations leading to constitutively active stimulatory G protein alpha-subunit (Gsα) cause different tumors, fibrous dysplasia of bone, and McCune-Albright syndrome, which are typically not associated with short stature. Enhanced signaling of the parathyroid hormone/parathyroid hormone-related peptide receptor, which couples to multiple G proteins including Gsα, leads to short bones with delayed endochondral ossification. It has remained unknown whether constitutive Gsα activity also impairs bone growth. Here we generated mice expressing a constitutively active Gsα mutant (Gsα-R201H) conditionally upon Cre recombinase (cGsα R201H mice). Gsα-R201H was expressed in cultured bone marrow stromal cells from cGsα R201H mice upon adenoviral-Cre transduction. When crossed with mice in which Cre is expressed in a tamoxifen-regulatable fashion (CAGGCre-ER™), tamoxifen injection resulted in mosaic expression of the transgene in double mutant offspring. We then crossed the cGsα R201H mice with Prx1-Cre mice, in which Cre is expressed in early limb-bud mesenchyme. The double mutant offspring displayed short limbs at birth, with narrow hypertrophic chondrocyte zones in growth plates and delayed formation of secondary ossification center. Consistent with enhanced Gsα signaling, bone marrow stromal cells from these mice demonstrated increased levels of c-fos mRNA. Our findings indicate that constitutive Gsα activity during limb development disrupts endochondral ossification and bone growth. Given that Gsα haploinsufficiency also leads to short bones, as in patients with Albright's hereditary osteodystrophy, these results suggest that a tight control of Gsα activity is essential for normal growth plate physiology. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Outside-in signaling – a brief review of GPCR signaling with a focus on the Drosophila GPCR family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanlon, Caitlin D.; Andrew, Deborah J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the largest family of receptors in many organisms, including worms, mice and humans. GPCRs are seven-transmembrane pass proteins that are activated by binding a stimulus (or ligand) in the extracellular space and then transduce that information to the inside of the cell through conformational changes. The conformational changes activate heterotrimeric G-proteins, which execute the downstream signaling pathways through the recruitment and activation of cellular enzymes. The highly specific ligand–GPCR interaction prompts an efficient cellular response, which is vital for the health of the cell and organism. In this Commentary, we review general features of GPCR signaling and then focus on the Drosophila GPCRs, which are not as well-characterized as their worm and mammalian counterparts. We discuss findings that the Drosophila odorant and gustatory receptors are not bona fide GPCRs as is the case for their mammalian counterparts. We also present here a phylogenetic analysis of the bona fide Drosophila GPCRs that suggest potential roles for several family members. Finally, we discuss recently discovered roles of GPCRs in Drosophila embryogenesis, a field we expect will uncover many previously unappreciated functions for GPCRs. PMID:26345366

  10. CINPA1 Is an Inhibitor of Constitutive Androstane Receptor That Does Not Activate Pregnane X Receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Cherian, Milu T; Lin, Wenwei; Wu, Jing; Chen, Taosheng

    2015-01-01

    Constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and pregnane X receptor (PXR) are xenobiotic sensors that enhance the detoxification and elimination of xenobiotics and endobiotics by modulating the expression of genes encoding drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters. Elevated levels of drug-metabolizing enzymes and efflux transporters, resulting from CAR activation in various cancers, promote the elimination of chemotherapeutic agents, leading to reduced therapeutic effectiveness and acquired drug ...

  11. Constitutive Expression of Functionally Active Protease-Activated Receptors 1 and 2 in Human Conjunctival Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy J. Nickel

    2006-01-01

    epithelial cells as in vitro model. We performed RT-PCR and immunofluorescence analyses to determine the expression of PAR1 and PAR2, and monitored the production of IL-6 after activating HCECs with PAR1 activating agents (thrombin or TFLLRN or PAR2 activating agents (tryptase, trypsin, or SLIGKV. The results show that HCECs constitutively express PAR1 and PAR2 mRNA and proteins, and produce significant amounts of IL-6 when incubated with specific PAR-activating enzymes or agonist peptides. Thrombin- and tryptase-induced HCEC activation was blocked by PAR1 and PAR2 neutralizing antibodies, respectively, and by specific enzyme inhibitors. The constitutive expression of PAR1 and PAR2, and their activation by thrombin and tryptase, respectively, may have important implications in ocular inflammation.

  12. Interaction Between Familial Transmission and a Constitutively Active Immune System Shapes Gut Microbiota in Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistry, Rupal; Kounatidis, Ilias; Ligoxygakis, Petros

    2017-01-01

    Resident gut bacteria are constantly influencing the immune system, yet the role of the immune system in shaping microbiota composition during an organism’s life span has remained unclear. Experiments in mice have been inconclusive due to differences in husbandry schemes that led to conflicting results. We used Drosophila as a genetically tractable system with a simpler gut bacterial population structure streamlined genetic backgrounds and established cross schemes to address this issue. We found that, depending on their genetic background, young flies had microbiota of different diversities that converged with age to the same Acetobacteraceae-dominated pattern in healthy flies. This pattern was accelerated in immune-compromised flies with higher bacterial load and gut cell death. Nevertheless, immune-compromised flies resembled their genetic background, indicating that familial transmission was the main force regulating gut microbiota. In contrast, flies with a constitutively active immune system had microbiota readily distinguishable from their genetic background with the introduction and establishment of previously undetectable bacterial families. This indicated the influence of immunity over familial transmission. Moreover, hyperactive immunity and increased enterocyte death resulted in the highest bacterial load observed starting from early adulthood. Cohousing experiments showed that the microenvironment also played an important role in the structure of the microbiota where flies with constitutive immunity defined the gut microbiota of their cohabitants. Our data show that, in Drosophila, constitutively active immunity shapes the structure and density of gut microbiota. PMID:28413160

  13. The essential role of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling in regulating T cell immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dashan

    2018-02-12

    The aim of this paper is to clarify the critical role of GPCR signaling in T cell immunity. The G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the most common targets in current pharmaceutical industry, and represent the largest and most versatile family of cell surface communicating molecules. GPCRs can be activated by a diverse array of ligands including neurotransmitters, chemokines as well as sensory stimuli. Therefore, GPCRs are involved in many key cellular and physiological processes, such as sense of light, taste and smell, neurotransmission, metabolism, endocrine and exocrine secretion. In recent years, GPCRs have been found to play an important role in immune system. T cell is an important type of immune cell, which plays a central role in cell-mediated immunity. A variety of GPCRs and their signaling mediators (RGS proteins, GRKs and β-arrestin) have been found to express in T cells and involved T cell-mediated immunity. We will summarize the role of GPCR signaling and their regulatory molecules in T cell activation, homeostasis and function in this article. GPCR signaling plays an important role in T cell activation, homeostasis and function. GPCR signaling is critical in regulating T cell immunity.

  14. Prevalence of bortezomib-resistant constitutive NF-kappaB activity in mantle cell lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kahl Brad S

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The proteasome inhibitor bortezomib can inhibit activation of the transcription factor NF-κB, a mechanism implicated in its anti-neoplastic effects observed in mantle cell lymphoma (MCL. However, NF-κB can be activated through many distinct mechanisms, including proteasome independent pathways. While MCL cells have been shown to harbor constitutive NF-κB activity, what fraction of this activity in primary MCL samples is sensitive or resistant to inhibition by bortezomib remains unclear. Results Proteasome activity in the EBV-negative MCL cell lines Jeko-1 and Rec-1 is inhibited by greater than 80% after exposure to 20 nM bortezomib for 4 hours. This treatment decreased NF-κB activity in Jeko-1 cells, but failed to do so in Rec-1 cells when assessed by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA. Concurrently, Rec-1 cells were more resistant to the cytotoxic effects of bortezomib than Jeko-1 cells. Consistent with a proteasome inhibitor resistant pathway of activation described in mouse B-lymphoma cells (WEHI231 and a breast carcinoma cell line (MDA-MB-468, the bortezomib-resistant NF-κB activity in Rec-1 cells is inhibited by calcium chelators, calmodulin inhibitors, and perillyl alcohol, a monoterpene capable of blocking L-type calcium channels. Importantly, the combination of perillyl alcohol and bortezomib is synergistic in eliciting Rec-1 cell cytotoxicity. The relevance of these results is illuminated by the additional finding that a considerable fraction of primary MCL samples (8 out of 10 displayed bortezomib-resistant constitutive NF-κB activity. Conclusion Our findings show that bortezomib-resistant NF-κB activity is frequently observed in MCL samples and suggest that this activity may be relevant to MCL biology as well as serve as a potential therapeutic target.

  15. Characterization of a CREB Gain-of-Function Mutant with Constitutive Transcriptional Activity In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Keyong; Asahara, Hiroshi; Jhala, Ulupi S.; Wagner, Brandee L.; Montminy, Marc

    2000-01-01

    The cyclic AMP (cAMP)-responsive factor CREB promotes cellular gene expression, following its phosphorylation at Ser133, via recruitment of the coactivator paralogs CREB-binding protein (CBP) and p300. CBP and p300, in turn, appear to mediate target gene induction via their association with RNA polymerase II complexes and via intrinsic histone acetyltransferase activities that mobilize promoter-bound nucleosomes. In addition to cAMP, a wide variety of stimuli, including hypoxia, UV irradiation, and growth factor addition, induce Ser133 phosphorylation with stoichiometry and kinetics comparable to those induced by cAMP. Yet a number of these signals are incapable of promoting target gene activation via CREB phosphorylation per se, suggesting the presence of additional regulatory events either at the level of CREB-CBP complex formation or in the subsequent recruitment of the transcriptional apparatus. Here we characterize a Tyr134Phe CREB mutant that behaves as a constitutive activator in vivo. Like protein kinase A (PKA)-stimulated wild-type CREB, the Tyr134Phe polypeptide was found to stimulate target gene expression via the Ser133-dependent recruitment of CBP and p300. Biochemical studies reveal that mutation of Tyr134 to Phe lowers the Km for PKA phosphorylation and thereby induces high levels of constitutive Ser133 phosphorylation in vivo. Consistent with its constitutive activity, Tyr134Phe CREB strongly promoted differentiation of PC12 cells in concert with suboptimal doses of nerve growth factor. Taken together, these results demonstrate that Ser133 phosphorylation is sufficient for cellular gene activation and that additional signal-dependent modifications of CBP or p300 are not required for recruitment of the transcriptional apparatus to the promoter. PMID:10825195

  16. Structural basis for constitutive activity and agonist-induced activation of the enteroendocrine fat sensor GPR119

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelstoft, Maja Storm; Norn, C; Pedersen, Maria Hauge

    2014-01-01

    the centre of the receptor out to extracellular loop-2b. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS: The high constitutive activity of GPR119 should be taken into account in future drug discovery efforts, which can now be guided by the detailed knowledge of the physiochemical properties of the extended ligand...

  17. Constitutive Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sales-Cruz, Mauricio; Piccolo, Chiara; Heitzig, Martina

    2011-01-01

    This chapter presents various types of constitutive models and their applications. There are 3 aspects dealt with in this chapter, namely: creation and solution of property models, the application of parameter estimation and finally application examples of constitutive models. A systematic...... procedure is introduced for the analysis and solution of property models. Models that capture and represent the temperature dependent behaviour of physical properties are introduced, as well as equation of state models (EOS) such as the SRK EOS. Modelling of liquid phase activity coefficients are also...

  18. Kinetic profiling an abundantly expressed planarian serotonergic GPCR identifies bromocriptine as a perdurant antagonist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John D. Chan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The diversity and uniqueness of flatworm G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs provides impetus for identifying ligands useful as tools for studying flatworm biology, or as therapeutics for treating diseases caused by parasitic flatworm infections. To catalyse this discovery process, technologies optimized for mammalian GPCR high throughput screening need be transposed for screening flatworm GPCRs. Here, we demonstrate the utility of a genetically encoded cAMP biosensor for resolving the properties of an abundantly expressed planarian serotonergic GPCR (S7.1R. Application of this methodology resolved the real time kinetics of GPCR modulation by ligands and demonstrated a marked difference in the kinetic action of antagonists at S7.1R. Notably, bromocriptine caused a protracted inhibition of S7.1R activity in vitro and a protracted paralysis of planarian movement, replicating the effect of S7.1R in vivo RNAi. The lengthy inhibition of function caused by bromocriptine at this abundantly expressed GPCR provides a useful tool to ablate serotonergic signaling in vivo, and is a noteworthy feature for exploitation as an anthelmintic vulnerability.

  19. Status of GPCR modeling and docking as reflected by community-wide GPCR Dock 2010 assessment.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kufareva, I.; Rueda, M.; Katritch, V.; Stevens, R.C.; Abagyan, R.; Vroling, B.; Sanders, M.P.A.

    2011-01-01

    The community-wide GPCR Dock assessment is conducted to evaluate the status of molecular modeling and ligand docking for human G protein-coupled receptors. The present round of the assessment was based on the recent structures of dopamine D3 and CXCR4 chemokine receptors bound to small molecule

  20. Status of GPCR Modeling and Docking as Reflected by Community-wide GPCR Dock 2010 Assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kufareva, I; Rueda, M; Katritch, V; Roumen, L.; de Esch, I.J.P.; Leurs, R.; de Graaf, C.; Stevens, R.C.; Abagyan, R

    2011-01-01

    The community-wide GPCR Dock assessment is conducted to evaluate the status of molecular modeling and ligand docking for human G protein-coupled receptors. The present round of the assessment was based on the recent structures of dopamine D3 and CXCR4 chemokine receptors bound to small molecule

  1. GGIP: Structure and sequence-based GPCR-GPCR interaction pair predictor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemoto, Wataru; Yamanishi, Yoshihiro; Limviphuvadh, Vachiranee; Saito, Akira; Toh, Hiroyuki

    2016-09-01

    G Protein-Coupled Receptors (GPCRs) are important pharmaceutical targets. More than 30% of currently marketed pharmaceutical medicines target GPCRs. Numerous studies have reported that GPCRs function not only as monomers but also as homo- or hetero-dimers or higher-order molecular complexes. Many GPCRs exert a wide variety of molecular functions by forming specific combinations of GPCR subtypes. In addition, some GPCRs are reportedly associated with diseases. GPCR oligomerization is now recognized as an important event in various biological phenomena, and many researchers are investigating this subject. We have developed a support vector machine (SVM)-based method to predict interacting pairs for GPCR oligomerization, by integrating the structure and sequence information of GPCRs. The performance of our method was evaluated by the Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curve. The corresponding area under the curve was 0.938. As far as we know, this is the only prediction method for interacting pairs among GPCRs. Our method could accelerate the analyses of these interactions, and contribute to the elucidation of the global structures of the GPCR networks in membranes. Proteins 2016; 84:1224-1233. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Anomalous constitutive Src kinase activity promotes B lymphoma survival and growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robertson Darrell A

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previously we have shown that B cell receptor (BCR expression and B cell receptor signaling pathways are important for the basal growth of B lymphoma cells. In particular we have shown that the activation of Syk, a non-src family protein tyrosine kinase and the mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPK, ERK and JNK that mediate BCR signals are required for the constitutive growth of B lymphoma cells. Since src family protein tyrosine kinases (SFKs like Lyn are known to be needed for the phosphorylation of BCR co-receptors, Ig-α and Ig-β, we hypothesized that one or more SFKs will be constitutively activated in B lymphoma cells and may be necessary for B lymphoma growth. Results Src kinase activity was found to be constitutively high in many murine and human B lymphoma cell lines and primary lymphoma samples. The specific pharmacological inhibitors of SFKs, PP1 and PP2 inhibited the proliferation of a number of both murine and human B lymphomas in a dose-dependent manner. Importantly, dasatinib (BMS-354825, an oral dual BCR-ABL and SFK specific inhibitor inhibited the growth of B lymphomas in the nanomolar range in vitro and strongly inhibited a mouse lymphoma growth in vivo. Among the SFKs, Lyn is predominantly phosphorylated and Lyn-specific small interfering RNA inhibited the growth of B lymphomas, supporting an important role for Lyn in B lymphoma growth. Suppression of SFK activity blocks BCR mediated signaling pathways. PMA or CpG can partially reverse the growth inhibition induced by SFK inhibition. Although blocking SFK activity inhibited the growth of a number of B lymphomas, some lymphomas such as SudHL-4, SudHL-6, OCI-Ly3 and OCI-Ly10 are more resistant due to an increased expression of the anti-apoptotic proteins Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL. Conclusions These studies further support our concept that BCR signaling pathways are important for the continued growth of established B lymphoma cells. Some of the intermediates in this

  3. Receptor oligomerization in family B1 of G-protein-coupled receptors: focus on BRET investigations and the link between GPCR oligomerization and binding cooperativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roed, Sarah Norklit; Orgaard, Anne; Jorgensen, Rasmus; De Meyts, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    The superfamily of the seven transmembrane G-protein-coupled receptors (7TM/GPCRs) is the largest family of membrane-associated receptors. GPCRs are involved in the pathophysiology of numerous human diseases, and they constitute an estimated 30-40% of all drug targets. During the last two decades, GPCR oligomerization has been extensively studied using methods like bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) and today, receptor-receptor interactions within the GPCR superfamily is a well-established phenomenon. Evidence of the impact of GPCR oligomerization on, e.g., ligand binding, receptor expression, and signal transduction indicates the physiological and pharmacological importance of these receptor interactions. In contrast to the larger and more thoroughly studied GPCR subfamilies A and C, the B1 subfamily is small and comprises only 15 members, including, e.g., the secretin receptor, the glucagon receptor, and the receptors for parathyroid hormone (PTHR1 and PTHR2). The dysregulation of several family B1 receptors is involved in diseases, such as diabetes, chronic inflammation, and osteoporosis which underlines the pathophysiological importance of this GPCR subfamily. In spite of this, investigation of family B1 receptor oligomerization and especially its pharmacological importance is still at an early stage. Even though GPCR oligomerization is a well-established phenomenon, there is a need for more investigations providing a direct link between these interactions and receptor functionality in family B1 GPCRs. One example of the functional effects of GPCR oligomerization is the facilitation of allosterism including cooperativity in ligand binding to GPCRs. Here, we review the currently available data on family B1 GPCR homo- and heteromerization, mainly based on BRET investigations. Furthermore, we cover the functional influence of oligomerization on ligand binding as well as the link between oligomerization and binding cooperativity.

  4. A Mathematical Model of Neonatal Rat Atrial Monolayers with Constitutively Active Acetylcholine-Mediated K+ Current.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rupamanjari Majumder

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Atrial fibrillation (AF is the most frequent form of arrhythmia occurring in the industrialized world. Because of its complex nature, each identified form of AF requires specialized treatment. Thus, an in-depth understanding of the bases of these arrhythmias is essential for therapeutic development. A variety of experimental studies aimed at understanding the mechanisms of AF are performed using primary cultures of neonatal rat atrial cardiomyocytes (NRAMs. Previously, we have shown that the distinct advantage of NRAM cultures is that they allow standardized, systematic, robust re-entry induction in the presence of a constitutively-active acetylcholine-mediated K+ current (IKACh-c. Experimental studies dedicated to mechanistic explorations of AF, using these cultures, often use computer models for detailed electrophysiological investigations. However, currently, no mathematical model for NRAMs is available. Therefore, in the present study we propose the first model for the action potential (AP of a NRAM with constitutively-active acetylcholine-mediated K+ current (IKACh-c. The descriptions of the ionic currents were based on patch-clamp data obtained from neonatal rats. Our monolayer model closely mimics the action potential duration (APD restitution and conduction velocity (CV restitution curves presented in our previous in vitro studies. In addition, the model reproduces the experimentally observed dynamics of spiral wave rotation, in the absence and in the presence of drug interventions, and in the presence of localized myofibroblast heterogeneities.

  5. Conditional expression of constitutively active estrogen receptor α in chondrocytes impairs longitudinal bone growth in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Kazuhiro; Tsukui, Tohru; Imazawa, Yukiko; Horie-Inoue, Kuniko; Inoue, Satoshi

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Conditional transgenic mice expressing constitutively active estrogen receptor α (caERα) in chondrocytes were developed. ► Expression of caERα in chondrocytes impaired longitudinal bone growth in mice. ► caERα affects chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation. ► This mouse model is useful for understanding the physiological role of ERαin vivo. -- Abstract: Estrogen plays important roles in the regulation of chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation, which are essential steps for longitudinal bone growth; however, the mechanisms of estrogen action on chondrocytes have not been fully elucidated. In the present study, we generated conditional transgenic mice, designated as caERα ColII , expressing constitutively active mutant estrogen receptor (ER) α in chondrocytes, using the chondrocyte-specific type II collagen promoter-driven Cre transgenic mice. caERα ColII mice showed retardation in longitudinal growth, with short bone lengths. BrdU labeling showed reduced proliferation of hypertrophic chondrocytes in the proliferating layer of the growth plate of tibia in caERα ColII mice. In situ hybridization analysis of type X collagen revealed that the maturation of hypertrophic chondrocytes was impaired in caERα ColII mice. These results suggest that ERα is a critical regulator of chondrocyte proliferation and maturation during skeletal development, mediating longitudinal bone growth in vivo.

  6. NADPH Oxidase Contributes to Photoreceptor Degeneration in Constitutively Active RAC1 Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hongman; Vijayasarathy, Camasamudram; Zeng, Yong; Marangoni, Dario; Bush, Ronald A.; Wu, Zhijian; Sieving, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The active form of small GTPase RAC1 is required for activation of NADPH oxidase (NOX), which in turn generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) in nonphagocytic cells. We explored whether NOX-induced oxidative stress contributes to rod degeneration in retinas expressing constitutively active (CA) RAC1. Methods Transgenic (Tg)–CA-RAC1 mice were given apocynin (10 mg/kg, intraperitoneal), a NOX inhibitor, or vehicle daily for up to 13 weeks. Superoxide production and oxidative damage were assessed by dihydroethidium staining and by protein carbonyls and malondialdehyde levels, respectively. Outer nuclear layer (ONL) cells were counted and electroretinogram (ERG) amplitudes measured in Tg-CA-RAC1 mice. Outer nuclear layer cells were counted in wild-type (WT) mice after transfer of CA-Rac1 gene by subretinal injection of AAV8-pOpsin-CA Rac1-GFP. Results Transgenic-CA-RAC1 retinas had significantly fewer photoreceptor cells and more apoptotic ONL cells than WT controls from postnatal week (Pw) 3 to Pw13. Superoxide accumulation and protein and lipid oxidation were increased in Tg-CA-RAC1 retinas and were reduced in mice treated with apocynin. Apocynin reduced the loss of photoreceptors and increased the rod ERG a- and b-wave amplitudes when compared with vehicle-injected transgenic controls. Photoreceptor loss was also observed in regions of adult WT retina transduced with AAV8-pOpsin-CA Rac1-GFP but not in neighboring regions that were not transduced or in AAV8-pOpsin-GFP–transduced retinas. Conclusions Constitutively active RAC1 promotes photoreceptor cell death by oxidative damage that occurs, at least partially, through NOX-induced ROS. Reactive oxygen species are likely involved in multiple forms of retinal degenerations, and our results support investigating RAC1 inhibition as a therapeutic approach that targets this disease pathway. PMID:27233035

  7. NADPH Oxidase Contributes to Photoreceptor Degeneration in Constitutively Active RAC1 Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hongman; Vijayasarathy, Camasamudram; Zeng, Yong; Marangoni, Dario; Bush, Ronald A; Wu, Zhijian; Sieving, Paul A

    2016-05-01

    The active form of small GTPase RAC1 is required for activation of NADPH oxidase (NOX), which in turn generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) in nonphagocytic cells. We explored whether NOX-induced oxidative stress contributes to rod degeneration in retinas expressing constitutively active (CA) RAC1. Transgenic (Tg)-CA-RAC1 mice were given apocynin (10 mg/kg, intraperitoneal), a NOX inhibitor, or vehicle daily for up to 13 weeks. Superoxide production and oxidative damage were assessed by dihydroethidium staining and by protein carbonyls and malondialdehyde levels, respectively. Outer nuclear layer (ONL) cells were counted and electroretinogram (ERG) amplitudes measured in Tg-CA-RAC1 mice. Outer nuclear layer cells were counted in wild-type (WT) mice after transfer of CA-Rac1 gene by subretinal injection of AAV8-pOpsin-CA Rac1-GFP. Transgenic-CA-RAC1 retinas had significantly fewer photoreceptor cells and more apoptotic ONL cells than WT controls from postnatal week (Pw) 3 to Pw13. Superoxide accumulation and protein and lipid oxidation were increased in Tg-CA-RAC1 retinas and were reduced in mice treated with apocynin. Apocynin reduced the loss of photoreceptors and increased the rod ERG a- and b-wave amplitudes when compared with vehicle-injected transgenic controls. Photoreceptor loss was also observed in regions of adult WT retina transduced with AAV8-pOpsin-CA Rac1-GFP but not in neighboring regions that were not transduced or in AAV8-pOpsin-GFP-transduced retinas. Constitutively active RAC1 promotes photoreceptor cell death by oxidative damage that occurs, at least partially, through NOX-induced ROS. Reactive oxygen species are likely involved in multiple forms of retinal degenerations, and our results support investigating RAC1 inhibition as a therapeutic approach that targets this disease pathway.

  8. Mechanism of constitutive phosphoinositide 3-kinase activation by oncogenic mutants of the p85 regulatory subunit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shekar, S Chandra; Wu, Haiyan; Fu, Zheng; Yip, Shu-Chin; Nagajyothi; Cahill, Sean M; Girvin, Mark E; Backer, Jonathan M

    2005-07-29

    p85/p110 phosphoinositide 3-kinases regulate multiple cell functions and are frequently mutated in human cancer. The p85 regulatory subunit stabilizes and inhibits the p110 catalytic subunit. The minimal fragment of p85 capable of regulating p110 is the N-terminal SH2 domain linked to the coiled-coil iSH2 domain (referred to as p85ni). We have previously proposed that the conformationally rigid iSH2 domain tethers p110 to p85, facilitating regulatory interactions between p110 and the p85 nSH2 domain. In an oncogenic mutant of murine p85, truncation at residue 571 leads to constitutively increased phosphoinositide 3-kinase activity, which has been proposed to result from either loss of an inhibitory Ser-608 autophosphorylation site or altered interactions with cellular regulatory factors. We have examined this mutant (referred to as p65) in vitro and find that p65 binds but does not inhibit p110, leading to constitutive p110 activity. This activated phenotype is observed with recombinant proteins in the absence of cellular factors. Importantly, this effect is also produced by truncating p85ni at residue 571. Thus, the phenotype is not because of loss of the Ser-608 inhibitory autophosphorylation site, which is not present in p85ni. To determine the structural basis for the phenotype of p65, we used a broadly applicable spin label/NMR approach to define the positioning of the nSH2 domain relative to the iSH2 domain. We found that one face of the nSH2 domain packs against the 581-593 region of the iSH2 domain. The loss of this interaction in the truncated p65 would remove the orienting constraints on the nSH2 domain, leading to a loss of p110 regulation by the nSH2. Based on these findings, we propose a general model for oncogenic mutants of p85 and p110 in which disruption of nSH2-p110 regulatory contacts leads to constitutive p110 activity.

  9. Endosomal generation of cAMP in GPCR signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilardaga, Jean-Pierre; Jean-Alphonse, Frederic G.; Gardella, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    It has been widely assumed that the production of the ubiquitous second messenger cyclic AMP, which is mediated by cell surface G protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs), and its termination take place exclusively at the plasma membrane. Recent studies reveal that diverse GPCRs do not always follow this conventional paradigm. In the new model, GPCRs mediate G-protein signaling not only from the plasma membrane but also from endosomal membranes. This model proposes that following ligand binding and activation, cell surface GPCRs internalize and redistribute into early endosomes, where trimeric G protein signaling can be maintained for an extended period of time. This Perspective discusses the molecular and cellular mechanistic subtleties as well as the physiological consequences of this unexpected process, which is considerably changing how we think about GPCR signaling and regulation and how we study drugs that target this receptor family. PMID:25271346

  10. GPCR biased ligands as novel heart failure therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Violin, Jonathan D; Soergel, David G; Boerrigter, Guido; Burnett, John C; Lark, Michael W

    2013-10-01

    G protein-coupled receptors have been successfully targeted by numerous therapeutics including drugs that have transformed the management of cardiovascular disease. However, many GPCRs, when activated or blocked by drugs, elicit both beneficial and adverse pharmacology. Recent work has demonstrated that in some cases, the salutary and deleterious signals linked to a specific GPCR can be selectively targeted by "biased ligands" that entrain subsets of a receptor's normal pharmacology. This review briefly summarizes the advances and current state of the biased ligand field, focusing on an example: biased ligands targeting the angiotensin II type 1 receptor. These compounds exhibit unique pharmacology, distinct from classic agonists or antagonists, and one such molecule is now in clinical development for the treatment of acute heart failure. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. A constitutively active G protein-coupled acetylcholine receptor regulates motility of larval Schistosoma mansoni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Kevin; Kimber, Michael J; Day, Tim A; Ribeiro, Paula

    2015-07-01

    The neuromuscular system of helminths controls a variety of essential biological processes and therefore represents a good source of novel drug targets. The neuroactive substance, acetylcholine controls movement of Schistosoma mansoni but the mode of action is poorly understood. Here, we present first evidence of a functional G protein-coupled acetylcholine receptor in S. mansoni, which we have named SmGAR. A bioinformatics analysis indicated that SmGAR belongs to a clade of invertebrate GAR-like receptors and is related to vertebrate muscarinic acetylcholine receptors. Functional expression studies in yeast showed that SmGAR is constitutively active but can be further activated by acetylcholine and, to a lesser extent, the cholinergic agonist, carbachol. Anti-cholinergic drugs, atropine and promethazine, were found to have inverse agonist activity towards SmGAR, causing a significant decrease in the receptor's basal activity. An RNAi phenotypic assay revealed that suppression of SmGAR activity in early-stage larval schistosomulae leads to a drastic reduction in larval motility. In sum, our results provide the first molecular evidence that cholinergic GAR-like receptors are present in schistosomes and are required for proper motor control in the larvae. The results further identify SmGAR as a possible candidate for antiparasitic drug targeting. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Chromatin-dependent cooperativity between constitutive and inducible activation domains in CREB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asahara, H; Santoso, B; Guzman, E; Du, K; Cole, P A; Davidson, I; Montminy, M

    2001-12-01

    The cyclic AMP (cAMP)-responsive factor CREB induces target gene expression via constitutive (Q2) and inducible (KID, for kinase-inducible domain) activation domains that function synergistically in response to cellular signals. KID stimulates transcription via a phospho (Ser133)-dependent interaction with the coactivator paralogs CREB binding protein and p300, whereas Q2 recruits the TFIID complex via a direct association with hTAF(II)130. Here we investigate the mechanism underlying cooperativity between the Q2 domain and KID in CREB by in vitro transcription assay with naked DNA and chromatin templates containing the cAMP-responsive somatostatin promoter. The Q2 domain was highly active on a naked DNA template, and Ser133 phosphorylation had no additional effect on transcriptional initiation in crude extracts. Q2 activity was repressed on a chromatin template, however, and this repression was relieved by the phospho (Ser133) KID-dependent recruitment of p300 histone acetyltransferase activity to the promoter. In chromatin immunoprecipitation assays of NIH 3T3 cells, cAMP-dependent recruitment of p300 to the somatostatin promoter stimulated acetylation of histone H4. Correspondingly, overexpression of hTAFII130 potentiated CREB activity in cells exposed to cAMP, but had no effect on reporter gene expression in unstimulated cells. We propose that cooperativity between the KID and Q2 domains proceeds via a chromatin-dependent mechanism in which recruitment of p300 facilitates subsequent interaction of CREB with TFIID.

  13. A Global Genomic Screening Strategy Reveals Diverse Activators of Constitutive Activated Receptor (CAR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A comprehensive survey of conditions that activate CAR in the mouse liver has not been carried out but would be useful in understanding their impact on CAR-dependent liver tumor induction. A gene signature dependent on CAR activation was identified by comparing the transcript pr...

  14. Human pregnane X receptor is activated by dibenzazepine carbamate-based inhibitors of constitutive androstane receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeske, Judith; Windshügel, Björn; Thasler, Wolfgang E; Schwab, Matthias; Burk, Oliver

    2017-06-01

    Unintentional activation of xenosensing nuclear receptors pregnane X receptor (PXR) and/or constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) by clinical drug use is known to produce severe side effects in patients, which may be overcome by co-administering antagonists. However, especially antagonizing CAR is hampered by the lack of specific inhibitors, which do not activate PXR. Recently, compounds based on a dibenzazepine carbamate scaffold were identified as potent CAR inhibitors. However, their potential to activate PXR was not thoroughly investigated, even if the lead compound was named "CAR inhibitor not PXR activator 1" (CINPA1). Thus, we performed a comprehensive analysis of the interaction of CINPA1 and four analogs with PXR. Cellular assays were used to investigate intra- and intermolecular interactions and transactivation activity of PXR as a function of the compounds. Modulation of PXR target gene expression was analyzed in primary human hepatocytes. Ligand binding to PXR was investigated by molecular docking and limited proteolytic digestion. We show here that CINPA1 induced the assembly of the PXR ligand-binding domain, released co-repressors from and recruited co-activators to the receptor. CINPA1 and its analogs induced the PXR-dependent activation of a CYP3A4 reporter gene and CINPA1 induced the expression of endogenous cytochrome P450 genes in primary hepatocytes, while not consistently inhibiting CAR-mediated induction. Molecular docking revealed favorable binding of CINPA1 and analogs to the PXR ligand-binding pocket, which was confirmed in vitro. Altogether, our data provide consistent evidence that compounds with a dibenzazepine carbamate scaffold, such as CINPA1 and its four analogs, bind to and activate PXR.

  15. Modulation of constitutive activity and signaling bias of the ghrelin receptor by conformational constraint in the second extracellular loop

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mokrosinski, Jacek; Frimurer, Thomas M; Sivertsen, Bjoern

    2012-01-01

    Based on a rare, natural Glu for Ala204(C+6) variant located six residues after the conserved Cys residue in extracellular loop 2 (ECL2b) associated with selective elimination of the high constitutive signaling of the ghrelin receptor, this loop was subjected to a detailed structure functional....... Moreover, the constitutive activity of the receptor was inhibited by Zn(2+) binding in an engineered metal-ion site stabilizing an a-helical conformation of this loop segment. It is concluded that the high constitutive activity of the ghrelin receptor is dependent upon flexibility in the C-terminal segment...

  16. Importance of constitutive activity and arrestin-independent mechanisms for intracellular trafficking of the ghrelin receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holliday, Nicholas D; Holst, Birgitte; Rodionova, Elena A

    2007-01-01

    and substantially decreased agonist-induced internalization in transiently transfected HEK293 cells. Internalized GhrelinR and GhR-39 were predominantly localized to recycling compartments, identified with transferrin and the monomeric G proteins Rab5 and Rab11. Both the inverse agonist [d-Arg(1), d-Phe(5), d-Trp(7....... Furthermore the interaction between phosphorylated receptors and beta-arrestin adaptor proteins has been examined. Replacement of the FLAG-tagged GhrelinR C tail with the equivalent GPR39 domain (GhR-39 chimera) preserved G(q) signaling. However in contrast to the GhrelinR, GhR-39 receptors exhibited no basal....... In contrast, agonist-stimulated GhrelinRs recruited the clathrin adaptor green fluorescent protein-tagged beta-arrestin2 to endosomes, coincident with increased receptor phosphorylation. Thus, GhrelinR internalization to recycling compartments depends on C-terminal motifs and constitutive activity...

  17. Constitutive expression of active microbial transglutaminase in Escherichia coli and comparative characterization to a known variant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javitt, Gabe; Ben-Barak-Zelas, Zohar; Jerabek-Willemsen, Moran; Fishman, Ayelet

    2017-02-28

    Microbial transglutaminase (mTG) is a robust enzyme catalyzing the formation of an isopeptide bond between glutamine and lysine residues. It has found use in food applications, pharmaceuticals, textiles, and biomedicine. Overexpression of soluble and active mTG in E. coli has been limited due to improper protein folding and requirement for proteolytic cleavage of the pro-domain. Furthermore, to integrate mTG more fully industrially and academically, thermostable and solvent-stable variants may be imperative. A novel expression system constitutively producing active mTG was designed. Wild-type (WT) mTG and a S2P variant had similar expression levels, comparable to previous studies. Kinetic constants were determined by a glutamate dehydrogenase-coupled assay, and the S2P variant showed an increased affinity and a doubled enzyme efficiency towards Z-Gln-Gly. The melting temperature (T m ) of the WT was determined by intrinsic fluorescence measurements to be 55.8 ± 0.1 °C and of the S2P variant to be 56.3 ± 0.4 °C and 45.5 ± 0.1 °C, showing a moderately different thermostability profile. Stability in water miscible organic solvents was determined for both the WT and S2P variant. Of the solvents tested, incubation of mTG in isopropanol for 24 h at 4 °C showed the strongest stabilizing effect with mTG retaining 61 and 72% activity for WT and S2P respectively in 70% isopropanol. Both enzymes also showed an increased initial activity in the presence of organic solvents with the highest activity increase in 40% DMSO. Nevertheless, both enzymes were inactivated in 70% of all organic solvents tested. A constitutive expression system of active mTG in E. coli without downstream proteolytic cleavage processing was used for overexpression and characterization. High throughput techniques for testing thermostability and kinetics were useful in streamlining analysis and could be used in the future for quickly identifying beneficial mutants. Hitherto untested

  18. Whole-cell biosensor for label-free detection of GPCR-mediated drug responses in personal cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillger, Julia M; Schoop, Jeffison; Boomsma, Dorret I; Slagboom, P Eline; IJzerman, Adriaan P; Heitman, Laura H

    2015-12-15

    Deciphering how genetic variation in drug targets such as G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) affects drug response is essential for precision medicine. GPCR signaling is traditionally investigated in artificial cell lines which do not provide sufficient physiological context. Patient-derived cell lines such as lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) could represent the ideal cellular model system. Here we describe a novel label-free, whole-cell biosensor method for characterizing GPCR-mediated drug responses in LCLs. Generally, such biosensor technology is deemed only compatible with adherent cell lines. We optimized and applied the methodology to study cellular adhesion properties as well as GPCR drug responses in LCLs, which are suspension cells. Coating the detector surface with the extracellular matrix protein fibronectin resulted in cell adherence and allowed detection of cellular responses. A prototypical GPCR present on these cells, i.e. the cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2), was selected for pharmacological characterization. Receptor activation with the agonist JWH133, blockade by antagonist AM630 as well as downstream signaling inhibition by PTX could be monitored sensitively and receptor-specifically. Potencies and effects were comparable between LCLs of two genetically unrelated individuals, providing the proof-of-principle that this biosensor technology can be applied to LCLs, despite their suspension cell nature, in order to serve as an in vitro model system for the evaluation of individual genetic influences on GPCR-mediated drug responses. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Clodronate Improves Survival of Transplanted Hoxb8 Myeloid Progenitors with Constitutively Active GMCSFR in Immunocompetent Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Lee

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available New methods to produce large numbers of myeloid progenitor cells, precursors to macrophages (MΦs, by maintaining Hoxb8 transcription factor activity1 has reinvigorated interest in MΦ cell therapies. We generated Hoxb8-dependent myeloid progenitors (HDPs by transducing lineage-negative bone marrow cells with a constitutively expressed Hoxb8 flanked by loxP. HDPs proliferate indefinitely and differentiate into MΦ when Hoxb8 is removed by a tamoxifen-inducible Cre. We genetically modified HDPs with a constitutively active GMCSF receptor and the tamoxifen-induced transcription factor IRF8, which we have termed “HDP-on.” The HDP-on proliferates without GMCSF and differentiates into the MΦ upon exposure to tamoxifen and ruxolitinib (GMCSF inhibitor via JAK1/2 blockade. We quantified the biodistribution of HDPs transplanted via intraperitoneal injection into immunodeficient NCG mice with a luciferase reporter; HDPs are detected for 14 days in the peritoneal cavity, liver, spleen, kidney, bone marrow, brain, lung, heart, and blood. In immunocompetent BALB/c mice, HDP-on cells, but not HDPs, are detected 1 day post-transplantation in the peritoneal cavity. Pretreatment of BALB/c mice with liposomal clodronate significantly enhances survival at day 7 for HDPs and HDP-on cells in the peritoneal cavity, spleen, and liver, but cells are undetectable at day 14. Short-term post-transplantation survival of HDPs is significantly improved using HDP-on and liposomal clodronate, opening a path for MΦ-based therapeutics.

  20. Regulation of GPCR Anterograde Trafficking by Molecular Chaperones and Motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Brent; Wertman, Jaime; Dupré, Denis J

    2015-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) make up a superfamily of integral membrane proteins that respond to a wide variety of extracellular stimuli, giving them an important role in cell function and survival. They have also proven to be valuable targets in the fight against various diseases. As such, GPCR signal regulation has received considerable attention over the last few decades. With the amplitude of signaling being determined in large part by receptor density at the plasma membrane, several endogenous mechanisms for modulating GPCR expression at the cell surface have come to light. It has been shown that cell surface expression is determined by both exocytic and endocytic processes. However, the body of knowledge surrounding GPCR trafficking from the endoplasmic reticulum to the plasma membrane, commonly known as anterograde trafficking, has considerable room for growth. We focus here on the current paradigms of anterograde GPCR trafficking. We will discuss the regulatory role of both the general and "nonclassical private" chaperone systems in GPCR trafficking as well as conserved motifs that serve as modulators of GPCR export from the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus. Together, these topics summarize some of the known mechanisms by which the cell regulates anterograde GPCR trafficking. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Constitutive activation of a slowly migrating isoform of Stat3 in mycosis fungoides: tyrphostin AG490 inhibits Stat3 activation and growth of mycosis fungoides tumor cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, M; Kaltoft, K; Nordahl, M

    1997-01-01

    . Jaks link cytokine receptors to Stats, and abnormal Jak/Stat signaling has been observed in some hemopoietic cancers. In MF tumor cells, a slowly migrating isoform of Stat3, Stat3(sm), was found to be constitutively activated, i.e., (i) Stat3(sm) was constitutively phosphorylated on tyrosine residues......, and tyrosine phosphorylation was not enhanced by growth factor stimulation; (ii) band shift assays and immunoprecipitations of DNA/Stat complexes showed constitutive DNA-binding properties of Stat3(sm); and (iii) Stat3(sm) was constitutively associated with Jak3. The abnormal activation of Stat3(sm) was highly...... specific. Thus, neither the fast migrating isoform of Stat3 (Stat3(fm)) nor other Stats (Stat1, Stat2, and Stat4 through Stat6) were constitutively activated. The Jak kinase inhibitor, tyrphostin AG490, blocked the constitutive activation of Stat3(sm) and inhibited spontaneous as well as interleukin 2...

  2. Constitutive activation of IKK2/NF-κB impairs osteogenesis and skeletal development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav Swarnkar

    Full Text Available Pathologic conditions impair bone homeostasis. The transcription factor NF-κB regulates bone homeostasis and is central to bone pathologies. Whereas contribution of NF-κB to heightened osteoclast activity is well-documented, the mechanisms underlying NF-κB impact on chondrocytes and osteoblasts are scarce. In this study, we examined the effect of constitutively active IKK2 (IKK2ca on chondrogenic and osteogenic differentiation. We show that retroviral IKK2ca but not GFP, IKK2WT, or the inactive IKK2 forms IKK2KM and IKK2SSAA, strongly suppressed osteogenesis and chondrogenesis, in vitro. In order to explore the effect of constitutive NF-κB activation on bone formation in vivo, we activated this pathway in a conditional fashion. Specifically, we crossed the R26StopIKK2ca mice with mice carrying the Col2-cre in order to express IKK2ca in osteoblasts and chondrocytes. Both chondrocytes and osteoblasts derived from Col2Cre/IKK2ca expressed IKK2ca. Mice were born alive yet died shortly thereafter. Histologically, newborn Col2Cre+/RosaIKK2ca heterozygotes (Cre+IKK2ca_w/f (het and homozygotes (Cre+IKK2ca_f/f (KI showed smaller skeleton, deformed vertebrate and reduced or missing digit ossification. The width of neural arches, as well as ossification in vertebral bodies of Cre+IKK2ca_w/f and Cre+IKK2ca_f/f, was reduced or diminished. H&E staining of proximal tibia from new born pups revealed that Cre+IKK2ca_f/f displayed disorganized hypertrophic zones within the smaller epiphysis. Micro-CT analysis indicated that 4-wk old Cre+IKK2ca_w/f has abnormal trabecular bone in proximal tibia compared to WT littermates. Mechanistically, ex-vivo experiments showed that expression of differentiation markers in calvarial osteoblasts derived from newborn IKK2ca knock-in mice was diminished compared to WT-derived cells. In situ hybridization studies demonstrated that the hypertrophic chondrocyte marker type-X collagen, the pre-hypertrophic chondrocyte markers

  3. GPCR-styrene maleic acid lipid particles (GPCR-SMALPs): their nature and potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheatley, Mark; Charlton, Jack; Jamshad, Mohammed; Routledge, Sarah J; Bailey, Sian; La-Borde, Penelope J; Azam, Maria T; Logan, Richard T; Bill, Roslyn M; Dafforn, Tim R; Poyner, David R

    2016-04-15

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) form the largest class of membrane proteins and are an important target for therapeutic drugs. These receptors are highly dynamic proteins sampling a range of conformational states in order to fulfil their complex signalling roles. In order to fully understand GPCR signalling mechanisms it is necessary to extract the receptor protein out of the plasma membrane. Historically this has universally required detergents which inadvertently strip away the annulus of lipid in close association with the receptor and disrupt lateral pressure exerted by the bilayer. Detergent-solubilized GPCRs are very unstable which presents a serious hurdle to characterization by biophysical methods. A range of strategies have been developed to ameliorate the detrimental effect of removing the receptor from the membrane including amphipols and reconstitution into nanodics stabilized by membrane scaffolding proteins (MSPs) but they all require exposure to detergent. Poly(styrene-co-maleic acid) (SMA) incorporates into membranes and spontaneously forms nanoscale poly(styrene-co-maleic acid) lipid particles (SMALPs), effectively acting like a 'molecular pastry cutter' to 'solubilize' GPCRs in the complete absence of detergent at any stage and with preservation of the native annular lipid throughout the process. GPCR-SMALPs have similar pharmacological properties to membrane-bound receptor, exhibit enhanced stability compared with detergent-solubilized receptors and being non-proteinaceous in nature, are fully compatible with downstream biophysical analysis of the encapsulated GPCR. © 2016 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  4. A desirability function-based scoring scheme for selecting fragment-like class A aminergic GPCR ligands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelemen, Ádám A.; Ferenczy, György G.; Keserű, György M.

    2015-01-01

    A physicochemical property-based desirability scoring scheme for fragment-based drug discovery was developed for class A aminergic GPCR targeted fragment libraries. Physicochemical property distributions of known aminergic GPCR-active fragments from the ChEMBL database were examined and used for a desirability function-based score. Property-distributions such as log D (at pH 7.4), PSA, pKa (strongest basic center), number of nitrogen atoms, number of oxygen atoms, and the number of rotatable bonds were combined into a desirability score (FrAGS). The validation of the scoring scheme was carried out using both public and proprietary experimental screening data. The scoring scheme is suitable for the design of aminergic GPCR targeted fragment libraries and might be useful for preprocessing fragments before structure based virtual or wet screening.

  5. CINPA1 Is an Inhibitor of Constitutive Androstane Receptor That Does Not Activate Pregnane X Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherian, Milu T; Lin, Wenwei; Wu, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and pregnane X receptor (PXR) are xenobiotic sensors that enhance the detoxification and elimination of xenobiotics and endobiotics by modulating the expression of genes encoding drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters. Elevated levels of drug-metabolizing enzymes and efflux transporters, resulting from CAR activation in various cancers, promote the elimination of chemotherapeutic agents, leading to reduced therapeutic effectiveness and acquired drug resistance. CAR inhibitors, in combination with existing chemotherapeutics, could therefore be used to attenuate multidrug resistance in cancers. Interestingly, all previously reported CAR inverse-agonists are also activators of PXR, rendering them mechanistically counterproductive in tissues where both these xenobiotic receptors are present and active. We used a directed high-throughput screening approach, followed by subsequent mechanistic studies, to identify novel, potent, and specific small-molecule CAR inhibitors that do not activate PXR. We describe here one such inhibitor, CINPA1 (CAR inhibitor not PXR activator 1), capable of reducing CAR-mediated transcription with an IC50 of ∼70 nM. CINPA1 1) is a specific xenobiotic receptor inhibitor and has no cytotoxic effects up to 30 µM; 2) inhibits CAR-mediated gene expression in primary human hepatocytes, where CAR is endogenously expressed; 3) does not alter the protein levels or subcellular localization of CAR; 4) increases corepressor and reduces coactivator interaction with the CAR ligand-binding domain in mammalian two-hybrid assays; and 5) disrupts CAR binding to the promoter regions of target genes in chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. CINPA1 could be used as a novel molecular tool for understanding CAR function. PMID:25762023

  6. CINPA1 is an inhibitor of constitutive androstane receptor that does not activate pregnane X receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherian, Milu T; Lin, Wenwei; Wu, Jing; Chen, Taosheng

    2015-05-01

    Constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and pregnane X receptor (PXR) are xenobiotic sensors that enhance the detoxification and elimination of xenobiotics and endobiotics by modulating the expression of genes encoding drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters. Elevated levels of drug-metabolizing enzymes and efflux transporters, resulting from CAR activation in various cancers, promote the elimination of chemotherapeutic agents, leading to reduced therapeutic effectiveness and acquired drug resistance. CAR inhibitors, in combination with existing chemotherapeutics, could therefore be used to attenuate multidrug resistance in cancers. Interestingly, all previously reported CAR inverse-agonists are also activators of PXR, rendering them mechanistically counterproductive in tissues where both these xenobiotic receptors are present and active. We used a directed high-throughput screening approach, followed by subsequent mechanistic studies, to identify novel, potent, and specific small-molecule CAR inhibitors that do not activate PXR. We describe here one such inhibitor, CINPA1 (CAR inhibitor not PXR activator 1), capable of reducing CAR-mediated transcription with an IC50 of ∼70 nM. CINPA1 1) is a specific xenobiotic receptor inhibitor and has no cytotoxic effects up to 30 µM; 2) inhibits CAR-mediated gene expression in primary human hepatocytes, where CAR is endogenously expressed; 3) does not alter the protein levels or subcellular localization of CAR; 4) increases corepressor and reduces coactivator interaction with the CAR ligand-binding domain in mammalian two-hybrid assays; and 5) disrupts CAR binding to the promoter regions of target genes in chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. CINPA1 could be used as a novel molecular tool for understanding CAR function. Copyright © 2015 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  7. Constitutively active Stat3 enhances neu-mediated migration and metastasis in mammary tumors via upregulation of Cten

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barbieri, Isaia; Pensa, Sara; Pannellini, Tania; Quaglino, Elena; Maritano, Diego; Demaria, Marco; Voster, Alessandra; Turkson, James; Cavallo, Federica; Watson, Christine J; Provero, Paolo; Musiani, Piero; Poli, Valeria

    2010-01-01

    The transcription factor signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) is constitutively activated in tumors of different origin, but the molecular bases for STAT3 requirement are only partly understood. To evaluate the contribution of enhanced Stat3 activation in a controlled model

  8. Combining Constitutively Active Rheb Expression and Chondroitinase Promotes Functional Axonal Regeneration after Cervical Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Di; Klaw, Michelle C; Connors, Theresa; Kholodilov, Nikolai; Burke, Robert E; Côté, Marie-Pascale; Tom, Veronica J

    2017-12-06

    After spinal cord injury (SCI), severed axons in the adult mammalian CNS are unable to mount a robust regenerative response. In addition, the glial scar at the lesion site further restricts the regenerative potential of axons. We hypothesized that a combinatorial approach coincidentally targeting these obstacles would promote axonal regeneration. We combined (1) transplantation of a growth-permissive peripheral nerve graft (PNG) into an incomplete, cervical lesion cavity; (2) transduction of neurons rostral to the SCI site to express constitutively active Rheb (caRheb; a Ras homolog enriched in brain), a GTPase that directly activates the growth-promoting pathway mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) via AAV-caRheb injection; and (3) digestion of growth-inhibitory chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans within the glial scar at the distal PNG interface using the bacterial enzyme chondroitinase ABC (ChABC). We found that expressing caRheb in neurons post-SCI results in modestly yet significantly more axons regenerating across a ChABC-treated distal graft interface into caudal spinal cord than either treatment alone. Excitingly, we found that caRheb+ChABC treatment significantly potentiates the formation of synapses in the host spinal cord and improves the animals' ability to use the affected forelimb. Thus, this combination strategy enhances functional axonal regeneration following a cervical SCI. Copyright © 2017 The American Society of Gene and Cell Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Evodia alkaloids suppress gluconeogenesis and lipogenesis by activating the constitutive androstane receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lushan; Wang, Zhangting; Huang, Minmin; Li, Yingying; Zeng, Kui; Lei, Jinxiu; Hu, Haihong; Chen, Baian; Lu, Jing; Xie, Wen; Zeng, Su

    2016-09-01

    The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) is a key sensor in xenobiotic detoxification and endobiotic metabolism. Increasing evidence suggests that CAR also plays a role in energy metabolism by suppressing the hepatic gluconeogenesis and lipogenesis. In this study, we investigated the effects of two evodia alkaloids, rutaecarpine (Rut) and evodiamine (Evo), on gluconeogenesis and lipogenesis through their activation of the human CAR (hCAR). We found that both Rut and Evo exhibited anti-lipogenic and anti-gluconeogenic effects in the hyperlipidemic HepG2 cells. Both compounds can potently activate hCAR, and treatment of cells with hCAR antagonists reversed the anti-lipogenic and anti-gluconeogenic effects of Rut and Evo. The anti-gluconeogenic effect of Rut and Evo was due to the CAR-mediated inhibition of the recruitment of forkhead box O1 (FoxO1) and hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF4α) onto the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) gene promoters. In vivo, we showed that treatment of mice with Rut improved glucose tolerance in a CAR-dependent manner. Our results suggest that the evodia alkaloids Rut and Evo may have a therapeutic potential for the treatment of hyperglycemia and type 2 diabetes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Xenobiotic nuclear receptors: New Tricks for An Old Dog, edited by Dr. Wen Xie. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Functional characterization of a constitutively active kinase variant of Arabidopsis phototropin 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Jan; Inoue, Shin-Ichiro; Kelly, Sharon M; Sullivan, Stuart; Kinoshita, Toshinori; Christie, John M

    2017-08-18

    Phototropins (phots) are plasma membrane-associated serine/threonine kinases that coordinate a range of processes linked to optimizing photosynthetic efficiency in plants. These photoreceptors contain two light-, oxygen-, or voltage-sensing (LOV) domains within their N terminus, with each binding one molecule of flavin mononucleotide as a UV/blue light-absorbing chromophore. Although phots contain two LOV domains, light-induced activation of the C-terminal kinase domain and subsequent receptor autophosphorylation is controlled primarily by the A'α-LOV2-Jα photosensory module. Mutations that disrupt interactions between the LOV2 core and its flanking helical segments can uncouple this mode of light regulation. However, the impact of these mutations on phot function in Arabidopsis has not been explored. Here we report that histidine substitution of Arg-472 located within the A'α-helix of Arabidopsis phot1 constitutively activates phot1 kinase activity in vitro without affecting LOV2 photochemistry. Expression analysis of phot1 R472H in the phot-deficient mutant confirmed that it is autophosphorylated in darkness in vivo but unable to initiate phot1 signaling in the absence of light. Instead, we found that phot1 R472H is poorly functional under low-light conditions but can restore phototropism, chloroplast accumulation, stomatal opening, and leaf positioning and expansion at higher light intensities. Our findings suggest that Arabidopsis can adapt to the elevated phosphorylation status of the phot1 R472H mutant in part by reducing its stability, whereas the activity of the mutant under high-light conditions can be attributed to additional increases in LOV2-mediated photoreceptor autophosphorylation. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. Identification and Characterization of CINPA1 Metabolites Facilitates Structure-Activity Studies of the Constitutive Androstane Receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Cherian, Milu T.; Yang, Lei; Chai, Sergio C.; Lin, Wenwei; Chen, Taosheng

    2016-01-01

    The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) regulates the expression of genes involved in drug metabolism and other processes. A specific inhibitor of CAR is critical for modulating constitutive CAR activity. We recently described a specific small-molecule inhibitor of CAR, CINPA1 (ethyl (5-(diethylglycyl)-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[b,f]azepin-3-yl)carbamate), which is capable of reducing CAR-mediated transcription by changing the coregulator recruitment pattern and reducing CAR occupancy at the...

  12. Overexpression of constitutively active MAP3K7 in ameloblasts causes enamel defects of mouse teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinping, Zhao; Qing, Chu; Wenying, Song; Chunyan, Yang; Lili, Xiang; Yao, Shi; Yumin, Wang; Zhenzhen, Xu; Li, Zhang; Yuguang, Gao

    2017-12-01

    Compelling evidence suggests that mitogen-activated protein kinases (Mapks) play an important role in amelogenesis. However, the role of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β-activating kinase 1 (Tak1, Map3k7), which is a known upstream kinase of Mapks, during amelogenesis remains to be determined. The aim of this study was to investigate the possible involvement of Map3k7 in amelogenesis. We generated transgenic mice that produced constitutively active human MAP3K7 (caMAP3K7) under the control of amelogenin (Amelx) gene promoter. Radiography and micro-computed tomography (μCT) analysis was used to detect the radio-opacity and density of the teeth. The enamel microstructure was observed with a scanning electron microscope. Histological analysis was used to observe the adhesion between ameloblasts and residual organic matrix of the enamel. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) was used to analyze the expression of enamel matrix protein. The enamel of mandibular molars in caMAP3K7-overexpressing mice displayed pigmentation and a highly irregular structure compared with the wild type littermates. Teeth of transgenic animals underwent rapid attrition due to the brittleness of the enamel layer. The microstructure of enamel, normally a highly ordered arrangement of hydroxyapatite crystals, was completely disorganized. The gross histological appearances of ameloblasts and supporting cellular structures, as well as the expression of the enamel protein amelotin (Amtn) were altered by the overexpression of caMAP3K7. Our data demonstrated that protein expression, processing and secretion occurred abnormally in transgenic mice overexpressing caMAP3K7. The overexpression of caMAP3K7 had a profound effect on enamel structure by disrupting the orderly growth of enamel prisms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. CINPA1 binds directly to constitutive androstane receptor and inhibits its activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherian, Milu T; Chai, Sergio C; Wright, William C; Singh, Aman; Alexandra Casal, Morgan; Zheng, Jie; Wu, Jing; Lee, Richard E; Griffin, Patrick R; Chen, Taosheng

    2018-03-31

    The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and pregnane X receptor (PXR) are xenobiotic sensors that regulate the expression of drug-metabolizing enzymes and efflux transporters. CAR activation promotes drug elimination, thereby reducing therapeutic effectiveness, or causes adverse drug effects via toxic metabolites. CAR inhibitors could be used to attenuate these adverse drug effects. CAR and PXR share ligands and target genes, confounding the understanding of the regulation of receptor-specific activity. We previously identified a small-molecule inhibitor, CINPA1, that inhibits CAR (without activating PXR at lower concentrations) by altering CAR-coregulator interactions and reducing CAR recruitment to DNA response elements of regulated genes. However, solid evidence was not presented for the direct binding of CINPA1 to CAR. In this study, we demonstrate direct interaction of CINPA1 with the CAR ligand-binding domain (CAR-LBD) and identify key residues involved in such interactions through a combination of biophysical and computational methods. We found that CINPA1 resides in the ligand-binding pocket to stabilize the CAR-LBD in a more rigid, less fluid state. Molecular dynamics simulations, together with our previously reported docking model, enabled us to predict which CAR residues were critical for interactions with CINPA1. The importance of these residues for CINPA1 binding were then validated by directed mutations and testing the mutant CAR proteins in transcription reporter and coregulatory interaction assays. We demonstrated strong hydrogen bonding of CINPA1 with N165 and H203 and identified other residues involved in hydrophobic contacts with CINPA1. Overall, our data confirm that CINPA1 directly binds to CAR. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Enhancement of endothelial cell migration by constitutively active LPA{sub 1}-expressing tumor cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitayoshi, Misaho; Kato, Kohei; Tanabe, Eriko; Yoshikawa, Kyohei; Fukui, Rie [Division of Cancer Biology and Bioinformatics, Department of Life Science, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Kinki University, 3-4-1, Kowakae, Higashiosaka, Osaka 577-8502 (Japan); Fukushima, Nobuyuki [Division of Molecular Neurobiology, Department of Life Science, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Kinki University, 3-4-1, Kowakae, Higashiosaka, Osaka 577-8502 (Japan); Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi, E-mail: ttujiuch@life.kindai.ac.jp [Division of Cancer Biology and Bioinformatics, Department of Life Science, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Kinki University, 3-4-1, Kowakae, Higashiosaka, Osaka 577-8502 (Japan)

    2012-06-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mutated LPA{sub 1} stimulates cell migration of endothelial cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer VEGF expressions are increased by mutated LPA{sub 1}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LPA signaling via mutated LPA{sub 1} is involved in angiogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mutated LPA{sub 1} promotes cancer cell progression. -- Abstract: Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) receptors belong to G protein-coupled transmembrane receptors (LPA receptors; LPA{sub 1} to LPA{sub 6}). They indicate a variety of cellular response by the interaction with LPA, including cell proliferation, migration and differentiation. Recently, we have reported that constitutive active mutated LPA{sub 1} induced the strong biological effects of rat neuroblastoma B103 cells. In the present study, we examined the effects of mutated LPA{sub 1} on the interaction between B103 cells and endothelial F-2 cells. Each LPA receptor expressing B103 cells were maintained in serum-free DMEM and cell motility assay was performed with a Cell Culture Insert. When F-2 cells were cultured with conditioned medium from Lpar1 and Lpar3-expressing cells, the cell motility of F-2 cells was significantly higher than control cells. Interestingly, the motile activity of F-2 cells was strongly induced by mutated LPA{sub 1} than other cells, correlating with the expression levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (Vegf)-A and Vegf-C. Pretreatment of LPA signaling inhibitors inhibited F-2 cell motility stimulated by mutated LPA{sub 1}. These results suggest that activation of LPA signaling via mutated LPA{sub 1} may play an important role in the promotion of angiogenesis in rat neuroblastoma cells.

  15. Integrating GPCR-specific information with full text articles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vroling, Bas; Thorne, David; McDermott, Philip; Attwood, Teresa K; Vriend, Gert; Pettifer, Steve

    2011-09-12

    With the continued growth in the volume both of experimental G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) data and of the related peer-reviewed literature, the ability of GPCR researchers to keep up-to-date is becoming increasingly curtailed. We present work that integrates the biological data and annotations in the GPCR information system (GPCRDB) with next-generation methods for intelligently exploring, visualising and interacting with the scientific articles used to disseminate them. This solution automatically retrieves relevant information from GPCRDB and displays it both within and as an adjunct to an article. This approach allows researchers to extract more knowledge more swiftly from literature. Importantly, it allows reinterpretation of data in articles published before GPCR structure data became widely available, thereby rescuing these valuable data from long-dormant sources.

  16. Multidimensional Tracking of GPCR Signaling via Peroxidase-Catalyzed Proximity Labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paek, Jaeho; Kalocsay, Marian; Staus, Dean P; Wingler, Laura; Pascolutti, Roberta; Paulo, Joao A; Gygi, Steven P; Kruse, Andrew C

    2017-04-06

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) play critical roles in regulating physiological processes ranging from neurotransmission to cardiovascular function. Current methods for tracking GPCR signaling suffer from low throughput, modification or overexpression of effector proteins, and low temporal resolution. Here, we show that peroxidase-catalyzed proximity labeling can be combined with isobaric tagging and mass spectrometry to enable quantitative, time-resolved measurement of GPCR agonist response in living cells. Using this technique, termed "GPCR-APEX," we track activation and internalization of the angiotensin II type 1 receptor and the β2 adrenoceptor. These receptors co-localize with a variety of G proteins even before receptor activation, and activated receptors are largely sequestered from G proteins upon internalization. Additionally, the two receptors show differing internalization kinetics, and we identify the membrane protein LMBRD2 as a potential regulator of β2 adrenoceptor signaling, underscoring the value of a dynamic view of receptor function. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Constitutively active form of natriuretic peptide receptor 2 ameliorates experimental pulmonary arterial hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobutoshi Nawa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We recently found a constitutively active mutant of natriuretic peptide receptor 2 (caNPR2; V883M, which synthesizes larger amounts of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP intracellularly without any ligand stimulation than existing drugs. The aim of this study was to investigate the therapeutic effects of gene transduction using caNPR2 for pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH. In vitro gene transduction into human pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells using Sendai virus (SeV vectors carrying caNPR2 induced 10,000-fold increases in the synthesis of cGMP without ligand stimulation, and the proliferation of caNPR2-expressing cells was significantly attenuated. The PAH model rats generated by hypoxia and the administration of SU5416 were then treated with SeV vectors through a direct injection into the left pulmonary artery. Right ventricular systolic pressure was significantly decreased 2 weeks after the treatment, while systemic blood pressure remained unchanged. Histological analyses revealed that the medial wall thickness and occlusion rate of pulmonary arterioles were significantly improved in caNPR2-treated lungs. Neither the systemic integration of virus vectors nor side effects were observed. The massive stimulation of cGMP synthesis by gene therapy with caNPR2 was safe and effective in a PAH rat model and, thus, has potential as a novel therapy for patients with severe progressive PAH.

  18. Chapter Three - Ubiquitination and Protein Turnover of G-Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinases in GPCR Signaling and Cellular Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penela, P

    2016-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are responsible for regulating a wide variety of physiological processes, and distinct mechanisms for GPCR inactivation exist to guarantee correct receptor functionality. One of the widely used mechanisms is receptor phosphorylation by specific G-protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs), leading to uncoupling from G proteins (desensitization) and receptor internalization. GRKs and β-arrestins also participate in the assembly of receptor-associated multimolecular complexes, thus initiating alternative G-protein-independent signaling events. In addition, the abundant GRK2 kinase has diverse "effector" functions in cellular migration, proliferation, and metabolism homeostasis by means of the phosphorylation or interaction with non-GPCR partners. Altered expression of GRKs (particularly of GRK2 and GRK5) occurs during pathological conditions characterized by impaired GPCR signaling including inflammatory syndromes, cardiovascular disease, and tumor contexts. It is increasingly appreciated that different pathways governing GRK protein stability play a role in the modulation of kinase levels in normal and pathological conditions. Thus, enhanced GRK2 degradation by the proteasome pathway occurs upon GPCR stimulation, what allows cellular adaptation to chronic stimulation in a physiological setting. β-arrestins participate in this process by facilitating GRK2 phosphorylation by different kinases and by recruiting diverse E3 ubiquitin ligase to the receptor complex. Different proteolytic systems (ubiquitin-proteasome, calpains), chaperone activities and signaling pathways influence the stability of GRKs in different ways, thus endowing specificity to GPCR regulation as protein turnover of GRKs can be differentially affected. Therefore, modulation of protein stability of GRKs emerges as a versatile mechanism for feedback regulation of GPCR signaling and basic cellular processes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. GLIDA: GPCR-ligand database for chemical genomic drug discovery

    OpenAIRE

    Okuno, Yasushi; Yang, Jiyoon; Taneishi, Kei; Yabuuchi, Hiroaki; Tsujimoto, Gozoh

    2005-01-01

    G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) represent one of the most important families of drug targets in pharmaceutical development. GPCR-LIgand DAtabase (GLIDA) is a novel public GPCR-related chemical genomic database that is primarily focused on the correlation of information between GPCRs and their ligands. It provides correlation data between GPCRs and their ligands, along with chemical information on the ligands, as well as access information to the various web databases regarding GPCRs. Thes...

  20. A synthetic intrabody-based selective and generic inhibitor of GPCR endocytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Eshan; Srivastava, Ashish; Baidya, Mithu; Kumari, Punita; Dwivedi, Hemlata; Nidhi, Kumari; Ranjan, Ravi; Dogra, Shalini; Koide, Akiko; Yadav, Prem N.; Sidhu, Sachdev S.; Koide, Shohei; Shukla, Arun K.

    2017-12-01

    Beta-arrestins (βarrs) critically mediate desensitization, endocytosis and signalling of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), and they scaffold a large number of interaction partners. However, allosteric modulation of their scaffolding abilities and direct targeting of their interaction interfaces to modulate GPCR functions selectively have not been fully explored yet. Here we identified a series of synthetic antibody fragments (Fabs) against different conformations of βarrs from phage display libraries. Several of these Fabs allosterically and selectively modulated the interaction of βarrs with clathrin and ERK MAP kinase. Interestingly, one of these Fabs selectively disrupted βarr-clathrin interaction, and when expressed as an intrabody, it robustly inhibited agonist-induced endocytosis of a broad set of GPCRs without affecting ERK MAP kinase activation. Our data therefore demonstrate the feasibility of selectively targeting βarr interactions using intrabodies and provide a novel framework for fine-tuning GPCR functions with potential therapeutic implications.

  1. GPCR & company: databases and servers for GPCRs and interacting partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalsman, Noga; Niv, Masha Y

    2014-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are a large superfamily of membrane receptors that are involved in a wide range of signaling pathways. To fulfill their tasks, GPCRs interact with a variety of partners, including small molecules, lipids and proteins. They are accompanied by different proteins during all phases of their life cycle. Therefore, GPCR interactions with their partners are of great interest in basic cell-signaling research and in drug discovery.Due to the rapid development of computers and internet communication, knowledge and data can be easily shared within the worldwide research community via freely available databases and servers. These provide an abundance of biological, chemical and pharmacological information.This chapter describes the available web resources for investigating GPCR interactions. We review about 40 freely available databases and servers, and provide a few sentences about the essence and the data they supply. For simplification, the databases and servers were grouped under the following topics: general GPCR-ligand interactions; particular families of GPCRs and their ligands; GPCR oligomerization; GPCR interactions with intracellular partners; and structural information on GPCRs. In conclusion, a multitude of useful tools are currently available. Summary tables are provided to ease navigation between the numerous and partially overlapping resources. Suggestions for future enhancements of the online tools include the addition of links from general to specialized databases and enabling usage of user-supplied template for GPCR structural modeling.

  2. Constitutive activation of Nrf2 induces a stable reductive state in the mouse myocardium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gobinath Shanmugam

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Redox homeostasis regulates key cellular signaling pathways in both physiology and pathology. The cell's antioxidant response provides a defense against oxidative stress and establishes a redox tone permissive for cell signaling. The molecular regulation of the well-known Keap1/Nrf2 system acts as sensor responding to changes in redox homeostasis and is poorly studied in the heart. Importantly, it is not yet known whether Nrf2 alone can serve as a master regulator of cellular redox homeostasis without compensation of the transcriptional regulation of antioxidant response element (ARE genes through alternate mechanisms. Here, we addressed this question using cardiac-specific transgenic expression at two different levels of constitutively active nuclear erythroid related factor 2 (caNrf2 functioning independently of Keap1. The caNrf2 mice showed augmentation of glutathione (GSH, the key regulator of the cellular thiol redox state. The Trans-AM assay for Nrf2-binding to the antioxidant response element (ARE showed a dose-dependent increase associated with upregulation of several major antioxidant genes and proteins. This was accompanied by a significant decrease in dihydroethidium staining and malondialdehyde (MDA in the caNrf2-TG mice myocardium. Interestingly, caNrf2 gene-dosage dependent redox changes were noted resulting in generation of a multi-stage model of pro-reductive and reductive conditions in the myocardium of TG-low and TG-high mice, respectively. These data clearly show that Nrf2 levels alone are capable of serving as the master regulator of the ARE. These models provide an important platform to investigate the impact of the Nrf2 system independent of the need to regulate the activity of Keap1 and the consequent exposure to pro-oxidants or electrophiles, which have numerous off-target effects.

  3. Selective elimination of high constitutive activity or chemokine binding in the human herpesvirus 8 encoded seven transmembrane oncogene ORF74

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, M M; Kledal, T N; Holst, Peter Johannes

    2000-01-01

    Open reading frame 74 (ORF74) encoded by human herpesvirus 8 is a highly constitutively active seven transmembrane (7TM) receptor stimulated by angiogenic chemokines, e.g. growth-related oncogene-alpha, and inhibited by angiostatic chemokines e.g. interferon-gamma-inducible protein. Transgenic mice...... and action of chemokines obtained through deletion of 22 amino acids from the N-terminal extension; an ORF74 with high constitutive activity but with selective elimination of stimulatory regulation by angiogenic chemokines obtained through substitution of basic residues at the extracellular ends of TM......-V or TM-VI; and an ORF74 lacking constitutive activity but with preserved ability to be stimulated by agonist chemokines obtained through introduction of an Asp residue on the hydrophobic, presumed membrane-exposed face of TM-II. It is concluded that careful molecular dissection can selectively eliminate...

  4. Constitutive activation of BMP signalling abrogates experimental metastasis of OVCA429 cells via reduced cell adhesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shepherd Trevor G

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Activation of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP4 signalling in human ovarian cancer cells induces a number of phenotypic changes in vitro, including altered cell morphology, adhesion, motility and invasion, relative to normal human ovarian surface epithelial cells. From these in vitro analyses, we had hypothesized that active BMP signalling promotes the metastatic potential of ovarian cancer. Methods To test this directly, we engineered OVCA429 human ovarian cancer cells possessing doxycycline-inducible expression of a constitutively-active mutant BMP receptor, ALK3QD, and administered these cells to immunocompromised mice. Further characterization was performed in vitro to address the role of activated BMP signalling on the EOC phenotype, with particular emphasis on epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT and cell adhesion. Results Unexpectedly, doxycycline-induced ALK3QD expression in OVCA429 cells reduced tumour implantation on peritoneal surfaces and ascites formation when xenografted into immunocompromised mice by intraperitoneal injection. To determine the potential mechanisms controlling this in vivo observation, we followed with several cell culture experiments. Doxycycline-induced ALK3QD expression enhanced the refractile, spindle-shaped morphology of cultured OVCA429 cells eliciting an EMT-like response. Using in vitro wound healing assays, we observed that ALK3QD-expressing cells migrated with long, cytoplasmic projections extending into the wound space. The phenotypic alterations of ALK3QD-expressing cells correlated with changes in specific gene expression patterns of EMT, including increased Snail and Slug and reduced E-cadherin mRNA expression. In addition, ALK3QD signalling reduced β1- and β3-integrin expression, critical molecules involved in ovarian cancer cell adhesion. The combination of reduced E-cadherin and β-integrin expression correlates directly with the reduced EOC cell cohesion in spheroids and

  5. GPCR responses in vascular smooth muscle can occur predominantly through dual transactivation of kinase receptors and not classical Gαq protein signalling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Peter J

    2013-05-30

    GPCR signalling is well known to proceed through several linear pathways involving activation of G proteins and their downstream signalling pathways such as activation of phospholipase C. In addition, GPCRs signal via transactivation of Protein Tyrosine Kinase receptors such as that for Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF) and Platelet-Derived Growth Factor (PDGF) where GPCR agonists mediate increase levels of phosphorylated Erk (pErk) the immediate downstream product of the activation of EGF receptor. It has recently been shown that this paradigm can be extended to include the GPCR transactivation of a Protein Serine/Threonine Kinase receptor, specifically the Transforming Growth Factor β Type I receptor (also known as Alk V) (TβRI) in which case GPCR activation leads to the formation of carboxy terminal polyphosphorylated Smad2 (phosphoSmad2) being the immediate downstream product of the activation of TβRI. Growth factor and hormone regulation of proteoglycan synthesis in vascular smooth muscle cells represent one component of an in vitro model of atherosclerosis because modified proteoglycans show enhanced binding to lipoproteins as the initiating step in atherosclerosis. In the example of proteoglycan synthesis stimulated by GPCR agonists such as thrombin and endothelin-1, the transactivation pathways for the EGF receptor and TβRI are both active and together account for essentially all of the response to the GPCRs. In contrast, signalling downstream of GPCRs such as increased inositol 1,4,5 trisphosphate (IP3) and intracellular calcium do not have any effect on GPCR stimulated proteoglycan synthesis. These data lead to the conclusion that dual transactivation pathways for protein tyrosine and serine/threonine kinase receptors may play a far greater role in GPCR signalling than currently recognised. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Structure of the R3/I5 Chimeric Relaxin Peptide, a Selective GPCR135 and GPCR142 Agonist*

    OpenAIRE

    Haugaard-Jönsson, Linda M.; Hossain, Mohammed Akhter; Daly, Norelle L.; Bathgate, Ross A. D.; Wade, John D.; Craik, David J.; Rosengren, K. Johan

    2008-01-01

    The human relaxin family comprises seven peptide hormones with various biological functions mediated through interactions with G-protein-coupled receptors. Interestingly, among the hitherto characterized receptors there is no absolute selectivity toward their primary ligand. The most striking example of this is the relaxin family ancestor, relaxin-3, which is an agonist for three of the four currently known relaxin receptors: GPCR135, GPCR142, and LGR7. Relaxin-3 and i...

  7. GPCR-SSFE: A comprehensive database of G-protein-coupled receptor template predictions and homology models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kreuchwig Annika

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs transduce a wide variety of extracellular signals to within the cell and therefore have a key role in regulating cell activity and physiological function. GPCR malfunction is responsible for a wide range of diseases including cancer, diabetes and hyperthyroidism and a large proportion of drugs on the market target these receptors. The three dimensional structure of GPCRs is important for elucidating the molecular mechanisms underlying these diseases and for performing structure-based drug design. Although structural data are restricted to only a handful of GPCRs, homology models can be used as a proxy for those receptors not having crystal structures. However, many researchers working on GPCRs are not experienced homology modellers and are therefore unable to benefit from the information that can be gleaned from such three-dimensional models. Here, we present a comprehensive database called the GPCR-SSFE, which provides initial homology models of the transmembrane helices for a large variety of family A GPCRs. Description Extending on our previous theoretical work, we have developed an automated pipeline for GPCR homology modelling and applied it to a large set of family A GPCR sequences. Our pipeline is a fragment-based approach that exploits available family A crystal structures. The GPCR-SSFE database stores the template predictions, sequence alignments, identified sequence and structure motifs and homology models for 5025 family A GPCRs. Users are able to browse the GPCR dataset according to their pharmacological classification or search for results using a UniProt entry name. It is also possible for a user to submit a GPCR sequence that is not contained in the database for analysis and homology model building. The models can be viewed using a Jmol applet and are also available for download along with the alignments. Conclusions The data provided by GPCR-SSFE are useful for investigating

  8. GPCR-SSFE: a comprehensive database of G-protein-coupled receptor template predictions and homology models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worth, Catherine L; Kreuchwig, Annika; Kleinau, Gunnar; Krause, Gerd

    2011-05-23

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) transduce a wide variety of extracellular signals to within the cell and therefore have a key role in regulating cell activity and physiological function. GPCR malfunction is responsible for a wide range of diseases including cancer, diabetes and hyperthyroidism and a large proportion of drugs on the market target these receptors. The three dimensional structure of GPCRs is important for elucidating the molecular mechanisms underlying these diseases and for performing structure-based drug design. Although structural data are restricted to only a handful of GPCRs, homology models can be used as a proxy for those receptors not having crystal structures. However, many researchers working on GPCRs are not experienced homology modellers and are therefore unable to benefit from the information that can be gleaned from such three-dimensional models. Here, we present a comprehensive database called the GPCR-SSFE, which provides initial homology models of the transmembrane helices for a large variety of family A GPCRs. Extending on our previous theoretical work, we have developed an automated pipeline for GPCR homology modelling and applied it to a large set of family A GPCR sequences. Our pipeline is a fragment-based approach that exploits available family A crystal structures. The GPCR-SSFE database stores the template predictions, sequence alignments, identified sequence and structure motifs and homology models for 5025 family A GPCRs. Users are able to browse the GPCR dataset according to their pharmacological classification or search for results using a UniProt entry name. It is also possible for a user to submit a GPCR sequence that is not contained in the database for analysis and homology model building. The models can be viewed using a Jmol applet and are also available for download along with the alignments. The data provided by GPCR-SSFE are useful for investigating general and detailed sequence-structure-function relationships

  9. Constitutional jurisprudence

    OpenAIRE

    Katju, Markandey

    2011-01-01

    Justice Markandey Katja (Judge, Supreme Court of India) explains and illustrates the concept of 'constitutional jurisprudence' - as a kind of philosphy of constitutional law, seeking to explain in general terms ideas such as: What is a constitution? What is its purpose? What is its position in the legal system of the country?

  10. TRPC4α and TRPC4β Similarly Affect Neonatal Cardiomyocyte Survival during Chronic GPCR Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschmer, Nadine; Bandleon, Sandra; von Ehrlich-Treuenstätt, Viktor; Hartmann, Sonja; Schaaf, Alice; Lamprecht, Anna-Karina; Miranda-Laferte, Erick; Langsenlehner, Tanja; Ritter, Oliver; Eder, Petra

    2016-01-01

    The Transient Receptor Potential Channel Subunit 4 (TRPC4) has been considered as a crucial Ca2+ component in cardiomyocytes promoting structural and functional remodeling in the course of pathological cardiac hypertrophy. TRPC4 assembles as homo or hetero-tetramer in the plasma membrane, allowing a non-selective Na+ and Ca2+ influx. Gαq protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) stimulation is known to increase TRPC4 channel activity and a TRPC4-mediated Ca2+ influx which has been regarded as ideal Ca2+ source for calcineurin and subsequent nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) activation. Functional properties of TRPC4 are also based on the expression of the TRPC4 splice variants TRPC4α and TRPC4β. Aim of the present study was to analyze cytosolic Ca2+ signals, signaling, hypertrophy and vitality of cardiomyocytes in dependence on the expression level of either TRPC4α or TRPC4β. The analysis of Ca2+ transients in neonatal rat cardiomyocytes (NRCs) showed that TRPC4α and TRPC4β affected Ca2+ cycling in beating cardiomyocytes with both splice variants inducing an elevation of the Ca2+ transient amplitude at baseline and TRPC4β increasing the Ca2+ peak during angiotensin II (Ang II) stimulation. NRCs infected with TRPC4β (Ad-C4β) also responded with a sustained Ca2+ influx when treated with Ang II under non-pacing conditions. Consistent with the Ca2+ data, NRCs infected with TRPC4α (Ad-C4α) showed an elevated calcineurin/NFAT activity and a baseline hypertrophic phenotype but did not further develop hypertrophy during chronic Ang II/phenylephrine stimulation. Down-regulation of endogenous TRPC4α reversed these effects, resulting in less hypertrophy of NRCs at baseline but a markedly increased hypertrophic enlargement after chronic agonist stimulation. Ad-C4β NRCs did not exhibit baseline calcineurin/NFAT activity or hypertrophy but responded with an increased calcineurin/NFAT activity after GPCR stimulation. However, this effect was not translated into an

  11. TRPC4α and TRPC4β Similarly Affect Neonatal Cardiomyocyte Survival during Chronic GPCR Stimulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine Kirschmer

    Full Text Available The Transient Receptor Potential Channel Subunit 4 (TRPC4 has been considered as a crucial Ca2+ component in cardiomyocytes promoting structural and functional remodeling in the course of pathological cardiac hypertrophy. TRPC4 assembles as homo or hetero-tetramer in the plasma membrane, allowing a non-selective Na+ and Ca2+ influx. Gαq protein-coupled receptor (GPCR stimulation is known to increase TRPC4 channel activity and a TRPC4-mediated Ca2+ influx which has been regarded as ideal Ca2+ source for calcineurin and subsequent nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT activation. Functional properties of TRPC4 are also based on the expression of the TRPC4 splice variants TRPC4α and TRPC4β. Aim of the present study was to analyze cytosolic Ca2+ signals, signaling, hypertrophy and vitality of cardiomyocytes in dependence on the expression level of either TRPC4α or TRPC4β. The analysis of Ca2+ transients in neonatal rat cardiomyocytes (NRCs showed that TRPC4α and TRPC4β affected Ca2+ cycling in beating cardiomyocytes with both splice variants inducing an elevation of the Ca2+ transient amplitude at baseline and TRPC4β increasing the Ca2+ peak during angiotensin II (Ang II stimulation. NRCs infected with TRPC4β (Ad-C4β also responded with a sustained Ca2+ influx when treated with Ang II under non-pacing conditions. Consistent with the Ca2+ data, NRCs infected with TRPC4α (Ad-C4α showed an elevated calcineurin/NFAT activity and a baseline hypertrophic phenotype but did not further develop hypertrophy during chronic Ang II/phenylephrine stimulation. Down-regulation of endogenous TRPC4α reversed these effects, resulting in less hypertrophy of NRCs at baseline but a markedly increased hypertrophic enlargement after chronic agonist stimulation. Ad-C4β NRCs did not exhibit baseline calcineurin/NFAT activity or hypertrophy but responded with an increased calcineurin/NFAT activity after GPCR stimulation. However, this effect was not

  12. Agonists and inverse agonists for the herpesvirus 8-encoded constitutively active seven-transmembrane oncogene product, ORF-74

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, M M; Kledal, T N; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    1999-01-01

    A number of CXC chemokines competed with similar, nanomolar affinity against 125I-interleukin-8 (IL-8) binding to ORF-74, a constitutively active seven-transmembrane receptor encoded by human herpesvirus 8. However, in competition against 125I-labeled growth-related oncogene (GRO)-alpha, the ORF-74...... receptor was highly selective for GRO peptides, with IL-8 being 10,000-fold less potent. The constitutive stimulating activity of ORF-74 on phosphatidylinositol turnover was not influenced by, for example, IL-8 binding. In contrast, GRO peptides acted as potent agonists in stimulating ORF-74 signaling...

  13. Growth hormone (GH)-independent dimerization of GH receptor by a leucine zipper results in constitutive activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behncken, S N; Billestrup, Nils; Brown, R

    2000-01-01

    Growth hormone initiates signaling by inducing homodimerization of two GH receptors. Here, we have sought to determine whether constitutively active receptor can be created in the absence of the extracellular domain by substituting it with high affinity leucine zippers to create dimers of the gro......Growth hormone initiates signaling by inducing homodimerization of two GH receptors. Here, we have sought to determine whether constitutively active receptor can be created in the absence of the extracellular domain by substituting it with high affinity leucine zippers to create dimers...

  14. Constitutional changes and the dilemmas of constitutionalism

    OpenAIRE

    Bačić, Arsen

    2009-01-01

    The need to develop constitutional mechanisms whose aim is to resolve fundamental relations in society demands the widest possible inclusion of all of society’s active participants in the discussion on the need to adopt or revise the Constitution. The opening of every new round of constitutional changes is of great importance because it always unlocks certain new and important questions. The answers to those questions should be offered by state authority (policy) and civil society including s...

  15. Efficient silkworm expression of human GPCR (nociceptin receptor) by a Bombyx mori bacmid DNA system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kajikawa, Mizuho; Sasaki, Kaori [Medical Institute of Bioregulation, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Wakimoto, Yoshitaro; Toyooka, Masaru [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Graduate School of Engineering, Gunma University, 1-5-1 Tenjin-cho, Kiryu, Gunma 376-8515 (Japan); Motohashi, Tomoko; Shimojima, Tsukasa [National Institute of Genetics, 1111 Yata, Mishima, Shizuoka 411-8540 (Japan); Takeda, Shigeki [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Graduate School of Engineering, Gunma University, 1-5-1 Tenjin-cho, Kiryu, Gunma 376-8515 (Japan); Park, Enoch Y. [Laboratory of Biotechnology, Integrated Bioscience Section, Graduate School of Science and Technology, Shizuoka University, 836 Oya, Suruga-ku, Shizuoka, Shizuoka 422-8529 (Japan); Maenaka, Katsumi, E-mail: kmaenaka-umin@umin.net [Medical Institute of Bioregulation, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan)

    2009-07-31

    Guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G protein) coupled receptors (GPCRs) are frequently expressed by a baculovirus expression vector system (BEVS). We recently established a novel BEVS using the bacmid system of Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV), which is directly applicable for protein expression in silkworms. Here, we report the first example of GPCR expression in silkworms by the simple injection of BmNPV bacmid DNA. Human nociceptin receptor, an inhibitory GPCR, and its fusion protein with inhibitory G protein alpha subunit (G{sub i}{alpha}) were both successfully expressed in the fat bodies of silkworm larvae as well as in the BmNPV viral fraction. Its yield was much higher than that from Sf9 cells. The microsomal fractions including the nociceptin receptor fusion, which are easily prepared by only centrifugation steps, exhibited [{sup 35}S]GTP{gamma}S-binding activity upon specific stimulation by nociceptin. Therefore, this rapid method is easy-to-use and has a high expression level, and thus will be an important tool for human GPCR production.

  16. Membrane-Mediated Oligomerization of G Protein Coupled Receptors and Its Implications for GPCR Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gahbauer, Stefan; Böckmann, Rainer A

    2016-01-01

    The dimerization or even oligomerization of G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) causes ongoing, controversial debates about its functional role and the coupled biophysical, biochemical or biomedical implications. A continously growing number of studies hints to a relation between oligomerization and function of GPCRs and strengthens the assumption that receptor assembly plays a key role in the regulation of protein function. Additionally, progress in the structural analysis of GPCR-G protein and GPCR-ligand interactions allows to distinguish between actively functional and non-signaling complexes. Recent findings further suggest that the surrounding membrane, i.e., its lipid composition may modulate the preferred dimerization interface and as a result the abundance of distinct dimeric conformations. In this review, the association of GPCRs and the role of the membrane in oligomerization will be discussed. An overview of the different reported oligomeric interfaces is provided and their capability for signaling discussed. The currently available data is summarized with regard to the formation of GPCR oligomers, their structures and dependency on the membrane microenvironment as well as the coupling of oligomerization to receptor function.

  17. From Recombinant Expression to Crystals: A Step-by-Step Guide to GPCR Crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Arun K; Kumari, Punita; Ghosh, Eshan; Nidhi, Kumari

    2015-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the primary targets of drugs prescribed for many human pathophysiological conditions such as hypertension, allergies, schizophrenia, asthma, and various types of cancer. High-resolution structure determination of GPCRs has been a key focus area in GPCR biology to understand the basic mechanism of their activation and signaling and to materialize the long-standing dream of structure-based drug design on these versatile receptors. There has been tremendous effort at this front in the past two decades and it has culminated into crystal structures of 27 different receptors so far. The recent progress in crystallization and structure determination of GPCRs has been driven by innovation and cutting-edge developments at every step involved in the process of crystallization. Here, we present a step-by-step description of various steps involved in GPCR crystallization starting from recombinant expression to obtaining diffracting crystals. We also discuss the next frontiers in GPCR biology that are likely to be a primary focus for crystallography efforts in the next decade or so. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Constitutively active IRF7/IRF3 fusion protein completely protects swine against Foot-and-Mouth Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) remains one of the most devastating livestock diseases around the world. Several serotype specific vaccine formulations exist but require about 5-7 days to induce protective immunity. Our previous studies have shown that a constitutively active fusion protein of porcine ...

  19. 20 CFR 667.220 - What Workforce Investment Act title I functions and activities constitute the costs of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... non-personnel and both direct and indirect. (b) The costs of administration are the costs associated... functions and activities constitute the costs of administration subject to the administrative cost limit... LABOR ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Administrative Rules...

  20. Constitutive overexpressed type I interferon induced downregulation of antiviral activity in medaka fish (Oryzias latipes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maekawa, Shun; Aoki, Takashi; Wang, Han-Ching

    2017-03-01

    In fish, as well as vertebrates, type I interferons (IFNs) are important cytokines that help to provide innate, antiviral immunity. Although low amounts of IFN are constitutively secreted under normal physiological conditions, long-term and excessive IFN stimulation leads to reduced sensitivity to the IFN signal. This provides a negative feedback mechanism that prevents inappropriate responses and autoimmunity. At present, however, neither IFN desensitization nor the normal physiological role of constitutive IFN are well characterized in fish. The objective here was therefore to produce and characterize a transgenic medaka fish (Oryzias latipes), designated IFNd-Tg, that constitutively overexpressed the IFNd gene. A dual promoter expression vector was constructed for overexpression of IFNd under an EF1α promoter and a DsRed reporter gene under control of a γF-crystaline promoter. The phenotype of the IFNd-Tg fish had a lower response to poly(I:C) and increased susceptibility to nervous necrosis virus (NNV) infection compared to wild-type (WT). Furthermore, transduction of IFN signals for STAT1b, STAT2 and IRF9 were down-regulated in the IFNd-Tg fish, and expression levels of RLR signal molecules (MDA5, MITA, IRF1 and IRF3) were lower than in WT. The constitutive overexpression of IFNd resulted in desensitization of IFN-stimulation, apparently due to downregulation of IFN signal transduction, and this caused increased susceptibility to NNV. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling via heterotrimeric G proteins from endosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsvetanova, Nikoleta G; Irannejad, Roshanak; von Zastrow, Mark

    2015-03-13

    Some G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), in addition to activating heterotrimeric G proteins in the plasma membrane, appear to elicit a "second wave" of G protein activation after ligand-induced internalization. We briefly summarize evidence supporting this view and then discuss what is presently known about the functional significance of GPCR-G protein activation in endosomes. Endosomal activation can shape the cellular response temporally by prolonging its overall duration, and may shape the response spatially by moving the location of intracellular second messenger production relative to effectors. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. A new approach for studying GPCR dimers: drug-induced inactivation and reactivation to reveal GPCR dimer function in vitro, in primary culture, and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teitler, Milt; Klein, Michael T.

    2011-01-01

    GPCRs are a major family of homologous proteins and are key mediators of the effects of numerous endogenous neurotransmitters, hormones, cytokines, therapeutic drugs, and drugs-of-abuse. Despite the enormous amount of research on the pharmacological and biochemical properties of GPCRs, the question as to whether they exist as monomers, dimers, or higher order structures in the body is unanswered. The GPCR dimer field has been dominated by techniques involving recombinant cell lines expressing mutant receptors, often involving the solubilization of the receptors. These techniques cannot be applied in vivo or even to primary cell cultures. This review will focus on a novel approach to exploring the functional properties of homodimers. Studies of the 5-HT7 and 5-HT2A serotonin receptors have revealed that binding of a pseudo-irreversible antagonist (“inactivator”) to one of the orthosteric sites of a homodimer abolishes all receptor activity, and subsequent binding of a competitive antagonist to the orthosteric site of the second protomer releases the inactivator, allowing the receptor to return to an active state. This approach demonstrates allosteric crosstalk between protomers of native GPCR homodimers, indicating that GPCRs do exist and function as homodimers in both recombinant cells and rat primary astrocytes. This technique can be applied universally using intact recombinant or primary cells in culture, membrane homogenate preparations and, potentially, in vivo. The data obtained using the 5-HT7 and 5-HT2A receptors are strongly supportive of a GPCR homodimer structure, with little evidence of monomer involvement in the function of these receptors. PMID:22119169

  3. Constitutive β-catenin activation in osteoblasts impairs terminal osteoblast differentiation and bone quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bao, Quanwei; Chen, Sixu; Qin, Hao; Feng, Jianquan; Liu, Huayu; Liu, Daocheng; Li, Ang; Shen, Yue; Zhong, Xiaozheng; Li, Junfeng; Zong, Zhaowen

    2017-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that Wnt/β-catenin signaling plays a central role in controlling bone mass. We previously reported that constitutive activation of β-catenin (CA-β-catenin) in osteoblasts potentially has side effects on the bone growth and bone remodeling process, although it could increase bone mass. The present study aimed to observe the effects of osteoblastic CA-β-catenin on bone quality and to investigate possible mechanisms of these effects. It was found that CA-β-catenin mice exhibited lower mineralization levels and disorganized collagen in long bones as confirmed by von Kossa staining and sirius red staining, respectively. Also, bone strength decreased significantly in CA-β-catenin mice. Then the effect of CA-β-catenin on biological functions of osteoblasts were investigated and it was found that the expression levels of osteocalcin, a marker for the late differentiation of osteoblasts, decreased in CA-β-catenin mice, while the expression levels of osterix and alkaline phosphatase, two markers for the early differentiation of osteoblasts, increased in CA-β-catenin mice. Furthermore, higher proliferation rate were revealed in osteoblasts that were isolated from CA-β-catenin mice. The Real-time PCR and western blot examination found that the expression level of c-myc and cyclin D1, two G1 progression-related molecules, increased in osteoblasts that were isolated from the CA-β-catenin mice, and the expression levels of CDK14 and cyclin Y, two mitotic-related molecules that can accelerate cells entering into S and G2/M phases, increased in osteoblasts that were isolated from the CA-β-catenin mice. In summary, osteoblastic CA-β-catenin kept osteoblasts in high proliferative state and impaired the terminal osteoblast differentiation, and this led to changed bone structure and decreased bone strength. - Highlights: • Wnt/β-catenin signaling plays a central role in controlling bone mass. • CA-β-catenin has side effects on the bone

  4. Authoritarian Constitutionalism

    OpenAIRE

    Tushnet, Mark V.

    2015-01-01

    Legal scholars and political theorists interested in constitutionalism as a normative concept tend to dichotomize the subject. There is liberal constitutionalism of the sort familiar in the modern West, with core commitments to human rights and self-governance implemented by means of varying institutional devices, and there is authoritarianism, rejecting human rights entirely and governed by unconstrained power-holders. This Article explores the possibility of forms of constitutionalism other...

  5. Constitutive activation of the thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR by mutating Ile691 in the cytoplasmic tail segment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Autosomal dominant non-autoimmune hyperthyroidism (ADNAH is a rare genetic disorder of the endocrine system. Molecular genetic studies in ADNAH have revealed heterozygous germline mutations in the TSHR. To data, mutations leading to an increase in the constitutive activation of the TSHR have been described in the transmembrane segments, exoloops and cytoplasmic loop of TSHR. These mutations result in constitutive activation of the G(αs/cAMP or G(αq/11/inositol phosphate (IP pathways, which stimulate thyroid hormone production and thyroid proliferation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In a previous study, we reported a new TSHR mutation located in the C-terminal domain of TSHR, which results in a substitution of the conserved Ile(691 for Phe. In this study, to address the question of whether the I691F mutated receptor could be responsible for G(αs/cAMP or G(αq/11/IP constitutive activity, wild-type and TSHR mutants were expressed in COS-7 cells to determine cAMP constitutive activity and IP formation. Compared to the cell surface with expression of the A623V mutated receptor as positive control, the I691F mutated receptor showed a slight increase of cAMP accumulation. Furthermore, I691F resulted in constitutive activation of the G(αq/11/IP signaling pathway. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results indicate that Ile(691 not only contributes to keeping TSHR inactive in the G(αs/cAMP pathways but also in the G(αq/11/IP cascade.

  6. Seven perspectives on GPCR H/D-exchange proteomics methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xi

    2017-01-01

    Recent research shows surging interest to visualize human G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) dynamic structures using the bottom-up H/D-exchange (HDX) proteomics technology. This opinion article clarifies critical technical nuances and logical thinking behind the GPCR HDX proteomics method, to help scientists overcome cross-discipline pitfalls, and understand and reproduce the protocol at high quality. The 2010 89% HDX structural coverage of GPCR was achieved with both structural and analytical rigor. This article emphasizes systematically considering membrane protein structure stability and compatibility with chromatography and mass spectrometry (MS) throughout the pipeline, including the effects of metal ions, zero-detergent shock, and freeze-thaws on HDX result rigor. This article proposes to view bottom-up HDX as two steps to guide choices of detergent buffers and chromatography settings: (I) protein HDX labeling in native buffers, and (II) peptide-centric analysis of HDX labels, which applies (a) bottom-up MS/MS to construct peptide matrix and (b) HDX MS to locate and quantify H/D labels. The detergent-low-TCEP digestion method demystified the challenge of HDX-grade GPCR digestion. GPCR HDX proteomics is a structural approach, thus its choice of experimental conditions should let structure lead and digestion follow, not the opposite.

  7. GLIDA: GPCR-ligand database for chemical genomic drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuno, Yasushi; Yang, Jiyoon; Taneishi, Kei; Yabuuchi, Hiroaki; Tsujimoto, Gozoh

    2006-01-01

    G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) represent one of the most important families of drug targets in pharmaceutical development. GPCR-LIgand DAtabase (GLIDA) is a novel public GPCR-related chemical genomic database that is primarily focused on the correlation of information between GPCRs and their ligands. It provides correlation data between GPCRs and their ligands, along with chemical information on the ligands, as well as access information to the various web databases regarding GPCRs. These data are connected with each other in a relational database, allowing users in the field of GPCR-related drug discovery to easily retrieve such information from either biological or chemical starting points. GLIDA includes structure similarity search functions for the GPCRs and for their ligands. Thus, GLIDA can provide correlation maps linking the searched homologous GPCRs (or ligands) with their ligands (or GPCRs). By analyzing the correlation patterns between GPCRs and ligands, we can gain more detailed knowledge about their interactions and improve drug design efforts by focusing on inferred candidates for GPCR-specific drugs. GLIDA is publicly available at http://gdds.pharm.kyoto-u.ac.jp:8081/glida. We hope that it will prove very useful for chemical genomic research and GPCR-related drug discovery.

  8. Use of Intraductal Adenovins Transduction to Assess the Mammary Tumorigenic Potential of a Constitutively Active Prolactin Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-10-01

    appeared to be secreted normally judging from the immunocytochemical localization of the milk fat globule protein, xanthine oxidase and the presence of... Active Prolactin Receptor PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Margaret C. Neville, Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: University of Colorado-HSC Denver, Colorado 80262...Constitutively Active Prolactin Receptor 6. AUTHOR(S) Margaret C. Neville, Ph.D. 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION

  9. Structure versus function-The impact of computational methods on the discovery of specific GPCR-ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermudez, Marcel; Wolber, Gerhard

    2015-07-15

    Over the past decades, computational methods have become invaluable for drug design campaigns but also as auxiliary tool for structural biology. The combination of experimental and in silico methods in the field of G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) is indispensable. Despite recent groundbreaking achievements in GPCR crystallography, structural information for the vast majority of this physiologically important protein class is only accessible through homology models. Since the understanding of the conformational changes resulting in multiple activation pathways is incomplete, the design of specific GPCR modulating drugs remains a major challenge. However, due to the highly interdisciplinary requirements for the investigation of receptor function and the necessity of joining scientist from different fields, computational approaches gain importance in rationalizing and illustrating certain specific effects. In silico methods, such as molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, pharmacophore modeling or docking, proved to be suitable to complement experimental approaches. In this review, we highlight recent examples of in silico studies that were successfully applied in the field of GPCR research. Those approaches follow two main goals: Firstly, structural investigations that help to understand the receptor function and the characterization of ligand binding and secondly the identification of novel GPCR modulators as potential drugs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Specific inhibition of GPCR-independent G protein signaling by a rationally engineered protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyme, Anthony; Marivin, Arthur; Maziarz, Marcin; DiGiacomo, Vincent; Papakonstantinou, Maria P; Patel, Prachi P; Blanco-Canosa, Juan B; Walawalkar, Isha A; Rodriguez-Davila, Gonzalo; Dominguez, Isabel; Garcia-Marcos, Mikel

    2017-11-28

    Activation of heterotrimeric G proteins by cytoplasmic nonreceptor proteins is an alternative to the classical mechanism via G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). A subset of nonreceptor G protein activators is characterized by a conserved sequence named the Gα-binding and activating (GBA) motif, which confers guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) activity in vitro and promotes G protein-dependent signaling in cells. GBA proteins have important roles in physiology and disease but remain greatly understudied. This is due, in part, to the lack of efficient tools that specifically disrupt GBA motif function in the context of the large multifunctional proteins in which they are embedded. This hindrance to the study of alternative mechanisms of G protein activation contrasts with the wealth of convenient chemical and genetic tools to manipulate GPCR-dependent activation. Here, we describe the rational design and implementation of a genetically encoded protein that specifically inhibits GBA motifs: GBA inhibitor (GBAi). GBAi was engineered by introducing modifications in Gαi that preclude coupling to every known major binding partner [GPCRs, Gβγ, effectors, guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitors (GDIs), GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs), or the chaperone/GEF Ric-8A], while favoring high-affinity binding to all known GBA motifs. We demonstrate that GBAi does not interfere with canonical GPCR-G protein signaling but blocks GBA-dependent signaling in cancer cells. Furthermore, by implementing GBAi in vivo, we show that GBA-dependent signaling modulates phenotypes during Xenopus laevis embryonic development. In summary, GBAi is a selective, efficient, and convenient tool to dissect the biological processes controlled by a GPCR-independent mechanism of G protein activation mediated by cytoplasmic factors.

  11. Trends in GPCR drug discovery: new agents, targets and indications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauser, Alexander Sebastian; Gloriam, David E.; Attwood, Misty M.

    2017-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the most intensively studied drug targets, mostly due to their substantial involvement in human pathophysiology and their pharmacological tractability. Here, we report an up-to-date analysis of all GPCR drugs and agents in clinical trials, which reveals...... current trends across molecule types, drug targets and therapeutic indications, including showing that 475 drugs (~34% of all drugs approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)) act at 108 unique GPCRs. Approximately 321 agents are currently in clinical trials, of which ~20% target 66 potentially...... novel GPCR targets without an approved drug, and the number of biological drugs, allosteric modulators and biased agonists has increased. The major disease indications for GPCR modulators show a shift towards diabetes, obesity and Alzheimer disease, although several central nervous system disorders...

  12. GPCR Signaling and Trafficking: The Long and Short of It.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlos, Nathan J; Friedman, Peter A

    2017-03-01

    Emerging findings disclose unexpected components of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling and cell biology. Select GPCRs exhibit classical signaling, that is restricted to cell membranes, as well as newly described persistent signaling that depends on internalization of the GPCR bound to β-arrestins. Termination of non-canonical endosomal signaling requires intraluminal acidification and sophisticated protein trafficking machineries. Recent studies reveal the structural determinants of the trafficking chaperones. This review summarizes advances in GPCR signaling and trafficking with a focus on the parathyroid hormone receptor (PTHR) as a prototype, and on the actin-sorting nexin 27 (SNX27)-retromer tubule (ASRT) complex, an endosomal sorting hub responsible for recycling and preservation of cell surface receptors. The findings are integrated into a model of PTHR trafficking with implications for signal transduction, bone growth, and mineral ion metabolism. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Overexpression of PMA1 enhances tolerance to various types of stress and constitutively activates the SAPK pathways in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yeji; Nasution, Olviyani; Lee, Young Mi; Kim, Eunjung; Choi, Wonja; Kim, Wankee

    2017-01-01

    PMA1 encodes a transmembrane polypeptide that functions to pump protons out of the cell. Ectopic PMA1 overexpression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae enhances tolerance to weak acids, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and ethanol, and changes the following physiological properties: better proton efflux, lower membrane permeability, and lessened internal hydrogen peroxide production. The enhanced stress tolerance was dependent on the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) Hog1 of the high osmolarity glycerol (HOG) pathway, but not the MAPK Slt2 of the cell wall integrity (CWI) pathway; however, a PMA1 overexpression constitutively activated both Hog1 and Slt2. The constitutive Hog1 activation required the MAPK kinase kinase (MAP3K) Ssk2 of the HOG pathway, but not Ste11 and Ssk22, two other MAP3Ks of the same pathway. The constitutive Slt2 activation did not require Rom2 and the membrane sensors of the CWI pathway, whereas Bck1 was indispensable. The PMA1 overexpression activated the stress response element but not the cyclic AMP response element and the Rlm1 transcription factor. PMA1 overexpression may facilitate the construction of industrial strains with simultaneous tolerance to weak acids, ROS, and ethanol.

  14. Constitutively active Notch1 converts cranial neural crest-derived frontonasal mesenchyme to perivascular cells in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie R. Miller

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Perivascular/mural cells originate from either the mesoderm or the cranial neural crest. Regardless of their origin, Notch signalling is necessary for their formation. Furthermore, in both chicken and mouse, constitutive Notch1 activation (via expression of the Notch1 intracellular domain is sufficient in vivo to convert trunk mesoderm-derived somite cells to perivascular cells, at the expense of skeletal muscle. In experiments originally designed to investigate the effect of premature Notch1 activation on the development of neural crest-derived olfactory ensheathing glial cells (OECs, we used in ovo electroporation to insert a tetracycline-inducible NotchΔE construct (encoding a constitutively active mutant of mouse Notch1 into the genome of chicken cranial neural crest cell precursors, and activated NotchΔE expression by doxycycline injection at embryonic day 4. NotchΔE-targeted cells formed perivascular cells within the frontonasal mesenchyme, and expressed a perivascular marker on the olfactory nerve. Hence, constitutively activating Notch1 is sufficient in vivo to drive not only somite cells, but also neural crest-derived frontonasal mesenchyme and perhaps developing OECs, to a perivascular cell fate. These results also highlight the plasticity of neural crest-derived mesenchyme and glia.

  15. Recombinant Nox4 cytosolic domain produced by a cell or cell-free base systems exhibits constitutive diaphorase activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Minh Vu Chuong, E-mail: mvchuong@yahoo.fr [GREPI AGIM FRE 3405 CNRS-UJF, Universite Joseph Fourier, Grenoble (France); Zhang, Leilei [GREPI AGIM FRE 3405 CNRS-UJF, Universite Joseph Fourier, Grenoble (France); Lhomme, Stanislas; Mouz, Nicolas [PX' Therapeutics, MINATEC/Batiment de Haute Technologie, Grenoble (France); Lenormand, Jean-Luc [HumProTher Laboratory, TheReX/TIMC-IMAG UMR 5525 CNRS UJF, Universite Joseph Fourier, UFR de Medecine, Domaine de la Merci, 38706 La Tronche (France); Lardy, Bernard; Morel, Francoise [GREPI AGIM FRE 3405 CNRS-UJF, Universite Joseph Fourier, Grenoble (France)

    2012-03-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A comparison of two bacterial cell and cell-free protein expression systems is presented. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Soluble and active truncated Nox4 proteins are produced. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nox4 has a constitutive diaphorase activity which is independent of cytosolic factors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Isoform Nox4B is unable to initiate the first electronic transfer step. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Findings contribute to the understanding of the mechanism of Nox4 oxidase activity. -- Abstract: The membrane protein NADPH (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate) oxidase Nox4 constitutively generates reactive oxygen species differing from other NADPH oxidases activity, particularly in Nox2 which needs a stimulus to be active. Although the precise mechanism of production of reactive oxygen species by Nox2 is well characterized, the electronic transfer throughout Nox4 remains unclear. Our study aims to investigate the initial electronic transfer step (diaphorase activity) of the cytosolic tail of Nox4. For this purpose, we developed two different approaches to produce soluble and active truncated Nox4 proteins. We synthesized soluble recombinant proteins either by in vitro translation or by bacteria induction. While proteins obtained by bacteria induction demonstrate an activity of 4.4 {+-} 1.7 nmol/min/nmol when measured against iodonitro tetrazolium chloride and 20.5 {+-} 2.8 nmol/min/nmol with cytochrome c, the soluble proteins produced by cell-free expression system exhibit a diaphorase activity with a turn-over of 26 {+-} 2.6 nmol/min/nmol when measured against iodonitro tetrazolium chloride and 48 {+-} 20.2 nmol/min/nmol with cytochrome c. Furthermore, the activity of the soluble proteins is constitutive and does not need any stimulus. We also show that the cytosolic tail of the isoform Nox4B lacking the first NADPH binding site is unable to demonstrate any diaphorase activity pointing out the

  16. Role of spatial inhomogenity in GPCR dimerisation predicted by receptor association-diffusion models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Sneha A.; Pawar, Aiswarya B.; Dighe, Anish; Athale, Chaitanya A.; Sengupta, Durba

    2017-06-01

    G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) association is an emerging paradigm with far reaching implications in the regulation of signalling pathways and therapeutic interventions. Recent super resolution microscopy studies have revealed that receptor dimer steady state exhibits sub-second dynamics. In particular the GPCRs, muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M1 (M1MR) and formyl peptide receptor (FPR), have been demonstrated to exhibit a fast association/dissociation kinetics, independent of ligand binding. In this work, we have developed a spatial kinetic Monte Carlo model to investigate receptor homo-dimerisation at a single receptor resolution. Experimentally measured association/dissociation kinetic parameters and diffusion coefficients were used as inputs to the model. To test the effect of membrane spatial heterogeneity on the simulated steady state, simulations were compared to experimental statistics of dimerisation. In the simplest case the receptors are assumed to be diffusing in a spatially homogeneous environment, while spatial heterogeneity is modelled to result from crowding, membrane micro-domains and cytoskeletal compartmentalisation or ‘corrals’. We show that a simple association-diffusion model is sufficient to reproduce M1MR association statistics, but fails to reproduce FPR statistics despite comparable kinetic constants. A parameter sensitivity analysis is required to reproduce the association statistics of FPR. The model reveals the complex interplay between cytoskeletal components and their influence on receptor association kinetics within the features of the membrane landscape. These results constitute an important step towards understanding the factors modulating GPCR organisation.

  17. Platforms for the identification of GPCR targets, and of orthosteric and allosteric modulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Rafael; Canela, Enric I; Casado, Vicent; Ferre, Sergi

    2010-04-01

    The review provides a summary of old and new approaches for GPCR target identification and for the screening of molecules acting on GPCR targets. The new findings in the field are presented as well as an opinion about how these developments may help GPCR drug discovery. Importance in the field: GPCRs have been the most useful family of proteins in terms of targets for drug discovery. The expectations for GPCR target identification and discovery of new drugs acting on 'old' or 'new' GPCR targets are very high. Given the fact that the pace at which new 'GPCR drugs' appear in the market is decreasing and since the new developments in the field are not being translated into drug discovery there is a need to review the field from a critical perspective. To overcome the limitation of the old approaches used in GPCR target identification and drugs discovery new approaches are required. In particular successful approaches in GPCR drug discovery should take into account that the real GPCR targets for a given disease are not GPCR monomers but GPCR heteromers. The reader will gain an overview of the strategies currently used and their pros and cons. The reader will also understand that new strategies may help in accelerating the access of GPCR into the market, and also notice that successful strategies should take advantage of the new findings in the field of GPCRs.

  18. CONSTITUTION AND CONSTITUTIONALISM CONTEMPORARY ISSUE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius ANDREESCU

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In a democratic society, the judicial legitimacy of the state and its power, of its institutions, but also the social and political grounds are generated and determined by the Constitution, defined as expressively as possible as being: “The fundamental political and judicial settlement of a people” (I. Deleanu. The supremacy of the Constitution has as main effect the conformity of the entire system of law with the constitutional norms. Guaranteeing the compliance with this principle, essential for the state of law, is first of all an attribution of the Constitutional Court, but also an obligation of the legislative power to receive, through the adopted normative acts, in content and in form, the constitutional norms. Altering the fundamental law of a state represents a political and judicial act extremely complex with major meanings and implications for the socio-political and national systems, but also for each individual. This is why such measure should be very well justified, to answer certain socio-political and legal needs well shaped and mainly to match the principles and rules specific to a democratic constitutional and state system, by insuring its stability and functionality. These are a few aspects of the Romanian contemporary constitutionalism that this study shall critically analyse in order to differentiate between the constitutional ideal and reality.

  19. Constitutive Activation of Transforming Growth Factor Beta Receptor 1 in the Mouse Uterus Impairs Uterine Morphology and Function1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yang; Duran, Samantha; Lydon, John P.; DeMayo, Francesco J.; Burghardt, Robert C.; Bayless, Kayla J.; Bartholin, Laurent; Li, Qinglei

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Despite increasing evidence pointing to the essential involvement of the transforming growth factor beta (TGFB) superfamily in reproduction, a definitive role of TGFB signaling in the uterus remains to be unveiled. In this study, we generated a gain-of-function mouse model harboring a constitutively active (CA) TGFB receptor 1 (TGFBR1), the expression of which was conditionally induced by the progesterone receptor (Pgr)-Cre recombinase. Overactivation of TGFB signaling was verified by enhanced phosphorylation of SMAD2 and increased expression of TGFB target genes in the uterus. TGFBR1 Pgr-Cre CA mice were sterile. Histological, cellular, and molecular analyses demonstrated that constitutive activation of TGFBR1 in the mouse uterus promoted formation of hypermuscled uteri. Accompanying this phenotype was the upregulation of a battery of smooth muscle genes in the uterus. Furthermore, TGFB ligands activated SMAD2/3 and stimulated the expression of a smooth muscle maker gene, alpha smooth muscle actin (ACTA2), in human uterine smooth muscle cells. Immunofluorescence microscopy identified a marked reduction of uterine glands in TGFBR1 Pgr-Cre CA mice within the endometrial compartment that contained myofibroblast-like cells. Thus, constitutive activation of TGFBR1 in the mouse uterus caused defects in uterine morphology and function, as evidenced by abnormal myometrial structure, dramatically reduced uterine glands, and impaired uterine decidualization. These results underscore the importance of a precisely controlled TGFB signaling system in establishing a uterine microenvironment conducive to normal development and function. PMID:25505200

  20. Gia/Mthl5 is an aorta specific GPCR required for Drosophila heart tube morphology and normal pericardial cell positioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Meghna V; Zhu, Jun-Yi; Jiang, Zhiping; Richman, Adam; VanBerkum, Mark F A; Han, Zhe

    2016-06-01

    G-protein signaling is known to be required for cell-cell contacts during the development of the Drosophila dorsal vessel. However, the identity of the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that regulates this signaling pathway activity is unknown. Here we describe the identification of a novel cardiac specific GPCR, called Gia, for "GPCR in aorta". Gia is the only heart-specific GPCR identified in Drosophila to date and it is specifically expressed in cardioblasts that fuse at the dorsal midline to become the aorta. Gia is the only Drosophila gene so far identified for which expression is entirely restricted to cells of the aorta. Deletion of Gia led to a broken-hearted phenotype, characterized by pericardial cells dissociated from cardioblasts and abnormal distribution of cell junction proteins. Both phenotypes were similar to those observed in mutants of the heterotrimeric cardiac G proteins. Lack of Gia also led to defects in the alignment and fusion of cardioblasts in the aorta. Gia forms a protein complex with G-αo47A, the alpha subunit of the heterotrimeric cardiac G proteins and interacts genetically with G-αo47A during cardiac morphogenesis. Our study identified Gia as an essential aorta-specific GPCR that functions upstream of cardiac heterotrimeric G proteins and is required for morphological integrity of the aorta during heart tube formation. These studies lead to a redefinition of the bro phenotype, to encompass morphological integrity of the heart tube as well as cardioblast-pericardial cell spatial interactions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Growth hormone (GH)-independent dimerization of GH receptor by a leucine zipper results in constitutive activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behncken, S N; Billestrup, Nils; Brown, R

    2000-01-01

    Growth hormone initiates signaling by inducing homodimerization of two GH receptors. Here, we have sought to determine whether constitutively active receptor can be created in the absence of the extracellular domain by substituting it with high affinity leucine zippers to create dimers of the gro......Growth hormone initiates signaling by inducing homodimerization of two GH receptors. Here, we have sought to determine whether constitutively active receptor can be created in the absence of the extracellular domain by substituting it with high affinity leucine zippers to create dimers...... of the growth hormone receptor (GHR) signaling domain. The entire extracellular domain of the GHR was replaced by the hemagglutinin-tagged zipper sequence of either the c-Fos or c-Jun transcription factor (termed Fos-GHR and Jun-GHR, respectively). Transient transfection of Fos-GHR or Jun-GHR resulted...

  2. Production of monoclonal antibodies against GPCR using cell-free synthesized GPCR antigen and biotinylated liposome-based interaction assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Hiroyuki; Ogasawara, Tomio; Ozawa, Tatsuhiko; Muraguchi, Atsushi; Jih, Pei-Ju; Morishita, Ryo; Uchigashima, Motokazu; Watanabe, Masahiko; Fujimoto, Toyoshi; Iwasaki, Takahiro; Endo, Yaeta; Sawasaki, Tatsuya

    2015-06-10

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are one of the most important drug targets, and anti-GPCR monoclonal antibody (mAb) is an essential tool for functional analysis of GPCRs. However, it is very difficult to develop GPCR-specific mAbs due to difficulties in production of recombinant GPCR antigens, and lack of efficient mAb screening method. Here we describe a novel approach for the production of mAbs against GPCR using two original methods, bilayer-dialysis method and biotinylated liposome-based interaction assay (BiLIA), both of which are developed using wheat cell-free protein synthesis system and liposome technology. Using bilayer-dialysis method, various GPCRs were successfully synthesized with quality and quantity sufficient for immunization. For selection of specific mAb, we designed BiLIA that detects interaction between antibody and membrane protein on liposome. BiLIA prevented denaturation of GPCR, and then preferably selected conformation-sensitive antibodies. Using this approach, we successfully obtained mAbs against DRD1, GHSR, PTGER1 and T1R1. With respect to DRD1 mAb, 36 mouse mAbs and 6 rabbit mAbs were obtained which specifically recognized native DRD1 with high affinity. Among them, half of the mAbs were conformation-sensitive mAb, and two mAbs recognized extracellular loop 2 of DRD1. These results indicated that this approach is useful for GPCR mAb production.

  3. The role of opioid antagonist efficacy and constitutive opioid receptor activity in the opioid withdrawal syndrome in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Navani, Dipesh M.; Sirohi, Sunil; Madia, Priyanka A.; Yoburn, Byron C.

    2011-01-01

    On the basis of efficacy, opioid antagonists are classified as inverse opioid agonists (e.g. naltrexone) or neutral opioid antagonists (e.g. 6β-naltrexol). This study examined the interaction between naltrexone and 6β-naltrexol in the precipitated opioid withdrawal syndrome in morphine dependent mice. Furthermore, the possible contribution of constitutive opioid receptor activity to precipitated withdrawal was evaluated using increasing levels of morphine dependence. In the first experiment, ...

  4. The E92K melanocortin 1 receptor mutant induces cAMP production and arrestin recruitment but not ERK activity indicating biased constitutive signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benned-Jensen, Tau; Mokrosinski, Jacek; Rosenkilde, Mette M

    2011-01-01

    identified in melanic mice and several other species. This mutation induces a pronounced increase in MC1R constitutive activity suggesting a link between constitutive activity and melanism which is corroborated by the attenuation of a-melanocyte stimulating hormone (aMSH) induced activation. However...

  5. Enhanced constitutive invasion activity in human nontumorigenic keratinocytes exposed to a low level of barium for a long time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thang, Nguyen D; Yajima, Ichiro; Ohnuma, Shoko; Ohgami, Nobutaka; Kumasaka, Mayuko Y; Ichihara, Gaku; Kato, Masashi

    2015-02-01

    We have recently demonstrated that exposure to barium for a short time (≤4 days) and at a low level (5 µM = 687 µg/L) promotes invasion of human nontumorigenic HaCaT cells, which have characteristics similar to those of normal keratinocytes, suggesting that exposure to barium for a short time enhances malignant characteristics. Here we examined the effect of exposure to low level of barium for a long time, a condition mimicking the exposure to barium through well water, on malignant characteristics of HaCaT keratinocytes. Constitutive invasion activity, focal adhesion kinase (FAK) protein expression and activity, and matrix metalloproteinase 14 (MMP14) protein expression in primary cultured normal human epidermal keratinocytes, HaCaT keratinocytes, and HSC5 and A431 human squamous cell carcinoma cells were augmented following an increase in malignancy grade of the cells. Constitutive invasion activity, FAK phosphorylation, and MMP14 expression levels of HaCaT keratinocytes after treatment with 5 µM barium for 4 months were significantly higher than those of control untreated HaCaT keratinocytes. Taken together, our results suggest that exposure to a low level of barium for a long time enhances constitutive malignant characteristics of HaCaT keratinocytes via regulatory molecules (FAK and MMP14) for invasion. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Constitutive STAT3-activation in Sezary syndrome: tyrphostin AG490 inhibits STAT3-activation, interleukin-2 receptor expression and growth of leukemic Sezary cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, K W; Kaltoft, K; Mikkelsen, G

    2001-01-01

    kinase inhibitor, tyrphostine AG490, inhibits STAT3 activation, STAT3 DNA binding, and IL-2Ralpha mRNA and protein expression in parallel; and (4) tyrphostine AG490 inhibits IL-2 driven mitogenesis and triggers apoptosis in SS tumor cells. In conclusion, we provide the first example of a constitutive...... STAT3 activation in SS tumor cells. Moreover, our findings suggest that STAT3 activation might play an important role in the constitutive IL-2Ralpha expression, survival, and growth of malignant SS cells....

  7. A constitutively active Gαi3 protein corrects the abnormal retinal pigment epithelium phenotype of Oa1-/- mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra Young

    Full Text Available Ocular Albinism type 1 (OA1 is a disease caused by mutations in the OA1 gene and characterized by the presence of macromelanosomes in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE as well as abnormal crossing of the optic axons at the optic chiasm. We showed in our previous studies in mice that Oa1 activates specifically Gαi3 in its signaling pathway and thus, hypothesized that a constitutively active Gαi3 in the RPE of Oa1-/- mice might keep on the Oa1 signaling cascade and prevent the formation of macromelanosomes. To test this hypothesis, we have generated transgenic mice that carry the constitutively active Gαi3 (Q204L protein in the RPE of Oa1-/- mice and are now reporting the effects that the transgene produced on the Oa1-/- RPE phenotype.Transgenic mice carrying RPE-specific expression of the constitutively active Gαi3 (Q204L were generated by injecting fertilized eggs of Oa1-/- females with a lentivirus containing the Gαi3 (Q204L cDNA. PCR, Southern blots, Western blots and confocal microscopy were used to confirm the presence of the transgene in the RPE of positive transgenic mice. Morphometrical analyses were performed using electron microscopy to compare the size and number of melanosomes per RPE area in putative Oa1-/-, Gαi3 (Q204L transgenic mice with those of wild-type NCrl and Oa1-/- mice.We found a correlation between the presence of the constitutively active Gαi3 (Q204L transgene and the rescue of the normal phenotype of RPE melanosomes in Oa1-/-, Gαi3 (Q204L mice. These mice have higher density of melanosomes per RPE area and a larger number of small melanosomes than Oa1-/- mice, and their RPE phenotype is similar to that of wild-type mice.Our results show that a constitutively active Gαi3 protein can by-pass the lack of Oa1 protein in Oa1-/- mice and consequently rescue the RPE melanosomal phenotype.

  8. Inverse agonist activity of sarpogrelate, a selective 5-HT2A-receptor antagonist, at the constitutively active human 5-HT2A receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muntasir, Habib Abul; Bhuiyan, Mohiuddin Ahmed; Ishiguro, Masaji; Ozaki, Masanobu; Nagatomo, Takafumi

    2006-10-01

    Mutations producing constitutively active G-protein coupled receptors have been found in the pathophysiology of several diseases, implying that inverse agonists at the constitutively active receptors may have preferred therapeutic applications. Because of the involvement of 5-HT(2A) receptors in mediating many cardiovascular diseases, constitutively active mutants of the 5-HT(2A) receptor may be responsible for the disease states. Thus, the purpose of the present study was to investigate the inverse agonist activity of sarpogrelate, a selective 5-HT(2A)-receptor antagonist, and its active metabolite, M-1; and we compared their activities with those of other 5-HT(2A)-receptor antagonists such as ritanserin, ketanserin, and cyproheptadine. Using a constitutively active mutant (C322K) of the human 5-HT(2A) receptor, we demonstrated that like other 5-HT(2A)-receptor antagonists, sarpogrelate acts as a potent inverse agonist by significantly reducing basal inositol phosphate levels. However, there were no significant differences between sarpogrelate and other 5-HT(2A)-receptor antagonists for their inverse agonist activity. Compared with the wild type receptor, mutant receptor displayed significantly higher affinity for 5-HT and lower affinity for sarpogrelate. These results indicate that stabilization of the inactive conformation of the 5-HT(2A) receptor may be a key component of the mechanism of action of sarpogrelate.

  9. Constitutive Activation of the Fission Yeast Pheromone-Responsive Pathway Induces Ectopic Meiosis and Reveals Ste11 as a Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Target

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærulff, Søren; Lautrup-Larsen, I.; Truelsen, S.

    2005-01-01

    In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, meiosis normally takes place in diploid zygotes resulting from conjugation of haploid cells. In the present study, we report that the expression of a constitutively activated version of the pheromone-responsive mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase...

  10. High Content Analysis of Compositional Heterogeneities to Study GPCR Oligomerization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walsh, Samuel McEwen

    In this thesis I demonstrate how the natural compositional heterogeneities of synthetic and living cell model systems can be used to quantitate the mechanics of G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) oligomerization with Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET). The thesis is structured around three a...

  11. FLIPR assays of intracellular calcium in GPCR drug discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kasper Bø; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    2009-01-01

    Fluorescent dyes sensitive to changes in intracellular calcium have become increasingly popular in G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) drug discovery for several reasons. First of all, the assays using the dyes are easy to perform and are of low cost compared to other assays. Second, most non...

  12. Trends in GPCR drug discovery: new agents, targets and indications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, Alexander S; Attwood, Misty M; Rask-Andersen, Mathias; Schiöth, Helgi B; Gloriam, David E

    2017-12-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the most intensively studied drug targets, mostly due to their substantial involvement in human pathophysiology and their pharmacological tractability. Here, we report an up-to-date analysis of all GPCR drugs and agents in clinical trials, which reveals current trends across molecule types, drug targets and therapeutic indications, including showing that 475 drugs (~34% of all drugs approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)) act at 108 unique GPCRs. Approximately 321 agents are currently in clinical trials, of which ~20% target 66 potentially novel GPCR targets without an approved drug, and the number of biological drugs, allosteric modulators and biased agonists has increased. The major disease indications for GPCR modulators show a shift towards diabetes, obesity and Alzheimer disease, although several central nervous system disorders are also highly represented. The 224 (56%) non-olfactory GPCRs that have not yet been explored in clinical trials have broad untapped therapeutic potential, particularly in genetic and immune system disorders. Finally, we provide an interactive online resource to analyse and infer trends in GPCR drug discovery.

  13. GPCR-targeting nanobodies: attractive research tools, diagnostics, and therapeutics.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mujić-Delić, A.; de Wit, R.H.; Verkaar, F.; Smit, M.J.

    2014-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) represent a major therapeutic target class. A large proportion of marketed drugs exert their effect through modulation of GPCR function, and GPCRs have been successfully targeted with small molecules. Yet, the number of small new molecular entities targeting GPCRs

  14. Interaction Between Familial Transmission and a Constitutively Active Immune System Shapes Gut Microbiota inDrosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistry, Rupal; Kounatidis, Ilias; Ligoxygakis, Petros

    2017-06-01

    Resident gut bacteria are constantly influencing the immune system, yet the role of the immune system in shaping microbiota composition during an organism's life span has remained unclear. Experiments in mice have been inconclusive due to differences in husbandry schemes that led to conflicting results. We used Drosophila as a genetically tractable system with a simpler gut bacterial population structure streamlined genetic backgrounds and established cross schemes to address this issue. We found that, depending on their genetic background, young flies had microbiota of different diversities that converged with age to the same Acetobacteraceae-dominated pattern in healthy flies. This pattern was accelerated in immune-compromised flies with higher bacterial load and gut cell death. Nevertheless, immune-compromised flies resembled their genetic background, indicating that familial transmission was the main force regulating gut microbiota. In contrast, flies with a constitutively active immune system had microbiota readily distinguishable from their genetic background with the introduction and establishment of previously undetectable bacterial families. This indicated the influence of immunity over familial transmission. Moreover, hyperactive immunity and increased enterocyte death resulted in the highest bacterial load observed starting from early adulthood. Cohousing experiments showed that the microenvironment also played an important role in the structure of the microbiota where flies with constitutive immunity defined the gut microbiota of their cohabitants. Our data show that, in Drosophila , constitutively active immunity shapes the structure and density of gut microbiota. Copyright © 2017 Mistry et al.

  15. Development of hypomelanotic macules is associated with constitutive activated mTORC1 in tuberous sclerosis complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Lisbeth Birk; Schönewolf-Greulich, Bitten; Rosengren, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    of TSC1/2 form a complex which at energy limiting states, down-regulates the activity of the regulator of protein synthesis, the mammalian target of rapamycin complex1 (mTORC1). As expected, in contrast to cultured control fibroblasts, starvation of cultured patient fibroblasts obtained from...... a hypomelanotic macule did not lead to repression of mTORC1, whereas partial repression was observed in patient fibroblasts obtained from non-lesional skin. The findings indicate that the development of hypomelanotic macules is associated with constitutive activated mTORC1, whereas mild deregulation of mTORC1...

  16. Modulation of the constitutive activity of the ghrelin receptor by use of pharmacological tools and mutagenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mokrosinski, Jacek; Holst, Birgitte

    2010-01-01

    by substitutions in an aromatic cluster that keep TMs VI and VII in close proximity to TM III and thus stabilize the active conformation. Also, substitution of a Phe in TM V is crucial for the high basal activity of the receptor as this residue serves as a partner for Trp VI:13 in the active conformation...

  17. Using constitutive activity to define appropriate high-throughput screening assays for orphan g protein-coupled receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Tony; Coleman, James L J; Smith, Nicola J

    2015-01-01

    Orphan G protein-coupled receptors represent an underexploited resource for drug discovery but pose a considerable challenge for assay development because their cognate G protein signaling pathways are often unknown. In this methodological chapter, we describe the use of constitutive activity, that is, the inherent ability of receptors to couple to their cognate G proteins in the absence of ligand, to inform the development of high-throughput screening assays for a particular orphan receptor. We specifically focus on a two-step process, whereby constitutive G protein coupling is first determined using yeast Gpa1/human G protein chimeras linked to growth and β-galactosidase generation. Coupling selectivity is then confirmed in mammalian cells expressing endogenous G proteins and driving accumulation of transcription factor-fused luciferase reporters specific to each of the classes of G protein. Based on these findings, high-throughput screening campaigns can be performed on the already miniaturized mammalian reporter system.

  18. Differential phosphorylation-dependent regulation of constitutively active and muscarinic receptor-activated IK,ACh channels in patients with chronic atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, Niels; Friedrich, Adina; Bock, Manja; Wettwer, Erich; Christ, Torsten; Knaut, Michael; Strasser, Ruth H; Ravens, Ursula; Dobrev, Dobromir

    2007-06-01

    In chronic atrial fibrillation (cAF) the potassium current IK,ACh develops agonist-independent constitutive activity. We hypothesized that abnormal phosphorylation-dependent regulation underlies the constitutive IK,ACh activity. We used voltage-clamp technique and biochemical assays to study IK,ACh regulation in atrial appendages from 61 sinus rhythm (SR), 11 paroxysmal AF (pAF), and 33 cAF patients. Compared to SR basal current was higher in cAF only, whereas the muscarinic receptor (2 micromol/L carbachol)-activated IK,ACh was smaller in pAF and cAF. In pAF the selective IK,ACh blocker tertiapin abolished the muscarinic receptor-activated IK,ACh but excluded agonist-independent constitutive IK,ACh activity. Blockade of type-2A phosphatase and the subsequent shift to increased muscarinic receptor phosphorylation (and inactivation) reduced muscarinic receptor-activated IK,ACh in SR but not in cAF, pointing to an impaired function of G-protein-coupled receptor kinase. Using subtype-selective kinase inhibitors we found that in SR the muscarinic receptor-activated IK,ACh requires phosphorylation by protein kinase G (PKG), protein kinase C (PKC), and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), but not by protein kinase A (PKA). In cAF, constitutive IK,ACh activity results from abnormal channel phosphorylation by PKC but not by PKG or CaMKII, whereas the additional muscarinic receptor-mediated IK,ACh activation occurs apparently without involvement of these kinases. In cAF, the higher protein level of PKCepsilon but not PKCalpha, PKCbeta1 or PKCdelta is likely to contribute to the constitutive IK,ACh activity. The occurrence of constitutive IK,ACh activity in cAF results from abnormal PKC function, whereas the muscarinic receptor-mediated IK,ACh activation does not require the contribution of PKG, PKC or CaMKII. Selective drug targeting of constitutively active IK,ACh channels may be suitable to reduce the ability of AF to become sustained.

  19. Constitutive activation of transforming growth factor Beta receptor 1 in the mouse uterus impairs uterine morphology and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yang; Duran, Samantha; Lydon, John P; DeMayo, Francesco J; Burghardt, Robert C; Bayless, Kayla J; Bartholin, Laurent; Li, Qinglei

    2015-02-01

    Despite increasing evidence pointing to the essential involvement of the transforming growth factor beta (TGFB) superfamily in reproduction, a definitive role of TGFB signaling in the uterus remains to be unveiled. In this study, we generated a gain-of-function mouse model harboring a constitutively active (CA) TGFB receptor 1 (TGFBR1), the expression of which was conditionally induced by the progesterone receptor (Pgr)-Cre recombinase. Overactivation of TGFB signaling was verified by enhanced phosphorylation of SMAD2 and increased expression of TGFB target genes in the uterus. TGFBR1 Pgr-Cre CA mice were sterile. Histological, cellular, and molecular analyses demonstrated that constitutive activation of TGFBR1 in the mouse uterus promoted formation of hypermuscled uteri. Accompanying this phenotype was the upregulation of a battery of smooth muscle genes in the uterus. Furthermore, TGFB ligands activated SMAD2/3 and stimulated the expression of a smooth muscle maker gene, alpha smooth muscle actin (ACTA2), in human uterine smooth muscle cells. Immunofluorescence microscopy identified a marked reduction of uterine glands in TGFBR1 Pgr-Cre CA mice within the endometrial compartment that contained myofibroblast-like cells. Thus, constitutive activation of TGFBR1 in the mouse uterus caused defects in uterine morphology and function, as evidenced by abnormal myometrial structure, dramatically reduced uterine glands, and impaired uterine decidualization. These results underscore the importance of a precisely controlled TGFB signaling system in establishing a uterine microenvironment conducive to normal development and function. © 2015 by the Society for the Study of Reproduction, Inc.

  20. Identification of a type 1 diabetes-associated CD4 promoter haplotype with high constitutive activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, O P; Karlsen, A E; Larsen, Z M

    2004-01-01

    promoter activity and (2) the CD4-181G variant encodes higher stimulated promoter activity than the CD4-181C variant. This difference is in part neutralized in the frequently occurring CD4 promoter haplotypes by the more upstream genetic variants. Thus, we report functional impact of a novel CD4-181C/G SNP...

  1. Investigations on organic fungicides; V. Chemical constitution and fungistatic activity of aliphatic bisdithiocarbamates and isothiocyanates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klöpping, H.L.; Kerk, G.J.M. van der

    1951-01-01

    In this paper, the investigations on the relations of structure to antifungal activity of sulphur compounds described in the previous publication of this series are extended to bisdithiocarbamates and isothiocyanates. The most active sulphur fungicide described in the literature so far, disodium

  2. A highly prevalent equine glycogen storage disease is explained by constitutive activation of a mutant glycogen synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maile, C A; Hingst, J R; Mahalingan, K K; O'Reilly, A O; Cleasby, M E; Mickelson, J R; McCue, M E; Anderson, S M; Hurley, T D; Wojtaszewski, J F P; Piercy, R J

    2017-01-01

    Equine type 1 polysaccharide storage myopathy (PSSM1) is associated with a missense mutation (R309H) in the glycogen synthase (GYS1) gene, enhanced glycogen synthase (GS) activity and excessive glycogen and amylopectate inclusions in muscle. Equine muscle biochemical and recombinant enzyme kinetic assays in vitro and homology modelling in silico, were used to investigate the hypothesis that higher GS activity in affected horse muscle is caused by higher GS expression, dysregulation, or constitutive activation via a conformational change. PSSM1-affected horse muscle had significantly higher glycogen content than control horse muscle despite no difference in GS expression. GS activity was significantly higher in muscle from homozygous mutants than from heterozygote and control horses, in the absence and presence of the allosteric regulator, glucose 6 phosphate (G6P). Muscle from homozygous mutant horses also had significantly increased GS phosphorylation at sites 2+2a and significantly higher AMPKα1 (an upstream kinase) expression than controls, likely reflecting a physiological attempt to reduce GS enzyme activity. Recombinant mutant GS was highly active with a considerably lower K m for UDP-glucose, in the presence and absence of G6P, when compared to wild type GS, and despite its phosphorylation. Elevated activity of the mutant enzyme is associated with ineffective regulation via phosphorylation rendering it constitutively active. Modelling suggested that the mutation disrupts a salt bridge that normally stabilises the basal state, shifting the equilibrium to the enzyme's active state. This study explains the gain of function pathogenesis in this highly prevalent polyglucosan myopathy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Constitutively active Arabidopsis MAP Kinase 3 triggers defense responses involving salicylic acid and SUMM2 resistance protein

    KAUST Repository

    Genot, Baptiste

    2017-04-12

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) are important regulators of plant immunity. Most of the knowledge about the function of these pathways is derived from loss-of-function approaches. Using a gain-of-function approach, we investigated the responses controlled by a constitutively active (CA) MPK3 in Arabidopsis thaliana. CA-MPK3 plants are dwarfed and display a massive de-repression of defense genes associated with spontaneous cell death as well as accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), phytoalexins and the stress-related hormones ethylene and salicylic acid (SA). Remarkably CA-MPK3/sid2 and CA-MPK3/ein2-50 lines which are impaired in SA synthesis and ethylene signaling, respectively, retain most of the CA-MPK3-associated phenotypes, indicating that constitutive activity of MPK3 can bypass SA and ethylene signaling to activate defense responses. A comparative analysis of the molecular phenotypes of CA-MPK3 and mpk4 autoimmunity suggested convergence between the MPK3 and MPK4-guarding modules. In support of this model, CA-MPK3 crosses with summ1 and summ2, two known suppressors of mpk4, resulted in a partial reversion of the CA-MPK3 phenotypes. Overall, our data unravel a novel mechanism by which the MAPK signaling network contributes to a robust defense response system.

  4. Replication stress and oxidative damage contribute to aberrant constitutive activation of DNA damage signalling in human gliomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartkova, J; Hamerlik, P; Stockhausen, Marie

    2010-01-01

    damage signalling in low- and high-grade human gliomas, and analyze the sources of such endogenous genotoxic stress. Based on analyses of human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cell lines, normal astrocytes and clinical specimens from grade II astrocytomas (n=41) and grade IV GBM (n=60), we conclude...... that the DDR machinery is constitutively activated in gliomas, as documented by phosphorylated histone H2AX (gammaH2AX), activation of the ATM-Chk2-p53 pathway, 53BP1 foci and other markers. Oxidative DNA damage (8-oxoguanine) was high in some GBM cell lines and many GBM tumors, while it was low in normal...... brain and grade II astrocytomas, despite the degree of DDR activation was higher in grade II tumors. Markers indicative of ongoing DNA replication stress (Chk1 activation, Rad17 phosphorylation, replication protein A foci and single-stranded DNA) were present in GBM cells under high- or low...

  5. Evolution of the class C GPCR Venus flytrap modules involved positive selected functional divergence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jianhua; Huang, Siluo; Qian, Ji; Huang, Jinlin; Jin, Li; Su, Zhixi; Yang, Ji; Liu, Jianfeng

    2009-03-27

    Class C G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) represent a distinct group of the GPCR family, which structurally possess a characteristically distinct extracellular domain inclusive of the Venus flytrap module (VFTM). The VFTMs of the class C GPCRs is responsible for ligand recognition and binding, and share sequence similarity with bacterial periplasmic amino acid binding proteins (PBPs). An extensive phylogenetic investigation of the VFTMs was conducted by analyzing for functional divergence and testing for positive selection for five typical groups of the class C GPCRs. The altered selective constraints were determined to identify the sites that had undergone functional divergence via positive selection. In order to structurally demonstrate the pattern changes during the evolutionary process, three-dimensional (3D) structures of the GPCR VFTMs were modelled and reconstructed from ancestral VFTMs. Our results show that the altered selective constraints in the VFTMs of class C GPCRs are statistically significant. This implies that functional divergence played a key role in characterizing the functions of the VFTMs after gene duplication events. Meanwhile, positive selection is involved in the evolutionary process and drove the functional divergence of the VFTMs. Our results also reveal that three continuous duplication events occurred in order to shape the evolutionary topology of class C GPCRs. The five groups of the class C GPCRs have essentially different sites involved in functional divergence, which would have shaped the specific structures and functions of the VFTMs. Taken together, our results show that functional divergence involved positive selection and is partially responsible for the evolutionary patterns of the class C GPCR VFTMs. The sites involved in functional divergence will provide more clues and candidates for further research on structural-function relationships of these modules as well as shedding light on the activation mechanism of the class C

  6. Constitutive activation of CaMKKα signaling is sufficient but not necessary for mTORC1 activation and growth in mouse skeletal muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferey, Jeremie L. A.; Brault, Jeffrey J.; Smith, Cheryl A. S.

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal muscle loading/overload stimulates the Ca2+-activated, serine/threonine kinase Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase-α (CaMKKα); yet to date, no studies have examined whether CaMKKα regulates muscle growth. The purpose of this study was to determine if constitutive activation of CaMKKα signaling could stimulate muscle growth and if so whether CaMKKα is essential for this process. CaMKKα signaling was selectively activated in mouse muscle via expression of a constitutively active form of CaMKKα using in vivo electroporation. After 2 wk, constitutively active CaMKKα expression increased muscle weight (∼10%) and protein content (∼10%), demonstrating that activation of CaMKKα signaling can stimulate muscle growth. To determine if active CaMKKα expression stimulated muscle growth via increased mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling and protein synthesis, [3H]phenylalanine incorporation into proteins was assessed with or without the mTORC1 inhibitor rapamycin. Constitutively active CaMKKα increased protein synthesis ∼60%, and this increase was prevented by rapamycin, demonstrating a critical role for mTORC1 in this process. To determine if CaMKKα is essential for growth, muscles from CaMKKα knockout mice were stimulated to hypertrophy via unilateral ablation of synergist muscles (overload). Surprisingly, compared with wild-type mice, muscles from CaMKKα knockout mice exhibited greater growth (∼15%) and phosphorylation of the mTORC1 substrate 70-kDa ribosomal protein S6 kinase (Thr389; ∼50%), demonstrating that CaMKKα is not essential for overload-induced mTORC1 activation or muscle growth. Collectively, these results demonstrate that activation of CaMKKα signaling is sufficient but not necessary for activation of mTORC1 signaling and growth in mouse skeletal muscle. PMID:25159322

  7. Constitutively active signaling by the G protein βγ-subunit mediates intrinsically increased phosphodiesterase-4 activity in human asthmatic airway smooth muscle cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aihua Hu

    Full Text Available Signaling by the Gβγ subunit of Gi protein, leading to downstream c-Src-induced activation of the Ras/c-Raf1/MEK-ERK1/2 signaling pathway and its upregulation of phosphodiesterase-4 (PDE4 activity, was recently shown to mediate the heightened contractility in proasthmatic sensitized isolated airway smooth muscle (ASM, as well as allergen-induced airway hyperresponsiveness and inflammation in an in vivo animal model of allergic asthma. This study investigated whether cultured human ASM (HASM cells derived from asthmatic donor lungs exhibit constitutively increased PDE activity that is attributed to intrinsically upregulated Gβγ signaling coupled to c-Src activation of the Ras/MEK/ERK1/2 cascade. We show that, relative to normal cells, asthmatic HASM cells constitutively exhibit markedly increased intrinsic PDE4 activity coupled to heightened Gβγ-regulated phosphorylation of c-Src and ERK1/2, and direct co-localization of the latter with the PDE4D isoform. These signaling events and their induction of heightened PDE activity are acutely suppressed by treating asthmatic HASM cells with a Gβγ inhibitor. Importantly, along with increased Gβγ activation, asthmatic HASM cells also exhibit constitutively increased direct binding of the small Rap1 GTPase-activating protein, Rap1GAP, to the α-subunit of Gi protein, which serves to cooperatively facilitate Ras activation and, thereby, enable enhanced Gβγ-regulated ERK1/2-stimulated PDE activity. Collectively, these data are the first to identify that intrinsically increased signaling via the Gβγ subunit, facilitated by Rap1GAP recruitment to the α-subunit, mediates the constitutively increased PDE4 activity detected in asthmatic HASM cells. These new findings support the notion that interventions targeted at suppressing Gβγ signaling may lead to novel approaches to treat asthma.

  8. Inhibition of constitutive NF-κB activity induces platelet apoptosis via ER stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Manoj; Kemparaju, Kempaiah; Girish, Kesturu S

    2017-12-02

    Platelets are anucleate cells, known for their pivotal roles in hemostasis, inflammation, immunity, and disease progression. Being anuclear, platelets are known to express several transcriptional factors which exert nongenomic functions, including the positive and negative regulation of platelet activation. NF-κB is one such transcriptional factor involved in the regulation of genes for survival, proliferation, inflammation and immunity. Although, the role NF-κB in platelet activation and aggregation is partially known, its function in management of platelet survival and apoptosis remain unexplored. Therefore, two unrelated inhibitors of NF-κB activation, BAY 11-7082 and MLN4924 were used to determine the role of NF-κB in platelets. Inhibition of NF-κB caused decreased SERCA activity and increased cytosolic Ca 2+ level causing ER stress which was determined by the phosphorylation of eIF2-α. Further, there was increased BAX and decreased BCl-2 levels, incidence of mitochondrial membrane potential depolarization, release of cytochrome c into cytosol, caspase activation, PS externalization and cell death in BAY 11-7082 and MLN4924 treated platelets. The obtained results demonstrate the critical role played by NF-κB in Ca 2+ homeostasis and survival of platelets. In addition, the study demonstrates the potential side effects associated with NF-κB inhibitors employed during inflammation and cancer therapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Constitutive Activity of the Arabidopsis MAP Kinase 3 Confers Resistance to Pseudomonas syringae and Drives Robust Immune Responses

    KAUST Repository

    Lang, Julien

    2017-08-02

    Mitogen Activated Protein Kinases (MAPKs) are known to be important mediators of plant responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. In a recent report, we enlarged the understanding of the Arabidopsis thaliana MPK3 functions showing that the expression of a constitutively active (CA) form of the protein led to auto-immune phenotypes. CA-MPK3 plants are dwarf and display defense responses that are characterized by the accumulation of salicylic acid and phytoalexins as well as by the upregulation of several defense genes. Consistently with these data, we present here results demonstrating that, compared to wild type controls, CA-MPK3 plants are more resistant to the hemibiotrophic pathogen Pseudomonas syringae DC3000. Based on our previous work, we also discuss the mechanisms of robust plant immunity controlled by sustained MPK3 activity, focusing especially on the roles of disease resistance proteins.

  10. Rho A and the Rho kinase pathway regulate fibroblast contraction: Enhanced contraction in constitutively active Rho A fibroblast cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nobe, Koji, E-mail: kojinobe@pharm.showa-u.ac.jp [Department of Pharmacology, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Showa University, Tokyo (Japan); Nobe, Hiromi [Department of Pharmacology, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Showa University, Tokyo (Japan); Department of Physical Therapy, Bunkyo-Gakuin University (Japan); Yoshida, Hiroko [Department of Pharmacology, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Showa University, Tokyo (Japan); Kolodney, Michael S. [Dermatology Division, Department of Medicine, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Paul, Richard J. [Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Honda, Kazuo [Department of Pharmacology, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Showa University, Tokyo (Japan)

    2010-08-20

    Research highlights: {yields} Mechanisms of fibroblast cell contraction in collagen matrix. {yields} Assessed an isometric force development using 3D-reconstituted-fibroblast fiber. {yields} Constitutively active Rho A induced the over-contraction of fibroblast cells. {yields} Rho A and Rho kinase pathway has a central role in fibroblast cell contraction. -- Abstract: Fibroblast cells play a central role in the proliferation phase of wound healing processes, contributing to force development. The intracellular signaling pathways regulating this non-muscle contraction are only partially understood. To study the relations between Rho A and contractile responses, constitutively active Rho A (CA-Rho A) fibroblast cells were reconstituted into fibers and the effects of calf serum (CS) on isometric force were studied. CS-induced force in CA-Rho A fibroblast fibers was twice as large as that in wild type (NIH 3T3) fibroblast fibers. During this response, the translocation of Rho A from the cytosol to the membrane was detected by Rho A activity assays and Western blot analysis. Pre-treatment with a Rho specific inhibitor (C3-exoenzyme) suppressed translocation as well as contraction. These results indicate that Rho A activation is essential for fibroblast contraction. The Rho kinase inhibitor ( (Y27632)) inhibited both NIH 3T3 and CA-Rho A fibroblast fiber contractions. Activation of Rho A is thus directly coupled with Rho kinase activity. We conclude that the translocation of Rho A from the cytosol to the membrane and the Rho kinase pathway can regulate wound healing processes mediated by fibroblast contraction.

  11. Phosphatase activity of staphylococci is constitutive in some species and repressed by phosphates in others.

    OpenAIRE

    Soro, O; Grazi, G; Varaldo, P E; Satta, G

    1990-01-01

    The phosphatase activities of colonies of staphylococcal strains belonging to the 10 species most frequently isolated from specimens of human origin were evaluated on media with undetermined inorganic phosphate contents and on media supplemented with known amounts of phosphates. All strains of all species tested were phosphatase positive on plates that were not supplemented with inorganic phosphates when the pH of the medium was high. In media supplemented with 0.3% phosphates at low and high...

  12. Retinoblastoma pathway defects show differential ability to activate the constitutive DNA damage response in human tumorigenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tort, F.; Bartkova, J.; Sehested, M.

    2006-01-01

    culture models with differential defects of retinoblastoma pathway components, as overexpression of cyclin D1 or lack of p16(Ink4a), either alone or combined, did not elicit detectable DDR. In contrast, inactivation of pRb, the key component of the pathway, activated the DDR in cultured human or mouse...... with their hierarchical positions along the retinoblastoma pathway. Our data provide new insights into oncogene-evoked DDR in human tumorigenesis, with potential implications for individualized management of tumors with elevated cyclin D1 versus cyclin E, due to their distinct clinical variables and biological behavior....

  13. Cloning of a novel orphan G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR-2037): in situ hybridization reveals high mRNA expression in rat brain restricted to neurons of the habenular complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthold, M; Collin, M; Sejlitz, T; Meister, B; Lind, P

    2003-12-12

    The family of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is one of the largest protein families in the mammalian genome. Receptors belonging to this class mediate the effects of very diverse ligands and are responsible for signaling events by affecting the activities of enzymes and ion channels. Here we describe the cloning and identification of GPCR-2037, a novel and previously not identified member of the large family of GPCRs. This orphan GPCR displays several typical features of family A type of GPCRs and shows highest homology with the galanin receptors 2 and 3. In rat brain, in situ hybridization showed that expression of GPCR-2037 mRNA was exclusively localized to neurons of the habenular complex. The expression was particularly prominent in the medial habenular nucleus, whereas the lateral habenular nucleus exhibited a lower number of labeled cells. The restricted and unique expression pattern of GPCR-2037 in the rat brain suggests a role for this orphan GPCR in the habenular complex, a brain structure implicated in the modulation of various physiological functions. Further studies involving the identification of the GPCR ligand will enable the functional characterization of this orphan receptor and its role in regulating the habenular complex.

  14. Pharmacological profiling an abundantly expressed schistosome serotonergic GPCR identifies nuciferine as a potent antagonist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John D. Chan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT is a key regulator of muscle contraction in parasitic flatworms. In Schistosoma mansoni, the myoexcitatory action of 5-HT is effected through activation of a serotonergic GPCR (Sm.5HTRL, prioritizing pharmacological characterization of this target for anthelmintic drug discovery. Here, we have examined the effects of several aporphine alkaloids on the signaling activity of a heterologously expressed Sm.5HTRL construct using a cAMP biosensor assay. Four structurally related natural products – nuciferine, D-glaucine, boldine and bulbocapnine – were demonstrated to block Sm.5HTRL evoked cAMP generation with the potency of GPCR blockade correlating well with the ability of each drug to inhibit contractility of schistosomule larvae. Nuciferine was also effective at inhibiting both basal and 5-HT evoked motility of adult schistosomes. These data advance our understanding of structure-affinity relationships at Sm.5HTRL, and demonstrate the effectiveness of Sm.5HTRL antagonists as hypomotility-evoking drugs across different parasite life cycle stages.

  15. Micromechanical analysis of constitutive properties of active piezoelectric structural fiber (PSF) composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Kenny; Dai, Qingli

    2011-04-01

    Recent studies showed that the active piezoelectric structural fiber (PSF) composites may achieve significant and simultaneous improvements in sensing/actuating, stiffness, fracture toughness and vibration damping. These characteristics can be very important in the application of civil, mechanical and aerospace structures. The PSF is fabricated by coating the piezoceramic onto the silicon carbide core fiber with electrophoretic deposition (EPD) process to overcome the fragile nature of the monolithic piezoelectric materials. The PSF composite laminates are made of longitudinally poled PSFs that are unidirectionally deployed in the polymer binding matrix. The PSF laminate transducer has electrical inputs/outputs that are delivered through a separate etched interdigital electrode layer. This study analyzed the electromechanical properties with the generalized dilute scheme for active PSF composite laminate by considering multiinclusions. The well-known Mori-Tanaka approach was used to evaluate the concentration tensor in the multi-inclusion micromechanics model. To accurately predict the transverse properties, the extended role of mixtures were applied by considering the inclusions' geometry and shape. The micromechanical finite element modeling was also conducted with representative volume element (RVE) to compare with the micromechanics analysis on the electromechanical properties. The micromechanics analysis and finite element micromechanical modeling were conducted with varied fiber geometry dimensions and volume fractions. These comparison studies indicate the combined micromechanics models with the generalized dilute scheme can effectively predict the electro-elastic properties of multi-inclusion PSF composites.

  16. Abrogation of constitutive Stat3 activity circumvents cisplatin resistant ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Teng; Gong, Danni; Han, Zhiqiang; Wei, Xiao; Yan, Yuting; Ye, Fei; Ding, Wencheng; Wang, Junnai; Xia, Xi; Li, Fei; Hu, Wencheng; Lu, Yunping; Wang, Shixuan; Zhou, Jianfeng; Ma, Ding; Gao, Qinglei

    2013-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of Stat3 in cisplatin resistant ovarian cancer. It was first demonstrated that higher activated Stat3 was detected in cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer cell lines. To provide evidence that supported the hypothesis that phosphorylated-Stat3 expression may promote cisplatin resistance, ectopic Stat3 was expressed by IL-6 stimulation that partially abrogates Stat3, as opposed to the knock-down of Stat3 by specific siRNA that restores cisplatin sensitivity against ovarian cancer cells. This hypothesis was further confirmed by clinical tumor specimens of ovarian cancer obtained from patients with cisplatin-resistance. Based on these premises, Stattic, an effective small molecular inhibitor of Stat3, was used to inhibit Stat3 activation. The data presented here show that Stattic restored the sensitivity to cisplatin in chemoresistant ovarian cancer by significant reductions in the expression of the anti-apoptosis protein Bcl-2, Bcl-XL, Survivin protein and phosphorylated-Akt levels. Consistent with these observations, this experiment demonstrated the first evidence of Stattic circumvented cisplatin resistance of orthotopic xenograft ovarian cancer in vivo. Altogether, these findings emphasize the importance of Stat3 in cisplatin resistance in ovarian cancer and provide a further impetus to clinically evaluate biological modifiers that may circumvent cisplatin resistance in patients with chemoresistant ovarian cancer. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Modulation of the constitutive activity of the ghrelin receptor by use of pharmacological tools and mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokrosiński, Jacek; Holst, Birgitte

    2010-01-01

    Ghrelin and its receptor are important regulators of metabolic functions, including appetite, energy expenditure, fat accumulation, and growth hormone (GH) secretion. The ghrelin receptor is characterized by an ability to signal even without any ligand present with approximately 50% of the maximally ghrelin-induced efficacy-a feature that may have important physiological implications. The high basal signaling can be modulated either by administration of specific ligands or by engineering of mutations in the receptor structure. [D-Arg(1), D-Phe(5), D-Trp(7,9), Leu(11)]-substance P was the first inverse agonist to be identified for the ghrelin receptor, and this peptide has been used as a starting point for identification of the structural requirements for inverse agonist properties in the ligand. The receptor binding core motif was identified as D-Trp-Phe-D-Trp-Leu-Leu, and elongation of this peptide in the amino-terminal end determined the efficacy. Attachment of a positively charged amino acid was responsible for full inverse agonism, whereas an alanin converted the peptide into a partial agonist. Importantly, by use of mutational mapping of the residues critical for the modified D-Trp-Phe-D-Trp-Leu-Leu peptides, it was found that space-generating mutations in the deeper part of the receptor improved inverse agonism, whereas similar mutations located in the more extracellular part improved agonism. Modulation of the basal signaling by mutations in the receptor structure is primarily obtained by substitutions in an aromatic cluster that keep TMs VI and VII in close proximity to TM III and thus stabilize the active conformation. Also, substitution of a Phe in TM V is crucial for the high basal activity of the receptor as this residue serves as a partner for Trp VI:13 in the active conformation. It is suggested that inverse agonist and antagonist against the ghrelin receptor provide an interesting possibility in the development of drugs for treatment of obesity and

  18. Livers with constitutive mTORC1 activity resist steatosis independent of feedback suppression of Akt.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidi L Kenerson

    Full Text Available Insulin resistance is an important contributing factor in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. AKT and mTORC1 are key components of the insulin pathway, and play a role in promoting de novo lipogenesis. However, mTORC1 hyperactivity per se does not induce steatosis in mouse livers, but instead, protects against high-fat diet induced steatosis. Here, we investigate the in vivo mechanism of steatosis-resistance secondary to mTORC1 activation, with emphasis on the role of S6K1-mediated feedback inhibition of AKT. Mice with single or double deletion of Tsc1 and/or S6k1 in a liver-specific or whole-body manner were generated to study glucose and hepatic lipid metabolism between the ages of 6-14 weeks. Following 8 weeks of high-fat diet, the Tsc1-/-;S6k1-/- mice had lower body weights but higher liver TG levels compared to that of the Tsc1-/- mice. However, the loss of S6k1 did not relieve feedback inhibition of Akt activity in the Tsc1-/- livers. To overcome Akt suppression, Pten was deleted in Tsc1-/- livers, and the resultant mice showed improved glucose tolerance compared with the Tsc1-/- mice. However, liver TG levels were significantly reduced in the Tsc1-/-;Pten-/- mice compared to the Pten-/- mice, which was restored with rapamycin. We found no correlation between liver TG and serum NEFA levels. Expression of lipogenic genes (Srebp1c, Fasn were elevated in the Tsc1-/-;Pten-/- livers, but this was counter-balanced by an up-regulation of Cpt1a involved in fatty acid oxidation and the anti-oxidant protein, Nrf2. In summary, our in vivo models showed that mTORC1-induced resistance to steatosis was dependent on S6K1 activity, but not secondary to AKT suppression. These findings confirm that AKT and mTORC1 have opposing effects on hepatic lipid metabolism in vivo.

  19. Prediction of GPCR-Ligand Binding Using Machine Learning Algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangmin Seo

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a novel method that predicts binding of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs and ligands. The proposed method uses hub and cycle structures of ligands and amino acid motif sequences of GPCRs, rather than the 3D structure of a receptor or similarity of receptors or ligands. The experimental results show that these new features can be effective in predicting GPCR-ligand binding (average area under the curve [AUC] of 0.944, because they are thought to include hidden properties of good ligand-receptor binding. Using the proposed method, we were able to identify novel ligand-GPCR bindings, some of which are supported by several studies.

  20. Triclocarban mediates induction of xenobiotic metabolism through activation of the constitutive androstane receptor and the estrogen receptor alpha.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei-Fei Yueh

    Full Text Available Triclocarban (3,4,4'-trichlorocarbanilide, TCC is used as a broad-based antimicrobial agent that is commonly added to personal hygiene products. Because of its extensive use in the health care industry and resistance to degradation in sewage treatment processes, TCC has become a significant waste product that is found in numerous environmental compartments where humans and wildlife can be exposed. While TCC has been linked to a range of health and environmental effects, few studies have been conducted linking exposure to TCC and induction of xenobiotic metabolism through regulation by environmental sensors such as the nuclear xenobiotic receptors (XenoRs. To identify the ability of TCC to activate xenobiotic sensors, we monitored XenoR activities in response to TCC treatment using luciferase-based reporter assays. Among the XenoRs in the reporter screening assay, TCC promotes both constitutive androstane receptor (CAR and estrogen receptor alpha (ERα activities. TCC treatment to hUGT1 mice resulted in induction of the UGT1A genes in liver. This induction was dependent upon the constitutive active/androstane receptor (CAR because no induction occurred in hUGT1Car(-/- mice. Induction of the UGT1A genes by TCC corresponded with induction of Cyp2b10, another CAR target gene. TCC was demonstrated to be a phenobarbital-like activator of CAR in receptor-based assays. While it has been suggested that TCC be classified as an endocrine disruptor, it activates ERα leading to induction of Cyp1b1 in female ovaries as well as in promoter activity. Activation of ERα by TCC in receptor-based assays also promotes induction of human CYP2B6. These observations demonstrate that TCC activates nuclear xenobiotic receptors CAR and ERα both in vivo and in vitro and might have the potential to alter normal physiological homeostasis. Activation of these xenobiotic-sensing receptors amplifies gene expression profiles that might represent a mechanistic base for

  1. Triclocarban Mediates Induction of Xenobiotic Metabolism through Activation of the Constitutive Androstane Receptor and the Estrogen Receptor Alpha

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yueh, Mei-Fei; Li, Tao; Evans, Ronald M.; Hammock, Bruce; Tukey, Robert H.

    2012-01-01

    Triclocarban (3,4,4′-trichlorocarbanilide, TCC) is used as a broad-based antimicrobial agent that is commonly added to personal hygiene products. Because of its extensive use in the health care industry and resistance to degradation in sewage treatment processes, TCC has become a significant waste product that is found in numerous environmental compartments where humans and wildlife can be exposed. While TCC has been linked to a range of health and environmental effects, few studies have been conducted linking exposure to TCC and induction of xenobiotic metabolism through regulation by environmental sensors such as the nuclear xenobiotic receptors (XenoRs). To identify the ability of TCC to activate xenobiotic sensors, we monitored XenoR activities in response to TCC treatment using luciferase-based reporter assays. Among the XenoRs in the reporter screening assay, TCC promotes both constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) activities. TCC treatment to hUGT1 mice resulted in induction of the UGT1A genes in liver. This induction was dependent upon the constitutive active/androstane receptor (CAR) because no induction occurred in hUGT1Car−/− mice. Induction of the UGT1A genes by TCC corresponded with induction of Cyp2b10, another CAR target gene. TCC was demonstrated to be a phenobarbital-like activator of CAR in receptor-based assays. While it has been suggested that TCC be classified as an endocrine disruptor, it activates ERα leading to induction of Cyp1b1 in female ovaries as well as in promoter activity. Activation of ERα by TCC in receptor-based assays also promotes induction of human CYP2B6. These observations demonstrate that TCC activates nuclear xenobiotic receptors CAR and ERα both in vivo and in vitro and might have the potential to alter normal physiological homeostasis. Activation of these xenobiotic-sensing receptors amplifies gene expression profiles that might represent a mechanistic base for potential human

  2. [Structural Life Science towards the Regulation of Selective GPCR Signaling].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Takuya

    2016-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the largest family of receptors in the human genome. They are involved in many diseases and also the target of approximately 30% of all modern medicinal drugs. GPCRs respond to a broad spectrum of chemical entities, ranging from photons, protons, and calcium ions to small organic molecules (including odorants and neurotransmitters), peptides, and glycoproteins. Many GPCRs are members of closely related subfamilies that respond to the same hormone or neurotransmitter. However, they have different physiologic functions based on the cells in which they are expressed and the different signaling pathways that they exploit (e.g., coupling through heterotrimeric G-proteins such as Gs, Gi, and Gq, as well as β-arrestins). Antibody fragments including Fab and Fv can effectively stabilize and crystallize membrane proteins. However, using the mouse hybridoma technology it has been difficult to develop monoclonal antibodies that can recognize conformational epitopes of native GPCRs. We have recently succeeded in developing antibodies against native GPCRs using this technology in combination with our improved immunization and screening methods. In this symposium review, I present a successful example of prostaglandin E2 receptor (one of the GPCRs) crystallization using antibody fragments. To avoid several adverse effects of current therapeutics, it is essential to understand the molecular mechanism of GPCR signaling in a monomeric, dimeric, or oligomeric state. Also, we are interested in selectively regulating GPCR signaling via functional antibodies developed using our methods and/or the designed small organic molecules depending on the GPCR structure.

  3. CsTFL1, a constitutive local repressor of flowering, modulates floral initiation by antagonising florigen complex activity in chrysanthemum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuchi, Yohei; Hisamatsu, Tamotsu

    2015-08-01

    Chrysanthemums require repeated cycles of short-day (SD) photoperiod for successful anthesis, but their vegetative state is strictly maintained under long-day (LD) or night-break (NB) conditions. We have previously demonstrated that photoperiodic flowering of a wild diploid chrysanthemum (Chrysanthemum seticuspe f. boreale) is controlled by a pair of systemic floral regulators, florigen (CsFTL3) and anti-florigen (CsAFT), produced in the leaves. Here, we report the functional characterisation of a local floral regulator, CsTFL1, a chrysanthemum orthologue of TERMINAL FLOWER 1 gene in Arabidopsis. Constitutive expression of CsTFL1 in C. seticuspe (CsTFL1-ox) resulted in extremely late flowering under SD and prevented up-regulation of floral meristem identity genes in shoot tips and leaves. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation assay showed that both CsTFL1 and CsFTL3 interacted with CsFDL1, a bZIP transcription factor FD homologue, in the nucleus. The transient gene expression assay indicated that CsTFL1 suppresses flowering by directly antagonising the flower inductive activity of the CsFTL3-CsFDL1 complex. Our results suggest that strict maintenance of vegetative state under non-inductive photoperiod is achieved by the coordinated action of both the systemic floral inhibitor and local floral inhibitor CsTFL1, which is constitutively expressed in shoot tips. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Homology model-based virtual screening for GPCR ligands using docking and target-biased scoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radestock, Sebastian; Weil, Tanja; Renner, Steffen

    2008-05-01

    The current study investigates the combination of two recently reported techniques for the improvement of homology model-based virtual screening for G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) ligands. First, ligand-supported homology modeling was used to generate receptor models that were in agreement with mutagenesis data and structure-activity relationship information of the ligands. Second, interaction patterns from known ligands to the receptor were applied for scoring and rank ordering compounds from a virtual library using ligand-receptor interaction fingerprint-based similarity (IFS). Our approach was evaluated in retrospective virtual screening experiments for antagonists of the metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) subtype 5. The results of our approach were compared to the results obtained by conventional scoring functions (Dock-Score, PMF-Score, Gold-Score, ChemScore, and FlexX-Score). The IFS lead to significantly higher enrichment rates, relative to the competing scoring functions. Though using a target-biased scoring approach, the results were not biased toward the chemical classes of the reference structures. Our results indicate that the presented approach has the potential to serve as a general setup for successful structure-based GPCR virtual screening.

  5. The E92K Melanocortin 1 Receptor Mutant Induces cAMP Production and Arrestin Recruitment but Not ERK Activity Indicating Biased Constitutive Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benned-Jensen, Tau; Mokrosinski, Jacek; Rosenkilde, Mette M.

    2011-01-01

    Background The melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) constitutes a key regulator of melanism. Consequently, many naturally-occurring MC1R mutations are associated with a change in color. An example is the Glu-to-Lys substitution found at position II:20/2.60 in the top of transmembrane helix II which has been identified in melanic mice and several other species. This mutation induces a pronounced increase in MC1R constitutive activity suggesting a link between constitutive activity and melanism which is corroborated by the attenuation of α-melanocyte stimulating hormone (αMSH) induced activation. However, the mechanism by which the mutation induces constitutive activity is currently not known. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we characterize the constitutive activity, cell surface expression and internalization of the mouse mutant, Mc1r E92K. As previously reported, only positively charged residues at position II:20/2.60 induced an increase in constitutive activity as measured by cAMP accumulation and CREB activation. Furthermore, the mutation induced a constitutive recruitment of β-arrestin. This phenomenon is only observed in MC1R, however, as the equivalent mutations in MC2-5R had no effect on receptor signaling. Interestingly, the mutation did not induce constitutive ERK1/2 phosphorylation or increase the internalization rate indicating the constitutive activity to be biased. Finally, to identify regions of importance for the increased constitutive activity of Mc1r E92K, we employed a chimeric approach and identified G102 and L110 in the extracellular loop 1 to be selectively important for the constitutive activity as this, but not αMSH-mediated activation, was abolished upon Ala substitution. Conclusions/Significance It is concluded that the E92K mutation induces an active conformation distinct from that induced by αMSH and that the extracellular loop 1 is involved in maintaining this conformational state. In turn, the results suggest that in MC1R, which lacks

  6. The E92K melanocortin 1 receptor mutant induces cAMP production and arrestin recruitment but not ERK activity indicating biased constitutive signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tau Benned-Jensen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R constitutes a key regulator of melanism. Consequently, many naturally-occurring MC1R mutations are associated with a change in color. An example is the Glu-to-Lys substitution found at position II:20/2.60 in the top of transmembrane helix II which has been identified in melanic mice and several other species. This mutation induces a pronounced increase in MC1R constitutive activity suggesting a link between constitutive activity and melanism which is corroborated by the attenuation of α-melanocyte stimulating hormone (αMSH induced activation. However, the mechanism by which the mutation induces constitutive activity is currently not known. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we characterize the constitutive activity, cell surface expression and internalization of the mouse mutant, Mc1r E92K. As previously reported, only positively charged residues at position II:20/2.60 induced an increase in constitutive activity as measured by cAMP accumulation and CREB activation. Furthermore, the mutation induced a constitutive recruitment of β-arrestin. This phenomenon is only observed in MC1R, however, as the equivalent mutations in MC2-5R had no effect on receptor signaling. Interestingly, the mutation did not induce constitutive ERK1/2 phosphorylation or increase the internalization rate indicating the constitutive activity to be biased. Finally, to identify regions of importance for the increased constitutive activity of Mc1r E92K, we employed a chimeric approach and identified G102 and L110 in the extracellular loop 1 to be selectively important for the constitutive activity as this, but not αMSH-mediated activation, was abolished upon Ala substitution. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: It is concluded that the E92K mutation induces an active conformation distinct from that induced by αMSH and that the extracellular loop 1 is involved in maintaining this conformational state. In turn, the results suggest that

  7. Constitutively Active Parathyroid Hormone Receptor Signaling in Cells in Osteoblastic Lineage Suppresses Mechanical Unloading-induced Bone Resorption*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Noriaki; Nakashima, Kazuhisa; Schipani, Ernestina; Hayata, Tadayoshi; Ezura, Yoichi; Soma, Kunimichi; Kronenberg, Henry M.; Noda, Masaki

    2013-01-01

    Multiple signaling pathways participate in the regulation of bone remodeling, and pathological negative balance in the regulation results in osteoporosis. However, interactions of signaling pathways that act comprehensively in concert to maintain bone mass are not fully understood. We investigated roles of parathyroid hormone receptor (PTH/PTHrP receptor) signaling in osteoblasts in unloading-induced bone loss using transgenic mice. Hind limb unloading by tail suspension reduced bone mass in wild-type mice. In contrast, signaling by constitutively active PTH/PTHrP receptor (caPPR), whose expression was regulated by the osteoblast-specific Col1a1 promoter (Col1a1-caPPR), suppressed unloading-induced reduction in bone mass in these transgenic mice. In Col1a1-caPPR transgenic (Tg) mice, hind limb unloading suppressed bone formation parameters in vivo and mineralized nodule formation in vitro similarly to those observed in wild-type mice. In addition, serum osteocalcin levels and mRNA expression levels of type I collagen, Runx2 and Osterix in bone were suppressed by unloading in both wild-type mice and Tg mice. However, in contrast to unloading-induced enhancement of bone resorption parameters in wild-type mice, Col1a1-caPPR signaling suppressed, rather than enhanced, osteoclast number and osteoclast surface as well as urinary deoxypyridinoline excretion upon unloading. Col1a1-caPPR signaling also suppressed mRNA expression levels of RANK and c-fms in bone upon unloading. Although the M-CSF and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) mRNA levels were enhanced in control Tg mice, these levels were suppressed in unloaded Tg mice. These results indicated that constitutive activation of PTH/PTHrP receptor signaling in osteoblastic cells suppresses unloading-induced bone loss specifically through the regulation of osteoclastic activity. PMID:17500070

  8. Constitutive arginine-dependent nitric oxide synthase activity in different organs of pea seedlings during plant development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corpas, Francisco J; Barroso, Juan B; Carreras, Alfonso; Valderrama, Raquel; Palma, José M; León, Ana M; Sandalio, Luisa M; del Río, Luis A

    2006-07-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an important signalling molecule in different animal and plant physiological processes. Little is known about its biological function in plants and on the enzymatic source or site of NO production during plant development. The endogenous NO production from L-arginine (NO synthase activity) was analyzed in leaves, stems and roots during plant development, using pea seedlings as a model. NOS activity was analyzed using a novel chemiluminescence-based assay which is more sensitive and specific than previous methods used in plant tissues. In parallel, NO accumulation was analyzed by confocal laser scanning microscopy using as fluorescent probes either DAF-2 DA or DAF-FM DA. A strong increase in NOS activity was detected in stems after 11 days growth, coinciding with the maximum stem elongation. The arginine-dependent NOS activity was constitutive and sensitive to aminoguanidine, a well-known irreversible inhibitor of animal NOS, and this NOS activity was differentially modulated depending on the plant organ and seedling developmental stage. In all tissues studied, NO was localized mainly in the vascular tissue (xylem) and epidermal cells and in root hairs. These loci of NO generation and accumulation suggest novel functions for NO in these cell types.

  9. Overexpression of OLE1 enhances stress tolerance and constitutively activates the MAPK HOG pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasution, Olviyani; Lee, Young Mi; Kim, Eunjung; Lee, Yeji; Kim, Wankee; Choi, Wonja

    2017-03-01

    OLE1 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes the sole and essential Δ-9 desaturase catalyzing the conversion of saturated to unsaturated fatty acids. Upon ectopic overexpression of OLE1 in S. cerevisiae, significant increases in the membrane oleic acid content were observed. OLE1-overexpressing strains displayed enhanced tolerance to various stresses, better proton efflux, lower membrane permeability, and lessened internal hydrogen peroxide content. The OLE1-mediated enhanced stress tolerance was considerably diminished upon deletion of HOG1, which encodes the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) Hog1 of the high osmolarity glycerol (HOG) pathway. Furthermore, OLE1 overexpression constitutively activated Hog1, which remained in the cytoplasm. Hog1 activation was accomplished through the MAPK kinase kinase (MAPKKK) Ssk2, but not Ste11 and Ssk22, the other MAPKKKs of the HOG pathway. Despite its cytoplasmic location, activated Hog1 was able to activate the expression of its canonical targets, including CTT1, HSP12, and STL1, and further, the cAMP and stress response elements present in the promoter. OLE1 overexpression neither caused nor relieved endoplasmic reticulum stress. Individually or in combination, the physiological and molecular changes caused by OLE1 overexpression may contribute to enhanced tolerance to various types of stress. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 620-631. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. GPCR Interaction: 188 [GRIPDB[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ivation are reduced by activation of CXCR4 in advance. In addition, calcium mobilization assays show these cross-desensitization proc...esses occur within seconds of receptor activation, and target receptor internalizat

  11. GPCR Interaction: 187 [GRIPDB[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available cesses occur within seconds of receptor activation, and target receptor internaliza...tivation are reduced by activation of CXCR4 in advance. In addition, calcium mobilization assays show these cross-desensitization pro

  12. Constitutive Activation of NF-kappaB in Prostate Carcinoma Cells Through a Positive Feedback Loop: Implication of Inducible IKK-Related Kinase (IKKi)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Budunova, Irina V

    2004-01-01

    The overall goal of this project is to understand the role of inducible IKK-related kinase IKKi in constitutive activation of anti-apoptotic transcription factor NF-kB prostate carcinoma (PC) cells...

  13. MicroRNA-122 down-regulation is involved in phenobarbital-mediated activation of the constitutive androstane receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryota Shizu

    Full Text Available Constitutive androstane receptor (CAR is a nuclear receptor that regulates the transcription of target genes, including CYP2B and 3A. Phenobarbital activates CAR, at least in part, in an AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK-dependent manner. However, the precise mechanisms underlying phenobarbital activation of AMPK are still unclear. In the present study, it was demonstrated that phenobarbital administration to mice decreases hepatic miR-122, a liver-enriched microRNA involved in both hepatic differentiation and function. The time-course change in the phenobarbital-mediated down-regulation of miR-122 was inversely correlated with AMPK activation. Phenobarbital decreased primary miR-122 to approximately 25% of the basal level as early as 1 h and suppressed transactivity of mir-122 promoter in HuH-7 cells, suggesting that the down-regulation occurred at the transcriptional level. AMPK activation by metformin or 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide 1-β-D-ribonucleoside had no evident effect on miR-122 levels. An inhibitory RNA specific for miR-122 increased activated AMPK and CAR-mediated trancactivation of the phenobarbital-responsive enhancer module in HepG2 cells. Conversely, the reporter activity induced by the ectopic CAR was almost completely suppressed by co-transfection with the miR-122 mimic RNA. GFP-tagged CAR was expressed in the cytoplasm in addition to the nucleus in the majority of HuH-7 cells in which miR-122 was highly expressed. Co-transfection of the mimic or the inhibitor RNA for miR-122 further increased or decreased, respectively, the number of cells that expressed GFP-CAR in the cytoplasm. Taken together, these results suggest that phenobarbital-mediated down-regulation of miR-122 is an early and important event in the AMPK-dependent CAR activation and transactivation of its target genes.

  14. MicroRNA-122 down-regulation is involved in phenobarbital-mediated activation of the constitutive androstane receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shizu, Ryota; Shindo, Sawako; Yoshida, Takemi; Numazawa, Satoshi

    2012-01-01

    Constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) is a nuclear receptor that regulates the transcription of target genes, including CYP2B and 3A. Phenobarbital activates CAR, at least in part, in an AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-dependent manner. However, the precise mechanisms underlying phenobarbital activation of AMPK are still unclear. In the present study, it was demonstrated that phenobarbital administration to mice decreases hepatic miR-122, a liver-enriched microRNA involved in both hepatic differentiation and function. The time-course change in the phenobarbital-mediated down-regulation of miR-122 was inversely correlated with AMPK activation. Phenobarbital decreased primary miR-122 to approximately 25% of the basal level as early as 1 h and suppressed transactivity of mir-122 promoter in HuH-7 cells, suggesting that the down-regulation occurred at the transcriptional level. AMPK activation by metformin or 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide 1-β-D-ribonucleoside had no evident effect on miR-122 levels. An inhibitory RNA specific for miR-122 increased activated AMPK and CAR-mediated trancactivation of the phenobarbital-responsive enhancer module in HepG2 cells. Conversely, the reporter activity induced by the ectopic CAR was almost completely suppressed by co-transfection with the miR-122 mimic RNA. GFP-tagged CAR was expressed in the cytoplasm in addition to the nucleus in the majority of HuH-7 cells in which miR-122 was highly expressed. Co-transfection of the mimic or the inhibitor RNA for miR-122 further increased or decreased, respectively, the number of cells that expressed GFP-CAR in the cytoplasm. Taken together, these results suggest that phenobarbital-mediated down-regulation of miR-122 is an early and important event in the AMPK-dependent CAR activation and transactivation of its target genes.

  15. The Precedent 443 of the Superior Labor Court and Judicial Activism: The Defense of a Non Selective Constitutional Hermeneutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humberto Lima de Lucena Filho

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper is dedicated to the analysis of the Precedent 443 of the Superior Labor Court, which deals with the discriminatory dismissal presumption of those labor with social stigma diseases from the perspective of judicial activism in the brazilian labor law and its objective influence on law and labor procedure law from the from the perspective of a not univocal constitutional hermeneutics. It aims, also, to conceptualize the stability institute in order to configure the dangers and misconceptions arising from it. Therefore, it concludes that the analogy that embodied the repeated judicial position was excessive. The research points out the logical-deductive method operated by the aid of the literature review, case law and positioning applicable law.

  16. Identification and Characterization of CINPA1 Metabolites Facilitates Structure-Activity Studies of the Constitutive Androstane Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherian, Milu T.; Yang, Lei; Chai, Sergio C.; Lin, Wenwei

    2016-01-01

    The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) regulates the expression of genes involved in drug metabolism and other processes. A specific inhibitor of CAR is critical for modulating constitutive CAR activity. We recently described a specific small-molecule inhibitor of CAR, CINPA1 (ethyl (5-(diethylglycyl)-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[b,f]azepin-3-yl)carbamate), which is capable of reducing CAR-mediated transcription by changing the coregulator recruitment pattern and reducing CAR occupancy at the promoter regions of its target genes. In this study, we showed that CINPA1 is converted to two main metabolites in human liver microsomes. By using cell-based reporter gene and biochemical coregulator recruitment assays, we showed that although metabolite 1 was very weak in inhibiting CAR function and disrupting CAR-coactivator interaction, metabolite 2 was inactive in this regard. Docking studies using the CAR ligand-binding domain structure showed that although CINPA1 and metabolite 1 can bind in the CAR ligand-binding pocket, metabolite 2 may be incapable of the molecular interactions required for binding. These results indicate that the metabolites of CINPA1 may not interfere with the action of CINPA1. We also used in vitro enzyme assays to identify the cytochrome P450 enzymes responsible for metabolizing CINPA1 in human liver microsomes and showed that CINPA1 was first converted to metabolite 1 by CYP3A4 and then further metabolized by CYP2D6 to metabolite 2. Identification and characterization of the metabolites of CINPA1 enabled structure-activity relationship studies of this family of small molecules and provided information to guide in vivo pharmacological studies. PMID:27519550

  17. Identification and Characterization of CINPA1 Metabolites Facilitates Structure-Activity Studies of the Constitutive Androstane Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherian, Milu T; Yang, Lei; Chai, Sergio C; Lin, Wenwei; Chen, Taosheng

    2016-11-01

    The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) regulates the expression of genes involved in drug metabolism and other processes. A specific inhibitor of CAR is critical for modulating constitutive CAR activity. We recently described a specific small-molecule inhibitor of CAR, CINPA1 (ethyl (5-(diethylglycyl)-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[b,f]azepin-3-yl)carbamate), which is capable of reducing CAR-mediated transcription by changing the coregulator recruitment pattern and reducing CAR occupancy at the promoter regions of its target genes. In this study, we showed that CINPA1 is converted to two main metabolites in human liver microsomes. By using cell-based reporter gene and biochemical coregulator recruitment assays, we showed that although metabolite 1 was very weak in inhibiting CAR function and disrupting CAR-coactivator interaction, metabolite 2 was inactive in this regard. Docking studies using the CAR ligand-binding domain structure showed that although CINPA1 and metabolite 1 can bind in the CAR ligand-binding pocket, metabolite 2 may be incapable of the molecular interactions required for binding. These results indicate that the metabolites of CINPA1 may not interfere with the action of CINPA1. We also used in vitro enzyme assays to identify the cytochrome P450 enzymes responsible for metabolizing CINPA1 in human liver microsomes and showed that CINPA1 was first converted to metabolite 1 by CYP3A4 and then further metabolized by CYP2D6 to metabolite 2. Identification and characterization of the metabolites of CINPA1 enabled structure-activity relationship studies of this family of small molecules and provided information to guide in vivo pharmacological studies. Copyright © 2016 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  18. Curcumin Modulates the Radiosensitivity of Colorectal Cancer Cells by Suppressing Constitutive and Inducible NF-κB Activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandur, Santosh K.; Deorukhkar, Amit; Pandey, Manoj K.; Pabon, Ana Maria B.S.; Shentu, Shujun; Guha, Sushovan; Aggarwal, Bharat B.; Krishnan, Sunil

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Radiation therapy is an integral part of the preoperative treatment of rectal cancers. However, only a minority of patients achieve a complete pathologic response to therapy because of resistance of these tumors to radiation therapy. This resistance may be mediated by constitutively active pro-survival signaling pathways or by inducible/acquired mechanisms in response to radiation therapy. Simultaneous inhibition of these pathways can sensitize these tumors to radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Human colorectal cancer cells were exposed to clinically relevant doses of gamma rays, and the mechanism of their radioresistance was investigated. We characterized the transcription factor nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation as a mechanism of inducible radioresistance in colorectal cancer and used curcumin, the active ingredient in the yellow spice turmeric, to overcome this resistance. Results: Curcumin inhibited the proliferation and the post-irradiation clonogenic survival of multiple colorectal cancer cell lines. Radiation stimulated NF-κB activity in a dose- and time-dependent manner, whereas curcumin suppressed this radiation-induced NF-κB activation via inhibition of radiation-induced phosphorylation and degradation of inhibitor of κB alpha, inhibition of inhibitor of κB kinase activity, and inhibition of Akt phosphorylation. Curcumin also suppressed NF-κB-regulated gene products (Bcl-2, Bcl-x L , inhibitor of apoptosis protein-2, cyclooxygenase-2, and cyclin D1). Conclusions: Our results suggest that transient inducible NF-κB activation provides a prosurvival response to radiation that may account for development of radioresistance. Curcumin blocks this signaling pathway and potentiates the antitumor effects of radiation therapy.

  19. Vestigialization of an Allosteric Switch: Genetic and Structural Mechanisms for the Evolution of Constitutive Activity in a Steroid Hormone Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridgham, Jamie T.; Keay, June; Ortlund, Eric A.; Thornton, Joseph W.

    2014-01-01

    An important goal in molecular evolution is to understand the genetic and physical mechanisms by which protein functions evolve and, in turn, to characterize how a protein's physical architecture influences its evolution. Here we dissect the mechanisms for an evolutionary shift in function in the mollusk ortholog of the steroid hormone receptors (SRs), a family of biologically essential transcription factors. In vertebrates, the activity of SRs allosterically depends on binding a hormonal ligand; in mollusks, however, the SR ortholog (called ER, because of high sequence similarity to vertebrate estrogen receptors) activates transcription in the absence of ligand and does not respond to steroid hormones. To understand how this shift in regulation evolved, we combined evolutionary, structural, and functional analyses. We first determined the X-ray crystal structure of the ER of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas (CgER), and found that its ligand pocket is filled with bulky residues that prevent ligand occupancy. To understand the genetic basis for the evolution of mollusk ERs' unique functions, we resurrected an ancient SR progenitor and characterized the effect of historical amino acid replacements on its functions. We found that reintroducing just two ancient replacements from the lineage leading to mollusk ERs recapitulates the evolution of full constitutive activity and the loss of ligand activation. These substitutions stabilize interactions among key helices, causing the allosteric switch to become “stuck” in the active conformation and making activation independent of ligand binding. Subsequent changes filled the ligand pocket without further affecting activity; by degrading the allosteric switch, these substitutions vestigialized elements of the protein's architecture required for ligand regulation and made reversal to the ancestral function more complex. These findings show how the physical architecture of allostery enabled a few large-effect mutations

  20. GPCR Interaction: 26 [GRIPDB[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available sfected HEK293T cells, suggesting that ... G(i/o) protein-coupled GPCRs could physically interact with Gq prote...aS inhibits adenylyl cyclase activity via G(i/o) proteins thorough the binding to A1R. ... Modified BRET observ...ss is promoted by the simultaneous activation of both receptors. 12123822, 113909

  1. Constitutive phosphorylation of ATM in lymphoblastoid cell lines from patients with ICF syndrome without downstream kinase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstine, Jimena V; Nahas, Shareef; Gamo, Kristin; Gartler, Stanley M; Hansen, R Scott; Roelfsema, Jeroen H; Gatti, Richard A; Marahrens, York

    2006-04-08

    Double strand DNA breaks in the genome lead to the activation of the ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase in a process that requires ATM autophosphorylation at serine-1981. ATM autophosphorylation only occurs if ATM is previously acetylated by Tip60. The activated ATM kinase phosphorylates proteins involved in arresting the cell cycle, including p53, and in repairing the DNA breaks. Chloroquine treatment and other manipulations that produce chromatin defects in the absence of detectable double strand breaks also trigger ATM phosphorylation and the phosphorylation of p53 in primary human fibroblasts, while other downstream substrates of ATM that are involved in the repair of DNA double strand breaks remain unphosphorylated. This raises the issue of whether ATM is constitutively activated in patients with genetic diseases that display chromatin defects. We examined lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) generated from patients with different types of chromatin disorders: Immunodeficiency, Centromeric instability, Facial anomalies (ICF) syndrome, Coffin Lowry syndrome, Rubinstein Taybi syndrome and Fascioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy. We show that ATM is phosphorylated on serine-1981 in LCLs derived from ICF patients but not from the other syndromes. The phosphorylated ATM in ICF cells did not phosphorylate the downstream targets NBS1, SMC1 and H2AX, all of which require the presence of double strand breaks. We demonstrate that ICF cells respond normally to ionizing radiation, ruling out the possibility that genetic deficiency in ICF cells renders activated ATM incapable of phosphorylating its downstream substrates. Surprisingly, p53 was also not phosphorylated in ICF cells or in chloroquine-treated wild type LCLs. In this regard the response to chromatin-altering agents differs between primary fibroblasts and LCLs. Our findings indicate that although phosphorylation at serine-1981 is essential in the activation of the ATM kinase, serine-1981 phosphorylation is

  2. MDCK cells expressing constitutively active Yes-associated protein (YAP) undergo apical extrusion depending on neighboring cell status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiba, Takanori; Ishihara, Erika; Miyamura, Norio; Narumi, Rika; Kajita, Mihoko; Fujita, Yasuyuki; Suzuki, Akira; Ogawa, Yoshihiro; Nishina, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Cell competition is a cell-cell interaction by which a cell compares its fitness to that of neighboring cells. The cell with the relatively lower fitness level is the “loser” and actively eliminated, while the cell with the relatively higher fitness level is the “winner” and survives. Recent studies have shown that cells with high Yes-associated protein (YAP) activity win cell competitions but the mechanism is unknown. Here, we report the unexpected finding that cells overexpressing constitutively active YAP undergo apical extrusion and are losers, rather than winners, in competitions with normal mammalian epithelial cells. Inhibitors of metabolism-related proteins such as phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K), mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), or p70S6 kinase (p70S6K) suppressed this apical extrusion, as did knockdown of vimentin or filamin in neighboring cells. Interestingly, YAP-overexpressing cells switched from losers to winners when co-cultured with cells expressing K-Ras (G12V) or v-Src. Thus, the role of YAP in deciding cell competitions depends on metabolic factors and the status of neighboring cells. PMID:27324860

  3. GPCR Interaction: 80 [GRIPDB[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available o permit dimerization, and the corresponding monomers were characterized in a fun...ctional melanocyte dispersion assay. Peptide dimers have enhanced functional activity; monospecific dimers h

  4. GPCR Interaction: 59 [GRIPDB[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available required for their anti-HIV-1 activity. 11854425, 14716309, 10725362, 12089144 Point mutation, bioinforma...tics approach BRET Western blot Cross-linking in the presence of agonist, immunoprecipitation, western blot NP_000570.1 ...

  5. Interrogating the Spatiotemporal Landscape of Neuromodulatory GPCR Signaling by Real-Time Imaging of cAMP in Intact Neurons and Circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian S. Muntean

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Modulation of neuronal circuits is key to information processing in the brain. The majority of neuromodulators exert their effects by activating G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs that control the production of second messengers directly impacting cellular physiology. How numerous GPCRs integrate neuromodulatory inputs while accommodating diversity of incoming signals is poorly understood. In this study, we develop an in vivo tool and analytical suite for analyzing GPCR responses by monitoring the dynamics of a key second messenger, cyclic AMP (cAMP, with excellent quantitative and spatiotemporal resolution in various neurons. Using this imaging approach in combination with CRISPR/Cas9 editing and optogenetics, we interrogate neuromodulatory mechanisms of defined populations of neurons in an intact mesolimbic reward circuit and describe how individual inputs generate discrete second-messenger signatures in a cell- and receptor-specific fashion. This offers a resource for studying native neuronal GPCR signaling in real time. : Muntean et al. develop an in vivo reagent to study processing of neurotransmitter GPCR signals by monitoring real-time dynamics of cAMP responses. They demonstrate application of this approach, in combination with CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing and optogenetics, to interrogate the functional organization of a striatal circuit. Keywords: cAMP, GPCR, neuromodulation, dopamine, striatum, imaging, optogenetics

  6. High constitutive activity of a virus-encoded seven transmembrane receptor in the absence of the conserved DRY motif (Asp-Arg-Tyr) in transmembrane helix 3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, Mette M; Kledal, Thomas N; Schwartz, Thue W

    2005-01-01

    -driven transcriptional activity through a pertussis toxin-sensitive manner. Gs and Gq were not activated constitutively as determined by the lack of inositol phosphate turnover and activities of the three transcription factors: cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), nuclear factor-kappaB, and nuclear factor...

  7. Activation of the constitutive androstane receptor inhibits gluconeogenesis without affecting lipogenesis or fatty acid synthesis in human hepatocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lynch, Caitlin; Pan, Yongmei; Li, Linhao [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Heyward, Scott; Moeller, Timothy [Bioreclamation In Vitro Technologies, Baltimore, MD 21227 (United States); Swaan, Peter W. [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Wang, Hongbing, E-mail: hwang@rx.umaryland.edu [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States)

    2014-08-15

    Objective: Accumulating evidence suggests that activation of mouse constitutive androstane receptor (mCAR) alleviates type 2 diabetes and obesity by inhibiting hepatic gluconeogenesis, lipogenesis, and fatty acid synthesis. However, the role of human (h) CAR in energy metabolism is largely unknown. The present study aims to investigate the effects of selective hCAR activators on hepatic energy metabolism in human primary hepatocytes (HPH). Methods: Ligand-based structure–activity models were used for virtual screening of the Specs database ( (www.specs.net)) followed by biological validation in cell-based luciferase assays. The effects of two novel hCAR activators (UM104 and UM145) on hepatic energy metabolism were evaluated in HPH. Results: Real-time PCR and Western blotting analyses reveal that activation of hCAR by UM104 and UM145 significantly repressed the expression of glucose-6-phosphatase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, two pivotal gluconeogenic enzymes, while exerting negligible effects on the expression of genes associated with lipogenesis and fatty acid synthesis. Functional experiments show that UM104 and UM145 markedly inhibit hepatic synthesis of glucose but not triglycerides in HPH. In contrast, activation of mCAR by 1,4-bis[2-(3,5-dichloropyridyloxy)]benzene, a selective mCAR activator, repressed the expression of genes associated with gluconeogenesis, lipogenesis, and fatty acid synthesis in mouse primary hepatocytes, which were consistent with previous observations in mouse model in vivo. Conclusion: Our findings uncover an important species difference between hCAR and mCAR in hepatic energy metabolism, where hCAR selectively inhibits gluconeogenesis without suppressing fatty acid synthesis. Implications: Such species selectivity should be considered when exploring CAR as a potential therapeutic target for metabolic disorders. - Highlights: • Novel hCAR activators were identified by computational and biological approaches. • The role

  8. Activation of the constitutive androstane receptor inhibits gluconeogenesis without affecting lipogenesis or fatty acid synthesis in human hepatocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lynch, Caitlin; Pan, Yongmei; Li, Linhao; Heyward, Scott; Moeller, Timothy; Swaan, Peter W.; Wang, Hongbing

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Accumulating evidence suggests that activation of mouse constitutive androstane receptor (mCAR) alleviates type 2 diabetes and obesity by inhibiting hepatic gluconeogenesis, lipogenesis, and fatty acid synthesis. However, the role of human (h) CAR in energy metabolism is largely unknown. The present study aims to investigate the effects of selective hCAR activators on hepatic energy metabolism in human primary hepatocytes (HPH). Methods: Ligand-based structure–activity models were used for virtual screening of the Specs database ( (www.specs.net)) followed by biological validation in cell-based luciferase assays. The effects of two novel hCAR activators (UM104 and UM145) on hepatic energy metabolism were evaluated in HPH. Results: Real-time PCR and Western blotting analyses reveal that activation of hCAR by UM104 and UM145 significantly repressed the expression of glucose-6-phosphatase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, two pivotal gluconeogenic enzymes, while exerting negligible effects on the expression of genes associated with lipogenesis and fatty acid synthesis. Functional experiments show that UM104 and UM145 markedly inhibit hepatic synthesis of glucose but not triglycerides in HPH. In contrast, activation of mCAR by 1,4-bis[2-(3,5-dichloropyridyloxy)]benzene, a selective mCAR activator, repressed the expression of genes associated with gluconeogenesis, lipogenesis, and fatty acid synthesis in mouse primary hepatocytes, which were consistent with previous observations in mouse model in vivo. Conclusion: Our findings uncover an important species difference between hCAR and mCAR in hepatic energy metabolism, where hCAR selectively inhibits gluconeogenesis without suppressing fatty acid synthesis. Implications: Such species selectivity should be considered when exploring CAR as a potential therapeutic target for metabolic disorders. - Highlights: • Novel hCAR activators were identified by computational and biological approaches. • The role

  9. Desensitization of menthol-activated cold receptors in lower extremities during local cooling in young women with a cold constitution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Fumio; Sone, Ryoko

    2017-03-01

    To test the hypothesis that topical menthol-induced reactivity of cold sensation and cutaneous vasoconstriction to local cooling is augmented in individuals with a cold constitution, we examined thermal sensation and cutaneous vasoconstrictor responses at menthol-treated and untreated sites in the legs during local skin cooling in young women complaining of chilliness (C group) and young women with no complaint as a normal control group (N group). During local skin cooling, the sensitivity to cold sensation was greater in the C group than in the N group. The application of menthol enhanced the cold sensation at a low temperature in the N group, but not in the C group. Cutaneous vasoconstrictor responses to local skin cooling were not altered by menthol treatment in either of the two groups. These findings suggest the desensitization of menthol-activated cold receptors in the legs of C group subjects, and a minor role of cold receptor activity in cutaneous vasoconstrictor response to local cooling.

  10. GPCR Interaction: 40 [GRIPDB[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available at similar levels. A significant agonist-promoted internalization of the beta2AR activates ERK1/2 MAPK in be...expressing beta1AR and both receptors. Agonist-promoted internalization of the be...efore, heterodimerization between beta1AR and beta2AR inhibits the agonist-promoted internalization of the b

  11. Xenopus oocyte electrophysiology in GPCR drug discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kasper Bø; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    2009-01-01

    Deorphanization of the large group of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) for which an endogenous activating ligand has not yet been identified (orphan GPCRs) has become increasingly difficult. A specialized technique that has been successfully applied to deorphanize some of these GPCRs involves ...

  12. Voltage-clamp-based methods for the detection of constitutively active acetylcholine-gated I(K,ACh) channels in the diseased heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, Niels; Makary, Samy; Nattel, Stanley; Dobrev, Dobromir

    2010-01-01

    Vagal nerve stimulation can promote atrial fibrillation (AF) that requires activation of the acetylcholine (ACh)-gated potassium current I(K,ACh). In chronic AF (cAF), I(K,ACh) shows strong activity despite the absence of ACh or analogous pharmacological stimulation. This receptor-independent, constitutive I(K,ACh) activity is suggested to represent an atrial-selective anti-AF therapeutic target, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are unknown. This chapter provides an overview of the voltage-clamp techniques that can be used to study constitutive I(K,ACh) activity in atrial myocytes and summarizes briefly the current knowledge about the potential underlying mechanism(s) of constitutive I(K,ACh) activity in diseased heart. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. ER/K linked GPCR-G protein fusions systematically modulate second messenger response in cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Rabia U; Dysthe, Matthew; Ritt, Michael; Sunahara, Roger K; Sivaramakrishnan, Sivaraj

    2017-08-10

    FRET and BRET approaches are well established for detecting ligand induced GPCR-G protein interactions in cells. Currently, FRET/BRET assays rely on co-expression of GPCR and G protein, and hence depend on the stoichiometry and expression levels of the donor and acceptor probes. On the other hand, GPCR-G protein fusions have been used extensively to understand the selectivity of GPCR signaling pathways. However, the signaling properties of fusion proteins are not consistent across GPCRs. In this study, we describe and characterize novel sensors based on the Systematic Protein Affinity Strength Modulation (SPASM) technique. Sensors consist of a GPCR and G protein tethered by an ER/K linker flanked by FRET probes. SPASM sensors are tested for the β2-, α1-, and α2- adrenergic receptors, and adenosine type 1 receptor (A 1 R), tethered to Gαs-XL, Gαi 2 , or Gαq subunits. Agonist stimulation of β2-AR and α2-AR increases FRET signal comparable to co-expressed FRET/BRET sensors. SPASM sensors also retain signaling through the endogenous G protein milieu. Importantly, ER/K linker length systematically tunes the GPCR-G protein interaction, with consequent modulation of second messenger signaling for cognate interactions. SPASM GPCR sensors serve the dual purpose of detecting agonist-induced changes in GPCR-G protein interactions, and linking these changes to downstream signaling.

  14. GPCR Heterodimerization in the Reproductive System: Functional Regulation and Implication for Biodiversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satake, Honoo; Matsubara, Shin; Aoyama, Masato; Kawada, Tsuyoshi; Sakai, Tsubasa

    2013-01-01

    A G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) functions not only as a monomer or homodimer but also as a heterodimer with another GPCR. GPCR heterodimerization results in the modulation of the molecular functions of the GPCR protomer, including ligand binding affinity, signal transduction, and internalization. There has been a growing body of reports on heterodimerization of multiple GPCRs expressed in the reproductive system and the resultant functional modulation, suggesting that GPCR heterodimerization is closely associated with reproduction including the secretion of hormones and the growth and maturation of follicles and oocytes. Moreover, studies on heterodimerization among paralogs of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) receptors of a protochordate, Ciona intestinalis, verified the species-specific regulation of the functions of GPCRs via multiple GnRH receptor pairs. These findings indicate that GPCR heterodimerization is also involved in creating biodiversity. In this review, we provide basic and current knowledge regarding GPCR heterodimers and their functional modulation, and explore the biological significance of GPCR heterodimerization.

  15. From Heptahelical Bundle to Hits from the Haystack: Structure-Based Virtual Screening for GPCR Ligands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooistra, A.J.; Roumen, L.; Leurs, R.; de Esch, I.J.P.; de Graaf, C.

    2013-01-01

    This review will focus on the construction, refinement, and validation of G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) structural models for the purpose of structure-based virtual screening (SBVS) and ligand design. The review will present a comparative analysis of GPCR crystal structures and their implication

  16. The G protein-coupled receptor heterodimer network (GPCR-HetNet) and its hub components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borroto-Escuela, Dasiel O; Brito, Ismel; Romero-Fernandez, Wilber; Di Palma, Michael; Oflijan, Julia; Skieterska, Kamila; Duchou, Jolien; Van Craenenbroeck, Kathleen; Suárez-Boomgaard, Diana; Rivera, Alicia; Guidolin, Diego; Agnati, Luigi F; Fuxe, Kjell

    2014-05-14

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) oligomerization has emerged as a vital characteristic of receptor structure. Substantial experimental evidence supports the existence of GPCR-GPCR interactions in a coordinated and cooperative manner. However, despite the current development of experimental techniques for large-scale detection of GPCR heteromers, in order to understand their connectivity it is necessary to develop novel tools to study the global heteroreceptor networks. To provide insight into the overall topology of the GPCR heteromers and identify key players, a collective interaction network was constructed. Experimental interaction data for each of the individual human GPCR protomers was obtained manually from the STRING and SCOPUS databases. The interaction data were used to build and analyze the network using Cytoscape software. The network was treated as undirected throughout the study. It is comprised of 156 nodes, 260 edges and has a scale-free topology. Connectivity analysis reveals a significant dominance of intrafamily versus interfamily connections. Most of the receptors within the network are linked to each other by a small number of edges. DRD2, OPRM, ADRB2, AA2AR, AA1R, OPRK, OPRD and GHSR are identified as hubs. In a network representation 10 modules/clusters also appear as a highly interconnected group of nodes. Information on this GPCR network can improve our understanding of molecular integration. GPCR-HetNet has been implemented in Java and is freely available at http://www.iiia.csic.es/~ismel/GPCR-Nets/index.html.

  17. GPCR Interaction: 39 [GRIPDB[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available s. A significant agonist-promoted internalization of the beta2AR activates ERK1/2 MAPK in beta2AR-expressing...AR and both receptors. Agonist-promoted internalization of the beta2AR was inhibi...erization between beta1AR and beta2AR inhibits the agonist-promoted internalization of the beta2AR and the a

  18. Mechanism of inverse agonist action of sarpogrelate at the constitutively active mutant of human 5-HT2A receptor revealed by molecular modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Murad; Muntasir, Habib Abul; Ishiguro, Masaji; Bhuiyan, Mohiuddin Ahmed; Rashid, Mamunur; Sugihara, Takumichi; Nagatomo, Takafumi

    2012-01-01

    We previously reported that sarpogrelate, a selective 5-HT2A antagonist, showed a potent inverse agonist activity to constitutively active mutant (C322K) of human 5-HT2A receptor (5-HT2AR). However, it remains to be unknown about the actual mechanism of this mutant for its constitutive activation as well as inverse agonist activity of sarpogrelate. Our model shows that mutation (C322K) of 5-HT2AR causes electronic repulsion between positively charged Arg173(3.50) and Lys322(6.34) residues resulting outward movement of the C-terminus of transmembrane helix (TMH) III. This motion of TMH III leads to a partially active structure of the receptor, which may be a key step in receptor activation. The structural model of the partially active receptor also indicates that the binding of sarpogrelate to the constitutively active receptor causes an inward swing of TMH III to an inactive receptor structure. Therefore, the present study may suggest that the electronic repulsion causing outward movement of the C-terminus of TMH III may be the key step for constitutive activation of mutant C322K of 5-HT2AR and the inward movement of TMH III causes the inverse agonist activity of sarpogrelate.

  19. Proteomic Analysis Shows Constitutive Secretion of MIF and p53-associated Activity of COX-2-/- Lung Fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dave, Mandar; Islam, Abul B M M K; Jensen, Roderick V; Rostagno, Agueda; Ghiso, Jorge; Amin, Ashok R

    2017-12-01

    The differential expression of two closelyassociated cyclooxygenase isozymes, COX-1 and COX-2, exhibited functions beyond eicosanoid metabolism. We hypothesized that COX-1 or COX-2 knockout lung fibroblasts may display altered protein profiles which may allow us to further differentiate the functional roles of these isozymes at the molecular level. Proteomic analysis shows constitutive production of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) in lung fibroblasts derived from COX-2 -/- but not wild-type (WT) or COX-1 -/- mice. MIF was spontaneously released in high levels into the extracellular milieu of COX2 -/- fibroblasts seemingly from the preformed intracellular stores, with no change in the basal gene expression of MIF. The secretion and regulation of MIF in COX-2 -/- was "prostaglandin-independent." GO analysis showed that concurrent with upregulation of MIF, there is a significant surge in expression of genes related to fibroblast growth, FK506 binding proteins, and isomerase activity in COX-2 -/- cells. Furthermore, COX-2 -/- fibroblasts also exhibit a significant increase in transcriptional activity of various regulators, antagonists, and co-modulators of p53, as well as in the expression of oncogenes and related transcripts. Integrative Oncogenomics Cancer Browser (IntroGen) analysis shows downregulation of COX-2 and amplification of MIF and/or p53 activity during development of glioblastomas, ependymoma, and colon adenomas. These data indicate the functional role of the MIF-COX-p53 axis in inflammation and cancer at the genomic and proteomic levels in COX-2-ablated cells. This systematic analysis not only shows the proinflammatory state but also unveils a molecular signature of a pro-oncogenic state of COX-1 in COX-2 ablated cells. Copyright © 2017 Beijing Institute of Genomics, Chinese Academy of Sciences and Genetics Society of China. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Proteomic Analysis Shows Constitutive Secretion of MIF and p53-associated Activity of COX-2−/− Lung Fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandar Dave

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The differential expression of two closelyassociated cyclooxygenase isozymes, COX-1 and COX-2, exhibited functions beyond eicosanoid metabolism. We hypothesized that COX-1 or COX-2 knockout lung fibroblasts may display altered protein profiles which may allow us to further differentiate the functional roles of these isozymes at the molecular level. Proteomic analysis shows constitutive production of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF in lung fibroblasts derived from COX-2−/− but not wild-type (WT or COX-1−/− mice. MIF was spontaneously released in high levels into the extracellular milieu of COX2−/− fibroblasts seemingly from the preformed intracellular stores, with no change in the basal gene expression of MIF. The secretion and regulation of MIF in COX-2−/− was “prostaglandin-independent.” GO analysis showed that concurrent with upregulation of MIF, there is a significant surge in expression of genes related to fibroblast growth, FK506 binding proteins, and isomerase activity in COX-2−/− cells. Furthermore, COX-2−/− fibroblasts also exhibit a significant increase in transcriptional activity of various regulators, antagonists, and co-modulators of p53, as well as in the expression of oncogenes and related transcripts. Integrative Oncogenomics Cancer Browser (IntroGen analysis shows downregulation of COX-2 and amplification of MIF and/or p53 activity during development of glioblastomas, ependymoma, and colon adenomas. These data indicate the functional role of the MIF-COX-p53 axis in inflammation and cancer at the genomic and proteomic levels in COX-2-ablated cells. This systematic analysis not only shows the proinflammatory state but also unveils a molecular signature of a pro-oncogenic state of COX-1 in COX-2 ablated cells.

  1. Galaxy7TM: flexible GPCR-ligand docking by structure refinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Gyu Rie; Seok, Chaok

    2016-07-08

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) play important physiological roles related to signal transduction and form a major group of drug targets. Prediction of GPCR-ligand complex structures has therefore important implications to drug discovery. With previously available servers, it was only possible to first predict GPCR structures by homology modeling and then perform ligand docking on the model structures. However, model structures generated without explicit consideration of specific ligands of interest can be inaccurate because GPCR structures can be affected by ligand binding. The Galaxy7TM server, freely accessible at http://galaxy.seoklab.org/7TM, improves an input GPCR structure by simultaneous ligand docking and flexible structure refinement using GALAXY methods. The server shows better performance in both ligand docking and GPCR structure refinement than commonly used programs AutoDock Vina and Rosetta MPrelax, respectively. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  2. GPCR-Mediated Signaling of Metabolites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Husted, Anna Sofie; Trauelsen, Mette; Rudenko, Olga

    2017-01-01

    In addition to their bioenergetic intracellular function, several classical metabolites act as extracellular signaling molecules activating cell-surface G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), similar to hormones and neurotransmitters. "Signaling metabolites" generated from nutrients or by gut...... microbiota target primarily enteroendocrine, neuronal, and immune cells in the lamina propria of the gut mucosa and the liver and, through these tissues, the rest of the body. In contrast, metabolites from the intermediary metabolism act mainly as metabolic stress-induced autocrine and paracrine signals...... in adipose tissue, the liver, and the endocrine pancreas. Importantly, distinct metabolite GPCRs act as efficient pro- and anti-inflammatory regulators of key immune cells, and signaling metabolites may thus function as important drivers of the low-grade inflammation associated with insulin resistance...

  3. Ins and outs of GPCR signaling in primary cilia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schou, Kenneth Bødtker; Pedersen, Lotte Bang; Christensen, Søren Tvorup

    2015-01-01

    Primary cilia are specialized microtubule-based signaling organelles that convey extracellular signals into a cellular response in most vertebrate cell types. The physiological significance of primary cilia is underscored by the fact that defects in assembly or function of these organelles lead to a range of severe diseases and developmental disorders. In most cell types of the human body, signaling by primary cilia involves different G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), which transmit specific signals to the cell through G proteins to regulate diverse cellular and physiological events. Here, we provide an overview of GPCR signaling in primary cilia, with main focus on the rhodopsin-like (class A) and the smoothened/frizzled (class F) GPCRs. We describe how such receptors dynamically traffic into and out of the ciliary compartment and how they interact with other classes of ciliary GPCRs, such as class B receptors, to control ciliary function and various physiological and behavioral processes. Finally, we discuss future avenues for developing GPCR-targeted drug strategies for the treatment of ciliopathies. PMID:26297609

  4. GPCR ontology: development and application of a G protein-coupled receptor pharmacology knowledge framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przydzial, Magdalena J; Bhhatarai, Barun; Koleti, Amar; Vempati, Uma; Schürer, Stephan C

    2013-12-15

    Novel tools need to be developed to help scientists analyze large amounts of available screening data with the goal to identify entry points for the development of novel chemical probes and drugs. As the largest class of drug targets, G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) remain of particular interest and are pursued by numerous academic and industrial research projects. We report the first GPCR ontology to facilitate integration and aggregation of GPCR-targeting drugs and demonstrate its application to classify and analyze a large subset of the PubChem database. The GPCR ontology, based on previously reported BioAssay Ontology, depicts available pharmacological, biochemical and physiological profiles of GPCRs and their ligands. The novelty of the GPCR ontology lies in the use of diverse experimental datasets linked by a model to formally define these concepts. Using a reasoning system, GPCR ontology offers potential for knowledge-based classification of individuals (such as small molecules) as a function of the data. The GPCR ontology is available at http://www.bioassayontology.org/bao_gpcr and the National Center for Biomedical Ontologies Web site.

  5. Integrating High-Content Analysis into a Multiplexed Screening Approach to Identify and Characterize GPCR Agonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yingjie; Watson, John; Chen, Mengjie; Shen, Ding Ren; Yarde, Melissa; Agler, Michele; Burford, Neil; Alt, Andrew; Jayachandra, Sukhanya; Cvijic, Mary Ellen; Zhang, Litao; Dyckman, Alaric; Xie, Jenny; O'Connell, Jonathan; Banks, Martyn; Weston, Andrea

    2014-08-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are one of the most popular and proven target classes for therapeutic intervention. The increased appreciation for allosteric modulation, receptor oligomerization, and biased agonism has led to the development of new assay platforms that seek to capitalize on these aspects of GPCR biology. High-content screening is particularly well suited for GPCR drug discovery given the ability to image and quantify changes in multiple cellular parameters, to resolve subcellular structures, and to monitor events within a physiologically relevant environment. Focusing on the sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P1) receptor, we evaluated the utility of high-content approaches in hit identification efforts by developing and applying assays to monitor β-arrestin translocation, GPCR internalization, and GPCR recycling kinetics. Using these approaches in combination with more traditional GPCR screening assays, we identified compounds whose unique pharmacological profiles would have gone unnoticed if using a single platform. In addition, we identified a compound that induces an atypical pattern of β-arrestin translocation and GPCR recycling kinetics. Our results highlight the value of high-content imaging in GPCR drug discovery efforts and emphasize the value of a multiassay approach to study pharmacological properties of compounds of interest. © 2014 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.

  6. Auxin-activated NADH oxidase activity of soybean plasma membranes is distinct from the constitutive plasma membrane NADH oxidase and exhibits prion-like properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morre, D. James; Morre, Dorothy M.; Ternes, Philipp

    2003-01-01

    The hormone-stimulated and growth-related cell surface hydroquinone (NADH) oxidase activity of etiolated hypocotyls of soybeans oscillates with a period of about 24 min or 60 times per 24-h day. Plasma membranes of soybean hypocotyls contain two such NADH oxidase activities that have been resolved by purification on concanavalin A columns. One in the apparent molecular weight range of 14-17 kDa is stimulated by the auxin herbicide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D). The other is larger and unaffected by 2,4-D. The 2,4-D-stimulated activity absolutely requires 2,4-D for activity and exhibits a period length of about 24 min. Also exhibiting 24-min oscillations is the rate of cell enlargement induced by the addition of 2,4-D or the natural auxin indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). Immediately following 2,4-D or IAA addition, a very complex pattern of oscillations is frequently observed. However, after several hours a dominant 24-min period emerges at the expense of the constitutive activity. A recruitment process analogous to that exhibited by prions is postulated to explain this behavior.

  7. A strong loss-of-function mutation in RAN1 results in constitution activation of the ethylene response pathway as well as a rosette-lethal phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith Woeste; Joseph J. Kieber

    2000-01-01

    A recessive mutation was identified that constitutively activated the ethylene response pathway in Arabidopsis and resuited in a rosette-lethal phenotype. Positional cloning of the gene corresponding to this mutation revealed that it was allelic to responsive to antagonist1 (ran1), a mutation that causes seedlings to respond in a positive manner to what is normally a...

  8. Curcumin induces growth-arrest and apoptosis in association with the inhibition of constitutively active JAK-STAT pathway in T cell leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajasingh, Johnson; Raikwar, Himanshu P.; Muthian, Gladson; Johnson, Caroline; Bright, John J.

    2006-01-01

    Adult T cell leukemia is an aggressive and frequently fatal malignancy that expressess constitutively activated growth-signaling pathways in association with deregulated growth and resistance to apoptosis. Curcumin (diferuloylmethane) is a naturally occurring yellow pigment, isolated from the rhizomes of the plant Curcuma longa that has traditionally been used in the treatment of injury and inflammation. But the effect and mechanism of action of curcumin on T cell leukemia is not known. To investigate the antitumor activity of curcumin in T cell leukemia, we examined its effect on constitutive phosphorylation of JAK and STAT proteins, proliferation, and apoptosis in HTLV-I-transformed T cell lines. HTLV-I-transformed T cell leukemia lines, MT-2, HuT-102, and SLB-1, express constitutively phosphorylated JAK3, TYK2, STAT3, and STAT5 signaling proteins. In vitro treatment with curcumin induced a dose-dependent decrease in JAK and STAT phosphorylation resulting in the induction of growth-arrest and apoptosis in T cell leukemia. The induction of growth-arrest and apoptosis in association with the blockade of constitutively active JAK-STAT pathway suggests this be a mechanism by which curcumin induces antitumor activity in T cell leukemia

  9. Lighting up multiprotein complexes: lessons from GPCR oligomerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciruela, Francisco; Vilardaga, Jean-Pierre; Fernández-Dueñas, Víctor

    2011-01-01

    Spatiotemporal characterization of protein–protein interactions (PPIs) is essential in determining the molecular mechanisms of intracellular signaling processes. In this review, we discuss how new methodological strategies derived from non-invasive fluorescence- and luminescence-based approaches (FRET, BRET, BiFC and BiLC), when applied to the study of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) oligomerization, can be used to detect specific PPIs in live cells. These technologies alone or in concert with complementary methods (SRET, BRET or BiFC, and SNAP-tag or TR-FRET) can be extremely powerful approaches for PPI visualization, even between more than two proteins. Here we provide a comprehensive update on all the biotechnological aspects, including the strengths and weaknesses, of new fluorescence- and luminescence-based methodologies, with a specific focus on their application for studying PPIs. PMID:20542584

  10. GPCR-interacting proteins (GIPs): nature and functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bockaert, J; Roussignol, G; Bécamel, C; Gavarini, S; Joubert, L; Dumuis, A; Fagni, L; Marin, P

    2004-11-01

    The simplistic idea that seven transmembrane receptors are single monomeric proteins that interact with heterotrimeric G-proteins after agonist binding is definitively out of date. Indeed, GPCRs (G-protein-coupled receptors) are part of multiprotein networks organized around scaffolding proteins. These GIPs (GPCR-interacting proteins) are either transmembrane or cytosolic proteins. Proteomic approaches can be used to get global pictures of these 'receptosomes'. This approach allowed us to identify direct but also indirect binding partners of serotonin receptors. GIPs are involved in a wide range of functions including control of the targeting, trafficking and signalling of GPCRs. One of them, Shank, which is a secondary and tertiary partner of metabotropic and ionotropic glutamate receptors, respectively, can induce the formation of a whole functional glutamate 'receptosome' and the structure to which it is associated, the dendritic spine.

  11. Selective elimination of high constitutive activity or chemokine binding in the human herpesvirus 8 encoded seven transmembrane oncogene ORF74

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, M M; Kledal, T N; Holst, Peter Johannes

    2000-01-01

    expressing ORF74 under control of the CD2 promoter develop highly vascularized Kaposi's sarcoma-like tumors. Through targeted mutagenesis we here create three distinct phenotypes of ORF74: a receptor with normal, high constitutive signaling through the phospholipase C pathway but deprived of binding...

  12. A physiological role of AMP-activated protein kinase in phenobarbital-mediated constitutive androstane receptor activation and CYP2B induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shindo, Sawako; Numazawa, Satoshi; Yoshida, Takemi

    2007-02-01

    CAR (constitutive androstane receptor) is a nuclear receptor that regulates the transcription of target genes, including CYP (cytochrome P450) 2B and 3A. The transactivation by CAR is regulated by its subcellular localization; however, the mechanism that governs nuclear translocation has yet to be clarified. It has been reported recently that AMPK (AMP-activated protein kinase) is involved in phenobarbital-mediated CYP2B induction in a particular culture system. We therefore investigated in vivo whether AMPK is involved in the activation of CAR-dependent gene expression. Immunoblot analysis using an antibody which recognizes Thr-172-phosphorylated AMPKalpha1/2 revealed phenobarbital-induced AMPK activation in rat and mouse livers as well. Phenobarbital, however, failed to increase the liver phospho-AMPK level of tumour-bearing rats in which CAR nuclear translocation had been impaired. In in vivo reporter gene assays employing PBREM (phenobarbital-responsive enhancer module) from CYP2B1, an AMPK inhibitor 8-bromo-AMP abolished phenobarbital-induced transactivation. In addition, Cyp2b10 gene expression was attenuated by 8-bromo-AMP. Forced expression of a dominant-negative mutant and the wild-type of AMPKalpha2 in the mouse liver suppressed and further enhanced phenobarbital-induced PBREM-reporter activity respectively. Moreover, the AMPK activator AICAR (5-amino-4-imidazolecarboxamide riboside) induced PBREM transactivation and an accumulation of CAR in the nuclear fraction of the mouse liver. However, AICAR and metformin, another AMPK activator, failed to induce hepatic CYP2B in mice and rats. These observations suggest that AMPK is at least partly involved in phenobarbital-originated signalling, but the kinase activation by itself is not sufficient for CYP2B induction in vivo.

  13. Ligand modulation of sidechain dynamics in a wild-type human GPCR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clark, Lindsay D.; Dikiy, Igor; Chapman, Karen

    2017-01-01

    GPCRs regulate all aspects of human physiology, and biophysical studies have deepened our understanding of GPCR conformational regulation by different ligands. Yet there is no experimental evidence for how sidechain dynamics control allosteric transitions between GPCR conformations. To address...... this deficit, we generated samples of a wild-type GPCR (A2AR) that are deuterated apart from 1H/13C NMR probes at isoleucine δ1 methyl groups, which facilitated 1H/13C methyl TROSY NMR measurements with opposing ligands. Our data indicate that low [Na+] is required to allow large agonist-induced structural...... changes in A2AR, and that patterns of sidechain dynamics substantially differ between agonist (NECA) and inverse agonist (ZM241385) bound receptors, with the inverse agonist suppressing fast ps-ns timescale motions at the G protein binding site. Our approach to GPCR NMR creates a framework for exploring...

  14. G protein-coupled time travel: evolutionary aspects of GPCR research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Römpler, Holger; Stäubert, Claudia; Thor, Doreen; Schulz, Angela; Hofreiter, Michael; Schöneberg, Torsten

    2007-02-01

    The common seven-transmembrane-domain (TMD) architecture of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) has been preserved over a vast period of time, and highly conserved amino acid motifs and residues have evolved to establish ligand and signal transduction specificities. The mining of evolutionary data from sequenced genomes and targeted retrieved orthologs has proven helpful for understanding the physiological relevance of individual GPCRs and for interpreting the clinical significance of GPCR mutations in structural terms. Sequence analysis of GPCR pseudogenes, which are considered as genomic traces of past functions, as well as recent success in sequence analysis of GPCR genes from extinct species, provide further information. This review discusses recent advances and approaches aimed at developing a better understanding of GPCR biology based on evolutionary data.

  15. High constitutive activity of a broad panel of housekeeping and tissue-specificcis-regulatory elements depends on a subset of ETS proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curina, Alessia; Termanini, Alberto; Barozzi, Iros; Prosperini, Elena; Simonatto, Marta; Polletti, Sara; Silvola, Alessio; Soldi, Monica; Austenaa, Liv; Bonaldi, Tiziana; Ghisletti, Serena; Natoli, Gioacchino

    2017-02-15

    Enhancers and promoters that control the transcriptional output of terminally differentiated cells include cell type-specific and broadly active housekeeping elements. Whether the high constitutive activity of these two groups of cis -regulatory elements relies on entirely distinct or instead also on shared regulators is unknown. By dissecting the cis -regulatory repertoire of macrophages, we found that the ELF subfamily of ETS proteins selectively bound within 60 base pairs (bp) from the transcription start sites of highly active housekeeping genes. ELFs also bound constitutively active, but not poised, macrophage-specific enhancers and promoters. The role of ELFs in promoting high-level constitutive transcription was suggested by multiple evidence: ELF sites enabled robust transcriptional activation by endogenous and minimal synthetic promoters, ELF recruitment was stabilized by the transcriptional machinery, and ELF proteins mediated recruitment of transcriptional and chromatin regulators to core promoters. These data suggest that the co-optation of a limited number of highly active transcription factors represents a broadly adopted strategy to equip both cell type-specific and housekeeping cis -regulatory elements with the ability to efficiently promote transcription. © 2017 Curina et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  16. Precise prediction of activators for the human constitutive androstane receptor using structure-based three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Harutoshi; Yamaotsu, Noriyuki; Iwazaki, Norihiko; Okamura, Shigeaki; Kume, Toshiyuki; Hirono, Shuichi

    2017-06-01

    The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR, NR1I3) regulates the expression of numerous drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters. The upregulation of various enzymes, including CYP2B6, by CAR activators is a critical problem leading to clinically severe drug-drug interactions (DDIs). To date, however, few effective computational approaches for identifying CAR activators exist. In this study, we aimed to develop three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) models to predict the CAR activating potency of compounds emerging in the drug-discovery process. Models were constructed using comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) based on the molecular alignments of ligands binding to CAR, which were obtained from ensemble ligand-docking using 28 compounds as a training set. The CoMFA model, modified by adding a lipophilic parameter with calculated logD 7.4 (S+logD 7.4 ), demonstrated statistically good predictive ability (r 2  = 0.99, q 2  = 0.74). We also confirmed the excellent predictability of the 3D-QSAR model for CAR activation (r 2 pred  = 0.71) using seven compounds as a test set for external validation. Collectively, our results indicate that the 3D-QSAR model developed in this study provides precise prediction of CAR activating potency and, thus, should be useful for selecting drug candidates with minimized DDI risk related to enzyme-induction in the early drug-discovery stage. Copyright © 2017 The Japanese Society for the Study of Xenobiotics. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. GPCR-GRAPA-LIB--a refined library of hidden Markov Models for annotating GPCRs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigeta, Ron; Cline, Melissa; Liu, Guoying; Siani-Rose, Michael A

    2003-03-22

    GPCR-GRAPA-LIB is a library of HMMs describing G protein coupled receptor families. These families are initially defined by class of receptor ligand, with divergent families divided into subfamilies using phylogenic analysis and knowledge of GPCR function. Protein sequences are applied to the models with the GRAPA curve-based selection criteria. RefSeq sequences for Homo sapiens, Drosophila melanogaster, and Caenorhabditis elegans have been annotated using this approach.

  18. Constitutive activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase predisposes diffuse large B-cell lymphoma cell lines to CD40-mediated cell death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hollmann, C Annette; Owens, Trevor; Nalbantoglu, Josephine

    2006-01-01

    , including LCK and VAV. In addition, CD40-sensitive DLBCL cell lines also displayed constitutive activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and failed to undergo apoptosis when ERK phosphorylation was inhibited. In contrast, CD40-resistant lines showed no constitutive activation of ERK......CD40 promotes survival, proliferation, and differentiation of normal B cells but can cause activation-induced cell death in malignant B lymphocytes. CD40 ligand and anti-CD40 antibodies have been used successfully to induce apoptosis in lymphoma lines both in vitro and in xenograft tumor models....... Although this makes CD40 an attractive target for antitumor therapies, the response of malignant B cells to CD40 signaling is variable, and CD40 stimulation can enhance proliferation and can increase chemoresistance in some cell lines. It would therefore be useful to identify markers that predict whether...

  19. Visualization and quantification of GPCR trafficking in mammalian cells by confocal microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nooh, Mohammed M; Bahouth, Suleiman W

    2017-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are recognized as one of the most fruitful group of therapeutic targets, accounting for more than 40% of all approved pharmaceuticals on the market. Therefore, the search for selective agents that affect GPCR function is of major interest to the pharmaceutical industry. This chapter describes methods for measuring agonist-promoted GPCR trafficking, which involves the internalization of the GPCR and its subsequent recycling back to the plasma membrane or retention and eventual degradation. These pathways will be analyzed by confocal cellular imaging, using the β 1 -adrenergic receptor (β 1 -AR) as a primary model. A major problem encountered in studying GPCR trafficking is the unavailability of antibodies that would recognize the native receptor in cells or tissues. Therefore, wild-type, point mutants, and β 1 -AR chimeras are generated as epitope-tagged proteins, which are stably- or transiently expressed in mammalian cells. GPCR are labeled with a fluorophore-conjugated antibody directed against the N-terminal epitope tag. The trafficking of the fluorophore-tagged GPCR between divergent trafficking pathways that result in retention and eventual degradation or recycling and reinsertion into the plasma membrane can be followed by confocal immunofluorescence microscopy techniques outlined in this review. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. utilizing constitutional values in constitutional comparison

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    a distinct set of commonalities, principles, standards and values that have gained currency in constitutional dialogue all over the world. Perhaps the best proof of this ripeness of constitutionalism is to be found in the signs that new, postmodern thinking about the state, the law and the sustainability of the established tenets of.

  1. Use of Intraductal Adenovins Transduction to Assess the Mammary Tumorigenic Potential of a Constitutively Active Prolactin Receptor

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2000-01-01

    ... are expressed. Transgenic technology has been used to evaluate the effects of an activated prolactin receptor, aPRLR, and an activated member of the prolactin signal transduction pathway, Akt, on the mammary...

  2. Crystal structure of a common GPCR-binding interface for G protein and arrestin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczepek, Michal; Beyrière, Florent; Hofmann, Klaus Peter; Elgeti, Matthias; Kazmin, Roman; Rose, Alexander; Bartl, Franz J; von Stetten, David; Heck, Martin; Sommer, Martha E; Hildebrand, Peter W; Scheerer, Patrick

    2014-09-10

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) transmit extracellular signals to activate intracellular heterotrimeric G proteins (Gαβγ) and arrestins. For G protein signalling, the Gα C-terminus (GαCT) binds to a cytoplasmic crevice of the receptor that opens upon activation. A consensus motif is shared among GαCT from the Gi/Gt family and the 'finger loop' region (ArrFL1-4) of all four arrestins. Here we present a 2.75 Å crystal structure of ArrFL-1, a peptide analogue of the finger loop of rod photoreceptor arrestin, in complex with the prototypical GPCR rhodopsin. Functional binding of ArrFL to the receptor was confirmed by ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy, competitive binding assays and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. For both GαCT and ArrFL, binding to the receptor crevice induces a similar reverse turn structure, although significant structural differences are seen at the rim of the binding crevice. Our results reflect both the common receptor-binding interface and the divergent biological functions of G proteins and arrestins.

  3. Gpr161 anchoring of PKA consolidates GPCR and cAMP signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, Verena A; Mayrhofer, Johanna E; Ilouz, Ronit; Tschaikner, Philipp; Raffeiner, Philipp; Röck, Ruth; Courcelles, Mathieu; Apelt, Federico; Lu, Tsan-Wen; Baillie, George S; Thibault, Pierre; Aanstad, Pia; Stelzl, Ulrich; Taylor, Susan S; Stefan, Eduard

    2016-07-12

    Scaffolding proteins organize the information flow from activated G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) to intracellular effector cascades both spatially and temporally. By this means, signaling scaffolds, such as A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs), compartmentalize kinase activity and ensure substrate selectivity. Using a phosphoproteomics approach we identified a physical and functional connection between protein kinase A (PKA) and Gpr161 (an orphan GPCR) signaling. We show that Gpr161 functions as a selective high-affinity AKAP for type I PKA regulatory subunits (RI). Using cell-based reporters to map protein-protein interactions, we discovered that RI binds directly and selectively to a hydrophobic protein-protein interaction interface in the cytoplasmic carboxyl-terminal tail of Gpr161. Furthermore, our data demonstrate that a binary complex between Gpr161 and RI promotes the compartmentalization of Gpr161 to the plasma membrane. Moreover, we show that Gpr161, functioning as an AKAP, recruits PKA RI to primary cilia in zebrafish embryos. We also show that Gpr161 is a target of PKA phosphorylation, and that mutation of the PKA phosphorylation site affects ciliary receptor localization. Thus, we propose that Gpr161 is itself an AKAP and that the cAMP-sensing Gpr161:PKA complex acts as cilium-compartmentalized signalosome, a concept that now needs to be considered in the analyzing, interpreting, and pharmaceutical targeting of PKA-associated functions.

  4. The adhesion G protein-coupled receptor G2 (ADGRG2/GPR64) constitutively activates SRE and NFκB and is involved in cell adhesion and migration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornelia Peeters, Miriam; Fokkelman, Michiel; Boogaard, Bob

    2015-01-01

    Adhesion G protein-coupled receptors (ADGRs) are believed to be activated by auto-proteolytic cleavage of their very large extracellular N-terminal domains normally acting as a negative regulator of the intrinsically constitutively active seven transmembrane domain. ADGRG2 (or GPR64) which...... activity through the adhesion- and migration-related transcription factors serum response element (SRE) and nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NFκB) presumably via coupling to Gα12/13 and Gαq. However, activation of these two pathways appears to occur through distinct molecular...... intracellular signal transduction. Knockdown of ADGRG2 by siRNA in the highly motile breast cancer cell lines Hs578T and MDA-MB-231 resulted in a strong reduction in cell adhesion and subsequent cell migration which was associated with a selective reduction in RelB, an NFκB family member. It is concluded...

  5. Interaction of Protease-Activated Receptor 2 with G Proteins and Beta-Arrestin 1 Studied by Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Akli eAyoub

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs are well recognized as being able to activate several signaling pathways through the activation of different G proteins as well as other signaling proteins such as beta-arrestins. Therefore, understanding how such multiple GPCR-mediated signaling can be integrated constitute an important aspect. Here, we applied bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET to shed more light on the G protein coupling profile of trypsin receptor, or protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2, and its interaction with beta-arrestin1. Using YFP and Rluc fusion constructs expressed in COS-7 cells, BRET data revealed a pre-assembly of PAR2 with both Galphai1 and Galphao and a rapid and transient activation of these G proteins upon receptor activation. In contrast, no preassembly of PAR2 with Galpha12 could be detected and their physical association can be measured with a very slow and sustained kinetics similar to that of beta-arrestin1 recruitment. These data demonstrate the coupling of PAR2 with Galphai1, Galphao and Galpha12 in COS-7 cells with differences in the kinetics of GPCR-G protein coupling, a parameter that very likely influences the cellular response. Moreover, this further illustrates that preassembly or agonist-induced G protein interaction depends on receptor-G protein pairs indicating another level of complexity and regulation of the signaling of GPCR-G protein complexes and its multiplicity.

  6. Constitutively active erythropoietin receptor expression in breast cancer cells promotes cellular proliferation and migration through a MAP-kinase dependent pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Ping; Jiang Xiaohong; Arcasoy, Murat O.

    2009-01-01

    The role of erythropoietin receptor (EpoR) expression in tumor cells and the potential of EpoR-mediated signaling to contribute to cellular proliferation and invasiveness require further characterization. To determine whether EpoR expression and activation in tumor cells modulates intracellular signal transduction to promote cellular proliferation and migration, we employed a novel experimental model using human breast cancer cells engineered to stably express a constitutively active EpoR-R129C variant. EpoR-R129C expression resulted in increased cellular proliferation and migration of breast cancer cells and these effects were associated with significantly increased Epo-induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2, AKT and c-Jun-NH2-kinase (SAPK/JNK) proteins. Expression of the constitutively active EpoR-R129C receptor promoted the proliferation and migration of breast cancer cells via activation of ERK- and SAPK/JNK-dependent signaling pathways, respectively. These findings suggest that EpoR over-expression and activation in breast cancer cells has the potential to contribute to tumor progression by promoting the proliferation and invasiveness of the neoplastic cells.

  7. Targeting GPCR-Gβγ-GRK2 signaling as a novel strategy for treating cardiorenal pathologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudomanova, Valeria; Blaxall, Burns C

    2017-08-01

    The pathologic crosstalk between the heart and kidney is known as cardiorenal syndrome (CRS). While the specific mechanisms underlying this crosstalk remain poorly understood, CRS is associated with exacerbated dysfunction of either or both organs and reduced survival. Maladaptive fibrotic remodeling is a key component of both heart and kidney failure pathogenesis and progression. G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling is a crucial regulator of cardiovascular and renal function. Chronic/pathologic GPCR signaling elicits the interaction of the G-protein Gβγ subunit with GPCR kinase 2 (GRK2), targeting the receptor for internalization, scaffolding to pathologic signals, and receptor degradation. Targeting this pathologic Gβγ-GRK2 interaction has been suggested as a possible strategy for the treatment of HF. In the current review, we discuss recent updates in understanding the role of GPCR-Gβγ-GRK2 signaling as a crucial mediator of maladaptive organ remodeling detected in HF and kidney dysfunction, with specific attention to small molecule-mediated inhibition of pathologic Gβγ-GRK2 interactions. Further, we explore the potential of GPCR-Gβγ-GRK2 signaling as a possible therapeutic target for cardiorenal pathologies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Single-molecule resolution of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonas, Kim C; Huhtaniemi, Ilpo; Hanyaloglu, Aylin C

    2016-01-01

    The organization of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) into dimers and higher-order oligomers has provided a potential mechanistic system in defining complex GPCR responses. Despite being studied for nearly 20 years it has, and still is, been an area of controversy. Although technology has developed to quantitatively measure these associations in real time, identify the structural interfaces and even systems to understand the physiological significance of di/oligomerization, key questions remain outstanding including the role of each individual complex from the monomer to the higher-order oligomer, in their native system. Recently, single-molecule microscopy approaches have provided the tools to directly visualize individual GPCRs in dimers and oligomers, though as with any technological development each have their advantages and limitations. This chapter will describe these recent developments in single-molecule fluorescent microscopy, focusing on our recent application of super-resolution imaging of the GPCR for the luteinizing hormone/chorionic gonadotropin to quantify GPCR monomers and formation of protomers in to dimers and distinct oligomeric forms. We present our approach, considerations, strategy, and challenges to visualize this receptor beyond the light diffraction limit via photoactivated localization microscopy with photoactivatable dyes. The addition of super-resolution approaches to the GPCR "nano-tool kit" will pave the way for novel avenues to answer outstanding questions regarding the existence and significance of these complexes to GPCR signaling. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Prevertebrate Local Gene Duplication Facilitated Expansion of the Neuropeptide GPCR Superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Seongsik; Furlong, Michael; Sim, Mikang; Cho, Minah; Park, Sumi; Cho, Eun Bee; Reyes-Alcaraz, Arfaxad; Hwang, Jong-Ik; Kim, Jaebum; Seong, Jae Young

    2015-11-01

    In humans, numerous genes encode neuropeptides that comprise a superfamily of more than 70 genes in approximately 30 families and act mainly through rhodopsin-like G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Two rounds of whole-genome duplication (2R WGD) during early vertebrate evolution greatly contributed to proliferation within gene families; however, the mechanisms underlying the initial emergence and diversification of these gene families before 2R WGD are largely unknown. In this study, we analyzed 25 vertebrate rhodopsin-like neuropeptide GPCR families and their cognate peptides using phylogeny, synteny, and localization of these genes on reconstructed vertebrate ancestral chromosomes (VACs). Based on phylogeny, these GPCR families can be divided into five distinct clades, and members of each clade tend to be located on the same VACs. Similarly, their neuropeptide gene families also tend to reside on distinct VACs. Comparison of these GPCR genes with those of invertebrates including Drosophila melanogaster, Caenorhabditis elegans, Branchiostoma floridae, and Ciona intestinalis indicates that these GPCR families emerged through tandem local duplication during metazoan evolution prior to 2R WGD. Our study describes a presumptive evolutionary mechanism and development pathway of the vertebrate rhodopsin-like GPCR and cognate neuropeptide families from the urbilaterian ancestor to modern vertebrates. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Understanding the GPCR biased signaling through G protein and arrestin complex structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, X Edward; Melcher, Karsten; Xu, H Eric

    2017-08-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the largest family of cell surface receptors and are important drug targets for many human diseases. The determination of the 3-D structure of GPCRs and their signaling complexes has promoted our understanding of GPCR biology and provided templates for structure-based drug discovery. In this review, we focus on the recent structure work on GPCR signaling complexes, the β2-adrenoreceptor-Gs and the rhodopsin-arrestin complexes in particular, and highlight the structural features of GPCR complexes involved in G protein- and arrestin-mediated signal transduction. The crystal structures reveal distinct structural mechanisms by which GPCRs recruit a G protein and an arrestin. A comparison of the two complex structures provides insight into the molecular mechanism of functionally selective GPCR signaling, and a structural basis for the discovery of G protein- and arrestin-biased treatments of human diseases related to GPCR signal transduction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The contribution of two isozymes to the pyruvate kinase activity of Vibrio cholerae: One K+-dependent constitutively active and another K+-independent with essential allosteric activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero-Mendiola, Carlos; García-Trejo, José J; Encalada, Rusely; Saavedra, Emma; Ramírez-Silva, Leticia

    2017-01-01

    In a previous phylogenetic study of the family of pyruvate kinase EC (2.7.1.40), a cluster with Glu117 and another with Lys117 were found (numbered according to the rabbit muscle enzyme). The sequences with Glu117 have been found to be K+-dependent, whereas those with Lys117 were K+-independent. Interestingly, only γ-proteobacteria exhibit sequences in both branches of the tree. In this context, it was explored whether these phylogenetically distinct pyruvate kinases were both expressed and contribute to the pyruvate kinase activity in Vibrio cholerae. The main findings of this work showed that the isozyme with Glu117 is an active K+-dependent enzyme. At the same substrate concentration, its Vmax in the absence of fructose 1,6 bisphosphate was 80% of that with its effector. This result is in accordance with the non-essential activation described by allosteric ligands for most pyruvate kinases. In contrast, the pyruvate kinase with Lys117 was a K+-independent enzyme displaying an allosteric activation by ribose 5-phosphate. At the same substrate concentration, its activity without the effector was 0.5% of the one obtained in the presence of ribose 5-phosphate, indicating that this sugar monophosphate is a strong activator of this enzyme. This absolute allosteric dependence is a novel feature of pyruvate kinase activity. Interestingly, in the K+-independent enzyme, Mn2+ may "mimic" the allosteric effect of Rib 5-P. Despite their different allosteric behavior, both isozymes display a rapid equilibrium random order kinetic mechanism. The intracellular concentrations of fructose 1,6-bisphosphate and ribose 5-phosphate in Vibrio cholerae have been experimentally verified to be sufficient to induce maximal activation of both enzymes. In addition, Western blot analysis indicated that both enzymes were co-expressed. Therefore, it is concluded that VcIPK and VcIIPK contribute to the activity of pyruvate kinase in this γ-proteobacterium.

  12. The TLR4 D299G and T399I SNPs are constitutively active to up-regulate expression of Trif-dependent genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgina L Hold

    Full Text Available Dysregulated Toll-Like Receptor (TLR signalling and genetic polymorphisms in these proteins are linked to many human diseases. We investigated TLR4 functional variants D299G and T399I to assess the impact on LPS-induced responsiveness in comparison to wild-type TLR4. The mechanism by which this occurs in unclear as these SNPs do not lie within the lipid A binding domain or dimerisation sites of the LPS-TLR4/MD2 receptor complexes. Transfection of TLR4D299G, TLR4T399I or TLR4D299G. T399I into HEK cells resulted in constitutive activation of an NF-κB reporter gene and a blunting of the LPS-induced reporter activation compared to WT-TLR4. Unstimulated human monocyte/macrophages, from patients with the D299G and T399I SNPs demonstrated a downregulation of many genes, particularly Tram/Trif signalling pathway constitutents compared to the TLR4 wild-type subjects supporting the concept of basal receptor activity. Monocyte/macrophages from carriers of the TLR4 D299G and T399I polymorphisms stimulated with LPS showed >6 fold lower levels of NF-κB and ∼12 fold higher IFN-β gene expression levels compared to wild-type subjects (P<0.05; MWU test and dramatically altered resultant cytokine profiles. We conclude that these TLR4 SNPs affect constitutive receptor activity which impacts on the hosts ability to respond to LPS challenge leading to a dysregulated sub-optimal immune response to infection.

  13. Constitutively Active Acetylcholine-Dependent Potassium Current Increases Atrial Defibrillation Threshold by Favoring Post-Shock Re-Initiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingen, Brian O.; Askar, Saïd F. A.; Neshati, Zeinab; Feola, Iolanda; Panfilov, Alexander V.; de Vries, Antoine A. F.; Pijnappels, Daniël A.

    2015-01-01

    Electrical cardioversion (ECV), a mainstay in atrial fibrillation (AF) treatment, is unsuccessful in up to 10–20% of patients. An important aspect of the remodeling process caused by AF is the constitutive activition of the atrium-specific acetylcholine-dependent potassium current (IK,ACh → IK,ACh-c), which is associated with ECV failure. This study investigated the role of IK,ACh-c in ECV failure and setting the atrial defibrillation threshold (aDFT) in optically mapped neonatal rat cardiomyocyte monolayers. AF was induced by burst pacing followed by application of biphasic shocks of 25–100 V to determine aDFT. Blocking IK,ACh-c by tertiapin significantly decreased DFT, which correlated with a significant increase in wavelength during reentry. Genetic knockdown experiments, using lentiviral vectors encoding a Kcnj5-specific shRNA to modulate IK,ACh-c, yielded similar results. Mechanistically, failed ECV was attributed to incomplete phase singularity (PS) removal or reemergence of PSs (i.e. re-initiation) through unidirectional propagation of shock-induced action potentials. Re-initiation occurred at significantly higher voltages than incomplete PS-removal and was inhibited by IK,ACh-c blockade. Whole-heart mapping confirmed our findings showing a 60% increase in ECV success rate after IK,ACh-c blockade. This study provides new mechanistic insight into failing ECV of AF and identifies IK,ACh-c as possible atrium-specific target to increase ECV effectiveness, while decreasing its harmfulness. PMID:26487066

  14. Engineering cell sensing and responses using a GPCR-coupled CRISPR-Cas system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kipniss, Nathan H; Dingal, P C Dave P; Abbott, Timothy R; Gao, Yuchen; Wang, Haifeng; Dominguez, Antonia A; Labanieh, Louai; Qi, Lei S

    2017-12-20

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the largest and most diverse group of membrane receptors in eukaryotes and detect a wide array of cues in the human body. Here we describe a molecular device that couples CRISPR-dCas9 genome regulation to diverse natural and synthetic extracellular signals via GPCRs. We generate alternative architectures for fusing CRISPR to GPCRs utilizing the previously reported design, Tango, and our design, ChaCha. Mathematical modeling suggests that for the CRISPR ChaCha design, multiple dCas9 molecules can be released across the lifetime of a GPCR. The CRISPR ChaCha is dose-dependent, reversible, and can activate multiple endogenous genes simultaneously in response to extracellular ligands. We adopt the design to diverse GPCRs that sense a broad spectrum of ligands, including synthetic compounds, chemokines, mitogens, fatty acids, and hormones. This toolkit of CRISPR-coupled GPCRs provides a modular platform for rewiring diverse ligand sensing to targeted genome regulation for engineering cellular functions.

  15. Use of Intraductal Adenovirus Transduction to Assess the Mammary Tumorigenic Potential of a Constitutively Active Prolactin Receptor

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Neville, Margaret

    1999-01-01

    ...), AKT, kinase dead AKT, the oncogenes fyn and src and DELTA AKT (the activated form). In addition a number of control vectors containing green fluorescent protein and Beta-galactosidase are available...

  16. Defective interleukin-4/Stat6 activity correlates with increased constitutive expression of negative regulators SOCS-3, SOCS-7, and CISH in colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao Hong; Xu, Shuang Bing; Yuan, Jia; Li, Ben Hui; Zhang, Yan; Yuan, Qin; Li, Pin Dong; Li, Feng; Zhang, Wen Jie

    2009-12-01

    Interleukin-4 (IL-4)-induced Stat6 activities (phenotypes) vary among human cancer cells, of which the HT-29 cell line carries an active Stat6(high) phenotype, while Caco-2 carries a defective Stat6(null) phenotype, respectively. Cancer cells with Stat6(high) show resistance to apoptosis and exaggerated metastasis, suggesting the clinical significance of Stat6 phenotypes. We previously showed that Stat6(high) HT-29 cells exhibited low constitutive expression of Stat6-negative regulators SOCS-1 and SHP-1 because of gene hypermethylation. This study further examined the constitutive expression of other closely related SOCS family numbers including SOCS-3, SOCS-5, SOCS-7, and CISH using RT-PCR. Similar to SOCS-1 and SHP-1, Stat6(high) HT-29 cells expressed low constitutive mRNA of SOCS-3, SOCS-7, and CISH than Stat6(null) Caco-2 cells. Interestingly, DNA demethylation using 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine in HT-29 cells up-regulated mRNA expression of the above genes, indicating a hypermethylation status, which was confirmed by methylation-specific sequencing in selected SOCS-3 gene. Furthermore, defective Stat6(null) Caco-2 exhibited impaired phosphorylation of Stat6 after IL-4 stimulation by flow cytometry, in keeping with the notion of an over-performed negative regulation. The findings that IL-4/Stat6 phenotypes show differential expression of multiple negative regulators suggest a model that a collective force of powerful negative regulators, directly and indirectly, acts on Stat6 activation, which may result in differential Stat6 phenotypes.

  17. Increase of anthraquinone content in Rubia cordifolia cells transformed by native and constitutively active forms of the AtCPK1 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shkryl, Yury N; Veremeichik, G N; Makhazen, D S; Silantieva, S A; Mishchenko, N P; Vasileva, E A; Fedoreyev, S A; Bulgakov, V P

    2016-09-01

    Overexpression of both native and mutant forms of AtCPK1 in Rubia cordifolia cells increased anthraquinone production and transcript abundance of the RcIPPI, RcOSBL, RcOSBS , and RcICS genes to different extents. Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) are involved in various cell processes and are regulated by a calcium signal system. CDPKs also function in plant defense against stress factors such as pathogens, temperature, and salinity. In this study, we compared the effect of heterologous expression of two forms of the Arabidopsis AtCPK1 gene, native and constitutively active (Ca(2+)-independent), on anthraquinone production in transgenic Rubia cordifolia cells. Significant qualitative and quantitative differences were found in the content of anthraquinone derivatives in control and AtCPK1-transgenic calli. Expression of the AtCPK1 gene increased anthraquinone production by 3 and 12 times for native and constitutively active forms, respectively, compared with control cells. In addition, we identified and quantified the expression of genes encoding key enzymes of the anthraquinone biosynthesis pathway, including isochorismate synthase (ICS), o-succinylbenzoate synthase (OSBS), o-succinylbenzoate ligase (OSBL), and isopentenyl diphosphate isomerase (IPPi). In all AtCPK1-transgenic cell lines, expression of ICS, OSBS, OSBL, and IPPi increased considerably at 14-15 days of subculture and decreased at the end of cultivation (30 days). The results suggest that both native and constitutively active AtCPK1 forms induced anthraquinone accumulation at the logarithmic growth stage via enhancement of expression of genes involved in the metabolism of anthraquinones or their regulatory mechanisms.

  18. Single-molecule imaging technique to study the dynamic regulation of GPCR function at the plasma membrane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snaar-Jagalska, B.E.; Cambi, A.; Schmidt, T.; de Keijzer, S.

    2013-01-01

    The lateral diffusion of a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) in the plasma membrane determines its interaction capabilities with downstream signaling molecules and critically modulates its function. Mechanisms that control GPCR mobility, like compartmentalization, enable a cell to fine-tune its

  19. Extracellular ionic locks determine variation in constitutive activity and ligand potency between species orthologs of the free fatty acid receptors FFA2 and FFA3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hudson, Brian D; Tikhonova, Irina G; Pandey, Sunil K

    2012-01-01

    Free fatty acid receptors 2 and 3 (FFA2 and FFA3) are G protein-coupled receptors for short chain free fatty acids (SCFAs). They respond to the same set of endogenous ligands but with distinct rank-order of potency such that acetate (C2) has been described as FFA2-selective, whereas propionate (C3...... selectivity to C2 and C3 resulted from broad differences in SCFAs potency at the mouse orthologs. In studies to define the molecular basis for these observations, marked variation in ligand-independent constitutive activity was identified using a [(35)S]GTPγS assay. The orthologs with higher potency...

  20. Mutations that silence constitutive signaling activity in the allosteric ligand-binding site of the thyrotropin receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Ann-Karin; Kleinau, Gunnar; Hoyer, Inna; Neumann, Susanne; Furkert, Jens; Rutz, Claudia; Schülein, Ralf; Gershengorn, Marvin C; Krause, Gerd

    2011-01-01

    The thyrotropin receptor (TSHR) exhibits elevated cAMP signaling in the basal state and becomes fully activated by thyrotropin. Previously we presented evidence that small-molecule ligands act allosterically within the transmembrane region in contrast to the orthosteric extracellular hormone-binding sites. Our goal in this study was to identify positions that surround the allosteric pocket and that are sensitive for inactivation of TSHR. Homology modeling combined with site-directed mutagenesis and functional characterization revealed seven mutants located in the allosteric binding site that led to a decrease of basal cAMP signaling activity. The majority of these silencing mutations, which constrain the TSHR in an inactive conformation, are found in two clusters when mapped onto the 3D structural model. We suggest that the amino acid positions identified herein are indicating locations where small-molecule antagonists, both neutral antagonists and inverse agonists, might interfere with active TSHR conformations.

  1. Constitutive activation of MEK1 in chondrocytes causes Stat1-independent achondroplasia-like dwarfism and rescues the Fgfr3-deficient mouse phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Shunichi; Balmes, Gener; McKinney, Sandra; Zhang, Zhaoping; Givol, David; de Crombrugghe, Benoit

    2004-01-01

    We generated transgenic mice that express a constitutively active mutant of MEK1 in chondrocytes. These mice showed a dwarf phenotype similar to achondroplasia, the most common human dwarfism, caused by activating mutations in FGFR3. These mice displayed incomplete hypertrophy of chondrocytes in the growth plates and a general delay in endochondral ossification, whereas chondrocyte proliferation was unaffected. Immunohistochemical analysis of the cranial base in transgenic embryos showed reduced staining for collagen type X and persistent expression of Sox9 in chondrocytes. These observations indicate that the MAPK pathway inhibits hypertrophic differentiation of chondrocytes and negatively regulates bone growth without inhibiting chondrocyte proliferation. Expression of a constitutively active mutant of MEK1 in chondrocytes of Fgfr3-deficient mice inhibited skeletal overgrowth, strongly suggesting that regulation of bone growth by FGFR3 is mediated at least in part by the MAPK pathway. Although loss of Stat1 restored the reduced chondrocyte proliferation in mice expressing an achondroplasia mutant of Fgfr3, it did not rescue the reduced hypertrophic zone, the delay in formation of secondary ossification centers, and the achondroplasia-like phenotype. These observations suggest a model in which Fgfr3 signaling inhibits bone growth by inhibiting chondrocyte differentiation through the MAPK pathway and by inhibiting chondrocyte proliferation through Stat1. PMID:14871928

  2. Differential regulation of metabolic pathways by androgen receptor (AR) and its constitutively active splice variant, AR-V7, in prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafi, Ayesha A; Putluri, Vasanta; Arnold, James M; Tsouko, Efrosini; Maity, Suman; Roberts, Justin M; Coarfa, Cristian; Frigo, Daniel E; Putluri, Nagireddy; Sreekumar, Arun; Weigel, Nancy L

    2015-10-13

    Metastatic prostate cancer (PCa) is primarily an androgen-dependent disease, which is treated with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Tumors usually develop resistance (castration-resistant PCa [CRPC]), but remain androgen receptor (AR) dependent. Numerous mechanisms for AR-dependent resistance have been identified including expression of constitutively active AR splice variants lacking the hormone-binding domain. Recent clinical studies show that expression of the best-characterized AR variant, AR-V7, correlates with resistance to ADT and poor outcome. Whether AR-V7 is simply a constitutively active substitute for AR or has novel gene targets that cause unique downstream changes is unresolved. Several studies have shown that AR activation alters cell metabolism. Using LNCaP cells with inducible expression of AR-V7 as a model system, we found that AR-V7 stimulated growth, migration, and glycolysis measured by ECAR (extracellular acidification rate) similar to AR. However, further analyses using metabolomics and metabolic flux assays revealed several differences. Whereas AR increased citrate levels, AR-V7 reduced citrate mirroring metabolic shifts observed in CRPC patients. Flux analyses indicate that the low citrate is a result of enhanced utilization rather than a failure to synthesize citrate. Moreover, flux assays suggested that compared to AR, AR-V7 exhibits increased dependence on glutaminolysis and reductive carboxylation to produce some of the TCA (tricarboxylic acid cycle) metabolites. These findings suggest that these unique actions represent potential therapeutic targets.

  3. alpha-Adducin mutations increase Na/K pump activity in renal cells by affecting constitutive endocytosis: implications for tubular Na reabsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torielli, Lucia; Tivodar, Simona; Montella, Rosa Chiara; Iacone, Roberto; Padoani, Gloria; Tarsini, Paolo; Russo, Ornella; Sarnataro, Daniela; Strazzullo, Pasquale; Ferrari, Patrizia; Bianchi, Giuseppe; Zurzolo, Chiara

    2008-08-01

    Genetic variation in alpha-adducin cytoskeletal protein is implicated in the polymerization and bundling of actin and alteration of the Na/K pump, resulting in abnormal renal sodium transport and hypertension in Milan hypertensive rats and humans. To investigate the molecular involvement of alpha-adducin in controlling Na/K pump activity, wild-type or mutated rat and human alpha-adducin forms were, respectively, transfected into several renal cell lines. Through multiple experimental approaches (microscopy, enzymatic assays, coimmunoprecipitation), we showed that rat and human mutated forms increased Na/K pump activity and the number of pump units; moreover, both variants coimmunoprecipitate with Na/K pump. The increased Na/K pump activity was not due to changes in its basolateral localization, but to an alteration of Na/K pump residential time on the plasma membrane. Indeed, both rat and human mutated variants reduced constitutive Na/K pump endocytosis and similarly affected transferrin receptor trafficking and fluid-phase endocytosis. In fact, alpha-adducin was detected in clathrin-coated vesicles and coimmunoprecipitated with clathrin. These results indicate that adducin, besides its modulatory effects on actin cytoskeleton dynamics, might play a direct role in clathrin-dependent endocytosis. The constitutive reduction of the Na/K pump endocytic rate induced by mutated adducin variants may be relevant in Na-dependent hypertension.

  4. Several nuclear events during apoptosis depend on caspase-3 activation but do not constitute a common pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Trisciuoglio

    Full Text Available A number of nuclear events occur during apoptosis, including DNA laddering, nuclear lamina breakdown, phosphorylation of histones H2B and histone H2AX, and the tight binding to chromatin of HMGB1 and CAD, the nuclease responsible for DNA laddering. We have performed an epistasis analysis to investigate whether these events cluster together in pathways. We find that all depend directly or indirectly on caspase-3 activation. CAD activation, H2AX phosphorylation and DNA laddering cluster together into a pathway, but all other events appear to be independent of each other downstream of caspase-3, and likely evolved subject to different functional pressures.

  5. A highly prevalent equine glycogen storage disease is explained by constitutive activation of a mutant glycogen synthase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maile, C A; Hingst, Janne Rasmuss; Mahalingan, K K

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Equine type 1 polysaccharide storage myopathy (PSSM1) is associated with a missense mutation (R309H) in the glycogen synthase (GYS1) gene, enhanced glycogen synthase (GS) activity and excessive glycogen and amylopectate inclusions in muscle. METHODS: Equine muscle biochemical and reco...

  6. Constitutive cannabinoid 1 and mu opioid receptor activity in the ventral tegmental area: occurrence, function and therapeutic relevance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meye, F.J.

    2012-01-01

    Cannabinoid 1 receptors (CB1Rs) play a crucial role in regulating systems dedicated to processing rewards and emotions. It was known that in artificial systems, CB1Rs can exhibit activity that is independent of the typical agonist-driven form. However, it remained largely unclear whether this

  7. Generic GPCR residue numbers - aligning topology maps while minding the gaps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isberg, Vignir; de Graaf, Chris; Bortolato, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    structures for classes B, C, and F now call for a community consensus in residue numbering within and across these classes. Furthermore, the structural era has uncovered helix bulges and constrictions that offset the generic residue numbers. The use of generic residue numbers depends on convenient access...... by pharmacologists, chemists, and structural biologists. We review the generic residue numbering schemes for each GPCR class, as well as a complementary structure-based scheme, and provide illustrative examples and GPCR database (GPCRDB) web tools to number any receptor sequence or structure....

  8. Genetic wiring maps of single-cell protein states reveal an off-switch for GPCR signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockmann, Markus; Blomen, Vincent A; Nieuwenhuis, Joppe; Stickel, Elmer; Raaben, Matthijs; Bleijerveld, Onno B; Altelaar, A F Maarten; Jae, Lucas T; Brummelkamp, Thijn R

    2017-06-08

    As key executers of biological functions, the activity and abundance of proteins are subjected to extensive regulation. Deciphering the genetic architecture underlying this regulation is critical for understanding cellular signalling events and responses to environmental cues. Using random mutagenesis in haploid human cells, we apply a sensitive approach to directly couple genomic mutations to protein measurements in individual cells. Here we use this to examine a suite of cellular processes, such as transcriptional induction, regulation of protein abundance and splicing, signalling cascades (mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), protein kinase B (AKT), interferon, and Wingless and Int-related protein (WNT) pathways) and epigenetic modifications (histone crotonylation and methylation). This scalable, sequencing-based procedure elucidates the genetic landscapes that control protein states, identifying genes that cause very narrow phenotypic effects and genes that lead to broad phenotypic consequences. The resulting genetic wiring map identifies the E3-ligase substrate adaptor KCTD5 (ref. 1) as a negative regulator of the AKT pathway, a key signalling cascade frequently deregulated in cancer. KCTD5-deficient cells show elevated levels of phospho-AKT at S473 that could not be attributed to effects on canonical pathway components. To reveal the genetic requirements for this phenotype, we iteratively analysed the regulatory network linked to AKT activity in the knockout background. This genetic modifier screen exposes suppressors of the KCTD5 phenotype and mechanistically demonstrates that KCTD5 acts as an off-switch for GPCR signalling by triggering proteolysis of Gβγ heterodimers dissociated from the Gα subunit. Although biological networks have previously been constructed on the basis of gene expression, protein-protein associations, or genetic interaction profiles, we foresee that the approach described here will enable the

  9. Extracellular Vesicles from a Helminth Parasite Suppress Macrophage Activation and Constitute an Effective Vaccine for Protective Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gillian Coakley

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have demonstrated that many parasites release extracellular vesicles (EVs, yet little is known about the specific interactions of EVs with immune cells or their functions during infection. We show that EVs secreted by the gastrointestinal nematode Heligmosomoides polygyrus are internalized by macrophages and modulate their activation. EV internalization causes downregulation of type 1 and type 2 immune-response-associated molecules (IL-6 and TNF, and Ym1 and RELMα and inhibits expression of the IL-33 receptor subunit ST2. Co-incubation with EV antibodies abrogated suppression of alternative activation and was associated with increased co-localization of the EVs with lysosomes. Furthermore, mice vaccinated with EV-alum generated protective immunity against larval challenge, highlighting an important role in vivo. In contrast, ST2-deficient mice are highly susceptible to infection, and they are unable to clear parasites following EV vaccination. Hence, macrophage activation and the IL-33 pathway are targeted by H. polygyrus EVs, while neutralization of EV function facilitates parasite expulsion.

  10. UNDERSTANDING INFORMAL CONSTITUTIONAL CHANGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen M. Griffin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Amid much recent American work on the problem of informal constitutional change, this article stakes out a distinctive position. I argue that theories of constitutional change in the US must address the question of the relationship between the “small c” and “big C” Constitution and treat seriously the possibility of conflict between them. I stress the unavoidable role the text of the Constitution and structural doctrines of federalism and separation of powers play in this relationship and thus in constitutional change, both formal and informal. I therefore counsel against theories that rely solely on a practice-based approach or analogies between “small c” constitutional developments and British or Commonwealth traditions of the “unwritten” constitution and constitutional “conventions.” The alternative I advocate is to approach constitutional change from a historicist perspective that focuses attention on state building and the creation of new institutional capacities. This approach will allow us to make progress by highlighting that there can be multiple constitutional orders in a given historical era, thus accounting for the conflictual nature of contemporary constitutional development in the US.

  11. Constitutively Active Akt1 Cooperates with KRasG12D to Accelerate In Vivo Pancreatic Tumor Onset and Progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toya M. Albury

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is a deadly disease characterized by metastatic progression and resistance to conventional therapeutics. Mutation of KRAS is the most frequent early event in pancreatic tumor progression. AKT isoforms are frequently activated in pancreatic cancer, and reports have implicated hyperactivation of AKT1, as well as AKT2, in pancreatic tumor formation. The objective here is to delineate the role of AKT in facilitating in vivo pancreatic tumor progression in the context of KRAS mutation and predisposition to pancreatic cancer. METHODS: Mice with Akt1 and KRas mutant alleles expressed using the pancreas Pdx promoter were mated to characterize the incidence and frequency of histologic and genetic alterations known to occur commonly in human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. RESULTS: Active Akt1 (Akt1Myr, containing a myristoylation sequence cooperated with active mutant KRasG12D to accelerate pancreatic carcinoma onset and progression and increase phosphorylation of downstream effectors in the Akt pathway. Mucin and smooth muscle actin expression was found in and around pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasms (PanINs, and accelerated time to metastasis was found in Akt1Myr/KRasG12D mice. CONCLUSIONS: In contrast to prior reports of pancreatic KRas mutant mice mated with mice deficient for various tumor suppressor genes, which resulted in aggressive disease within a few months of age, Akt1Myr/KRasG12D mice enabled the study of PanINs and spontaneous pancreatic transformation more characteristic of human pancreatic progression in elderly individuals. The Akt1Myr/KRasG12D model holds promise for delineating the tumor biology and biomarkers critical for understanding their cooperation in cancer oncogenesis and future targeting in therapeutic strategies.

  12. Resveratrol suppresses constitutive activation of AKT via generation of ROS and induces apoptosis in diffuse large B cell lymphoma cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azhar R Hussain

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We have recently shown that deregulation PI3-kinase/AKT survival pathway plays an important role in pathogenesis of diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL. In an attempt to identify newer therapeutic agents, we investigated the role of Resveratrol (trans-3,4', 5-trihydroxystilbene, a naturally occurring polyphenolic compound on a panel of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL cells in causing inhibition of cell viability and inducing apoptosis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We investigated the action of Resveratrol on DLBCL cells and found that Resveratrol inhibited cell viability and induced apoptosis by inhibition of constitutively activated AKT and its downstream targets via generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Simultaneously, Resveratrol treatment of DLBCL cell lines also caused ROS dependent upregulation of DR5; and interestingly, co-treatment of DLBCL with sub-toxic doses of TRAIL and Resveratrol synergistically induced apoptosis via utilizing DR5, on the other hand, gene silencing of DR5 abolished this effect. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Altogether, these data suggest that Resveratrol acts as a suppressor of AKT/PKB pathway leading to apoptosis via generation of ROS and at the same time primes DLBCL cells via up-regulation of DR5 to TRAIL-mediated apoptosis. These data raise the possibility that Resveratrol may have a future therapeutic role in DLBCL and possibly other malignancies with constitutive activation of the AKT/PKB pathway.

  13. Constitutive Smad signaling and Smad-dependent collagen gene expression in mouse embryonic fibroblasts lacking peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, Asish K; Wei, Jun; Wu, Minghua; Varga, John

    2008-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), a potent inducer of collagen synthesis, is implicated in pathological fibrosis. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ) is a nuclear hormone receptor that regulates adipogenesis and numerous other biological processes. Here, we demonstrate that collagen gene expression was markedly elevated in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) lacking PPAR-γ compared to heterozygous control MEFs. Treatment with the PPAR-γ ligand 15d-PGJ 2 failed to down-regulate collagen gene expression in PPAR-γ null MEFs, whereas reconstitution of these cells with ectopic PPAR-γ resulted in their normalization. Compared to control MEFs, PPAR-γ null MEFs displayed elevated levels of the Type I TGF-β receptor (TβRI), and secreted more TGF-β1 into the media. Furthermore, PPAR-γ null MEFs showed constitutive phosphorylation of cellular Smad2 and Smad3, even in the absence of exogenous TGF-β, which was abrogated by the ALK5 inhibitor SB431542. Constitutive Smad2/3 phosphorylation in PPAR-γ null MEFs was associated with Smad3 binding to its cognate DNA recognition sequences, and interaction with coactivator p300 previously implicated in TGF-β responses. Taken together, these results indicate that loss of PPAR-γ in MEFs is associated with upregulation of collagen synthesis, and activation of intracellular Smad signal transduction, due, at least in part, to autocrine TGF-β stimulation

  14. Constitutive activation of β-catenin in neural progenitors results in disrupted proliferation and migration of neurons within the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pöschl, Julia; Grammel, Daniel; Dorostkar, Mario M; Kretzschmar, Hans A; Schüller, Ulrich

    2013-02-15

    Wnt signaling is known to play crucial roles in the development of multiple organs as well as in cancer. In particular, constitutive activation of Wnt/β-Catenin signaling in distinct populations of forebrain or brainstem precursor cells has previously been shown to result in dramatic brain enlargement during embryonic stages of development as well as in the formation of medulloblastoma, a malignant brain tumor in childhood. In order to extend this knowledge to postnatal stages of both cerebral and cerebellar cortex development, we conditionally activated Wnt signaling by introducing a dominant active form of β-catenin in hGFAP-positive neural precursors. Such mutant mice survived up to 21 days postnatally. While the mice revealed enlarged ventricles and an initial expansion of the Pax6-positive ventricular zone, Pax6 expression and proliferative activity in the ventricular zone was virtually lost by embryonic day 16.5. Loss of Pax6 expression was not followed by expression of the subventricular zone marker Tbr2, indicating insufficient neuronal differentiation. In support of this finding, cortical thickness was severely diminished in all analyzed stages from embryonic day 14.5 to postnatal day 12, and appropriate layering was not detectable. Similarly, cerebella of hGFAP-cre::Ctnnb1(ex3)(Fl/+) mice were hypoplastic and displayed severe lamination defects. Constitutively active β-Catenin induced inappropriate proliferation of granule neurons and inadequate development of Bergmann glia, thereby preventing regular migration of granule cells and normal cortical layering. We conclude that Wnt signaling has divergent roles in the central nervous system and that Wnt needs to be tightly controlled in a time- and cell type-specific manner. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Overexpression of a rice NPR1 homolog leads to constitutive activation of defense response and hypersensitivity to light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chern, Mawsheng; Fitzgerald, Heather A; Canlas, Patrick E; Navarre, Duroy A; Ronald, Pamela C

    2005-06-01

    Arabidopsis NPR1/NIM1 is a key regulator of systemic acquired resistance (SAR), which confers lasting broad-spectrum resistance. Previous reports indicate that rice has a disease-resistance pathway similar to the Arabidopsis SAR pathway. Here we report the isolation and characterization of a rice NPR1 homologue (NH1). Transgenic rice plants overexpressing NH1 (NH1ox) acquire high levels of resistance to Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae. The resistance phenotype is heritable and correlates with the presence of the transgene and reduced bacterial growth. Northern analysis shows that NH1ox rice spontaneously activates defense genes, contrasting with NPR1-overexpressing Arabidopsis, where defense genes are not activated until induction. Wild-type NH1, but not a point mutant corresponding to npr1-1, interacts strongly with the rice transcription factor rTGA2.2 in yeast two-hybrid. Greenhouse-grown NH1ox plants develop lesion-mimic spots on leaves at preflowering stage although no other developmental effects are observed. However, when grown in growth chambers (GCs) under low light, NH1ox plants are dwarfed, indicating elevated sensitivity to light. The GC-grown NH1ox plants show much higher salicylic acid (SA) levels than the wild type, whereas greenhouse-grown NH1ox plants contain lower SA. These results indicate that NH1 may be involved in the regulation of SA in response to environmental changes.

  16. Comparative Expression Study of the Endo–G Protein Coupled Receptor (GPCR) Repertoire in Human Glioblastoma Cancer Stem-like Cells, U87-MG Cells and Non Malignant Cells of Neural Origin Unveils New Potential Therapeutic Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennon, Sarah; Carapito, Christine; Dong, Jihu; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Junier, Marie-Pierre; Chneiweiss, Hervé; Cianférani, Sarah; Haiech, Jacques; Kilhoffer, Marie-Claude

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastomas (GBMs) are highly aggressive, invasive brain tumors with bad prognosis and unmet medical need. These tumors are heterogeneous being constituted by a variety of cells in different states of differentiation. Among these, cells endowed with stem properties, tumor initiating/propagating properties and particularly resistant to chemo- and radiotherapies are designed as the real culprits for tumor maintenance and relapse after treatment. These cells, termed cancer stem-like cells, have been designed as prominent targets for new and more efficient cancer therapies. G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), a family of membrane receptors, play a prominent role in cell signaling, cell communication and crosstalk with the microenvironment. Their role in cancer has been highlighted but remains largely unexplored. Here, we report a descriptive study of the differential expression of the endo-GPCR repertoire in human glioblastoma cancer stem-like cells (GSCs), U-87 MG cells, human astrocytes and fetal neural stem cells (f-NSCs). The endo-GPCR transcriptome has been studied using Taqman Low Density Arrays. Of the 356 GPCRs investigated, 138 were retained for comparative studies between the different cell types. At the transcriptomic level, eight GPCRs were specifically expressed/overexpressed in GSCs. Seventeen GPCRs appeared specifically expressed in cells with stem properties (GSCs and f-NSCs). Results of GPCR expression at the protein level using mass spectrometry and proteomic analysis are also presented. The comparative GPCR expression study presented here gives clues for new pathways specifically used by GSCs and unveils novel potential therapeutic targets. PMID:24662753

  17. 118 CONSTITUTIONALISM AND GOOD GOVERNANCE IN NIGERIA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fr. Ikenga

    This paper attempts to analyse the constitutional development of Nigeria with a view to really determining at what point it can be said that Nigeria had a constitution. The various determinants of constitutionalism are to be x-rayed and juxtaposed with the activities of the government particularly the fourth and fifth republics.

  18. Expression of a constitutively active calcineurin encoded by an intron-retaining mRNA in follicular keratinocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Fujimura

    Full Text Available Hair growth is a highly regulated cyclical process. Immunosuppressive immunophilin ligands such as cyclosporin A (CsA and FK506 are known as potent hair growth modulatory agents in rodents and humans that induce active hair growth and inhibit hair follicle regression. The immunosuppressive effectiveness of these drugs has been generally attributed to inhibition of T cell activation through well-characterized pathways. Specifically, CsA and FK506 bind to intracellular proteins, principally cyclophilin A and FKBP12, respectively, and thereby inhibit the phosphatase calcineurin (Cn. The calcineurin (Cn/NFAT pathway has an important, but poorly understood, role in the regulation of hair follicle development. Here we show that a novel-splicing variant of calcineurin Aß CnAß-FK, which is encoded by an intron-retaining mRNA and is deficient in the autoinhibitory domain, is predominantly expressed in mature follicular keratinocytes but not in the proliferating keratinocytes of rodents. CnAß-FK was weakly sensitive to Ca(2+ and dephosphorylated NFATc2 under low Ca(2+ levels in keratinocytes. Inhibition of Cn/NFAT induced hair growth in nude mice. Cyclin G2 was identified as a novel target of the Cn/NFATc2 pathway and its expression in follicular keratinocytes was reduced by inhibition of Cn/NFAT. Overexpression of cyclin G2 arrested the cell cycle in follicular keratinocytes in vitro and the Cn inhibitor, cyclosporin A, inhibited nuclear localization of NFATc2, resulting in decreased cyclin G2 expression in follicular keratinocytes of rats in vivo. We therefore suggest that the calcineurin/NFAT pathway has a unique regulatory role in hair follicle development.

  19. Multiple Mechanisms Cooperate to Constitutively Exclude the Transcriptional Co-Activator YAP from the Nucleus During Murine Oogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbassi, Laleh; Malki, Safia; Cockburn, Katie; Macaulay, Angus; Robert, Claude; Rossant, Janet; Clarke, Hugh J

    2016-05-01

    Reproduction depends on the generation of healthy oocytes. Improving therapeutic strategies to prolong or rescue fertility depends on identifying the inter- and intracellular mechanisms that direct oocyte development under physiological conditions. Growth and proliferation of multiple cell types is regulated by the Hippo signaling pathway, whose chief effectors are the transcriptional co-activator YAP and its paralogue WWTR1. To resolve conflicting results concerning the potential role of Hippo in mammalian oocyte development, we systematically investigated the expression and localization of YAP in mouse oocytes. We report that that YAP is expressed in the germ cells beginning as early as Embryonic Day 15.5 and subsequently throughout pre- and postnatal oocyte development. However, YAP is restricted to the cytoplasm at all stages. YAP is phosphorylated at serine-112 in growing and fully grown oocytes, identifying a likely mechanistic basis for its nuclear exclusion, and becomes dephosphorylated at this site during meiotic maturation. Phosphorylation at serine-112 is regulated by a mechanism dependent on cyclic AMP and protein kinase A, which is known to be active in oocytes prior to maturation. Growing oocytes also contain a subpopulation of YAP, likely dephosphorylated, that is able enter the oocyte nucleus, but it is not retained there, implying that oocytes lack the cofactors required to retain YAP in the nucleus. Thus, although YAP is expressed throughout oocyte development, phosphorylation-dependent and -independent mechanisms cooperate to ensure that it does not accumulate in the nucleus. We conclude that nuclear YAP does not play a significant physiological role during oocyte development in mammals. © 2016 by the Society for the Study of Reproduction, Inc.

  20. Utilizing constitutional values in constitutional comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Venter

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available We are living in an era in which constitutional law has become a comparative science. A cogent, generally accepted methodology for constitutional comparison, however does not exist. There can, it is therefore submitted, be no such thing as a universal, monolithic science or discipline of comparative law, be it in the field of private or of public law. On the other hand, juridical comparison done unscientifically will not yield the fruits of useful knowledge.The law in general is replete with unspecific notions such as justice, reasonableness, public interest, boni mores, and many others. It should therefore not be disturbing to find that values are often foundational to the operation and application of constitutional law. The values underpinning different constitutional systems may be useful as a tertium comparationis in a comparative exercise. This however requires a penetrating consideration of the foundations of the systems being compared.In this contribution "a small comparative exercise" is undertaken by way of demonstration of the method. The South African constitutional provisions relating to equality and affirmative action are set against the background of the relevant norms and practices in the United States of America and Canada. This produces some useful insights:• in the USA equality increasingly underpins a strict proscription of discrimination, thus shrinking the scope for justifiable affirmative action programmes;• the South African law relating to discrimination and upliftment of the disadvantaged was clearly influenced by, and is therefore better understood against the background of, the equivalent arrangements in Canada, which was in its turn possibly conceived against the backdrop of early developments in this regard in the USA;• the Canadian doctrine and law of the constitution deals with affirmative action as an exception to the prohibition of discrimination and does not favour private affirmative action programmes

  1. Inhibition of STAT3 reduces astrocytoma cell invasion and constitutive activation of STAT3 predicts poor prognosis in human astrocytoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinchuan Liang

    Full Text Available Astrocytoma cells characteristically possess high invasion potentials. Recent studies have revealed that knockdown of signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 (STAT3 expression by RNAi induces apoptosis in astrocytoma cell. Nevertheless, the distinct roles of STAT3 in astrocytoma's invasion and recurrence have not been elucidated. In this study, we silenced STAT3 using Small interfering RNAs in two human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM cell lines (U251 and U87, and investigated the effect on GBM cell adhesion and invasion. Our results demonstrate that disruption of STAT3 inhibits GBM cell's adhesion and invasion. Knockdown of STAT3 significantly increased E-cadherin but decreased N-cadherin, vascular endothelial growth factor, matrix metalloproteinase 2 and matrix metalloproteinase 9. Additionally, expression of pSTAT3(Tyr705 correlates with astrocytoma WHO classification, Karnofsky performance status scale score, tumor recurrence and survival. Furthermore, pSTAT3(Tyr705 is a significant prognostic factor in astrocytoma. In conclusion, STAT3 may affect astrocytoma invasion, expression of pSTAT3(Tyr705 is a significant prognostic factor in tumor recurrence and overall survival in astrocytoma patients. Therefore, STAT3 may provide a potential target for molecular therapy in human astrocytoma, and pSTAT3(Tyr705could be an important biomarker for astrocytoma prognosis.

  2. Constitution, 5 October 1988.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    This document contains major provisions of the constitution adopted by Brazil on 5 October 1988. This constitution seeks to promote the welfare of all citizens without discrimination. The equality of all citizens is guaranteed, and the equal rights of women are specifically mentioned. Property rights are also guaranteed and defined. Female inmates are granted the right to remain with their children while breast feeding. Workers are guaranteed a minimum wage, a family allowance for dependents, maternity/paternity leave, specific incentives to protect the labor market for women, retirement benefits, free day care for preschool-age children, pay equity, and equal rights between tenured and sporadically employed workers. Agrarian reform provisions are given, including the authority to expropriate land. Social and economic policies to promote health are called for, and public health services are to be decentralized, to be integrated, and to foster community participation. Pension plan and social assistance provisions are outlined as are duties of the state in regard to education. The amount of money to be dedicated to education is set out, and a national educational plan is called for to achieve such goals as the eradication of illiteracy, the universalization of school attendance, the improvement of instruction, and the provision of vocational training. Specific measures are set out to protect and preserve the environment. Family policy deals with issues of marriage, the definition of a family, divorce, the right to family planning services, and the deterrence of domestic violence. Social protection provisions cover mothers and children, handicapped persons, and protection of minors. Finally, the customs and rights of Indians are protected, with special provisions given to protect land tenure and to protect the rights of Indians in water resource development and prospecting and mining activities.

  3. Movimientos sociales, activismo constitucional y narrativa democrática en la Argentina contemporánea Social movements, constitutional activism and democratic narrative in contemporary Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Delamata

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available El artículo analiza tres procesos recientes de movilización socio-legal en Argentina y subraya el rol de la Constitución y la comunidad legal garantista en su despliegue. El enfoque utilizado propone entender los procesos bajo la forma de una reactivación del patrón activista gestado en la transición democrática y señala sus efectos actuales sobre los procedimientos democráticos y la gramática de ciudadanía.The article analyzes three contemporary processes of socio-legal mobilization in Argentina and underlines the role of the Constitution and of the legal community in its enforcement. The adopted approach aims at understanding those processes as a sort of reactivation of the activist tradition born during the transition to democracy, and emphasizing the present effects of this constitutional activism on democratic procedures and the citizenship grammar.

  4. Quantification of GPCR internalization by single-molecule microscopy in living cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Serge, A.; Keijzer, S. de; Hemert, F. Van; Hickman, M.R.; Hereld, D.; Spaink, H.P.; Schmidt, T.; Snaar-Jagalska, B.E.

    2011-01-01

    Receptor internalization upon ligand stimulation is a key component of a cell's response and allows a cell to correctly sense its environment. Novel fluorescent methods have enabled the direct visualization of the agonist-stimulated G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) trafficking in living cells.

  5. Ligand modulation of sidechain dynamics in a wild-type human GPCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Lindsay D; Dikiy, Igor; Chapman, Karen; Rödström, Karin Ej; Aramini, James; LeVine, Michael V; Khelashvili, George; Rasmussen, Søren Gf; Gardner, Kevin H; Rosenbaum, Daniel M

    2017-10-06

    GPCRs regulate all aspects of human physiology, and biophysical studies have deepened our understanding of GPCR conformational regulation by different ligands. Yet there is no experimental evidence for how sidechain dynamics control allosteric transitions between GPCR conformations. To address this deficit, we generated samples of a wild-type GPCR (A 2A R) that are deuterated apart from 1 H/ 13 C NMR probes at isoleucine δ1 methyl groups, which facilitated 1 H/ 13 C methyl TROSY NMR measurements with opposing ligands. Our data indicate that low [Na + ] is required to allow large agonist-induced structural changes in A 2A R, and that patterns of sidechain dynamics substantially differ between agonist (NECA) and inverse agonist (ZM241385) bound receptors, with the inverse agonist suppressing fast ps-ns timescale motions at the G protein binding site. Our approach to GPCR NMR creates a framework for exploring how different regions of a receptor respond to different ligands or signaling proteins through modulation of fast ps-ns sidechain dynamics.

  6. GPCR-OKB: the G Protein Coupled Receptor Oligomer Knowledge Base.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khelashvili, G.; Dorff, K.; Shan, J.; Camacho-Artacho, M.; Skrabanek, L.; Vroling, B.; Bouvier, M.; Devi, L.A.; George, S.R.; Javitch, J.A.; Lohse, M.J.; Milligan, G.; Neubig, R.R.; Palczewski, K.; Parmentier, M.; Pin, J.P.; Vriend, G.; Campagne, F.; Filizola, M.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY: Rapid expansion of available data about G Protein Coupled Receptor (GPCR) dimers/oligomers over the past few years requires an effective system to organize this information electronically. Based on an ontology derived from a community dialog involving colleagues using experimental and

  7. Ligation of the adhesion-GPCR EMR2 regulates human neutrophil function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yona, Simon; Lin, Hsi-Hsien; Dri, Pietro; Davies, John Q.; Hayhoe, Richard P. G.; Lewis, Sion M.; Heinsbroek, Sigrid E. M.; Brown, K. Alun; Perretti, Mauro; Hamann, Jörg; Treacher, David F.; Gordon, Siamon; Stacey, Martin

    2008-01-01

    At present, approximately 150 different members of the adhesion-G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family have been identified in metazoans. Surprisingly, very little is known about their function, although they all possess large extracellular domains coupled to a seven-transmembrane domain,

  8. Regulation of GPCR-mediated smooth muscle contraction : implications for asthma and pulmonary hypertension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wright, D B; Tripathi, S; Sikarwar, A; Santosh, K T; Perez-Zoghbi, J; Ojo, O O; Irechukwu, N; Ward, J P T; Schaafsma, D

    Contractile G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) have emerged as key regulators of smooth muscle contraction, both under healthy and diseased conditions. This brief review will discuss some key topics and novel insights regarding GPCR-mediated airway and vascular smooth muscle contraction as

  9. Outside-in signalling generated by a constitutively activated integrin αIIbβ3 impairs proplatelet formation in human megakaryocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loredana Bury

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The interaction of megakaryocytes with matrix proteins of the osteoblastic and vascular niche is essential for megakaryocyte maturation and proplatelet formation. Fibrinogen is present in the vascular niche and the fibrinogen receptor α(IIbβ(3 is abundantly expressed on megakaryocytes, however the role of the interaction between fibrinogen and α(IIbβ(3 in proplatelet formation in humans is not yet fully understood. We have recently reported a novel congenital macrothrombocytopenia associated with a heterozygous mutation of the β(3 subunit of α(IIbβ(3. The origin of thrombocytopenia in this condition remains unclear and this may represent an interesting natural model to get further insight into the role of the megakaryocyte fibrinogen receptor in megakaryopoiesis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Patients' peripheral blood CD45+ cells in culture were differentiated into primary megakaryocytes and their maturation, spreading on different extracellular matrix proteins, and proplatelet formation were analyzed. Megakaryocyte maturation was normal but proplatelet formation was severely impaired, with tips decreased in number and larger in size than those of controls. Moreover, megakaryocyte spreading on fibrinogen was abnormal, with 50% of spread cells showing disordered actin distribution and more evident focal adhesion points than stress fibres. Integrin α(IIbβ(3 expression was reduced but the receptor was constitutively activated and a sustained, and substrate-independent, activation of proteins of the outside-in signalling was observed. In addition, platelet maturation from preplatelets was impaired. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data show that constitutive activation of α(IIbβ(3-mediated outside-in signalling in human megakaryocytes negatively influences proplatelet formation, leading to macrothombocytopenia.

  10. GPR68, a proton-sensing GPCR, mediates interaction of cancer-associated fibroblasts and cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, Shu Z; Sriram, Krishna; Liang, Wenjing; Chang, Sarah E; French, Randall; McCann, Thalia; Sicklick, Jason; Nishihara, Hiroshi; Lowy, Andrew M; Insel, Paul A

    2018-03-01

    The microenvironment of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is characterized by a dense fibrotic stroma (desmoplasia) generated by pancreatic cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) derived from pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) and pancreatic fibroblasts (PFs). Using an unbiased GPCRomic array approach, we identified 82 G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) commonly expressed by CAFs derived from 5 primary PDAC tumors. Compared with PSCs and PFs, CAFs have increased expression of GPR68 (a proton-sensing GPCR), with the results confirmed by immunoblotting, The Cancer Genome Atlas data, and immunohistochemistry of PDAC tumors. Co-culture of PSCs with PDAC cells, or incubation with TNF-α, induced GPR68 expression. GPR68 activation (by decreasing the extracellular pH) enhanced IL-6 expression via a cAMP/PKA/cAMP response element binding protein signaling pathway. Knockdown of GPR68 by short interfering RNA diminished low pH-induced production of IL-6 and enhancement of PDAC cell proliferation by CAF conditioned media. CAFs from other gastrointestinal cancers also express GPR68. PDAC cells thus induce expression by CAFs of GPR68, which senses the acidic microenvironment, thereby increasing production of fibrotic markers and IL-6 and promoting PDAC cell proliferation. CAF-expressed GPR68 is a mediator of low-pH-promoted regulation of the tumor microenvironments, in particular to PDAC cell-CAF interaction and may be a novel therapeutic target for pancreatic and perhaps other types of cancers.-Wiley, S. Z., Sriram, K., Liang, W., Chang, S. E., French, R., McCann, T., Sicklick, J., Nishihara, H., Lowy, A. M., Insel, P. A. GPR68, a proton-sensing GPCR, mediates interaction of cancer-associated fibroblasts and cancer cells.

  11. Roles of phosphorylation and helix propensity in the binding of the KIX domain of CREB-binding protein by constitutive (c-Myb) and inducible (CREB) activators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zor, Tsaffrir; Mayr, Bernhard M; Dyson, H Jane; Montminy, Marc R; Wright, Peter E

    2002-11-01

    cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB)-binding protein (CBP) is a general transcriptional co-activator that mediates interactions between transcription factors and the basal transcription machinery. To obtain insights into the mechanism by which the KIX domain of CBP can recognize the transactivation domains of many different transcription factors, we have used NMR and biochemical analyses to study the interactions of KIX with the transactivation domain from the constitutive activator c-Myb and with the kinase-inducible transactivation domain (KID) from CREB. NMR chemical shift mapping shows that both activation domains bind to the same surface of KIX. In the unbound state, both the phosphorylated KID and c-Myb activation domains are only partly structured, and binding to KIX is coupled with folding to form an amphipathic helix. Helix-destabilizing mutations significantly impair binding, whereas mutations that increase the intrinsic secondary structure content of the free phosphorylated KID peptide have only a small influence on binding affinity. Low affinity but specific binding of unphosphorylated KID to KIX was measured by ITC and was also observed in Western blot assays and by a fluorescence resonance energy transfer experiment in living cells. The large increase in the affinity for phosphorylated KID is due to favorable intermolecular interactions involving the phosphate moiety. After induction by phosphorylation, CREB is able to compete effectively with other transcriptional activators for binding to CBP.

  12. Tissue-specific transcriptome analyses provide new insights into GPCR signalling in adult Schistosoma mansoni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahnel, Steffen; Wheeler, Nic; Lu, Zhigang; Wangwiwatsin, Arporn; McVeigh, Paul; Maule, Aaron; Berriman, Matthew; Day, Timothy; Ribeiro, Paula; Grevelding, Christoph G

    2018-01-01

    Schistosomes are blood-dwelling trematodes with global impact on human and animal health. Because medical treatment is currently based on a single drug, praziquantel, there is urgent need for the development of alternative control strategies. The Schistosoma mansoni genome project provides a platform to study and connect the genetic repertoire of schistosomes to specific biological functions essential for successful parasitism. G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) form the largest superfamily of transmembrane receptors throughout the Eumetazoan phyla, including platyhelminths. Due to their involvement in diverse biological processes, their pharmacological importance, and proven druggability, GPCRs are promising targets for new anthelmintics. However, to identify candidate receptors, a more detailed understanding of the roles of GPCR signalling in schistosome biology is essential. An updated phylogenetic analysis of the S. mansoni GPCR genome (GPCRome) is presented, facilitated by updated genome data that allowed a more precise annotation of GPCRs. Additionally, we review the current knowledge on GPCR signalling in this parasite and provide new insights into the potential roles of GPCRs in schistosome reproduction based on the findings of a recent tissue-specific transcriptomic study in paired and unpaired S. mansoni. According to the current analysis, GPCRs contribute to gonad-specific functions but also to nongonad, pairing-dependent processes. The latter may regulate gonad-unrelated functions during the multifaceted male-female interaction. Finally, we compare the schistosome GPCRome to that of another parasitic trematode, Fasciola, and discuss the importance of GPCRs to basic and applied research. Phylogenetic analyses display GPCR diversity in free-living and parasitic platyhelminths and suggest diverse functions in schistosomes. Although their roles need to be substantiated by functional studies in the future, the data support the selection of GPCR candidates

  13. Interpreting the Constitution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, William J., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses constitutional interpretations relating to capital punishment and protection of human dignity. Points out the document's effectiveness in creating a new society by adapting its principles to current problems and needs. Considers two views of the Constitution that lead to controversy over the legitimacy of judicial decisions. (PS)

  14. The Constitution by Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhut, Stephanie; Jones, Megan

    2010-01-01

    On their visit to the National Archives Experience in Washington, D.C., students in Jenni Ashley and Gay Brock's U.S. history classes at the Potomac School in McLean, Virginia, participated in a pilot program called "The Constitution by Cell." Armed with their cell phones, a basic understanding of the Constitution, and a willingness to…

  15. Xenobiotic-induced hepatocyte proliferation associated with constitutive active/androstane receptor (CAR or peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα is enhanced by pregnane X receptor (PXR activation in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryota Shizu

    Full Text Available Xenobiotic-responsive nuclear receptors pregnane X receptor (PXR, constitutive active/androstane receptor (CAR and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα play pivotal roles in the metabolic functions of the liver such as xenobiotics detoxification and energy metabolism. While CAR or PPARα activation induces hepatocyte proliferation and hepatocarcinogenesis in rodent models, it remains unclear whether PXR activation also shows such effects. In the present study, we have investigated the role of PXR in the xenobiotic-induced hepatocyte proliferation with or without CAR activation by 1,4-bis[2-(3,5-dichloropyridyloxy]benzene (TCPOBOP and phenobarbital, or PPARα activation by Wy-14643 in mice. Treatment with TCPOBOP or phenobarbital increased the percentage of Ki-67-positive nuclei as well as mRNA levels of cell proliferation-related genes in livers as expected. On the other hand, treatment with the PXR activator pregnenolone 16α-carbonitrile (PCN alone showed no such effects. Surprisingly, PCN co-treatment significantly augmented the hepatocyte proliferation induced by CAR activation with TCPOBOP or phenobarbital in wild-type mice but not in PXR-deficient mice. Intriguingly, PXR activation also augmented the hepatocyte proliferation induced by Wy-14643 treatment. Moreover, PCN treatment increased the RNA content of hepatocytes, suggesting the induction of G0/G1 transition, and reduced mRNA levels of Cdkn1b and Rbl2, encoding suppressors of cell cycle initiation. Our present findings indicate that xenobiotic-induced hepatocyte proliferation mediated by CAR or PPARα is enhanced by PXR co-activation despite that PXR activation alone does not cause the cell proliferation in mouse livers. Thus PXR may play a novel and unique role in the hepatocyte/liver hyperplasia upon exposure to xenobiotics.

  16. Dimerization of inositol monophosphatase Mycobacterium tuberculosis SuhB is not constitutive, but induced by binding of the activator Mg2+

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nigou Jérôme

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The cell wall of Mycobacterium tuberculosis contains a wide range of phosphatidyl inositol-based glycolipids that play critical structural roles and, in part, govern pathogen-host interactions. Synthesis of phosphatidyl inositol is dependent on free myo-inositol, generated through dephosphorylation of myo-inositol-1-phosphate by inositol monophosphatase (IMPase. Human IMPase, the putative target of lithium therapy, has been studied extensively, but the function of four IMPase-like genes in M. tuberculosis is unclear. Results We determined the crystal structure, to 2.6 Å resolution, of the IMPase M. tuberculosis SuhB in the apo form, and analysed self-assembly by analytical ultracentrifugation. Contrary to the paradigm of constitutive dimerization of IMPases, SuhB is predominantly monomeric in the absence of the physiological activator Mg2+, in spite of a conserved fold and apparent dimerization in the crystal. However, Mg2+ concentrations that result in enzymatic activation of SuhB decisively promote dimerization, with the inhibitor Li+ amplifying the effect of Mg2+, but failing to induce dimerization on its own. Conclusion The correlation of Mg2+-driven enzymatic activity with dimerization suggests that catalytic activity is linked to the dimer form. Current models of lithium inhibition of IMPases posit that Li+ competes for one of three catalytic Mg2+ sites in the active site, stabilized by a mobile loop at the dimer interface. Our data suggest that Mg2+/Li+-induced ordering of this loop may promote dimerization by expanding the dimer interface of SuhB. The dynamic nature of the monomer-dimer equilibrium may also explain the extended concentration range over which Mg2+ maintains SuhB activity.

  17. The constitutive activation of the CEF-4/9E3 chemokine gene depends on C/EBPbeta in v-src transformed chicken embryo fibroblasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gagliardi, M; Maynard, S; Bojovic, B

    2001-01-01

    The CEF-4/9E3 chemokine gene is expressed constitutively in chicken embryo fibroblasts (CEF) transformed by the Rous sarcoma virus (RSV). This aberrant induction is controlled at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. Transcriptional activation depends on multiple elements of the CEF....../EBPbeta binds to a second element located in proximity of the TRE. A mutation of this distal CAAT box impaired the activation of the CEF-4 promoter by pp60(v-src) indicating that this element is also part of the SRU. Using the RCASBP retroviral vector, we expressed a dominant negative mutant of C....../EBPbeta (designated Delta184-C/EBPbeta) in RSV-transformed CEF. Delta184-C/EBPbeta decreased the accumulation of the CEF-4 mRNA and activation of the CEF-4 promoter by pp60(v-src). The induction of the Cox-2 gene (CEF-147) was also reduced by Delta184-C/EBPbeta. The effect of the dominant negative mutant was observed...

  18. Deletion of Asn{sup 281} in the {alpha}-subunit of the human insulin receptor causes constitutive activation of the receptor and insulin desensitization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desbois-Mouthon, C.; Sert-Langeron, C.; Magre, J.; Blivet, M.J. [INSERM, Paris (France)] [and others

    1996-02-01

    We studied the structure and function of the insulin receptor (IR) in two sisters with leprechaunism. The patients had inherited alterations in the IR gene and were compound heterozygotes. Their paternal IR allele carried a major deletion, including exons 10-13, which shifted the reading frame and introduced a premature chain termination codon in the IR sequence. This allele was expressed at a very low level in cultured fibroblasts (<10% of total IR messenger ribonucleic acid content) and encoded a truncated protein lacking transmembrane and tyrosine kinase domains. The maternal IR allele was deleted of 3 bp in exon 3, causing the loss of Asn{sup 281} in the {alpha}-subunit. This allele generated levels of IR messenger ribonucleic acid and cell surface receptors similar to those seen in control fibroblasts. However, IRs from patients` cells had impaired insulin binding and exhibited in vivo and in vitro constitutive activation of autophosphorylation and tyrosine kinase activity. As a result of this IR-preactivated state, the cells were desensitized to insulin stimulation of glycogen and DNA syntheses. These findings strongly suggest that Asn{sup 281} of the IR {alpha}-subunit plays a critical role in the inhibitory constraint exerted by the extracellular {alpha}-subunit over the intracellular kinase activity. 59 refs., 6 figs.

  19. The ON:OFF switch, σ1R-HINT1 protein, controls GPCR-NMDA receptor cross-regulation: Implications in neurological disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Muñoz, María; Cortés-Montero, Elsa; Pozo-Rodrigálvarez, Andrea; Sánchez-Blázquez, Pilar; Garzón-Niño, Javier

    2015-01-01

    In the brain, the histidine triad nucleotide-binding protein 1 (HINT1) and sigma 1 receptors (σ1Rs) coordinate the activity of certain G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) with that of glutamate N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs). To determine the role of HINT1-σ1R in the plasticity of GPCR-NMDAR interactions, substances acting at MOR, cannabinoid CB1 receptor, NMDAR and σ1R were injected into mice, and their effects were evaluated through in vivo, ex vivo, and in vitro assays. It was observed that HINT1 protein binds to GPCRs and NMDAR NR1 subunits in a calcium-independent manner, whereas σ1R binding to these proteins increases in the presence of calcium. In this scenario, σ1R agonists keep HINT1 at the GPCR and stimulate GPCR-NMDAR interaction, whereas σ1R antagonists transfer HINT1 to NR1 subunits and disengage both receptors. This regulation is lost in σ1R−/− mice, where HINT1 proteins mostly associate with NMDARs, and GPCRs are physically and functionally disconnected from NMDARs. In HINT1−/− mice, ischemia produces low NMDAR-mediated brain damage, suggesting that several different GPCRs enhance glutamate excitotoxicity via HINT1-σ1R. Thus, several GPCRs associate with NMDARs by a dynamic process under the physiological control of HINT1 proteins and σ1Rs. The NMDAR-HINT1-σ1R complex deserves attention because it offers new therapeutic opportunities. PMID:26461475

  20. The time point of β-catenin knockout in hepatocytes determines their response to xenobiotic activation of the constitutive androstane receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganzenberg, Katrin; Singh, Yasmin; Braeuning, Albert

    2013-01-01

    The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) controls the expression of drug-metabolizing enzymes and regulates hepatocyte proliferation. Studies with transgenic mice with an early postnatal conditional hepatocyte-specific knockout of the β-catenin gene Ctnnb1 revealed that β-catenin deficiency decreases the magnitude of induction of drug-metabolizing enzymes by CAR activators, abrogates zonal differences in the hepatocytes’ susceptibility to these compounds, and impacts on hepatocyte proliferation. These data, however, do not allow distinguishing between effects caused by β-catenin deficiency during postnatal liver development and acute effects of β-catenin deficiency in the adult animal at the time point of CAR activation. Therefore, CAR activation was now studied in a different mouse model allowing for the hepatocyte-specific knockout of β-catenin in adult mice. Treatment of these mice with 3 mg/kg body weight of the model CAR activator 1,4-bis-[2-(3,5-dichloropyridyloxy)]benzene (TCPOBOP) confirmed previous findings related to the coordinate regulation of drug metabolism by β-catenin and CAR. More importantly, the present study clarified that the impact of β-catenin signaling on CAR-mediated enzyme induction in the liver is not merely due to developmental defects caused by a postnatal lack of β-catenin, but depends on the presence of β-catenin at the time point of xenobiotic treatment. The study also revealed interesting differences between the two mouse models: hepatic zonation of TCPOBOP-dependent induction of drug-metabolizing enzymes was restored in mice with late knockout of β-catenin, and the strong proliferative response of female mice was exclusively abolished when using animals with a late β-catenin knockout. This suggests a β-catenin-dependent postnatal priming of hepatocytes during postnatal liver development, later affecting the proliferative response of adult animals to CAR-activating xenobiotics

  1. Activation of the Constitutive Androstane Receptor induces hepatic lipogenesis and regulates Pnpla3 gene expression in a LXR-independent way

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marmugi, Alice; Lukowicz, Céline; Lasserre, Frederic; Montagner, Alexandra; Polizzi, Arnaud; Ducheix, Simon; Goron, Adeline; Gamet-Payrastre, Laurence; Gerbal-Chaloin, Sabine; Pascussi, Jean Marc; Moldes, Marthe; Pineau, Thierry; Guillou, Hervé; Mselli-Lakhal, Laila

    2016-01-01

    The Constitutive Androstane Receptor (CAR, NR1I3) has been newly described as a regulator of energy metabolism. A relevant number of studies using animal models of obesity suggest that CAR activation could be beneficial on the metabolic balance. However, this remains controversial and the underlying mechanisms are still unknown. This work aimed to investigate the effect of CAR activation on hepatic energy metabolism during physiological conditions, i.e. in mouse models not subjected to metabolic/nutritional stress. Gene expression profiling in the liver of CAR knockout and control mice on chow diet and treated with a CAR agonist highlighted CAR-mediated up-regulations of lipogenic genes, concomitant with neutral lipid accumulation. A strong CAR-mediated up-regulation of the patatin-like phospholipase domain-containing protein 3 (Pnpla3) was demonstrated. Pnpla3 is a gene whose polymorphism is associated with the pathogenesis of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) development. This observation was confirmed in human hepatocytes treated with the antiepileptic drug and CAR activator, phenobarbital and in immortalized human hepatocytes treated with CITCO. Studying the molecular mechanisms controlling Pnpla3 gene expression, we demonstrated that CAR does not act by a direct regulation of Pnpla3 transcription or via the Liver X Receptor but may rather involve the transcription factor Carbohydrate Responsive Element-binding protein. These data provide new insights into the regulation by CAR of glycolytic and lipogenic genes and on pathogenesis of steatosis. This also raises the question concerning the impact of drugs and environmental contaminants in lipid-associated metabolic diseases. - Highlights: • Induction of hepatic glycolytic and lipogenic genes upon CAR activation by TCPOBOP. • These effects are not mediated by the nuclear receptor LXR. • CAR activation resulted in hepatic lipid accumulation. • Pnpla3 expression is regulated by CAR in mouse liver and

  2. Global environmental constitutionalism

    OpenAIRE

    Bosselmann, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    This article supports the perspective that environmental constitutionalism is a global and foundational subject. Considering the novelty and thin base of this only emerging field of inquiry, it aims for making some suggestions for formulating the purpose and scope of environmental constitutionalism in a global range. Moreover, considering that the very nature of environmental rights is more fundamental than classic human rights, the mindset and methodology applied to the studies of constituti...

  3. Constitutive activation of jasmonate signaling in an Arabidopsis mutant correlates with enhanced resistance to Erysiphe cichoracearum, Pseudomonas syringae, and Myzus persicae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Christine; Karafyllidis, Ioannis; Turner, John G

    2002-10-01

    In Arabidopsis spp., the jasmonate (JA) response pathway generally is required for defenses against necrotrophic pathogens and chewing insects, while the salicylic acid (SA) response pathway is generally required for specific, resistance (R) gene-mediated defenses against both biotrophic and necrotrophic pathogens. For example, SA-dependent defenses are required for resistance to the biotrophic fungal pathogen Erysiphe cichoracearum UCSC1 and the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola, and also are expressed during response to the green peach aphid Myzus persicae. However, recent evidence indicates that the expression of JA-dependent defenses also may confer resistance to E. cichoracearum. To confirm and to extend this observation, we have compared the disease and pest resistance of wild-type Arabidopsis plants with that of the mutants coil, which is insensitive to JA, and cev1, which has constitutive JA signaling. Measurements of the colonization of these plants by E. cichoracearum, P. syringae pv. maculicola, and M. persicae indicated that activation of the JA signal pathway enhanced resistance, and was associated with the activation of JA-dependent defense genes and the suppression of SA-dependent defense genes. We conclude that JA and SA induce alternative defense pathways that can confer resistance to the same pathogens and pests.

  4. The constitutive activation of Egr-1/C/EBPa mediates the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus by enhancing hepatic gluconeogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Ning; Jiang, Shan; Lu, Jia-Ming; Yu, Xiao; Lai, Shan-Shan; Zhang, Jing-Zi; Zhang, Jin-Long; Tao, Wei-Wei; Wang, Xiu-Xing; Xu, Na; Xue, Bin; Li, Chao-Jun

    2015-02-01

    The sequential secretion of insulin and glucagon delicately maintains glucose homeostasis by inhibiting or enhancing hepatic gluconeogenesis during postprandial or fasting states, respectively. Increased glucagon/insulin ratio is believed to be a major cause of the hyperglycemia seen in type 2 diabetes. Herein, we reveal that the early growth response gene-1 (Egr-1) can be transiently activated by glucagon in hepatocytes, which mediates glucagon-regulated gluconeogenesis by increasing the expression of gluconeogenesis genes. Blockage of Egr-1 function in the liver of mice led to lower fasting blood glucose, better pyruvate tolerance, and higher hepatic glycogen content. The mechanism analysis demonstrated that Egr-1 can directly bind to the promoter of C/EBPa and regulate the expression of gluconeogenesis genes in the later phase of glucagon stimulation. The transient increase of Egr-1 by glucagon kept the glucose homeostasis after fasting for longer periods of time, whereas constitutive Egr-1 elevation found in the liver of db/db mice and high serum glucagon level overactivated the C/EBPa/gluconeogenesis pathway and resulted in hyperglycemia. Blockage of Egr-1 activation in prediabetic db/db mice was able to delay the progression of diabetes. Our results suggest that dysregulation of Egr-1/C/EBPa on glucagon stimulation may provide an alternative mechanistic explanation for type 2 diabetes. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The distribution of FDG at PET examinations constitutes a relative mechanism: significant effects at activity quantification in patients with a high muscular uptake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindholm, Henry; Johansson, Ove; Jacobsson, Hans [Karolinska University Hospital Solna, Department of Radiology, Stockholm (Sweden); Jonsson, Cathrine [Karolinska University Hospital Solna, Department of Hospital Physics, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2012-11-15

    At {sup 18}F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) examinations a high tracer uptake of the skeletal muscles is sometimes encountered which can lead to reduced uptake in pathological lesions. This was evaluated in retrospect in patients being recalled for a repeat examination after reducing the muscular uptake. Ten patients with increased muscular tracer uptake were examined with FDG PET/CT on two occasions with a mean of 6 days. All patients showed at least one pathological lesion with increased tracer uptake. The muscular uptake was reduced at the second examination by informing the patient to refrain from physical activity together with pretreatment with diazepam. The maximum standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}) of the pathological lesion and SUV{sub mean} of certain skeletal muscles, liver, spleen, lungs, blood and certain bone marrow portions were calculated. In all patients, the muscular uptake was reduced to a normal level at visual evaluation as well as at comparison of SUVs with 25 consecutive clinical patients exhibiting a normal FDG distribution (p < 0.001). The mean lesion SUV{sub max} increased from 2.4 to 3.7 (54 %) between the examinations (p < 0.05). All reference tissues/organs showed a significant increase of SUV at the second examination. Relating lesion SUV{sub max} to the activity of any of the reference tissues/organs there was no significant difference between the studies. The distribution of FDG constitutes a relative mechanism. This must be especially considered at longitudinal examinations in the same patient at therapy evaluations. In examinations with a somehow distorted general distribution of the activity, it may be more relevant to relate the lesion activity to a reference tissue/organ than relying on SUV assessments. (orig.)

  6. Constitutive AP-1 activity and EBV infection induce PD-L1 in Hodgkin lymphomas and posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders: implications for targeted therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Michael R; Rodig, Scott; Juszczynski, Przemyslaw; Ouyang, Jing; Sinha, Papiya; O'Donnell, Evan; Neuberg, Donna; Shipp, Margaret A

    2012-03-15

    Programmed cell death ligand 1 (PD-L1) is a molecule expressed on antigen-presenting cells that engages the PD-1 receptor on T cells and inhibits T-cell receptor signaling. The PD-1 axis can be exploited by tumor cells to dampen host antitumor immune responses and foster tumor cell survival. PD-1 blockade has shown promise in multiple malignancies but should be directed toward patients in whom it will be most effective. In recent studies, we found that the chromosome 9p24.1 amplification increased the gene dosage of PD-L1 and its induction by JAK2 in a subset of patients with classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL). However, cHLs with normal 9p24.1 copy numbers also expressed detectable PD-L1, prompting analyses of additional PD-L1 regulatory mechanisms. Herein, we utilized immunohistochemical, genomic, and functional analyses to define alternative mechanisms of PD-L1 activation in cHL and additional EBV(+) lymphoproliferative disorders. We identified an AP-1-responsive enhancer in the PD-L1 gene. In cHL Reed-Sternberg cells, which exhibit constitutive AP-1 activation, the PD-L1 enhancer binds AP-1 components and increases PD-L1 promoter activity. In addition, we defined Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection as an alternative mechanism for PD-L1 induction in cHLs with diploid 9p24.1. PD-L1 was also expressed by EBV-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines as a result of latent membrane protein 1-mediated, JAK/STAT-dependent promoter and AP-1-associated enhancer activity. In addition, more than 70% of EBV(+) posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders expressed detectable PD-L1. AP-1 signaling and EBV infection represent alternative mechanisms of PD-L1 induction and extend the spectrum of tumors in which to consider PD-1 blockade.

  7. Ginkgolic Acid C 17:1, Derived from Ginkgo biloba Leaves, Suppresses Constitutive and Inducible STAT3 Activation through Induction of PTEN and SHP-1 Tyrosine Phosphatase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Ho Baek

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Ginkgolic acid C 17:1 (GAC 17:1 extracted from Ginkgo biloba leaves, has been previously reported to exhibit diverse antitumor effect(s through modulation of several molecular targets in tumor cells, however the detailed mechanism(s of its actions still remains to be elucidated. Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3 is an oncogenic transcription factor that regulates various critical functions involved in progression of diverse hematological malignancies, including multiple myeloma, therefore attenuating STAT3 activation may have a potential in cancer therapy. We determined the anti-tumor mechanism of GAC 17:1 with respect to its effect on STAT3 signaling pathway in multiple myeloma cell lines. We found that GAC 17:1 can inhibit constitutive activation of STAT3 through the abrogation of upstream JAK2, Src but not of JAK1 kinases in U266 cells and also found that GAC can suppress IL-6-induced STAT3 phosphorylation in MM.1S cells. Treatment of protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP inhibitor blocked suppression of STAT3 phosphorylation by GAC 17:1, thereby indicating a critical role for a PTP. We also demonstrate that GAC 17:1 can induce the substantial expression of PTEN and SHP-1 at both protein and mRNA level. Further, deletion of PTEN and SHP-1 genes by siRNA can repress the induction of PTEN and SHP-1, as well as abolished the inhibitory effect of drug on STAT3 phosphorylation. GAC 17:1 down-regulated the expression of STAT3 regulated gene products and induced apoptosis of tumor cells. Overall, GAC 17:1 was found to abrogate STAT3 signaling pathway and thus exert its anticancer effects against multiple myeloma cells.

  8. Molecular dynamics simulations of GPCR-cholesterol interaction: An emerging paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Durba; Chattopadhyay, Amitabha

    2015-09-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the largest class of molecules involved in signal transduction across cell membranes and represent major targets in the development of novel drug candidates. Membrane cholesterol plays an important role in GPCR structure and function. Molecular dynamics simulations have been successful in exploring the effect of cholesterol on the receptor and a general consensus molecular view is emerging. We review here recent molecular dynamics studies at multiple resolutions highlighting the main features of cholesterol-GPCR interaction. Several cholesterol interaction sites have been identified on the receptor that are reminiscent of nonannular sites. These cholesterol hot-spots are highly dynamic and have a microsecond time scale of exchange with the bulk lipids. A few consensus sites (such as the CRAC site) have been identified that correspond to higher cholesterol interaction. Interestingly, high plasticity is observed in the modes of cholesterol interaction and several sites have been suggested to have high cholesterol occupancy. We therefore believe that these cholesterol hot-spots are indicative of 'high occupancy sites' rather than 'binding sites'. The results suggest that the energy landscape of cholesterol association with GPCRs corresponds to a series of shallow minima interconnected by low barriers. These specific interactions, along with general membrane effects, have been observed to modulate GPCR organization. Membrane cholesterol effects on receptor structure and organization, that in turn influences receptor cross-talk and drug efficacy, represent a new frontier in GPCR research. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Lipid-protein interactions. Guest Editors: Amitabha Chattopadhyay and Jean-Marie Ruysschaert. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. NF1 Is an Effector and Regulator of the GPCR Signaling in the Nervous System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Kirill Martemyanov, Ph.D., Associate Professor CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: The Scripps Research Institute – Florida Jupiter ...NF1 Is an Effector and Regulator of the GPCR Signaling in the Nervous System 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Kirill Martemyanov, Ph.D...ADDRESS(ES) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER The Scripps Research Institute – Florida 130 Scripps Way Jupiter , FL 33458-5284

  10. Constitutive impaired TCR/CD3-mediated activation of T cells in IDDM patients co-exist with normal co-stimulation pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nervi, S; Atlan-Gepner, C; Fossat, C; Vialettes, B

    1999-09-01

    IDDM is a T cell-mediated autoimmune disease which is paradoxically associated with T cell functional deficiencies. The proliferative response of PBMC under CD3-, Vbeta2-, Vbeta8- and Vbeta7-stimulation was investigated in IDDM and NIDDM patients, non-diabetic first-degree relatives and control subjects. Despite normal surface expression of the TCR/CD3 complex, the TCR/CD3-mediated proliferation of PBMC from IDDM patients was significantly impaired compared to control subjects (PMHC genotype, to metabolic disturbances or to presence of specific autoantibodies. Inefficient activation of T cells was not related to a lower capacity of CD28 to transduce co-stimulative signals because proliferative responses under CD2/CD28 stimulations were similar in IDDM and control groups. The IL-2/IL-2 receptor system was functional because unstimulated PBMC proliferated in response to increasing amounts of IL-2. Nevertheless, despite normal expression of CD25, addition of IL-2 did not normalize the proliferative defect linked to IDDM. In conclusion, excluding a faulty co-stimulation pathway, these results are in favour of a constitutive defect in the CD3/TCR transduction machinery, increasing sensitivity to apoptosis or anergy in T cells from IDDM patients. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  11. Assessment of the transmembrane domain structures in GPCR Dock 2013 models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ting; Liu, Haiguang; Duan, Yong

    2018-03-01

    The community-wide blind prediction of G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) structures and ligand docking has been conducted three times and the quality of the models was primarily assessed by the accuracy of ligand binding modes. The seven transmembrane (TM) helices of the receptors were taken as a whole; thus the model quality within the 7TM domains has not been evaluated. Here we evaluate the 7TM domain structures in the models submitted for the last round of prediction - GPCR Dock 2013. Applying the 7 × 7 RMSD matrix analysis described in our prior work, we show that the models vary widely in prediction accuracy of the 7TM structures, exhibiting diverse structural differences from the targets. For the prediction of the 5-hydroxytryptamine receptors, the top 7TM models are rather close to the targets, which however are not ranked top by ligand-docking. On the other hand, notable deviations of the TMs are found in in the previously identified top docking models that closely resemble other receptors. We further reveal reasons of success and failure in ligand docking for the models. This current assessment not only complements the previous assessment, but also provides important insights into the current status of GPCR modeling and ligand docking. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Distinct conformations of GPCR-β-arrestin complexes mediate desensitization, signaling, and endocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahill, Thomas J; Thomsen, Alex R B; Tarrasch, Jeffrey T; Plouffe, Bianca; Nguyen, Anthony H; Yang, Fan; Huang, Li-Yin; Kahsai, Alem W; Bassoni, Daniel L; Gavino, Bryant J; Lamerdin, Jane E; Triest, Sarah; Shukla, Arun K; Berger, Benjamin; Little, John; Antar, Albert; Blanc, Adi; Qu, Chang-Xiu; Chen, Xin; Kawakami, Kouki; Inoue, Asuka; Aoki, Junken; Steyaert, Jan; Sun, Jin-Peng; Bouvier, Michel; Skiniotis, Georgios; Lefkowitz, Robert J

    2017-03-07

    β-Arrestins (βarrs) interact with G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) to desensitize G protein signaling, to initiate signaling on their own, and to mediate receptor endocytosis. Prior structural studies have revealed two unique conformations of GPCR-βarr complexes: the "tail" conformation, with βarr primarily coupled to the phosphorylated GPCR C-terminal tail, and the "core" conformation, where, in addition to the phosphorylated C-terminal tail, βarr is further engaged with the receptor transmembrane core. However, the relationship of these distinct conformations to the various functions of βarrs is unknown. Here, we created a mutant form of βarr lacking the "finger-loop" region, which is unable to form the core conformation but retains the ability to form the tail conformation. We find that the tail conformation preserves the ability to mediate receptor internalization and βarr signaling but not desensitization of G protein signaling. Thus, the two GPCR-βarr conformations can carry out distinct functions.

  13. Method for rapid optimization of recombinant GPCR protein expression and stability using virus-like particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Thao T; Nguyen, Jasmine T; Liu, Juping; Stanczak, Pawel; Thompson, Aaron A; Yan, Yingzhuo G; Chen, Jasmine; Allerston, Charles K; Dillard, Charles L; Xu, Hao; Shoger, Nicholas J; Cameron, Jill S; Massari, Mark E; Aertgeerts, Kathleen

    2017-05-01

    Recent innovative approaches to stabilize and crystallize GPCRs have resulted in an unprecedented breakthrough in GPCR crystal structures as well as application of the purified receptor protein in biophysical and biochemical ligand binding assays. However, the protein optimization process to enable these technologies is lengthy and requires iterative overexpression, solubilization, purification and functional analysis of tens to hundreds of protein variants. Here, we report a new and versatile method to screen in parallel hundreds of GPCR variants in HEK293 produced virus-like particles (VLPs) for protein yield, stability, functionality and ligand binding. This approach reduces the time and resources during GPCR construct optimization by eliminating lengthy protein solubilization and purification steps and by its adaptability to many binding assay formats (label or label-free detection). We exemplified the robustness of our VLP method by screening 210 GALR3-VLP variants in a radiometric agonist-based binding assay and a subset of 88 variants in a label-free antagonist-based assay. The resulting GALR3 agonist or antagonist stabilizing variants were then further used for recombinant protein expression in transfected insect cells. The final purified protein variants were successfully immobilized on a biosensor chip and used in a surface plasmon resonance binding assay. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. CONSTITUTIONAL FOUNDATIONS OF JURISDICTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Jamal Batista

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available At the current stage of our State of Law there is no way to separate the study of the civil procedural law from the Federal Constitution, especially the jurisdiction, because it is in the Constitution that there are the legitimizing foundations of the jurisdiction institute. In this article, we carry on about the constitutional foundations of jurisdiction, such as: the principle of natural justice, principle of access to justice, principle of impartiality, principle of publicity, principle of motivation and principle of submission to res judicata. The conclusion is, after all, that jurisdiction, as one of the bulwarks of the citizen, finds in the “Citizen Constitution” of 1988 its foundations and decisive bases.

  15. Improving the police activities in ensuring the constitutional rights and freedoms of man and citizen and interaction with civil society institutions: comprehensive measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirichek E.V.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Russian police reform is another important step to modernize the country and public administration system. The main purpose of ongoing reforms is to create the modern and efficient law enforcement system, to form a new image of police officer in the XXI century and to change the social role of law enforcement agencies in society. Unfortunately, the results expected by society aren’t achieved. It’s stated that the reform is only at its beginning, many decisions are still to be made and implemented. The main focus is on comprehensive measures aimed at improving the police activities in ensuring the constitutional rights and freedoms of man and citizen and interaction with civil society institutions. Some features and problems of interaction between police and civil society institutions are considered. Statistics is provided. A number of constructive conclusions concerning further progressive development of interaction of police with civil society institutions are made. Despite the significant number of papers devoted to these issues, it’s necessary to note the insufficient elaboration of problems in this area. The reason is the ongoing reforms in Russia in general and police reform in particular, the instability of the current legislation regulating these issues. A lack of a clear concept of the reform, arising from a clear understanding of the police role and functions, is evident. These and other circumstances determine the topicality and practical importance of the research, the necessity of studying the peculiarities of police activities to improve its efficiency. They also indicate the need for scientific and practical recommendations.

  16. Gene editing a constitutively active OsRac1 by homologous recombination-based gene targeting induces immune responses in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Thu Thi; Shimatani, Zenpei; Kawano, Yoji; Terada, Rie; Shimamoto, Ko

    2013-12-01

    OsRac1 is a member of the plant small GTPase Rac/Rop family and plays a key role in rice immunity. The constitutively active (CA) G19V mutation of OsRac1 was previously shown to induce reactive oxygen species production, phytoalexin synthesis and defense gene activation, leading to resistance to rice blast infection. To study further the effect of the G19V mutation in disease resistance, we introduced a single base substitution by gene targeting and removed the selectable marker using Cre-loxP site-specific recombination. The CA-OsRac1 gene generated by gene targeting was termed CA-gOsRac1. The G19V mutation was transferred from a targeting vector to the OsRac1 locus and stably transmitted to the next generation. In the leaf blade of homozygous CA-gOsRac1 plants, mutant transcript levels were much lower than in those of wild-type plants. In contrast, mutant transcripts in roots, leaf sheaths and panicles were more abundant than those in leaf blades. However, upon chitin treatment, the expression of defense-related genes PAL1 and PBZ1 in the cell culture was greater in the mutants compared with wild-type plants. Furthermore, induction of hypersensitive response (HR)-like cell death was observed in the leaf sheaths of mutant plants infected with a compatible race of rice blast fungus. In the CA-gOsRac1 plants, a number of genes previously shown to be induced by Magnaporthe oryzae and Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) infection were induced in the leaf sheath without pathogen infection. These results suggest that gene targeting will provide mutations useful for gene function studies and crop improvement.

  17. Constitutively active 5-HT receptors: An explanation of how 5-HT antagonists inhibit gut motility in species where 5-HT is not a enteric neurotransmitter ?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nick eSpencer

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Antagonists of 5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT receptors are well known to inhibit gastrointestinal (GI-motility and transit in a variety of mammals, including humans. Originally, these observations had been interpreted by many investigators (including us as evidence that endogenous 5-HT plays a major role in GI motility. This seemed a logical assumption. However, the story changed dramatically after recent studies revealed that 5-HT antagonists still blocked major GI motility patterns (peristalsis and colonic migrating motor complexes in segments of intestine depleted of all 5-HT. Then, these results were further supported by Dr. Gershons’ laboratory, which showed that genetic deletion of all genes that synthesizes 5-HT had minor, or no inhibitory effects on GI transit in vivo. If 5-HT was essential for GI motility patterns and transit, then one would expect major disruptions in motility and transit when 5-HT synthesis was genetically ablated. This does not occur. The inhibitory effects of 5-HT antagonists on GI motility clearly occur independently of any 5-HT in the gut. Evidence now suggests that 5-HT antagonists act on 5-HT receptors in the gut which are constitutively active, and don’t require 5-HT for their activation. This would explain a long-standing mystery of how 5-HT antagonists inhibit gut motility in species like mice, rats and humans where 5-HT is not an enteric neurotransmitter. Studies are now increasingly demonstrating that the presence of a neurochemical in enteric neurons does not mean they function as neurotransmitters. Caution should be exercised when interpreting any inhibitory effects of 5-HT antagonists on GI motility.

  18. Mode of Action and Human Relevance Analysis for Nuclear Receptor-Mediated Liver Toxicity: A Case Study with Phenobarbital as a Model Constitutive Androstane Receptor (CAR) Activator

    Science.gov (United States)

    The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and pregnane X receptor (PXR) are key nuclear receptors involved in the regulation of cellular responses. to exposure to many xenobiotics and various physiological processes. Phenobarbital (PB) is a non­ genotoxic i...

  19. Constitutive AP-1 Activity and EBV Infection Induce PD-L1 in Hodgkin Lymphomas and Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorders: Implications for Targeted Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Michael R.; Rodig, Scott; Juszczynski, Przemyslaw; Ouyang, Jing; Sinha, Papiya; O’Donnell, Evan; Neuberg, Donna; Shipp, Margaret A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Programmed cell death ligand 1 (PD-L1) is a molecule expressed on antigen-presenting cells that engages the PD-1 receptor on T cells and inhibits T-cell receptor signaling. The PD-1 axis can be exploited by tumor cells to dampen host anti-tumor immune responses and foster tumor cell survival. PD-1 blockade has shown promise in multiple malignancies but should be directed towards patients in whom it will be most effective. In recent studies, we found that the chromosome 9p24.1 amplification increased the gene dosage of PD-L1 and its induction by JAK2 in a subset of patients with classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL). However, cHLs with normal 9p24.1 copy numbers also expressed detectable PD-L1, prompting analyses of additional PD-L1 regulatory mechanisms. Experimental Design Herein, we utilized immunohistochemical, genomic and functional analyses to define alternative mechanisms of PD-L1 activation in cHL and additional EBV+ lymphoproliferative disorders. Results We identified an AP-1-responsive enhancer in the PD-L1 gene. In cHL Reed Sternberg cells, which exhibit constitutive AP-1 activation, the PD-L1 enhancer binds AP-1 components and increases PD-L1 promoter activity. In addition, we defined EBV infection as an alternative mechanism for PD-L1 induction in cHLs with diploid 9p24.1. PD-L1 was also expressed by EBV-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines as a result of latent membrane protein 1-mediated, JAK/STAT-dependent promoter and AP-1-associated enhancer activity. In addition, over 70% of EBV+ post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders expressed detectable PD-L1. Conclusions AP-1 signaling and EBV infection represent alternative mechanisms of PD-L1 induction and extend the spectrum of tumors in which to consider PD-1 blockade. PMID:22271878

  20. The Constitution of Partnering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottlieb, Stefan Christoffer

    The constitution of partnering. Afhandlingen behandler konstitueringen af ledelseskonceptet partnering og dets anvendelse i dansk byggeri. Partnering er et udbredt koncept i byggeriet som betoner samarbejde, tillid og gensidighed mellem de deltagende parter, og konceptet har de senere år har været...

  1. Communicative Constitution of Organizations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoeneborn, Dennis; Vasquez, Consuelo

    2017-01-01

    The notion of the communicative constitution of organizations (CCO) is at the center of a growing theoretical development within organizational communication studies. CCO scholarship is based on the idea that organization emerges in and is sustained and transformed by communication. This entry...

  2. Sexuality and the Constitution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copelon, Rhonda

    1987-01-01

    Argues for abortion rights and protection of intimate decisions and relationships. Describes the role and position of women in eighteenth century American society as a means of exposing the fallacy of the anti-abortion movement's insistence on adherence to constitutional text. Discusses the recent attempts to overturn the Roe v. Wade ruling. (PS)

  3. iGPCR-drug: a web server for predicting interaction between GPCRs and drugs in cellular networking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuan Xiao

    Full Text Available Involved in many diseases such as cancer, diabetes, neurodegenerative, inflammatory and respiratory disorders, G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs are among the most frequent targets of therapeutic drugs. It is time-consuming and expensive to determine whether a drug and a GPCR are to interact with each other in a cellular network purely by means of experimental techniques. Although some computational methods were developed in this regard based on the knowledge of the 3D (dimensional structure of protein, unfortunately their usage is quite limited because the 3D structures for most GPCRs are still unknown. To overcome the situation, a sequence-based classifier, called "iGPCR-drug", was developed to predict the interactions between GPCRs and drugs in cellular networking. In the predictor, the drug compound is formulated by a 2D (dimensional fingerprint via a 256D vector, GPCR by the PseAAC (pseudo amino acid composition generated with the grey model theory, and the prediction engine is operated by the fuzzy K-nearest neighbour algorithm. Moreover, a user-friendly web-server for iGPCR-drug was established at http://www.jci-bioinfo.cn/iGPCR-Drug/. For the convenience of most experimental scientists, a step-by-step guide is provided on how to use the web-server to get the desired results without the need to follow the complicated math equations presented in this paper just for its integrity. The overall success rate achieved by iGPCR-drug via the jackknife test was 85.5%, which is remarkably higher than the rate by the existing peer method developed in 2010 although no web server was ever established for it. It is anticipated that iGPCR-Drug may become a useful high throughput tool for both basic research and drug development, and that the approach presented here can also be extended to study other drug - target interaction networks.

  4. The Antibodies against the Computationally Designed Mimic of the Glycoprotein Hormone Receptor Transmembrane Domain Provide Insights into Receptor Activation and Suppress the Constitutively Activated Receptor Mutants*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, Ritankar; Railkar, Reema; Dighe, Rajan R.

    2012-01-01

    The exoloops of glycoprotein hormone receptors (GpHRs) transduce the signal generated by the ligand-ectodomain interactions to the transmembrane helices either through direct hormonal contact and/or by modulating the interdomain interactions between the hinge region (HinR) and the transmembrane domain (TMD). The ligand-induced conformational alterations in the HinRs and the interhelical loops of luteinizing hormone receptor/follicle stimulating hormone receptor/thyroid stimulating hormone receptor were mapped using exoloop-specific antibodies generated against a mini-TMD protein designed to mimic the native exoloop conformations that were created by joining the thyroid stimulating hormone receptor exoloops constrained through helical tethers and library-derived linkers. The antibody against the mini-TMD specifically recognized all three GpHRs and inhibited the basal and hormone-stimulated cAMP production without affecting hormone binding. Interestingly, binding of the antibody to all three receptors was abolished by prior incubation of the receptors with the respective hormones, suggesting that the exoloops are buried in the hormone-receptor complexes. The antibody also suppressed the high basal activities of gain-of-function mutations in the HinRs, exoloops, and TMDs such as those involved in precocious puberty and thyroid toxic adenomas. Using the antibody and point/deletion/chimeric receptor mutants, we demonstrate that changes in the HinR-exoloop interactions play an important role in receptor activation. Computational analysis suggests that the mini-TMD antibodies act by conformationally locking the transmembrane helices by means of restraining the exoloops and the juxta-membrane regions. Using GpHRs as a model, we describe a novel computational approach of generating soluble TMD mimics that can be used to explain the role of exoloops during receptor activation and their interplay with TMDs. PMID:22904318

  5. What constitutes information integrity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Flowerday

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available This research focused on what constitutes information integrity as this is a problem facing companies today. Moreover, information integrity is a pillar of information security and is required in order to have a sound security management programme. However, it is acknowledged that 100% information integrity is not currently achievable due to various limitations and therefore the auditing concept of reasonable assurance is adopted. This is in line with the concept that 100% information security is not achievable and the notion that adequate security is the goal, using appropriate countermeasures. The main contribution of this article is to illustrate the importance of and provide a macro view of what constitutes information integrity. The findings are in harmony with Samuel Johnson's words (1751: 'Integrity without knowledge is weak and useless, and knowledge without integrity is dangerous and dreadful.'

  6. What constitutes information integrity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Flowerday

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This research focused on what constitutes information integrity as this is a problem facing companies today. Moreover, information integrity is a pillar of information security and is required in order to have a sound security management programme. However, it is acknowledged that 100% information integrity is not currently achievable due to various limitations and therefore the auditing concept of reasonable assurance is adopted. This is in line with the concept that 100% information security is not achievable and the notion that adequate security is the goal, using appropriate countermeasures. The main contribution of this article is to illustrate the importance of and provide a macro view of what constitutes information integrity. The findings are in harmony with Samuel Johnson's words (1751: 'Integrity without knowledge is weak and useless, and knowledge without integrity is dangerous and dreadful.'

  7. The constitutional view

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Horácio Sá Pereira

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1808-1711.2016v20n2p165   This brief paper is devoted to criticizing the widespread reading of Kant’s first Critique, according to which reference to subject-independent objects is “constituted” by higherorder cognitive abilities (concepts. Let us call this the “constitutional view”. In this paper, I argue that the constitutional reading confuses the un-Kantian problem of how we come to represent objects (which I call the intentionality thesis, with the quite different problem of how we cognize (erkennen (which I call the “cognition thesis” that we do represent objects, that is, things that exist independently of the subject.

  8. The Evolution of the GPCR Signaling System in Eukaryotes: Modularity, Conservation, and the Transition to Metazoan Multicellularity

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mendoza, Alex; Sebé-Pedrós, Arnau; Ruiz-Trillo, Iñaki

    2014-01-01

    The G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling system is one of the main signaling pathways in eukaryotes. Here, we analyze the evolutionary history of all its components, from receptors to regulators, to gain a broad picture of its system-level evolution. Using eukaryotic genomes covering most lineages sampled to date, we find that the various components of the GPCR signaling pathway evolved independently, highlighting the modular nature of this system. Our data show that some GPCR families, G proteins, and regulators of G proteins diversified through lineage-specific diversifications and recurrent domain shuffling. Moreover, most of the gene families involved in the GPCR signaling system were already present in the last common ancestor of eukaryotes. Furthermore, we show that the unicellular ancestor of Metazoa already had most of the cytoplasmic components of the GPCR signaling system, including, remarkably, all the G protein alpha subunits, which are typical of metazoans. Thus, we show how the transition to multicellularity involved conservation of the signaling transduction machinery, as well as a burst of receptor diversification to cope with the new multicellular necessities. PMID:24567306

  9. Spontaneous Glutamatergic Synaptic Activity Regulates Constitutive COX-2 Expression in Neurons: OPPOSING ROLES FOR THE TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS CREB (cAMP RESPONSE ELEMENT BINDING) PROTEIN AND Sp1 (STIMULATORY PROTEIN-1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewett, Sandra J; Shi, Jingxue; Gong, Yifan; Dhandapani, Krishnan; Pilbeam, Carol; Hewett, James A

    2016-12-30

    Burgeoning evidence supports a role for cyclooxygenase metabolites in regulating membrane excitability in various forms of synaptic plasticity. Two cyclooxygenases, COX-1 and COX-2, catalyze the initial step in the metabolism of arachidonic acid to prostaglandins. COX-2 is generally considered inducible, but in glutamatergic neurons in some brain regions, including the cerebral cortex, it is constitutively expressed. However, the transcriptional mechanisms by which this occurs have not been elucidated. Here, we used quantitative PCR and also analyzed reporter gene expression in a mouse line carrying a construct consisting of a portion of the proximal promoter region of the mouse COX-2 gene upstream of luciferase cDNA to characterize COX-2 basal transcriptional regulation in cortical neurons. Extracts from the whole brain and from the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, and olfactory bulbs exhibited high luciferase activity. Moreover, constitutive COX-2 expression and luciferase activity were detected in cortical neurons, but not in cortical astrocytes, cultured from wild-type and transgenic mice, respectively. Constitutive COX-2 expression depended on spontaneous but not evoked excitatory synaptic activity and was shown to be N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor-dependent. Constitutive promoter activity was reduced in neurons transfected with a dominant-negative cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) and was eliminated by mutating the CRE-binding site on the COX-2 promoter. However, mutation of the stimulatory protein-1 (Sp1)-binding site resulted in an N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor-dependent enhancement of COX-2 promoter activity. Basal binding of the transcription factors CREB and Sp1 to the native neuronal COX-2 promoter was confirmed. In toto, our data suggest that spontaneous glutamatergic synaptic activity regulates constitutive neuronal COX-2 expression via Sp1 and CREB protein-dependent transcriptional mechanisms. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry

  10. Constitutive Activation of the G-Protein Subunit G[alpha]s within Forebrain Neurons Causes PKA-Dependent Alterations in Fear Conditioning and Cortical "Arc" mRNA Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Michele P.; Cheung, York-Fong; Favilla, Christopher; Siegel, Steven J.; Kanes, Stephen J.; Houslay, Miles D.; Abel, Ted

    2008-01-01

    Memory formation requires cAMP signaling; thus, this cascade has been of great interest in the search for cognitive enhancers. Given that medications are administered long-term, we determined the effects of chronically increasing cAMP synthesis in the brain by expressing a constitutively active isoform of the G-protein subunit G[alpha]s…

  11. The Na+/H+ exchanger NHE1, but not the Na+, HCO3- cotransporter NBCn1, regulates motility of MCF7 breast cancer cells expressing constitutively active ErbB2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, Gitte; Stock, Christian-Martin; Lemaire, Justine

    2012-01-01

    We and others have shown central roles of the Na(+)/H(+) exchanger NHE1 in cell motility. The aim of this study was to determine the roles of NHE1 and of the Na(+), HCO(3)(-) cotransporter NBCn1 in motility of serum-starved MCF-7 breast cancer cells expressing constitutively active ErbB2 (¿NErbB2...

  12. A new inhibitor of the β-arrestin/AP2 endocytic complex reveals interplay between GPCR internalization and signalling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beautrait, Alexandre; Paradis, Justine S.; Zimmerman, Brandon; Giubilaro, Jenna; Nikolajev, Ljiljana; Armando, Sylvain; Kobayashi, Hiroyuki; Yamani, Lama; Namkung, Yoon; Heydenreich, Franziska M.; Khoury, Etienne; Audet, Martin; Roux, Philippe P.; Veprintsev, Dmitry B.; Laporte, Stéphane A.; Bouvier, Michel

    2017-04-01

    In addition to G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) desensitization and endocytosis, β-arrestin recruitment to ligand-stimulated GPCRs promotes non-canonical signalling cascades. Distinguishing the respective contributions of β-arrestin recruitment to the receptor and β-arrestin-promoted endocytosis in propagating receptor signalling has been limited by the lack of selective analytical tools. Here, using a combination of virtual screening and cell-based assays, we have identified a small molecule that selectively inhibits the interaction between β-arrestin and the β2-adaptin subunit of the clathrin adaptor protein AP2 without interfering with the formation of receptor/β-arrestin complexes. This selective β-arrestin/β2-adaptin inhibitor (Barbadin) blocks agonist-promoted endocytosis of the prototypical β2-adrenergic (β2AR), V2-vasopressin (V2R) and angiotensin-II type-1 (AT1R) receptors, but does not affect β-arrestin-independent (transferrin) or AP2-independent (endothelin-A) receptor internalization. Interestingly, Barbadin fully blocks V2R-stimulated ERK1/2 activation and blunts cAMP accumulation promoted by both V2R and β2AR, supporting the concept of β-arrestin/AP2-dependent signalling for both G protein-dependent and -independent pathways.

  13. Understanding the Role of GPCR Heteroreceptor Complexes in Modulating the Brain Networks in Health and Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borroto-Escuela, Dasiel O; Carlsson, Jens; Ambrogini, Patricia; Narváez, Manuel; Wydra, Karolina; Tarakanov, Alexander O; Li, Xiang; Millón, Carmelo; Ferraro, Luca; Cuppini, Riccardo; Tanganelli, Sergio; Liu, Fang; Filip, Malgorzata; Diaz-Cabiale, Zaida; Fuxe, Kjell

    2017-01-01

    The introduction of allosteric receptor-receptor interactions in G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) heteroreceptor complexes of the central nervous system (CNS) gave a new dimension to brain integration and neuropsychopharmacology. The molecular basis of learning and memory was proposed to be based on the reorganization of the homo- and heteroreceptor complexes in the postjunctional membrane of synapses. Long-term memory may be created by the transformation of parts of the heteroreceptor complexes into unique transcription factors which can lead to the formation of specific adapter proteins. The observation of the GPCR heterodimer network (GPCR-HetNet) indicated that the allosteric receptor-receptor interactions dramatically increase GPCR diversity and biased recognition and signaling leading to enhanced specificity in signaling. Dysfunction of the GPCR heteroreceptor complexes can lead to brain disease. The findings of serotonin (5-HT) hetero and isoreceptor complexes in the brain over the last decade give new targets for drug development in major depression. Neuromodulation of neuronal networks in depression via 5-HT, galanin peptides and zinc involve a number of GPCR heteroreceptor complexes in the raphe-hippocampal system: GalR1-5-HT1A, GalR1-5-HT1A-GPR39, GalR1-GalR2, and putative GalR1-GalR2-5-HT1A heteroreceptor complexes. The 5-HT1A receptor protomer remains a receptor enhancing antidepressant actions through its participation in hetero- and homoreceptor complexes listed above in balance with each other. In depression, neuromodulation of neuronal networks in the raphe-hippocampal system and the cortical regions via 5-HT and fibroblast growth factor 2 involves either FGFR1-5-HT1A heteroreceptor complexes or the 5-HT isoreceptor complexes such as 5-HT1A-5-HT7 and 5-HT1A-5-HT2A. Neuromodulation of neuronal networks in cocaine use disorder via dopamine (DA) and adenosine signals involve A2AR-D2R and A2AR-D2R-Sigma1R heteroreceptor complexes in the dorsal and

  14. The Bicentennial and State Constitutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clay, Henry

    1988-01-01

    Illustrates how the Bicentennial of the U.S. Constitution provides an opportunity to teach about the broader concept of constitutionalism through study of the state constitutions. Presents an argument for teaching about state constitutions, their role in the federal system, and the values they convey. (LS)

  15. The constitutive sofa cushion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanghøj, Sara

    2009-01-01

    body, space and artefact, thereby revealing the materialization process. Based on results of the analysis, ANT (Actor-Network- Theory) is used in order to discuss how The Danish Folk High School's conception of simplicity as an aesthetic and gendered ideal in the formal education of female handcraft...... personal values materialize through a hand-made everyday artefact, and how can the artefact constitute action and self-perception? The empirical research and analysis concerns how a former textile crafts teacher's subjective values and professional identity materialize through a hand-woven sofa cushion...

  16. Testing of constitutive models in LAME.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammerand, Daniel Carl; Scherzinger, William Mark

    2007-09-01

    Constitutive models for computational solid mechanics codes are in LAME--the Library of Advanced Materials for Engineering. These models describe complex material behavior and are used in our finite deformation solid mechanics codes. To ensure the correct implementation of these models, regression tests have been created for constitutive models in LAME. A selection of these tests is documented here. Constitutive models are an important part of any solid mechanics code. If an analysis code is meant to provide accurate results, the constitutive models that describe the material behavior need to be implemented correctly. Ensuring the correct implementation of constitutive models is the goal of a testing procedure that is used with the Library of Advanced Materials for Engineering (LAME) (see [1] and [2]). A test suite for constitutive models can serve three purposes. First, the test problems provide the constitutive model developer a means to test the model implementation. This is an activity that is always done by any responsible constitutive model developer. Retaining the test problem in a repository where the problem can be run periodically is an excellent means of ensuring that the model continues to behave correctly. A second purpose of a test suite for constitutive models is that it gives application code developers confidence that the constitutive models work correctly. This is extremely important since any analyst that uses an application code for an engineering analysis will associate a constitutive model in LAME with the application code, not LAME. Therefore, ensuring the correct implementation of constitutive models is essential for application code teams. A third purpose of a constitutive model test suite is that it provides analysts with example problems that they can look at to understand the behavior of a specific model. Since the choice of a constitutive model, and the properties that are used in that model, have an enormous effect on the results of an

  17. AT1 receptor induced alterations in histone H2A reveal novel insights into GPCR control of chromatin remodeling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajaganapathi Jagannathan

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Chronic activation of angiotensin II (AngII type 1 receptor (AT(1R, a prototypical G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR induces gene regulatory stress which is responsible for phenotypic modulation of target cells. The AT(1R-selective drugs reverse the gene regulatory stress in various cardiovascular diseases. However, the molecular mechanisms are not clear. We speculate that activation states of AT(1R modify the composition of histone isoforms and post-translational modifications (PTM, thereby alter the structure-function dynamics of chromatin. We combined total histone isolation, FPLC separation, and mass spectrometry techniques to analyze histone H2A in HEK293 cells with and without AT(1R activation. We have identified eight isoforms: H2AA, H2AG, H2AM, H2AO, H2AQ, Q96QV6, H2AC and H2AL. The isoforms, H2AA, H2AC and H2AQ were methylated and H2AC was phosphorylated. The relative abundance of specific H2A isoforms and PTMs were further analyzed in relationship to the activation states of AT(1R by immunochemical studies. Within 2 hr, the isoforms, H2AA/O exchanged with H2AM. The monomethylated H2AC increased rapidly and the phosphorylated H2AC decreased, thus suggesting that enhanced H2AC methylation is coupled to Ser1p dephosphorylation. We show that H2A125Kme1 promotes interaction with the heterochromatin associated protein, HP1α. These specific changes in H2A are reversed by treatment with the AT(1R specific inhibitor losartan. Our analysis provides a first step towards an awareness of histone code regulation by GPCRs.

  18. Constitution, 5 May 1989.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    This document contains provisions of Cambodia's Constitution of May 5, 1989. Article 7 gives men and women equal rights in marriage and the family, calls for monogamous marriages, and affords social protection to mothers and children. Article 8 guides parent-child relationships. The 14th article defines state property, and the 15th gives citizens full rights to own, use, and inherit land. The use of agricultural and forested land can only be changed with permission. Article 22 assigns educational responsibilities to the state, including free elementary education and a gradual expansion of higher education. Adult literacy classes are also promoted. Article 26 guarantees free medical consultations, and article 27 gives women a 90-day paid maternity leave. Breast-feeding women are also given special privileges. Article 33 guarantees the right to pay equity and to social security benefits. Article 36 grants the freedom to travel, the inviolability of homes, and privacy in correspondence of all types.

  19. Function-specific virtual screening for GPCR ligands using a combined scoring method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooistra, Albert J; Vischer, Henry F; McNaught-Flores, Daniel; Leurs, Rob; de Esch, Iwan J P; de Graaf, Chris

    2016-06-24

    The ability of scoring functions to correctly select and rank docking poses of small molecules in protein binding sites is highly target dependent, which presents a challenge for structure-based drug discovery. Here we describe a virtual screening method that combines an energy-based docking scoring function with a molecular interaction fingerprint (IFP) to identify new ligands based on G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) crystal structures. The consensus scoring method is prospectively evaluated by: 1) the discovery of chemically novel, fragment-like, high affinity histamine H1 receptor (H1R) antagonists/inverse agonists, 2) the selective structure-based identification of ß2-adrenoceptor (ß2R) agonists, and 3) the experimental validation and comparison of the combined and individual scoring approaches. Systematic retrospective virtual screening simulations allowed the definition of scoring cut-offs for the identification of H1R and ß2R ligands and the selection of an optimal ß-adrenoceptor crystal structure for the discrimination between ß2R agonists and antagonists. The consensus approach resulted in the experimental validation of 53% of the ß2R and 73% of the H1R virtual screening hits with up to nanomolar affinities and potencies. The selective identification of ß2R agonists shows the possibilities of structure-based prediction of GPCR ligand function by integrating protein-ligand binding mode information.

  20. The Constitutional Court and the Imperative of its Reform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Gilia

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent debates on the upcoming review of the Constitution have determined us to pay close attention to the basic institution in a democratic state, that is the Constitutional Court. Being caught in the crossfire between power and opposition, the Constitutional Court had a hard time lately, facing severe attacks. The aim of our study is to analyze the evolution of the Constitutional Court within the inland constitutional system, particularly bringing up the flaws describing the Court’s activity. We have also analyzed the proposals put forth by several bodies or experts regarding the constitutional contentious court. At the end of our study, following an analysis of different constitutional types of constitutional review, used by a number of states in Europe, we introduced several resolutions that may improve the role, the course and, last but not least, the activity of the Romanian Constitutional Court.

  1. Constitutive models in LAME.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammerand, Daniel Carl; Scherzinger, William Mark

    2007-09-01

    The Library of Advanced Materials for Engineering (LAME) provides a common repository for constitutive models that can be used in computational solid mechanics codes. A number of models including both hypoelastic (rate) and hyperelastic (total strain) constitutive forms have been implemented in LAME. The structure and testing of LAME is described in Scherzinger and Hammerand ([3] and [4]). The purpose of the present report is to describe the material models which have already been implemented into LAME. The descriptions are designed to give useful information to both analysts and code developers. Thus far, 33 non-ITAR/non-CRADA protected material models have been incorporated. These include everything from the simple isotropic linear elastic models to a number of elastic-plastic models for metals to models for honeycomb, foams, potting epoxies and rubber. A complete description of each model is outside the scope of the current report. Rather, the aim here is to delineate the properties, state variables, functions, and methods for each model. However, a brief description of some of the constitutive details is provided for a number of the material models. Where appropriate, the SAND reports available for each model have been cited. Many models have state variable aliases for some or all of their state variables. These alias names can be used for outputting desired quantities. The state variable aliases available for results output have been listed in this report. However, not all models use these aliases. For those models, no state variable names are listed. Nevertheless, the number of state variables employed by each model is always given. Currently, there are four possible functions for a material model. This report lists which of these four methods are employed in each material model. As far as analysts are concerned, this information is included only for the awareness purposes. The analyst can take confidence in the fact that model has been properly implemented

  2. VALUATION IN THE CONSTITUTIONAL ERA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Brimer

    16 ..... stem from the pre-constitutional era, and the constitutional framework and its legitimate reform efforts. A decision on what is just ...... Carroll L Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (Digital Scanning Scituate MA. 2007). Dagan 1999 Va L Rev.

  3. State provision of constitutional goods

    OpenAIRE

    Espinosa , Romain

    2016-01-01

    International audience; This paper investigates the impact of constitutional rights on the level of public expenditure in a large sample of countries. To do so, we construct a panel of 73 countries from 1960 to 2011. We first investigate factors that drive constitutional changes regarding constitutional rights. To address potential endogeneity concerns in the choice of constitutional rules, we rely on an instrumental variable within estimation (country and time fixed effects) to estimate the ...

  4. Start Of The French Constitutionalism: Constitution Of 1791

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey V. Bochkarev

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In the present article author analyzes questions of French constitutionalism origin. Author notes that in France, over the past two centuries, a state of law, which is based on the principles of popular sovereignty has been formed; observance of human rights and freedoms by the state; parliamentary democracy; supremacy of constitution in relation to all other laws and regulations; separation of powers and institute of authorities responsibility as an organizational framework for the legal state; independence of the judiciary; compliance with commitments taken by the State during international relations. These principles were laid down in the constitutional history of the country. In the present article an attempt to explore the beginning of the French constitutionalism through the prism of the Constitution of 1791 was made. Author makes concludes that in the Constitution of 1791 the fundamental principles of constitutional law were laid, some of which are reflected in the Constitution of the Fifth Republic in France and continue to operate. Constitution of the Fifth Republic proclaimed commitment to "human rights and principles of national sovereignty as defined by the Declaration of 1789, confirmed and complemented by the Preamble to the Constitution of 1946, and despite many disputes, Constitutional Council reaffirmed inviolability of the equality before the law principle, which exists in the Declaration.

  5. Ontoteleological Constitution of Entrepreneurship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Luiz Teixeira Boava

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Entrepreneurship is a pluri-disciplinary phenomenon, object of research in several areas of knowledge. However, studies on this theme present approaches that start to consider entrepreneurship as a field of private knowledge in the phase of epistemological construction. In this context, the aim of this investigation is to contribute to the discussions on the theme, through studies on the ontoteleological constitution of entrepreneurship, in propaedeutic character, deflagrating new approaches. Thus, there is a presentation concerning the study of entrepreneurship, which may emphasize its ontical and ontological aspects. In addition, the reason why it is complex to define entrepreneurship is investigated. Subjects regarding the philosophy of entrepreneurship are introduced, seeking to present the bases for an ontoteleological approach to the phenomenon. Such an approach assumes that the finality of the entrepreneurial act relates to the main principles and transformations required into the organization. Finally, it is concluded that man is an entrepreneurial being, the meta-entrepreneur, and his entrepreneurial actions are not determined by external factors, but rather by the condition of his potentiality.

  6. The diffusion of constitutional rights

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goderis, B.V.G.; Versteeg, M.

    Constitutions are commonly regarded as uniquely national products, shaped by domestic ideals and politics. This paper develops and empirically investigates a novel hypothesis, which is that constitutions are also shaped by transnational influence, or “diffusion.” Constitutional rights can diffuse

  7. Whole-cell biosensor for label-free detection of GPCR-mediated drug responses in personal cell lines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hillger, J.M.; Schoop, J.; Boomsma, D.I.; Slagboom, P.E.; IJzerman, A.P.; Heitman, L.H.

    2015-01-01

    Deciphering how genetic variation in drug targets such as G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) affects drug response is essential for precision medicine. GPCR signaling is traditionally investigated in artificial cell lines which do not provide sufficient physiological context. Patient-derived cell

  8. GPCR-drug interactions prediction using random forest with drug-association-matrix-based post-processing procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jun; Li, Yang; Yang, Jing-Yu; Shen, Hong-Bin; Yu, Dong-Jun

    2016-02-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are important targets of modern medicinal drugs. The accurate identification of interactions between GPCRs and drugs is of significant importance for both protein function annotations and drug discovery. In this paper, a new sequence-based predictor called TargetGDrug is designed and implemented for predicting GPCR-drug interactions. In TargetGDrug, the evolutionary feature of GPCR sequence and the wavelet-based molecular fingerprint feature of drug are integrated to form the combined feature of a GPCR-drug pair; then, the combined feature is fed to a trained random forest (RF) classifier to perform initial prediction; finally, a novel drug-association-matrix-based post-processing procedure is applied to reduce potential false positive or false negative of the initial prediction. Experimental results on benchmark datasets demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed method, and an improvement of 15% in the Matthews correlation coefficient (MCC) was observed over independent validation tests when compared with the most recently released sequence-based GPCR-drug interactions predictor. The implemented webserver, together with the datasets used in this study, is freely available for academic use at http://csbio.njust.edu.cn/bioinf/TargetGDrug. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Targeted expression of constitutively active receptors for parathyroid hormone and parathyroid hormone-related peptide delays endochondral bone formation and rescues mice that lack parathyroid hormone-related peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schipani, E; Lanske, B; Hunzelman, J; Luz, A; Kovacs, C S; Lee, K; Pirro, A; Kronenberg, H M; Jüppner, H

    1997-12-09

    Mice in which the genes encoding the parathyroid hormone (PTH)-related peptide (PTHrP) or the PTH/PTHrP receptor have been ablated by homologous recombination show skeletal dysplasia due to accelerated endochondral bone formation, and die at birth or in utero, respectively. Skeletal abnormalities due to decelerated chondrocyte maturation are observed in transgenic mice where PTHrP expression is targeted to the growth plate, and in patients with Jansen metaphyseal chondrodysplasia, a rare genetic disorder caused by constitutively active PTH/PTHrP receptors. These and other findings thus indicate that PTHrP and its receptor are essential for chondrocyte differentiation. To further explore the role of the PTH/PTHrP receptor in this process, we generated transgenic mice in which expression of a constitutively active receptor, HKrk-H223R, was targeted to the growth plate by the rat alpha1 (II) collagen promoter. Two major goals were pursued: (i) to investigate how constitutively active PTH/PTHrP receptors affect the program of chondrocyte maturation; and (ii) to determine whether expression of the mutant receptor would correct the severe growth plate abnormalities of PTHrP-ablated mice (PTHrP-/-). The targeted expression of constitutively active PTH/PTHrP receptors led to delayed mineralization, decelerated conversion of proliferative chondrocytes into hypertrophic cells in skeletal segments that are formed by the endochondral process, and prolonged presence of hypertrophic chondrocytes with delay of vascular invasion. Furthermore, it corrected at birth the growth plate abnormalities of PTHrP-/- mice and allowed their prolonged survival. "Rescued" animals lacked tooth eruption and showed premature epiphyseal closure, indicating that both processes involve PTHrP. These findings suggest that rescued PTHrP-/- mice may gain considerable importance for studying the diverse, possibly tissue-specific role(s) of PTHrP in postnatal development.

  10. MicroRNA-34a promotes genomic instability by a broad suppression of genome maintenance mechanisms downstream of the oncogene KSHV-vGPCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Claudia J; Popp, Oliver; Thirunarayanan, Nanthakumar; Dittmar, Gunnar; Lipp, Martin; Müller, Gerd

    2016-03-01

    The Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV)-encoded chemokine receptor vGPCR acts as an oncogene in Kaposi's sarcomagenesis. Until now, the molecular mechanisms by which the vGPCR contributes to tumor development remain incompletely understood. Here, we show that the KSHV-vGPCR contributes to tumor progression through microRNA (miR)-34a-mediated induction of genomic instability. Large-scale analyses on the DNA, gene and protein level of cell lines derived from a mouse model of vGPCR-driven tumorigenesis revealed that a vGPCR-induced upregulation of miR-34a resulted in a broad suppression of genome maintenance genes. A knockdown of either the vGPCR or miR-34a largely restored the expression of these genes and confirmed miR-34a as a downstream effector of the KSHV-vGPCR that compromises genome maintenance mechanisms. This novel, protumorigenic role of miR-34a questions the use of miR-34a mimetics in cancer therapy as they could impair genome stability.

  11. Constitution, 1989. [Selected provisions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    Chapter XII of the Hungarian Constitution, 1989, details the Fundamental Rights and Duties of Citizens. Everyone lawfully within the territory of Hungary has the right to liberty of movement and the freedom to choose his or her residence, except when restricted by law, including the right to leave his or her residence or county. The Republic of Hungary grants asylum to foreign citizens who were persecuted for racial, religious ethnic, linguistic, or political reasons. Men and women shall equally enjoy all civil, political, economic, social and political rights. Mothers are entitled to special care and protection before and after childbirth; women and juveniles are protected at work by special regulations. Every child has the right to special care an assistance from his or her family, the State, and society, for appropriate physical, spiritual, and moral development. Parents shall decide the kind of education their children receive. Hungary grants equal rights to all person within its territories, without regard to race, color, sex, language, religion, political, or other opinion, national, and social origin, property, birth and other status. Prejudicial discrimination shall be severely punished. Everyone has the right to work, to the free choice of employment and profession and to equal pay for equal work. Citizens have the right to social security, including social services necessary in old age, sickness, disability, widowhood, orphanhood an unemployment through no fault of their own. Hungary guarantees the right to culture for its citizens and realized this right by free and compulsory elementary education, by secondary and higher education which is accessible to all on the basis of capacity, and by the financial support of those receiving an education.

  12. Dilemmas on the European Constitution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zvonko Posavec

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the author discusses the dilemmas associated with the role of the European Constitution in the further development of the Union. Analysing the implications of the rejection of the European Constitution by the referenda in France and the Netherlands, the author sets forth arguments why such decisions should be neither overrated nor underrated. Aiming to broaden the basis for understanding the European constitutional crisis, the author further discusses the categories of state, constitution and nation. Scrutiny into these categories, he argues, is a crucial prerequisite for understanding the sources of dilemmas regarding the European Constitution and for further development of the EU political system

  13. Mechanism and function of Drosophila capa GPCR: a desiccation stress-responsive receptor with functional homology to human neuromedinU receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selim Terhzaz

    Full Text Available The capa peptide receptor, capaR (CG14575, is a G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR for the D. melanogaster capa neuropeptides, Drm-capa-1 and -2 (capa-1 and -2. To date, the capa peptide family constitutes the only known nitridergic peptides in insects, so the mechanisms and physiological function of ligand-receptor signalling of this peptide family are of interest. Capa peptide induces calcium signaling via capaR with EC₅₀ values for capa-1 = 3.06 nM and capa-2 = 4.32 nM. capaR undergoes rapid desensitization, with internalization via a b-arrestin-2 mediated mechanism but is rapidly re-sensitized in the absence of capa-1. Drosophila capa peptides have a C-terminal -FPRXamide motif and insect-PRXamide peptides are evolutionarily related to vertebrate peptide neuromedinU (NMU. Potential agonist effects of human NMU-25 and the insect -PRLamides [Drosophila pyrokinins Drm-PK-1 (capa-3, Drm-PK-2 and hugin-gamma [hugg

  14. Assessing the osteoblast transcriptome in a model of enhanced bone formation due to constitutive G{sub s}–G protein signaling in osteoblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wattanachanya, Lalita, E-mail: lalita_md@yahoo.com [Endocrine Research Unit, Veterans Affairs Medical Center and Departments of Medicine and Physiology, University of California, San Francisco, CA (United States); Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University and King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital, Thai Red Cross Society, Bangkok (Thailand); Wang, Liping, E-mail: lipingwang05@yahoo.com [Endocrine Research Unit, Veterans Affairs Medical Center and Departments of Medicine and Physiology, University of California, San Francisco, CA (United States); Millard, Susan M., E-mail: susan.millard@mater.uq.edu.au [Endocrine Research Unit, Veterans Affairs Medical Center and Departments of Medicine and Physiology, University of California, San Francisco, CA (United States); Lu, Wei-Dar, E-mail: weidar_lu@yahoo.com [Endocrine Research Unit, Veterans Affairs Medical Center and Departments of Medicine and Physiology, University of California, San Francisco, CA (United States); O’Carroll, Dylan, E-mail: dylancocarroll@gmail.com [Endocrine Research Unit, Veterans Affairs Medical Center and Departments of Medicine and Physiology, University of California, San Francisco, CA (United States); Hsiao, Edward C., E-mail: Edward.Hsiao@ucsf.edu [Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, CA (United States); Conklin, Bruce R., E-mail: bconklin@gladstone.ucsf.edu [Gladstone Institute of Cardiovascular Disease, San Francisco, CA (United States); Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, CA (United States); Department of Cellular and Molecular Pharmacology, University of California, San Francisco, CA (United States); Nissenson, Robert A., E-mail: Robert.Nissenson@ucsf.edu [Endocrine Research Unit, Veterans Affairs Medical Center and Departments of Medicine and Physiology, University of California, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2015-05-01

    G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling in osteoblasts (OBs) is an important regulator of bone formation. We previously described a mouse model expressing Rs1, an engineered constitutively active G{sub s}-coupled GPCR, under the control of the 2.3 kb Col I promoter. These mice showed a dramatic age-dependent increase in trabecular bone of femurs. Here, we further evaluated the effects of enhanced G{sub s} signaling in OBs on intramembranous bone formation by examining calvariae of 1- and 9-week-old Col1(2.3)/Rs1 mice and characterized the in vivo gene expression specifically occurring in osteoblasts with activated G{sub s} G protein-coupled receptor signaling, at the cellular level rather than in a whole bone. Rs1 calvariae displayed a dramatic increase in bone volume with partial loss of cortical structure. By immunohistochemistry, Osterix was detected in cells throughout the inter-trabecular space while Osteocalcin was expressed predominantly in cells along bone surfaces, suggesting the role of paracrine mediators secreted from OBs driven by 2.3 kb Col I promoter could influence early OB commitment, differentiation, and/or proliferation. Gene expression analysis of calvarial OBs revealed that genes affected by Rs1 signaling include those encoding proteins important for cell differentiation, cytokines and growth factors, angiogenesis, coagulation, and energy metabolism. The set of G{sub s}-GPCRs and other GPCRs that may contribute to the observed skeletal phenotype and candidate paracrine mediators of the effect of G{sub s} signaling in OBs were also determined. Our results identify novel detailed in vivo cellular changes of the anabolic response of the skeleton to G{sub s} signaling in mature OBs. - Highlights: • OB expression of an engineered G{sub s}-coupled receptor dramatically increases bone mass. • We investigated the changes in gene expression in vivo in enhanced OB G{sub s} signaling. • Genes in cell cycle and transcription were increased in

  15. Constitutional judges (guarantee of the Constitution and responsibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Javier Ansuátegui Roig

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available My aim in this paper is to propose a reflection on the position and the importance that the constitutional judge has in the legal systems of contemporary constitutionalism. The figure of the judge responsible of protecting the Constitution is a key institution, without which we cannot understand the laws of constitutional democracies, their current lines of development, and the guarantee of rights and freedoms that constitute the normative core of these systems. Moreover, the reflection on the exercise of the powers of the judge, its scope and its justification is an important part of contemporary legal discussion, still relevant, albeit not exclusively - in the field of legal philosophy. The object of attention of my reflection is the judge who has the power of judicial review, in a scheme of defense of the Constitution, regardless the specific ways of this defense.

  16. The Spanish Constitution, the Constitutional Court and the Catalan Referendum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abat Ninet, Antoni

    2015-01-01

    This chapter deals with a core topic in constitutional law, that of the conflict between constitutions and will of the demos. Aristotle in Book IV of the Politics had already anticipated the possible conflict between these two forms of Politeia (constitutions), when defining the types of democracy...... and politeia that Aristotle defined now clashes between two powerful symbolic and romantic phenomena. In the Spanish-Catalan binomial scenario, there are some elements that need to be analysed to obtain a complete picture of the constitutional possibilities to of accommodating a Catalan self...

  17. Essential Medicines in National Constitutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toebes, Brigit; Hogerzeil, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A constitutional guarantee of access to essential medicines has been identified as an important indicator of government commitment to the progressive realization of the right to the highest attainable standard of health. The objective of this study was to evaluate provisions on access to essential medicines in national constitutions, to identify comprehensive examples of constitutional text on medicines that can be used as a model for other countries, and to evaluate the evolution of constitutional medicines-related rights since 2008. Relevant articles were selected from an inventory of constitutional texts from WHO member states. References to states’ legal obligations under international human rights law were evaluated. Twenty-two constitutions worldwide now oblige governments to protect and/or to fulfill accessibility of, availability of, and/or quality of medicines. Since 2008, state responsibilities to fulfill access to essential medicines have expanded in five constitutions, been maintained in four constitutions, and have regressed in one constitution. Government commitments to essential medicines are an important foundation of health system equity and are included increasingly in state constitutions. PMID:27781006

  18. GPCR engineering yields high-resolution structural insights into beta2-adrenergic receptor function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenbaum, Daniel M; Cherezov, Vadim; Hanson, Michael A

    2007-01-01

    crystallization, we engineered a beta2AR fusion protein in which T4 lysozyme (T4L) replaces most of the third intracellular loop of the GPCR ("beta2AR-T4L") and showed that this protein retains near-native pharmacologic properties. Analysis of adrenergic receptor ligand-binding mutants within the context......The beta2-adrenergic receptor (beta2AR) is a well-studied prototype for heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G protein)-coupled receptors (GPCRs) that respond to diffusible hormones and neurotransmitters. To overcome the structural flexibility of the beta2AR and to facilitate its...... a conformational pathway from the ligand-binding pocket to regions that interact with G proteins....

  19. Integrin and GPCR Crosstalk in the Regulation of ASM Contraction Signaling in Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teoh, Chun Ming; Tam, John Kit Chung; Tran, Thai

    2012-01-01

    Airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) is one of the cardinal features of asthma. Contraction of airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells that line the airway wall is thought to influence aspects of AHR, resulting in excessive narrowing or occlusion of the airway. ASM contraction is primarily controlled by agonists that bind G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), which are expressed on ASM. Integrins also play a role in regulating ASM contraction signaling. As therapies for asthma are based on symptom relief, better understanding of the crosstalk between GPCRs and integrins holds good promise for the design of more effective therapies that target the underlying cellular and molecular mechanism that governs AHR. In this paper, we will review current knowledge about integrins and GPCRs in their regulation of ASM contraction signaling and discuss the emerging concept of crosstalk between the two and the implication of this crosstalk on the development of agents that target AHR.

  20. Quantitative GPCR and ion channel transcriptomics in primary alveolar macrophages and macrophage surrogates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Groot-Kormelink Paul J

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alveolar macrophages are one of the first lines of defence against invading pathogens and play a central role in modulating both the innate and acquired immune systems. By responding to endogenous stimuli within the lung, alveolar macrophages contribute towards the regulation of the local inflammatory microenvironment, the initiation of wound healing and the pathogenesis of viral and bacterial infections. Despite the availability of protocols for isolating primary alveolar macrophages from the lung these cells remain recalcitrant to expansion in-vitro and therefore surrogate cell types, such as monocyte derived macrophages and phorbol ester-differentiated cell lines (e.g. U937, THP-1, HL60 are frequently used to model macrophage function. Methods The availability of high throughput gene expression technologies for accurate quantification of transcript levels enables the re-evaluation of these surrogate cell types for use as cellular models of the alveolar macrophage. Utilising high-throughput TaqMan arrays and focussing on dynamically regulated families of integral membrane proteins, we explore the similarities and differences in G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR and ion channel expression in alveolar macrophages and their widely used surrogates. Results The complete non-sensory GPCR and ion channel transcriptome is described for primary alveolar macrophages and macrophage surrogates. The expression of numerous GPCRs and ion channels whose expression were hitherto not described in human alveolar macrophages are compared across primary macrophages and commonly used macrophage cell models. Several membrane proteins known to have critical roles in regulating macrophage function, including CXCR6, CCR8 and TRPV4, were found to be highly expressed in macrophages but not expressed in PMA-differentiated surrogates. Conclusions The data described in this report provides insight into the appropriate choice of cell models for

  1. Remarkable similarities between the hemichordate (Saccoglossus kowalevskii) and vertebrate GPCR repertoire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Arunkumar; Almén, Markus Sällman; Fredriksson, Robert; Schiöth, Helgi B

    2013-09-10

    Saccoglossus kowalevskii (the acorn worm) is a hemichordate belonging to the superphylum of deuterostome bilateral animals. Hemichordates are sister group to echinoderms, and closely related to chordates. S. kowalevskii has chordate like morphological traits and serves as an important model organism, helping developmental biologists to understand the evolution of the central nervous system (CNS). Despite being such an important model organism, the signalling system repertoire of the largest family of integral transmembrane receptor proteins, G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is largely unknown in S. kowalevskii. Here, we identified 260 unique GPCRs and classified as many as 257 of them into five main mammalian GPCR families; Glutamate (23), Rhodopsin (212), Adhesion (18), Frizzled (3) and Secretin (1). Despite having a diffuse nervous system, the acorn worm contains well conserved orthologues for human Adhesion and Glutamate family members, with a similar N-terminal domain architecture. This is particularly true for genes involved in CNS development and regulation in vertebrates. The average sequence identity between the GPCR orthologues in human and S. kowalevskii is around 47%, and this is same as observed in couple of the closest vertebrate relatives, Ciona intestinalis (41%) and Branchiostoma floridae (~47%). The Rhodopsin family has fewer members than vertebrates and lacks clear homologues for 6 of the 13 subgroups, including olfactory, chemokine, prostaglandin, purine, melanocyte concentrating hormone receptors and MAS-related receptors. However, the peptide and somatostatin binding receptors have expanded locally in the acorn worm. Overall, this study is the first large scale analysis of a major signalling gene superfamily in the hemichordate lineage. The establishment of orthologue relationships with genes involved in neurotransmission and development of the CNS in vertebrates provides a foundation for understanding the evolution of signal transduction

  2. On the constitutionality of dose limiting values

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goetz, V.

    1976-01-01

    The fundamental right according to Art. 2 par. 2 sentence 1 of the German Constitution is relevant for the set-up and application of radiation protection law. Resulting from Art. 2 par. 2 sentence 1 of the Constitution it is a general obligation of the state to protect life (Federal Constitutional Court, judgment of 25th Feb., 1975, BVerfGE 39.1) and physical soundness. The subjective basic right of everybody to defend against official encroachments his personal integrity corresponds to the right of the individual within the framework of the official obligation for protection from the state (to ward off danger). The term of danger, as to the degree of its determination, corresponds to that of the encroachment. To speak of danger in a legal sense, the causal connection between a certain source of danger and certain damage must be ascertained and proved. Topical controversies as to the admissibility of activity discharges of low doses range in the field of risk reduction and thus in the field of the duty of the state to take precautionary steps against risks (Art. 2 par. 2 sentence 1 of the Constitution). The constitution, however, does not contain any basic right that every risk has to be avoided. On the other hand, the necessity of cautions valuation of radiation risks can be derived from the Constitution. The fixation of dose limits and their application in connection with general radiation protection principles (paragraph 28 E of the Radiation Protection Ordinance) do not contain any 'interference' with the basic right in the sense of Art. 2 par. 2 sentence 3 of the Constitution. Neither from aspects of the principle of the legal state nor from Art. 80 par. 1 of the Constitution can the use of the legal form of the Ordinance be doubted. (orig./HP) [de

  3. Constitutional Issues--Watergate and the Constitution. Teaching with Documents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Archives and Records Administration, Washington, DC.

    When U.S. President Richard Nixon resigned in 1974 in the wake of the Watergate scandal, it was only the second time that impeachment of a president had been considered. Although the U.S. Constitution has provisions for a person removed from office to be indicted, there are no guidelines in the Constitution about a President who has resigned. The…

  4. Constitutions compared : An introduction to comparative constitutional law

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heringa, Aalt Willem

    2016-01-01

    This book provides a user-friendly introduction to comparative constitutional law. For each area of constitutional law, a general introduction and a comparative overview is provided, which is then followed by more detailed country chapters on that specific area. The subjects covered are the origins

  5. La Constitution économique parmi les Constitutions européennes

    OpenAIRE

    Kaarlo Tuori

    2011-01-01

    In the European context, the place of the revolutionary notions of constitutive power, demos and constitutional moment is occupied by the evolutionary concept of constitutionalisation. Economic constitution is merely one aspect in multi-dimensional European constitution (alisation). My tentative proposal is to distinguish between the following dimensions of constitution : economic constitution ; juridical constitution ; political constitution ; social constitution ; and security constitution....

  6. National constitutional courts in the European Constitutional Democracy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Komárek, Jan

    2014-01-01

    This article critically assesses the transformation of national constitutional courts’ place in the law and politics of the EU and its member states. This process eliminates the difference between constitutional and ordinary national courts, which is crucial for the institutional implementation...... the EU and its member states, understood together as the European Constitutional Democracy—the central notion developed in this article in order to support an argument that should speak to both EU lawyers and national constitutionalists....... of the discourse theory of law and democracy. It also disrupts the symbiotic relationship between national constitutional democracies established after World War II and European integration. The article argues that maintaining the special place of national constitutional courts is in the vital interest of both...

  7. The effect of ligand efficacy on the formation and stability of a GPCR-G protein complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yao, Xiao Jie; Vélez Ruiz, Gisselle; Whorton, Matthew R

    2009-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) mediate the majority of physiologic responses to hormones and neurotransmitters. However, many GPCRs exhibit varying degrees of agonist-independent G protein activation. This phenomenon is referred to as basal or constitutive activity. For many of these GPCRs...

  8. Chronic regulation of colonic epithelial secretory function by activation of G protein-coupled receptors.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Toumi, F

    2011-02-01

    Enteric neurotransmitters that act at G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are well known to acutely promote epithelial Cl(-) and fluid secretion. Here we examined if acute GPCR activation might have more long-term consequences for epithelial secretory function.

  9. The constitution of partnering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottlieb, Stefan Christoffer

    questions and practices of planning, decision-making and control to the sphere of the practical work. Using partnering as the master-case this development is described as a process, which first and foremost took place by enforcing a so-called logic of exemptions on a politico-institutional level. It is thus...... demonstrated that the elements or concepts we associate with partnering, e.g. economic incentives, the freedom to choose work partners, conflict resolution models, common activities etc., each and one can be seen as contributing to the 'sidelining' of one or more perceived inconveniences of the so....... In chapter 2 Foucault's concept of the dispositive is subjected to inquiry. It is argued that the dispositive analysis has to be seen as a continuation, rather than a replacement, of Foucault's archaeological and genealogical projects. It is thus shown that Foucault in his work with the knowledge archaeology...

  10. The Constitution and American Radicalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobel, Jules

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the history of the following movements' attitudes towards the Constitution: (1) abolition; (2) feminism; (3) trade unions; (4) socialism and communism; and (5) civil rights and anti-war. Maintains that the tensions in these movements' towards the Constitution represent basic contradictions in the document itself. (PS)

  11. The Constitution and Its Critics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Main, Thomas J.

    2011-01-01

    In planning a freshman undergraduate curriculum with colleagues recently, the question arose as to what type of understanding educators wanted to impart to their students about the Constitution. The alleged defects of the Constitution that these books point to are wide-ranging and can be classified into various categories. Some problems--such as…

  12. Constitutive Effects of Performance Indicators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahler-Larsen, Peter

    2014-01-01

    that are demonstrably problematic. Based on a distinction between trivial and advanced measure fixation, an argument is made for constitutive effects that are based on less problematic assumptions. Through this conceptual move, the political dimension of performance indicators is appreciated. The conceptual dimensions...... of constitutive effects are carved out, empirical illustrations of their applicability are offered and implications discussed....

  13. Constitutive rules, language, and ontology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hindriks, Frank

    It is a commonplace within philosophy that the ontology of institutions can be captured in terms of constitutive rules. What exactly such rules are, however, is not well understood. They are usually contrasted to regulative rules: constitutive rules (such as the rules of chess) make institutional

  14. Legal theology in imposed constitutionalism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abat Ninet, Antoni

    2018-01-01

    The focus of this paper is the question of legitimacy, and how can we consider legitimate an imposed constitution and the subsequent constitutional principles, practices and values that go hand-in-hand with the legal and political acculturation. Constitutional texts around the world are good...... examples of transposition and complicity of theological and juridical thoughts. For the purpose of this paper, imposed constitutions are political and legal norms of a state enacted and enforced without the free and full agreement of the Demos. Legal theology implies the application of religious phenomena......, theories and concepts to achieve undisputed legal legitimacy. Imposed constitutions as rules imposed for salvation for those “Platonic Philosophes” who have seen the “light”, that known the episteme are paramount examples of legal and political theology. The paper has two main sections. The first one...

  15. Gene network inference and biochemical assessment delineates GPCR pathways and CREB targets in small intestinal neuroendocrine neoplasia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignat Drozdov

    Full Text Available Small intestinal (SI neuroendocrine tumors (NET are increasing in incidence, however little is known about their biology. High throughput techniques such as inference of gene regulatory networks from microarray experiments can objectively define signaling machinery in this disease. Genome-wide co-expression analysis was used to infer gene relevance network in SI-NETs. The network was confirmed to be non-random, scale-free, and highly modular. Functional analysis of gene co-expression modules revealed processes including 'Nervous system development', 'Immune response', and 'Cell-cycle'. Importantly, gene network topology and differential expression analysis identified over-expression of the GPCR signaling regulators, the cAMP synthetase, ADCY2, and the protein kinase A, PRKAR1A. Seven CREB response element (CRE transcripts associated with proliferation and secretion: BEX1, BICD1, CHGB, CPE, GABRB3, SCG2 and SCG3 as well as ADCY2 and PRKAR1A were measured in an independent SI dataset (n = 10 NETs; n = 8 normal preparations. All were up-regulated (p<0.035 with the exception of SCG3 which was not differently expressed. Forskolin (a direct cAMP activator, 10(-5 M significantly stimulated transcription of pCREB and 3/7 CREB targets, isoproterenol (a selective ß-adrenergic receptor agonist and cAMP activator, 10(-5 M stimulated pCREB and 4/7 targets while BIM-53061 (a dopamine D(2 and Serotonin [5-HT(2] receptor agonist, 10(-6 M stimulated 100% of targets as well as pCREB; CRE transcription correlated with the levels of cAMP accumulation and PKA activity; BIM-53061 stimulated the highest levels of cAMP and PKA (2.8-fold and 2.5-fold vs. 1.8-2-fold for isoproterenol and forskolin. Gene network inference and graph topology analysis in SI NETs suggests that SI NETs express neural GPCRs that activate different CRE targets associated with proliferation and secretion. In vitro studies, in a model NET cell system, confirmed that transcriptional

  16. Great Constitutional Ideas: Justice, Equality, and Property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starr, Isidore

    1987-01-01

    Examines the ideas of justice, equality, and property as they are represented in the Declaration of Independence, the U.S. Constitution and the Bill of Rights. Discusses how these ideas affect the way public schools operate and the lessons educators teach or don't teach about our society. Includes ideas for classroom activities. (JDH)

  17. Ubiquitin-Like Protein SAMP1 and JAMM/MPN+ Metalloprotease HvJAMM1 Constitute a System for Reversible Regulation of Metabolic Enzyme Activity in Archaea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiyun Cao

    Full Text Available Ubiquitin/ubiquitin-like (Ub/Ubl proteins are involved in diverse cellular processes by their covalent linkage to protein substrates. Here, we provide evidence for a post-translational modification system that regulates enzyme activity which is composed of an archaeal Ubl protein (SAMP1 and a JAMM/MPN+ metalloprotease (HvJAMM1. Molybdopterin (MPT synthase activity was found to be inhibited by covalent linkage of SAMP1 to the large subunit (MoaE of MPT synthase. HvJAMM1 was shown to cleave the covalently linked inactive form of SAMP1-MoaE to the free functional individual SAMP1 and MoaE subunits of MPT synthase, suggesting reactivation of MPT synthase by this metalloprotease. Overall, this study provides new insight into the broad idea that Ub/Ubl modification is a post-translational process that can directly and reversibly regulate the activity of metabolic enzymes. In particular, we show that Ub/Ubl linkages on the active site residues of an enzyme (MPT synthase can inhibit its catalytic activity and that the enzyme can be reactivated through cleavage by a JAMM/MPN+ metalloprotease.

  18. GPCR-SSFE 2.0-a fragment-based molecular modeling web tool for Class A G-protein coupled receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worth, Catherine L; Kreuchwig, Franziska; Tiemann, Johanna K S; Kreuchwig, Annika; Ritschel, Michele; Kleinau, Gunnar; Hildebrand, Peter W; Krause, Gerd

    2017-07-03

    G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) are key players in signal transduction and therefore a large proportion of pharmaceutical drugs target these receptors. Structural data of GPCRs are sparse yet important for elucidating the molecular basis of GPCR-related diseases and for performing structure-based drug design. To ameliorate this problem, GPCR-SSFE 2.0 (http://www.ssfa-7tmr.de/ssfe2/), an intuitive web server dedicated to providing three-dimensional Class A GPCR homology models has been developed. The updated web server includes 27 inactive template structures and incorporates various new functionalities. Uniquely, it uses a fingerprint correlation scoring strategy for identifying the optimal templates, which we demonstrate captures structural features that sequence similarity alone is unable to do. Template selection is carried out separately for each helix, allowing both single-template models and fragment-based models to be built. Additionally, GPCR-SSFE 2.0 stores a comprehensive set of pre-calculated and downloadable homology models and also incorporates interactive loop modeling using the tool SL2, allowing knowledge-based input by the user to guide the selection process. For visual analysis, the NGL viewer is embedded into the result pages. Finally, blind-testing using two recently published structures shows that GPCR-SSFE 2.0 performs comparably or better than other state-of-the art GPCR modeling web servers. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  19. GPCR-SSFE 2.0—a fragment-based molecular modeling web tool for Class A G-protein coupled receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreuchwig, Franziska; Tiemann, Johanna K.S.; Kreuchwig, Annika; Ritschel, Michele; Kleinau, Gunnar; Hildebrand, Peter W.; Krause, Gerd

    2017-01-01

    Abstract G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) are key players in signal transduction and therefore a large proportion of pharmaceutical drugs target these receptors. Structural data of GPCRs are sparse yet important for elucidating the molecular basis of GPCR-related diseases and for performing structure-based drug design. To ameliorate this problem, GPCR-SSFE 2.0 (http://www.ssfa-7tmr.de/ssfe2/), an intuitive web server dedicated to providing three-dimensional Class A GPCR homology models has been developed. The updated web server includes 27 inactive template structures and incorporates various new functionalities. Uniquely, it uses a fingerprint correlation scoring strategy for identifying the optimal templates, which we demonstrate captures structural features that sequence similarity alone is unable to do. Template selection is carried out separately for each helix, allowing both single-template models and fragment-based models to be built. Additionally, GPCR-SSFE 2.0 stores a comprehensive set of pre-calculated and downloadable homology models and also incorporates interactive loop modeling using the tool SL2, allowing knowledge-based input by the user to guide the selection process. For visual analysis, the NGL viewer is embedded into the result pages. Finally, blind-testing using two recently published structures shows that GPCR-SSFE 2.0 performs comparably or better than other state-of-the art GPCR modeling web servers. PMID:28582569

  20. Essential Oil from Sweet Potato Vines, a Potential New Natural Preservative, and an Antioxidant on Sweet Potato Tubers: Assessment of the Activity and the Constitution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Bo; Xue, Ling-Wei; Zhang, Qiu-Yue; Kong, Wan-Wan; Peng, Jun; Kou, Meng; Jiang, Ji-Hong

    2016-10-12

    Pathogenic fungi and oxidation are the major factors that cause the deterioration of sweet potatoes and also cause the loss of quality that makes consumption unsafe. In the present study, the in vitro results demonstrate that the essential oil from sweet potato vines exhibits significantly enhanced activity compared to that of the control. Furthermore, the essential oil can actively inhibit the growth of some common microorganisms inducing pathogenic bacteria and fungi (inhibition rates above 50% at low concentrations). A total of 31 constituents were identified using GC-MS and confirmed that linalool and p-hydroxybenzoic acid are the major active ingredients. The experiment involving actual tubers showed that the essential oil could retains its quality and effectiveness again the fungus disease. This suggests that it could be used in the food industry to increase the shelf life of stored produce (tubers) to ensure food safety without the use of additives or preservatives.

  1. Functional characterization of human RSK4, a new 90-kDa ribosomal S6 kinase, reveals constitutive activation in most cell types

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dümmler, Bettina A; Hauge, Camilla; Silber, Joachim

    2005-01-01

    The 90-kDa ribosomal S6 kinases (RSK1-3) are important mediators of growth factor stimulation of cellular proliferation, survival, and differentiation and are activated via coordinated phosphorylation by ERK and 3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1 (PDK1). Here we performed the functiona...

  2. Compact halo-ligand-conjugated quantum dots for multicolored single-molecule imaging of overcrowding GPCR proteins on cell membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsuzaki, Akihito; Ohyanagi, Tatsuya; Tsukasaki, Yoshikazu; Miyanaga, Yukihiro; Ueda, Masahiro; Jin, Takashi

    2015-03-25

    To detect single molecules within the optical diffraction limit (< ca. 200 nm), a multicolored imaging technique is developed using Halo-ligand conjugated quantum dots (Halo-QDs; <6 nm in diameter). Using three types of Halo-QDs, multicolored single-molecule fluorescence imaging of GPCR proteins in Dictyostelium cells is achieved. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Mutations in the C-terminal region affect subcellular localization of crucian carp herpesvirus (CaHV) GPCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Gui, Lang; Chen, Zong-Yan; Zhang, Qi-Ya

    2016-08-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are known as seven transmembrane domain receptors and consequently can mediate diverse biological functions via regulation of their subcellular localization. Crucian carp herpesvirus (CaHV) was recently isolated from infected fish with acute gill hemorrhage. CaHV GPCR of 349 amino acids (aa) was identified based on amino acid identity. A series of variants with truncation/deletion/substitution mutation in the C-terminal (aa 315-349) were constructed and expressed in fathead minnow (FHM) cells. The roles of three key C-terminal regions in subcellular localization of CaHV GPCR were determined. Lysine-315 (K-315) directed the aggregation of the protein preferentially at the nuclear side. Predicted N-myristoylation site (GGGWTR, aa 335-340) was responsible for punctate distribution in periplasm or throughout the cytoplasm. Predicted phosphorylation site (SSR, aa 327-329) and GGGWTR together determined the punctate distribution in cytoplasm. Detection of organelles localization by specific markers showed that the protein retaining K-315 colocalized with the Golgi apparatus. These experiments provided first evidence that different mutations of CaHV GPCR C-terminals have different affects on the subcellular localization of fish herpesvirus-encoded GPCRs. The study provided valuable information and new insights into the precise interactions between herpesvirus and fish cells, and could also provide useful targets for antiviral agents in aquaculture.

  4. Assessing GPCR homology models constructed from templates of various transmembrane sequence identities: Binding mode prediction and docking enrichment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loo, Jason S E; Emtage, Abigail L; Ng, Kar Weng; Yong, Alene S J; Doughty, Stephen W

    2018-03-01

    GPCR crystal structures have become more readily accessible in recent years. However, homology models of GPCRs continue to play an important role as many GPCR structures remain unsolved. The new crystal structures now available provide not only additional templates for homology modelling but also the opportunity to assess the performance of homology models against their respective crystal structures and gain insight into the performance of such models. In this study we have constructed homology models from templates of various transmembrane sequence identities for eight GPCR targets to better understand the relationship between transmembrane sequence identity and model quality. Model quality was assessed relative to the crystal structure in terms of structural accuracy as well as performance in two typical structure-based drug design applications: ligand binding pose prediction and docking enrichment in virtual screening. Crystal structures significantly outperformed homology models in both assessments. Accurate ligand binding pose prediction was possible but difficult to achieve using homology models, even with the use of induced fit docking. In virtual screening using homology models still conferred significant enrichment compared to random selection, with a clear benefit also observed in using models optimized through induced fit docking. Our results indicate that while homology models that are reasonably accurate structurally can be constructed, without significant refinement homology models will be outperformed by crystal structures in ligand binding pose prediction and docking enrichment regardless of the template used, primarily due to the extremely high level of structural accuracy needed for such applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Structural Studies of G Protein-Coupled Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dandan; Zhao, Qiang; Wu, Beili

    2015-10-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute the largest and the most physiologically important membrane protein family that recognizes a variety of environmental stimuli, and are drug targets in the treatment of numerous diseases. Recent progress on GPCR structural studies shed light on molecular mechanisms of GPCR ligand recognition, activation and allosteric modulation, as well as structural basis of GPCR dimerization. In this review, we will discuss the structural features of GPCRs and structural insights of different aspects of GPCR biological functions.

  6. The N2-Src neuronal splice variant of C-Src has altered SH3 domain ligand specificity and a higher constitutive activity than N1-Src

    OpenAIRE

    Keenan, Sarah; Lewis, Philip A.; Wetherill, Sarah J.; Dunning, Christopher J.R.; Evans, Gareth J.O.

    2015-01-01

    N2-Src is a poorly understood neuronal splice variant of the ubiquitous C-Src tyrosine kinase, containing a 17 amino acid insert in its Src homology 3 (SH3) domain. To characterise the properties of N2-Src we directly compared its SH3 domain specificity and kinase activity with C- and N1-Src in vitro. N2- and N1-Src had a similar low affinity for the phosphorylation of substrates containing canonical C-Src SH3 ligands and synaptophysin, an established neuronal substrate for C-Src. N2-Src also...

  7. The Constitution's Prescription for Freedom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peach, Lucinda

    1986-01-01

    Examines how the framers of the Constitution came to choose our system of government, how that system was designed to function, and how the separation of powers has served to maintain our democracy despite attempts to violate it. (JDH)

  8. Constitutive Modelling in Geomechanics Introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Puzrin, Alexander M

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this book is to bridge the gap between the traditional Geomechanics and Numerical Geotechnical Modelling with applications in science and practice. Geomechanics is rarely taught within the rigorous context of Continuum Mechanics and Thermodynamics, while when it comes to Numerical Modelling, commercially available finite elements or finite differences software utilize constitutive relationships within the rigorous framework. As a result, young scientists and engineers have to learn the challenging subject of constitutive modelling from a program manual and often end up with using unrealistic models which violate the Laws of Thermodynamics.  The book is introductory, by no means does it claim any completeness and state of the art in such a dynamically developing field as numerical and constitutive modelling of soils. The author gives basic understanding of conventional continuum mechanics approaches to constitutive modelling, which can serve as a foundation for exploring more advanced theories....

  9. The merits of global constitutionalism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Peters

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Global constitutionalism is an agenda that identifies and advocates for the application of constitutionalist principles in the international legal sphere. Global constitutionalization is the gradual emergence of constitutionalist features in international law. Critics of global constitutionalism doubt the empirical reality of constitutionalization, call into question the analytic value of constitutionalism as an academic approach, and fear that the discourse is normatively dangerous because it is anti-pluralist, artificially creates a false legitimacy, and promises an unrealistic end of politics. This article addresses these objections. I argue that global constitutionalization is likely to compensate for globalization induced constitutionalist deficits on the national level, that a constitutionalist reading of international law can serve as a hermeneutic device, and that the constitutionalist vocabulary uncovers legitimacy deficits of international law and suggests remedies. Global constitutionalism, therefore, has a responsibilizing and much-needed critical potential.

  10. A survey on constitutional justice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kheirollah Parvin

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The idea of supervising the conformity of statutory law with constitutional law, is due to necessities rooted in two essential principles: the supremacy of constitution and the hierarchy of the law. Constitution as the supreme law in the sense of status and legal value , is placed at the top of the legal pyramid of every political system and therefore requires a special organization and discipline that will act as the sanction of the principles and the main content incorporated in this legal instrument. this special organization and discipline known as Constitutional justice in legal Literature now and have studing in two main patterns. Firs pattern based on Supervision of courts on rules and other pattern is Apply by Emphasis on role of Political Institutions in Supervision on rules. This two patterns have common purpose but have different backgrounds and methods.

  11. Cleanup liability and the Constitution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedland, D.M.; Hagen, P.E.

    1992-01-01

    It was observed in the July 1992 issue of this Journal that a plain reading of the Constitution's prohibition on open-quotes ex post factoclose quotes suggests that some environmental statutes such as the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA or Superfund) and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) conflict with Constitutional principles. Like many Constitutional principles, however, the Supreme Court's interpretation of the Constitution's bar on ex post facto laws has a long history. The Court has consistently interpreted this clause as limited to criminal or penal statutes. This article discusses the history of the ex post facto clause, the retroactive application of CERCLA and RCRA, the decision that retroactive application of CERCLA and RCRA does not violate the ex post facto clause, and laws, regulations, and guidance. 27 refs

  12. Membrane progesterone receptor beta (mPRβ/Paqr8) promotes progesterone-dependent neurite outgrowth in PC12 neuronal cells via non-G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasubuchi, Mayu; Watanabe, Keita; Hirano, Kanako; Inoue, Daisuke; Li, Xuan; Terasawa, Kazuya; Konishi, Morichika; Itoh, Nobuyuki; Kimura, Ikuo

    2017-07-12

    Recently, sex steroid membrane receptors garnered world-wide attention because they may be related to sex hormone-mediated unknown rapid non-genomic action that cannot be currently explained by their genomic action via nuclear receptors. Progesterone affects cell proliferation and survival via non-genomic effects. In this process, membrane progesterone receptors (mPRα, mPRβ, mPRγ, mPRδ, and mPRε) were identified as putative G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) for progesterone. However, the structure, intracellular signaling, and physiological functions of these progesterone receptors are still unclear. Here, we identify a molecular mechanism by which progesterone promotes neurite outgrowth through mPRβ (Paqr8) activation. Mouse mPRβ mRNA was specifically expressed in the central nervous system. It has an incomplete GPCR topology, presenting 6 transmembrane domains and did not exhibit typical GPCR signaling. Progesterone-dependent neurite outgrowth was exhibited by the promotion of ERK phosphorylation via mPRβ, but not via other progesterone receptors such as progesterone membrane receptor 1 (PGRMC-1) and nuclear progesterone receptor in nerve growth factor-induced neuronal PC12 cells. These findings provide new insights of regarding the non-genomic action of progesterone in the central nervous system.

  13. The constitutive activation of the CEF-4/9E3 chemokine gene depends on C/EBPbeta in v-src transformed chicken embryo fibroblasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gagliardi, M; Maynard, S; Bojovic, B

    2001-01-01

    -4 promoter composing a Src-responsive-Unit or SRU. The SRU includes a TPA responsive element, a PRDII/kappaB domain and a CAAT box. In this report, we identify C/EBPbeta as a component of the trans-acting factor interacting with the CAAT box of the CEF-4 promoter. In addition, we show that C....../EBPbeta binds to a second element located in proximity of the TRE. A mutation of this distal CAAT box impaired the activation of the CEF-4 promoter by pp60(v-src) indicating that this element is also part of the SRU. Using the RCASBP retroviral vector, we expressed a dominant negative mutant of C....../EBPbeta (designated Delta184-C/EBPbeta) in RSV-transformed CEF. Delta184-C/EBPbeta decreased the accumulation of the CEF-4 mRNA and activation of the CEF-4 promoter by pp60(v-src). The induction of the Cox-2 gene (CEF-147) was also reduced by Delta184-C/EBPbeta. The effect of the dominant negative mutant was observed...

  14. CONSTITUTIONALISM

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eliasn

    Mao Zedong's statement seems to hold true in the contemporary world as well. In democratic countries, it is the democratically elected officials who are allowed to govern or control the military, although technical affairs are left to the military personnel. Instead, if full autonomy or sovereignty is granted to the military leaders,.

  15. Constitutional Verbosity and Social Trust

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørnskov, Christian; Voigt, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    A common argument in the trust literature is that high-trust cultures allow efficient commercial contracts to be shorter, covering fewer contingencies. We take this idea to the topic of social contracts. Specifically, we ask whether social trust affects the length and detail of constitutions. Cross......-country estimates suggest that national trust levels are indeed robustly and negatively associated with the length of countries’ constitutions....

  16. Global Survey of National Constitutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perehudoff, Katrina

    2017-01-01

    Abstract General Comment No. 22, issued in 2016 by the Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (CESCR), clarifies states’ legal duties to respect, protect, and fulfill the right to sexual and reproductive health (SRH). Our study analyzes domestic constitutions around the world to investigate whether and to what extent the right to sexual and reproductive health is respected, protected, and fulfilled; to what extent these provisions are inclusive and non-discriminatory; and to what degree the interlinkages between this and other human rights are acknowledged. Of the 195 constitutions accessed, 27 enshrine sexual and/or reproductive health, and seven adopt restrictive approaches to this right. In the 27 constitutions, provisions most frequently enshrine respect of one’s sexual health and family planning decisions, the protection of sexual health, and the provision of reproductive health care and family planning services (fulfillment). Most of the 27 constitutions fail to adequately respect reproductive health rights; to protect reproductive health, family planning, and abortion services from third-party interference; and to fulfill all dimensions of sexual health and access to abortion. Three of the 27 constitutions enshrine a universal right to SRH, and additional constitutions protect specific vulnerable groups (such as women, children) and/or restrict the scope of rights holders to couples. Among the 27 constitutions, nine explicitly link the right to sexual and reproductive health to the rights to education, science, and/or to make autonomous decisions about sexuality and reproduction. Our results can serve as a baseline measure to track constitutional reforms in pursuit of the realization of sexual and reproductive health and rights, and as building blocks for future lawmakers committed to realizing these rights through domestic legal reform. PMID:29302182

  17. Functional analysis of 14 genes that constitute the purine catabolic pathway in Bacillus subtilis and evidence for a novel regulon controlled by the PucR transcription activator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz, Anna Charlotte; Nygaard, P.; Saxild, Hans Henrik

    2001-01-01

    expression of five genes (pucA, pucB, pucC, pucD, and pucE). Uricase activity is encoded by the pucL and pucM genes, and a uric acid transport system is encoded by pucJ and pucK. Allantoinase is encoded by the pucH gene, and allantoin permease is encoded by the pucI gene. Allantoate amidohydrolase is encoded...... acid, allantoin, and uric acid were all found to function as effector molecules for PucR-dependent regulation of puc gene expression. When cells were grown in the presence of glutamate plus allantoin, a 3- to 10-fold increase in expression was seen for most of the genes. However, expression of the puc...

  18. An experimental evaluation of the anti-atherogenic potential of the plant, Piper betle, and its active constitutent, eugenol, in rats fed an atherogenic diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkadeswaran, Karuppasamy; Thomas, Philip A; Geraldine, Pitchairaj

    2016-05-01

    Hypercholesterolemia is a major risk factor for systemic atherosclerosis and subsequent cardiovascular disease. Lipoperoxidation-mediated oxidative damage is believed to contribute strongly to the progression of atherogenesis. In the current investigation, putative anti-atherogenic and antioxidative properties of an ethanolic extract of Piper betle and of its active constituent, eugenol, were sought in an experimental animal model of chronic hypercholesterolemia. Atherogenic diet-fed rats that received either Piper betle extract orally (500mg/kg b.wt) or eugenol orally (5mg/kg b.wt) for 15days (commencing 30days after the atherogenic diet had been started) exhibited the following variations in different parameters, when compared to atherogenic diet-fed rats that received only saline: (1) significantly lower mean levels of total cholesterol, triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and very low density lipoprotein cholesterol in both serum and hepatic tissue samples; (2) lower mean serum levels of aspartate amino-transferase, alanine amino-transferase, alkaline phosphatase, lactate dehydrogenase and lipid-metabolizing enzymes (lipoprotein lipase, 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase; (3) significantly lower mean levels of enzymatic antioxidants (catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione-S-transferase) and non-enzymatic antioxidants (reduced glutathione, vitamin C and vitamin E) and significantly higher mean levels of malondialdehyde in haemolysate and hepatic tissue samples. Histopathological findings suggested a protective effect of the Piper betle extract and a more pronounced protective effect of eugenol on the hepatic and aortic tissues of atherogenic diet-fed (presumed atherosclerotic) rats. These results strongly suggest that the Piper betle extract and its active constituent, eugenol, exhibit anti-atherogenic effects which may be due to their anti-oxidative properties. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights

  19. Right Product, Wrong Packaging: Not 'Constitution', but 'Constitutional Charter'

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Law

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available The article seeks to locate the principal cause of Europe’s prevailing ratification crisis in the inappropriate title arrived at in the European Convention, Treaty Establishing a Constitution for Europe. This over-ambitious styling led the media to characterise the text as simply an ‘EU Constitution’. Yet, the text was not a Constitution as we traditionally understand the term, i.e. the founding document of a State: scholars are agreed that the EU is not, and will not become upon ratification, a State.In terms of substance, whilst the text certainly strengthened some emerging constitutional aspects, it was not a major departure from the status quo like the Single European Act and Treaty on European Union had been; and it remained technically a treaty like all its predecessors. Arguably, therefore, it did not require referenda to ratify. However, confusion over the scale and importance of what was proposed, stemming from ambiguity in the title, pushed politicians down this unfortunate path.The article identifies a high level of consensus among commentators as to the true nature of the text: most are happy designating it a treaty (noun with constitutional (adjective aspects. The early proposed title Constitutional Treaty for Europe was arguably, therefore, the correct one; but it is now too late to choose this option, as the terms Constitution and Constitutional Treaty have already been muddled in debate. A more distinctive change is required. One idea could be to follow the principle employed elsewhere in the text of codifying the generally accepted but presently unwritten legal concepts of the European Court of Justice, as was done for example for ‘primacy’ and ‘direct effect’. The Court has characterised the EU treaties as a ‘constitutional charter’ for over twenty years now, and on this basis a modified title could read Treaty Establishing a Constitutional Charter for Europe. Importantly, the term ‘charter’ is recognised

  20. Mini G protein probes for active G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in live cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Qingwen; Okashah, Najeah; Inoue, Asuka; Nehmé, Rony; Carpenter, Byron; Tate, Christopher G; Lambert, Nevin A

    2018-03-09

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are key signaling proteins that regulate nearly every aspect of cell function. Studies of GPCRs have benefitted greatly from the development of molecular tools to monitor receptor activation and downstream signaling. Here we show that mini G proteins are robust probes that can be used in a variety of assay formats to report GPCR activity in living cells. Mini G (mG) proteins are engineered GTPase domains of Gα subunits that were developed for structural studies of active state GPCRs. Confocal imaging revealed that mG proteins fused to fluorescent proteins were located diffusely in the cytoplasm, and translocated to sites of receptor activation at the cell surface and at intracellular organelles. Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) assays with mG proteins fused to either a fluorescent protein or luciferase reported agonist, superagonist and inverse agonist activities. Variants of mG proteins (mGs, mGsi, mGsq and mG12) corresponding to the four families of Gα subunits displayed appropriate coupling to their cognate GPCRs, allowing quantitative profiling of subtype-specific coupling to individual receptors. BRET between luciferase-mG fusion proteins and fluorescent markers indicated the presence of active GPCRs at the plasma membrane, Golgi apparatus and endosomes. Complementation assays with fragments of NanoLuc luciferase fused to GPCRs and mG proteins reported constitutive receptor activity and agonist-induced activation with up to 20-fold increases in luminescence. We conclude that mG proteins are versatile tools for studying GPCR activation and coupling specificity in cells, and should be useful for discovering and characterizing G protein subtype-biased ligands. Published under license by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.