WorldWideScience

Sample records for constant air volume

  1. Converting Constant Volume, Multizone Air Handling Systems to Energy Efficient Variable Air Volume Multizone Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-26

    ASHRAE standard 55-2010 defines thermal environmental conditions for human occupancy. Occupant comfort was gaged by calculating the percent of time that...simulated the pre-retrofit condition and operated the system as a constant volume multizone with a fixed outside air damper position. Test modes 1... condition of the typical multizone system presents the potential for unexpected maintenance or performance problems. Note that the demonstration will

  2. The Energy Implications of Air-Side Fouling in Constant Air Volume HVAC Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Eric J. H.

    2011-12-01

    This thesis examines the effect of air-side fouling on the energy consumption of constant air volume (CAV) heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems in residential and small commercial buildings. There is a particular focus on evaluating the potential energy savings that may result from the remediation of such fouling from coils, filters, and other air system components. A computer model was constructed to simulate the behavior of a building and its duct system under various levels of fouling. The model was verified through laboratory and field testing and then used to run parametric simulations to examine the range of energy impacts for various climates and duct system characteristics. A sensitivity analysis was conducted to determine the impact of parameters like duct insulation, duct leakage, duct location, and duct design on savings potential. Duct system pressures, temperatures, and energy consumption for two houses were monitored for one month. The houses' duct systems, which were both in conditioned space, were given a full cleaning, and were then monitored for another month. The flow rates at the houses improved by 10% and 6%. The improvements were primarily due to installing a new filter, as both houses had only light coil fouling. The results indicate that there was negligible change in heating energy efficiency due to the system cleaning. The parametric simulation results are in agreement with the field experiment: for systems in all eight climates, with flowrates degraded by 20% or less, if ducts are located within the thermal zone, HVAC source energy savings from cleaning are negligible or even slightly negative. However, if ducts are outside the thermal zone, savings are in the 1 to 5% range. For systems with flowrates degraded by 40%, if ducts are within the thermal zone, savings from cleaning occurs only for air conditioning energy, up to 8% in climates like Miami, FL. If ducts are outside the thermal zone, savings occurs with both

  3. Flame kernel characterization of laser ignition of natural gas-air mixture in a constant volume combustion chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Dhananjay Kumar; Dharamshi, Kewal; Agarwal, Avinash Kumar

    2011-09-01

    In this paper, laser-induced ignition was investigated for compressed natural gas-air mixtures. Experiments were performed in a constant volume combustion chamber, which simulate end of the compression stroke conditions of a SI engine. This chamber simulates the engine combustion chamber conditions except turbulence of air-fuel mixture. It has four optical windows at diametrically opposite locations, which are used for laser ignition and optical diagnostics simultaneously. All experiments were conducted at 10 bar chamber pressure and 373 K chamber temperature. Initial stage of combustion phenomena was visualized by employing Shadowgraphy technique using a high speed CMOS camera. Flame kernel development of the combustible fuel-air mixture was investigated under different relative air-fuel ratios ( λ=1.2-1.7) and the images were interrogated for temporal propagation of flame front. Pressure-time history inside the combustion chamber was recorded and analyzed. This data is useful in characterizing the laser ignition of natural gas-air mixture and can be used in developing an appropriate laser ignition system for commercial use in SI engines.

  4. Arrhenius Rate: constant volume burn

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menikoff, Ralph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-12-06

    A constant volume burn occurs for an idealized initial state in which a large volume of reactants at rest is suddenly raised to a high temperature and begins to burn. Due to the uniform spatial state, there is no fluid motion and no heat conduction. This reduces the time evolu tion to an ODE for the reaction progress variable. With an Arrhenius reaction rate, two characteristics of thermal ignition are illustrated: induction time and thermal runaway. The Frank-Kamenetskii approximation then leads to a simple expression for the adiabatic induction time. For a first order reaction, the analytic solution is derived and used to illustrate the effect of varying the activation temperature; in particular, on the induction time. In general, the ODE can be solved numerically. This is used to illustrate the effect of varying the reaction order. We note that for a first order reaction, the time evolution of the reaction progress variable has an exponential tail. In contrast, for a reaction order less than one, the reaction completes in a nite time. The reaction order also affects the induction time.

  5. Analysis of the chemical equilibrium of combustion at constant volume

    OpenAIRE

    Marius BREBENEL

    2014-01-01

    Determining the composition of a mixture of combustion gases at a given temperature is based on chemical equilibrium, when the equilibrium constants are calculated on the assumption of constant pressure and temperature. In this paper, an analysis of changes occurring when combustion takes place at constant volume is presented, deriving a specific formula of the equilibrium constant. The simple reaction of carbon combustion in pure oxygen in both cases (constant pressure and constant ...

  6. Analysis of the chemical equilibrium of combustion at constant volume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius BREBENEL

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Determining the composition of a mixture of combustion gases at a given temperature is based on chemical equilibrium, when the equilibrium constants are calculated on the assumption of constant pressure and temperature. In this paper, an analysis of changes occurring when combustion takes place at constant volume is presented, deriving a specific formula of the equilibrium constant. The simple reaction of carbon combustion in pure oxygen in both cases (constant pressure and constant volume is next considered as example of application, observing the changes occurring in the composition of the combustion gases depending on temperature.

  7. Premixed combustion under electric field in a constant volume chamber

    KAUST Repository

    Cha, Min Suk

    2012-12-01

    The effects of electric fields on outwardly propagating premixed flames in a constant volume chamber were experimentally investigated. An electric plug, subjected to high electrical voltages, was used to generate electric fields inside the chamber. To minimize directional ionic wind effects, alternating current with frequency of 1 kHz was employed. Lean and rich fuel/air mixtures for both methane and propane were tested to investigate various preferential diffusion conditions. As a result, electrically induced instability showing cracked structure on the flame surface could be observed. This cracked structure enhanced flame propagation speed for the initial period of combustion and led to reduction in flame initiation and overall combustion duration times. However, by analyzing pressure data, it was found that overall burning rates are not much affected from the electric field for the pressurized combustion period. The reduction of overall combustion time is less sensitive to equivalence ratio for methane/air mixtures, whereas the results demonstrate pronounced effects on a lean mixture for propane. The improvement of combustion characteristics in lean mixtures will be beneficial to the design of lean burn engines. Two hypothetical mechanisms to explain the electrically induced instability were proposed: 1) ionic wind initiated hydrodynamic instability and 2) thermodiffusive instability through the modification of transport property such as mass diffusivity. © 2012 IEEE.

  8. Constant load and constant volume response of municipal solid waste in simple shear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zekkos, Dimitrios; Fei, Xunchang

    2017-05-01

    Constant load and constant volume simple shear testing was conducted on relatively fresh municipal solid waste (MSW) from two landfills in the United States, one in Michigan and a second in Texas, at respective natural moisture content below field capacity. The results were assessed in terms of two failure strain criteria, at 10% and 30% shear strain, and two interpretations of effective friction angle. Overall, friction angle obtained assuming that the failure plane is horizontal and at 10% shear strain resulted in a conservative estimation of shear strength of MSW. Comparisons between constant volume and constant load simple shear testing results indicated significant differences in the shear response of MSW with the shear resistance in constant volume being lower than the shear resistance in constant load. The majority of specimens were nearly uncompacted during specimen preparation to reproduce the state of MSW in bioreactor landfills or in uncontrolled waste dumps. The specimens had identical percentage of waste. The results of these tests suggest the possibility of significantly lower shear strength of MSW in bioreactor landfills where waste is placed with low compaction effort and constant volume, i.e., "undrained", conditions may occur. Compacted MSW specimens resulted in shear strength parameters that are higher than uncompacted specimens and closer to values reported in the literature. However, the normalized undrained shear strength in simple shear for uncompacted and compacted MSW was still higher than the normalized undrained shear strength reported in the literature for clayey and silty soils. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Thermosetting resins with high fractions of free volume and inherently low dielectric constants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Liang-Kai; Hu, Chien-Chieh; Su, Wen-Chiung; Liu, Ying-Ling

    2015-08-18

    This work demonstrates a new class of thermosetting resins, based on Meldrum's acid (MA) derivatives, which have high fractions of free volume and inherently low k values of about 2.0 at 1 MHz. Thermal decomposition of the MA groups evolves CO2 and acetone to create air-trapped cavities so as to reduce the dielectric constants.

  10. Constant Entropy Properties for an Approximate Model of Equilibrium Air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, C. Frederick; Hodge, Marion E.

    1961-01-01

    Approximate analytic solutions for properties of equilibrium air up to 15,000 K have been programmed for machine computation. Temperature, compressibility, enthalpy, specific heats, and speed of sound are tabulated as constant entropy functions of temperature. The reciprocal of acoustic impedance and its integral with respect to pressure are also given for the purpose of evaluating the Riemann constants for one-dimensional, isentropic flow.

  11. PIV measurement of constant area mixing in subsonic air ejector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dvořák Václav

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with experimental study of constant area mixing in subsonic axi-symmetric air ejector. The velocity fields inside the constant area mixing chamber were taken through the vitreous wall of the chamber, while the laser beam entered it from the opened outflow of the ejector. PIV measurements of four different mixing regimes, each with different ejection ratio were performed. Basic description of results are given and it is claimed that results are reliable. Obtained data will be later compared with constant temperature anemometry and with numerical calculations.

  12. Osmosis at constant volume and water uptake in tall trees

    OpenAIRE

    Zupanovic, Pasko; Brumen, Milan; Fajmut, Ales; Kuic, Domagoj; Juretic, Davor

    2009-01-01

    We consider a thermodynamic state of a solvent and solution separated with an elastic semipermeable membrane in a box with a constant volume and the relevance of this simple model for the water uptake in tall trees. Under moderate concentrations of a solute, the solution and solvent are under the positive and negative pressure, respectively. In the case of the soft membrane the pressure difference between the compartments with the solvent and solution is given by van't Hoff equation. A state ...

  13. Thermodynamics and dynamics of a monoatomic glass former. Constant pressure and constant volume behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapko, Vitaliy; Matyushov, Dmitry V; Angell, C Austen

    2008-04-14

    We report constant-volume and constant-pressure simulations of the thermodynamic and dynamic properties of the low-temperature liquid and crystalline phases of the modified Stillinger-Weber (SW) model. We have found an approximately linear temperature increase of the effective Gaussian width of the distribution of inherent structures. This effect comes from non-Gaussianity of the landscape and is consistent with the predictions of the Gaussian excitations model representing the thermodynamics of the configurational manifold as an ensemble of excitations, each carrying an excitation entropy. The SW model provides us with both the configurational and excess entropies, with the difference mostly attributed to vibrational anharmonicity. We therefore can address the distinction between the excess thermodynamic quantities, often used to interpret experiments, and configurational thermodynamics used to describe the dynamics in the Adam-Gibbs (AG) equation. However we are limited computationally to work at temperatures above the "crossover" temperature at which the breakdown in the Adam-Gibbs relation has been identified in laboratory studies. We find a new break in the slope of the constant pressure AG plot (in the same sense but at much higher temperature than with laboratory data) when the excess entropy is used in the AG equation. This break, which we associate with anharmonic vibrational effects, is not seen when the configurational entropy is used. The simulation diffusivity data are equally well fitted by the AG equation and by a new equation, derived within the Gaussian excitations model, that emphasizes enthalpy over entropy as the thermodynamic control variable for transport in viscous liquids. We show that the modified SW model has close links to the behavior observed for bulk metallic glasses, both in its diffusional and in its thermodynamic properties.

  14. 40 CFR 86.519-90 - Constant volume sampler calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... and make at least 8 readings across the critical flow range of the venturi. (7) Data analysis. The... analysis: (i) The air flow rate, Qs, at each test point is calculated from the flowmeter data using the... minute. (D)(1) Tp = Pump inlet temperature, (°K) = PTI + 273. (2) For English units, Tp = PTI + 460. (E...

  15. Experimental analysis of fuzzy controlled energy efficient demand controlled ventilation economizer cycle variable air volume air conditioning system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajagopalan Parameshwaran

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In the quest for energy conservative building design, there is now a great opportunity for a flexible and sophisticated air conditioning system capable of addressing better thermal comfort, indoor air quality, and energy efficiency, that are strongly desired. The variable refrigerant volume air conditioning system provides considerable energy savings, cost effectiveness and reduced space requirements. Applications of intelligent control like fuzzy logic controller, especially adapted to variable air volume air conditioning systems, have drawn more interest in recent years than classical control systems. An experimental analysis was performed to investigate the inherent operational characteristics of the combined variable refrigerant volume and variable air volume air conditioning systems under fixed ventilation, demand controlled ventilation, and combined demand controlled ventilation and economizer cycle techniques for two seasonal conditions. The test results of the variable refrigerant volume and variable air volume air conditioning system for each techniques are presented. The test results infer that the system controlled by fuzzy logic methodology and operated under the CO2 based mechanical ventilation scheme, effectively yields 37% and 56% per day of average energy-saving in summer and winter conditions, respectively. Based on the experimental results, the fuzzy based combined system can be considered to be an alternative energy efficient air conditioning scheme, having significant energy-saving potential compared to the conventional constant air volume air conditioning system.

  16. Air Force Leadership Development: Transformation’s Constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-05-01

    organization better.ൺ According to Warren Bennis and Burt Nanus , "To choose a direction, a leader must first have developed a mental image of a possible...therefore, its naturally transformational. Leaders of the Air Force must embrace changes and be able to adapt. Burt Nanus , a professor of management and...also quotes another source, "Warren Bennis echoes this sentiment in On Becoming a Leader. He analyzed the leadership learning basics employed by a

  17. Enhancement of flame development by microwave-assisted spark ignition in constant volume combustion chamber

    KAUST Repository

    Wolk, Benjamin

    2013-07-01

    The enhancement of laminar flame development using microwave-assisted spark ignition has been investigated for methane-air mixtures at a range of initial pressures and equivalence ratios in a 1.45. l constant volume combustion chamber. Microwave enhancement was evaluated on the basis of several parameters including flame development time (FDT) (time for 0-10% of total net heat release), flame rise time (FRT) (time for 10-90% of total net heat release), total net heat release, flame kernel growth rate, flame kernel size, and ignitability limit extension. Compared to a capacitive discharge spark, microwave-assisted spark ignition extended the lean and rich ignition limits at all pressures investigated (1.08-7.22. bar). The addition of microwaves to a capacitive discharge spark reduced FDT and increased the flame kernel size for all equivalence ratios tested and resulted in increases in the spatial flame speed for sufficiently lean flames. Flame enhancement is believed to be caused by (1) a non-thermal chemical kinetic enhancement from energy deposition to free electrons in the flame front and (2) induced flame wrinkling from excitation of flame (plasma) instability. The enhancement of flame development by microwaves diminishes as the initial pressure of the mixture increases, with negligible flame enhancement observed above 3. bar. © 2013 The Combustion Institute.

  18. Converting Constant Volume, Multizone Air Handling Systems to Energy Efficient Variable Air Volume Multizone Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-05

    US Army ERDC-CERL 2902 Newmark Dr. Champaign, IL 61822 217-373-4433 Joseph Bush 46 C& P Report EW-201152 EW-201152 Environmental Security Technology...26  Table 16. Questionnaire Summary ............................................................................................... 27  v ACRONYMS...Services and Systems, and Leigh Young from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Huntsville Center. Others who provided helpful assistance include

  19. Equilibrium and Dynamic Osmotic Behaviour of Aqueous Solutions with Varied Concentration at Constant and Variable Volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minkov, Ivan L.; Manev, Emil D.; Sazdanova, Svetla V.; Kolikov, Kiril H.

    2013-01-01

    Osmosis is essential for the living organisms. In biological systems the process usually occurs in confined volumes and may express specific features. The osmotic pressure in aqueous solutions was studied here experimentally as a function of solute concentration (0.05–0.5 M) in two different regimes: of constant and variable solution volume. Sucrose, a biologically active substance, was chosen as a reference solute for the complex tests. A custom made osmotic cell was used. A novel operative experimental approach, employing limited variation of the solution volume, was developed and applied for the purpose. The established equilibrium values of the osmotic pressure are in agreement with the theoretical expectations and do not exhibit any evident differences for both regimes. In contrast, the obtained kinetic dependences reveal striking divergence in the rates of the process at constant and varied solution volume for the respective solute concentrations. The rise of pressure is much faster at constant solution volume, while the solvent influx is many times greater in the regime of variable volume. The results obtained suggest a feasible mechanism for the way in which the living cells rapidly achieve osmotic equilibrium upon changes in the environment. PMID:24459448

  20. Equilibrium and dynamic osmotic behaviour of aqueous solutions with varied concentration at constant and variable volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minkov, Ivan L; Manev, Emil D; Sazdanova, Svetla V; Kolikov, Kiril H

    2013-01-01

    Osmosis is essential for the living organisms. In biological systems the process usually occurs in confined volumes and may express specific features. The osmotic pressure in aqueous solutions was studied here experimentally as a function of solute concentration (0.05-0.5 M) in two different regimes: of constant and variable solution volume. Sucrose, a biologically active substance, was chosen as a reference solute for the complex tests. A custom made osmotic cell was used. A novel operative experimental approach, employing limited variation of the solution volume, was developed and applied for the purpose. The established equilibrium values of the osmotic pressure are in agreement with the theoretical expectations and do not exhibit any evident differences for both regimes. In contrast, the obtained kinetic dependences reveal striking divergence in the rates of the process at constant and varied solution volume for the respective solute concentrations. The rise of pressure is much faster at constant solution volume, while the solvent influx is many times greater in the regime of variable volume. The results obtained suggest a feasible mechanism for the way in which the living cells rapidly achieve osmotic equilibrium upon changes in the environment.

  1. Equilibrium and Dynamic Osmotic Behaviour of Aqueous Solutions with Varied Concentration at Constant and Variable Volume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan L. Minkov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Osmosis is essential for the living organisms. In biological systems the process usually occurs in confined volumes and may express specific features. The osmotic pressure in aqueous solutions was studied here experimentally as a function of solute concentration (0.05–0.5 M in two different regimes: of constant and variable solution volume. Sucrose, a biologically active substance, was chosen as a reference solute for the complex tests. A custom made osmotic cell was used. A novel operative experimental approach, employing limited variation of the solution volume, was developed and applied for the purpose. The established equilibrium values of the osmotic pressure are in agreement with the theoretical expectations and do not exhibit any evident differences for both regimes. In contrast, the obtained kinetic dependences reveal striking divergence in the rates of the process at constant and varied solution volume for the respective solute concentrations. The rise of pressure is much faster at constant solution volume, while the solvent influx is many times greater in the regime of variable volume. The results obtained suggest a feasible mechanism for the way in which the living cells rapidly achieve osmotic equilibrium upon changes in the environment.

  2. PIV and CTA Measurement of Constant Area Mixing in Subsonic Air Ejector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jašíková D.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with experimental study of constant area mixing in subsonic axi-symmetric air ejector. Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV and Constant Temperature Anemometry (CTA measurements of four different mixing regimes, each with different ejection ratio were performed. For PIV measuring, the velocity fields inside the constant area mixing chamber were taken through the vitreous wall of the chamber, while the laser beam entered it from the opened outflow of the ejector. For CTA measuring, probe perpendicular to the ejector axis was used. Data obtained from both methods are compared. Basic descriptions of the results are given and it is claimed that results are reliable

  3. Narrow band flame emission from dieseline and diesel spray combustion in a constant volume combustion chamber

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Zengyang

    2016-08-18

    In this paper, spray combustion of diesel (No. 2) and diesel-gasoline blend (dieseline: 80% diesel and 20% gasoline by volume) were investigated in an optically accessible constant volume combustion chamber. Effects of ambient conditions on flame emissions were studied. Ambient oxygen concentration was varied from 12% to 21% and three ambient temperatures were selected: 800 K, 1000 K and 1200 K. An intensified CCD camera coupled with bandpass filters was employed to capture the quasi-steady state flame emissions at 430 nm and 470 nm bands. Under non-sooting conditions, the narrow-band flame emissions at 430 nm and 470 nm can be used as indicators of CH∗ (methylidyne) and HCHO∗ (formaldehyde), respectively. The lift-off length was measured by imaging the OH∗ chemiluminescence at 310 nm. Flame emission structure and intensity distribution were compared between dieseline and diesel at wavelength bands. Flame emission images show that both narrow band emissions become shorter, thinner and stronger with higher oxygen concentration and higher ambient temperature for both fuels. Areas of weak intensity are observed at the flame periphery and the upstream for both fuels under all ambient conditions. Average flame emission intensity and area were calculated for 430 nm and 470 nm narrow-band emissions. At a lower ambient temperature the average intensity increases with increasing ambient oxygen concentration. However, at the 1200 K ambient temperature condition, the average intensity is not increasing monotonically for both fuels. For most of the conditions, diesel has a stronger average flame emission intensity than dieseline for the 430 nm band, and similar phenomena can be observed for the 470 nm band with 800 K and 1200 K ambient temperatures. However, for the 1000 K ambient temperature cases, dieseline has stronger average flame emission intensities than diesel for all oxygen concentrations at 470 nm band. Flame emissions for the two bands have a

  4. Toluene in alveolar air during controlled exposure to constant and to varying concentrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bælum, Jesper

    1990-01-01

    The concentration of toluene in the alveolar air was measured in 20 males and 17 females exposed for 7 h either to a constant exposure to 100 ppm toluene or to a varying exposure with the same time-weighted average, but with peaks of 300 ppm every 30 min. Both exposure schedules included 50 to 100...... W exercise in three 15-min periods. Repetitive measurements of the toluene concentrations in the alveolar air were made in two 30-min periods, one at rest and one including work. At rest the alveolar concentration increased rapidly in response to an increase in the inspiratory air concentration......, while exercise delayed this increase by about 2 min, probably due to an altered distribution of toluene in the body. The average alveolar concentration was 16.5 +/- 6.8 ppm (mean +/- SD) at rest and 19.5 +/- 5.3 ppm in the period including exercise while there was no difference between constant...

  5. A simplified permeability model for coalbed methane reservoirs based on matchstick strain and constant volume theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Qiang [China University of Mining and Technology, Beijing (China); Harpalani, Satya; Liu, Shimin [Southern Illinois University, Carbondale (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Significant changes occur in the absolute permeability of coalbed methane (CBM) reservoirs during primary depletion or enhanced recovery/CO{sub 2} sequestration operations. In order to project gas production, several analytical models have been developed to predict changes in coal permeability as a function of stress/porosity and sorption. Although these models are more transparent and less complicated than the coupled numerical models, there are differences between the various analytical models and there are several uncertainties. These are discussed briefly in this paper. A new model is then proposed, which is based on the volumetric balance between the bulk coal, and solid grains and pores, using the constant volume theory. It incorporates primarily the changes in grain and cleat volumes and is, therefore, different from the other models that lay heavy emphasis on the pore volume/cleat compressibility values. Finally, in order to demonstrate the simplicity of the proposed model, a history matching exercise is carried out using field data in order to compare the different models. The modeling results suggest that the agreement between the predicted permeability using the existing models and the one proposed here is very good. The merit of the proposed model is its simplicity, and the fact that all input parameters are easily measurable for any coal type with no uncertainties. (author)

  6. AIR QUALITY CRITERIA FOR PARTICULATE MATTER, VOLUMES I-III

    Science.gov (United States)

    There is no abstract available for these documents. If further information is requested, please refer to the bibliographic citation and contact the Technical Information Staff at the number listed below.Air Quality Criteria for Particulate Matter, Volume I - EP...

  7. A determination of the Planck constant using the LNE Kibble balance in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, M.; Ziane, D.; Pinot, P.; Karcher, R.; Imanaliev, A.; Pereira Dos Santos, F.; Merlet, S.; Piquemal, F.; Espel, P.

    2017-08-01

    A determination of the Planck constant h using the LNE Kibble balance in air was carried out in the spring of 2017. Substantial improvements since 2014, chiefly related to the mass standard, mechanical alignments, voltage measurements and type A evaluation uncertainties, leads to a h value of 6.626 070 41(38)  ×  10-34 J · s, with a relative standard uncertainty of 5.7  ×  10-8.

  8. Gas permeation measurement under defined humidity via constant volume/variable pressure method

    KAUST Repository

    Jan Roman, Pauls

    2012-02-01

    Many industrial gas separations in which membrane processes are feasible entail high water vapour contents, as in CO 2-separation from flue gas in carbon capture and storage (CCS), or in biogas/natural gas processing. Studying the effect of water vapour on gas permeability through polymeric membranes is essential for materials design and optimization of these membrane applications. In particular, for amine-based CO 2 selective facilitated transport membranes, water vapour is necessary for carrier-complex formation (Matsuyama et al., 1996; Deng and Hägg, 2010; Liu et al., 2008; Shishatskiy et al., 2010) [1-4]. But also conventional polymeric membrane materials can vary their permeation behaviour due to water-induced swelling (Potreck, 2009) [5]. Here we describe a simple approach to gas permeability measurement in the presence of water vapour, in the form of a modified constant volume/variable pressure method (pressure increase method). © 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  9. 17th DOE nuclear air cleaning conference: proceedings. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    First, M.W. (ed.)

    1983-02-01

    Volume 2 contains papers presented at the following sessions: adsorption; noble gas treatment; personnel education and training; filtration and filter testing; measurement and instrumentation; air cleaning equipment response to accident related stress; containment venting air cleaning; and an open end session. Twenty-eight papers were indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Data Base. Ten papers had been entered earlier.

  10. A Novel Constant-Pressure Pumped Hydro Combined with Compressed Air Energy Storage System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erren Yao

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available As intermittent renewable energy is receiving increasing attention, the combination of intermittent renewable energy with large-scale energy storage technology is considered as an important technological approach for the wider application of wind power and solar energy. Pumped hydro combined with compressed air energy storage system (PHCA is one of the energy storage systems that not only integrates the advantages but also overcomes the disadvantages of compressed air energy storage (CAES systems and pumped hydro energy storage systems to solve the problem of energy storage in China’s arid regions. Aiming at the variable working conditions of PHCA system technology, this study proposes a new constant-pressure PHCA. The most significant characteristics of this system were that the water pump and hydroturbine work under stable conditions and this improves the working efficiency of the equipment without incurring an energy loss. In addition, the constant-pressure PHCA system was subjected to energy and exergy analysis, in expectation of exploring an attractive solution for the large-scale storage of existing intermittent renewable energy.

  11. Spray ignition measurements in a constant volume combustion vessel under engine-relevant conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, Varun

    Pressure-based and optical diagnostics for ignition delay (ID) measurement of a diesel spray from a multi-hole nozzle were investigated in a constant volume combustion vessel (CVCV) at conditions similar to those in a conventional diesel engine at the start of injection (SOI). It was first hypothesized that compared to an engine, the shorter ID in a CVCV was caused by NO, a byproduct of premixed combustion. The presence of a significant concentration of NO+NO2 was confirmed experimentally and by using a multi-zone model of premixed combustion. Experiments measuring the effect of NO on ID were performed at conditions relevant to a conventional diesel engine. Depending on the temperature regime and the nature of the fuel, NO addition was found to advance or retard ignition. Constant volume ignition simulations were capable of describing the observed trends; the magnitudes were different due to the physical processes involved in spray ignition, not modeled in the current study. The results of the study showed that ID is sensitive to low NO concentrations (temperature regime. A second source of uncertainty in pressure-based ID measurement is the systematic error associated with the correction used to account for the speed of sound. Simultaneous measurements of volumetric OH chemiluminescence (OHC) and pressure during spray ignition found the OHC to closely resemble the pressure-based heat release rate for the full combustion duration. The start of OHC was always found to be shorter than the pressure-based ID for all fuels and conditions tested by 100 ms. Experiments were also conducted measuring the location and timing of high-temperature ignition and the steady-state lift-off length by high-speed imaging of OHC during spray ignition. The delay period calculated using the measured ignition location and the bulk average speed of sound was in agreement with the delay between OHC and the pressure-based ID. Results of the study show that start of OHC is coupled to

  12. Non-constant volume exponential solutions in higher-dimensional Lovelock cosmologies

    CERN Document Server

    Chirkov, Dmitry; Toporensky, Alexey

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we propose a scheme which allows one to find all possible exponential solutions of special class -- non-constant volume solutions -- in Lovelock gravity in arbitrary number of dimensions and with arbitrate combinations of Lovelock terms. We apply this scheme to (6+1)- and (7+1)-dimensional flat anisotropic cosmologies in Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet and third-order Lovelock gravity to demonstrate how our scheme does work. In course of this demonstration we derive all possible solutions in (6+1) and (7+1) dimensions and compare solutions and their abundance between cases with different Lovelock terms present. As a special but more "physical" case we consider spaces which allow three-dimensional isotropic subspace for they could be viewed as examples of compactification schemes. Our results suggest that the same solution with three-dimensional isotropic subspace is more "probable" to occur in the model with most possible Lovelock terms taken into account, which could be used as kind of anthropic argument...

  13. Estimating octanol-air partition coefficients with octanol-water partition coefficients and Henry's law constants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meylan, William M; Howard, Philip H

    2005-11-01

    The octanol-air partition coefficient (K(OA)) is useful for predicting the partitioning behavior of organic compounds between air and environmental matrices such as soil, vegetation, and aerosol particles. At present, experimentally determined K(OA) values are available for only several hundred compounds. Therefore, the ability to estimate K(OA) is necessary for screening level evaluation of most chemicals. Although it is possible to estimate K(OA) from the octanol-water partition coefficient (K(OW)) and Henry's law constant (HLC), various concerns have been raised in regard to the usability of this estimation methodology. This work examines the accuracy and usability of K(OW) and HLC in application to a comprehensive database set of K(OA) values for screening level environmental assessment. Results indicate that K(OW) and HLC can be used to accurately predict K(OA) even when estimated K(OW) and HLC values are used. For an experimental dataset of 310log K(OA) values for different compounds, the K(OW)-HLC method was statistically accurate as follows: correlation coefficient (r2): 0.972, standard deviation: 0.526, absolute mean error: 0.358 using predominantly experimental K(OW) and HLC values. When K(OW) and HLC values were estimated (using the KOWWIN and HENRYWIN programs), the statistical accuracy was: correlation coefficient (r2): 0.957, standard deviation: 0.668, absolute mean error: 0.479.

  14. EOS simulation and GRNN modeling of the constant volume depletion behavior of gas condensate reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elsharkawy, A.M.; Foda, S.G. [Kuwait University, Safat (Kuwait). Petroleum Engineering Dept.

    1998-03-01

    Currently, two approaches are being used to predict the changes in retrograde gas condensate composition and estimate the pressure depletion behavior of gas condensate reservoirs. The first approach uses the equation of states whereas the second uses empirical correlations. Equations of states (EOS) are poor predictive tools for complex hydrocarbon systems. The EOS needs adjustment against phase behavior data of reservoir fluid of known composition. The empirical correlation does not involve numerous numerical computations but their accuracy is limited. This study presents two general regression neural network (GRNN) models. The first model, GRNNM1, is developed to predict dew point pressure and gas compressibility at dew point using initial composition of numerous samples while the second model, GRNNM2, is developed to predict the changes in well stream effluent composition at any stages of pressure depletion. GRNNM2 can also be used to determine the initial reservoir fluid composition using dew point pressure, gas compressibility at dew point, and reservoir temperature. These models are based on analysis of 142 sample of laboratory studies of constant volume depletion (CVD) for gas condensate systems forming a total of 1082 depletion stages. The database represents a wide range of gas condensate systems obtained worldwide. The performance of the GRNN models has been compared to simulation results of the equation of state. The study shows that the proposed general regression neural network models are accurate, valid, and reliable. These models can be used to forecast CVD data needed for many reservoir engineering calculations in case laboratory data is unavailable. The GRNN models save computer time involved in EOS calculations. The study also show that once these models are properly trained they can be used to cut expenses of frequent sampling and laborious experimental CVD tests required for gas condensate reservoirs. 55 refs., 13 figs., 6 tabs.

  15. Air Pollution Translations: A Bibliography with Abstracts - Volume 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Air Pollution Control Administration (DHEW), Raleigh, NC.

    This volume is the second in a series of compilations presenting abstracts and indexes of translations of technical air pollution literature. The 444 entries are grouped into 12 subject categories: General; Emission Sources; Atmospheric Interaction; Measurement Methods; Control Methods; Effects--Human Health; Effects--Plants and Livestock;…

  16. SPECIES - EVALUATING THERMODYNAMIC PROPERTIES, TRANSPORT PROPERTIES & EQUILIBRIUM CONSTANTS OF AN 11-SPECIES AIR MODEL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, R. A.

    1994-01-01

    Accurate numerical prediction of high-temperature, chemically reacting flowfields requires a knowledge of the physical properties and reaction kinetics for the species involved in the reacting gas mixture. Assuming an 11-species air model at temperatures below 30,000 degrees Kelvin, SPECIES (Computer Codes for the Evaluation of Thermodynamic Properties, Transport Properties, and Equilibrium Constants of an 11-Species Air Model) computes values for the species thermodynamic and transport properties, diffusion coefficients and collision cross sections for any combination of the eleven species, and reaction rates for the twenty reactions normally occurring. The species represented in the model are diatomic nitrogen, diatomic oxygen, atomic nitrogen, atomic oxygen, nitric oxide, ionized nitric oxide, the free electron, ionized atomic nitrogen, ionized atomic oxygen, ionized diatomic nitrogen, and ionized diatomic oxygen. Sixteen subroutines compute the following properties for both a single species, interaction pair, or reaction, and an array of all species, pairs, or reactions: species specific heat and static enthalpy, species viscosity, species frozen thermal conductivity, diffusion coefficient, collision cross section (OMEGA 1,1), collision cross section (OMEGA 2,2), collision cross section ratio, and equilibrium constant. The program uses least squares polynomial curve-fits of the most accurate data believed available to provide the requested values more quickly than is possible with table look-up methods. The subroutines for computing transport coefficients and collision cross sections use additional code to correct for any electron pressure when working with ionic species. SPECIES was developed on a SUN 3/280 computer running the SunOS 3.5 operating system. It is written in standard FORTRAN 77 for use on any machine, and requires roughly 92K memory. The standard distribution medium for SPECIES is a 5.25 inch 360K MS-DOS format diskette. The contents of the

  17. Highway air quality impact appraisals. Volume I. Introduction to air quality analysis. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollack, R.I.; Tesche, T.W.; Reynolds, S.D.; Hillyer, M.J.; Jerskey, T.N.

    1978-06-01

    This report is the first of a two volume series intended to provide transportation planners and engineers with guidance on how to perform air quality analyses. Volume I presents basic information useful for analyzing local or regional air quality impacts. Subjects discussed include basic characteristics, sources, removal processes, and air quality standards for five pollutants--hydrocarbons, nitrogen oxides, sulfur oxides, particulates, and photochemical oxidants; emissions, control devices, and legislation on vehicular emissions; nonvehicular anthropogenic and natural sources of those five pollutants; construction of emissions inventories; relative contributions of vehicular emissions to air quality at regional, urban, and roadway spatial scales; physical and chemical processes that affect pollutant concentrations; an assessment of types of air quality models, including algebraic (Gaussian), trajectory, and grid numerical models; and the design and use of air quality monitoring programs. The treatment of these issues is designed specifically for the highway planner or engineer who is required to perform air quality evaluations of transportation or land use plans. A glossary is included. Volume I may be useful as a general reference work, particularly on the subjects of emissions, atmospheric processes, and air quality models.

  18. The Time Evolution of a Constant Mass of Air Pollutant Emitted by a Point Source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.H.A. Hassan

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The transient behaviour of a constant mass (i.e. a blob of pollutant released from a point source at a height, , above ground level at time  is studied. The time dependent atmospheric diffusion equation in the presence of diffusion in both horizontal and vertical directions is used to model the problem. The model is found to be governed by an initial-boundary-value problem for the concentration of the pollutant. The solution is obtained in closed form using integral transform methods. The solution is illustrated graphically using appropriate numerical integrations. As time passes, the pollutant blob moves with a central point of accumulation of pollutant while the blob increases in volume to spread the pollutant around it. The motion of the accumulation point in space and time is strongly influenced by wind and gravity while the spread of the pollutant is governed by diffusion. The time taken by the blob to diffuse into space is estimated as a function of the parameters governing wind, gravity and diffusion.

  19. Spray combustion of Jet-A and diesel fuels in a constant volume combustion chamber

    KAUST Repository

    Jing, Wei

    2015-01-01

    This work investigates the spray combustion of Jet-A fuel in an optical constant-volume combustion chamber under different ambient initial conditions. Ambient temperature was varied at 800 K, 1000 K, and 1200 K and five different ambient O2 concentrations were used, spanning 10-21%. These ambient conditions can be used to mimic practical diesel engine working conditions under different fuel injection timings and exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) levels. Both transient and quasi-steady state analyses were conducted. The transient analysis focused on the flame development from the beginning to the end of the combustion process, illustrating how the flame structure evolves with time. The quasi-steady state analysis concentrated on the stable flame structure and compared the flame emissions in terms of spatially integrated intensity, flame effective area, and intensity per pixel. The transient analysis was based on measurements using high-speed imaging of both OH∗ chemiluminescence and broadband natural luminosity (NL). For the quasi-steady state analysis, three flame narrow-band emissions (OH∗ at 310 nm, Band A at 430 nm and Band B at 470 nm) were captured using an ICCD camera. Based on the current Jet-A data and diesel data obtained from previous experiments, a comparison between Jet-A and diesel was made in terms of flame development during the transient state and spatially integrated intensity, flame effective area, and intensity per pixel during the quasi-steady state. For the transient results, Jet-A shares a similar flame development trend to diesel, but featuring a narrower region of NL and a wider region of OH∗ with the increase of ambient temperature and O2 concentration. The soot cloud is oxidized more quickly for Jet-A than diesel at the end of combustion, evident by comparing the area of NL, especially under high O2 concentration. The quasi-steady state results suggest that soot is oxidized effectively under high O2 concentration conditions by the

  20. Pressure Measurement and Flowfield Characterization of a Two-Dimensional Ideally Expanded, Constant Area, Air/air Ejector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin, Michael Anthony

    A detailed experimental investigation of a two -dimensional, Mach 1.8 air-primary, Mach 0.3 air-secondary ejector at high Reynolds number has been performed, from which a nonintrusive method for whole-field visualization using turbulent wall-pressure has been developed. The experiments were conducted using mean and time-accurate wall pressure measurements, impact-pressure measurements using a traversing probe, and Schlieren and shadowgraph visualization techniques. The time-accurate pressure measurements were recorded using a sealed Kulite miniature pressure transducer with a 0.7 mm diameter sensing diaphragm. For all except the optical methods, measurements were taken from the initial flow interface to about 13 hydraulic tube-diameters downstream in the constant-area mixing section. From the mean measurements, values of stagnation pressure, density, velocity, static pressure, Mach number, and dynamic pressure were developed and are presented. Using the time-accurate pressure measurements, a color contour plot of the rms pressure was developed that definitively shows the regions of the flow in agreement with the other measurements. Additionally, probability density functions, skewness, and kurtosis were calculated. Peak values of skewness (S) and kurtosis (K) on the centerline at about 2.5 hydraulic diameters are S = 1.85 and K = 11.5. The inlet rms pressure values, normalized by freestream dynamic pressure for the primary (~0.001), were found to be in fair agreement with previous experimental values; however, those in the secondary were much higher (~0.2), apparently due to the acoustic radiation from the primary. Fourier analysis of the time-accurate pressure measurements show that the autospectra contain k ^{-1}, k^{-7/3}, and k^{-11/3} pressure spectrum functions as predicted by prevailing theory for the overlap layer, turbulence-turbulence interaction, and turbulence-mean-shear interaction, respectively. It is believed that this is the first experiment in

  1. Measurements of OH* and CH* Chemiluminescence in Premixed Flames in a Constant Volume Combustion Bomb under Autoignition Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    TINAUT FLUIXA, FRANCISCO VICENTE; Reyes, M.; Giménez, B.; Pastor Soriano, José Vicente

    2011-01-01

    The objectives of this paper are as follows: (1) To study parametrically OH* and CH* chemiluminescence trace evolution as a function of the initial pressure, temperature, and equivalence ratio of premixed flames of n-heptane, under autoignition conditions, in a constant volume combustion bomb. The signals of the electronically excited states of OH* (306 nm) and CH* (430 nm) have been detected through band-pass filters with two photomultiplier tubes placed in an optical access of the combustio...

  2. Osmosis-induced water uptake by Eurobitum bituminized radioactive waste and pressure development in constant volume conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marieen, A., E-mail: amarien@sckcen.be [Waste and Disposal Expert Group, Belgian Nuclear Research Centre (SCK-CEN), Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Mokni, N., E-mail: Nadia.mokni@upc.edu [Department of Geotechnical Engineering and Geosciences, Universidad Politecnica de Catalunya (UPC), Calle Gran Capitan, s/n, Edificio C-1, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); Valcke, E. [Waste and Disposal Expert Group, Belgian Nuclear Research Centre (SCK-CEN), Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Olivella, S. [Department of Geotechnical Engineering and Geosciences, Universidad Politecnica de Catalunya (UPC), Calle Gran Capitan, s/n, Edificio C-1, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); Smets, S. [Waste and Disposal Expert Group, Belgian Nuclear Research Centre (SCK-CEN), Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Li, X., E-mail: xli@sckcen.be [EIG EURIDICE, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium)

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The water uptake by Eurobitum is studied to judge the safety of geological disposal. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High pressures of up to 20 MPa are measured in constant volume water uptake tests. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The morphology of leached Eurobitum samples is studied with {mu}CT and ESEM. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The observations are reproduced by an existing CHM formulation for Eurobitum. - Abstract: The chemo-hydro-mechanical (CHM) interaction between swelling Eurobitum radioactive bituminized waste (BW) and Boom Clay is investigated to assess the feasibility of geological disposal for the long-term management of this waste. These so-called compatibility studies include laboratory water uptake tests at Belgian Nuclear Research Center SCK-CEN, and the development of a coupled CHM formulation for Eurobitum by the International Center for Numerical Methods and Engineering (CIMNE, Polytechnical University of Cataluna, Spain). In the water uptake tests, the osmosis-induced swelling, pressure increase and NaNO{sub 3} leaching of small cylindrical BW samples (diameter 38 mm, height 10 mm) is studied under constant total stress conditions and nearly constant volume conditions; the actual geological disposal conditions should be intermediate between these extremes. Two nearly constant volume tests were stopped after 1036 and 1555 days to characterize the morphology of the hydrated BW samples and to visualize the hydrated part with microfocus X-ray Computer Tomography ({mu}CT) and Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy (ESEM). In parallel, a coupled CHM formulation is developed that describes chemically and hydraulically coupled flow processes in porous materials with salt crystals, and that incorporates a porosity dependent membrane efficiency, permeability and diffusivity. When Eurobitum BW is hydrated in (nearly) constant volume conditions, the osmosis-induced water uptake results in an increasing pressure to

  3. Minimization of wave drag due to thickness with constraints on constant volume and maximum thickness position

    OpenAIRE

    Ishida, Yoji; 石田 洋治

    2001-01-01

    A numerical method has been developed for designing minimum-drag supersonic wing thickness with constraints on total volume and wing's maximum thickness position. This method is based on the linearized supersonic theory and is an extension of Kawasaki's method (ref.10) which deals only with total volume constraint. The maximum thickness position of the wing, a new constraint condition, is important information from both aerodynamic and structural points of view. The addition of the constraint...

  4. Keeping the Edge. Air Force Materiel Command Cold War Context (1945-1991). Volume 3: Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-08-01

    network, development of Gapa see Missiles Garden City (Kansas) see Army Air Field 103 Keeping the Edge: Volume III Gardner, Trevor Volume II...Volume I: 310 Volume II: 2, 275, 306, 308, 497 Gapa Volume I: 191 Volume II: 216,327 Ground-Launched Cruise Missile (GLCM

  5. The minimum air volume kept in diving Adelie penguins : evidence for regulation of air volume in the respiratory system

    OpenAIRE

    Sato, Katsufumi; Watanuki, Yutaka; Naito, Yasuhiko

    2006-01-01

    Penguins are outstanding divers. Particularly intriguing is the observation that they seem to dive on inspiration, which contributes to increasing oxygen stores but which increases their buoyancy. It has been concluded that buoyancy is a major factor in determining the energetics of shallow diving birds and there is a positive correlation between estimated air volume in the body (respiratory system and feathers) and the maximum depth in the dive of free-ranging penguins. However, it is not kn...

  6. Spray combustion of biomass-based renewable diesel fuel using multiple injection strategy in a constant volume combustion chamber

    KAUST Repository

    Jing, Wei

    2016-05-26

    Effect of a two-injection strategy associated with a pilot injection on the spray combustion process was investigated under conventional diesel combustion conditions (1000 K and 21% O2 concentration) for a biomass-based renewable diesel fuel, i.e., biomass to liquid (BTL), and a regular No. 2 diesel in a constant volume combustion chamber using multiband flame measurement and two-color pyrometry. The spray combustion flame structure was visualized by using multiband flame measurement to show features of soot formation, high temperature and low temperature reactions, which can be characterized by the narrow-band emissions of radicals or intermediate species such as OH, HCHO, and CH. The objective of this study was to identify the details of multiple injection combustion, including a pilot and a main injection, and to provide further insights on how the two injections interact. For comparison, three injection strategies were considered for both fuels including a two-injection strategy (Case TI), single injection strategy A (Case SA), and single injection strategy B (Case SB). Multiband flame results show a strong interaction, indicated by OH emissions between the pilot injection and the main injection for Case TI while very weak connection is found for the narrow-band emissions acquired through filters with centerlines of 430 nm and 470 nm. A faster flame development is found for the main injection of Case TI compared to Cases SA and SB, which could be due to the high temperature environment and large air entrainment from the pilot injection. A lower soot level is observed for the BTL flame compared to the diesel flame for all three injection types. Case TI has a lower soot level compared to Cases SA and SB for the BTL fuel, while the diesel fuel maintains a similar soot level among all three injection strategies. Soot temperature of Case TI is lower for both fuels, especially for diesel. Based on these results, it is expected that the two-injection strategy could be

  7. Minimization of Wave Drag Due to Thickness with Constraints on Constant Volume and Maximum Thickness Position

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Yoji

    We have developed a numerical method for design of minimum-drag supersonic wing thickness with constraints on total volume and wing maximum thickness position. The method is based on the linearized supersonic theory and is an extension of Kawasaki's method which deals only with total volume constraint. The maximum thickness position of the wing, a new constraint condition, is an important information from both aerodynamic and structural point of view. The addition of the constraint has considerably extended the design possibility and has actually produced many interesting optimum thickness families. Numerical examples are given for delta, gothic and arrow wings which confirm the usefulness of present design method.

  8. Osmosis-induced water uptake by Eurobitum bituminized radioactive waste and pressure development in constant volume conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariën, A.; Mokni, N.; Valcke, E.; Olivella, S.; Smets, S.; Li, X.

    2013-01-01

    The chemo-hydro-mechanical (CHM) interaction between swelling Eurobitum radioactive bituminized waste (BW) and Boom Clay is investigated to assess the feasibility of geological disposal for the long-term management of this waste. These so-called compatibility studies include laboratory water uptake tests at the Belgian Nuclear Research Center SCK•CEN, and the development of a coupled CHM formulation for Eurobitum by the International Center for Numerical Methods and Engineering (CIMNE, Polytechnical University of Cataluña, Spain). In the water uptake tests, the osmosis-induced swelling, pressure increase and NaNO3 leaching of small cylindrical BW samples (diameter 38 mm, height 10 mm) is studied under constant total stress conditions and nearly constant volume conditions; the actual geological disposal conditions should be intermediate between these extremes. Two nearly constant volume tests were stopped after 1036 and 1555 days to characterize the morphology of the hydrated BW samples and to visualize the hydrated part with microfocus X-ray Computer Tomography (μCT) and Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy (ESEM). In parallel, a coupled CHM formulation is developed that describes chemically and hydraulically coupled flow processes in porous materials with salt crystals, and that incorporates a porosity dependent membrane efficiency, permeability and diffusivity. When Eurobitum BW is hydrated in (nearly) constant volume conditions, the osmosis-induced water uptake results in an increasing pressure to values that can be (in theory) as high as 42.8 MPa, being the osmotic pressure of a saturated NaNO3 solution. After about four years of hydration in nearly constant volume water uptake tests, pressures up to 20 MPa are measured. During this hydration period only the outer layers with a thickness of 1-2 mm were hydrated (as derived from μCT and ESEM analyses), and only about 10-20% of the initial NaNO3 content was released by the samples. In the studied test

  9. Changes in the air cell volume of artificially incubated ostrich eggs ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A total of 2160 images of candled, incubated ostrich eggs were digitized to determine the percentage of egg volume occupied by the air cell at different stages of incubation. The air cell on average occupied 2.5% of the volume of fresh eggs. For eggs that hatched successfully, this volume increased to an average of 24.4% ...

  10. An Experimental Study on the Macroscopic Spray Characteristics of Biodiesel and Diesel in a Constant Volume Chamber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongzhan Xie

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate the macroscopic spray characteristics of different 0%–100% blends of biodiesel derived from drainage oil and diesel (BD0, BD20, BD50, BD80, BD100, such as spray tip penetration, average tip velocity at penetration, spray angle, average spray angle, spray evolution process, spray area and spray volume under different injection pressures (60, 70, 80, 90, 100 MPa and ambient pressures (0.1, 0.3, 0.5, 0.7, 0.9 MPa using a common rail system equipped with a constant volume chamber. The characteristic data was extracted from spray images grabbed by a high speed visualization system. The results showed that the ambient pressure and injection pressure had significant effects on the spray characteristics. As the ambient pressure increased, the spray angle increased, while the spray tip penetration and the peak of average tip velocity decreased. As the injection pressure increased, the spray tip penetration, spray angle, spray area and spray volume increased. The increasing blend ratio of biodiesel brought about a shorter spray tip penetration and a smaller spray angle compared with those of diesel. This is due to the comparatively higher viscosity and surface tension of biodiesel, which enhanced the friction effect between fuel and the injector nozzle surface and inhibited the breakup of the liquid jet.

  11. Computer codes for the evaluation of thermodynamic properties, transport properties, and equilibrium constants of an 11-species air model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Richard A.; Lee, Kam-Pui; Gupta, Roop N.

    1990-01-01

    The computer codes developed provide data to 30000 K for the thermodynamic and transport properties of individual species and reaction rates for the prominent reactions occurring in an 11-species nonequilibrium air model. These properties and the reaction-rate data are computed through the use of curve-fit relations which are functions of temperature (and number density for the equilibrium constant). The curve fits were made using the most accurate data believed available. A detailed review and discussion of the sources and accuracy of the curve-fitted data used herein are given in NASA RP 1232.

  12. Aqueous solubility, Henry's law constants and air/water partition coefficients of n-octane and two halogenated octanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarraute, S; Delepine, H; Costa Gomes, M F; Majer, V

    2004-12-01

    New data on the aqueous solubility of n-octane, 1-chlorooctane and 1-bromooctane are reported between 1 degree C and 45 degrees C. Henry's law constants, K(H), and air/water partition coefficients, K(AW), were calculated by associating the measured solubility values to vapor pressures taken from literature. The mole fraction aqueous solubility varies between (1.13-1.60)x10(-7) for n-octane with a minimum at approximately 23 degrees C, (3.99-5.07)x10(-7) for 1-chlorooctane increasing monotonically with temperature and (1.60-3.44)x10(-7) for 1-bromooctane with a minimum near 18 degrees C. The calculated air-water partition coefficients increase with temperature and are two orders of magnitude lower for the halogenated derivatives compared to octane. The precision of the results, taken as the average absolute deviations of the aqueous solubility, the Henry's law constants, or the air/water partition coefficients, from appropriate smoothing equations as a function of temperature is of 3% for n-octane and of 2% and 4% for 1-chlorooctane and 1-bromooctane, respectively. A new apparatus based on the dynamic saturation column method was used for the solubility measurements. Test measurements with n-octane indicated the capability of measuring solubilities between 10(-6) and 10(-10) in mole fraction, with an estimated accuracy better than +/-10%. A thorough thermodynamic analysis of converting measured data to air/water partition coefficients is presented.

  13. Three-dimensional simulations of microstructural evolution in polycrystalline dual-phase materials with constant volume fractions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Stefan Othmar; Voorhees, P.W.; Lauridsen, Erik Mejdal

    2013-01-01

    -state distributions of grain sizes and topology were determined. It was found that the grain size distributions were in good agreement with experimentally characterized size distributions for solid particles coarsening in a liquid matrix, and that the distributions of the number of faces were in good agreement....../50 and 40/60 were examined. After an initial transient, the number of grains decrease from ∼2600 to ∼500. It was found that the mean grain size of grains of both phases obeyed a power law with an exponent of 3, and the microstructural evolution was found to be controlled by diffusion. Steady...... with the topology of single-phase grain structures as determined by experiment and simulation. The evolution of size and number of faces for the minority and majority phase grains in the 40/60 volume fraction simulation is presented and discussed. Non-constant curvature across some interphase boundaries...

  14. Determining the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity of a compacted sand-bentonite mixture under constant volume and free-swell conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Cui, Yu-Jun; Loiseau, Cyril; Delage, Pierre; 10.1016/j.pce.2008.10.017

    2008-01-01

    Highly compacted sand-bentonite mixtures are often considered as possible engineered barriers in deep high-level radioactive waste disposals. In-situ, the saturation of these barriers from their initially unsaturated state is a complex hydro-mechanical coupled process in which temperature effects also play a role. The key parameter of this process is the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity of the barrier. In this paper, isothermal infiltration experiments were conducted to determine the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity according to the instantaneous profile method. To do so, total suction changes were monitored at different locations along the soil specimen by using resistivity relative humidity probes. Three constant volume infiltration tests were conducted showing, unexpectedly, a decrease of the hydraulic conductivity during infiltration. One test performed under free-swell conditions showed the opposite and standard trend. These observations were interpreted in terms of microstructure changes during wett...

  15. Energy efficient PCM-based variable air volume air conditioning system for modern buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parameshwaran, R.; Harikrishnan, S. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Anna University Chennai, Chennai (India); Kalaiselvam, S. [Centre for Nanoscience and Technology, Anna University Chennai, Chennai (India)

    2010-08-15

    This work aims at achieving enhanced energy conservation for space conditioning with the application of a new combined variable air volume (VAV)-based chilled water air conditioning (A/C) system and thermal energy storage (TES) system. The phase change material (PCM) used in this system exhibited good charging and discharging characteristics that directly helped in conserving the overall energy spent on cooling and ventilation. The present system was experimentally investigated for summer and winter climatic conditions under demand controlled ventilation (DCV) and DCV combined with the economizer cycle ventilation (ECV) to substantiate its energy savings capability. Based on the results, in the DCV and combined DCV-ECV modes, this system achieved 28% and 47% of per day average energy conservative potential, respectively, while compared to the conventional chilled water-based A/C system. Similarly, the VAV-TES system yielded an on-peak total energy savings of 38% and 42%, respectively, for the same operating conditions. (author)

  16. Dynamics of chest wall volume regulation during constant work rate exercise in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takara, L.S.; Cunha, T.M.; Barbosa, P.; Rodrigues, M.K.; Oliveira, M.F.; Nery, L.E. [Setor de Função Pulmonar e Fisiologia Clínica do Exercício, Disciplina de Pneumologia, Departamento de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Neder, J.A. [Setor de Função Pulmonar e Fisiologia Clínica do Exercício, Disciplina de Pneumologia, Departamento de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Division of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Medicine, Queen' s University, Kingston, ON (Canada)

    2012-10-15

    This study evaluated the dynamic behavior of total and compartmental chest wall volumes [(V{sub CW}) = rib cage (V{sub RC}) + abdomen (V{sub AB})] as measured breath-by-breath by optoelectronic plethysmography during constant-load exercise in patients with stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Thirty males (GOLD stages II-III) underwent a cardiopulmonary exercise test to the limit of tolerance (Tlim) at 75% of peak work rate on an electronically braked cycle ergometer. Exercise-induced dynamic hyperinflation was considered to be present when end-expiratory (EE) V{sub CW} increased in relation to resting values. There was a noticeable heterogeneity in the patterns of V{sub CW} regulation as EEV{sub CW} increased non-linearly in 17/30 “hyperinflators” and decreased in 13/30 “non-hyperinflators” (P < 0.05). EEV{sub AB} decreased slightly in 8 of the “hyperinflators”, thereby reducing and slowing the rate of increase in end-inspiratory (EI) V{sub CW} (P < 0.05). In contrast, decreases in EEV{sub CW} in the “non-hyperinflators” were due to the combination of stable EEV{sub RC} with marked reductions in EEV{sub AB}. These patients showed lower EIV{sub CW} and end-exercise dyspnea scores but longer Tlim than their counterparts (P < 0.05). Dyspnea increased and Tlim decreased non-linearly with a faster rate of increase in EIV{sub CW} regardless of the presence or absence of dynamic hyperinflation (P < 0.001). However, no significant between-group differences were observed in metabolic, pulmonary gas exchange and cardiovascular responses to exercise. Chest wall volumes are continuously regulated during exercise in order to postpone (or even avoid) their migration to higher operating volumes in patients with COPD, a dynamic process that is strongly dependent on the behavior of the abdominal compartment.

  17. Dynamics of chest wall volume regulation during constant work rate exercise in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.S. Takara

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the dynamic behavior of total and compartmental chest wall volumes [(V CW = rib cage (V RC + abdomen (V AB] as measured breath-by-breath by optoelectronic plethysmography during constant-load exercise in patients with stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Thirty males (GOLD stages II-III underwent a cardiopulmonary exercise test to the limit of tolerance (Tlim at 75% of peak work rate on an electronically braked cycle ergometer. Exercise-induced dynamic hyperinflation was considered to be present when end-expiratory (EE V CW increased in relation to resting values. There was a noticeable heterogeneity in the patterns of V CW regulation as EEV CW increased non-linearly in 17/30 "hyperinflators" and decreased in 13/30 "non-hyperinflators" (P < 0.05. EEV AB decreased slightly in 8 of the "hyperinflators", thereby reducing and slowing the rate of increase in end-inspiratory (EI V CW (P < 0.05. In contrast, decreases in EEV CW in the "non-hyperinflators" were due to the combination of stable EEV RC with marked reductions in EEV AB. These patients showed lower EIV CW and end-exercise dyspnea scores but longer Tlim than their counterparts (P < 0.05. Dyspnea increased and Tlim decreased non-linearly with a faster rate of increase in EIV CW regardless of the presence or absence of dynamic hyperinflation (P < 0.001. However, no significant between-group differences were observed in metabolic, pulmonary gas exchange and cardiovascular responses to exercise. Chest wall volumes are continuously regulated during exercise in order to postpone (or even avoid their migration to higher operating volumes in patients with COPD, a dynamic process that is strongly dependent on the behavior of the abdominal compartment.

  18. Measuring air layer volumes retained by submerged floating-ferns Salvinia and biomimetic superhydrophobic surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias J. Mayser

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Some plants and animals feature superhydrophobic surfaces capable of retaining a layer of air when submerged under water. Long-term air retaining surfaces (Salvinia-effect are of high interest for biomimetic applications like drag reduction in ship coatings of up to 30%. Here we present a novel method for measuring air volumes and air loss under water. We recorded the buoyancy force of the air layer on leaf surfaces of four different Salvinia species and on one biomimetic surface using a highly sensitive custom made strain gauge force transducer setup. The volume of air held by a surface was quantified by comparing the buoyancy force of the specimen with and then without an air layer. Air volumes retained by the Salvinia-surfaces ranged between 0.15 and 1 L/m2 depending on differences in surface architecture. We verified the precision of the method by comparing the measured air volumes with theoretical volume calculations and could find a good agreement between both values. In this context we present techniques to calculate air volumes on surfaces with complex microstructures. The introduced method also allows to measure decrease or increase of air layers with high accuracy in real-time to understand dynamic processes.

  19. Measuring air layer volumes retained by submerged floating-ferns Salvinia and biomimetic superhydrophobic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayser, Matthias J; Bohn, Holger F; Reker, Meike; Barthlott, Wilhelm

    2014-01-01

    Some plants and animals feature superhydrophobic surfaces capable of retaining a layer of air when submerged under water. Long-term air retaining surfaces (Salvinia-effect) are of high interest for biomimetic applications like drag reduction in ship coatings of up to 30%. Here we present a novel method for measuring air volumes and air loss under water. We recorded the buoyancy force of the air layer on leaf surfaces of four different Salvinia species and on one biomimetic surface using a highly sensitive custom made strain gauge force transducer setup. The volume of air held by a surface was quantified by comparing the buoyancy force of the specimen with and then without an air layer. Air volumes retained by the Salvinia-surfaces ranged between 0.15 and 1 L/m(2) depending on differences in surface architecture. We verified the precision of the method by comparing the measured air volumes with theoretical volume calculations and could find a good agreement between both values. In this context we present techniques to calculate air volumes on surfaces with complex microstructures. The introduced method also allows to measure decrease or increase of air layers with high accuracy in real-time to understand dynamic processes.

  20. SU-F-T-33: Air-Kerma Strength and Dose Rate Constant by the Full Monte Carlo Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuji, S [Kawasaki Medical School, Kurashiki, Okayama (Japan); Oita, M [Graduate School of Health Sciences, Okayama University, Okayama, Okayama (Japan); Narihiro, N [Kawasaki College of Allied Health Professions, Kurashiki, Okayama (Japan)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: In general, the air-kerma strength (Sk) has been determined by the energy weighting the photon energy fluence and the corresponding mass-energy absorption coefficient or mass-energy transfer coefficient. Kerma is an acronym for kinetic energy released per unit mass, defined as the sum of the initial kinetic energies of all the charged particles. Monte Carlo (MC) simulations can investigate the kinetic energy of the charged particles after photo interactions and sum the energy. The Sk of {sup 192}Ir source is obtained in the full MC simulation and finally the dose rate constant Λ is determine. Methods: MC simulations were performed using EGS5 with the microSelectron HDR v2 type of {sup 192}Ir source. The air-kerma rate obtained to sum the electron kinetic energy after photoelectric absorption or Compton scattering for transverse-axis distance from 1 to 120 cm with a 10 m diameter air phantom. Absorbed dose in water is simulated with a 30 cm diameter water phantom. The transport cut-off energy is 10 keV and primary photons from the source need two hundred and forty billion in the air-kerma rate and thirty billion in absorbed dose in water. Results: Sk is multiplied by the square of the distance in air-kerma rate and determined by fitting a linear function. The result of Sk is (2.7039±0.0085)*10-{sup −11} µGy m{sup 2} Bq{sup −1} s{sup −1}. Absorbed dose rate in water at 1 cm transverse-axis distance D(r{sub 0}, θ{sub 0}) is (3.0114±0.0015)*10{sup −11} cGy Bq{sup −1} s{sup −1}. Conclusion: From the results, dose rate constant Λ of the microSelectron HDR v2 type of {sup 192}Ir source is (1.1137±0.0035) cGy h{sup −1} U{sup −1} by the full MC simulations. The consensus value conΛ is (1.109±0.012) cGy h{sup −1} U{sup −1}. The result value is consistent with the consensus data conΛ.

  1. Automation Applications in an Advance Air Traffic Management System : Volume IIB : Functional Analysis of Air Traffic Management (Cont'd)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-08-01

    Volume 2 contains the analysis and description of air traffic management activities at three levels of detail - functions, subfunctions, and tasks. A total of 265 tasks are identified and described, and the flow of information inputs and outputs amon...

  2. Automation Applications in an Advanced Air Traffic Management System : Volume 2A. Functional Analysis of Air Traffic Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-08-01

    Volume 2 contains the analysis and description of air traffic management activities at three levels of detail - functions, subfunctions, and tasks. A total of 265 tasks are identified and described, and the flow of information inputs and outputs amon...

  3. Determination of the Henry's law constants of low-volatility compounds via the measured air-phase transfer coefficients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Huan-Ping; Lee, Jiunn-Fwu; Chiou, Cary T

    2017-09-01

    Accurate Henry's law constants (H) are unavailable for the majority of organic pollutants, especially those having a low volatility. A novel kinetics-based experimental method is introduced to determine H for a wide range of low-H compounds. The method consists of measuring independently the water-to-air transfer coefficient (KL) and the associated air-phase transfer coefficient (kG) of a low-H chemical (solute) in water when KL ≅ kGH prevails according to the two-film theory. The kG for a solute is obtained via a developed gas-dynamic equation that relates kG to the solute molecular weight and the solute-vapor escaping efficiency (β) through a boundary air layer. The value of β is only a function of the in situ air turbulence level, independent of the chemical species. Thus, the required β for solutes can be estimated from the evaporative rates of pure volatile liquids under the same ambient setting. By relating the estimated kG with the measured KL of a low-H solute, the solute H is established. The H values of 45 low-H chemicals, including many complex pesticides, in the range of ∼10-7 to ∼10-3 have thus been determined. The accountability of the method is underscored by the consistency of the measured and credible literature H values for a number of the low-H compounds studied. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Determination of temperature dependent Henry's law constants of polychlorinated naphthalenes: Application to air-sea exchange in Izmir Bay, Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odabasi, Mustafa; Adali, Mutlu

    2016-12-01

    The Henry's law constant (H) is a crucial variable to investigate the air-water exchange of persistent organic pollutants. H values for 32 polychlorinated naphthalene (PCN) congeners were measured using an inert gas-stripping technique at five temperatures ranging between 5 and 35 °C. H values in deionized water (at 25 °C) varied between 0.28 ± 0.08 Pa m3 mol-1 (PCN-73) and 18.01 ± 0.69 Pa m3 mol-1 (PCN-42). The agreement between the measured and estimated H values from the octanol-water and octanol-air partition coefficients was good (measured/estimated ratio = 1.00 ± 0.41, average ± SD). The calculated phase change enthalpies (ΔHH) were within the interval previously determined for other several semivolatile organic compounds (42.0-106.4 kJ mol-1). Measured H values, paired atmospheric and aqueous concentrations and meteorological variables were also used to reveal the level and direction of air-sea exchange fluxes of PCNs at the coast of Izmir Bay, Turkey. The net PCN air-sea exchange flux varied from -0.55 (volatilization, PCN-24/14) to 2.05 (deposition, PCN-23) ng m-2 day-1. PCN-19, PCN-24/14, PCN-42, and PCN-33/34/37 were mainly volatilized from seawater while the remaining congeners were mainly deposited. The overall number of the cases showing deposition was higher (67.9%) compared to volatilization (21.4%) and near equilibrium (10.7%).

  5. Henry's Law constants or air to water partition coefficients for 1,3,5-triazines by an LFER method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Michael H; Enomoto, Kei; Clarke, Eric D; Rosés, Martí; Ràfols, Clara; Fuguet, Elisabet

    2007-03-01

    Solvation descriptors have been obtained for 19 substituted 1,3,5-triazines, using literature data on water to solvent partitions, and our own experimental determinations of water to solvent partition coefficients and micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC) retention factors. The solvation descriptors can then be used to predict environmentally important air to water partition coefficients, K(w), which are the reciprocal of Henry's Law constants, with due regard to units. For this class of chemistry it is shown that the values of log K(w) so obtained are generally in good agreement with the experimental values compiled in this work and also compare well with the calculated values from the established bond contribution method of Meylan and Howard as implemented in the EPI Suite, but not with calculated values from the semi-empirical quantum chemical solvation models, SM2 and SM3, recently reported by Delgado and Alderete (J. Chem. Inf. Comput. Sci., 2003, 41, 1226-1230).

  6. Air Force Civil Engineer, Volume 9, Number 1, Spring 2001

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    I had to convince people of.� Young, a heavy equipment operator who has worked snow removal at Grand Forks Air Force Base, N.D.; Osan Air Base, Korea...storage tanks at Spangdahlem AB, Germany. Geer is a 2000 Lance P. Sijan Air Force Leadership Award recipient. (Photo by SrA Esperanza Berrios) 31 CE

  7. A technique for determination of lung outline and regional lung air volume distribution from computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, John; Conway, Joy; Majoral, Caroline; Bennett, Michael; Caillibotte, Georges; Montesantos, Spyridon; Katz, Ira

    2014-02-01

    Determination of the lung outline and regional lung air volume is of value in analysis of three-dimensional (3D) distribution of aerosol deposition from radionuclide imaging. This study describes a technique for using computed tomography (CT) scans for this purpose. Low-resolution CT scans of the thorax were obtained during tidal breathing in 11 healthy control male subjects on two occasions. The 3D outline of the lung was determined by image processing using minimal user interaction. A 3D map of air volume was derived and total lung air volume calculated. The regional distribution of air volume from center to periphery of the lung was analyzed using a radial transform and the outer-to-inner ratio of air volume determined. The average total air volume in the lung was 1,900±126 mL (1 SEM), which is in general agreement with the expected value for adult male subjects in the supine position. The fractional air volume concentration increased from the center toward the periphery of the lung. Outer-to-inner (O/I) ratios were higher for the left lung [11.5±1.8 (1 SD)] than for the right [10.1±0.8 (1 SD)] (plungs from CT images and obtaining an image of the distribution of air volume is described. The normal range of various parameters describing the regional distribution of air volume is presented, together with a measure of intrasubject repeatability. This technique and data will be of value in analyzing 3D radionuclide images of aerosol deposition.

  8. Retro-nasal aroma release is correlated with variations in the in-mouth air cavity volume after empty deglutition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishellany-Dutour, Anne; Woda, Alain; Labouré, Hélène; Bourdiol, Pierre; Lachaze, Pauline; Guichard, Elisabeth; Feron, Gilles

    2012-01-01

    We hypothesized that interindividual differences in motor activities during chewing and/or swallowing were determining factors for the transfer of volatile aroma from the in-mouth air cavity (IMAC) toward the olfactory mucosa. In our first experiment, we looked for changes in IMAC volume after saliva deglutition in 12 healthy subjects. The mean IMAC volume was measured after empty deglutition using an acoustic pharyngometer device. Based on the time course of the IMAC volume after swallowing, we discerned two groups of subjects. The first group displayed a small, constant IMAC volume (2.26 mL ±0.62) that corresponded to a high tongue position. The second group displayed a progressive increase in IMAC (from 6.82 mL ±2.37 to 22.82 mL ±3.04) that corresponded to a progressive lowering of the tongue to its resting position. In our second experiment, we investigated the relationship between IMAC volume changes after deglutition and the level of aroma release at the nostril. For this purpose, the release of menthone was measured at the nostril level in 25 subjects who consumed similar amounts of a mint tablet. The subjects were separated into two groups corresponding to two levels of menthone release: high (H) and low (L). The mean volume of IMAC was measured during and after empty deglutition. Group H displayed a small, constant amplitude of IMAC volume change after deglutition, while Group L displayed a progressive increase in IMAC. It is likely that Group H continuously released the aroma through the veloglossal isthmus as the mint was consumed, while Group L trapped the aroma in the oral cavity and then released it into the nasal cavity upon swallowing. These results show that the in vivo aroma release profile in humans depends closely on the different motor patterns at work during empty deglutition.

  9. Soot temperature and KL factor for biodiesel and diesel spray combustion in a constant volume combustion chamber

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Ji

    2013-07-01

    This paper presents measurements of the soot temperature and KL factor for biodiesel and diesel combustion in a constant volume chamber using a two-color technique. This technique uses a high-speed camera coupled with two narrowband filters (550. nm and 650. nm, 10. nm FWHM). After calibration, statistical analysis shows that the uncertainty of the two-color temperature is less than 5%, while it is about 50% for the KL factor. This technique is then applied to the spray combustion of biodiesel and diesel fuels under an ambient oxygen concentration of 21% and ambient temperatures of 800, 1000 and 1200. K. The heat release result shows higher energy utilization efficiency for biodiesel compared to diesel under all conditions; meanwhile, diesel shows a higher pressure increase due to its higher heating value. Biodiesel yields a lower temperature inside the flame area, a longer soot lift-off length, and a smaller soot area compared to diesel. Both the KL factor and the total soot with biodiesel are lower than with diesel throughout the entire combustion process, and this difference becomes larger as the ambient temperature decreases. Biodiesel shows approximately 50-100. K lower temperatures than diesel at the quasi-steady stage for 1000 and 1200. K ambient temperature, while diesel shows a lower temperature than biodiesel at 800. K ambient. This result may raise the question of how important the flame temperature is in explaining the higher NO. x emissions often observed during biodiesel combustion. Other factors may also play an important role in controlling NO. x emissions. Both biodiesel and diesel temperature measurements show a monotonic dependence on the ambient temperature. However, the ambient temperature appears to have a more significant effect on the soot formation and oxidation in diesel combustion, while biodiesel combustion soot characteristics shows relative insensitivity to the ambient temperature. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

  10. AIR QUALITY CRITERIA FOR PARTICULATE MATTER, VOLUMES I-III, (EXTERNAL REVIEW DRAFT, 1995)

    Science.gov (United States)

    There is no abstract available for these documents. If further information is requested, please refer to the bibliographic citation and contact the Technical Information Staff at the number listed above.Air Quality Criteria for Particulate Matter, Volume I, Extern...

  11. Air & Space Power Journal. Volume 22, Number 3, Fall 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    Development Mr. Brent Marley Redstone Arsenal, Alabama Mr. Rémy M. Mauduit Air Force Research Institute Col Phillip S. Meilinger, USAF, Retired West...Col Bob Potter, USAF, Retired Air Force Research Institute Dr. Steve Rothstein Colorado Springs Science Center Project Lt Col Reagan E. Schaupp

  12. Air & Space Power Journal. Volume 24, Number 3, Fall 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Center for Professional Development Mr. Brent Marley Redstone Arsenal, Alabama Mr. Rémy M. Mauduit Air Force Research Institute Col Phillip S...USAF, MC, SFS The Pentagon Col Bob Potter, USAF, Retired Air Force Research Institute Dr. Steve Rothstein Colorado Springs Science Center Project

  13. Modelo de simulação de secagem de produtos agrícolas usando entalpia do ar constante Drying simulation model of agricultural products with constant air enthalpy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valdecir A. Dalpasquale

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available A simulação matemática de secagem de produtos agrícolas teve seu auge nas décadas de 1960 e 1970, com destaque para os modelos de Thompson e de Michigan. Entretanto, nenhum deles abordou a condição de entalpia constante do ar de secagem durante o processo, limitando-se a conferir se a umidade relativa do ar não excedia 100%. Estudos conduzidos na Universidade Estadual de Maringá permitiram concluir que os balanços de energia e de massa de um processo de secagem estão incluídos no uso da mesma entalpia do ar durante a secagem, ajustando-se, com ela, a umidade absoluta do ar em função da umidade removida do produto. Com essa nova razão da mistura do ar e com a entalpia constante, avalia-se a nova temperatura do ar de secagem na saída da camada e, com essas duas propriedades psicrométricas, a umidade relativa do ar. Se ela atingir a condição saturada, encerra-se o processo de secagem naquele tempo, a partir daquela posição. Os resultados obtidos por simulação foram conferidos com resultados experimentais de secagem de milho em camadas fixas, com elevada concordância entre eles.Mathematical drying simulation of agricultural products reached its highest point in the decades of 1960 and 1970, with prominence for MSU and Thompson's models. However, none of them used the constant enthalpy condition of drying air during the process, being limited to checking if the relative humidity of the air did not exceed 100%. Studies conducted in the State University of Maringá allowed to conclude that energy and mass balances of a drying process are included when using the same air enthalpy in such process. The absolute humidity of the air is adjusted as a function of the removed humidity of the product. With that new absolute humidity of the air and with the constant enthalpy, the new temperature of the drying air is evaluated in the exit of the layer and, with those two psychrometric properties, the relative humidity of the air. If it

  14. Two-stage Lagrangian modeling of ignition processes in ignition quality tester and constant volume combustion chambers

    KAUST Repository

    Alfazazi, Adamu

    2016-08-10

    The ignition characteristics of isooctane and n-heptane in an ignition quality tester (IQT) were simulated using a two-stage Lagrangian (TSL) model, which is a zero-dimensional (0-D) reactor network method. The TSL model was also used to simulate the ignition delay of n-dodecane and n-heptane in a constant volume combustion chamber (CVCC), which is archived in the engine combustion network (ECN) library (http://www.ca.sandia.gov/ecn). A detailed chemical kinetic model for gasoline surrogates from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was utilized for the simulation of n-heptane and isooctane. Additional simulations were performed using an optimized gasoline surrogate mechanism from RWTH Aachen University. Validations of the simulated data were also performed with experimental results from an IQT at KAUST. For simulation of n-dodecane in the CVCC, two n-dodecane kinetic models from the literature were utilized. The primary aim of this study is to test the ability of TSL to replicate ignition timings in the IQT and the CVCC. The agreement between the model and the experiment is acceptable except for isooctane in the IQT and n-heptane and n-dodecane in the CVCC. The ability of the simulations to replicate observable trends in ignition delay times with regard to changes in ambient temperature and pressure allows the model to provide insights into the reactions contributing towards ignition. Thus, the TSL model was further employed to investigate the physical and chemical processes responsible for controlling the overall ignition under various conditions. The effects of exothermicity, ambient pressure, and ambient oxygen concentration on first stage ignition were also studied. Increasing ambient pressure and oxygen concentration was found to shorten the overall ignition delay time, but does not affect the timing of the first stage ignition. Additionally, the temperature at the end of the first stage ignition was found to increase at higher ambient pressure

  15. Measuring air layer volumes retained by submerged floating-ferns Salvinia and biomimetic superhydrophobic surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Mayser, Matthias J; Bohn, Holger F; Meike Reker; Wilhelm Barthlott

    2014-01-01

    Some plants and animals feature superhydrophobic surfaces capable of retaining a layer of air when submerged under water. Long-term air retaining surfaces (Salvinia-effect) are of high interest for biomimetic applications like drag reduction in ship coatings of up to 30%. Here we present a novel method for measuring air volumes and air loss under water. We recorded the buoyancy force of the air layer on leaf surfaces of four different Salvinia species and on one biomimetic surface using a hig...

  16. MRI-determined left ventricular "crescent effect": a consequence of the slight deviation of contents of the pericardial sack from the constant-volume state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Emily A; Bowman, Andrew W; Kovács, Sándor J

    2005-02-01

    During one cardiac cycle, the volume encompassed by the pericardial sack in healthy subjects remains nearly constant, with a transient +/-5% decrease in volume at end systole. This "constant-volume" attribute defines a constraint that the longitudinal versus radial pericardial contour dimension relationship must obey. Using cardiac MRI, we determined the extent to which the constant-volume attribute is valid from four-chamber slices (two-dimensional) compared with three-dimensional volumetric data. We also compared the relative percentage of longitudinal versus radial (short-axis) change in cross-sectional area (dimension) of the pericardial contour, thereby assessing the fate of the +/-5% end-systolic volume decrease. We analyzed images from 10 normal volunteers and 1 subject with congenital absence of the pericardium, obtained using a 1.5-T MR scanner. Short-axis cine loop stacks covering the entire heart were acquired, as were single four-chamber cine loops. In the short-axis and four-chamber slices, relative to midventricular end-diastolic location, end-systolic pericardial (left ventricular epicardial) displacement was observed to be radial and maximized at end systole. Longitudinal (apex to mediastinum) pericardial contour dimension change and pericardial area change on the four-chamber slice were negligible throughout the cardiac cycle. We conclude that the +/-5% end-systolic decrease in the volume encompassed by the pericardial sack is primarily accounted for by a "crescent effect" on short-axis views, manifesting as a nonisotropic radial diminution of the pericardial/epicardial contour of the left ventricle. This systolic drop in cardiac volume occurs primarily at the ventricular level and is made up during the subsequent diastole when blood crosses the pericardium in the pulmonary venous Doppler D wave during early rapid left ventricular filling.

  17. Performance of a hydrogen burner to simulate air entering scramjet combustors. [simulation of total temperature, total pressure, and volume fraction of oxygen of air at flight conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russin, W. R.

    1974-01-01

    Tests were conducted to determine the performance of a hydrogen burner used to produce a test gas that simulates air entering a scramjet combustor at various flight conditions. The test gas simulates air in that it duplicates the total temperature, total pressure, and the volume fraction of oxygen of air at flight conditions. The main objective of the tests was to determine the performance of the burner as a function of the effective exhaust port area. The conclusions were: (1) pressure oscillations of the chugging type were reduced in amplitude to plus or minus 2 percent of the mean pressure level by proper sizing of hydrogen, oxygen, and air injector flow areas; (2) combustion efficiency remained essentially constant as the exhaust port area was increased by a factor of 3.4; (3) the mean total temperature determined from integrating the exit radial gas property profiles was within plus or minus 5 percent of the theoretical bulk total temperature; (4) the measured exit total temperature profile had a local peak temperature more than 30 percent greater than the theoretical bulk total temperature; and (5) measured heat transfer to the burner liner was 75 percent of that predicted by theory based on a flat radial temperature profile.

  18. Air & Space Power Journal. Volume 21, Number 4, Winter 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Professional Development Col Edward Mann, USAF, Retired Colorado Springs, Colorado Mr. Brent Marley Redstone Arsenal, Alabama Col Phillip S...Studies Dr. Bruce T. Murphy Air University Col Robert Owen, USAF, Retired Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University Col Bob Potter, USAF, Retired USAF...www .afa.org/magazine/feb2007/0207desert.pdf (accessed 4 February 2007). 22. Brig Gen Robert h. “ Bob ” holmes et al., “the air Force’s new Ground

  19. Air & Space Power Journal. Volume 19, Number 3, Fall 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-09-01

    del Conflicto del Atlántico Sur (La Guerra Inaudita II) (Buenos Aires, Argentina: Air War School, August 1997). 5. Ibid., 4. 6. See Comodoro José C...such spokespeople may be a necessity: they benefit from the authority conferred by rank and from deeper familiarity with the planning and...Even military readers familiar with the story will find themselves entertained and educated by this account. 2005-3 Book Reviews.indd 6:59:30 AM114

  20. A Survey of Modern Air Traffic Control. Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-07-01

    oceanic traffic would use combined hyperbolic-inertial navigation systems. System I could be implemented to meet the demanda for air traffic services...but one of great importance if the projected gro~th in air traffic occurs and the current trend in labor osts c ontinue. Satellite-aided systems...control <>fair traffic through increased use of automated facilities, then a less labor intensive syst e m may be feas i ble with attendant long term

  1. Journal of Air Transportation, Volume 12, No. 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, Brent D. (Editor); Kabashkin, Igor (Editor)

    2007-01-01

    Topics discussed include: a) Data Mining Methods Applied to Flight Operations Quality Assurance Data: A Comparison to Standard Statistical Methods; b) Financial Comparisons across Different Business Models in the Canadian Airline Industry; c) Carving a Niche for the "No-Frills" Carrier, Air Arabia, in Oil-Rich Skies; d) Situational Leadership in Air Traffic Control; and e) The Very Light Jet Arrives: Stakeholders and Their Perceptions.

  2. Modulation of the adsorption properties at air-water interfaces of complexes of egg white ovalbumin with pectin by the dielectric constant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kudryashova, E.V.; Jongh, H.H.J.de

    2008-01-01

    The possibility of modulating the mesoscopic properties of food colloidal systems by the dielectric constant is studied by determining the impact of small amounts of ethanol (10%) on the adsorption of egg white ovalbumin onto the air-water interface in the absence and presence of pectin. The

  3. Mexico City Air Quality Research Initiative; Volume 5, Strategic evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-03-01

    Members of the Task HI (Strategic Evaluation) team were responsible for the development of a methodology to evaluate policies designed to alleviate air pollution in Mexico City. This methodology utilizes information from various reports that examined ways to reduce pollutant emissions, results from models that calculate the improvement in air quality due to a reduction in pollutant emissions, and the opinions of experts as to the requirements and trade-offs that are involved in developing a program to address the air pollution problem in Mexico City. The methodology combines these data to produce comparisons between different approaches to improving Mexico City`s air quality. These comparisons take into account not only objective factors such as the air quality improvement or cost of the different approaches, but also subjective factors such as public acceptance or political attractiveness of the different approaches. The end result of the process is a ranking of the different approaches and, more importantly, the process provides insights into the implications of implementing a particular approach or policy.

  4. Dielectric Constant Modelling with Soil–Air Composition and Its Effect on Sar Radar Signal Backscattered over Soil Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrez Zribi

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to present the contribution of a new dielectric constant characterisation for the modelling of radar backscattering behaviour. Our analysis is based on a large number of radar measurements acquired during different experimental campaigns (Orgeval’94, Pays de Caux’98, 99. We propose a dielectric constant model, based on the combination of contributions from both soil and air fractions. This modelling clearly reveals the joint influence of the air and soil phases, in backscattering measurements over rough surfaces with large clods. A relationship is established between the soil fraction and soil roughness, using the Integral Equation Model (IEM, fitted to real radar data. Finally, the influence of the air fraction on the linear relationship between moisture and the backscattered radar signal is discussed.

  5. Journal of Air Transportation; Volume 9, No. 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Brent D. (Editor); Kabashkin, Igor (Editor)

    2004-01-01

    The mission of the Journal of Air Transportation (JAT) is to provide the global community immediate key resource information in all areas of air transportation. The goal of the Journal is to be recognized as the preeminent scholarly journal in the aeronautical aspects of transportation. As an international and interdisciplinary journal, the JAT will provide a forum for peer-reviewed articles in all areas of aviation and space transportation research, policy, theory, case study, practice, and issues. While maintaining a broad scope, a focal point of the journal will be in the area of aviation administration and policy.

  6. Journal of Air Transportation, Volume 10, No. 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Brent (Editor); Unal, Mehmet (Editor); Gudmundsson, Sveinn Vidar (Editor); Kabashkin, Igor (Editor)

    2005-01-01

    Topics discussed include: Mitigation Alternatives for Carbon Dioxide Emissions by the Air Transport Industry in Brazil; Air Transport Regulation Under Transformation: The Case of Switzerland; An Estimation of Aircraft Emissions at Turkish Airports; Guide to the Implementation of Iso 14401 at Airports; The Impact of Constrained Future Scenarios on Aviation and Emissions; The Immediate Financial Impact of Transportation Deregulation on the Stockholders of the Airline Industry; Aviation Related Airport Marketing in an Overlapping Metropolitan Catchment Area: The Case of Milan's Three Airports; and Airport Pricing Systems and Airport Deregulation Effects on Welfare.

  7. Journal of Air Transportation, Volume 10, No. 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Brent D. (Editor); Kabashkin, Igor (Editor); Lucas, Sarah (Editor); Scarpellini-Metz, Nanette (Editor)

    2005-01-01

    The mission of the Journal of Air Transportation (JA is to provide the global community immediate key resource information in all areas of air transportation. The goal of the Journal is to be recognized as the preeminent scholarly journal in the aeronautical aspects of transportation. As an international and interdisciplinary journal, the JAT will provide a forum for peer-reviewed articles in all areas of aviation and space transportation research, policy, theory, case study, practice, and issues. While maintaining a broad scope, a focal point of the journal will be in the area of aviation administration and policy.

  8. Journal of Air Transportation, Volume 11, No. 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Brent (Editor); Kabashkin, Igor (Editor); Fink, Mary (Editor)

    2007-01-01

    The mission of the Journal of Air Transportation (JAT) is to provide the global community immediate key resource information in all areas of air transportation. The goal of the Journal is to be recognized as the preeminent scholarly journal in the aeronautical aspects of transportation. As an international and interdisciplinary journal, the JAT will provide a forum for peer-reviewed articles in all areas of aviation and space transportation research, policy, theory, case study, practice, and issues. While maintaining a broad scope, a focal point of the journal will be in the area of aviation administration and policy

  9. The effects of the forward speed and air volume of an air-assisted sprayer on spray deposition in tendone trained vineyards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Pascuzzi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the results of spray application trials in a tendone trained vineyard in order to evaluate the influence of forward speed and air volume on the foliar deposition of plant protection products (PPPs, maintaining roughly constant the volume applied. The trials used an air-assisted sprayer with a centrifugal fan and 4+4 adjustable fan-shaped diffusers, each with a nozzle-holder group. A full factorial experimental design was implemented, with three forward speeds and two airflow rates, organised with a randomised complete block design including three replicates. In order to consider the influence of canopy development, the tests (one spray application for each replicate of a mixture containing a water-soluble food dye as a tracer were replicated during two phenological stages: i the end of flowering; and ii berry touch. Leaves were picked at random from the canopy after each spray treatment, and foliar PPP deposition was evaluated using a spectrophotometer. This analysis of foliar deposition showed that the airflow rates produced by the fan were unsuitable for the dense canopy typical of this type of vineyard. However, the special shape of the diffusers may make this sprayer effective if the main objective of pesticide applications in tendone trained table grape vineyards is to control bunch diseases.

  10. APEX (Air Pollution Exercise) Volume 21: Legal References: Air Pollution Control Regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC. Office of Manpower Development.

    The Legal References: Air Pollution Control Regulations Manual is the last in a set of 21 manuals (AA 001 009-001 029) used in APEX (Air Pollution Exercise), a computerized college and professional level "real world" game simulation of a community with urban and rural problems, industrial activities, and air pollution difficulties. The manual…

  11. Air Force Civil Engineer, Volume 14, Number 2, 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Energy Program was given the Environmental Protection Agency’s 2006 Climate Protection Award, in acknowledgment of the Air Force’s significant... Climate Protection Partnerships Division; Lt Col Brian Weidmann, Chief, Readiness Installation Support Branch, USAF/A7; and Mr. Michael Aimone, Assistant

  12. Air & Space Power Journal. Volume 18, Number 4, Winter 2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-12-01

    group became entan­ gled in RAF legalities.25 To remedy this defi- AIR LINES 39 ciency and appease bruised egos , Eisenhower formulated plans to...systems, there were potential cliques , but Ike kept that to a minimum. That is one of his greatest contributions.”9 His leadership in­ cluded...perspective gained from healthy relationships to both the leadership and peer group. If we summarize what these prominent re­ search approaches offer

  13. Journal of Air Transportation, Volume 11, No. 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Brent (Editor); Kabashkin, Igor (Editor); Fink, Mary (Editor)

    2006-01-01

    Topics covered include: Analysis of System-wide Investment in the National Airspace System: A Portfolio Analytical Framework and an Example; Regional Air Transport in Europe: The Potential Role of the Civil Tiltrotor in Reducing Airside Congestion; The Development of Jomo Kenyatta International Airport as a Regional Aviation Hub; Corporate Social Responsibility in Aviation; The Competitive Effects of Airline Mergers and Acquisitions: More Capital Market Evidence; and The Competitive Position of Hub Airports in the Transatlantic Market.

  14. Evidence of bias in air-water Henry's law constants for semivolatile organic compounds measured by inert gas stripping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shunthirasingham, Chubashini; Lei, Ying Duan; Wania, Frank

    2007-06-01

    Accurate knowledge of the air-water Henry's law constant (H) is crucial for understanding an organic compound's environmental behavior. The inert gas stripping (IGS) method, widely used to measure H of semivolatile organic compounds (SOCs), may yield erroneously high values for compounds with a high water surface adsorption coefficient, K(IA), because chemical adsorbed to the bubble surface may be transferred to the head space upon bursting at the top of the stripping column. Experiments with alkanols of variable chain length identified a K(IA) threshold of approximately 10(-3) m, above which IGS is susceptible to this artifact. Most SOCs are predicted to have K(IA) values well above that threshold. IGS-determined H-values for chemicals belonging to various groups of SOCs were evaluated by comparison with H-values either calculated from reliable vapor pressure and solubility data or derived from data compilations that achieve thermodynamic consistency through optimized adjustment of measured physical-chemical property data. The investigated deviations were found to be generally consistent with what would be expected from a surface adsorption artifact. Namely, the apparent bias in IGS-determined H-values, if it occurs, (1) is positive, (2) increases with increasing size of an SOC, and (3) increases with decreasing temperature. It generally is also of a magnitude predicted using estimated K(IA) values. However, different studies display different K(IA) threshold values, beyond which the artifact becomes notable, and some studies appear to succeed in avoiding the artifact altogether. Whereas the use of aerosol traps cannot explain the absence of a surface adsorption artifact, it may be related to higher flow rates used by some investigators. For large compounds or those with more than one functional group, the predicted deviation is too large when compared to observations, suggesting that the estimated K(IA) values for those compounds are too high. A full quantitative

  15. Effects of ambient temperature and oxygen concentration on diesel spray combustion using a single-nozzle injector in a constant volume combustion chamber

    KAUST Repository

    Jing, Wei

    2013-09-02

    This work investigates the effects of ambient conditions on diesel spray combustion in an optically accessible, constant volume chamber using a single-nozzle fuel injector. The ambient O2 concentration was varied between five discrete values from 10% to 21% and three different ambient temperatures (800 K, 1000 K, and 1200 K). These conditions simulate different exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) levels and ambient temperatures in diesel engines. Both conventional diesel combustion and low temperature combustion (LTC) modes were observed under these conditions. A transient analysis and a quasi-steady state analysis are employed in this article. The transient analysis focuses on the flame development from beginning to the end, illustrating how the flame structure changes during this process; the quasi-steady state analysis focuses on the stable flame structure. The transient analysis was conducted using high-speed imaging of both OH* chemiluminescence and natural luminosity (NL). In addition, three different images were acquired using an ICCD camera, corresponding to OH* chemiluminescence, narrow-band flame emission at 430 nm (Band A) and at 470 nm (Band B), and were used to investigate the quasi-steady state combustion process. From the transient analysis, it was found that the NL signal becomes stronger and confined to narrow regions when the temperature and O2 concentration increase during the development of flame. The OH* intensity is much lower for the 10% ambient O2 and 800 K conditions compared to the higher temperatures and O2 levels. This implies the occurrence of LTC under these conditions. Results from the quasi-steady combustion stage indicate that high-temperature reactions effectively oxidize the soot in the downstream locations where only OH* signal is observed. In addition, an area was calculated for each spectral region, and results show that the area of Band A and Band B emissions in these images is larger than the area of OH* emissions at the lower O2

  16. Regional volume changes in canine lungs suspended in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbrecht, Peter H.; Kyle, Richard R.; Bryant, Howard J.; Feuerstein, Irwin

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of the absence of a pleural pressure gradient (simulating the presumed condition found in microgravity) upon regional expansion of the lung. We attempted to produce a uniform pressure over the surface of the lung by suspending excised lungs in air. Such studies should help determine whether or not the absence of a pleural pressure gradient leads to uniform ventilation. A preparation in which there is no pleural pressure gradient should also be useful in studying non-gravitational effects on ventilation distribution.

  17. Air & Space Power Journal. Volume 19, Number 1, Spring 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-03-01

    not ritual . Feedback? Why is it critical to success? If you ask your people if they receive feedback and then ask them their perception of...Air Force placed you in command. According to an old saying heard in Texas, “When you go to a dance , you dance with the one that brung you.” As...C4ISR Flight Plan. An examination of the Ground Constel­ lationNet reveals the progress we have made in creating our self- healing , self-forming Global

  18. Journal of Air Transportation, Volume 10, No. 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Brent D. (Editor); Kabashkin, Igor (Editor)

    2005-01-01

    The following topics are discussed: The Effects of Safety Information on Aeronautical Decision Making; Design, Development, and Validation of an Interactive Multimedia Training Simulator for Responding to Air Transportation Bomb Threats; Discovering the Regulatory Considerations of the Federal Aviation Administration: Interviewing the Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee; How to Control Airline Routes from the Supply Side: The Case of TAP; An Attempt to Measure the Traffic Impact of Airline Alliances; and Study Results on Knowledge Requirements for Entry-level Airport Operations and Management Personnel.

  19. Journal of Air Transportation, Volume 11, No. 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Brent (Editor); Kabashkin, Igor (Editor); Gudmundsson, Sveinn Vidar (Editor); EspiritoSanto, Jr. Respicio (Editor)

    2006-01-01

    The following topics were covered: How Do Airlines Perceive That Strategic Alliances Affect Their Individual Branding?; Airline Choice for Domestic Flights in Sao Paulo Metropolitan Area: An Application of the Conditional Logit Model; Consequences of Feeder Delays for the Success of A380 Operations; Inside the Mechanics of Network Development: How Competition and Strategy Reorganize European Air Traffic; The Opportunities and Threats of Turning Airports into Hubs; Another Approach to Enhance Airline Safety: Using System Safety Tools; A Simulation Based Approach for Contingency Planning for Aircraft Turnaround Activities in Airline Hubs; and The Council on Aviation Accreditation: Part One- Historical Foundation.

  20. Quality optimisation of combined osmotic dehydration and microwave assisted air drying of pineapple using constant power emission

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Botha, GE

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Combination of osmotic dehydration with microwave assisted air drying offers increased flexibility for process control and product quality. Osmotic dehydration (55ºBrix solution at 40ºC for 90 minutes) combined with microwave assisted air drying...

  1. Peripheral Jet Air Cushion Landing System Spanloader Aircraft. Volume II

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-12-01

    T11864.8 Wr STRU 33930*8 war SYS 1520440 U STRUCT ti I vb . -jujal wfiMI ’af 󈧡.2 j. 2, j NFRACTIDN ’) 3w/S$TýE e0750 CUS64 S~T 7 7.0 GEAR 󈧭 138.00 VJ fT...90.0 GFAR MT 75.0 u!FT 224700.0 L/A 375*283 4/a .273 HIP 98913iolOMCPi - Fj 4R1.I u1 ’~711-h24. A 8239 WWV WT AIR] =20V776.9 W FIUEL :44261.1 WT TIP

  2. Journal of Air Transportation, Volume 9, No. 2. Volume 9, No. 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Brent (Editor); Kabashkin, Igor (Editor); Gudmundsson, Sveinn Vidar (Editor); Scarpellini, Nanette (Editor)

    2004-01-01

    The following articles from the "Journal of Air Transportation" were processed: Future Requirements and Concepts for Cabins of Blended Wing Body Configurations:A Scenario Approach; Future Scenarios for the European Airline Industry: A Marketing-Based Perspective; An Application of the Methodology for Assessment of the Sustainability of the Air Transport System; Modeling the Effect of Enlarged Seating Room on Passenger Preferences of Domestic Airlines in Taiwan; Developing a Fleet Standardization Index for Airline Pricing; and Future Airport Capacity Utilization in Germany: Peaked Congestion and/or Idle Capacity).

  3. Los Alamos Controlled Air Incinerator for radioactive waste. Volume II. Engineering design reference manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koenig, R.A.; Draper, W.E.; Newmyer, J.M.; Warner, C.L.

    1982-10-01

    This two-volume report is a detailed design and operating documentation of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Controlled Air Incinerator (CAI) and is an aid to technology transfer to other Department of Energy contractor sites and the commercial sector. Volume I describes the CAI process, equipment, and performance, and it recommends modifications based on Los Alamos experience. It provides the necessary information for conceptual design and feasibility studies. Volume II provides descriptive engineering information such as drawings, specifications, calculations, and costs. It aids duplication of the process at other facilities.

  4. 2007 NASA Seal/Secondary Air System Workshop. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinetz, Bruce M.; Hendricks, Robert C.; Delgado, Irebert

    2008-01-01

    The 2007 NASA Seal/Secondary Air System workshop covered the following topics: (i) Overview of NASA's new Orion project aimed at developing a new spacecraft that will fare astronauts to the International Space Station, the Moon, Mars, and beyond; (ii) Overview of NASA's fundamental aeronautics technology project; (iii) Overview of NASA Glenn s seal project aimed at developing advanced seals for NASA's turbomachinery, space, and reentry vehicle needs; (iv) Reviews of NASA prime contractor, vendor, and university advanced sealing concepts, test results, experimental facilities, and numerical predictions; and (v) Reviews of material development programs relevant to advanced seals development. Turbine engine studies have shown that reducing seal leakage as well as high-pressure turbine (HPT) blade tip clearances will reduce fuel burn, lower emissions, retain exhaust gas temperature margin, and increase range. Turbine seal development topics covered include a method for fast-acting HPT blade tip clearance control, noncontacting low-leakage seals, intershaft seals, and a review of engine seal performance requirements for current and future Army engine platforms.

  5. 2005 NASA Seal/Secondary Air System Workshop, Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Editor); Hendricks, Robert C. (Editor)

    2006-01-01

    The 2005 NASA Seal/Secondary Air System workshop covered the following topics: (i) Overview of NASA s new Exploration Initiative program aimed at exploring the Moon, Mars, and beyond; (ii) Overview of the NASA-sponsored Propulsion 21 Project; (iii) Overview of NASA Glenn s seal project aimed at developing advanced seals for NASA s turbomachinery, space, and reentry vehicle needs; (iv) Reviews of NASA prime contractor, vendor, and university advanced sealing concepts including tip clearance control, test results, experimental facilities, and numerical predictions; and (v) Reviews of material development programs relevant to advanced seals development. Turbine engine studies have shown that reducing high-pressure turbine (HPT) blade tip clearances will reduce fuel burn, lower emissions, retain exhaust gas temperature margin, and increase range. Several organizations presented development efforts aimed at developing faster clearance control systems and associated technology to meet future engine needs. The workshop also covered several programs NASA is funding to develop technologies for the Exploration Initiative and advanced reusable space vehicle technologies. NASA plans on developing an advanced docking and berthing system that would permit any vehicle to dock to any on-orbit station or vehicle. Seal technical challenges (including space environments, temperature variation, and seal-on-seal operation) as well as plans to develop the necessary "androgynous" seal technologies were reviewed. Researchers also reviewed tests completed for the shuttle main landing gear door seals.

  6. 2006 NASA Seal/Secondary Air System Workshop; Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinetz, Bruce, M. (Editor); Hendricks, Robert C. (Editor); Delgado, Irebert (Editor)

    2007-01-01

    The 2006 NASA Seal/Secondary Air System workshop covered the following topics: (i) Overview of NASA s new Exploration Initiative program aimed at exploring the Moon, Mars, and beyond; (ii) Overview of NASA s new fundamental aeronautics technology project; (iii) Overview of NASA Glenn Research Center s seal project aimed at developing advanced seals for NASA s turbomachinery, space, and reentry vehicle needs; (iv) Reviews of NASA prime contractor, vendor, and university advanced sealing concepts including tip clearance control, test results, experimental facilities, and numerical predictions; and (v) Reviews of material development programs relevant to advanced seals development. Turbine engine studies have shown that reducing seal leakages as well as high-pressure turbine (HPT) blade tip clearances will reduce fuel burn, lower emissions, retain exhaust gas temperature margin, and increase range. Several organizations presented development efforts aimed at developing faster clearance control systems and associated technology to meet future engine needs. The workshop also covered several programs NASA is funding to develop technologies for the Exploration Initiative and advanced reusable space vehicle technologies. NASA plans on developing an advanced docking and berthing system that would permit any vehicle to dock to any on-orbit station or vehicle. Seal technical challenges (including space environments, temperature variation, and seal-on-seal operation) as well as plans to develop the necessary "androgynous" seal technologies were reviewed. Researchers also reviewed seal technologies employed by the Apollo command module that serve as an excellent basis for seals for NASA s new Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV).

  7. Rancang Bangun dan Studi Eksperimen Alat Penukar Panas untuk Memanfaatkan Energi Refrigerant Keluar Kompresor AC sebagai Pemanas Air pada ST/D=6 dengan Variasi Volume Air

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhmad Fajrin Aminanta

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Sistem pendingin atau refrigerasi merupakan proses pelepasan kalor dari suatu substansi dengan cara penurunan temperatur dan pemindahan panas ke substansi lainnya. Salah satu pemanfaatan panas yang dihasilkan oleh fluida kerja dalam hal ini refrigerant dari sistem pendingin adalah teknologi heat recovery water heater, dimana sebelum panas dibuang ke lingkungan melalui kondensor, refrigeran panas yang keluar dari kompresor dilewatkan melalui water heater untuk diambil panasnya oleh air sebelum masuk ke komponen kondenser. Proses pertama adalah perancangan dimensi water heater. Tahap selanjutnya adalah melakukan simulasi untuk mengetahui karakteristik perpindahan panas pada water. Setelah tahap simulasi selesai, tahap berikutnya adalah tahap eksperimen, dimana penulis akan melakukan tahap eksperimen sistem AC split yang sudah ditambahkan water heater dengan memvariasikan volume air. Dari penelitian ini didapatkan hasil yaitu pengaruh variasi volume air terhadap karakteristik perpindahan panas adalah waktu pemanasan berbanding lurus terhadap besarnya volume water heater, dimana untuk memanaskan air hingga mencapai temperature 45oC pada volume air 75 liter membutuhkan waktu 210 menit, volume 85 liter membutuhkan waktu 240 menit dan volume 100 liter membutuhkan waktu 255 menit. Dan didapatkan kenaikan Coeffecient of Performance (COP dengan penambahan water heater pada sistem refrigerasi pada volume air 75 liter sebesar 4,44, pada volume 85 liter 4,49 dan volume 100 liter 4,54. Kemudian juga didapatkan nilai kerja kompresor pada setiap variasi volume air, dimana pada volume 75 liter kerja kompresor adalah 0,5 kW, volume 85 liter kerja kompresor sebesar 0,494 kW dan volume 100 liter sebesar 0,489 kW.

  8. An initial abstraction and constant loss model, and methods for estimating unit hydrographs, peak streamflows, and flood volumes for urban basins in Missouri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huizinga, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Streamflow data, basin characteristics, and rainfall data from 39 streamflow-gaging stations for urban areas in and adjacent to Missouri were used by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Metropolitan Sewer District of St. Louis to develop an initial abstraction and constant loss model (a time-distributed basin-loss model) and a gamma unit hydrograph (GUH) for urban areas in Missouri. Study-specific methods to determine peak streamflow and flood volume for a given rainfall event also were developed.

  9. 2004 NASA Seal/Secondary Air System Workshop, Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    The 2004 NASA Seal/Secondary Air System workshop covered the following topics: (1) Overview of NASA s new Exploration Initiative program aimed at exploring the Moon, Mars, and beyond; (2) Overview of the NASA-sponsored Ultra-Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) program; (3) Overview of NASA Glenn s seal program aimed at developing advanced seals for NASA s turbomachinery, space, and reentry vehicle needs; (4) Reviews of NASA prime contractor and university advanced sealing concepts including tip clearance control, test results, experimental facilities, and numerical predictions; and (5) Reviews of material development programs relevant to advanced seals development. The NASA UEET overview illustrated for the reader the importance of advanced technologies, including seals, in meeting future turbine engine system efficiency and emission goals. For example, the NASA UEET program goals include an 8- to 15-percent reduction in fuel burn, a 15-percent reduction in CO2, a 70-percent reduction in NOx, CO, and unburned hydrocarbons, and a 30-dB noise reduction relative to program baselines. The workshop also covered several programs NASA is funding to develop technologies for the Exploration Initiative and advanced reusable space vehicle technologies. NASA plans on developing an advanced docking and berthing system that would permit any vehicle to dock to any on-orbit station or vehicle, as part of NASA s new Exploration Initiative. Plans to develop the necessary mechanism and androgynous seal technologies were reviewed. Seal challenges posed by reusable re-entry space vehicles include high-temperature operation, resiliency at temperature to accommodate gap changes during operation, and durability to meet mission requirements.

  10. Journal of Air Transportation, Volume 8, No. 2. Volume 8, No. 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Brent (Editor); Kabashkin, Igor (Editor); Nickerson, Jocelyn (Editor)

    2003-01-01

    The mission of the Journal of Air Transportation (JAT) is to provide the global community immediate key resource information in all areas of air transportation. This journal contains articles on the following:Fuel Consumption Modeling of a Transport Category Aircraft: A FlightOperationsQualityAssurance (F0QA) Analysis;Demand for Air Travel in the United States: Bottom-Up Econometric Estimation and Implications for Forecasts by Origin and Destination Pairs;Blind Flying on the Beam: Aeronautical Communication, Navigation and Surveillance: Its Origins and the Politics of Technology: Part I1 Political Oversight and Promotion;Blind Flying on the Beam: Aeronautical Communication, Navigation and Surveillance: Its Origins and the Politics of Technology: Part 111: Emerging Technologies;Ethics Education in University Aviation Management Programs in the US: Part Two B-Statistical Analysis of Current Practice;Integrating Human Factors into the Human-computer Interface: and How Best to Display Meteorological Information for Critical Aviation Decision-making and Performance.

  11. An investigation of the effect of powder reservoir volume on the consistency of alumina powder flow rates in dental air-abrasion devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Avijit; Uddin, Mohsin; Paolinelis, G; Watson, Timothy F

    2008-03-01

    To investigate the effect of powder reservoir fill volume on the emitted alumina powder flow rate of four dental air-abrasion units. The null hypothesis examined was that powder reservoir fill volume has no effect on alpha-alumina powder flow rate. The spent alumina powder from the four air-abrasion units tested (Abradent, Crystalmark, Clendale, CA, USA; Aquacut, Velopex, Horesham, UK; MicroPrep Associate Lares, Chico, CA, USA; Rondoflex 360, KaVo, Lake Zurich, IL, USA) was gathered in a collecting chamber over a 60s running period. The difference in the weight pre- and post-collection was noted and flow rate calculated for different reservoir fill volumes (100%, 75%, 50% and 25%). The powder flow rate of each machine was significantly affected by a change in powder reservoir volume (pabrasive (70% and 69%, respectively), whereas, smaller differences were seen with the Abradent (59%), Aquacut 29 microm and 53 microm abrasive (62% and 30%) and MicroPrep (35%) machines. It was shown that the fill of the reservoir affects the powder flow rate of air-abrasion units, thus disproving the null hypothesis. In a clinical setting and in future research studies, the powder reservoir should be filled to a set level to achieve a constant and reproducible cutting performance of the tested units.

  12. United States Air Force 611th air support group 611th Civil Engineer Squadron, Elmendorf AFB, Alaska. Eareckson Air Station, Alaska Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study Report, final. Volume 2. Report for July 1994-September 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-30

    The Volume II has been prepared to present the findings of the environmental investigation activities conducted at Eareckson Air Station. The RI/FS report has been divided into four primary volumes. This volume, Volume II, discusses 13 source areas that are recommended to be proposed for no further action.

  13. A comparison of flexural properties of aramid reinforced pultrusions having constant fiber volume and varied matrices, pretreatments, and postcures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Maywood L.; Johnson, Gary S.; Macconochie, Ian O.

    1986-01-01

    Aramid reinforcement composite materials of equal fiber volume having varied polymer thermoset matrices have been pultruded and flexurally tested to failure. The objective was to improve flexural properties of aramid reinforced pultrusions. Pultrusions of both sized and unsized aramid fiber with four different resin systems were compared to determine the effects of sizing compounds and post-thermal treatments on the flexural strength as an indication of fiber wettability and fiber-to-resin interface bonding. Improvements in flexural strength as the result of pretreatments with sizing solutions used in this study were marginal. The most significant improvements in flexural properties were the results of postcuring. Overall improvements ranged from a low 39,647 Psi(273 Mpa) to a high of 80,390 Psi(554 Mpa), or 103 percent. The fact that post-thermal treatments improved the flexural properties of the four pultrusions indicates that a full cure did not occur in either resin system during the pultrusion process. The increased flexural strengths of the polyester and vinyl ester pultrusions were the most surprising. Based on data presented, the most promising resin system of the four examined (VE 8300, Aropol 7430, Epon 9302, and Epon 9310) for Kevlar reinforced pultrusion is Epon 9310 epoxy.

  14. An adaptive maneuvering logic computer program for the simulation of one-on-one air-to-air combat. Volume 1: General description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgin, G. H.; Fogel, L. J.; Phelps, J. P.

    1975-01-01

    A technique for computer simulation of air combat is described. Volume 1 decribes the computer program and its development in general terms. Two versions of the program exist. Both incorporate a logic for selecting and executing air combat maneuvers with performance models of specific fighter aircraft. In the batch processing version the flight paths of two aircraft engaged in interactive aerial combat and controlled by the same logic are computed. The realtime version permits human pilots to fly air-to-air combat against the adaptive maneuvering logic (AML) in Langley Differential Maneuvering Simulator (DMS). Volume 2 consists of a detailed description of the computer programs.

  15. A Simple Sensorless Scheme for Induction Motor Drives Fed by a Matrix Converter Using Constant Air-Gap Flux and PQR Transformation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaabjerg, Frede; Lee, Kyo Beum

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a new and simple method for sensorless operation of matrix converter drives using a constant air-gap flux and the imaginary power flowing to the motor. To improve low-speed sensorless performance, the non-linearities of a matrix converter drive such as commutation delays, turn......-on and turn-off times of switching devices, and on-state switching device voltage drop are modeled using PQR transformation and compensated using a reference current control scheme. The proposed compensation method is applied for high performance induction motor drives using a 3 kW matrix converter system...

  16. Automated Applications in an Advanced Air Traffic Management System : Volume 2B. Functional Analysis of Air Traffic Management (Cont'd.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-08-01

    Volume 2 contains the analysis and description of air traffic management activities at three levels of detail - functions, subfunctions, and tasks. A total of 265 tasks are identified and described, and the flow of information inputs and outputs amon...

  17. Automation Applications in an Advanced Air Traffic Management System : Volume 2C. Functional Analysis of Air Traffic Management (Cont.'d)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-08-01

    Volume 2 contains the analysis and description of air traffic management activities at three levels of detail - functions, subfunctions, and tasks. A total of 265 tasks are identified and described, and the flow of information inputs and outputs amon...

  18. Modulating ventilation - low cost VAV for office buildings. [Variable Air Volume]; Modulerende ventilation - low cost VAV til kontor-bygninger. Slutrapport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoej Christensen, A.; Olsen, Hans; Drivsholm, C.

    2012-02-15

    The report describes a concept for renovating older existing Constant Air Volume (CAV) ventilation systems to modulating low-cost Variable Air Volume (VAV) systems. The concept is based on the total ventilated area being divided into appropriate indoor climate zones, which can cover from one to several offices with similar climate needs. For this initial climate assessment two relatively ''simple'' tools were developed that can estimate the temperature level in one room from the ventilation airflow, heat loads, etc.: - BSimFast (24-hour mean temperature calculation according to SBI-196, 2000); - BSimLight (Temperature simulation based on Danvak Textbook of Heat and Climate Technology). The concept of 'one room' can also be extended to 'one zone' with appropriate assumptions. However, only one mean room temperature is calculated. The different climate zones were equipped with Halton HFB control unit at the air supply and exhaust side. The project the following feedback options were used: - HFB unit's damper opening degree (0 to 90 degrees); - HFB unit's current flow; - HFB unit's exhaust temperature; and feedback from: - Frequency transformer (fan speed); - The central static duct pressure at the ventilation unit. In the project a control algorithm is developed that ensures a robust control of the entire ventilation system without adverse cyclic variations, based among other things on the exhaust temperature for each climate zone, and with the requirement that at least one throttle valve is always at least 80% open. It turned out that information on the current partial air volumes was necessary in addition to the individual throttle settings. Otherwise, a cyclic variations could not be controlled..Thus, it was the exhaust temperature from individual climate zones that defined the respective volumes of air. The concept was implemented on a complete CAV system and on part of a large CAV system, respectively. (LN)

  19. Dynamic measures of regional lung air volume using phase contrast x-ray imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitchen, M J; Lewis, R A; Morgan, M J; Siu, K K W; Habib, A [School of Physics, Monash University, Melbourne VIC 3800 (Australia); Wallace, M J; Siew, M L; Hooper, S B [Department of Physiology, Monash University, Melbourne VIC 3800 (Australia); Fouras, A [Division of Biological Engineering, Monash University, Melbourne VIC 3800 (Australia); Yagi, N; Uesugi, K [SPring-8/JASRI, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan)], E-mail: Marcus.Kitchen@sci.monash.edu.au

    2008-11-07

    Phase contrast x-ray imaging can provide detailed images of lung morphology with sufficient spatial resolution to observe the terminal airways (alveoli). We demonstrate that quantitative functional and anatomical imaging of lung ventilation can be achieved in vivo using two-dimensional phase contrast x-ray images with high contrast and spatial resolution (<100 {mu}m) in near real time. Changes in lung air volume as small as 25 {mu}L were calculated from the images of term and preterm rabbit pup lungs (n = 28) using a single-image phase retrieval algorithm. Comparisons with plethysmography and computed tomography showed that the technique provided an accurate and robust method of measuring total lung air volumes. Furthermore, regional ventilation was measured by partitioning the phase contrast images, which revealed differences in aeration for different ventilation strategies.

  20. Dynamic measures of regional lung air volume using phase contrast x-ray imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitchen, M. J.; Lewis, R. A.; Morgan, M. J.; Wallace, M. J.; Siew, M. L.; Siu, K. K. W.; Habib, A.; Fouras, A.; Yagi, N.; Uesugi, K.; Hooper, S. B.

    2008-11-01

    Phase contrast x-ray imaging can provide detailed images of lung morphology with sufficient spatial resolution to observe the terminal airways (alveoli). We demonstrate that quantitative functional and anatomical imaging of lung ventilation can be achieved in vivo using two-dimensional phase contrast x-ray images with high contrast and spatial resolution (lung air volume as small as 25 µL were calculated from the images of term and preterm rabbit pup lungs (n = 28) using a single-image phase retrieval algorithm. Comparisons with plethysmography and computed tomography showed that the technique provided an accurate and robust method of measuring total lung air volumes. Furthermore, regional ventilation was measured by partitioning the phase contrast images, which revealed differences in aeration for different ventilation strategies.

  1. United States Air Force Summer Faculty Research Program. Program Technical Report. 1990. Volume 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-06-05

    of Jet Fuel: Effects on Vesicular- Arbuscular Mycorrhizae lii Volume IV 145 Mathematical Modeling and Decision-Making Dr. Miguel Medina for Air Force...transfer. Many special features and algorithms of recent advent in the CFD community are also included in the procedure. With an extensive review and...exchange devices. An excellent review of the application of heat pipes in the aerospace field is offered by Chang and llager[l]. Another important advantage

  2. MELSAR: a mesoscale air quality model for complex terrain. Volume 2. Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allwine, K.J.; Whiteman, C.D.

    1985-04-01

    This final report is submitted as part of the Green River Ambient Model Assessment (GRAMA) project conducted at the US Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest Laboratory for the US Environmental Protection Agency. The GRAMA Program has, as its ultimate goal, the development of validated air quality models that can be applied to the complex terrain of the Green River Formation of western Colorado, eastern Utah and southern Wyoming. The Green River Formation is a geologic formation containing large reserves of oil shale, coal, and other natural resources. Development of these resources may lead to a degradation of the air quality of the region. Air quality models are needed immediately for planning and regulatory purposes to assess the magnitude of these regional impacts. This report documents one of the models being developed for this purpose within GRAMA - specifically a model to predict short averaging time (less than or equal to 24 h) pollutant concentrations resulting from the mesoscale transport of pollutant releases from multiple sources. MELSAR has not undergone any rigorous operational testing, sensitivity analyses, or validation studies. Testing and evaluation of the model are needed to gain a measure of confidence in the model's performance. This report consists of two volumes. This volume contains the Appendices, which include listings of the FORTRAN code and Volume 1 contains the model overview, technical description, and user's guide. 13 figs., 10 tabs.

  3. The Conference Proceedings of the 2003 Air Transport Research Society (ATRS) World Conference, Volume 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Brent (Editor); Gudmundsson, Sveinn (Editor); Oum, Tae (Editor)

    2003-01-01

    The UNO Aviation Institute Monograph Series began in 1994 as a key component of the education outreach and information transfer missions of the Aviation Institute and the NASA Nebraska Space Grant & EPSCoR Programs. The series is an outlet for aviation materials to be indexed and disseminated through an efficient medium. Publications are welcome in all aspects of aviation. Publication formats may include, but are not limited to, conference proceedings, bibliographies, research reports, manuals, technical reports, and other documents that should be archived and indexed for future reference by the aviation and world wide communities. The Conference proceedings of the 2003 Air Transport Research Society (ATRS) world conference, volume 5 is presented. The topics include: 1) The Temporal Configuration of Airline Networks in Europe; 2) Determination and Applications of Environmental Costs at Different Sized Airports-Aircraft Noise and Engine Emissions; 3) Cost Effective Measures to Reduce CO2 Emissions in the Air Freight Sector; 4) An Assessment of the Sustainability of Air Transport System: Quantification of Indicators; 5) Regulation, Competition and Network Evolution in Aviation; 6) Regulation in the Air: Price and Frequency Cap; 7) Industry Consolidation and Future Airline Network Structures in Europe; 8) Application of Core Theory to the U.S. Airline Industry; 9) Air Freight Transshipment Route Choice Analysis; 10) A Fuzzy Approach of the Competition on Air Transport Market; and 11) Developing Passenger Demand Models for International Aviation from/to Egypt: A Case Study of Cairo Airport and Egyptair.

  4. Large-volume constant-concentration sampling technique coupling with surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy for rapid on-site gas analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhuomin; Zhan, Yisen; Huang, Yichun; Li, Gongke

    2017-08-05

    In this work, a portable large-volume constant-concentration (LVCC) sampling technique coupling with surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) was developed for the rapid on-site gas analysis based on suitable derivatization methods. LVCC sampling technique mainly consisted of a specially designed sampling cell including the rigid sample container and flexible sampling bag, and an absorption-derivatization module with a portable pump and a gas flowmeter. LVCC sampling technique allowed large, alterable and well-controlled sampling volume, which kept the concentration of gas target in headspace phase constant during the entire sampling process and made the sampling result more representative. Moreover, absorption and derivatization of gas target during LVCC sampling process were efficiently merged in one step using bromine-thiourea and OPA-NH4+ strategy for ethylene and SO2 respectively, which made LVCC sampling technique conveniently adapted to consequent SERS analysis. Finally, a new LVCC sampling-SERS method was developed and successfully applied for rapid analysis of trace ethylene and SO2 from fruits. It was satisfied that trace ethylene and SO2 from real fruit samples could be actually and accurately quantified by this method. The minor concentration fluctuations of ethylene and SO2 during the entire LVCC sampling process were proved to be samples were achieved in range of 95.0-101% and 97.0-104% respectively. It is expected that portable LVCC sampling technique would pave the way for rapid on-site analysis of accurate concentrations of trace gas targets from real samples by SERS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Explosion hazard of hydrogen-air mixtures in the large volumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petukhov, V.A.; Naboko, I.M.; Fortov, V.E. [Joint Institute for High Temperatures of Russian Academy of Sciences, Izhorskaya 13/19, Moscow 127512 (Russian Federation)

    2009-07-15

    The report deals with the investigation of non-stationary combustion of hydrogen-air mixtures extremely relevant to the issues of safety. Considered are the conditions of its formation and development in the tubes, in the conic element and in the spherical 12-m diameter chamber. The report shows that at the formation of non-stationary combustion in the conic element, in its top the pressure can develop exceeding 100 MPa. It is also shown that in large closed volumes non-stationary combustion can develop from a small energy source, in contrast to detonation for its stimulation in large volumes of significant power influences are required. Simultaneously, in the large closed volume a pressure can be formed by far exceeding the Chapman-Jouguet pressure in the front of stationary detonation. (author)

  6. Air-water Henry's law constants for PCB congeners: Experimental determination and modeling of structure-property relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Fu; Chu, Shaogang; Hong, Chia-Swee

    2006-08-01

    A modified gas-purging technique was used for the determination of Henry's law constants (HLCs) for four non-ortho- and eight mono-ortho-substituted polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). The method involves measurement of a compound's concentration in only the water phase while that compound is being stripped isothermally from the solution at a known gas flow rate. HLCs were calculated from the slope of a plot of ln(Cn) versus (1/V)n, where (Sigma 1/V)n = 1/V0 + 1/V1 + ... + 1/V(n-1). The HLCs ranged from 5.6 to 21.8 Pa m3/mol, with an average precision of 13%, and they are comparable to values in the literature. Meta-analysis technique and principal component regression (PCR) were applied to model the relationship between experimentally determined HLC values of 94 PCB congeners and the congeners' structures. Cross-validation yields an optimal model with two principal components. Statistical analysis suggests that HLCs of PCBs are primarily affected by meta-chlorine substitution, a relationship which has never been discussed in the literature. The substitution of chlorines on the biphenyl rings generally leads to smaller HLCs. The predicted HLCs are in good agreement with the experimentally determined values.

  7. Comparison of a Constant Air Volume (CAV) and a Demand Controlled Ventilation (DCV) System in a Residential Building

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Dorthe Kragsig; Nielsen, Toke Rammer; Topp, Claus

    2008-01-01

    hygroscopic properties on indoor climate and energy consumption was investigated for the two systems. Dynamic simulations of the studio apartment were carried out in the program WUFI+ with weather data from Copenhagen including outside temperature end relative humidity. For the non-hygroscopic case...... it was found that the energy consumption for heating and operating the ventilation system could be reduced by respectively 8.0% and 10.6 % in the case of DCV without negative impact on the indoor climate. Including the hygroscopic properties of the materials resulted in a reduction of the energy consumption...

  8. Overestimation of thoracic gas volume during the airway resistance maneuver. A potential error in the diagnosis of air trapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigro, Carlos A; Dibur, Eduardo; Lima, Sandra; Giavedoni, Santiago; Prieto, Ernesto J; Rhodius, Edgardo E

    2005-01-01

    There are no data published about the agreement between the measurement of thoracic gas volume (TGV) during the airway resistance (TGV-Raw) and the conventional technique described by Dubois. The aim of this study was to establish the agreement between both methods to measure TGV. We studied eighty consecutive subjects. Only sixty-six performed acceptable plethysmography maneuvers. The patients were measured with a constant volume plethysmograph (Medical Graphics 1085 DL). TGV was performed in the same patient with two techniques: 1) during the airway resistance (Raw) measurement (TGV-Raw) and 2) during quiet breathing at the end of expiration (TGV). The panting frequency was 1 to 2 Hz with both maneuvers. The differences between both techniques were expressed in percentage (deltaTGV %) and absolute values (deltaTGV). The TGV-Raw of the whole group was higher than TGV (3.69 +/- 1.08 l vs 3.28 +/- 1.05 l, p TGV-Raw than TGV (Normal: 3.44 +/- 0.77 l vs 2.98 +/- 0.72 l , p TGV-Raw and TGV, with discrepancies of up to +0.95 l or +34%. The deltaTGV % was similar between the patients' subgroups and between the subjects with different degree of airflow obstruction (Normal: 16.5 +/- 10%, Obstructive: 10.8 +/- 9.4%, Restrictive: 18 +/- 14.3%, p NS; mild obstruction: 10.7 +/- 11%, moderate obstruction: 12.3 +/- 5.7, severe obstruction: 10.1+/- 6.6, p NS). In conclusion, TGV-Raw was larger than TGV. This was because the patients generally panted at a volume above FRC when performing the TGV-Raw maneuver. TGV-Raw should not be used to estimate FRC because FRC would be overestimated and the diagnosis of air trapping may be erroneous.

  9. Development of an Inline Dry Power Inhaler That Requires Low Air Volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farkas, Dale; Hindle, Michael; Longest, P Worth

    2017-12-20

    Inline dry powder inhalers (DPIs) are actuated by an external air source and have distinct advantages for delivering aerosols to infants and children, and to individuals with compromised lung function or who require ventilator support. However, current inline DPIs either perform poorly, are difficult to operate, and/or require large volumes (∼1 L) of air. The objective of this study was to develop and characterize a new inline DPI for aerosolizing spray-dried formulations with powder masses of 10 mg and higher using a dispersion air volume of 10 mL per actuation that is easy to load (capsule-based) and operate. Primary features of the new low air volume (LV) DPIs are fixed hollow capillaries that both pierce the capsule and provide a continuous flow path for air and aerosol passing through the device. Two different configurations were evaluated, which were a straight-through (ST) device, with the inlet and outlet capillaries on opposite ends of the capsule, and a single-sided (SS) device, with both the inlet and outlet capillaries on the same side of the capsule. The devices were operated with five actuations of a 10 mL air syringe using an albuterol sulfate (AS) excipient-enhanced growth (EEG) formulation. Device emptying and aerosol characteristics were evaluated for multiple device outlet configurations. Each device had specific advantages. The best case ST device produced the smallest aerosol [mean mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) = 1.57 μm; fine particle fraction MMAD = 2.13 μm; FPF <5μm  = 89.3%) that was marginally higher than the initial deaggregation target. The new LV-DPIs produced an acceptable high-quality aerosol with only 10 mL of dispersion air per actuation and were easy to load and operate. This performance should enable application in high and low flow mechanical ventilation systems and high efficiency lung delivery to both infants and children.

  10. Preliminary study of the primary nozzle position of a supersonic air ejector with a constant-area mixing chamber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kracik Jan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This work aims at investigating the primary nozzle position in a proposed supersonic air ejector device. The ejector is primarily made up of a supersonic primary nozzle, which is located in the axis of the ejector, a suction chamber or secondary stream inlet, a mixing chamber and a diffuser. The ejector design allows to translate the primary nozzle in the axis direction and fix it in a chosen distance from the beginning of the mixing chamber and hence influence the secondary mass flow rate. In a limit case, it is possible to set the nozzle to such a position where no secondary flow occurs. If we ignore the case where no secondary flow occurs, five different nozzle distances have been investigated in this paper. Some cases seem to be alike and there are no significant dissimilarities between them. Courses of relative back-pressure ratio are carried out against the entrainment ratio and transition between on-design and off-design regimes is determined. Measurements of the mixed flow based on the standard ISO 5167 are performed by means of orifice plate method. In addition, a comparison between experiments and simulations performed by Ansys Fluent software is presented in order to indicate further improvements to the numerical model.

  11. Concept for a Satellite-Based Advanced Air Traffic Management System : Volume 4. Operational Description and Qualitative Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-02-01

    The volume presents a description of how the Satellite-Based Advanced Air Traffic Management System (SAATMS) operates and a qualitative assessment of the system. The operational description includes the services, functions, and tasks performed by the...

  12. Desorption of Herbicides from Atmospheric Particulates During High-Volume Air Sampling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwight V. Quiring

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Pesticides can be present in the atmosphere either as vapours and/or in association with suspended particles. High-volume air sampling, in which air is aspirated first through a glass fibre filter to capture pesticides associated with atmospheric particulates and then polyurethane foam (PUF, often in combination with an adsorbent resin such as XAD-2, to capture pesticides present as vapours, is generally employed during atmospheric monitoring for pesticides. However, the particulate fraction may be underestimated because some pesticides may be stripped or desorbed from captured particulates due to the pressure drop created by the high flow of air through the filter. This possibility was investigated with ten herbicide active ingredients commonly used on the Canadian prairies (dimethylamine salts of 2,4-D, MCPA and dicamba, 2,4-D 2-ethylhexyl ester, bromoxynil octanoate, diclofop methyl ester, fenoxaprop ethyl ester, trifluralin, triallate and ethalfluralin and seven hydrolysis products (2,4-D, MCPA, dicamba, bromoxynil, diclofop, clopyralid and mecoprop. Finely ground heavy clay soil fortified with active ingredients/hydrolysis products was evenly distributed on the glass fibre filters of high-volume air samplers and air aspirated through the samplers at a flow rate of 12.5 m3/h for a 7-day period. The proportion desorbed as vapour from the fortified soil was determined by analysis of the PUF/XAD-2 resin composite cartridges. The extent of desorption from the fortified soil applied to the filters varied from 0% for each of the dimethylamine salts of 2,4-D, MCPA and dicamba to approximately 50% for trifluralin, triallate and ethalfluralin.

  13. Proceedings of the 21st DOE/NRC nuclear air cleaning conference; Volume 2, Sessions 9--16

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    First, M.W. [ed.] [Harvard Univ., Boston, MA (United States). Harvard Air Cleaning Lab.

    1991-02-01

    The 21st meeting of the Department of Energy/Nuclear Regulatory Commission (DOE/NRC) Nuclear Air Cleaning Conference was held in San Diego, CA on August 13--16, 1990. The proceedings have been published as a two volume set. Volume 2 contains sessions covering adsorbents, nuclear codes and standards, modelling, filters, safety, containment venting and a review of nuclear air cleaning programs around the world. Also included is the list of attendees and an index of authors and speakers. (MHB)

  14. Robins Air Force Base Integrated Resource Assessment. Volume 2, Baseline Detail

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, J.M.; Sullivan, G.P.; Wahlstrom, R.R.; Larson, L.L.

    1993-08-01

    This report documents the assessment of baseline energy use at Robins Air Force Base (AFB), a US Air Force Materiel Command facility located near Macon, Georgia. This is a companion report to Volume 1, Executive Summary, and Volume 3, Integrated Resource Assessment. The US Air Force Materiel Command (AFMC) has tasked the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), supported by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Robins AFB. This is part of a model program that PNL is designing to support energy-use decisions in the federal sector. This program (1) identifies and evaluates all cost-effective energy projects; (2) develops a schedule at each installation for project acquisition considering project type, size, timing, and capital requirements, as well as energy and dollar savings; and (3) targets 100% of the financing required to implement energy efficiency projects. PNL applied this model program to Robins AFB. The analysis examines the characteristics of electric, natural gas, oil, propane, and wood chip use for fiscal year 1991. The results include energy-use intensities for the facilities at Robins AFB by building type, fuel type, and energy end use. A complete energy consumption reconciliation is presented that accounts for the distribution of all major energy uses and losses among buildings, utilities, and central systems.

  15. Exposure to Severe Urban Air Pollution Influences Cognitive Outcomes, Brain Volume and Systemic Inflammation in Clinically Healthy Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderon-Garciduenas, Lilian; Engle, Randall; Mora-Tiscareno, Antonieta; Styner, Martin; Gomez-Garza, Gilberto; Zhu, Hongtu; Jewells, Valerie; Torres-Jardon, Ricardo; Romero, Lina; Monroy-Acosta, Maria E.; Bryant, Christopher; Gonzalez-Gonzalez, Luis Oscar; Medina-Cortina, Humberto; D'Angiulli, Amedeo

    2011-01-01

    Exposure to severe air pollution produces neuroinflammation and structural brain alterations in children. We tested whether patterns of brain growth, cognitive deficits and white matter hyperintensities (WMH) are associated with exposures to severe air pollution. Baseline and 1 year follow-up measurements of global and regional brain MRI volumes,…

  16. Henry's law constant of hydrocarbons in air-water system: the cavity ovality effect on the non-electrostatic contribution term of solvation free energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modarresi, H; Modarress, H; Dearden, J C

    2005-10-01

    In this study, a quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) model for the prediction of Henry's law constants of aliphatic hydrocarbons in air-water system has been developed, based on a data-set of 189 compounds. The well-known linear thermodynamic relation between the logarithm of Henry's law constant and solvation free energy has been used for developing the model. It is emphasised that the solvent-accessible surface area (SASA) descriptor is not adequate for predicting the solvation free energy of a wide range of aliphatic hydrocarbons; there are many compounds that have the same solvent-accessible surface area with different solvation free energy. Therefore, we have introduced cavity ovality as a good descriptor of molecular cavity shape factor. The root mean square error (RMSE) of the QSPR regression model based on SASA improves from 0.40 to 0.22 by introducing the cavity ovality descriptor. The QSPR linear ovality model has good statistical parameters (r(2) = 0.90). To emphasise the significant effect of the new descriptor, a non-linear neural network model with only two nodes in the hidden layer was developed, and also yielded a RMSE of 0.22.

  17. The Conference Proceedings of the 1998 Air Transport Research Group (ATRG) of the WCTR Society. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oum, Tae Hoon (Editor); Bowen, Brent D. (Editor)

    1998-01-01

    This report (Volume 1) is comprised of 5 sessions of the Air Transport Research Group (ATRG) Conference held in Antwerp, Belgium, July 1998. The sessions contain 3-4 papers (presentations) each. The session numbers and their respective headings are: (1) Airline alliances; (2) Airline Competition and Market Structure; (4) Liberalization, Open Skies, and Policy Issues; (5) Yield Management and Other Models; and (11) Air Traffic Control (ATC) and Air Navigational Systems (ANS).

  18. Mexico City air quality research initiative. Volume IV. Characterization and measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mauzy, A. [ed.

    1994-04-01

    This volume describes the methods and the data gathered in an attempt to measure and characterize the meteorological factors and the concentration of different pollutants in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area. The main objective of this document was to provide input for the simulation models and to obtain information that could be used to test and improve the models` performance. Four field campaigns were conducted, as well as routine monitoring, in order to obtain a database of atmospheric dynamics and air pollution characteristics. Sections include Airborne measurements, Remote sensing measurements, and Traditional (in situ) measurements.

  19. Rancang Bangun dan Studi Eksperimen Alat Penukar Panas untuk Memanfaatkan Energi Referigerant Keluar Kompresor AC sebagai Pemanas Air pada ST/D=4 dengan Variasi Volume Air

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binar Kusumah Bagja

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Sistem referigerasi memiliki energi yang besar dalam melepaskan kalor. Kalor akibat kompresi pada kompresor bisa dimanfaatkan misalnya untuk pemanasan air. Pemanfaatan kalor tersebut dilakukan dengan cara menambahkan water heater sebelum aliran fluida referigeran masuk ke kondensor. Water heater tersebut dalam keadaan tercelup di dalam sebuah tangki berisi air untuk melepas kalor terhadap air. Perancangan water heater dilakukan dengan mencari panjang tube (L, diameter tube (D, dan jarak antar tube. Water Heater ini diletakkan setelah komponen kompressor pada sistem AC. Proses awal untuk mencari rancangan water heater adalah dengan mencari temperatur keluaran kompresor dimana untuk mencari potensi panas yang akan dimanfaatkan untuk memanaskan air. Setelah mencari potensi panas yang dihasilkan dari energi keluaran kompresor adalah mencari kapasitas kalor yang akan diberikan water heater terhadap air dan kemudian selanjutnya mencari perpindahan panas yang terjadi pada proses pemanasan air tersebut yang kemudian dilakukan perhitungan untuk mencari panjang tube (L dan penentuan jarak ST/D pada tube. Setelah diperoleh geometri water heater, langkah selanjutnya adalah melakukan simulasi numerik dengan menggunakan perangkat lunak FLUENT 6.3.2 untuk mengetahui karaketeristik perpindahan panas yang terjadi di dalam proses pemanasan air dengan jarak ST/D yang telah ditentukan sebelumnya. Langkah selanjutnya melakukan eksperimen. Eksperimen dilakukan dengan memvariasikan volume air dalam tangki yaitu sebesar 75 liter; 85 liter; dan 100 liter. Hasil simulasi numerik diperoleh bahwa pola aliran kecepatan dengan nilai tertinggi berada pada daerah sekitaran tube inlet dikarenakan temperatur yang paling tinggi dibandingkan tube lainnya sehingga menimbulkan perbedaan temperatur dan juga densitas pada sekitaran tube inlet. Hasil eksperimen diperoleh bahwa volume air yang besar yaitu sebesar 100 liter memiliki Coefficient of Performance (COP tertinggi yaitu sebesar

  20. Assessment of gas compression and lung volume during air stacking maneuver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarmento, A; Resqueti, V R; Fregonezi, G A F; Aliverti, A

    2017-01-01

    We reasoned that the application of positive pressure through air stacking (AS) technique could cause gas compression and the absolute lung volumes could be estimated. The aim of this study was to estimate the amount of gas compression (ΔV comp) during AS in healthy subjects positioned at 45° trunk inclination and verify if the simultaneous measurements of chest wall volume changes (ΔV CW), by optoelectronic plethysmography, and changes in lung volume (ΔV ao), by pneumotachograph, combined with pressure variation at the airways opening (ΔP ao) during AS are able to provide reliable data on absolute lung volumes. Twenty healthy subjects (mean age 23.5 ± 3.8 years) were studied during a protocol that included slow vital capacity and AS maneuvers. V comp was calculated by subtracting ΔV ao and ΔV CW occurring during AS and total lung capacity (TLC) was estimated by applying Boyle-Mariote's law using V comp and ΔP ao. During AS, 0.140 ± 0.050 L of gas was compressed with an average ΔP ao of 21.78 ± 6.18 cmH2O. No significant differences between the estimated TLC (-0.03 ± 3.0% difference, p = 0.6020), estimated FRC (-2.0 ± 12.4% difference, p = 0.5172), measured IC (1.2 ± 11.2% difference, p = 0.7627) and predicted values were found. During AS, a significant gas compression occurs and absolute lung volumes can be estimated by simultaneous measurements of ΔV CW, ΔV ao and ΔP ao.

  1. Coupling model of aerobic waste degradation considering temperature, initial moisture content and air injection volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jun; Liu, Lei; Ge, Sai; Xue, Qiang; Li, Jiangshan; Wan, Yong; Hui, Xinminnan

    2018-02-01

    A quantitative description of aerobic waste degradation is important in evaluating landfill waste stability and economic management. This research aimed to develop a coupling model to predict the degree of aerobic waste degradation. On the basis of the first-order kinetic equation and the law of conservation of mass, we first developed the coupling model of aerobic waste degradation that considered temperature, initial moisture content and air injection volume to simulate and predict the chemical oxygen demand in the leachate. Three different laboratory experiments on aerobic waste degradation were simulated to test the model applicability. Parameter sensitivity analyses were conducted to evaluate the reliability of parameters. The coupling model can simulate aerobic waste degradation, and the obtained simulation agreed with the corresponding results of the experiment. Comparison of the experiment and simulation demonstrated that the coupling model is a new approach to predict aerobic waste degradation and can be considered as the basis for selecting the economic air injection volume and appropriate management in the future.

  2. Patrick Air Force Base integrated resource assessment. Volume 2, Baseline detail

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wahlstrom, R.R.; King, D.A.; Parker, S.A.; Sandusky, W.F.

    1993-08-01

    The US Air Force has tasked the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), in support of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), to assess energy use at Patrick Air Force Base (AFB). The information obtained from this assessment will be used in identifying energy resource opportunities to reduce overall energy consumption on the base. The primary focus of this report is to assess the current baseline energy consumption at Patrick AFB. It is a comparison report to Volume 1, the Executive Summary, and Volume 3, the Resource Assessment. This assessment requires that information be obtained and characterized for buildings, utilities, energy sources, energy uses, and load profile information to be used to improve the characterization of energy use on the base. The characteristics of electricity, natural gas, and No. 2 fuel oil are analyzed for on-base facilities and housing. The assessment examines basic regional information used to determine energy-use intensity (EUI) values for Patrick AFB facilities by building, fuel type, and energy end use. It also provides a summary of electricity consumption from Florida Power and Light Company (FPL) metered data for 1985-1991. Load profile information obtained from FPL data is presented for the north and south substations for the four seasons of the year, including weekdays and weekends.

  3. Robins Air Force Base integrated resource assessment. Volume 3, Resource assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, G.P.; Keller, J.M.; Stucky, D.J.; Wahlstrom, R.R.; Larson, L.L.

    1993-10-01

    The US Air Force Materiel Command (AFMC) has tasked the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), supported by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Robins Air Force Base (AFB). This is part of a model program that PNL is designing to support energy-use decisions in the federal sector. This report provides the results of the fossil fuel and electric energy resource opportunity (ERO) assessments performed by PNL at the AFMC Robins AFB facility located approximately 15 miles south of Macon, Georgia. It is a companion report to Volume 1, Executive Summary, and Volume 2, Baseline Detail. The results of the analyses of EROs are presented in 13 common energy end-use categories (e.g., boilers and furnaces, service hot water, and building lighting). A narrative-description of each ERO is provided, including information on the installed cost, energy and dollar savings; impacts on operation and maintenance (O&M); and, when applicable, a discussion of energy supply and demand, energy security, and environmental issues. A description of the evaluation methodologies and technical and cost assumptions is also provided for each ERO. Summary tables present the cost-effectiveness of energy end-use equipment before and after the implementation of each ERO and present the results of the life-cycle cost (LCC) analysis indicating the net present value (NPV) and savings to investment ratio (SIR) of each ERO.

  4. Effects of Air Stacking Maneuver on Cough Peak Flow and Chest Wall Compartmental Volumes of Subjects With Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarmento, Antonio; Resqueti, Vanessa; Dourado-Júnior, Mario; Saturnino, Lailane; Aliverti, Andrea; Fregonezi, Guilherme; de Andrade, Armele Dornelas

    2017-11-01

    To assess the acute effects of air stacking on cough peak flow (CPF) and chest wall compartmental volumes of persons with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) versus healthy subjects positioned at 45° body inclination. Cross-sectional study with a matched-pair design. University hospital. Persons (N=24) with ALS (n=12) and age-matched healthy subjects (n=12). CPF, chest wall compartmental inspiratory capacity, chest wall vital capacity, chest wall tidal volume and operational volumes, breathing pattern, and percentage of contribution of the compartments to the inspired volume were measured by optoelectronic plethysmography. Compared with healthy subjects, significantly lower CPF (P=.007), chest wall compartmental inspiratory capacity (P<.001), chest wall vital capacity (P<.001), and chest wall tidal volume (P<.001) were found in subjects with ALS. Immediately after air stacking, CPF (P<.001) and chest wall compartmental inspiratory capacity (P<.001) significantly increased in both groups, with values returning to basal only in healthy subjects. After air stacking, the abdominal compartment (P=.004) was determined to be responsible for the inspired volume in subjects with ALS. Significantly higher chest wall vital capacity (P=.05) was observed in subjects with ALS 5 minutes after air stacking, with the rib cage compartment (P=.049) being responsible for volume change. No differences were found in chest wall vital capacity and compartmental volumes of healthy subjects. Chest wall tidal volume (P<.001) significantly increased during the protocol in the healthy subjects, mainly because of end-inspiratory (P<.001) and abdominal volumes (P=.008). No significant differences were observed in percentage of contribution of the compartments to the inspired volume and end-expiratory volume of both groups. No significant differences were found in chest wall tidal volume, operational volume, and breathing pattern in persons with ALS. Air stacking is effective in increasing CPF

  5. Comparison of soot formation for diesel and jet-a in a constant volume combustion chamber using two-color pyrometry

    KAUST Repository

    Jing, Wei

    2014-04-01

    The measurement of the two-color line of sight soot and KL factor for NO.2 diesel and jet-A fuels was conducted in an optical constant volume combustion chamber by using a high speed camera under 1000 K ambient temperature and varied oxygen concentration conditions. The ambient conditions were set as follows: four oxygen cases including 10%, 15%, 18% and 21% at 1000 K ambient temperature. KL factor and soot temperature were determined based on the two-color pyrometry technique using two band-pass filters with wavelengths of 650 nm and 550 nm. The results show that low soot temperature is observed in the upstream inner flame along the centerline, which is surrounded by high soot temperature regions, and a high KL factor is found in the same region with a low soot temperature. The results under different times suggest that soot temperature is higher for high O2 conditions during the entire flame development; meanwhile, both integrated KL factor and soot area decrease with the increase of O2 concentration. The two fuels share a similar trend of soot temperature and KL factor, however, diesel flame has a higher soot temperature and a larger high soot temperature area compared to jet-A flame. On the other hand, diesel flame shows a lower soot level during the quasi-steady state with a higher total soot level at the end of the combustion under low O2 conditions. A lower O2 concentration range from 10% to 15% is expected to have the possibility to achieve a simultaneous reduction of soot and NOx in sooting flames under the 1000 K ambient temperature condition. Copyright © 2014 SAE International.

  6. United States Air Force 611th air support group 611th Civil Engineer Squadron, Elmendorf AFB, Alaska. Eareckson Air Station, Alaska. Remedial investigation/feasibility study report, final. Volume 1. Report for July 1994-September 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-25

    The Report, has been prepared to present the findings of the environmental investigation activities conducted at Eareckson Air Station. The RI/FS report has been divided into four primary volumes. This volume, Volume I, provides general information about environmental activities conducted at Eareckson AS to date (Section 1.0), summarizes 1993 and 1994 investigation activities (Section 2.0), outlines the decision process (Section 3.0), and presents basewide findings (Section 4.0).

  7. Concept for a Satellite-Based Advanced Air Traffic Management System : Volume 8. Operational Logic Flow Diagrams for a Generic Advanced Air Traffic Management system

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-02-01

    The volume presents a description of the services a generic Advanced Air Traffic Management System (AATMS) should provide to the useres of the system to facilitate the safe, efficient flow of traffic. It provides a definition of the functions which t...

  8. MATHEMATICAL CONSTANTS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, H.P.; Potter, Elinor

    1971-03-01

    This collection of mathematical data consists of two tables of decimal constants arranged according to size rather than function, a third table of integers from 1 to 1000, giving some of their properties, and a fourth table listing some infinite series arranged according to increasing size of the coefficients of the terms. The decimal values of Tables I and II are given to 20 D.

  9. Vapour pressures, aqueous solubility, Henry's law constants and air/water partition coefficients of 1,8-dichlorooctane and 1,8-dibromooctane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarraute, Sabine; Mokbel, Ilham; Costa Gomes, Margarida F; Majer, Vladimir; Delepine, Hervé; Jose, Jacques

    2006-09-01

    New data on the vapour pressures and aqueous solubility of 1,8-dichlorooctane and 1,8-dibromooctane are reported as a function of temperature between 20 degrees C and 80 degrees C and 1 degrees C and 40 degrees C, respectively. For the vapour pressures, a static method was used during the measurements which have an estimated uncertainty between 3% and 5%. The aqueous solubilities were determined using a dynamic saturation column method and the values are accurate to within +/-10%. 1,8-Dichlorooctane is more volatile than 1,8-dibromooctane in the temperature range covered (p(sat) varies from 3 to 250 Pa and from 0.53 to 62 Pa, respectively) and is also approximately three times more soluble in water (mole fraction solubilities at 25 degrees C of 5.95 x 10(-7) and 1.92 x 10(-7), respectively). A combination of the two sets of data allowed the calculation of the Henry's law constants and the air water partition coefficients. A simple group contribution concept was used to rationalize the data obtained.

  10. Demand modelling of passenger air travel: An analysis and extension, volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, I. D.

    1978-01-01

    Previous intercity travel demand models in terms of their ability to predict air travel in a useful way and the need for disaggregation in the approach to demand modelling are evaluated. The viability of incorporating non-conventional factors (i.e. non-econometric, such as time and cost) in travel demand forecasting models are determined. The investigation of existing models is carried out in order to provide insight into their strong points and shortcomings. The model is characterized as a market segmentation model. This is a consequence of the strengths of disaggregation and its natural evolution to a usable aggregate formulation. The need for this approach both pedagogically and mathematically is discussed. In addition this volume contains two appendices which should prove useful to the non-specialist in the area.

  11. Numerical modeling of turbulence mixed convection heat transfer in air filled enclosures by finite volume method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Safaei

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, first the turbulent natural convection and then laminar mixed convection of air flow was solved in a room and the calculated outcomes are compared with results of other scientists and after showing validation of calculations, aforementioned flow is solved as a turbulent mixed convection flow, using the valid turbulence models Standard k-ε, RNG k-ε and RSM. To solve governing differential equations for this flow, finite volume method was used. This method is a specific case of residual weighting method. The results show that at high Richardson Numbers, the flow is rather stationary at the center of the enclosure. Moreover, it is distinguished that when Richardson Number increases the maximum of local Nusselt decreases. Therefore, it can be said that less number of Richardson Number, more rate of heat transfer.

  12. Cape Canaveral Air Force Station integrated resource assessment. Volume 3, Resource assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandusky, W.F.; Eichman, C.J.; King, D.A.; McMordie, K.L.; Parker, S.A.; Shankle, S.A.; Wahlstrom, R.R.

    1994-03-01

    The U.S. Air Force (USAF) has tasked the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (AFS). Projects considered can be either in the form of energy management or energy conservation. The overall efforts of this task are based on a model program PNL is designing to support energy-use decisions in the federal sector. This report provides the results of the fossil fuel and electric energy resource opportunity (ERO) assessments performed by PNL at Cape Canaveral AFS, which is located approximately 10 miles north of Cocoa Beach, Florida. It is a companion report to Volume 1: Executive Summary and Volume 2: Baseline Detail. The results of the analyses of EROs are presented in 11 common energy end-use categories (e.g., boilers and furnaces, service hot water, and building lighting). A narrative description of each ERO is provided, including information on the installed cost, energy and dollar savings, impacts on operations and maintenance (O&M), and, when applicable, a discussion of energy supply and demand, energy security, and environmental issues. Descriptions of the evaluation methodologies and technical and cost assumptions are also provided for each ERO. Summary tables present the cost- effectiveness of energy end-use equipment before and after the implementation of each ERO and present the results of the life-cycle cost (LCC) analysis, indicating the net present value (NPV) and savings-to-investment ratio (SIR) of each ERO.

  13. Vandenberg Air Force Base integrated resource assessment. Volume 3, Resource assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daellenbach, K.K.; Dagle, J.E.; Dittmer, A.L.; Elliott, D.B.; Halverson, M.A.; Hickman, B.J.; Parker, G.B.; Richman, E.E.; Shankle, S.A.

    1993-06-01

    The US Air Force Space Command (SPACECOM) has tasked the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), as the lead laboratory supporting the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB). This is part of a model program that PNL is designing to support energy-use decisions in the federal sector. This report provides the results of the fossil fuel and electric energy resource opportunity (ERO) assessments performed by PNL at the SPACECOM VAFB facility located approximately 50 miles northwest of Santa Barbara, California. It is a companion report to Volume 1, Executive Summary, and Volume 2, Baseline Detail. The results of the analysis of EROs are presented in ten common energy end-use categories (e.g., boilers and furnaces, service hot water, and building lighting). In addition, a case study of process loads at Space Launch Complex-4 (SLC-4) is included. A narrative description of each ERO is provided, including information on the installed cost, energy and dollar savings; impacts on operation and maintenance (O and M); and, when applicable, a discussion of energy supply and demand, energy security, and environmental issues. A description of the evaluation methodologies and technical and cost assumptions is also provided for each ERO. Summary tables present the cost-effectiveness of energy end-use equipment before and after the implementation of each ERO and present the results of the life-cycle cost (LCC) analysis indicating the net present value (NPV) and value index (VI) of each ERO. Finally, an appendix includes a summary of an economic analysis case study of the South Vandenberg Power Plant (SVPP) operating scenarios.

  14. Determination of regional lung air volume distribution at mid-tidal breathing from computed tomography: a retrospective study of normal variability and reproducibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, John; Conway, Joy; Majoral, Caroline; Bennett, Michael; Caillibotte, Georges; Montesantos, Spyridon; Katz, Ira

    2014-07-25

    Determination of regional lung air volume has several clinical applications. This study investigates the use of mid-tidal breathing CT scans to provide regional lung volume data. Low resolution CT scans of the thorax were obtained during tidal breathing in 11 healthy control male subjects, each on two separate occasions. A 3D map of air volume was derived, and total lung volume calculated. The regional distribution of air volume from centre to periphery of the lung was analysed using a radial transform and also using one dimensional profiles in three orthogonal directions. The total air volumes for the right and left lungs were 1035 +/- 280 ml and 864 +/- 315 ml, respectively (mean and SD). The corresponding fractional air volume concentrations (FAVC) were 0.680 +/- 0.044 and 0.658 +/- 0.062. All differences between the right and left lung were highly significant (p lung air volumes and FAVC were 6.5% and 6.9% and 2.5% and 3.6%, respectively. FAVC correlated significantly with lung space volume (r = 0.78) (p lung. Central to peripheral ratios were significantly higher for the right (0.100 +/- 0.007 SD) than the left (0.089 +/- 0.013 SD) (p volume in the lung at mid-tidal breathing is described. Mean values and reproducibility are described for healthy male control subjects. Fractional air volume concentration is shown to increase with lung size.

  15. Reproducibility of the Helium-3 Constant-Volume Gas Thermometry and New Data Down to 1.9 K at NMIJ/AIST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Tohru; Shimazaki, Takeshi; Tamura, Osamu

    2017-07-01

    This study confirms reproducibility of the International Temperature Scale of 1990 (ITS-90) realized by interpolation using the constant-volume gas thermometer (CVGT) of National Metrology Institute of Japan (NMIJ)/AIST with 3He as the working gas from 3 K to 24.5561 K by comparing the newly obtained results and those of earlier reports, indicating that the CVGT has retained its capability after renovation undertaken since strong earthquakes struck Japan. The thermodynamic temperature T is also obtained using the single-isotherm fit to four working gas densities (127 mol\\cdot m^{-3}, 145 mol\\cdot m^{-3}, 171 mol\\cdot m^{-3} and 278 mol\\cdot m^{-3}) down to 1.9 K, using the triple point temperature of Ne as a reference temperature. In this study, only the second virial coefficient is taken into account for the single-isotherm fit. Differences between T and the ITS-90 temperature, T-T_{90}, reported in earlier works down to 3 K were confirmed in this study. At the temperatures below 3 K down to 2.5 K, T-T_{90} is much smaller than the standard combined uncertainty of thermodynamic temperature measurement. However, T- T_{90} seems to increase with decreasing temperature below 2.5 K down to 1.9 K, although still within the standard combined uncertainty of thermodynamic temperature measurement. In this study, T is obtained also from the CVGT with a single gas density of 278 mol\\cdot m^{-3} using the triple-point temperature of Ne as a reference temperature by making correction for the deviation from the ideal gas using theoretical values of the second and third virial coefficients down to 2.6 K, which is the lowest temperature of the theoretical values of the third virial coefficient. T values obtained using this method agree well with those obtained from the single-isotherm fit. We also found that the second virial coefficient obtained by the single-isotherm fit to experimental results agrees well with that obtained by the single-isotherm fit to the theoretically

  16. Rancang Bangun dan Studi Eksperimen Alat Penukar Panas untuk Memanfaatkan Energi Refrigerant Keluar Kompresor AC sebagai Pemanas Air pada ST/D=8 dengan Variasi Volume Air

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fajri Chairbowo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstrak­- Kebutuhan masyarakat terhadap air hangat semakin meningkat. Hal itu disebabkan air hangat mempunyai berbagai manfaat. Air hangat efektif dalam melarutkan lemak ataupun sabun, serta air hangat dapat melancarkan peredaran darah manusia ketika digunakan. Demi efisiensi dalam penggunaan energi, penelitian yang dilakukan tentang pemanfaatan panas buang dari sistem refrigerasi.. Sebelum panas dibuang ke lingkungan, water heater ditambahkan oleh penulis ke sistem refrigerasi yang peletakkannya sesudah proses kompresi. Dimana water heater akan mengambil kalor dari refrigeran pemanas yang melintas sesudah dari kompresor. Sistem refrigerasi yang digunakan mempunyai daya  1 HP (746 Watt. Dalam penelitian ini sudah ditetapkan diameter tube dari water heater adalah 1 cm dengan jarak transversal setiap tube 8 cm, fluida yang mengalir di dalam tube adalah R-22 dan fluida diam yang berada di dalam tangki adalah air. Langkah awal dari penelitian ini  adalah melakukan pengujian  sistem AC split untuk mendapatkan data-data yang dibutuhkan dalam perancangan water heater. Tahap selanjutnya adalah studi numerik dimana studi numerik dilakukan secara dua dimensi dengan kondisi steady, incompressible, dan laminar dengan prinsip Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD, menggunakan perangkat lunak GAMBIT 2.4.6 untuk tahap pembuatan domain dan disimulasikan dengan perangkat lunak FLUENT 6.3.26. Tahap terakhir adalah eksperimen yang bertujuan untuk mengetahui water heater yang dibuat sesuai dengan rancangan penulis. Kemudian water heater yang sudah dibuat, dipasang ke sistem AC split. Pada tahap eksperimen, penulis melakukan variasi terhadap volume air di tangki, yaitu 75 liter, 85 liter dan 100 liter. Hasil dari simulasi numerik menunjukkan fenomena perpindahan panas pada water heater, yang berupa kontur temperatur, kontur kecepatan dan velocity vector dalam bentuk dua dimensi tampak samping water heater. Hasil dari studi eksperimen ini menunjukkan nilai

  17. Child-specific thoracic gas volume prediction equations for air-displacement plethysmography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields, David A; Hull, Holly R; Cheline, A J; Yao, Manjiang; Higgins, Paul B

    2004-11-01

    To develop child-specific thoracic gas volume (TGV) prediction equations for use in air-displacement plethysmography in 6- to 17-year-old children. Study 1 developed TGV prediction equations using anthropometric variables after completing a measured TGV and air-displacement plethysmography test in 224 healthy boys and girls (11.2 +/- 3.2 years, 45.3 +/- 18.7 kg, 149.9 +/- 18.5 cm). Study 2 cross-validated the prediction equations in a separate cohort of 62 healthy boys and girls (11.2 +/- 3.4 years, 44.2 +/- 15.3 kg, 149.4 +/- 19.3 cm). In Study 1 (development of TGV prediction equations), the quadratic relationship using height as the independent variable and the measured TGV as the dependent variable yielded the highest adjusted R(2) and the lowest SE of estimate in both genders, thus producing the following prediction equations: TGV = 0.00056 x H(2) - 0.12422 x H + 8.15194 (boys) and TGV = 0.00044 x H(2) - 0.09220 x H + 6.00305 (girls). In Study 2 (cross-validation), no significant difference between the predicted and measured TGVs (-0.018 +/- 0.377 liters) was observed. The regression between the measured TGV and the predicted TGV yielded a slope and intercept that did not significantly differ from the line of identity. Prediction accuracy was good as indicated by a high R(2) (0.862) and low SE of estimate (0.369 liters). The new child-specific TGV prediction equations accurately, precisely, and without bias estimated the actual TGV of 6- to 17-year-old children.

  18. 27 CFR 30.66 - Table 6, showing respective volumes of alcohol and water and the specific gravity in both air and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... respective volumes of alcohol and water and the specific gravity in both air and vacuum of spirituous liquor... volumes of alcohol and water and the specific gravity in both air and vacuum of spirituous liquor. This... the alcohol in the required strength, multiply the quotient by the water in the required strength, and...

  19. Air and Space Power Journal. Volume 30, Number 2, Summer 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Angels Gates of Fire: An Epic Novel of Thermopylae The Last Stand: Custer , Sitting Bull, and the Battle of the Little Bighorn April 1865: The...Conventional Arms Transfers, 6. 36. Igor Sutyagin, “Air Defence—the Opposite Side of Air Power” (paper presented at Chief of the Air Staff RAF Air Power

  20. A uniform laminar air plasma plume with large volume excited by an alternating current voltage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuechen; Bao, Wenting; Chu, Jingdi; Zhang, Panpan; Jia, Pengying

    2015-12-01

    Using a plasma jet composed of two needle electrodes, a laminar plasma plume with large volume is generated in air through an alternating current voltage excitation. Based on high-speed photography, a train of filaments is observed to propagate periodically away from their birth place along the gas flow. The laminar plume is in fact a temporal superposition of the arched filament train. The filament consists of a negative glow near the real time cathode, a positive column near the real time anode, and a Faraday dark space between them. It has been found that the propagation velocity of the filament increases with increasing the gas flow rate. Furthermore, the filament lifetime tends to follow a normal distribution (Gaussian distribution). The most probable lifetime decreases with increasing the gas flow rate or decreasing the averaged peak voltage. Results also indicate that the real time peak current decreases and the real time peak voltage increases with the propagation of the filament along the gas flow. The voltage-current curve indicates that, in every discharge cycle, the filament evolves from a Townsend discharge to a glow one and then the discharge quenches. Characteristic regions including a negative glow, a Faraday dark space, and a positive column can be discerned from the discharge filament. Furthermore, the plasma parameters such as the electron density, the vibrational temperature and the gas temperature are investigated based on the optical spectrum emitted from the laminar plume.

  1. Validity of new child-specific thoracic gas volume prediction equations for air-displacement plethysmography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gower Barbara A

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To determine the validity of the recently developed child-specific thoracic gas volume (TGV prediction equations for use in air-displacement plethysmography (ADP in diverse pediatric populations. Methods Three distinct populations were studied: European American and African American children living in Birmingham, Alabama and European children living in Lisbon, Portugal. Each child completed a standard ADP testing protocol, including a measured TGV according to the manufactures software criteria. Measured TGV was compared to the predicted TGV from current adult-based ADP proprietary equations and to the recently developed child-specific TGV equations of Fields et al. Similarly, percent body fat, derived using the TGV prediction equations, was compared to percent body fat derived using measured TGV. Results Predicted TGV from adult-based equations was significantly different from measured TGV in girls from each of the three ethnic groups (P Conclusion The child-specific TGV equations developed by Fields et al. provided a modest improvement over the adult-based TGV equations in an ethnically diverse group of children.

  2. Validity of new child-specific thoracic gas volume prediction equations for air-displacement plethysmography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Paul B; Silva, Analiza M; Sardinha, Luis B; Hull, Holly R; Goran, Michael I; Gower, Barbara A; Fields, David A

    2006-06-05

    To determine the validity of the recently developed child-specific thoracic gas volume (TGV) prediction equations for use in air-displacement plethysmography (ADP) in diverse pediatric populations. Three distinct populations were studied: European American and African American children living in Birmingham, Alabama and European children living in Lisbon, Portugal. Each child completed a standard ADP testing protocol, including a measured TGV according to the manufactures software criteria. Measured TGV was compared to the predicted TGV from current adult-based ADP proprietary equations and to the recently developed child-specific TGV equations of Fields et al. Similarly, percent body fat, derived using the TGV prediction equations, was compared to percent body fat derived using measured TGV. Predicted TGV from adult-based equations was significantly different from measured TGV in girls from each of the three ethnic groups (P TGV estimates did not significantly differ from measured TGV in any of the ethnic or gender groups. Percent body fat estimates using adult-derived and child-specific TGV estimates did not differ significantly from percent body fat measures using measured TGV in any of the groups. The child-specific TGV equations developed by Fields et al. provided a modest improvement over the adult-based TGV equations in an ethnically diverse group of children.

  3. High spatiotemporal resolution measurement of regional lung air volumes from 2D phase contrast x-ray images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leong, Andrew F. T.; Islam, M. Sirajul; Kitchen, Marcus J. [School of Physics, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Fouras, Andreas [Division of Biological Engineering, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Wallace, Megan J.; Hooper, Stuart B. [Ritchie Centre and Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Monash Institute of Medical Research, Monash University, Victoria 3168 (Australia)

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: Described herein is a new technique for measuring regional lung air volumes from two-dimensional propagation-based phase contrast x-ray (PBI) images at very high spatial and temporal resolution. Phase contrast dramatically increases lung visibility and the outlined volumetric reconstruction technique quantifies dynamic changes in respiratory function. These methods can be used for assessing pulmonary disease and injury and for optimizing mechanical ventilation techniques for preterm infants using animal models. Methods: The volumetric reconstruction combines the algorithms of temporal subtraction and single image phase retrieval (SIPR) to isolate the image of the lungs from the thoracic cage in order to measure regional lung air volumes. The SIPR algorithm was used to recover the change in projected thickness of the lungs on a pixel-by-pixel basis (pixel dimensions {approx}16.2 {mu}m). The technique has been validated using numerical simulation and compared results of measuring regional lung air volumes with and without the use of temporal subtraction for removing the thoracic cage. To test this approach, a series of PBI images of newborn rabbit pups mechanically ventilated at different frequencies was employed. Results: Regional lung air volumes measured from PBI images of newborn rabbit pups showed on average an improvement of at least 20% in 16% of pixels within the lungs in comparison to that measured without the use of temporal subtraction. The majority of pixels that showed an improvement was found to be in regions occupied by bone. Applying the volumetric technique to sequences of PBI images of newborn rabbit pups, it is shown that lung aeration at birth can be highly heterogeneous. Conclusions: This paper presents an image segmentation technique based on temporal subtraction that has successfully been used to isolate the lungs from PBI chest images, allowing the change in lung air volume to be measured over regions as small as the pixel size. Using

  4. The Conference Proceedings of the 1997 Air Transport Research Group (ATRG) of the WCTR Society. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oum, Tae Hoon (Editor); Bowen, Brent D. (Editor)

    1997-01-01

    The UNO Aviation Institute has published the 1997 Proceedings of the Air Transport Research Group of the World Conference on Transportation Research (WCTR) Society. Items published in this three volume, seven monograph series were presented at the triennial ATRG Conference held at the University of British Columbia, June 25-27, 1997. A wide variety of policy issues are discussed including the following: open- skies agreements, liberalization, globalization, airline competition, airport performance, pricing, hubs, and safety, among others.

  5. MELSAR: a mesoscale air quality model for complex terrain. Volume 1. Overview, technical description and user's guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allwine, K.J.; Whiteman, C.D.

    1985-04-01

    This final report is submitted as part of the Green River Ambient Model Assessment (GRAMA) program conducted at the US Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest Laboratory for the US Environmental Protection Agency. The GRAMA program has, as its ultimate goal, the development of validated air quality models that can be applied to the complex terrain of the Green River Formation of western Colorado, eastern Utah, and southern Wyoming. The Green River Formation is a geologic formation containing large reserves of oil shale, coal, and other natural resources. Development of these resources may lead to a degradation of the air quality of the region. Air quality models are needed immediately for planning and regulatory purposes to assess the magnitude of these regional impacts. This report documents one of the models being developed for this purpose within GRAMA - specifically a model to predict short averaging time (less than or equal to 24 h) pollutant concentrations resulting from the mesoscale transport of pollutant releases from multiple sources. MELSAR has not undergone any rigorous operational testing, sensitivity analyses, or validation studies. Testing and evaluation of the model are needed to gain a measure of confidence in the model's performance. This report consists of two volumes. Volume 1 contains the model overview, technical description, and user's guide, and Volume 2 contains the Appendices which include listings of the FORTRAN code. 51 refs., 31 figs., 35 tabs.

  6. Air Emissions Species Manual. Volume 2. Particulate-matter Species Profiles. Second edition. Final report, April 1988-October 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brooks, G.W.; Waddell, J.T.; Butler, W.A.

    1990-01-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has several activities that require speciated particulate matter (PM) or volatile organic compound (VOC) profiles from several source categories. In an effort to update the available speciated PM profile data base, EPA initiated studies to update the Receptor Model Source Composition Library (EPA-450/4-85-002) and produce a revision entitled Air Emissions Species Manual - Volume II, Particulate Matter Species Profiles (EPA-450/2-88-003b). Similarly for VOC emissions, EPA performed studies to revise the Volatile Organic Compound Species Data Manual - Second Edition (EPA-450/4-80-015) and provide an updated version in the Air Emissions Species Manual - Volume I, Volatile Organic Compound Species Profiles (EPA-450/2-88-003a). The purpose of this document is to update the PM profiles in the Air Emissions Species Manual, Volume II, with new information obtained from contacts with principal researchers in the field of PM species profiles and source receptor modeling. The profiles are based on data voluntarily submitted by the researchers.

  7. Air and Space Power Journal. Volume 23, Number 2, Summer 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    George Custer 02-Feature-Singer.indd 86 4/28/09 1:29:03 PM 86 AIR & SPACE POWER JOURNAL SUMMER 2009 and Gen George Patton seem classic examples...Bios - 2009-2.indd 126 4/28/09 1:34:02 PM OUR CONTRIBUTORS Air Vice-Marshal Prof. R. A. Mason, Royal Air Force ( RAF ), retired, CB, CBE, MA, DSc...related defense subjects. He has contributed to studies for the RAF and United States Air Force (USAF), as well as the air forces of Australia, New

  8. Air

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and your health: Green living Sun Water Air Health effects of air pollution How to protect yourself from air pollution Chemicals Noise Quizzes Links to more information girlshealth glossary girlshealth. ...

  9. Supplemental site inspection for Air Force Plant 59, Johnson City, New York, Volume 2: Appendices A-E

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nashold, B.; Rosenblatt, D.; Tomasko, D. [and others

    1995-08-01

    This summary describes a Supplemental Site Inspection (SSI) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) at Air Force Plant 59 (AFP 59) in Johnson City, New York. All required data pertaining to this project were entered by ANL into the Air Force-wide Installation Restoration Program Information System (IRPIMS) computer format and submitted to an appropriate authority. The work was sponsored by the United States Air Force as part of its Installation Restoration Program (IRP). Previous studies had revealed the presence of contaminants at the site and identified several potential contaminant sources. Argonne`s study was conducted to answer questions raised by earlier investigations. This volume consists of appendices A-E, containing field data and data validation.

  10. The Conference Proceedings of the 2001 Air Transport Research Society (ATRS) of the WCTR Society. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yeong-Heok (Editor); Bowen, Brent D. (Editor); Tarry, Scott E. (Editor)

    2001-01-01

    The ATRS held its Annual conference at Jeju Island, Korea in July 2001. The conference was a success with nearly 140 participants including 70 presenters. This report contains presentations from Volume 1 on the following: Airline and Travel Agent Relationships in Asia;Benchmarking Aviation Safety in the Commercial Airline Industry;Impact of Frequent Flyer Program on the Demand for Air Travel; Application of Genetic Algorithm on Airline Schedule;The Effects of Dual Carrier Designation and Partial Liberalization: The Case of Canada;Defense of Air Carriers and Air Agencies in FAA Enforcement proceedin gs - Damage Control Before the Case Arises; Cost Incentives for Airline Mergers? - An examination on the cost impact of U.S. airline mergers and acquisitions;Airport Regulation, Airline Competition and Canada's Airport System; Airline Competition: The Case of Israel's Domestic Doupoly; Non-Financial Indicators of Airline Distress: A Conceptual Approach;and Airport Privatization: An Empirical Analysis of Financial and Operational Efficiency.

  11. Supplemental site inspection for Air Force Plant 59, Johnson City, New York, Volume 3: Appendices F-Q

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nashold, B.; Rosenblatt, D.; Hau, J. [and others

    1995-08-01

    This summary describes a Supplemental Site Inspection (SSI) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) at Air Force Plant 59 (AFP 59) in Johnson City, New York. All required data pertaining to this project were entered by ANL into the Air Force-wide Installation Restoration Program Information System (IRPIMS) computer format and submitted to an appropriate authority. The work was sponsored by the United States Air Force as part of its Installation Restoration Program (IRP). Previous studies had revealed the presence of contaminants at the site and identified several potential contaminant sources. Argonne`s study was conducted to answer questions raised by earlier investigations. This volume consists of appendices F-Q, which contain the analytical data from the site characterization.

  12. An energy stable evolution method for simulating two-phase equilibria of multi-component fluids at constant moles, volume and temperature

    KAUST Repository

    Kou, Jisheng

    2016-02-25

    In this paper, we propose an energy-stable evolution method for the calculation of the phase equilibria under given volume, temperature, and moles (VT-flash). An evolution model for describing the dynamics of two-phase fluid system is based on Fick’s law of diffusion for multi-component fluids and the Peng-Robinson equation of state. The mobility is obtained from diffusion coefficients by relating the gradient of chemical potential to the gradient of molar density. The evolution equation for moles of each component is derived using the discretization of diffusion equations, while the volume evolution equation is constructed based on the mechanical mechanism and the Peng-Robinson equation of state. It is proven that the proposed evolution system can well model the VT-flash problem, and moreover, it possesses the property of total energy decay. By using the Euler time scheme to discretize this evolution system, we develop an energy stable algorithm with an adaptive choice strategy of time steps, which allows us to calculate the suitable time step size to guarantee the physical properties of moles and volumes, including positivity, maximum limits, and correct definition of the Helmhotz free energy function. The proposed evolution method is also proven to be energy-stable under the proposed time step choice. Numerical examples are tested to demonstrate efficiency and robustness of the proposed method.

  13. Storage of LWR spent fuel in air. Volume 3, Results from exposure of spent fuel to fluorine-contaminated air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunningham, M.E.; Thomas, L.E.

    1995-06-01

    The Behavior of Spent Fuel in Storage (BSFS) Project has conducted research to develop data on spent nuclear fuel (irradiated U0{sub 2}) that could be used to support design, licensing, and operation of dry storage installations. Test Series B conducted by the BSFS Project was designed as a long-term study of the oxidation of spent fuel exposed to air. It was discovered after the exposures were completed in September 1990 that the test specimens had been exposed to an atmosphere of bottled air contaminated with an unknown quantity of fluorine. This exposure resulted in the test specimens reacting with both the oxygen and the fluorine in the oven atmospheres. The apparent source of the fluorine was gamma radiation-induced chemical decomposition of the fluoro-elastomer gaskets used to seal the oven doors. This chemical decomposition apparently released hydrofluoric acid (HF) vapor into the oven atmospheres. Because the Test Series B specimens were exposed to a fluorine-contaminated oven atmosphere and reacted with the fluorine, it is recommended that the Test Series B data not be used to develop time-temperature limits for exposure of spent nuclear fuel to air. This report has been prepared to document Test Series B and present the collected data and observations.

  14. Air-Liquid Partition Coefficient for a Diverse Set of Organic Compounds: Henry’s Law Constant in Water and Hexadecane

    Science.gov (United States)

    The SPARC vapor pressure and activity coefficient models were coupled to estimate Henry’s Law Constant (HLC) in water and in hexadecane for a wide range of non-polar and polar solute organic compounds without modification to/or additional parameterization of the vapor pressure or...

  15. Air University Library Index to Military Periodicals. Cumulative Issue January - December 1988. Volume 39, Number 4

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Adams, Emily

    1988-01-01

    The Air University Library Index to Military Periodicals is a subject index to significant articles, news items, and editorials appearing in 77 English language military and aeronautical periodicals...

  16. Air University Library Index to Military Periodicals. Cumulative Issue January - December 1985. Volume 36, Number 4

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Goodman, A

    1985-01-01

    The Air University Library Index to Military Periodicals is a subject index to significant articles, news items, and editorials appearing in 76 English language military and aeronautical periodicals...

  17. Predicted Versus Measured Thoracic Gas Volume For The Bod Pod® Air Displacement Plethysmography System

    OpenAIRE

    Blaney, Phil A

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether there is a significant difference between measured values of thoracic gas volume (MTGV) and predicted values of thoracic gas volume (PTGV) using the Bod Pod®. One hundred and thirteen college freshmen, both males and females, were tested using the Bod Pod® by first measuring thoracic gas volume with the Bod Pod® technique, then by using pre-determined values based on height, weight, and age that predict thoracic gas volume. Results of a paire...

  18. Comparison of air sac volume, lung volume, and lung densities determined by use of computed tomography in conscious and anesthetized Humboldt penguins (Spheniscus humboldti) positioned in ventral, dorsal, and right lateral recumbency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevitt, Benjamin N; Langan, Jennifer N; Adkesson, Michael J; Mitchell, Mark A; Henzler, Margaret; Drees, Randi

    2014-08-01

    To determine the effects of recumbency on air sac volume, lung volume, and lung densities in CT images of healthy, conscious and anesthetized spontaneously breathing Humboldt penguins (Spheniscus humboldti). 25 adult (13 male and 12 female) Humboldt penguins. CT images of conscious penguins in ventral recumbency and anesthetized penguins in dorsal, ventral, and right lateral recumbency were obtained. Air sac volume, lung volume, and lung densities in CT images were calculated. A paired samples t test was used to determine whether right and left lung densities differed among recumbencies. Repeated-measures ANOVA (controlled for sex and order of recumbencies during CT) was used to determine whether air sac or lung volumes differed among recumbencies. Recumbency had a significant effect on air sac volume but not lung volume. Air sac volume was largest in conscious penguins in ventral recumbency (mean ± SD, 347.2 ± 103.1 cm(3)) and lowest in anesthetized penguins in dorsal recumbency (median, 202.0 cm(3); 10th to 90th percentile, 129.2 to 280.3 cm(3)). Lung densities were highest in anesthetized penguins in dorsal recumbency (right lung median, 0.522 g/cm(3); left lung median, 0.511 g/cm(3)) and lowest in anesthetized penguins in ventral recumbency (right lung median, 0.488 g/cm(3); left lung median, 0.482 g/cm(3)). Results indicated that anesthetized Humboldt penguins had the lowest air sac volume and highest lung densities in dorsal recumbency. Therefore, this recumbency may not be recommended. Minimal changes in lung volume were detected among recumbencies or between conscious and anesthetized penguins.

  19. The Conference Proceedings of the 2001 Air Transport Research Society (ATRS) of the WCTR Society. Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yeong-Heok (Editor); Bowen, Brent D. (Editor); Tarry, Scott E. (Editor)

    2001-01-01

    The ATRS held its 5th Annual conference at the City University of Hong Kong Campus in July 2001. The conference was a success with nearly 140 participants including 70 presenters. Titles that comprise Volume 2 include: Intelligent Airport Gate Assignment System; A Study on the Effects of the Personality Compatibility to the Job Performance; ITS/CVO Application for Air cargo Transportation in Korea; An Airport as a Logistics and Economic Hub: The Case of Incheon International Airport; The Impact Of Aviation Safety over the Consumer's Behavior; The Integration of China and Taiwan Air Networks for Direct Air Cargo Services; Quality perception and carrier choice in Civil Aviation; Future Trends in Business Travel Decision Making; Cooperation Among German Airports in Europe; Inbound and Outbound Air Passenger Traffic Forecasting between the United States and Selected Asian countries; An Evaluation of Alternative Facilities for Airport Redevelopment using Fuzzy Linguistic Approach; Economic Analysis of Airline Alliances; The Aviation Cooperation between the two Koreas Preparing for the Reunification of the Peninsula; and A Study on the Air Transport Cooperation in Northeast Asia between China, Japan and Korea.

  20. United States Air Force Summer Faculty Research Program. Management Report. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-12-01

    Dr. E. Friday of TEAS, and Messers Bob Erhart, Dennis Goldstein, Dick Mabry, Bob Erdman, Harris Barker, and Dr. Duane Finello of the laboratory were...Tower ( Marley , Baltimore Air Coil) Roof Ventilation (Green Heck, in-house) Compressed air (Ingersol Rand, in-house) V-bel t Drives ( in house) Motors, 50

  1. Air and Space Power Journal. Volume 23, Number 1, Spring 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Command Dr. Richard I. Lester Eaker College for Professional Development Mr. Brent Marley Redstone Arsenal, Alabama Mr. Rémy M. Mauduit Air Force...University Lt Col Brian S. Pinkston, USAF, MC, SFS The Pentagon Col Bob Potter, USAF, Retired Air Force Research Institute Dr. Steve Rothstein

  2. Air and Space Power Journal. Volume 24, Number 2, Summer 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Douglas E. Lee Air Force Space Command Dr. Richard I. Lester Eaker Center for Professional Development Mr. Brent Marley Redstone Arsenal, Alabama Mr...Riddle Aeronautical University Lt Col Brian S. Pinkston, USAF, MC, SFS The Pentagon Col Bob Potter, USAF, Retired Air Force Research Institute Dr. Steve

  3. United States Air Force Summer Faculty Research Program. 1988 Program Technical Report. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-12-01

    Roy Stables and Dr. E. Friday of TEAS, and Messers Bob Erhart, Dennis Goldstein, Dick Mabry, Bob Erdman, Harris Barker, and Dr. Duane Finello of the... Marley , Baltimore Air Coil) Roof Ventilation (Green Heck, in-house) Compressed air (Ingersol Rand, in-house) V-belt Drives (in house) Motors, 50 hp and

  4. Air and Space Power Journal. Volume 21, Number 1, Spring 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Retired Colorado Springs, Colorado Mr. Brent Marley USAF Air War College Col Phillip Meilinger, USAF, Retired Chicago, Illinois Dr. Daniel Mortensen...Murphy Air University Col Robert Owen, USAF, Retired Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University Col Bob Potter, USAF, Retired USAF Public Affairs Center of

  5. United States Air Force Research Initiation Program for 1988. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-04-01

    concentration in air. Time was normalized by dividing experimental run time by the hydraulic detention time of the soil column which gives air pore...standardized solutions and were checked with a research quality pH meter for low [OH’] and by titration against potassium acid phthalate tor more

  6. Supplemental site inspection for Air Force Plant 59, Johnson City, New York, Volume 1: Investigation report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nashold, B.; Rosenblatt, D.; Hau, J. [and others

    1995-08-01

    This summary describes a Supplemental Site Inspection (SSI) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) at Air Force Plant 59 (AFP 59) in Johnson City, New York. All required data pertaining to this project were entered by ANL into the Air Force-wide Installation Restoration Program Information System (IRPIMS) computer format and submitted to an appropriate authority. The work was sponsored by the United States Air Force as part of its Installation Restoration Program (IRP). Previous studies had revealed the presence of contaminants at the site and identified several potential contaminant sources. Argonne`s study was conducted to answer questions raised by earlier investigations.

  7. An analysis of radio frequency surveillance systems for air traffic control volume II: appendixes

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-02-01

    Performance criteria that afford quantitative evaluation of a variety of current and proposed configurations of the Air Traffic Control Radar Beacon System (ATCRBS) are described in detail. Two analytic system models are developed to allow applicatio...

  8. Analysis of Radio Frequency Surveillance Systems for Air Traffic Control : Volume 1. Text.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-02-01

    Performance criteria that afford quantitative evaluation of a variety of current and proposed configurations of the Air Traffic Control Radar Beacon System (ATCRBS) are described in detail. Two analytic system models are developed to allow applicatio...

  9. Software for an Experimental Air-Ground Data Link : Volume 2. System Operation Manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-10-01

    This report documents the complete software system developed for the Experimental Data Link System which was implemented for flight test during the Air-Ground Data Link Development Program (FAA-TSC- Project Number FA-13). The software development is ...

  10. Total reference air kerma can accurately predict isodose surface volumes in cervix cancer brachytherapy. A multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nkiwane, Karen S; Andersen, Else; Champoudry, Jerome; de Leeuw, Astrid; Swamidas, Jamema; Lindegaard, Jacob; Pötter, Richard; Kirisits, Christian; Tanderup, Kari

    To demonstrate that V 60  Gy, V 75  Gy, and V 85  Gy isodose surface volumes can be accurately estimated from total reference air kerma (TRAK) in cervix cancer MRI-guided brachytherapy (BT). 60 Gy, 75 Gy, and 85 Gy isodose surface volumes levels were obtained from treatment planning systems (V TPS ) for 239 EMBRACE study patients from five institutions treated with various dose rates, fractionation schedules and applicators. An equation for estimating V TPS from TRAK was derived. Furthermore, a surrogate Point A dose (Point A*) was proposed and tested for correlation with V 75  Gy. Predicted volumes V pred  = 4965 (TRAK/dref) 3/2 + 170 (TRAK/dref) - 1.5 gave the best fit to V TPS . The difference between V TPS and predicted volumes was 0.0% ± 2.3%. All volumes were predicted within 10%. The prediction was valid for (1) high-dose rate and pulsed dose rate, (2) intracavitary vs. intracavitary/interstitial applicators, and (3) tandem-ring, tandem-ovoid, and mold. Point A* = 14 TRAK was converted to total EQD 2 and showed high correlation with V 75  Gy. TRAK derived Isodose surface volumes may become a tool for assessment of treatment intensity. Furthermore, surrogate Point A ∗ doses can be applied for both intracavitary and intracavitary/interstitial BT and can be used to compare treatments across fractionation schedules. Copyright © 2017 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Air and Space Power Journal. Volume 24, Number 4, Winter 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Yi People: The Story of PLAAF Pilot Yang Guoxiang . . . . . . 91 Bob Bergin 101 ❙ Book Reviews A Government Ill Executed: The Decline of the...Lee Air Force Space Command Dr. Richard I. Lester Eaker Center for Professional Development Mr. Brent Marley Redstone Arsenal, Alabama Mr. Rémy M...Aeronautical University Lt Col Brian S. Pinkston, USAF, MC, SFS The Pentagon Col Bob Potter, USAF, Retired Air Force Research Institute Dr. Steve Rothstein

  12. Gulf War Air Power Survey. Volume 5. A Statistical Compendium and Chronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    Briefer Files; GWAPS, NA-524 [notes only]) Logistcs : USCINCCENT reports that stockages of critical air-to-air and "tank killer" munitions still fall...34individually and in concert" to reverse Iraq’s conquest of Kuwait, even if that can not be accomplished by peaceful means. Intelligence: Iraqi ground...300400Z Nov 90, owAPS, css #85) 30 November 1990 C+115 Logistcs : In an example of what was almost a daily occurrence, COMUSCENTAF requests priority

  13. Air Pollution in Siberia. A Volume and Risk-Weighted Analysis of a Siberian Pollution Database

    OpenAIRE

    N.K. Warner-Merl

    1998-01-01

    Air pollution from industrial centers in Siberia pose observable environmental threats. Siberian ecosystems have begun to show stress from the accumulation of pollution depositions that come from cities and industrial plants. While some uncertainty exists as to the long-term effects of air pollution upon forests, in measurable terms such as human mortality and incidence of disease, forest species decline or forest dieback, observable impacts indicate that there is a cause for concern. Industr...

  14. Spatio-temporal visualization of air-sea CO2 flux and carbon budget using volume rendering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Zhenhong; Fang, Lei; Bai, Yan; Zhang, Feng; Liu, Renyi

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents a novel visualization method to show the spatio-temporal dynamics of carbon sinks and sources, and carbon fluxes in the ocean carbon cycle. The air-sea carbon budget and its process of accumulation are demonstrated in the spatial dimension, while the distribution pattern and variation of CO2 flux are expressed by color changes. In this way, we unite spatial and temporal characteristics of satellite data through visualization. A GPU-based direct volume rendering technique using half-angle slicing is adopted to dynamically visualize the released or absorbed CO2 gas with shadow effects. A data model is designed to generate four-dimensional (4D) data from satellite-derived air-sea CO2 flux products, and an out-of-core scheduling strategy is also proposed for on-the-fly rendering of time series of satellite data. The presented 4D visualization method is implemented on graphics cards with vertex, geometry and fragment shaders. It provides a visually realistic simulation and user interaction for real-time rendering. This approach has been integrated into the Information System of Ocean Satellite Monitoring for Air-sea CO2 Flux (IssCO2) for the research and assessment of air-sea CO2 flux in the China Seas.

  15. Determination of respirable mass concentration using a high volume air sampler and a sedimentation method for fractionation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, J.

    1995-12-31

    A preliminary study of a new method for determining respirable mass concentration is described. This method uses a high volume air sampler and subsequent fractionation of the collected mass using a particle sedimentation technique. Side-by-side comparisons of this method with cyclones were made in the field and in the laboratory. There was good agreement among the samplers in the laboratory, but poor agreement in the field. The effect of wind on the samplers` capture efficiencies is the primary hypothesized source of error among the field results. The field test took place at the construction site of a hazardous waste landfill located on the Hanford Reservation.

  16. Mexico City air quality research initiative, volume 3, modeling and simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mauzy, A. [ed.] [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1994-06-01

    The objective of the modeling and simulation task was to develop, test, and apply an appropriate set of models that could translate emission changes into air quality changes. Specifically, we wanted to develop models that could describe how existing measurements of ozone (O{sub 3}), carbon monoxide (CO), and sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) would be expected to change if their emissions were changed. The modeling must be able to address the effects of difference in weather conditions and changes in land use as well as the effects of changes in emission levels. It must also be able to address the effects of changes in the nature and distribution of the emissions as well as changes in the total emissions. A second objective was to provide an understanding of the conditions that lead to poor air quality in Mexico City. We know in a general sense that Mexico City`s poor air quality is the result of large quantities of emissions in a confined area that is subject to light winds, but we did not know much about many aspects of the problem. For example, is the air quality on a given day primarily the result of emissions on that day...or is there an important carryover from previous nights and days? With a good understanding of the important meteorological circumstances that lead to poor air quality, we learn what it take duce an accurate forecast of impending quality so that we can determine the advisability of emergency measures.

  17. Gulf War Air Power Survey. Volume 1. Planning and Command and Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    34breaking point." At the direction of Secreary of Defense Richard B. Cheney, Glosson spoke with McConnell, and the beginning of a modus operandi was...categories upon which their plan, and eventually the Desert Storm air campaign, was built. When serial campaign planning shifted from the Air Staff to CENTAF...orders from General Homer, special F-16 " killer scouts" began working with the ABCCCs. Two of these F-16s were assigned to orbit over selected Iraqi

  18. Ideas, Concepts, Doctrine: Basic Thinking in the United States Air Force, 1907-1960. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-12-01

    Boeing Company a contract for ground-to-air pilotless aircraft ( GAPA ) for use against high-performance aircraft and contracted with the General Electric...the Air Force stopped development of the GAPA missile in November 1949 and contracted with Boeing and the University ofMichigan to investigate the...539-40 Bomi : 544, 478-79, 505 Delta : 307 Eagle : 495-96, 534 Falcon : 478, 483, 491 GAR-9: 534, 537 Ground-to-airpilotless aircraft( GAPA ) : 179,484

  19. The Symposium Proceedings of the 1998 Air Transport Research Group (ATRG). Volume 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds-Feighan, Aisling (Editor); Bowen, Brent D. (Editor)

    1998-01-01

    Contents include the following: airline deregulation in Australia: a medium term assessment; why can't Japan deregulate the airline industry and open the sky immediately?; toward a market-oriented air transport system?: present developments in Russian civil aviation performance and policy; the asian economic crisis and its implications for aviation policy in asia pacific: industry outlook approaching the next millennium; a tale of two airlines: the post privatization performance of two caribbean airlines: the role of capital productivity in British Airways' financial recovery; airline privatization: does it matter?; airfright demand: responding to new developments in logistics; and air cargo business relationships.

  20. Commencement Bay Study. Volume VII. Sediments, Noise, Climate, and Air Quality, Aesthetics, Birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-12-31

    Passeriformes VI. Sand-spit at mouth of Puyallup River numerous shore birds feeding Western Grede-large flocks Double Crested Cormorant-spring only...L Of S.AN3ARDSl V-0 ICOMMENCEMENT BAY STUDY ~~ Sediments Noise Climate, and Air Qualt Aesthetics Birds .. . . ... . . .......... 2..... VV.X D0O~U~T...Sediments, Noise, Climate 5. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER and Air Quality, Birds 682-021-05 7. AUTHOR(*) S. CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBR(s) DACW67-80-C

  1. Air University Library Index to Military Periodicals, Volume 43, Number 3, July-September 1992,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-09-01

    L. Major General Albin G. Wheeler, USA; ANDERSON, Mdvin F., Lt Levitt. illus tab map bibliog. Air Power interview. Herman Marshall. Interservice about...8217getting Program management is a team sport (but FRASER, Helen smarter’ to manage budget cuts and what game should we play7), tab illus PNG (Papua New...MARSHALL, Herman 󈨠): p4 (Sep 21 󈨠): p28 Major General Albin G. Wheeler, USA; Air cover from AF, Navy pilots ’in Bosia Report tells military how to end

  2. Technical and economic assessment of fluidized bed augmented compressed air energy-storage system. Volume II. Introduction and technology assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giramonti, A.J.; Lessard, R.D.; Merrick, D.; Hobson, M.J.

    1981-09-01

    The results are described of a study subcontracted by PNL to the United Technologies Research Center on the engineering feasibility and economics of a CAES concept which uses a coal fired, fluidized bed combustor (FBC) to heat the air being returned from storage during the power production cycle. By burning coal instead of fuel oil, the CAES/FBC concept can completely eliminate the dependence of compressed air energy storage on petroleum fuels. The results of this assessment effort are presented in three volumes. Volume II presents a discussion of program background and an in-depth coverage of both fluid bed combustion and turbomachinery technology pertinent to their application in a CAES power plant system. The CAES/FBC concept appears technically feasible and economically competitive with conventional CAES. However, significant advancement is required in FBC technology before serious commercial commitment to CAES/FBC can be realized. At present, other elements of DOE, industrial groups, and other countries are performing the required R and D for advancement of FBC technology. The CAES/FBC will be reevaluated at a later date when FBC technology has matured and many of the concerns now plaguing FBC are resolved. (LCL)

  3. Phase I: the pipeline-gas demonstration plant. Demonstration plant engineering and design. Volume 17. Plant section 2500 - Plant and Instrument Air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1981-05-01

    Contract No. EF-77-C-01-2542 between Conoco Inc. and the US Department of Energy provides for the design, construction, and operation of a demonstration plant capable of processing bituminous caking coals into clean pipeline quality gas. The project is currently in the design phase (Phase I). This phase is scheduled to be completed in June 1981. One of the major efforts of Phase I is the process and project engineering design of the Demonstration Plant. The design has been completed and is being reported in 24 volumes. This is Volume 17 which reports the design of Plant Section 2500 - Plant and Instrument Air. The plant and instrument air system is designed to provide dry, compressed air for a multitude of uses in plant operations and maintenance. A single centrifugal air compressor provides the total plant and instrument air requirements. An air drying system reduces the dew point of the plant and instrument air. Plant Section 2500 is designed to provide air at 100/sup 0/F and 100 psig. Both plant and instrument air are dried to a -40/sup 0/F dew point. Normal plant and instrument air requirements total 1430 standard cubic feet per minute.

  4. Mexico City air quality research initiative. Volume 2, Problem definition, background, and summary of prior research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-06-01

    Air pollution in Mexico City has increased along with the growth of the city, the movement of its population, and the growth of employment created by industry. The main cause of pollution in the city is energy consumption. Therefore, it is necessary to take into account the city`s economic development and its prospects when considering the technological relationships between well-being and energy consumption. Air pollution in the city from dust and other particles suspended in the air is an old problem. However, pollution as we know it today began about 50 years ago with the growth of industry, transportation, and population. The level of well-being attained in Mexico City implies a high energy use that necessarily affects the valley`s natural air quality. However, the pollution has grown so fast that the City must act urgently on three fronts: first, following a comprehensive strategy, transform the economic foundation of the city with nonpolluting activities to replace the old industries, second, halt pollution growth through the development of better technologies; and third, use better fuels, emission controls, and protection of wooded areas.

  5. Air and Space Power Journal. Volume 26, Number 1, January-February 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    for Professional Development Mr. Brent Marley Redstone Arsenal, Alabama Mr. Rémy M. Mauduit Air Force Research Institute Col Phillip S. Meilinger...Pentagon Col Bob Potter, USAF, Retired Pensacola, Florida Dr. Steve Rothstein Colorado Springs Science Center Project Lt Col Reagan E. Schaupp, USAF

  6. Air and Space Power Journal. Volume 22, Number 4, Winter 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    19 Col Bob Glahn, USAF, Retired Reply to “Military Transformation: Ends, Ways, and Means...02:42 AM Heirpower! Eight Basic Habits of Exceptionally Powerful Lieutenants CMSgt Bob Vásquez, USAF, Retired Reviewer: Cadet Luis Santiago...Professional Development Mr. Brent Marley Redstone Arsenal, Alabama Mr. Rémy M. Mauduit Air Force Research Institute Col Phillip S. Meilinger, USAF

  7. Air and Space Power Joumal. Volume 25, Number 3, Fall 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Command Dr. Richard I. Lester Eaker Center for Professional Development Mr. Brent Marley Redstone Arsenal, Alabama Mr. Rémy M. Mauduit Air Force...Lt Col Brian S. Pinkston, USAF, MC, SFS The Pentagon Col Bob Potter, USAF, Retired Pensacola, Florida Dr. Steve Rothstein Colorado Springs Science

  8. Air & Space Power Journal. Volume 26, Number 2, March-April 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    Center for Professional Development Mr. Brent Marley Redstone Arsenal, Alabama Mr. Rémy M. Mauduit Air Force Research Institute Col Phillip S. Meilinger...Pentagon Col Bob Potter, USAF, Retired Pensacola, Florida Dr. Steve Rothstein Colorado Springs Science Center Project Lt Col Reagan E. Schaupp, USAF

  9. Air and Space Power Journal. Volume 25, Number 3, Fall 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Lester Eaker Center for Professional Development Mr. Brent Marley Redstone Arsenal, Alabama Mr. Rémy M. Mauduit Air Force Research Institute Col...USAF, MC, SFS The Pentagon Col Bob Potter, USAF, Retired Pensacola, Florida Dr. Steve Rothstein Colorado Springs Science Center Project Lt Col Reagan

  10. Air and Space Power Journal. Volume 22, Number 2, Summer 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Professional Development Mr. Brent Marley Redstone Arsenal, Alabama Mr. Remy M. Mauduit Air University Col Phillip S. Meilinger, USAF, Retired...University Col Robert Owen, USAF, Retired Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University Lt Col Brian S. Pinkston, USAF, MC, SFS Maxwell AFB, Alabama Col Bob

  11. Air & Space Power Journal. Volume 26, Number 1, January-February 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    Benjamin S. Lambeth RAND Mr. Douglas E. Lee Air Force Space Command Dr. Richard I. Lester Eaker Center for Professional Development Mr. Brent Marley ...Owen, USAF, Retired Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University Lt Col Brian S. Pinkston, USAF, MC, SFS The Pentagon Col Bob Potter, USAF, Retired Pensacola

  12. Air & Space Power Journal. Volume 27, Number 1, January-February 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    WorldCom . 6. The term left of bang refers to a timeline in which each marked incident is a “bang.” Activities “right of bang” are reactive responses to the... fraud , battlefield damage, or pre-emptive surprise attack. For example, it has been proposed that the Air Force dynamically re- target its strategic

  13. Air & Space Power Journal. Volume 27, Number 2, March-April 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    decisional knowl- edge by integrating the best information from each of the service’s de- March–April 2013 Air & Space Power Journal | 24 Senior Leader...and a testament to what a coalition-led op- eration can do. Tomas Valasek, of the Center for European Reform in London, asserts that it was “as good

  14. Air and Space Power Journal. Volume 20, Number 3, Fall 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    homeland operations—treating it sep - arately from the ROMO discussion for em- phasis. The text explains the types of tasks Airmen might perform in this...Pio Matassi, 1994), 23. 3. Nicanor Costa Méndez, Malvinas ésta es la Historia (Buenos Aires: Sudamericana, 1993), 25. 4. Argentinian entrepreneur

  15. Building America Best Practices Series, Volume 10: Retrofit Techniques and Technologies: Air Sealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baechler, Michael C.; Gilbride, Theresa L.; Hefty, Marye G.; Cole, Pamala C.; Williamson, Jennifer L.; Love, Pat M.

    2010-04-12

    This report was prepared by PNNL for the U.S. Department of Energy Building America Program. The report provides information to home owners who want to make their existing homes more energy efficient by sealing leaks in the building envelope (ceiling, walls, and floors) that let in drafts and let conditioned air escape. The report provides descriptions of 19 key areas of the home where air sealing can improve home performance and energy efficiency. The report includes suggestions on how to find a qualified weatherization or home performance contractor, what to expect in a home energy audit, opportune times for performing air sealing, and what safety and health concerns to be aware of. The report describes some basic building science concepts and topics related to air sealing including ventilation, diagnostic tools, and code requirements. The report will be available for free download from the DOE Building America website. It is a suitable consumer education tool for home performance and weatherization contractors to share with customers to describe the process and value of home energy retrofits.

  16. Cell volume regulation in the perfused liver of a freshwater air ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madhu

    ; J. Biosci. 29 337–347. Graf J, Haddad P, Häussinger D and Lang F 1988 Cell volume regulation in liver; Renal Physiol. Biochem. 11 202–220. Grinstein S, Cohen S and Rothstein A 1984 Cytoplasmic pH regulation in thymic lymphocytes by ...

  17. [Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio]. Volume 9, Removal action system design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-04-01

    This Removal Action System Design has been prepared as a Phase I Volume for the implementation of the Phase II removal action at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB) near Dayton, Ohio. The objective of the removal action is to prevent, to the extent practicable, the migration of ground water contaminated with chlorinated volatile organic compounds (VOCS) across the southwest boundary of Area C. The Phase 1, Volume 9 Removal Action System Design compiles the design documents prepared for the Phase II Removal Action. These documents, which are presented in Appendices to Volume 9, include: Process Design, which presents the 30 percent design for the ground water treatment system (GWTS); Design Packages 1 and 2 for Earthwork and Road Construction, and the Discharge Pipeline, respectively; no drawings are included in the appendix; Design Package 3 for installation of the Ground Water Extraction Well(s); Design Package 4 for installation of the Monitoring Well Instrumentation; and Design Package 5 for installation of the Ground Water Treatment System; this Design Package is incorporated by reference because of its size.

  18. Air & Space Power Journal. Volume 29, Number 5, September-October 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    approach only wastes resources as the environment and requirement change in their midst. As the cheese constantly moves in technology and cyberspace, we... Cheese ? An Amazing Way to Deal with Change in Your Work (New York: G. P. Putnam’s Sons, 1998). 7. SAF/CIO A6 CTO, CIET-B, Target Baseline 2.0, 2015...but the sea change is in the relationship of the aircrew to the aircraft.36 The craft and crews evolved toward a flow-based understanding of their

  19. Temperature-dependent Henry's law constants of 4-alkyl-branched chain fatty acids and 3-methylindole in an oil-air matrix and analysis of volatiles in lamb fat using selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry (SIFT-MS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castada, Hardy Z; Polentz, Victoria; Barringer, Sheryl; Wick, Macdonald

    2017-10-07

    4-Alkyl-branched chain fatty acids and 3-methylindole are characteristic flavor compounds associated with sheep meat. Determining their partitioning behavior between the gas and condensed phase and ultimately developing a correlation between the compound's headspace concentration and sensory descriptive grouping are important for high throughput characterization and grading classification. The headspace concentrations of 3-methylindole, 4-methyloctanoic acid, 4-ethyloctanoic acid, and 4-methylnonanoic acid above corn oil-based standard solutions, and lamb fat samples were measured using selected ion flow tube-mass spectrometry (SIFT-MS). The standard solutions were equilibrated at 80, 100, 110 and 125(o) C while the fat samples were equilibrated at 125(o) C. Statistical evaluation, linear and polynomial regression analyses were performed to establish the compound-specific and temperature-dependent Henry's law constants, enthalpy (∆H) and entropy (∆S) of phase changes. The Henry's law constants (kH(cp) ) were calculated from the regression analysis with a high degree of confidence (p 0.99). The kH(cp) increased with increase in equilibrium temperature. The empirical calculation of the ∆H and ∆S at different temperatures confirmed the temperature-dependence of the Henry's law constants. The headspace concentrations of the lamb-flavor compounds were determined above actual lamb fat samples and the corresponding condensed phase concentrations were successfully derived. The temperature-dependent Henry's law constants, ∆H, and ∆S of phase changes for 3-methylindole, 4-methyloctanoic acid, 4-ethyloctanoic acid, and 4-methylnonanoic acid in an air-oil matrix were empirically derived. The effectiveness of SIFT-MS for the direct, real-time, and rapid determination of key flavor compounds in lamb fat samples was established. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  20. A Systems Analysis View of the Vietnam War: 1965-1972. Volume 5. The Air War

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-02-18

    his forces indcpadcziL3,y of the level or bombir’,, the~ interdiction has failed. Tfie avail~ ab ] e evidence on cnei.y activity in South Vietnam...in the target area. ’ Abe table below shows the average and median tactical air response times for alert and diverted airborne aircraft supporting...financial and produccion planning. The old estimate will be redesignated as the Budget Plan and will appear as such in the OSD SEA Statistical

  1. United States Air Force Summer Faculty Research Program (1987). Program Technical Report. Volume 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-12-01

    John E. Erdei Degree: Ph.D., Condensed Matter, Assistant Professor 1983 Dept. of Physics Specialty: Physics University of Dayton Assigned: APL...PROPULSION LABORATORY (AFWAL/APL) (Wright-Patterson Air Force Base) 1. Suresh Aggarwal 5. Thomas Lalk 2. Bryan Becker 6. Ramendra Roy 3. John Erdei 7...Processing in Real-lime Systems Dr. Ramez A. Elmasri 47 Non-Uniform Spatial Systems and the Dr. John E. Erdei Transition to Turbulence 48 Bank-To-Turn

  2. United States Air Force Summer Faculty Research Program (1987). Program Technical Report. Volume 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-12-01

    Houston, TX 77036 (713) 749-2630 Dr. John E. Erdei Degree: Ph.D., Condensed Matter, Assistant Professor 1983 Dept. of Physics Specialty: Physics... Erdei 7. Richard Tankin 4. Dennis Flentge 8. Cheng-Hsiao Wu ARMAMENT LABORATORY (AD) (Eglin Air Force Base) 1. Charles Bell 6. Joseph Feeley 2. David...Processing in Real-Time Systems Dr. Ramez A. Elmasri 47 Non-Uniform Spatial Systems and the Dr. John E. Erdei Transition to Turbulence 48 Bank-To-Turn

  3. Air Force Journal of Logistics. Volume 34, Numbers 3 and 4, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    the buyer, and certainly not reasonable. For example, by obtaining at least two offers or quotes. COs declare their prices to be fair and...Britain’s Lord Arthur Balfour . the common sentiment was that the United States could do more to help the Allied effort by "sending a powerful air force...Luftwaffe fighters, declared on his first flight. "It felt as if an angel was pushing."-" The technology behind this superb aircraft was the turbojet

  4. United States Air Force Summer Faculty Research Program 1989. Program Technical Report. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-12-01

    and the Astronautics Laboratory at Edwards Air Force Base for sponsoring this research effort. The AstroLab provided a truly unique research environment...fundamental research and system evaluation at the AstroLab . The codes selected will then be adapted to the AstroLab computer systems. A mathematical...potential application to the AstroLab 4 cryogenic heat pipe study. Important system specifications include: 1) monodirectional heat transfer, 2

  5. United States Air Force High School Apprenticeship Program. 1990 Program Management Report. Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-04-18

    Douglas Wickert S Geophysics Laboratory Hanscom Air Force Base, Massachusetts 1 1. Stephen Britten 4. Jason Klingensmith 2. Weihaw Chuang 5. Galen...ENTRAN Manual Stanley Wall 83 Final Report Douglas Wickert . Geophysics Laboratory 84 Determining Tropical Storm Direction of Stephen Britten Movement...like to thank Roy Surovec, my mentor, and Laurie Woodworth, my friend. I also give my thanks to the rest of the area i 1-30 employees especially Dave

  6. Air & Space Power Journal. Volume 27, Number 6. November-December 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    station’s commander. The elements of ADCON specified to the de- ployed COMAFFOR and those retained by the home-unit Air Force commander should be spelled out...Germany—over- cast skies, smoke from factories, German antiaircraft defenses, and a myriad of other factors—produced an average circular error ...perspective, it was exciting to discover that someone had finally writ - ten about this previously almost forgotten aspect of World War II that portended

  7. Love Canal Emergency Declaration Area habitability study. Volume 2. Air assessment: indicator chemicals. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-02-01

    Environmental studies were conducted to provide data that could be used by the Commissioner of Health for the State of New York in determining whether the Emergency Declaration Area (EDA) surrounding the Love Canal hazardous-waste site is habitable. An air assessment was conducted for Love Canal Indicator Chemicals. Homes throughout the EDA were sampled using the Trace Atmospheric Gas Analyzer Model 6000E.

  8. Air and Space Power Journal. Volume 25, Number 2, Summer 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    searchers have combined a faster but less robust feature-tracking algorithm with a commercial- grade INS to attain real-time performance on a small...other contaminants de- grade more slowly in the leaking area when alternative biofuels are present, the con- tamination plume can spread greater dis...activities, bring security to the population, prevent acts of personal coercion and in� timidation , or arrest the spread of fear. Air supremacy

  9. Air Force Journal of Logistics: Spares Campaign 2002. Volume 26 Number 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-09-01

    Technique: Lean Logistics, Six-Sigma Tool: Pert Analysis, Kaizen and Kaikaku, Variance Analysis To effectively use supplier strengths , a more efficient...Force requirements. The Air Force’s Unique PSCM Approach The PSCM initiative addresses existing, underlying supply chain weaknesses through...could be directed at a weak point and overcome the enemy.14 De Guibert advocated mobile field artillery because large quantities of artillery and

  10. The Army Air Forces in World War II. Volume 7. Services Around the World

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    remote regions; minor wounds; infections and parasitic disease; unappetizing meals; enervating climate; fear; and a host of other elements, none of...Air Wacs were reported to have a beauty parlor on the base and Indian laborers to keep their barracks in order. After the headquarters moved up into...expiration with the nose and mouth held shut, but this maneuver carries infected secretions into the middle ear. Because of the abnormal conditions

  11. United States Air Force Graduate Student Research Program. Program Technical rept. Volume 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-12-01

    SCHOOL OF AEROSPACE MEDICINE (SAM) (Brooks Air Force Base) 1. John Barnaby 7. Conrad Murray 2. Otis Cosby 8. Christine Nelson 3. Jerry Dillon 9...Report as Prof. Joe Ross *** 97 Light Beam Interaction Induced by a Christine Nelson Transition Metal Complexed to a Tridentate Ligand xxix 98...rotors, canard -wing interactions and multiple-staged turbo machinery all possess this type of wake impingement Store separation is a subset of the

  12. United States Air Force Graduate Student Research Program. Program Technical rept. Volume 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-12-01

    presented on a Silicon Graphics 3020 IRIS computer system. A high-resolution (1024 by 768 pixels) color monitor updating at 20 frames/s presented the...histogram plots in color , printing of incidence matrix, and automatic development of a network diagram representing the model code. 8.) Suppression... pigmentary dispersion glaucoma were excluded from this study. 95-2 ACKNOWLEDGEMENT I would like to express my appreciation to the Air Force Systems

  13. Air & Space Power Journal. Volume 29, Number 2, March-April 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Power Journal | 3 Dr. Christian F. Anrig Swiss Air Force Dr. Bruce Bechtol Angelo State University Dr. Kendall K. Brown NASA Marshall Space Flight...physical requirements for an SLB ship are modest and need not break the bank to acquire. Given their center-of-gravity importance to the overall SLB...president. He sought out both privates and students, talking with them individually and un- derstanding their needs. Rudder developed a clear vision

  14. United States Air Force Graduate Student Research Program for 1990. Program Technical Report. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-06-05

    1986) MCNP - A General Monte Carlo Code for Neutron and Photon Transoort LA- 7396-M, Rev. 2, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM. GA...85721 (602) 621-1646 Brahm Rhodes DegMe: MS Boston Univ. Specialty: Mechanical Engineering Aero/Mech. Office Assigned: Geophysics Laboratory 110...Air Force Base) 1. Leonard Carter 4. John Noto 2. James Day 5. Brahm Rhodes 3. Thomas Kuchar HUMAN RESOURCES LABORATORY (Brooks, Williams and Wright

  15. Air & Space Power Journal. Volume 29, Number 3, May-June 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    correctly, both of these paradigms have strengths, and, once selected, both develop bureaucratic inertia that resists change. The trick is figuring out...end-capability portfolios. This is potentially the most difficult part of proposing strategic reform: overcoming bureaucratic inertia and political... sleep depriva- tion from “Washing Machine Charlie” (p. 73), their nickname for enemy air raids, often delivered in three or four waves in a single night

  16. Air and Space Power Journal. Volume 20, Number 4, Winter 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    that Argentina’s Gen Leopoldo Fortunato Galtieri used to fight the Malvinas War. Prof. Carlos Raúl Gorgoño Gutiérrez Buenos Aires, Argentina...appearance. Although this fine work doesn’t provide anything new about Hindenburg, it is the first new biography of him in years. The authors give a...minute read with dialogue reminiscent of a Marx brothers movie. Roger Hall takes a lighthearted look at the dangerous and often dirty business of

  17. VOLUME SEDIMEN DAN VALUASI EKONOMI SUMBERDAYA AIR EMBUNG DI KOTA KUPANG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxi Nikodemus Dethan

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Masalah yang dikaji dalam penelitian ini adalah analisis jumlah sedimen dalam kantung embung dan valuasi ekonomi sumberdaya air embung, dengan mengambil 3 (tiga lokasi embung di Kota Kupang. Tujuan dari penelitian ini menghitung dan mengetahui jumlah sedimen dalam kantung embung dan valuasi ekonomi sumberdaya air embung. Hasil perhitungan sedimen embung Nononesnab diperoleh jumlah sedimen sebesar 1382,96 m3, embung Nonopasi  sebesar 976,82 m3, dan  embung Kampung Lama sebesar 186,18 m3. Nilai valuasi ekonomi sumberdaya air embung dilihat dari hasil perhitungan Total WTP sebagai berikut, untuk penawaran 1 (satu embung sebesar Rp. 437.234,04, untuk penawaran 2 (dua embung sebesar Rp. 295.744,68, untuk penawaran 3 (tiga  embung sebesar Rp.225.531,91, untuk penawaran 4 (empat embung sebesar Rp. 166.489,36 dan untuk penawaran 5 (lima embung sebesar Rp. 100.638,30. Dari hasil nilai valuasi ekonomi sumberdaya air embung menunjukkan bahwa semakin tinggi penawaran penambahan pembangunan embung baru semakin rendah tingkat kesediaan masyarakat untuk membayar. This research has been done to analyse the sediment in quarries and economic valuation of water resources. The locations were at 3 quarries in Kupang City.  The result of sediment Nonoesnab quarry was 1.382,96 m3, Nonopasi quarry was 976,82 m3, and Kampung Lama quarry was 186,18 m3.  Economic valuation water resources as total WTP as follows, WTP of  1 quarry was Rp. 437.234,04, WTP of 2 quarries was Rp. 295.744,68, WTP of 3 quarries was Rp. 225.531,91,WTP of 4 quarries was Rp. 166.489,36 and WTP of 5 quarries was Rp. 100.638,30. Based on economic valuation of water resources showed that the higher the additional development of the quarry, the lower the public's willingness to pay.

  18. Rational use of supply air in residential buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Dorthe Kragsig; Nielsen, Toke Rammer; Svendsen, Svend

    2009-01-01

    The ventilation rate influences the air quality by determining the intensity of pollution sources. This paper compared the intensity of the sensory pollution during occupied hours in an apartment ventilated by a constant air volume system and demand controlled ventilation systems controlled...

  19. Automated En Route Air Traffic Control Algorithmic Specifications. Volume 3. Flight Plan Conflict Probe,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-09-01

    esatabli shed in the current AIC system and may be used in future documents describing later versions of AERA. In the text and in local tables in this volume...probe and to FALSE otherwise. In case of a trial probe, the variable Real Subject_FlId contains the flight identifier of the flighbt being probeao This...is used to avoid detecting potential conflicts of the trial trajectory and the actual trajectory of the flight being trial probed. ( Real

  20. Air-Emissions-Species Manual. Volume 1. Volatile-organic-compound species profiles. Second edition. Final report, April 1988-October 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brooks, G.W.; Waddell, J.T.; Butler, W.A.

    1990-01-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has several activities that require speciated particulate matter (PM) or volatile organic compounds (VOC) profiles from several source categories. In an effort to update the available speciated PM-profile data base, EPA initiated studies to update the Receptor Model Source Composition Library and produce a revision entitled Air Emissions Species Manual - Volume II, Particulate Matter Species Profiles. Similarly for VOC emissions, EPA performed studies to revise the Volatile Organic Compound Species Data Manual - Second Edition and provide an updated version in the Air Emissions Species Manual - Volume I, Volatile Organic Compound Species Profiles. The purpose of the document is to update VOC profiles in the Air Emissions Species Manual, Volume I.

  1. Griffiss Air Force Base integrated resource assessment. Volume 3, Electric resource assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, P.R.; Shankle, S.A.; Elliott, D.B.; Stucky, D.J.; Keller, J.M.; Wahlstrom, R.R.; Dagle, J.E.; Gu, A.Y.

    1993-09-01

    The US Air Force Air Combat Command (ACC) has tasked the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Griffiss Air Force Base (AFB). FEMP, with support from the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), is designing this model program for federal customers served by the Niagara Mohawk Power Company. The program with Griffiss AFB will (1) identify and evaluate all cost-effective electric energy projects; (2) develop a schedule for project acquisition considering project type, size, timing, capital requirements, as well as energy and dollar savings; and (3) secure 100% of the financing required to implement electric energy efficiency projects from Niagara Mohawk and have them procure the necessary contractors to perform detailed audits and install the technologies. This report provides the results of the electric energy resource opportunity (ERO) assessments performed by PNL at one of Niagara Mohawk`s primary federal facilities, the ACC Griffiss AFB facility located near Rome, New York. The results of the analyses of EROs are presented in seven common energy end-use categories. A narrative description of each ERO provides information on the initial cost, energy and dollar savings; impacts on operations and maintenance (O&M); and, when applicable, a discussion of energy supply and demand, energy security, and environmental issues. The evaluation methodology and technical and cost assumptions are also described for each ERO. Summary tables present the operational performance of energy end-use equipment before and after the implementation of each ERO and the results of the life-cycle cost analysis indicating the net present value (NPV) and savings-to-investment ratio (SIR) of each ERO.

  2. Air and Space Power Journal. Volume 24, Number 1, Spring 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Brent Marley Redstone Arsenal, Alabama Mr. Rémy M. Mauduit Air Force Research Institute Col Phillip S. Meilinger, USAF, Retired West Chicago, Illinois...University Col Robert Owen, USAF, Retired Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University Lt Col Brian S. Pinkston, USAF, MC, SFS The Pentagon Col Bob Potter, USAF...2009). 12.  “Limitation of Systems,”  Bob Behn’s Public Management Report 3, no. 9 (May 2006): 1–2, http:// www.ksg.harvard.edu/thebehnreport/May2006

  3. FAA Air Traffic Control Operations Concepts. Volume 7. ATCT (Airport Traffic Control Towers) Tower Controllers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-04-21

    t.’, Vf~pS UWI * Jn0 Iji T~/ APA ’-1-5 3.C #? vALA" .,TI 21 IdRI .. ’tFb9 iYCiCKAflI TASK STATEMViENTS Courdinotion Icsk Number Tok !btotomjnt Media...HI Tl.4.9.7.i PERFORM TEE, Communicating Norma ~illy Air-To-Ground *clearance non-compliance query’§ TL.4.9.9 SUGGEST CLEARANCE ALTERNATIVES TO PILOT...Sarasota - Bradenton, Florida PWA Oklahoma City (Wiley Post ), Oklahoma APA Denvr (Centennial), Colorado COS Colorado Sprieigs, Colorado DAB Daytona

  4. Comparison of Cryotop and micro volume air cooling methods for cryopreservation of bovine matured oocytes and blastocysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    PUNYAWAI, Kanchana; ANAKKUL, Nitira; SRIRATTANA, Kanokwan; AIKAWA, Yoshio; SANGSRITAVONG, Siwat; NAGAI, Takashi; IMAI, Kei; PARNPAI, Rangsun

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to compare the efficiency of the Cryotop method and that of two methods that employ a micro volume air cooling (MVAC) device by analyzing the survival and development of bovine oocytes and blastocysts vitrified using each method. In experiment I, in vitro-matured (IVM) oocytes were vitrified using an MVAC device without direct contact with liquid nitrogen (LN2; MVAC group) or directly plunged into LN2 (MVAC in LN2 group). A third group of IVM oocytes was vitrified using a Cryotop device (Cryotop group). After warming, vitrified oocytes were fertilized in vitro. There were no significant differences in cleavage and blastocyst formation rates among the three vitrified groups, with the rates ranging from 53.1% to 56.6% and 20.0% to 25.5%, respectively; however, the rates were significantly lower (P vitrification of bovine IVM oocytes and IVP expanded blastocysts. PMID:26119929

  5. Cargo Logistics Airlift Systems Study (CLASS). Volume 3: Cross impact between the 1990 market and the air physical distribution systems, book 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burby, R. J.; Kuhlman, W. H.

    1978-01-01

    Book 2 of this volume is divided into the following sections: (1) commodities and system networks; (2) future mode choice decisions and commodity air eligibility; (3) comparative cargo transportation costs - air, truck, rail and water; (4) elasticities of demand; (5) operating cost; (6) operating profit, rate making, and returns; (7) importance of rate and service on future aircraft; (8) potential market demand for new aircraft; (9) scenario of events affecting system/market growth; and (10) future study and technology requirements.

  6. A Model Using Local Weather Data to Determine the Effective Sampling Volume for PCB Congeners Collected on Passive Air Samplers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herkert, Nicholas J; Martinez, Andres; Hornbuckle, Keri C

    2016-07-05

    We have developed and evaluated a mathematical model to determine the effective sampling volumes (Veff) of PCBs and similar compounds captured using polyurethane foam passive air samplers (PUF-PAS). We account for the variability in wind speed, air temperature, and equilibrium partitioning over the course of the deployment of the samplers. The model, provided as an annotated Matlab script, predicts the Veff as a function of physical-chemical properties of each compound and meteorology from the closest Integrated Surface Database (ISD) data set obtained through NOAA's National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI). The model was developed to be user-friendly, only requiring basic Matlab knowledge. To illustrate the effectiveness of the model, we evaluated three independent data sets of airborne PCBs simultaneously collected using passive and active samplers: at sites in Chicago, Lancaster, UK, and Toronto, Canada. The model provides Veff values comparable to those using depuration compounds and calibration against active samplers, yielding an average congener specific concentration method ratio (active/passive) of 1.1 ± 1.2. We applied the model to PUF-PAS samples collected in Chicago and show that previous methods can underestimate concentrations of PCBs by up to 40%, especially for long deployments, deployments conducted under warming conditions, and compounds with log Koa values less than 8.

  7. Cost-benefit analysis of improved air quality in an office building

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Djukanovic, R.; Wargocki, Pawel; Fanger, Povl Ole

    2002-01-01

    A cost-benefit analysis of measures to improve air quality in an existing air-conditoned office building (11581 m2, 864 employees) was carried out for hot, temperate and cold climates and for two operating modes: Variable Air Volume (VAV) with economizer; and Constant Air Volume (CAV) with heat...... productivity for every 10% reduction in the proportion of occupants entering a space who are dissatisfied with the air quality. With this assumption, the annual benefit due to improved air quality was always at least 10 times higher than the increase in annual energy and maintenance costs. The payback time...

  8. Some zero-sum constants with weights

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Proceedings – Mathematical Sciences; Volume 118; Issue 2. Some Zero-Sum Constants with Weights. S D Adhikari ... Motivated by some recent developments around the notion of Davenport constant with weights, we study them in some basic cases. We also define a new combinatorial invariant related to ...

  9. The Symposium Proceedings of the 1998 Air Transport Research Group (ATRG). Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds-Feighan, Aisling (Editor); Bowen, Brent D. (Editor)

    1998-01-01

    The Air Transport Research Group of the World Conference on Transportation Research (WCTR) Society was formally launched as a special interest group at the 7th Triennial WCTR in Sydney, Australia in 1995. Since then, our membership base has expanded rapidly, and now includes over 400 active transportation researchers, policy-makers, industry executives, major corporations and research institutes from 28 countries. It became a tradition that the ATRG would hold an international conference at least once a year. In 1998, the ATRG organized a consecutive stream of 14 aviation sessions at the 8th Triennial WCTR Conference (July 12-17: Antwerp). Again, on 19-21 July, 1998, the ATRG Symposium was organized and executed very successfully by Dr. Aisling Reynolds-Feighan of the University College of Dublin. The Aviation Institute at the University of Nebraska at Omaha has published the Proceedings of the 1998 ATRG Dublin Symposium (being co-edited by Dr. Aisling Reynolds-Feighan and Professor Brent Bowen), and the Proceedings of the 1998 WCTR-ATRG Conference (being co-edited by Professors Tae H. Oum and Brent Bowen).

  10. Impact of traffic volume and composition on the air quality and pedestrian exposure in urban street canyon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakowska, Agata; Wong, Ka Chun; Townsend, Thomas; Chan, Ka Lok; Westerdahl, Dane; Ng, Simon; Močnik, Griša; Drinovec, Luka; Ning, Zhi

    2014-12-01

    Vehicle emissions are identified as a major source of air pollution in metropolitan areas. Emission control programs in many cities have been implemented as part of larger scale transport policy interventions to control traffic pollutants and reduce public health risks. These interventions include provision of traffic-free and low emission zones and congestion charging. Various studies have investigated the impact of urban street configurations, such as street canyon in urban centers, on pollutants dispersion and roadside air quality. However, there are few investigations in the literature to study the impact of change of fleet composition and street canyon effects on the on-road pollutants concentrations and associated roadside pedestrian exposure to the pollutants. This study presents an experimental investigation on the traffic related gas and particle pollutants in and near major streets in one of the most developed business districts in Hong Kong, known as Central. Both street canyon and open roadway configurations were included in the study design. Mobile measurement techniques were deployed to monitor both on-road and roadside pollutants concentrations at different times of the day and on different days of a week. Multiple traffic counting points were also established to concurrently collect data on traffic volume and fleet composition on individual streets. Street canyon effects were evident with elevated on-road pollutants concentrations. Diesel vehicles were found to be associated with observed pollutant levels. Roadside black carbon concentrations were found to correlate with their on-road levels but with reduced concentrations. However, ultrafine particles showed very high concentrations in roadside environment with almost unity of roadside/on-road ratios possibly due to the accumulation of primary emissions and secondary PM formation. The results from the study provide useful information for the effective urban transport design and bus route

  11. Cosmological constant, fine structure constant and beyond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Hao; Zou, Xiao-Bo; Li, Hong-Yu; Xue, Dong-Ze [Beijing Institute of Technology, School of Physics, Beijing (China)

    2017-01-15

    In the present work, we consider the cosmological constant model Λ ∝ α{sup -6}, which is well motivated from three independent approaches. As is well known, the hint of varying fine structure constant α was found in 1998. If Λ ∝ α{sup -6} is right, it means that the cosmological constant Λ should also be varying. Here, we try to develop a suitable framework to model this varying cosmological constant Λ ∝ α{sup -6}, in which we view it from an interacting vacuum energy perspective. Then we consider the observational constraints on these models by using the 293 Δα/α data from the absorption systems in the spectra of distant quasars. We find that the model parameters can be tightly constrained to the very narrow ranges of O(10{sup -5}) typically. On the other hand, we can also view the varying cosmological constant model Λ ∝ α{sup -6} from another perspective, namely it can be equivalent to a model containing ''dark energy'' and ''warm dark matter'', but there is no interaction between them. We find that this is also fully consistent with the observational constraints on warm dark matter. (orig.)

  12. Ion exchange equilibrium constants

    CERN Document Server

    Marcus, Y

    2013-01-01

    Ion Exchange Equilibrium Constants focuses on the test-compilation of equilibrium constants for ion exchange reactions. The book first underscores the scope of the compilation, equilibrium constants, symbols used, and arrangement of the table. The manuscript then presents the table of equilibrium constants, including polystyrene sulfonate cation exchanger, polyacrylate cation exchanger, polymethacrylate cation exchanger, polysterene phosphate cation exchanger, and zirconium phosphate cation exchanger. The text highlights zirconium oxide anion exchanger, zeolite type 13Y cation exchanger, and

  13. The Conference Proceedings of the 1999 Air Transport Research Group (ATRG) of the WCTR Society. Volume 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Anming (Editor); Bowen, Brent D. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    Issues around direct flights across Taiwan Strait are always one of the hottest topics in eastern Asia transport market. Although the direct links have not been connected yet, they are still highly concerned by different disciplines of politics, laws, and management. Airlines and related business also watch closely to these issues for policy changes will easily affect their interests in Chinese market which the future of the air transportation in eastern Asia is heavily depending on. In the past decades, Hong Kong was the most important hub in this market; it will still be an important one in the future. It is proved, however, traffic on the link between Hong Kong and Taiwan can be shifted to the link between Macau and Taiwan, so can it be shifted to the links across Taiwan Strait. Moreover, outgoing passengers from China transferred in Hong Kong can also find transit services in Taiwan. These movements will possibly cause a big change in eastern Asian air transport system for there are millions of passengers travelling in this area. The uncertainties of direct links across Taiwan Strait are still leaving, some problems unsolved. Whether the direct links will be defined as international routes or domestic' routes are not clear; the selection of hubs and airlines to provide direct services are not yet made; even the type of freedoms and bilateral agreements can also change the market and network quite a lot. A much bigger volume of passengers can also be found if further travelling deregulation for Chinese to travel across Taiwan Strait can be made. All these variables are making issues around direct flights worthy of continuous observant.

  14. Effect of continuous oxygen insufflation on induced-gastric air volume during cardiopulmonary resuscitation in a cadaveric model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, Nicolas; Voiglio, Eric J; Rerbal, Djamila; Jost, Daniel; Dubien, Pierre-Yves; Lanoe, Vincent; Dhers, Marion; Tourtier, Jean-Pierre; Plaisance, Patrick; Gueugniaud, Pierre-Yves

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to compare the volume of gas insufflated in the stomach with continuous external chest compressions plus continuous oxygen insufflation (C-CPR) versus standard-CPR (S-CPR) which alternates external chest compressions and synchronized positive insufflations through a bag-valve-mask with a 30/2 ratio. The secondary objective was to compare upper airway pressures (intratracheal and intramask) generated during continuous oxygen insufflation. Open, prospective, randomized, cross over, comparative, non-inferiority study. CPR was performed for six minutes periods, on seven fresh human corpses, with C-CPR or S-CPR in a random order. Before each CPR period, the stomach was completely emptied through the gastrostomy tube, and then 200 mL of air was injected in the stomach to be sure it was not collapsed. The gastric volume was measured at the end of each intervention. Intratracheal and intramask pressures were recorded continuously during C-CPR. Results were provided as mean ± standard deviation. Statistical analyses were done with a paired student t test. Induced-gastric inflation was lower with C-CPR (221 ± 130 mL) than with S-CPR (5401 ± 2208 mL, p = 0.001). Throughout C-CPR, no difference was found between the intratracheal and intramask pressures (4.4 ± 1.2; 4.0 ± 0.8 cmH2O, respectively, p = 0.45). This human cadaver study demonstrates that continuous oxygen insufflation induced less gastric inflation than intermittent insufflation during CPR. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Cosmological Constant, Fine Structure Constant and Beyond

    CERN Document Server

    Wei, Hao; Li, Hong-Yu; Xue, Dong-Ze

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we consider the cosmological constant model $\\Lambda\\propto\\alpha^{-6}$, which is well motivated from three independent approaches. As is well known, the evidence of varying fine structure constant $\\alpha$ was found in 1998. If $\\Lambda\\propto\\alpha^{-6}$ is right, it means that the cosmological constant $\\Lambda$ should be also varying. In this work, we try to develop a suitable framework to model this varying cosmological constant $\\Lambda\\propto\\alpha^{-6}$, in which we view it from an interacting vacuum energy perspective. We propose two types of models to describe the evolutions of $\\Lambda$ and $\\alpha$. Then, we consider the observational constraints on these models, by using the 293 $\\Delta\\alpha/\\alpha$ data from the absorption systems in the spectra of distant quasars, and the data of type Ia supernovae (SNIa), cosmic microwave background (CMB), baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO). We find that the model parameters can be tightly constrained to the narrow ranges of ${\\cal O}(10^{-5})$ t...

  16. Projectile Motion with Quadratic Damping in a Constant ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 19; Issue 5. Projectile Motion with Quadratic Damping in a Constant Gravitational Field. Chandra Das Dhiranjan Roy. General Article Volume 19 Issue 5 May 2014 pp 446-465 ...

  17. Summer Research Program - 1997 Summer Faculty Research Program Volume 6 Arnold Engineering Development Center United States Air Force Academy Air Logistics Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-12-01

    Fracture Analysis of the F-5, 15%-Spar Bolt DR Devendra Kumar SAALC/LD 6- 16 CUNY-City College, New York, NY A Simple, Multiversion Concurrency Control...Program, University of Dayton, Dayton, OH. [3]AFGROW, Air Force Crack Propagation Analysis Program, Version 3.82 (1997) 15-8 A SIMPLE, MULTIVERSION ...Office of Scientific Research Boiling Air Force Base, DC and San Antonio Air Logistic Center August 1997 16-1 A SIMPLE, MULTIVERSION CONCURRENCY

  18. Evaluation of natural- and forced-draft staging air systems for nitric oxide reduction in refinery process heaters. Volume 2. Data supplement. Final report October 1982-February 1984

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benson, R.C.; Frohoff, R.A.; Markee, J.A.

    1984-08-01

    The two-volume report gives results of pilot-scale tests to evaluate combustion modifications for emission reduction and efficiency enhancement on petroleum process heaters. Objectives were to determine nitric oxide (NO) emission reductions, thermal efficiency changes, long-term performance, and cost of both natural- and forced-draft staged-combustion-air modifications. Forced-draft-staged-combustion-air modifications had been shown to be the most promising combustion modification in previous pilot-scale tests. The test unit was a vertical, cylindrical, natural-draft crude heater, and the test fuels were natural gas, refinery gas, and a combination of No. 6 oil and refinery gas.

  19. Changes in the electro-physical properties of MCT epitaxial films affected by a plasma volume discharge induced by an avalanche beam in atmospheric-pressure air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigoryev, D. V.; Voitsekhovskii, A. V.; Lozovoy, K. A.; Tarasenko, V. F.; Shulepov, M. A.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper the influence of the plasma volume discharge of nanosecond duration formed in a non-uniform electric field at atmospheric pressure on samples of epitaxial films HgCdTe (MCT) films are discussed. The experimental data show that the action of pulses of nanosecond volume discharge in air at atmospheric pressure leads to changes in the electrophysical properties of MCT epitaxial films due to formation of a near-surface high- conductivity layer of the n-type conduction. The preliminary results show that it is possible to use such actions in the development of technologies for the controlled change of the properties of MCT.

  20. On Aryabhata's Planetary Constants

    OpenAIRE

    Kak, Subhash

    2001-01-01

    This paper examines the theory of a Babylonian origin of Aryabhata's planetary constants. It shows that Aryabhata's basic constant is closer to the Indian counterpart than to the Babylonian one. Sketching connections between Aryabhata's framework and earlier Indic astronomical ideas on yugas and cyclic calendar systems, it is argued that Aryabhata's system is an outgrowth of an earlier Indic tradition.

  1. Generalized Pickands constants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.G. Debicki

    2001-01-01

    textabstractPickands constants play an important role in the exact asymptotic of extreme values for Gaussian stochastic processes. By the {it generalized Pickands constant ${cal H_{eta$ we mean the limit begin{eqnarray* {cal H_{eta= lim_{T to inftyfrac{ {cal H_{eta(T){T, end{eqnarray* where ${cal

  2. Deconstructing the Cosmological Constant

    CERN Document Server

    Jejjala, V; Minic, D; Jejjala, Vishnu; Leigh, Robert G.; Minic, Djordje

    2003-01-01

    Deconstruction provides a novel way of dealing with the notoriously difficult ultraviolet problems of four-dimensional gravity. This approach also naturally leads to a new perspective on the holographic principle, tying it to the fundamental requirements of unitarity and diffeomorphism invariance, as well as to a new viewpoint on the cosmological constant problem. The numerical smallness of the cosmological constant is implied by a unique combination of holography and supersymmetry, opening a new window into the fundamental physics of the vacuum.

  3. Installation Restoration Program Site Final Assessment Report, Volume 1: 111th Fighter Group Willow Grove Air Reserve Station, Pennsylvania Air National Guard, Willow Grove, Pennsylvania

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1996-01-01

    ...) at Willow Grove Air Reserve Station (WGARS) in Pennsylvania. The site assessment, as presented herein, has been supplemented by additional Site Characterization work accomplished by PEER Consultants, P.C. in 1997...

  4. Dielectric properties of polyimide/SiO{sub 2} hollow spheres composite films with ultralow dielectric constant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Zhou, E-mail: hongzhou@hrbust.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin University of Science and Technology, Harbin 150040 (China); Key Laboratory of Engineering Dielectrics and its Application Ministry of Education, Harbin University of Science and Technology, Harbin 150040 (China); Dongyang, Wei; Yong, Fan; Hao, Chen; Yusen, Yang; Jiaojiao, Yu; Liguo, Jin [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin University of Science and Technology, Harbin 150040 (China)

    2016-01-15

    Highlights: • Polyimide/silica hollow spheres films with ultralow dielectric constant were obtained. • Smaller nanoscale silica hollow spheres were uniformly distributed in the polymer matrix. • Air volume content in the hybrid composite films was calculated. - Abstract: In this study, polyimide (PI)/SiO{sub 2} hollow spheres (SHS) composite films were prepared by incorporating different contents of 20–50 nm sized SHS into PI derived from pyromellitic dianhydride (PMDA) and 4,4′-oxydianiline (ODA). The dielectric constant of the PI films was reduced from 3.41 to 2.09 for a hybrid film containing 10 wt.% SHS. When the content of SHS was >10 wt.%, the dielectric constant increased due to the aggregation of the SHS. The ultralow dielectric constant could be attributed to the presence of air voids within the structure of SHS itself as well as the air between the PI matrix and the SHS. Furthermore, the air content in the PI/SHS composite films was calculated by Bruggeman's Effective Medium Theory. The PI/SHS composite films with ultralow dielectric constant and low dielectric loss can be considered as good candidate for advanced dielectric materials.

  5. Feasibility Study for an Air Force Environmental Model and Data Exchange. Volume 1. Model and Data Requirements with Recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-07-01

    ls Date Base Management. Mathematical Models Environmental Environmental Management ABSTRACT (Continue an tov~e Ofd necessary, aid Iden Ifil by blOc... Mathematical equations representing the physical and chemical processes of air and water are the most common, but there are also models of such...Armaments Division/ Comuter Systems D/KRESS ____ [IQ Air Force Systems ConmandSac/~v Pjan Iso/wJ Air Weather Service hleadquiarters 3rd Weather

  6. Elastic constants of calcite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peselnick, L.; Robie, R.A.

    1962-01-01

    The recent measurements of the elastic constants of calcite by Reddy and Subrahmanyam (1960) disagree with the values obtained independently by Voigt (1910) and Bhimasenachar (1945). The present authors, using an ultrasonic pulse technique at 3 Mc and 25??C, determined the elastic constants of calcite using the exact equations governing the wave velocities in the single crystal. The results are C11=13.7, C33=8.11, C44=3.50, C12=4.82, C13=5.68, and C14=-2.00, in units of 1011 dyncm2. Independent checks of several of the elastic constants were made employing other directions and polarizations of the wave velocities. With the exception of C13, these values substantially agree with the data of Voigt and Bhimasenachar. ?? 1962 The American Institute of Physics.

  7. Impact of airflow interaction on inhaled air quality and transport of contaminants in rooms with personalized and total volume ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melikov, Arsen Krikor; Cermak, Radim; Kovar, O.

    2003-01-01

    The impact of airflow interaction on inhaled air quality and transport of contaminants between occupants was studied in regard to pollution from floor covering, human bioeffluents and exhaled air, with combinations of two personalized ventilation systems (PV) with mixing and displacement ventilat......The impact of airflow interaction on inhaled air quality and transport of contaminants between occupants was studied in regard to pollution from floor covering, human bioeffluents and exhaled air, with combinations of two personalized ventilation systems (PV) with mixing and displacement...... ventilation. In total, 80 L/s of clean air supplied at 20°C was distributed between the ventilation systems at different combinations of personalized airflow rate. Two breathing thermal manikins were used to simulate occupants in a full-scale test room. Regardless of the airflow interaction, the inhaled air...... quality with personalized and mixing ventilation was higher or at least similar compared to mixing ventilation alone. In the case of PV combined with displacement ventilation, the interaction caused mixing of the room air, an increase in the transport of bioeffluents and exhaled air between occupants and...

  8. Air-to-Air Encounters in Southeast Asia. Volume III. Events from 1 March 1967 to 1 August 1967 and Miscellaneous Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    1969-02-01

    0906H Two F-4Cs (BLUE Flight) were on a SILVER DAWN/BIG EYE tsoort mission. 11. DATA SOURCES 35 TFW Danang PASTEL at 1510Z 8 April 1966 󈧐. NARRATIVE...the start of this attack and had increased to over two rings when the MI~s broke off. 11. DATA SOURCES 432TPW OPREP-3 011150Z January 67 PASTEL 00016...Unknown No prior air-to-air engagements 11. DATA SOURCES Messages * Reports: 432TRW OPREP-3 16o514Z Jan 67, PASTEL 00397 4I32TRW OPREP-3 2607341Z Jan 67

  9. Algorithm for structure constants

    CERN Document Server

    Paiva, F M

    2011-01-01

    In a $n$-dimensional Lie algebra, random numerical values are assigned by computer to $n(n-1)$ especially selected structure constants. An algorithm is then created, which calculates without ambiguity the remaining constants, obeying the Jacobi conditions. Differently from others, this algorithm is suitable even for poor personal computer. ------------- En $n$-dimensia algebro de Lie, hazardaj numeraj valoroj estas asignitaj per komputilo al $n(n-1)$ speciale elektitaj konstantoj de strukturo. Tiam algoritmo estas kreita, kalkulante senambigue la ceterajn konstantojn, obeante kondicxojn de Jacobi. Malsimile al aliaj algoritmoj, tiu cxi tauxgas ecx por malpotenca komputilo.

  10. Radiographic constant exposure technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domanus, Joseph Czeslaw

    1985-01-01

    The constant exposure technique has been applied to assess various industrial radiographic systems. Different X-ray films and radiographic papers of two producers were compared. Special attention was given to fast film and paper used with fluorometallic screens. Radiographic image quality was tes...... was tested by the use of ISO wire IQI's and ASTM penetrameters used on Al and Fe test plates. Relative speed and reduction of kilovoltage obtained with the constant exposure technique were calculated. The advantages of fast radiographic systems are pointed out...

  11. Control of nitrogen oxides: assessment of needs and options, technical support document. Volume 6. Applying NO/sub x/ air quality models. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayes, S.R.; Liu, C.; Holman, H.Y.; Souten, D.R.; Hillyer, M.J.; Killus, J.P.

    1981-09-01

    This is the final volume of a six-volume Technical Support Document which is designed to provide utilities with information needed to contend with several pending NO/sub x/-related regulatory changes. This volume examines the use and choice of air quality models to assess the impacts of power plant emissions of NO/sub x/. Simple Gaussian models and more refined reactive plume models are considered. The choice is seen to depend upon the specific circumstances and the regulatory issue being addressed as well as upon the resources required by the alternative models. Since general dicta for model choice are not possible, a case study approach is used to explain the choice through analogy. For each case study, four steps are outlined. Background material for basic reader orientation are presented, thus illustrating the types of information that must be assembled. The situation is visualized in air quality modeling terms. The selection of a suitable model or set of models is demonstrated with the use of a series of decision trees. Guidance is offered the reader in identifying data needs and assessing data availability. By examining the representative case studies, the reader should gain insight into the planning and conduct of the NO/sub x/ modeling process.

  12. The Fine Structure Constant

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    electromagnetic force between subatomic charged parti- cles, and essentially determines how an atom holds to- gether its electrons. It is however not obvious why this constant has this ..... about α in 1948: “The theoretical interpretation of its numerical value is one of the most important unsolved problems of atomic physics.”

  13. Gravitational constant calculation methodologies

    OpenAIRE

    Shakhparonov, V. M.; Karagioz, O. V.; Izmailov, V. P.

    2011-01-01

    We consider the gravitational constant calculation methodologies for a rectangular block of the torsion balance body presented in the papers Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 240801 (2009) and Phys.Rev. D. 82, 022001 (2010). We have established the influence of non-equilibrium gas flows on the obtained values of G.

  14. Modeling Air Stripping of Ammonia in an Agitated Vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kofi, Adu-Wusu; Martino, Christopher J.; Wilmarth, William R.; Bennett, William M.; Peters, Robert s.

    2005-11-29

    A model has been developed to predict the rate of removal of ammonia (NH{sub 3}) from solution in a sparged agitated vessel. The model is first-order with respect to liquid-phase concentration of NH{sub 3}. The rate constant for the first-order equation is a function of parameters related to the vessel/impeller characteristics, the air/liquid properties as well as the process conditions. However, the vessel/impeller characteristics, the air/liquid properties, and the process conditions reduce the rate constant dependence to only three parameters, namely, the air sparge rate, the liquid volume or batch size, and the Henry's law constant of NH{sub 3} for the liquid or solution. Thus, the rate of removal is not mass-transfer limited. High air sparge rates, high temperatures, and low liquid volumes or batch sizes increase the rate of removal of NH{sub 3} from solution. The Henry's law constant effect is somewhat reflected in the temperature since Henry's law constant increases with increasing temperature. Data obtained from actual air stripping operation agree fairly well with the model predictions.

  15. Pilots' use of a traffic alert and collision-avoidance system (TCAS 2) in simulated air carrier operations. Volume 1: Methodology, summary and conclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, Sheryl L.; Billings, Charles E.; Scott, Barry C.; Tuttell, Robert J.; Olsen, M. Christine; Kozon, Thomas E.

    1989-01-01

    Pilots' use of and responses to a traffic alert and collision-avoidance system (TCAS 2) in simulated air carrier line operations are described in Volume 1. TCAS 2 monitors the positions of nearby aircraft by means of transponder interrogation, and it commands a climb or descent when conflicting aircraft are projected to reach an unsafe closest point-of-approach within 20 to 25 seconds. A different level of information about the location of other air traffic was presented to each of three groups of flight crews during their execution of eight simulated air carrier flights. A fourth group of pilots flew the same segments without TCAS 2 equipment. Traffic conflicts were generated at intervals during the flights; many of the conflict aircraft were visible to the flight crews. The TCAS equipment successfully ameliorated the seriousness of all conflicts; three of four non-TCAS crews had hazardous encounters. Response times to TCAS maneuver commands did not differ as a function of the amount of information provided, nor did response accuracy. Differences in flight experience did not appear to contribute to the small performance differences observed. Pilots used the displays of conflicting traffic to maneuver to avoid unseen traffic before maneuver advisories were issued by the TCAS equipment. The results indicate: (1) that pilots utilize TCAS effectively within the response times allocated by the TCAS logic, and (2) that TCAS 2 is an effective collision avoidance device. Volume II contains the appendices referenced in Volume I, providing details of the experiment and the results, and the text of two reports written in support of the program.

  16. Pilots' use of a traffic alert and collision-avoidance system (TCAS 2) in simulated air carrier operations. Volume 2: Appendices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, Sheryl L.; Billings, Charles E.; Scott, Barry C.; Tuttell, Robert J.; Olsen, M. Christine; Kozon, Thomas E.

    1989-01-01

    Pilots' use of and responses to a traffic alert and collision-avoidance system (TCAS 2) in simulated air carrier line operations are discribed in Volume 1. TCAS 2 monitors the positions of nearby aircraft by means of transponder interrogation, and it commands a climb or descent which conflicting aircraft are projected to reach an unsafe closest point-of-approach within 20 to 25 seconds. A different level of information about the location of other air traffic was presented to each of three groups of flight crews during their execution of eight simulated air carrier flights. A fourth group of pilots flew the same segments without TCAS 2 equipment. Traffic conflicts were generated at intervals during the flights; many of the conflict aircraft were visible to the flight crews. The TCAS equipment successfully ameliorated the seriousness of all conflicts; three of four non-TCAS crews had hazardous encounters. Response times to TCAS maneuver commands did not differ as a function of the amount of information provided, nor did response accuracy. Differences in flight experience did not appear to contribute to the small performance differences observed. Pilots used the displays of conflicting traffic to maneuver to avoid unseen traffic before maneuver advisories were issued by the TCAS equipment. The results indicate: (1) that pilots utilize TCAS effectively within the response times allocated by the TCAS logic, and (2) that TCAS 2 is an effective collision avoidance device. Volume 2 contains the appendices referenced in Volume 1, providing details of the experiment and the results, and the text of two reports written in support of the program.

  17. Expanded Air Force Physical Fitness Battery: Muscle Strength, Muscle Endurance, and Flexibility Considered. Volume I, Final Report

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Palmer, Barbara

    1997-01-01

    .... It was concluded that of the benefits of strength training, improved deployment preparedness, safe and efficient everyday work performance, and safer aerobic and team activity are most important to the Air Force...

  18. Automation Applications in an Advanced Air Traffic Management System : Volume 3. Methodology for Man-Machine Task Allocation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-08-01

    Volume 3 describes the methodology for man-machine task allocation. It contains a description of man and machine performance capabilities and an explanation of the methodology employed to allocate tasks to human or automated resources. It also presen...

  19. Keeping the Edge. Air Force Materiel Command Cold War Context (1945-1991). Volume 2: Installations and Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-08-01

    character of each building within the gToup. Again, banded fenestration accented only the public facade (toward the circular drive), and was virtually ...time, the United States Air Force had virtually no defense against SAMs. The Tactical Air Warfare Center developed and tested the F-4G (Wild Weasel...site plans for the ADC command post at Kirtland included a small gatehouse (guard station), the ADCC (the Type 4 Operations Building / Building O), a

  20. APLIKASI METODE NUMERIK DALAM PERHITUNGAN LUAS DAN VOLUME BADAN KAPAL YANG BERADA DI BAWAH PERMUKAAN AIR LAUT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eko Julianto Sasono

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This research studied about application of numeric metode to calculate area and volume of ship under water. The numeric methode used in this research are trapesium and simpson methode as comparesion. Correction value condition must be less than 0.5 %. As the results, simpson methode is better than trapezium with correction value for midship area and volume displacement less than 0.5 %.

  1. Studi Numerik Karakteristik Pengeringan Batubara pada Fluidized Bed Coal Dyer Terhadap Pengaruh Variasi Temperatur Air Heater dengan Tube Heater Tersusun Staggered dan Perbandingan Volume Chamber dan Volume Batubara Sebesar 50%

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayu Sarah Novrizqa

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Indonesia mempunyai sumber daya batubara yang cukup besar dan sebagian besar sumber daya tersebut termasuk ke dalam batubara peringkat rendah berupa lignit dan sub-bituminus yang memiliki kadar air yang tinggi. Tingginya kadar air menyebabkan rendahnya nilai kalor, sehingga pemanfaatan batubara jenis ini menjadi terbatas dan sulit untuk dipasarkan. Oleh karena itu perlu adanya teknologi pengeringan yang dapat meningkatkan nilai kalor dari batubara tersebut. Dalam proses pengeringan akan melibatkan perpindahan panas dan massa. Proses ini akan didefinisikan dalam suatu studi numerik, dimana penelitian ini dilakukan dengan metode numerik dengan software Fluent 6.3.26. Pemilihan kondisi simulasi digunakan model turbulensi k-ε realizable dan skema interpolasi first-order upwind. Serta mempelajari pengaruh temperatur inlet udara pengering yang divariasikan. Variasi temperatur adalah 316 K, 327 K, 339 K. Dari penelitian ini  dapat diketahui nilai drying rate serta pengaruh temperatur dan posisi batubara dalam proses pengeringan pada drying chamber fluidized bed coal dryer dengan tube heater tersusun staggered serta pengaruh dari perbandingan volume batubara dengan volume chamber sebesar 50%. Moisture content batubara yang paling banyak berkurang dialami oleh temperature outlet terbesar yaitu 339 K dari 0,22 hingga 0,0167. Laju pengeringan yang memiliki waktu paling cepat yaitu pada temperatur 339 K, sekitar 1100 detik, sedangkan yang memiliki waktu paling lama yaitu pada temperatur 316 K, sekitar 4600 detik.

  2. The Hubble Constant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Neal

    2015-01-01

    I review the current state of determinations of the Hubble constant, which gives the length scale of the Universe by relating the expansion velocity of objects to their distance. There are two broad categories of measurements. The first uses individual astrophysical objects which have some property that allows their intrinsic luminosity or size to be determined, or allows the determination of their distance by geometric means. The second category comprises the use of all-sky cosmic microwave background, or correlations between large samples of galaxies, to determine information about the geometry of the Universe and hence the Hubble constant, typically in a combination with other cosmological parameters. Many, but not all, object-based measurements give H0 values of around 72-74 km s(-1) Mpc(-1), with typical errors of 2-3 km s(-1) Mpc(-1). This is in mild discrepancy with CMB-based measurements, in particular those from the Planck satellite, which give values of 67-68 km s(-1) Mpc(-1) and typical errors of 1-2 km s(-1) Mpc(-1). The size of the remaining systematics indicate that accuracy rather than precision is the remaining problem in a good determination of the Hubble constant. Whether a discrepancy exists, and whether new physics is needed to resolve it, depends on details of the systematics of the object-based methods, and also on the assumptions about other cosmological parameters and which datasets are combined in the case of the all-sky methods.

  3. Analytical modeling of operating characteristics of premixing-prevaporizing fuel-air mixing passages. Volume 1: Analysis and results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, O. L.; Chiappetta, L. M.; Edwards, D. E.; Mcvey, J. B.

    1982-01-01

    A model for predicting the distribution of liquid fuel droplets and fuel vapor in premixing-prevaporizing fuel-air mixing passages of the direct injection type is reported. This model consists of three computer programs; a calculation of the two dimensional or axisymmetric air flow field neglecting the effects of fuel; a calculation of the three dimensional fuel droplet trajectories and evaporation rates in a known, moving air flow; a calculation of fuel vapor diffusing into a moving three dimensional air flow with source terms dependent on the droplet evaporation rates. The fuel droplets are treated as individual particle classes each satisfying Newton's law, a heat transfer, and a mass transfer equation. This fuel droplet model treats multicomponent fuels and incorporates the physics required for the treatment of elastic droplet collisions, droplet shattering, droplet coalescence and droplet wall interactions. The vapor diffusion calculation treats three dimensional, gas phase, turbulent diffusion processes. The analysis includes a model for the autoignition of the fuel air mixture based upon the rate of formation of an important intermediate chemical species during the preignition period.

  4. Storage of LWR spent fuel in air: Volume 1: Design and operation of a spent fuel oxidation test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thornhill, C.K.; Campbell, T.K.; Thornhill, R.E.

    1988-12-01

    This report describes the design and operation and technical accomplishments of a spent-fuel oxidation test facility at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The objective of the experiments conducted in this facility was to develop a data base for determining spent-fuel dry storage temperature limits by characterizing the oxidation behavior of light-water reactor (LWR) spent fuels in air. These data are needed to support licensing of dry storage in air as an alternative to spent-fuel storage in water pools. They are to be used to develop and validate predictive models of spent-fuel behavior during dry air storage in an Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI). The present licensed alternative to pool storage of spent fuel is dry storage in an inert gas environment, which is called inerted dry storage (IDS). Licensed air storage, however, would not require monitoring for maintenance of an inert-gas environment (which IDS requires) but does require the development of allowable temperature limits below which UO/sub 2/ oxidation in breached fuel rods would not become a problem. Scoping tests at PNL with nonirradiated UO/sub 2/ pellets and spent-fuel fragment specimens identified the need for a statistically designed test matrix with test temperatures bounding anticipated maximum acceptable air-storage temperatures. This facility was designed and operated to satisfy that need. 7 refs.

  5. The Conference Proceedings of the 2001 Air Transport Research Society (ATRS) of the WCTR Society. Volume 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yeong-Heok (Editor); Bowen, Brent D. (Editor); Tarry, Scott E. (Editor)

    2001-01-01

    The papers presented at this conference include: 1) The Global Airline Company: Agent of Market Power or Competition? 2) Airport Pavement Management; 3) Reservation System Providers and the Impact of Codeshare Arrangements on Screen Display; 4) Strategic Classification of Current Airline Alliances and Examination of Critical Factors Involving the Formations - an Explorative Perspective; 5) Airport Privatization Policy and Performance Measurement in Korea; 6) Pilot and Air Traffic Controller Relationships: The Role of Interdependence and Relative Influence; 7) Liberalization of Air Cargo Services: Background and an Economic Analysis; 8) The Implication of Hub and Spoke Network on the Airline Alliance Strategy.

  6. The Hubble Constant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neal Jackson

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available I review the current state of determinations of the Hubble constant, which gives the length scale of the Universe by relating the expansion velocity of objects to their distance. There are two broad categories of measurements. The first uses individual astrophysical objects which have some property that allows their intrinsic luminosity or size to be determined, or allows the determination of their distance by geometric means. The second category comprises the use of all-sky cosmic microwave background, or correlations between large samples of galaxies, to determine information about the geometry of the Universe and hence the Hubble constant, typically in a combination with other cosmological parameters. Many, but not all, object-based measurements give H_0 values of around 72–74 km s^–1 Mpc^–1, with typical errors of 2–3 km s^–1 Mpc^–1. This is in mild discrepancy with CMB-based measurements, in particular those from the Planck satellite, which give values of 67–68 km s^–1 Mpc^–1 and typical errors of 1–2 km s^–1 Mpc^–1. The size of the remaining systematics indicate that accuracy rather than precision is the remaining problem in a good determination of the Hubble constant. Whether a discrepancy exists, and whether new physics is needed to resolve it, depends on details of the systematics of the object-based methods, and also on the assumptions about other cosmological parameters and which datasets are combined in the case of the all-sky methods.

  7. Spaces of constant curvature

    CERN Document Server

    Wolf, Joseph A

    2010-01-01

    This book is the sixth edition of the classic Spaces of Constant Curvature, first published in 1967, with the previous (fifth) edition published in 1984. It illustrates the high degree of interplay between group theory and geometry. The reader will benefit from the very concise treatments of riemannian and pseudo-riemannian manifolds and their curvatures, of the representation theory of finite groups, and of indications of recent progress in discrete subgroups of Lie groups. Part I is a brief introduction to differentiable manifolds, covering spaces, and riemannian and pseudo-riemannian geomet

  8. Commercialization of air conditioning heat pump/water heater. Final technical report, Volume 1: Transmittal documents; Executive summary; Project summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-01-30

    This is the final technical report on a commercialization project for an air conditioning heat pump water heater. The objective of the project was to produce a saleable system which would be economically competitive with natural gas and cost effective with regard to initial cost versus annual operating costs. The development and commercialization of the system is described.

  9. The Conference Proceedings of the 1997 Air Transport Research Group (ATRG) of the WCTR Society. Volume 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oum, T. H.; Bowen, B. D.

    1997-01-01

    This paper covers topics such as: Safety and Air Fares; International Airline Safety; Multi-fare Seat Allocation Problem; Dynamic Allocation of Airline Seat Inventory; Seat Allocation on Flights with Two Fares; Effects of Intercontinental Alliances; Domestic Airline Mergers; Simulating the Effects of Airline Deregulation on Frequency Choice; and Firm Size Inequality and Market Power.

  10. Report on Technology Horizons: A Vision for Air Force Science and Technology During 2010-2030. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-15

    may enable approaches such as pulse-to-pulse waveform diversity that can assist in offsetting the threats posed by DRFMs and other electronic...warfare. As potential adversaries increasingly move to AESA radars and make use of DRFM -based systems for RF spoofing, Air Force freedom of operation

  11. Gestational Exposure to Air Pollution Alters Cortical Volume, Microglial Morphology, and Microglia-Neuron Interactions in a Sex-Specific Manner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica L. Bolton

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Microglia are the resident immune cells of the brain, important for normal neural development in addition to host defense in response to inflammatory stimuli. Air pollution is one of the most pervasive and harmful environmental toxicants in the modern world, and several large scale epidemiological studies have recently linked prenatal air pollution exposure with an increased risk of neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism spectrum disorder (ASD. Diesel exhaust particles (DEP are a primary toxic component of air pollution, and markedly activate microglia in vitro and in vivo in adult rodents. We have demonstrated that prenatal exposure to DEP in mice, i.e., to the pregnant dams throughout gestation, results in a persistent vulnerability to behavioral deficits in adult offspring, especially in males, which is intriguing given the greater incidence of ASD in males to females (∼4:1. Moreover, there is a striking upregulation of toll-like receptor (TLR 4 gene expression within the brains of the same mice, and this expression is primarily in microglia. Here we explored the impact of gestational exposure to DEP or vehicle on microglial morphology in the developing brains of male and female mice. DEP exposure increased inflammatory cytokine protein and altered the morphology of microglia, consistent with activation or a delay in maturation, only within the embryonic brains of male mice; and these effects were dependent on TLR4. DEP exposure also increased cortical volume at embryonic day (E18, which switched to decreased volume by post-natal day (P30 in males, suggesting an impact on the developing neural stem cell niche. Consistent with this hypothesis, we found increased microglial-neuronal interactions in male offspring that received DEP compared to all other groups. Taken together, these data suggest a mechanism by which prenatal exposure to environmental toxins may affect microglial development and long-term function, and thereby contribute

  12. Oscillation of large air bubble cloud

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Y.Y.; Kim, H.Y.; Park, J.K. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-07-01

    The behavior of a large air bubble cloud, which is generated by the air discharged from a perforated sparger, is analyzed by solving Rayleigh-Plesset equation, energy equations and energy balance equation. The equations are solved by Runge-Kutta integration and MacCormack finite difference method. Initial conditions such as driving pressure, air volume, and void fraction strongly affect the bubble pressure amplitude and oscillation frequency. The pool temperature has a strong effect on the oscillation frequency and a negligible effect on the pressure amplitude. The polytropic constant during the compression and expansion processes of individual bubbles ranges from 1.0 to 1.4, which may be attributed to the fact that small bubbles oscillated in frequencies different from their resonance. The temperature of the bubble cloud rapidly approaches the ambient temperature, as is expected from the polytropic constants being between 1.0 and 1.4. (authors)

  13. Surface Environmental Surveillance Project: Locations Manual Volume 1 – Air and Water Volume 2 – Farm Products, Soil & Vegetation, and Wildlife

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fritz, Brad G.; Patton, Gregory W.; Stegen, Amanda; Poston, Ted M.

    2009-01-01

    This report describes all environmental monitoring locations associated with the Surface Environmental Surveillance Project. Environmental surveillance of the Hanford site and surrounding areas is conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Sampling is conducted to evaluate levels of radioactive and nonradioactive pollutants in the Hanford environs, as required in DOE Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program, and DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment. The environmental surveillance sampling design is described in the Hanford Site Environmental Monitoring Plan, United States Department of Energy, Richland Operation Office (DOE/RL-91-50). This document contains the locations of sites used to collect samples for the Surface Environmental Surveillance Project (SESP). Each section includes directions, maps, and pictures of the locations. A general knowledge of roads and highways on and around the Hanford Site is necessary to successfully use this manual. Supplemental information (Maps, Gazetteer, etc.) may be necessary if user is unfamiliar with local routes. The SESP is a multimedia environmental surveillance effort to measure the concentrations of radionuclides and chemicals in environmental media to demonstrate compliance with applicable environmental quality standards and public exposure limits, and assessing environmental impacts. Project personnel annually collect selected samples of ambient air, surface water, agricultural products, fish, wildlife, and sediments. Soil and vegetation samples are collected approximately every 5 years. Analytical capabilities include the measurement of radionuclides at very low environmental concentrations and, in selected media, nonradiological chemicals including metals, anions, volatile organic compounds, and total organic carbon.

  14. Air ejector augmented compressed air energy storage system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrens, Frederick W.; Kartsounes, George T.

    1980-01-01

    Energy is stored in slack demand periods by charging a plurality of underground reservoirs with air to the same peak storage pressure, during peak demand periods throttling the air from one storage reservoir into a gas turbine system at a constant inlet pressure until the air pressure in the reservoir falls to said constant inlet pressure, thereupon permitting air in a second reservoir to flow into said gas turbine system while drawing air from the first reservoir through a variable geometry air ejector and adjusting said variable geometry air ejector, said air flow being essentially at the constant inlet pressure of the gas turbine system.

  15. Air ejector augmented compressed air energy storage system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrens, F.W.; Kartsounes, G.T.

    Energy is stored in slack demand periods by charging a plurality of underground reservoirs with air to the same peak storage pressure, during peak demand periods throttling the air from one storage reservoir into a gas turbine system at a constant inlet pressure until the air presure in the reservoir falls to said constant inlet pressure, thereupon permitting air in a second reservoir to flow into said gas turbine system while drawing air from the first reservoir through a variable geometry air ejector and adjusting said variable geometry air ejector, said air flow being essentially at the constant inlet pressure of the gas turbine system.

  16. The effect of undissolved air on isochoric freezing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Pedro A; Preciado, Jessica; Carlson, Gary; DeLonzor, Russ; Rubinsky, Boris

    2016-06-01

    This study evaluates the effect of undissolved air on isochoric freezing of aqueous solutions. Isochoric freezing is concerned with freezing in a constant volume thermodynamic system. A possible advantage of the process is that it substantially reduces the percentage of ice in the system at every subzero temperature, relative to atmospheric freezing. At the pressures generated by isochoric freezing, or high pressure isobaric freezing, air cannot be considered an incompressible substance and the presence of undissolved air substantially increases the amount of ice that forms at any subfreezing temperature. This effect is measurable at air volumes as low as 1%. Therefore eliminating the undissolved air, or any separate gaseous phase, from the system is essential for retaining the properties of isochoric freezing. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Quantum Theory without Planck's Constant

    OpenAIRE

    Ralston, John P.

    2012-01-01

    Planck's constant was introduced as a fundamental scale in the early history of quantum mechanics. We find a modern approach where Planck's constant is absent: it is unobservable except as a constant of human convention. Despite long reference to experiment, review shows that Planck's constant cannot be obtained from the data of Ryberg, Davisson and Germer, Compton, or that used by Planck himself. In the new approach Planck's constant is tied to macroscopic conventions of Newtonian origin, wh...

  18. When constants are important

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beiu, V.

    1997-04-01

    In this paper the authors discuss several complexity aspects pertaining to neural networks, commonly known as the curse of dimensionality. The focus will be on: (1) size complexity and depth-size tradeoffs; (2) complexity of learning; and (3) precision and limited interconnectivity. Results have been obtained for each of these problems when dealt with separately, but few things are known as to the links among them. They start by presenting known results and try to establish connections between them. These show that they are facing very difficult problems--exponential growth in either space (i.e. precision and size) and/or time (i.e., learning and depth)--when resorting to neural networks for solving general problems. The paper will present a solution for lowering some constants, by playing on the depth-size tradeoff.

  19. The Hubble Constant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackson Neal

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available I review the current state of determinations of the Hubble constant, which gives the length scale of the Universe by relating the expansion velocity of objects to their distance. In the last 20 years, much progress has been made and estimates now range between 60 and 75 km s^-1 Mpc^-1, with most now between 70 and 75 km s^-1 Mpc^-1, a huge improvement over the factor-of-2 uncertainty which used to prevail. Further improvements which gave a generally agreed margin of error of a few percent rather than the current 10% would be vital input to much other interesting cosmology. There are several programmes which are likely to lead us to this point in the next 10 years.

  20. Installation Restoration Program Stage 2-1 Remedial Investigation. Beale Air Force Base, Marysville, California. Volume 1. Text and Plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-03-29

    ABSTRACT ( Coen n mIvvrsg of new y &V AW n by blad anfbw) As part of the ongoing Installation Restoration Program at Beale Air Force Base, California, 24...detected at the same depths at 0.005 (be- low LOQ), 0.014, 0.006, and 0.21 mg/kg. 1,1,2 trichloro- ethane was detected at 0.009 mg/kg at 48 feet (42

  1. Commercialization of air conditioning heat pump/water heater. Final technical report, Volume 2: Appendix A through E

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-01-30

    This is the final technical report on a commercialization project for an air conditioning heat pump water heater. The objective of the project was to produce a saleable system which would be economically competitive with natural gas and cost effective with regard to initial cost versus annual operating costs. The development and commercialization of the system is described. Compiled data included in numerous figures, tables and graphs.

  2. AICUZ Handbook. A Guidance Document for Air Installation Compatible Use Zone (AICUZ) Program. Volume III. Appendices. Working Draft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    in the development of land use planning controls which will protect the public safety and health as well as preserve the operational capabilities of...assistance by - AFB to aid in the local land use planning process. This study updates information on base flying activities since 19. Noise contours and...acquisition by the Air Force, land use planning and controls are strongly encouraged in these areas for the protection of the public. A sample

  3. Predicted versus measured thoracic gas volumes of collegiate athletes made by the BOD POD air displacement plethysmography system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Dale R

    2015-10-01

    Measured (TGVm) and predicted (TGVp) thoracic gas volumes from the BOD POD were compared in 33 lean, university athletes. On average, TGVp (3.529 L) was not significantly different (p = 0.343) from TGVm (3.628 L); however, there was a bias (r = -0.703, p < 0.001). The difference in the percentage of body fat (BF) was within ±2% BF for 76% of the sample, but athletes at the extremes of height should have TGV measured.

  4. Charge Stratification and Fuel/Air Ratio Effect on theEfficiency of (ICADE) I. C. Engine Cycle

    OpenAIRE

    Hayder Abed Dhahad

    2011-01-01

    The Isolated Combustion and Diluted Expansion (ICADE) internal combustion engine cycle combines the advantages of constant volume combustion of the Otto cycle with the high compression ratio of the Diesel cycle. This work studies the effect of isolated air mass (charge stratification) on the efficiency of the cycle; the analysis shows that the decrease of isolated air mass will increase the efficiency of the cycle and the large dilution air mass will quench all NOx forming reactions and reduc...

  5. Electromagnetic corrections to pseudoscalar decay constants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glaessle, Benjamin Simon

    2017-03-06

    First principles Lattice quantum chromodynamics (LQCD) calculations enable the determination of low energy hadronic amplitudes. Precision LQCD calculations with relative errors smaller than approximately 1% require the inclusion of electromagnetic effects. We demonstrate that including (quenched) quantum electrodynamics effects in the LQCD calculation effects the values obtained for pseudoscalar decay constants in the per mille range. The importance of systematic effects, including finite volume effects and the charge dependence of renormalization and improvement coefficients, is highlighted.

  6. Immunochemical estimations of allergenic activities from outdoor aero-allergens, collected by a high-volume air sampler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, J; Poulsen, L K; Mygind, K

    1989-01-01

    , and the pulverizing elution technique was found to be optimal with regard to yield and convenience. When a surfactant, Tween 20 (0.5% v/v), was added to the elution buffer, a recovery of 80% could be obtained. Allergens in eluates were analysed by means of an IgG-subclass RAST inhibition assay. This immunochemical...... method for quantification of airborne allergens was validated, as a high recovery of timothy grass pollen allergens was eluted from air filters, and eluates were shown specific by RAST inhibition. The amount of immunochemically measured airborne timothy and birch allergens collected by means of the HIVOL...

  7. The U.S. Air Service in World War I. Volume III. The Battle of St. Mihiel

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    the Bois de Gargantua , and on the second day will advance to the western limit of its sector.... (e) The attack from the west will be delivered by the...for defence. This order will carry the left of the 4th Corps through the woods of Belle Oziere and through the Bois de Gargantua . The Army Commander...Bezonvaux, 484 Bicqueley airfield, 54, 59, 80, 81, 84 Billy-sous-les-Cotes, 281 Blanzee, 484 Block, Capt. P.A., 122 Bois de Gargantua , 77 740 U.S. Air

  8. United States Air Force Summer Research Program 1991. High School Apprenticeship Program (HSAP) Reports. Volume 10. Armstrong Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-09

    20 tubing. The angled end of the PE 10 tubing was pushed to meet the PE 19-6 20 tubing. With a metal spatula , epoxy was applied to the place where the...long duty days, they became the most important source of nutrition. However, the lunches were prepared by MAC kitchens as carefully and as thoroughly...important source of nutrition for aircrew during long (20 hours) duty days. They are provided by MAC base kitchens and consumed by air crew during their

  9. The Conference Proceedings of the 1999 Air Transport Research Group (ATRG) of the WCTR Society. Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Anming (Editor); Bowen Brent D. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    In this paper, we develop a model with which allows us to measure not only the changes in equilibrium outcomes and welfare consequences of liberalizing a bilateral air transport agreement, but also the distribution of the gains and losses to carriers and consumers of each bilateral country and those of the third foreign countries. Our model also allows to measure the effects of changes in a bilateral agreement on the amount of traffic diversion between the direct bilateral routes and the indirect routes via a third country. We also provide an extension of our model to a case of oligopoly market outcome (Coumot Nash equilibrium). In our model, quality aspects are treated in the framework of hedonic price theory by specifying the quality-adjusted price (quantity) as a multiplication of the observed price (quantity) by the reciprocal quality index function (the quality index function). Numerical simulations were conducted to measure the effects of changing the following major policy levers in a bilateral air transport agreement: 1) Removing price regulation while retaining frequency and entry restrictions; 2) Removing price and entry regulation while retaining frequency restrictions; 3) Removing frequency regulations while retaining price and entry regulations; 4) Removing frequency and entry regulations while retaining price regulation; 5) Removing price and frequency regulations while retaining entry restriction; and 6) Removing all price, frequency and entry regulations (de facto, open skies).

  10. Preliminary feasibility evalution of compressed air storage power systems. Volume II. Appendices, period June 1975--December 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-12-01

    Interest in compressed air storage has been developing in Sweden, Finland, Denmark, England, and France, as well as the United States. One commercial unit is under construction in Huntorf, West Germany. Compressed air for peak power can be stored either in natural or man-made caverns. Only new excavations in hard rock down to depths of about 2500 feet are considered in this report. In 1974, conditions for underground storage were discussed in a Geological Survey of Potential Cavern Areas in New England, referred to as the CAINE report. In this survey of the northeast region, the rest of the corridor between Washington and Boston has been added. The rock formations in the entire area of about 45,000 square miles are evaluated. The physical properties of rocks and criteria for their evaluation in underground openings are discussed. Methods of rock excavation and the basis for selecting areas are considered. Information on bedrock units along the corridor is reviewed. A list of favorable rock formations is included.

  11. Personality factors in flight operations. Volume 1: Leader characteristics and crew performance in a full-mission air transport simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chidester, Thomas R.; Kanki, Barbara G.; Foushee, H. Clayton; Dickinson, Cortlandt L.; Bowles, Stephen V.

    1990-01-01

    Crew effectiveness is a joint product of the piloting skills, attitudes, and personality characteristics of team members. As obvious as this point might seem, both traditional approaches to optimizing crew performance and more recent training development highlighting crew coordination have emphasized only the skill and attitudinal dimensions. This volume is the first in a series of papers on this simulation. A subsequent volume will focus on patterns of communication within crews. The results of a full-mission simulation research study assessing the impact of individual personality on crew performance is reported. Using a selection algorithm described in previous research, captains were classified as fitting one of three profiles along a battery of personality assessment scales. The performances of 23 crews led by captains fitting each profile were contrasted over a one-and-one-half-day simulated trip. Crews led by captains fitting a positive Instrumental-Expressive profile (high achievement motivation and interpersonal skill) were consistently effective and made fewer errors. Crews led by captains fitting a Negative Expressive profile (below average achievement motivation, negative expressive style, such as complaining) were consistently less effective and made more errors. Crews led by captains fitting a Negative Instrumental profile (high levels of competitiveness, verbal aggressiveness, and impatience and irritability) were less effective on the first day but equal to the best on the second day. These results underscore the importance of stable personality variables as predictors of team coordination and performance.

  12. Natural air ventilation in underground galleries as a tool to increase radon sampling volumes for geologic monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eff-Darwich, Antonio [Departamento de Edafologia y Geologia, Universidad de La Laguna, Av. Astrofisico Francisco, Sanchez s/n, 38206 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, c/Via Lactea s/n, 38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)], E-mail: adarwich@ull.es; Vinas, Ronaldo [Departamento de Edafologia y Geologia, Universidad de La Laguna, Av. Astrofisico Francisco, Sanchez s/n, 38206 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Soler, Vicente [Estacion Volcanologica de Canarias, IPNA-CSIC, Av. Astrofisico Francisco Sanchez s/n, 38206 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Nuez, Julio de la; Quesada, Maria L. [Departamento de Edafologia y Geologia, Universidad de La Laguna, Av. Astrofisico Francisco, Sanchez s/n, 38206 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)

    2008-09-15

    A simple numerical model was implemented to infer airflow (natural ventilation) in underground tunnels from the differences in the temporal patterns of radon, {sup 222}Rn, concentration time-series that were measured at two distant points in the interior of the tunnels. The main purpose of this work was to demonstrate that the installation of radon monitoring stations closer to the entrance of the tunnels was sufficient to remotely analyse the distribution of radon concentration in their interiors. This could ease the monitoring of radon, since the effective sampling volume of a single monitoring station located closer to the entrance of a tunnel is approximately 30,000 times larger than the sampling volume of a sub-soil radon sensor. This methodology was applied to an underground gallery located in the volcanic island of Tenerife, Canary Islands. This island constitutes an ideal laboratory to study the geo-dynamical behaviour of radon because of the existence of a vast network of galleries that conforms the main water supply of the island.

  13. Beyond the Hubble Constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-08-01

    about the distances to galaxies and thereby about the expansion rate of the Universe. A simple way to determine the distance to a remote galaxy is by measuring its redshift, calculate its velocity from the redshift and divide this by the Hubble constant, H0. For instance, the measured redshift of the parent galaxy of SN 1995K (0.478) yields a velocity of 116,000 km/sec, somewhat more than one-third of the speed of light (300,000 km/sec). From the universal expansion rate, described by the Hubble constant (H0 = 20 km/sec per million lightyears as found by some studies), this velocity would indicate a distance to the supernova and its parent galaxy of about 5,800 million lightyears. The explosion of the supernova would thus have taken place 5,800 million years ago, i.e. about 1,000 million years before the solar system was formed. However, such a simple calculation works only for relatively ``nearby'' objects, perhaps out to some hundred million lightyears. When we look much further into space, we also look far back in time and it is not excluded that the universal expansion rate, i.e. the Hubble constant, may have been different at earlier epochs. This means that unless we know the change of the Hubble constant with time, we cannot determine reliable distances of distant galaxies from their measured redshifts and velocities. At the same time, knowledge about such change or lack of the same will provide unique information about the time elapsed since the Universe began to expand (the ``Big Bang''), that is, the age of the Universe and also its ultimate fate. The Deceleration Parameter q0 Cosmologists are therefore eager to determine not only the current expansion rate (i.e., the Hubble constant, H0) but also its possible change with time (known as the deceleration parameter, q0). Although a highly accurate value of H0 has still not become available, increasing attention is now given to the observational determination of the second parameter, cf. also the Appendix at the

  14. County-Level Climate Uncertainty for Risk Assessments: Volume 4 Appendix C - Historical Maximum Near-Surface Air Temperature.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Backus, George A.; Lowry, Thomas Stephen; Jones, Shannon M; Walker, La Tonya Nicole; Roberts, Barry L; Malczynski, Leonard A.

    2017-06-01

    This report uses the CMIP5 series of climate model simulations to produce country- level uncertainty distributions for use in socioeconomic risk assessments of climate change impacts. It provides appropriate probability distributions, by month, for 169 countries and autonomous-areas on temperature, precipitation, maximum temperature, maximum wind speed, humidity, runoff, soil moisture and evaporation for the historical period (1976-2005), and for decadal time periods to 2100. It also provides historical and future distributions for the Arctic region on ice concentration, ice thickness, age of ice, and ice ridging in 15-degree longitude arc segments from the Arctic Circle to 80 degrees latitude, plus two polar semicircular regions from 80 to 90 degrees latitude. The uncertainty is meant to describe the lack of knowledge rather than imprecision in the physical simulation because the emphasis is on unfalsified risk and its use to determine potential socioeconomic impacts. The full report is contained in 27 volumes.

  15. County-Level Climate Uncertainty for Risk Assessments: Volume 6 Appendix E - Historical Minimum Near-Surface Air Temperature.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Backus, George A.; Lowry, Thomas Stephen; Jones, Shannon M; Walker, La Tonya Nicole; Roberts, Barry L; Malczynski, Leonard A.

    2017-06-01

    This report uses the CMIP5 series of climate model simulations to produce country- level uncertainty distributions for use in socioeconomic risk assessments of climate change impacts. It provides appropriate probability distributions, by month, for 169 countries and autonomous-areas on temperature, precipitation, maximum temperature, maximum wind speed, humidity, runoff, soil moisture and evaporation for the historical period (1976-2005), and for decadal time periods to 2100. It also provides historical and future distributions for the Arctic region on ice concentration, ice thickness, age of ice, and ice ridging in 15-degree longitude arc segments from the Arctic Circle to 80 degrees latitude, plus two polar semicircular regions from 80 to 90 degrees latitude. The uncertainty is meant to describe the lack of knowledge rather than imprecision in the physical simulation because the emphasis is on unfalsified risk and its use to determine potential socioeconomic impacts. The full report is contained in 27 volumes.

  16. County-Level Climate Uncertainty for Risk Assessments: Volume 2 Appendix A - Historical Near-Surface Air Temperature.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Backus, George A.; Lowry, Thomas Stephen; Jones, Shannon M; Walker, La Tonya Nicole; Roberts, Barry L; Malczynski, Leonard A.

    2017-06-01

    This report uses the CMIP5 series of climate model simulations to produce country- level uncertainty distributions for use in socioeconomic risk assessments of climate change impacts. It provides appropriate probability distributions, by month, for 169 countries and autonomous-areas on temperature, precipitation, maximum temperature, maximum wind speed, humidity, runoff, soil moisture and evaporation for the historical period (1976-2005), and for decadal time periods to 2100. It also provides historical and future distributions for the Arctic region on ice concentration, ice thickness, age of ice, and ice ridging in 15-degree longitude arc segments from the Arctic Circle to 80 degrees latitude, plus two polar semicircular regions from 80 to 90 degrees latitude. The uncertainty is meant to describe the lack of knowledge rather than imprecision in the physical simulation because the emphasis is on unfalsified risk and its use to determine potential socioeconomic impacts. The full report is contained in 27 volumes.

  17. The Conference Proceedings of the 1998 Air Transport Research Group (ATRG) of the WCTR Society. Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oum, Tae Hoon (Editor); Bowen, Brent D. (Editor)

    1998-01-01

    Contents include the following: Airport choice in a multiple airport region: an empirical analysis for the San Francisco bay area. Liberalization of the westeuropian aviation: choice of a new hub airport for an airline. Austin Bergstrom airport traffic control tower establishment of a major activity level tower. A study to optimize the environmental capacity of Amsterdam airport schiphol.Airport performance in stakeholder involvement and communication strategies: a comparison of major Australian and North American air carrier and general aviation airports. Airport planning and location.Location of international airport and regional development. A simulation technique for analysis of Brasilian airport passanger terminal building.Multimodal airport access in Japan. Planning surface access provision at major airports Airline economics and the inclusion of environmental costs on airport hub pricing: a theoretical analysis. Airport financing and user charge systems in the USA. Optimal demand for operating lease of aircraft. Aircraft leasing industry and social welfare.The development of performance indicators for airports: a management perspective. Study about operational effect of the "security check-in" implantation in Brasilian international airports.Austin Bergstrom west loop cable system.and Optimal resource allocation model for airport passanger terminals.

  18. The Conference Proceedings of the 1998 Air Transport Research Group (ATRG) of the WCTR Society. Volume 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Brent D. (Editor); Oum, Tae Hoon (Editor)

    1998-01-01

    The Air Transport Research Group of the WCTR Society was formally launched as a special interest group at the 7h Triennial WCTR in Sydney, Australia in 1995. Since then, our membership base has expanded rapidly, and now includes over 400 active transportation researchers, policy-makers, industry executives, major corporations and research institutes from 28 countries. It became a tradition that the ATRG would hold an international conference at least once a year. In 1998, the ATRG organized a consecutive stream of 14 aviation sessions at the 8th Triennial WCTR Conference (July 12-17: Antwerp). Again, on 19-21 July, 1998, the ATRG Symposium was organized and executed every successfully by Dr. Aisling Reynolds-Feighan of the University College of Dublin. The Aviation Institute at the University of Nebraska at Omaha has published the Proceedings of the 1998 ATRG Dublin Symposium (being co-edited by Dr. Aisling Reynolds-Feighan and Professor Brent Bowen), and the Proceedings of the 1998 WCTR- ATRG Conference (being co-edited by Professors Tae H. Oum and Brent Bowen).

  19. Assessment of human sinus cavity air volume using tunable diode laser spectroscopy, with application to sinusitis diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jing; Zhang, Hao; Li, Tianqi; Lin, Huiying; Svanberg, Katarina; Svanberg, Sune

    2015-11-01

    Sinusitis is a very common disease and improved diagnostic tools are desirable also in view of reducing over-prescription of antibiotics. A non-intrusive optical technique called GASMAS (GAs in Scattering Media Absorption Spectroscopy), which has a true potential of being developed into an important complement to other means of detection, was utilized in this work. Water vapor in the frontal sinuses, related to the free gas volume, was studied at around 937 nm in healthy volunteers. The results show a good stability of the GASMAS signals over extended times for the frontal sinuses for all volunteers, showing promising applicability to detect anomalies due to sinusitis. Measurements were also performed following the application of a decongestion spray. No noticeable signal change was observed, which is consistent with the fact that the water vapor concentration is given by the temperature only, and is not influenced by changes in cavity ventilation. Evaluated GASMAS data recorded on 6 consecutive days show signal stability for the left and right frontal sinus in one of the test volunteers. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Determinação de volumes e pressões de balonetes de tubos traqueais insuflados com ar ambiente ou óxido nitroso Determinación de volúmenes y presiones de balones de tubos traqueales insuflados con aire ambiente u óxido nitroso Volume and pressure of tracheal tube cuffs filled with air or nitrous oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernesto Leonardo Cárpio Peña

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available JUSTIFICATIVA E OBJETIVOS: A pressão exercida pelo balonete do tubo traqueal contra a parede da traquéia deve permitir fluxo capilar adequado e prevenir escapes de ar ou aspiração pulmonar. Esta pesquisa procurou determinar as variações de pressão do balonete insuflado com ar ambiente ou com óxido nitroso a 100%. MÉTODO: Trinta pacientes foram selecionados para receber anestesia geral balanceada com intubação orotraqueal. O balonete foi insuflado conforme critérios clínicos. As medidas de base foram realizadas após 15 minutos do início da anestesia com um manômetro aneróide calibrado em cm de H2O e forneceram os valores iniciais de pressão e volume. Os pacientes foram divididos em dois grupos: balonete reinsuflado com ar ambiente, grupo A, ou com óxido nitroso, grupo B. As medidas de pressão foram obtidas em intervalos até a primeira hora e os resultados comparados. RESULTADOS: Os grupos mostraram-se comparáveis para idade e sexo. Em ambos os grupos os valores basais médios para pressão foram próximos de 40 cmH2O com 8 ml de volume. No grupo com ar ambiente, as pressões aumentaram até 36 cmH2O em uma hora. No grupo de balonete insuflado com N2O, as pressões diminuíram abaixo de 20 cmH2O entre 20 e 30 minutos de anestesia. CONCLUSÕES: O uso de N2O a 100% para insuflação do balonete de sonda traqueal não constitui método seguro, acarretando progressiva perda da capacidade de vedação. O uso de ar ambiente promove aumento de volume e de pressão no balonete, aumentando possibilidade de lesão da mucosa traqueal.JUSTIFICATIVA Y OBJETIVOS: La presión ejercida por el balón del tubo traqueal contra la pared de la traquea debe permitir flujo capilar adecuado y prevenir escapes de aire o aspiración pulmonar. Esta pesquisa buscó determinar las variaciones de presión del balón insuflado con aire ambiente o con óxido nitroso a 100%. MÉTODO: Treinta pacientes fueron seleccionados para recibir anestesia general

  1. Simulations of the potential revenue from investment in improved indoor air quality in an office building

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wargocki, Pawel; Djukanovic, Rade

    2005-01-01

    The annual costs of energy and maintenance in running a heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC) system and life-cycle costs (LCC) of investments for improving air quality in an office building were compared with the resulting revenues from increased office productivity as a consequence....... The air quality was improved by increasing the outdoor air supply rate and by reducing the pollution loads. These upgrades involved increased energy and HVAC maintenance costs, first costs of a HVAC system and building construction costs. But the additional investments were highly cost...... of improved worker performance; benefits from reduced health costs and sickness absence were not included. The building was simulated in a cold, a moderate and a hot climate. It was ventilated by a constant air volume (CAV) system with heat recovery and by a variable air volume (VAV) system with an economizer...

  2. Automatic air flow control in air conditioning ducts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obler, H. D.

    1972-01-01

    Device is designed which automatically selects air flow coming from either of two directions and which can be adjusted to desired air volume on either side. Device uses one movable and two fixed scoops which control air flow and air volume.

  3. The relative volume growth of minimal submanifolds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markvorsen, Steen; Palmer, V.

    2002-01-01

    The volume growth of certain well-defined subsets of minimal submanifolds in riemannian spaces are compared with the volume growth of balls and spheres ill space forms of constant curvature.......The volume growth of certain well-defined subsets of minimal submanifolds in riemannian spaces are compared with the volume growth of balls and spheres ill space forms of constant curvature....

  4. Recent advances in thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometery method to eliminate the matrix effect between air and water samples: application to the accurate determination of Henry's law constant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong-Hyun; Kim, Ki-Hyun

    2014-05-16

    Accurate values for the Henry's law constants are essential to describe the environmental dynamics of a solute, but substantial errors are recognized in many reported data due to practical difficulties in measuring solubility and/or vapor pressure. Despite such awareness, validation of experimental approaches has scarcely been made. An experimental approach based on thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometery (TD-GC-MS) method was developed to concurrently allow the accurate determination of target compounds from the headspace and aqueous samples in closed equilibrated system. The analysis of six aromatics and eight non-aromatic oxygenates was then carried out in a static headspace mode. An estimation of the potential bias and mass balance (i.e., sum of mass measured individually from gas and liquid phases vs. the mass initially added to the system) demonstrates compound-specific phase dependency so that the best results are obtained by aqueous (less soluble aromatics) and headspace analysis (more soluble non-aromatics). Accordingly, we were able to point to the possible sources of biases in previous studies and provide the best estimates for the Henry's constants (Matm(-1)): benzene (0.17), toluene (0.15), p-xylene (0.13), m-xylene (0.13), o-xylene (0.19), styrene (0.27); propionaldehyde (9.26), butyraldehyde (6.19), isovaleraldehyde (2.14), n-valeraldehyde (3.98), methyl ethyl ketone (10.5), methyl isobutyl ketone (3.93), n-butyl acetate (2.41), and isobutyl alcohol (22.2). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Uncertainty evaluation of the kerma in the air, related to the active volume in the ionization chamber of concentric cylinders, by Monte Carlo simulation; Avaliacao de incerteza no kerma no ar, em relacao ao volume ativo da camara de ionizacao de cilindros concentricos, por simulacao de Monte Carlo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lo Bianco, A.S.; Oliveira, H.P.S.; Peixoto, J.G.P., E-mail: abianco@ird.gov.b [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Lab. Nacional de Metrologia das Radiacoes Ionizantes (LNMRI)

    2009-07-01

    To implant the primary standard of the magnitude kerma in the air for X-ray between 10 - 50 keV, the National Metrology Laboratory of Ionizing Radiations (LNMRI) must evaluate all the uncertainties of measurement related with Victtoren chamber. So, it was evaluated the uncertainty of the kerma in the air consequent of the inaccuracy in the active volume of the chamber using the calculation of Monte Carlo as a tool through the Penelope software

  6. Assessment and prediction of thoracic gas volume in pregnant women: an evaluation in relation to body composition assessment using air displacement plethysmography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksson, Pontus; Löf, Marie; Forsum, Elisabet

    2013-01-14

    Assessment of body fat (BF) in pregnant women is important when investigating the relationship between maternal nutrition and offspring health. Convenient and accurate body composition methods applicable during pregnancy are therefore needed. Air displacement plethysmography, as applied in Bod Pod, represents such a method since it can assess body volume (BV) which, in combination with body weight, can be used to calculate body density and body composition. However, BV must be corrected for the thoracic gas volume (TGV) of the subject. In non-pregnant women, TGV may be predicted using equations, based on height and age. It is unknown, however, whether these equations are valid during pregnancy. Thus, we measured the TGV of women in gestational week 32 (n 27) by means of plethysmography and predicted their TGV using equations established for non-pregnant women. Body weight and BV of the women was measured using Bod Pod. Predicted TGV was significantly (P = 0·033) higher than measured TGV by 6 % on average. Calculations in hypothetical women showed that this overestimation tended to be more pronounced in women with small TGV than in women with large TGV. The overestimation of TGV resulted in a small but significant (P = 0·043) overestimation of BF, equivalent to only 0·5 % BF, on average. A Bland-Altman analysis showed that the limits of agreement were narrow (from -1·9 to 2·9 % BF). Thus, although predicted TGV was biased and too high, the effect on BF was marginal and probably unimportant in many situations.

  7. Spectrophotometric determination of association constant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    Least-squares 'Systematic Trial-and-Error Procedure' (STEP) for spectrophotometric evaluation of association constant (equilibrium constant) K and molar absorption coefficient E for a 1:1 molecular complex, A + B = C, with error analysis according to Conrow et al. (1964). An analysis of the Charge...

  8. Combustion characteristics of stratified mixture. 1st Report. Measurement of mixture distribution in a constant-volume combustion chamber using laser-induced NO2 fluorescence; Sojo kongoki no nensho tokusei ni kansuru kenkyu. 1. Laser reiki NO2 keikoho ni yoru teiyo nenshokinai kongoki bunpu no keisoku

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujimoto, M.; Nishida, K.; Hiroyasu, H. [Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Tabata, M. [Mazda Motor Corp., Hiroshima (Japan)

    1996-06-25

    Laser-induced fluorescence from nitrogen dioxide (NO2) as gas fuel tracer was applied to determine mixture stratification in a pancake-type constant-volume combustion chamber using propane and hydrogen fuels. The second-harmonic output of a pulsed Nd: YAG laser was used as a light source for fluorescence excitation. The fluorescence images were corrected by a gated image-intensified CCD camera. The quantitative analysis of fuel concentration was made possible by the application of linearity between fluorescence intensity and NO2 concentration at a low trace level. The stratified mixture (center-rich or center-lean) was concentrically formed in the central region of the chamber by a jet flow from a tangentially oriented port. The concentration difference in the radial direction of the chamber decreased with time from the start of injection. The rate of decrease was faster for hydrogen than for propane. After 300 ms from start of injection, however, the time histories of the concentration difference were nearly constant for both fuels regardless of overall concentration. 10 refs., 16 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Development of energy-efficient comfortable ventilation systems with air quality guided volume flow control and continuous monitoring of the window opening status. Part 1. Use of the LuQaS triple sensor for air quality guided volume flow control of mechanical ventilation systems in domestic buildings. Research project; Entwicklung energieeffizienter Komfortlueftungsanlagen mit luftqualitaetsgefuehrter Volumenstromregelung und kontinuierlicher Erfassung des Fensteroeffnungszustandes. Teilbericht 1. Einsatz des LuQaS-Triple-Sensors zur luftqualitaetsgefuehrten Volumenstromregelung von mechanischen Lueftungsanlagen in Wohngebaeuden. Forschungsprojekt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grossklos, Marc; Ebel, Witta; Knissel, Jens

    2011-05-15

    The report presents the preparatory work on the research project of the above title. The first chapter presents a status report on air quality monitoring inside rooms and evaluates the projects so far in which the LuQaS air quality sensor was used. The second chapter is a documentation of preliminary measurements using the LuQaS sensor in two passive residential buildings and several individual measurements for sensor calibration. It was found that in apartments with mechanical ventilation, the sensor reflects the user activities; further, the measured values indicate signal changes also in the off-air of the building, so that control via central sensors in the ventilation and off-air systems appears feasible. The third chapter discusses control strategies for air quality control. Apart from a discussion of control unit types, operating regimes, methods to determine rated values, and additional control functions, the effects of threshold value control with different threshold limit values and volume flow changes on the air quality of a model building was simulated. The results prove the expectation that the air quality inside a building will be influenced positively by air quality control. Theoretical investigations of the DrD method will be presented in another part-report of the project.

  10. Distribution of adhesion rate constant in the coal sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian Brožek

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Flotation is the process of enrichment which consists in differentiating the useful component (volume property in the separation products. Flotation leads to the differentiation of the volume property by means of applying the differentiation of surface properties. Since there is a correlation between these properties, the authors determined the distribution of adhesion rate constant in relation with the content of the useful component and applying the dispersive model of a particle. The content of the useful component is directly connected with the volume physical property, represented by particle density. The paper present distribution functions of density and adhesion rate constant in the sample. Also the relation between adhesion rate constant and ash content for narrow density fractions has been revealed.

  11. Within- and between-laboratory precision in the measurement of body volume using air displacement plethysmography and its effect on body composition assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, A L; Saunders, S; McCarthy, H D; Williams, J E; Fuller, N J

    2004-01-01

    To determine and compare the extent of within- and between-laboratory precision in body volume (BV) measurements using air displacement plethysmography (ADP), the BOD POD body composition system, and to interpret any such variability in terms of body composition estimates. Repeated test procedures of BV assessment using the BOD POD ADP were reproduced at two laboratories for the estimation of precision, both within and between laboratories. In total, 30 healthy adult volunteers, 14 men (age, 19-48 y; body mass index (BMI), 19.7-30.3 kg/m2) and 16 women (age, 19-40 y; BMI, 16.3-35.7 kg/m2), were each subjected to two test procedures at both laboratories. Two additional volunteers were independently subjected to 10 repeated test procedures at both laboratories. Repeated measurements of BV, uncorrected for the effects of isothermal air in the lungs and the surface area artifact, were obtained using the BOD POD ADP, with the identical protocol being faithfully applied at both laboratories. Uncorrected BV measurements were adjusted to give estimates of actual BV that were used to calculate body density (body weight (BWt)/actual BV) from which estimates of body composition were derived. The differences between repeated BV measurements or body composition estimates were used to assess within-laboratory precision (repeatability), as standard deviation (SD) and coefficient of variation; the differences between measurements reproduced at each laboratory were used to determine between-laboratory precision (reproducibility), as bias and 95% limits of agreement (from SD of the differences between laboratories). The extent of within-laboratory methodological precision for BV (uncorrected and actual) was variable according to subject, sample group and laboratory conditions (range of SD, 0.04-0.13 l), and was mostly due to within-individual biological variability (typically 78-99%) rather than to technical imprecision. There was a significant (PBOD POD instrument was reasonably

  12. The Handling of Constant Volumes of Various Concentrations of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper reports on the effects of varying the concentration of sea water dosed at a rate of 10% of body mass on the handling of fluid and solutes by jackass penguins (Spheniscus demersus). The salt gland only secreted when the seawater dosed was hypertonic to the plasma and caused a rise in plasma osmotic ...

  13. THE HANDLING OF CONSTANT VOLUMES OF VARIOUS CONCEN

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper reports on the effects of varying the concentration of seawater dosed at a rate of 10% of body mass on the hand ling of fluid and solutes by jackass penguins (Spheniscus demersus). The salt gland only secreted when the seawater dosed was hypertonic to the plasma and caused a rise in plasma osmotic ...

  14. High Duty Cycle, Extended Operation Constant Volume Combustion Engine Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Science Mission Directorate is chartered with answering fundamental questions requiring the view from and into space. Its future direction will be moving away...

  15. THE HANDLING OF CONSTANT VOLUMES OF VARIOUS CONCEN

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    veins of the flipper where samples were taken. The mean ± S D of the data obtained are presented in Table 3. Dosing with seawater at concentrations considerably exceeding plasma concentrations, ego 40% SW and above, increased the concentration of all plasma components although a large variation and low numbers ...

  16. Constant Volume Combustion Engine for Planetary Ascent Vehicles Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Mars Sample Return mission is being planned to return samples of Martian rock, regolith, and atmosphere to Earth for scientific analysis. The Martian sample size...

  17. Varying Constants, Gravitation and Cosmology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzan, Jean-Philippe

    2011-01-01

    Fundamental constants are a cornerstone of our physical laws. Any constant varying in space and/or time would reflect the existence of an almost massless field that couples to matter. This will induce a violation of the universality of free fall. Thus, it is of utmost importance for our understanding of gravity and of the domain of validity of general relativity to test for their constancy. We detail the relations between the constants, the tests of the local position invariance and of the universality of free fall. We then review the main experimental and observational constraints that have been obtained from atomic clocks, the Oklo phenomenon, solar system observations, meteorite dating, quasar absorption spectra, stellar physics, pulsar timing, the cosmic microwave background and big bang nucleosynthesis. At each step we describe the basics of each system, its dependence with respect to the constants, the known systematic effects and the most recent constraints that have been obtained. We then describe the main theoretical frameworks in which the low-energy constants may actually be varying and we focus on the unification mechanisms and the relations between the variation of different constants. To finish, we discuss the more speculative possibility of understanding their numerical values and the apparent fine-tuning that they confront us with.

  18. Varying Constants, Gravitation and Cosmology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Philippe Uzan

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Fundamental constants are a cornerstone of our physical laws. Any constant varying in space and/or time would reflect the existence of an almost massless field that couples to matter. This will induce a violation of the universality of free fall. Thus, it is of utmost importance for our understanding of gravity and of the domain of validity of general relativity to test for their constancy. We detail the relations between the constants, the tests of the local position invariance and of the universality of free fall. We then review the main experimental and observational constraints that have been obtained from atomic clocks, the Oklo phenomenon, solar system observations, meteorite dating, quasar absorption spectra, stellar physics, pulsar timing, the cosmic microwave background and big bang nucleosynthesis. At each step we describe the basics of each system, its dependence with respect to the constants, the known systematic effects and the most recent constraints that have been obtained. We then describe the main theoretical frameworks in which the low-energy constants may actually be varying and we focus on the unification mechanisms and the relations between the variation of different constants. To finish, we discuss the more speculative possibility of understanding their numerical values and the apparent fine-tuning that they confront us with.

  19. Environmental Report 1996, Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrach, R.J.

    1996-01-01

    This is Volume 2 of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s (LLNL`s) annual Environmental Report 1996, prepared for the US Department of Energy. Volume 2 supports Volume 1 summary data and is essentially a detailed data report that provides individual data points, where applicable. Volume 2 includes information on monitoring of air, air effluents, sewerable water, surface water, ground water, soil and sediment, vegetation and foodstuff, environmental radiation, and quality assurance.

  20. Assistência de ar e volumes de aplicação na deposição de calda e no controle do arroz vermelho (Oryza sativa L. Air assistance and volume of application in spray deposition and in red rice control (Oryza sativa L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leopoldo L. S. Vigano

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available O trabalho teve como objetivo avaliar o efeito da assistência de ar junto à barra pulverizadora e de três volumes de pulverização na dessecação e deposição da calda em arroz vermelho, sob cultivo de nabo forrageiro, em áreas de recuperação de várzeas, utilizando o herbicida paraquat e o corante Azul Brilhante, respectivamente. Os volumes de pulverização foram 100; 200 e 300 L ha-1 da solução aquosa, contendo corante alimentício (1.500 mg L-1. Com ou sem a assistência de ar junto à barra, foram utilizadas pontas de pulverização de jato plano tipo AXI 110015 à pressão de 117,3 kPa, AXI 11002 e AXI 11003 a 276 kPa. A avaliação da deposição da pulverização deu-se em folhas de plantas de arroz vermelho. Os maiores volumes (200 e 300 L ha-1 pulverizados com a assistência de ar junto à barra pulverizadora proporcionaram maiores depósitos do corante em relação ao volume de 100 L ha-1. Não foram constatadas diferenças na deposição do corante para os volumes pulverizados, sem a assistência de ar junto à barra, tampouco entre os volumes de 200 e 300 L ha-1 com a assistência de ar junto à barra. As maiores percentagens de controle do arroz vermelho foram obtidas com a assistência de ar junto à barra, independentemente do volume pulverizado, equivalendo-se ao controle obtido com 300 L ha-1, sem o uso dessa tecnologia.The aim of this research was to evaluate the effect of air-assistance on spraying at three volumes in spray deposition and control of red rice under fodder radish cultivation. To evaluate the control of this weed and spray deposition were used paraquat herbicide and a Brilliant Blue dye, respectively. The three spraying volumes were 100, 200 and 300 L ha-1, using a tracer dye at 1,500 mg L-1. Both solutions and volumes were sprayed with flat fan nozzles AXI 110015 at 117.3 kPa, AXI 11002 and AXI 11003 at 276 kPa, respectively, with and without air-assistance on the boom. The evaluation of deposition

  1. Learning Read-constant Polynomials of Constant Degree modulo Composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chattopadhyay, Arkadev; Gavaldá, Richard; Hansen, Kristoffer Arnsfelt

    2011-01-01

    Boolean functions that have constant degree polynomial representation over a fixed finite ring form a natural and strict subclass of the complexity class \\textACC0ACC0. They are also precisely the functions computable efficiently by programs over fixed and finite nilpotent groups. This class...... is not known to be learnable in any reasonable learning model. In this paper, we provide a deterministic polynomial time algorithm for learning Boolean functions represented by polynomials of constant degree over arbitrary finite rings from membership queries, with the additional constraint that each variable...... in the target polynomial appears in a constant number of monomials. Our algorithm extends to superconstant but low degree polynomials and still runs in quasipolynomial time....

  2. Effective cosmological constant induced by stochastic fluctuations of Newton's constant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco de Cesare

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We consider implications of the microscopic dynamics of spacetime for the evolution of cosmological models. We argue that quantum geometry effects may lead to stochastic fluctuations of the gravitational constant, which is thus considered as a macroscopic effective dynamical quantity. Consistency with Riemannian geometry entails the presence of a time-dependent dark energy term in the modified field equations, which can be expressed in terms of the dynamical gravitational constant. We suggest that the late-time accelerated expansion of the Universe may be ascribed to quantum fluctuations in the geometry of spacetime rather than the vacuum energy from the matter sector.

  3. Advanced air distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melikov, Arsen Krikor

    2011-01-01

    The aim of total volume air distribution (TVAD) involves achieving uniform temperature and velocity in the occupied zone and environment designed for an average occupant. The supply of large amounts of clean and cool air are needed to maintain temperature and pollution concentration at acceptable....... Ventilation in hospitals is essential to decrease the risk of airborne cross-infection. At present, mixing air distribution at a minimum of 12 ach is used in infection wards. Advanced air distribution has the potential to aid in achieving healthy, comfortable and productive indoor environments at levels...... higher than what can be achieved today with the commonly used total volume air distribution principles....

  4. Systematics of constant roll inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anguelova, Lilia; Suranyi, Peter; Wijewardhana, L. C. R.

    2018-02-01

    We study constant roll inflation systematically. This is a regime, in which the slow roll approximation can be violated. It has long been thought that this approximation is necessary for agreement with observations. However, recently it was understood that there can be inflationary models with a constant, and not necessarily small, rate of roll that are both stable and compatible with the observational constraint ns ≈ 1. We investigate systematically the condition for such a constant-roll regime. In the process, we find a whole new class of inflationary models, in addition to the known solutions. We show that the new models are stable under scalar perturbations. Finally, we find a part of their parameter space, in which they produce a nearly scale-invariant scalar power spectrum, as needed for observational viability.

  5. From the Rydberg constant to the fundamental constants metrology; De la constante de Rydberg a la metrologie des constantes fondamentales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nez, F

    2005-06-15

    This document reviews the theoretical and experimental achievements of the author since the beginning of his scientific career. This document is dedicated to the spectroscopy of hydrogen, deuterium and helium atoms. The first part is divided into 6 sub-sections: 1) the principles of hydrogen spectroscopy, 2) the measurement of the 2S-nS/nD transitions, 3) other optical frequency measurements, 4) our contribution to the determination of the Rydberg constant, 5) our current experiment on the 1S-3S transition, 6) the spectroscopy of the muonic hydrogen. Our experiments have improved the accuracy of the Rydberg Constant by a factor 25 in 15 years and we have achieved the first absolute optical frequency measurement of a transition in hydrogen. The second part is dedicated to the measurement of the fine structure constant and the last part deals with helium spectroscopy and the search for optical references in the near infrared range. (A.C.)

  6. Mirror QCD and Cosmological Constant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Pasechnik

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available An analog of Quantum Chromo Dynamics (QCD sector known as mirror QCD (mQCD can affect the cosmological evolution due to a non-trivial contribution to the Cosmological Constant analogous to that induced by the ground state in non-perturbative QCD. In this work, we explore a plausible hypothesis for trace anomalies cancellation between the usual QCD and mQCD. Such an anomaly cancellation between the two gauge theories, if it exists in Nature, would lead to a suppression or even elimination of their contributions to the Cosmological Constant. The trace anomaly compensation condition and the form of the non-perturbative mQCD coupling constant in the infrared limit have been proposed by analysing a partial non-perturbative solution of the Einstein–Yang-Mills equations of motion.

  7. The Henry's constant of monochloramine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Miguel A; Anderson, Michael A

    2018-02-01

    Monochloramine is a secondary disinfectant used in drinking water and is also formed in chlorinated wastewater. While known to hydrolyze over time and react with dissolved organic matter, its partitioning between the aqueous and gas phase has not been extensively studied. Preliminary experiments demonstrated that monochloramine concentrations in solutions open to the atmosphere or actively aerated decreased more rapidly than in sealed solutions, indicating significant losses to the atmosphere. For example, a monochloramine solution open to the atmosphere yielded a loss rate constant of 0.08 d-1, a value twice that for sealed samples without headspace (0.04 d-1) where loss occurs exclusively as a result of hydrolysis. A solution aerated at 10 mL s-1 had a loss rate constant nearly 10× greater than that for hydrolysis alone (0.35 d-1). To better understand partitioning of monochloramine to the gas phase and potential for volatilization, the dimensionless Henry's law constants of monochloramine (KH) were determined using an equilibrium headspace technique at five different temperatures (11, 16, 21, 27, and 32 °C). The resulting values ranged from 8 × 10-3 to 4 × 10-2, indicating a semi-volatile compound, and were found to be consistent with quantitative structure activity relationship predictions. At 20 °C, monochloramine exhibits a dimensionless Henry's constant of about 1.7 × 10-2 which is 35 times greater than ammonia but comparable to the Henry's constant of inorganic semi-volatile compounds such sulfur dioxide. The Henry's constant values for monochloramine suggests that volatilization could be a relevant loss process in open systems such as rivers receiving chlorinated wastewater effluent, swimming pools and cooling towers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. A Comparative Study of the Drying Rate Constant, Drying Efficiency ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The adoption of the drying techniques would ensure steady availability of these vegetables all the year round as well as reduce carbon emissions from the conventional drying methods and hence mitigate global warming. KEYWORDS: Solar drying, open- air sun drying, drying rate constant, falling rate, climate change, food ...

  9. A five-dimensional model of varying fine structure constant

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    dimensional model of varying fine structure constant. J P Mbelek. Cosmology Volume 62 Issue 3 March 2004 pp 741-743. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/pram/062/03/0741-0743 ...

  10. Crystal structure and elastic constants of Dharwar cotton fibre using ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 30; Issue 5. Crystal structure and elastic constants of Dharwar cotton fibre using WAXS data. O M Samir R ... Using this data and employing linked atom least squares (LALS) method, we report here the molecular and crystal structure of these cotton fibres. Employing ...

  11. Constant Proportion Debt Obligations (CPDOs)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cont, Rama; Jessen, Cathrine

    2012-01-01

    Constant Proportion Debt Obligations (CPDOs) are structured credit derivatives that generate high coupon payments by dynamically leveraging a position in an underlying portfolio of investment-grade index default swaps. CPDO coupons and principal notes received high initial credit ratings from...

  12. GRAPHICAL DETERMINATION OF DISSOCIATION CONSTANT ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    ABSTRACT. The dissociation constant (pKa) of non – polar amino acids including (alanine, glycine, valine phenylalanine and tryptophan) were determined by potentiometric titration technique. The pKa values obtained by extrapolation for alanine, glycine, and valine were 10.29, 9.87 and 9.91 respectively. The implications ...

  13. GRAPHICAL DETERMINATION OF DISSOCIATION CONSTANT ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    3: Plot of pH versus Log [HA]/[A-] for pKa of Valine. CONCLUSION. The acid dissociation constant of non polar amino acids determined graphically for the first time from the available literature were found to be similar with corresponding calculated values reported in the literature. Therefore the graphical approach is ...

  14. Biodegradation testing of chemicals with high Henry’s constants – separating mass and effective concentration reveals higher rate constants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birch, Heidi; Andersen, Henrik Rasmus; Comber, Mike

    During simulation-type biodegradation tests, volatile chemicals will continuously partition between water phase and headspace. This study addressed how (1) this partitioning affects biodegradation test results and (2) it can be accounted for by combining mass balance and dynamic biodegradation...... Microextraction (HS-SPME) was applied directly on the test systems to measure substrate depletion by biodegradation relative to abiotic controls. HS-SPME was also applied to determine air to water partitioning ratios. Water phase biodegradation rate constants, kwater, were up to 72 times higher than test system...... biodegradation rate constants, ksystem. True water phase degradation rate constants facilitate extrapolation to other air-water systems and are more suitable input parameters for aquatic exposure and fate models. As such, they should be considered more appropriate for risk assessments than test system rate...

  15. CATALOG OF MATERIALS AS POTENTIAL SOURCES OF INDOOR AIR EMISSIONS - VOLUME 1. INSULATION, WALLCOVERINGS, RESI- LIENT FLOOR COVERINGS, CARPET, ADHESIVES, SEALANTS AND CAULKS, AND PESTICIDES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report discusses and presents data on constituents and emissions from products that have the potential to impact the indoor air environment. t is a tool to be used by researchers to help organize the study of materials as potential sources of indoor air emissions. ncluded are...

  16. AICE Survey of USSR Air Pollution Literature, Volume 15: A Third Compilation of Technical Reports on the Biological Effects and the Public Health Aspects of Atmospheric Pollutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuttonson, M. Y.

    Ten papers were translated: Maximum permissible concentrations of noxious substances in the atmospheric air of populated areas; Some aspects of the biological effect of microconcentrations of two chloroisocyanates; The toxicology of low concentrations of aromatic hydrocarbons; Chronic action of low concentrations of acrolein in air on the…

  17. Keeping the Edge. Air Force Materiel Command Cold War Context (1945-1991). Volume 1: Command Lineage Scientific Achievement and Major Tenant Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-08-01

    Wojnas (the Air Force Base Conversion Agency at the former Griffiss); Mr. Scott Haslett (Hanscom); Ms. Jackeline Gavuardi (Hill); Mr. David Tovar ...General Schriever, and of Air Materiel Command, General Samuel Anderson, countered each other’s proposals for the preferred reorganization, with General

  18. Wormholes and the cosmological constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klebanov, Igor; Susskind, Leonard; Banks, Tom

    1989-05-01

    We review Coleman's wormhole mechanism for the vanishing of the cosmological constant. We show that in a minisuperspace model wormhole-connected universes dominate the path integral. We also provide evidence that the euclidean path integral over geometries with spherical topology is unstable with respect to formation of infinitely many wormhole-connected 4-spheres. Consistency is restored by summing over all topologies, which leads to Coleman's result. Coleman's argument for determination of other parameters is reviewed and applied to the mass of the pion. A discouraging result is found that the pion mass is driven to zero. We also consider qualitatively the implications of the wormhole theory for cosmology. We argue that a small number of universes containing matter and energy may exist in contact with infinitely many cold and empty universe. Contact with the cold universe insures that the cosmological constant in the warm ones in zero.

  19. Wormholes and the cosmological constant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klebanov, I.; Susskind, L.; Banks, T.

    1989-05-08

    We review Coleman's wormhole mechanism for the vanishing of the cosmological constant. We show that in a minisuperspace model wormhole-connected universes dominate the path integral. We also provide evidence that the euclidean path integral over geometries with spherical topology is unstable with respect to formation of infinitely many wormhole-connected 4-spheres. Consistency is restored by summing over all topologies, which leads to Coleman's result. Coleman's argument for determination of other parameters is reviewed and applied to the mass of the pion. A discouraging result is found that the pion mass is driven to zero. We also consider qualitatively the implications of the wormhole theory for cosmology. We argue that a small number of universes containing matter and energy may exist in contact with infinitely many cold and empty universes. Contact with the cold universes insures that the cosmological constant in the warm ones is zero.

  20. A new cosmological constant model

    CERN Document Server

    López, J L; Lopez, J; Nanopoulos, D

    1996-01-01

    We propose a new cosmological model with a time-dependent cosmological constant (\\Lambda\\propto 1/t^2), which starting at the Planck time as \\Lambda_{Pl}\\sim M^2_{Pl}, evolves to the present-day allowed value of \\Lambda_0\\sim10^{-120}M^2_{Pl}. This scenario is supported by non-critical string theory considerations. We compute the age of the Universe and the time-dependence of the scale factor in this model, and find general agreement with recent determinations of the Hubble parameter for substantial values of \\Omega_{\\rm \\Lambda}. This effectively low-density open Universe model differs from the traditional cosmological constant model, and has observable implications for particle physics and cosmology.

  1. Cosmological Constant and Local Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Bernabeu, Jose; Mavromatos, Nick E

    2010-01-01

    We discuss the linearization of Einstein equations in the presence of a cosmological constant, by expanding the solution for the metric around a flat Minkowski space-time. We demonstrate that one can find consistent solutions to the linearized set of equations for the metric perturbations, in the Lorentz gauge, which are not spherically symmetric, but they rather exhibit a cylindrical symmetry. We find that the components of the gravitational field satisfying the appropriate Poisson equations have the property of ensuring that a scalar potential can be constructed, in which both contributions, from ordinary matter and $\\Lambda > 0$, are attractive. In addition, there is a novel tensor potential, induced by the pressure density, in which the effect of the cosmological constant is repulsive. We also linearize the Schwarzschild-de Sitter exact solution of Einstein's equations (due to a generalization of Birkhoff's theorem) in the domain between the two horizons. We manage to transform it first to a gauge in whic...

  2. Searching for Kaprekar's constants: algorithms and results

    OpenAIRE

    Walden, Byron L.

    2005-01-01

    We examine some new results on Kaprekar's constants, specifically establishing the unique 7-digit (in base 4) and 9-digit (in base 5) Kaprekar's constants and showing that there are no 15-, 21-, 27-, or 33-digit Kaprekar's constants.

  3. High-Temperature Slow Crack Growth of Silicon Carbide Determined by Constant-Stress-Rate and Constant-Stress Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sung H.; Salem, J. A.; Nemeth, N. N.

    1998-01-01

    High-temperature slow-crack-growth behaviour of hot-pressed silicon carbide was determined using both constant-stress-rate ("dynamic fatigue") and constant-stress ("static fatigue") testing in flexure at 1300 C in air. Slow crack growth was found to be a governing mechanism associated with failure of the material. Four estimation methods such as the individual data, the Weibull median, the arithmetic mean and the median deviation methods were used to determine the slow crack growth parameters. The four estimation methods were in good agreement for the constant-stress-rate testing with a small variation in the slow-crack-growth parameter, n, ranging from 28 to 36. By contrast, the variation in n between the four estimation methods was significant in the constant-stress testing with a somewhat wide range of n= 16 to 32.

  4. Environmental report 1995. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrach, R.J.; Failor, R.A.; Gallegos, G.M. [and others

    1996-09-01

    This is Volume 2 of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s (LLNL`s) annual Environmental Report 1995. This volume is intended to support summary data from Volume 1 and is essentially a detailed data report that provides additional data points, where applicable. Some summary data are also included in Volume 2, and more detailed accounts are given of sample collection and analytical methods. Volume 2 includes information in eight chapters on monitoring of air, air effluent, sewage, surface water, ground water, soil and sediment, vegetation and foodstuff, and environmental radiation, as well as three chapters on ground water protection, compliance self-monitoring and quality assurance.

  5. A change in the electro-physical properties of narrow-band CdHgTe solid solutions acted upon by a volume discharge induced by an avalanche electron beam in the air at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voitsekhovskii, A. V.; Grigor'ev, D. V.; Korotaev, A. G.; Kokhanenko, A. P.; Tarasenko, V. F.; Shulepov, M. A.

    2012-03-01

    The effect of a nanosecond volume discharge forming in an inhomogeneous electrical field at atmospheric pressure on the CdHgTe (MCT) epitaxial films of the p-type conduction with the hole concentration 2·1016 cm3 and mobility 500 cm2·V-1·s-1 is studied. The measurement of the electrophysical parameters of the MCT specimens upon irradiation shows that a layer exhibiting the n-type conduction is formed in the near-surface region of the epitaxial films. After 600 pulses and more, the thickness and the parameters of the layer are such that the measured field dependence of the Hall coefficient corresponds to the material of the n-type conduction. Analysis of the preliminary results reveals that the foregoing nanosecond volume discharge in the air at atmospheric pressure is promising for modification of electro-physical MCT properties.

  6. Air Force Journal of Logistics: Logistics Dimensions Improving Bare Base Agile Combat Support, The Path to Integration. Volume 28, Number 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    remote unaccompanied tour. For many families, the ability to live a more stable life without multiple moves and extended separation was very attractive...disciplinary actions. Few disciplinary actions. Large group of underage personnel. Rarely have underage personnel. Dormitory living for single junior enlisted... Education and Training Command, Air Force Space Command, and Air Force Materiel Command. Designed to be functionally aligned, each command was changed to be

  7. Exact constants in approximation theory

    CERN Document Server

    Korneichuk, N

    1991-01-01

    This book is intended as a self-contained introduction for non-specialists, or as a reference work for experts, to the particular area of approximation theory that is concerned with exact constants. The results apply mainly to extremal problems in approximation theory, which in turn are closely related to numerical analysis and optimization. The book encompasses a wide range of questions and problems: best approximation by polynomials and splines; linear approximation methods, such as spline-approximation; optimal reconstruction of functions and linear functionals. Many of the results are base

  8. Cryptography in constant parallel time

    CERN Document Server

    Applebaum, Benny

    2013-01-01

    Locally computable (NC0) functions are 'simple' functions for which every bit of the output can be computed by reading a small number of bits of their input. The study of locally computable cryptography attempts to construct cryptographic functions that achieve this strong notion of simplicity and simultaneously provide a high level of security. Such constructions are highly parallelizable and they can be realized by Boolean circuits of constant depth.This book establishes, for the first time, the possibility of local implementations for many basic cryptographic primitives such as one-way func

  9. Background culturable bacteria aerosol in two large public buildings using HVAC filters as long term, passive, high-volume air samplers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Nicholas J; Kuehn, Thomas H; Kim, Seung Won; Raynor, Peter C; Anantharaman, Senthilvelan; Ramakrishnan, M A; Goyal, Sagar M

    2008-04-01

    Background culturable bacteria aerosols were collected and identified in two large public buildings located in Minneapolis, Minnesota and Seattle, Washington over a period of 5 months and 3 months, respectively. The installed particulate air filters in the ventilation systems were used as the aerosol sampling devices at each location. Both pre and final filters were collected from four air handing units at each site to determine the influence of location within the building, time of year, geographical location and difference between indoor and outdoor air. Sections of each loaded filter were eluted with 10 ml of phosphate buffered saline (PBS). The resulting solutions were cultured on blood agar plates and incubated for 24 h at 36 degrees C. Various types of growth media were then used for subculturing, followed by categorization using a BioLog MicroStation (Biolog, Hayward, CA, USA) and manual observation. Environmental parameters were gathered near each filter by the embedded on-site environmental monitoring systems to determine the effect of temperature, humidity and air flow. Thirty nine different species of bacteria were identified, 17 found only in Minneapolis and 5 only in Seattle. The hardy spore-forming genus Bacillus was the most commonly identified and showed the highest concentrations. A significant decrease in the number of species and their concentration occurred in the Minneapolis air handling unit supplying 100% outdoor air in winter, however no significant correlations between bacteria concentration and environmental parameters were found.

  10. A first-principles approach to finite temperature elastic constants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Y; Wang, J J; Zhang, H; Manga, V R; Shang, S L; Chen, L-Q; Liu, Z-K [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2010-06-09

    A first-principles approach to calculating the elastic stiffness coefficients at finite temperatures was proposed. It is based on the assumption that the temperature dependence of elastic stiffness coefficients mainly results from volume change as a function of temperature; it combines the first-principles calculations of elastic constants at 0 K and the first-principles phonon theory of thermal expansion. Its applications to elastic constants of Al, Cu, Ni, Mo, Ta, NiAl, and Ni{sub 3}Al from 0 K up to their respective melting points show excellent agreement between the predicted values and existing experimental measurements.

  11. Influence of dielectric constant of polymerization medium on ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    σ = 1/ρ. 2.6 Gas sensor study. In our gas sensor set up, the ammonia–air mixture was taken from the headspace of a bottle containing ammonia solution. The ammonia concentration in the mixture was estimated by trapping a known volume in ice-cold dilute hydrochlo- ric solution that was titrated with standard sodium hydro ...

  12. Representative volume element of asphalt pavement for electromagnetic measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terhi Pellinen

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The motivation for this study was to investigate the representative volume element (RVE needed to correlate the nondestructive electromagnetic (EM measurements with the conventional destructive asphalt pavement quality control measurements. A large pavement rehabilitation contract was used as the test site for the experiment. Pavement cores were drilled from the same locations where the stationary and continuous Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR measurements were obtained. Laboratory measurements included testing the bulk density of cores using two methods, the surface-saturated dry method and determining bulk density by dimensions. Also, Vector Network Analyzer (VNA and the through specimen transmission configuration were employed at microwave frequencies to measure the reference dielectric constant of cores using two different footprint areas and therefore volume elements. The RVE for EM measurements turns out to be frequency dependent; therefore in addition to being dependent on asphalt mixture type and method of obtaining bulk density, it is dependent on the resolution of the EM method used. Then, although the average bulk property results agreed with theoretical formulations of higher core air void content giving a lower dielectric constant, for the individual cores there was no correlation for the VNA measurements because the volume element seizes deviated. Similarly, GPR technique was unable to capture the spatial variation of pavement air voids measured from the 150-mm drill cores. More research is needed to determine the usable RVE for asphalt.

  13. Formas estructurales de fuerza constante

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zalewski, Waclaw

    1963-05-01

    Full Text Available The author seeks to prove the need to obtain the most essential form in the various types of structures by applying a number of rational principles, of which the constant stress principle is one of the most decisive. The structural form should be a logical consequence of all its functional circumstances, and this requires a clear understanding of the general behaviour of each part of the structure, and also of the main stresses which operate on it, considered as a unitary whole. To complete his theoretical argument, the author gives some examples, in the design of which the criterion of constant stress has been adopted. The author considers the various aspects which are involved in obtaining a structural design that satisfies given functional and aesthetic requirements. In doing so he refers to his personal experience within Poland, and infers technical principles of general validity which should determine the rational design of the form, as an integrated aspect of the structural pattern. The projects which illustrate this paper are Polish designs of undoubted constructive significance, in which the principle of constant stress has been applied. Finally the author condenses his whole theory in a simple and straightforward practical formula, which should be followed if a truly rational form is to be achieved: the constancy of stress in the various structural elements.El autor se esfuerza en mostrar la necesidad de llegar a la forma real en las distintas estructuras siguiendo una serie de principios racionales, entre los que domina el criterio de la fuerza constante. La forma ha de ser una consecuencia lógica en todos sus aspectos, y esto exige un claro conocimiento del comportamiento general de cada una de las partes de la estructura, y de los esfuerzos generales que dominan en la misma al considerarla como un todo. Para completar la exposición de orden teórico, el autor presenta algunos ejemplos en cuyo proyecto se ha seguido el criterio de

  14. Graphs with constant μ and μ

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dam, E.R.; Haemers, W.H.

    1995-01-01

    A graph G has constant u = u(G) if any two vertices that are not adjacent have u common neighbours. G has constant u and u if G has constant u = u(G), and its complement G has constant u = u(G). If such a graph is regular, then it is strongly regular, otherwise precisely two vertex degrees occur. We

  15. Stability constant estimator user`s guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hay, B.P.; Castleton, K.J.; Rustad, J.R.

    1996-12-01

    The purpose of the Stability Constant Estimator (SCE) program is to estimate aqueous stability constants for 1:1 complexes of metal ions with ligands by using trends in existing stability constant data. Such estimates are useful to fill gaps in existing thermodynamic databases and to corroborate the accuracy of reported stability constant values.

  16. Constant training in direct ophthalmoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Younan HC

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Helen-Cara Younan, Rishi Iyer, Janaki Natasha DesaiFaculty of Medicine, Imperial College London, London, UKWe read with great interest the review by Ricci and Ferraz on the advances in training and practice in ophthalmoscopy simulation.1As final year medical students, we have recently experienced direct ophthalmoscopy teaching and agree with the authors that “simulation is a helpful tool in ophthalmoscopy training”.1 Indeed, in our experience, simulation is useful in teaching a wide variety of clinical skills including venepuncture, intravenous cannulation, and catheterization. We were taught all of these clinical skills in our first clinical year of study through use of simulation models. With regards to our direct ophthalmoscopy teaching, we were first taught to recognize the normal retina and different retinal pathologies using images, before practicing our technique and recognition of those images in a model similar to the THELMA (The Human Eye Learning Model Assistant described by the authors.1However, we feel that the use of simulation models alone is not enough to provide confidence and competency in direct ophthalmoscopy among medical students. The authors conclude that “constant training is a well-known strategy for skill enhancement”,1 and we have found that a lack of constant training in direct ophthalmoscopy is evident. After learning venepuncture, cannulation, and catheterization on the simulation models, we were able to observe doctors performing these skills before performing them on patients either in the wards or in theatre. These are skills that we are constantly trained in across a wide variety of medical and surgical attachments. However, opportunities to observe and practice ophthalmoscopy during our attachments are more limited, and thus we are not continuing to use the skills we learn.Authors' replyLucas Holderegger Ricci,1 Caroline Amaral Ferraz21Department of Ophthalmology, School of Medicine, Laureate

  17. Dynamic measurements of the elastic constants of glass wool

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarnow, Viggo

    2005-01-01

    The sound wave in the air between the fibers of glass wool exerts an oscillatory viscous drag on the fibers and excites a mechanical wave in the fiber skeleton. Accurate calculations of sound attenuation in glass wool must take the mechanical wave in the fiber skeleton into account......, and this requires knowledge of the dynamic elastic constants of the fiber skeleton. The mechanical properties of glass wool are highly anisotropic. Previously only one of the elastic constants has been measured dynamically, but here all the elastic constants are reported. The measurement method is well known...... formula. The elastic constants were measured in the frequency range 20–160 Hz for glass wool of mass density 30 kg/m3. The elastic constant C11 depended on the frequency; at 20 Hz it was 1.5+0.01i MPa, and at 160 Hz it was 2.6+0.06i MPa. The constant C33=12+0.6i kPa did not depend on frequency. The shear...

  18. Recommended Henry’s Law Constants for Non-Groundwater Pathways Models in GoldSim

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyer, J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-06-20

    This memorandum documents the source and numerical value of Henry’s law constants for volatile radionuclides of interest used in the non-groundwater (air and radon) pathways models for the 2018 E-Area Performance Assessment.

  19. The fundamental constants a mystery of physics

    CERN Document Server

    Fritzsch, Harald

    2009-01-01

    The speed of light, the fine structure constant, and Newton's constant of gravity — these are just three among the many physical constants that define our picture of the world. Where do they come from? Are they constant in time and across space? In this book, physicist and author Harald Fritzsch invites the reader to explore the mystery of the fundamental constants of physics in the company of Isaac Newton, Albert Einstein, and a modern-day physicist

  20. Omnidirectional antenna having constant phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sena, Matthew

    2017-04-04

    Various technologies presented herein relate to constructing and/or operating an antenna having an omnidirectional electrical field of constant phase. The antenna comprises an upper plate made up of multiple conductive rings, a lower ground-plane plate, a plurality of grounding posts, a conical feed, and a radio frequency (RF) feed connector. The upper plate has a multi-ring configuration comprising a large outer ring and several smaller rings of equal size located within the outer ring. The large outer ring and the four smaller rings have the same cross-section. The grounding posts ground the upper plate to the lower plate while maintaining a required spacing/parallelism therebetween.

  1. Henry's law constants of polyols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compernolle, S.; Müller, J.-F.

    2014-12-01

    Henry's law constants (HLC) are derived for several polyols bearing between 2 and 6 hydroxyl groups, based on literature data for water activity, vapour pressure and/or solubility. While deriving HLC and depending on the case, also infinite dilution activity coefficients (IDACs), solid state vapour pressures or activity coefficient ratios are obtained as intermediate results. An error analysis on the intermediate quantities and the obtained HLC is included. For most compounds, these are the first values reported, while others compare favourably with literature data in most cases. Using these values and those from a previous work (Compernolle and Müller, 2014), an assessment is made on the partitioning of polyols, diacids and hydroxy acids to droplet and aqueous aerosol.

  2. Henry's law constants of polyols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Compernolle

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Henry's law constants (HLC are derived for several polyols bearing between 2 and 6 hydroxyl groups, based on literature data for water activity, vapour pressure and/or solubility. While deriving HLC and depending on the case, also infinite dilution activity coefficients (IDACs, solid state vapour pressures or activity coefficient ratios are obtained as intermediate results. An error analysis on the intermediate quantities and the obtained HLC is included. For most compounds, these are the first values reported, while others compare favourably with literature data in most cases. Using these values and those from a previous work (Compernolle and Müller, 2014, an assessment is made on the partitioning of polyols, diacids and hydroxy acids to droplet and aqueous aerosol.

  3. Philicities, Fugalities, and Equilibrium Constants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayr, Herbert; Ofial, Armin R

    2016-05-17

    The mechanistic model of Organic Chemistry is based on relationships between rate and equilibrium constants. Thus, strong bases are generally considered to be good nucleophiles and poor nucleofuges. Exceptions to this rule have long been known, and the ability of iodide ions to catalyze nucleophilic substitutions, because they are good nucleophiles as well as good nucleofuges, is just a prominent example for exceptions from the general rule. In a reaction series, the Leffler-Hammond parameter α = δΔG(⧧)/δΔG° describes the fraction of the change in the Gibbs energy of reaction, which is reflected in the change of the Gibbs energy of activation. It has long been considered as a measure for the position of the transition state; thus, an α value close to 0 was associated with an early transition state, while an α value close to 1 was considered to be indicative of a late transition state. Bordwell's observation in 1969 that substituent variation in phenylnitromethanes has a larger effect on the rates of deprotonation than on the corresponding equilibrium constants (nitroalkane anomaly) triggered the breakdown of this interpretation. In the past, most systematic investigations of the relationships between rates and equilibria of organic reactions have dealt with proton transfer reactions, because only for few other reaction series complementary kinetic and thermodynamic data have been available. In this Account we report on a more general investigation of the relationships between Lewis basicities, nucleophilicities, and nucleofugalities as well as between Lewis acidities, electrophilicities, and electrofugalities. Definitions of these terms are summarized, and it is suggested to replace the hybrid terms "kinetic basicity" and "kinetic acidity" by "protophilicity" and "protofugality", respectively; in this way, the terms "acidity" and "basicity" are exclusively assigned to thermodynamic properties, while "philicity" and "fugality" refer to kinetics

  4. International Energy Agency Building Energy Simulation Test and Diagnostic Method for Heating, Ventilating, and Air-Conditioning Equipment Models (HVAC BESTEST): Volume 2: Cases E300-E545.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neymark J.; Judkoff, R.

    2004-12-01

    This report documents an additional set of mechanical system test cases that are planned for inclusion in ANSI/ASHRAE STANDARD 140. The cases test a program's modeling capabilities on the working-fluid side of the coil, but in an hourly dynamic context over an expanded range of performance conditions. These cases help to scale the significance of disagreements that are less obvious in the steady-state cases. The report is Vol. 2 of HVAC BESTEST Volume 1. Volume 1 was limited to steady-state test cases that could be solved with analytical solutions. Volume 2 includes hourly dynamic effects, and other cases that cannot be solved analytically. NREL conducted this work in collaboration with the Tool Evaluation and Improvement Experts Group under the International Energy Agency (IEA) Solar Heating and Cooling Programme Task 22.

  5. [Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright- Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio]. Volume 4, Health and Safety Plan (HSP); Phase 1, Task 4 Field Investigation report: Draft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-10-01

    This Health and Safety Plan (HSP) was developed for the Environmental Investigation of Ground-water Contamination Investigation at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base near Dayton, Ohio, based on the projected scope of work for the Phase 1, Task 4 Field Investigation. The HSP describes hazards that may be encountered during the investigation, assesses the hazards, and indicates what type of personal protective equipment is to be used for each task performed. The HSP also addresses the medical monitoring program, decontamination procedures, air monitoring, training, site control, accident prevention, and emergency response.

  6. MARKETING OF WHEAT ON A CONSTANT AND NIL MOISTURE BASIS

    OpenAIRE

    William W. WILSON; Dahl, Bruce L.

    2002-01-01

    This study examined moisture specification practices in the United States and for major exporters and assessed impacts of changes to a nil or constant moisture basis on prices and revenue. These were examined under scenarios where information on moisture in current prices is limited and under a scenario where current prices reflect Full Knowledge of moisture advantages. Results indicate that changing to a nil moisture basis (which requires a subsequent adjustment in volumes to reflect the sub...

  7. The cosmological constant and the energy of gravitational radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Chruściel, Piotr T

    2016-01-01

    We propose a definition of mass for characteristic hypersurfaces in asymptotically vacuum space-times with non-vanishing cosmological constant $\\Lambda \\in {\\mathbb R}^*$, generalising the definition of Trautman and Bondi for $\\Lambda=0$. We show that our definition reduces to some standard definitions in several situations. We establish a balance formula linking the characteristic mass and a suitably defined renormalised volume of the null hypersurface, generalising the positivity identity of one of us (PTC) and Paetz proved when $\\Lambda=0$.

  8. Can you see Air?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 12; Issue 6. Can you see Air? Andal Narayanan Joseph Samuel Supurna Sinha. Classroom Volume 12 Issue 6 June 2007 pp 71-75. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/012/06/0071-0075 ...

  9. Indoor Air Pollution

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 9; Issue 1. Indoor Air Pollution - Danger at Home. N Pon Saravanan. General Article Volume 9 Issue 1 January 2004 pp 6-11. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/009/01/0006-0011. Keywords.

  10. Rapid estimate of solid volume in large tuff cores using a gas pycnometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thies, C. [ed.; Geddis, A.M.; Guzman, A.G. [and others

    1996-09-01

    A thermally insulated, rigid-volume gas pycnometer system has been developed. The pycnometer chambers have been machined from solid PVC cylinders. Two chambers confine dry high-purity helium at different pressures. A thick-walled design ensures minimal heat exchange with the surrounding environment and a constant volume system, while expansion takes place between the chambers. The internal energy of the gas is assumed constant over the expansion. The ideal gas law is used to estimate the volume of solid material sealed in one of the chambers. Temperature is monitored continuously and incorporated into the calculation of solid volume. Temperature variation between measurements is less than 0.1{degrees}C. The data are used to compute grain density for oven-dried Apache Leap tuff core samples. The measured volume of solid and the sample bulk volume are used to estimate porosity and bulk density. Intrinsic permeability was estimated from the porosity and measured pore surface area and is compared to in-situ measurements by the air permeability method. The gas pycnometer accommodates large core samples (0.25 m length x 0.11 m diameter) and can measure solid volume greater than 2.20 cm{sup 3} with less than 1% error.

  11. Archives of Environmental Health, Volume 18 Number 4. Ninth AMA Air Pollution Medical Research Conference, Denver, July 22-24, 1968.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Frank

    Papers read before the Ninth American Medical Association (AMA) Air Pollution Medical Research Conference, Denver, Colorado, July 22-24, 1968, are presented in this document. Topics deal with the relationship and effects of atmospheric pollution to respiratory diseases, epidemiology, human physiological reactions, urban morbidity, health of school…

  12. DNA Master File of Ground-Shock, Air-Blast, and Structure-Response Data. Volume 1. Archive Description and User’s Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-11-01

    Ralston, Alberta: Suffield Experimental Station, 6/67. (AD 817 810) Reefer , J.H. Air Blast Predictions for Operation DISTANT PLAIN% BRL...Systems, 10/1/74. (AD 922 915L) HOB, 1000-POUND Reefer , J. and Reisler, R. Height-of-Burst Parameters for 1000-Pound TNT Charges Ballistics

  13. Cost/benefit tradeoffs for reducing the energy consumption of the commercial air transportation system. Volume 2: Market and economic analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanabkoude, J. C.

    1976-01-01

    The impact of the most promising fuel conserving options on fuel consumption, passenger demand, operating costs, and airline profits when implemented into the U.S. domestic and international airline fleets is assessed. The potential fuel savings achievable in the U.S. scheduled air transportation system over the forecast period, 1973-1990, are estimated.

  14. AICE Survey of USSR Air Pollution Literature, Volume 13: Technical Papers from the Leningrad International Symposium on the Meteorological Aspects of Atmospheric Pollution, Part 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuttonson, M. Y., Ed.

    Twelve papers were translated from Russian: Automation of Information Processing Involved in Experimental Studies of Atmospheric Diffusion, Micrometeorological Characteristics of Atmospheric Pollution Conditions, Study of theInfluence of Irregularities of the Earth's Surface on the Air Flow Characteristics in a Wind Tunnel, Use of Parameters of…

  15. AICE Survey of USSR Air Pollution Literature, Volume 12: Technical Papers from the Leningrad International Symposium on the Meteorological Aspects of Atmospheric Pollution, Part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuttonson, M. Y.

    Twelve papers dealing with the meteorological aspects of air pollution were translated. These papers were initially presented at an international symposium held in Leningrad during July 1968. The papers are: Status and prospective development of meteorological studies of atmospheric pollution, Effect of the stability of the atmosphere on the…

  16. Proceedings Papers of the AFSC (Air Force Systems Command) Avionics Standardization Conference (2nd) Held at Dayton, Ohio on 30 November - 2 December 1982. Volume 10. Addendum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-11-01

    the scope of this methodology development effort. Specifically, this methodo - lo~y excludes the following: 270 06 * - -.........- - ~ ~ .A. I g5 MO 4...AIR FORCE SYSTEMS 5/6 COMMAND) AVIONICS STAND..(U) AERONAUTICAL SYSTEMS DIVWRIGHT-PATTERSON RFB OH DIRECTO ATE 0.. 1 UNCLASSIFIED C A PORUBCANSKY NOV

  17. [Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio]. Volume 5, Appendix A, Part 1, Field Investigation report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-03-01

    This report presents information related to the sampling of ground water at the Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. It is part of an investigation into possible ground water contamination. Information concerns well drilling/construction; x-ray diffraction and sampling; soil boring logs; and chain-of-custody records.

  18. Tunnelling with a negative cosmological constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, G. W.

    1996-02-01

    The point of this paper is to see what light new results in hyperbolic geometry may throw on gravitational entropy and whether gravitational entropy is relevant for the quantum origin of the universe. We introduce some new gravitational instantons which mediate the birth from nothing of closed universes containing wormholes and suggest that they may contribute to the density matrix of the universe. We also discuss the connection between their gravitational action and the topological and volumetric entropies introduced in hyperbolic geometry. These coincide for hyperbolic 4-manifolds, and increase with increasing topological complexity of the 4-manifold. We raise the question of whether the action also increases with the topological complexity of the initial 3-geometry, measured either by its 3-volume or its Matveev complexity. We point out, in distinction to the non-supergravity case, that universes with domains of negative cosmological constant separated by supergravity domain walls cannot be born from nothing. Finally we point out that our wormholes provide examples of the type of Perpetual Motion machines envisaged by Frolov and Novikov.

  19. A state-of-the-art review of transportation systems evaluation techniques relevant to air transportation, volume 1. [urban planning and urban transportation using decision theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haefner, L. E.

    1975-01-01

    Mathematical and philosophical approaches are presented for evaluation and implementation of ground and air transportation systems. Basic decision processes are examined that are used for cost analyses and planning (i.e, statistical decision theory, linear and dynamic programming, optimization, game theory). The effects on the environment and the community that a transportation system may have are discussed and modelled. Algorithmic structures are examined and selected bibliographic annotations are included. Transportation dynamic models were developed. Citizen participation in transportation projects (i.e, in Maryland and Massachusetts) is discussed. The relevance of the modelling and evaluation approaches to air transportation (i.e, airport planning) is examined in a case study in St. Louis, Missouri.

  20. The fundamental constants and quantum electrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Taylor, Barry N; Langenberg, D N

    1969-01-01

    Introduction ; review of experimental data ; least-squares adjustment to obtain values of the constants without QED theory ; implications for quantum electrodynamics ; final recommended set of fundamental constants ; summary and conclusions.

  1. Capacitive Cells for Dielectric Constant Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, Horacio Munguía; Maldonado, Rigoberto Franco

    2015-01-01

    A simple capacitive cell for dielectric constant measurement in liquids is presented. As an illustrative application, the cell is used for measuring the degradation of overheated edible oil through the evaluation of their dielectric constant.

  2. ESR melting under constant voltage conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlienger, M.E.

    1997-02-01

    Typical industrial ESR melting practice includes operation at a constant current. This constant current operation is achieved through the use of a power supply whose output provides this constant current characteristic. Analysis of this melting mode indicates that the ESR process under conditions of constant current is inherently unstable. Analysis also indicates that ESR melting under the condition of a constant applied voltage yields a process which is inherently stable. This paper reviews the process stability arguments for both constant current and constant voltage operation. Explanations are given as to why there is a difference between the two modes of operation. Finally, constant voltage process considerations such as melt rate control, response to electrode anomalies and impact on solidification will be discussed.

  3. Critical survey of stability constants of EDTA complexes critical evaluation of equilibrium constants in solution stability constants of metal complexes

    CERN Document Server

    Anderegg, G

    2013-01-01

    Critical Survey of Stability Constants of EDTA Complexes focuses on the computations, values, and characteristics of stability constants. The book emphasizes that for a critical discussion of experimentally determined stability constants, it is important to consider the precision of the values that manifests the self-consistency of the constant, taking into consideration the random errors. The publication reviews the stability constants of metal complexes. The numerical calculations affirm the reactions and transformations of metal ions when exposed to varying conditions. The text also present

  4. Surprises in numerical expressions of physical constants

    OpenAIRE

    Amir, Ariel; Lemeshko, Mikhail; Tokieda, Tadashi

    2016-01-01

    In science, as in life, `surprises' can be adequately appreciated only in the presence of a null model, what we expect a priori. In physics, theories sometimes express the values of dimensionless physical constants as combinations of mathematical constants like pi or e. The inverse problem also arises, whereby the measured value of a physical constant admits a `surprisingly' simple approximation in terms of well-known mathematical constants. Can we estimate the probability for this to be a me...

  5. Constant-Pressure Combustion Charts Including Effects of Diluent Addition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, L Richard; Bogart, Donald

    1949-01-01

    Charts are presented for the calculation of (a) the final temperatures and the temperature changes involved in constant-pressure combustion processes of air and in products of combustion of air and hydrocarbon fuels, and (b) the quantity of hydrocarbon fuels required in order to attain a specified combustion temperature when water, alcohol, water-alcohol mixtures, liquid ammonia, liquid carbon dioxide, liquid nitrogen, liquid oxygen, or their mixtures are added to air as diluents or refrigerants. The ideal combustion process and combustion with incomplete heat release from the primary fuel and from combustible diluents are considered. The effect of preheating the mixture of air and diluents and the effect of an initial water-vapor content in the combustion air on the required fuel quantity are also included. The charts are applicable only to processes in which the final mixture is leaner than stoichiometric and at temperatures where dissociation is unimportant. A chart is also included to permit the calculation of the stoichiometric ratio of hydrocarbon fuel to air with diluent addition. The use of the charts is illustrated by numerical examples.

  6. Searching for Kaprekar's constants: algorithms and results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byron L. Walden

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We examine some new results on Kaprekar's constants, specifically establishing the unique 7-digit (in base 4 and 9-digit (in base 5 Kaprekar's constants and showing that there are no 15-, 21-, 27-, or 33-digit Kaprekar's constants.

  7. Untangling Fixed Effects and Constant Regressors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaassen, F.; Teulings, R.

    2015-01-01

    Fixed effects (FE) in panel data models overlap each other and prohibit the identification of the impact of "constant" regressors. Think of regressors that are constant across countries in a country-time panel with time FE. The traditional approach is to drop some FE and constant regressors by

  8. Induction of Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase by Lipopolysaccharide and the Influences of Cell Volume Changes, Stress Hormones and Oxidative Stress on Nitric Oxide Efflux from the Perfused Liver of Air-Breathing Catfish, Heteropneustes fossilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Mahua G; Saha, Nirmalendu

    2016-01-01

    The air-breathing singhi catfish (Heteropneustes fossilis) is frequently being challenged by bacterial contaminants, and different environmental insults like osmotic, hyper-ammonia, dehydration and oxidative stresses in its natural habitats throughout the year. The main objectives of the present investigation were to determine (a) the possible induction of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) gene with enhanced production of nitric oxide (NO) by intra-peritoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (a bacterial endotoxin), and (b) to determine the effects of hepatic cell volume changes due to anisotonicity or by infusion of certain metabolites, stress hormones and by induction of oxidative stress on production of NO from the iNOS-induced perfused liver of singhi catfish. Intra-peritoneal injection of LPS led to induction of iNOS gene and localized tissue specific expression of iNOS enzyme with more production and accumulation of NO in different tissues of singhi catfish. Further, changes of hydration status/cell volume, caused either by anisotonicity or by infusion of certain metabolites such as glutamine plus glycine and adenosine, affected the NO production from the perfused liver of iNOS-induced singhi catfish. In general, increase of hydration status/cell swelling due to hypotonicity caused decrease, and decrease of hydration status/cell shrinkage due to hypertonicity caused increase of NO efflux from the perfused liver, thus suggesting that changes in hydration status/cell volume of hepatic cells serve as a potent modulator for regulating the NO production. Significant increase of NO efflux from the perfused liver was also observed while infusing the liver with stress hormones like epinephrine and norepinephrine, accompanied with decrease of hydration status/cell volume of hepatic cells. Further, oxidative stress, caused due to infusion of t-butyl hydroperoxide and hydrogen peroxide separately, in the perfused liver of singhi catfish, resulted in

  9. Image quality and volume computed tomography air kerma index (C{sub vol}) evaluation in Recife; Avaliacao da qualidade de imagem e do indice volumetrico de Kerma ar em tomografia computadorizada (C{sub vol}) em Recife

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, Marcos Ely Almeida

    2008-07-01

    The Computed Tomography (CT) is an important diagnostic imaging method, widely used. However, in spite of all the advantages and technologic advances within the CT scanners, the tomographic procedures result in high absorbed doses to patients. The main objective of this work was to perform a dosimetric study of CT scanners located at Recife and to evaluate the image quality on CT examinations in these equipment. The volume CT air kerma index (C{sub VOL}) and air kerma length product (P{sub KL,CT}) were estimated. These values were calculated using normalized weighted air kerma indexes in CT standard dosimetry phantoms ({sub n}C{sub W}), supplied by ImPACT group for several CT scanners, and the scan parameters of routine head, routine chest and hi-resolution chest CT exams performed at 20 institutions. The irradiation parameters of 15 adult patients for each CT procedure were registered at six participating centres, at which the phantom from the American College of Radiology (ACR) CT accreditation protocol was used for the image quality measurements. For routine head exams, the C{sub VOL} values varied between 12 and 58 mGy (at the posterior fossa) and 15 to 58 mGy (at the cerebrum) and the P{sub KL,CT}, from 150 to 750 mGy{center_dot}cm. The C{sub VOL} values for routine chest procedures varied from 3 to 26 mGy and the P{sub KL,CT}, between 120 and 460 mGy{center_dot}cm. In relation to Hi-resolution chest exams, C{sub VOL} values were from 1.0 to 2.7 mGy and the P{sub KL,CT} values varied between 24 and 67 mGy{center_dot}cm. The image quality evaluations results showed that almost all scanners presented at least one inadequacy. One of the equipment presented faults at 70% of the tests. With regard to the image noise, only two scanners presented acceptable results. From these results, it is possible to conclude that the volume CT air kerma index values are lower than the European reference levels. However, the image quality of these CT scanners does not attend the

  10. International Energy Agency Building Energy Simulation Test and Diagnostic Method for Heating, Ventilating, and Air-Conditioning Equipment Models (HVAC BESTEST); Volume 1: Cases E100-E200

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neymark, J.; Judkoff, R.

    2002-01-01

    This report describes the Building Energy Simulation Test for Heating, Ventilating, and Air-Conditioning Equipment Models (HVAC BESTEST) project conducted by the Tool Evaluation and Improvement International Energy Agency (IEA) Experts Group. The group was composed of experts from the Solar Heating and Cooling (SHC) Programme, Task 22, Subtask A. The current test cases, E100-E200, represent the beginning of work on mechanical equipment test cases; additional cases that would expand the current test suite have been proposed for future development.

  11. Technical support document: Energy efficiency standards for consumer products: Room air conditioners, water heaters, direct heating equipment, mobile home furnaces, kitchen ranges and ovens, pool heaters, fluorescent lamp ballasts and television sets. Volume 1, Methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-11-01

    The Energy Policy and Conservation Act (P.L. 94-163), as amended, establishes energy conservation standards for 12 of the 13 types of consumer products specifically covered by the Act. The legislation requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to consider new or amended standards for these and other types of products at specified times. DOE is currently considering amending standards for seven types of products: water heaters, direct heating equipment, mobile home furnaces, pool heaters, room air conditioners, kitchen ranges and ovens (including microwave ovens), and fluorescent light ballasts and is considering establishing standards for television sets. This Technical Support Document presents the methodology, data, and results from the analysis of the energy and economic impacts of the proposed standards. This volume presents a general description of the analytic approach, including the structure of the major models.

  12. Air Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA's air research provides the critical science to develop and implement outdoor air regulations under the Clean Air Act and puts new tools and information in the hands of air quality managers and regulators to protect the air we breathe.

  13. FOREWORD: International determination of the Avogadro constant International determination of the Avogadro constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massa, Enrico; Nicolaus, Arnold

    2011-04-01

    This issue of Metrologia collects papers about the results of an international research project aimed at the determination of the Avogadro constant, NA, by counting the atoms in a silicon crystal highly enriched with the isotope 28Si. Fifty years ago, Egidi [1] thought about realizing an atomic mass standard. In 1965, Bonse and Hart [2] operated the first x-ray interferometer, thus paving the way to the achievement of Egidi's dream, and soon Deslattes et al [3] completed the first counting of the atoms in a natural silicon crystal. The present project, outlined by Zosi [4] in 1983, began in 2004 by combining the experiences and capabilities of the BIPM, INRIM, IRMM, NIST, NPL, NMIA, NMIJ and PTB. The start signal, ratified by a memorandum of understanding, was a contract for the production of a silicon crystal highly enriched with 28Si. The enrichment process was undertaken by the Central Design Bureau of Machine Building in St Petersburg. Subsequently, a polycrystal was grown in the Institute of Chemistry of High-Purity Substances of the Russian Academy of Sciences in Nizhny Novgorod and a 28Si boule was grown and purified by the Leibniz-Institut für Kristallzüchtung in Berlin. Isotope enrichment made it possible to apply isotope dilution mass spectroscopy, to determine the Avogadro constant with unprecedented accuracy, and to fulfil Egidi's dream. To convey Egidi's 'fantasy' into practice, two 28Si kilogram prototypes shaped as quasi-perfect spheres were manufactured by the Australian Centre for Precision Optics; their isotopic composition, molar mass, mass, volume, density and lattice parameter were accurately determined and their surfaces were chemically and physically characterized at the atomic scale. The paper by Andreas et al reviews the work carried out; it collates all the findings and illustrates how Avogadro's constant was obtained. Impurity concentration and gradients in the enriched crystal were measured by infrared spectroscopy and taken into

  14. Development of standardized air-blown coal gasifier/gas turbine concepts for future electric power systems. Volume 5, Appendix D: Cost support information: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadowski, R.S.; Brown, M.J.; Harriz, J.T.; Ostrowski, E.

    1991-01-01

    The cost estimate provided for the DOE sponsored study of Air Blown Coal Gasification was developed from vendor quotes obtained directly for the equipment needed in the 50 MW, 100 MW, and 200 MW sized plants and from quotes from other jobs that have been referenced to apply to the particular cycle. Quotes were generally obtained for the 100 MW cycle and a scale up/down factor was used to generate the cost estimates for the 200 MW and 50 MW cycles, respectively. Information from GTPro (property of Thermoflow, Inc.) was used to estimate the cost of the 200 MW and 50 MW gas turbine, HRSG, and steam turbines. To available the use of GTPro`s estimated values for this equipment, a comparison was made between the quotes obtained for the 100 MW cycle (ABB GT 11N combustion turbine and a HSRG) against the estimated values by GTPro.

  15. Preliminary assessment of the health and environmental effects of coal utilization in the midwest. Volume I. Energy scenarios, technology characterizations, air and water resource impacts, and health effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-01-01

    An initial evaluation of the major health and environmental issues associated with increased coal use in the six midwestern states of Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio, and Wisconsin is presented. Using an integrated assessment approach, the evaluation proceeds from a base-line scenario of energy demand and facility siting for the period 1975 to 2020. Emphasis is placed on impacts from coal extraction, land reclamation, coal combustion for electrical generation, and coal gasification. The range of potential impacts and constraints is illustrated by a second scenario that represents an expected upper limit for coal utilization in Illinois. Included are: (1) a characterization of the energy demand and siting scenarios, coal related technologies, and coal resources, and (2) the related impacts on air quality, water availability, water quality, and human health.

  16. Integration of Advanced Concepts and Vehicles Into the Next Generation Air Transportation System. Volume 1; Introduction, Key Messages, and Vehicle Attributes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zellweger, Andres; Resnick, Herbert; Stevens, Edward; Arkind, Kenneth; Cotton William B.

    2010-01-01

    Raytheon, in partnership with NASA, is leading the way in ensuring that the future air transportation continues to be a key driver of economic growth and stability and that this system provides an environmentally friendly, safe, and effective means of moving people and goods. A Raytheon-led team of industry and academic experts, under NASA contract NNA08BA47C, looked at the potential issues and impact of introducing four new classes of advanced aircraft into the next generation air transportation system -- known as NextGen. The study will help determine where NASA should further invest in research to support the safe introduction of these new air vehicles. Small uncrewed or unmanned aerial systems (SUAS), super heavy transports (SHT) including hybrid wing body versions (HWB), very light jets (VLJ), and supersonic business jets (SSBJ) are the four classes of aircraft that we studied. Understanding each vehicle's business purpose and strategy is critical to assessing the feasibility of new aircraft operations and their impact on NextGen's architecture. The Raytheon team used scenarios created by aviation experts that depict vehicles in year 2025 operations along with scripts or use cases to understand the issues presented by these new types of vehicles. The information was then mapped into the Joint Planning and Development Office's (JPDO s) Enterprise Architecture to show how the vehicles will fit into NextGen's Concept of Operations. The team also identified significant changes to the JPDO's Integrated Work Plan (IWP) to optimize the NextGen vision for these vehicles. Using a proven enterprise architecture approach and the JPDO s Joint Planning Environment (JPE) web site helped make the leap from architecture to planning efficient, manageable and achievable. Very Light Jets flying into busy hub airports -- Supersonic Business Jets needing to climb and descend rapidly to achieve the necessary altitude Super-heavy cargo planes requiring the shortest common flight

  17. Stresses and elastic constants of crystalline sodium, from molecular dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schiferl, S.K.

    1985-02-01

    The stresses and the elastic constants of bcc sodium are calculated by molecular dynamics (MD) for temperatures to T = 340K. The total adiabatic potential of a system of sodium atoms is represented by pseudopotential model. The resulting expression has two terms: a large, strictly volume-dependent potential, plus a sum over ion pairs of a small, volume-dependent two-body potential. The stresses and the elastic constants are given as strain derivatives of the Helmholtz free energy. The resulting expressions involve canonical ensemble averages (and fluctuation averages) of the position and volume derivatives of the potential. An ensemble correction relates the results to MD equilibrium averages. Evaluation of the potential and its derivatives requires the calculation of integrals with infinite upper limits of integration, and integrand singularities. Methods for calculating these integrals and estimating the effects of integration errors are developed. A method is given for choosing initial conditions that relax quickly to a desired equilibrium state. Statistical methods developed earlier for MD data are extended to evaluate uncertainties in fluctuation averages, and to test for symmetry. 45 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs.

  18. External bulb variable volume maser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhardt, V. S.; Cervenka, P. O. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A maser functioning as a frequency standard stable to one part in 10 to the 14th power includes a variable volume, constant surface area storage bulb having a fixed volume portion located in a resonant cavity from which the frequency standard is derived. A variable volume portion of the bulb, exterior to the resonant cavity, has a maximum volume on the same order of magnitude as the fixed volume bulb portion. The cavity has a length to radius ratio of at least 3:1 so that the operation is attained without the need for a feedback loop. A baffle plate, between the fixed and variable volume bulb portions, includes apertures for enabling hydrogen atoms to pass between the two bulb portions and is an electromagnetic shield that prevents coupling of the electromagnetic field of the cavity into the variable volume bulb portion.

  19. Axiomatic approach to the cosmological constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Christian

    2009-09-01

    A theory of the cosmological constant Λ is currently out of reach. Still, one can start from a set of axioms that describe the most desirable properties a cosmological constant should have. This can be seen in certain analogy to the Khinchin axioms in information theory, which fix the most desirable properties an information measure should have and that ultimately lead to the Shannon entropy as the fundamental information measure on which statistical mechanics is based. Here we formulate a set of axioms for the cosmological constant in close analogy to the Khinchin axioms, formally replacing the dependence of the information measure on probabilities of events by a dependence of the cosmological constant on the fundamental constants of nature. Evaluating this set of axioms one finally arrives at a formula for the cosmological constant given by Λ=1ħG(, where G is the gravitational constant, me the electron mass, and α the low-energy limit of the fine structure constant. This formula is in perfect agreement with current WMAP data. Our approach gives physical meaning to the Eddington-Dirac large-number hypothesis and suggests that the observed value of the cosmological constant is not at all unnatural.

  20. A natural cosmological constant from chameleons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nastase, Horatiu, E-mail: nastase@ift.unesp.br [Instituto de Física Teórica, UNESP-Universidade Estadual Paulista, R. Dr. Bento T. Ferraz 271, Bl. II, Sao Paulo 01140-070, SP (Brazil); Weltman, Amanda, E-mail: amanda.weltman@uct.ac.za [Astrophysics, Cosmology & Gravity Center, Department of Mathematics and Applied Mathematics, University of Cape Town, Private Bag, Rondebosch 7700 (South Africa)

    2015-07-30

    We present a simple model where the effective cosmological constant appears from chameleon scalar fields. For a Kachru–Kallosh–Linde–Trivedi (KKLT)-inspired form of the potential and a particular chameleon coupling to the local density, patches of approximately constant scalar field potential cluster around regions of matter with density above a certain value, generating the effect of a cosmological constant on large scales. This construction addresses both the cosmological constant problem (why Λ is so small, yet nonzero) and the coincidence problem (why Λ is comparable to the matter density now)

  1. A natural cosmological constant from chameleons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horatiu Nastase

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We present a simple model where the effective cosmological constant appears from chameleon scalar fields. For a Kachru–Kallosh–Linde–Trivedi (KKLT-inspired form of the potential and a particular chameleon coupling to the local density, patches of approximately constant scalar field potential cluster around regions of matter with density above a certain value, generating the effect of a cosmological constant on large scales. This construction addresses both the cosmological constant problem (why Λ is so small, yet nonzero and the coincidence problem (why Λ is comparable to the matter density now.

  2. [Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio]. Volume 3, Sampling and analysis plan (SAP): Phase 1, Task 4, Field Investigation: Draft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-10-01

    In April 1990, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB), initiated an investigation to evaluate a potential Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) removal action to prevent, to the extent practicable, the offsite migration of contaminated ground water from WPAFB. WPAFB retained the services of the Environmental Management Operations (EMO) and its principle subcontractor, International Technology Corporation (IT) to complete Phase 1 of the environmental investigation of ground-water contamination at WPAFB. Phase 1 of the investigation involves the short-term evaluation and potential design for a program to remove ground-water contamination that appears to be migrating across the western boundary of Area C, and across the northern boundary of Area B along Springfield Pike. Primarily, Task 4 of Phase 1 focuses on collection of information at the Area C and Springfield Pike boundaries of WPAFB. This Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) has been prepared to assist in completion of the Task 4 field investigation and is comprised of the Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPP) and the Field Sampling Plan (FSP).

  3. Design of single-winding energy-storage reactors for dc-to-dc converters using air-gapped magnetic-core structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohri, A. K.; Wilson, T. G.; Owen, H. A., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    A procedure is presented for designing air-gapped energy-storage reactors for nine different dc-to-dc converters resulting from combinations of three single-winding power stages for voltage stepup, current stepup and voltage stepup/current stepup and three controllers with control laws that impose constant-frequency, constant transistor on-time and constant transistor off-time operation. The analysis, based on the energy-transfer requirement of the reactor, leads to a simple relationship for the required minimum volume of the air gap. Determination of this minimum air gap volume then permits the selection of either an air gap or a cross-sectional core area. Having picked one parameter, the minimum value of the other immediately leads to selection of the physical magnetic structure. Other analytically derived equations are used to obtain values for the required turns, the inductance, and the maximum rms winding current. The design procedure is applicable to a wide range of magnetic material characteristics and physical configurations for the air-gapped magnetic structure.

  4. Constant Width Planar Computation Characterizes ACC0

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, K.A.

    2004-01-01

    We obtain a characterization of ACC 0 in terms of a natural class of constant width circuits, namely in terms of constant width polynomial size planar circuits. This is shown via a characterization of the class of acyclic digraphs which can be embedded on a cylinder surface in such a way that all...

  5. Stability constants for silicate adsorbed to ferrihydrite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Hans Christian Bruun; Wetche, T.P.; Raulund-Rasmussen, Karsten

    1994-01-01

    Intrinsic surface acidity constants (K(a1)intr, K(a2)intr) and surface complexation constant for adsorption of orthosilicate onto synthetic ferrihydrite (K(Si) for the complex = FeOSi(OH)3) have been determined from acid/base titrations in 0.001-0.1 m NaClO4 electrolytes and silicate adsorption e...

  6. The case for the cosmological constant

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    I present a short overview of current observational results and theoretical models for a cosmological constant. The main motivation for invoking a small cosmological constant (or -term) at the present epoch has to do with observations of high redshift Type Ia supernovae which suggest an accelerating universe.

  7. The case for the cosmological constant

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. I present a short overview of current observational results and theoretical models for a cosmological constant. The main motivation for invoking a small cosmological constant (orA-term) at the present epoch has to do with observations of high redshift Type Ia supernovae which suggest an accelerating universe.

  8. DETERMINATION OF STABILITY CONSTANTS OF MANGANESE (II ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    Keywords: Amino acids, dissociation constant, potentiometry, stability constant. INTRODUCTION. Acids – base titration involves the gradual addition or removal of protons for example using the deprotic form of glycine. The plot has two distinct stages corresponding to the deprotonation of the two different groups on glycine.

  9. Fullerene derivatives with increased dielectric constants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jahani, Fatemeh; Torabi, Solmaz; Chiechi, Ryan C; Koster, L Jan Anton; Hummelen, Jan C

    2014-01-01

    The invention of new organic materials with high dielectric constants is of extreme importance for the development of organic-based devices such as organic solar cells. We report on a synthetic way to increase the dielectric constant of fullerene derivatives. It is demonstrated that introducing

  10. Electromechanical systems generating constant frequency alternating current

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Т.А. Мазур

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available  In the article we consider the usage of electromechanical drivers of constant speed rotation, which is based on many stepped electrodynamic reduction unit, in onboard main systems of electric supply of alternative current with constant frequency.

  11. Shapley value for constant-sum games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khmelnitskaya, Anna Borisovna

    2003-01-01

    It is proved that Young’s [4] axiomatization for the Shapley value by marginalism, efficiency, and symmetry is still valid for the Shapley value defined on the class of nonnegative constant-sum games with nonzero worth of grand coalition and on the entire class of constant-sum games as well.

  12. Possible Economies in Air-Conditioning by Accepting Temperature Swings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loudon, A. G.; Petherbridge, P.

    Public building air conditioning systems, which use constant and varying heat and cooling loads, are compared and investigated. Experiments indicated that constant temperature controls based on outside air temperature alone were inefficient. Ventilating a building with outside air and the methods of doing so are cited as being the most economical…

  13. Graviton fluctuations erase the cosmological constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetterich, C.

    2017-10-01

    Graviton fluctuations induce strong non-perturbative infrared renormalization effects for the cosmological constant. The functional renormalization flow drives a positive cosmological constant towards zero, solving the cosmological constant problem without the need to tune parameters. We propose a simple computation of the graviton contribution to the flow of the effective potential for scalar fields. Within variable gravity, with effective Planck mass proportional to the scalar field, we find that the potential increases asymptotically at most quadratically with the scalar field. The solutions of the derived cosmological equations lead to an asymptotically vanishing cosmological ;constant; in the infinite future, providing for dynamical dark energy in the present cosmological epoch. Beyond a solution of the cosmological constant problem, our simplified computation also entails a sizeable positive graviton-induced anomalous dimension for the quartic Higgs coupling in the ultraviolet regime, substantiating the successful prediction of the Higgs boson mass within the asymptotic safety scenario for quantum gravity.

  14. Cinema air as fresh as you can wish. Crystal UFA Palace in Dresden: Cash desk computer controls fresh-air volume according to attendance; Kintopp-Atmosphaere vom Frischesten. Kristall-Ufa-Palast Dresden: Per Kassen-Computer erfasster Zuschauerandrang regelt den Aussenluft-Anteil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1999-01-01

    The prism has a lively inner life. Together with the round UFA Palace cinema from the 1970s it comprises more than 15 cinema halls with 4550 seats. Eight of the halls are located in the new building. The room climate in the halls is kept at a near constant 21 C during performances. The core zone accommodating the cinema halls is conditioned by an air circuit comprising altogether eight air exchange plants with integrated heating and cooling for the eight halls. Outside the seated areas, i.e. in the entrance zone and other short-time occupied places the temperature is normally controlled by the outgoing air on its way out into the street. The cash office in the lobby has a supplementary floor heating system to keep the employees` feet warm. [Deutsch] Das Prisma hat ein bewegtes Innenleben. Es handelt sich um den Kristall-Ufa-Palast, ein Kino. Gemeinsam mit dem danebenstehenden Ufa-Palast-Rundkino aus den 70er Jahren verfuegt es ueber 15 Saele mit 4550 Plaetzen, davon acht Kinos in dem Neubau. Das Raumklima in den einzelnen Saelen wird waehrend der Vorstellung nahezu konstant auf 21 C gehalten. Die Kernzone mit den Kinosaelen haengt an einem Klimakreis mit insgesamt acht Zu- und Abluftanlagen mit Heiz- und Kuehlfunktion fuer die acht Saele. Ausserhalb dieser eigentlichen Aufenthaltszone temperiert in der Regel die Fortluft den Eingangs- und Nicht-Aufenthaltsbereich, bevor sie zur Strasse hin entweicht. Der Kinokassenraum in der Lobby wird zusaetzlich beheizt. Fuer warme Fuesse sorgt eine Fussbodenheizung. (orig./MSK)

  15. Air Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Air pollution is a mixture of solid particles and gases in the air. Car emissions, chemicals from factories, dust, ... a gas, is a major part of air pollution in cities. When ozone forms air pollution, it's ...

  16. Ground State of the Universe and the Cosmological Constant. A Nonperturbative Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husain, Viqar; Qureshi, Babar

    2016-02-12

    The physical Hamiltonian of a gravity-matter system depends on the choice of time, with the vacuum naturally identified as its ground state. We study the expanding Universe with scalar field in the volume time gauge. We show that the vacuum energy density computed from the resulting Hamiltonian is a nonlinear function of the cosmological constant and time. This result provides a new perspective on the relation between time, the cosmological constant, and vacuum energy.

  17. Constants and Pseudo-Constants of Coupled Beam Motion in the PEP-II Rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Decker, F.J.; Colocho, W.S.; Wang, M.H.; Yan, Y.T.; Yocky, G.; /SLAC

    2011-11-01

    Constants of beam motion help as cross checks to analyze beam diagnostics and the modeling procedure. Pseudo-constants, like the betatron mismatch parameter or the coupling parameter det C, are constant till certain elements in the beam line change them. This can be used to visually find the non-desired changes, pinpointing errors compared with the model.

  18. Indoor Air Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Takeji

    The reduction of intake of outdoor air volume in air conditioned buildings, adopted as the strategy for saving energy, has caused sick building syndrome abroad. Such symptoms of sick building as headache, stimuli of eye and nose and lethargy, appears to result from cigarette smoke, folmaldehyde and volatile organic carbons. On the other hand, in airtight residences not only carbon monoxide and nitrogen oxides from domestic burning appliances but also allergens of mite, fungi, pollen and house dust, have become a subject of discussion. Moreover, asbestos and radon of carcinogen now attract a great deal of attention. Those indoor air pollutants are discussed.

  19. Interacting universes and the cosmological constant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonso-Serrano, A. [Centro de Física “Miguel Catalán”, Instituto de Física Fundamental, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Estación Ecológica de Biocosmología, Pedro de Alvarado 14, 06411 Medellín (Spain); Bastos, C. [Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Avenida Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Bertolami, O. [Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Avenida Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Departamento de Física e Astronomia, Faculdade de Ciências da Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); Robles-Pérez, S., E-mail: salvarp@imaff.cfmac.csic.es [Centro de Física “Miguel Catalán”, Instituto de Física Fundamental, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Estación Ecológica de Biocosmología, Pedro de Alvarado 14, 06411 Medellín (Spain); Física Teórica, Universidad del País Vasco, Apartado 644, 48080 Bilbao (Spain)

    2013-02-12

    In this Letter it is studied the effects that an interaction scheme among universes can have in the values of their cosmological constants. In the case of two interacting universes, the value of the cosmological constant of one of the universes becomes very close to zero at the expense of an increasing value of the cosmological constant of the partner universe. In the more general case of a chain of N interacting universes with periodic boundary conditions, the spectrum of the Hamiltonian splits into a large number of levels, each of them associated with a particular value of the cosmological constant, that can be occupied by single universes revealing a collective behavior that plainly shows that the multiverse is much more than the mere sum of its parts.

  20. Graviton fluctuations erase the cosmological constant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Wetterich

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Graviton fluctuations induce strong non-perturbative infrared renormalization effects for the cosmological constant. The functional renormalization flow drives a positive cosmological constant towards zero, solving the cosmological constant problem without the need to tune parameters. We propose a simple computation of the graviton contribution to the flow of the effective potential for scalar fields. Within variable gravity, with effective Planck mass proportional to the scalar field, we find that the potential increases asymptotically at most quadratically with the scalar field. The solutions of the derived cosmological equations lead to an asymptotically vanishing cosmological “constant” in the infinite future, providing for dynamical dark energy in the present cosmological epoch. Beyond a solution of the cosmological constant problem, our simplified computation also entails a sizeable positive graviton-induced anomalous dimension for the quartic Higgs coupling in the ultraviolet regime, substantiating the successful prediction of the Higgs boson mass within the asymptotic safety scenario for quantum gravity.

  1. The time constant of the somatogravic illusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Correia Grácio, B.J.; Winkel, K.N. de; Groen, E.L.; Wentink, M.; Bos, J.E.

    2013-01-01

    Met desdemona hebben we gevonden dat de tijd constante van de somatografische illusie rond twee seconden is. Dit resultaat verschilt van wat was gevonden in ander onderzoek dat gebruikt maakt van een gewone centrifuge

  2. Building evolutionary architectures support constant change

    CERN Document Server

    Ford, Neal; Kua, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    The software development ecosystem is constantly changing, providing a constant stream of new tools, frameworks, techniques, and paradigms. Over the past few years, incremental developments in core engineering practices for software development have created the foundations for rethinking how architecture changes over time, along with ways to protect important architectural characteristics as it evolves. This practical guide ties those parts together with a new way to think about architecture and time.

  3. Trialogue on the number of fundamental constants

    CERN Document Server

    Duff, Michael J; Veneziano, Gabriele

    2002-01-01

    This paper consists of three separate articles on the number of fundamental dimensionful constants in physics. We started our debate in summer 1992 on the terrace of the famous CERN cafeteria. In the summer of 2001 we returned to the subject to find that our views still diverged and decided to explain our current positions. LBO develops the traditional approach with three constants, GV argues in favor of just two, while MJD advocates zero.

  4. Air bag restraint device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marts, D.J.; Richardson, J.G.

    1995-10-17

    A rear-seat air bag restraint device is disclosed that prevents an individual, or individuals, from continuing violent actions while being transported in a patrol vehicle`s rear seat without requiring immediate physical contact by the law enforcement officer. The air bag is activated by a control switch in the front seat and inflates to independently restrict the amount of physical activity occurring in the rear seat of the vehicle while allowing the officer to safely stop the vehicle. The air bag can also provide the officer additional time to get backup personnel to aid him if the situation warrants it. The bag is inflated and maintains a constant pressure by an air pump. 8 figs.

  5. Air bag restraint device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marts, Donna J.; Richardson, John G.

    1995-01-01

    A rear-seat air bag restraint device is disclosed that prevents an individual, or individuals, from continuing violent actions while being transported in a patrol vehicle's rear seat without requiring immediate physical contact by the law enforcement officer. The air bag is activated by a control switch in the front seat and inflates to independently restrict the amount of physical activity occurring in the rear seat of the vehicle while allowing the officer to safely stop the vehicle. The air bag can also provide the officer additional time to get backup personnel to aid him if the situation warrants it. The bag is inflated and maintains a constant pressure by an air pump.

  6. Archives of ALGA. Volume 2

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    Volume 2 contains 3 articles: Ilir Berisha, Translation of Bäcklunds paper ”Surfaces of constant negative curvature”; Johan Erlandsson, "Survey of mathematical models in biology from point of view of Lie group analysis"; Niklas Säfström, "Group analysis of a tumour growth model"

  7. Effect of negative ionisation of inspired air on the response of asthmatic children to exercise and inhaled histamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Dov, I; Amirav, I; Shochina, M; Amitai, I; Bar-Yishay, E; Godfrey, S

    1983-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of negative ionisation of inspired air on bronchial reactivity, 11 asthmatic children were challenged twice by exercise and 10 were challenged twice by histamine inhalation. The children breathed negatively ionised air (4 X 10(5) - 10 X 10(5) ions/cm3) or control room air in random order in a double-blind fashion. All challenges were matched in terms of basal lung function and the exercise tests were matched in terms of ventilation and respiratory heat loss. Exercise-induced asthma was significantly attenuated by exposure to negatively ionised air, the mean postexercise fall in one-second forced expiratory volume (FEV1) being 29% (SE 5%) of the initial value after the control and 21% (3%) after the ionised air test (p less than 0.02). Ten of the 11 subjects developed less exercise-induced asthma while breathing ionised air. Although the median dose of histamine (cumulative breath units) which caused a constant fall in FEV1 for each individual was higher with the ionised air challenge than with the control challenge the difference was not significant. Five of the 10 subjects were less sensitive to histamine and the other five more sensitive when breathing ionised air. It is concluded that negative ionisation of inspired air can modulate the bronchial response to exercise but the effect on the response to histamine is much more variable. PMID:6351332

  8. The rate of pressure rise of gaseous propylene-air explosions in spherical and cylindrical enclosures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razus, Domnina; Movileanua, Codina; Oancea, Dumitru

    2007-01-02

    The maximum rates of pressure rise of propylene-air explosions at various initial pressures and various fuel/oxygen ratios in three closed vessels (a spherical vessel with central ignition and two cylindrical vessels with central or with top ignition) are reported. It was found that in explosions of quiescent mixtures the maximum rates of pressure rise are linear functions on total initial pressure, at constant initial temperature and fuel/oxygen ratio. The slope and intercept of found correlations are greatly influenced by vessel's volume and shape and by the position of the ignition source--factors which determine the amount of heat losses from the burned gas in a closed vessel explosion. Similar data on propylene-air inert mixtures are discussed in comparison with those referring to propylene-air, revealing the influence of nature and amount of inert additive. The deflagration index KG of centrally ignited explosions was also calculated from maximum rates of pressure rise.

  9. Improved CT-based estimate of pulmonary gas trapping accounting for scanner and lung-volume variations in a multicenter asthmatic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sanghun; Hoffman, Eric A; Wenzel, Sally E; Castro, Mario; Lin, Ching-Long

    2014-09-15

    Lung air trapping is estimated via quantitative computed tomography (CT) using density threshold-based measures on an expiration scan. However, the effects of scanner differences and imaging protocol adherence on quantitative assessment are known to be problematic. This study investigates the effects of protocol differences, such as using different CT scanners and breath-hold coaches in a multicenter asthmatic study, and proposes new methods that can adjust intersite and intersubject variations. CT images of 50 healthy subjects and 42 nonsevere and 52 severe asthmatics at total lung capacity (TLC) and functional residual capacity (FRC) were acquired using three different scanners and two different coaching methods at three institutions. A fraction threshold-based approach based on the corrected Hounsfield unit of air with tracheal density was applied to quantify air trapping at FRC. The new air-trapping method was enhanced by adding a lung-shaped metric at TLC and the lobar ratio of air-volume change between TLC and FRC. The fraction-based air-trapping method is able to collapse air-trapping data of respective populations into distinct regression lines. Relative to a constant value-based clustering scheme, the slope-based clustering scheme shows the improved performance and reduced misclassification rate of healthy subjects. Furthermore, both lung shape and air-volume change are found to be discriminant variables for differentiating among three populations of healthy subjects and nonsevere and severe asthmatics. In conjunction with the lung shape and air-volume change, the fraction-based measure of air trapping enables differentiation of severe asthmatics from nonsevere asthmatics and nonsevere asthmatics from healthy subjects, critical for the development and evaluation of new therapeutic interventions. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  10. Improved CT-based estimate of pulmonary gas trapping accounting for scanner and lung-volume variations in a multicenter asthmatic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sanghun; Hoffman, Eric A.; Wenzel, Sally E.; Castro, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Lung air trapping is estimated via quantitative computed tomography (CT) using density threshold-based measures on an expiration scan. However, the effects of scanner differences and imaging protocol adherence on quantitative assessment are known to be problematic. This study investigates the effects of protocol differences, such as using different CT scanners and breath-hold coaches in a multicenter asthmatic study, and proposes new methods that can adjust intersite and intersubject variations. CT images of 50 healthy subjects and 42 nonsevere and 52 severe asthmatics at total lung capacity (TLC) and functional residual capacity (FRC) were acquired using three different scanners and two different coaching methods at three institutions. A fraction threshold-based approach based on the corrected Hounsfield unit of air with tracheal density was applied to quantify air trapping at FRC. The new air-trapping method was enhanced by adding a lung-shaped metric at TLC and the lobar ratio of air-volume change between TLC and FRC. The fraction-based air-trapping method is able to collapse air-trapping data of respective populations into distinct regression lines. Relative to a constant value-based clustering scheme, the slope-based clustering scheme shows the improved performance and reduced misclassification rate of healthy subjects. Furthermore, both lung shape and air-volume change are found to be discriminant variables for differentiating among three populations of healthy subjects and nonsevere and severe asthmatics. In conjunction with the lung shape and air-volume change, the fraction-based measure of air trapping enables differentiation of severe asthmatics from nonsevere asthmatics and nonsevere asthmatics from healthy subjects, critical for the development and evaluation of new therapeutic interventions. PMID:25103972

  11. The time dependence of fundamental constants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Udem, Thomas [Max-Planck Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Garching (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    Since Webb et al. have detected a slightly smaller fine structure constant by quasar absorption spectra about 10 billion years ago an old idea of P.A.M. Dirac from 1937 was revived. Using arguments philosophical in nature he speculated that fundamental constants should vary along with the expanding universe. For a long time the only possibility to search for these minute changes was to exploit the large look-back time of astronomical or geological observations. With the advent of frequency combs the possibility to check for these time variations in the laboratory with optical transitions in atoms, ions and molecules became readily available. Even though the time period covered by these laboratory measurements is typically 10 orders of magnitude shorter than for astronomical observations, they can be 10 orders of magnitude more accurate to provide comparable sensitivity. The question of the time dependence of fundamental constants is of high relevance in the context of modern cosmological models.

  12. Vanishing cosmological constant in elementary particles theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pisano, F. [Instituto de Fisica Teorica (IFT), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Tonasse, M.D. [Universidade do Estado, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica

    1997-01-01

    The quest of a vanishing cosmological constant is considered in the simplest anomaly-free chiral gauge extension of the electroweak standard model where the new physics is limited to a well defined additional flavordynamics above the Fermi scale, namely up to a few TeVs by matching the gauge coupling constants at the electroweak scale, and with an extended Higgs structure. In contrast to the electroweak standard model, it is shown how the extended scalar sector of the theory allows a vanishing or a very small cosmological constant. the details of the cancellation mechanism are presented. At accessible energies the theory is indistinguishable from the standard model of elementary particles and it is in agreement with all existing data. (author). 32 refs. 32 refs.

  13. Our Universe from the cosmological constant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrau, Aurélien; Linsefors, Linda, E-mail: Aurelien.Barrau@cern.ch, E-mail: linda.linsefors@lpsc.in2p3.fr [Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie, Université Grenoble-Alpes, CNRS-IN2P3, 53, avenue des Martyrs, 38026 Grenoble Cedex (France)

    2014-12-01

    The issue of the origin of the Universe and of its contents is addressed in the framework of bouncing cosmologies, as described for example by loop quantum gravity. If the current acceleration is due to a true cosmological constant, this constant is naturally conserved through the bounce and the Universe should also be in a (contracting) de Sitter phase in the remote past. We investigate here the possibility that the de Sitter temperature in the contracting branch fills the Universe with radiation that causes the bounce and the subsequent inflation and reheating. We also consider the possibility that this gives rise to a cyclic model of the Universe and suggest some possible tests.

  14. f( R) constant-roll inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motohashi, Hayato; Starobinsky, Alexei A.

    2017-08-01

    The previously introduced class of two-parametric phenomenological inflationary models in general relativity in which the slow-roll assumption is replaced by the more general, constant-roll condition is generalized to the case of f( R) gravity. A simple constant-roll condition is defined in the original Jordan frame, and exact expressions for a scalaron potential in the Einstein frame, for a function f( R) (in the parametric form) and for inflationary dynamics are obtained. The region of the model parameters permitted by the latest observational constraints on the scalar spectral index and the tensor-to-scalar ratio of primordial metric perturbations generated during inflation is determined.

  15. Cosmological constant, supersymmetry, nonassociativity, and big numbers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dzhunushaliev, Vladimir [KazNU, Department of Theoretical and Nuclear Physics, Almaty (Kazakhstan); IETP, Al-Farabi KazNU, Almaty (Kazakhstan)

    2015-02-01

    The nonassociative generalization of supersymmetry is considered. It is shown that the associator of four supersymmetry generators has the coefficient ∝ ℎ/l{sub 0}{sup 2} where l0 is some characteristic length. Two cases are considered: (a) l{sub 0}{sup -2} coincides with the cosmological constant; (b) l{sub 0} is the classical radius of the electron. It is also shown that the scaled constant is of the order of 10{sup -120} for the first case and 10{sup -30} for the second case. The possible manifestation and smallness of nonassociativity is discussed. (orig.)

  16. Flexible alternatives to constant frequency systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart-Wilson, John

    The use of hybrid systems in which variable frequency is used as generated, with a proportion being converted to constant frequency by electronic conversion, is examined as a flexible alternative to constant frequency systems. Here, some practical solutions to the technical issues raised by adopting the more flexible approach to electrical system generation are presented. In particular, attention is given to the frequency ranges used, impact on aircraft equipment, motor-driven equipment, transformer rectifier units, lighting, and avionics. The discussion also covers fan-assisted galley ovens, system architecture, special airworthiness requirements, and power quality.

  17. The Cosmological Constant Problem (1/2)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    I will review the cosmological constant problem as a serious challenge to our notion of naturalness in Physics. Weinberg’s no go theorem is worked through in detail. I review a number of proposals possibly including Linde's universe multiplication, Coleman's wormholes, the fat graviton, and SLED, to name a few. Large distance modifications of gravity are also discussed, with causality considerations pointing towards a global modification as being the most sensible option. The global nature of the cosmological constant problem is also emphasized, and as a result, the sequestering scenario is reviewed in some detail, demonstrating the cancellation of the Standard Model vacuum energy through a global modification of General Relativity.

  18. The Cosmological Constant Problem (2/2)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    I will review the cosmological constant problem as a serious challenge to our notion of naturalness in Physics. Weinberg’s no go theorem is worked through in detail. I review a number of proposals possibly including Linde's universe multiplication, Coleman's wormholes, the fat graviton, and SLED, to name a few. Large distance modifications of gravity are also discussed, with causality considerations pointing towards a global modification as being the most sensible option. The global nature of the cosmological constant problem is also emphasized, and as a result, the sequestering scenario is reviewed in some detail, demonstrating the cancellation of the Standard Model vacuum energy through a global modification of General Relativity.

  19. Reconstruction of constant slow-roll inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Qing

    2017-09-01

    Using the relations between the slow-roll parameters and the power spectra for the single field slow-roll inflation, we derive the scalar spectral tilt n s and the tensor to scalar ratio r for the constant slow-roll inflation, and obtain the constraint on the slow-roll parameter η from the Planck 2015 results. The inflationary potential for the constant slow-roll inflation is then reconstructed in the framework of both general relativity and the scalar-tensor theory of gravity, and compared with the recently reconstructed E model potential. In the strong coupling limit, we show that the η attractor is reached.

  20. Regional respiratory time constants during lung recruitment in high-frequency oscillatory ventilated preterm infants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miedema, Martijn; de Jongh, Frans H.; Frerichs, Inez; van Veenendaal, Mariëtte B.; van Kaam, Anton H.

    2012-01-01

    To assess the regional respiratory time constants of lung volume changes during stepwise lung recruitment before and after surfactant treatment in high-frequency oscillatory ventilated preterm infants. A stepwise oxygenation-guided recruitment procedure was performed before and after surfactant

  1. Deactivation in the rabbit left ventricle induced by constant ejection flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijkstra, Hessel; Boom, H.B.K.

    1989-01-01

    A study of pressure generated by the left ventricle after ejection with constant flow for different values of the ejection flow, flow duration, time of flow arrest, and ventricular volume is discussed. It was found that pressure after ejection, normalized with respect to isovolumic pressure, is

  2. Coenzyme B12 model studies: Equilibrium constants for the pH ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 114; Issue 1. Coenzyme B12 model studies: Equilibrium constants for the H-dependent axial ligation of benzyl(aquo)cobaloxime by various N- and S-donor ligands. D Sudarshan Reddy N Ravi Kumar Reddy V Sridhar S Satyanarayana. Inorganic and Analytical ...

  3. Simulated Air Launch Environment. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-10-01

    Variable time steps may be used in !he step forward integration. A Prony series curve fit is used on the master relaxation modulus curve to obtain the...represented by an nth term exponential series which is obtained by fit - ing a Prony series to the relaxation modulus curve. In addition it is necessary to...metal pins pushed into the propellant surface. The clip gage, with holes drilled in the tabs, is then fitted in place onto the pins and small amounts

  4. Problems with combined fresh air - off-air systems. Ventilation systems; Probleme bei kombinierten Zu- und Abluftgeraeten. Lueftungstechnische Anlagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lexis, J.

    2003-12-01

    As a rule, specifications on air volumes are made for ventilation systems for fresh air supply only or, alternatively, off-air removal only. In case of mixed air or recirculation, the required air volumes may differ considerably from the specifications. [German] In der Regel beziehen sich die Ausschreibungs- bzw. Garantieluftmengen auf den Betrieb einer lueftungstechnischen Anlage mit reiner Aussen- und Fortluft. Bei Umluft- oder Mischluftbetrieb koennen die geforderten Luftmengen jedoch erheblich von den Ausschreibungsforderungen abweichen. (orig.)

  5. Union-Find with Constant Time Deletions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alstrup, Stephen; Thorup, Mikkel; Gørtz, Inge Li

    2014-01-01

    modification of the classical union-find data structure that supports delete, as well as makeset and union operations, in constant worst-case time, while still supporting find operations in O(log n) worst-case time and O(α_M/N_(n)) amortized time. Our analysis supplies, in particular, a very concise potential...

  6. Timelike Constant Mean Curvature Surfaces with Singularities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brander, David; Svensson, Martin

    2014-01-01

    We use integrable systems techniques to study the singularities of timelike non-minimal constant mean curvature (CMC) surfaces in the Lorentz–Minkowski 3-space. The singularities arise at the boundary of the Birkhoff big cell of the loop group involved. We examine the behavior of the surfaces...

  7. Some zero-sum constants with weights

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    imsc.res.in. MS received 28 February 2007. Abstract. For an abelian group G, the Davenport constant D(G) is defined to be the smallest natural number k such that any sequence of k elements in G has a non- empty subsequence whose sum is ...

  8. Benjamin Constant. Ontdekker van de moderne vrijheid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Hert, Paul; Kinneging, A.; Colette, M.

    2015-01-01

    In 1806 analyseerde de Zwitsers-Franse politicus, filosoof en essayist Benjamin Constant (1767-1830) de moderne samenleving in zijn bekende boek Principes de politique. Uit dit klassiek geworden werk spreekt Constant’s ambivalentie en gevoel van nuance en subtiliteit. De “moderne” individuele

  9. Experimental Determination of the Avogadro Constant

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    obtained from a frame-by-frame analysis of the video over a suffi- ciently long period of time. The diffusion coefficient D is given by σ 2/(2∆t). Once again using Stokes–Einstein relation (equation 6) we can obtain the Boltzmann constant and hence the Avogadro number. Counting α Particles. Rutherford in 1903 demonstrated ...

  10. Redundant internal coordinates, compliance constants and non ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    If chosen properly, the internal coordinates will have minimum mixing in the normal mode representation. This can in principle lead to an automation ... It was shown in the literature that the relaxed force constants could be used as a measure of bond order in all atom-atom distance coordinates. Some of the bonded and ...

  11. Redundant internal coordinates, compliance constants and non ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Redundant internal coordinates, compliance constants and non-bonded interactions – some new insights. MOUMITA MAJUMDER and SADASIVAM MANOGARAN. ∗. Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur 208 016, India e-mail: sm@iitk.ac.in. MS received 21 February 2012; revised 8 July ...

  12. Pion decay constants in dense skyrmion matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee H.-J.

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available According to the QCD, the hadronic matter can have various phases with matter density and temperature. In general, when there is phase transition in a matter, it is known that a symmetry in the matter changes. In case of the hadronic matter, the chiral symmetry in the matter is expected to be restored when the matter density (or temperature increases. The actual order parameter with respect to the chiral symmetry in the hadronic matter is known as the quark condensate from the QCD, but the pion decay constant, corresponding to the radius of the chiral circle, plays the role of the order parameter in an effective field theoretical approach to the QCD. In this paper, by using the skyrmion model which is an effective theory to the QCD, we construct the skyrmion matter as a model of the hadronic matter (nuclear matter and calculate the pion decay constant in the matter. Because of presence of the matter, the pion decay constant is split into the two components, the temporal component and the spatial component. We discuss the phase transition in the skyrmion matter and behavior of the two components of the decay constant for massless pion with density of the skyrmion matter.

  13. Teaching Nanochemistry: Madelung Constants of Nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Mark D.; Baker, A. David

    2010-01-01

    The Madelung constants for binary ionic nanoparticles are determined. The computational method described here sums the Coulombic interactions of each ion in the particle without the use of partial charges commonly used for bulk materials. The results show size-dependent lattice energies. This is a useful concept in teaching how properties such as…

  14. Optical Constants of Cometary Ice Tholins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khare, B. N.; Cruikshank, D.; Arakawa, E. T.; McDonald, G. D.

    1997-07-01

    We have previously reported the optical constants from 0.06 to 40 mu m of ice tholin I, produced by plasma irradiation of 1:6 ethane:water frost at 77K (Khare et al. 1993, Icarus 103, 290). Such ices containing water and small amounts of simple hydrocarbons either in the form of clathrates or intimate physical mixtures are thought to be common outer solar system condensates that were incorporated into comets and other bodies. For the imaginary part of the refractive index (k)index n is not affected by these changes since the k values are small. Here we present our revised optical constants for ice tholin I, and compare with optical constants of ice tholin II, produced by plasma irradiation of ices made from a 80:16:3.2:0.8 water:methanol:carbon dioxide:ethane gas mixture (McDonald et al. 1996, Icarus 122, 107), a first order approximation to known and inferred cometary compositions. These additional data on the optical constants of ice tholin II will provide another choice for comparison with spectra of comets and other icy solar system bodies.

  15. Constant force extensional rheometry of polymer solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szabo, Peter; McKinley, Gareth H.; Clasen, Christian

    2012-01-01

    We revisit the rapid stretching of a liquid filament under the action of a constant imposed tensile force, a problem which was first considered by Matta and Tytus [J. Non-Newton. Fluid Mech. 35 (1990) 215–229]. A liquid bridge formed from a viscous Newtonian fluid or from a dilute polymer solution...

  16. dielectric constants of irradiated and carbonated polymers

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    1985-09-01

    Sep 1, 1985 ... irradiated and carbonated polymers as a function of carbon concentration are investigated. Both low and high density polymers are used. Results predict a quadratic increase in the dielectric constant of specimen as the percentage concentration of carbon is increased. This may be due to the formation of ...

  17. Novel negative tone photodefinable low dielectric constant hybrid films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markley, Thomas J.; Weigel, Scott J.; Kretz, Chris P.

    2005-05-01

    Multifunctional films have the potential to reduce the number of processing steps to prepare various complex electronic devices and thereby reduce the cost of manufacturing the device and increase the throughput of the process. By combining low dielectric thin film and photoresist technologies into one material, such an advantage could be provided to electronics device markets. Air Products and Chemicals has discovered negative tone photodefinable films having dielectric constant values less than 3.0 that are developable in water and/or aqueous TMAH solutions. The low dielectric films produced via a novel reaction pathway involving the use of photoacid generators (PAGs) provides a versatile link to various feature sizes depending on the choice of radiation source and PAG used. Specific examples of film properties and processing latitude will be presented for these developmental materials.

  18. Constant-Fluence Area Scaling for Laser Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinko, John E.

    2008-04-01

    A series of experiments was conducted on polyoxymethylene (POM, trade name Delrin®) propellants in air at atmospheric pressure. A TEA CO2 laser with maximum output power up to 20 J was used to deliver 300 ns pulses of 10.6 μm radiation to POM targets. Ablation at a constant fluence and a range of spot areas was achieved by varying combinations of the laser energy and spot size. Relevant empirical scaling laws governing laser propulsion parameters such as the momentum coupling coefficient (Cm) and specific impulse (Isp) for spot areas within a range of about 0.05-0.25 cm2 are presented. Experimental measurements of imparted impulse, Cm, Isp, and ablated mass per pulse were made using dynamic piezoelectric force sensors and a scientific balance. Finally, Schlieren ICCD imaging of shock waves and vapor plumes was performed and analyzed.

  19. Numerical Study of Laminar Forced Convection of Water/Al2o3 Nanofluid in an Annulus with Constant Wall Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin Kashani

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Laminar forced convection of a nanofluid consisting of water and Al2O3 in a horizontal annulus has been studied numerically. Two-phase mixture model has been used to investigate thermal behaviors of the nanofluid over constant temperature thermal boundary condition and with different volume concentration of nanoparticles. Comparisons with previously published experimental and analytical works on flow behavior in horizontal annulus show good agreements between the results as volume fraction is zero. In general convective heat transfer coefficient increases with nanoparticle concentration. ABSTRAK: Kertaskerja ini mengkaji secara numerik olakan paksa bendalir lamina yang menganduangi air dan Al2O3 didalam anulus mendatar. Model campuran dua fasa digunakan bagi mengkaji tingkah laku haba bendalir nano pada keadaan suhu malar dengan kepekatan nanopartikel berbeza. Perbandingan dengan karya eksperimen dan analitikal yang telah diterbitkan menunjukkan bahawa kelakuan aliran didalm anulus mendatar adalah baik apabila pecahan isipadu adalah sifar. Pada amnya, pekali pemindahan haba olakan meningkat dengan kepekatan nanopartikel. KEYWORDS: nanofluid; volume concentration; heat transfer enhancement; laminar flow convection; annulus

  20. B meson spectrum and decay constant from Nf=2 simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Blossier, Benoit; Della Morte, Michele; Donnellan, Michael; Fritzsch, Patrick; Garron, Nicolas; Heitger, Jochen; von Hippel, Georg; Leder, Bjorn; Simma, Hubert; Sommer, Rainer

    2010-01-01

    We report on the status of an ALPHA Collaboration project to extract quantities for B physics phenomenology from Nf=2 lattice simulations. The framework is Heavy Quark Effective Theory (HQET) expanded up to the first order of the inverse b-quark mass. The couplings of the effective theory are determined by imposing matching conditions of observables computed in HQET with their counterpart computed in QCD. That program, based on Nf=2 simulations in a small physical volume with SF boundary conditions, is now almost finished. On the other side the analysis of configurations selected from the CLS ensembles, in order to measure HQET hadronic matrix elements, has just started recently so that only results obtained at a single lattice spacing, a=0.07 fm, will be discussed. We give our first results for the b-quark mass and for the B meson decay constant.

  1. Ultrasound attenuation dependence on air compression or expansion processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jakevicius, L.; Demcenko, A.; Mardosaite, R.

    2010-01-01

    In this work variation of ultrasonic attenuation coefficient is analyzed in terms of air compression or expansion processes. In closed spaces changing air volume, the ultrasound attenuation coefficient depends on thermodynamic processes which occur during the air volume change. Two limiting cases

  2. Construction of Lines of Constant Density and Constant Refractive Index for Ternary Liquid Mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasic, Aleksandar Z.; Djordjevic, Bojan D.

    1983-01-01

    Demonstrates construction of density constant and refractive index constant lines in triangular coordinate system on basis of systematic experimental determinations of density and refractive index for both homogeneous (single-phase) ternary liquid mixtures (of known composition) and the corresponding binary compositions. Background information,…

  3. Sample variance in the local measurements of the Hubble constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hao-Yi; Huterer, Dragan

    2017-11-01

    The current >3σ tension between the Hubble constant H0 measured from local distance indicators and from cosmic microwave background is one of the most highly debated issues in cosmology, as it possibly indicates new physics or unknown systematics. In this work, we explore whether this tension can be alleviated by the sample variance in the local measurements, which use a small fraction of the Hubble volume. We use a large-volume cosmological N-body simulation to model the local measurements and to quantify the variance due to local density fluctuations and sample selection. We explicitly take into account the inhomogeneous spatial distribution of type Ia supernovae. Despite the faithful modelling of the observations, our results confirm previous findings that sample variance in the local Hubble constant (H_0^loc) measurements is small; we find σ (H_0^loc)=0.31 {km s^{-1}Mpc^{-1}}, a nearly negligible fraction of the ˜6 km s-1Mpc-1 necessary to explain the difference between the local and global H0 measurements. While the H0 tension could in principle be explained by our local neighbourhood being a underdense region of radius ˜150 Mpc, the extreme required underdensity of such a void (δ ≃ -0.8) makes it very unlikely in a ΛCDM universe, and it also violates existing observational constraints. Therefore, sample variance in a ΛCDM universe cannot appreciably alleviate the tension in H0 measurements even after taking into account the inhomogeneous selection of type Ia supernovae.

  4. Molecular equilibrium structures from experimental rotational constants and calculated vibration-rotation interaction constants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pawlowski, F; Jorgensen, P; Olsen, Jeppe

    2002-01-01

    A detailed study is carried out of the accuracy of molecular equilibrium geometries obtained from least-squares fits involving experimental rotational constants B(0) and sums of ab initio vibration-rotation interaction constants alpha(r)(B). The vibration-rotation interaction constants have been...... calculated for 18 single-configuration dominated molecules containing hydrogen and first-row atoms at various standard levels of ab initio theory. Comparisons with the experimental data and tests for the internal consistency of the calculations show that the equilibrium structures generated using Hartree......-Fock vibration-rotation interaction constants have an accuracy similar to that obtained by a direct minimization of the CCSD(T) energy. The most accurate vibration-rotation interaction constants are those calculated at the CCSD(T)/cc-pVQZ level. The equilibrium bond distances determined from these interaction...

  5. Time place learning and activity profile under constant light and constant dark in zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura, Clarissa de Almeida; Lima, Jéssica Polyana da Silva; Silveira, Vanessa Augusta Magalhães; Miguel, Mário André Leocadio; Luchiari, Ana Carolina

    2017-05-01

    The ability to learn about the signs of variability in space and time is known as time place learning (TPL). To adjust their circadian rhythms, animals use stimuli that change regularly, such as the light-dark cycle, temperature, food availability or even social stimuli. Because light-dark cycle is the most important environmental temporal cue, we asked how a diurnal animal would perform TPL if this cue was removed. Zebrafish has been extensively studied in the chronobiology area due to it diurnal chronotype, thus, we studied the effects of constant light and constant dark on the time-place learning and activity profile in zebrafish. Our data show that while under constant light and dark condition zebrafish was not able of TPL, after 30days under the constant conditions, constant light led to higher activity level and less significant (robust) 24h rhythm. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Solar air heaters and their applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selcuk, M. K.

    1977-01-01

    The solar air heater appears to be the most logical choice, as far as the ultimate application of heating air to maintain a comfortable environment is concerned. One disadvantage of solar air heaters is the need for handling larger volumes of air than liquids due to the low density of air as a working substance. Another disadvantage is the low thermal capacity of air. In cases where thermal storage is needed, water is superior to air. Design variations of solar air heaters are discussed along with the calculation of the efficiency of a flat plate solar air heater, the performance of various collector types, and the applications of solar air heaters. Attention is given to collectors with nonporous absorber plates, collectors with porous absorbers, the performance of flat plate collectors with finned absorbers, a wire mesh absorber, and an overlapped glass plate air heater.

  7. The Effects of Air Preheating and Fuel/Air Inlet Diameter on the Characteristics of Vortex Flame

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Khaleghi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of fuel/air inlet diameter as well as air preheating on the flame stability, temperature distribution, pollutant formation, and combustion characteristics of a lab-scaled asymmetric vortex flame have been investigated. A three-dimensional steady-state finite volume solver has been used to solve the governing and energy equations. The solver uses a first-order upwind scheme to discretize the governing equations in the space. The semi-implicit method for pressure linked equations has been applied to couple the pressure to the velocity terms. Several turbulence models were applied to predict the flame temperature and it was found that k-ε RNG has given the best results in accordance with the experimental results. The results reveal that the inlet air diameter can enhance the thermal properties and reduce the NOx emission while the inlet fuel diameter has less significant impact. Increasing diameters are accompanied with a pressure drop. It was found that preheating the air and fuel would significantly affect the flame temperature and NOx emission with constant mass flow rate.

  8. Chiral behaviour of the pion decay constant in N{sub f}=2 QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lottini, Stefano [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany). John von Neumann-Inst. fuer Computing NIC; Collaboration: ALPHA Collaboration

    2013-11-15

    As increased statistics and new ensembles with light pions have become available within the CLS effort, we complete previous work by inspecting the chiral behaviour of the pion decay constant. We discuss the validity of Chiral Perturbation Theory ({chi}PT) and examine the results concerning the pion decay constant and the ensuing scale setting, the pion mass squared in units of the quark mass, and the ratio of decay constants f{sub K}=f{sub {pi}}; along the way, the relevant low-energy constants of SU(2) {chi}PT are estimated. All simulations were performed with two dynamical flavours of nonperturbatively O(a)-improved Wilson fermions, on volumes with m{sub {pi}}L{>=}4, pion masses{>=}192 MeV and lattice spacings down to 0.048 fm. Our error analysis takes into account the effect of slow modes on the autocorrelations.

  9. Dessecação da aveia-preta (Avena strigosa Schreb com herbicida de contato, em presença ou não de assistência de ar junto à barra do pulverizador, em diferentes volumes de calda Black-oats (Avena strigosa Schreb control with contact burndown herbicide applied at different carrier volumes, with and without air assistance at sleeve boom sprayer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz C. Garcia

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available A tecnologia de aplicação dos produtos fitossanitários na agricultura pode ser aprimorada mediante a redução dos desperdícios. Com o objetivo de contribuir com tal avanço tecnológico, avaliou-se a eficácia de um herbicida com ação de contato, aplicado em pós-emergência com pulverizadores sem e com assistência de ar junto à barra, em diferentes volumes de calda. O experimento foi instalado no município de Ponta Grossa - PR, com a dessecação de aveia-preta (Avena strigosa Schreb implantada em sistema de plantio direto sob a palha. Empregou-se a mistura herbicida formulada (SC de dicloreto de paraquate (400 g ha-1 + diuron (200 g ha-1. O delineamento experimental utilizado foi o de blocos casualizados (DBC, em esquema fatorial 2 (pulverizador sem e com assistência de ar x 5 (volumes de calda: 0; 100; 200; 300 e 400 L ha-1, com quatro repetições. A avaliação do efeito da dessecação se deu por meio da escala proposta pela Asociación Latinoamericana de Malezas (ALAM. A interação entre os fatores foi significativa, obtendo-se suficiência na dessecação a partir de 200 e 100 L ha-1, sem e com assistência de ar na barra, respectivamente.Agricultural pesticide application technology is largely improved by reduction of waste and losses. With such objective, an experiment was conducted in order to evaluate the efficacy of a post-emergence contact herbicide applied with and without air-assisted sleeve boom in different spray volumes. The experiment was carried out in Ponta Grossa county, in a no-till black oats cover crop (Avena strigosa Schreb. The formulated mixture (SC of paraquat and diuron at 400 + 200 g a.i ha-1 was applied with a sleeve boom sprayer, with and without air-assistance and five spray volumes: 0; 100; 200; 300 and 400 L ha-1. Treatments were placed in a 2 x 5 factorial arrangement in a randomized complete block design with four replications. Herbicide efficacy was evaluated by the ALAM rating system. Efficacy

  10. Multiphoton amplitude in a constant background field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Aftab; Ahmadiniaz, Naser; Corradini, Olindo; Kim, Sang Pyo; Schubert, Christian

    2018-01-01

    In this contribution, we present our recent compact master formulas for the multiphoton amplitudes of a scalar propagator in a constant background field using the worldline fomulation of quantum field theory. The constant field has been included nonperturbatively, which is crucial for strong external fields. A possible application is the scattering of photons by electrons in a strong magnetic field, a process that has been a subject of great interest since the discovery of astrophysical objects like radio pulsars, which provide evidence that magnetic fields of the order of 1012G are present in nature. The presence of a strong external field leads to a strong deviation from the classical scattering amplitudes. We explicitly work out the Compton scattering amplitude in a magnetic field, which is a process of potential relevance for astrophysics. Our final result is compact and suitable for numerical integration.

  11. f(R) constant-roll inflation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motohashi, Hayato [Universidad de Valencia-CSIC, Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular (IFIC), Valencia (Spain); Starobinsky, Alexei A. [L.D. Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics, RAS, Moscow (Russian Federation); National Research University Higher School of Economics, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2017-08-15

    The previously introduced class of two-parametric phenomenological inflationary models in general relativity in which the slow-roll assumption is replaced by the more general, constant-roll condition is generalized to the case of f(R) gravity. A simple constant-roll condition is defined in the original Jordan frame, and exact expressions for a scalaron potential in the Einstein frame, for a function f(R) (in the parametric form) and for inflationary dynamics are obtained. The region of the model parameters permitted by the latest observational constraints on the scalar spectral index and the tensor-to-scalar ratio of primordial metric perturbations generated during inflation is determined. (orig.)

  12. BOREAS RSS-17 Dielectric Constant Profile Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Nickeson, Jaime (Editor); McDonald, Kyle C.; Zimmerman, Reiner; Way, JoBea

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS RSS-17 team acquired and analyzed imaging radar data from the ESA's ERS-1 over a complete annual cycle at the BOREAS sites in Canada in 1994 to detect shifts in radar backscatter related to varying environmental conditions. This data set consists of dielectric constant profile measurements from selected trees at various BOREAS flux tower sites. The relative dielectric constant was measured at C-band (frequency = 5 GHz) as a function of depth into the trunk of three trees at each site, Measurements were made during April 1994 with an Applied Microwave Corporation field PDP fitted with a 0.358-cm (0.141-inch) diameter coaxial probe tip. The data are available in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  13. Mixed quantum states with variable Planck constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Gosson, Maurice A.

    2017-09-01

    Recent cosmological measurements tend to confirm that the fine structure constant α is not immutable and has undergone a tiny variation since the Big Bang. Choosing adequate units, this could also reflect a variation of Planck's constant h. The aim of this Letter is to explore some consequences of such a possible change of h for the pure and mixed states of quantum mechanics. Surprisingly enough it is found that not only is the purity of a state extremely sensitive to such changes, but that quantum states can evolve into classical states, and vice versa. A complete classification of such transitions is however not possible for the moment being because of yet unsolved mathematical difficulties related to the study of positivity properties of trace class operators.

  14. Benjamin Constant. Libertad, democracia y pluralismo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Patricia Fonnegra Osorio

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A partir de un enfoque interpretativo, en este artículo se aborda por qué para Benjamin Constant la democracia solo puede darse en donde se presenta una relación necesaria entre la libertad entendida como defensa de los derechos individuales -libertad como independencia o negativa- y la libertad concebida como principio de la participación pública -libertad como autonomía o positiva-. Asimismo, se presenta la importancia que atribuye el autor a las tradiciones que dan vida a la configuración del universo cultural de un pueblo. Se concluye que en la obra de Constant se encuentra una clara defensa del Estado de derecho y del pluralismo, la cual puede iluminar la comprensión de los problemas políticos de la contemporaneidad.

  15. Some Dynamical Effects of the Cosmological Constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axenides, M.; Floratos, E. G.; Perivolaropoulos, L.

    Newton's law gets modified in the presence of a cosmological constant by a small repulsive term (antigravity) that is proportional to the distance. Assuming a value of the cosmological constant consistent with the recent SnIa data (Λ~=10-52 m-2), we investigate the significance of this term on various astrophysical scales. We find that on galactic scales or smaller (less than a few tens of kpc), the dynamical effects of the vacuum energy are negligible by several orders of magnitude. On scales of 1 Mpc or larger however we find that the vacuum energy can significantly affect the dynamics. For example we show that the velocity data in the local group of galaxies correspond to galactic masses increased by 35% in the presence of vacuum energy. The effect is even more important on larger low density systems like clusters of galaxies or superclusters.

  16. Daylight calculations using constant luminance curves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Betman, E. [CRICYT, Mendoza (Argentina). Laboratorio de Ambiente Humano y Vivienda

    2005-02-01

    This paper presents a simple method to manually estimate daylight availability and to make daylight calculations using constant luminance curves calculated with local illuminance and irradiance data and the all-weather model for sky luminance distribution developed in the Atmospheric Science Research Center of the University of New York (ARSC) by Richard Perez et al. Work with constant luminance curves has the advantage that daylight calculations include the problem's directionality and preserve the information of the luminous climate of the place. This permits accurate knowledge of the resource and a strong basis to establish conclusions concerning topics related to the energy efficiency and comfort in buildings. The characteristics of the proposed method are compared with the method that uses the daylight factor. (author)

  17. Disturbing Implications of a Cosmological Constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyson, Lisa; Kleban, Matthew; Susskind, Leonard

    2002-10-01

    In this paper we consider the implications of a cosmological constant for the evolution of the universe, under a set of assumptions motivated by the holographic and horizon complementarity principles. We discuss the ``causal patch'' description of spacetime required by this framework, and present some simple examples of cosmologies described this way. We argue that these assumptions inevitably lead to very deep paradoxes, which seem to require major revisions of our usual assumptions.

  18. Efficient Determination of Reverberation Chamber Time Constant

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Xiaotian; Robinson, Martin P.; Flintoft, Ian D.; Dawson, John F.

    2017-01-01

    Determination of the rate of energy loss in a reverberation chamber is fundamental to many different measurements such as absorption cross-section, antenna efficiency, radiated power, and shielding effectiveness. Determination of the energy decay time-constant in the time domain by linear fitting the power delay profile, rather than using the frequency domain quality-factor, has the advantage of being independent of the radiation efficiency of antennas used in the measurement. However, determ...

  19. Gravitation, the Quantum, and Cosmological Constant

    OpenAIRE

    Mazur, Pawel O.

    1996-01-01

    The arguments of statistical nature for the existence of constituents of active gravitational masses are presented. The present paper proposes a basis for microscopic theory of universal gravitation. Questions like the relation of cosmological constant and quantum theory, black hole radiance and the nature of inertia are addressed. This paper is the second in the series of papers published in Acta Physica Polonica {\\bf B}.

  20. Relationship of coagulation constant to time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nadirov, N.K.; Anisimov, B.F.; Borodkin, L.P.

    1982-01-01

    Tests were carried out for the purpose of constructing mathematical models of electrodehydration of petroleum. Work was performed in electric fields with constant current. A 1% emulsion ''water in vaseline oil'' was placed into a cell after a 5 minute treatment in a UZDN-1 ultrasound disperser. Distance between electrodes was held at 25 mm. The cell was fed high voltage current from the source (VS-20-10), which was held constant throughout the entire test period. Current was measured with a microampermeter type M266M. Changes in the emulsion were observed using a KM-6 cathetometer. It was shown that the character of changes in function M(t), are dependent on the voltage of the electric field, viscosity of the media, initial concentration and initial distribution of particles according to size. The constant of kinetic coagulation is dependent on time: during the initial moment of electro-treatment of a reverse emulsion, thermal coagulation was observed, which gradually is replaced with electro-gravitational coagulation.