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Sample records for constituent interchange model

  1. Quark interchange model of baryon interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maslow, J.N.

    1983-01-01

    The strong interactions at low energy are traditionally described by meson field theories treating hadrons as point-like particles. Here a mesonic quark interchange model (QIM) is presented which takes into account the finite size of the baryons and the internal quark structure of hadrons. The model incorporates the basic quark-gluon coupling of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) and the MIT bag model for color confinement. Because the quark-gluon coupling constant is large and it is assumed that confinement excludes overlap of hadronic quark bags except at high momenta, a non-perturbative method of nuclear interactions is presented. The QIM allows for exchange of quark quantum numbers at the bag boundary between colliding hadrons mediated at short distances by a gluon exchange between two quarks within the hadronic interior. This generates, via a Fierz transformation, an effective space-like t channel exchange of color singlet (q anti-q) states that can be identified with the low lying meson multiplets. Thus, a one boson exchange (OBE) model is obtained that allows for comparison with traditional phenomenological models of nuclear scattering. Inclusion of strange quarks enables calculation of YN scattering. The NN and YN coupling constants and the nucleon form factors show good agreement with experimental values as do the deuteron low energy data and the NN low energy phase shifts. Thus, the QIM provides a simple model of strong interactions that is chirally invariant, includes confinement and allows for an OBE form of hadronic interaction at low energies and momentum transfers.

  2. Quark interchange model of baryon interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maslow, J.N.

    1983-01-01

    The strong interactions at low energy are traditionally described by meson field theories treating hadrons as point-like particles. Here a mesonic quark interchange model (QIM) is presented which takes into account the finite size of the baryons and the internal quark structure of hadrons. The model incorporates the basic quark-gluon coupling of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) and the MIT bag model for color confinement. Because the quark-gluon coupling constant is large and it is assumed that confinement excludes overlap of hadronic quark bags except at high momenta, a non-perturbative method of nuclear interactions is presented. The QIM allows for exchange of quark quantum numbers at the bag boundary between colliding hadrons mediated at short distances by a gluon exchange between two quarks within the hadronic interior. This generates, via a Fierz transformation, an effective space-like t channel exchange of color singlet (q anti-q) states that can be identified with the low lying meson multiplets. Thus, a one boson exchange (OBE) model is obtained that allows for comparison with traditional phenomenological models of nuclear scattering. Inclusion of strange quarks enables calculation of YN scattering. The NN and YN coupling constants and the nucleon form factors show good agreement with experimental values as do the deuteron low energy data and the NN low energy phase shifts. Thus, the QIM provides a simple model of strong interactions that is chirally invariant, includes confinement and allows for an OBE form of hadronic interaction at low energies and momentum transfers

  3. Constituent models and large transverse momentum reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1975-01-01

    The discussion of constituent models and large transverse momentum reactions includes the structure of hard scattering models, dimensional counting rules for large transverse momentum reactions, dimensional counting and exclusive processes, the deuteron form factor, applications to inclusive reactions, predictions for meson and photon beams, the charge-cubed test for the e/sup +-/p → e/sup +-/γX asymmetry, the quasi-elastic peak in inclusive hadronic reactions, correlations, and the multiplicity bump at large transverse momentum. Also covered are the partition method for bound state calculations, proofs of dimensional counting, minimal neutralization and quark--quark scattering, the development of the constituent interchange model, and the A dependence of high transverse momentum reactions

  4. Hydrodynamical model with massless constituents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiu, C.B.; Wang, K.H.

    1974-01-01

    Within the constituent hydrodynamical model, it is shown that the total number of constituents is conserved, if these constituents are massless and satisfy the Fermi-Dirac distribution. A simple scheme for the transition from the constituent-phase to the hadron-phase is suggested, and the hadron inclusive momentum spectra are presented for this case. This phase transition scheme predicts the average transverse momentum of meson resonances which is compatible with the data. (U.S.)

  5. NN interaction from bag-model quark interchange

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakker, B.L.G.; Bozoian, M.; Maslow, J.N.; Weber, H.J.

    1982-03-01

    A partial-wave helicity-state analysis of elastic nucleon-nucleon scattering is carried out in momentum space. Its basis is a one- and two-boson exchange amplitude from a bag-model quark interchange mechanism. The resulting phase shifts and bound-state parameters of the deuteron are compared with other meson theoretic potentials and data up to laboratory energies of approx.350 MeV.

  6. NN interaction from bag-model quark interchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakker, B.L.G.; Bozoian, M.; Maslow, J.N.; Weber, H.J.

    1982-01-01

    A partial-wave helicity-state analysis of elastic nucleon-nucleon scattering is carried out in momentum space. Its basis is a one- and two-boson exchange amplitude from a bag-model quark interchange mechanism. The resulting phase shifts and bound-state parameters of the deuteron are compared with other meson theoretic potentials and data up to laboratory energies of approx.350 MeV

  7. Dual dynamics of constituent interchange in soft and hard hadronic processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akkelin, S.V.; Kobylinskii, N.A.; Martynov, E.S.; Shelest, V.P.

    1987-01-01

    The possibility of combining the dual theory of soft hadronic processes with the rules of dimensional counting for hard processes is investigated. It is shown that this is achieved in the framework of a dual analytic model with certain conditions on the form and parameters of the Regge trajectories

  8. A Cross-Classified CFA-MTMM Model for Structurally Different and Nonindependent Interchangeable Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Tobias; Schultze, Martin; Jeon, Minjeong; Nussbeck, Fridtjof W; Praetorius, Anna-Katharina; Eid, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Multirater (multimethod, multisource) studies are increasingly applied in psychology. Eid and colleagues (2008) proposed a multilevel confirmatory factor model for multitrait-multimethod (MTMM) data combining structurally different and multiple independent interchangeable methods (raters). In many studies, however, different interchangeable raters (e.g., peers, subordinates) are asked to rate different targets (students, supervisors), leading to violations of the independence assumption and to cross-classified data structures. In the present work, we extend the ML-CFA-MTMM model by Eid and colleagues (2008) to cross-classified multirater designs. The new C4 model (Cross-Classified CTC[M-1] Combination of Methods) accounts for nonindependent interchangeable raters and enables researchers to explicitly model the interaction between targets and raters as a latent variable. Using a real data application, it is shown how credibility intervals of model parameters and different variance components can be obtained using Bayesian estimation techniques.

  9. Low-dimensional model of resistive interchange convection in magnetized plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazdenkov, S.; Sato, Tetsuya

    1997-09-01

    Self-organization and generation of large shear flow component in turbulent resistive interchange convection in magnetized plasma is considered. The effect of plasma density-electrostatic potential coupling via the inertialess electron dynamics along the magnetic field is shown to play significant role in the onset of shear component. The results of large-scale numerical simulation and low-dimensional (reduced) model are presented and compared. (author)

  10. Sivers function in constituent quark models

    CERN Document Server

    Scopetta, S.; Fratini, F.; Vento, V.

    2008-01-01

    A formalism to evaluate the Sivers function, developed for calculations in constituent quark models, is applied to the Isgur-Karl model. A non-vanishing Sivers asymmetry, with opposite signs for the u and d flavor, is found; the Burkardt sum rule is fulfilled up to 2 %. Nuclear effects in the extraction of neutron single spin asymmetries in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering off 3He are also evaluated. In the kinematics of JLab, it is found that the nuclear effects described by an Impulse Approximation approach are under control.

  11. A longitudinal multilevel CFA-MTMM model for interchangeable and structurally different methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Tobias; Schultze, Martin; Eid, Michael; Geiser, Christian

    2014-01-01

    One of the key interests in the social sciences is the investigation of change and stability of a given attribute. Although numerous models have been proposed in the past for analyzing longitudinal data including multilevel and/or latent variable modeling approaches, only few modeling approaches have been developed for studying the construct validity in longitudinal multitrait-multimethod (MTMM) measurement designs. The aim of the present study was to extend the spectrum of current longitudinal modeling approaches for MTMM analysis. Specifically, a new longitudinal multilevel CFA-MTMM model for measurement designs with structurally different and interchangeable methods (called Latent-State-Combination-Of-Methods model, LS-COM) is presented. Interchangeable methods are methods that are randomly sampled from a set of equivalent methods (e.g., multiple student ratings for teaching quality), whereas structurally different methods are methods that cannot be easily replaced by one another (e.g., teacher, self-ratings, principle ratings). Results of a simulation study indicate that the parameters and standard errors in the LS-COM model are well recovered even in conditions with only five observations per estimated model parameter. The advantages and limitations of the LS-COM model relative to other longitudinal MTMM modeling approaches are discussed. PMID:24860515

  12. Constituent quarks as clusters in quark-gluon-parton model. [Total cross sections, probability distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanki, T [Osaka Univ., Toyonaka (Japan). Coll. of General Education

    1976-12-01

    We present a quark-gluon-parton model in which quark-partons and gluons make clusters corresponding to two or three constituent quarks (or anti-quarks) in the meson or in the baryon, respectively. We explicitly construct the constituent quark state (cluster), by employing the Kuti-Weisskopf theory and by requiring the scaling. The quark additivity of the hadronic total cross sections and the quark counting rules on the threshold powers of various distributions are satisfied. For small x (Feynman fraction), it is shown that the constituent quarks and quark-partons have quite different probability distributions. We apply our model to hadron-hadron inclusive reactions, and clarify that the fragmentation and the diffractive processes relate to the constituent quark distributions, while the processes in or near the central region are controlled by the quark-partons. Our model gives the reasonable interpretation for the experimental data and much improves the usual ''constituent interchange model'' result near and in the central region (x asymptotically equals x sub(T) asymptotically equals 0).

  13. Successes and failures of the constituent quark model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipkin, H.J.

    1982-01-01

    Our approach considers the model as a possible bridge between QCD and the experimental data and examines its predictions to see where these succeed and where they fail. We also attempt to improve the model by looking for additional simple assumptions which give better fits to the experimental data. But we avoid complicated models with too many ad hoc assumptions and too many free parameters; these can fit everything but teach us nothing. We define our constituent quark model by analogy with the constituent electron model of the atom and the constituent nucleon model of the nucleus. In the same way that an atom is assumed to consist only of constituent electrons and a central Coulomb field and a nucleus is assumed to consist only of constituent nucleons hadrons are assumed to consist only of their constituent valence quarks with no bag, no glue, no ocean, nor other constituents. Although these constituent models are oversimplified and neglect other constituents we push them as far as we can. Atomic physics has photons and vacuum polarization as well as constituent electrons, but the constituent model is adequate for calculating most features of the spectrum when finer details like the Lamb shift are neglected. 54 references

  14. Interchange turbulence model for the edge plasma in SOLEDGE2D-EIRENE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bufferand, H.; Marandet, Y. [Aix-Marseille Universite, CNRS, PIIM, Marseille (France); Ciraolo, G.; Ghendrih, P.; Bucalossi, J.; Fedorczak, N.; Gunn, J.; Tamain, P. [CEA, IRFM, Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Colin, C.; Galassi, D.; Leybros, R.; Serre, E. [Aix-Marseille Universite, CNRS, M2P2, Marseille (France)

    2016-08-15

    Cross-field transport in edge tokamak plasmas is known to be dominated by turbulent transport. A dedicated effort has been made to simulate this turbulent transport from first principle models but the numerical cost to run these simulations on the ITER scale remains prohibitive. Edge plasma transport study relies mostly nowadays on so-called transport codes where the turbulent transport is taken into account using effective ad-hoc diffusion coefficients. In this contribution, we propose to introduce a transport equation for the turbulence intensity in SOLEDGE2D-EIRENE to describe the interchange turbulence properties. Going beyond the empirical diffusive model, this system automatically generates profiles for the turbulent transport and hence reduces the number of degrees of freedom for edge plasma transport codes. We draw inspiration from the k-epsilon model widely used in the neutral fluid community. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  15. Deformed baryons: constituent quark model vs. bag model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwamura, Y.; Nogami, Y.

    1985-01-01

    Recently Bhaduri et al. developed a nonrelativistic constituent quark model for deformed baryons. In that model the quarks move in a deformable mean field, and the deformation parameters are determined by minimizing the quark energy subject to the constraint of volume conservation. This constraint is an ad hoc assumption. It is shown that, starting with a bag model, a model similar to that of Bhaduri et al. can be constructed. The deformation parameters are determined by the pressure balance on the bag surface. There is, however, a distinct difference between the two models with respect to the state dependence of the ''volume''. Implications of this difference are discussed

  16. Constituent rearrangement model and large transverse momentum reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igarashi, Yuji; Imachi, Masahiro; Matsuoka, Takeo; Otsuki, Shoichiro; Sawada, Shoji.

    1978-01-01

    In this chapter, two models based on the constituent rearrangement picture for large p sub( t) phenomena are summarized. One is the quark-junction model, and the other is the correlating quark rearrangement model. Counting rules of the models apply to both two-body reactions and hadron productions. (author)

  17. Quark confinement in a constituent quark model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langfeld, K.; Rho, M.

    1995-01-01

    On the level of an effective quark theory, we define confinement by the absence of quark anti-quark thresholds in correlation function. We then propose a confining Nambu-Jona-Lasinio-type model. The confinement is implemented in analogy to Anderson localization in condensed matter systems. We study the model's phase structure as well as its behavior under extreme conditions, i.e. high temperature and/or high density

  18. KN interaction in a constituent quark model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labarsouque, J.; Leandri, J.; Silvestre Brac, B.

    1997-01-01

    The kaon-nucleon s-wave phase shift have been calculated in a quark potential model using the resonating group method. The Hill-Wheeler equation has been solved numerically without any parametrization of the KN relative wave-function. The I = 0 phase shift has been found in agreement with the experimental data. In the I = 1 channel too much repulsion has been obtained., probably due to the lack of medium-range boson exchange type attraction. In a second step, pion and sigma-type exchange have been incorporated in the calculation

  19. Interchange Recognition Method Based on CNN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HE Haiwei

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The identification and classification of interchange structures in OSM data can provide important information for the construction of multi-scale model, navigation and location services, congestion analysis, etc. The traditional method of interchange identification relies on the low-level characteristics of artificial design, and cannot distinguish the complex interchange structure with interference section effectively. In this paper, a new method based on convolutional neural network for identification of the interchange is proposed. The method combines vector data with raster image, and uses neural network to learn the fuzzy characteristics of the interchange, and classifies the complex interchange structure in OSM. Experiments show that this method has strong anti-interference, and has achieved good results in the classification of complex interchange shape, and there is room for further improvement with the expansion of the case base and the optimization of neural network model.

  20. Tetraquarks in a chiral constituent-quark model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vijande, J.; Fernandez, F.; Valcarce, A.; Silvestre-Brac, B.

    2004-01-01

    We analyze the possibility of heavy-light tetraquark bound states by means of a chiral constituent-quark model. The study is done in a variational approach. Special attention is paid to the contribution given by the different terms of the interacting potential and also to the role played by the different color channels. We find a stable state for both qq anti c anti c and qq anti b anti b configurations. Possible decay modes of these structures are analyzed. (orig.)

  1. Tetraquarks in a chiral constituent-quark model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vijande, J.; Fernandez, F.; Valcarce, A. [Grupo de Fisica Nuclear, Universidad de Salamanca, E-37008, Salamanca (Spain); Silvestre-Brac, B. [Institut des Sciences Nucleaires, 53 Avenue des Martyrs, F-38026, Grenoble Cedex (France)

    2004-03-01

    We analyze the possibility of heavy-light tetraquark bound states by means of a chiral constituent-quark model. The study is done in a variational approach. Special attention is paid to the contribution given by the different terms of the interacting potential and also to the role played by the different color channels. We find a stable state for both qq anti c anti c and qq anti b anti b configurations. Possible decay modes of these structures are analyzed. (orig.)

  2. On Latent Growth Models for Composites and Their Constituents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, Gregory R; Mao, Xiulin; Kher, Hemant

    2013-09-01

    Over the last decade and a half, latent growth modeling has become an extremely popular and versatile technique for evaluating longitudinal change and its determinants. Most common among the models applied are those for a single measured variable over time. This model has been extended in a variety of ways, most relevant for the current work being the multidomain and the second-order latent growth models. Whereas the former allows for growth function characteristics to be modeled for multiple outcomes simultaneously, with the degree of growth characteristics' relations assessed within the model (e.g., cross-domain slope factor correlations), the latter models growth in latent outcomes, each of which has effect indicators repeated over time. But what if one has an outcome that is believed to be formative relative to its indicator variables rather than latent? In this case, where the outcome is a composite of multiple constituents, modeling change over time is less straightforward. This article provides analytical and applied details for simultaneously modeling growth in composites and their constituent elements, including a real data example using a general computer self-efficacy questionnaire.

  3. Multi-satellite ocean tide modelling - the K-1 constituent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ole Baltazar; Knudsen, Per

    1997-01-01

    All major ocean tide constituents are aliased into signals with periods less than 90 days from TOPEX/POSEIDON altimetry, except the K-1 constituent. The aliased K-1 has a period of 173 days. Consequently, it might be confounded with height variations caused by the semiannual cycle having a period......, where the presence of crossing tracks cannot separate K-1 from the semiannual signal from TOPEX/POSEIDON, the importance of including ERS-1 and GEOSAT observations was demonstrated. A comparison with 29 pelagic and coastal tide gauges in the Southern Ocean south of 50 degrees S gave 5.59 (M-2), 2.27 (S......-2) and 5.04 (K-1) cm RMS agreement for FES95.1 ocean tide model. The same comparison for the best empirical estimated constituents based on TOPEX/POSEIDON + ERS-1 + GEOSAT gave 4.32, 2.21, and 4.29 cm for M-2, S-2 and K-1, respectively....

  4. Modeling of Alkane Oxidation Using Constituents and Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellan, Jasette; Harstad, Kenneth G.

    2010-01-01

    It is currently not possible to perform simulations of turbulent reactive flows due in particular to complex chemistry, which may contain thousands of reactions and hundreds of species. This complex chemistry results in additional differential equations, making the numerical solution of the equation set computationally prohibitive. Reducing the chemical kinetics mathematical description is one of several important goals in turbulent reactive flow modeling. A chemical kinetics reduction model is proposed for alkane oxidation in air that is based on a parallel methodology to that used in turbulence modeling in the context of the Large Eddy Simulation. The objective of kinetic modeling is to predict the heat release and temperature evolution. This kinetic mechanism is valid over a pressure range from atmospheric to 60 bar, temperatures from 600 K to 2,500 K, and equivalence ratios from 0.125 to 8. This range encompasses diesel, HCCI, and gas-turbine engines, including cold ignition. A computationally efficient kinetic reduction has been proposed for alkanes that has been illustrated for n-heptane using the LLNL heptane mechanism. This model is consistent with turbulence modeling in that scales were first categorized into either those modeled or those computed as progress variables. Species were identified as being either light or heavy. The heavy species were decomposed into defined 13 constituents, and their total molar density was shown to evolve in a quasi-steady manner. The light species behave either in a quasi-steady or unsteady manner. The modeled scales are the total constituent molar density, Nc, and the molar density of the quasi-steady light species. The progress variables are the total constituent molar density rate evolution and the molar densities of the unsteady light species. The unsteady equations for the light species contain contributions of the type gain/loss rates from the heavy species that are modeled consistent with the developed mathematical

  5. Kaon-Nucleon scattering in a constituent quark model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemaire, S.

    2002-06-01

    We have investigated Kaon-Nucleon (KN) interaction in a constituent quark model in the momentum range for the Kaon between 0 and 1 GeV/c in the laboratory frame. This study has been motivated by the fact that in an approach relying on a boson exchange mechanism the Bonn group was forced, in order to obtain good agreement with I = 0 s-wave phase shifts, to add the exchange of a short range fictitious repulsive scalar meson. This need for repulsion, whose range (∼ 0.2 fm) is smaller than the nucleon radius, clearly shows that the quark substructure of the nucleons and K + mesons cannot be neglected. The Kaon-Nucleon phase shifts are calculated in a quark potential model using the resonating group method (RGM). We have to cope with a five body problem with antisymmetrization with respect to the four ordinary quarks of the Kaon-Nucleon system. One requirement of our approach is that the quark-quark interaction must give a quite good description of the hadron spectra. One goal of the present work aims at determining the influence of a relativistic kinematics, in this constituent quark model, for the calculation of KN phase shifts. We have also investigated s, p, d, f, g waves KN elastic phase shifts and we have included a spin-orbit term in the quark-quark interaction. Then we have studied the influence of medium and long range exchange mechanism in the quark quark interaction on KN phase shifts. (author)

  6. Hadron form factors in the constituent quark model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardarelli, F.; Salme', G.; Simula, S.; Pace, E.

    1998-01-01

    Hadron electromagnetic form factors are evaluated in a light-front constituent quark model based on the eigenfunctions of a mass operator, including in the q-q interaction a confining term and a one-gluon-exchange term (OGE). The spin-dependent part of the interaction plays an essential role for obtaining both a proper fit of the experimental nucleon electromagnetic form factors and the faster than dipole decrease of the magnetic N-P 33 (1232) transition form factor. The effects of the D wave, produced by the tensor part of the OGE interaction, on the quadrupole and Coulomb N-P 33 (1232) transition form factors have been found to be negligible. (author)

  7. Chiral bag model with constituent quarks: topological and nontopological decisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malakhov, I.Yu.; Sveshnikov, K.A.; Fedorov, S.M.; Khalili, M.F.

    2002-01-01

    The three-phase modification of the hybrid chiral bag containing along with asymptotic freedom and hadronization phases and also intermediate phase of the constituent quarks is considered. The self-consistent solutions of the equations of the model in the (1 + 1)-dimensional case are determined with an account of the fermion vacuum polarization effects. The bag renormalized complete energy is studied as a function of the parameters characterizing the bag geometry and its topological (baryon) charge. It is shown that for nonzero topological charge there exists the whole series of configurations representing the local minima of the bag complete energy and containing all three phases, whereas the bag energy minimum in the nontopological case corresponds to zero dimensions of the area corresponding to asymptotic freedom phase [ru

  8. Kaon quark distribution functions in the chiral constituent quark model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Akira; Sawada, Takahiro; Kao, Chung Wen

    2018-04-01

    We investigate the valence u and s ¯ quark distribution functions of the K+ meson, vK (u )(x ,Q2) and vK (s ¯)(x ,Q2), in the framework of the chiral constituent quark model. We judiciously choose the bare distributions at the initial scale to generate the dressed distributions at the higher scale, considering the meson cloud effects and the QCD evolution, which agree with the phenomenologically satisfactory valence quark distribution of the pion and the experimental data of the ratio vK (u )(x ,Q2)/vπ (u )(x ,Q2) . We show how the meson cloud effects affect the bare distribution functions in detail. We find that a smaller S U (3 ) flavor symmetry breaking effect is observed, compared with results of the preceding studies based on other approaches.

  9. Modeling of heat transfer within porous multi-constituent materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niezgoda, M.

    2012-01-01

    The CEA works a great deal with porous materials - carbon composites, ceramics - and aims to optimize their properties for specific uses. These materials can be composed of several constituents and generally has a complex structure with pore size of several tens of micrometers. It is used in large-scale systems that are bigger than its own characteristic scale in which they are considered as equivalent to a homogeneous medium for the simulation of its behavior in its using environment without taking into account its local morphology. We are especially interested in the effective thermal diffusivity of heterogeneous materials that we estimate as a function of temperature with the help of an inverse method by considering they are homogeneous. The identification of the diffusivity of porous and/or semi-transparent materials is made difficult because of the strong conducto-radiative coupling can quickly occur when the temperature increases. We have thus modeled the coupled conductive and radiative heat transfer as a function of the temperature within porous multi-constituent materials from their morphology discretized into a set of homogeneous voxels. We have developed a methodology that consists in starting from a 3D-microstructure of the studied materials obtained by tomography. The microstructures constitute the numerical support to this modeling that renders it possible, on the one hand, to simulate any kind of numerical thermal experiments, especially the flash method whose the results render it possible to estimate the thermal diffusivity, and on the other hand, to reproduce the thermal behavior of our materials in their using conditions. (author) [fr

  10. Modeling and simulation using the compositional interchange format for hybrid systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sonntag, C.L.W.; Schiffelers, R.R.H.; Beek, van D.A.; Rooda, J.E.; Engell, S.; Troch, I.; Breitenecker, F.

    2009-01-01

    One of the major challenges towards a broad industrial acceptance of hybrid systems techniques and tools is the large number of distinct modeling formalisms and the resulting manual effort for the tool-based solution of many complex design or analysis tasks. A promising approach to achieve

  11. Double parton correlations in Light-Front constituent quark models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rinaldi Matteo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Double parton distribution functions (dPDF represent a tool to explore the 3D proton structure. They can be measured in high energy proton-proton and proton nucleus collisions and encode information on how partons inside a proton are correlated among each other. dPFDs are studied here in the valence quark region, by means of a constituent quark model, where two particle correlations are present without any additional prescription. This framework allows to understand the dynamical origin of the correlations and to clarify which, among the features of the results, are model independent. Use will be made of a relativistic light-front scheme, able to overcome some drawbacks of the previous calculation. Transverse momentum correlations, due to the exact treatment of the boosts, are predicted and analyzed. The role of spin correlations is also shown. Due to the covariance of the approach, some symmetries of the dPDFs are seen unambigously. For the valence sector, also the study of the QCD evolution of the model results, which can be performed safely thanks to the property of good support, has been also completed.

  12. Various decays of some hadronic systems in constituent quark models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonnaz, R.

    2001-09-01

    The topic of this study is the decay of mesons in constituent quark models. Those models as well as the various quark-antiquark interaction potentials are presented. Strong decay of a meson into two or three mesons is studied in the second part. The original 3 P o model is presented as well as the research of a vertex function γ(p) depending on the momentum for the created qq-bar pair. We show that a function γ(p) of constant+Gaussian type is superior than the constant usually used. The second part is dedicated to electromagnetic transitions studied through the emission of a real or a virtual photon. In the case of real photon emission, the different approximations found in the literature are reviewed and compared to the formalism going beyond the long wave length approximation. Mixing angles are tested for some mesons. In the case of virtual photon, the expression of decay width obtained by van Royen and Weisskopf is re-demonstrated and then improved by taking into account the quark momentum distribution inside the meson. An electromagnetic dressing of quarks is introduced that improves the results. All along this study, wave functions of various sophistication degrees are used. The results of decay widths are compared to a large bulk of experimental data. (author)

  13. Modeling corrosion and constituent release from a metal waste form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, T. H.; Fink, J. K.; Abraham, D. P.; Johnson, I.; Johnson, S. G.; Wigeland, R. A.

    2000-01-01

    Several ANL ongoing experimental programs have measured metal waste form (MWF) corrosion and constituent release. Analysis of this data has initiated development of a consistent and quantitative phenomenology of uniform aqueous MWF corrosion. The effort so far has produced a preliminary fission product and actinide release model based on measured corrosion rates and calibrated by immersion test data for a 90 C J-13 and concentrated J-13 solution environment over 1-2 year exposure times. Ongoing immersion tests of irradiated and unirradiated MWF samples using more aggressive test conditions and improved tracking of actinides will serve to further validate, modify, and expand the application base of the preliminary model-including effects of other corrosion mechanisms. Sample examination using both mechanical and spectrographic techniques will better define both the nature and durability of the protective barrier layer. It is particularly important to assess whether the observations made with J-13 solution at 900 C persist under more aggressive conditions. For example, all the multiplicative factors in Table 1 implicitly assume the presence of protective barriers. Under sufficiently aggressive test conditions, such protective barriers may very well be altered or even eliminated

  14. A simple DOP model for constituency parsing of Italian sentences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sangati, F.

    2009-01-01

    We present a simplified Data-Oriented Parsing (DOP) formalism for learning the constituency structure of Italian sentences. In our approach we try to simplify the original DOP methodology by constraining the number and type of fragments we extract from the training corpus. We provide some examples

  15. In quest of a relativistic constituent quark model - some constructive remarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofsaess, T.; Schierholz, G.

    1978-01-01

    The set-up of a relativistic constituent quark model in four dimensions is one of the outstanding problems in particle physics. For the time being this involves a great deal of model building which, very probably, will not change in the near future. In this paper we shall offer some general remarks which might help putting such models into shape. Most of the earlier attempts are found controversial. In particular, a conventional quark constituent interpretation could not be recovered. (orig.) [de

  16. EMP protection technology interchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, L.C.

    1977-01-01

    Investigation and assessment of the potential degrading and destructive effects associated with the nuclear electromagnetic (EMP) phenomena has created a large technological base. This base is indeed quite broad owing to the unique and system-pervasive character of the EMP. One of the aims of an emerging discipline, such as that associated with EMP, is to provide for adequate transfer and integration of the developing technology into the overall engineering community. The needs of the community and how EMP hardening and protection information can be transferred or exchanged are reviewed. Many of the current and generally available sources of information are listed, examples of interchange methods are provided, and problems of developing specifications, standards, and suitable guidelines for design and incorporation of protection are also discussed

  17. Constraints on constituent quark masses from potential models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silvestre-Brac, B.

    1998-01-01

    Starting from reasonable hypotheses, the magnetic moments for the baryons are revisited dat the light of general space wave functions. They allow to put very severe bounds on the quark masses as derived from usual potential models. The experimental situation cannot be explained in the framework of such models. (author)

  18. Hierarchical states in the compositional interchange format

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beohar, H.; Nadales Agut, D.E.; Beek, van D.A.; Cuijpers, P.J.L.; Aceto, L.; Sobocinski, P.

    2010-01-01

    CIF is a language designed for two purposes, namely as a specification language for hybrid systems and as an interchange format for allowing model transformations between other languages for hybrid systems. To facilitate the top-down development of a hybrid system and also to be able to express

  19. Process mining for electronic data interchange

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engel, R.; Krathu, W.; Zapletal, M.; Pichler, C.; Aalst, van der W.M.P.; Werthner, H.; Huemer, C.; Setzer, T.

    2011-01-01

    Choreography modeling and service integration received a lot of attention in the last decade. However, most real-world implementations of inter-organizational systems are still realized by traditional Electronic Data Interchange (EDI) standards. In traditional EDI standards, the notion of process or

  20. Design management of electronic data interchange systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heck, van H.W.G.M.

    1993-01-01

    This study deals with the management of the design process of Electronic Data Interchange (EDI) systems. Its objectives are (1) to investigate the design process of EDI systems from a practical and theoretical perspective; (2) to develop a model to describe factors relevant to EDI

  1. Modeling of constituent redistribution in U-Pu-Zr metallic fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yeon Soo [Argonne National Laboratory, Nuclear Engineering, RERTR, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)]. E-mail: yskim@anl.gov; Hayes, S.L. [Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-6188 (United States); Hofman, G.L. [Argonne National Laboratory, Nuclear Engineering, RERTR, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Yacout, A.M. [Argonne National Laboratory, Nuclear Engineering, RERTR, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2006-12-01

    A computer model was developed to analyze constituent redistribution in U-Pu-Zr metallic nuclear fuels. Diffusion and thermochemical properties were parametrically determined to fit the postirradiation data from a fuel test performed in the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II). The computer model was used to estimate redistribution profiles of fuels proposed for the conceptual designs of small modular fast reactors. The model results showed that the level of redistribution of the fuel constituents of the designs was similar to the measured data from EBR-II.

  2. Electromagnetic properties of baryons in the constituent quark model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warns, M.

    1992-01-01

    The electromagnetic properties of baryons are investigated in the framework of a relativized quark model. The model includes beyond the usual single quark transition ansatz relativistic effects due to the strong interaction and confinement forces between the quarks. Furthermore the center-of-mass motion of the three-quark system is separated off in a Lorentz-invariant way. All relativistic correction terms are obtained by expanding the corresponding relativistic expressions in powers of the quark velocity. In this way recoil effects on the electromagnetic interaction between the photon and the baryon could be explicitly studied. Using the harmonic oscillator wavefunctions with the configuration mixing from the Isgur-Karl model, the form factors of the nucleon and the electromagnetic transition amplitudes both for longitudinally and transversely polarized photons are calculated for the most important baryon resonances. An extension to baryons involving strange quarks is also considered. Comparisons are made with the results of the nonrelativistic quark model and with some other approaches. (orig.)

  3. KN phase shifts in a constituent quark model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemaire, S.; Labarsouque, J.; Silvestre-Brac, B.

    2001-01-01

    In a first step, the I=1 and I=0 kaon-nucleon s-wave phase shifts have been calculated in a quark potential model using the resonating group method (RGM) and a relativistic kinematics. The spinless Salpeter equation has been solved numerically using the Fourier grid hamiltonian method. The results have been compared to the nonrelativistic ones. For each isospin channel the phase shifts obtained are not so far from the nonrelativistic results. Then, K-nucleon p, d, f, g-waves phase shifts have been calculated using a nonrelativistic kinematics

  4. Testing the constituent quark model in KN scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemaire, S. E-mail: lemaire@cenbg.in2p3.fr; Labarsouque, J.; Silvestre-Brac, B

    2003-02-10

    The kaon-nucleon S, P, D, F, G waves phase shifts have been calculated using a non-relativistic quark potential model and the resonating group method (RGM). The calculation has been performed using quark-quark potential which both includes gluon, pion and sigma exchanges and reproduces as well as possible the meson spectrum. The agreement obtained with the existing experimental phase shifts is quite poor. The results are also compared with a previous calculation based only on gluon exchanges at the quark level.

  5. Testing the constituent quark model in KN scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemaire, S.; Labarsouque, J.; Silvestre-Brac, B.

    2003-01-01

    The kaon-nucleon S, P, D, F, G waves phase shifts have been calculated using a non-relativistic quark potential model and the resonating group method (RGM). The calculation has been performed using quark-quark potential which both includes gluon, pion and sigma exchanges and reproduces as well as possible the meson spectrum. The agreement obtained with the existing experimental phase shifts is quite poor. The results are also compared with a previous calculation based only on gluon exchanges at the quark level

  6. Extrap interchange stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheffel, J.

    1989-05-01

    This is a non-linear MHD study of Extrap interchange stability. The closed-line stability criterion d(pgγ)/dψ ≥ 0 is used for fully 2-D numerical calculations of marginally stable equilibria. It is found that Extrap has a stabilzing effect on these modes. The reason for this is that q = Ιdl/B diverges towards the separatrix, which forms a boundary for the pinch. Consequently, in comparison with the 1-D Z-pinch, the Extrap octupole field allows steeper pressure profile in the boundary region. This stabilizing effect is shown to diminish in equilibria with an externally imposed axial magnetic field. It is also shown how the shape of the plasma cross-section depends on the relative direction of plasma current and external rod currents, when the current density j is finite on the boundary. Unfavourable curvature and higher values of j at the boundary are obtained in the case of parallel currents. Only when j vanishes at the separatrix, the cross-section can be truly square-shaped. The type of singularity of q at the separatrix is derived, as well as criteria for j to become singular

  7. Anti-inflammatory and bronchodilatory constituents of leaf extracts of Anacardium occidentale L. in animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awakan, Oluwakemi Josephine; Malomo, Sylvia Omonirume; Adejare, Abdullahi Adeyinka; Igunnu, Adedoyin; Atolani, Olubunmi; Adebayo, Abiodun Humphrey; Owoyele, Bamidele Victor

    2018-01-01

    Anacardium occidentale L. leaf is useful in the treatment of inflammation and asthma, but the bioactive constituents responsible for these activities have not been characterized. Therefore, this study was aimed at identifying the bioactive constituent(s) of A. occidentale ethanolic leaf extract (AOEL) and its solvent-soluble portions, and evaluating their effects on histamine-induced paw edema and bronchoconstriction. The bronchodilatory effect was determined by measuring the percentage protection provided by plant extracts in the histamine-induced bronchoconstriction model in guinea pigs. The anti-inflammatory effect of the extracts on histamine-induced paw edema in rats was determined by measuring the increase in paw diameter, after which the percent edema inhibition was calculated. The extracts were analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry to identify the bioactive constituents. Column chromatography and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were used respectively to isolate and characterize the constituents. The bronchodilatory and anti-inflammatory activities of the isolated bioactive constituent were evaluated. Histamine induced bronchoconstriction in the guinea pigs and edema in the rat paw. AOEL, hexane-soluble portion of AOEL, ethyl acetate-soluble portion of AOEL, and chloroform-soluble portion of AOEL significantly increased bronchodilatory and anti-inflammatory activities (P 9-octadecenamide) was identified as the most abundant compound in the extracts and was isolated. Oleamide significantly increased bronchodilatory and anti-inflammatory activities by 32.97% and 98.41%, respectively (P < 0.05). These results indicate that oleamide is one of the bioactive constituents responsible for the bronchodilatory and anti-inflammatory activity of A. occidentale leaf, and can therefore be employed in the management of bronchoconstriction and inflammation. Copyright © 2017 Shanghai Changhai Hospital. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights

  8. Semi-analytical Model for Estimating Absorption Coefficients of Optically Active Constituents in Coastal Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, D.; Cui, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The objectives of this paper are to validate the applicability of a multi-band quasi-analytical algorithm (QAA) in retrieval absorption coefficients of optically active constituents in turbid coastal waters, and to further improve the model using a proposed semi-analytical model (SAA). The ap(531) and ag(531) semi-analytically derived using SAA model are quite different from the retrievals procedures of QAA model that ap(531) and ag(531) are semi-analytically derived from the empirical retrievals results of a(531) and a(551). The two models are calibrated and evaluated against datasets taken from 19 independent cruises in West Florida Shelf in 1999-2003, provided by SeaBASS. The results indicate that the SAA model produces a superior performance to QAA model in absorption retrieval. Using of the SAA model in retrieving absorption coefficients of optically active constituents from West Florida Shelf decreases the random uncertainty of estimation by >23.05% from the QAA model. This study demonstrates the potential of the SAA model in absorption coefficients of optically active constituents estimating even in turbid coastal waters. Keywords: Remote sensing; Coastal Water; Absorption Coefficient; Semi-analytical Model

  9. Study of two-dimensional interchange turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugama, Hideo; Wakatani, Masahiro.

    1990-04-01

    An eddy viscosity model describing enstrophy transfer in two-dimensional turbulence is presented. This model is similar to that of Canuto et al. and provides an equation for the energy spectral function F(k) as a function of the energy input rate to the system per unit wavenumber, γ s (k). In the enstrophy-transfer inertial range, F(k)∝ k -3 is predicted by the model. The eddy viscosity model is applied to the interchange turbulence of a plasma in shearless magnetic field. Numerical simulation of the two-dimensional interchange turbulence demonstrates that the energy spectrum in the high wavenumber region is well described by this model. The turbulent transport driven by the interchange turbulence is expressed in terms of the Nusselt number Nu, the Rayleigh number Ra and Prantl number Pr in the same manner as that of thermal convection problem. When we use the linear growth rate for γ s (k), our theoretical model predicts that Nu ∝ (Ra·Pr) 1/2 for a constant background pressure gradient and Nu ∝ (Ra·Pr) 1/3 for a self-consistent background pressure profile with the stress-free slip boundary conditions. The latter agrees with our numerical result showing Nu ∝ Ra 1/3 . (author)

  10. Random Interchange of Magnetic Connectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthaeus, W. H.; Ruffolo, D. J.; Servidio, S.; Wan, M.; Rappazzo, A. F.

    2015-12-01

    Magnetic connectivity, the connection between two points along a magnetic field line, has a stochastic character associated with field lines random walking in space due to magnetic fluctuations, but connectivity can also change in time due to dynamical activity [1]. For fluctuations transverse to a strong mean field, this connectivity change be caused by stochastic interchange due to component reconnection. The process may be understood approximately by formulating a diffusion-like Fokker-Planck coefficient [2] that is asymptotically related to standard field line random walk. Quantitative estimates are provided, for transverse magnetic field models and anisotropic models such as reduced magnetohydrodynamics. In heliospheric applications, these estimates may be useful for understanding mixing between open and close field line regions near coronal hole boundaries, and large latitude excursions of connectivity associated with turbulence. [1] A. F. Rappazzo, W. H. Matthaeus, D. Ruffolo, S. Servidio & M. Velli, ApJL, 758, L14 (2012) [2] D. Ruffolo & W. Matthaeus, ApJ, 806, 233 (2015)

  11. A constituent quark model with colour degrees of freedom confronts the data on hadron-nucleus interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozanska, M.; Jezabek, M.

    1991-04-01

    Three version of a model with colour excitations of constituent quarks are examined using inclusive leading proton and antiproton spectra in nuclear interactions at high energies. The comparison with experimental data excludes the models in which fragmentation into leading final hadrons depends only on the colour charge of constituents in an intermediate system. (author)

  12. Low-lying 1/2-hidden strange pentaquark states in the constituent quark model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui Li; Zong-Xiu Wu; Chun-Sheng An; Hong Chen

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the spectrum of the low-lying 1/2-hidden strange pentaquark states,employing the constituent quark model,and looking at two ways within that model of mediating the hyperfine interaction between quarks-Goldstone boson exchange and one gluon exchange.Numerical results show that the lowest 1/2-hidden strange pentaquark state in the Goldstone boson exchange model lies at ~ 1570 MeV,so this pentaquark configuration may form a notable component in S11(1535) if the Goldstone boson exchange model is applied.This is consistent with the prediction that S11 (1535) couples very strongly to strangeness channels.

  13. Establishing a Proper Model of Tobacco Dependence: Influence of Age and Tobacco Smoke Constituents

    OpenAIRE

    Gellner, Candice Ann

    2017-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is the leading preventable cause of death in the United States. Of those who smoke, 9 out of 10 report trying their first cigarette before the age of 18. Although most people who initiate tobacco use are teenagers, animal models for studying tobacco dependence have traditionally focused on how adult animals initiate, withdrawal from and relapse to cigarette smoking. Furthermore, cigarette smoke contains more than 7,000 constituents, including nicotine, yet pre-clinical resea...

  14. Capturing optically important constituents and properties in a marine biogeochemical and ecosystem model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutkiewicz, S.; Hickman, A. E.; Jahn, O.; Gregg, W. W.; Mouw, C. B.; Follows, M. J.

    2015-07-01

    We present a numerical model of the ocean that couples a three-stream radiative transfer component with a marine biogeochemical-ecosystem component in a dynamic three-dimensional physical framework. The radiative transfer component resolves the penetration of spectral irradiance as it is absorbed and scattered within the water column. We explicitly include the effect of several optically important water constituents (different phytoplankton functional types; detrital particles; and coloured dissolved organic matter, CDOM). The model is evaluated against in situ-observed and satellite-derived products. In particular we compare to concurrently measured biogeochemical, ecosystem, and optical data along a meridional transect of the Atlantic Ocean. The simulation captures the patterns and magnitudes of these data, and estimates surface upwelling irradiance analogous to that observed by ocean colour satellite instruments. We find that incorporating the different optically important constituents explicitly and including spectral irradiance was crucial to capture the variability in the depth of the subsurface chlorophyll a (Chl a) maximum. We conduct a series of sensitivity experiments to demonstrate, globally, the relative importance of each of the water constituents, as well as the crucial feedbacks between the light field, the relative fitness of phytoplankton types, and the biogeochemistry of the ocean. CDOM has proportionally more importance at attenuating light at short wavelengths and in more productive waters, phytoplankton absorption is relatively more important at the subsurface Chl a maximum, and water molecules have the greatest contribution when concentrations of other constituents are low, such as in the oligotrophic gyres. Scattering had less effect on attenuation, but since it is important for the amount and type of upwelling irradiance, it is crucial for setting sea surface reflectance. Strikingly, sensitivity experiments in which absorption by any of the

  15. Standardizing data exchange for clinical research protocols and case report forms: An assessment of the suitability of the Clinical Data Interchange Standards Consortium (CDISC) Operational Data Model (ODM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huser, Vojtech; Sastry, Chandan; Breymaier, Matthew; Idriss, Asma; Cimino, James J

    2015-10-01

    Efficient communication of a clinical study protocol and case report forms during all stages of a human clinical study is important for many stakeholders. An electronic and structured study representation format that can be used throughout the whole study life-span can improve such communication and potentially lower total study costs. The most relevant standard for representing clinical study data, applicable to unregulated as well as regulated studies, is the Operational Data Model (ODM) in development since 1999 by the Clinical Data Interchange Standards Consortium (CDISC). ODM's initial objective was exchange of case report forms data but it is increasingly utilized in other contexts. An ODM extension called Study Design Model, introduced in 2011, provides additional protocol representation elements. Using a case study approach, we evaluated ODM's ability to capture all necessary protocol elements during a complete clinical study lifecycle in the Intramural Research Program of the National Institutes of Health. ODM offers the advantage of a single format for institutions that deal with hundreds or thousands of concurrent clinical studies and maintain a data warehouse for these studies. For each study stage, we present a list of gaps in the ODM standard and identify necessary vendor or institutional extensions that can compensate for such gaps. The current version of ODM (1.3.2) has only partial support for study protocol and study registration data mainly because it is outside the original development goal. ODM provides comprehensive support for representation of case report forms (in both the design stage and with patient level data). Inclusion of requirements of observational, non-regulated or investigator-initiated studies (outside Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulation) can further improve future revisions of the standard. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. On equal constituent quark masses in different heavy quarkonia potential models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewin, K.; Motz, G.

    1989-01-01

    In a representative number of more or less QCD-motivated QQ-bar potentials the simultaneous transformations of potentials V' j (r)=V i (r)-V i (r 0 ), m' Qi +1/2V j (r 0 ) (i -model index) introduce approximately equal constituent quark masses m' Qi ≅m Q (Q=b,c) for all considered models. The known model independence of m bi -m ci is explained and the influence of the transformation on data reproduction is studied. 16 refs.; 4 figs.; 1 tab

  17. Parton distributions and EMC ratios of the 6Li nucleus in the constituent quark exchange model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modarres, M.; Hadian, A.

    2017-10-01

    While the constituent quark model (CQM), in which the quarks are assumed to be the complex objects, is used to calculate the parton distribution functions of the iso-scalar lithium-6 (6Li) nucleus, the u-d constituent quark distribution functions of the 6Li nucleus are evaluated from the valence quark exchange formalism (VQEF) for the A = 6 iso-scalar system. After computing the valence quark, sea quark, and gluon distribution functions in the constituent quark exchange model (CQEM, i.e., CQM +VQEF), the nucleus structure function is calculated for the 6Li nucleus at the leading order (LO) and the next-to-leading-order (NLO) levels to extract the European muon collaboration (EMC) ratio, at different hard scales, using the standard Dokshitzer-Gribov-Lipatov-Altarelli-Parisi (DGALP) evolution equations. The outcomes are compared with those of our previous works and the available NMC experimental data, and various physical points are discussed. It is observed that the present EMC ratios are considerably improved compared with those of our previous works, in which only the valence quark distributions were considered to calculate the EMC ratio, and are closer to the NMC data. Finally, it is concluded that at a given appropriate hard scale, the LO approximation may be enough for calculating the nucleus EMC ratio.

  18. Paying for payments: free payments and optimal interchange fees

    OpenAIRE

    Korsgaard, Søren

    2014-01-01

    Do consumers and merchants use the most efficient payment instruments? I examine how inter- change fees, which are fees paid from merchants' banks to consumers' banks when card transactions take place, influence the choice between cash and payment cards. I show that when consumers do not pay transaction fees to banks - a common feature in bank contracts - card use is declining in interchange fees, and surcharging does not neutralize interchange fees. According to my model, banks set interchan...

  19. Information interchange system and apparatus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2013-01-01

    To overcome the drawback of difficulties when interchanging a patient's health record among different health information management systems and yet keep the patient's privacy, this invention proposes a method comprising the steps of: extracting, from a certificate, a signature of a first service

  20. Low-lying 1/2- hidden strange pentaquark states in the constituent quark model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Wu, Zong-Xiu; An, Chun-Sheng; Chen, Hong

    2017-12-01

    We investigate the spectrum of the low-lying 1/2- hidden strange pentaquark states, employing the constituent quark model, and looking at two ways within that model of mediating the hyperfine interaction between quarks - Goldstone boson exchange and one gluon exchange. Numerical results show that the lowest 1/2- hidden strange pentaquark state in the Goldstone boson exchange model lies at ˜1570 MeV, so this pentaquark configuration may form a notable component in S 11(1535) if the Goldstone boson exchange model is applied. This is consistent with the prediction that S 11(1535) couples very strongly to strangeness channels. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11675131, 11645002), Chongqing Natural Science Foundation (cstc2015jcyjA00032) and Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities (SWU115020)

  1. INTERCHANGE RECONNECTION AND CORONAL HOLE DYNAMICS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edmondson, J. K.; Antiochos, S. K.; DeVore, C. R.; Lynch, B. J.; Zurbuchen, T. H.

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the effect of magnetic reconnection between open and closed fields, often referred to as 'interchange' reconnection, on the dynamics and topology of coronal hole boundaries. The most important and most prevalent three-dimensional topology of the interchange process is that of a small-scale bipolar magnetic field interacting with a large-scale background field. We determine the evolution of such a magnetic topology by numerical solution of the fully three-dimensional MHD equations in spherical coordinates. First, we calculate the evolution of a small-scale bipole that initially is completely inside an open field region and then is driven across a coronal hole boundary by photospheric motions. Next the reverse situation is calculated in which the bipole is initially inside the closed region and driven toward the coronal hole boundary. In both cases, we find that the stress imparted by the photospheric motions results in deformation of the separatrix surface between the closed field of the bipole and the background field, leading to rapid current sheet formation and to efficient reconnection. When the bipole is inside the open field region, the reconnection is of the interchange type in that it exchanges open and closed fields. We examine, in detail, the topology of the field as the bipole moves across the coronal hole boundary and find that the field remains well connected throughout this process. Our results, therefore, provide essential support for the quasi-steady models of the open field, because in these models the open and closed flux are assumed to remain topologically distinct as the photosphere evolves. Our results also support the uniqueness hypothesis for open field regions as postulated by Antiochos et al. On the other hand, the results argue against models in which open flux is assumed to diffusively penetrate deeply inside the closed field region under a helmet streamer. We discuss the implications of this work for coronal observations.

  2. Topological and nontopological solutions for the chiral bag model with constituent quarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sveshnikov, K.; Malakhov, I.; Khalili, M.; Fedorov, S.

    2002-01-01

    The three-phase version of the hybrid chiral bag model, containing the phase of asymptotic freedom, the hadronization phase as well as the intermediate phase of constituent quarks is proposed. For this model the self-consistent solutions of different topology are found in (1 + 1)D with due regard for fermion vacuum polarization effects. The renormalized total energy of the bag is studied as a function of its geometry and topological charge. It is shown that in the case of nonzero topological charge there exists a set of configurations being the local minima of the total energy of the bag and containing all the three phases, while in the nontopological case the minimum of the total energy of the bag corresponds to vanishing size of the phase of asymptotic freedom

  3. Possible D(*) anti D(*) and B(*) anti B(*) molecular states in the extended constituent quark models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, You-Chang; Tan, Zhi-Yun; Ping, Jialun; Zong, Hong-Shi

    2017-01-01

    The possible neutral D (*) anti D (*) and B (*) anti B (*) molecular states are studied in the framework of the constituent quark models, which is extended by including the s-channel one-gluon exchange. Using different types of quark-quark potentials, we solve the four-body Schroedinger equation by means of the Gaussian expansion method. The bound states of D (*) anti D (*) with J PC = 1 ++ , 2 ++ and B (*) anti B (*) with J PC = 0 ++ , 1 +- , 1 ++ , 2 ++ are obtained. The molecular states D* anti D with J PC = 1 ++ and B* anti B with J PC = 1 +- are good candidates for X(3872) and Z 0 b (10610), respectively. The dependence of the results on the model parameters is also discussed. (orig.)

  4. Strange mesonic transition form factor in the chiral constituent quark model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, H.; Ramsey-Musolf, M.J.

    1998-01-01

    The form factor g ρπ (S) (Q 2 ) of the strange vector current transition matrix element left-angle ρ|bar sγ μ s|π right-angle is calculated within the chiral quark model. A strange vector current of the constituent U and D quarks is induced by kaon radiative corrections and this mechanism yields the nonvanishing values of g ρπ (S) (0). The numerical result at the photon point is consistent with the one given by the φ-meson dominance model, but the falloff in the Q 2 dependence is faster than the monopole form factor. Mesonic radiative corrections are also examined for the electromagnetic ρ-to-π and K * -to-K transition amplitudes. copyright 1998 The American Physical Society

  5. Characterization and modeling of major constituent equilibrium chemistry of a blended cement mortar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, J.; Kosson, D. S.; Brown, K. G.; Garrabrants, A. C.; Meeussen, J. C. L.; Van Der Sloot, H. A.

    2013-01-01

    Cementitious materials containing ground granulated iron blast furnace slag and coal combustion fly ash as admixtures are being used extensively for nuclear waste containment applications. Whereas the solid phases of ordinary Portland cement (OPC) have been studied in great detail, the chemistry of cement, fly ash and slag blends has received relatively less study. Given that OPC is generally more reactive than slag and fly ash, the mineralogy of OPC provides a logical starting point for describing the major constituent chemistry of blended cement mortars. To this end, a blended cement mortar containing Portland cement, granulated blast furnace slag, fly ash and quartz sand was modeled using a set of solid phases known to form in hydrated OPC with the geochemical speciation solver LeachXS/ORCHESTRA. Comparison of modeling results to the experimentally determined pH-dependent batch leaching concentrations (USEPA Method 1313) indicates that major constituent concentrations are described reasonably well with the Portland cement mineral set; however, modeled and measured aluminum concentrations differ greatly. Scanning electron microscopic analysis of the mortar reveals the presence of Al-rich phyllosilicate minerals heretofore unreported in similar cementitious blends: kaolinite and potassic phyllosilicates similar in composition to illite and muscovite. Whereas the potassic phyllosilicates are present in the quartz sand aggregate, the formation of kaolinite appears to be authigenic. The inclusion of kaolinite in speciation modeling provides a substantially improved description of the release of Al and therefore, suggests that the behavior of phyllosilicate phases may be important for predicting long-term physico-chemical behavior of such systems. (authors)

  6. A metallic solution model with adjustable parameter for describing ternary thermodynamic properties from its binary constituents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang Zheng; Qiu Guanzhou

    2007-01-01

    A metallic solution model with adjustable parameter k has been developed to predict thermodynamic properties of ternary systems from those of its constituent three binaries. In the present model, the excess Gibbs free energy for a ternary mixture is expressed as a weighted probability sum of those of binaries and the k value is determined based on an assumption that the ternary interaction generally strengthens the mixing effects for metallic solutions with weak interaction, making the Gibbs free energy of mixing of the ternary system more negative than that before considering the interaction. This point is never considered in the models currently reported, where the only difference in a geometrical definition of molar values of components is considered that do not involve thermodynamic principles but are completely empirical. The current model describes the results of experiments very well, and by adjusting the k value also agrees with those from models used widely in the literature. Three ternary systems, Mg-Cu-Ni, Zn-In-Cd, and Cd-Bi-Pb are recalculated to demonstrate the method of determining k and the precision of the model. The results of the calculations, especially those in Mg-Cu-Ni system, are better than those predicted by the current models in the literature

  7. Measured and modeled humidification factors of fresh smoke particles from biomass burning: role of inorganic constituents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. Hand

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available During the 2006 FLAME study (Fire Laboratory at Missoula Experiment, laboratory burns of biomass fuels were performed to investigate the physico-chemical, optical, and hygroscopic properties of fresh biomass smoke. As part of the experiment, two nephelometers simultaneously measured dry and humidified light scattering coefficients (bsp(dry and bsp(RH, respectively in order to explore the role of relative humidity (RH on the optical properties of biomass smoke aerosols. Results from burns of several biomass fuels from the west and southeast United States showed large variability in the humidification factor (f(RH=bsp(RH/bsp(dry. Values of f(RH at RH=80–85% ranged from 0.99 to 1.81 depending on fuel type. We incorporated measured chemical composition and size distribution data to model the smoke hygroscopic growth to investigate the role of inorganic compounds on water uptake for these aerosols. By assuming only inorganic constituents were hygroscopic, we were able to model the water uptake within experimental uncertainty, suggesting that inorganic species were responsible for most of the hygroscopic growth. In addition, humidification factors at 80–85% RH increased for smoke with increasing inorganic salt to carbon ratios. Particle morphology as observed from scanning electron microscopy revealed that samples of hygroscopic particles contained soot chains either internally or externally mixed with inorganic potassium salts, while samples of weak to non-hygroscopic particles were dominated by soot and organic constituents. This study provides further understanding of the compounds responsible for water uptake by young biomass smoke, and is important for accurately assessing the role of smoke in climate change studies and visibility regulatory efforts.

  8. Kinetic features of interchange turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarazin, Y; Grandgirard, V; Fleurence, E; Garbet, X; Ghendrih, Ph; Bertrand, P; Depret, G

    2005-01-01

    Non-linear gyrokinetic simulations of the interchange instability are discussed. The semi-Lagrangian numerical scheme allows one to address two critical points achieved with simulations lasting several confinement times: an accurate statistical analysis of the fluctuations and the back reaction of the turbulence on equilibrium profiles. Zonal flows are found to quench a 2D + 1D interchange turbulence when one of the species has a vanishing response to zonal modes. Conversely, when streamers dominate, the equilibrium profiles are found to be stiff. In the non-linear regime and steady-state turbulence, the distribution function exhibits a significant departure from a Maxwellian distribution. This property is characterized by an expansion on generalized Laguerre functions with a slow decay of the series of moments. This justifies the use of gyrokinetic simulations since a standard fluid approach, based on a limited number of moments, would certainly require a complex closure so as to take into account the impact of these non-vanishing high order moments

  9. A Model of Reduced Kinetics for Alkane Oxidation Using Constituents and Species for N-Heptane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harstad, Kenneth G.; Bellan, Josette

    2011-01-01

    The reduction of elementary or skeletal oxidation kinetics to a subgroup of tractable reactions for inclusion in turbulent combustion codes has been the subject of numerous studies. The skeletal mechanism is obtained from the elementary mechanism by removing from it reactions that are considered negligible for the intent of the specific study considered. As of now, there are many chemical reduction methodologies. A methodology for deriving a reduced kinetic mechanism for alkane oxidation is described and applied to n-heptane. The model is based on partitioning the species of the skeletal kinetic mechanism into lights, defined as those having a carbon number smaller than 3, and heavies, which are the complement of the species ensemble. For modeling purposes, the heavy species are mathematically decomposed into constituents, which are similar but not identical to groups in the group additivity theory. From analysis of the LLNL (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory) skeletal mechanism in conjunction with CHEMKIN II, it is shown that a similarity variable can be formed such that the appropriately non-dimensionalized global constituent molar density exhibits a self-similar behavior over a very wide range of equivalence ratios, initial pressures and initial temperatures that is of interest for predicting n-heptane oxidation. Furthermore, the oxygen and water molar densities are shown to display a quasi-linear behavior with respect to the similarity variable. The light species ensemble is partitioned into quasi-steady and unsteady species. The reduced model is based on concepts consistent with those of Large Eddy Simulation (LES) in which functional forms are used to replace the small scales eliminated through filtering of the governing equations; in LES, these small scales are unimportant as far as the overwhelming part of dynamic energy is concerned. Here, the scales thought unimportant for recovering the thermodynamic energy are removed. The concept is tested by

  10. Arctic warming will promote Atlantic-Pacific fish interchange

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wisz, Mary; Broennimann, O.; Grønkjær, Peter

    2015-01-01

    the interchange of marine biota between the two seas. Here, we forecast the potential northward progression of 515 fish species following climate change, and report the rate of potential species interchange between the Atlantic and the Pacific via the Northwest Passage and the Northeast Passage. For this, we...... projected niche-based models under climate change scenarios and simulated the spread of species through the passages when climatic conditions became suitable. Results reveal a complex range of responses during this century, and accelerated interchange after 2050. By 2100 up to 41 species could enter......Throughout much of the Quaternary Period, inhospitable environmental conditions above the Arctic Circle have been a formidable barrier separating most marine organisms in the North Atlantic from those in the North Pacific. Rapid warming has begun to lift this barrier, potentially facilitating...

  11. Interchange Instability and Transport in Matter-Antimatter Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendl, Alexander; Danler, Gregor; Wiesenberger, Matthias; Held, Markus

    2017-06-01

    Symmetric electron-positron plasmas in inhomogeneous magnetic fields are intrinsically subject to interchange instability and transport. Scaling relations for the propagation velocity of density perturbations relevant to transport in isothermal magnetically confined electron-positron plasmas are deduced, including damping effects when Debye lengths are large compared to Larmor radii. The relations are verified by nonlinear full-F gyrofluid computations. Results are analyzed with respect to planned magnetically confined electron-positron plasma experiments. The model is generalized to other matter-antimatter plasmas. Magnetized electron-positron-proton-antiproton plasmas are susceptible to interchange-driven local matter-antimatter separation, which can impede sustained laboratory magnetic confinement.

  12. Interchange Instability and Transport in Matter-Antimatter Plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendl, Alexander; Danler, Gregor; Wiesenberger, Matthias; Held, Markus

    2017-06-09

    Symmetric electron-positron plasmas in inhomogeneous magnetic fields are intrinsically subject to interchange instability and transport. Scaling relations for the propagation velocity of density perturbations relevant to transport in isothermal magnetically confined electron-positron plasmas are deduced, including damping effects when Debye lengths are large compared to Larmor radii. The relations are verified by nonlinear full-F gyrofluid computations. Results are analyzed with respect to planned magnetically confined electron-positron plasma experiments. The model is generalized to other matter-antimatter plasmas. Magnetized electron-positron-proton-antiproton plasmas are susceptible to interchange-driven local matter-antimatter separation, which can impede sustained laboratory magnetic confinement.

  13. Two-dimensional numerical modelling of sediment and chemical constituent transport within the lower reaches of the Athabasca River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashyap, Shalini; Dibike, Yonas; Shakibaeinia, Ahmad; Prowse, Terry; Droppo, Ian

    2017-01-01

    Flows and transport of sediment and associated chemical constituents within the lower reaches of the Athabasca River between Fort McMurray and Embarrass Airport are investigated using a two-dimensional (2D) numerical model called Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code (EFDC). The river reach is characterized by complex geometry, including vegetated islands, alternating sand bars and an unpredictable thalweg. The models were setup and validated using available observed data in the region before using them to estimate the levels of cohesive sediment and a select set of chemical constituents, consisting of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and metals, within the river system. Different flow scenarios were considered, and the results show that a large proportion of the cohesive sediment that gets deposited within the study domain originates from the main stem upstream inflow boundary, although Ells River may also contribute substantially during peak flow events. The floodplain, back channels and islands in the river system are found to be the major areas of concern for deposition of sediment and associated chemical constituents. Adsorbed chemical constituents also tend to be greater in the main channel water column, which has higher levels of total suspended sediments, compared to in the flood plain. Moreover, the levels of chemical constituents leaving the river system are found to depend very much on the corresponding river bed concentration levels, resulting in higher outflows with increases in their concentration in the bed sediment.

  14. Constituent quark model for nuclear stopping in high energy nuclear collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, T.K.; Maruyama, M.; Takagi, F.

    1997-01-01

    We study nuclear stopping in high energy nuclear collisions using the constituent quark model. It is assumed that wounded nucleons with a different number of interacted quarks hadronize in different ways. The probabilities of having such wounded nucleons are evaluated for proton-proton, proton-nucleus, and nucleus-nucleus collisions. After examining our model in proton-proton and proton-nucleus collisions and fixing the hadronization functions, it is extended to nucleus-nucleus collisions. It is used to calculate the rapidity distribution and the rapidity shift of final-state protons in nucleus-nucleus collisions. The computed results are in good agreement with the experimental data on 32 S+ 32 S at E lab =200A GeV and 208 Pb+ 208 Pb at E lab =160A GeV. Theoretical predictions are also given for proton rapidity distribution in 197 Au+ 197 Au at √(s)=200A GeV (BNL-RHIC). We predict that the nearly baryon-free region will appear in the midrapidity region and the rapidity shift is left-angle Δy right-angle=2.24

  15. A Well-Mixed Computational Model for Estimating Room Air Levels of Selected Constituents from E-Vapor Product Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali A. Rostami

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Concerns have been raised in the literature for the potential of secondhand exposure from e-vapor product (EVP use. It would be difficult to experimentally determine the impact of various factors on secondhand exposure including, but not limited to, room characteristics (indoor space size, ventilation rate, device specifications (aerosol mass delivery, e-liquid composition, and use behavior (number of users and usage frequency. Therefore, a well-mixed computational model was developed to estimate the indoor levels of constituents from EVPs under a variety of conditions. The model is based on physical and thermodynamic interactions between aerosol, vapor, and air, similar to indoor air models referred to by the Environmental Protection Agency. The model results agree well with measured indoor air levels of nicotine from two sources: smoking machine-generated aerosol and aerosol exhaled from EVP use. Sensitivity analysis indicated that increasing air exchange rate reduces room air level of constituents, as more material is carried away. The effect of the amount of aerosol released into the space due to variability in exhalation was also evaluated. The model can estimate the room air level of constituents as a function of time, which may be used to assess the level of non-user exposure over time.

  16. Bibliographic information interchange with data independence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macedo, L.F.P. de

    1980-01-01

    A technique for bibliographic information processing, at the standardized interchange format ISO 2709 or ANSI Z39.2, which allows to obtain programs with data independence is developed. A format definition language and manipulation commands which enable data storage and retrieval at the logical level are specified. With this technique it is possible to implement programs which can accept data from any information system, reducing, therefore, the requirements of a common bibliographic information interchange format. (Author) [pt

  17. STUDY OF ESTIMATE CONCENTRATION OF WATER CONSTITUENTS AT BADUNG STRAIT BALI USING INVERSE MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Ketut Swardika

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available An algorithm was employed to retrieve the concentrations of three water constituents, chlorophyll-a,suspended matter and colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM from MODIS (Moderate-ResolutionImaging Spectrometer in wide range covering from oligotrophic case-1 to turbid case-2 waters at theBadung Strait Bali. The algorithm is a neural network (NN which is used to parameterize the inverse of aradiative transfer model. It’s used in this study as a multiple nonlinear regression technique. The NN is a feedforward back propagation model with two hidden layers. The NN was trained with computed radiancecovering the range of chlorophyll-a from 0.001 to 64.0 ?g/l, inorganic suspended matter from 0.01 to 50.0mg/l, and CDOM absorption at 440nm from 0.001 to 5.0 m-1. Inputs to the NN are the radiance of the fivespectral channels which were under discussion for MODIS. The outputs are the three water constituentconcentrations. The NN algorithm was tested using in-situ data set on May, September, November 2005 atthe Badung Strait Bali and the north sea of Sumbawa Island and applied to MODIS. The coefficient ofdetermination (R2 between chlorophyll-a concentrations derived from simulation and in-situ data is 0.327,for suspended matter R2 is 0.408. No in-situ measurements of CDOM available for validation. Also, in-situdata were compared with the corresponding distribution obtained by the NASA standard OC4 (OC3M forMODIS chlorophyll-a algorithm and giving R2 0.188. This study gives better accuracy compare withstandard algorithm. How ever both studies are giving over estimate chlorophyll-a concentration. Since thereare no standard MODIS products available for suspended matter and CDOM, the result of the retrieval by theNN for these two variables could only be assessed by a general knowledge of their concentrations anddistribution patterns

  18. XML-Based SHINE Knowledge Base Interchange Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Mark; Mackey, Ryan; Tikidjian, Raffi

    2008-01-01

    The SHINE Knowledge Base Interchange Language software has been designed to more efficiently send new knowledge bases to spacecraft that have been embedded with the Spacecraft Health Inference Engine (SHINE) tool. The intention of the behavioral model is to capture most of the information generally associated with a spacecraft functional model, while specifically addressing the needs of execution within SHINE and Livingstone. As such, it has some constructs that are based on one or the other.

  19. Market structure and credit card pricing: what drives the interchange?

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu Wang

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a model for the credit card industry, where oligopolistic card networks price their products in a complex marketplace with competing payment instruments, rational consumers/merchants, and competitive card issuers/acquirers. The analysis suggests that card networks demand higher interchange fees to maximize card issuers' profits as card payments become more efficient. At equilibrium, consumer rewards and card transaction volume also increase, while consumer surplus and merc...

  20. Statistical analysis of anomalous transport in resistive interchange turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugama, Hideo; Wakatani, Masahiro.

    1992-01-01

    A new anomalous transport model for resistive interchange turbulence is derived from statistical analysis applying two-scale direct-interaction approximation to resistive magnetohydrodynamic equations with a gravity term. Our model is similar to the K-ε model for eddy viscosity of turbulent shear flows in that anomalous transport coefficients are expressed in terms of by the turbulent kinetic energy K and its dissipation rate ε while K and ε are determined by transport equations. This anomalous transport model can describe some nonlocal effects such as those from boundary conditions which cannot be treated by conventional models based on the transport coefficients represented by locally determined plasma parameters. (author)

  1. Feasibility of automated foundational ontology interchangeability

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Khan, ZC

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available the Source Domain Ontology (sOd), with the domain knowledge com- ponent of the source ontology, the Source Foundational Ontology (sOf ) that is the foundational ontology component of the source ontology that is to be interchanged, and any equivalence... or subsumption mappings between enti- ties in sOd and sOf . – The Target Ontology (tO) which has been interchanged, which comprises the Target Domain Ontology (tOd), with the domain knowledge component of the target ontology, and the Target Foundational Ontology...

  2. Focus on Nutrition. MCH Program Interchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Washington, DC.

    This issue of the "MCH Program Interchange" describes selected materials and publications in maternal and child health (MCH) nutrition services and programs. The materials were developed by or are available from federal agencies, state and local public health agencies, and voluntary and professional organizations. The information is intended to…

  3. Bioboxes: standardised containers for interchangeable bioinformatics software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belmann, Peter; Dröge, Johannes; Bremges, Andreas; McHardy, Alice C; Sczyrba, Alexander; Barton, Michael D

    2015-01-01

    Software is now both central and essential to modern biology, yet lack of availability, difficult installations, and complex user interfaces make software hard to obtain and use. Containerisation, as exemplified by the Docker platform, has the potential to solve the problems associated with sharing software. We propose bioboxes: containers with standardised interfaces to make bioinformatics software interchangeable.

  4. The influence of steepness of dominance hierarchies on reciprocity and interchange in captive groups of bonobos (Pan paniscus)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stevens, J.M.G.; Vervaecke, H.; Vries, Han de; Elsacker, L. van

    2005-01-01

    Biological market models explain variability in reciprocity and interchange between groups. In groups with a shallow dominance gradient, grooming will be mostly exchanged for itself (i.e. exchange will occur). In groups with steep dominance hierarchies, interchange is expected: individuals will

  5. Constituency Input into Budget Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Norman E.

    1995-01-01

    Presents techniques for ensuring constituency involvement in district- and site-level budget management. Outlines four models for securing constituent input and focuses on strategies to orchestrate the more complex model for staff and community participation. Two figures are included. (LMI)

  6. Nucleon form factors at high q2 within constituent quark models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desplanques, B.; Silvestre-Brac, B.; Cano, F.; Noguera, S.; Gonzalez, P.; .

    2000-01-01

    The nucleon form factors are calculated using a non-relativistic description in terms of constituent quarks. The emphasis is put on present numerical methods used to solve the three-body problem in order to reliably predict the expected asymptotic behavior of form factors. Nucleon wave functions obtained in the hyperspherical formalism or employing Faddeev equations have been considered. While a q -8 behavior is expected at high q for a quark-quark force behaving like 1/r at short distances, it is found that the hyper central approximation in the hyperspherical formalism (K = 0) leads to a q -7 behavior. An infinite set of waves would be required to get the correct behavior. Solutions of the Faddeev equations lead to the q -8 behavior. The coefficient of the corresponding term, however, depends on the number of partial waves retained in the Faddeev amplitude. The convergence to the asymptotic behavior has also been studied. Approximate expressions characterizing this one have been derived. From the comparison with the most complete Faddeev calculation, a validity range is inferred for restricted calculations. Refs. 46 (author)

  7. Diverging diamond interchange performance evaluation (I-44 and Route 13)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-01

    Performance evaluation was conducted on the first diverging diamond interchange (DDI) or double : crossover interchange (DCD) constructed in the United States. This evaluation assessed traffic operations, safety and : public perceptions t...

  8. Financing mechanisms for capital improvements : interchanges, final report, March 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    This report examines the use of alternative local financing mechanisms for interchange and interchange area infrastructure improvements. The financing mechanisms covered include transportation impact fees, tax increment financing, value capture finan...

  9. Financing mechanisms for capital improvements : interchanges : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    This report examines the use of alternative local financing mechanisms for interchange and interchange area infrastructure improvements. The financing mechanisms covered include transportation impact fees, tax increment financing, value capture finan...

  10. Modeling constituent redistribution in U–Pu–Zr metallic fuel using the advanced fuel performance code BISON

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galloway, J.; Unal, C.; Carlson, N.; Porter, D.; Hayes, S.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • An improved constituent distribution formulation in metallic nuclear fuels. • The new algorithm is implemented into the advanced fuel performance framework BISON. • Experimental Breeder Reactor-II data, T179, DP16, T459 are reanalyzed. • Phase dependent diffusion coefficients are improved. • Most influential phase is gamma, followed by alpha and thirdly the beta phase. - Abstract: An improved robust formulation for constituent distribution in metallic nuclear fuels is developed and implemented into the advanced fuel performance framework BISON. The coupled thermal diffusion equations are solved simultaneously to reanalyze the constituent redistribution in post irradiation data from fuel tests performed in Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II). Deficiencies observed in previously published formulation and numerical implementations are also improved. The present model corrects an inconsistency between the enthalpies of solution and the solubility limit curves of the phase diagram while also adding an artificial diffusion term when in the 2-phase regime that stabilizes the standard Galerkin finite element (FE) method used by BISON. An additional improvement is in the formulation of zirconium flux as it relates to the Soret term. With these new modifications, phase dependent diffusion coefficients are revaluated and compared with the previously recommended values. The model validation included testing against experimental data from fuel pins T179, DP16 and T459, irradiated in EBR-II. A series of viable material properties for U–Pu–Zr based materials was determined through a sensitivity study, which resulted in three cases with differing parameters that showed strong agreement with one set of experimental data, rod T179. Subsequently a full-scale simulation of T179 was performed to reduce uncertainties, particularly relating to the temperature boundary condition for the fuel. In addition a new thermal conductivity model combining all

  11. Understanding SOL plasma turbulence by interchange motions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Horáček, Jan; Pitts, R. A.; Nielsen, A.H.; Garcia, O.E.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 16 (2007), s. 192-193 ISSN 0003-0503. [Annual meeting of the division of plasma physics/49th./. Orlando , 12.11.2007-16.11.2007] Grant - others:-(XE) European Training fellowships and Grants (Euratom), EDGETURB Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : tokamak * plasma * scrape-off layer * turbulence * interchange instability Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics http://meetings.aps.org/Meeting/DPP07/Event/70125

  12. Modeling the Process of Purchase Payment as a Constituent of Information Security in E-commerce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volodymyr Skitsko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A mathematical model of the process of payment for purchases in an online store has been presented. The model belongs to the class of semi-open queueing networks with four phases of exponential servers and Poisson arrivals. The authors describe in detail the derivation of the equations describing the system. Analytic expressions are derived on the basis of the proposed model for the average number of online store customers who have already paid for goods. Practical implementation of the model allows us to determine the number of clients who have added goods to their cart, but have not yet passed through the payment verification system, and thus determine the stream of real customers of the online store. (original abstract

  13. Total cross sections of hadron interactions at high energies in low constituents number model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abramovskij, V.A.; Radchenko, N.V.

    2009-01-01

    We consider QCD hadrons interaction model in which gluons density is low in initial state wave function in rapidity space and real hadrons are produced from color strings decay. In this model behavior of total cross sections of pp, pp bar, π ± p, K ± p, γp, and γγ interactions is well described. The value of proton-proton total cross section at LHC energy is predicted

  14. Protease-inhibiting, molecular modeling and antimicrobial activities of extracts and constituents from Helichrysum foetidum and Helichrysum mechowianum (compositae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malolo, Fanny-Aimée Essombe; Bissoue Nouga, Achille; Kakam, Antoine; Franke, Katrin; Ngah, Lidwine; Flausino, Otavio; Mpondo Mpondo, Emmanuel; Ntie-Kang, Fidele; Ndom, Jean Claude; Bolzani, Vanderlan da Silva; Wessjohann, Ludger

    2015-01-01

    Helichrysum species are used extensively for stress-related ailments and as dressings for wounds normally encountered in circumcision rites, bruises, cuts and sores. It has been reported that Helichysum species are used to relief abdominal pain, heart burn, cough, cold, wounds, female sterility, menstrual pain. From the extracts of Helichrysum foetidum (L.) Moench, six known compounds were isolated and identified. They were 7, 4'-dihydroxy-5-methoxy-flavanone (1), 6'-methoxy-2',4, 4'-trihydroxychalcone (2), 6'-methoxy-2',4-dihydroxychalcone -4'-O-β-D-glucoside (3), apigenin (4), apigenin-7-O-β-D-glucoside (5), kaur-16-en-18-oic acid (6) while two known compounds 3,5,7-trihydroxy-8-methoxyflavone (12), 4,5-dicaffeoyl quinic acid (13) together with a mixture of phytosterol were isolated from the methanol extract of Helichrysum mechowianum Klatt. All the compounds were characterized by spectroscopic and mass spectrometric methods, and by comparison with literature data. Both extracts and all the isolates were screened for the protease inhibition, antibacterial and antifungal activities. In addition, the phytochemical profiles of both species were investigated by ESI-MS experiments. These results showed that the protease inhibition assay of H. foetidum could be mainly attributed to the constituents of flavonoids glycosides (3, 5) while the compound (13) from H. mechowianum contributes to the stomach protecting effects. In addition, among the antibacterial and antifungal activities of all the isolates, compound (6) was found to possess a potent inhibitor effect against the tested microorganisms. The heterogeneity of the genus is also reflected in its phytochemical diversity. The differential bioactivities and determined constituents support the traditional use of the species. Molecular modelling was carried out by computing selected descriptors related to drug absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicity (ADMET). Graphical abstractCompounds isolated

  15. Experimentally-based multiscale model of the elastic moduli of bovine trabecular bone and its constituents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamed, Elham [University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, 1206 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Novitskaya, Ekaterina, E-mail: eevdokim@ucsd.edu [University of California, San Diego, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Materials Science and Engineering Program, 9500 Gilman Dr., La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Li, Jun; Jasiuk, Iwona [University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, 1206 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); McKittrick, Joanna [University of California, San Diego, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Materials Science and Engineering Program, 9500 Gilman Dr., La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The elastic moduli of trabecular bone were modeled using an analytical multiscale approach. Trabecular bone was represented as a porous nanocomposite material with a hierarchical structure spanning from the collagen–mineral level to the trabecular architecture level. In parallel, compression testing was done on bovine femoral trabecular bone samples in two anatomical directions, parallel to the femoral neck axis and perpendicular to it, and the measured elastic moduli were compared with the corresponding theoretical results. To gain insights on the interaction of collagen and minerals at the nanoscale, bone samples were deproteinized or demineralized. After such processing, the treated samples remained as self-standing structures and were tested in compression. Micro-computed tomography was used to characterize the hierarchical structure of these three bone types and to quantify the amount of bone porosity. The obtained experimental data served as inputs to the multiscale model and guided us to represent bone as an interpenetrating composite material. Good agreement was found between the theory and experiments for the elastic moduli of the untreated, deproteinized, and demineralized trabecular bone. - Highlights: • A multiscale model was used to predict the elastic moduli of trabecular bone. • Samples included demineralized, deproteinized and untreated bone. • The model portrays bone as a porous, interpenetrating two phase composite. • The experimental elastic moduli for trabecular bone fell between theoretical bounds.

  16. Experimentally-based multiscale model of the elastic moduli of bovine trabecular bone and its constituents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamed, Elham; Novitskaya, Ekaterina; Li, Jun; Jasiuk, Iwona; McKittrick, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    The elastic moduli of trabecular bone were modeled using an analytical multiscale approach. Trabecular bone was represented as a porous nanocomposite material with a hierarchical structure spanning from the collagen–mineral level to the trabecular architecture level. In parallel, compression testing was done on bovine femoral trabecular bone samples in two anatomical directions, parallel to the femoral neck axis and perpendicular to it, and the measured elastic moduli were compared with the corresponding theoretical results. To gain insights on the interaction of collagen and minerals at the nanoscale, bone samples were deproteinized or demineralized. After such processing, the treated samples remained as self-standing structures and were tested in compression. Micro-computed tomography was used to characterize the hierarchical structure of these three bone types and to quantify the amount of bone porosity. The obtained experimental data served as inputs to the multiscale model and guided us to represent bone as an interpenetrating composite material. Good agreement was found between the theory and experiments for the elastic moduli of the untreated, deproteinized, and demineralized trabecular bone. - Highlights: • A multiscale model was used to predict the elastic moduli of trabecular bone. • Samples included demineralized, deproteinized and untreated bone. • The model portrays bone as a porous, interpenetrating two phase composite. • The experimental elastic moduli for trabecular bone fell between theoretical bounds

  17. Better Models for Agile Virtual Enterprises - the Enterprise and its Constituents as Hybrid Agents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernus, Peter; Baltrusch, Rob; Tølle, Martin

    2003-01-01

    The article proposes a way to improve reference models for the management of virtual enterprises. The pattern of management roles is based on enveloping each decision centre into an agent wrapper, using the same tools and algorithms. Using this approach enterprises (organization, networks, virtual...... enterprises) will have the emergent agent property – the ability to follow objectives, plan, and take timely corrective action in case the plan breaks down....

  18. The baryonic spectrum in a constituent quark model including a three-body force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desplanques, B.; Gignoux, C.; Silvestre-Brac, B.; Gonzalez, P.; Navarro, J.; Noguera, S.

    1992-01-01

    We analyze, within a non-relativistic quark model, the low energy part of the baryonic spectrum in the octet and decuplet flavour representations. The relevance of a strong Coulomb potential is emphasized in order to explain its general features. The addition of a three-body force allows to solve the 'Roper puzzle', giving a consistent explanation to its relative position in the spectrum. (orig.)

  19. Radiative transfer modeling applied to sea water constituent determination. [Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faller, K. H.

    1979-01-01

    Optical radiation from the sea is influenced by pigments dissolved in the water and contained in discrete organisms suspended in the sea, and by pigmented and unpigmented inorganic and organic particles. The problem of extracting the information concerning these pigments and particulates from the optical properties of the sea is addressed and the properties which determine characteristics of the radiation that a remote sensor will detect and measure are considered. The results of the application of the volume scattering function model to the data collected in the Gulf of Mexico and its environs indicate that the size distribution of the concentrations of particles found in the sea can be predicted from measurements of the volume scattering function. Furthermore, with the volume scattering function model and knowledge of the absorption spectra of dissolved pigments, the radiative transfer model can compute a distribution of particle sizes and indices of refraction and concentration of dissolved pigments that give an upwelling light spectrum that closely matches measurements of that spectrum at sea.

  20. Modeling of the effect of freezer conditions on the principal constituent parameters of ice cream by using response surface methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, K; Ochi, H; Taketsuka, M; Saito, H; Sakurai, K; Ichihashi, N; Iwatsuki, K; Kokubo, S

    2008-05-01

    A systematic analysis was carried out by using response surface methodology to create a quantitative model of the synergistic effects of conditions in a continuous freezer [mix flow rate (L/h), overrun (%), cylinder pressure (kPa), drawing temperature ( degrees C), and dasher speed (rpm)] on the principal constituent parameters of ice cream [rate of fat destabilization (%), mean air cell diameter (mum), and mean ice crystal diameter (mum)]. A central composite face-centered design was used for this study. Thirty-one combinations of the 5 above-mentioned freezer conditions were designed (including replicates at the center point), and ice cream samples were manufactured and examined in a continuous freezer under the selected conditions. The responses were the 3 variables given above. A quadratic model was constructed, with the freezer conditions as the independent variables and the ice cream characteristics as the dependent variables. The coefficients of determination (R(2)) were greater than 0.9 for all 3 responses, but Q(2), the index used here for the capability of the model for predicting future observed values of the responses, was negative for both the mean ice crystal diameter and the mean air cell diameter. Therefore, pruned models were constructed by removing terms that had contributed little to the prediction in the original model and by refitting the regression model. It was demonstrated that these pruned models provided good fits to the data in terms of R(2), Q(2), and ANOVA. The effects of freezer conditions were expressed quantitatively in terms of the 3 responses. The drawing temperature ( degrees C) was found to have a greater effect on ice cream characteristics than any of the other factors.

  1. Atmospheric Constituents in GEOS-5: Components for an Earth System Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawson, Steven; Douglass, Anne; Duncan, Bryan; Nielsen, Eric; Ott, Leslie; Strode, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    The GEOS-S model is being developed for weather and climate processes, including the implementation of "Earth System" components. While the stratospheric chemistry capabilities are mature, we are presently extending this to include predictions of the tropospheric composition and chemistry - this includes CO2, CH4, CO, nitrogen species, etc. (Aerosols are also implemented, but are beyond the scope of this paper.) This work will give an overview of our chemistry modules, the approaches taken to represent surface emissions and uptake of chemical species, and some studies of the sensitivity of the atmospheric circulation to changes in atmospheric composition. Results are obtained through focused experiments and multi-decadal simulations.

  2. Interchange stability of noncircular reversed field pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skinner, D.A.; Prager, S.C.; Todd, A.M.M.

    1987-08-01

    Interchange (Mercier) stability of toroidal reversed-field-pinch plasmas with noncircular cross-section is evaluated numerically. Marginally stable pressure profiles and beta values are produced. Most shapes, such as indented or vertically elongated, reduce stability by making the net magnetic curvature of the poloidal-field-dominated plasmas yet worse than that of the circle. Horizontally elongated plasmas slightly enhance stability beyond that of the circle as a result of increased shear produced by toroidicity. Such shear enhancement by the toroidal shift of magnetic surfaces might be exploited for future, more comprehensive studies

  3. A semantic-preserving transformation from the compositional interchange format to UPPAAL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nadales Agut, D.E.; Reniers, M.A.; Schiffelers, R.R.H.; Jorgensen, K.E.; Beek, van D.A.; Bittanti, S.; Cenedese, A.; Zampieri, S.

    2011-01-01

    The Compositional Interchange Format (CIF), is a modeling formalism for hybrid systems, that aims to establishing interoperability of a wide range of tools by means of model transformations to and from CIF. UPPAAL is currently a very successful tool for the specification and analysis of timed

  4. Comprehensive Evaluation and Classification of Interchange Diagrammatic Guide Signs’ Complexity

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Yang; Zhao, Xiaohua; He, Qing; Huang, Lihua; Rong, Jian

    2018-01-01

    The effectiveness of interchange diagrammatic guide signs has significant meaning in traffic safety and driver’s understanding. This paper presented a comprehensive evaluation and classification of interchange diagrammatic guide signs’ complexity. The effectiveness of interchange diagrammatic guide signs relies on how well road users can understand those diagrams. This study tested 37 types of diagrams on the visual recognition complexity degree in three levels, general level, partial level, ...

  5. Achieving ICME with Multiscale Modeling: The Effects of Constituent Properties and Processing on the Performance of Laminated Polymer Matrix Composite Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineda, Evan Jorge; Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Arnold, Steven M.

    2014-01-01

    Integrated computational materials engineering (ICME) is a useful approach for tailoring the performance of a material. For fiber-reinforced composites, not only do the properties of the constituents of the composite affect the performance, but so does the architecture (or microstructure) of the constituents. The generalized method of cells is demonstrated to be a viable micromechanics tool for determining the effects of the microstructure on the performance of laminates. The micromechanics is used to predict the inputs for a macroscale model for a variety of different fiber volume fractions, and fiber architectures. Using this technique, the material performance can be tailored for specific applications by judicious selection of constituents, volume fraction, and architectural arrangement given a particular manufacturing scenario

  6. An asymptotic homogenization model for smart 3D grid-reinforced composite structures with generally orthotropic constituents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, E M; Kalamkarov, A L; Georgiades, A V; Challagulla, K S

    2009-01-01

    A comprehensive micromechanical model for smart 3D composite structures reinforced with a periodic grid of generally orthotropic cylindrical reinforcements that also exhibit piezoelectric behavior is developed. The original boundary value problem characterizing the piezothermoelastic behavior of these structures is decoupled into a set of three simpler unit cell problems dealing, separately, with the elastic, piezoelectric and thermal expansion characteristics of the smart composite. The technique used is that of asymptotic homogenization and the solution of the unit cell problems permits determination of the effective elastic, piezoelectric and thermal expansion coefficients. The general orthotropy of the constituent materials is very important from the practical viewpoint and makes the analysis much more complicated. Several examples of practical interest are used to illustrate the work including smart 3D composites with cubic and conical embedded grids as well as diagonally reinforced smart structures. It is also shown in this work that in the limiting particular case of 2D grid-reinforced structures with isotropic reinforcements our results converge to earlier published results

  7. Achieving robust interchangeability of test assets in ATE systems

    CERN Document Server

    Oblad, R P

    1999-01-01

    This paper identities the key issues that have made if so difficult to achieve asset interchangeability. Several of the historical attempts to solve the problem of asset interchangeability are described, along with an analysis of the reasons that they did not achieve the expected results. Specific topics that are covered are SCPI, VXIplug&play, IVI, ATLAS, and Measurement Subsystems. Principles associated with the ownership of interfaces will be outlined. Finally, a set of rules and principles will be discussed that must be applied to achieve robust asset interchangeability. Robust is defined as interchangeability that can be "guaranteed" without testing all TPSs against the modified test system. (9 refs).

  8. Robustness of near-infrared calibration models for the prediction of milk constituents during the milking process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melfsen, Andreas; Hartung, Eberhard; Haeussermann, Angelika

    2013-02-01

    The robustness of in-line raw milk analysis with near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) was tested with respect to the prediction of the raw milk contents fat, protein and lactose. Near-infrared (NIR) spectra of raw milk (n = 3119) were acquired on three different farms during the milking process of 354 milkings over a period of six months. Calibration models were calculated for: a random data set of each farm (fully random internal calibration); first two thirds of the visits per farm (internal calibration); whole datasets of two of the three farms (external calibration), and combinations of external and internal datasets. Validation was done either on the remaining data set per farm (internal validation) or on data of the remaining farms (external validation). Excellent calibration results were obtained when fully randomised internal calibration sets were used for milk analysis. In this case, RPD values of around ten, five and three for the prediction of fat, protein and lactose content, respectively, were achieved. Farm internal calibrations achieved much poorer prediction results especially for the prediction of protein and lactose with RPD values of around two and one respectively. The prediction accuracy improved when validation was done on spectra of an external farm, mainly due to the higher sample variation in external calibration sets in terms of feeding diets and individual cow effects. The results showed that further improvements were achieved when additional farm information was added to the calibration set. One of the main requirements towards a robust calibration model is the ability to predict milk constituents in unknown future milk samples. The robustness and quality of prediction increases with increasing variation of, e.g., feeding and cow individual milk composition in the calibration model.

  9. Internet-based data interchange with XML

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuerst, Karl; Schmidt, Thomas

    2000-12-01

    In this paper, a complete concept for Internet Electronic Data Interchange (EDI) - a well-known buzzword in the area of logistics and supply chain management to enable the automation of the interactions between companies and their partners - using XML (eXtensible Markup Language) will be proposed. This approach is based on Internet and XML, because the implementation of traditional EDI (e.g. EDIFACT, ANSI X.12) is mostly too costly for small and medium sized enterprises, which want to integrate their suppliers and customers in a supply chain. The paper will also present the results of the implementation of a prototype for such a system, which has been developed for an industrial partner to improve the current situation of parts delivery. The main functions of this system are an early warning system to detect problems during the parts delivery process as early as possible, and a transport following system to pursue the transportation.

  10. A transformation framework for the compositional interchange format for hybrid systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, D.; Schiffelers, R.R.H.; Hüfner, Martin; Sonntag, Christian

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the Compositional Interchange Format for hybrid systems (CIF) is to establish inter-operability of a wide range of tools by means of model transformations - using the CIF as intermediate, the implementation of many bi-lateral translators between specific formalisms can be avoided.

  11. New concepts in the abstract format of the Compositional Interchange Format

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.A. van Beek; P.J. Collins (Pieter); D.E. Nadales Agut; J.E. Rooda (Jacobus); R.R.H. Schiffelers; A. Giua; M. Silva (Manuel); J. Zaytoon

    2009-01-01

    textabstractThe compositional interchange format for hybrid systems (CIF) supports inter-operability of a wide range of tools by means of model transformations to and from the CIF. Work on the CIF takes place in the FP7 Multiform project, and in several other European projects. The CIF consists of

  12. Dynamics and fluctuation spectra of electrostatic resistive interchange turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sydora, R.D.; Leboeuf, J.N.; An, Z.G.; Diamond, P.H.; Lee, G.S.; Hahm, T.S.

    1985-11-01

    The saturation mechanism for density and potential fluctuation spectra which evolve from linearly unstable electrostatic resistive interchange modes, are investigated using particle simulations. Detailed comparisons of the nonlinear evolution, saturation levels and resultant spectra between two- and three-dimensional sheared magnetic field configurations are made. Significant differences appear. The single rational surface, quasilinear-dominated evolution, fluctuation spectrum is adequately described using a density convection model. For the multiple rational surface case, the potential fluctuations are adequately represented by a balance between the nonlinearly modified source (curvature drive) and linear sink (parallel resistive field line diffusion). An accurate description of the density spectrum requires a mode coupling theory based on the two-point density correlation evolution equation. 24 refs., 15 figs

  13. The Harang reversal and the interchange stability of the magnetotail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtani, Shinichi; Gkioulidou, Matina; Wang, Chih-Ping; Wolf, Richard A.

    2016-04-01

    The present study addresses steady convection in the plasma sheet in terms of the interchange stability with special attention to the Harang reversal. The closure of the tail current with a field-aligned current (FAC) results from the divergence/convergence of the pressure gradient current. If the magnetotail is in a steady state, the associated change of local plasma pressure p has to balance with its advective change. Accordingly, for adiabatic transport, the flux tube entropy parameter pVγ increases and decreases along the convection path in regions corresponding to downward and upward FACs, respectively. This requirement, along with the condition for the interchange stability imposes an important constraint on the direction of convection especially in the regions of downward FACs. It is deduced that for the dusk cell, the convection in the downward R2 current has to be directed azimuthally duskward, which follows the sunward, possibly dawnward deflected, convection in the region of the premidnight upward R1 current. This duskward turn of convection takes place in the vicinity of the R1-R2 demarcation, and it presumably corresponds to the Harang reversal. For the dawn cell the convection in the postmidnight downward R1 current has to deflect dawnward, and then it proceeds sunward in the upward R2 current. The continuity of the associated ionospheric currents consistently reproduces the assumed FAC distribution. The proposed interrelationships between the convection and FACs are also verified with a quasi-steady plasma sheet configuration and convection reproduced by a modified Rice Convection Model with force balance.

  14. Simulation of the interchange instability in a magnetospheric substorm site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Mingalev

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available We perform modeling of the interchange instability driven by longitudinal pressure asymmetry in the region of the pressure buildup that forms in the inner magnetosphere at the substorm growth phase. The simulation refers to the dawnward side of the Harang discontinuity and times after Bz IMF turning northward. The solution for the equilibrium state indicates tailward flows associated with vortices, which is in agreement with a previous finding of Ashour-Abdalla et al. (1999, 2002. We show that in the regions of equilibrium field-aligned currents (FACs, small initial perturbations in pVγ (p is the isotropic plasma pressure, V is the unit magnetic flux tube volume, γ=5/3 the adiabatic exponent, set up as ripples inclined to azimuth, grow in time. For the background FAC of ~10-6 A/m2, the linear growth rate of the instability is ~6 min. Starting from the 12th min of evolution, the perturbations exhibit nonlinear deformations, develop undulations and front steepening. An interesting peculiarity in the distribution of the associated small-scale FACs is that they become asymmetric with time. Specifically, the downward currents are more localised, reaching densities up to 15×10-6 A/m2 at the nonlinear stage. The upward FACs are more dispersed. When large enough, these currents are likely to produce the aurora. We also run our simulation for the initial perturbations of large transverse scales in order to demonstrate that the interchange instability can be responsible for pressure and cross-tail current spatial variations of great extent.

  15. Analysis of satisfaction factors at urban transport interchanges: Measuring travelers’ attitudes to information, security and waiting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lois Garcia, D.; Monzon de Caceres, A.; Hernandez del Olmo, S.

    2016-07-01

    Transport interchanges can be considered as a node, where people transfer from one mode to another, and as a place to stay, using facilities and services as well as waiting areas. Reducing disruption of transfer in multimodal trips is a key element for assuring seamless mobility in big cities. Based on previous research (Hernández & Monzón, 2016) this paper aims to explore the predictive capacity of attitudes towards several service factors on general satisfaction with transport interchange. Complementary, it was analyzing how personal and trip characteristics are related to evaluation of some variables, and examining the influence of waiting time on the perceived quality. To that end, a two steps methodology was conducted (personal and on-line interview) in a representative sample of 740 users (54% female, 55% work purpose trip). We performed path analysis to test the model showing a satisfactory statistical fit. The model developed show good performance for predicting general satisfaction at Moncloa Transport Interchange (Madrid, Spain). The outputs of the model indicate that Information and Safety and Security factors predicted 49% of general satisfaction. Furthermore, the results showed also a strong association between evaluation of Design and Environmental quality, factors that not affect directly general satisfaction but do so through Information and Safety & Security perception, acting the last as mediator variables. Nevertheless, spending time queuing inside the interchange show a negative influence on Information and Safety & Security, while age of participants affect negatively to Information, which mean that elder have some cognitive accessibility problems. Moreover, our data shows gender differences in safety perception, since women feel less safe (particularity the youngest) inside the interchange. The results indicate a number of priority measures to enhance. (Author)

  16. Flute-interchange stability in a hot electron plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dominguez, R.R.

    1980-01-01

    Several topics in the kinetic stability theory of flute-interchange modes in a hot electron plasma are discussed. The stability analysis of the hot-electron, curvature-driven flute-interchange mode, previously performed in a slab geometry, is extended to a cylindrical plasma. The cold electron concentration necessary for stability differs substantially from previous criteria. The inclusion of a finite temperature background plasma in the stability analysis results in an ion curvature-driven flute-interchange mode which may be stabilized by either hot-electron diamagnetic effects, hot-electron plasma density, or finite (ion) Larmor radius effects

  17. Factors That Influence Running Intensity in Interchange Players in Professional Rugby League.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaney, Jace A; Thornton, Heidi R; Duthie, Grant M; Dascombe, Ben J

    2016-11-01

    Rugby league coaches adopt replacement strategies for their interchange players to maximize running intensity; however, it is important to understand the factors that may influence match performance. To assess the independent factors affecting running intensity sustained by interchange players during professional rugby league. Global positioning system (GPS) data were collected from all interchanged players (starters and nonstarters) in a professional rugby league squad across 24 matches of a National Rugby League season. A multilevel mixed-model approach was employed to establish the effect of various technical (attacking and defensive involvements), temporal (bout duration, time in possession, etc), and situational (season phase, recovery cycle, etc) factors on the relative distance covered and average metabolic power (P met ) during competition. Significant effects were standardized using correlation coefficients, and the likelihood of the effect was described using magnitude-based inferences. Superior intermittent running ability resulted in very likely large increases in both relative distance and P met . As the length of a bout increased, both measures of running intensity exhibited a small decrease. There were at least likely small increases in running intensity for matches played after short recovery cycles and against strong opposition. During a bout, the number of collision-based involvements increased running intensity, whereas time in possession and ball time out of play decreased demands. These data demonstrate a complex interaction of individual- and match-based factors that require consideration when developing interchange strategies, and the manipulation of training loads during shorter recovery periods and against stronger opponents may be beneficial.

  18. Model documentation for relations between continuous real-time and discrete water-quality constituents in Cheney Reservoir near Cheney, Kansas, 2001--2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Mandy L.; Graham, Jennifer L.; Gatotho, Jackline W.

    2013-01-01

    Cheney Reservoir, located in south-central Kansas, is one of the primary water supplies for the city of Wichita, Kansas. The U.S. Geological Survey has operated a continuous real-time water-quality monitoring station in Cheney Reservoir since 2001; continuously measured physicochemical properties include specific conductance, pH, water temperature, dissolved oxygen, turbidity, fluorescence (wavelength range 650 to 700 nanometers; estimate of total chlorophyll), and reservoir elevation. Discrete water-quality samples were collected during 2001 through 2009 and analyzed for sediment, nutrients, taste-and-odor compounds, cyanotoxins, phytoplankton community composition, actinomycetes bacteria, and other water-quality measures. Regression models were developed to establish relations between discretely sampled constituent concentrations and continuously measured physicochemical properties to compute concentrations of constituents that are not easily measured in real time. The water-quality information in this report is important to the city of Wichita because it allows quantification and characterization of potential constituents of concern in Cheney Reservoir. This report updates linear regression models published in 2006 that were based on data collected during 2001 through 2003. The update uses discrete and continuous data collected during May 2001 through December 2009. Updated models to compute dissolved solids, sodium, chloride, and suspended solids were similar to previously published models. However, several other updated models changed substantially from previously published models. In addition to updating relations that were previously developed, models also were developed for four new constituents, including magnesium, dissolved phosphorus, actinomycetes bacteria, and the cyanotoxin microcystin. In addition, a conversion factor of 0.74 was established to convert the Yellow Springs Instruments (YSI) model 6026 turbidity sensor measurements to the newer YSI

  19. Brand and generic medications: Are they interchangeable

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Jazairi, Abdulrazak S.; Blhareth, S.; Eqtefan, Iyad S.; Al-Suwayeh, Saleh A.

    2008-01-01

    Generic substitution has become a common practice since the late 1970s in the United States. At that time, many of these generics caused bioavailability problems, which fueled suspicions about their efficacy and safety and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) standards for bioequivalence. In Saudi Arabia, the increasing number of local products raised several concerns with regard to switching from brands to generics. Our objective was to review and examine the basis of the controversy surrounding brand and generic interchangeability and to explore a practical approach in pursuing a switch. Articles indexed initially under terms such as generic medications, generic substitution, bioequivalence and bioinequivalence were identified. These terms were used to search the indexing service, MEDLINE (1966-2006). References from the extracted articles and additional data sources, including the Code of Federal Regulations and Regulatory Guidelines from the FDA Center for Drug Evaluation and research were also reviewed. Foe most drugs, bioequivalence testing generally should enable clinicians to routinely substitute generic for innovator products. However, for narrow therapeutic, critical dose drugs, or for highly variable drugs, safe switching between products can not be assured. These drugs need special precautions and blood level monitoring upon switching. FDA firmly believes that approved generic and brand drugs can be dispensed with the full expectation that the consumer will receive the same clinical benefit. Performing the switch process is an advisable practice to reduce health care costs in countries with strong post-marketing surveillance program, but caution is to be exercised when narrow therapeutic index drugs or highly variable drugs are prescribed. (author)

  20. Macroscopic numerical simulation model of multi-constituent fluid flows in porous medium; Modele macroscopique de simulation numerique d'ecoulements de fluides multiconstituants en milieu poreux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilbois, B.

    2003-07-01

    In this work, a new model is built which allows to take into consideration the overall mass transfer phenomena (in particular convection) taking place inside a mixture of n{sub c} constituents in a porous medium. This model should allow to foresee the quantitative composition of fluids in oil fields and also to improve the knowledge of the flow of different species inside mixtures. The overall physical phenomena taking place at oil fields is explained in the first chapter. Chapter 2 recalls some thermodynamical notions at the equilibrium and outside equilibrium. These notions, necessary to understand the forecasting methods used by petroleum geologists, are described in chapter 3. This chapter includes also a bibliographic study about the methods of simulation of mass and heat transfers in porous media. In chapter 4, using the thermodynamical relations of irreversible processes described in chapter 2, a new type of macroscopic model allowing to describe the overall phenomena analyzed is developed. The numerical method used to solve this new system of equations is precised. Finally, chapter 5 proposes a set of cases for the validation of the uncoupled phenomena and some qualitative examples of modeling of coupled phenomena. (J.S.)

  1. Goldstone-Boson Dynamics for Constituent Quarks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plessas, W.

    2003-07-01

    We address some essential features of the Goldstone-boson-exchange constituent quark model. Starting from its background we discuss the motivation for its construction and show its performance in light and strange baryon spectroscopy. Then we quote results from first applications of this type of constituent quark model in covariant calculations of electroweak nucleon form factors.

  2. Collecting and Analyzing Stakeholder Feedback for Signing at Complex Interchanges

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this project was to identify design constraints related to signing, markings, and geometry for complex interchanges, and then to identify useful topics for future research that will yield findings that can address those design issues. ...

  3. Good Security Practices for Electronic Commerce, Including Electronic Data Interchange

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Saltman, Roy

    1993-01-01

    Electronic commerce (EC) is the use of documents in electronic form, rather than paper, for carrying out functions of business or government that require interchange of information, obligations, or monetary value between organizations...

  4. Towards harmonized data interchange in food consumption data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pakkala, H.; Christensen, Tue; Presser, K.

    2014-01-01

    Food consumption data are collected and used in several fields of science. The data are often combined from various sources and interchanged between different systems. There is, however, no harmonized and widely used data interchange format. In addition, food consumption data are often combined w...... interchange format for food consumption based on work and experiences related to food composition.The aim is that the data interchange format will provide a basis for wider harmonization in the future.......Food consumption data are collected and used in several fields of science. The data are often combined from various sources and interchanged between different systems. There is, however, no harmonized and widely used data interchange format. In addition, food consumption data are often combined...... with other data such as food composition data. In the field of food composition, successful harmonization has recently been achieved by the European Food Information Resource Network, which is now the basis of a standard draft by the European Committee for Standardization. We present an XML-based data...

  5. Regression models to estimate real-time concentrations of selected constituents in two tributaries to Lake Houston near Houston, Texas, 2005-07

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oden, Timothy D.; Asquith, William H.; Milburn, Matthew S.

    2009-01-01

    In December 2005, the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the City of Houston, Texas, began collecting discrete water-quality samples for nutrients, total organic carbon, bacteria (total coliform and Escherichia coli), atrazine, and suspended sediment at two U.S. Geological Survey streamflow-gaging stations upstream from Lake Houston near Houston (08068500 Spring Creek near Spring, Texas, and 08070200 East Fork San Jacinto River near New Caney, Texas). The data from the discrete water-quality samples collected during 2005-07, in conjunction with monitored real-time data already being collected - physical properties (specific conductance, pH, water temperature, turbidity, and dissolved oxygen), streamflow, and rainfall - were used to develop regression models for predicting water-quality constituent concentrations for inflows to Lake Houston. Rainfall data were obtained from a rain gage monitored by Harris County Homeland Security and Emergency Management and colocated with the Spring Creek station. The leaps and bounds algorithm was used to find the best subsets of possible regression models (minimum residual sum of squares for a given number of variables). The potential explanatory or predictive variables included discharge (streamflow), specific conductance, pH, water temperature, turbidity, dissolved oxygen, rainfall, and time (to account for seasonal variations inherent in some water-quality data). The response variables at each site were nitrite plus nitrate nitrogen, total phosphorus, organic carbon, Escherichia coli, atrazine, and suspended sediment. The explanatory variables provide easily measured quantities as a means to estimate concentrations of the various constituents under investigation, with accompanying estimates of measurement uncertainty. Each regression equation can be used to estimate concentrations of a given constituent in real time. In conjunction with estimated concentrations, constituent loads were estimated by multiplying the

  6. Using a latent variable model with non-constant factor loadings to examine PM2.5 constituents related to secondary inorganic aerosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhenzhen; O'Neill, Marie S; Sánchez, Brisa N

    2016-04-01

    Factor analysis is a commonly used method of modelling correlated multivariate exposure data. Typically, the measurement model is assumed to have constant factor loadings. However, from our preliminary analyses of the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) PM 2.5 fine speciation data, we have observed that the factor loadings for four constituents change considerably in stratified analyses. Since invariance of factor loadings is a prerequisite for valid comparison of the underlying latent variables, we propose a factor model that includes non-constant factor loadings that change over time and space using P-spline penalized with the generalized cross-validation (GCV) criterion. The model is implemented using the Expectation-Maximization (EM) algorithm and we select the multiple spline smoothing parameters by minimizing the GCV criterion with Newton's method during each iteration of the EM algorithm. The algorithm is applied to a one-factor model that includes four constituents. Through bootstrap confidence bands, we find that the factor loading for total nitrate changes across seasons and geographic regions.

  7. Multi-Scale Analysis for Characterizing Near-Field Constituent Concentrations in the Context of a Macro-Scale Semi-Lagrangian Numerical Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yearsley, J. R.

    2017-12-01

    The semi-Lagrangian numerical scheme employed by RBM, a model for simulating time-dependent, one-dimensional water quality constituents in advection-dominated rivers, is highly scalable both in time and space. Although the model has been used at length scales of 150 meters and time scales of three hours, the majority of applications have been at length scales of 1/16th degree latitude/longitude (about 5 km) or greater and time scales of one day. Applications of the method at these scales has proven successful for characterizing the impacts of climate change on water temperatures in global rivers and on the vulnerability of thermoelectric power plants to changes in cooling water temperatures in large river systems. However, local effects can be very important in terms of ecosystem impacts, particularly in the case of developing mixing zones for wastewater discharges with pollutant loadings limited by regulations imposed by the Federal Water Pollution Control Act (FWPCA). Mixing zone analyses have usually been decoupled from large-scale watershed influences by developing scenarios that represent critical scenarios for external processes associated with streamflow and weather conditions . By taking advantage of the particle-tracking characteristics of the numerical scheme, RBM can provide results at any point in time within the model domain. We develop a proof of concept for locations in the river network where local impacts such as mixing zones may be important. Simulated results from the semi-Lagrangian numerical scheme are treated as input to a finite difference model of the two-dimensional diffusion equation for water quality constituents such as water temperature or toxic substances. Simulations will provide time-dependent, two-dimensional constituent concentration in the near-field in response to long-term basin-wide processes. These results could provide decision support to water quality managers for evaluating mixing zone characteristics.

  8. The influence of finite Larmor radius effects on the radial interchange motions of plasma filaments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jens; Garcia, Odd E.; Larsen, Jeppe Stærk

    2011-01-01

    The influence of finite Larmor radius (FLR) effects on the perpendicular convection of isolated particle density filaments driven by interchange motions in magnetized plasmas is investigated using a two-moment gyrofluid model. By means of numerical simulations on a two-dimensional, bi-periodic do......The influence of finite Larmor radius (FLR) effects on the perpendicular convection of isolated particle density filaments driven by interchange motions in magnetized plasmas is investigated using a two-moment gyrofluid model. By means of numerical simulations on a two-dimensional, bi......-periodic domain perpendicular to the magnetic field, it is demonstrated that the radial velocities of the blob-like filaments are roughly described by the inertial scaling, which prescribes a velocity proportional to the square root of the summed electron and ion pressures times the square root of the blob width...

  9. Suppression of nonlinear frequency-sweeping of resonant interchange modes in a magnetic dipole with applied radio frequency fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maslovsky, D.; Levitt, B.; Mauel, M. E.

    2003-01-01

    Interchange instabilities excited by energetic electrons trapped by a magnetic dipole nonlinearly saturate and exhibit complex, coherent spectral characteristics and frequency sweeping [H. P. Warren and M. E. Mauel, Phys. Plasmas 2, 4185 (1995)]. When monochromatic radio frequency (rf) fields are applied in the range of 100-1000 MHz, the saturation behavior of the interchange instability changes dramatically. For applied fields of sufficient intensity and pulse-length, coherent interchange fluctuations are suppressed and frequency sweeping is eliminated. When rf fields are switched off, coherent frequency sweeping reappears. Since low frequency interchange instabilities preserve the electron's first and second adiabatic invariants, these observations can be interpreted as resulting from nonlinear resonant wave-particle interactions described within a particle phase-space, (ψ,φ), comprised of the third adiabatic invariant and the azimuthal angle. Self-consistent numerical simulation is used to study (1) the nonlinear development of the instability, (2) the radial mode structure of the interchange instability, and (3) the suppression of frequency sweeping. When the applied rf heating is modeled as an 'rf collisionality', the simulation reproduces frequency sweeping suppression and suggests an explanation for the observations that is consistent with Berk and co-workers [H. L. Berk et al., Phys. Plasmas 6, 3102 (1999)

  10. Nonlinear simulation of electromagnetic current diffusive interchange mode turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yagi, M.; Itoh, S.I.; Fukuyama, A.

    1998-01-01

    The anomalous transport in toroidal plasmas has been investigated extensively. It is pointed out that the nonlinear instability is important in driving the microturbulence[1], i.e., the self-sustained plasma turbulence. This concept is explained as follows; when the electron motion along the magnetic field line is resisted by the background turbulence, it gives rise to the effective resistivity and enhances the level of the turbulence. The nonlinear simulation of the electrostatic current diffusive interchange mode (CDIM) in the two dimensional sheared slab geometry has been performed as an example. The occurrence of the nonlinear instability and the self-sustainment of the plasma turbulence were confirmed by this simulation[2]. On the other hand, the electromagnetic turbulence is sustained in the high pressure limit. The possibility of the self-organization with more variety has been pointed out[3]. It is important to study the electromagnetic turbulence based on the nonlinear simulation. In this paper, the model equation for the electrostatic CDIM turbulence[2] is extended for both electrostatic and electromagnetic turbulence. (1) Not only E x B convective nonlinearity but also the electromagnetic nonlinearity which is related to the parallel flow are incorporated into the model equation. (2) The electron and ion pressure evolution equations are solved separately, making it possible to distinguish the electron and ion thermal diffusivities. The two dimensional nonlinear simulation of the electromagnetic CDIM is performed based on the extended fluid model. This paper is organized as follows. The model equation is explained in section II. The result of simulation is shown in section III. The conclusion and discussion are given in section IV. (author)

  11. Lowest-lying even-parity anti B{sub s} mesons: heavy-quark spin-flavor symmetry, chiral dynamics, and constituent quark-model bare masses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albaladejo, M.; Fernandez-Soler, P.; Nieves, J.; Ortega, P.G. [Centro Mixto CSIC-Universidad de Valencia, Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular (IFIC), Institutos de Investigacion de Paterna, Aptd. 22085, Valencia (Spain)

    2017-03-15

    The discovery of the D{sup *}{sub s0}(2317) and D{sub s1}(2460) resonances in the charmed-strange meson spectra revealed that formerly successful constituent quark models lose predictability in the vicinity of two-meson thresholds. The emergence of non-negligible effects due to meson loops requires an explicit evaluation of the interplay between Q anti q and (Q anti q)(q anti q) Fock components. In contrast to the c anti s sector, there is no experimental evidence of J{sup P} = 0{sup +}, 1{sup +} bottom-strange states yet. Motivated by recent lattice studies, in this work the heavy-quark partners of the D{sub s0}{sup *}(2317) and D{sub s1}(2460) states are analyzed within a heavy meson chiral unitary scheme. As a novelty, the coupling between the constituent quark-model P-wave anti B{sub s} scalar and axial mesons and the anti B{sup (*)}K channels is incorporated employing an effective interaction, consistent with heavy-quark spin symmetry, constrained by the lattice energy levels. (orig.)

  12. Nonlinear behavior of multiple-helicity resistive interchange modes near marginally stable states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugama, Hideo; Nakajima, Noriyoshi; Wakatani, Masahiro.

    1991-05-01

    Nonlinear behavior of resistive interchange modes near marginally stable states is theoretically studied under the multiple-helicity condition. Reduced fluid equations in the sheared slab configuration are used in order to treat a local transport problem. With the use of the invariance property of local reduced fluid model equations under a transformation between the modes with different rational surfaces, weakly nonlinear theories for single-helicity modes by Hamaguchi and Nakajima are extended to the multiple-helicity case and applied to the resistive interchange modes. We derive the nonlinear amplitude equations of the multiple-helicity modes, from which the convective transport in the saturated state is obtained. It is shown how the convective transport is enhanced by nonlinear interaction between modes with different rational surfaces compared with the single-helicity case. We confirm that theoretical results are in good agreement with direct numerical simulations. (author)

  13. Nuclear medicine image and data interchange through e-mail

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyra, M; Skouroliakou, K; Perris, A; Georgossopoulos, C; Pappas, D [Radiology Department, Athens University, Athens (Greece); Stefanides, C [Pediatric Hospital, Aglaia Kyriakou, Athens (Greece)

    1999-12-31

    Prosperity of easy interchange in every day practice of Nuclear Medicine found its application through the INTERNET media. We use a simple and safe way to interchange images and diagnostic information between the scintigraphic acquisition and processing location and the clinical department in order to improve patient`s health care and young doctor`s education. images and patient reports are transferred and saved through dedicated software to a workstation that transforms y-camera scintigraphic images in a PC readable format. Diagnosis reports and scintigraphic images are incorporated to a database directory in hypertext form. Usual WWW connection gives the possibility of patients` examinations transfer by email attachments as well as interchange of relative comments towards both directions. Cost effective solution has been achieved using standard hard- and soft-ware. Furthermore, both educational files can be downloaded from our department ftp location, by a unique password. (authors) 7 refs., 3 figs.

  14. Nuclear medicine image and data interchange through e-mail

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyra, M.; Skouroliakou, K.; Perris, A.; Georgossopoulos, C.; Pappas, D.; Stefanides, C.

    1998-01-01

    Prosperity of easy interchange in every day practice of Nuclear Medicine found its application through the INTERNET media. We use a simple and safe way to interchange images and diagnostic information between the scintigraphic acquisition and processing location and the clinical department in order to improve patient's health care and young doctor's education. images and patient reports are transferred and saved through dedicated software to a workstation that transforms y-camera scintigraphic images in a PC readable format. Diagnosis reports and scintigraphic images are incorporated to a database directory in hypertext form. Usual WWW connection gives the possibility of patients' examinations transfer by email attachments as well as interchange of relative comments towards both directions. Cost effective solution has been achieved using standard hard- and soft-ware. Furthermore, both educational files can be downloaded from our department ftp location, by a unique password. (authors)

  15. Induced interchange heterozygosity in Sesbania aegyptiaca (poir. ) pers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zadoo, S.N.

    1987-03-01

    Three plants with reciprocal translocation of chromosomes were isolated from M/sub 1/ progeny of Sesbania aegyptiaca (Poir.) Pers., after treating the dry seeds with 10, 20, 30, 40 and 45 K rad doses of gamma rays. The cytological observation of these plants revealed that in each case a reciprocal interchange involving two non-homologous chromosomes has taken place. The plants have been studied for their meiotic behaviour, with particular reference to type and frequency of multiple associations, mode of orientation of interchange multiple at metaphase-I, disjunction at anaphase-I, and chiasma frequency. The consequences of these factors vis-a-vis the fertility has been discussed.

  16. Possible D{sup (*)} anti D{sup (*)} and B{sup (*)} anti B{sup (*)} molecular states in the extended constituent quark models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, You-Chang [Nanjing University, Department of Physics, Nanjing (China); Zunyi Normal University, School of Physics and Electronic Science, Zunyi (China); Institute of Theoretical Physics, CAS, State Key Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Beijing (China); Tan, Zhi-Yun [Zunyi Normal University, School of Physics and Electronic Science, Zunyi (China); Ping, Jialun [Nanjing Normal University, Department of Physics, Nanjing (China); Zong, Hong-Shi [Nanjing University, Department of Physics, Nanjing (China); Institute of Theoretical Physics, CAS, State Key Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Beijing (China)

    2017-09-15

    The possible neutral D{sup (*)} anti D{sup (*)} and B{sup (*)} anti B{sup (*)} molecular states are studied in the framework of the constituent quark models, which is extended by including the s-channel one-gluon exchange. Using different types of quark-quark potentials, we solve the four-body Schroedinger equation by means of the Gaussian expansion method. The bound states of D{sup (*)} anti D{sup (*)} with J{sup PC} = 1{sup ++}, 2{sup ++} and B{sup (*)} anti B{sup (*)} with J{sup PC} = 0{sup ++}, 1{sup +-}, 1{sup ++}, 2{sup ++} are obtained. The molecular states D* anti D with J{sup PC} = 1{sup ++} and B* anti B with J{sup PC} = 1{sup +-} are good candidates for X(3872) and Z{sup 0}{sub b}(10610), respectively. The dependence of the results on the model parameters is also discussed. (orig.)

  17. Development of multi-component diesel surrogate fuel models – Part I: Validation of reduced mechanisms of diesel fuel constituents in 0-D kinetic simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poon, Hiew Mun; Pang, Kar Mun; Ng, Hoon Kiat

    2016-01-01

    In the present work, development and validation of reduced chemical kinetic mechanisms for several different hydrocarbons are performed. These hydrocarbons are potential representative for practical diesel fuel constituents. n-Hexadecane (HXN), 2,2,4,4,6,8,8-heptamethylnonane (HMN), cyclohexane...... (CHX) and toluene are selected to represent straight-alkane, branched-alkane, cyclo-alkane and aromatic compounds in the diesel fuel. A five-stage chemical kinetic mechanism reduction scheme formulated in the previous work is applied to develop the reduced HMN and CHX models based on their respective...... detailed mechanisms. Alongside with the development of the reduced CHX model, a skeletal toluene sub-mechanism is constructed since the elementary reactions for toluene are subset of the detailed CHX mechanism. The final reduced HMN mechanism comprises 89 species with 319 elementary reactions, while...

  18. Interchange Slip-Running Reconnection and Sweeping SEP-Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masson, S.; Aulanier, G.; Pariat, E.; Klein, K.-L.

    2011-01-01

    We present a new model to explain how particles, accelerated at a reconnection site that is not magnetically connected to the Earth, could eventually propagate along the well-connected open flux tube. Our model is based on the results of a low-beta resistive magnetohydrodynamics simulation of a three-dimensional line-tied and initially current-free bipole, that is embedded in a non-uniform open potential field. The topology of this configuration is that of an asymmetric coronal null-point, with a closed fan surface and an open outer spine. When driven by slow photospheric shearing motions, field lines, initially fully anchored below the fan dome, reconnect at the null point, and jump to the open magnetic domain. This is the standard interchange mode as sketched and calculated in 2D. The key result in 3D is that, reconnected open field lines located in the vicinity of the outer spine, keep reconnecting continuously, across an open quasi-separatrix layer, as previously identified for non-open-null-point reconnection. The apparent slipping motion of these field lines leads to form an extended narrow magnetic flux tube at high altitude. Because of the slip-running reconnection, we conjecture that if energetic particles would be travelling through, or be accelerated inside, the diffusion region, they would be successively injected along continuously reconnecting field lines that are connected farther and farther from the spine. At the scale of the full Sun, owing to the super-radial expansion of field lines below 3 solar radius, such energetic particles could easily be injected in field lines slipping over significant distances, and could eventually reach the distant flux tube that is well-connected to the Earth.

  19. Antidiabetic Effects of Yam (Dioscorea batatas and Its Active Constituent, Allantoin, in a Rat Model of Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyeon-Kyu Go

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate the therapeutic efficacies of crude yam (Dioscorea batatas powder (PY, water extract of yam (EY, and allantoin (the active constituent of yam in streptozotocin (STZ-induced diabetic rats with respect to glucose, insulin, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1, C-peptide, glycated hemoglobin (HbAlc, lipid metabolism, and oxidative stress. For this purpose, 50 rats were divided into five groups: normal control (NC, diabetic control (STZ, and STZ plus treatment groups (STZ + PY, STZ + EY, and STZ + allantoin. After treatment for one-month, there was a decrease in blood glucose: 385 ± 7 in STZ, 231 ± 3 in STZ + PY, 214 ± 11 in STZ + EY, and 243 ± 6 mg/dL in STZ + allantoin, respectively. There were significant statistical differences (p < 0.001 compared to STZ (100%: 60% in STZ + PY, 55% in STZ + EY, and 63% in STZ + allantoin. With groups in the same order, there were significant decreases (p < 0.001 in HbAlc (100% as 24.4 ± 0.6 ng/mL, 78%, 75%, and 77%, total cholesterol (100% as 122 ± 3 mg/dL, 70%, 67%, and 69%, and low-density lipoprotein (100% as 29 ± 1 mg/dL, 45%, 48%, and 38%. There were also significant increases (p < 0.001 in insulin (100% as 0.22 ± 0.00 ng/mL, 173%, 209%, and 177%, GLP-1 (100% as 18.4 ± 0.7 pmol/mL, 160%, 166%, and 162%, and C-peptide (100% as 2.56 ± 0.10 ng/mL, 129%, 132%, and 130%. The treatment effectively ameliorated antioxidant stress as shown by a significant decrease (p < 0.001 in malondialdehyde (100% as 7.25 ± 0.11 nmol/mL, 87%, 86%, and 85% together with increases (p < 0.01 in superoxide dismutase (100% as 167 ± 6 IU/mL, 147%, 159%, and 145% and reduced glutathione (100% as 167 ± 6 nmol/mL, 123%, 141%, and 140%. The results indicate that yam and allantoin have antidiabetic effects by modulating antioxidant activities, lipid profiles and by promoting the release of GLP-1, thereby improving the function of β-cells maintaining normal insulin and glucose levels.

  20. Electronic Data Interchange (EDI) for Libraries and Publishers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santosuosso, Joe

    1992-01-01

    Defines electronic data interchange (EDI) as the exchange of data between computer systems without human intervention or interpretation. Standards are discussed; and the implementation of EDI in libraries and the serials publishing community in the areas of orders and acquisitions, claims, and invoice processing is described. (LRW)

  1. CEN MetaLex: Facilitating Interchange in e-Government

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, A.; Winkels, R.

    2011-01-01

    MetaLex is a generic and extensible interchange framework for the XML encoding of the structure of, and metadata about, documents that function as a source of law. It aims to be jurisdiction and language-neutral, and is based on modern XML publishing concepts like a strict separation between text,

  2. Resinous constituent extracting process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sayer, W F

    1947-10-07

    The method of recovering oily constituents from coal or oil shale comprising the saturation of coal or oil shale in a sealed vessel with an organic solution having a boiling point at atmospheric pressure of not exceeding 220/sup 0/C, elevating the temperature within the vessel to a temperature below the cracking temperature of the constituents and maintaining the pressure within the vessel below 51 pounds, to extract the oily material from the coal or oil shale and subsequently separating the solvent from the oily material.

  3. Second NASA Technical Interchange Meeting (TIM): Advanced Technology Lifecycle Analysis System (ATLAS) Technology Tool Box (TTB)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ONeil, D. A.; Mankins, J. C.; Christensen, C. B.; Gresham, E. C.

    2005-01-01

    The Advanced Technology Lifecycle Analysis System (ATLAS), a spreadsheet analysis tool suite, applies parametric equations for sizing and lifecycle cost estimation. Performance, operation, and programmatic data used by the equations come from a Technology Tool Box (TTB) database. In this second TTB Technical Interchange Meeting (TIM), technologists, system model developers, and architecture analysts discussed methods for modeling technology decisions in spreadsheet models, identified specific technology parameters, and defined detailed development requirements. This Conference Publication captures the consensus of the discussions and provides narrative explanations of the tool suite, the database, and applications of ATLAS within NASA s changing environment.

  4. Estimation of Constituent Concentrations, Loads, and Yields in Streams of Johnson County, Northeast Kansas, Using Continuous Water-Quality Monitoring and Regression Models, October 2002 through December 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Teresa J.; Lee, Casey J.; Ziegler, Andrew C.

    2008-01-01

    Johnson County is one of the most rapidly developing counties in Kansas. Population growth and expanding urban land use affect the quality of county streams, which are important for human and environmental health, water supply, recreation, and aesthetic value. This report describes estimates of streamflow and constituent concentrations, loads, and yields in relation to watershed characteristics in five Johnson County streams using continuous in-stream sensor measurements. Specific conductance, pH, water temperature, turbidity, and dissolved oxygen were monitored in five watersheds from October 2002 through December 2006. These continuous data were used in conjunction with discrete water samples to develop regression models for continuously estimating concentrations of other constituents. Continuous regression-based concentrations were estimated for suspended sediment, total suspended solids, dissolved solids and selected major ions, nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorus species), and fecal-indicator bacteria. Continuous daily, monthly, seasonal, and annual loads were calculated from concentration estimates and streamflow. The data are used to describe differences in concentrations, loads, and yields and to explain these differences relative to watershed characteristics. Water quality at the five monitoring sites varied according to hydrologic conditions; contributing drainage area; land use (including degree of urbanization); relative contributions from point and nonpoint constituent sources; and human activity within each watershed. Dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations were less than the Kansas aquatic-life-support criterion of 5.0 mg/L less than 10 percent of the time at all sites except Indian Creek, which had DO concentrations less than the criterion about 15 percent of the time. Concentrations of suspended sediment, chloride (winter only), indicator bacteria, and pesticides were substantially larger during periods of increased streamflow. Suspended

  5. Nuclei with exotic constituents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, Toshimitsu.

    1990-08-01

    We discuss various interesting features in the behavior of exotic constituents of nuclei such as hyperons and mesons, in particular, with emphases on the aspect of exotic halos which are formed in general by short-range repulsion and long-range attraction. Specifically, Λ and Σ hypernuclei and pionic nuclei are discussed. (author)

  6. Constituents of Chondria armata

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Govenkar, M.B.; Wahidullah, S.

    A novel long chain fatty ester, pentyl hentriacontanoate 1 and an orange red pigment, caulerpin 2 have been isolated and characterised from a red alga Chondria armata. The pigment caulerpin hitherto known to be a constituent of green algae of genus...

  7. Apparatus, System and Method for Fast Detection of Genetic Information by PCR in an Interchangeable Chip

    KAUST Repository

    Wen, Weijia; Wu, Jinbo; Kodzius, Rimantas

    2011-01-01

    A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) device for fast amplification and detection of DNA includes an interchangeable PCR chamber, a temperature control component, and an optical detection system. The DNA amplification is performed on an interchangeable

  8. NASA Technical Interchange Meeting (TIM): Advanced Technology Lifecycle Analysis System (ATLAS) Technology Tool Box

    Science.gov (United States)

    ONeil, D. A.; Craig, D. A.; Christensen, C. B.; Gresham, E. C.

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this Technical Interchange Meeting was to increase the quantity and quality of technical, cost, and programmatic data used to model the impact of investing in different technologies. The focus of this meeting was the Technology Tool Box (TTB), a database of performance, operations, and programmatic parameters provided by technologists and used by systems engineers. The TTB is the data repository used by a system of models known as the Advanced Technology Lifecycle Analysis System (ATLAS). This report describes the result of the November meeting, and also provides background information on ATLAS and the TTB.

  9. Identification of nevadensin as an important herb-based constituent inhibiting estragole bioactivation and physiology-based biokinetic modeling of its possible in vivo effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alhusainy, W.; Paini, A.; Punt, A.; Louisse, J.; Spenkelink, A.; Vervoort, J.; Delatour, T.; Scholz, G.; Schilter, B.; Adams, T.; Bladeren, P.J. van; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.

    2010-01-01

    Estragole is a natural constituent of several herbs and spices including sweet basil. In rodent bioassays, estragole induces hepatomas, an effect ascribed to estragole bioactivation to 1'-sulfooxyestragole resulting in DNA adduct formation. The present paper identifies nevadensin as a basil constituent able to inhibit DNA adduct formation in rat hepatocytes exposed to the proximate carcinogen 1'-hydroxyestragole and nevadensin. This inhibition occurs at the level of sulfotransferase (SULT)-mediated bioactivation of 1'-hydroxyestragole. The Ki for SULT inhibition by nevadensin was 4 nM in male rat and human liver fractions. Furthermore, nevadensin up to 20 μM did not inhibit 1'-hydroxyestragole detoxification by glucuronidation and oxidation. The inhibition of SULT by nevadensin was incorporated into the recently developed physiologically based biokinetic (PBBK) rat and human models for estragole bioactivation and detoxification. The results predict that co-administration of estragole at a level inducing hepatic tumors in vivo (50 mg/kg bw) with nevadensin at a molar ratio of 0.06, representing the ratio of their occurrence in basil, results in almost 100% inhibition of the ultimate carcinogen 1'-sulfooxyestragole when assuming 100% uptake of nevadensin. Assuming 1% uptake, inhibition would still amount to more than 83%. Altogether these data point at a nevadensin-mediated inhibition of the formation of the ultimate carcinogenic metabolite of estragole, without reducing the capacity to detoxify 1'-hydroxyestragole via glucuronidation or oxidation. These data also point at a potential reduction of the cancer risk when estragole exposure occurs within a food matrix containing SULT inhibitors compared to what is observed upon exposure to pure estragole.

  10. multi-scale data assimilation approaches and error characterisation applied to the inverse modelling of atmospheric constituent emission fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koohkan, Mohammad Reza

    2012-01-01

    Data assimilation in geophysical sciences aims at optimally estimating the state of the system or some parameters of the system's physical model. To do so, data assimilation needs three types of information: observations and background information, a physical/numerical model, and some statistical description that prescribes uncertainties to each component of the system. In my dissertation, new methodologies of data assimilation are used in atmospheric chemistry and physics: the joint use of a 4D-Var with a sub-grid statistical model to consistently account for representativeness errors, accounting for multiple scale in the BLUE estimation principle, and a better estimation of prior errors using objective estimation of hyper-parameters. These three approaches will be specifically applied to inverse modelling problems focusing on the emission fields of tracers or pollutants. First, in order to estimate the emission inventories of carbon monoxide over France, in-situ stations which are impacted by the representativeness errors are used. A sub-grid model is introduced and coupled with a 4D-Var to reduce the representativeness error. Indeed, the results of inverse modelling showed that the 4D-Var routine was not fit to handle the representativeness issues. The coupled data assimilation system led to a much better representation of the CO concentration variability, with a significant improvement of statistical indicators, and more consistent estimation of the CO emission inventory. Second, the evaluation of the potential of the IMS (International Monitoring System) radionuclide network is performed for the inversion of an accidental source. In order to assess the performance of the global network, a multi-scale adaptive grid is optimised using a criterion based on degrees of freedom for the signal (DFS). The results show that several specific regions remain poorly observed by the IMS network. Finally, the inversion of the surface fluxes of Volatile Organic Compounds

  11. 32 CFR 644.409 - Procedures for Interchange of National Forest Lands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Procedures for Interchange of National Forest... Interests § 644.409 Procedures for Interchange of National Forest Lands. (a) General. The interchange of national forest lands is accomplished in three steps: first, agreement must be reached between the two...

  12. AXAF FITS standard for ray trace interchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Paul F.

    1993-07-01

    A standard data format for the archival and transport of x-ray events generated by ray trace models is described. Upon review and acceptance by the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF) Software Systems Working Group (SSWG), this standard shall become the official AXAF data format for ray trace events. The Flexible Image Transport System (FITS) is well suited for the purposes of the standard and was selected to be the basis of the standard. FITS is both flexible and efficient and is also widely used within the astronomical community for storage and transfer of data. In addition, software to read and write FITS format files are widely available. In selecting quantities to be included within the ray trace standard, the AXAF Mission Support team, Science Instruments team, and the other contractor teams were surveyed. From the results of this survey, the following requirements were established: (1) for the scientific needs, each photon should have associated with it: position, direction, energy, and statistical weight; the standard must also accommodate path length (relative phase), and polarization. (2) a unique photon identifier is necessary for bookkeeping purposes; (3) a log of individuals, organizations, and software packages that have modified the data must be maintained in order to create an audit trail; (4) a mechanism for extensions to the basic kernel should be provided; and (5) the ray trace standard should integrate with future AXAF data product standards.

  13. Chemical constituents of Asparagus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negi, J. S.; Singh, P.; Joshi, G. P.; Rawat, M. S.; Bisht, V. K.

    2010-01-01

    Asparagus species (family Liliaceae) are medicinal plants of temperate Himalayas. They possess a variety of biological properties, such as being antioxidants, immunostimulants, anti-inflammatory, antihepatotoxic, antibacterial, antioxytocic, and reproductive agents. The article briefly reviews the isolated chemical constituents and the biological activities of the plant species. The structural formula of isolated compounds and their distribution in the species studied are also given. PMID:22228964

  14. Inorganic Constituents in Coal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rađenović A.

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Coal contains not only organic matter but also small amounts of inorganic constituents. More thanone hundred different minerals and virtually every element in the periodic table have been foundin coal. Commonly found group minerals in coal are: major (quartz, pyrite, clays and carbonates,minor, and trace minerals. Coal includes a lot of elements of low mass fraction of the orderof w=0.01 or 0.001 %. They are trace elements connected with organic matter or minerals comprisedin coal. The fractions of trace elements usually decrease when the rank of coal increases.Fractions of the inorganic elements are different, depending on the coal bed and basin. A varietyof analytical methods and techniques can be used to determine the mass fractions, mode ofoccurrence, and distribution of organic constituents in coal. There are many different instrumentalmethods for analysis of coal and coal products but atomic absorption spectroscopy – AAS is theone most commonly used. Fraction and mode of occurrence are one of the main factors that haveinfluence on transformation and separation of inorganic constituents during coal conversion.Coal, as an important world energy source and component for non-fuels usage, will be continuouslyand widely used in the future due to its relatively abundant reserves. However, there is aconflict between the requirements for increased use of coal on the one hand and less pollution onthe other. It’s known that the environmental impacts, due to either coal mining or coal usage, canbe: air, water and land pollution. Although, minor components, inorganic constituents can exert asignificant influence on the economic value, utilization, and environmental impact of the coal.

  15. Reload pattern optimization by application of multiple cyclic interchange algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geemert, R. van; Quist, A.J.; Hoogenboom, J.E. [Technische Univ. Delft (Netherlands)

    1996-09-01

    Reload pattern optimization procedures are proposed which are based on the multiple cyclic interchange approach, according to which the search for the reload pattern associated with the highest objective function value can be thought of as divided in multiple stages. The transition from the initial to the final stage is characterized by an increase in the degree of locality of the search procedure. The general idea is that, during the first stages, the `elite` cluster containing the group of best patterns must be located, after which the solution space is sampled in a more and more local sense to find the local optimum in this cluster. The transition(s) from global search behaviour to local search behaviour can be either prompt, by defining strictly separate search regimes, or gradual by introducing stochastic tests for the number of fuel bundles involved in a cyclic interchange. Equilibrium cycle optimization results are reported for a test PWR reactor core of modest size. (author)

  16. Reload pattern optimization by application of multiple cyclic interchange algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geemert, R. van; Quist, A.J.; Hoogenboom, J.E.

    1996-01-01

    Reload pattern optimization procedures are proposed which are based on the multiple cyclic interchange approach, according to which the search for the reload pattern associated with the highest objective function value can be thought of as divided in multiple stages. The transition from the initial to the final stage is characterized by an increase in the degree of locality of the search procedure. The general idea is that, during the first stages, the 'elite' cluster containing the group of best patterns must be located, after which the solution space is sampled in a more and more local sense to find the local optimum in this cluster. The transition(s) from global search behaviour to local search behaviour can be either prompt, by defining strictly separate search regimes, or gradual by introducing stochastic tests for the number of fuel bundles involved in a cyclic interchange. Equilibrium cycle optimization results are reported for a test PWR reactor core of modest size. (author)

  17. XAFS Data Interchange: A single spectrum XAFS data file format

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravel, B.; Newville, M.

    2016-01-01

    We propose a standard data format for the interchange of XAFS data. The XAFS Data Interchange (XDI) standard is meant to encapsulate a single spectrum of XAFS along with relevant metadata. XDI is a text-based format with a simple syntax which clearly delineates metadata from the data table in a way that is easily interpreted both by a computer and by a human. The metadata header is inspired by the format of an electronic mail header, representing metadata names and values as an associative array. The data table is represented as columns of numbers. This format can be imported as is into most existing XAFS data analysis, spreadsheet, or data visualization programs. Along with a specification and a dictionary of metadata types, we provide an application-programming interface written in C and bindings for programming dynamic languages. (paper)

  18. A pseudo-Voigt component model for high-resolution recovery of constituent spectra in Raman spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alstrøm, Tommy Sonne; Schmidt, Mikkel Nørgaard; Rindzevicius, Tomas

    2017-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a well-known analytical technique for identifying and analyzing chemical species. Since Raman scattering is a weak effect, surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is often employed to amplify the signal. SERS signal surface mapping is a common method for detecting trace...... to directly and reliably identify the Raman modes, with overall performance similar to the state of the art non-negative matrix factorization approach. However, the model provides better interpretation and is a step towards enabling the use of SERS in detection of trace amounts of molecules in real-life...

  19. Nonlinear growth of the quasi-interchange instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waelbroeck, F.L.

    1988-07-01

    In this paper nonlinear effects on the growth of a pressure-driven, interchange-like mode are investigated. This mode is thought to be responsible for the sawtooth crashes observed in JET and successfully accounts for most of their features. The analysis presented here differs from previous bifurcation calculations by the inclusion of toroidal coupling effects. Toroidal curvature, which is important for pressure-driven modes, destroys the helical symmetry which is typical of kink-like instabilities. 14 refs., 3 figs

  20. Towards Building a Uniform Cloud Database Representation for Data Interchange

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreica Alina

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper proposes design principles for data representation and simplification in order to design cloud services for data exchange between various information systems. We use equivalence algorithms and canonical representation in the cloud database. The solution we describe brings important advantages in organizational / entity communication and cooperation, with important societal benefits and can be provided within cloud architectures. The generic design principles we apply bring important advantages in the design of the interchange services.

  1. Theory of semicollisional drift-interchange modes in cylindrical plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahm, T.S.; Chen, L.

    1985-01-01

    Resistive interchange instabilities in cylindrical plasmas are studied, including the effects of electron diamagnetic drift, perpendicular resistivity, and plasma compression. The analyses are pertinent to the semicollisional regime where the effective ion gyro-radius is larger than the resistive layer width. Both analytical and numerical results show that the modes can be completely stabilized by the perpendicular plasma transport. Ion sound effects, meanwhile, are found to be negligible in the semicollisional regime

  2. Electronic data interchange in the Canadian natural gas industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheinfield, J.

    1995-01-01

    The concept of electronic data interchange (EDI) in the gas industry was discussed. EDI as a champion of costumer service and as a powerful management tool was defined, and the process of electronic information transfer was explained. EDI was then placed in the context of the business process, and its benefits in providing efficient service and product improvement were enumerated. North American Gas EDI standards, and industry initiatives were explored in detail

  3. An O([Formula: see text]) algorithm for sorting signed genomes by reversals, transpositions, transreversals and block-interchanges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shuzhi; Hao, Fanchang; Leong, Hon Wai

    2016-02-01

    We consider the problem of sorting signed permutations by reversals, transpositions, transreversals, and block-interchanges. The problem arises in the study of species evolution via large-scale genome rearrangement operations. Recently, Hao et al. gave a 2-approximation scheme called genome sorting by bridges (GSB) for solving this problem. Their result extended and unified the results of (i) He and Chen - a 2-approximation algorithm allowing reversals, transpositions, and block-interchanges (by also allowing transversals) and (ii) Hartman and Sharan - a 1.5-approximation algorithm allowing reversals, transpositions, and transversals (by also allowing block-interchanges). The GSB result is based on introduction of three bridge structures in the breakpoint graph, the L-bridge, T-bridge, and X-bridge that models goodreversal, transposition/transreversal, and block-interchange, respectively. However, the paper by Hao et al. focused on proving the 2-approximation GSB scheme and only mention a straightforward [Formula: see text] algorithm. In this paper, we give an [Formula: see text] algorithm for implementing the GSB scheme. The key idea behind our faster GSB algorithm is to represent cycles in the breakpoint graph by their canonical sequences, which greatly simplifies the search for these bridge structures. We also give some comparison results (running time and computed distances) against the original GSB implementation.

  4. Long-term behavior of the concentration of the minor constituents in the mesosphere – a model study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Grygalashvyly

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the influence the rising concentrations of methane, nitrous oxide and carbon dioxide which have occurred since the pre-industrial era, have had on the chemistry of the mesosphere. For this investigation we use our global 3-D-model COMMA-IAP which was designed for the exploration of the MLT-region and in particular the extended mesopause region. Assumptions and approximations for the trends in the Lyman-α flux (needed for the water vapor dissociation rate, methane and the water vapor mixing ratio at the hygropause are necessary to accomplish this study. To approximate the solar Lyman-α flux back to the pre-industrial time, we derived a quadratic fit using the sunspot number record which extends back to 1749 and is the only solar proxy available for the Lyman-α flux prior to 1947. We assume that methane increases with a constant growth rate from the pre-industrial era to the present. An unsolved problem for the model calculations consists of how the water vapor mixing ratio at the hygropause should be specified during this period. We assume that the hygropause was dryer during pre-industrial times than the present. As a consequence of methane oxidation, the model simulation indicates that the middle atmosphere has become more humid as a result of the rising methane concentration, but with some dependence on height and with a small time delay of few years. The solar influence on the water vapor mixing ratio is insignificant below about 80 km in summer high latitudes, but becomes increasingly more important above this altitude. The enhanced water vapor concentration increases the hydrogen radical concentration and reduces the mesospheric ozone. A second region of stronger ozone decrease is located in the vicinity of the stratopause. Increases in CO2 concentration enhance slightly the concentration of CO in the mesosphere. However, its influence upon the chemistry is small and its main effect is connected with a cooling

  5. Uncatalysed and potassium-catalysed pyrolysis of the cell-wall constituents of biomass and their model compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nowakowski, Daniel J.; Jones, Jenny M. [Energy and Resources Research Institute, School of Process, Environmental and Materials Engineering (SPEME), University of Leeds, Leeds, LS2 9JT (United Kingdom)

    2008-09-15

    Cell-wall components (cellulose, hemicellulose (oat spelt xylan), lignin (Organosolv)), and model compounds (levoglucosan (an intermediate product of cellulose decomposition) and chlorogenic acid (structurally similar to lignin polymer units)) have been investigated to probe in detail the influence of potassium on their pyrolysis behaviours as well as their uncatalysed decomposition reaction. Cellulose and lignin were pretreated to remove salts and metals by hydrochloric acid, and this dematerialized sample was impregnated with 1% of potassium as potassium acetate. Levoglucosan, xylan and chlorogenic acid were mixed with CH{sub 3}COOK to introduce 1% K. Characterisation was performed using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential thermal analysis (DTA). In addition to the TGA pyrolysis, pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (PY-GC-MS) analysis was introduced to examine reaction products. Potassium-catalysed pyrolysis has a huge influence on the char formation stage and increases the char yields considerably (from 7.7% for raw cellulose to 27.7% for potassium impregnated cellulose; from 5.7% for raw levoglucosan to 20.8% for levoglucosan with CH{sub 3}COOK added). Major changes in the pyrolytic decomposition pathways were observed for cellulose, levoglucosan and chlorogenic acid. The results for cellulose and levoglucosan are consistent with a base catalysed route in the presence of the potassium salt which promotes complete decomposition of glucosidic units by a heterolytic mechanism and favours its direct depolymerization and fragmentation to low molecular weight components (e.g. acetic acid, formic acid, glyoxal, hydroxyacetaldehyde and acetol). Base catalysed polymerization reactions increase the char yield. Potassium-catalysed lignin pyrolysis is very significant: the temperature of maximum conversion in pyrolysis shifts to lower temperature by 70 K and catalysed polymerization reactions increase the char yield from 37% to 51%. A similar trend

  6. Directory interchange format manual, version 3.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    The Directory Interchange Format (DIF) is a data structure used to exchange directory level information about data sets among information systems. The format consists of a number of fields that describe the attributes of a directory entry and text blocks that contain a descriptive summary of and references for the directory entry. All fields and the summary are preceded by labels identifying their contents. All values are ASCII character strings. The structure is intended to be flexible, allowing for future changes in the contents of directory entries.

  7. Collisionless interchange instability 1. Numerical simulations of intermediate-scale irregularities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zargham, S.; Seyler, C.E.

    1987-01-01

    Numerical simulations of the generalized Rayleigh-Taylor instability are presented. The model and simulations are applicable to bottomside and topside spread F, unstable barium cloud dynamics, and collisional interchange instability in general. The principal result is that the evolution of the effective electric field, and shocklike structures propagating perpendicular to E eff along the extrema of the quasiperiodic structures. The spectral properties of the nonlinear state are analyzed using one-dimensional power spectra calculated along spatial trajectories for selected angles to E eff . In this way a direct comparison to in situ probe data can be made. The inherent anisotropy of the nonlinear state is reflected in major qualitative differences between the spectra taken parallel to and perpendicular to E eff . The fundamental finding of the present work is that anisotropy in interchange dynamics is much greater than had been previously reported. This strong anisotropy can explain much of the spectral and spatial structural characteristics of both bottomside and topside spread F. In a companion paper a comparison of the simulation results to various in situ data sets is given

  8. SHORT COMMUNICATION CHEMICAL CONSTITUENTS AND ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CHEMICAL CONSTITUENTS AND ANTIOXIDANT ACTIVITIES OF THE FRUITS ... alkaloids, phenols, steroids, flavonoids, saponins and terpenoids while tannin ..... Harveer, K.; Jasmeen, S. Synthesis, characterization and radical scavenging ...

  9. B{sup ¯}{sub s}→K semileptonic decay from an Omnès improved constituent quark model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albertus, C. [Departamento de Física Atómica, Nuclear y Molecular e Instituto Carlos I de Física Teórica y Computacional, Universidad de Granada, Avenida de Fuentenueva s/n, E-18071 Granada (Spain); Hernández, E. [Departamento de Física Fundamental e IUFFyM, Universidad de Salamanca, Plaza de la Merced s/n, E-37008 Salamanca (Spain); Hidalgo-Duque, C.; Nieves, J. [Instituto de Física Corpuscular (IFIC), Centro Mixto CSIC-Universidad de Valencia, Institutos de Investigación de Paterna, Apartado 22085, E-46071 Valencia (Spain)

    2014-11-10

    We study the f{sup +} form factor for the semileptonic B{sup ¯}{sub s}→K{sup +}ℓ{sup −}ν{sup ¯}{sub ℓ} decay in a constituent quark model. The valence quark estimate is supplemented with the contribution from the B{sup ¯⁎} pole that dominates the high q{sup 2} region. We use a multiply-subtracted Omnès dispersion relation to extend the quark model predictions from its region of applicability near q{sub max}{sup 2}=(M{sub B{sub s}}−M{sub K}){sup 2}∼23.75 GeV{sup 2} to all q{sup 2} values accessible in the physical decay. To better constrain the dependence of f{sup +} on q{sup 2}, we fit the subtraction constants to a combined input from previous light cone sum rule by Duplancic and Melic (2008) [11] and the present quark model results. From this analysis, we obtain Γ(B{sup ¯}{sub s}→K{sup +}ℓ{sup −}ν{sup ¯}{sub ℓ})=(5.47{sub −0.46}{sup +0.54})|V{sub ub}|{sup 2}×10{sup −9} MeV, which is about 10% and 20% higher than the predictions based on Lattice QCD and QCD light cone sum rules respectively. The former predictions, for both the form factor f{sup +}(q{sup 2}) and the differential decay width, lie within the 1σ band of our estimated uncertainties for all q{sup 2} values accessible in the physical decay, except for a quite small region very close to q{sub max}{sup 2}. Differences with the light cone sum results for the form factor f{sup +} are larger than 20% in the region above q{sup 2}=15 GeV{sup 2}.

  10. Constituent gluon interpretation of glueballs and gluelumps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boulanger, N.; Buisseret, F.; Mathieu, V.; Semay, C.

    2008-01-01

    Arguments are given that support the interpretation of the lattice QCD glueball and gluelump spectra in terms of bound states of massless constituent gluons with helicity 1. In this scheme, we show that the mass hierarchy of the currently known gluelumps and glueballs is mainly due to the number of constituent gluons and can be understood within a simple flux tube model. It is also argued that the lattice QCD 0 +- glueball should be seen as a four-gluon bound state. We finally predict the mass of the 0 - state, not yet computed in lattice QCD. (orig.)

  11. Note on some charge exchange cross sections of inelastic pn and pp reactions in terms of the quark interchange concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakken, V.; Jacobsen, T.

    The charge exchange cross sections observed for pN interactions at 19 GeV/c in terms of the quark-quark interchange concept are discussed. If one uu-pair and one dd-pair of sea-quarks are assigned to each initial nucleon in pn and pp inelastic reactions, and if these quarks are assumed to participate on equal footing with the valence quarks in a quark-quark interchange mechanism between the two initial nucleons, the ratios between some observed charge exchange cross sections are well reproduced. This indicates that in this model the sea-quarks contribute significantly to the particle production in low p(subT) hadronic processes. (Auth.)

  12. Guidelines for Provision and Interchange of Geothermal Data Assets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2014-07-03

    The US Department of Energy Office of Geothermal Technologies (OGT) is funding and overseeing the development of the National Geothermal Data System (NGDS), a distributed information system providing access to integrated data in support of, and generated in, all phases of geothermal development. NGDS is being built in an open paradigm and will employ state-of-the-art informatics approaches and capabilities to advance the state of geothermal knowledge in the US. This document presents guidelines related to provision and interchange of data assets in the context of the National Geothermal Data System. It identifies general specifications for NGDS catalog metadata and data content, and provides specific instructions for preparation and submission of data assets by OGT-funded projects.

  13. Transport intermodal interchanges: Socio-economic impacts at Lille European metropolis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heddebaut, O.; Ciommo, F. di

    2016-07-01

    Within the framework of the “City-HUB” FP7 European research project 27 interchanges were studied in nine European countries. It investigated how transport interchanges work from the point of view of governance and the organization of facilities. On this basis a typology of interchanges has been defined for classifying the interchanges and selecting the key elements for improving the interchanges location, construction, and organization of an interchange. The paper focus on the implementation of the City-HUB interchange typology to the case study of Lille European Metropolis (MEL) where two contingent railways stations Lille Flandres and Lille Europe were analysed as a potential unique interchange. Indeed, the article is related to the creation of a joint interchanges able to attract more public transport users than private users such as it is now the case. These two main railways interchanges have different territorial and transport functions (i.e. one is oriented to regional traffic and the other one to national and international traffic). Urban planners and transport authorities would like to connect both stations creating a unique interchange. A key point of the Lille’s City-HUB analysis is related to the involvement of the stakeholders. Their involvement is at the origin of the interactions between City-HUB and its socio-economic and urban context. We demonstrate that combining transport and land use planning policies could boost commercial development, new business offices or housing. The urban City-Hub overcomes its role of transport infrastructure for being a “place”. (Author)

  14. An experimental model to study the effects of a senna extract on the blood constituent labeling and biodistribution of a radiopharmaceutical in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Deise Elizabeth; Pereira, Marcia Oliveira; Bernardo, Luciana Camargo; Carmo, Fernanda Santos; Fonseca, Adenilson de Souza da; Bernardo-Filho, Mario

    2011-01-01

    Cassia angustifolia Vahl (senna) is a natural product that contains sennosides, which are active components that affect the intestinal tract and induce diarrhea. Authors have shown that senna produces DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) lesions in Escherichia coli cultures and can act as an antifungal agent. Natural drugs can alter the labeling of blood constituents with technetium-⁹⁹m (⁹⁹mTc) and can affect the biodistribution of radiopharmaceuticals. In this work, we have evaluated the influence of a senna extract on the radiolabeling of blood constituents and on the biodistribution of the radiopharmaceutical sodium pertechnetate (Na⁹⁹mTcO₄)in Wistar rats. Twelve animals were treated with senna extract for 7 days. Blood samples were withdrawn from the animals and the radiolabeling procedure was carried out. The senna extract did not modify the radiolabeling of the blood constituents. A biodistributional assay was performed by administering Na⁹⁹mTcO₄ and determining its activity in different organs and in blood. The senna extract altered the biodistribution of Na⁹⁹mTcO₄ in the thyroid, liver, pancreas, lungs and blood. These results are associated with properties of the chemical substances present in the aqueous senna extract. Although these assays were performed in animals, our findings suggest that caution should be exercised when nuclear medicine examinations using Na⁹⁹mTcO₄ are conducted in patients who are using senna extract.

  15. An experimental model to study the effects of a senna extract on the blood constituent labeling and biodistribution of a radiopharmaceutical in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deise Elizabeth Souza

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cassia angustifolia Vahl (senna is a natural product that contains sennosides, which are active components that affect the intestinal tract and induce diarrhea. Authors have shown that senna produces DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid lesions in Escherichia coli cultures and can act as an antifungal agent. Natural drugs can alter the labeling of blood constituents with technetium-99m (99mTc and can affect the biodistribution of radiopharmaceuticals. In this work, we have evaluated the influence of a senna extract on the radiolabeling of blood constituents and on the biodistribution of the radiopharmaceutical sodium pertechnetate (Na99mTcO4in Wistar rats. Twelve animals were treated with senna extract for 7 days. Blood samples were withdrawn from the animals and the radiolabeling procedure was carried out. The senna extract did not modify the radiolabeling of the blood constituents. A biodistributional assay was performed by administering Na99mTcO4 and determining its activity in different organs and in blood. The senna extract altered the biodistribution of Na99mTcO4 in the thyroid, liver, pancreas, lungs and blood. These results are associated with properties of the chemical substances present in the aqueous senna extract. Although these assays were performed in animals, our findings suggest that caution should be exercised when nuclear medicine examinations using Na99mTcO4 are conducted in patients who are using senna extract.

  16. An experimental model to study the effects of a senna extract on the blood constituent labeling and biodistribution of a radiopharmaceutical in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Deise Elizabeth; Pereira, Marcia Oliveira; Bernardo, Luciana Camargo; Carmo, Fernanda Santos, E-mail: marciaoliveira.13@terra.com.b [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Biologia Roberto Alcantara Gomes. Lab. de Radiofarmacia Experimental; Fonseca, Adenilson de Souza da [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. Biomedico. Dept. de Ciencias Fisiologicas; Bernardo-Filho, Mario [Instituto Nacional do Cancer (INCA), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenadoria de Pesquisa

    2011-07-01

    Cassia angustifolia Vahl (senna) is a natural product that contains sennosides, which are active components that affect the intestinal tract and induce diarrhea. Authors have shown that senna produces DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) lesions in Escherichia coli cultures and can act as an antifungal agent. Natural drugs can alter the labeling of blood constituents with technetium-99m ({sup 99m}Tc) and can affect the biodistribution of radiopharmaceuticals. In this work, we have evaluated the influence of a senna extract on the radiolabeling of blood constituents and on the biodistribution of the radiopharmaceutical sodium pertechnetate (Na{sup 99m}TcO{sub 4}) in Wistar rats. Twelve animals were treated with senna extract for 7 days. Blood samples were withdrawn from the animals and the radiolabeling procedure was carried out. The senna extract did not modify the radiolabeling of the blood constituents. A biodistributional assay was performed by administering Na{sup 99m}TcO{sub 4} and determining its activity in different organs and in blood. The senna extract altered the biodistribution of Na{sup 99m}TcO{sub 4} in the thyroid, liver, pancreas, lungs and blood. These results are associated with properties of the chemical substances present in the aqueous senna extract. Although these assays were performed in animals, our findings suggest that caution should be exercised when nuclear medicine examinations using Na{sup 99m}TcO{sub 4} are conducted in patients who are using senna extract. (author)

  17. An experimental model to study the effects of a senna extract on the blood constituent labeling and biodistribution of a radiopharmaceutical in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Deise Elizabeth; Pereira, Marcia Oliveira; Bernardo, Luciana Camargo; Carmo, Fernanda Santos; Fonseca, Adenilson de Souza da; Bernardo-Filho, Mario

    2011-01-01

    Cassia angustifolia Vahl (senna) is a natural product that contains sennosides, which are active components that affect the intestinal tract and induce diarrhea. Authors have shown that senna produces DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) lesions in Escherichia coli cultures and can act as an antifungal agent. Natural drugs can alter the labeling of blood constituents with technetium-99m ( 99m Tc) and can affect the biodistribution of radiopharmaceuticals. In this work, we have evaluated the influence of a senna extract on the radiolabeling of blood constituents and on the biodistribution of the radiopharmaceutical sodium pertechnetate (Na 99m TcO 4 ) in Wistar rats. Twelve animals were treated with senna extract for 7 days. Blood samples were withdrawn from the animals and the radiolabeling procedure was carried out. The senna extract did not modify the radiolabeling of the blood constituents. A biodistributional assay was performed by administering Na 99m TcO 4 and determining its activity in different organs and in blood. The senna extract altered the biodistribution of Na 99m TcO 4 in the thyroid, liver, pancreas, lungs and blood. These results are associated with properties of the chemical substances present in the aqueous senna extract. Although these assays were performed in animals, our findings suggest that caution should be exercised when nuclear medicine examinations using Na 99m TcO 4 are conducted in patients who are using senna extract. (author)

  18. Regression model development and computational procedures to support estimation of real-time concentrations and loads of selected constituents in two tributaries to Lake Houston near Houston, Texas, 2005-9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Michael T.; Asquith, William H.; Oden, Timothy D.

    2012-01-01

    In December 2005, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the City of Houston, Texas, began collecting discrete water-quality samples for nutrients, total organic carbon, bacteria (Escherichia coli and total coliform), atrazine, and suspended sediment at two USGS streamflow-gaging stations that represent watersheds contributing to Lake Houston (08068500 Spring Creek near Spring, Tex., and 08070200 East Fork San Jacinto River near New Caney, Tex.). Data from the discrete water-quality samples collected during 2005–9, in conjunction with continuously monitored real-time data that included streamflow and other physical water-quality properties (specific conductance, pH, water temperature, turbidity, and dissolved oxygen), were used to develop regression models for the estimation of concentrations of water-quality constituents of substantial source watersheds to Lake Houston. The potential explanatory variables included discharge (streamflow), specific conductance, pH, water temperature, turbidity, dissolved oxygen, and time (to account for seasonal variations inherent in some water-quality data). The response variables (the selected constituents) at each site were nitrite plus nitrate nitrogen, total phosphorus, total organic carbon, E. coli, atrazine, and suspended sediment. The explanatory variables provide easily measured quantities to serve as potential surrogate variables to estimate concentrations of the selected constituents through statistical regression. Statistical regression also facilitates accompanying estimates of uncertainty in the form of prediction intervals. Each regression model potentially can be used to estimate concentrations of a given constituent in real time. Among other regression diagnostics, the diagnostics used as indicators of general model reliability and reported herein include the adjusted R-squared, the residual standard error, residual plots, and p-values. Adjusted R-squared values for the Spring Creek models ranged

  19. What Kind of International Interchange Is Beneficial? Experiences of Taiwanese Indigenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shan-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Because of globalization, international interchanges among indigenes in every country have become more frequent. Influenced by international multicultural trends, Taiwan's government not only supports indigenous populations to revive their traditional cultures, but also encourages the promotion of the international interchange activities among…

  20. The Place of Community-Based Learning in Higher Education: A Case Study of Interchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardwick, Louise

    2013-01-01

    This article focuses on one strand of community engagement: community-based learning for students. It considers in particular Interchange as a case study. Interchange is a registered charity based in, but independent of, a department in a Higher Education Institution. It brokers between undergraduate research/work projects and Voluntary Community…

  1. Effect of therapeutic interchange on medication reconciliation during hospitalization and upon discharge in a geriatric population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica S Wang

    Full Text Available Therapeutic interchange of a same class medication for an outpatient medication is a widespread practice during hospitalization in response to limited hospital formularies. However, therapeutic interchange may increase risk of medication errors. The objective was to characterize the prevalence and safety of therapeutic interchange.Secondary analysis of a transitions of care study. We included patients over age 64 admitted to a tertiary care hospital between 2009-2010 with heart failure, pneumonia, or acute coronary syndrome who were taking a medication in any of six commonly-interchanged classes on admission: proton pump inhibitors (PPIs, histamine H2-receptor antagonists (H2 blockers, hydroxymethylglutaryl CoA reductase inhibitors (statins, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs, and inhaled corticosteroids (ICS. There was limited electronic medication reconciliation support available. Main measures were presence and accuracy of therapeutic interchange during hospitalization, and rate of medication reconciliation errors on discharge. We examined charts of 303 patients taking 555 medications at time of admission in the six medication classes of interest. A total of 244 (44.0% of medications were therapeutically interchanged to an approved formulary drug at admission, affecting 64% of the study patients. Among the therapeutically interchanged drugs, we identified 78 (32.0% suspected medication conversion errors. The discharge medication reconciliation error rate was 11.5% among the 244 therapeutically interchanged medications, compared with 4.2% among the 311 unchanged medications (relative risk [RR] 2.75, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.45-5.19.Therapeutic interchange was prevalent among hospitalized patients in this study and elevates the risk for potential medication errors during and after hospitalization. Improved electronic systems for managing therapeutic interchange and medication reconciliation

  2. Constituency Orientation in Irish Politics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kusche, Isabel

    2017-01-01

    The constituency orientation of Irish politicians is a recurring topic in Irish political science. Its analysis has predominantly focused on TDs. This article uses a content analysis of candidate video statements in the general election 2016 in order to assess the strength of constituency...... this pattern, indicated by the weak constituency orientation in Dublin and Cork constituencies. Results also indicate differences between parties and some political statuses, while the gender of the candidates is of no relevance. Although the material does not permit a clear distinction between effects...... of political culture and short-term considerations, taken together the results indicate that localism in Irish politics matters, but in more complicated ways than usually depicted....

  3. Logistic and linear regression model documentation for statistical relations between continuous real-time and discrete water-quality constituents in the Kansas River, Kansas, July 2012 through June 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Guy M.; Graham, Jennifer L.

    2016-04-06

    The Kansas River is a primary source of drinking water for about 800,000 people in northeastern Kansas. Source-water supplies are treated by a combination of chemical and physical processes to remove contaminants before distribution. Advanced notification of changing water-quality conditions and cyanobacteria and associated toxin and taste-and-odor compounds provides drinking-water treatment facilities time to develop and implement adequate treatment strategies. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Kansas Water Office (funded in part through the Kansas State Water Plan Fund), and the City of Lawrence, the City of Topeka, the City of Olathe, and Johnson County Water One, began a study in July 2012 to develop statistical models at two Kansas River sites located upstream from drinking-water intakes. Continuous water-quality monitors have been operated and discrete-water quality samples have been collected on the Kansas River at Wamego (USGS site number 06887500) and De Soto (USGS site number 06892350) since July 2012. Continuous and discrete water-quality data collected during July 2012 through June 2015 were used to develop statistical models for constituents of interest at the Wamego and De Soto sites. Logistic models to continuously estimate the probability of occurrence above selected thresholds were developed for cyanobacteria, microcystin, and geosmin. Linear regression models to continuously estimate constituent concentrations were developed for major ions, dissolved solids, alkalinity, nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorus species), suspended sediment, indicator bacteria (Escherichia coli, fecal coliform, and enterococci), and actinomycetes bacteria. These models will be used to provide real-time estimates of the probability that cyanobacteria and associated compounds exceed thresholds and of the concentrations of other water-quality constituents in the Kansas River. The models documented in this report are useful for characterizing changes

  4. An interchangeable scanning Hall probe/scanning SQUID microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Chiu-Chun; Lin, Hui-Ting; Wu, Sing-Lin; Chen, Tse-Jun; Wang, M. J.; Ling, D. C.; Chi, C. C.; Chen, Jeng-Chung

    2014-01-01

    We have constructed a scanning probe microscope for magnetic imaging, which can function as a scanning Hall probe microscope (SHPM) and as a scanning SQUID microscope (SSM). The scanning scheme, applicable to SHPM and SSM, consists of a mechanical positioning (sub) micron-XY stage and a flexible direct contact to the sample without a feedback control system for the Z-axis. With the interchangeable capability of operating two distinct scanning modes, our microscope can incorporate the advantageous functionalities of the SHPM and SSM with large scan range up to millimeter, high spatial resolution (⩽4 μm), and high field sensitivity in a wide range of temperature (4.2 K-300 K) and magnetic field (10 −7 T-1 T). To demonstrate the capabilities of the system, we present magnetic images scanned with SHPM and SSM, including a RbFeB magnet and a nickel grid pattern at room temperature, surface magnetic domain structures of a La 2/3 Ca 1/3 MnO 3 thin film at 77 K, and superconducting vortices in a striped niobium film at 4.2 K

  5. Planetary interchange of bioactive material: probability factors and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, B C

    2001-01-01

    It is now well-accepted that both lunar and martian materials are represented in the meteorite collections. Early suggestions that viable organisms might survive natural transport between planets have not yet been thoroughly examined. The concept of Planetary Interchange of Bioactive Material (PIBM) is potentially relevant to the conditions under which life originated. PIBM has been also invoked to infer that the potential danger to Earth from martian materials is non-existent, an inference with, however, many pitfalls. Numerous impediments to efficient transfer of viable organisms exist. In this work, the lethality of space radiation during long transients and the biasing of launched objects toward materials unlikely to host abundant organisms are examined and shown to reduce the likelihood of successful transfer by orders of magnitude. It is also shown that martian meteorites studied to date assuredly have been subjected to sterilizing levels of ionizing radiation in space. PIBM considerations apply to both the solar system locale(s) of the origin of life and to the applicability of planetary protection protocols to preserve the biospheres of planetary bodies, including our own.

  6. Stabilization of numerical interchange in spectral-element magnetohydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sovinec, C. R.

    2016-08-01

    Auxiliary numerical projections of the divergence of flow velocity and vorticity parallel to magnetic field are developed and tested for the purpose of suppressing unphysical interchange instability in magnetohydrodynamic simulations. The numerical instability arises with equal-order C0 finite- and spectral-element expansions of the flow velocity, magnetic field, and pressure and is sensitive to behavior at the limit of resolution. The auxiliary projections are motivated by physical field-line bending, and coercive responses to the projections are added to the flow-velocity equation. Their incomplete expansions are limited to the highest-order orthogonal polynomial in at least one coordinate of the spectral elements. Cylindrical eigenmode computations show that the projections induce convergence from the stable side with first-order ideal-MHD equations during h-refinement and p-refinement. Hyperbolic and parabolic projections and responses are compared, together with different methods for avoiding magnetic divergence error. The projections are also shown to be effective in linear and nonlinear time-dependent computations with the NIMROD code Sovinec et al. [17], provided that the projections introduce numerical dissipation.

  7. An interchangeable scanning Hall probe/scanning SQUID microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Chiu-Chun; Lin, Hui-Ting; Wu, Sing-Lin [Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Chen, Tse-Jun; Wang, M. J. [Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Ling, D. C. [Department of Physics, Tamkang University, Tamsui Dist., New Taipei City 25137, Taiwan (China); Chi, C. C.; Chen, Jeng-Chung [Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Frontier Research Center on Fundamental and Applied Sciences of Matters, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China)

    2014-08-15

    We have constructed a scanning probe microscope for magnetic imaging, which can function as a scanning Hall probe microscope (SHPM) and as a scanning SQUID microscope (SSM). The scanning scheme, applicable to SHPM and SSM, consists of a mechanical positioning (sub) micron-XY stage and a flexible direct contact to the sample without a feedback control system for the Z-axis. With the interchangeable capability of operating two distinct scanning modes, our microscope can incorporate the advantageous functionalities of the SHPM and SSM with large scan range up to millimeter, high spatial resolution (⩽4 μm), and high field sensitivity in a wide range of temperature (4.2 K-300 K) and magnetic field (10{sup −7} T-1 T). To demonstrate the capabilities of the system, we present magnetic images scanned with SHPM and SSM, including a RbFeB magnet and a nickel grid pattern at room temperature, surface magnetic domain structures of a La{sub 2/3}Ca{sub 1/3}MnO{sub 3} thin film at 77 K, and superconducting vortices in a striped niobium film at 4.2 K.

  8. Space Solar Power Technical Interchange Meeting 2: SSP TIM 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Jim; Hawk, Clark W.

    1998-01-01

    The 2nd Space Solar Power Technical Interchange Meeting (SSP TIM 2) was conducted September 21st through 24th with the first part consisting of a Plenary session. The summary results of this Plenary session are contained in part one of this report. The attendees were then organized into Working Breakout Sessions and Integrated Product Team (IPT) Sessions for the purpose of conducting in-depth discussions in specific topic areas and developing a consensus as to appropriate study plans and actions to be taken. The Second part covers the Plenary Summary Session, which contains the summary results of the Working Breakout Sessions and IPT Sessions. The appendix contains the list of attendees. The ob'jective was to provide an update for the study teams and develop plans for subsequent study activities. This SSP TIM 2 was initiated and the results reported electronically over the Internet. The International Space Station (ISS) could provide the following opportunities for conducting research and technology (R&T) which are applicable to SSP: (1) Automation and Robotics, (2) Advanced Power Generation, (3) Advanced Power Management & Distribution (PMAD), (4) Communications Systems and Networks, (5) Energy Storage, (6) In Space Propulsion (ISP), (7) Structural Dynamics and Control, and Assembly and (8) Wireless Power Transmission.

  9. Turbulent interchange in simulated rod bundle geometries for Genetron-12 flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrunik, K.

    1973-01-01

    Turbulent interchange data between subchannel arrays simulating an infinite triangular array in a rod bundle fuel cluster were obtained for two-phase Genetron-12 (dichlorodifluoromethane), single phase subcooled Genetron-12 and single phase water flows at gap spacings of 0.025, 0.052 and 0.100 inches. Single phase turbulent interchange rates were relatively independent of the pitch to diameter ratio for the larger two gaps studied but increased for the smallest gap spacing. Two-phase Genetron-12 interchange data were obtained under conditions of unequal qualities and mass fluxes and essentially zero radial pressure gradient along the interconnection region between subchannels. Vapour transport occurred primarily by a diffusional type mechanism and was qualitatively similar to single phase behaviour. For annular flow conditions liquid interchange occurred through a dual mechanism via the film flow and entrained droplets. Vapour interchange was significantly suppressed at the smallest gap spacing due to the presence of the liquid film. Liquid interchange under two-phase conditions increased with gap spacing from 0.025 to 0.052 inches and levelled off slightly at 0.100 inches. Data obtained with heat addition in one test channel indicated negligible effects on the vapour transfer rates but a slight reduction in the magnitude of liquid interchange. (O.T.)

  10. 75 FR 62919 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on the Route 250 Bypass Interchange at McIntire Road...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-13

    ... on the Route 250 Bypass Interchange at McIntire Road Project in Virginia AGENCY: Federal Highway.... 139(l)(1). The actions relate to the Route 250 Bypass Interchange at McIntire Road project in the City... Virginia: Route 250 Bypass Interchange at McIntire Road. The project would involve construction of a grade...

  11. [Chemical constituents in Buddleja albiflora].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Liang; Huang, Jincheng; Zhao, Yanping; Li, Chong

    2009-12-01

    To study the chemical constituents of Buddleja albiflora. The constituents were isolated by column chromatography and their structures were elucidated by spectroscopic methods. Eleven compounds were isolated and identified as luteolin (1), quercetin (2), quercetin-3-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside (3), apigenin (4), apigenin-7-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside (5), apigenin-7-O-neohesperidoside (6), acacetin-7-O-beta-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1-6)-beta-D-glucopyranoside (7), cranioside A (8), acetylmartynoside B (9), 4"-O-acetylmartynoside (10), isomartynoside (11). All these compounds were obtained from B. albiflora for the first time and compound 8 was obtained from the genus Buddleja for the first time.

  12. Radiation damage to DNA constituents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergene, R.

    1977-01-01

    The molecular changes of the DNA molecule, in various systems exposed to inoizing radiation, have been the subject of a great number of studies. In the present work electron spin resonance spectroscopy (ESR) has been applied to irradiated crystalline systems, in particular single crystals of DNA subunits and their derivatives. The main conclusions about the molecular damage are based on this technique in combination with molecular orbital calculations. It should be emphasized that the ESR technique is restricted to damage containing unpaired electrons. These unstable intermediates called free radicals seem, however, to be involved in all molecular models describing the action of radiation on DNA. One of the premises for a detailed theory of the radiation induced reactions at the physico-chemical level seems to involve exact knowledge of the induced free radicals as well as the modes of their formation and fate. For DNA, as such, it is hardly possible to arrive at such a level of knowledge since the molecular complexity prevents selective studies of the many different radiation induced products. One possible approach is to study the free radicals formed in the constituents of DNA. In the present work three lines of approach should be mentioned. The first is based on the observation that radical formation in general causes only minor structural alterations to the molecule in question. The use of isotopes with different spin and magnetic moment (in particular deuterium) may also serve a source of information. Deuteration leads to a number of protons, mainly NH - and OH, becoming substituted, and if any of these are involved in interactions with unpaired protons the resonance pattern is influeneed. The third source of information is molecular orbital calculation. The electron spin density distribution is a function in the three dimensional space based on the system's electronic wave functions. This constitutes the basis for the idea that ESR data can be correlated with

  13. Identification of Relevant Phytochemical Constituents for Characterization and Authentication of Tomatoes by General Linear Model Linked to Automatic Interaction Detection (GLM-AID) and Artificial Neural Network Models (ANNs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández Suárez, Marcos; Astray Dopazo, Gonzalo; Larios López, Dina; Espinosa, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    There are a large number of tomato cultivars with a wide range of morphological, chemical, nutritional and sensorial characteristics. Many factors are known to affect the nutrient content of tomato cultivars. A complete understanding of the effect of these factors would require an exhaustive experimental design, multidisciplinary scientific approach and a suitable statistical method. Some multivariate analytical techniques such as Principal Component Analysis (PCA) or Factor Analysis (FA) have been widely applied in order to search for patterns in the behaviour and reduce the dimensionality of a data set by a new set of uncorrelated latent variables. However, in some cases it is not useful to replace the original variables with these latent variables. In this study, Automatic Interaction Detection (AID) algorithm and Artificial Neural Network (ANN) models were applied as alternative to the PCA, AF and other multivariate analytical techniques in order to identify the relevant phytochemical constituents for characterization and authentication of tomatoes. To prove the feasibility of AID algorithm and ANN models to achieve the purpose of this study, both methods were applied on a data set with twenty five chemical parameters analysed on 167 tomato samples from Tenerife (Spain). Each tomato sample was defined by three factors: cultivar, agricultural practice and harvest date. General Linear Model linked to AID (GLM-AID) tree-structured was organized into 3 levels according to the number of factors. p-Coumaric acid was the compound the allowed to distinguish the tomato samples according to the day of harvest. More than one chemical parameter was necessary to distinguish among different agricultural practices and among the tomato cultivars. Several ANN models, with 25 and 10 input variables, for the prediction of cultivar, agricultural practice and harvest date, were developed. Finally, the models with 10 input variables were chosen with fit's goodness between 44 and 100

  14. Identification of Relevant Phytochemical Constituents for Characterization and Authentication of Tomatoes by General Linear Model Linked to Automatic Interaction Detection (GLM-AID and Artificial Neural Network Models (ANNs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Hernández Suárez

    Full Text Available There are a large number of tomato cultivars with a wide range of morphological, chemical, nutritional and sensorial characteristics. Many factors are known to affect the nutrient content of tomato cultivars. A complete understanding of the effect of these factors would require an exhaustive experimental design, multidisciplinary scientific approach and a suitable statistical method. Some multivariate analytical techniques such as Principal Component Analysis (PCA or Factor Analysis (FA have been widely applied in order to search for patterns in the behaviour and reduce the dimensionality of a data set by a new set of uncorrelated latent variables. However, in some cases it is not useful to replace the original variables with these latent variables. In this study, Automatic Interaction Detection (AID algorithm and Artificial Neural Network (ANN models were applied as alternative to the PCA, AF and other multivariate analytical techniques in order to identify the relevant phytochemical constituents for characterization and authentication of tomatoes. To prove the feasibility of AID algorithm and ANN models to achieve the purpose of this study, both methods were applied on a data set with twenty five chemical parameters analysed on 167 tomato samples from Tenerife (Spain. Each tomato sample was defined by three factors: cultivar, agricultural practice and harvest date. General Linear Model linked to AID (GLM-AID tree-structured was organized into 3 levels according to the number of factors. p-Coumaric acid was the compound the allowed to distinguish the tomato samples according to the day of harvest. More than one chemical parameter was necessary to distinguish among different agricultural practices and among the tomato cultivars. Several ANN models, with 25 and 10 input variables, for the prediction of cultivar, agricultural practice and harvest date, were developed. Finally, the models with 10 input variables were chosen with fit's goodness

  15. Interchanges in popcorn (Zea mays L. involving the nucleolus organizer chromosome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Suely Pagliarini

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of microsporogenesis in endogamous plants of popcorn (S5 to S7 showed several and distinctinterchanges which involve the nucleolus organizer (chromosome 6. The detection of cells with interchanges was facilitatedby the presence of two nucleoli of different sizes in contrast to normal ones with a single big nucleolus. Interchange points donot always seem to be at the same place. Whereas in several situations the interchange point clearly involved more than twochromosome pairs, a simple terminal translocation seemed to occur in others. During diplotene, a cross-shaped configurationconnected with the nucleoli was observed in some meiocytes. Some heteromorphic bivalents were found during diakinesis,after which meiosis progressed normally to the end and gave rise to apparently normal tetrads with one normal nucleolus ineach microspore. Tests of pollen viability in fixed pollen grains showed 100% stainability in normal and in affected plants.This is the first report on chromosome interchanges in popcorn.

  16. Interchange instability with line-typing and finite Larmor radius effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riordan, J.C.; Hartman, C.W.

    1977-01-01

    Finite Larmor radius and end effects are included in a treatment of the low-β interchange instability. Higher order modes are shown to be destabilized by incomplete line-tying through an external plasma

  17. Developing A Priority-Based Decision Making Mod To Evaluate Geometric Configuration Of Urban Interchanges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naeimi, M.; Alimoradi, Z.; Razi, M.; Monajjem, S.

    2014-01-01

    The present article involves in evaluation and engineering judgment of various geometric configurations for highway interchanges by considering substantial parameters over the discretion process. The geometric, economical and architectural criteria as the fundamental indicators are divided into

  18. Lane assignment traffic control devices on frontage roads and conventional roads at interchanges : technical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-01

    The intersection and mandatory movement lane control signs placed on intersection approaches are critical to : safe and efficient intersection operations. Ramp, frontage road, and cross-street approaches to interchanges : often widen at intersections...

  19. Controls for the Electronic Data Interchange at the Defense Finance and Accounting Service Columbus

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2001-01-01

    .... The Electronic Data Interchange sends and receives contract payment information from computer to computer in a standard format, thus allowing documents to be received, validated, accepted, and immediately processed...

  20. Geothermal Energy and the Eastern US: Fifth technical information interchange meeting, Minutes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-12-01

    The technical interchange meeting documented here is the fifth meeting where people interested in geothermal energy in the Eastern US have met to interchange technical information. These meetings are intended to assist all in the difficult task of balancing time and effort in doing their assigned jobs and keeping track of what others are doing in similar or related tasks. All of the aforementioned meetings have served their intended purpose and further regional and national meetings are sure to follow.

  1. Geothermal Energy and the Eastern US: Technical Information Interchange Meeting, Minutes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1979-12-01

    The technical interchange meeting documented here is the fourth meeting where people interested in geothermal energy in the Eastern US have met to interchange technical information. These meetings are intended to assist all in the difficult task of balancing time and effort in doing their assigned jobs and keeping track of what others are doing in similar or related tasks. All of the aforementioned meetings have served their intended purpose and further regional and national meetings are sure to follow.

  2. Statistical Analysis of Interchange Injection Events from Over a Decade of Cassini Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azari, A.; Jia, X.; Liemohn, M. W.; Sergis, N.; Thomsen, M. F.; Mitchell, D. G.; Rymer, A. M.; Paranicas, C.; Provan, G.; Ye, S.; Cowley, S. W. H.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Vandegriff, J. D.; Kurth, W. S.

    2017-12-01

    The Cassini spacecraft has routinely observed interchange injection events with multiple instruments since arriving at Saturn in 2004. Interchange injection events are thought to initiate from a Rayleigh-Taylor like plasma instability sourced from Saturn's rapid rotation (period 10.8 hours) and dense plasma population outgassing primarily from Enceladus, and are the primary source of mass transport in the inner/middle magnetosphere. This dense plasma must be transported outward, and to conserve magnetic flux, inward moving flux tubes of low density, energetic (> keV) plasma from the outer reaches of the Saturnian system also occur. These inward-bound flux tubes are referred to as interchange injections. We will present a statistical evaluation of the occurrence rates of interchange injections at Saturn demonstrating seasonal dependence of interchange over the entirety of the Cassini mission's equatorial orbits between 2005 and 2016. We identify interchange events from CHarge Energy Mass Spectrometer (CHEMS) H+ data using a trained and tested automated algorithm. Our event identification compares well with manual identification and previous surveys of injections by L-shell and local time (Chen and Hill, 2008, Lai et al., 2016, Kennelly et al., 2013). We find that peak rates of interchange events occur between 7 - 9 Saturn radii, in agreement with previous surveys. We also evaluate interchange by preferred local time sector and season, splitting our events into pre-equinox, equinox, and post - equinox time periods. We determine that over all seasons, nightside occurrence dominated as compared to dayside, but the preferred dayside sector shifts from pre-noon during equinox, to post-noon during post-equinox. We will further investigate seasonal dependence by presenting occurrence organized by the phase systems derived based on Saturn kilometric radiation (SKR) and magnetic field perturbations (PPO).

  3. Chromosome orientation and sterility in gamma-ray induced interchanges in chili pepper (Capsicum annuum L.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, O.A.; Panda, R.C.; Rao, K.G.R.

    1986-01-01

    After gamma irradiation (30 Kr) of seeds of Capsicum annuum cultivar cerasiformis (2 n = 24) two plants were recorded each carrying two interchanges. The nucleolus organiser chromosome appeared not to be involved. The interchange heterozygotes were weak and meiosis was irregular. At least one multivalent association per PMC was recorded. At metaphase I the predominant orientation was adjacent. The probable reasons for anaphase I and other meiotic irregularities and the incidence of high pollen sterility are discussed. (author)

  4. Antifungal constituents of Melicope borbonica

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Henrik Toft; Adsersen, Anne; Bremner, Paul

    2004-01-01

    -methoxycoumarin, cedrelopsin and psoralen], two sesquiterpenes (alpha-curcumene and 3,6-epidioxy-1,10-bisaboladiene), eugenol, methyleugenol and a lignan (sesamin) were isolated. None of the isolated constituents exhibited antiin fl ammatory activity in vitro. No alkaloids were detected....

  5. Shear flow generation and turbulence suppression by resistive ballooning and resistive interchange modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guzdar, P.N.; Drake, J.F.

    1993-01-01

    The generation of shear flow by resistive ballooning modes and resistive interchange modes is compared and contrasted using a 3-D fluid code. The resistive ballooning modes give rise to poloidally asymmetric transport and hence drive poloidal rotation due to the Reynold's Stress as well as the anomalous Stringer/Winsor mechanism. On the other hand the resistive interchange mode can drive shear flow only through the Reynold's Stress. The studies show that if the self-consistent sheared flow is suppressed, the resistive ballooning modes give rise to a larger anomalous transport than produced by the resistive interchange modes. Furthermore the shear flow generated by the resistive ballooning modes is larger than that driven by the resistive interchange modes due to the combined effect of the dual mechanisms stated earlier. As a consequence strong suppression of the fluctuations as well as reduction of the transport occurs for resistive ballooning modes. On the other hand, for the resistive interchange modes the level of fluctuation as well as the anomalous transport is not reduced by the self consistent shear flow generated by the Reynold's Stress. This latter result is in agreement with some earlier 3-D simulation of resistive interchange modes

  6. Determination of the interchangeable heavy-metal fraction in soils by isotope dilution mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaebler, H.E.; Bahr, A.; Mieke, B.

    1999-01-01

    An isotope dilution technique using enriched stable isotopes is applied to determine the interchangeable heavy-metal fraction in soils. Metals in two soil samples are extracted at constant pH, with water, NH 4 NO 3 , and EDTA. A spike of enriched stable isotopes is added to the suspension of sample and eluant at the beginning of the extraction. The heavy-metal fraction which exchanges with the added spike during the extraction is called the interchangeable fraction. The extractable heavy-metal fractions are obtained from the heavy-metal concentrations in the eluates. Isotope ratios and concentrations are determined by HR-ICP-MS. The isotope dilution technique described enables both the extractable and the interchangeable heavy-metal fractions to be determined in the same experiment. The combination of both results gives additional information on elemental availability under different conditions that cannot be obtained by analyzing the extractable heavy-metal fractions alone. It is demonstrated that in some cases different eluants just shift the distribution of the interchangeable fraction of an element between the solid and liquid phases (e.g., Pb and Cd in a topsoil sample) while the amount of the interchangeable fraction itself remains constant. For other elements, as Ni, Zn, and Cr, the use of different eluants (different pH, complexing agents) sometimes enlarges the interchangeable fraction. (orig.)

  7. Interchangeability of the Wii Balance Board for Bipedal Balance Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnechère, Bruno; Jansen, Bart; Omelina, Lubos; Rooze, Marcel; Van Sint Jan, Serge

    2015-08-27

    Since 2010, an increasing interest in more portable and flexible hardware for balance and posture assessment led to previously published studies determining whether or not the Wii Balance Board could be used to assess balance and posture, both scientifically and clinically. However, no previous studies aimed at comparing results from different Wii Balance Boards for clinical balance evaluation exist. The objective of this crossover study is to assess the interchangeability of the Wii Balance Board. A total of 6 subjects participated in the study and their balance was assessed using 4 different Wii Balance Boards. Trials were recorded simultaneously with Wii Balance Boards and with a laboratory force plate. Nine relevant clinical parameters were derived from center of pressure displacement data obtained from Wii Balance Board and force plate systems. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC), F tests, and Friedman tests were computed to assess the agreement between trials and to compare the Wii Balance Board and force plate results. Excellent correlations were found between the Wii Balance Board and force plate (mean ρ =.83). With the exception of 2 parameters, strong to excellent agreements were found for the 7 remaining parameters (ICC=.96). No significant differences were found between trials recorded with different Wii Balance Boards. Our results indicate that for most of the parameters analyzed, balance and posture assessed with one Wii Balance Board were statistically similar to results obtained from another. Furthermore, the good correlation between the Wii Balance Board and force plate results shows that Wii Balance Boards can be reliably used for scientific assessment using most of the parameters analyzed in this study. These results also suggest that the Wii Balance Board could be used in multicenter studies and therefore, would allow for the creation of larger populations for clinical studies. Ethical Committee of the Erasme Hospital (CCB B406201215142

  8. Distribution, persistence and interchange of Epstein-Barr virus strains among PBMC, plasma and saliva of primary infection subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwok, Hin; Chan, Koon Wing; Chan, Kwok Hung; Chiang, Alan Kwok Shing

    2015-01-01

    Our study aimed at investigating the distribution, persistence and interchange of viral strains among peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), plasma and saliva of primary Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection subjects. Twelve infectious mononucleosis (IM) patients and eight asymptomatic individuals (AS) with primary EBV infection were followed longitudinally at several time points for one year from the time of diagnosis, when blood and saliva samples were collected and separated into PBMC, plasma and saliva, representing circulating B cell, plasma and epithelial cell compartments, respectively. To survey the viral strains, genotyping assays for the natural polymorphisms in two latent EBV genes, EBNA2 and LMP1, were performed and consisted of real-time PCR on EBNA2 to distinguish type 1 and 2 viruses, fluorescent-based 30-bp typing assay on LMP1 to distinguish deletion and wild type LMP1, and fluorescent-based heteroduplex tracking assays on both EBNA2 and LMP1 to distinguish defined polymorphic variants. No discernible differences were observed between IM patients and AS. Multiple viral strains were acquired early at the start of infection. Stable persistence of dominant EBV strains in the same tissue compartment was observed throughout the longitudinal samples. LMP1-defined strains, China 1, China 2 and Mediterranean+, were the most common strains observed. EBNA2-defined groups 1 and 3e predominated the PBMC and saliva compartments. Concordance of EBNA2 and LMP1 strains between PBMC and saliva suggested ready interchange of viruses between circulating B cell and epithelial cell pools, whilst discordance of viral strains observed between plasma and PBMC/saliva indicated presence of viral pools in other undetermined tissue compartments. Taken together, the results indicated that the distribution, persistence and interchange of viral strains among the tissue compartments are more complex than those proposed by the current model of EBV life cycle.

  9. Constituents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thrane, Torben

    2004-01-01

    Taking language as a special, second-order representational system, the article explores some consequences of this view for syntactico-semantic analysis, in particular for the notion of argument structure.......Taking language as a special, second-order representational system, the article explores some consequences of this view for syntactico-semantic analysis, in particular for the notion of argument structure....

  10. MAPA: Implementation of the Standard Interchange Format and use for analyzing lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shasharina, Svetlana G.; Cary, John R.

    1997-05-01

    MAPA (Modular Accelerator Physics Analysis) is an object oriented application for accelerator design and analysis with a Motif based graphical user interface. MAPA has been ported to AIX, Linux, HPUX, Solaris, and IRIX. MAPA provides an intuitive environment for accelerator study and design. The user can bring up windows for fully nonlinear analysis of accelerator lattices in any number of dimensions. The current graphical analysis methods of Lifetime plots and Surfaces of Section have been used to analyze the improved lattice designs of Wan, Cary, and Shasharina (this conference). MAPA can now read and write Standard Interchange Format (MAD) accelerator description files and it has a general graphical user interface for adding, changing, and deleting elements. MAPA's consistency checks prevent deletion of used elements and prevent creation of recursive beam lines. Plans include development of a richer set of modeling tools and the ability to invoke existing modeling codes through the MAPA interface. MAPA will be demonstrated on a Pentium 150 laptop running Linux.

  11. A small-world methodology of analysis of interchange energy-networks: The European behaviour in the economical crisis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dassisti, M.; Carnimeo, L.

    2013-01-01

    European energy policy pursues the objective of a sustainable, competitive and reliable supply of energy. In 2007, the European Commission adopted a proper energy policy for Europe supported by several documents and included an action plan to meet the major energy challenges Europe has to face. A farsighted diversified yearly mix of energies was suggested to countries, aiming at increasing security of supply and efficiency, but a wide and systemic view of energy interchanges between states was missing. In this paper, a Small-World methodology of analysis of Interchange Energy-Networks (IENs) is presented, with the aim of providing a useful tool for planning sustainable energy policies. A proof case is presented to validate the methodology by considering the European IEN behaviour in the period of economical crisis. This network is approached as a Small World Net from a modelling point of view, by supposing that connections between States are characterised by a probability value depending on economic/political relations between countries. - Highlights: • Different view of the imports and exports of electric energy flows between European for potential use in ruling exchanges. • Panel data from 1996 to 2010 as part of a network of exchanges was considered from Eurostat official database. • The European import/export energy flows modelled as a network with Small World phenomena, interpreting the evolution over the years. • Interesting systemic tool for ruling and governing energy flows between countries

  12. Study of the Effects of Monacolin K and Other Constituents of Red Yeast Rice on Obesity, Insulin-Resistance, Hyperlipidemia, and Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis Using a Mouse Model of Metabolic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makoto Fujimoto

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is a progressive and intractable disease associated with metabolic syndrome. Red yeast rice (RYR contains monacolin K, a potent inhibitor of HMG-CoA reductase, and its consumption decreases cholesterol and triglyceride levels. We examined the efficacy of RYR constituents using a novel metabolic syndrome-NAFLD mouse model (MSG mice. Methods. Two types of RYR grown under different culture conditions were used. 1P-DU contained only 0.002 g/100 g of monacolin K, whereas 3P-D1 contained 0.131 g/100 g. MSG mice were divided into three groups: control (C group fed standard food, RYR-C group fed standard food with 1% 1P-DU, and RYR-M group fed standard food with 1% 3P-D1. Mice were examined from 12 to 24 weeks of age. Results. Serum insulin, leptin, and liver damage as well as macrophage aggregation in visceral fat in RYR-C and RYR-M groups were lower than those in C group. The serum adiponectin levels in RYR-C group were significantly higher than those in RYR-M and C groups. Conclusions. RYR was effective against obesity-related inflammation, insulin resistance, and NAFLD in MSG mice irrespective of monacolin K levels. GABA and various peptides produced during fermentation were determined as the active constituents of RYR.

  13. Reciprocation and interchange of grooming, agonistic support, feeding tolerance, and aggression in semi-free-ranging Barbary macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carne, Charlotte; Wiper, Sue; Semple, Stuart

    2011-11-01

    Evidence from a range of primate species indicates that grooming can be exchanged either for itself or for other rank-related "commodities," such as agonistic support, feeding tolerance, or reduced aggression. Patterns of exchange behavior have been found to vary considerably between species, and understanding the causes of this variation is central to the study of the evolution of primate social systems. It is, therefore, essential that exchange behavior is examined in a wide range of species and settings. This article is the first to explore the reciprocation and interchange of grooming in the Barbary macaque (Macaca sylvanus). We collected focal data on semi-free-ranging adult female Barbary macaques at Trentham Monkey Forest, England, and analyzed dyadic data using Generalized Linear Mixed Models. We found evidence for the reciprocal exchange of grooming and for the interchange of grooming for agonistic support and tolerance while feeding. There was no evidence that grooming was traded for a reduction in aggression; indeed, we found a positive relationship between aggression given and grooming received. This may reflect the "extortion" of grooming from subordinates by dominant animals. These results will facilitate comparative analyses of exchange behavior by adding to the current database a new species, characterized by a different social style from those macaque species previously investigated. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Influence of radio frequency waves on the interchange stability in HANBIT mirror plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hogun Jhang; Kim, S.S.; Lee, S.G.; Park, B.H.; Bak, J.G.

    2005-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies are made of the influence of high frequency radio frequency (rf) waves upon interchange stability in HANBIT mirror plasmas. An emphasis is put on the interchange stability near the resonance region, ω 0 ∼Ω i , where ω 0 is the angular frequency of the applied rf wave and Ω i is the ion cyclotron frequency. Recent HANBIT experiments have shown the existence of the interchange-stable operation window in favor of ω 0 /Ω i ≤1 with its sensitivity on the applied rf power. A strong nonlinear interaction between the rf wave and the interchange mode has been observed with the generation of sideband waves. A theoretical analysis including both the ponderomotive force and the nonlinear sideband wave coupling has been developed and applied to the interpretation of the experiments, resulting in a good agreement. From the study, it is concluded that the nonlinear wave-wave coupling process is responsible for the rf stabilization of the interchange modes in HANBIT mirror plasmas operating near the resonance condition. (author)

  15. 7 CFR 930.16 - Sales constituency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Definitions § 930.16 Sales constituency. Sales constituency means a common marketing organization or brokerage... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Sales constituency. 930.16 Section 930.16 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements...

  16. The determination of parameters for thermal unit pricing and economic interchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briggs, D.W.; Pickles, R.; McPhail, E.M.

    1988-01-01

    When an interchange of energy occurs between adjoining utilities which is not the subject of a predetermined fixed price agreement but is related to the immediate cost of generating and transmitting the power, the purchaser and seller need to know the cost of the power before agreeing to the interchange. A working party from three Maritime utilities was set up to reveiw areas of interchange energy pricing between them and in particular standardize the following aspects: test procedure for a unit heat rate over its load range; maintenance and operating costs; provision for contingency costs; start up costs of units; and a pricing formula considering the above items. The three utilities are Nova Scotia Power Corporation, Maritime Electric, and New Brunswick Power Commission. Details are presented of the three utility's methods of determining heat rate, operating factor, total fuel cost, transmission loss, operations and maintenance costs, gas turbine parameters, pricing formulae, and start up costs. 2 figs., 7 tabs

  17. Theory of energetic trapped particle-induced resistive interchange-ballooning modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biglari, H.; Chen, L.

    1986-02-01

    A theory describing the influence of energetic trapped particles on resistive interchange-ballooning modes in tokamaks is presented. It is shown that a population of hot particles trapped in the region of adverse curvature can resonantly interact with and destabilize the resistive interchange mode, which is stable in their absence because of favorable average curvature. The mode is different from the usual resistive interchange mode not only in its destabilization mechanism, but also in that it has a real component to its frequency comparable to the precessional drift frequency of the rapidly circulating energetic species. Corresponding growth rate and threshold conditions for this trapped-particle-driven instability are derived and finite banana width effects are shown to have a stabilizing effect on the mode. Finally, the ballooning/tearing dispersion relation is generalized to include hot particles, so that both the ideal and the resistive modes are derivable in the appropriate limits. 23 refs., 7 figs

  18. ePrescribing: Reducing Costs through In-Class Therapeutic Interchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenner, Shane P; Chakravarthy, Rohini; Johnson, Kevin B; Miller, William L; Olson, Julie; Wickizer, Marleen; Johnson, Nate N; Ohmer, Rick; Uskavitch, David R; Bernard, Gordon R; Neal, Erin B; Lehmann, Christoph U

    2016-12-14

    Spending on pharmaceuticals in the US reached $373.9 billion in 2014. Therapeutic interchange offers potential medication cost savings by replacing a prescribed drug for an equally efficacious therapeutic alternative. Hard-stop therapeutic interchange recommendation alerts were developed for four medication classes (HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, serotonin receptor agonists, intranasal steroid sprays, and proton-pump inhibitors) in an electronic prescription-writing tool for outpatient prescriptions. Using prescription data from January 2012 to June 2015, the Compliance Ratio (CR) was calculated by dividing the number of prescriptions with recommended therapeutic interchange medications by the number of prescriptions with non-recommended medications to measure effectiveness. To explore potential cost savings, prescription data and medication costs were analyzed for the 45,000 Vanderbilt Employee Health Plan members. For all medication classes, significant improvements were demonstrated - the CR improved (proton-pump inhibitors 2.8 to 5.32, nasal steroids 2.44 to 8.16, statins 2.06 to 5.51, and serotonin receptor agonists 0.8 to 1.52). Quarterly savings through the four therapeutic interchange interventions combined exceeded $200,000 with an estimated annual savings for the health plan of $800,000, or more than $17 per member. A therapeutic interchange clinical decision support tool at the point of prescribing resulted in increased compliance with recommendations for outpatient prescriptions while producing substantial cost savings to the Vanderbilt Employee Health Plan - $17.77 per member per year. Therapeutic interchange rules require rational targeting, appropriate governance, and vigilant content updates.

  19. Positional interchanges influence the physical and technical match performance variables of elite soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuth, G; Carr, G; Barnes, C; Carling, C; Bradley, P S

    2016-01-01

    Positional variation in match performance is well established in elite soccer but no information exists on players switching positions. This study investigated the influence of elite players interchanging from one position to another on physical and technical match performance. Data were collected from multiple English Premier League (EPL) seasons using a computerised tracking system. After adhering to stringent inclusion criteria, players were examined across several interchanges: central-defender to fullback (CD-FB, n = 11, 312 observations), central-midfielder to wide-midfielder (CM-WM, n = 7, 171 observations), wide-midfielder to central-midfielder (WM-CM, n = 7, 197 observations) and attacker to wide-midfielder (AT-WM, n = 4, 81 observations). Players interchanging from CD-FB covered markedly more high-intensity running and sprinting distance (effect size [ES]: -1.56 and -1.26), lost more possessions but made more final third entries (ES: -1.23 and -1.55). Interchanging from CM-WM and WM-CM resulted in trivial to moderate differences in both physical (ES: -0.14-0.59 and -0.21-0.39) and technical performances (ES: -0.48-0.64 and -0.36-0.54). Players interchanging from AT-WM demonstrated a moderate difference in high-intensity running without possession (ES: -0.98) and moderate-to-large differences in the number of clearances, tackles and possessions won (ES: -0.77, -1.16 and -1.41). The data demonstrate that the physical and technical demands vary greatly from one interchange to another but utility players seem able to adapt to these positional switches.

  20. Pro EDI in BizTalk Server 2006 R2 electronic document interchange solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Beckner, Mark

    2008-01-01

    As business becomes more dependent on working with partners, suppliers, and other organizations in a streamlined way, Electronic Data Interchange (EDI) is one of the next big waves in connected systems. Microsoft BizTalk Server 2006 R2 offers an efficient, integrated way to deploy EDI solutions, and with the help of this book, readers will see how EDI can be used in their business and how best to get it set up with BizTalk. This book offers insights into the brand-new Biztalk 2006 R2--based EDI functionality, including the far greater flexibility in handling interchange. It gives advice coveri

  1. Linear theory of drift-tearing and interchange modes in a screw pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copenhaver, C.

    1978-04-01

    A drift dispersion relation, as applied to a resistive incompressible plasma in a screw pinch, is derived. This dispersion relation incorporates both drift-tearing and drift-interchange modes and is valid throughout the collisional regime by including kinetic theory factors. The dispersion relation reduces to the drift-tearing dispersion relation in the zero pressure gradient limit, and to the classical resistive dispersion relation in the zero drift limit. The electron temperature gradient instability is still present. Now, however, the introduction of the interchange-drift instability increases the growth rate further above the tearing-drift case. (orig.) [de

  2. [Chemical constituents of Aconitum tanguticum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Ming; Lin, Limei; Li, Chun; Wang, Zhimin; Guo, Wubao

    2012-05-01

    To study the chemical constituents isolated from the whole plant of Aconitum tanguticum. Chemical constituents were isolated and purified from the title plant by using a combination of various chromatographic techniques including column chromatography over silica gel, Sephadex LH-20, ODS and preparative HPLC. Their structures were elucidated by spectroscopic techniques including 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR, 2D-NMR, and ESI-MS. Seven compounds were isolated from this plant and their structures were identified as kaempferol-3-O-[alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1-->6)-beta-D-galactopyranoside]-7-O-alpha-L-rhamnopyrano-side (1), kaempferol-3-O-[alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1-->6)-beta-D-glucopyranoside]-7-O-alpha-L-rhamnopyranoside (2), kaempferol 7-O-alpha-L-rhamnopyranoside (3), gentiopieroside (4), vomifoliol-9-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside (5), dihydrovomifoliol-9-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside (6) and 3,4-dihydroxyphenyl alcohol-beta-D-glucopyranoside (7). All the compounds were isolated from this plant for the first time.

  3. Quark solitons as constituents of hadrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, J.; Frishman, Y.; Hanany, A.; Karlinev, M.

    1992-01-01

    We exhibit static solutions of multi-flavour QCD in two dimensions that have the quantum numbers of baryons and mesons, constructed out of quark and anti-quark solitons. In isolation the latter solitons have infinite energy, corresponding to the presence of a string carrying the non-singlet colour flux off to spatial infinity. When N c solitons of this type are combined, a static, finite-energy, colour singlet solution is formed, corresponding to a baryon. Similarly, static meson solutions are formed out of a soliton and an anti-soliton of different flavours. The stability of the mesons against annihilation is ensured by flavour conservation. The static solutions exist only when the fundamental fields of the bosonized lagrangian belong to U(N c xN f ) rather than to SU(N c )xU(N f ). Discussion of flavour-symmetry breaking requires a careful treatment of the normal-ordering ambiguity. Our results can be viewed as a derivation of the constituent quark model in QCD 2 , allowing a detailed study of constituent mass generation and of the heavy-quark symmetry. (orig.)

  4. ASSESSING UNIVERSITY RESEARCH PERFORMANCE WITH MULTIPLE CONSTITUENCIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuang-Liang Liu

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The research performance of the university is critical to the national competitiveness. Previous research has established that research performance is based on scholarly publishing. Several studies suggested that journal ranking is the important research quality indicator. However, unilateral measurement for the research performance will seriously corrode the development of university research work. Assessing university research performance with multiple constituencies is a better to enhance the university research. Although substantial studies have been performed on the critical factors that affect knowledge exploration in the university, those in knowledge exploitation are still lacking. With the multiple constituencies, a fully understanding of research performance can be gained. In the research model, knowledge exploration represents the academic research and knowledge exploitation represents the university–industry collaboration. Data collected from 124 university data in online database. The study shows that knowledge exploration and exploitation both are significant positive predictors of university competitiveness. University resources play important roles to affect both knowledge exploration and exploitation in the university. The study also shows that higher knowledge exploration will enhance knowledge exploitation. Implications for theory and practice and suggestions for future research are discussed.

  5. Derivation of the stress-strain behavior of the constituents of bio-inspired layered TiO2/PE-nanocomposites by inverse modeling based on FE-simulations of nanoindentation test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasko, G; Schäfer, I; Burghard, Z; Bill, J; Schmauder, S; Weber, U; Galler, D

    2013-03-01

    Owing to the apparent simple morphology and peculiar properties, nacre, an iridescent layer, coating of the inner part of mollusk shells, has attracted considerable attention of biologists, material scientists and engineers. The basic structural motif in nacre is the assembly of oriented plate-like aragonite crystals with a 'brick' (CaCO3 crystals) and 'mortar' (macromolecular components like proteins) organization. Many scientific researchers recognize that such structures are associated with the excellent mechanical properties of nacre and biomimetic strategies have been proposed to produce new layered nanocomposites. During the past years, increasing efforts have been devoted towards exploiting nacre's structural design principle in the synthesis of novel nanocomposites. However, the direct transfer of nacre's architecture to an artificial inorganic material has not been achieved yet. In the present contribution we report on laminated architecture, composed of the inorganic oxide (TiO2) and organic polyelectrolyte (PE) layers which fulfill this task. To get a better insight and understanding concerning the mechanical behaviour of bio-inspired layered materials consisting of oxide ceramics and organic layers, the elastic-plastic properties of titanium dioxide and organic polyelectrolyte phase are determined via FE-modelling of the nanoindentation process. With the use of inverse modeling and based on numerical models which are applied on the microscopic scale, the material properties of the constituents are derived.

  6. Analgesic effects of an ethanol extract of the fruits of Xylopia aethiopica (Dunal A. Rich (Annonaceae and the major constituent, xylopic acid in murine models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Woode

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fruit extracts of Xylopia aethiopica are used traditionally in the management of pain disorders including rheumatism, headache, colic pain, and neuralgia. Little pharmacological data exists in scientific literature of the effect of the fruit extract and its major diterpene, xylopic acid, on pain. The present study evaluated the analgesic properties of the ethanol extract of X. aethiopica (XAE and xylopic acid (XA, in murine models. Materials and Methods: XAE and XA were assessed in chemical (acetic acid-induced abdominal writhing and formalin tests, thermal (Tail-flick and Hargreaves thermal hyperalgesia tests, and mechanical (Randall-Selitto paw pressure test pain models. Results: XAE and XA exhibited significant analgesic activity in all the pain models used. XAE (30-300 mg kg -1 , p.o. and XA (10-100 mg kg -1 , p.o. inhibited acetic acid-induced visceral nociception, formalin- induced paw pain (both neurogenic and inflammatory, thermal pain as well as carrageenan-induced mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia in animals. Morphine (1-10 mg kg -1 , i.p. and diclofenac (1-10 mg kg -1 , i.p., used as controls, exhibited similar anti-nociceptive activities. XAE and XA did not induce tolerance to their respective anti-nociceptive effects in the formalin test after chronic administration. Morphine tolerance did not also cross-generalize to the analgesic effects of XAE or XA. Conclusions: These findings establish the analgesic properties of the ethanol fruit extract of X. aethiopica and its major diterpene, xylopic acid.

  7. [Chemical constituents from Vaccinium bracteatum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Jing; Chen, Xia; Niu, Chang-Shan; Yu, Shi-Shan

    2014-02-01

    The chemical constituents of Vaccinium bracteatum were studied by means of macroporous resin, ODS column chromatography and preparative HPLC. Eleven compounds were isolated from this plant. By using ESI-MS and NMR, the structures of the eleven compounds were determined as 10-O-trans-p-coumaroyl-6alpha-hydroxyl-dihydromonotropein (1), 10-O-cis-p-coumaroyl -6alpha-hydroxyl-dihydromonotropein (2), vaccinoside (3), 10-O-cis-p-coumaroyl monotropein (4), isolariciresinol-9-O-beta-D-xyloside (5), tectoridin (6), vicenin-3 (7), quercetin-3-O-alpha-L-rhamnoside (8), quercetin-3-O-alpha-L-arabinopyranoside (9), quercetin-3-O-beta-D-galactopyranoside (10), and quercetin-3-O-beta-D-glucuronide (11), respectively. Compounds 1 and 2 are new, and compounds 4, 6 and 7 are isolated from the genus Vaccinium for the first time.

  8. [Chemical constituents of Rauvolfia verticillata].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Bo; Li, Wen-Jing; Zhao, Chun-Jie

    2012-06-01

    The study on the Rauvolfia verticillata (Lour.) Baill., which belongs to Apocynaceae, was carried out to look for its chemical constituents and pharmacological activity. The isolation and purification were performed by chromatography on silica gel, Sephadex LH-20 and ODS (octadecyl silane) open column. The structures of obtained compounds were elucidated on the basis of physicochemical properties and spectral analysis. Three indole alkaloids and one acridone alkaloid were isolated from chloroform layer extract and identified as ajmalicine B (1), sandwicine (2), raunescine (3) and 7-hydroxynoracronycine (4) separately. Ajmalicine B (1) is a new compound belonging to indole alkaloid. Compound 4 as an acridone alkaloid was a new type compound isolated from Rauvolfia genus for the first time. We also did some biological activity research on the new type compound (4) to explore other pharmacological activities in addition to antihypertensive activity.

  9. [Chemical constituents of Swertia macrosperma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongling; Geng, Changan; Zhang, Xuemei; Ma, Yunbao; Jiang, Zhiyong; Chen, Jijun

    2010-12-01

    To study the chemical constituents of Swertia macrosperma. The air-dried whole plants of Swertia macrosperma were extracted with boiling water. The extract was concentrated to a small amount of volume and extracted with petroleum ether, EtOAc and n-BuOH, successively. The compounds were isolated and purified by column chromatography from the EtOAc fraction, and identified based on spectral analyses (MS, 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR). Thirteen compounds were isolated from S. macrosperma, and were characterized as norbellidifolin (1), 1-hydroxy-3,7, 8-trimethoxy-xanthone (2), norswertianolin (3), swertianolin (4), 1,3,7,8-tetrahydroxyxanthone-8-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside (5), swertiamatin (6), decentapicrin (7), coniferl aldehyde (8), sinapaldehyde (9), balanophonin (10), together with beta-sitosterol, daucosterol, and oleanolic acid . Compounds 2, 4-10 were obtained from Swertia macrosperma for the first time.

  10. S, P, D, F, G-waves KN phase shifts in a constituent quark model with a spin-orbit interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemaire, S.; Labarsouque, J.; Silvestre-Brac, B.

    2002-01-01

    The I=1 and I=0 kaon-nucleon s, p, d, f, g-waves phase shifts have been calculated in a nonrelativistic quark potential model using the resonating group method (RGM). The interquark potential includes gluon exchanges with a spin-orbit interaction. This force has been determined to reproduce as well as possible the meson and baryon spectra. The same force is employed for the cluster and intercluster dynamics and the relative KN wave-function is calculated without any approximation. While some channels are correctly described, the theory is still unable to explain others

  11. Anti-Ulcerogenic Properties of Lycium chinense Mill Extracts against Ethanol-Induced Acute Gastric Lesion in Animal Models and Its Active Constituents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Opeyemi J. Olatunji

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to explore the gastroprotective properties of the aerial part of Lycium chinense Mill (LCA against ethanol-induced gastric mucosa lesions in mice models. Administration of LCA at doses of 50, 100, 200 and 400 mg/kg body weight prior to ethanol consumption dose dependently inhibited gastric ulcers. The gastric mucosal injury was analyzed by gastric juice acidity, glutathione (GSH, superoxide dismutase (SOD, malondialdehyde (MDA, myeloperoxidase (MPO activities. Furthermore, the levels of the inflammatory mediators, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, interleukin-6 (IL-6 and interleukin-1β (IL-1β in serum were also analyzed using ELISA. Pathological changes were also observed with the aid of hematoxylin-eosin (HE staining. Our results indicated that LCA significantly reduced the levels of MPO, MDA and increased SOD and GSH activities. Furthermore, LCA also significantly inhibited the levels of TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β in the serum of ulcerated mice in a dose dependent manner. Immunohistological analysis indicated that LCA also significantly attenuated the overexpression of nuclear factor-κB in pretreated mice models. This findings suggests Lycium chinense Mill possesses gastroprotective properties against ethanol-induced gastric injury and could be a possible therapeutic intervention in the treatment and management of gastric ulcers.

  12. 78 FR 6845 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Interchange Project in Massachusetts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-31

    ..., Cambridge, MA 02142, Monday through Friday 8:00 a.m.-4:30 p.m., 617-494-2419, [email protected]dot.gov . For the Massachusetts Department of Transportation Highway Division (MassDOT): Ms. Mary Hynes, Project Manager... on Proposed Interchange Project in Massachusetts AGENCY: Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), DOT...

  13. Electron density in reasonably real metallic surfaces, including interchange and correlation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moraga, L.A.; Martinez, G.

    1981-01-01

    By means of a new method, the electron density in a jellium surface is calculated taking in account interchange and correlation effects; reproducing, in this way, the Lang and Kohn results. The new method is self-consistent but not iterative and hence is possible extend it to the solution of the same problem in more reasonably real metallic surfaces. (L.C.) [pt

  14. 75 FR 61497 - Approval Pathway for Biosimilar and Interchangeable Biological Products; Public Hearing; Request...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-05

    ... Price Competition and Innovation Act of 2009 (BPCI Act) that amends the Public Health Service Act (PHS... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2010-N-0477] Approval Pathway for Biosimilar and Interchangeable Biological Products; Public Hearing; Request for...

  15. Fluency Effects in Recognition Memory: Are Perceptual Fluency and Conceptual Fluency Interchangeable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanska, Meredith; Olds, Justin M.; Westerman, Deanne L.

    2014-01-01

    On a recognition memory test, both perceptual and conceptual fluency can engender a sense of familiarity and elicit recognition memory illusions. To date, perceptual and conceptual fluency have been studied separately but are they interchangeable in terms of their influence on recognition judgments? Five experiments compared the effect of…

  16. Interchange stability criteria for anisotropic central-cell plasmas in the tandem mirror GAMMA 10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hojo, Hitoshi; Inutake, Masaaki; Ichimura, Makoto; Katsumata, Ryota; Watanabe, Tsuguhiro.

    1993-05-01

    Flute interchange stability of anisotropic central-cell plasmas in the tandem mirror GAMMA 10 is studied numerically. The stability criteria on the beta value is obtained as a function of axial localization length of the pressure in both central and anchor cells. The temperature anisotropy of the plasma is also discussed. (author)

  17. Towards Verification of Constituent Systems through Automated Proof

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couto, Luis Diogo Monteiro Duarte; Foster, Simon; Payne, R

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores verification of constituent systems within the context of the Symphony tool platform for Systems of Systems (SoS). Our SoS modelling language, CML, supports various contractual specification elements, such as state invariants and operation preconditions, which can be used...... to specify contractual obligations on the constituent systems of a SoS. To support verification of these obligations we have developed a proof obligation generator and theorem prover plugin for Symphony. The latter uses the Isabelle/HOL theorem prover to automatically discharge the proof obligations arising...... from a CML model. Our hope is that the resulting proofs can then be used to formally verify the conformance of each constituent system, which is turn would result in a dependable SoS....

  18. Effect of fast electrons on the stability of resistive interchange modes in the TJ-II stellarator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    García, L. [Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Avda. de la Universidad 30, 28911 Leganés, Madrid (Spain); Ochando, M. A.; Hidalgo, C.; Milligen, B. Ph. van [CIEMAT - Laboratorio Nacional de Fusión, Avda. Complutense 40, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Carreras, B. A. [BACV Solutions, 110 Mohawk Road, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 (United States); Carralero, D. [Max-Planck-Institute for Plasma Physics, Boltzmannstr. 2, Garching (Germany)

    2016-06-15

    In this paper, we report on electromagnetic phenomena in low-β plasmas at the TJ-II stellarator, controlled by external heating. To understand the observations qualitatively, we introduce a simple modification of the standard resistive MHD equations, to include the potential impact of fast electrons on instabilities. The dominant instabilities of the modeling regime are resistive interchange modes, and calculations are performed in a configuration with similar characteristics as the TJ-II stellarator. The main effect of the trapping of fast electrons by magnetic islands induced by MHD instabilities is to increase the magnetic component of the fluctuations, changing the character of the instability to tearing-like and modifying the frequency of the modes. These effects seem to be consistent with some of the experimental observations.

  19. Linear studies of resistive interchange modes in a cylindrical reversed field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirin, A.A.; O'Neill, N.J.; Killeen, J.; Bonugli, R.J.; Ellis, M.J.

    1986-01-01

    Resistive interchange modes in a cylindrical reversed field pinch are studied using a one-dimensional, linear, compressible initial value code. Separate equations for the electron and ion temperature perturbations are solved. Hall terms and the thermal force vector are included in Ohm's law. Anisotropic thermal conductivity and viscosity are included in the code model. Calculations are carried out for various values of poloidal and toroidal mode number, Lundquist number, Suydam parameter, Hall parameter, thermal conductivity, viscosity, etc., with respect to uniform density equilibria known to be stable to tearing modes. It is shown that in the cold ion limit sufficiently large Hall terms cause all modes that are tested to become stable. However for T/sub i/ = T/sub e/ and ignoring the effects of viscosity and thermal conductivity, there is a critical value of the ratio of Alfven to ion cyclotron frequency above which the ''even'' mode not only dominates the ''odd'' mode but is likely to have a growth rate significantly larger than that of the odd mode in the absence of Hall terms. Inclusion of a classical tensor thermal conductivity, while having little effect on the odd mode in the absence of Hall terms, does stabilize the even mode for sufficiently large Hall parameter. Inclusion of a classical tensor viscosity reduces the growth rate of (but does not necessarily stabilize) the odd mode. Inclusion of Hall and thermal force terms, tensor thermal conductivity and tensor viscosity causes all modes that are tested to stabilize. Results are compared to other contemporary studies

  20. Assessment of In Vivo Antidiabetic Properties of Umbelliferone and Lupeol Constituents of Banana (Musa sp. var. Nanjangud Rasa Bale) Flower in Hyperglycaemic Rodent Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramu, Ramith; S Shirahatti, Prithvi; S, Nanjunda Swamy; Zameer, Farhan; Lakkappa Dhananjaya, Bhadrapura; M N, Nagendra Prasad

    2016-01-01

    Banana is an extensively cultivated plant worldwide, mainly for its fruit, while its ancillary product, the banana flower is consumed as a vegetable and is highly recommended for diabetics in the traditional Indian medicine system. This study is based on an investigation of the in vivo antihyperglycaemic activity of Umbelliferone (C1) and Lupeol (C2) isolated from the ethanol extract of banana flower (EF) in alloxan induced diabetic rat model. Diabetic rats which were administered with C1, C2 and EF (100 and 200 mg/kg b. wt.) for 4 weeks showed deterioration in fasting hyperglycaemia and reversal of abnormalities in serum/urine protein, urea and creatinine, when compared to the diabetic control group of rats. The diabetic group of rats fed with EF, C1 and C2 (100 mg/kg b. wt.) once daily, for a period of 28 days resulted in a significant reduction of diabetic symptoms viz., polyphagia, polydipsia, polyuria and urine sugar together with an improved body weight. HbA1c extent was reduced whereas levels of insulin and Hb were increased. Both the extract and compounds wielded positive impacts in diabetic rats by reversal of altered activities of hepatic marker enzymes viz., aspartate transaminase (AST), alanine transaminase (ALT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP); glycolytic enzyme (hexokinase); shunt enzyme (glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase); gluconeogenic enzymes (glucose-6-phosphatase, fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase, lactate dehydrogenase) and pyruvate kinase. The characteristic diabetic complications such as hypercholesterolemia and hypertriacylglycerolemia also significantly reverted to normal in the serum/liver of diabetic rats. Besides these, the treatment increased the activities of enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants in the serum and liver. The histological observations revealed a marked regeneration of the β-cells in the drug treated diabetic rats. In conclusion, the present study illustrates that EF, C1 and C2 enhances the glycolytic activities, besides

  1. Assessment of In Vivo Antidiabetic Properties of Umbelliferone and Lupeol Constituents of Banana (Musa sp. var. Nanjangud Rasa Bale Flower in Hyperglycaemic Rodent Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramith Ramu

    Full Text Available Banana is an extensively cultivated plant worldwide, mainly for its fruit, while its ancillary product, the banana flower is consumed as a vegetable and is highly recommended for diabetics in the traditional Indian medicine system. This study is based on an investigation of the in vivo antihyperglycaemic activity of Umbelliferone (C1 and Lupeol (C2 isolated from the ethanol extract of banana flower (EF in alloxan induced diabetic rat model. Diabetic rats which were administered with C1, C2 and EF (100 and 200 mg/kg b. wt. for 4 weeks showed deterioration in fasting hyperglycaemia and reversal of abnormalities in serum/urine protein, urea and creatinine, when compared to the diabetic control group of rats. The diabetic group of rats fed with EF, C1 and C2 (100 mg/kg b. wt. once daily, for a period of 28 days resulted in a significant reduction of diabetic symptoms viz., polyphagia, polydipsia, polyuria and urine sugar together with an improved body weight. HbA1c extent was reduced whereas levels of insulin and Hb were increased. Both the extract and compounds wielded positive impacts in diabetic rats by reversal of altered activities of hepatic marker enzymes viz., aspartate transaminase (AST, alanine transaminase (ALT, alkaline phosphatase (ALP; glycolytic enzyme (hexokinase; shunt enzyme (glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase; gluconeogenic enzymes (glucose-6-phosphatase, fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase, lactate dehydrogenase and pyruvate kinase. The characteristic diabetic complications such as hypercholesterolemia and hypertriacylglycerolemia also significantly reverted to normal in the serum/liver of diabetic rats. Besides these, the treatment increased the activities of enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants in the serum and liver. The histological observations revealed a marked regeneration of the β-cells in the drug treated diabetic rats. In conclusion, the present study illustrates that EF, C1 and C2 enhances the glycolytic activities

  2. Dataflow Interchange Format and a Framework for Processing Dataflow Graphs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Keceli, Fuat

    2004-01-01

    ..., and recognizing useful subclasses of dataflow models. This thesis also develops the framework for a Java-based software repository that provides dataflow analysis and optimization algorithms for DIF representations. The featured framework is accompanied by toolboxes for hierarchical design support and visualization of graphs.

  3. Scheil-Gulliver Constituent Diagrams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelton, Arthur D.; Eriksson, Gunnar; Bale, Christopher W.

    2017-06-01

    During solidification of alloys, conditions often approach those of Scheil-Gulliver cooling in which it is assumed that solid phases, once precipitated, remain unchanged. That is, they no longer react with the liquid or with each other. In the case of equilibrium solidification, equilibrium phase diagrams provide a valuable means of visualizing the effects of composition changes upon the final microstructure. In the present study, we propose for the first time the concept of Scheil-Gulliver constituent diagrams which play the same role as that in the case of Scheil-Gulliver cooling. It is shown how these diagrams can be calculated and plotted by the currently available thermodynamic database computing systems that combine Gibbs energy minimization software with large databases of optimized thermodynamic properties of solutions and compounds. Examples calculated using the FactSage system are presented for the Al-Li and Al-Mg-Zn systems, and for the Au-Bi-Sb-Pb system and its binary and ternary subsystems.

  4. [Chemical constituents of Swertia angustifolia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Kang; Cao, Tuan-wu; Wang, Hong-ling; Geng, Chang-an; Zhang, Xue-mei; Chen, Ji-jun

    2015-09-01

    This present work is to study the chemical constituents of Swertia angustifolia. The whole plants of air-dried Swertia angustifolia was extracted with 90% EtOH. The water extract was suspended in H2O and extracted with petroleum ether, EtOAc and nBuOH, successively. The compounds were isolated and purified by column chromatography from the EtOAc fraction, and identified based on spectral analyses (MS, 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR). Fourteen compounds were isolated and characterized as 1, 8-dihydroxy-3, 7-dimethoxyxanthone (1), 1, 8-dihydroxy-3, 5, 7-trimethoxyxanthone (2), 7-hydroxy-3, 8-dimethoxyxanthone-1-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (3), 8-0-[β-D-xylopyranosyl-(1-6) -β-D-glucopyranosyl] -1, 7-dihydroxy-3-methoxyxanthone (4), (+) -syringaresinol (5), ferulic acid (6), trans-coniferyl aldehyde (7), sinapaldehyde (8), trans-coniferyl alcohol (9), 3, 4-dihydroxybenzoic acid (10), 2-hydroxybenzoic acid (11), isophthalic acid (12), 2-furoic acid (13), and 2-methyl-4(3H)-quinazolinone(14). Compounds 2-14 were obtained from this plant for the first time.

  5. [Chemical constituents of Halenia elliptica].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongling; Chen, Hao; Geng, Chang'an; Zhang, Xuemei; Ma, Yunbao; Jiang, Zhiyong; Chen, Jijun

    2011-06-01

    To study the chemical constituents of Halenia elliptica. The air-dried whole plants of Halenia elliptica were extracted with 90% EtOH. The EtOH extract was condensed to a small amount of volume and extracted with petroleum ether, EtOAc and n-BuOH, successively. The compounds were isolated and purified by column chromatography from the EtOAc fraction, and identified based on spectral analyses (MS, 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR). 12 compounds were isolated from H. elliptica, and characterized as 8-hydroxy-2-methylchromone (1), 5-methoxy-2-methylchromone (2), 7-epi-vogeloside (3), coniferl aldehyde (4), sinapaldehyde (5), norbellidifolin (6), 1-hydroxyl-2,3,4,6-tetramethoxyxanthone (7), 1-hydroxyl-2,3,4,7-tetramethoxyxanthone (8), 1-hydroxyl-2,3,5-trimethoxyxanthone (9), together with azelaic acid, beta-sitosterol, and oleanolic acid. Compounds 1, 2 were new natural compounds and compounds 3-6, 10 were obtained from H. elliptica for the first time and compound 6 showed inhibitory activities against HBsAg and HBeAg secretion with IC50 value of 0.77 and < 0.62 mmol x L(-1), respectively.

  6. Constituent quark mass and nucleon properties in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beyer, M.; Singh, S.K.

    1986-01-01

    It is shown that the Nolen-Schiffer anomaly, the quenching of gsub(A) and the increase in some electromagnetic properties of nucleons in nuclei can all be explained qualitatively in a constituent quark model if the quark mass is assumed to depend on its confinement size. (author)

  7. Tensor Susceptibilities of the Vacuum from Constituent Quarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broniowski, W.; Polyakov, M.; Goeke, K.; Hyun-Chul Kim

    1998-01-01

    We show that the constituent quark model leads to simple expression for the isoscalar and isovector tensor susceptibilities of the vacuum. The found values are negative and of magnitude compatible with QCD-sum-rule parametrizations of spectral densities in appropriate L=1-meson channels. (author)

  8. Tensor Susceptibilities of the Vacuum from Constituent Quarks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broniowski, W [The H. Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Cracow (Poland); Polyakov, M; Goeke, K [Institute for Theoretical Physics II, Ruhr-Universitaet-Bochum, Bochum (Germany); Kim, Hyun-Chul [Pusan National University, Department of Physics, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-05-15

    We show that the constituent quark model leads to simple expression for the isoscalar and isovector tensor susceptibilities of the vacuum. The found values are negative and of magnitude compatible with QCD-sum-rule parametrizations of spectral densities in appropriate L=1-meson channels. (author)

  9. Constituent Aspects of Workplace Guidance in Secondary VET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swager, Robert; Klarus, Ruud; van Merriënboer, Jeroen J. G.; Nieuwenhuis, Loek F. M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to present an integrated model of workplace guidance to enhance awareness of what constitutes good guidance, to improve workplace guidance practices in vocational education and training. Design/methodology/approach: To identify constituent aspects of workplace guidance, a systematic search of Web of Science was conducted,…

  10. Constituent aspects of workplace guidance in secondary VET

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swager, Robert; Klarus, Ruud; Van Merriënboer, Jeroen; Nieuwenhuis, Loek

    2018-01-01

    Purpose – This paper aims to present an integrated model of workplace guidance to enhance awareness of what constitutes good guidance, to improve workplace guidance practices in vocational education and training. Design/methodology/approach – To identify constituent aspects of workplace guidance,

  11. Suppression of inflammatory reactions by terpinen-4-ol, a main constituent of tea tree oil, in a murine model of oral candidiasis and its suppressive activity to cytokine production of macrophages in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ninomiya, Kentaro; Hayama, Kazumi; Ishijima, Sanae A; Maruyama, Naho; Irie, Hiroshi; Kurihara, Junichi; Abe, Shigeru

    2013-01-01

    The onset of oral candidiasis is accompanied by inflammatory symptoms such as pain in the tongue, edema or tissue damage and lowers the quality of life (QOL) of the patient. In a murine oral candidiasis model, the effects were studied of terpinen-4-ol (T-4-ol), one of the main constituents of tea tree oil, Melaleuca alternifolia, on inflammatory reactions. When immunosuppressed mice were orally infected with Candida albicans, their tongues showed inflammatory symptoms within 24 h after the infection, which was monitored by an increase of myeloperoxidase activity and macrophage inflammatory protein-2 in their tongue homogenates. Oral treatment with 50 µL of 40 mg/mL terpinen-4-ol 3h after the Candida infection clearly suppressed the increase of these inflammatory parameters. In vitro analysis of the effects of terpinen-4-ol on cytokine secretion of macrophages indicated that 800 µg/mL of this substance significantly inhibited the cytokine production of the macrophages cultured in the presence of heat-killed C. albicans cells. Based on these findings, the role of the anti-inflammatory action of T-4-ol in its therapeutic activity against oral candidiasis was discussed.

  12. Preliminary Investigation on the Phytochemical Constituents of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Demand for honey consumption nowadays is continuously increasing worldwide due to its multiple importance from food to medicine. The medicinal value of honey lies in the bioactive phytochemical constituents that produce health benefits to man. Investigation of the phytochemical constituents of the two honey samples ...

  13. CHEMICAL INVESTIGATION OF THE VOLATILE CONSTITUENTS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CHEMICAL INVESTIGATION OF THE VOLATILE CONSTITUENTS OF CLEOME VISCOSA FROM NIGERIA. Gabriel Olatunji, Peter Weyerstahl, Stephen Oguntoye. Abstract. The major volatile constituents of the oils from the integral parts of Cleome viscosa L. from Nigeria have been identified by GC, GC/MS and 1H NMR.

  14. Fiscal 1998 engineer interchange project on the engineer interchange project (coal mine technology field), international interchange project. Preliminary study in Russia; 1998 nendo gijutsusha koryu jigyo (tanko gijutsu bun'ya) kokusai koryu jigyo. Jizen chosa (Russia)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    For the engineer interchange project (coal mine technology field), field survey for collecting information was made on the level and trend of production technology through visits to some coal industry organizations by specialists in Russia which is one candidate for the engineer training project by sending and receiving. Although coal is positioned as an important energy resource in Russia, poor business performance and a decrease in production are reported because of privatization and cur off of subsidies during a transfer period to a market economy. In addition, severe environment surrounding the Russian coal industry such as a delay of facility renewal due to poor funds, overage facilities, and moral reduction of workers due to a rationing delay has a potential for further reduction of production. The research group thus surveyed the current state of the Russian coal industry such as actual production structures, actual coal mines, technical levels, and various problem points in Moscow and Baykal districts. (NEDO)

  15. Assessment of interchangeability rate between 2 methods of measurements: An example with a cardiac output comparison study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorne, Emmanuel; Diouf, Momar; de Wilde, Robert B P; Fischer, Marc-Olivier

    2018-02-01

    The Bland-Altman (BA) and percentage error (PE) methods have been previously described to assess the agreement between 2 methods of medical or laboratory measurements. This type of approach raises several problems: the BA methodology constitutes a subjective approach to interchangeability, whereas the PE approach does not take into account the distribution of values over a range. We describe a new methodology that defines an interchangeability rate between 2 methods of measurement and cutoff values that determine the range of interchangeable values. We used a simulated data and a previously published data set to demonstrate the concept of the method. The interchangeability rate of 5 different cardiac output (CO) pulse contour techniques (Wesseling method, LiDCO, PiCCO, Hemac method, and Modelflow) was calculated, in comparison with the reference pulmonary artery thermodilution CO using our new method. In our example, Modelflow with a good interchangeability rate of 93% and a cutoff value of 4.8 L min, was found to be interchangeable with the thermodilution method for >95% of measurements. Modelflow had a higher interchangeability rate compared to Hemac (93% vs 86%; P = .022) or other monitors (Wesseling cZ = 76%, LiDCO = 73%, and PiCCO = 62%; P < .0001). Simulated data and reanalysis of a data set comparing 5 CO monitors against thermodilution CO showed that, depending on the repeatability of the reference method, the interchangeability rate combined with a cutoff value could be used to define the range of values over which interchangeability remains acceptable.

  16. Outcome of a ceftriaxone/cefotaxime interchange programme in a major teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutensohn, A; Bunz, D; Frighetto, L; Jewesson, P

    1991-01-01

    A two-stage intervention programme was performed to enable the effective substitution of ceftriaxone for cefotaxime in a teaching hospital with large numbers of transient prescribers. One hundred and sixteen patients with a variety of bacterial infections were randomized to an open, historical control comparative study to determine if ceftriaxone was an acceptable replacement for cefotaxime. For 6 months prior to the intervention, both cephalosporins were available on formulary. Following an initial informational stage, a therapeutic interchange programme was implemented to convert prescriptions for cefotaxime to ceftriaxone. Ceftriaxone and cefotaxime were equivalent in terms of microbiological and clinical efficacy and patient tolerance in 77 evaluable patients. No changes in prescriber service occurred after the changeover. Post-intervention treatment courses required a ceftriaxone/cefotaxime interchange in 28% of the cases. Ceftriaxone appeared to be a suitable and cost-effective alternative to cefotaxime in this hospital. The intervention programme successfully invoked the formulary change with minimal expense and prescriber opposition.

  17. Modulation of thermal conductivity in kinked silicon nanowires: phonon interchanging and pinching effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jin-Wu; Yang, Nuo; Wang, Bing-Shen; Rabczuk, Timon

    2013-04-10

    We perform molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the reduction of the thermal conductivity by kinks in silicon nanowires. The reduction percentage can be as high as 70% at room temperature. The temperature dependence of the reduction is also calculated. By calculating phonon polarization vectors, two mechanisms are found to be responsible for the reduced thermal conductivity: (1) the interchanging effect between the longitudinal and transverse phonon modes and (2) the pinching effect, that is, a new type of localization, for the twisting and transverse phonon modes in the kinked silicon nanowires. Our work demonstrates that the phonon interchanging and pinching effects, induced by kinking, are brand-new and effective ways in modulating heat transfer in nanowires, which enables the kinked silicon nanowires to be a promising candidate for thermoelectric materials.

  18. Apparatus, System and Method for Fast Detection of Genetic Information by PCR in an Interchangeable Chip

    KAUST Repository

    Wen, Weijia

    2011-03-03

    A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) device for fast amplification and detection of DNA includes an interchangeable PCR chamber, a temperature control component, and an optical detection system. The DNA amplification is performed on an interchangeable chip with volumes as small as 1.25 µl, while the heating and cooling rate may be as fast as 12.7 °C/second ensuring that the total time needed of only 25 minutes to complete the 35 cycle PCR amplification. The PCR may be performed according to a two-temperature approach for denaturing and annealing (Td and Ta) of DNA with the PCR chip, with which the amplification of male-specific SRY gene marker by utilizing raw saliva may be achieved. The genetic identification may be in-situ detected after PCR by the optical detection system.

  19. Interchange on the Civitavecchia Railway Line- Capranica Scalo - Capranica resort Orte Scalo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Pulvirenti

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The project is an interchange in the territory of Tuscia, in the small town of Capranica Scalo (VT, Italy. It is where two railway lines intersect, the Roma-Viterbo FR3 line and Civitavecchia-Orte line. The latter has been inserted within the TEN -T recognised as an important link for the European freight transport. It is currently subject to a restoration project. Based on the results from the analysis it has been designed a central space, the interchange, for an area larger than the single city centre. It will not only improve the integration between different modes of transport and enhance the traveling and waiting times, but it is proposed as a condenser of entertainment activities, representing also a showroom for the promotion of the territory and enhancement of its resources.

  20. Fast detection of genetic information by an optimized PCR in an interchangeable chip.

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Jinbo

    2012-02-01

    In this paper, we report the construction of a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) device for fast amplification and detection of DNA. This device consists of an interchangeable PCR chamber, a temperature control component as well as an optical detection system. The DNA amplification happens on an interchangeable chip with the volumes as low as 1.25 μl, while the heating and cooling rate was as fast as 12.7°C/second ensuring that the total time needed of only 25 min to complete the 35 cycle PCR amplification. An optimized PCR with two-temperature approach for denaturing and annealing (Td and Ta) of DNA was also formulated with the PCR chip, with which the amplification of male-specific sex determining region Y (SRY) gene marker by utilizing raw saliva was successfully achieved and the genetic identification was in-situ detected right after PCR by the optical detection system.

  1. Comparison and interchangeability of macular thickness measured with Cirrus OCT and Stratus OCT in myopic eyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geng Wang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To investigate the difference of macular thickness measurements between stratus optical coherence tomography (OCT and Cirrus OCT (Carl Zeiss Meditec, Dublin, CA, USA in the same myopic patient and to develop a conversion equation to interchange macular thickness obtained with these two OCT devices. METHODS: Eighty-nine healthy Chinese adults with spherical equivalent (SE ranging from -1.13 D to -9.63 D were recruited. The macular thickness was measured by Cirrus OCT and Stratus OCT. The correlation between macular thickness and axial length and the agreement between two OCT measurements were evaluated. A formula was generated to interchange macular thickness obtained with two OCT devices. RESULTS: Average macular thickness measured with Stratus OCT (r=-0.280, P=0.008 and Cirrus OCT (r=-0.224, P=0.034 were found to be negatively correlated with axial length. No statistically significant correlation was found between axial length and central subfield macular thickness (CMT measured with Stratus OCT (r=0.191, P=0.073 and Cirrus OCT (r=0.169, P=0.113. The mean CMT measured with Cirrus OCT was 53.63±7.94 μm thicker than with Stratus OCT. The formula CMTCirrus OCT=78.328+0.874×CMTStratus OCT was generated to interchange macular thickness obtained with two OCT devices. CONCLUSION: Macular thickness measured with Cirrus OCT were thicker than with Stratus OCT in myopic eyes. A formula can be used to interchange macular thickness measured with two OCT devices in myopic eyes. Studies with different OCT devices and larger samples are warranted to enable the comparison of macular values measured with different OCT devices.

  2. Wave Propagation in the Effective Model of Alternating Porous and Impermeable Solid Layers Propagation des ondes dans un modèle effectif constitué de couches solides alternativement poreuses et imperméables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molotkov L.

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Elastic properties of finely layered media are of great interest for seismic exploration. Theoretical models give a dependence of overall properties on constituent parameters. On the one hand they help geophysicists to estimate possible ranges of anisotropy and on the other hand they provide a basis for interpretation of measured anisotropic parameters in terms of microstructure. Last forty years such models with elastic constituents have been extensively used. Recently they have been updated for describing fractured rocks (Hsu and Schoenberg, 1993. In this case thin, and soft elastic layer models fracture. However reservoir rocks are porous and permeable. Porosity and permeability are taken into account by well-known Biot model. Finely layered porous sequences have some distinctive properties which are the topic of modern research (Schoenberg, 1996. Therefore it is important to update developed concepts to porous medium. Bakulin and Molotkov (1998, 1997 who generalized Backus averaging on poroelastic medium have done first step. Here we pay attention to one special case when there is only one preferential direction of fluid flow in porous rock. This may be caused by presence of impermeable barriers or lenses, which are modeled as set of solid layers intersecting porous medium. Such model corresponds to highly hydraulically anisotropic rock, which has very strong anisotropy of pore space structure and permeability. Les propriétés élastiques des milieux finement stratifiés présentent un grand intérêt pour l'exploration sismique. Les modèles théoriques donnent les propriétés générales en fonction des paramètres des constituants. D'une part, ils aident les géophysiciens à évaluer les gammes d'anisotropie possibles, et d'autre part, ils offrent une base pour l'interprétation des paramètres d'anisotropie mesurés en termes de microstructure. De tels modèles, élastiques, ont été largement utilisés ces quarante dernières ann

  3. Bicoherence Analysis of Electrostatic Interchange Mode Coupling in a Turbulent Laboratory Magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abler, M. C.; Mauel, M. E.; Saperstein, A.

    2017-12-01

    Plasmas confined by a strong dipole field exhibit interchange and entropy mode turbulence, which previous experiments have shown respond locally to active feedback [1]. On the Collisionless Terrella Experiment (CTX), this turbulence is characterized by low frequency, low order, quasi-coherent modes with complex spectral dynamics. We apply bicoherence analysis [2] to study nonlinear phase coupling in a variety of scenarios. First, we study the self-interaction of the naturally occurring interchange turbulence; this analysis is then expanded to include the effects of single or multiple driven modes in the frequency range of the background turbulent oscillations. Initial measurements of coupling coefficients are presented in both cases. Driven low frequency interchange modes are observed to generate multiple harmonics which persist throughout the plasma, becoming weaker as they propagate away from the actuator in the direction of the electron magnetic drift. Future work is also discussed, including application of wavelet bicoherence analysis and applications to planetary magnetospheres. [1] Roberts, Mauel, and Worstell, Phys Plasmas (2015). [2] Grierson, Worstell, and Mauel, Phys Plasmas (2009). Supported by NSF-DOE Partnership for Plasma Science Grants DOE-DE-FG02-00ER54585 and NSF-PHY-1201896.

  4. Space Solar Power Exploratory Research and Technology (SERT) Technical Interchange Meeting 2 (SERT TIM 2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Joe; Sanders, Clark W.

    2000-01-01

    The University of Alabama in Huntsville's (UAH) Propulsion Research Center hosted the Space Solar Power Exploratory Research & Technology (SERT) Technical Interchange Meeting TIM) 2 in Huntsville, Alabama December 7-10. 1999 with 126 people in attendance. The SERT program includes both competitively procured activities. which are being implemented through a portfolio of focused R&D investments--with the maximum leveraging of existing resources inside and outside NASA. and guided by these system studies. Axel Roth. Director of the Flight Projects Directorate NASA MSFC, welcomed the SERT TIM 2 participants and challenged them to develop the necessary technologies and demonstrations that will lead to Space Solar Power (SSP) International implementation. Joe Howell, NASA MSFC, reiterated the SERT TIM 2 objectives: 1) Refining and modeling systems approaches for the utilization of SSP concepts and technologies, ranging, from the near-term e.g. for space science, exploration and commercial space applications to the far-term (e. g. SSP for terrestrial markets), including systems concepts, technology, infrastructure (i.g., transportation), and economics. 2) Conducting technology research, development and demonstration activities to produce "proof- of-concept" validation of critical SSP elements for both the nearer and farther-term applications. 3) Initiating partnerships Nationality and Internationally that could be expanded, as appropriate, to pursue later SSP technology and applications (e.g., space science. colonization, etc.). Day one began with the NASA Centers presenting their SERT activities summary since SERT TIM 1 and wound up with a presentation by Masahiro Mori, NASDA titled "NASDA In-house Study for SSP". Demonstration for the Near-Term. Day two began with the SERT Systems Studies and Analysis reports resulting from NRA 8-23 followed by presentations of SERT Technology Demonstrations reports resulting from NRA 8-23. Day two closed with John Mankins presentation

  5. Multi-Constituent Simulation of Thrombus Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wei-Tao; Jamiolkowski, Megan A; Wagner, William R; Aubry, Nadine; Massoudi, Mehrdad; Antaki, James F

    2017-02-20

    In this paper, we present a spatio-temporal mathematical model for simulating the formation and growth of a thrombus. Blood is treated as a multi-constituent mixture comprised of a linear fluid phase and a thrombus (solid) phase. The transport and reactions of 10 chemical and biological species are incorporated using a system of coupled convection-reaction-diffusion (CRD) equations to represent three processes in thrombus formation: initiation, propagation and stabilization. Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations using the libraries of OpenFOAM were performed for two illustrative benchmark problems: in vivo thrombus growth in an injured blood vessel and in vitro thrombus deposition in micro-channels (1.5 mm × 1.6 mm × 0.1 mm) with small crevices (125 μm × 75 μm and 125 μm × 137 μm). For both problems, the simulated thrombus deposition agreed very well with experimental observations, both spatially and temporally. Based on the success with these two benchmark problems, which have very different flow conditions and biological environments, we believe that the current model will provide useful insight into the genesis of thrombosis in blood-wetted devices, and provide a tool for the design of less thrombogenic devices.

  6. Multi-Constituent Simulation of Thrombus Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wei-Tao; Jamiolkowski, Megan A.; Wagner, William R.; Aubry, Nadine; Massoudi, Mehrdad; Antaki, James F.

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we present a spatio-temporal mathematical model for simulating the formation and growth of a thrombus. Blood is treated as a multi-constituent mixture comprised of a linear fluid phase and a thrombus (solid) phase. The transport and reactions of 10 chemical and biological species are incorporated using a system of coupled convection-reaction-diffusion (CRD) equations to represent three processes in thrombus formation: initiation, propagation and stabilization. Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations using the libraries of OpenFOAM were performed for two illustrative benchmark problems: in vivo thrombus growth in an injured blood vessel and in vitro thrombus deposition in micro-channels (1.5 mm × 1.6 mm × 0.1 mm) with small crevices (125 μm × 75 μm and 125 μm × 137 μm). For both problems, the simulated thrombus deposition agreed very well with experimental observations, both spatially and temporally. Based on the success with these two benchmark problems, which have very different flow conditions and biological environments, we believe that the current model will provide useful insight into the genesis of thrombosis in blood-wetted devices, and provide a tool for the design of less thrombogenic devices.

  7. FDA Guidance on Biosimilar Interchangeability Elicits Diverse Views: Current and Potential Marketers Complain About Too-High Hurdles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlas, Stephen

    2017-08-01

    Pharmaceutical industry sectors are at odds as the Food and Drug Administration seeks to define "interchangeability" for biosimilars. The battle lines vary by topic, but biosimilar marketers, health plans, and drugstores are generally urging lower hurdles.

  8. An efficient algorithm for sorting by block-interchanges and its application to the evolution of vibrio species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ying Chih; Lu, Chin Lung; Chang, Hwan-You; Tang, Chuan Yi

    2005-01-01

    In the study of genome rearrangement, the block-interchanges have been proposed recently as a new kind of global rearrangement events affecting a genome by swapping two nonintersecting segments of any length. The so-called block-interchange distance problem, which is equivalent to the sorting-by-block-interchange problem, is to find a minimum series of block-interchanges for transforming one chromosome into another. In this paper, we study this problem by considering the circular chromosomes and propose a Omicron(deltan) time algorithm for solving it by making use of permutation groups in algebra, where n is the length of the circular chromosome and delta is the minimum number of block-interchanges required for the transformation, which can be calculated in Omicron(n) time in advance. Moreover, we obtain analogous results by extending our algorithm to linear chromosomes. Finally, we have implemented our algorithm and applied it to the circular genomic sequences of three human vibrio pathogens for predicting their evolutionary relationships. Consequently, our experimental results coincide with the previous ones obtained by others using a different comparative genomics approach, which implies that the block-interchange events seem to play a significant role in the evolution of vibrio species.

  9. FOCUS AND CONSTITUENT QUESTION FORMATION IN DAGBANI

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Issah

    Key words: SpecFoc, focus marker, clause initial, constituent interrogatives, information ... 1Throughout this work, I use the phrase interrogative words in a general way to refer to the ...... Wh-Questions and extraction asymmetries in Malagasy.

  10. 2002 Defense Modeling and Simulation Office (DMSO) Laboratory for Human Behavior Model Interchange Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-07-01

    into other game genres such as Real-Time Strategy (RTS) games and Massively Multiplayer Online Role- Playing Games ( MMORPG ). Unfortunately these game...games with a number of game companies, most notably Quicksilver, developers of Masters of Orion Ill, and UbiSoft, developer of the upcoming Matrix MMORPG ...in a recent DMSO funded effort to identify analysis applications of MMORPGs headed by Dr. David Johnson at IDA. This effort has suggested that the

  11. Hazardous constituent source term. Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has several facilities that either generate and/or store transuranic (TRU)-waste from weapons program research and production. Much of this waste also contains hazardous waste constituents as regulated under Subtitle C of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Toxicity characteristic metals in the waste principally include lead, occurring in leaded rubber gloves and shielding. Other RCRA metals may occur as contaminants in pyrochemical salt, soil, debris, and sludge and solidified liquids, as well as in equipment resulting from decontamination and decommissioning activities. Volatile organic compounds (VOCS) contaminate many waste forms as a residue adsorbed on surfaces or occur in sludge and solidified liquids. Due to the presence of these hazardous constituents, applicable disposal regulations include land disposal restrictions established by Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA). The DOE plans to dispose of TRU-mixed waste from the weapons program in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) by demonstrating no-migration of hazardous constituents. This paper documents the current technical basis for methodologies proposed to develop a post-closure RCRA hazardous constituent source term. For the purposes of demonstrating no-migration, the hazardous constituent source term is defined as the quantities of hazardous constituents that are available for transport after repository closure. Development of the source term is only one of several activities that will be involved in the no-migration demonstration. The demonstration will also include uncertainty and sensitivity analyses of contaminant transport

  12. Process model repositories and PNML

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hee, van K.M.; Post, R.D.J.; Somers, L.J.A.M.; Werf, van der J.M.E.M.; Kindler, E.

    2004-01-01

    Bringing system and process models together in repositories facilitates the interchange of model information between modelling tools, and allows the combination and interlinking of complementary models. Petriweb is a web application for managing such repositories. It supports hierarchical process

  13. From fundamental fields to constituent quarks and nucleon form factors?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coester, F.

    1991-01-01

    Constituent-quark models formulated in the frame work of nonrelativistic quantum mechanics have been successful in accounting for the mass spectra of mesons and baryons. Applications to elastic electron scattering require relativistic dynamics. Relativistic quantum mechanics of constituent quarks can be formulated by constructing a suitable unitary representation of the Poincare group on the three-quark Hilbert space. The mass and spin operators of this representation specify the relativistic model dynamics. The dynamics of fundamental quark fields, on the other hand, is specified by a Euclidean functional integral. In this paper, the author shows how the dynamics of the fundamental fields can be related in principle to the Hamiltonian dynamics of quark particles through the properties of the Wightman functions

  14. Botulinum toxin type A products are not interchangeable: a review of the evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brin MF

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Mitchell F Brin,1,2 Charmaine James,3 John Maltman1 1Allergan, Inc., Irvine, CA, USA; 2Department of Neurology, University of California, Irvine, CA, USA; 3Allergan, Marlow, UKAbstract: Botulinum toxin type A (BoNTA products are injectable biologic medications derived from Clostridium botulinum bacteria. Several different BoNTA products are marketed in various countries, and they are not interchangeable. Differences between products include manufacturing processes, formulations, and the assay methods used to determine units of biological activity. These differences result in a specific set of interactions between each BoNTA product and the tissue injected. Consequently, the products show differences in their in vivo profiles, including preclinical dose response curves and clinical dosing, efficacy, duration, and safety/adverse events. Most, but not all, published studies document these differences, suggesting that individual BoNTA products act differently depending on experimental and clinical conditions, and these differences may not always be predictable. Differentiation through regulatory approvals provides a measure of confidence in safety and efficacy at the specified doses for each approved indication. Moreover, the products differ in the amount of study to which they have been subjected, as evidenced by the number of publications in the peer-reviewed literature and the quantity and quality of clinical studies. Given that BoNTAs are potent biological products that meet important clinical needs, it is critical to recognize that their dosing and product performance are not interchangeable and each product should be used according to manufacturer guidelines.Keywords: onabotulinumtoxinA, abobotulinumtoxinA, incobotulinumtoxinA, glabellar lines, non-interchangeability

  15. Is there need for baryons with constituent glue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meissner, U.G.

    1983-01-01

    We investigate the breathing-mode spectrum of the Λ-particle in the framework of a general bag model including confinement via surface tension and volume energy. We show that the experimental states Λ 1/2 (1600) and Λ 1/2 (1800) can be described as radial surface excitations of the Λ. We further comment on a recent paper describing these Λ-excitations as baryons with constituent glue. (orig.)

  16. Ionic interchanges and adsorbents of interest in nuclear and environmental processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olguin G, M. T.

    2010-01-01

    The ionic interchanges and the adsorbents are of special interest inside the water treatment processes (industrial or human consumption), as well as for the radionuclides generation, due to their structural characteristics and to their capacity to remove an extensive range of polluting species. In the ININ have been developed researches on these materials, with the purpose of generating new knowledge that serves like base inside radionuclides separation processes or polluted water treatment. The results obtained until the present have been published in different scientific magazines. (Author)

  17. Asymptotics of the spectral gap for the interchange process on large hypercubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starr, Shannon; Conomos, Matthew P

    2011-01-01

    We consider the interchange process (IP) on the d-dimensional, discrete hypercube of side-length n. Specifically, we compare the spectral gap of the IP to the spectral gap of the random walk (RW) on the same graph. We prove that the two spectral gaps are asymptotically equivalent, in the limit n→∞. This result gives further supporting evidence for a conjecture of Aldous, that the spectral gap of the IP equals the spectral gap of the RW on all finite graphs. Our proof is based on an argument invented by Handjani and Jungreis, who proved Aldous's conjecture for all trees

  18. Rancang Bangun Aplikasi Transaksi Elektronik Ritel Pupuk Dengan Metode Electronic Data Interchange (EDI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelly Oktavia Adiwijaya

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Fertilizer distribution from distributor to agents, are required to be responsive in addressing the demand for fertilizers. Distributors are also required to be able to manage inventory in the warehouse, to avoid overstocking of fertilizer. Design and implementation of a fertilizer retail electronic commerce applications using electronic data interchange (EDI method is applied in this study. The system is built to help distributors to control the existence of the stock of fertilizer so no excess stock. In addition, the use of EDI can provide information quickly (real-time without having to go directly to the warehouse locations.

  19. Chemical and nuclear emergencies: Interchanging lessons learned from planning and accident experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adler, V.; Sorensen, J.H.; Rogers, G.O.

    1989-01-01

    Because the goal of emergency preparedness for both chemical and nuclear hazards is to reduce human exposure to hazardous materials, this paper examines the interchange of lessons learned from emergency planning and accident experience in both industries. While the concerns are slightly different, sufficient similarity is found for each to draw implications from the others experience. Principally the chemical industry can learn from the dominant planning experience associated with nuclear power plants, while the nuclear industry can chiefly learn from the chemical industry's accident experience. 23 refs

  20. Two-dimensional convection and interchange motions in fluids and magnetized plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia, O.E.; Bian, N.H.; Naulin, V.

    2006-01-01

    fluids, emphasizing its relation to interchange motions of non- uniformly magnetized plasmas. This is followed by a review of the theories for the onset of convection and quasi-linear saturation in driven-dissipative systems. Non-linear numerical simulations which result in stationary convective states...... behaviour of the fluctuation level which is associated with relaxation oscillations in the kinetic energy of the azimuthally mean flows. This leads to a state of large-scale intermittency manifested by exponential tails in the single-point probability distribution function of the dependent variables...

  1. Standards for the secure data interchange in teleradiology put into practice for image and report distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eichelberg, M.; Riesmeier, J.; Thiel, A.; Jensch, P.; Emmel, D.; Haderer, A.; Ricke, J.; Stohlmann, L.; Bernarding, J.

    2002-01-01

    The use of telemedicine is becoming indispensable for a continuous and economical delivery of a high quality of care. However, data protection requirements have to be considered. For the selection of solutions, vendor-independent components based on standards are a prerequisite for a seamless integration into the existing, often heterogeneous, IT infrastructure. The ''Internet protocol'' TCP/IP and the DICOM standard with it's new security extensions form the basis for an internationally standardized and accepted procedure for a secure interchange of radiological images beyond platform boundaries. (orig.) [de

  2. Classical relativistic constituent particles and composite-particle scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, M.J.

    1984-01-01

    A nonlocal Lagrangian formalism is developed to describe a classical many-particle system. The nonstandard Lagrangian is a function of a single parameter s which is not, in general, associated with the physical clock. The particles are constrained to be constituents of composite systems, which in turn can decompose into asymptotic composite states representing free observable particles. To demonstrate this, explicit models of composite-composite particle scattering are constructed. Space-time conservation laws are not imposed separately on the system, but follow upon requiring the constituents to ''pair up'' into free composites at s = +infinity,-infinity. One model is characterized by the appearance of an ''external'' zero-mass composite particle which participates in the scattering process without affecting the space-time conservation laws of the two-composite system. Initial conditions on the two incoming composite particles and the zero-mass participant determine the scattering angle and the final states of the two outgoing composite particles. Although the formalism is classical, the model displays some features usually associated with quantum field theory, such as particle scattering by means of constituent exchange, creation and annihilation of particles, and restriction of values of angular momentum

  3. Analysis of gamma irradiated pepper constituents, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takagi, Kazuko; Okuyama, Tsuneo

    1988-01-01

    A reversed phase high performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) method was developed for the analysis of many constituents of pepper at the same time. And a extraction method of ultraviolet absorbing constituents from pepper was developed for the HPLC analysis. The Ultraviolet absorbing constituents were extracted by precooled Automatic Air-Hammer from frozen pepper with 20% acetonitrile in water. The process of extraction was achieved under cooling by liquid nitrogen from start to end. The extracted constituents were separated on a reversed phase C 8 (LiChrospher 300 RP - 8 10 μm 0.4 I.D. x 0.4 cm and LiChrosorb RP - 8 SelectB 0.4 I. D. x 25 cm) column with a concave gradient from 0.1% trifluoro acetic acid (TFA) in water to 75% acetonitrile and 0.1% TFA in water for 60 minutes. The eluted constituents were detected 210 nm and 280 nm. The present method permits the detection of about 50 peaks by 280 nm. (author)

  4. Analysis of constituents of earth formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hertzog, R.C.; Grau, J.A.

    1981-01-01

    The composition of an earth formation is investigated by repetitively irradiating the formation with bursts of neutrons from a source and measuring an energy spectrum of the scattering gamma rays resulting from such irradiation e.g. by photomultiplier or solid state detector. The measured spectrum is thereafter analyzed by comparing it with a composite spectrum, made up of standard spectra, measured in a controlled environment, of constituents postulated to comprise the formation. As a result of such analysis, the proportions of the postulated constituents in the formation are determined. Since the measured spectrum is subject to degradation due to changes in the resolution of the detector, a filtering arrangement effects modification of the standard spectra in a manner which compensates for the changes in the detector and thereby provides for a more accurate determination of the constituents of the formation. Temperature is measured by sensor to compensate for temperature dependence of detector resolution. (author)

  5. Impact of a radio-frequency identification system and information interchange on clearance processes for cargo at border posts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernest Bhero

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Improved operational efficiency is important to role players in cross-border logistics and trade corridors. Cargo owners and cargo forwarders have been particularly concerned about long delays in the processing and clearing of cargo at border posts. Field studies suggest that these delays are due to a combination of factors, such as a lack of optimum system configurations and non-optimised human-dependent operations, which make the operations prone to corruption and other malpractices. Objectives: This article presents possible strategies for improving some of the operations in this sector. The research hinges on two key questions: (1 what is the impact of information interchange between stakeholders on the cargo transit time and (2 how will cargo transit time be impacted upon by automatic identification of cargo and the status of cargo seals on arriving vehicles at the border? Method: The use of information communication systems enabled by automatic identification systems (incorporating radio-frequency identification technology is suggested. Results: Results obtained by the described simulation model indicate that improvements of up to 82% with regard to transit time are possible using these techniques. Conclusion: The findings therefore demonstrate how operations at border posts can be improved through the use of appropriate technology and configuration of the operations.

  6. Random Walk on a Perturbation of the Infinitely-Fast Mixing Interchange Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvi, Michele; Simenhaus, François

    2018-03-01

    We consider a random walk in dimension d≥1 in a dynamic random environment evolving as an interchange process with rate γ >0 . We prove that, if we choose γ large enough, almost surely the empirical velocity of the walker X_t/t eventually lies in an arbitrary small ball around the annealed drift. This statement is thus a perturbation of the case γ =+∞ where the environment is refreshed between each step of the walker. We extend three-way part of the results of Huveneers and Simenhaus (Electron J Probab 20(105):42, 2015), where the environment was given by the 1-dimensional exclusion process: (i) We deal with any dimension d≥1 ; (ii) We treat the much more general interchange process, where each particle carries a transition vector chosen according to an arbitrary law μ ; (iii) We show that X_t/t is not only in the same direction of the annealed drift, but that it is also close to it.

  7. Parasites of freshwater fishes and the Great American Biotic Interchange: a bridge too far?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, A; García-Varela, M; Pérez-Ponce de León, G

    2017-03-01

    We examine the extent to which adult helminths of freshwater fishes have been part of the Great American Biotic Interchange (GABI), by integrating information in published studies and new data from Panama with fish biogeography and Earth history of Middle America. The review illustrates the following: (1) the helminth fauna south of the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt, and especially south of the Isthmus of Tehuantepec, shows strong Neotropical affinities; (2) host-parasite associations follow principles of the 'biogeographic core fauna' in which host-lineage specificity is pronounced; (3) phylogenetic analysis of the widespread freshwater trematode family Allocreadiidae reveals a complex history of host-shifting and co-diversification involving mainly cyprinodontiforms and characids; (4) allocreadiids, monogeneans and spiruridan nematodes of Middle American cyprinodontiforms may provide clues to the evolutionary history of their hosts; and (5) phylogenetic analyses of cryptogonimid trematodes may reveal whether or how cichlids interacted with marine or brackish-water environments during their colonization history. The review shows that 'interchange' is limited and asymmetrical, but simple narratives of northward isthmian dispersal will likely prove inadequate to explain the historical biogeography of many host-parasite associations in tropical Middle America, particularly those involving poeciliids. Finally, our study highlights the urgent need for targeted survey work across Middle America, focused sampling in river drainages of Colombia and Venezuela, and deeper strategic sampling in other parts of South America, in order to develop and test robust hypotheses about fish-parasite associations in Middle America.

  8. Concordance and interchangeability of biometric measurements of ocular axial length in patients awaiting cataract surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Serrano, María José; Roman-Ortiz, Carmen; Villa-Sáez, M Luz; Labrador-Castellanos, M Purificación; Blanco-Carrasco, Rosario; Lozano-Ballesteros, Felicidad; Pedraza-Martín, Carmen; José-Herrero, M Teresa San; López-Ropero, Ana M; Tenías Burillo, José María

    2014-01-01

    To estimate in patients awaiting cataract surgery the concordance and interchangeability of axial eye length measurements performed with the aid of various biometric methods (optical or ultrasonic) by different operators (nurses) at different times during the period prior to surgery. We selected 182 consecutive eyes from 91 patients.Ocular axial length was measured with the aid of 2 methods (IOLMaster® and Ocuscan®) by 9 randomly allocated technicians at 2 different times during the waiting period. The concordance between measurements was evaluated by means of the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC); the interchangeability of the results was assessed with Bland Altman plots and Passing and Bablok regression. The measurements were consistent between biometric methods (ICC 0.975, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.968 to 0.980) and measurement dates (ICC 0.996, 95% CI 0.995 to 0.997). Interobserver agreement was more heterogeneous (ICC range 0.844 to 0.998). No systematic errors were observed among the various biometric methods and measurement dates. Because measurement of axial length in phakic patients may be technician-dependent, the technician's experience should be noted in the protocols of ophthalmology services.

  9. Random Walk on a Perturbation of the Infinitely-Fast Mixing Interchange Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvi, Michele; Simenhaus, François

    2018-05-01

    We consider a random walk in dimension d≥ 1 in a dynamic random environment evolving as an interchange process with rate γ >0. We prove that, if we choose γ large enough, almost surely the empirical velocity of the walker X_t/t eventually lies in an arbitrary small ball around the annealed drift. This statement is thus a perturbation of the case γ =+∞ where the environment is refreshed between each step of the walker. We extend three-way part of the results of Huveneers and Simenhaus (Electron J Probab 20(105):42, 2015), where the environment was given by the 1-dimensional exclusion process: (i) We deal with any dimension d≥1; (ii) We treat the much more general interchange process, where each particle carries a transition vector chosen according to an arbitrary law μ ; (iii) We show that X_t/t is not only in the same direction of the annealed drift, but that it is also close to it.

  10. Constituent quarks in nuclear matter and the Nolen-Schiffer anomaly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutz, M.; Lee, H.K.; Weise, W.

    1991-01-01

    We investigate the density dependence of the neutron-proton mass difference using the Nambu and Jona-Lasinio model in combination with the Isgur-Karl constituent quark model. The decrease of the constituent quark masses with increasing density reduces the n-p mass difference in the proper way to help resolving the Nolen-Schiffer anomaly. We point out however, that in the presence of vector interactions, this effect is less pronounced than previously suggested. (orig.)

  11. Acoustic constituents of prosodic typology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, Masahiko

    Different languages sound different, and considerable part of it derives from the typological difference of prosody. Although such difference is often referred to as lexical accent types (stress accent, pitch accent, and tone; e.g. English, Japanese, and Chinese respectively) and rhythm types (stress-, syllable-, and mora-timed rhythms; e.g. English, Spanish, and Japanese respectively), it is unclear whether these types are determined in terms of acoustic properties, The thesis intends to provide a potential basis for the description of prosody in terms of acoustics. It argues for the hypothesis that the source component of the source-filter model (acoustic features) approximately corresponds to prosody (linguistic features) through several experimental-phonetic studies. The study consists of four parts. (1) Preliminary experiment: Perceptual language identification tests were performed using English and Japanese speech samples whose frequency spectral information (i.e. non-source component) is heavily reduced. The results indicated that humans can discriminate languages with such signals. (2) Discussion on the linguistic information that the source component contains: This part constitutes the foundation of the argument of the thesis. Perception tests of consonants with the source signal indicated that the source component carries the information on broad categories of phonemes that contributes to the creation of rhythm. (3) Acoustic analysis: The speech samples of Chinese, English, Japanese, and Spanish, differing in prosodic types, were analyzed. These languages showed difference in acoustic characteristics of the source component. (4) Perceptual experiment: A language identification test for the above four languages was performed using the source signal with its acoustic features parameterized. It revealed that humans can discriminate prosodic types solely with the source features and that the discrimination is easier as acoustic information increases. The

  12. The analysis of fuel constituent redistribution for ternary metallic fuel slug

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Byoung Oon; Lee, Dong Uk; Kim, Young Kyun; Chang, Jin Wook; Lee, Ki Bok; Kim, Young Il

    2004-02-01

    U-TRU-Zr metallic alloy is being considered as the fuel slug for the proliferation resistance core of KALIMER. The radial fuel constituent migration is a general phenomenon in the metallic alloys. This phenomenon may affect the in-reactor performance of metallic fuel rods, influencing such factors as melting temperature, thermal conductivity, power generation rate, phase boundaries and eutectic melting of the fuel slug. Thus, constituent redistribution modeling is essential when developing a metallic fuel performance code. The constituent migration model adopted in this report was based on the Ishida's model and Hofman's theory. A subroutine program has been made and installed into the MACSIS code to simulate constituent redistribution. The radial profile of Zr redistribution was calculated for the ternary metallic fuel, and compared with the measured data.

  13. Mutations of Electrons as Constituents of Hadrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driscoll, R. B.

    1997-04-01

    Conjecture (C) 1: Coulomb-charged constituents of electron (e) are attracted to its barycentre by lepto-strong force F=K/r^2+f; f is stably perturbative for r Non-fiction Library, Urbana, 1986); R.M. Santilli, Hadronic Mechanics (Ukrainian Academy of Sciences, Kiev, 1995 and 1996), 3 volumes.)

  14. Patch testing with constituents of Compositae mixes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsen, Evy; Andersen, Klaus Ejner

    2012-01-01

    Background. The development of mixes containing Compositae plant extracts has improved the diagnosis of Compositae contact allergy, but none of them has fulfilled the criteria for an ideal European plant mix. Objective. To evaluate which constituents of two commercial Compositae mixes were most u...

  15. The fragrance mix and its constituents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, J D; Menné, T

    1995-01-01

    Results from 14 years of patch testing with the fragrance mix and its constituents are reviewed. From 1979-1992, 8215 consecutive patients were patch tested with the fragrance mix and 449 (5.5%) had a positive reaction. An increase in the frequency of reactions to fragrance mix was seen from the ...

  16. Simultaneous Determination of Seven Constituents in Herbal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Simultaneous Determination of Seven Constituents in Herbal Prescription Jaeumganghwa-Tang Using HPLC-PDA. CS Seo, JH Kim, HK Shin. Abstract. A simple and accurate high-performance liquid chromatographic method was applied to the quantitative analysis of seven components of the traditional herbal prescription ...

  17. CYTOTOXIC ACTIVITY OF THE CONSTITUENTS OF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Crude methanol extracts obtained from the stem, roots and leaves of Anthocleista djalonensis and three natural plant constituents (djalonenol 1, sweroside 3 and djalonensone 9 respectively) isolated from these extracts were evaluated invitro against ST-57 brain tumor transformed fibroblasts. In addition, six semisynthetic ...

  18. Antioxidant and antibacterial constituents of Steganotaenia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GC-MS analysis of the hexane and dichloromethane was carried out to determine their chemical constituents. Results revealed that both extracts contained similar compounds (including cumene, xylene, citronellol and long chain hydrocarbons). In addition the dichloromethane extract contains cadinanol, ar-curcumene and ...

  19. Classification of Westminster Parliamentary constituencies using e-petition data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Clark

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In a representative democracy it is important that politicians have knowledge of the desires, aspirations and concerns of their constituents. Opportunities to gauge these opinions are however limited and, in the era of novel data, thoughts turn to what alternative, secondary, data sources may be available to keep politicians informed about local concerns. One such source of data are signatories to electronic petitions (e-petitions. Such e-petitions have risen greatly in popularity over the past decade and allow members of the public to initiate and sign an e-petition online, with popular e-petitions resulting in media attention, a response from the government or ultimately a debate in parliament. These data are thus novel in their availability and have not yet been widely used for research purposes. In this article we will use the e-petition data to show how semantic classes of Westminster Parliamentary constituencies, fitted as Gaussian finite mixture models via EM algorithm, can be used to typify constituencies. We identify four classes: Domestic Liberals; International Liberals; Nostalgic Brits and Rural Concerns, and illustrate how they map onto electoral results. The findings and the utility of this approach to incorporate new e-petitions and adapt to changes in electoral geography are discussed.

  20. Local regulation of interchange turbulence in a dipole-confined plasma torus using current-collection feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, T. M.; Mauel, M. E.; Worstell, M. W.

    2015-01-01

    Turbulence in plasma confined by a magnetic dipole is dominated by interchange fluctuations with complex dynamics and short spatial coherence. We report the first use of local current-collection feedback to modify, amplify, and suppress these fluctuations. The spatial extent of turbulence regulation is limited to a correlation length near the collector. Changing the gain and phase of collection results in power either extracted from or injected into the turbulence. The measured plasma response shows some agreement with calculations of the linear response of global interchange-like MHD and entropy modes to current-collection feedback

  1. THE ENSURING FUNCTIONAL INTERCHANGEABILITY WHEN FORMING THE CONTROL COMPLEX OF INDICATORS OF THE INITIAL CONDITION OF THE CONSUMER OF SPORTS AND IMPROVING SERVICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Khorloohiyn

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available One of key elements of an engineering component quality management system of process of provision of sports and improving services in gyms is the subsystem of diagnostics of physical client state. The aim of the study was to increase in efficiency of functioning of a quality management system of process of provision of sports and improving services in gyms due to development of techniques of incorrect estimation of the initial client state.The task of formation of a complex of indices of the initial status by criterion of necessary informtiveness is formulated. The principle of the functional interchangeability as a methodological basis for its decision is reasonable. The hierarchical structure of an integral assessment of the initial client state of gym is offered. On its basis the hierarchical model of rating of informtiveness of a complex of the single (measured indices, the providing objectivity of an integral assessment of the initial status is developed. The correctness of model is provided at the expense of a formulation of a complex of assumptions and original technology of application of different methods of expert estimation.The result of simulation of informtiveness of an integral assessment of the initial client state for a specific type of service and the purposes of physical enhancement includes: 1 library of sets of single indices, for each of which the technique and a monitoring aid, and also an informtiveness assessment in points, 2 the rules of support of the functional interchangeability of alternative complexes of indices by criterion of sufficiency of informtiveness of a complex based on additive models and the accepted restrictions is defined.The concept of a technique of formation of a complex of the measured and (or evaluated indices of the initial client state for the specific type of sports and improving service adapted under material opportunities of gym on the one hand, and responding to criterion of necessary

  2. A modular scanning tunneling microscope with an interchangeable elastic closed cell and external actuators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjarnason, Elias H.; Arnalds, Unnar B.; Olafsson, Sveinn

    2006-01-01

    We introduce a novel modular cell based scanning tunneling microscope with external piezoelectric actuators. A tip and a sample are contained in a closed interchangeable cell, consisting of a stiff top plate and a bottom part, fastened together by an elastic material. The bottom part, containing a scanning tip, is fastened to a base unit while the top plate, containing a sample, is capable of scanning motion by external piezoelectric actuators mounted in the same base unit. The actuators are pre-loaded by the deformation of the elastic material of the cell, giving an increased stability. This design is expected to simplify the scanning tunneling microscope (STM) operation in difficult environments greatly by enclosing only the tip and sample in a small cell-module, which is pluggable to a scanning mechanism and other supportive functionalities. A frequency characterization and an image scan showing atomic resolution of highly oriented graphite in air, at room temperature, is presented

  3. The neutronic and fuel cycle performance of interchangeable 3500 MWth metal and oxide fueled LMRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, E.K.; Wade, D.C.

    1990-01-01

    This study summarizes the neutronic and fuel cycle analysis performed at Argonne National Laboratory for an oxide and a metal fueled 3500 MWth LMR. These reactor designs formed the basis for a joint US/European study of LMR ATWS events. The oxide and metal core designs were developed to meet reactor performance specifications that are constrained by requirements for core loading interchangeability and for a small burnup reactivity swing. Differences in the computed performance parameters of the oxide and metal cores, arising from basic differences in their neutronic characteristics, are identified and discussed. It is shown that metal and oxide cores designed to the same ground rules exhibit many similar performance characteristics; however, they differ substantially in reactivity coefficients, control strategies, and fuel cycle options. 12 refs., 2 figs., 12 tabs

  4. Complementary Speckle Patterns: Deterministic Interchange of Intrinsic Vortices and Maxima through Scattering Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gateau, Jérôme; Rigneault, Hervé; Guillon, Marc

    2017-01-27

    Intensity maxima and zeros of speckle patterns obtained behind a diffuser are experimentally interchanged by applying a spiral phase delay of charge ±1 to the impinging coherent beam. This transform arises from the expectation that tightly focused beams, which have a planar wave front around the focus, are so changed into vortex beams and vice versa. The statistics of extrema locations and the intensity distribution of the so-generated "complementary" patterns are characterized by numerical simulations. It is demonstrated experimentally that the incoherent superposition of the three "complementary speckle patterns" yield a synthetic speckle grain size enlarged by a factor of sqrt[3]. A cyclic permutation of optical vortices and intensity maxima is unexpectedly observed and discussed.

  5. An XXX male resulting from paternal X-Y interchange and maternal X-X nondisjunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annerén, G; Andersson, M; Page, D C; Brown, L G; Berg, M; Läckgren, G; Gustavson, K H; de la Chapelle, A

    1987-01-01

    A 2-year-old boy was found to have a 47,XXX karyotype. Restriction-fragment-length-polymorphism analysis showed that, of his three X chromosomes, one is of paternal and two are of maternal origin. The results of Y-DNA hybridization were reminiscent of those in XX males in two respects. First, hybridization to Southern transfers revealed the presence in this XXX male of sequences derived from the Y-chromosomal short arm. Second, in situ hybridization showed that this Y DNA was located on the tip of the X-chromosomal short arm. We conclude that this XXX male resulted from the coincidence of X-X nondisjunction during maternal meiosis and aberrant X-Y interchange either during or prior to paternal meiosis. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:2889356

  6. Interchange and Infernal Fishbone Modes in Plasmas with Tangentially Injected Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolesnichenko; Ya.I.; Marchenko; V.S.; White; R.B.

    2006-01-01

    New energetic particle mode instabilities of fishbone type are predicted. The considered instabilities are driven by the circulating energetic ions. They can arise in plasmas of tokamaks and spherical tori with weak magnetic shear in the wide core region and strong shear at the periphery, provided that the central safety factor is close to the ratio m/n, where m and n are the poloidal mode number and toroidal mode number, respectively. The instability with m = n = 1 has interchange-like spatial structure, whereas the structure of instabilities with m/n > 1 is similar to that of the infernal MHD mode (except for the region in vicinity of the local Alfven resonance)

  7. Anderson Localization from the Berry-Curvature Interchange in Quantum Anomalous Hall Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yulei; Qiao, Zhenhua

    In this talk, we theoretically investigate the localization mechanism of the quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE) in the presence of spin-flip disorders. We show that the QAHE stays quantized at weak disorders, then enters a Berry-curvature mediated metallic phase at moderate disorders, and finally goes into the Anderson insulating phase at strong disorders. From the phase diagram, we find that at the charge neutrality point although the QAHE is most robust against disorders, the corresponding metallic phase is much easier to be localized into the Anderson insulating phase due to the interchange of Berry curvatures carried, respectively, by the conduction and valence bands. In the end, we provide a phenomenological picture related to the topological charges to better understand the underlying physical origin of the QAHE Anderson localization.

  8. Interchanges genesis Plan of Madrid = Génesis del plan de intercambiadores de Madrid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Aldecoa Martínez-Conde

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The public transport, as we know it today, originates from the end of the 18 th and beginning of the 19th Centuries. Initially a privilege for the aristocratic and bourgeoisie classes, public transport saw a surge in development once communication between Madrid and others distant urban centers became a necessity that demanded a more economical and accessible transport system. The increase of these services, along with the diversification of the means of transportation, quickly caused congestion problems at transfer points. Throughout the last century, these same problems have been confronted with a variety of diverse strategies and solutions. All in all, the history of intermodality in Madrid tells the story of an evolution that has allowed the urban web to unite all of its branches extending from the main gates that are now being converted the interchanges in relation with the city. From its creation in 1985, the CRTM (transport authority of Madrid, considered the intermodality to be a main priority within the following different fields of action: infrastructure, ticketing and whole image and information. Within the interchanges is where the integration efforts of the different transport modes best become a reality. In essence, interchanges play the same role in today`s cities as the gates in the walls of a centuries-old medieval city. At this moment, interchanges are the gates to the cities of the 21st Century. Resumen El transporte público, tal como lo conocemos hoy, se origina a finales del siglo XVIII y principios del XIX. Inicialmente fue un privilegio para las clases aristocráticas y burguesas. El transporte público vio un aumento en el desarrollo una vez que la comunicación entre Madrid y otros centros urbanos distantes se convirtió en una necesidad que exigía un sistema de transporte más económico y accesible. El aumento de estos servicios, junto con la diversificación de los medios de transporte, causó rápidamente problemas

  9. SU/sub 3/ and color properties of the psi constituents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolfenstein, L [Carnegie-Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, Pa. (USA)

    1976-06-19

    It is suggested that the psi constituents form a (3,1) representation of SU/sub 3/xSU/sub 3/c rather than (1,3) as in the charm scheme. Within the framework of confined color this allows the psi constituents to be produced above some threshold and decay weakly, as suggested in recent models. Some general consequences of this classification are discussed and a specific scheme which may help to resolve some problems in psi spectroscopy is presented.

  10. [Chemical constituents from stems of Ilex pubescens].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Xian-dong; Zhang, Qian; Feng, Feng; Liu, Wen-yuan

    2012-09-01

    To study the chemical constituents from the stems of Ilex pubescens Hook. et Am. The chemical constituents were isolated and purified by various column chromatographic methods with diatomite, silica gel, ODS and Sephadex LH-20. Their structures were identified on physical properties and spectroscopic methods. Nine compounds were isolated and determined as luteolin(1), quercetin(2), hyperoside(3), rutin(4), 1, 5-dihydroxy-3-methyl-anthraquinone(5),3,5-dimethoxy-4-hydroxy-benzoic acid-1-O-beta-D-glucoside(6), hexadecanoic acid(7), stearic acid(8), n-tetratriacontanol(9), respectively. All the compounds are isolated from this plant for the first time, and compounds 5 and 6 are isolated from this genus for the first time.

  11. [Chemical constituents from rhizomes of Illicium henryi].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jifeng; Zhang, Xuemei; Shi, Yao; Jiang, Zhiyong; Ma, Yunbao; Chen, Jijun

    2010-09-01

    To study the chemical constituents of Illicium henryi. Column chromatographic techniques using silica gel, Sephadex LH-20, Rp-8 and Rp-18 as packing materials were applied to isolate constituents. The structures of isolates were determined on the basis of spectroscopic data analyses. Twelve compounds were isolated from the rhizomes of I. henryi, which were characterized as balanophonin (1), aviculin (2), rubriflosides A (3), 1,2-bis(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-1,3-propanediol (4), jasopyran (5), kaempferol (6), quercetin (7), (2R, 3R)-3, 5, 7, 3', 5'- pentahydroxyflavan (8), 3, 4, 5-trimethoxyphenyl-1-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside (9), 3, 4-dimethoxyphenyl-1-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside (10), coniferyl aldehyde (11), sinapaldehyde (12), respectively. All the isolates were obtained for the first time from this plant.

  12. Analysis of chemical constituents in Cistanche species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yong; Tu, Peng-Fei

    2009-03-13

    Species of the genus of Cistanche (Rou Cong Rong in Chinese) are perennial parasite herbs, and are mainly distributed in arid lands and warm deserts. As a superior tonic for the treatment of kidney deficiency, impotence, female infertility, morbid leucorrhea, profuse metrorrhagia and senile constipation, Cistanche herbs earned the honor of "Ginseng of the desert". Recently, there has been increasing scientific attention on Herba Cistanche for its remarkable bioactivities including antioxidation, neuroprotection, and anti-aging. The chemical constituents of Cistanche plants mainly include volatile oils and non-volatile phenylethanoid glycosides (PhGs), iridoids, lignans, alditols, oligosaccharides and polysaccharides. Pharmacological studies show that PhGs are the main active components for curing kidney deficiency, antioxidation and neuroprotection; galactitol and oligosaccharides are the representatives for the treatment of senile constipation, while polysaccharides are responsible for improving body immunity. In this paper, the advances on the chemical constituents of Cistanche plants and their corresponding analyses are reviewed.

  13. Separation of the constituents of coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Betrand, M F

    1938-12-06

    A process is disclosed of separating, by means of dense aqueous solutions, the constituents of coal, isolated by preliminary crushing from each other and/or from barren and carbonaceous shales, comprising the addition to the washing water before treatment or during any stage of the preparation of the coal before separation, or to the dense separating solution of agents improving the wetting of the coal by water.

  14. 77 FR 74504 - Proposed Low-Effect Habitat Conservation Plan for the State-Route 99/Cartmill Avenue Interchange...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-14

    ... harass, harm, pursue, hunt, shoot, wound, kill, trap, capture, or collect, or to attempt to engage in any..., compact soil, and install road surfaces (paving). Install erosion control structures (such as silt fencing... additional highway ramps would be constructed in the other Interchange quadrants. The existing frontage road...

  15. Interchangeability of biosimilar and biological reference product: updated regulatory positions and pre- and post-marketing evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trifirò, Gianluca; Marcianò, Ilaria; Ingrasciotta, Ylenia

    2018-03-01

    Since 2006, biosimilars have been available in several countries worldwide, thus allowing for potential savings in pharmaceutical expenditure. However, there have been numerous debates about the interchangeability of biosimilars and reference products based on concerns of immunogenicity by switching between biological products, which may cause lack of effect and toxicity. Areas covered: The authors provide the reader with an overview of the different positions of regulatory authorities on the interchangeability and automatic substitution of biosimilars and reference products. Presently, the FDA allows automatic substitution without prescriber intervention if the biosimilar is interchangeable with reference products, while the European Medicines Agency delegate to each single EU member state. Expert opinion: Different approaches in defining interchangeability and automatic substitution call for harmonization to increase confidence of healthcare professionals and patients about the clinical impact of switching. Networks of electronic healthcare records and administrative databases, potentially linkable to clinical charts and registries may rapidly assess frequency and benefit-risk profile of different switching patterns in routine care at different levels, thus integrating and strengthening pre-marketing evidence.

  16. An Assessment of Clinical Interchangeability of TEG (R) and RoTEM (R) Thromboelastographic Variables in Cardiac Surgical Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Venema, L.F.; Post, W.J.; Hendriks, H.G.D.; Huet, R.C.G.; de Wolf, J.T.W.; de Vries, A.J.

    BACKGROUND: Bedside thromboelastography is increasingly used, but an assessment of the clinical interchangeability of the 2 major systems, TEG (R) (Hemoscope) and RoTEM (R) (Pentapharm), has not been performed. METHODS: We measured blood samples from 46 cardiac surgical patients after induction of

  17. Analysis of gamma irradiated pepper constituents, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takagi, Kazuko; Ochiai, Junko; Okuyama, Tsuneo

    1988-01-01

    Black pepper, white pepper, frozen green pepper and real pink pepper (kept in vinegar) were analyzed by reversed phase IIPLC. The extraction method and HPLC conditions were same as the first report, that is, the extraction from pepper was performed by Automatic Air Hammer and the extracted samples were separated on a reversed phase C 8 column with a concave gradient from 0.1% trifluoro aceticacid (TFA) in water to 75% acetonitrile - 0.1% TFA in water for 60 minutes and detected at 210 nm, 280 nm. The different constituents were observed clearly on chromatogram between black pepper and white pepper. The different constituents were observed between different producing white peppers, and as the result that the analyzed pepper was distinguished its producing district by HPLC chromatogram. In order to investigate of effect of lyophilization on white pepper extracts, lyophilized extraction was analyzed by this HPLC method. Some peaks were decreased by lyophilization. The effect of heat on white pepper constituents was examined. White pepper was heated by electronic oven and thermostat. When the former method was used, decreased peak number (peak height was lower than without heat treatment) was more than latter method. These subtle change was able to be recognized by these HPLC chromatograms. (author)

  18. Distribution of radioactive constituents in river waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herranz, M.; Elejalde, C.; Legarda, F.; Romero, F.

    1994-01-01

    For a research project on the distribution and evaluation of natural and artificial radioactive constituents in ecological segments of Biscay (northeast spain), the amounts of nuclides present in the main river waters were measured. Radioactive procedures include i) total alpha and beta indexes with a gas flow detector, dry residues near to 2 and 10 mg/ cm sup 2, respectively and counting periods of 1000 mn, ii) gamma emitters with a low level gamma spectrometer (Ge-HP detector + 8000 channels analyser) using the dry residue from 8 litres and a counting period of 4 days and iii) statistical treatment of data at 95% confidence.In this paper, ten water samples from the nervion river basin are included. Physical and chemical parameters of samples were also determined by standard procedures, because there is a sharp change in the composition of this river in the first part of the course. Radioactive constituents were identified as follows: a sample has a detectable alpha index, all samples contains beta emitters with a high variability, natural nuclides from uranium and thorium families were detected in some cases. A parallel behaviour is found between samples where K-40 and Cs-137 were found. The paper tries at last to find relations among chemical and radioactive constituents by the application of multivariate statistical methods, specially for the case of Cs-137, the only artificial nuclide identified in this work. 1 tab., 2 figs., 5 refs. (author)

  19. [Advance in chemical constituents of genus Clematis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Feng; Yang, Depo

    2009-10-01

    Progresses in the studies on chemical constituents of Clematis L. (belonging to the family Ranunculaceae) were systematiically reviewed in this article. The plants in this genus have a wide spectrum of constituents as follows: triterpenes, flavonoids, lignans, coumarins, alkaloids, volatile oils, steroids, organic acids, macrocyclic compounds and phenols, etc., among which triterpenoid saponins, flavonoids and lignans are the main components. The triterpenoid saponins are mainly oleanolic type and hederagenin type, most of which are bidesmosidic saponins, substituted with oligosaccharide chains at both C-3 and C-28, and some are substituted with acetyl, caffeoyl, isoferuloyl, p-methoxy cinnamyl and 3,4-dimethoxy cinnamyl groups in the oligosaccharide chains. The flavonoids from Clematis species are mainly flavones, flavonols, flavanones, isoflavones, xanthones and their glucosides (sugar moieties are connected to the aglycone through either the oxygen or the carbon atoms), the aglycones of which are mainly apigenin, kaempferol, luteolin and quercetin. The lignans from Clematis are mainly eupomatene lignans, cyclolignans, monoepoxylignans, bisepoxylignans and lignanolides. Clematis spp. are rich in resources, however, studies on their chemical constituents have only been carried out on twenty or so spp. As a result, it is necessary to expand our study on other spp. from this genus for better utilization of medicinal resources.

  20. Electromagnetic splitting for mesons and baryons using dressed constituent quarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silvestre-Brac, Bernard; Brau, Fabian; Semay, Claude

    2003-01-01

    Electromagnetic splittings for mesons and baryons are calculated in a formalism where the constituent quarks are considered as dressed quasiparticles. The electromagnetic interaction, which contains coulomb, contact and hyperfine terms, is folded with the quark electrical density. Two different types of strong potentials are considered. Numerical treatment is done very carefully and several approximations are discussed in detail. Our model contains only one free parameter and the agreement with experimental data is reasonable although it seems very difficult to obtain a perfect description in any case

  1. Numerical Study of Velocity Shear Stabilization of 3D and Theoretical Considerations for Centrifugally Confined Plasmas and Other Interchange-Limited Fusion Concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassam, Adil [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    2015-09-21

    We studied the feasibility of resonantly driving GAMs in tokamaks. A numerical simulation was carried out and showed the essential features and limitations. It was shown further that GAMs can damp by phase-mixing, from temperature gradients, or nonlinear detuning, thus broadening the resonance. Experimental implications of this were quantified. Theoretical support was provided for the Maryland Centrifugal Experiment, funded in a separate grant by DOE. Plasma diamagnetism from supersonic rotation was established. A theoretical model was built to match the data. Additional support to the experiment in terms of numerical simulation of the interchange turbulence was provided. Spectra from residual turbulence on account of velocity shear suppression were obtained and compared favorably to experiment. A new drift wave, driven solely by the thermal force, was identified.

  2. Effects of fine particulate matter and its constituents on low birth weight among full-term infants in California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basu, Rupa; Harris, Maria; Sie, Lillian; Malig, Brian; Broadwin, Rachel; Green, Rochelle

    2014-01-01

    Relationships between prenatal exposure to fine particles (PM 2.5 ) and birth weight have been observed previously. Few studies have investigated specific constituents of PM 2.5 , which may identify sources and major contributors of risk. We examined the effects of trimester and full gestational prenatal exposures to PM 2.5 mass and 23 PM 2.5 constituents on birth weight among 646,296 term births in California between 2000 and 2006. We used linear and logistic regression models to assess associations between exposures and birth weight and risk of low birth weight (LBW; 2.5 mass and several PM 2.5 constituents were significantly associated with reductions in term birth weight. The largest reductions in birth weight were associated with exposure to vanadium, sulfur, sulfate, iron, elemental carbon, titanium, manganese, bromine, ammonium, zinc, and copper. Several of these PM 2.5 constituents were associated with increased risk of term LBW. Reductions in birth weight were generally larger among younger mothers and varied by race/ethnicity. Exposure to specific constituents of PM 2.5 , especially traffic-related particles, sulfur constituents, and metals, were associated with decreased birth weight in California. -- Highlights: • Examine full gestational and trimester fine particle and its constituents on term birth weight. • Fine particles and several of its constituents associated with birth weight reductions. • Largest reductions for traffic-related particles, sulfur constituents, and metals. • Greater birth weight reductions for younger mothers, and varied by race/ethnicity

  3. Evaluation of TEG(®) and RoTEM(®) inter-changeability in trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagemo, Jostein S; Næss, Paal A; Johansson, Pär; Windeløv, Nis A; Cohen, Mitchell Jay; Røislien, Jo; Brohi, Karim; Heier, Hans Erik; Hestnes, Morten; Gaarder, Christine

    2013-05-01

    Massive haemorrhage is a leading cause of preventable deaths in trauma. Traumatic coagulopathy is frequently present early after trauma, and is associated with increased mortality. A number of recent trials suggest that viscoelastic haemostatic assays (VHA), such as thromboelastography and thromboelastometry, are useful tools in guiding transfusion. Treatment algorithms exist for the use of VHAs but are not validated in traumatic haemorrhage. In this study we examined the inter-changeability of two commonly used VHAs, TEG(®) and RoTEM(®). A total of 184 trauma patients over the age of 18, requiring full trauma team activation, were included at three different hospitals in three different countries (Copenhagen, Denmark, San Francisco, CA, USA and Oslo, Norway). Blood samples were drawn immediately upon arrival, and TEG(®) and RoTEM(®) analyzed simultaneously. Correlations were calculated using. Spearman's rank correlation coefficient. Agreement was evaluated by Bland-Altman plots and calculation of limits of agreement. The mean ISS in the total population was 17, and the mortality was 16.5%. Mean base excess was -2.8 (SD: 4.2). The correlation coefficient for corresponding values for the two devices was 0.24 for the R-time vs CT in all centres combined. For the K-time vs CFT the correlation was 0.48, for the α-angleTEG vs α-angleRoTEM 0.44, and for MA vs MCF 0.76. Limits of agreement exceeded the preset clinically acceptable deviation of 10% for all variables in all centres except for MA/MCF in one centre (Copenhagen). Generally, correlation coefficients were lower and agreement poorer in the one centre (Oslo) where measurements were performed bedside by clinicians. Inter-changeability between TEG(®) and RoTEM(®) is limited in the trauma setting. Agreement seems poorer when clinicians operate the devices. Development and validation of separate treatment algorithms for the two devices is required. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Regional consequences of a biotic interchange: insights from the Lessepsian invasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawrot, Rafal; Albano, Paolo G.; Chattopadhyay, Devapriya; Zuschin, Martin

    2016-04-01

    The fossil record provides ample evidence of large-scale biotic interchanges and their pervasive effects on regional biotas, but mechanisms controlling such events are difficult to decipher in deep time. Massive invasion of Indo-Pacific species into the Mediterranean Sea triggered by the opening of the Suez Canal offers a unique opportunity to examine the ecological consequences of breaking down biogeographic barriers. We developed an extensive database of taxonomic composition, body size and ecological characteristics of the Red Sea and Mediterranean bivalve fauna in order to link biotic selectivity of the invasion process with its effects on the recipient biota. Shallow-water occurrence and presence outside the tropical zone in other regions are the strongest predictors of the successful transition through the Suez Canal. Subsequent establishment of alien species in the Mediterranean Sea correlates with early arrival and preference for hard substrates. Finally, large-bodied species and hard-bottom dwellers are over-represented among the invasive aliens that have reached the spread stage and impose a strong impact on native communities. Although body size is important only at the last invasion stage, alien species are significantly larger compared to native Mediterranean bivalves. This reflects biogeographic difference in the body-size distributions of the source and recipient species pools related to the recent geological history of the Mediterranean Sea. Contrary to the general expectations on the effects of temperature on average body size, continued warming of the Mediterranean Sea accelerates the entry of tropical aliens and thus indirectly leads to increase in the proportion of large-bodied species in local communities and the regional biota. Invasion-driven shifts in species composition are stronger in hard-substrate communities, which host a smaller pool of incumbent species and are more susceptible to the establishment of newcomers. Analogous differences

  5. Effects of time pressure and accountability to constituents on negotiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mosterd, I.; Rutte, C.G.

    2000-01-01

    A laboratory experiment examined the effects of time pressure (high versus low) and accountability to constituents (not-accountable-to-constituents versus accountable-to-constituents) on the competitiveness of negotiators' interaction and on the outcome (i.e., agreement or impasse) of the

  6. Two new constituents from Erigeron breviscapus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Yu, De-Quan

    2013-09-01

    Two novel constituents, named erigeronones A (1) and B (2), together with apigenin-7-O-β-galacturonide (3), quercetin-7-O-β-glucuronide (4), quercetin-3-O-β-galacturonide (5), and eriodictyol-7-O-β-glucuronide (6), were isolated from the whole grass of Erigeron breviscapus (Vant) Hand.-Mazz (Compositae). Their structures were established on the basis of spectral analyses and comparison with the literature data. Both new compounds 1 and 2 possess a γ-pyrone moiety that is rare in nature. Compound 1 showed significant protective effect on H2O2-injured human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

  7. Chemical constituents of Salacia elliptica (Celastraceae)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duarte, Lucienir Pains; Figueiredo, Rute Cunha; Sousa, Grasiely Faria de; Soares, Debora Barbosa da Silva; Rodrigues, Salomao Bento Vasconcelos; Silva, Fernando Cesar; Silva, Gracia Divina de Fatima; Vieira Filho, Sidney Augusto

    2010-01-01

    The chemical investigation of Salacia elliptica allowed to the isolation of 20 constituents: two polyols, one xanthone, a mixture of long chain hydrocarbons, one carboxylic acid, one polymer, two steroidal compounds, one aromatic ester and eleven pentacyclic triterpenes. These triterpenes include 3β-stearyloxy-oleanane, 3β-stearyloxy-ursane, one seco-friedelane, and eight compounds of the friedelane series. The chemical structure and the relative configuration of a new triterpene 1,3-dioxo-16α-hydroxyfriedelane (15) were established through 1 H and 13 C NMR including 2D experiments (HMBC, HMQC, COSY and NOESY) and herein reported for the first time (author)

  8. Chemical constituents of Salacia elliptica (Celastraceae)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duarte, Lucienir Pains; Figueiredo, Rute Cunha; Sousa, Grasiely Faria de; Soares, Debora Barbosa da Silva; Rodrigues, Salomao Bento Vasconcelos; Silva, Fernando Cesar; Silva, Gracia Divina de Fatima, E-mail: lucienir@ufmg.b [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica; Vieira Filho, Sidney Augusto [Universidade Federal de Ouro Preto, MG (Brazil). Escola de Farmacia. Dept. de Farmacia

    2010-07-01

    The chemical investigation of Salacia elliptica allowed to the isolation of 20 constituents: two polyols, one xanthone, a mixture of long chain hydrocarbons, one carboxylic acid, one polymer, two steroidal compounds, one aromatic ester and eleven pentacyclic triterpenes. These triterpenes include 3{beta}-stearyloxy-oleanane, 3{beta}-stearyloxy-ursane, one seco-friedelane, and eight compounds of the friedelane series. The chemical structure and the relative configuration of a new triterpene 1,3-dioxo-16alpha-hydroxyfriedelane (15) were established through {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR including 2D experiments (HMBC, HMQC, COSY and NOESY) and herein reported for the first time (author)

  9. Chemical constituents of Salacia elliptica (Celastraceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucienir Pains Duarte

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The chemical investigation of Salacia elliptica allowed to the isolation of 20 constituents: two polyols, one xanthone, a mixture of long chain hydrocarbons, one carboxylic acid, one polymer, two steroidal compounds, one aromatic ester and eleven pentacyclic triterpenes. These triterpenes include 3β-stearyloxy-oleanane, 3β-stearyloxy-ursane, one seco-friedelane, and eight compounds of the friedelane serie. The chemical structure and the relative configuration of a new triterpene 1,3-dioxo-16α-hydroxyfriedelane (15 were established through ¹H and 13C NMR including 2D experiments (HMBC, HMQC, COSY and NOESY and herein reported for the first time.

  10. Immunomodulatory constituents from an ascomycete, Microascus tardifaciens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, H; Fujimaki, T; Okuyama, E; Yamazaki, M

    1999-10-01

    Fractionation guided by the immunosuppressive activity of the defatted AcOEt extract of an Ascomycete, Microascus tardifaciens, afforded eight constituents, questin (emodin 8-O-methylether) (1), rubrocristin (2), 5,7-dihydroxy-4-methylphthalide (3), cladosporin (asperentin) (4), cladosporin 8-O-methylether (5), tradioxopiperazine A [cyclo-L-alanyl-5-isopentenyl-2-(1',1'-dimethylallyl)-L-tryptophan] (6), tradioxopiperazine B [cyclo-L-alanyl-7-isopentenyl-2-(1',1'-dimethylallyl)-L-tryptophan] (7), and asperflavin (8), among which 6 and 7 were new compounds. Compounds 1 and 2 showed considerably high immunosuppressive activity, 6 was moderate and, 3, 4, 5, 7 and 8 showed low activity.

  11. Research reactor in-core fuel management optimization by application of multiple cyclic interchange algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Geemert, R.; Hoogenboom, J.E.; Gibcus, H.P.M. [Technische Univ. Delft (Netherlands). Interfacultair Reactor Inst.; Quist, A.J. [Delft University of Technology, Faculty of Applied Mathematics and Informatics Mekelweg 4, 2628 JB, Delft (Netherlands)

    1998-12-01

    Fuel shuffling optimization procedures are proposed for the Hoger Onderwijs Reactor (HOR) in Delft, The Netherlands, a 2MWth swimming-pool type research reactor. These procedures are based on the multiple cyclic interchange approach, according to which the search for the reload pattern associated with the highest objective function value can be thought of as divided in multiple stages. The transition from the initial to the final stage is characterized by an increase in the degree of locality of the search procedure. The general idea is that, during the first stages, the `elite` cluster containing the group of best patterns must be located, after which the solution space is sampled in a more and more local sense to find the local optimum in this cluster. The transition(s) from global search behaviour to local search behaviour can be either prompt, by defining strictly separate search regimes, or gradual by introducing stochastic acceptance tests. The possible objectives and the safety and operation constraints, as well as the optimization procedure, are discussed, followed by some optimization results for the HOR. (orig.) 4 refs.

  12. Research reactor in-core fuel management optimization by application of multiple cyclic interchange algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geemert, R. van; Hoogenboom, J.E.; Gibcus, H.P.M.

    1998-01-01

    Fuel shuffling optimization procedures are proposed for the Hoger Onderwijs Reactor (HOR) in Delft, The Netherlands, a 2MWth swimming-pool type research reactor. These procedures are based on the multiple cyclic interchange approach, according to which the search for the reload pattern associated with the highest objective function value can be thought of as divided in multiple stages. The transition from the initial to the final stage is characterized by an increase in the degree of locality of the search procedure. The general idea is that, during the first stages, the 'elite' cluster containing the group of best patterns must be located, after which the solution space is sampled in a more and more local sense to find the local optimum in this cluster. The transition(s) from global search behaviour to local search behaviour can be either prompt, by defining strictly separate search regimes, or gradual by introducing stochastic acceptance tests. The possible objectives and the safety and operation constraints, as well as the optimization procedure, are discussed, followed by some optimization results for the HOR. (orig.)

  13. DOD Electronic Commerce (EC)/Electronic Data Interchange (EDI) in contracting report

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Use of Electronic Commerce (EC)/Electronic Data Interchange (EDI) to support Department of Defense (DoD) procurement processes has been under consideration for some time. A 1988 Deputy Secretary of Defense memo calls for maximum use of EDI, based on 10 years of DoD EDI investigation and experiments. In 1990, Defense Management Review Decision 941 stated, 'The strategic goal of DoD's current efforts is to provide the department with the capability to initiate, conduct, and maintain its external business related transactions and internal logistics, contracting, and financial activities without requiring the use of hard copy media.' The EC in Contracting PAT membership reflected a broad cross section of Military Services and Defense Agencies working on a full-time basis for 60 days. The diversity of the EC in Contracting PAT ensured that the needs and concerns of all DoD components were addressed during the creation of the report. The resultant plan, therefore, represents a comprehensive approach for implementing EC throughout the DoD.

  14. The interchangeability of radioisotope and X-ray based measurements of bone mineral density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adachi, J.D.; Webber, C.E.

    1991-01-01

    Lumbar spine and femoral neck bone mineral density (BMD) were measured with a Novo radioisotope based dual photon densitometer and with a Lunar X-ray densitometer in 94 subjects attending a Metabolic Bone Disease Clinic. There was a strong correlation between results obtained from each machine. The correlation coefficients for the spine and femoral neck were 0.97 and 0.88, respectively. Differences between results from each machine were normally distributed with a mean bias of 37.5% (spine) and 27.8% (femur), arising principally from differences in machine calibration. In each case the BMD was greater measured by X-ray absorptiometry. The range for the bias was approximately 25-50% for the spine and 10-45% for the femoral neck. The results from these two machines are not interchangeable. When subjects participating in long term studies using a radioisotope densitometer are transferred to an X-ray densitometer, an individual conversion factor must be measured at each site for each subject. (author)

  15. Amazonian magnetostratigraphy: Dating the first pulse of the Great American Faunal Interchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Kenneth E., Jr.; Prothero, Donald R.; Romero-Pittman, Lidia; Hertel, Fritz; Rivera, Nadia

    2010-04-01

    The chronostratigraphy of the youngest Neogene deposits of the Amazon Basin, which comprise the Madre de Dios Formation in eastern Peru, remains unresolved. Although 40Ar/ 39Ar dates on two volcanic ashes from this formation in Peru provide critical baseline data points, stratigraphic correlations among scattered riverine outcrops in adjacent drainage basins remain problematic. To refine the chronostratigraphy of the Madre de Dios Formation, we report here the magnetostratigraphy of an outcrop on the Madre de Dios River in southeastern Peru. A total of 18 polarity zones was obtained in the ˜65-m-thick Cerro Colorado section, which we correlate to magnetozones Chrons C4Ar to C2An (9.5-3.0 Ma) based on the prior 40Ar/ 39Ar dates. These results confirm the late Miocene age of a gomphothere recovered from the Ipururo Formation, which underlies the late Miocene Ucayali Unconformity at the base of the Cerro Colorado outcrop. The results also support earlier interpretations of a late Miocene age for other fossils of North American mammals recovered from basal conglomeratic deposits of the Madre de Dios Formation immediately above the Ucayali Unconformity. These mammals include other gomphotheres, peccaries, and tapirs, and their presence in South America in the late Miocene is recognized as part of the first pulse of the Great American Faunal Interchange.

  16. Microfluidic impact printer with interchangeable cartridges for versatile non-contact multiplexed micropatterning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yuzhe; Huang, Eric; Lam, Kit S; Pan, Tingrui

    2013-05-21

    Biopatterning has been increasingly used for well-defined cellular microenvironment, patterned surface topology, and guided biological cues; however, it meets challenges on biocompatibility, thermal and chemical sensitivity, as well as limited availability of reagents. In this paper, we aim at combining the desired features from non-contact inkjet printing and dot-matrix impact printing to establish a versatile multiplexed micropatterning platform, referred to as Microfluidic Impact Printer (MI-Printer), for emerging biomedical applications. Using this platform, we can achieve the distinct features of no cross-contamination, sub-microliter ink loading with a minimal dead volume, high-throughput printing, biocompatible non-contact processing, sequential patterning with self-alignment, wide adaptability for complex media (e.g., cell suspension or colloidal solutions), interchangeable/disposable cartridge design, and simple assembly and configuration, all highly desirable towards laboratory-based research and development. Specifically, the printing resolution of the MI-printer platform has been experimentally characterized and theoretically analysed. Optimal printing resolution of 80 μm has been repeatedly obtained. Furthermore, two useful functions of the MI-printer, multiplexed printing and combinatorial printing, have been experimentally demonstrated with less than 10 μm misalignment. Moreover, molecular and biological patterning, utilizing the multiplexed and combinatorial printing, has been implemented to illustrate the utility of this versatile printing technique for emerging biomedical applications.

  17. Summary of Work for Joint Research Interchanges with DARWIN Integrated Product Team 1998

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesselink, Lambertus

    1999-01-01

    The intent of Stanford University's SciVis group is to develop technologies that enabled comparative analysis and visualization techniques for simulated and experimental flow fields. These techniques would then be made available under the Joint Research Interchange for potential injection into the DARWIN Workspace Environment (DWE). In the past, we have focused on techniques that exploited feature based comparisons such as shock and vortex extractions. Our current research effort focuses on finding a quantitative comparison of general vector fields based on topological features. Since the method relies on topological information, grid matching and vector alignment is not needed in the comparison. This is often a problem with many data comparison techniques. In addition, since only topology based information is stored and compared for each field, there is a significant compression of information that enables large databases to be quickly searched. This report will briefly (1) describe current technologies in the area of comparison techniques, (2) will describe the theory of our new method and finally (3) summarize a few of the results.

  18. Summary of Work for Joint Research Interchanges with DARWIN Integrated Product Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesselink, Lambertus

    1999-01-01

    The intent of Stanford University's SciVis group is to develop technologies that enabled comparative analysis and visualization techniques for simulated and experimental flow fields. These techniques would then be made available un- der the Joint Research Interchange for potential injection into the DARWIN Workspace Environment (DWE). In the past, we have focused on techniques that exploited feature based comparisons such as shock and vortex extractions. Our current research effort focuses on finding a quantitative comparison of general vector fields based on topological features. Since the method relies on topological information, grid matching an@ vector alignment is not needed in the comparison. This is often a problem with many data comparison techniques. In addition, since only topology based information is stored and compared for each field, there is a significant compression of information that enables large databases to be quickly searched. This report will briefly (1) describe current technologies in the area of comparison techniques, (2) will describe the theory of our new method and finally (3) summarize a few of the results.

  19. Analysis of gamma irradiated pepper constituents, 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takagi, Kazuko; Okuyama, Tsuneo; Ishikawa, Toshihiro.

    1988-01-01

    Gamma irradiated peppers (10 krad, 100 krad, 1 Mrad) were analyzed by HPLC. The extraction method and HPLC conditions were same as the first report, that is, the extraction from pepper was performed by Automatic Air Hammer and the extracted samples were separated on a reversed phase C 8 column with a concave gradient from 0.1% trifluoro aceticacid (TFA) in water to 75% acetonitrile-0.1% TFA in water for 60 minutes and detected at 210 nm, 280 nm. It is difficult to compare with irradiated and unirradiated pepper constituents by their peak height or area. And the method of multi variant statistically analysis was introduced. The 'peak n area/peak n + 1 area' ratio was calculated by computer. Each peak area was accounted by integrator. The value of these ratio were called 'parameter'. Each chromatogram has 741 parameters calculated with 39 chromatographic peaks. And these parameters were abopted to the multi variant statiscally analysis. Comparison of constituents between irradiated pepper and unirradiated pepper was done by 741 parameters. The correlation of parameters between irradiated and unirradiated was investigated by use of computer. Some parameters of irradiated case were selected as which had no correlation with unirradiated case. That is to say these parameters were thought to be changed with gamma spectrum irradiation. By this method, Coumarin was identified as a changed component with gamma irradiation. (author)

  20. Patch testing with constituents of Compositae mixes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulsen, Evy; Andersen, Klaus E

    2012-05-01

    The development of mixes containing Compositae plant extracts has improved the diagnosis of Compositae contact allergy, but none of them has fulfilled the criteria for an ideal European plant mix. To evaluate which constituents of two commercial Compositae mixes were most useful as screening agents. These comprised 76 patients testing positive to Compositae mix 6% in petrolatum and 29 patients testing positive to Compositae mix 5% pet., all of whom were tested with constituents of the respective mixes. The majority of patients tested positive to parthenolide or parthenolide-containing extracts, followed by German chamomile, yarrow, and arnica. As German chamomile is a weak sensitizer, the results suggest cross-reactions or reactions to unknown allergens. No one was positive to Roman chamomile. Even though parthenolide seems to be a suitable supplement to the baseline series, the results emphasize that it is important to patch test with extracts of native or locally grown plants, not only because of the geographical variation, but also because of the potential unknown allergens contained in short ether preparations and the variability in the individual patient's exposure and cross-reaction patterns. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  1. Support structure for reactor core constituent element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aida, Yasuhiko.

    1993-01-01

    A connection pipe having an entrance nozzle inserted therein as a reactor core constituent element is protruded above the upper surface of a reactor core support plate. A through hole is disposed to the protruding portion of the connection pipe. The through hole and a through hole disposed to the reactor core support plate are connected by a communication pipe. A shear rod is disposed in a horizontal portion at the inside of the communication pipe and is supported by a spring horizontally movably. Further, a groove is disposed at a position of the entrance nozzle opposing to the shear rod. The shear rod is urged out of the communication pipe by the pressure of the high pressure plenum and the top end portion of the shear rod is inserted to the groove of the entrance nozzle during operation. Accordingly, the shear rod is positioned in a state where it is extended from the through hole of the communication pipe to the groove of the entrance nozzle. This can mechanically constrain the rising of the reactor core constituent elements by the shear rod upon occurrence of earthquakes. (I.N.)

  2. Resistive interchange mode destabilized by helically trapped energetic ions and its effects on energetic ions and bulk plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du, X.D.; Toi, K.; Osakabe, M.

    2014-10-01

    A resistive interchange mode with bursting behavior and rapid frequency chirping in the range less than 10 kHz is observed for the first time in the magnetic hill region of net current-free, low beta LHD (Large Helical Device) plasmas during high power injection of perpendicular neutral beams. The mode resonates with the precession motion of helically trapped energetic beam ions, following the resonant condition. The radial mode structure is found to be very similar to that of usual pressure-driven interchange mode, of which radial displacement eigenfunction has an even function around the rational surface. This beam driven mode is excited when the beta value of helically trapped energetic ions exceed a certain threshold. The radial transport of helically trapped energetic ions induced by the mode transiently generates significant radial electric field near the plasma peripheral region. Thus generated radial electric field clearly suppresses micro turbulence and improves bulk plasma confinement, suggesting strong flow shear generation. (author)

  3. A new biocompatible nanocomposite as a promising constituent of sunscreens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Rehab M; Elfeky, Souad A; Verwanger, Thomas; Krammer, Barbara

    2016-06-01

    Skin naturally uses antioxidants to protect itself from the damaging effects of sunlight. If this is not sufficient, other measures have to be taken. Like this, hydroxyapatite has the potential to be applied as an active constituent of sunscreens since calcium phosphate absorbs in the ultraviolet region (UV). The objective of the present work was to synthesize a hydroxyapatite-ascorbic acid nanocomposite (HAp/AA-NC) as a new biocompatible constituent of sunscreens and to test its efficiency with skin cell models. The synthesized HAp/AA-NC was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, absorption spectrophotometry and X-ray diffraction analysis. The protective effect of the construct was tested with respect to viability and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation of primary human dermal fibroblasts (SKIN) and human epidermal keratinocytes (HaCaT). Both cell lines were irradiated with UV light, λmax=254 nm with a fluence of 25 mJ cm(-2) to mimic the effect of UV radiation of sunlight on the skin. Results showed that HAp/AA-NC had a stimulating effect on the cell viability of both, HaCaT and SKIN cells, relative to the irradiated control. Intracellular ROS significantly decreased in UV irradiated cells when treated with HAp/AA-NC. We conclude that the synthesized HAp/AA-NC have been validated in vitro as a skin protector against the harmful effect of UV-induced ROS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Diagnostic consistency and interchangeability of schizophrenic disorders and bipolar disorders: A 7-year follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Yen-Ni; Yang, Shu-Yu; Kuo, Chian-Jue; Lin, Shih-Ku

    2018-03-01

    The change in psychiatric diagnoses in clinical practice is not an unusual phenomenon. The interchange between the diagnoses of schizophrenic disorders and bipolar disorders is a major clinical issue because of the differences in treatment regimens and long-term prognoses. In this study, we used a nationwide population-based sample to compare the diagnostic consistency and interchange rate between schizophrenic disorders and bipolar disorders. In total, 25 711 and 11 261 patients newly diagnosed as having schizophrenic disorder and bipolar disorder, respectively, were retrospectively enrolled from the Psychiatric Inpatient Medical Claims database between 2001 and 2005. We followed these two cohorts for 7 years to determine whether their diagnoses were consistent throughout subsequent hospitalizations. The interchange between the two diagnoses was analyzed. In the schizophrenic disorder cohort, the overall diagnostic consistency rate was 87.3% and the rate of change to bipolar disorder was 3.0% during the 7-year follow-up. Additional analyses of subtypes revealed that the change rate from schizoaffective disorder to bipolar disorder was 12.0%. In the bipolar disorder cohort, the overall diagnostic consistency rate was 71.9% and the rate of change to schizophrenic disorder was 8.3%. Changes in the diagnosis of a major psychosis are not uncommon. The interchange between the diagnoses of schizophrenic disorders and bipolar disorders might be attributed to the evolution of clinical symptoms and the observation of preserved social functions that contradict the original diagnosis. While making a psychotic diagnosis, clinicians should be aware of the possibility of the change in diagnosis in the future. © 2017 The Authors. Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences © 2017 Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology.

  5. Effects of the chromatic defocus caused by interchange of two monochromatic lights on refraction and ocular dimension in guinea pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Yi-Feng; Dai, Jin-Hui; Liu, Rui; Chen, Min-Jie; Zhou, Xing-Tao; Chu, Ren-Yuan

    2013-01-01

    To investigate refractive and axial responses to the shift of focal plane resulting from the interchange of two monochromatic lights separately corresponding to the peak wavelengths of the cones absorption spectrum in retina, fifty 2-week-old pigmented guinea pigs were randomly assigned to five groups based on the mode of illumination: short-wavelength light (SL), middle-wavelength light (ML) and broad-band white light (BL) for 20 weeks, SL for 10 weeks followed by ML for 10 weeks (STM), as well as ML for 10 weeks followed by SL for 10 weeks (MTS). Biometric and refractive measurements were then performed every 2 weeks. After 10 weeks, SL and STM groups became more hyperopic and had less vitreous elongation than BL group. However, ML and MTS groups became more myopic and had more vitreous elongation. After interchange of the monochromatic light, the refractive error decreased rapidly by about 1.93D and the vitreous length increased by 0.14 mm in STM group from 10 to 12 weeks. After that, there were no significant intergroup differences between STM and BL groups. The interchange from ML to SL quickly increased the refractive error by about 1.53D and decreased the vitreous length by about 0.13 mm in MTS group after two weeks. At this time, there were also no significant intergroup differences between MTS and BL groups. The guinea pig eye can accurately detect the shift in focal plane caused by interchange of two monochromatic lights and rapidly generate refractive and axial responses. However, an excessive compensation was induced. Some properties of photoreceptors or retina may be changed by the monochromatic light to influence the following refractive development.

  6. Effects of the chromatic defocus caused by interchange of two monochromatic lights on refraction and ocular dimension in guinea pigs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Feng Qian

    Full Text Available To investigate refractive and axial responses to the shift of focal plane resulting from the interchange of two monochromatic lights separately corresponding to the peak wavelengths of the cones absorption spectrum in retina, fifty 2-week-old pigmented guinea pigs were randomly assigned to five groups based on the mode of illumination: short-wavelength light (SL, middle-wavelength light (ML and broad-band white light (BL for 20 weeks, SL for 10 weeks followed by ML for 10 weeks (STM, as well as ML for 10 weeks followed by SL for 10 weeks (MTS. Biometric and refractive measurements were then performed every 2 weeks. After 10 weeks, SL and STM groups became more hyperopic and had less vitreous elongation than BL group. However, ML and MTS groups became more myopic and had more vitreous elongation. After interchange of the monochromatic light, the refractive error decreased rapidly by about 1.93D and the vitreous length increased by 0.14 mm in STM group from 10 to 12 weeks. After that, there were no significant intergroup differences between STM and BL groups. The interchange from ML to SL quickly increased the refractive error by about 1.53D and decreased the vitreous length by about 0.13 mm in MTS group after two weeks. At this time, there were also no significant intergroup differences between MTS and BL groups. The guinea pig eye can accurately detect the shift in focal plane caused by interchange of two monochromatic lights and rapidly generate refractive and axial responses. However, an excessive compensation was induced. Some properties of photoreceptors or retina may be changed by the monochromatic light to influence the following refractive development.

  7. Paranormal belief and errors of probabilistic reasoning: The role of constituent conditional relatedness in believers' susceptibility to the conjunction fallacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Paul; Fisk, John E; Lowrie, Emma

    2017-11-01

    The present study examines the extent to which stronger belief in either extrasensory perception, psychokinesis or life-after-death is associated with a proneness to making conjunction errors (CEs). One hundred and sixty members of the UK public read eight hypothetical scenarios and for each estimated the likelihood that two constituent events alone plus their conjunction would occur. The impact of paranormal belief plus constituents' conditional relatedness type, estimates of the subjectively less likely and more likely constituents plus relevant interaction terms tested via three Generalized Linear Mixed Models. General qualification levels were controlled for. As expected, stronger PK beliefs and depiction of a positively conditionally related (verses conditionally unrelated) constituent pairs predicted higher CE generation. ESP and LAD beliefs had no impact with, surprisingly, higher estimates of the less likely constituent predicting fewer - not more - CEs. Theoretical implications, methodological issues and ideas for future research are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Statistical Analysis of CMC Constituent and Processing Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornuff, Jonathan

    2004-01-01

    Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMCs) are the next "big thing" in high-temperature structural materials. In the case of jet engines, it is widely believed that the metallic superalloys currently being utilized for hot structures (combustors, shrouds, turbine vanes and blades) are nearing their potential limits of improvement. In order to allow for increased turbine temperatures to increase engine efficiency, material scientists have begun looking toward advanced CMCs and SiC/SiC composites in particular. Ceramic composites provide greater strength-to-weight ratios at higher temperatures than metallic alloys, but at the same time require greater challenges in micro-structural optimization that in turn increases the cost of the material as well as increases the risk of variability in the material s thermo-structural behavior. to model various potential CMC engine materials and examines the current variability in these properties due to variability in component processing conditions and constituent materials; then, to see how processing and constituent variations effect key strength, stiffness, and thermal properties of the finished components. Basically, this means trying to model variations in the component s behavior by knowing what went into creating it. inter-phase and manufactured by chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) and melt infiltration (MI) were considered. Examinations of: (1) the percent constituents by volume, (2) the inter-phase thickness, (3) variations in the total porosity, and (4) variations in the chemical composition of the Sic fiber are carried out and modeled using various codes used here at NASA-Glenn (PCGina, NASALife, CEMCAN, etc...). The effects of these variations and the ranking of their respective influences on the various thermo-mechanical material properties are studied and compared to available test data. The properties of the materials as well as minor changes to geometry are then made to the computer model and the detrimental effects

  9. Chemical Constituents of Caesalpinia decapetala (Roth Alston

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Yang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The current study targets the chemical constituents of Caesalpinia decapetala (Roth Alston and investigates the bioactivities of the isolated compounds. Fourteen known compounds were isolated using column chromatography, and structural identification was performed by physical and spectral analyses. The biological activities of the compounds were also evaluated by 3-(4,5-dimethythiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT and 2,2-diphenlyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH assays. Emodin (6, baicalein (9, and apigenin (12 displayed antitumor activities against the MGC-803 cell line, while quercetin (2, rutin (5, baicalein (9, and epicatechin (13 showed stronger DPPH scavenging activities compared with ascorbic acid. Andrographolide (1, quercetin (2, bergenin (4, rutin (5, emodin (6, betulin (7, baicalein (9, polydatin (10, salicin (11, and apigenin (12, were obtained from C. decapetala (Roth Alston for the first time.

  10. Constituent gluons and the static quark potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greensite, Jeff [San Francisco State Univ., CA (United States); Szczepaniak, Adam P. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2016-04-01

    We suggest that Hamiltonian matrix elements between physical states in QCD might be approximated, in Coulomb gauge, by "lattice-improved" tree diagrams; i.e. tree diagram contributions with dressed ghost, transverse gluon, and Coulomb propagators obtained from lattice simulations. Such matrix elements can be applied to a variational treatment of hadronic states which include constituent gluons. As an illustration and first application of this hybrid approach, we derive a variational estimate of the heavy quark potential for distances up to 2.5 fm. The Coulomb string tension in SU(3) gauge theory is about a factor of four times greater than the asymptotic string tension. In our variational approach, using for simplicity a single variational parameter, we can reduce this overshoot by nearly the factor required. The building blocks of our approach are Coulomb gauge propagators, and in this connection we present new lattice results for the ghost and transverse gluon propagators in position space.

  11. Regional differences in constituents of gall stones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashok, M; Nageshwar Reddy, D; Jayanthi, V; Kalkura, S N; Vijayan, V; Gokulakrishnan, S; Nair, K G M

    2005-01-01

    The pathogenesis of pigment and mixed gall stone formation remains elusive. The elemental constituents of gall stones from southern states of Tamil Nadu, Kerala and Karnataka have been characterized. Our aim was to determine the elemental concentration of representative samples of pigment, mixed and cholesterol gall stones from Andhra Pradesh using proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) using a 3 MV horizontal pelletron accelerator. Pigment gall stones had significantly high concentrations of copper, iron and lead; chromium was absent. Except for iron all these elements were significantly low in cholesterol gall stones and intermediate levels were seen in mixed gall stones. Highest concentrations of chromium was seen in cholesterol and titanium in mixed gall stones respectively; latter similar to other southern states. Arsenic was distinctly absent in cholesterol and mixed gall stones. The study has identified differences in elemental components of the gall stones from Andhra Pradesh.

  12. Antimelanoma and Antityrosinase from Alpinia galangal Constituents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Yu Lo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Two compounds, 1,7-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl-1,4,6-heptatrien-3-one (BHPHTO and bisdemethoxycurcumin (BDMC they have been isolated from the rhizomes of Alpinia galangal, and the structures of both pure constituents were determined using spectroscopic analyses. The study examined the bioeffectivenesses of the two compounds on the human melanoma A2058 and showed that significantly inhibited the proliferation of melanoma cells in the cell viability assay. This research was also taken on the tests to B16-F10 cell line and showed minor inhibitory consequences of cellular tyrosinase activities and melanin contents. Our results revealed the anticancer effects of A. galangal compounds, and therefore, the target compounds could be potentially applied in the therapeutic application and the food industry.

  13. Effects of interfering constituents on tritium smears

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levi, G.D. Jr.; Cheeks, K.E.

    1993-01-01

    Tritium smears are performed by Health Protection Operations (HPO) to assess transferable contamination on work place surfaces, materials for movement outside Radiologically Controlled Areas (RCA), and product containers being shipped between facilities. Historically, gas proportional counters were used to detect transferable tritium contamination collected by smearing. Because tritium is a low-energy beta emitter, gas proportional counters do not provide the sensitivity or the counting efficiency to accurately measure the tritium activity on the smear. Liquid Scintillation Counters (LSC) provide greater counting efficiency for the low-energy beta particles along with greater reliability and reproducibility compared to gas flow proportional counters. The purpose of this technical evaluation was to determine the effects of interfering constituents such as filters, dirt and oil on the counting efficiency and tritium recoveries of tritium smears by LSC

  14. Prescription Omega-3 Fatty Acid Products and Dietary Supplements Are Not Interchangeable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilleman, Daniel; Smer, Aiman

    2016-01-01

    To provide an overview of prescription and dietary supplement omega-3 fatty acid (OM3-FA) products and considerations for clinical use. Narrative review. The PubMed database was searched for cardiovascular-related investigations focused on eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and/or docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) (limit: English-only articles). Additional regulatory information on prescription and dietary supplements was obtained from United States Food and Drug Administration online sources. Prescription QM3-FA products are supported by robust clinical development and safety monitoring programs, whereas dietary supplements are not required to demonstrate safety or efficacy prior to marketing. There are no over-the-counter OM3-FA products available in the United States. Investigations of OM3-FA dietary supplements show that quantities of EPA and DHA are highly variable within and between brands. Dietary supplements also may contain potentially harmful components, including oxidized OM3-FA, other lipids, cholesterol, and toxins. Prescription OM3-FA products may contain DHA and EPA or EPA alone. All prescription OM3-FA products have demonstrated statistically significant triglyceride reduction as monotherapy or in combination with statins in patients with hypertriglyceridemia. Differential effects between products containing EPA and DHA compared with a high-purity EPA product (icosapent ethyl) have clinical implications: Increases in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol associated with DHA have the potential to confound strategies for managing patients with dyslipidemia. Cardiovascular outcomes studies of prescription CM3-FA products are ongoing. OM3-FA dietary supplements should not be substituted for prescription products, and prescription OM3-FA products that contain DHA are not equivalent to or interchangeable with high-purity EPA (icosapent ethyl) and should not be substituted for it.

  15. First North American fossil monkey and early Miocene tropical biotic interchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloch, Jonathan I.; Woodruff, Emily D.; Wood, Aaron R.; Rincon, Aldo F.; Harrington, Arianna R.; Morgan, Gary S.; Foster, David A.; Montes, Camilo; Jaramillo, Carlos A.; Jud, Nathan A.; Jones, Douglas S.; MacFadden, Bruce J.

    2016-05-01

    New World monkeys (platyrrhines) are a diverse part of modern tropical ecosystems in North and South America, yet their early evolutionary history in the tropics is largely unknown. Molecular divergence estimates suggest that primates arrived in tropical Central America, the southern-most extent of the North American landmass, with several dispersals from South America starting with the emergence of the Isthmus of Panama 3-4 million years ago (Ma). The complete absence of primate fossils from Central America has, however, limited our understanding of their history in the New World. Here we present the first description of a fossil monkey recovered from the North American landmass, the oldest known crown platyrrhine, from a precisely dated 20.9-Ma layer in the Las Cascadas Formation in the Panama Canal Basin, Panama. This discovery suggests that family-level diversification of extant New World monkeys occurred in the tropics, with new divergence estimates for Cebidae between 22 and 25 Ma, and provides the oldest fossil evidence for mammalian interchange between South and North America. The timing is consistent with recent tectonic reconstructions of a relatively narrow Central American Seaway in the early Miocene epoch, coincident with over-water dispersals inferred for many other groups of animals and plants. Discovery of an early Miocene primate in Panama provides evidence for a circum-Caribbean tropical distribution of New World monkeys by this time, with ocean barriers not wholly restricting their northward movements, requiring a complex set of ecological factors to explain their absence in well-sampled similarly aged localities at higher latitudes of North America.

  16. Transcriptional activity of the giant barrel sponge, Xestospongia muta Holobiont: Molecular Evidence for Metabolic Interchange

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cara L Fiore

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Compared to our understanding of the taxonomic composition of the symbiotic microbes in marine sponges, the functional diversity of these symbionts is largely unknown. Furthermore, the application of genomic, transcriptomic, and proteomic techniques to functional questions on sponge host-symbiont interactions is in its infancy. In this study, we generated a transcriptome for the host and a metatranscriptome of its microbial symbionts for the giant barrel sponge, Xestospongia muta, from the Caribbean. In combination with a gene-specific approach, our goals were to 1 characterize genetic evidence for nitrogen cycling in X. muta, an important limiting nutrient on coral reefs 2 identify which prokaryotic symbiont lineages are metabolically active and, 3 characterize the metabolic potential of the prokaryotic community. Xestospongia muta expresses genes from multiple nitrogen transformation pathways that when combined with the abundance of this sponge, and previous data on dissolved inorganic nitrogen fluxes, shows that this sponge is an important contributor to nitrogen cycling on coral reefs. Additionally, we observed significant differences in gene expression of the archaeal amoA gene, which is involved in ammonia oxidation, between coral reef locations consistent with differences in the fluxes of dissolved inorganic nitrogen previously reported. In regards to symbiont metabolic potential, the genes in the biosynthetic pathways of several amino acids were present in the prokaryotic metatranscriptome dataset but in the host-derived transcripts only the catabolic reactions for these amino acids were present. A similar pattern was observed for the B vitamins (riboflavin, biotin, thiamin, cobalamin. These results expand our understanding of biogeochemical cycling in sponges, and the metabolic interchange highlighted here advances the field of symbiont physiology by elucidating specific metabolic pathways where there is high potential for host

  17. Lapin Data Interchange Among Database, Analysis and Display Programs Using XML-Based Text Files

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of grant NCC3-966 was to investigate and evaluate the interchange of application-specific data among multiple programs each carrying out part of the analysis and design task. This has been carried out previously by creating a custom program to read data produced by one application and then write that data to a file whose format is specific to the second application that needs all or part of that data. In this investigation, data of interest is described using the XML markup language that allows the data to be stored in a text-string. Software to transform output data of a task into an XML-string and software to read an XML string and extract all or a portion of the data needed for another application is used to link two independent applications together as part of an overall design effort. This approach was initially used with a standard analysis program, Lapin, along with standard applications a standard spreadsheet program, a relational database program, and a conventional dialog and display program to demonstrate the successful sharing of data among independent programs. Most of the effort beyond that demonstration has been concentrated on the inclusion of more complex display programs. Specifically, a custom-written windowing program organized around dialogs to control the interactions have been combined with an independent CAD program (Open Cascade) that supports sophisticated display of CAD elements such as lines, spline curves, and surfaces and turbine-blade data produced by an independent blade design program (UD0300).

  18. Sustainable Regulation of Information Sharing with Electronic Data Interchange by a Trust-Embedded Contract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guanghua Han

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the risks in demand information sharing applications by electronic soft-orders using electronic data interchange (EDI systems in e-commerce and aims to suggest a sustainable regulation mechanism with a trust-embedded contract. In a supply chain with one retailer and one supplier, the retailer solicits private forecasted demand and places soft-orders via EDI to the supplier. To ensure abundant supply, the retailer has an incentive to inflate her soft-orders, which potentially harms the credible information sharing and sustainability of business cooperation. Normally, the degree to which the supplier relies on the retailer’s order information is specified by trust, which is evaluated according to the retailer’s reputation and supplier’s intuition in this study. Based on standard game theory, we find that both the retailer’s order and the quantity of supplier prepared materials are independent of the retailer’s forecast. Therefore, EDI based information sharing in e-commerce without a regulation mechanism leads to inefficient demand information sharing. Since both the supplier and retailer are proved to faces huge of potential profit losses due to the failure of information sharing, the commerce by EDI based information sharing is full of risk and unsustainable. Therefore, a regulation mechanism that leaded by the retailer is proposed to establish ‘win-win’ sustainable cooperation. Numerical experiments highlight the value of trust, the impact of reputation and intuition in decisions, and the effectiveness of the regulation mechanism by a cost-sharing contract.

  19. Potential pitfalls in the nuclear medicine imaging: Experimental models to evaluate the effect of natural products on the radiolabeling of blood constituents, bioavailability of radiopharmaceutical and on the survival of Escherichia coli strains submitted to the treatment with stannous ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soares, Scheila F.; Brito, Lavinia C.; Souza, Deise E.; Bernardo, Luciana C.; Oliveira, Joelma F.; Bernardo-Filho, Mario

    2006-01-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) allows studies of physiological or pathological processes. Red blood cells labeled with technetium-99m ( 99m Tc-RBC) are used as a radiopharmaceutical in several evaluations. The radiolabeling efficiency and bioavailability of radiopharmaceuticals can be altered by natural/synthetic drugs and may induce pitfalls in the analysis of the nuclear medicine imaging. The labeling with 99m Tc requires a reducing agent and stannous chloride (SnCl 2 ) is widely utilized. However, SnCl 2 presents a citotoxic and/or genotoxic potential in Escherichia coli (E. coli) strains. The aim of this work was to evaluate the influence of aqueous extracts of Baccharis genistelloides (BG), Terminalia chebula (TC), Maytenus ilicifolia (MI), Cassia angustifolia (CA) and Equisetum arvense (EA) on (i) radiolabeling of blood constituents (ii) bioavailability of sodium pertechnetate(Na 99m TcO 4 ) radiopharmaceutical (iii) survival of E. coli. In vitro labeling of RBC was performed with blood (Wistar rats) incubated with each extract, SnCl 2 and Na 99m TcO 4 . Plasma (P) and blood cells (BC) were isolated, another aliquots precipitated and soluble (SF) and insoluble (IF) fractions isolated and counted. In the bioavailability of Na 99m TcO 4 , Wistar rats were treated (7 days) with aqueous extract or with 0.9%NaCl, the radiopharmaceutical was administered, the animals sacrificed, the organs isolated, weighted and radioactivity counted. To evaluate the effect on the bacterial survival, E. coli was treated with: (a) SnCl 2 ; (b) 0.9% NaCl; (c) vegetal extract; or (d) SnCl 2 and vegetal extract. Radiolabeling efficiency showed a significantly decrease (ANOVA/Tukey post-test, p 99m TcO 4 was altered significantly (unpaired t-student test, p 2 action and this fact can be related to the free radical scavenging properties of the chemical compounds of the extracts. In conclusion these findings could be worthwhile to try to understand and to avoid some

  20. A numerical investigation into the performance of the soil nail wall and pile foundation at the Swift Delta I-5 Interchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Finite Difference Methods (FDM) and Finite Element Methods (FEM) studies are reported studying the soil nail wall construction at the Swift Delta I-5 Interchange bridge reconstruction in North Portland, Oregon. Five layers of soil nails were installe...

  1. Inhibition of MAO by fractions and constituents of hypericum extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bladt, S; Wagner, H

    1994-10-01

    The inhibition of monoamine oxidase (MAO) by six fractions from hypericum extract and three characteristic constituents (as pure substances) were analyzed in vitro and ex vivo to study the antidepressive mechanism of action. Rat brain homogenates were used as the in vitro model, while the ex vivo analysis was performed after intraperitoneal application of the test substances to albino rats. Massive inhibition of MAO-A could be shown with the total extract and all fractions only at the concentration of 10(-3) mol/L. At 10(-4) mol/L, one fraction rich in flavonoides showed an inhibition of 39%, and all other fractions demonstrated less than 25% inhibition. Using pure hypericin as well as in all ex vivo experiments, no relevant inhibiting effects could be shown. From the results it can be concluded that the clinically proven antidepressive effect of hypericum extract cannot be explained in terms of MAO inhibition.

  2. Poetry and its Essential Constituents According to Feijoo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo OLAY VALDÉS

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Throughout his essays, Feijoo makes numerous references to his own definition of poetry. He argues that the essential constituents of poetry must be «enthusiasm» (intensity and «versification» (rhythm. Feijoo considers that non-fiction should be regarded as another relevant constitutive of poetry, because non-fiction facilitates the teaching ability and usefulness of poetry. On account of his defense of non-fiction as a way to emphasize the docere, Feijoo came to prefer Lucan’s Pharsalia above Virgil’s Aeneid. Finally, Feijoo also maintained that naturalness was the last requisite of poetry, so he criticized the excesses of Baroque and he defended the literary models and the classical composition strategies that Neoclassicism would soon recover.

  3. Possible effects of volcanic eruptions on stratospheric minor constituent chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolarski, R. S.; Butler, D. M.

    1979-01-01

    Although stratosphere penetrating volcanic eruptions have been infrequent during the last half century, periods have existed in the last several hundred years when such eruptions were significantly more frequent. Several mechanisms exist for these injections to affect stratospheric minor constituent chemistry, both on the long-term average and for short-term perturbations. These mechanisms are reviewed and, because of the sensitivity of current models of stratospheric ozone to chlorine perturbations, quantitative estimates are made of chlorine injection rates. It is found that, if chlorine makes up as much as 0.5 to 1% of the gases released and if the total gases released are about the same magnitude as the fine ash, then a major stratosphere penetrating eruption could deplete the ozone column by several percent. The estimate for the Agung eruption of 1963 is just under 1% an amount not excluded by the ozone record but complicated by the peak in atmospheric nuclear explosions at about the same time.

  4. Constituent quarks and the gluonic contribution to the spin of the nucleon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eldahoumi, Gamal

    2009-01-01

    The internal structure of the nucleon is more complicated than expected in a simple quark model. In particular, the portion of the nucleon spin carried by the spins of the quarks is not, as expected, of the order of one, but according to the experimental data much smaller. In this thesis we study the spin structure of the proton in quantum chromodynamics. The constituent quark model, based on SU(6), predicts that the spin of the proton should be carried by the quarks, in disagreement with the experiments. It appears strange, that the theoretical model works so well for the magnetic moments of the nucleons, but not for the spin, although the spin and the magnetic moments are closely related to each other. We shall resolve this problem by assuming that the constituent quarks have an internal structure on their own. Thus a constituent quark has a dynamical structure, and we can introduce notions like the quark or gluon distributions inside a constituent quark. In the light of new experimental data from HERMES, COMPASS, JLab, and RHIC-spin, the current status of our knowledge of the spin structure is discussed in the two theoretical frameworks: the naive parton model, and the QCD evolved parton model. QCD a is successful theory, both in perturbative and non-perturbative regions, but the spin of the nucleon still needs to be explained within QCD. (orig.)

  5. Constituent quarks and the gluonic contribution to the spin of the nucleon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eldahoumi, Gamal

    2009-01-15

    The internal structure of the nucleon is more complicated than expected in a simple quark model. In particular, the portion of the nucleon spin carried by the spins of the quarks is not, as expected, of the order of one, but according to the experimental data much smaller. In this thesis we study the spin structure of the proton in quantum chromodynamics. The constituent quark model, based on SU(6), predicts that the spin of the proton should be carried by the quarks, in disagreement with the experiments. It appears strange, that the theoretical model works so well for the magnetic moments of the nucleons, but not for the spin, although the spin and the magnetic moments are closely related to each other. We shall resolve this problem by assuming that the constituent quarks have an internal structure on their own. Thus a constituent quark has a dynamical structure, and we can introduce notions like the quark or gluon distributions inside a constituent quark. In the light of new experimental data from HERMES, COMPASS, JLab, and RHIC-spin, the current status of our knowledge of the spin structure is discussed in the two theoretical frameworks: the naive parton model, and the QCD evolved parton model. QCD a is successful theory, both in perturbative and non-perturbative regions, but the spin of the nucleon still needs to be explained within QCD. (orig.)

  6. Potential pitfalls in the nuclear medicine imaging: Experimental models to evaluate the effect of natural products on the radiolabeling of blood constituents, bioavailability of radiopharmaceutical and on the survival of Escherichia coli strains submitted to the treatment with stannous ion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soares, Scheila F. [Instituto de Biologia Roberto Alcantara Gomes, Departamento de Biofisica e Biometria, Laboratorio de Radiofarmacia Experimental, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Av. 28 de setembro, 87, Rio de Janeiro, RJ 20551-030 (Brazil); Brito, Lavinia C. [Instituto de Biologia Roberto Alcantara Gomes, Departamento de Biofisica e Biometria, Laboratorio de Radiofarmacia Experimental, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Av. 28 de setembro, 87, Rio de Janeiro, RJ 20551-030 (Brazil); Souza, Deise E. [Instituto de Biologia Roberto Alcantara Gomes, Departamento de Biofisica e Biometria, Laboratorio de Radiofarmacia Experimental, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Av. 28 de setembro, 87, Rio de Janeiro, RJ 20551-030 (Brazil); Bernardo, Luciana C. [Instituto de Biologia Roberto Alcantara Gomes, Departamento de Biofisica e Biometria, Laboratorio de Radiofarmacia Experimental, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Av. 28 de setembro, 87, Rio de Janeiro, RJ 20551-030 (Brazil); Oliveira, Joelma F. [Instituto de Biologia Roberto Alcantara Gomes, Departamento de Biofisica e Biometria, Laboratorio de Radiofarmacia Experimental, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Av. 28 de setembro, 87, Rio de Janeiro, RJ 20551-030 (Brazil); Bernardo-Filho, Mario [Instituto de Biologia Roberto Alcantara Gomes, Departamento de Biofisica e Biometria, Laboratorio de Radiofarmacia Experimental, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Av. 28 de setembro, 87, Rio de Janeiro, RJ 20551-030 (Brazil)]. E-mail: bernardo@uerj.br

    2006-12-20

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) allows studies of physiological or pathological processes. Red blood cells labeled with technetium-99m ({sup 99m}Tc-RBC) are used as a radiopharmaceutical in several evaluations. The radiolabeling efficiency and bioavailability of radiopharmaceuticals can be altered by natural/synthetic drugs and may induce pitfalls in the analysis of the nuclear medicine imaging. The labeling with {sup 99m}Tc requires a reducing agent and stannous chloride (SnCl{sub 2}) is widely utilized. However, SnCl{sub 2} presents a citotoxic and/or genotoxic potential in Escherichia coli (E. coli) strains. The aim of this work was to evaluate the influence of aqueous extracts of Baccharis genistelloides (BG), Terminalia chebula (TC), Maytenus ilicifolia (MI), Cassia angustifolia (CA) and Equisetum arvense (EA) on (i) radiolabeling of blood constituents (ii) bioavailability of sodium pertechnetate(Na{sup 99m}TcO{sub 4}) radiopharmaceutical (iii) survival of E. coli. In vitro labeling of RBC was performed with blood (Wistar rats) incubated with each extract, SnCl{sub 2} and Na{sup 99m}TcO{sub 4}. Plasma (P) and blood cells (BC) were isolated, another aliquots precipitated and soluble (SF) and insoluble (IF) fractions isolated and counted. In the bioavailability of Na{sup 99m}TcO{sub 4}, Wistar rats were treated (7 days) with aqueous extract or with 0.9%NaCl, the radiopharmaceutical was administered, the animals sacrificed, the organs isolated, weighted and radioactivity counted. To evaluate the effect on the bacterial survival, E. coli was treated with: (a) SnCl{sub 2}; (b) 0.9% NaCl; (c) vegetal extract; or (d) SnCl{sub 2} and vegetal extract. Radiolabeling efficiency showed a significantly decrease (ANOVA/Tukey post-test, p<0.05) after treatment with BG, TC, MI and CA extracts. The bioavailability results showed that the uptake of Na{sup 99m}TcO{sub 4} was altered significantly (unpaired t-student test, p<0.05) in blood, lungs (CA

  7. Not Just a Sum? Identifying Different Types of Interplay between Constituents in Combined Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Deun, Katrijn; Thorrez, Lieven; van den Berg, Robert A; Smilde, Age K; Van Mechelen, Iven

    2015-01-01

    Experiments in which the effect of combined manipulations is compared with the effects of their pure constituents have received a great deal of attention. Examples include the study of combination therapies and the comparison of double and single knockout model organisms. Often the effect of the combined manipulation is not a mere addition of the effects of its constituents, with quite different forms of interplay between the constituents being possible. Yet, a well-formalized taxonomy of possible forms of interplay is lacking, let alone a statistical methodology to test for their presence in empirical data. Starting from a taxonomy of a broad range of forms of interplay between constituents of a combined manipulation, we propose a sound statistical hypothesis testing framework to test for the presence of each particular form of interplay. We illustrate the framework with analyses of public gene expression data on the combined treatment of dendritic cells with curdlan and GM-CSF and show that these lead to valuable insights into the mode of action of the constituent treatments and their combination. R code implementing the statistical testing procedure for microarray gene expression data is available as supplementary material. The data are available from the Gene Expression Omnibus with accession number GSE32986.

  8. Plants and chemical constituents with giardicidal activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavia M.M. Amaral

    Full Text Available Intestinal infection caused by Giardia lamblia represents a serious public health problem, with increased rates of prevalence in numerous countries. Increased resistance of the parasite and the side-effects of the reference drugs employed in the treatment of giardiasis make necessary to seek new therapeutic agents. Natural products, especially of plant origin, represent excellent starting point for research. The objective of this study is to review the literature on plant extracts, fractions and chemical constituents whose giardicidal activity has been investigated in vitro. The review describes 153 (one hundred and fifty-three plant species from 69 (sixty-nine families that were evaluated for their giardicidal activity. The geographical distribution of the plant species, the part used, preparation, strain of Giardia lamblia tested and the results obtained by the authors are also given. One hundred and one compounds isolated from plant species, classified by chemical class, are presented. Recent aspects of research on natural products of plant origin employed in the treatment of giardiasis are also discussed.

  9. Mentha piperita micropropagation and volatil constituents evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Ignacio Zapata

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of in vitro plant tissue culture techniques for the propagation of aromatic and medicinal species, could play very promising role for the economy of small farmers, due to the high potential of industrialization of their essential oils. In this work is shown how the tissue culture technique has been used for the propagation of Mentha piperita, as its essential oil is widely used in the flavor and fragrance industry. Mints from different sources were studied, and evaluation of the yield and quality of the essential oil was carry out, before and after the micropropagation by plant tissue culture. Several basal mediums with different proportion of plant growth regulators and vitamins were tested in order to maximize the propagation results. The constituents of the essential oil were quantified by Gas Chromatography. Lin & Staba (1962 basal medium, supplemented with BAP, and some vitamins, was the best for mints species micropropagation. The yield and quality of essential oil produced by plant tissue culture and its mother plant were very similar.

  10. Antimicrobial chemical constituents from endophytic fungus Phomasp.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hidayat Hussain; Siegfried Draeger; Barbara Schulz; Karsten Krohn; Ines Kock; Ahmed Al-Harrasi; Ahmed Al-Rawahi; Ghulam Abbas; Ivan R Green; Afzal Shah; Amin Badshah; Muhammad Saleem

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the antimicrobial potential of different extracts of the endophytic fungus Phomasp. and the tentative identification of their active constituents.Methods:The extract and compounds were screened for antimicrobial activity using theAgarWellDiffusionMethod. Four compounds were purified using column chromatography and their structures were assigned using1H and13CNMR spectra,DEPT,2DCOSY,HMQC andHMBC experiments.Results:The ethyl acetate fraction ofPhomasp. showed good antifungal, antibacterial, and algicidal properties.One new dihydrofuran derivative, named phomafuranol(1), together with three known compounds, phomalacton(2),(3R)-5-hydroxymellein(3) and emodin(4) were isolated from the ethyl acetate fraction ofPhomasp.Preliminary studies indicated that phomalacton(2) displayed strong antibacterial, good antifungal and antialgal activities.Similarly(3R)-5-hydroxymellein (3) and emodin(4) showed good antifungal, antibacterial and algicidal properties.Conclusions:Antimicrobial activities of the ethyl acetate fraction of the endophytic fungusPhomasp. and isolated compounds clearly demonstrate thatPhomasp. and its active compounds represent a great potential for the food, cosmetic and pharmaceutical industries.

  11. [Chemical constituents of leaves of Psidium guajava].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Meng; Wang, Ying; Jian, Yu-Qing; Sun, Xue-Gang; Huang, Xiao-Jun; Zhang, Xiao-Qi; Ye, Wen-Cai

    2014-03-01

    To study the chemical constituents of the 95% ethanol extract of Psidium guajava. Compounds were separated by using a combination of various chromatographic methods including silica gel, D101 macroporous resin, ODS, Sephadex LH-20 and preparative HPLC. Their structures were elucidated by physicochemical properties and spectral data Eighteen compounds were isolated and identified as (+) -globulol (1), clovane-2beta, 9alpha-diol (2), 2beta-acetoxyclovan-9alpha-ol (3), (+) -caryolane-1 ,9beta-diol (4), ent-T-muurolol (5), clov-2-ene-9alpha-ol (6), isophytol (7), tamarixetin (8), gossypetin (9), quercetin (10), kaempferol (11), guajaverin (12), avicularin (13), chrysin 6-C-glucoside (14), 3'-O-methyl-3, 4-methylenedioxyellagic acid 4'-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside (15), p-hydroxy-benzoic acid (16), guavinoside A (17) and guavinoside B (18). Compounds 2-9 and 14-16 were isolated from this plant for the first time. The ethanol extract showed 61.3% inhibition against the proliferation of colon cancer cell line SW480.

  12. Antioxidant Constituents of Cotoneaster melanocarpus Lodd.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adelheid H. Brantner

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was the evaluation of the antioxidant capacity of Cotoneaster melanocarpus Lodd. and the identification of antioxidant active constituents of this plant. C. melanocarpus Lodd. is a shrub indigenous to Mongolia and used in Traditional Mongolian Medicine as a styptic. Before extraction, the plant material was separated into three parts: young sterile shoots, older stems and leaves. All these parts were extracted with water, methanol, ethyl acetate, dichloromethane and hexane, successively. The methanolic extract of the sterile shoots showed the highest antioxidant activity in the DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging assay (IC50 30.91 ± 2.97 µg/mL. This active extract was further analyzed with chromatographic methods. TLC fingerprinting and HPLC indicated the presence of the flavonol glycosides quercetin-3-O-rutinoside (rutin, quercetin-3-O-galactoside (hyperoside and quercetin-3-O-glucoside (isoquercetin, ursolic acid as well as chlorogenic acid, neochlorogenic acid and cryptochlorogenic acid. The findings were substantiated with LC-MS. All identified compounds have antioxidant properties and therefore contribute to the radical scavenging activity of the whole plant.

  13. System for measuring engine exhaust constituents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carduner, K.R.; Colvin, A.D.; Leong, D.Y.W.

    1992-01-01

    This patent describes a system for measuring an automotive engine exhaust constituent. It comprises: a meter for determining the mass of air flowing through the engine and for generating an engine airflow signal corresponding to the airflow; sample handling apparatus; diluent adding means; processor means. This patent also describes a method for using an analyzer to determine the amount of lubricating oil consumed by an automotive engine. It comprises: determining the amount of sulfur dioxide within the room air being drawn into the engine; maintaining a constant total flow comprised of a constant fraction of the engine's exhaust gas and a diluent gas through the analyzer, while: determining the amount of sulfur dioxide contained within the engine's exhaust, determining the amount of sulfur dioxide contained within the engine's exhaust, while operating the engine on room air; determining an efficiency factor for the analyzer; and using the efficiency factor and the concentration of sulfur in the engine oil and the amounts of sulfur dioxide determined in steps a and d to determine the amount of lubrication oil leaving the engine through its exhaust

  14. Effects of fine particulate matter and its constituents on low birth weight among full-term infants in California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basu, Rupa, E-mail: Rupa.Basu@oehha.ca.gov [California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment, Air Pollution Epidemiology Section, Oakland, CA (United States); Harris, Maria [School of Public Health, Boston University, Boston, MA (United States); Sie, Lillian [School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Malig, Brian; Broadwin, Rachel; Green, Rochelle [California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment, Air Pollution Epidemiology Section, Oakland, CA (United States)

    2014-01-15

    Relationships between prenatal exposure to fine particles (PM{sub 2.5}) and birth weight have been observed previously. Few studies have investigated specific constituents of PM{sub 2.5}, which may identify sources and major contributors of risk. We examined the effects of trimester and full gestational prenatal exposures to PM{sub 2.5} mass and 23 PM{sub 2.5} constituents on birth weight among 646,296 term births in California between 2000 and 2006. We used linear and logistic regression models to assess associations between exposures and birth weight and risk of low birth weight (LBW; <2500 g), respectively. Models were adjusted for individual demographic characteristics, apparent temperature, month and year of birth, region, and socioeconomic indicators. Higher full gestational exposures to PM{sub 2.5} mass and several PM{sub 2.5} constituents were significantly associated with reductions in term birth weight. The largest reductions in birth weight were associated with exposure to vanadium, sulfur, sulfate, iron, elemental carbon, titanium, manganese, bromine, ammonium, zinc, and copper. Several of these PM{sub 2.5} constituents were associated with increased risk of term LBW. Reductions in birth weight were generally larger among younger mothers and varied by race/ethnicity. Exposure to specific constituents of PM{sub 2.5}, especially traffic-related particles, sulfur constituents, and metals, were associated with decreased birth weight in California. -- Highlights: • Examine full gestational and trimester fine particle and its constituents on term birth weight. • Fine particles and several of its constituents associated with birth weight reductions. • Largest reductions for traffic-related particles, sulfur constituents, and metals. • Greater birth weight reductions for younger mothers, and varied by race/ethnicity.

  15. Using Data-Dependent Priors to Mitigate Small Sample Bias in Latent Growth Models: A Discussion and Illustration Using M"plus"

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeish, Daniel M.

    2016-01-01

    Mixed-effects models (MEMs) and latent growth models (LGMs) are often considered interchangeable save the discipline-specific nomenclature. Software implementations of these models, however, are not interchangeable, particularly with small sample sizes. Restricted maximum likelihood estimation that mitigates small sample bias in MEMs has not been…

  16. A new biocompatible nanocomposite as a promising constituent of sunscreens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amin, Rehab M., E-mail: rehabamin@niles.edu.eg [Department of Laser Applications in Photochemistry, National Institute of Laser Enhanced Sciences, Cairo University (Egypt); Elfeky, Souad A. [Department of Laser Applications in Photochemistry, National Institute of Laser Enhanced Sciences, Cairo University (Egypt); University of Bath, Department of Chemistry, Bath BA2 7AY (United Kingdom); Verwanger, Thomas; Krammer, Barbara [Department of Molecular Biology, University of Salzburg, Hellbrunnerstr. 34, 5020 Salzburg (Austria)

    2016-06-01

    Skin naturally uses antioxidants to protect itself from the damaging effects of sunlight. If this is not sufficient, other measures have to be taken. Like this, hydroxyapatite has the potential to be applied as an active constituent of sunscreens since calcium phosphate absorbs in the ultraviolet region (UV). The objective of the present work was to synthesize a hydroxyapatite–ascorbic acid nanocomposite (HAp/AA-NC) as a new biocompatible constituent of sunscreens and to test its efficiency with skin cell models. The synthesized HAp/AA-NC was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, absorption spectrophotometry and X-ray diffraction analysis. The protective effect of the construct was tested with respect to viability and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation of primary human dermal fibroblasts (SKIN) and human epidermal keratinocytes (HaCaT). Both cell lines were irradiated with UV light, λ{sub max} = 254 nm with a fluence of 25 mJ cm{sup −2} to mimic the effect of UV radiation of sunlight on the skin. Results showed that HAp/AA-NC had a stimulating effect on the cell viability of both, HaCaT and SKIN cells, relative to the irradiated control. Intracellular ROS significantly decreased in UV irradiated cells when treated with HAp/AA-NC. We conclude that the synthesized HAp/AA-NC have been validated in vitro as a skin protector against the harmful effect of UV-induced ROS. - Highlights: • Hydroxyapatite–ascorbic acid nanocomposites were synthesized and characterized. • The prepared composites had a stimulating effect on the skin cell viability. • Reactive oxygen species decreased in UV-irradiated nanocomposite treated cells. • Hydroxyapatite–ascorbic acid nanocomposites could be used in sunscreens.

  17. Analysis of reaction schemes using maximum rates of constituent steps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motagamwala, Ali Hussain; Dumesic, James A.

    2016-01-01

    We show that the steady-state kinetics of a chemical reaction can be analyzed analytically in terms of proposed reaction schemes composed of series of steps with stoichiometric numbers equal to unity by calculating the maximum rates of the constituent steps, rmax,i, assuming that all of the remaining steps are quasi-equilibrated. Analytical expressions can be derived in terms of rmax,i to calculate degrees of rate control for each step to determine the extent to which each step controls the rate of the overall stoichiometric reaction. The values of rmax,i can be used to predict the rate of the overall stoichiometric reaction, making it possible to estimate the observed reaction kinetics. This approach can be used for catalytic reactions to identify transition states and adsorbed species that are important in controlling catalyst performance, such that detailed calculations using electronic structure calculations (e.g., density functional theory) can be carried out for these species, whereas more approximate methods (e.g., scaling relations) are used for the remaining species. This approach to assess the feasibility of proposed reaction schemes is exact for reaction schemes where the stoichiometric coefficients of the constituent steps are equal to unity and the most abundant adsorbed species are in quasi-equilibrium with the gas phase and can be used in an approximate manner to probe the performance of more general reaction schemes, followed by more detailed analyses using full microkinetic models to determine the surface coverages by adsorbed species and the degrees of rate control of the elementary steps. PMID:27162366

  18. A new biocompatible nanocomposite as a promising constituent of sunscreens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amin, Rehab M.; Elfeky, Souad A.; Verwanger, Thomas; Krammer, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Skin naturally uses antioxidants to protect itself from the damaging effects of sunlight. If this is not sufficient, other measures have to be taken. Like this, hydroxyapatite has the potential to be applied as an active constituent of sunscreens since calcium phosphate absorbs in the ultraviolet region (UV). The objective of the present work was to synthesize a hydroxyapatite–ascorbic acid nanocomposite (HAp/AA-NC) as a new biocompatible constituent of sunscreens and to test its efficiency with skin cell models. The synthesized HAp/AA-NC was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, absorption spectrophotometry and X-ray diffraction analysis. The protective effect of the construct was tested with respect to viability and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation of primary human dermal fibroblasts (SKIN) and human epidermal keratinocytes (HaCaT). Both cell lines were irradiated with UV light, λ_m_a_x = 254 nm with a fluence of 25 mJ cm"−"2 to mimic the effect of UV radiation of sunlight on the skin. Results showed that HAp/AA-NC had a stimulating effect on the cell viability of both, HaCaT and SKIN cells, relative to the irradiated control. Intracellular ROS significantly decreased in UV irradiated cells when treated with HAp/AA-NC. We conclude that the synthesized HAp/AA-NC have been validated in vitro as a skin protector against the harmful effect of UV-induced ROS. - Highlights: • Hydroxyapatite–ascorbic acid nanocomposites were synthesized and characterized. • The prepared composites had a stimulating effect on the skin cell viability. • Reactive oxygen species decreased in UV-irradiated nanocomposite treated cells. • Hydroxyapatite–ascorbic acid nanocomposites could be used in sunscreens.

  19. Heating and reconnection of the emerging magnetic flux-tubes and the role of the interchange instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, Y.; Sakurai, T.

    1977-01-01

    In this paper it is proposed that the basic behaviors of newly-emerged magnetic regions (NEMR) as seen in EUV and soft X-rays from space are interpreted by the interchange instability of the magnetic field of NEMR in the global situation surrounding it. It is shown that the situation with the NEMR is unstable against the interchange instability, and a continual relaxation to the lower energy state, or a continual invasion of the magnetic flux of the NEMR to the ambient region in the form of fine bundles or thin sheets, will take place in a short time scale of tau 1 approximately L/Vsub(A) following the change in the boundary condition at the photosphere. The second and the final relaxation is shown to be the enhanced Joule dissipation in a time scale of hours to several days occurring in the thin current sheets on the interface of this intermingled structure which is distributed in a large volume. This hypothesis may provide an explanation for the heating of NEMR to an X-ray emitting temperature, which is otherwise rather difficult to explain. The observed fast reconnection without appreciable flares (except for some smaller brightenings) is another aspect which can be explained in the present hypothesis. Namely, since the situation with the NEMR is unstable for the interchange from the beginning, the stressed configuration is relaxed before storing appreciable energy in the form of magnetic stress and therefore without a drastic release of a large amount of stored stress energy in the form of a flare. (Auth.)

  20. Screening and identification of potential bioactive constituents in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... of lung cancer, liver cancer and digestive cancer. Materials and Methods: In this study, the potential bioactive constituents of SCP were isolated and identified by chromatographic and spectroscopic methods. The immunomodulatory and DPPH radical scavenging activities of the constituents were also evaluated in vitro.

  1. [Study on the chemical constituent from Buddleja purdomii].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yan; Li, Chong; Zhang, Chengzhong; Xu, Yourui; Tao, Baoquan

    2004-05-01

    To study the chemical constituents from Buddleja purdomii W. W. Smith. The constituents were isolated and purified by various chromatographic methods and structurally identified by spectral analysis. 4 compounds were identified as vanillin (I), vanillic acid (II), acteoside (III), acteoside isomer (IV). All these compounds were obtained from this plant for the first time.

  2. [Study on the chemical constituents of Buddleja purdomii].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yinghua; Li, Chong; Zhang, Chengzhong; Tao, Baoquan

    2005-11-01

    To study the chemical constituents of Buddleja purdomii W. W Smith. The constituents were isolated and purified by various chromatographic methods and structurally identified by spectral analysis. 4 compounds were obtained as cryptomeridiol (I), aucubin (II), galactilol (III), daucosterol (IV). All these compounds are obtained from this plant for the first time.

  3. 40 CFR 264.342 - Principal organic hazardous constituents (POHCs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) Principal Organic Hazardous Constituents (POHCs) in the waste feed must be treated to the extent required by... organic constituents in the waste and on their concentration or mass in the waste feed, considering the... (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE TREATMENT, STORAGE...

  4. Volatile constituents of Glechoma hirsute Waldst. & Kit. and G ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The essential oils of two Glechoma species from Serbia have been analyzed by GC and GC/MS. Eighty eight and two hundred thirty eight constituents identified accounted for 90.6 and 86.6% of the total oils of G. hirsuta Waldst. & Kit. and G. hederacea L., respectively. In both oils the dominant constituent class was the ...

  5. Methods of determining incremental energy costs for economic dispatch and inter-utility interchange in Canadian utilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Hawary, M.E.; El-Hawary, F.; Mbamalu, G.A.N.

    1991-01-01

    A questionnaire was mailed to ten Canadian utilities to determine the methods the utilities use in determining the incremental cost of delivering energy at any time. The questionnaire was divided into three parts: generation, transmission and general. The generation section dealt with heat rates, fuel, operation and maintenance, startup and shutdown, and method of prioritizing and economic evaluation of interchange transactions. Transmission dealt with inclusion of transmission system incremental maintenance costs, and transmission losses determination. The general section dealt with incremental costs aspects, and various other economic considerations. A summary is presented of responses to the questionnaire

  6. Unified 1.9...4.0 MeV linear accelerators with interchangeable accelerating structures for customs inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budtov, A.A.; Klinov, A.P.; Krestianinov, A.S.

    2004-01-01

    A series of compact linear electron accelerators for 1.9, 2.5 and 4.0 MeV equipped with a local radiation shielding has been designed and constructed in the NPK LUTS, the D.V.Efremov Institute (NIIEFA). The accelerators are intended for mobile facilities used for customs inspection of large-scale containers. Results of optimizing calculations of irradiator parameters and electron dynamics, verified under accelerators testing, are presented in the report. The main design approaches allowing the construction of unified accelerators with interchangeable accelerating structures for energies in the range of 1.9...4.0 MeV are also given

  7. Observation of Atmospheric Constituents From Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrows, J. P.

    Remote sensing of the atmosphere from space is a growing research field. Surprisingly but for good physical reasons, the mesosphere and stratosphere are easier to probe from space than the troposphere. GOME (Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment) and SCIAMACHY (Scanning Imaging absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY) are related European instruments, which were proposed and been designed to measure atmospheric constituents (gases, aerosols and clouds) by passive remote sensing of the up-welling solar radiation leaving atmosphere. GOME is a smaller version of SCIAMACHY and was launched as part of the core payload of the second European research satellite (ERS-2) on the 20th April 1995. GOME comprises four spectral channels and measures simultaneously the earthshine radiance or solar extra terrestrial irradiance between 240 and 790 nm. Inversion of GOME measurements using the DOAS (Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy) yields the total column of trace gases (e.g. O3, NO2, HCHO, BrO and OClO). Application of the FURM (Full Retrieval Method) enables the profiles of O3 to be retrieved. One of the important achievements of GOME has been the separation of tropopsheirc columns of trace gases using TEM (Tropospheric Excess Method). SCIAMACHY has been developed as Germa n, Dutch and Belgian contribution to ENVISAT. It has significantly enhanced capability compared to GOME, measuring a larger spectral range, 220-2380 nm, and observing in alternate nadir and limb modes as well as solar and lunar occultation. ENVISAT is to be launched into a sun synchronous polar orbit, having an equator crossing time of 10.00 a.m. at the beginning of March 2002. SCIAMACHY is thereby able to measure many more species and vertical profiles than GOME. This facilitates improved tropospheric retrievals. Finally GeoTROPE (Geostationary TROPospheric Explorer) is a new mission, which is proposed for launch within the ESA Earth Explorer Opportunity Mission. It comprises two national

  8. PM2.5 constituents and hospital emergency-room visits in Shanghai, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Liping; Cai, Jing; Wang, Hongli; Wang, Weibing; Zhou, Min; Lou, Shengrong; Chen, Renjie; Dai, Haixia; Chen, Changhong; Kan, Haidong

    2014-09-02

    Although ambient PM2.5 has been linked to adverse health effects, the chemical constituents that cause harm are largely unclear. Few prior studies in a developing country have reported the health impacts of PM2.5 constituents. In this study, we examined the short-term association between PM2.5 constituents and emergency room visits in Shanghai, China. We measured daily concentrations of PM2.5, organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon (EC), and eight water-soluble ions between January 1, 2011 and December 31, 2012. We analyzed the data using overdispersed generalized linear Poisson models. During our study period, the mean daily average concentration of PM2.5 in Shanghai was 55 μg/m(3). Major contributors to PM2.5 mass included OC, EC, sulfate, nitrate, and ammonium. For a 1-day lag, an interquartile range increment in PM2.5 mass (36.47 μg/m(3)) corresponded to 0.57% [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.13%, 1.01%] increase of emergency room visits. In all the three models used, we found significant positive associations of emergency room visits with OC and EC. Our findings suggest that PM2.5 constituents from the combustion of fossil fuel (e.g., OC and EC) may have an appreciable influence on the health impact attributable to PM2.5.

  9. Interchange reaction of disulfides and denaturation of oxytocin by copper(II)/ascorbic acid/O2 system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, H; Hirobe, M

    1987-05-29

    The interchange reaction of disulfides was caused by the copper(II)/ascorbic acid/O2 system. The incubation of two symmetric disulfides, L-cystinyl-bis-L-phenylalanine (PP) and L-cystinyl-bis-L-tyrosine (TT), with L-ascorbic acid and CuSO4 in potassium phosphate buffer (pH 7.2, 50 mM) resulted in the formation of an asymmetric disulfide, L-cystinyl-L-phenylalanine-L-tyrosine (PT), and the final ratio of PP:PT:TT was 1:2:1. As the reaction was inhibited by catalase and DMSO only at the initial time, hydroxyl radical generated by the copper(II)/ascorbic acid/O2 system seemed to be responsible for the initiation of the reaction. Oxytocin and insulin were denatured by this system, and catalase and DMSO similarly inhibited these denaturations. As the composition of amino acids was unchanged after the reaction, hydroxyl radical was thought to cause the cleavage and/or interchange reaction of disulfides to denature the peptides.

  10. The effect of the fodder species over the interchangeable bases of sulfated acid soil in municipality of Paipa (Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Angélica Bernal Figueroa

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available One of the limitations on acid sulphated soils (SSA is related to the inhibition in the absorption of interchangeable bases generated mainly by excesses of aluminum oxide of change; this affects its productivity and limits the availability of nutrients for plants. This research evaluated in greenhouse, the effect of fodder beet (Beta vulgaris L., forage turnip (Brassica rapa L. and fodder radish (Raphanus sativus L. on the interchangeable bases of an SSA, contrasted with a not sulfated ground, in order to identify species for management and rehabilitation of these soils in Paipa (Boyacá. An experimental design was implemented with 6 treatments and 3 repetitions in which the basis measurement was made in the ground before and after the species plating and the measured leaf area and plants height when their vegetative period ended. Several significative statistic differences were found (P<0.01 in the basis concentration, as well as in the variables in the leaf area and height of the plant. The results indicated that the growth of the turnip (B. rapa and horseradish (R. sativus fodder, along with the complementary use of calcareous amendments as a corrective, led to an increase in the concentrations of Ca, Mg, K, and Na in the SSA, and presented a better growth and resistance to them. Similarly, the planting of fodder beet (B. vulgaris generated positive effects in the soil; however, the height and leaf area of this species were affected in the SSA, which limits their productivity.

  11. Constituent-level pile-up mitigation techniques in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Pile-up of simultaneous proton-proton collisions at the LHC has a significant impact on jet reconstruction. In this note the performance of several pile-up mitigation techniques is evaluated in detailed simulations of the ATLAS experiment. Four algorithms that act on the jet-constituent level are evaluated: SoftKiller, the cluster vertex fraction algorithm and Voronoi and constituent subtraction. We find that application of these constituent-level algorithms improves the resolution of low-transverse-momentum jets. The improvement is significant for collisions with 80-200 simultaneous proton-proton collisions envisaged in future runs of the LHC.

  12. Cannabidiol, a Cannabis sativa constituent, as an antipsychotic drug

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuardi A.W.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A high dose of delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol, the main Cannabis sativa (cannabis component, induces anxiety and psychotic-like symptoms in healthy volunteers. These effects of delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol are significantly reduced by cannabidiol (CBD, a cannabis constituent which is devoid of the typical effects of the plant. This observation led us to suspect that CBD could have anxiolytic and/or antipsychotic actions. Studies in animal models and in healthy volunteers clearly suggest an anxiolytic-like effect of CBD. The antipsychotic-like properties of CBD have been investigated in animal models using behavioral and neurochemical techniques which suggested that CBD has a pharmacological profile similar to that of atypical antipsychotic drugs. The results of two studies on healthy volunteers using perception of binocular depth inversion and ketamine-induced psychotic symptoms supported the proposal of the antipsychotic-like properties of CBD. In addition, open case reports of schizophrenic patients treated with CBD and a preliminary report of a controlled clinical trial comparing CBD with an atypical antipsychotic drug have confirmed that this cannabinoid can be a safe and well-tolerated alternative treatment for schizophrenia. Future studies of CBD in other psychotic conditions such as bipolar disorder and comparative studies of its antipsychotic effects with those produced by clozapine in schizophrenic patients are clearly indicated.

  13. Predicting Raters’ Transparency Judgments of English and Chinese Morphological Constituents using Latent Semantic Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hsueh-Cheng; Hsu, Li-Chuan; Tien, Yi-Min; Pomplun, Marc

    2013-01-01

    The morphological constituents of English compounds (e.g., “butter” and “fly” for “butterfly”) and two-character Chinese compounds may differ in meaning from the whole word. Subjective differences and ambiguity of transparency make the judgments difficult, and a computational alternative based on a general model may be a way to average across subjective differences. The current study proposes two approaches based on Latent Semantic Analysis (Landauer & Dumais, 1997): Model 1 compares the semantic similarity between a compound word and each of its constituents, and Model 2 derives the dominant meaning of a constituent based on a clustering analysis of morphological family members (e.g., “butterfingers” or “buttermilk” for “butter”). The proposed models successfully predicted participants’ transparency ratings, and we recommend that experimenters use Model 1 for English compounds and Model 2 for Chinese compounds, due to raters’ morphological processing in different writing systems. The dominance of lexical meaning, semantic transparency, and the average similarity between all pairs within a morphological family are provided, and practical applications for future studies are discussed. PMID:23784009

  14. Analysis of chemical constituents in medicinal plants of selected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Analysis of chemical constituents in medicinal plants of selected districts of Pakhtoonkhwa, Pakistan. I Hussain, R Ullah, J Khan, N Khan, M Zahoor, N Ullah, MuR Khattak, FA Khan, A Baseer, M Khurram ...

  15. hispidulin and other constituents of scoparia dulcis linn

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    HIV. INTRODUCTION. Scoparia dulcis Linn. (Scrophulariaceae) has been extensively studied for its flavone and terpene constituents (Ahmed et al., 1990, Ah- san et al., 2003, Chen et al., 1976, Hayashi et al., 1987, 1987b, 1988, 1990, 1991, ...

  16. anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities: chemical constituents of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a

    *Corresponding author. E-mail: bedisag@yahoo.fr. ANTI-INFLAMMATORY AND ANALGESIC ACTIVITIES: CHEMICAL CONSTITUENTS OF ESSENTIAL OILS OF OCIMUM GRATISSIMUM,. EUCALYPTUS CITRIODORA AND CYMBOPOGON GIGANTEUS INHIBITED. LIPOXYGENASE L-1 AND CYCLOOXYGENASE OF ...

  17. Volatile constituents from Samanae saman (Jacq.) Merr. Fabaceae

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJB SERVER

    2006-10-16

    Oct 16, 2006 ... Key words: Samanae saman, Fabaceae, volatile oil, fatty acids, terpenoids, palmitic acid, 1,8-cineole. .... Gas chromatography – mass spectrometry analyses (GC/MS) ... this study, is an important constituent of most vegetable.

  18. Tabanone a new phytotoxic constituent of cogongrass (Imperta culindrica)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogongrass [Imperata cylindrica (L.) Beauv.] is a troublesome invasive weedy species with reported allelopathic properties. The phytotoxicity of different constituents isolated from roots and aerial parts of this species was evaluated on Lactuca sativa and Agrostis stolonifera. No significant phytot...

  19. Pyrrolizidine Alkaloids: Testing for Toxic Constituents of Comfrey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmer, John J.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the possibilities of toxins present in medicinal herbs. Describes an experiment in which toxic constituents can be selectively detected by thin-layer chromatography and NMR spectroscopy. (TW)

  20. Do quarks play an explicit role as nuclear constituents ?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, Toshimitsu.

    1986-10-01

    Experimental signatures for explicit roles of quarks as nuclear constituents are looked for. It is stressed that hyperons in nuclei may reveal unique information on nuclear interior and possible quark deconfinement. Future directions of hypernuclear spectroscopy are discussed. (author)

  1. [Studies on the chemical constituents of Buddleja albiflora (II)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hai-Ping; Tao, Liang

    2010-06-01

    To study the chemical constituents of Buddleja albiflora. The constituents were isolated by column chromatography and their structures were elucidated by spectroscopic analyses. seven compounds were isolated and identified as aucubin (1), catalpol (2), acteoside (3), martynoside (4), ursolicacid (5), daucosterol (6), beta-sitosterol-3-0-beta-D-(6'-0-palmitate) glucopyranosisde (7). All these compounds are obtained from Buddleja albiflora for the first time.

  2. [Studies on the chemical constituents of Portulaca oleracea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ce-jia; Liu, Dian-yu; Xiang, Lan; Zhou, Wen; Shao, Ning-ning

    2009-11-01

    To study the chemical constituents of Portulaca oleracea. The constituents were isolated by column chromatography and identified on the basis of physicochemical and spectral data. Five compounds were isolated from 70% ethanol extract of this plant and their structures were elucidated as cyclo (Phe-Ile) (1), cycle (Tyr-Ala) (2), adenine (3), friedelin (4) and isoselachoceric acid (5). Compounds 1-5 are isolated from Portulaca oleracea for the first time.

  3. Products of Irreducible Characters Having Complex-Valued Constituents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa R. Hendrixson

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available First, we prove that when a finite solvable group $G$ has a faithful irreducible character $\\chi$ such that $\\chi\\overline{\\chi}$ has two irreducible constituents, both must be real-valued. Then, we study the situation where $\\chi\\overline{\\chi}$ has exactly three distinct nonprincipal irreducible constituents, two of which are complex conjugates. In this case, we prove that $G$ has derived length bounded above by $6$.

  4. Leachability of radioactive constituents from uranium mine tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constable, T.W.

    1987-04-01

    A series of long-term studies were conducted both to examine the leachability of major constituents (acidity, TDS) and radioisotopes from uranium mining/milling tailings and settling pond sludges, and to assess the effect of two treatment methods (solidification and vegetation) on leachate characteristics. Four bench-scale experiments were conducted to examine the leachability of: 1) old tailings and those containing a large portion of (Ba,Ra)SO 4 sludges; 2) untreated and solidified (Ba,Ra)SO 4 sludges located at the bottom of settling ponds; 3) new tailings that had been vegetated or solidified; and 4) new tailings subject to varying flow rates. A fifth study was conducted to examine the microbiology of Experiments 2 and 3. In addition, the lysimeter solids remaining in the old tailings at the end of Experiment 1 were characterized through chemical and radionuclide analyses and Scanning Electron Microscope-X-ray Emission and Mossbauer Spectroscopy techniques. This report provides an extensive database of temporal variations in leachate characteristics under both normal and accelerated water application rates. It also presents hypotheses of possible leaching mechanisms in the wastes that could explain the observed data, and conceptual model of tailings leaching processes which integrates the results of all the tailings experiments

  5. Transformations of inorganic coal constituents in combustion systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helble, J.J. (ed.); Srinivasachar, S.; Wilemski, G.; Boni, A.A. (PSI Technology Co., Andover, MA (United States)); Kang, Shin-Gyoo; Sarofim, A.F.; Graham, K.A.; Beer, J.M. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States)); Peterson, T.W.; Wendt, J.O.L.; Gallagher, N.B.; Bool, L. (Arizona Univ., Tucson, AZ (United States)); Huggins, F.E.; Huffman, G.P.; Shah, N.; Shah, A. (Kentucky Univ., Lexingt

    1992-11-01

    The inorganic constituents or ash contained in pulverized coal significantly increase the environmental and economic costs of coal utilization. For example, ash particles produced during combustion may deposit on heat transfer surfaces, decreasing heat transfer rates and increasing maintenance costs. The minimization of particulate emissions often requires the installation of cleanup devices such as electrostatic precipitators, also adding to the expense of coal utilization. Despite these costly problems, a comprehensive assessment of the ash formation and had never been attempted. At the start of this program, it was hypothesized that ash deposition and ash particle emissions both depended upon the size and chemical composition of individual ash particles. Questions such as: What determines the size of individual ash particles What determines their composition Whether or not particles deposit How combustion conditions, including reactor size, affect these processes remained to be answered. In this 6-year multidisciplinary study, these issues were addressed in detail. The ambitious overall goal was the development of a comprehensive model to predict the size and chemical composition distributions of ash produced during pulverized coal combustion. Results are described.

  6. Effects of the cellulose, xylan and lignin constituents on biomass pyrolysis characteristics and bio-oil composition using the Simplex Lattice Mixture Design method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, Yongsheng; Cai, Yixi; Li, Xiaohua; Jiao, Lihua; Xia, Jisheng; Deng, Xiuli

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Simplex Lattice Mixture Design was firstly applied to study biomass pyrolysis process. • Interactions between the constituents had effects on the biomass pyrolysis behavior. • Biomass pyrolysis behavior can be predicted based on the ratios of three constituents. • Bio-oil composition was affected by the constituents and their pyrolysis products. - Abstract: In order to clarify the relationships between biomass pyrolysis mechanism and its main constituents. The effects of main constituents on biomass pyrolysis characteristics were firstly determined by thermo-gravimetric analysis based on the Simplex Lattice Mixture Design to investigate that whether the prediction of the pyrolysis behavior of a certain lignocellulosic biomass is possible when its main constituent contents are known. The results showed that there are constituent interactions in the pyrolysis process, which can be intuitively reflected through the change laws of kinetics parameters. The mathematical models for calculating kinetics values were established, and the models were proved to be valid for predicting lignocellulosic biomass pyrolysis behavior. In addition, the effects of biomass constituents on bio-oil compositions were explored by subsequent vacuum pyrolysis experiments. The xylan pyrolysis had a certain inhibitory effect on the pyrolysis of cellulose, and the pyrolysis products of lignin might promote the further decomposition of sugars from cellulose pyrolysis, while the interaction between xylan and lignin had a little effect on the bio-oil composition.

  7. Observations of temporal and spatial behaviour of plasmas in relation to the interchange stability boundary scaling in GAMMA 10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minami, R.; Cho, T.; Kohagura, J.

    2002-01-01

    Observations of internal core plasma structural behaviour during the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) destabilization of the central cell plasmas are carried out by the use of our developed semiconductor x-ray detector arrays installed in both central cell and anchor regions of the GAMMA 10 tandem mirror. In the present paper, it is found from the developed x-ray diagnostics that the bulk plasmas rotate without a change in its shape and structure with an ExB velocity during the destabilization. The onset of the off-axis rotation is identified to be closely related to a scaling of the MHD stability boundary (i.e. the anchor beta requirements for stabilizing central cell hot ion plasmas). These data confirm pressure driven interchange instability in tandem mirror plasmas, and reveal the rigid rotational bulk plasma structure as the first demonstrated interior plasma property during the destabilization. (author)

  8. The constituent quark model the spectrum of mesons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shojaei, M.R.; Rajabi, A.A.; Hasanabadi, H.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: We calculate exact solution of the Schroedinger equation analytically for a meson consisting of a quark and antiquark, considering the interaction potential between the particles as a combination of two potentials, a potential due to color charge and an oscillatory potential as confining potential. in this paper, first consider potential between quarks as a function of radios x, thus we assume this potential as a central potential. This potential is derived from that the central potential. This potential is derived from that the quark see itself under influence of another quark, in this case central potential is considered as: V(x)=ax 2 -c/x. Potential is obtained from interaction between a quark and an antiquary. The source of it is color charge and ax 2 potential plays confining potential. Because this potential shows oscillations of one quark to another quark in the distance x from it.. In addition to the above potentials we consider the spin-spin, spin - isospin and isospin - isospin interactions as perturbing potentials, and calculate the mass of the mesons for each potential separately finally using the equivalence of mass-energy we calculate the mass of the mesons

  9. Ethnoecology of the interchange of wild and weedy plants and mushrooms in Phurépecha markets of Mexico: economic motives of biotic resources management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farfán-Heredia, Berenice; Casas, Alejandro; Moreno-Calles, Ana I; García-Frapolli, Eduardo; Castilleja, Aída

    2018-01-15

    Interactions between societies and nature are regulated by complex systems of beliefs, symbolism, customs, and worldviews (kosmos), ecological knowledge (corpus), and management strategies and practices (praxis), which are constructed as product of experiences and communication of people throughout time. These aspects influence social relations, life strategies, and cultural identity, and all of them in turn influence and are influenced by local and regional patterns of interchange. In this study, we analyze the interchange of wild and weedy plants and mushrooms in traditional markets of the Phurépecha region of Mexico. Particularly, the social relations constructed around the interchange of these products; how knowledge, cultural values, and ecological factors influence and are influenced by interchange; and how all these factors influence the type and intensity of biotic resources management. We studied three main traditional markets of the Phurépecha region of Michoacán, Mexico, through 140 visits to markets and 60 semi-structured interviews to sellers of wild and weedy plants and mushrooms. In nearly 2 years, we carried out 80 visits and 30 interviews in the "Barter Market", 20 visits and 15 interviews in the "Phurépecha Tiánguis", and 40 visits and 15 interviews to the "Municipal Market". We documented information about the spaces of interchange that form the markets, the types of interchange occurring there, the cultural and economic values of the resources studied, the environmental units that are sources of such resources, the activities associated to resources harvesting and, particularly, the management techniques practiced to ensure or increase their availability. We analyzed the relations between the amounts of products interchanged, considered as pressures on the resources; the perception of their abundance or scarcity, considered as the magnitude of risk in relation to the pressures referred to; and the management types as response to pressures

  10. Constituent concentrations, loads, and yields to Beaver Lake, Arkansas, water years 1999-2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolyard, Susan E.; De Lanois, Jeanne L.; Green, W. Reed

    2010-01-01

    Beaver Lake is a large, deep-storage reservoir used as a drinking-water supply and considered a primary watershed of concern in the State of Arkansas. As such, information is needed to assess water quality, especially nutrient enrichment, nutrient-algal relations, turbidity, and sediment issues within the reservoir system. Water-quality samples were collected at three main inflows to Beaver Lake: the White River near Fayetteville, Richland Creek at Goshen, and War Eagle Creek near Hindsville. Water-quality samples collected over the period represented different flow conditions (from low to high). Constituent concentrations, flow-weighted concentrations, loads, and yields from White River, Richland Creek, and War Eagle Creek to Beaver Lake for water years 1999-2008 were documented for this report. Constituents include total ammonia plus organic nitrogen, dissolved nitrite plus nitrate nitrogen, dissolved orthophosphorus (soluble reactive phosphorus), total phosphorus, total nitrogen, dissolved organic carbon, total organic carbon, and suspended sediment. Linear regression models developed by computer program S-LOADEST were used to estimate loads for each constituent for the 10-year period at each station. Constituent yields and flow-weighted concentrations for each of the three stations were calculated for the study. Constituent concentrations and loads and yields varied with time and varied among the three tributaries contributing to Beaver Lake. These differences can result from differences in precipitation, land use, contributions of nutrients from point sources, and variations in basin size. Load and yield estimates varied yearly during the study period, water years 1999-2008, with the least nutrient and sediment load and yields generally occurring in water year 2006, and the greatest occurring in water year 2008, during a year with record amounts of precipitation. Flow-weighted concentrations of most constituents were greatest at War Eagle Creek near Hindsville

  11. Current quarks and constituent-classification quarks: some questions and ideas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Close, F.E.

    1977-01-01

    A brief introduction is given to the spin dependence of inelastic photo and electroproduction. Parton model predictions of Kuti and Weisskopf are then criticized and a paradox noted in connection with a sum rule of Bjorken. The resolution of this paradox raises several questions concerning the constituent and current quark approaches to resonance excitation. Particular attention is given to current algebra constraints, angular momentum in the nucleon, the x → 1 behavior of inelastic electroproduction, psi production and radiative decays

  12. Particle size and chemical constituents of ambient particulate pollution associated with cardiovascular mortality in Guangzhou, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Hualiang; Tao, Jun; Du, Yaodong; Liu, Tao; Qian, Zhengmin; Tian, Linwei; Di, Qian; Rutherford, Shannon; Guo, Lingchuan; Zeng, Weilin; Xiao, Jianpeng; Li, Xing; He, Zhihui; Xu, Yanjun; Ma, Wenjun

    2016-01-01

    Though significant associations between particulate matter (PM) air pollution and cardiovascular diseases have been widely reported, it remains unclear what characteristics, such as particle size and chemical constituents, may be responsible for the effects. A time-series model was applied to examine the cardiovascular effects of particle size (for the period of 2009–2011) and chemical constituents (2007–2010) in Guangzhou, we controlled for potential confounders in the model, such as time trends, day of the week, public holidays, meteorological factors and influenza epidemic. We found significant associations of cardiovascular mortality with PM_1_0, PM_2_._5 and PM_1; the excess risk (ER) was 6.10% (95% CI: 1.76%, 10.64%), 6.11% (95% CI: 1.76%, 10.64%) and 6.48% (95% CI: 2.10%, 11.06%) for per IQR increase in PM_1_0, PM_2_._5 and PM_1 at moving averages for the current day and the previous 3 days (lag_0_3), respectively. We did not find significant effects of PM_2_._5_-_1_0 and PM_1_-_2_._5. For PM_2_._5 constituents, we found that organic carbon, elemental carbon, sulfate, nitrate and ammonium were significantly associated with cardiovascular mortality, the corresponding ER for an IQR concentration increase at lag_0_3 was 1.13% (95% CI: 0.10%, 2.17%), 2.77% (95% CI: 0.72%, 4.86%), 2.21% (95% CI: 1.05%, 3.38%), 1.98% (95% CI: 0.54%, 3.44%), and 3.38% (95% CI: 1.56%, 5.23%), respectively. These results were robust to adjustment of other air pollutants and they remained consistent in various sensitivity analyses by changing model parameters. Our study suggests that PM_1 and constituents from combustion and secondary aerosols might be important characteristics of PM pollution associated with cardiovascular mortality in Guangzhou. - Highlights: • PM_1_0, PM_2_._5 and PM_1 were significantly associated with cardiovascular mortality. • We did not find significant cardiovascular effects of PM_2_._5_-_1_0 and PM_1_-_2_._5. • PM_1 might be most responsible for

  13. Bag-model quantum chromodynamics for hyperons at low energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, H.J.; Maslow, J.N.

    1980-01-01

    In a non-perturbative bag model framework, gluon exchange which mediates quark exchange scattering in conjunction with quark interchange is shown to be the basis of the OBE interactions of hyperons at low energy. (orig.)

  14. Teacher Mobility and Transnational, "British World" Space: The League of the Empire's "Interchange of Home and Dominion Teachers", 1907-1931

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crutchley, Jody

    2015-01-01

    This article explores the experiences of teachers who participated in the League of the Empire's "Interchange of Home and Dominion Teachers" scheme through a tripartite approach to "British World" space. First, it identifies the mechanisms through which exchanges were established. It analyses the patterns of teacher mobility…

  15. Brain correlates of constituent structure in sign language comprehension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Antonio; Limousin, Fanny; Dehaene, Stanislas; Pallier, Christophe

    2018-02-15

    During sentence processing, areas of the left superior temporal sulcus, inferior frontal gyrus and left basal ganglia exhibit a systematic increase in brain activity as a function of constituent size, suggesting their involvement in the computation of syntactic and semantic structures. Here, we asked whether these areas play a universal role in language and therefore contribute to the processing of non-spoken sign language. Congenitally deaf adults who acquired French sign language as a first language and written French as a second language were scanned while watching sequences of signs in which the size of syntactic constituents was manipulated. An effect of constituent size was found in the basal ganglia, including the head of the caudate and the putamen. A smaller effect was also detected in temporal and frontal regions previously shown to be sensitive to constituent size in written language in hearing French subjects (Pallier et al., 2011). When the deaf participants read sentences versus word lists, the same network of language areas was observed. While reading and sign language processing yielded identical effects of linguistic structure in the basal ganglia, the effect of structure was stronger in all cortical language areas for written language relative to sign language. Furthermore, cortical activity was partially modulated by age of acquisition and reading proficiency. Our results stress the important role of the basal ganglia, within the language network, in the representation of the constituent structure of language, regardless of the input modality. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. INNOVATIVE MIOR PROCESS UTILIZING INDIGENOUS RESERVOIR CONSTITUENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D.O. Hitzman; A.K. Stepp; D.M. Dennis; L.R. Graumann

    2003-09-01

    This research program was directed at improving the knowledge of reservoir ecology and developing practical microbial solutions and technologies for improving oil production. The goal was to identify and utilize indigenous microbial populations which can produce beneficial metabolic products and develop a methodology to stimulate those select microbes with nutrient amendments to increase oil recovery. This microbial technology has the capability of producing multiple oil-releasing agents. Experimental laboratory work in model sandpack cores was conducted using microbial cultures isolated from produced water samples. Comparative laboratory studies demonstrating in situ production of microbial products as oil recovery agents were conducted in sand packs with natural field waters using cultures and conditions representative of oil reservoirs. Increased oil recovery in multiple model sandpack systems was achieved and the technology and results were verified by successful field studies. Direct application of the research results has lead to the development of a feasible, practical, successful, and cost-effective technology which increases oil recovery. This technology is now being commercialized and applied in numerous field projects to increase oil recovery. Two field applications of the developed technology reported production increases of 21% and 24% in oil recovery.

  17. Summary Report for the Technical Interchange Meeting on Development of Baseline Material Properties and Design Guidelines for In-Space Manufacturing Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prater, T. J.; Bean, Q. A.; Werkheiser, N. J.; Johnston, M. M.; Ordonez, E. A.; Ledbetter, F. E.; Risdon, D. L.; Stockman, T. J.; Sandridge, S. K. R.; Nelson, G. M.

    2016-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and the Agency as a whole are currently engaged in a number of in-space manufacturing (ISM) activities that have the potential to reduce launch costs, enhance crew safety, and provide the capabilities needed to undertake long-duration spaceflight. The recent 3D Printing in Zero-G experiment conducted on board the International Space Station (ISS) demonstrated that parts of acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) plastic can be manufactured in microgravity using fused deposition modeling (FDM). This project represents the beginning of the development of a capability that is critical to future NASA missions. Current and future ISM activities will require the development of baseline material properties to facilitate design, analysis, and certification of materials manufactured using in-space techniques. The purpose of this technical interchange meeting (TIM) was to bring together MSFC practitioners and experts in materials characterization and development of baseline material properties for emerging technologies to advise the ISM team as we progress toward the development of material design values, standards, and acceptance criteria for materials manufactured in space. The overall objective of the TIM was to leverage MSFC's shared experiences and collective knowledge in advanced manufacturing and materials development to construct a path forward for the establishment of baseline material properties, standards development, and certification activities related to ISM. Participants were asked to help identify research and development activities that will (1) accelerate acceptance and adoption of ISM techniques among the aerospace design community; (2) benefit future NASA programs, commercial technology developments, and national needs; and (3) provide opportunities and avenues for further collaboration.

  18. Polarized constituent quarks in NLO approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khorramian, Ali N.; Tehrani, S. Atashbar; Mirjalili, A.

    2006-01-01

    The valon representation provides a basis between hadrons and quarks, in terms of which the bound-state and scattering properties of hadrons can be united and described. We studied polarized valon distributions which have an important role in describing the spin dependence of parton distribution in leading and next-to-leading order approximation. Convolution integral in frame work of valon model as a useful tool, was used in polarized case. To obtain polarized parton distributions in a proton we need to polarized valon distribution in a proton and polarized parton distributions inside the valon. We employed Bernstein polynomial averages to get unknown parameters of polarized valon distributions by fitting to available experimental data

  19. [Chemical Constituents in hypoglycemic active fraction of Celastrus orbiculatus leaf].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiao-xia; Zhang, Ting-ting; Wang, Ding-yong

    2014-06-01

    To study the chemical constituents in the hypoglycemic active fraction of Celastrus orbiculatus leaf. The constituents were separated and purified by column chromatography and thin layer chromatography, and their structures were elucidated by IR, MS and NMR. Seven compounds were isolated from the active fraction of Celastnrus orbiculatus, which identified as kaempferol( 1) ,quercetin(2), kaempferol-7-0-α-L-rhamnoside (3), kaempferol-3,7-di-O-α-L-rhamnoside (4) , quercetin-3-0-β-D-glucoside(5), myricetrin(6) and kaempferol-3-0-rutinoside(7). Chemical constituents in the hypoglycemic active fraction of Celastrus orbiculatus leaf are reported for the first time,and compounds 5,6 and 7 are firstly obtained from this plant.

  20. Methods of using adsorption media for separating or removing constituents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tranter, Troy J [Idaho Falls, ID; Herbst, R Scott [Idaho Falls, ID; Mann, Nicholas R [Blackfoot, ID; Todd, Terry A [Aberdeen, ID

    2011-10-25

    Methods of using an adsorption medium to remove at least one constituent from a feed stream. The method comprises contacting an adsorption medium with a feed stream comprising at least one constituent and removing the at least one constituent from the feed stream. The adsorption medium comprises a polyacrylonitrile (PAN) matrix and at least one metal hydroxide homogenously dispersed therein. The adsorption medium may comprise from approximately 15 wt % to approximately 90 wt % of the PAN and from approximately 10 wt % to approximately 85 wt % of the at least one metal hydroxide. The at least one metal hydroxide may be selected from the group consisting of ferric hydroxide, zirconium hydroxide, lanthanum hydroxide, cerium hydroxide, titanium hydroxide, copper hydroxide, antimony hydroxide, and molybdenum hydroxide.

  1. Comparison of collision operators for drift and MHD-interchange modes in unsheared slab geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rewoldt, G.; Tang, W.M.; Hastie, R.J.

    1986-02-01

    The general procedure for the kinetic analysis of low-frequency electrostatic and electromagnetic modes in toroidal geometry is now well known. In the collisionless limit, the relevant dynamics (e.g., trapped particles, resonances, etc.) can be treated appropriately. However, with the introduction of collisional effects, it is customary, for tractability, to employ model collision operators which do not rigorously satisfy all conservation properties of more exact collision operators. Insight into the essential required features of such operators can be gained by studying models with increasing levels of completeness for a simpler, unsheared slab geometry. The results presented here for this simpler geometry can provide guidance in choosing model collision operators for toroidal-geometry kinetic calculations. 6 refs., 3 figs

  2. A recent review on phytochemical constituents and medicinal properties of kesum (Polygonum minus Huds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paritala Vikram

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Medicinal plants and herbal preparations are gaining renowned interest in scientific communities nowadays due to their reliable pharmacological actions and affordability to common people which makes them effective in control of various diseases. Polygonum minus (Polygonaceae locally known as kesum is an aromatic plant commonly used in Malay delicacies. The plant is having potential applications due to its high volatile oil constituents in perfumes and powerful antioxidant activity. It has been used traditionally to treat various ailments including dandruff. The research has been carried out by various researchers using different in vitro and in vivo models for biological evaluations to support these claims. This review paper may help upcoming research activities on Polygonum minus by giving up to date information on the phytochemical constituents and medicinal properties of kesum to a possible extent with relevant data.

  3. Chemical constituents and antioxidant activity of the essential oil from leaves of Annona vepretorum Mart. (Annonaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Camila de Souza; de Oliveira, Ana Paula; Lima, Rafaely Nascimento; Alves, Péricles Barreto; Diniz, Tâmara Coimbra; da Silva Almeida, Jackson Roberto Guedes

    2015-01-01

    Annona vepretorum (AV) is a native tree from Caatinga biome (semiarid region of Brazil) popularly known as "araticum" and "pinha da Caatinga." This study was carried out to evaluate the chemical constituents and antioxidant activity (AA) of the essential oil from the leaves from AV (EO-Av) collected in Petrolina, Pernambuco, Brazil. Fresh leaves of AV were cut into pieces, and subjected to distillation for 2 h in a clevenger-type apparatus. Gas chromatograph (GC) analyses were performed using a mass spectrometry/flame ionization detector. The identification of the constituents was assigned on the basis of comparison of their relative retention indices. The antioxidant ability of the EO was investigated through two in vitro models such as radical scavenging activity using 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl method and β-carotene-linoleate-model system. The positive controls (ascorbic acid, butylated hydroxyanisole and butylated hydroxytoluene) were those using the standard solutions. Assays were carried out in triplicate. The oil showed a total of 21 components, and 17 were identified, representing 93.9% of the crude EO. Spathulenol (43.7%), limonene (20.5%), caryophyllene oxide (8.1%) and α-pinene (5.5%) were found to be the major individual constituents. Spathulenol and caryophyllene oxide could be considered chemotaxonomic markers of these genera. The EO demonstrated weak AA.

  4. Anti-diarrheal constituents of Alpinia oxyphylla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Junqing; Wang, Sheng; Li, Yonghui; Xu, Peng; Chen, Feng; Tan, Yinfeng; Duan, Jinao

    2013-09-01

    Isolation, screening and in vivo assays have been used for evaluating anti-diarrhea bioactive of Alpinia oxyphylla. Preliminary experimental results showed that 95% ethanol extract and 90% ethanol elution significantly extended the onset time of diarrhea and reduced the wet feces proportion, however 50% ethanol election had no effect on diarrhea. Chemical analysis results displayed that Nootkatone, Tectochrysin and yakuchinone A may be bioactive ingredients for curing diarrhea. Duodenum in vitro experiment showed that Tectochrysin 50, 100 μM reduces carbachol-induced contraction, while yakuchinone A and Nootkatone had no effect. Bioinformatic computational method as molecular docking has been complementary to experimentally work to explore the potential mechanism. The study of pathogenesis of diarrhea in humans and animal models suggested that Na(+)/H(+) exchanger3 (NHE3) and aquaporin4 (AQP4) are causative agents of diarrhea. The analysis was done on the basis of scoring and binding ability and the docking analysis showed that Tectochrysin has maximum potential against NHE3 (PDB ID: 2OCS) and AQP4 (PDB ID: 3GD8). Tectochrysin indicated minimum energy score and the highest number of interactions with active site residues. These results suggested that A. oxyphylla might exhibit its anti-diarrhea effect partially by affecting the proteins of NHE3 and AQP4 with its active ingredient Tectochrysin. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Updates to Constituent Subtraction in Heavy Ions at CMS

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The latest upgrades and performance of constituent subtraction in 5.02 TeV PbPb collisions is presented. The constituent subtraction is extended through the full tracker acceptance, increasing the rapidity reach of correctly subtracted jets. A modulation in azimuthal angle is added to the subtraction, accounting for flow on an event-by-event basis and improving jet energy resolution. Closure of jet energy scale after corrections and jet energy resolution is shown for R=0.4 and R=0.8 jets, the latter for the first time in CMS Heavy-Ions.

  6. [Chemical constituents of the roots of Vaccinium bracteatum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Xiao-Lan; Mai, Xi; Guo, Hui; Lai, Xiao-Ping

    2012-06-01

    To study the chemical constituents of the roots of Vaccinium bracteatum. The constituents were separated and purified with chromatographic methods (including silica gel, Sephadex LH-20 and RP-18 column chromatography), and their structures were determined by spectroscopic methods (including MS, 1H-NMR and 13C-NMR). 10 compounds were isolated from the roots of Vaccinium bracteatu and were elucidated as chlorogenic acid (1), pinoresinol (2), ferulic acid (3), kaempferol (4), trans-caffeic acid (5), beta-sitosterol (6), quercetin (7), oleanolic acid (8), apigenin (9) and luteolin (10). Compounds 1 -3 are obtained from this plant for the first time.

  7. [Study on the chemical constituents of Buddleja davidii].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xue-Jing; Zeng, Yong; Luo, Jian-Jun; Chang, Xiao-Li; Xie, Qin-Jian; Wang, Ting; Li, Chong; Zhao, Lei

    2012-12-01

    To study the chemical constituents of Buddleja davidii. The constituents were isolated and purified by silica gel column chromatography, polyamide column chromatography and macroporous adsorption resin and their structures were identified by spectroscopic analysis. Eight compounds were elucidated as : Cranioside A (1), Eutigoside A (2), 1-O-4-Dimethoxyphenylethyl-4-O-3,4-dimethoxyphenylethy-beta-D-glucopyranoside (3), Isomartynoside (4'), 4"-O-Acetylmartynoside (5), Stigmasterol glueoside (6), beta-Sitosterol (7), Daucosterol (8). All these compounds are obtained from this plant for the first time.

  8. The Chemical Constituents and Pharmacological Actions of Cordyceps sinensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi; Wang, Jihui; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Hanyue; Zhang, Xuelan; Han, Chunchao

    2015-01-01

    Cordyceps sinensis, also called DongChongXiaCao (winter worm, summer grass) in Chinese, is becoming increasingly popular and important in the public and scientific communities. This study summarizes the chemical constituents and their corresponding pharmacological actions of Cordyceps sinensis. Many bioactive components of Cordyceps sinensis have been extracted including nucleoside, polysaccharide, sterol, protein, amino acid, and polypeptide. In addition, these constituents' corresponding pharmacological actions were also shown in the study such as anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antitumour, antiapoptosis, and immunomodulatory actions. Therefore can use different effects of C. sinensis against different diseases and provide reference for the study of Cordyceps sinensis in the future. PMID:25960753

  9. The integration of the Constituent Congress in 1917

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Bernardino Sánchez Aguilar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper offers a new perspective around the perception of political legitimacy held by the representatives to one of the most emblematic assemblies in Mexico. Reviewing the credentials of the Querétaro Constituent Congress allows us to observe the first internal disputes within constitutionalism, since plenty has been said about the enactment of the Political Constitution of the Mexican United States, whereas the legislative sessions that gave rise to it are not studied enough.  By presenting the chiaroscuros of the constituent parliamentary work, particularly during the first days of the electoral college, this article aims to complement the existing enormous historiographic production on this Congress.

  10. Management of diabetic complications: a chemical constituents based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Randhir; Kaur, Navpreet; Kishore, Lalit; Gupta, Girish Kumar

    2013-10-28

    Long term hyperglycemia leads to development of complications associated with diabetes. Diabetic complications are now a global health problem without effective therapeutic approach. Hyperglycemia and oxidative stress are important components for the development of diabetic complications. Over the past few decades, herbal medicines have attracted much attention as potential therapeutic agents in the prevention and treatment of diabetic complications due to their multiple targets and less toxic side effects. This review aims to assess the current available knowledge of medicinal herbs for attenuation and management of diabetic complications and their underlying mechanisms. Bibliographic investigation was carried out by scrutinizing classical text books and peer reviewed papers, consulting worldwide accepted scientific databases (SCOPUS, PUBMED, SCIELO, NISCAIR, Google Scholar) to retrieve available published literature. The inclusion criteria for the selection of plants were based upon all medicinal herbs and their active compounds with attributed potentials in relieving diabetic complications. Moreover, plants which have potential effect in ameliorating oxidative stress in diabetic animals have been included. Overall, 238 articles were reviewed for plant literature and out of the reviewed literature, 127 articles were selected for the study. Various medicinal plants/plant extracts containing flavonoids, alkaloids, phenolic compounds, terpenoids, saponins and phytosterol type chemical constituents were found to be effective in the management of diabetic complications. This effect might be attributed to amelioration of persistent hyperglycemia, oxidative stress and modulation of various metabolic pathways involved in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications. Screening chemical candidate from herbal medicine might be a promising approach for new drug discovery to treat the diabetic complications. There is still a dire need to explore the mechanism of action of

  11. Alternating-Script Priming in Japanese: Are Katakana and Hiragana Characters Interchangeable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perea, Manuel; Nakayama, Mariko; Lupker, Stephen J.

    2017-01-01

    Models of written word recognition in languages using the Roman alphabet assume that a word's visual form is quickly mapped onto abstract units. This proposal is consistent with the finding that masked priming effects are of similar magnitude from lowercase, uppercase, and alternating-case primes (e.g., beard-BEARD, BEARD-BEARD, and BeArD-BEARD).…

  12. Interchangeability and comparative effectiveness between generic and brand montelukast immediate release tablets after a single oral administration in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaid, Abdel Naser; Mousa, Ayman; Ghazal, Nadia; Bustami, Rana

    2015-01-01

    Montelukast is a leukotriene receptor antagonist. The release of leukotrienes causes narrowing and constricting in the respiratory airways. Blocking the action of these leukotrienes, montelukast can be used for the prophylaxis and treatment of chronic asthma. The aim of this study was to evaluate the interchangeability and comparative effectiveness between a generic and a brand montelukast 10 mg immediate release tablets (Broncast(®) and Singulair(®), respectively) after a single oral dose among Arab Mediterranean volunteers. An open-label, randomized two-period crossover bioequivalence design was conducted in 31 healthy male volunteers with a 1 week washout between each study period and under fasting conditions. The plasma drug concentration was assessed by using a previously validated LC MS/MS method. The ratio between the generic and brand of geometric least squares means was reported for both generic and brand products. Moreover, an in vitro dissolution study was conducted on generic and brand tablets using three different pH media, and similarity and non-similarity factors (f2 and f1) were calculated. The used bioanalytical method was found to be linear within the range 6.098-365.855 ng/mL. The correlation coefficient was close to 0.999 during the course of the study validation. Statistical comparison of the main pharmacokinetic parameters showed the inexistence of any significant difference between generic and the brand. The point estimates (ratios of geometric means) were 111.939, 111.711, and 112.169 % for AUC0-24, AUC0-∞, and Cmax, respectively. The 90 % confidence intervals (CIs) were within the pre-defined limits of 80.00-125.00 % as specified by the FDA and EMA for bioequivalence studies. F2 and f1 were higher than 50 and lower than 15, respectively in all selected pH media. Broncast(®) immediate release film coated tablets (10 mg/tablet) are bioequivalent to Singulair(®) immediate release film coated tablets (10 mg/tablet), with a

  13. A MODULAR PHOTOSYNTHETIC MICROBIAL FUEL CELL WITH INTERCHANGEABLE ALGAE SOLAR COMPARTMENTS

    OpenAIRE

    Fleury, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    This project trial provides a novel small-scale solar harnessing technology which increases environmental effectiveness while maintaining optimal energy efficiency. Although modern solar panels are purposed in producing clean energy, the materials and byproducts of solar cell manufacturing are not eco-friendly. Thus, considering an organic, renewable and energy efficient solar cell model is necessary. Investigations explored multiple highly-photosynthetic algal species which were later integr...

  14. Electronic Data Interchange: from its Birth to its New Role in Logistics Information Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Janssens, Gerrit K.

    2011-01-01

    The introduction of internet applications in e-commerce made many adopters think that EDI would soon disappear. But the trend in logistics towards closer collaboration in supply chains made on the other hand the impact of EDI larger. A resultant of those forces will probably lead to a new type of EDI, which integrates with other technologies. Early studies on EDI were promoting its use because of savings in administrative work. But due to intra-corporation management model...

  15. Temporal trends in water-quality constituent concentrations and annual loads of chemical constituents in Michigan watersheds, 1998–2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoard, Christopher J.; Fogarty, Lisa R.; Duris, Joseph W.

    2018-02-21

    In 1998, the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality and the U.S. Geological Survey began the Water Chemistry Monitoring Program for select streams in the State of Michigan. Objectives of this program were to provide assistance with (1) statewide water-quality assessments, (2) the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permitting process, and (3) water-resource management decisions. As part of this program, water-quality data collected from 1998 to 2013 were analyzed to identify potential trends for select constituents that were sampled. Sixteen water-quality constituents were analyzed at 32 stations throughout Michigan. Trend analysis on the various water-quality data was done using either the uncensored Seasonal Kendall test or through Tobit regression. In total, 79 trends were detected in the constituents analyzed for 32 river stations sampled for the study period—53 downward trends and 26 upward trends were detected. The most prevalent trend detected throughout the State was for ammonia, with 11 downward trends and 1 upward trend estimated.In addition to trends, constituent loads were estimated for 31 stations from 2002 to 2013 for stations that were sampled 12 times per year. Loads were computed using the Autobeale load computation program, which used the Beale ratio estimator approach to estimate an annual load. Constituent loads were the largest in large watershed streams with the highest annual flows such as the Saginaw and Grand Rivers. Likewise, constituent loads were the smallest in smaller tributaries that were sampled as part of this program such as the Boardman and Thunder Bay Rivers.

  16. Significance of high energy spin effects in constituent pictures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, C.K.

    1977-01-01

    The spin information about high energy hadronic reactions is important for further understanding of the nature and the behavior of hadronic constituents. The usefulness of the information is discussed in the cases of dilepton production from hadronic collisions, large P/sub T/ inclusive and elastic scatterings, and small angle elastic scattering and quantum number exchanged reactions

  17. Charge radii of octet and decuplet baryons in chiral constituent ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    in electron–baryon scattering experiments [4,5] giving rp = 0.877 ± 0.007 fm ... breaking of the SU(3) symmetry and a non-vanishing neutron charge mean square radius ... QCD Lagrangian is not invariant under the chiral transformation. ... of a constituent quark GBs [34–37], successfully explains the 'proton spin problem'.

  18. Scattering Phase Functions of Constituents of Mineral Dust Aerosols ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... Montmorillonte, Hematite, Calcite and Quartz. The behaviour of these constituents as observed by their phase functions provide information on the optical properties and radiative effects of the mineral dust types and is therefore useful on regional and global scales in assessing radiative impacts of dust outbreak events.

  19. Exploring basic biochemical constituents in the body tissues of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Feeding regime did not influence susceptibility to mass loss during export. Animal age influenced the biochemical composition and export performance of abalone. Keywords: abalone; aquaculture; feeds; Haliotis midae; live export; mass loss; tissue biochemical constituents. African Journal of Marine Science 2010, 32(1): ...

  20. Chemical composition of volatile constituents from the leaves of Aloe ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJB SERVER

    2006-09-18

    Sep 18, 2006 ... very helpful enzymes, saponins, hormones and amino acids which can be absorbed into the human skin. One of the constituents of the Aloe pith is ... higher than green tea and grape seed extracts, respectively. It is also well ...

  1. Characterization of Formation Water Constituents and the Effect of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael Horsfall

    ABSTRACT: The research work examined the constituents of formation water and fresh water dilution effects from a land location in the Niger Delta Area of Nigeria. Some selected physicochemical and microbiological analyses were determined at ambient temperature (82oF) and formation temperature (185oF). Analysis of ...

  2. Erythrocyte indices and serum biochemical constituents of broiler ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    One hundred and twenty (120) four weeks old Ross breed broiler finisher birds were used to study the effect of feeding maggot meal as a replacement for fish meal on erythrocyte indices and serum biochemical constituents. The birds were divided into 5 treatment groups identified as T1, T2, T3 , T4 and T5 with 24 birds per ...

  3. Activity guided isolation of chemical constituents from the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study we investigated the chemical constituents of bioactive methanol extract of Euphorbia schimperi C. Presl. For this the methanol extract was fractionated into 20, 40, 60, 80% MeOH in CHCl3, and 100% MeOH fractions respectively by vacuum liquid chromatography. Excision wound surface of the animals were ...

  4. Anti- toxoplasma gondii activity of constituents from Balsamocitrus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Isolation, characterization and anti-Toxoplasma gondii activity of constituents from the CH2Cl2/MeOH (1/1) extract of the roots of the cameroonian plant Balsamocitrus camerunensis L. were investigated in this study. Four known coumarins derivatives were isolated, namely, marmin (1), imperatorin (2), xanthoxyletin (3), ...

  5. Cytotoxic potential of valerian constituents and valerian tinctures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, R.; Hendriks, H; Scheffer, J.J C; Woerdenbag, H.J.

    Underground parts of three Valeriana species, namely V. officinalis L. s.l., V. wallichii DC. (V. jatamansi Jones), and V. edulis Nutt. ex Torr & Gray ssp. procera (H.B.K.) F. G. Meyer (V. mexicana DC.), are used in phytotherapy because of their mild sedative properties. Characteristic constituents

  6. The binary branching nature of syllable constituents: the English onset

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Motivating evidence is drawn from other languages, specifically Italian, Spanish and Portuguese, because it is believed that, except for the coda, the binary branching nature of syllable constituents is universally imposed in the world\\'s languages. Also, no one language or dialect can exhaustively account for all linguistic ...

  7. Studies on the chemical constituents, antioxidants and membrane ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The chemical constituents, antioxidant and membrane stability activities of Hibiscus rosa sinensis Linn. (Malvaceae) flower were determined. The total anthocyanin was 165 mg / kg with about 6 % reduction due to fermentation. Tannin, ascorbic acid, and total polyphenol were 11.8 g / kg; 478 mg / kg; and 14.4 mg / g, ...

  8. Spectrograph dedicated to measuring tropospheric trace gas constituents from space

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, J. de; Laan, E.C.; Deutz, A.F.; Escudero-Sanz, I.; Bokhove, H.; Hoegee, J.; Aben, I.; Jongma, R.; Landgraf, J.; Hasekamp, O.P.; Houweling, S.; Weele, M. van; Oss, R. van; Oord, G. van den; Levelt, P.

    2005-01-01

    Several organizations in the Netherlands are cooperating to develop user requirements and instrument concepts in the line of SCIAMACHY and OMI but with an increased focus on measuring tropospheric constituents from space. The concepts use passive spectroscopy in dedicated wavelength sections in the

  9. Method for verification of constituents of a process stream

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baylor, L.C.; Buchanan, B.R.; O`Rourke, P.E.

    1993-01-01

    This invention is comprised of a method for validating a process stream for the presence or absence of a substance of interest such as a chemical warfare agent; that is, for verifying that a chemical warfare agent is present in an input line for feeding the agent into a reaction vessel for destruction, or, in a facility for producing commercial chemical products, that a constituent of the chemical warfare agent has not been substituted for the proper chemical compound. The method includes the steps of transmitting light through a sensor positioned in the feed line just before the chemical constituent in the input line enters the reaction vessel, measuring an optical spectrum of the chemical constituent from the light beam transmitted through it, and comparing the measured spectrum to a reference spectrum of the chemical agent and preferable also reference spectra of surrogates. A signal is given if the chemical agent is not entering a reaction vessel for destruction, or if a constituent of a chemical agent is added to a feed line in substitution of the proper chemical compound.

  10. Chemical Constituents and Biological Properties of the Marine Soft ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The genus Nephthea is a member of the family Acyonaceae, subfamily Nephtheidae, and is distributed throughout the world mainly in the Indo-Pacific region. The genus Nephthea has been studied for its phytochemical constituents and these studies have resulted in the discovery of over a hundred compounds comprising ...

  11. Variation in the essential oil constituents of Pteronia incana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The essential oil of Pteronia incana was collected and was investigated on a monthly basis using GCMS. The oil volume and its constituents vary greatly with different time of sampling and distillation. The oil contains a high percentage of myrcene a-pinene, b-pinene with sabinene, a-terpinene, 1.8 cineole and limonene.

  12. Isolation of nematicidal constituents from essential oil of Kaempferia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To explore the nematicidal activities of the essential oil of Kaempferia galanga rhizomes and its isolated constituents against Heterodera avenae. Methods: Essential oil of K. galanga rhizomes was obtained by hydrodistillation and characterized by gas chromatography/mass spectrometric (GC/MS) analysis using ...

  13. Antiparasitic, Nematicidal and Antifouling Constituents from Juniperus Berries

    Science.gov (United States)

    A bioassay-guided fractionation of Juniperus procera berries yielded antiparasitic, nematicidal and antifouling constituents, including a wide range of known abietane, pimarane and labdane diterpenes. Among these, abieta-7,13-diene (1) demonstrated in vitro antimalarial activity against Plasmodium f...

  14. Elemental constituent of food and the daily intake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Kazumasa

    1976-01-01

    Constituent of element in foods and it's daily intake was discussed. In tables were shown instances of analysed values of major elements in Japanese foods, daily dietary intake of 8 elements in Japan (analysed value of total diet and estimated amounts of daily dietary intake of 32 elements. (J.P.N.)

  15. The chemical constituents of calabash ( Crescentia cujete ) | Ejelonu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Virtually, all parts of the calabash (Crescentia cujete) tree have been found to be useful; the wood for tool handles, ribs in boat building, cattle yokes, and the gourd is used for cups, containers and musical instruments. The calabash (C. cujete) fruit was studied for its chemical constituents- proximate and mineral composition ...

  16. Determination of Chemical Constituents of the Marine Pulmonate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Determination of Chemical Constituents of the Marine Pulmonate Slug, Paraoncidium reevesii. B Sun, H Shen, H Wu, L Yao, Z Cheng, Y Diao. Abstract. Purpose: To isolate and identify the chemical components of Paraoncidium reevesii. Methods: Silica gel column chromatography was used to isolate the components from ...

  17. Cassini MIMI Close-Up of Saturn Energetic Particles: Low Altitude Trapped Radiation, Auroral Ion Acceleration, and Interchange Flow Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, D. G.; Krimigis, S. M.; Krupp, N.; Paranicas, C.; Roussos, E.; Kollmann, P.

    2017-12-01

    We present observations from the final orbits of the Cassini Mission at Saturn by the Magnetospheric Imaging Instrument (MIMI). Crossing inside the D-Ring at the equator and just above Saturn's atmosphere, these orbits covered regions never visited previously in the mission. Highlights include the confirmation of an inner radiation belt analogous to the inner radiation belt at Earth by the Low Energy Magnetospheric Measurement System (LEMMS), with surprising twists—Saturn's D-ring material appears to be a source for these particles. Details will be presented in another session. The Grand Finale orbits also afforded a close-up view of the auroral ion acceleration regions by the Ion and Neutral Camera (INCA). Ionospheric ions at the base of auroral field lines are accelerated perpendicular to the magnetic field to 10's and 100's of keV, and charge exchange with exospheric neutrals to be emitted as energetic neutral atoms and images by INCA. We show that this acceleration region lies at about 0.1 Rs. Another feature seen previously in the mission but imaged with greater resolution is a flow channel associated with interchange motion in the middle magnetosphere. We show this feature to extend over several Saturn radii in the radial direction, and over about 2 Saturn radii azimuthally. Additional data have been received since the writing of this abstract and before Cassini's plunge into the atmosphere on September 15, so additional features may be presented.

  18. Neotropical mammal diversity and the Great American Biotic Interchange: spatial and temporal variation in South America's fossil record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo, Juan D.; Forasiepi, Analía; Jaramillo, Carlos; Sánchez-Villagra, Marcelo R.

    2015-01-01

    The vast mammal diversity of the Neotropics is the result of a long evolutionary history. During most of the Cenozoic, South America was an island continent with an endemic mammalian fauna. This isolation ceased during the late Neogene after the formation of the Isthmus of Panama, resulting in an event known as the Great American Biotic Interchange (GABI). In this study, we investigate biogeographic patterns in South America, just before or when the first immigrants are recorded and we review the temporal and geographical distribution of fossil mammals during the GABI. We performed a dissimilarity analysis which grouped the faunal assemblages according to their age and their geographic distribution. Our data support the differentiation between tropical and temperate assemblages in South America during the middle and late Miocene. The GABI begins during the late Miocene (~10–7 Ma) and the putative oldest migrations are recorded in the temperate region, where the number of GABI participants rapidly increases after ~5 Ma and this trend continues during the Pleistocene. A sampling bias toward higher latitudes and younger records challenges the study of the temporal and geographic patterns of the GABI. PMID:25601879

  19. Analytical Validation of a Portable Mass Spectrometer Featuring Interchangeable, Ambient Ionization Sources for High Throughput Forensic Evidence Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawton, Zachary E; Traub, Angelica; Fatigante, William L; Mancias, Jose; O'Leary, Adam E; Hall, Seth E; Wieland, Jamie R; Oberacher, Herbert; Gizzi, Michael C; Mulligan, Christopher C

    2017-06-01

    Forensic evidentiary backlogs are indicative of the growing need for cost-effective, high-throughput instrumental methods. One such emerging technology that shows high promise in meeting this demand while also allowing on-site forensic investigation is portable mass spectrometric (MS) instrumentation, particularly that which enables the coupling to ambient ionization techniques. While the benefits of rapid, on-site screening of contraband can be anticipated, the inherent legal implications of field-collected data necessitates that the analytical performance of technology employed be commensurate with accepted techniques. To this end, comprehensive analytical validation studies are required before broad incorporation by forensic practitioners can be considered, and are the focus of this work. Pertinent performance characteristics such as throughput, selectivity, accuracy/precision, method robustness, and ruggedness have been investigated. Reliability in the form of false positive/negative response rates is also assessed, examining the effect of variables such as user training and experience level. To provide flexibility toward broad chemical evidence analysis, a suite of rapidly-interchangeable ion sources has been developed and characterized through the analysis of common illicit chemicals and emerging threats like substituted phenethylamines. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  20. Rapid screening of basic colorants in processed vegetables through mass spectrometry using an interchangeable thermal desorption electrospray ionization source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Yu-Ying; Chen, Yen-Ling; Lin, Hong-Yi; Huang, Yeou-Lih

    2018-06-20

    Thermal desorption electrospray ionization/mass spectrometry (TD-ESI-MS) employing a quickly interchangeable ionization source is a relatively new ambient ionization mass spectrometric technique that has had, to date, only a limited number of applications related to food safety control. With reallocation of resources, this direct-analysis technique has had wider use in food analysis when operated in dual-working mode (pretreatment-free qualitative screening and conventional quantitative confirmation) after switching to an ambient ionization source from a traditional atmospheric pressure ionization source. Herein, we describe the benefits and challenges associated with the use of a TD-ESI source to detect adulterants in processed vegetables (PVs), as a proof-of-concept for the detection of basic colorants. While TD-ESI can offer direct qualitative screening analyses for PVs with detection capabilities lower than those provided with liquid chromatography/UV detection within 30 s, the use of TD-ESI for semi-quantification is applicable only for homogeneous food matrices. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Rapid detection of illegal colorants on traditional Chinese pastries through mass spectrometry with an interchangeable thermal desorption electrospray ionization source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Yu-Ying; Chen, Yen-Ling; Chen, Wei-Chu; Chen, Bai-Hsiun; Huang, Yeou-Lih

    2018-06-30

    Ambient mass spectrometry using an interchangeable thermal desorption/electrospray ionization source (TD-ESI) is a relatively new technique that has had only a limited number of applications to date. Nevertheless, this direct-analysis technique has potential for wider use in analytical chemistry (e.g., in the rapid direct detection of contaminants, residues, and adulterants on and in food) when operated in dual-working mode (pretreatment-free qualitative screening and conventional quantitative confirmation) after switching to a TD-ESI source from a conventional ESI source. Herein, we describe the benefits and challenges associated with the use of a TD-ESI source to detect adulterants on traditional Chinese pastries (TCPs), as a proof-of-concept for the detection of illegal colorants. While TD-ESI can offer direct (i.e., without any sample preparation) qualitative screening analyses for TCPs with adequate sensitivity within 30 s, the use of TD-ESI for semi-quantification is applicable only for homogeneous matrices (e.g., tang yuan). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Analytical Validation of a Portable Mass Spectrometer Featuring Interchangeable, Ambient Ionization Sources for High Throughput Forensic Evidence Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawton, Zachary E.; Traub, Angelica; Fatigante, William L.; Mancias, Jose; O'Leary, Adam E.; Hall, Seth E.; Wieland, Jamie R.; Oberacher, Herbert; Gizzi, Michael C.; Mulligan, Christopher C.

    2017-06-01

    Forensic evidentiary backlogs are indicative of the growing need for cost-effective, high-throughput instrumental methods. One such emerging technology that shows high promise in meeting this demand while also allowing on-site forensic investigation is portable mass spectrometric (MS) instrumentation, particularly that which enables the coupling to ambient ionization techniques. While the benefits of rapid, on-site screening of contraband can be anticipated, the inherent legal implications of field-collected data necessitates that the analytical performance of technology employed be commensurate with accepted techniques. To this end, comprehensive analytical validation studies are required before broad incorporation by forensic practitioners can be considered, and are the focus of this work. Pertinent performance characteristics such as throughput, selectivity, accuracy/precision, method robustness, and ruggedness have been investigated. Reliability in the form of false positive/negative response rates is also assessed, examining the effect of variables such as user training and experience level. To provide flexibility toward broad chemical evidence analysis, a suite of rapidly-interchangeable ion sources has been developed and characterized through the analysis of common illicit chemicals and emerging threats like substituted phenethylamines. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  3. The interchangeability of global positioning system and semiautomated video-based performance data during elite soccer match play.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harley, Jamie A; Lovell, Ric J; Barnes, Christopher A; Portas, Matthew D; Weston, Matthew

    2011-08-01

    In elite-level soccer, player motion characteristics are commonly generated from match play and training situations using semiautomated video analysis systems and global positioning system (GPS) technology, respectively. Before such data are used collectively to quantify global player load, it is necessary to understand both the level of agreement and direction of bias between the systems so that specific interventions can be made based on the reported results. The aim of this report was to compare data derived from both systems for physical match performances. Six elite-level soccer players were analyzed during a competitive match using semiautomated video analysis (ProZone® [PZ]) and GPS (MinimaxX) simultaneously. Total distances (TDs), high speed running (HSR), very high speed running (VHSR), sprinting distance (SPR), and high-intensity running distance (HIR; >4.0 m·s(-1)) were reported in 15-minute match periods. The GPS reported higher values than PZ did for TD (GPS: 1,755.4 ± 245.4 m; PZ: 1,631.3 ± 239.5 m; p < 0.05); PZ reported higher values for SPR and HIR than GPS did (SPR: PZ, 34.1 ± 24.0 m; GPS: 20.3 ± 15.8 m; HIR: PZ, 368.1 ± 129.8 m; GPS: 317.0 ± 92.5 m; p < 0.05). Caution should be exercised when using match-load (PZ) and training-load (GPS) data interchangeably.

  4. The root barks of Morus alba and the flavonoid constituents inhibit airway inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hun Jai; Jin, Hong-Guang; Woo, Eun-Rhan; Lee, Sang Kook; Kim, Hyun Pyo

    2013-08-26

    The root barks of Morus alba have been used in traditional medicine as an anti-inflammatory drug, especially for treating lung inflammatory disorders. To find new alternative agents against airway inflammation and to establish the scientific rationale of the herbal medicine in clinical use, the root barks of Morus alba and its flavonoid constituents were examined for the first time for their pharmacological activity against lung inflammation. For in vivo evaluation, an animal model of lipopolysaccharide-induced airway inflammation in mice was used. An inhibitory action against the production of proinflammatory molecules in lung epithelial cells and lung macrophages was examined. Against lipopolysaccharide-induced airway inflammation, the ethanol extract of the root barks of Morus alba clearly inhibited bronchitis-like symptoms, as determined by TNF-α production, inflammatory cells infiltration and histological observation at 200-400mg/kg/day by oral administration. In addition, Morus alba and their major flavonoid constituents including kuwanone E, kuwanone G and norartocarpanone significantly inhibited IL-6 production in lung epithelial cells (A549) and NO production in lung macrophages (MH-S). Taken together, it is concluded that Morus alba and the major prenylated flavonoid constituents have a potential for new agents to control lung inflammation including bronchitis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Multilevel multitrait-multimethod latent analysis of structurally different and interchangeable raters of school climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konold, Timothy; Cornell, Dewey

    2015-09-01

    Informant-based systems of assessment are common platforms for measuring a variety of educational and psychological constructs where the use of multiple informants is considered best practice. In many instances, structurally different informant types (e.g., students and teachers) are solicited on the basis of their unique roles with the target of measurement. The use of multiple informants provides an opportunity to evaluate the degree to which the obtained ratings are influenced by the trait of focus and extraneous sources that can be attributed to the rater. Data from a multilevel multitrait-multimethod design in which students (N = 35,565) and teachers (N = 9,112), from 340 middle schools, responded to items measuring 3 dimensions of school climate were evaluated through a multilevel correlated trait-correlated method latent variable model. Results indicated that ratings of school climate obtained by students and teachers demonstrated high levels of convergent validity, and that school-level ratings obtained by students and teachers were equitable in the assessment of teasing and bullying. Student ratings of support and structure yielded somewhat stronger evidence of convergent validity than ratings obtained by teachers as revealed by their respective trait factor loadings. This was explained in part by the higher levels of common method effects that were observed for teachers. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved.

  6. Functional interchangeability of late domains, late domain cofactors and ubiquitin in viral budding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Zhadina

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The membrane scission event that separates nascent enveloped virions from host cell membranes often requires the ESCRT pathway, which can be engaged through the action of peptide motifs, termed late (L- domains, in viral proteins. Viral PTAP and YPDL-like L-domains bind directly to the ESCRT-I and ALIX components of the ESCRT pathway, while PPxY motifs bind Nedd4-like, HECT-domain containing, ubiquitin ligases (e.g. WWP1. It has been unclear precisely how ubiquitin ligase recruitment ultimately leads to particle release. Here, using a lysine-free viral Gag protein derived from the prototypic foamy virus (PFV, where attachment of ubiquitin to Gag can be controlled, we show that several different HECT domains can replace the WWP1 HECT domain in chimeric ubiquitin ligases and drive budding. Moreover, artificial recruitment of isolated HECT domains to Gag is sufficient to stimulate budding. Conversely, the HECT domain becomes dispensable if the other domains of WWP1 are directly fused to an ESCRT-1 protein. In each case where budding is driven by a HECT domain, its catalytic activity is essential, but Gag ubiquitination is dispensable, suggesting that ubiquitin ligation to trans-acting proteins drives budding. Paradoxically, however, we also demonstrate that direct fusion of a ubiquitin moiety to the C-terminus of PFV Gag can also promote budding, suggesting that ubiquitination of Gag can substitute for ubiquitination of trans-acting proteins. Depletion of Tsg101 and ALIX inhibits budding that is dependent on ubiquitin that is fused to Gag, or ligated to trans-acting proteins through the action of a PPxY motif. These studies underscore the flexibility in the ways that the ESCRT pathway can be engaged, and suggest a model in which the identity of the protein to which ubiquitin is attached is not critical for subsequent recruitment of ubiquitin-binding components of the ESCRT pathway and viral budding to proceed.

  7. Interchange rotation factors and player characteristics influence physical and technical performance in professional Australian Rules football.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, Patrick A; Kempton, Thomas; Ryan, Samuel; Hocking, Joel; Coutts, Aaron J

    2018-03-01

    To examine the effects of match-related and individual player characteristics on activity profile and technical performance during rotations in professional Australian football. Longitudinal observational study. Global positioning system data and player rating scores were collected from 33 professional Australian football players during 15 Australian football League matches. Player rating scores were time aligned with their relative total and high-speed running (HSR) distance (>20kmh -1 ) for each on ground rotation. Individual players' maximal aerobic running speed (MAS) was determined from a two-kilometre trial. A multilevel linear mixed model was used to examine the influence of rotations on physical activity profiles and skill execution during match play. Rotation duration and accumulated distance resulted in a trivial-to-moderate reduction in relative total and HSR distances as well as relative rating points. The number of disposals in a rotation had a small positive effect on relative total and HSR distances and a large positive effect on relative rating points. MAS was associated with a moderate-to-large increase in relative total distance, but had a large negative effect on relative rating points. Previous rotation time, stoppages and the number of rotations in the quarter had a trivial-to-small negative effect on relative total and HSR distances. A greater speed (mmin -1 ) was associated with a trivial increase in rating points during a rotation, while there was a trivial decrease in relative total distance as rating points increased. The complex relationship between factors that influence activity profile and technical performance during rotations in Australian football needs to be considered when interpreting match performance. Copyright © 2017 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Chemical Source Inversion using Assimilated Constituent Observations in an Idealized Two-dimensional System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangborn, Andrew; Cooper, Robert; Pawson, Steven; Sun, Zhibin

    2009-01-01

    We present a source inversion technique for chemical constituents that uses assimilated constituent observations rather than directly using the observations. The method is tested with a simple model problem, which is a two-dimensional Fourier-Galerkin transport model combined with a Kalman filter for data assimilation. Inversion is carried out using a Green's function method and observations are simulated from a true state with added Gaussian noise. The forecast state uses the same spectral spectral model, but differs by an unbiased Gaussian model error, and emissions models with constant errors. The numerical experiments employ both simulated in situ and satellite observation networks. Source inversion was carried out by either direct use of synthetically generated observations with added noise, or by first assimilating the observations and using the analyses to extract observations. We have conducted 20 identical twin experiments for each set of source and observation configurations, and find that in the limiting cases of a very few localized observations, or an extremely large observation network there is little advantage to carrying out assimilation first. However, in intermediate observation densities, there decreases in source inversion error standard deviation using the Kalman filter algorithm followed by Green's function inversion by 50% to 95%.

  9. User's manual for the Graphical Constituent Loading Analysis System (GCLAS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koltun, G.F.; Eberle, Michael; Gray, J.R.; Glysson, G.D.

    2006-01-01

    This manual describes the Graphical Constituent Loading Analysis System (GCLAS), an interactive cross-platform program for computing the mass (load) and average concentration of a constituent that is transported in stream water over a period of time. GCLAS computes loads as a function of an equal-interval streamflow time series and an equal- or unequal-interval time series of constituent concentrations. The constituent-concentration time series may be composed of measured concentrations or a combination of measured and estimated concentrations. GCLAS is not intended for use in situations where concentration data (or an appropriate surrogate) are collected infrequently or where an appreciable amount of the concentration values are censored. It is assumed that the constituent-concentration time series used by GCLAS adequately represents the true time-varying concentration. Commonly, measured constituent concentrations are collected at a frequency that is less than ideal (from a load-computation standpoint), so estimated concentrations must be inserted in the time series to better approximate the expected chemograph. GCLAS provides tools to facilitate estimation and entry of instantaneous concentrations for that purpose. Water-quality samples collected for load computation frequently are collected in a single vertical or at single point in a stream cross section. Several factors, some of which may vary as a function of time and (or) streamflow, can affect whether the sample concentrations are representative of the mean concentration in the cross section. GCLAS provides tools to aid the analyst in assessing whether concentrations in samples collected in a single vertical or at single point in a stream cross section exhibit systematic bias with respect to the mean concentrations. In cases where bias is evident, the analyst can construct coefficient relations in GCLAS to reduce or eliminate the observed bias. GCLAS can export load and concentration data in formats

  10. Determination of heavy metals and human health risk assessment of road dust on the Tema motor way and Tetteh Quarshie interchange in Accra, Ghana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atiemo, S.M.; Ofosu, F.G.; Aboh, I.J.K.; Yeboah, P.O.

    2010-01-01

    Street dust samples were collected from Tema Motor way (near Ashiaman overhead) and Tetteh Quarshie interchange in Accra. The samples were segregated into two groups of grain sizes between 100 um - 250 um and the other being less than 100 um. Energy dispersive X-ray florescence technique was used to determine their elemental compositions. In all twenty (20) elements were identified: K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ga, Ge, As, Se, Br, Rb, Sr, Y, Zr and Pb. The results show significant concentrations levels of K, Ca, Ti, Pb, Zn, Cu, Mn, Fe, Rb, Sr, Y, Zr and Cr in all the samples. Enrichment factors determined for the elements show high enrichment of V, Zn, Cu, Zr, Cr, Br and Pb from the sample sites. There was no indication of significant anthropogenic contribution of manganese (Mn) which gave average enrichment factor values of 0.60 and 0.78 in the road dust at the Tema motor way and Tetteh Quarshie Interchange respectively. Risk assessment of selected heavy metal contaminants from both sites indicate that Pb gave Hazard Index (HI) values of 0.56 and 0.62 which falls below the safe level of one (1). It was also observed that ingestion which gave HI values of 2.1 and 2.3 was the highest risk of exposure pathway. Tetteh Quarshie Interchange gave the highest cumulative risk of exposure. (author)

  11. [Studies on chemical constituents from leaves of Vaccinium bracteatum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zeng-Liang; Zhang, Lin; Tian, Jing-Kui; Zhou, Wen-Ming

    2008-09-01

    To investigate the chemical constituents from the leaves of Vaccinium bracteatum. Many column chromatographic techniques were used for the isolation and separation of chemical constituents. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of spectral analysis and chemical evidences. Twelve compounds were isolated from the plant, and they were identified as chrysoeriol (1), scopoletin (2), trans-p-hydroxycinnamic acid (3), trans-p-hydroxycinnamic acid ethyl ester (4), cafeic acid ethyl ester (5), beta-sitosterol (6), iuteolin (7), quercetin (8), esculetin (9), cafeic acid (10), isolariciresinol-9-O-beta-D-xyloside (11), 10-O-trans-p-coumaroylsandoside (12). Compounds 4, 5, 11, 12 were isolated from the genus Vaccinium for the first time, and compounds 1, 2, 9, 10 were isolated from this plant for the first time.

  12. The European Constitution: sovereignty, legitimacy and constituent power

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Signe Larsen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of Hannah Arendt’s and Carl Schmitt’s writings on the constituent power, this article sets out to develop an interpretative framework which would aid the understanding of the legitimation crisis of European integration initiated by the EU constitutional failure of 2004. The question raised in this essay is whether the successful establishment of democratic constitutional legitimacy is conditional upon the existence of a federal state. From the perspective of the constituent power, two opposing answers are given based on two rivalling notions of the ultimate meaning of constitutional politics: freedom and security. The article concludes that even though the EU as a case remains undecided, it seems likely that democracy and constitutional politics have parted ways in the EU both in the Arendtian and in the Schmittian sense. If that is the case, the constitutional crisis is a serious problem for the future of democracy in the EU.

  13. Antibacterial activity of chemical constituents isolated from Asparagus racemosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Abdullah Shah

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Asparagus racemosus is a medical extensively used in traditional medicine for various disorders including its use in infectious. So far work has been done to identify its active constituents responsible for antiseptic folk use of this plant. In the current investigation, we have made an effort to identify its chemical constituents that might be partly responsible for antimicrobial properties. Extraction and isolation of plant extract lead to isolation of two nor-lignans and two steroidal triterpenes (compound 1 to 4. All compound showed considerable antibacterial activities against E. coli and S. aureus while no significant activity was observed against S. typhi. This study highlighted the potential of A. racemosus to be further explored as a source of bioactive natural products.

  14. Immunogenicity study to investigate the interchangeability among three different types of polio vaccine: A cohort study in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohfuji, Satoko; Ito, Kazuya; Ishibashi, Motoki; Shindo, Shizuo; Takasaki, Yoshio; Yokoyama, Takashi; Yokoyama, Takato; Yamashita, Yuji; Shibao, Keigo; Nakano, Takashi; Tsuru, Tomomi; Irie, Shin; Hirota, Yoshio

    2017-06-01

    In Japan, the routine immunization program with oral polio vaccine (OPV) has been suspended since September 2012, when a program with 4 doses of inactivated monovalent polio vaccine (IPV) or quadrivalent vaccine against diphtheria, pertussis, and tetanus with IPV (DTaP-IPV) was introduced. The aim of this study was to examine the interchangeability among these 3 types of polio vaccines.We conducted a prospective cohort study at 5 pediatric clinics in Japan. A total of 153 infants were assigned to 1 of the 4 groups by considering the vaccination history of OPV and trivalent vaccine against DTaP. Eleven infants with a history of OPV received 3 doses of DTaP-IPV; 49 infants with a history of OPV and DTaP received 3 doses of IPV; 50 polio vaccine-naïve infants received 2 doses of IPV followed by 2 doses of DTaP-IPV; and 43 polio vaccine-naive infants received 2 doses of DTaP-IPV followed by IPV. The immunogenicity after polio vaccination was evaluated among these 4 groups.After 2 doses of polio vaccination, more than 80% of the infants exhibited a neutralization antibody titer ≥1:8 for all Sabin strains and wild strains in all groups. After the third dose, the seroprotection proportion (i.e., a neutralization antibody titer ≥1:8) reached about 100%. After the fourth dose, a neutralization antibody titer exceeded the required protective levels (i.e., a neutralization antibody titer ≥1:8) considerably in all groups.Four doses of polio vaccines induced a sufficient level of immunity in Japanese infants, irrespective of vaccine combinations or order.

  15. Trend of digital camera and interchangeable zoom lenses with high ratio based on patent application over the past 10 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sensui, Takayuki

    2012-10-01

    Although digitalization has tripled consumer-class camera market scale, extreme reductions in prices of fixed-lens cameras has reduced profitability. As a result, a number of manufacturers have entered the market of the System DSC i.e. digital still camera with interchangeable lens, where large profit margins are possible, and many high ratio zoom lenses with image stabilization functions have been released. Quiet actuators are another indispensable component. Design with which there is little degradation in performance due to all types of errors is preferred for good balance in terms of size, lens performance, and the rate of quality to sub-standard products. Decentering, such as that caused by tilting, sensitivity of moving groups is especially important. In addition, image stabilization mechanisms actively shift lens groups. Development of high ratio zoom lenses with vibration reduction mechanism is confronted by the challenge of reduced performance due to decentering, making control over decentering sensitivity between lens groups everything. While there are a number of ways to align lenses (axial alignment), shock resistance and ability to stand up to environmental conditions must also be considered. Naturally, it is very difficult, if not impossible, to make lenses smaller and achieve a low decentering sensitivity at the same time. 4-group zoom construction is beneficial in making lenses smaller, but decentering sensitivity is greater. 5-group zoom configuration makes smaller lenses more difficult, but it enables lower decentering sensitivities. At Nikon, the most advantageous construction is selected for each lens based on specifications. The AF-S DX NIKKOR 18-200mm f/3.5-5.6G ED VR II and AF-S NIKKOR 28-300mm f/3.5-5.6G ED VR are excellent examples of this.

  16. Air charged and microtip catheters cannot be used interchangeably for urethral pressure measurement: a prospective, single-blind, randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zehnder, Pascal; Roth, Beat; Burkhard, Fiona C; Kessler, Thomas M

    2008-09-01

    We determined and compared urethral pressure measurements using air charged and microtip catheters in a prospective, single-blind, randomized trial. A consecutive series of 64 women referred for urodynamic investigation underwent sequential urethral pressure measurements using an air charged and a microtip catheter in randomized order. Patients were blinded to the type and sequence of catheter used. Agreement between the 2 catheter systems was assessed using the Bland and Altman 95% limits of agreement method. Intraclass correlation coefficients of air charged and microtip catheters for maximum urethral closure pressure at rest were 0.97 and 0.93, and for functional profile length they were 0.9 and 0.78, respectively. Pearson's correlation coefficients and Lin's concordance coefficients of air charged and microtip catheters were r = 0.82 and rho = 0.79 for maximum urethral closure pressure at rest, and r = 0.73 and rho = 0.7 for functional profile length, respectively. When applying the Bland and Altman method, air charged catheters gave higher readings than microtip catheters for maximum urethral closure pressure at rest (mean difference 7.5 cm H(2)O) and functional profile length (mean difference 1.8 mm). There were wide 95% limits of agreement for differences in maximum urethral closure pressure at rest (-24.1 to 39 cm H(2)O) and functional profile length (-7.7 to 11.3 mm). For urethral pressure measurement the air charged catheter is at least as reliable as the microtip catheter and it generally gives higher readings. However, air charged and microtip catheters cannot be used interchangeably for clinical purposes because of insufficient agreement. Hence, clinicians should be aware that air charged and microtip catheters may yield completely different results, and these differences should be acknowledged during clinical decision making.

  17. Passive constituents dispersion simulation in Solimoes river; Simulacao de dispersao de constituintes passivos no rio Solimoes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres Junior, Audalio Rebelo; Assad, Luiz Paulo de Freitas; Silva, Ricardo Marcelo da; Palagano, Mariana Ramalho; Decco, Hatsue Takanaca de; Mano, Manlio Fernandes; Landau, Luiz [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (LAMMA/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Modelagem de Processos Marinhos e Atmosfericos; Ferreira, Paulo Gustavo Crisostomo [Petrobras, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    This work presents a passive constituents transport simulation in Solimoes river, that is part of Piatam Project modeling activities. The fluvial hydraulic was done using the Princeton Ocean Model (POM) for the Solimoes Terminal (TESOL) proximity region. An ADCP section was used as initial condition in one of the model boundaries. The velocity field was compared with five ADCP section collected along the simulated river and similar velocity magnitude was observed. Then this dynamic field was used to initialize the oil transport model NICOIL, the one that was used to simulate a 1000 m{sup 3} of soft oil spill (42 deg API), the Urucu type oil. Simultaneously to the ADCP data collection an in situ observation has been done to observe the oil spill spreading, using popcorn liberated in the river. The popcorn spill trajectory observed was similar to the one modeled. (author)

  18. [Studies on chemical constituents from Buddleja lindleyana Fert].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, J H; Zhao, Y Y; Qiao, L; Fang, Y O; Huang, Q A

    2001-01-01

    To study the chemical constituents of Buddleja lindleyana. Separation by chromatographic methods and identification by spectral analysis. Seven compounds vanillic acid, daidzein octacosanoic acid, beta-sitosterol-3-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside, stigmasterol-3-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside, alpha-spinasterol-3-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside, betulin acid were isolated. All the compounds were obtained from this plant for the first time.

  19. Antiviral and antituberculous activity of Helichrysum melanacme constituents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lall, N; Hussein, A A; Meyer, J J M

    2006-04-01

    Bioassay guided fractionation of the acetonic extract of Helichrysum melanacme using human Influenza virus type A and a drug-sensitive strain of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in vitro resulted in the isolation of 2 4',6'-trihydroxy-3'-prenylchalcone (1) and 4',6',5''-trihydroxy-6'',6''-dimethyldihydropyrano[2'',3''-2',3'] chalcone (2) as active constituents. 3-O-methylquercetin and quercetin were also isolated but were inactive against the microorganisms tested in this study.

  20. Coriander (Coriandrum sativum L.) and its bioactive constituents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laribi, Bochra; Kouki, Karima; M'Hamdi, Mahmoud; Bettaieb, Taoufik

    2015-06-01

    Coriander (Coriandrum sativum L.), a member of the Apiaceae family, is among most widely used medicinal plant, possessing nutritional as well as medicinal properties. Thus, the aim of this updated review is to highlight the importance of coriander as a potential source of bioactive constituents and to summarize their biological activities as well as their different applications from data obtained in recent literature, with critical analysis on the gaps and potential for future investigations. A literature review was carried out by searching on the electronic databases including PubMed, Scopus, ScienceDirect, and Google Scholar for studies focusing on the biological and pharmacological activities of coriander seed and herb bioactive constituents. All recent English-language articles published between 2000 and 2014 were searched using the terms 'C. sativum', 'medicinal plant', 'bioactive constituents', and 'biological activities'. Subsequently, coriander seed and herb essential oils have been actively investigated for their chemical composition and biological activities including antimicrobial, antioxidant, hypoglycemic, hypolipidemic, anxiolytic, analgesic, anti-inflammatory, anti-convulsant and anti-cancer activities, among others. Although coriander has been reported to possess a wide range of traditional medicinal uses, no report is available in its effectiveness use in reactive airway diseases such as asthma and bronchiolitis. In brief, the information presented herein will be helpful to create more interest towards this medicinal species by defining novel pharmacological and clinical applications and hence, may be useful in developing new drug formulations in the future or by employing coriander bioactive constituents in combination with conventional drugs to enhance the treatment of diseases such as Alzheimer and cancer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Combining of radionuclides with constituent materials of marine algae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Ryoichi; Nakahara, Motokazu; Ishii, Toshiaki; Ueda, Taishi; Shimizu, Chiaki.

    1979-01-01

    The relations between the accumulation-elimination of radionuclides and the constituent materials of marine algae were studied to determine more precisely the mechanism of the radioactive contamination of marine organisms. This will increase the information about the behavior of radionuclides in marine organisms in relation to the environmental conditions (temperature, physico-chemical state of radioisotope, and so on) and the biological conditions (feeding habits, species, and so on). Eisenia contaminated by 137 Cs and 106 Ru- 106 Rh was fractionated by solvent extraction into 6 fractions. The largest portion of 137 Cs was in the boiling water fraction; 106 Ru- 106 Rh was most extracted by 24% KOH solution. Elution patterns by Sephadex G-100 gel-filtration of samples differed largely from each other, both among the 3 kinds of radionuclides and between the 2 species of the algae. Therefore, the accumulation of the radionuclides by the marine algae was proved to be not only due to a physical absorption to the surface of the algae but also to the biological combining of the radionuclides with the constituents of the algae. Furthermore, it was found that radionuclides which combine with a few constituents of alga are not eliminated equally. This is considered to be useful for the physiological analysis of elimination curves. (author)

  2. Ethnopharmacological Investigations of Phytochemical Constituents Isolated from the Genus Cuscuta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Muhammad; Rehman, Kanwal; Hussain, Iqbal; Farooq, Tahir; Ali, Bisharat; Majeed, Irum; Akash, Muhammad Sajid Hamid

    2017-01-01

    The genus Cuscuta, of the family Cuscutaceae, is present in plants and has been traditionally used medicinally against many diseases and conditions, notably depression, mental illness, headache, spleen disease, jaundice, diabetes mellitus, and hypertension. Large numbers of phytochemical constituents such as alkaloids, flavonoids, lignins, oxygen heterocyclic compounds, steroids, fatty acids, phenolic acids, resin glycosides, and polysaccharides have been isolated from different species of Cuscuta. Ethnopharmacological studies conducted on such constituents have also been shown Cuscuta to possess anticancer, antiviral, antispasmodic, antihypertensive, anticonvulsant, antibacterial, antioxidant, diuretic, and hair-growth activity. Many tribes and traditional communities have long used the different forms of Cuscuta for treatment and prevention of many diseases. In this article, we comprehensively summarize relevant data regarding the phytochemical, ethnopharmacological, and traditional therapeutic uses of Cuscuta. In addition, we review the parts of the plants that are used as traditional therapeutic agents, their regions of existence, and their possible modes of action. To conclude, we provide evidence and new insights for further discovery and development of natural drugs from Cuscuta. We show that further studies are needed to investigate the mechanism of action and safety profile of phytochemical constituents isolated from Cuscuta.

  3. The use of stable isotopes to trace oil sands constituents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farwell, A.J.; Nero, V.; Dixon, D.G.

    2002-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the biological effects of oil sands mining operations on aquatic ecosystems. The study focused on the Athabasca oil sand deposit, the largest of 4 deposits in northern Alberta. In particular, the study examined the cycling of oil sand constituents in Benthic invertebrates collected from test pits at Syncrude Canada Ltd.. The invertebrates were similar in size, but different in the quantity of process-affected water or mature fine tailings containing residual bitumen. Dragonflies and damselflies in particular, showed trends of depletion for the carbon 13 isotope and enrichment in nitrogen 15 isotope in pits where levels of process affected water was high. The depletion of carbon 13 isotope suggests that oil sand constituents assimilate into the benthic food chain. The greatest carbon 13 depletion, which was approximately 27 per cent, was found to be in test pits with high turbidity. This implies that oil sands constituents degrade microbially instead of by photosynthetic production. All benthic invertebrate group demonstrated an incremental enrichment in nitrogen 15 isotope from the control pit to the pit with greatest levels of mature fine tailings

  4. Volatile Constituents of Three Piper Species from Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hieua, Le D; Hoic, Tran M; Thangda, Tran D; Ogunwande, Isiaka A

    2015-11-01

    The chemical compositions of the essential oils obtained by hydrodistillation of three Piper plants grown in Vietnam are reported. The analysis was achieved by means of gas chromatography with flame ionization detection (GC-FID) and gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The main constituents of the leaf oil of Piper majusculum Blume were β-caryophyllene (20.7%), germacrene D (18.6%) and β-elemene (11.3%). The quantitatively significant compounds of the volatile oils of P. harmandii C. DC were sabinene (leaves, 14.5%; stems, 16.2%), benzyl benzoate (leaves, 20.0%; stems, 29.40%) and benzyl salicylate (leaves, 14.1%; stems, 24.3%). Also, α-cadinol (17.0%) was identified in large proportion in the leaf oil. However, sabinene (leaves, 17.9%; stems, 13.5%), benzyl benzoate (leaves, 20.5%; stems, 32.5%) and β-eudesmol (leaves, 13.8%; stems, 8.4%) were the main constituents of P. brevicaule C. DC. This is the first report on the volatile constituents of both P. harmandii and P. brevicaule.

  5. Preventive and Prophylactic Mechanisms of Action of Pomegranate Bioactive Constituents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viladomiu, Monica; Hontecillas, Raquel; Lu, Pinyi; Bassaganya-Riera, Josep

    2013-01-01

    Pomegranate fruit presents strong anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antiobesity, and antitumoral properties, thus leading to an increased popularity as a functional food and nutraceutical source since ancient times. It can be divided into three parts: seeds, peel, and juice, all of which seem to have medicinal benefits. Several studies investigate its bioactive components as a means to associate them with a specific beneficial effect and develop future products and therapeutic applications. Many beneficial effects are related to the presence of ellagic acid, ellagitannins (including punicalagins), punicic acid and other fatty acids, flavonoids, anthocyanidins, anthocyanins, estrogenic flavonols, and flavones, which seem to be its most therapeutically beneficial components. However, the synergistic action of the pomegranate constituents appears to be superior when compared to individual constituents. Promising results have been obtained for the treatment of certain diseases including obesity, insulin resistance, intestinal inflammation, and cancer. Although moderate consumption of pomegranate does not result in adverse effects, future studies are needed to assess safety and potential interactions with drugs that may alter the bioavailability of bioactive constituents of pomegranate as well as drugs. The aim of this review is to summarize the health effects and mechanisms of action of pomegranate extracts in chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:23737845

  6. Use of time series and harmonic constituents of tidal propagation to enhance estimation of coastal aquifer heterogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Joseph D.; White, Jeremy T.; Langevin, Christian D.

    2010-01-01

    A synthetic two‐dimensional model of a horizontally and vertically heterogeneous confined coastal aquifer system, based on the Upper Floridan aquifer in south Florida, USA, subjected to constant recharge and a complex tidal signal was used to generate 15‐minute water‐level data at select locations over a 7‐day simulation period.   “Observed” water‐level data were generated by adding noise, representative of typical barometric pressure variations and measurement errors, to 15‐minute data from the synthetic model. Permeability was calibrated using a non‐linear gradient‐based parameter inversion approach with preferred‐value Tikhonov regularization and 1) “observed” water‐level data, 2) harmonic constituent data, or 3) a combination of “observed” water‐level and harmonic constituent data.    In all cases, high‐frequency data used in the parameter inversion process were able to characterize broad‐scale heterogeneities; the ability to discern fine‐scale heterogeneity was greater when harmonic constituent data were used.  These results suggest that the combined use of highly parameterized‐inversion techniques and high frequency time and/or processed‐harmonic constituent water‐level data could be a useful approach to better characterize aquifer heterogeneities in coastal aquifers influenced by ocean tides.

  7. Spin content of constituent quarks and one-spin asymmetries in inclusive processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Troshin, S.M.; Tyurin, N.E.

    1995-01-01

    A mechanism for one-spin asymmetries observed in inclusive hadron production is considered. The main role belongs to the orbital angular momentum of the quark-antiquark cloud in the internal structure of constituent quarks. The origin of the asymmetries in pion production is a result of retaining this internal angular orbital momentum by the perturbative phase of QCD under transition from the non-perturbative phase is proved. The non-perturbative hadron structure is based on the results of chiral quark models. 33 refs.; 8 figs

  8. SUGOI: automated ontology interchangeability

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Khan, ZC

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A foundational ontology can solve interoperability issues among the domain ontologies aligned to it. However, several foundational ontologies have been developed, hence such interoperability issues exist among domain ontologies. The novel SUGOI tool...

  9. User's guide for the implementation of level one of the proposed American National Standard Specifications for an information interchange data descriptive file on control data 6000/7000 series computers

    CERN Document Server

    Wiley, R A

    1977-01-01

    User's guide for the implementation of level one of the proposed American National Standard Specifications for an information interchange data descriptive file on control data 6000/7000 series computers

  10. Mr Huidong LI Deputy Chairman and Secretary-General, Rev. Committee of Chinese Nationalist Party Vice President, Sun Yat-Sen Culture Interchange Association of China Member, Committee for Internal and Judicial Affairs of the National People's Congress of China

    CERN Multimedia

    Bennett, Sophia Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    Mr Huidong LI Deputy Chairman and Secretary-General, Rev. Committee of Chinese Nationalist Party Vice President, Sun Yat-Sen Culture Interchange Association of China Member, Committee for Internal and Judicial Affairs of the National People's Congress of China

  11. MANAGEMENT PROCEDURE OF SUPPLIES OF UNITS, MATERIALS AND CONSTITUENT PARTS FOR REPAIR AND MAINTENANCE SUPPORT OF TRANSPORT AND PRODUCTION MACHINES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Yurievich Stroganov

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This article considers a question of creation of schemes and sequence of passing of the main stages of process of execution of repair and maintenance works order taking into account formation of stocks of necessary spare parts, materials and constituent parts. Models of an input stream are offered for inventory control system, which are rather adequately described by autoregressive models of order two.

  12. Complexation of buffer constituents with neutral complexation agents: part I. Impact on common buffer properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riesová, Martina; Svobodová, Jana; Tošner, Zdeněk; Beneš, Martin; Tesařová, Eva; Gaš, Bohuslav

    2013-09-17

    The complexation of buffer constituents with the complexation agent present in the solution can very significantly influence the buffer properties, such as pH, ionic strength, or conductivity. These parameters are often crucial for selection of the separation conditions in capillary electrophoresis or high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) and can significantly affect results of separation, particularly for capillary electrophoresis as shown in Part II of this paper series (Beneš, M.; Riesová, M.; Svobodová, J.; Tesařová, E.; Dubský, P.; Gaš, B. Anal. Chem. 2013, DOI: 10.1021/ac401381d). In this paper, the impact of complexation of buffer constituents with a neutral complexation agent is demonstrated theoretically as well as experimentally for the model buffer system composed of benzoic acid/LiOH or common buffers (e.g., CHES/LiOH, TAPS/LiOH, Tricine/LiOH, MOPS/LiOH, MES/LiOH, and acetic acid/LiOH). Cyclodextrins as common chiral selectors were used as model complexation agents. We were not only able to demonstrate substantial changes of pH but also to predict the general complexation characteristics of selected compounds. Because of the zwitterion character of the common buffer constituents, their charged forms complex stronger with cyclodextrins than the neutral ones do. This was fully proven by NMR measurements. Additionally complexation constants of both forms of selected compounds were determined by NMR and affinity capillary electrophoresis with a very good agreement of obtained values. These data were advantageously used for the theoretical descriptions of variations in pH, depending on the composition and concentration of the buffer. Theoretical predictions were shown to be a useful tool for deriving some general rules and laws for complexing systems.

  13. 40 CFR 227.7 - Limits established for specific wastes or waste constituents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., shellfish and wildlife by: (1) Extending the range of biological pests, viruses, pathogenic microorganisms... containing biodegradable constituents, or constituents which consume oxygen in any fashion, may be dumped in...

  14. [Analysis of the chemical constituents of volatile oils of Metasequoia glyptostroboides leave].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shong, E; Lui, R

    1997-10-01

    The chemical constituents of volatile oils of Metasequoia glyptostroboides leave were analyzed by GC-MS-DS. 27 constituents were identified, alpha-pinene (70.65%) and caryophyllene (10.38%) of them are main components.

  15. Determination of quantitative retention-activity relationships between pharmacokinetic parameters and biological effectiveness fingerprints of Salvia miltiorrhiza constituents using biopartitioning and microemulsion high-performance liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Haoshi; Huang, Hongzhang; Zheng, Aini; Yu, Nuojun; Li, Ning

    2017-11-01

    In this study, we analyzed danshen (Salvia miltiorrhiza) constituents using biopartitioning and microemulsion high-performance liquid chromatography (MELC). The quantitative retention-activity relationships (QRARs) of the constituents were established to model their pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters and chromatographic retention data, and generate their biological effectiveness fingerprints. A high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method was established to determine the abundance of the extracted danshen constituents, such as sodium danshensu, rosmarinic acid, salvianolic acid B, protocatechuic aldehyde, cryptotanshinone, and tanshinone IIA. And another HPLC protocol was established to determine the abundance of those constituents in rat plasma samples. An experimental model was built in Sprague Dawley (SD) rats, and calculated the corresponding PK parameterst with 3P97 software package. Thirty-five model drugs were selected to test the PK parameter prediction capacities of the various MELC systems and to optimize the chromatographic protocols. QRARs and generated PK fingerprints were established. The test included water/oil-soluble danshen constituents and the prediction capacity of the regression model was validated. The results showed that the model had good predictability. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Interchangeability of meningococcal group C conjugate vaccines with different carrier proteins in the United Kingdom infant immunisation schedule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladhani, Shamez N; Andrews, Nick J; Waight, Pauline; Hallis, Bassam; Matheson, Mary; England, Anna; Findlow, Helen; Bai, Xilian; Borrow, Ray; Burbidge, Polly; Pearce, Emma; Goldblatt, David; Miller, Elizabeth

    2015-01-29

    An open, non-randomised study was undertaken in England during 2011-12 to evaluate vaccine antibody responses in infants after completion of the routine primary infant immunisation schedule, which included two doses of meningococcal group C (MenC) conjugate (MCC) vaccine at 3 and 4 months. Any of the three licensed MCC vaccines could be used for either dose, depending on local availability. Healthy term infants registered at participating general practices (GPs) in Hertfordshire and Gloucestershire, UK, were recruited prospectively to provide a single blood sample four weeks after primary immunisation, which was administered by the GP surgery. Vaccination history was obtained at blood sampling. MenC serum bactericidal antibody (SBA) and IgG antibodies against Haemophilus influenzae b (Hib), pertussis toxin (PT), diphtheria toxoid (DT), tetanus toxoid (TT) and thirteen pneumococcal serotypes were analysed according to MCC vaccines received. MenC SBA responses differed significantly (Pvaccine schedule as follows: MenC SBA geometric mean titres (GMTs) were significantly lower in infants receiving a diphtheria cross-reacting material-conjugated MCC (MCC-CRM) vaccine followed by TT-conjugated MCC (MCC-TT) vaccine (82.0; 95% CI, 39-173; n=14) compared to those receiving two MCC-CRM (418; 95% CI, 325-537; n=82), two MCC-TT (277; 95% CI, 223-344; n=79) or MCC-TT followed by MCC-CRM (553; 95% CI, 322-949; n=18). The same group also had the lowest Hib geometric mean concentrations (0.60 μg/mL, 0.27-1.34) compared to 1.85 μg/mL (1.23-2.78), 2.86 μg/mL (2.02-4.05) and 4.26 μg/mL (1.94-9.36), respectively. Our results indicate that MCC vaccines with different carrier proteins are not interchangeable. When several MCC vaccines are available, children requiring more than one dose should receive MCC vaccines with the same carrier protein or, alternatively, receive MCC-TT first wherever possible. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Once-daily dose regimen of ribavirin is interchangeable with a twice-daily dose regimen: randomized open clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balk JM

    2015-08-01

    .05. No significant differences in the hematological profile were observed (P>0.05. Conclusion: The standard twice-daily RBV regimen is interchangeable with the once-daily regimen. The once-daily regimen will improve compliance and opens the opportunity to combine RBV with other drugs dosed once a day, in a single pill. Keywords: hepatitis C, dose regimen, ribavirin, pegylated interferon

  18. Low endemism, continued deep-shallow interchanges, and evidence for cosmopolitan distributions in free-living marine nematodes (order Enoplida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas W Kelley

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nematodes represent the most abundant benthic metazoa in one of the largest habitats on earth, the deep sea. Characterizing major patterns of biodiversity within this dominant group is a critical step towards understanding evolutionary patterns across this vast ecosystem. The present study has aimed to place deep-sea nematode species into a phylogenetic framework, investigate relationships between shallow water and deep-sea taxa, and elucidate phylogeographic patterns amongst the deep-sea fauna. Results Molecular data (18 S and 28 S rRNA confirms a high diversity amongst deep-sea Enoplids. There is no evidence for endemic deep-sea lineages in Maximum Likelihood or Bayesian phylogenies, and Enoplids do not cluster according to depth or geographic location. Tree topologies suggest frequent interchanges between deep-sea and shallow water habitats, as well as a mixture of early radiations and more recently derived lineages amongst deep-sea taxa. This study also provides convincing evidence of cosmopolitan marine species, recovering a subset of Oncholaimid nematodes with identical gene sequences (18 S, 28 S and cox1 at trans-Atlantic sample sites. Conclusions The complex clade structures recovered within the Enoplida support a high global species richness for marine nematodes, with phylogeographic patterns suggesting the existence of closely related, globally distributed species complexes in the deep sea. True cosmopolitan species may additionally exist within this group, potentially driven by specific life history traits of Enoplids. Although this investigation aimed to intensively sample nematodes from the order Enoplida, specimens were only identified down to genus (at best and our sampling regime focused on an infinitesimal small fraction of the deep-sea floor. Future nematode studies should incorporate an extended sample set covering a wide depth range (shelf, bathyal, and abyssal sites, utilize additional genetic loci (e

  19. Correcting Model Fit Criteria for Small Sample Latent Growth Models with Incomplete Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeish, Daniel; Harring, Jeffrey R.

    2017-01-01

    To date, small sample problems with latent growth models (LGMs) have not received the amount of attention in the literature as related mixed-effect models (MEMs). Although many models can be interchangeably framed as a LGM or a MEM, LGMs uniquely provide criteria to assess global data-model fit. However, previous studies have demonstrated poor…

  20. Leaching of DOC, DN, and inorganic constituents from scrap tires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selbes, Meric; Yilmaz, Ozge; Khan, Abdul A; Karanfil, Tanju

    2015-11-01

    One concern for recycle and reuse of scrap tires is the leaching of tire constituents (organic and inorganic) with time, and their subsequent potential harmful impacts in environment. The main objective of this study was to examine the leaching of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), dissolved nitrogen (DN), and selected inorganic constituents from scrap tires. Different sizes of tire chips and crumb rubber were exposed to leaching solutions with pH's ranging from 3.0 to 10.0 for 28days. The leaching of DOC and DN were found to be higher for smaller size tire chips; however, the leaching of inorganic constituents was independent of the size. In general, basic pH conditions increased the leaching of DOC and DN, whereas acidic pH conditions led to elevated concentrations of metals. Leaching was minimal around the neutral pH values for all the monitored parameters. Analysis of the leaching rates showed that components associated with the rubbery portion of the tires (DOC, DN, zinc, calcium, magnesium, etc.) exhibited an initial rapid followed by a slow release. On the other hand, a constant rate of leaching was observed for iron and manganese, which are attributed to the metal wires present inside the tires. Although the total amounts that leached varied, the observed leaching rates were similar for all tire chip sizes and leaching solutions. Operation under neutral pH conditions, use of larger size tire chips, prewashing of tires, and removal of metal wires prior to application will reduce the impact of tire recycle and reuse. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.