WorldWideScience

Sample records for consortium pooled analysis

  1. Cannabis smoking and lung cancer risk: Pooled analysis in the International Lung Cancer Consortium

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, L.R.; Morgenstern, H.; Greenland, S.; Chang, S.C.; Lazarus, P.; Teare, M.D.; Woll, P.J.; Orlow, I.; Cox, B.; Brhane, Y.; Liu, G.; Hung, R.J.

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the association between cannabis smoking and lung cancer risk, data on 2,159 lung cancer cases and 2,985 controls were pooled from 6 case-control studies in the US, Canada, UK, and New Zealand within the International Lung Cancer Consortium. Study-specific associations between cannabis smoking and lung cancer were estimated using unconditional logistic regression adjusting for sociodemographic factors, tobacco smoking status and pack-years; odds-ratio estimates were pooled usin...

  2. Diet and the risk of head and neck cancer: a pooled analysis in the INHANCE consortium.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Chuang, Shu-Chun

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the association between diet and head and neck cancer (HNC) risk using data from the International Head and Neck Cancer Epidemiology (INHANCE) consortium. The INHANCE pooled data included 22 case-control studies with 14,520 cases and 22,737 controls. Center-specific quartiles among the controls were used for food groups, and frequencies per week were used for single food items. A dietary pattern score combining high fruit and vegetable intake and low red meat intake was created. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the dietary items on the risk of HNC were estimated with a two-stage random-effects logistic regression model. An inverse association was observed for higher-frequency intake of fruit (4th vs. 1st quartile OR = 0.52, 95% CI = 0.43-0.62, p (trend) < 0.01) and vegetables (OR = 0.66, 95% CI = 0.49-0.90, p (trend) = 0.01). Intake of red meat (OR = 1.40, 95% CI = 1.13-1.74, p (trend) = 0.13) and processed meat (OR = 1.37, 95% CI = 1.14-1.65, p (trend) < 0.01) was positively associated with HNC risk. Higher dietary pattern scores, reflecting high fruit\\/vegetable and low red meat intake, were associated with reduced HNC risk (per score increment OR = 0.90, 95% CI = 0.84-0.97).

  3. Marijuana smoking and the risk of head and neck cancer: pooled analysis in the INHANCE consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthiller, Julien; Lee, Yuan-Chin Amy; Boffetta, Paolo; Wei, Qingyi; Sturgis, Erich M; Greenland, Sander; Morgenstern, Hal; Zhang, Zuo-Feng; Lazarus, Philip; Muscat, Joshua; Chen, Chu; Schwartz, Stephen M; Eluf Neto, José; Wünsch Filho, Victor; Koifman, Sergio; Curado, Maria Paula; Matos, Elena; Fernandez, Leticia; Menezes, Ana; Daudt, Alexander W; Ferro, Gilles; Brennan, Paul; Hashibe, Mia

    2009-05-01

    Marijuana contains carcinogens similar to tobacco smoke and has been suggested by relatively small studies to increase the risk of head and neck cancer (HNC). Because tobacco is a major risk factor for HNC, large studies with substantial numbers of never tobacco users could help to clarify whether marijuana smoking is independently associated with HNC risk. We pooled self-reported interview data on marijuana smoking and known HNC risk factors on 4,029 HNC cases and 5,015 controls from five case-control studies within the INHANCE Consortium. Subanalyses were conducted among never tobacco users (493 cases and 1,813 controls) and among individuals who did not consume alcohol or smoke tobacco (237 cases and 887 controls). The risk of HNC was not elevated by ever marijuana smoking [odds ratio (OR), 0.88; 95% confidence intervals (95% CI), 0.67-1.16], and there was no increasing risk associated with increasing frequency, duration, or cumulative consumption of marijuana smoking. An increased risk of HNC associated with marijuana use was not detected among never tobacco users (OR, 0.93; 95% CI, 0.63-1.37; three studies) nor among individuals who did not drink alcohol and smoke tobacco (OR, 1.06; 95% CI, 0.47-2.38; two studies). Our results are consistent with the notion that infrequent marijuana smoking does not confer a risk of these malignancies. Nonetheless, because the prevalence of frequent marijuana smoking was low in most of the contributing studies, we could not rule out a moderately increased risk, particularly among subgroups without exposure to tobacco and alcohol.

  4. In-Home Coal and Wood Use and Lung Cancer Risk: A Pooled Analysis of the International Lung Cancer Consortium

    OpenAIRE

    Hosgood, H. Dean; Boffetta, Paolo; Greenland, Sander; Lee, Yuan-Chin Amy; McLaughlin, John; Seow, Adeline; Duell, Eric J.; Andrew, Angeline S.; Zaridze, David; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila; Rudnai, Peter; Lissowska, Jolanta; Fabiánová, Eleonóra; Mates, Dana; Bencko, Vladimir

    2010-01-01

    Background Domestic fuel combustion from cooking and heating is an important public health issue because roughly 3 billion people are exposed worldwide. Recently, the International Agency for Research on Cancer classified indoor emissions from household coal combustion as a human carcinogen (group 1) and from biomass fuel (primarily wood) as a probable human carcinogen (group 2A). Objectives We pooled seven studies from the International Lung Cancer Consortium (5,105 cases and 6,535 controls)...

  5. Estrogen receptor beta rs1271572 polymorphism and invasive ovarian carcinoma risk: pooled analysis within the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galina Lurie

    Full Text Available The association of ovarian carcinoma risk with the polymorphism rs1271572 in the estrogen receptor beta (ESR2 gene was examined in 4946 women with primary invasive ovarian carcinoma and 6582 controls in a pooled analysis of ten case-control studies within the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium (OCAC. All participants were non-Hispanic white women. Odds ratios (ORs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs were estimated using unconditional logistic regression adjusted for site and age. Women with the TT genotype were at increased risk of ovarian carcinoma compared to carriers of the G allele (OR = 1.10; 95%; CI: 1.01-1.21; p = 0.04; the OR was 1.09 (CI: 0.99-1.20; p = 0.07 after excluding data from the center (Hawaii that nominated this SNP for OCAC genotyping A stronger association of rs1271572 TT versus GT/GG with risk was observed among women aged ≤50 years versus older women (OR = 1.35; CI: 1.12-1.62; p = 0.002; p for interaction = 0.02 that remained statistically significant after excluding Hawaii data (OR = 1.34; CI: 1.11-1.61; p = 0.009. No heterogeneity of the association was observed by study, menopausal status, gravidity, parity, use of contraceptive or menopausal hormones, tumor histological type, or stage at diagnosis. This pooled analysis suggests that rs1271572 might influence the risk of ovarian cancer, in particular among younger women.

  6. Caesarean delivery and risk of childhood leukaemia: a pooled analysis from the Childhood Leukemia International Consortium (CLIC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcotte, Erin L; Thomopoulos, Thomas P; Infante-Rivard, Claire; Clavel, Jacqueline; Petridou, Eleni Th; Schüz, Joachim; Ezzat, Sameera; Dockerty, John D; Metayer, Catherine; Magnani, Corrado; Scheurer, Michael E; Mueller, Beth A; Mora, Ana M; Wesseling, Catharina; Skalkidou, Alkistis; Rashed, Wafaa M; Francis, Stephen S; Ajrouche, Roula; Erdmann, Friederike; Orsi, Laurent; Spector, Logan G

    2016-04-01

    Results from case-control studies have shown an increased risk of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) in young children born by caesarean delivery, and prelabour caesarean delivery in particular; however, an association of method of delivery with childhood leukaemia subtypes has yet to be established. We therefore did a pooled analysis of data to investigate the association between childhood leukaemia and caesarean delivery. We pooled data from 13 case-control studies from the Childhood Leukemia International Consortium done in nine countries (Canada, Costa Rica, Egypt, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, New Zealand, and the USA) for births from 1970-2013. We analysed caesarean delivery overall and by indications that probably resulted in prelabour caesarean delivery or emergency caesarean delivery. We used multivariable logistic regression models, adjusted for child's birthweight, sex, age, ethnic origin, parental education, maternal age, and study, to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% CIs for the risk of ALL and acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) in children aged 0-14 years at diagnosis. The studies provided data for 8780 ALL cases, 1332 AML cases, and 23 459 controls, of which the birth delivery method was known for 8655 (99%) ALL cases, 1292 (97%) AML cases, and 23 351 (>99%) controls. Indications for caesarean delivery were available in four studies (there were caesarean deliveries for 1061 of 4313 ALL cases, 138 of 664 AML cases, and 1401 of 5884 controls). The OR for all indications of caesarean delivery and ALL was 1·06 (95% CI 0·99-1·13), and was significant for prelabour caesarean delivery and ALL (1·23 [1·04-1·47]; p=0·018). Emergency caesarean delivery was not associated with ALL (OR 1·02 [95% CI 0·81-1·30]). AML was not associated with caesarean delivery (all indications OR 0·99 [95% CI 0·84-1·17]; prelabour caesarean delivery 0·83 [0·54-1·26]; and emergency caesarean delivery 1·05 [0·63-1·77]). Our results suggest an increased risk of

  7. Non-Hodgkin lymphoma, body mass index and cytokine polymorphisms: a pooled analysis from the InterLymph consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Eleanor; Skibola, Christine F.; Bracci, Paige M.; Cerhan, James R.; Costas, Laura; Smedby, Karin Ekström; Holly, Elizabeth A.; Maynadié, Marc; Novak, Anne J.; Lightfoot, Tracy J.; Ansell, Stephen M.; Smith, Alex G.; Liebow, Mark; Melbye, Mads; Morton, Lindsay; de Sanjosé, Silvia; Slager, Susan L.; Wang, Sophia S.; Zhang, Yawei; Zheng, Tongzhang; Roman, Eve

    2015-01-01

    Background Excess adiposity has been associated with lymphomagenesis, possibly mediated by increased cytokine production causing a chronic inflammatory state. The relationship between obesity, cytokine polymorphisms and selected mature B-cell neoplasms is reported. Method Data on 4979 cases and 4752 controls from nine American/European studies from the InterLymph consortium (1988–2008) were pooled. For diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), follicular lymphoma (FL) and chronic lymphocytic leukaemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma (CLL/SLL), joint associations of body mass index (from self-reported height and weight) and 12 polymorphisms in cytokines IL1A (rs1800587), IL1B (rs16944, rs1143627), IL1RN (rs454078), IL2 (rs2069762), IL6 (rs1800795, rs1800797), IL10 (rs1800890, rs1800896), TNF (rs1800629), LTA (rs909253), and CARD15 (rs2066847) were investigated using unconditional logistic regression. BMI-polymorphism interaction effects were estimated using the relative excess risk due to interaction (RERI). Results Obesity (BMI≥30kg m−2) was associated with DLBCL risk (OR=1.33, 95%CI 1.02–1.73), as was TNF-308GA+AA (OR=1.24, 95%CI 1.07–1.44). Together, being obese and TNF-308GA+AA increased DLBCL risk almost two-fold relative to those of normal weight and TNF-308GG (OR=1.93 95%CI 1.27–2.94), with a RERI of 0.41 (95%CI −0.05,0.84, P(interaction)=0.13). For FL and CLL/SLL, no associations with obesity or TNF-308GA+AA, either singly or jointly, were observed. No evidence of interactions between obesity and the other polymorphisms were detected. Conclusions Our results suggest that cytokine polymorphisms do not generally interact with BMI to increase lymphoma risk but obesity and TNF-308GA+AA may interact to increase DLBCL risk. Impact Studies using better measures of adiposity are needed to further investigate the interactions between obesity and TNF-308G>A in the pathogenesis of lymphoma. PMID:25962811

  8. Gastroesophageal reflux in relation to adenocarcinomas of the esophagus: a pooled analysis from the Barrett's and Esophageal Adenocarcinoma Consortium (BEACON.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael B Cook

    Full Text Available Previous studies have evidenced an association between gastroesophageal reflux and esophageal adenocarcinoma (EA. It is unknown to what extent these associations vary by population, age, sex, body mass index, and cigarette smoking, or whether duration and frequency of symptoms interact in predicting risk. The Barrett's and Esophageal Adenocarcinoma Consortium (BEACON allowed an in-depth assessment of these issues.Detailed information on heartburn and regurgitation symptoms and covariates were available from five BEACON case-control studies of EA and esophagogastric junction adenocarcinoma (EGJA. We conducted single-study multivariable logistic regressions followed by random-effects meta-analysis. Stratified analyses, meta-regressions, and sensitivity analyses were also conducted.Five studies provided 1,128 EA cases, 1,229 EGJA cases, and 4,057 controls for analysis. All summary estimates indicated positive, significant associations between heartburn/regurgitation symptoms and EA. Increasing heartburn duration was associated with increasing EA risk; odds ratios were 2.80, 3.85, and 6.24 for symptom durations of <10 years, 10 to <20 years, and ≥20 years. Associations with EGJA were slighter weaker, but still statistically significant for those with the highest exposure. Both frequency and duration of heartburn/regurgitation symptoms were independently associated with higher risk. We observed similar strengths of associations when stratified by age, sex, cigarette smoking, and body mass index.This analysis indicates that the association between heartburn/regurgitation symptoms and EA is strong, increases with increased duration and/or frequency, and is consistent across major risk factors. Weaker associations for EGJA suggest that this cancer site has a dissimilar pathogenesis or represents a mixed population of patients.

  9. Infertility and incident endometrial cancer risk: a pooled analysis from the epidemiology of endometrial cancer consortium (E2C2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, H P; Cook, L S; Weiderpass, E; Adami, H-O; Anderson, K E; Cai, H; Cerhan, J R; Clendenen, T V; Felix, A S; Friedenreich, C M; Garcia-Closas, M; Goodman, M T; Liang, X; Lissowska, J; Lu, L; Magliocco, A M; McCann, S E; Moysich, K B; Olson, S H; Petruzella, S; Pike, M C; Polidoro, S; Ricceri, F; Risch, H A; Sacerdote, C; Setiawan, V W; Shu, X O; Spurdle, A B; Trabert, B; Webb, P M; Wentzensen, N; Xiang, Y-B; Xu, Y; Yu, H; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, A; Brinton, L A

    2015-01-01

    Background: Nulliparity is an endometrial cancer risk factor, but whether or not this association is due to infertility is unclear. Although there are many underlying infertility causes, few studies have assessed risk relations by specific causes. Methods: We conducted a pooled analysis of 8153 cases and 11 713 controls from 2 cohort and 12 case-control studies. All studies provided self-reported infertility and its causes, except for one study that relied on data from national registries. Logistic regression was used to estimate adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results: Nulliparous women had an elevated endometrial cancer risk compared with parous women, even after adjusting for infertility (OR=1.76; 95% CI: 1.59–1.94). Women who reported infertility had an increased risk compared with those without infertility concerns, even after adjusting for nulliparity (OR=1.22; 95% CI: 1.13–1.33). Among women who reported infertility, none of the individual infertility causes were substantially related to endometrial cancer. Conclusions: Based on mainly self-reported infertility data that used study-specific definitions of infertility, nulliparity and infertility appeared to independently contribute to endometrial cancer risk. Understanding residual endometrial cancer risk related to infertility, its causes and its treatments may benefit from large studies involving detailed data on various infertility parameters. PMID:25688738

  10. Allergies and risk of pancreatic cancer: a pooled analysis from the Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Sara H; Hsu, Meier; Satagopan, Jaya M; Maisonneuve, Patrick; Silverman, Debra T; Lucenteforte, Ersilia; Anderson, Kristin E; Borgida, Ayelet; Bracci, Paige M; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas; Cotterchio, Michelle; Dai, Qi; Duell, Eric J; Fontham, Elizabeth H; Gallinger, Steven; Holly, Elizabeth A; Ji, Bu-Tian; Kurtz, Robert C; La Vecchia, Carlo; Lowenfels, Albert B; Luckett, Brian; Ludwig, Emmy; Petersen, Gloria M; Polesel, Jerry; Seminara, Daniela; Strayer, Lori; Talamini, Renato

    2013-09-01

    In order to quantify the risk of pancreatic cancer associated with history of any allergy and specific allergies, to investigate differences in the association with risk according to age, gender, smoking status, or body mass index, and to study the influence of age at onset, we pooled data from 10 case-control studies. In total, there were 3,567 cases and 9,145 controls. Study-specific odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were calculated by using unconditional logistic regression adjusted for age, gender, smoking status, and body mass index. Between-study heterogeneity was assessed by using the Cochran Q statistic. Study-specific odds ratios were pooled by using a random-effects model. The odds ratio for any allergy was 0.79 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.62, 1.00) with heterogeneity among studies (P allergies or asthma. There were no major differences among subgroups defined by age, gender, smoking status, or body mass index. Older age at onset of allergies was slightly more protective than earlier age.

  11. Exposure to secondhand tobacco smoke and lung cancer by histological type: a pooled analysis of the International Lung Cancer Consortium (ILCCO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Claire H; Lee, Yuan-Chin Amy; Hung, Rayjean J; McNallan, Sheila R; Cote, Michele L; Lim, Wei-Yen; Chang, Shen-Chih; Kim, Jin Hee; Ugolini, Donatella; Chen, Ying; Liloglou, Triantafillos; Andrew, Angeline S; Onega, Tracy; Duell, Eric J; Field, John K; Lazarus, Philip; Le Marchand, Loic; Neri, Monica; Vineis, Paolo; Kiyohara, Chikako; Hong, Yun-Chul; Morgenstern, Hal; Matsuo, Keitaro; Tajima, Kazuo; Christiani, David C; McLaughlin, John R; Bencko, Vladimir; Holcatova, Ivana; Boffetta, Paolo; Brennan, Paul; Fabianova, Eleonora; Foretova, Lenka; Janout, Vladimir; Lissowska, Jolanta; Mates, Dana; Rudnai, Peter; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila; Mukeria, Anush; Zaridze, David; Seow, Adeline; Schwartz, Ann G; Yang, Ping; Zhang, Zuo-Feng

    2014-01-01

    While the association between exposure to secondhand smoke and lung cancer risk is well established, few studies with sufficient power have examined the association by histological type. In this study, we evaluated the secondhand smoke-lung cancer relationship by histological type based on pooled data from 18 case-control studies in the International Lung Cancer Consortium (ILCCO), including 2,504 cases and 7,276 controls who were never smokers and 10,184 cases and 7,176 controls who were ever smokers. We used multivariable logistic regression, adjusting for age, sex, race/ethnicity, smoking status, pack-years of smoking, and study. Among never smokers, the odds ratios (OR) comparing those ever exposed to secondhand smoke with those never exposed were 1.31 (95% CI: 1.17–1.45) for all histological types combined, 1.26 (95% CI: 1.10–1.44) for adenocarcinoma, 1.41 (95% CI: 0.99–1.99) for squamous cell carcinoma, 1.48 (95% CI: 0.89–2.45) for large cell lung cancer, and 3.09 (95% CI: 1.62–5.89) for small cell lung cancer. The estimated association with secondhand smoke exposure was greater for small cell lung cancer than for non-small cell lung cancers (OR=2.11, 95% CI: 1.11–4.04). This analysis is the largest to date investigating the relation between exposure to secondhand smoke and lung cancer. Our study provides more precise estimates of the impact of secondhand smoke on the major histological types of lung cancer, indicates the association with secondhand smoke is stronger for small cell lung cancer than for the other histological types, and suggests the importance of intervention against exposure to secondhand smoke in lung cancer prevention. PMID:24615328

  12. Exposure to secondhand tobacco smoke and lung cancer by histological type: a pooled analysis of the International Lung Cancer Consortium (ILCCO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Claire H; Lee, Yuan-Chin Amy; Hung, Rayjean J; McNallan, Sheila R; Cote, Michele L; Lim, Wei-Yen; Chang, Shen-Chih; Kim, Jin Hee; Ugolini, Donatella; Chen, Ying; Liloglou, Triantafillos; Andrew, Angeline S; Onega, Tracy; Duell, Eric J; Field, John K; Lazarus, Philip; Le Marchand, Loic; Neri, Monica; Vineis, Paolo; Kiyohara, Chikako; Hong, Yun-Chul; Morgenstern, Hal; Matsuo, Keitaro; Tajima, Kazuo; Christiani, David C; McLaughlin, John R; Bencko, Vladimir; Holcatova, Ivana; Boffetta, Paolo; Brennan, Paul; Fabianova, Eleonora; Foretova, Lenka; Janout, Vladimir; Lissowska, Jolanta; Mates, Dana; Rudnai, Peter; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila; Mukeria, Anush; Zaridze, David; Seow, Adeline; Schwartz, Ann G; Yang, Ping; Zhang, Zuo-Feng

    2014-10-15

    While the association between exposure to secondhand smoke and lung cancer risk is well established, few studies with sufficient power have examined the association by histological type. In this study, we evaluated the secondhand smoke-lung cancer relationship by histological type based on pooled data from 18 case-control studies in the International Lung Cancer Consortium (ILCCO), including 2,504 cases and 7,276 control who were never smokers and 10,184 cases and 7,176 controls who were ever smokers. We used multivariable logistic regression, adjusting for age, sex, race/ethnicity, smoking status, pack-years of smoking, and study. Among never smokers, the odds ratios (OR) comparing those ever exposed to secondhand smoke with those never exposed were 1.31 (95% CI: 1.17-1.45) for all histological types combined, 1.26 (95% CI: 1.10-1.44) for adenocarcinoma, 1.41 (95% CI: 0.99-1.99) for squamous cell carcinoma, 1.48 (95% CI: 0.89-2.45) for large cell lung cancer, and 3.09 (95% CI: 1.62-5.89) for small cell lung cancer. The estimated association with secondhand smoke exposure was greater for small cell lung cancer than for nonsmall cell lung cancers (OR=2.11, 95% CI: 1.11-4.04). This analysis is the largest to date investigating the relation between exposure to secondhand smoke and lung cancer. Our study provides more precise estimates of the impact of secondhand smoke on the major histological types of lung cancer, indicates the association with secondhand smoke is stronger for small cell lung cancer than for the other histological types, and suggests the importance of intervention against exposure to secondhand smoke in lung cancer prevention. © 2014 UICC.

  13. The role of sleep difficulties in the vasomotor menopausal symptoms and depressed mood relationships: an international pooled analysis of eight studies in the InterLACE consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Hsin-Fang; Pandeya, Nirmala; Dobson, Annette J; Kuh, Diana; Brunner, Eric J; Crawford, Sybil L; Avis, Nancy E; Gold, Ellen B; Mitchell, Ellen S; Woods, Nancy F; Bromberger, Joyce T; Thurston, Rebecca C; Joffe, Hadine; Yoshizawa, Toyoko; Anderson, Debra; Mishra, Gita D

    2018-02-12

    Many women experience both vasomotor menopausal symptoms (VMS) and depressed mood at midlife, but little is known regarding the prospective bi-directional relationships between VMS and depressed mood and the role of sleep difficulties in both directions. A pooled analysis was conducted using data from 21 312 women (median: 50 years, interquartile range 49-51) in eight studies from the InterLACE consortium. The degree of VMS, sleep difficulties, and depressed mood was self-reported and categorised as never, rarely, sometimes, and often (if reporting frequency) or never, mild, moderate, and severe (if reporting severity). Multivariable logistic regression models were used to examine the bi-directional associations adjusted for within-study correlation. At baseline, the prevalence of VMS (40%, range 13-62%) and depressed mood (26%, 8-41%) varied substantially across studies, and a strong dose-dependent association between VMS and likelihood of depressed mood was found. Over 3 years of follow-up, women with often/severe VMS at baseline were more likely to have subsequent depressed mood compared with those without VMS (odds ratios (OR) 1.56, 1.27-1.92). Women with often/severe depressed mood at baseline were also more likely to have subsequent VMS than those without depressed mood (OR 1.89, 1.47-2.44). With further adjustment for the degree of sleep difficulties at baseline, the OR of having a subsequent depressed mood associated with often/severe VMS was attenuated and no longer significant (OR 1.13, 0.90-1.40). Conversely, often/severe depressed mood remained significantly associated with subsequent VMS (OR 1.80, 1.38-2.34). Difficulty in sleeping largely explained the relationship between VMS and subsequent depressed mood, but it had little impact on the relationship between depressed mood and subsequent VMS.

  14. Burden of hip fracture using disability-adjusted life-years: a pooled analysis of prospective cohorts in the CHANCES consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadimitriou, Nikos; Tsilidis, Konstantinos K; Orfanos, Philippos; Benetou, Vassiliki; Ntzani, Evangelia E; Soerjomataram, Isabelle; Künn-Nelen, Annemarie; Pettersson-Kymmer, Ulrika; Eriksson, Sture; Brenner, Hermann; Schöttker, Ben; Saum, Kai-Uwe; Holleczek, Bernd; Grodstein, Francine D; Feskanich, Diane; Orsini, Nicola; Wolk, Alicja; Bellavia, Andrea; Wilsgaard, Tom; Jørgensen, Lone; Boffetta, Paolo; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Trichopoulou, Antonia

    2017-05-01

    No studies have estimated disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) lost due to hip fractures using real-life follow-up cohort data. We aimed to quantify the burden of disease due to incident hip fracture using DALYs in prospective cohorts in the CHANCES consortium, and to calculate population attributable fractions based on DALYs for specific risk factors. We used data from six cohorts of participants aged 50 years or older at recruitment to calculate DALYs. We applied disability weights proposed by the National Osteoporosis Foundation and did a series of sensitivity analyses to examine the robustness of DALY estimates. We calculated population attributable fractions for smoking, body-mass index (BMI), physical activity, alcohol intake, type 2 diabetes and parity, use of hormone replacement therapy, and oral contraceptives in women. We calculated summary risk estimates across cohorts with pooled analysis and random-effects meta-analysis methods. 223 880 men and women were followed up for a mean of 13 years (SD 6). 7724 (3·5%) participants developed an incident hip fracture, of whom 413 (5·3%) died as a result. 5964 DALYs (27 per 1000 individuals) were lost due to hip fractures, 1230 (20·6%) of which were in the group aged 75-79 years. 4150 (69·6%) DALYs were attributed to disability. Current smoking was the risk factor responsible for the greatest hip fracture burden (7·5%, 95% CI 5·2-9·7) followed by physical inactivity (5·5%, 2·1-8·5), history of diabetes (2·8%, 2·1-4·0), and low to average BMI (2·0%, 1·4-2·7), whereas low alcohol consumption (0·01-2·5 g per day) and high BMI had a protective effect. Hip fracture can lead to a substantial loss of healthy life-years in elderly people. National public health policies should be strengthened to reduce hip fracture incidence and mortality. Primary prevention measures should be strengthened to prevent falls, and reduce smoking and a sedentary lifestyle. European Community's Seventh Framework Programme

  15. Progesterone receptor variation and risk of ovarian cancer is limited to the invasive endometrioid subtype: results from the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium pooled analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pearce, C.L.; Wu, A.H.; Gayther, S.A.

    2008-01-01

    There is evidence that progesterone plays a role in the aetiology of invasive epithelial ovarian cancer. Therefore, genes involved in pathways that regulate progesterone may be candidates for susceptibility to this disease. Previous studies have suggested that genetic variants in the progesterone...... receptor gene (PGR) may be associated with ovarian cancer risk, although results have been inconsistent. We have established an international consortium to pool resources and data from many ovarian cancer case-control studies in an effort to identify variants that influence risk. In this study, three PGR...... single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), for which previous data have suggested they affect ovarian cancer risk, were examined. These were +331 C/T (rs10895068), PROGINS (rs1042838), and a 3' variant (rs608995). A total of 4788 ovarian cancer cases and 7614 controls from 12 case-control studies were...

  16. Recent alcohol consumption and risk of incident ovarian carcinoma: a pooled analysis of 5,342 cases and 10,358 controls from the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelemen Linda E

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies evaluating the association between alcohol intake and ovarian carcinoma (OC are inconsistent. Because OC and ovarian borderline tumor histologic types differ genetically, molecularly and clinically, large numbers are needed to estimate risk associations. Methods We pooled data from 12 case-control studies in the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium comprising 5,342 OC cases, 1,455 borderline tumors and 10,358 controls with quantitative information on recent alcohol intake to estimate odds ratios (OR and 95% confidence intervals (CI according to frequencies of average daily intakes of beer, wine, liquor and total alcohol. Results Total alcohol intake was not associated with all OC: consumption of >3 drinks per day compared to none, OR=0.92, 95% CI=0.76-1.10, P trend=0.27. Among beverage types, a statistically non-significant decreased risk was observed among women who consumed >8 oz/d of wine compared to none (OR=0.83, 95% CI=0.68-1.01, P trend=0.08. This association was more apparent among women with clear cell OC (OR, 0.43; 95% CI, 0.22-0.83; P trend=0.02, although based on only 10 cases and not statistically different from the other histologic types (P value for statistical heterogeneity between histologic types = 0.09. Statistical heterogeneity of the alcohol- and wine-OC associations was seen among three European studies, but not among eight North American studies. No statistically significant associations were observed in separate analyses evaluating risk with borderline tumors of serous or mucinous histology. Smoking status did not significantly modify any of the associations. Conclusions We found no evidence that recent moderate alcohol drinking is associated with increased risk for overall OC, or that variation in risk is associated strongly with specific histologic types. Understanding modifiable causes of these elusive and deadly cancers remains a priority for the research community.

  17. Recent alcohol consumption and risk of incident ovarian carcinoma: a pooled analysis of 5,342 cases and 10,358 controls from the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelemen, Linda E; Köbel, Martin; Lurie, Galina; Thompson, Pamela J; Carney, Michael E; Moysich, Kirsten; Edwards, Robert; Bunker, Clare; Jensen, Allan; Høgdall, Estrid; Cramer, Daniel W; Bandera, Elisa V; Vitonis, Allison F; Olson, Sara H; King, Melony; Chandran, Urmila; Lissowska, Jolanta; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Yang, Hannah; Webb, Penelope M; Schildkraut, Joellen M; Goodman, Marc T; Terry, Kathryn L; Risch, Harvey A; Rossing, Mary Anne; Brinton, Louise A; Doherty, Jennifer A; Ness, Roberta B; Kjær, Susanne Krüger; Chang-Claude, Jenny

    2013-01-01

    Studies evaluating the association between alcohol intake and ovarian carcinoma (OC) are inconsistent. Because OC and ovarian borderline tumor histologic types differ genetically, molecularly and clinically, large numbers are needed to estimate risk associations. We pooled data from 12 case-control studies in the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium comprising 5,342 OC cases, 1,455 borderline tumors and 10,358 controls with quantitative information on recent alcohol intake to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) according to frequencies of average daily intakes of beer, wine, liquor and total alcohol. Total alcohol intake was not associated with all OC: consumption of >3 drinks per day compared to none, OR=0.92, 95% CI=0.76-1.10, P trend=0.27. Among beverage types, a statistically non-significant decreased risk was observed among women who consumed >8 oz/d of wine compared to none (OR=0.83, 95% CI=0.68-1.01, P trend=0.08). This association was more apparent among women with clear cell OC (OR, 0.43; 95% CI, 0.22-0.83; P trend=0.02), although based on only 10 cases and not statistically different from the other histologic types (P value for statistical heterogeneity between histologic types = 0.09). Statistical heterogeneity of the alcohol- and wine-OC associations was seen among three European studies, but not among eight North American studies. No statistically significant associations were observed in separate analyses evaluating risk with borderline tumors of serous or mucinous histology. Smoking status did not significantly modify any of the associations. We found no evidence that recent moderate alcohol drinking is associated with increased risk for overall OC, or that variation in risk is associated strongly with specific histologic types. Understanding modifiable causes of these elusive and deadly cancers remains a priority for the research community

  18. Young Adult and Usual Adult Body Mass Index and Multiple Myeloma Risk: A Pooled Analysis in the International Multiple Myeloma Consortium (IMMC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birmann, Brenda M; Andreotti, Gabriella; De Roos, Anneclaire J; Camp, Nicola J; Chiu, Brian C H; Spinelli, John J; Becker, Nikolaus; Benhaim-Luzon, Véronique; Bhatti, Parveen; Boffetta, Paolo; Brennan, Paul; Brown, Elizabeth E; Cocco, Pierluigi; Costas, Laura; Cozen, Wendy; de Sanjosé, Silvia; Foretová, Lenka; Giles, Graham G; Maynadié, Marc; Moysich, Kirsten; Nieters, Alexandra; Staines, Anthony; Tricot, Guido; Weisenburger, Dennis; Zhang, Yawei; Baris, Dalsu; Purdue, Mark P

    2017-06-01

    Background: Multiple myeloma risk increases with higher adult body mass index (BMI). Emerging evidence also supports an association of young adult BMI with multiple myeloma. We undertook a pooled analysis of eight case-control studies to further evaluate anthropometric multiple myeloma risk factors, including young adult BMI. Methods: We conducted multivariable logistic regression analysis of usual adult anthropometric measures of 2,318 multiple myeloma cases and 9,609 controls, and of young adult BMI (age 25 or 30 years) for 1,164 cases and 3,629 controls. Results: In the pooled sample, multiple myeloma risk was positively associated with usual adult BMI; risk increased 9% per 5-kg/m 2 increase in BMI [OR, 1.09; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.04-1.14; P = 0.007]. We observed significant heterogeneity by study design ( P = 0.04), noting the BMI-multiple myeloma association only for population-based studies ( P trend = 0.0003). Young adult BMI was also positively associated with multiple myeloma (per 5-kg/m 2 ; OR, 1.2; 95% CI, 1.1-1.3; P = 0.0002). Furthermore, we observed strong evidence of interaction between younger and usual adult BMI ( P interaction adult BMI may increase multiple myeloma risk and suggest that healthy BMI maintenance throughout life may confer an added benefit of multiple myeloma prevention. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 26(6); 876-85. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  19. Associated Links Among Smoking, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, and Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Pooled Analysis in the International Lung Cancer Consortium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruyi Huang

    2015-11-01

    Interpretation: This is the largest pooling study that provides improved understanding of smoking on SCLC, and further demonstrates a causal pathway through COPD that warrants further experimental study.

  20. Body mass index and diabetes in Asia: a cross-sectional pooled analysis of 900,000 individuals in the Asia cohort consortium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Boffetta

    Full Text Available The occurrence of diabetes has greatly increased in low- and middle-income countries, particularly in Asia, as has the prevalence of overweight and obesity; in European-derived populations, overweight and obesity are established causes of diabetes. The shape of the association of overweight and obesity with diabetes risk and its overall impact have not been adequately studied in Asia.A pooled cross-sectional analysis was conducted to evaluate the association between baseline body mass index (BMI, measured as weight in kg divided by the square of height in m and self-reported diabetes status in over 900,000 individuals recruited in 18 cohorts from Bangladesh, China, India, Japan, Korea, Singapore and Taiwan. Logistic regression models were fitted to calculate cohort-specific odds ratios (OR of diabetes for categories of increasing BMI, after adjustment for potential confounding factors. OR were pooled across cohorts using a random-effects meta-analysis. The sex- and age-adjusted prevalence of diabetes was 4.3% in the overall population, ranging from 0.5% to 8.2% across participating cohorts. Using the category 22.5-24.9 kg/m² as reference, the OR for diabetes spanned from 0.58 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.31, 0.76 for BMI lower than 15.0 kg/m² to 2.23 (95% CI 1.86, 2.67 for BMI higher than 34.9 kg/m². The positive association between BMI and diabetes prevalence was present in all cohorts and in all subgroups of the study population, although the association was stronger in individuals below age 50 at baseline (p-value of interaction<0.001, in cohorts from India and Bangladesh (p<0.001, in individuals with low education (p-value 0.02, and in smokers (p-value 0.03; no differences were observed by gender, urban residence, or alcohol drinking.This study estimated the shape and the strength of the association between BMI and prevalence of diabetes in Asian populations and identified patterns of the association by age, country, and other risk

  1. Family history of cancer and risk of Pancreatic Cancer: A Pooled Analysis from the Pancreatic Cancer Cohort Consortium (PanScan)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Eric J.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Fuchs, Charles S.; LaCroix, Andrea; McWilliams, Robert R.; Steplowski, Emily; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z.; Arslan, Alan A.; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; Gross, Myron; Helzlsouer, Kathy; Petersen, Gloria; Zheng, Wei; Agalliu, Ilir; Allen, Naomi E.; Amundadottir, Laufey; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Buring, Julie E.; Canzian, Federico; Clipp, Sandra; Dorronsoro, Miren; Gaziano, J. Michael; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Hankinson, Susan E.; Hartge, Patricia; Hoover, Robert N.; Hunter, David J.; Jacobs, Kevin B.; Jenab, Mazda; Kraft, Peter; Kooperberg, Charles; Lynch, Shannon M.; Sund, Malin; Mendelsohn, Julie B.; Mouw, Tracy; Newton, Christina C.; Overvad, Kim; Palli, Domenico; Peeters, Petra H.M.; Rajkovic, Aleksandar; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Thomas, Gilles; Tobias, Geoffrey S.; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Virtamo, Jarmo; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Wolpin, Brian M.; Yu, Kai; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne

    2010-01-01

    A family history of pancreatic cancer has consistently been associated with increased risk of pancreatic cancer. However, uncertainty remains about the strength of this association. Results from previous studies suggest a family history of select cancers (i.e. ovarian, breast, and colorectal) could also be associated, although not as strongly, with increased risk of pancreatic cancer. We examined the association between a family history of five types of cancer (pancreas, prostate, ovarian, breast, and colorectal) and risk of pancreatic cancer using data from a collaborative nested case-control study conducted by the Pancreatic Cancer Cohort Consortium. Cases and controls were from cohort studies from the United States, Europe, and China, and a case-control study from the Mayo Clinic. Analyses of family history of pancreatic cancer included 1,183 cases and 1,205 controls. A family history of pancreatic cancer in a parent, sibling, or child was associated with increased risk of pancreatic cancer (multivariate-adjusted OR = 1.76, 95% CI 1.19–2.61). A family history of prostate cancer was also associated with increased risk (OR = 1.45, 95% CI 1.12–1.89). There were no statistically significant associations with a family history of ovarian cancer (OR = 0.82, 95% CI 0.52–1.31), breast cancer (OR = 1.21, 95% CI 0.97–1.51), or colorectal cancer (OR = 1.17, 95% CI 0.93–1.47). Our results confirm a moderate sized association between a family history of pancreatic cancer and risk of pancreatic cancer and also provide evidence for an association with a family history of prostate cancer worth further study. PMID:20049842

  2. Polymorphisms in Genes of Relevance for Oestrogen and Oxytocin Pathways and Risk of Barrett's Oesophagus and Oesophageal Adenocarcinoma: A Pooled Analysis from the BEACON Consortium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarina Lagergren

    Full Text Available The strong male predominance in oesophageal adenocarcinoma (OAC and Barrett's oesophagus (BO continues to puzzle. Hormonal influence, e.g. oestrogen or oxytocin, might contribute.This genetic-epidemiological study pooled 14 studies from three continents, Australia, Europe, and North America. Polymorphisms in 3 key genes coding for the oestrogen pathway (receptor alpha (ESR1, receptor beta (ESR2, and aromatase (CYP19A1, and 3 key genes of the oxytocin pathway (the oxytocin receptor (OXTR, oxytocin protein (OXT, and cyclic ADP ribose hydrolase glycoprotein (CD38, were analysed using a gene-based approach, versatile gene-based test association study (VEGAS.Among 1508 OAC patients, 2383 BO patients, and 2170 controls, genetic variants within ESR1 were associated with BO in males (p = 0.0058 and an increased risk of OAC and BO combined in males (p = 0.0023. Genetic variants within OXTR were associated with an increased risk of BO in both sexes combined (p = 0.0035 and in males (p = 0.0012. We followed up these suggestive findings in a further smaller data set, but found no replication. There were no significant associations between the other 4 genes studied and risk of OAC, BO, separately on in combination, in males and females combined or in males only.Genetic variants in the oestrogen receptor alpha and the oxytocin receptor may be associated with an increased risk of BO or OAC, but replication in other large samples are needed.

  3. Polymorphisms in Genes of Relevance for Oestrogen and Oxytocin Pathways and Risk of Barrett's Oesophagus and Oesophageal Adenocarcinoma: A Pooled Analysis from the BEACON Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagergren, Katarina; Ek, Weronica E; Levine, David; Chow, Wong-Ho; Bernstein, Leslie; Casson, Alan G; Risch, Harvey A; Shaheen, Nicholas J; Bird, Nigel C; Reid, Brian J; Corley, Douglas A; Hardie, Laura J; Wu, Anna H; Fitzgerald, Rebecca C; Pharoah, Paul; Caldas, Carlos; Romero, Yvonne; Vaughan, Thomas L; MacGregor, Stuart; Whiteman, David; Westberg, Lars; Nyren, Olof; Lagergren, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    The strong male predominance in oesophageal adenocarcinoma (OAC) and Barrett's oesophagus (BO) continues to puzzle. Hormonal influence, e.g. oestrogen or oxytocin, might contribute. This genetic-epidemiological study pooled 14 studies from three continents, Australia, Europe, and North America. Polymorphisms in 3 key genes coding for the oestrogen pathway (receptor alpha (ESR1), receptor beta (ESR2), and aromatase (CYP19A1)), and 3 key genes of the oxytocin pathway (the oxytocin receptor (OXTR), oxytocin protein (OXT), and cyclic ADP ribose hydrolase glycoprotein (CD38)), were analysed using a gene-based approach, versatile gene-based test association study (VEGAS). Among 1508 OAC patients, 2383 BO patients, and 2170 controls, genetic variants within ESR1 were associated with BO in males (p = 0.0058) and an increased risk of OAC and BO combined in males (p = 0.0023). Genetic variants within OXTR were associated with an increased risk of BO in both sexes combined (p = 0.0035) and in males (p = 0.0012). We followed up these suggestive findings in a further smaller data set, but found no replication. There were no significant associations between the other 4 genes studied and risk of OAC, BO, separately on in combination, in males and females combined or in males only. Genetic variants in the oestrogen receptor alpha and the oxytocin receptor may be associated with an increased risk of BO or OAC, but replication in other large samples are needed.

  4. Estimating and explaining the effect of education and income on head and neck cancer risk: INHANCE consortium pooled analysis of 31 case-control studies from 27 countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, David I; Brenner, Darren R; McMahon, Alex D; Macpherson, Lorna M D; Agudo, Antonio; Ahrens, Wolfgang; Bosetti, Cristina; Brenner, Hermann; Castellsague, Xavier; Chen, Chu; Curado, Maria Paula; Curioni, Otávio A; Dal Maso, Luigino; Daudt, Alexander W; de Gois Filho, José F; D'Souza, Gypsyamber; Edefonti, Valeria; Fabianova, Eleonora; Fernandez, Leticia; Franceschi, Silvia; Gillison, Maura; Hayes, Richard B; Healy, Claire M; Herrero, Rolando; Holcatova, Ivana; Jayaprakash, Vijayvel; Kelsey, Karl; Kjaerheim, Kristina; Koifman, Sergio; La Vecchia, Carlo; Lagiou, Pagona; Lazarus, Philip; Levi, Fabio; Lissowska, Jolanta; Luce, Daniele; Macfarlane, Tatiana V; Mates, Dana; Matos, Elena; McClean, Michael; Menezes, Ana M; Menvielle, Gwenn; Merletti, Franco; Morgenstern, Hal; Moysich, Kirsten; Müller, Heiko; Muscat, Joshua; Olshan, Andrew F; Purdue, Mark P; Ramroth, Heribert; Richiardi, Lorenzo; Rudnai, Peter; Schantz, Stimson; Schwartz, Stephen M; Shangina, Oxana; Simonato, Lorenzo; Smith, Elaine; Stucker, Isabelle; Sturgis, Erich M; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila; Talamini, Renato; Thomson, Peter; Vaughan, Thomas L; Wei, Qingyi; Winn, Deborah M; Wunsch-Filho, Victor; Yu, Guo-Pei; Zhang, Zuo-Feng; Zheng, Tongzhang; Znaor, Ariana; Boffetta, Paolo; Chuang, Shu-Chun; Ghodrat, Marianoosh; Amy Lee, Yuan-Chin; Hashibe, Mia; Brennan, Paul

    2015-03-01

    Low socioeconomic status has been reported to be associated with head and neck cancer risk. However, previous studies have been too small to examine the associations by cancer subsite, age, sex, global region and calendar time and to explain the association in terms of behavioral risk factors. Individual participant data of 23,964 cases with head and neck cancer and 31,954 controls from 31 studies in 27 countries pooled with random effects models. Overall, low education was associated with an increased risk of head and neck cancer (OR = 2.50; 95% CI = 2.02 - 3.09). Overall one-third of the increased risk was not explained by differences in the distribution of cigarette smoking and alcohol behaviors; and it remained elevated among never users of tobacco and nondrinkers (OR = 1.61; 95% CI = 1.13 - 2.31). More of the estimated education effect was not explained by cigarette smoking and alcohol behaviors: in women than in men, in older than younger groups, in the oropharynx than in other sites, in South/Central America than in Europe/North America and was strongest in countries with greater income inequality. Similar findings were observed for the estimated effect of low versus high household income. The lowest levels of income and educational attainment were associated with more than 2-fold increased risk of head and neck cancer, which is not entirely explained by differences in the distributions of behavioral risk factors for these cancers and which varies across cancer sites, sexes, countries and country income inequality levels. © 2014 UICC.

  5. Circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D and risk of pancreatic cancer: Cohort Consortium Vitamin D Pooling Project of Rarer Cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z; Jacobs, Eric J; Arslan, Alan A; Qi, Dai; Patel, Alpa V; Helzlsouer, Kathy J; Weinstein, Stephanie J; McCullough, Marjorie L; Purdue, Mark P; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Snyder, Kirk; Virtamo, Jarmo; Wilkins, Lynn R; Yu, Kai; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Zheng, Wei; Albanes, Demetrius; Cai, Qiuyin; Harvey, Chinonye; Hayes, Richard; Clipp, Sandra; Horst, Ronald L; Irish, Lonn; Koenig, Karen; Le Marchand, Loic; Kolonel, Laurence N

    2010-07-01

    Results from epidemiologic studies examining pancreatic cancer risk and vitamin D intake or 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentrations (the best indicator of vitamin D derived from diet and sun) have been inconsistent. Therefore, the authors conducted a pooled nested case-control study of participants from 8 cohorts within the Cohort Consortium Vitamin D Pooling Project of Rarer Cancers (VDPP) (1974-2006) to evaluate whether prediagnostic circulating 25(OH)D concentrations were associated with the development of pancreatic cancer. In total, 952 incident pancreatic adenocarcinoma cases occurred among participants (median follow-up, 6.5 years). Controls (n = 1,333) were matched to each case by cohort, age, sex, race/ethnicity, date of blood draw, and follow-up time. Conditional logistic regression analysis was used to calculate smoking-, body mass index-, and diabetes-adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for pancreatic cancer. Clinically relevant 25(OH)D cutpoints were compared with a referent category of 50- or =100 nmol/L) was associated with a statistically significant 2-fold increase in pancreatic cancer risk overall (odds ratio = 2.12, 95% confidence interval: 1.23, 3.64). Given this result, recommendations to increase vitamin D concentrations in healthy persons for the prevention of cancer should be carefully considered.

  6. Correlates of circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D: Cohort Consortium Vitamin D Pooling Project of Rarer Cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullough, Marjorie L; Weinstein, Stephanie J; Freedman, D Michal; Helzlsouer, Kathy; Flanders, W Dana; Koenig, Karen; Kolonel, Laurence; Laden, Francine; Le Marchand, Loic; Purdue, Mark; Snyder, Kirk; Stevens, Victoria L; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael; Virtamo, Jarmo; Yang, Gong; Yu, Kai; Zheng, Wei; Albanes, Demetrius; Ashby, Jason; Bertrand, Kimberly; Cai, Hui; Chen, Yu; Gallicchio, Lisa; Giovannucci, Edward; Jacobs, Eric J; Hankinson, Susan E; Hartge, Patricia; Hartmuller, Virginia; Harvey, Chinonye; Hayes, Richard B; Horst, Ronald L; Shu, Xiao-Ou

    2010-07-01

    Low vitamin D status is common globally and is associated with multiple disease outcomes. Understanding the correlates of vitamin D status will help guide clinical practice, research, and interpretation of studies. Correlates of circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentrations measured in a single laboratory were examined in 4,723 cancer-free men and women from 10 cohorts participating in the Cohort Consortium Vitamin D Pooling Project of Rarer Cancers, which covers a worldwide geographic area. Demographic and lifestyle characteristics were examined in relation to 25(OH)D using stepwise linear regression and polytomous logistic regression. The prevalence of 25(OH)D concentrations less than 25 nmol/L ranged from 3% to 36% across cohorts, and the prevalence of 25(OH)D concentrations less than 50 nmol/L ranged from 29% to 82%. Seasonal differences in circulating 25(OH)D were most marked among whites from northern latitudes. Statistically significant positive correlates of 25(OH)D included male sex, summer blood draw, vigorous physical activity, vitamin D intake, fish intake, multivitamin use, and calcium supplement use. Significant inverse correlates were body mass index, winter and spring blood draw, history of diabetes, sedentary behavior, smoking, and black race/ethnicity. Correlates varied somewhat within season, race/ethnicity, and sex. These findings help identify persons at risk for low vitamin D status for both clinical and research purposes.

  7. Genetic variation in the immunosuppression pathway genes and breast cancer susceptibility: a pooled analysis of 42,510 cases and 40,577 controls from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Jieping; Rudolph, Anja; Moysich, Kirsten B; Behrens, Sabine; Goode, Ellen L; Bolla, Manjeet K; Dennis, Joe; Dunning, Alison M; Easton, Douglas F; Wang, Qin; Benitez, Javier; Hopper, John L; Southey, Melissa C; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Broeks, Annegien; Fasching, Peter A; Haeberle, Lothar; Peto, Julian; Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Sawyer, Elinor J; Tomlinson, Ian; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marmé, Frederik; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Bojesen, Stig E; Flyger, Henrik; Nielsen, Sune F; Nordestgaard, Børge G; González-Neira, Anna; Menéndez, Primitiva; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Neuhausen, Susan L; Brenner, Hermann; Arndt, Volker; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K; Brauch, Hiltrud; Hamann, Ute; Nevanlinna, Heli; Fagerholm, Rainer; Dörk, Thilo; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Mannermaa, Arto; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Van Dijck, Laurien; Smeets, Ann; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Eilber, Ursula; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Couch, Fergus J; Hallberg, Emily; Giles, Graham G; Milne, Roger L; Haiman, Christopher A; Schumacher, Fredrick; Simard, Jacques; Goldberg, Mark S; Kristensen, Vessela; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Zheng, Wei; Beeghly-Fadiel, Alicia; Winqvist, Robert; Grip, Mervi; Andrulis, Irene L; Glendon, Gord; García-Closas, Montserrat; Figueroa, Jonine; Czene, Kamila; Brand, Judith S; Darabi, Hatef; Eriksson, Mikael; Hall, Per; Li, Jingmei; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Pharoah, Paul D P; Shah, Mitul; Kabisch, Maria; Torres, Diana; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Ademuyiwa, Foluso; Ambrosone, Christine B; Swerdlow, Anthony; Jones, Michael; Chang-Claude, Jenny

    2016-01-01

    Immunosuppression plays a pivotal role in assisting tumors to evade immune destruction and promoting tumor development. We hypothesized that genetic variation in the immunosuppression pathway genes may be implicated in breast cancer tumorigenesis. We included 42,510 female breast cancer cases and 40,577 controls of European ancestry from 37 studies in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (2015) with available genotype data for 3595 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 133 candidate genes. Associations between genotyped SNPs and overall breast cancer risk, and secondarily according to estrogen receptor (ER) status, were assessed using multiple logistic regression models. Gene-level associations were assessed based on principal component analysis. Gene expression analyses were conducted using RNA sequencing level 3 data from The Cancer Genome Atlas for 989 breast tumor samples and 113 matched normal tissue samples. SNP rs1905339 (A>G) in the STAT3 region was associated with an increased breast cancer risk (per allele odds ratio 1.05, 95 % confidence interval 1.03-1.08; p value = 1.4 × 10(-6)). The association did not differ significantly by ER status. On the gene level, in addition to TGFBR2 and CCND1, IL5 and GM-CSF showed the strongest associations with overall breast cancer risk (p value = 1.0 × 10(-3) and 7.0 × 10(-3), respectively). Furthermore, STAT3 and IL5 but not GM-CSF were differentially expressed between breast tumor tissue and normal tissue (p value = 2.5 × 10(-3), 4.5 × 10(-4) and 0.63, respectively). Our data provide evidence that the immunosuppression pathway genes STAT3, IL5, and GM-CSF may be novel susceptibility loci for breast cancer in women of European ancestry.

  8. Seismic analysis of large pools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, R.G.; Tokarz, F.J.

    1976-11-17

    Large pools for storing spent, nuclear fuel elements are being proposed to augment present storage capacity. To preserve the ability to isolate portions of these pools, a modularization requirement appears desirable. The purpose of this project was to investigate the effects of modularization on earthquake resistance and to assess the adequacy of current design methods for seismic loads. After determining probable representative pool geometries, three rectangular pool configurations, all 240 x 16 ft and 40 ft deep, were examined. One was unmodularized; two were modularized into 80 x 40 ft cells in one case and 80 x 80 ft cells in the other. Both embedded and above-ground installations for a hard site and embedded installations for an intermediate hard site were studied. It was found that modularization was unfavorable in terms of reducing the total structural load attributable to dynamic effects, principally because one or more cells could be left unfilled. The walls of unfilled cells would be subjected to significantly higher loads than the walls of a filled, unmodularized pool. Generally, embedded installations were preferable to above-ground installations, and the hard site was superior to the intermediate hard site. It was determined that Housner's theory was adequate for calculating hydrodynamic effects on spent fuel storage pools. Current design methods for seismic loads were found to be satisfactory when results from these methods were compared with those from LUSH analyses. As a design method for dynamic soil pressure, we found the Mononobe-Okabe theory, coupled with correction factors as suggested by Seed, to be acceptable. The factors we recommend for spent fuel storage pools are tabulated.

  9. Seismic analysis of large pools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, R.G.; Tokarz, F.J.

    1976-01-01

    Large pools for storing spent, nuclear fuel elements are being proposed to augment present storage capacity. To preserve the ability to isolate portions of these pools, a modularization requirement appears desirable. The purpose of this project was to investigate the effects of modularization on earthquake resistance and to assess the adequacy of current design methods for seismic loads. After determining probable representative pool geometries, three rectangular pool configurations, all 240 x 16 ft and 40 ft deep, were examined. One was unmodularized; two were modularized into 80 x 40 ft cells in one case and 80 x 80 ft cells in the other. Both embedded and above-ground installations for a hard site and embedded installations for an intermediate hard site were studied. It was found that modularization was unfavorable in terms of reducing the total structural load attributable to dynamic effects, principally because one or more cells could be left unfilled. The walls of unfilled cells would be subjected to significantly higher loads than the walls of a filled, unmodularized pool. Generally, embedded installations were preferable to above-ground installations, and the hard site was superior to the intermediate hard site. It was determined that Housner's theory was adequate for calculating hydrodynamic effects on spent fuel storage pools. Current design methods for seismic loads were found to be satisfactory when results from these methods were compared with those from LUSH analyses. As a design method for dynamic soil pressure, we found the Mononobe-Okabe theory, coupled with correction factors as suggested by Seed, to be acceptable. The factors we recommend for spent fuel storage pools are tabulated

  10. Circulating 25-Hydroxyvitamin D and the Risk of Rarer Cancers: Design and Methods of the Cohort Consortium Vitamin D Pooling Project of Rarer Cancers

    OpenAIRE

    Gallicchio, Lisa; Helzlsouer, Kathy J.; Chow, Wong-Ho; Freedman, D. Michal; Hankinson, Susan E.; Hartge, Patricia; Hartmuller, Virginia; Harvey, Chinonye; Hayes, Richard B.; Horst, Ronald L.; Koenig, Karen L.; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Laden, Francine; McCullough, Marjorie L.; Parisi, Dominick

    2010-01-01

    The Cohort Consortium Vitamin D Pooling Project of Rarer Cancers (VDPP), a consortium of 10 prospective cohort studies from the United States, Finland, and China, was formed to examine the associations between circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentrations and the risk of rarer cancers. Cases (total n = 5,491) included incident primary endometrial (n = 830), kidney (n = 775), ovarian (n = 516), pancreatic (n = 952), and upper gastrointestinal tract (n = 1,065) cancers and non-Hodgki...

  11. Pooling job physical exposure data from multiple independent studies in a consortium study of carpal tunnel syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapellusch, Jay M.; Garg, Arun; Bao, Stephen S.; Silverstein, Barbara A.; Burt, Susan E.; Dale, Ann Marie; Evanoff, Bradley A.; Gerr, Frederic E.; Harris-Adamson, Carisa; Hegmann, Kurt T.; Merlino, Linda A.; Rempel, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Pooling data from different epidemiological studies of musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) is necessary to improve statistical power and to more precisely quantify exposure–response relationships for MSDs. The pooling process is difficult and time-consuming, and small methodological differences could lead to different exposure–response relationships. A subcommittee of a six-study research consortium studying carpal tunnel syndrome: (i) visited each study site, (ii) documented methods used to collect physical exposure data and (iii) determined compatibility of exposure variables across studies. Certain measures of force, frequency of exertion and duty cycle were collected by all studies and were largely compatible. A portion of studies had detailed data to investigate simultaneous combinations of force, frequency and duration of exertions. Limited compatibility was found for hand/wrist posture. Only two studies could calculate compatible Strain Index scores, but Threshold Limit Value for Hand Activity Level could be determined for all studies. Challenges of pooling data, resources required and recommendations for future researchers are discussed. PMID:23697792

  12. The Premenopausal Breast Cancer Collaboration: A pooling project of studies participating in the National Cancer Institute Cohort Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Hazel B.; Schoemaker, Minouk J.; Wright, Lauren B.; McGowan, Craig; Brook, Mark N.; McClain, Kathleen M.; Jones, Michael E.; Adami, Hans-Olov; Agnoli, Claudia; Baglietto, Laura; Bernstein, Leslie; Bertrand, Kimberly A.; Blot, William J.; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Butler, Lesley; Chen, Yu; Doody, Michele M.; Dossus, Laure; Eliassen, A. Heather; Giles, Graham G.; Gram, Inger T.; Hankinson, Susan E.; Hoffman-Bolton, Judy; Kaaks, Rudolf; Key, Timothy J.; Kirsh, Victoria A.; Kitahara, Cari M.; Koh, Woon-Puay; Larsson, Susanna C.; Lund, Eiliv; Ma, Huiyan; Merritt, Melissa A.; Milne, Roger L.; Navarro, Carmen; Overvad, Kim; Ozasa, Kotaro; Palmer, Julie R.; Peeters, Petra H.; Riboli, Elio; Rohan, Thomas E.; Sadakane, Atsuko; Sund, Malin; Tamimi, Rulla M.; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Vatten, Lars; Visvanathan, Kala; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Willett, Walter C.; Wolk, Alicja; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Zheng, Wei; Sandler, Dale P.; Swerdlow, Anthony J.

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer is a leading cancer diagnosis among premenopausal women around the world. Unlike rates in postmenopausal women, incidence rates of advanced breast cancer have increased in recent decades for premenopausal women. Progress in identifying contributors to breast cancer risk among premenopausal women has been constrained by the limited numbers of premenopausal breast cancer cases in individual studies and resulting low statistical power to subcategorize exposures or to study specific subtypes. The Premenopausal Breast Cancer Collaborative Group was established to facilitate cohort-based analyses of risk factors for premenopausal breast cancer by pooling individual-level data from studies participating in the United States National Cancer Institute Cohort Consortium. This paper describes the Group, including the rationale for its initial aims related to pregnancy, obesity, and physical activity. We also describe the 20 cohort studies with data submitted to the Group by June 2016. The infrastructure developed for this work can be leveraged to support additional investigations. PMID:28600297

  13. Phase analysis in gated blood pool tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, Kenichi; Bunko, Hisashi; Tada, Akira; Taki, Junichi; Nanbu, Ichiro

    1984-01-01

    Phase analysis of gated blood pool study has been applied to detect the site of accessory conduction pathway (ACP) in the Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome; however, there was a limitation to detect the precise location of ACP by phase analysis alone. In this study, we applied phase analysis to gated blood pool tomography using seven pin hole tomography (7PT) and gated emission computed tomography (GECT) in 21 patients with WPW syndrome and 3 normal subjects. In 17 patients, the sites of ACPs were confirmed by epicardial mapping and the result of the surgical division of ACP. In 7PT, the site of ACP grossly agreed to the abnormal initial phase in phase image in 5 out of 6 patients with left cardiac type. In GECT, phase images were generated in short axial, vertical and horizontal long axial sections. In 8 out of 9 patients, the site of ACP was correctly identified by phase images, and in a patient who had two ACPs, initial phase corresponded to one of the two locations. Phase analysis of gated blood pool tomography has advantages for avoiding overlap of blood pools and for estimating three-dimensional propagation of the contraction, and can be a good adjunctive method in patients with WPW syndrome. (author)

  14. Modal analysis of pool door in water tank

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kang Soo; Jeong, Kyeong Hoon; Park, Chan Gook; Koo, In Soo [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    A pool door is installed at the chase of the pool gate by means of an overhead crane in the building of a research reactor. The principal function of the pool door, which is located between the reactor pool and service pool, is to separate the reactor pool from the service pool for the maintenance and/or the removal of the equipment either in the reactor pool or service pool. The pool door consists of stainless steel plates supported by structural steel frames and sealing components. The pool door is equipped with double inflatable gaskets. The configuration of the pool door is shown in Figure 1. The FEM analysis and theoretical calculation by the formula were performed to evaluate the natural frequency for the pool door in the water. The results from the two methods were compared.

  15. Swimming pool reactor reliability and safety analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Zhaohuan

    1997-01-01

    A reliability and safety analysis of Swimming Pool Reactor in China Institute of Atomic Energy is done by use of event/fault tree technique. The paper briefly describes the analysis model, analysis code and main results. Meanwhile it also describes the impact of unassigned operation status on safety, the estimation of effectiveness of defense tactics in maintenance against common cause failure, the effectiveness of recovering actions on the system reliability, the comparison of occurrence frequencies of the core damage by use of generic and specific data

  16. Circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D and the risk of rarer cancers: Design and methods of the Cohort Consortium Vitamin D Pooling Project of Rarer Cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallicchio, Lisa; Helzlsouer, Kathy J; Chow, Wong-Ho; Freedman, D Michal; Hankinson, Susan E; Hartge, Patricia; Hartmuller, Virginia; Harvey, Chinonye; Hayes, Richard B; Horst, Ronald L; Koenig, Karen L; Kolonel, Laurence N; Laden, Francine; McCullough, Marjorie L; Parisi, Dominick; Purdue, Mark P; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Snyder, Kirk; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z; Tworoger, Shelley S; Varanasi, Arti; Virtamo, Jarmo; Wilkens, Lynne R; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Yu, Kai; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Zheng, Wei; Abnet, Christian C; Albanes, Demetrius; Bertrand, Kimberly; Weinstein, Stephanie J

    2010-07-01

    The Cohort Consortium Vitamin D Pooling Project of Rarer Cancers (VDPP), a consortium of 10 prospective cohort studies from the United States, Finland, and China, was formed to examine the associations between circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentrations and the risk of rarer cancers. Cases (total n = 5,491) included incident primary endometrial (n = 830), kidney (n = 775), ovarian (n = 516), pancreatic (n = 952), and upper gastrointestinal tract (n = 1,065) cancers and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (n = 1,353) diagnosed in the participating cohorts. At least 1 control was matched to each case on age, date of blood collection (1974-2006), sex, and race/ethnicity (n = 6,714). Covariate data were obtained from each cohort in a standardized manner. The majority of the serum or plasma samples were assayed in a central laboratory using a direct, competitive chemiluminescence immunoassay on the DiaSorin LIAISON platform (DiaSorin, Inc., Stillwater, Minnesota). Masked quality control samples included serum standards from the US National Institute of Standards and Technology. Conditional logistic regression analyses were conducted using clinically defined cutpoints, with 50-<75 nmol/L as the reference category. Meta-analyses were also conducted using inverse-variance weights in random-effects models. This consortium approach permits estimation of the association between 25(OH)D and several rarer cancers with high accuracy and precision across a wide range of 25(OH)D concentrations.

  17. The Activities of the European Consortium on Nuclear Data Development and Analysis for Fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, U.; Avrigeanu, M.; Avrigeanu, V.; Cabellos, O.; Kodeli, I.; Koning, A.; Konobeyev, A.Yu.; Leeb, H.; Rochman, D.; Pereslavtsev, P.; Sauvan, P.; Sublet, J.-C.; Trkov, A.; Dupont, E.; Leichtle, D.; Izquierdo, J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the activities of the European Consortium on Nuclear Data Development and Analysis for Fusion. The Consortium combines available European expertise to provide services for the generation, maintenance, and validation of nuclear data evaluations and data files relevant for ITER, IFMIF and DEMO, as well as codes and software tools required for related nuclear calculations

  18. The Activities of the European Consortium on Nuclear Data Development and Analysis for Fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, U., E-mail: ulrich.fischer@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Neutron Physic and Reactor Technology, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Avrigeanu, M.; Avrigeanu, V. [Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH), RO-077125 Magurele (Romania); Cabellos, O. [Departamento de Ingenieria Nuclear, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Kodeli, I. [Jozef Stefan Institute (JSI), Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Koning, A. [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group (NRG), Westerduinweg 3, 1755 LE Petten (Netherlands); Konobeyev, A.Yu. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Neutron Physic and Reactor Technology, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Leeb, H. [Technische Universitaet Wien, Atominstitut, Wiedner Hauptstrasse 8–10, 1040 Wien (Austria); Rochman, D. [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group (NRG), Westerduinweg 3, 1755 LE Petten (Netherlands); Pereslavtsev, P. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Neutron Physic and Reactor Technology, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Sauvan, P. [Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia, C. Juan del Rosal, 12, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Sublet, J.-C. [Euratom/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Trkov, A. [Jozef Stefan Institute (JSI), Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Dupont, E. [OECD Nuclear Energy Agency, Paris (France); Leichtle, D.; Izquierdo, J. [Fusion for Energy, Barcelona (Spain)

    2014-06-15

    This paper presents an overview of the activities of the European Consortium on Nuclear Data Development and Analysis for Fusion. The Consortium combines available European expertise to provide services for the generation, maintenance, and validation of nuclear data evaluations and data files relevant for ITER, IFMIF and DEMO, as well as codes and software tools required for related nuclear calculations.

  19. Circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D and risk of epithelial ovarian cancer: Cohort Consortium Vitamin D Pooling Project of Rarer Cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wei; Danforth, Kim N; Tworoger, Shelley S; Goodman, Marc T; Arslan, Alan A; Patel, Alpa V; McCullough, Marjorie L; Weinstein, Stephanie J; Kolonel, Laurence N; Purdue, Mark P; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Snyder, Kirk; Steplowski, Emily; Visvanathan, Kala; Yu, Kai; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Gao, Yu-Tang; Hankinson, Susan E; Harvey, Chinonye; Hayes, Richard B; Henderson, Brian E; Horst, Ronald L; Helzlsouer, Kathy J

    2010-07-01

    A role for vitamin D in ovarian cancer etiology is supported by ecologic studies of sunlight exposure, experimental mechanism studies, and some studies of dietary vitamin D intake and genetic polymorphisms in the vitamin D receptor. However, few studies have examined the association of circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D), an integrated measure of vitamin D status, with ovarian cancer risk. A nested case-control study was conducted among 7 prospective studies to evaluate the circulating 25(OH)D concentration in relation to epithelial ovarian cancer risk. Logistic regression models were used to estimate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals among 516 cases and 770 matched controls. Compared with 25(OH)D concentrations of 50- or =75 (OR = 1.11, 95% CI: 0.79, 1.55) nmol/L. Analyses stratified by tumor subtype, age, body mass index, and other variables were generally null but suggested an inverse association between 25(OH)D and ovarian cancer risk among women with a body mass index of > or =25 kg/m(2) (P(interaction) < 0.01). In conclusion, this large pooled analysis did not support an overall association between circulating 25(OH)D and ovarian cancer risk, except possibly among overweight women.

  20. Consortium analysis of 7 candidate SNPs for ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramus, S.J.; Vierkant, R.A.; Johnatty, S.E.

    2008-01-01

    The Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium selected 7 candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), for which there is evidence from previous studies of an association with variation in ovarian cancer or breast cancer risks. The SNPs selected for analysis were F31I (rs2273535) in AURKA, N372H...... (rs144848) in BRCA2, rs2854344 in intron 17 of RB1, rs2811712 5' flanking CDKN2A, rs523349 in the 3' UTR of SRD5A2, D302H (rs1045485) in CASP8 and L10P (rs1982073) in TGFB1. Fourteen studies genotyped 4,624 invasive epithelial ovarian cancer cases and 8,113 controls of white non-Hispanic origin...... was suggestive although no longer statistically significant (ordinal OR 0.92, 95% CI 0.79-1.06). This SNP has also been shown to have an association with decreased risk in breast cancer. There was a suggestion of an association for AURKA, when one study that caused significant study heterogeneity was excluded...

  1. Analysis of sodium pool fire in SFEF for assessing the limiting pool fire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mangarjuna Rao, P.; Ramesh, S.S.; Nashine, B.K.; Kasinathan, N.; Chellapandi, P.

    2011-01-01

    Accidental sodium leaks and resultant sodium fires in Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) systems can create a threat to the safe operation of the plant. To avoid this defence-in depth approach is implemented from the design stage of reactor itself. Rapid detection of sodium leak and fast dumping of the sodium into the storage tank of a defective circuit, leak collection trays, adequate lining of load bearing structural concrete and extinguishment of the sodium fire are the important defensive measures in the design, construction and operation of a LMFBR for protection against sodium leaks and their resultant fires. Evaluation of sodium leak events and their consequences by conducting large scale engineering experiments is very essential for effective implementation of the above protection measures for sodium fire safety. For this purpose a Sodium Fire Experimental Facility (SFEF) is constructed at SED, IGCAR. SFEF is having an experimental hall of size 9 m x 6 m x 10 m with 540 m 3 volume and its design pressure is 50 kPa. It is a concrete structure and provided with SS 304 liner, which is fixed to the inside surfaces of walls, ceiling and floor. A leak tight door of size (1.8 m x 2.0 m) is provided to the experimental hall and the facility is provided with a sodium equipment hall and a control room. Experimental evaluation of sodium pool fire consequences is an important activity in the LMFBR sodium fire safety related studies. An experimental program has been planned for different types of sodium fire studies in SFEF. A prior to that numerical analysis have been carried out for enclosed sodium pool fires using SOFIRE-II sodium pool fire code for SFEF experimental hall configuration to evaluate the limiting pool fire. This paper brings out results of the analysis carried out for this purpose. Limiting pool fire of SFEF depends on the exposed surface area of the pool, amount of sodium in the pool, oxygen concentration and initial sodium temperature. Limiting

  2. Computerized comprehensive data analysis of Lung Imaging Database Consortium (LIDC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan Jun; Pu Jiantao; Zheng Bin; Wang Xingwei; Leader, Joseph K.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Lung Image Database Consortium (LIDC) is the largest public CT image database of lung nodules. In this study, the authors present a comprehensive and the most updated analysis of this dynamically growing database under the help of a computerized tool, aiming to assist researchers to optimally use this database for lung cancer related investigations. Methods: The authors developed a computer scheme to automatically match the nodule outlines marked manually by radiologists on CT images. A large variety of characteristics regarding the annotated nodules in the database including volume, spiculation level, elongation, interobserver variability, as well as the intersection of delineated nodule voxels and overlapping ratio between the same nodules marked by different radiologists are automatically calculated and summarized. The scheme was applied to analyze all 157 examinations with complete annotation data currently available in LIDC dataset. Results: The scheme summarizes the statistical distributions of the abovementioned geometric and diagnosis features. Among the 391 nodules, (1) 365 (93.35%) have principal axis length ≤20 mm; (2) 120, 75, 76, and 120 were marked by one, two, three, and four radiologists, respectively; and (3) 122 (32.48%) have the maximum volume overlapping ratios ≥80% for the delineations of two radiologists, while 198 (50.64%) have the maximum volume overlapping ratios <60%. The results also showed that 72.89% of the nodules were assessed with malignancy score between 2 and 4, and only 7.93% of these nodules were considered as severely malignant (malignancy ≥4). Conclusions: This study demonstrates that LIDC contains examinations covering a diverse distribution of nodule characteristics and it can be a useful resource to assess the performance of the nodule detection and/or segmentation schemes.

  3. Living on a farm, contact with farm animals and pets, and childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia: pooled and meta-analyses from the Childhood Leukemia International Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsi, Laurent; Magnani, Corrado; Petridou, Eleni T; Dockerty, John D; Metayer, Catherine; Milne, Elizabeth; Bailey, Helen D; Dessypris, Nick; Kang, Alice Y; Wesseling, Catharina; Infante-Rivard, Claire; Wünsch-Filho, Victor; Mora, Ana M; Spector, Logan G; Clavel, Jacqueline

    2018-04-16

    The associations between childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and several factors related to early stimulation of the immune system, that is, farm residence and regular contacts with farm animals (livestock, poultry) or pets in early childhood, were investigated using data from 13 case-control studies participating in the Childhood Leukemia International Consortium. The sample included 7847 ALL cases and 11,667 controls aged 1-14 years. In all studies, the data were obtained from case and control parents using standardized questionnaires. Pooled odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated by unconditional logistic regression adjusted for age, sex, study, maternal education, and maternal age. Contact with livestock in the first year of life was inversely associated with ALL (OR = 0.65, 95% CI: 0.50, 0.85). Inverse associations were also observed for contact with dogs (OR = 0.92, 95% CI: 0.86, 0.99) and cats (OR = 0.87, 95% CI: 0.80, 0.94) in the first year of life. There was no evidence of a significant association with farm residence in the first year of life. The findings of these large pooled and meta-analyses add additional evidence to the hypothesis that regular contact with animals in early childhood is inversely associated with childhood ALL occurrence which is consistent with Greaves' delayed infection hypothesis. © 2018 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. The Pharmaceutical Industry Beamline of Pharmaceutical Consortium for Protein Structure Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishijima, Kazumi; Katsuya, Yoshio

    2002-01-01

    The Pharmaceutical Industry Beamline was constructed by the Pharmaceutical Consortium for Protein Structure Analysis which was established in April 2001. The consortium is composed of 22 pharmaceutical companies affiliating with the Japan Pharmaceutical Manufacturers Association. The beamline is the first exclusive on that is owned by pharmaceutical enterprises at SPring-8. The specification and equipments of the Pharmaceutical Industry Beamline is almost same as that of RIKEN Structural Genomics Beamline I and II. (author)

  5. Structural analysis of the reactor pool for the RRRP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alberro, J.G.; Abbate, A.D.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the present document is to describe the structural design of the Reactor Pool relevant to the RRRP (Replacement Research Reactor Project) for the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation. The structural analysis required coordinated design, engineering, analysis, and fabrication efforts. The pool has been designed, manufactured, and inspected following as guideline the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, which defines the requirements for the pool to withstand hydrostatic and mechanical forces, ensuring its integrity throughout its lifetime. Standard off-the-shelf finite element programs (Nastran and Ansys codes) were used to evaluate the pool and further qualify the design and its construction. Both global and local effect analyses were carried out. The global analysis covers the structural integrity of the pool wall (6 mm thick) considering the different load states acting on it, namely hydrostatic pressure, thermal expansion, and seismic event. The local analysis evaluates the structural behaviour of the pool at specific points resulting from the interaction among components. It is confirmed that maximum stresses and displacements fall below the allowable values required by the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. The water pressure analysis was validated by means of a hydrostatic test. (authors)

  6. UPDG: Utilities package for data analysis of Pooled DNA GWAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho Daniel WH

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite being a well-established strategy for cost reduction in disease gene mapping, pooled DNA association study is much less popular than the individual DNA approach. This situation is especially true for pooled DNA genomewide association study (GWAS, for which very few computer resources have been developed for its data analysis. This motivates the development of UPDG (Utilities package for data analysis of Pooled DNA GWAS. Results UPDG represents a generalized framework for data analysis of pooled DNA GWAS with the integration of Unix/Linux shell operations, Perl programs and R scripts. With the input of raw intensity data from GWAS, UPDG performs the following tasks in a stepwise manner: raw data manipulation, correction for allelic preferential amplification, normalization, nested analysis of variance for genetic association testing, and summarization of analysis results. Detailed instructions, procedures and commands are provided in the comprehensive user manual describing the whole process from preliminary preparation of software installation to final outcome acquisition. An example dataset (input files and sample output files is also included in the package so that users can easily familiarize themselves with the data file formats, working procedures and expected output. Therefore, UPDG is especially useful for users with some computer knowledge, but without a sophisticated programming background. Conclusions UPDG provides a free, simple and platform-independent one-stop service to scientists working on pooled DNA GWAS data analysis, but with less advanced programming knowledge. It is our vision and mission to reduce the hindrance for performing data analysis of pooled DNA GWAS through our contribution of UPDG. More importantly, we hope to promote the popularity of pooled DNA GWAS, which is a very useful research strategy.

  7. LNG pool fire simulation for domino effect analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masum Jujuly, Muhammad; Rahman, Aziz; Ahmed, Salim; Khan, Faisal

    2015-01-01

    A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation of liquefied natural gas (LNG) pool fire has been performed using ANSYS CFX-14. The CFD model solves the fundamental governing equations of fluid dynamics, namely, the continuity, momentum and energy equations. Several built-in sub-models are used to capture the characteristics of pool fire. The Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes (RANS) equation for turbulence and the eddy-dissipation model for non-premixed combustion are used. For thermal radiation, the Monte Carlo (MC) radiation model is used with the Magnussen soot model. The CFD results are compared with a set of experimental data for validation; the results are consistent with experimental data. CFD results show that the wind speed has significant contribution on the behavior of pool fire and its domino effects. The radiation contours are also obtained from CFD post processing, which can be applied for risk analysis. The outcome of this study will be helpful for better understanding of the domino effects of pool fire in complex geometrical settings of process industries. - Highlights: • Simulation of pool fire using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model. • Integration of CFD based pool fire model with domino effect. • Application of the integrated CFD based domino effect analysis

  8. Spent nuclear fuel storage pool thermal-hydraulic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gay, R.R.

    1984-01-01

    Storage methods and requirements for spent nuclear fuel at U.S. commercial light water reactors are reviewed in Section 1. Methods of increasing current at-reactor storage capabilities are also outlined. In Section 2 the development of analytical methods for the thermal-hydraulic analysis of spent fuel pools is chronicled, leading up to a discussion of the GFLOW code which is described in Section 3. In Section 4 the verification of GFLOW by comparisons of the code's predictions to experimental data taken inside the fuel storage pool at the Maine Yankee nuclear power plant is presented. The predictions of GFLOW using 72, 224, and 1584 node models of the storage pool are compared to each other and to the experimental data. An example of thermal licensing analysis for Maine Yankee using the GFLOW code is given in Section 5. The GFLOW licensing analysis is compared to previous licensing analysis performed by Yankee Atomic using the RELAP-4 computer code

  9. Core disruptive accident and recriticality analysis with FX2-POOL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abramson, P.B.

    1976-01-01

    The current state of development of FX2-POOL, a two-dimensional hydrodynamic, thermodynamic and neutronic scoping model for Hypothetical Core Disruptive Accident analysis is described. Checkout comparisons to VENUS for prompt burst conditions were good. Use of FX2-POOL to examine the importance of fuel to steel heat transfer during a prompt burst indicates that heat transfer plays no important role on that time scale. Scoping studies of material thermohydrodynamics for about 20 to 30 milliseconds following the prompt burst indicate that heat transfer is important on the time scale necessary for the CDA bubble to grow to the size of the original core. Preliminary results are presented for energetics of boiling fuel steel pools which are forced recritical by local surface pressurization

  10. Analysis of radiation shields of BNPP spent fuel pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayoobian, N.; Hadad, K.; Nematollahi, M. R.

    2007-01-01

    Radioactive protection is one of the most important subjects in nuclear power plants safety. Analysis of BNPP spent fuel pool shielding , as a main source of energetic γ-rays was the main goal of this project. Firstly, we simulated the reactor core using WIMSD-4 neutronic code and the amount of fission product in the fuel assembly (FA) was calculated during the reactor operation. Then, by obtaining the results from the previous calculation and by using MCNP4C nuclear code , the intensity of γ-rays was obtained in layers of spent fuel pool shields. The results have shown that no significant γ-rays passed through these shields. Finally, an accident and resulting exposure dose above the pool was analyzed

  11. Pooling, meta-analysis, and the evaluation of drug safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leizorovicz Alain

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The "integrated safety report" of the drug registration files submitted to health authorities usually summarizes the rates of adverse events observed for a new drug, placebo or active control drugs by pooling the safety data across the trials. Pooling consists of adding the numbers of events observed in a given treatment group across the trials and dividing the results by the total number of patients included in this group. Because it considers treatment groups rather than studies, pooling ignores validity of the comparisons and is subject to a particular kind of bias, termed "Simpson's paradox." In contrast, meta-analysis and other stratified analyses are less susceptible to bias. Methods We use a hypothetical, but not atypical, application to demonstrate that the results of a meta-analysis can differ greatly from those obtained by pooling the same data. In our hypothetical model, a new drug is compared to 1 a placebo in 4 relatively small trials in patients at high risk for a certain adverse event and 2 an active reference drug in 2 larger trials of patients at low risk for this event. Results Using meta-analysis, the relative risk of experiencing the adverse event with the new drug was 1.78 (95% confidence interval [1.02; 3.12] compared to placebo and 2.20 [0.76; 6.32] compared to active control. By pooling the data, the results were, respectively, 1.00 [0.59; 1.70] and 5.20 [2.07; 13.08]. Conclusions Because these findings could mislead health authorities and doctors, regulatory agencies should require meta-analyses or stratified analyses of safety data in drug registration files.

  12. Numerical analysis on pool boiling using user defined function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Sung Uk; Jeon, Byong Guk; Kim, Seok; Euh, Dong-Jin [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    PAFS (passive auxiliary feedwater system) adopted in the APR+ (Advanced Power Reactor Plus) of Korea is one such application. When PAFS is activated with an actuation signal, steam from the steam generator passes through heat exchanger tubes submerged in a water tank of the PAFS. Outside these heat exchanger tubes, nucleate boiling phenomena appears. In the present work, a numerical study is reported on three-dimensional transient state pool boiling of water having an immersed heat source. The velocity vector fields during the decrease in the water level are numerically investigated in a pool, and the accuracy of the results is checked by comparing the experimental results conducted using the PIV techniques by Kim et al. These numerical results can be used as basic research data for an analysis and prediction of the natural circulation phenomena in the cooling tank of the passive safety system in a nuclear power plant.

  13. Emerging Global Initiatives in Neurogenetics: The Enhancing Neuroimaging Genetics through Meta-analysis (ENIGMA) Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bearden, Carrie E; Thompson, Paul M

    2017-04-19

    The Enhancing Neuroimaging Genetics through Meta-analysis (ENIGMA) Consortium is a global team science effort, now including over 800 scientists spread across 340 institutions in 35 countries, with the shared goal of understanding disease and genetic influences on the brain. This "crowdsourcing" approach to team neuroscience has unprecedented power for advancing our understanding of both typical and atypical human brain development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Finding determinants of audit delay by pooled OLS regression analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Vuko, Tina; Čular, Marko

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate determinants of audit delay. Audit delay is measured as the length of time (i.e. the number of calendar days) from the fiscal year-end to the audit report date. It is important to understand factors that influence audit delay since it directly affects the timeliness of financial reporting. The research is conducted on a sample of Croatian listed companies, covering the period of four years (from 2008 to 2011). We use pooled OLS regression analysis, mode...

  15. 25 CFR 1000.17 - What documents must a Tribe/Consortium submit to OSG to apply for admission to the applicant pool?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... following: (a) Successful completion of a planning phase and a planning report. The requirements for both of these are described in § 1000.19 and § 1000.20. A Consortium's planning activities satisfy this... by providing, as part of the application, an audit report prepared in accordance with procedures...

  16. Use of Sugammadex in Patients With Obesity: A Pooled Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monk, Terri G; Rietbergen, Henk; Woo, Tiffany; Fennema, Hein

    A growing proportion of patients undergoing surgical procedures are obese, providing anesthesiologists with numerous challenges for patient management. The current pooled analysis evaluated recovery times following sugammadex reversal of neuromuscular blockade by body mass index (BMI) in general, and in particular, in patients with BMIs ≥30 kg/m (defined as obese) and sugammadex doses for reversal of moderate [reappearance of the second twitch of the train-of-four (TOF); sugammadex 2 mg/kg] or deep (1-2 post-tetanic counts or 15 minutes after rocuronium; sugammadex 4 mg/kg) rocuronium- or vecuronium-induced neuromuscular blockade. All doses of sugammadex were administered based on actual body weight. The recovery time from sugammadex administration to a TOF ratio ≥0.9 was the primary efficacy variable in all individual studies and in the pooled analysis. This analysis comprised a total of 1418 adult patients treated with sugammadex; 267 (18.8%) of these patients had a BMI ≥30 kg/m. The average time to recovery of the TOF ratio to 0.9 was 1.9 minutes for rocuronium-induced blockade and 3.0 minutes for vecuronium-induced blockade. No clinically relevant correlation was observed between BMI and recovery time. The recommended sugammadex doses based on actual body weight provide rapid recovery from neuromuscular blockade in both obese and non-obese patients; no dose adjustments are required in the obese patient.

  17. Information-Pooling Bias in Collaborative Security Incident Correlation Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajivan, Prashanth; Cooke, Nancy J

    2018-03-01

    Incident correlation is a vital step in the cybersecurity threat detection process. This article presents research on the effect of group-level information-pooling bias on collaborative incident correlation analysis in a synthetic task environment. Past research has shown that uneven information distribution biases people to share information that is known to most team members and prevents them from sharing any unique information available with them. The effect of such biases on security team collaborations are largely unknown. Thirty 3-person teams performed two threat detection missions involving information sharing and correlating security incidents. Incidents were predistributed to each person in the team based on the hidden profile paradigm. Participant teams, randomly assigned to three experimental groups, used different collaboration aids during Mission 2. Communication analysis revealed that participant teams were 3 times more likely to discuss security incidents commonly known to the majority. Unaided team collaboration was inefficient in finding associations between security incidents uniquely available to each member of the team. Visualizations that augment perceptual processing and recognition memory were found to mitigate the bias. The data suggest that (a) security analyst teams, when conducting collaborative correlation analysis, could be inefficient in pooling unique information from their peers; (b) employing off-the-shelf collaboration tools in cybersecurity defense environments is inadequate; and (c) collaborative security visualization tools developed considering the human cognitive limitations of security analysts is necessary. Potential applications of this research include development of team training procedures and collaboration tool development for security analysts.

  18. Analysis of the loss of pool cooling accident in a PWR spent fuel pool with MAAP5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Xiaoli; Li, Wei; Zhang, Yapei; Tian, Wenxi; Su, Guanghui; Qiu, Suizheng

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A PWR spent fuel pool was modeled by using MAAP5. • Loss of pool cooling severe accident scenarios were studied. • Loss of pool cooling accidents with two mitigation measures were analyzed. - Abstract: The Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident shows that it is necessary to study potential severe accidents and corresponding mitigation measures for the spent fuel pool (SFP) of a nuclear power plant (NPP). This paper presents the analysis of loss of pool cooling accident scenarios and the discussion of mitigation measures for the SFP at a pressurized water reactor (PWR) NPP with the MAAP5 code. Analysis of uncompensated loss of water due to the loss of pool cooling with different initial pool water levels of 12.2 m (designated as a reference case) and 10.7 m have been performed based on a MAAP5 input model. Scenarios of the accident such as overheating of uncovered fuel assemblies, oxidation of claddings and hydrogen generation, loss of intactness of fuel rod claddings, and release of radioactive fission products were predicted with the assumption that mitigation measures were unavailable. The results covered a broad spectrum of severe accident evaluations in the SFP. Furthermore, as important mitigation measures, the effects of recovering the SFP cooling system and makeup water in SFP on the accident progressions have also been investigated respectively based on the events of pool water boiling and spent fuels uncovery. Based upon the reference case, three cases with the recovery of SFP cooling system and three other cases with makeup water in SFP have been studied. The results showed that, severe accident might happen if SFP cooling system was not restored timely before the spent fuels started to become uncovered; spent fuels could be completely submerged and severe accident might be avoided if SFP makeup water system provided water with a mass flow rate larger than the average evaporation rate defined as the division of pool water mass above the

  19. Finding determinants of audit delay by pooled OLS regression analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina Vuko

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to investigate determinants of audit delay. Audit delay is measured as the length of time (i.e. the number of calendar days from the fiscal year-end to the audit report date. It is important to understand factors that influence audit delay since it directly affects the timeliness of financial reporting. The research is conducted on a sample of Croatian listed companies, covering the period of four years (from 2008 to 2011. We use pooled OLS regression analysis, modelling audit delay as a function of the following explanatory variables: audit firm type, audit opinion, profitability, leverage, inventory and receivables to total assets, absolute value of total accruals, company size and audit committee existence. Our results indicate that audit committee existence, profitability and leverage are statistically significant determinants of audit delay in Croatia.

  20. Nonlinear analysis and evaluation of a reinforced concrete spent fuel storage pool for accidental thermal loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kabir, A.F.; Bolourchi, S.

    1991-01-01

    A feasibility study was conducted for addition of consolidated fuel racks to an existing reinforced concrete spent fuel storage pool of a Mark I BWR plant. Nonlinear analysis of a detailed three-dimensional model of the fuel pool, considering cracking in concrete under gravity and thermal load conditions, showed that the pool has reserve capacities to carry the additional loads. (author)

  1. 76 FR 72923 - Pool Corporation; Analysis To Aid Public Comment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-28

    ... manufacturers, warehouse them, and then resell the products to pool retail stores, pool service companies and.... ADDRESSES: Interested parties may file a comment online or on paper, by following the instructions in the... 0115'' on your comment, and file your comment online at https://ftcpublic.commentworks.com/ftc...

  2. Numerical analysis of weld pool oscillation in laser welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Jung Ho [Chungbuk National University, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of); Farson, Dave F [The Ohio State University, Columbus (United States); Hollis, Kendall; Milewski, John O. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos (United States)

    2015-04-15

    Volume of fluid (VOF) numerical simulation was used to investigate melt flow and volumetric oscillation of conduction-mode pulsed laser weld pools. The result is compared to high speed video stream of titanium laser spot welding experiment. The total simulation time is 10ms with the first 5 ms being heating and melting under constant laser irradiation and the remaining 5 ms corresponding to resolidification of the weld pool. During the melting process, the liquid pool did not exhibit periodic oscillation but was continually depressed by the evaporation recoil pressure. After the laser pulse, the weld pool was excited into volumetric oscillation by the release of pressure on its surface and oscillation of the weld pool surface was analyzed. The simulation model suggested adjusting thermal diffusivity to match cooling rate and puddle diameter during solidification which is distinguishable from previous weld pool simulation. The frequency continuously increased from several thousand cycles per second to tens of thousands of cycles per second as the weld pool solidified and its diameter decreased. The result is the first trial of investigation of small weld pool oscillation in laser welding although there have been several reports about arc welding.

  3. Genome-Centric Analysis of a Thermophilic and Cellulolytic Bacterial Consortium Derived from Composting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemos, Leandro N.; Pereira, Roberta V.; Quaggio, Ronaldo B.; Martins, Layla F.; Moura, Livia M. S.; da Silva, Amanda R.; Antunes, Luciana P.; da Silva, Aline M.; Setubal, João C.

    2017-01-01

    Microbial consortia selected from complex lignocellulolytic microbial communities are promising alternatives to deconstruct plant waste, since synergistic action of different enzymes is required for full degradation of plant biomass in biorefining applications. Culture enrichment also facilitates the study of interactions among consortium members, and can be a good source of novel microbial species. Here, we used a sample from a plant waste composting operation in the São Paulo Zoo (Brazil) as inoculum to obtain a thermophilic aerobic consortium enriched through multiple passages at 60°C in carboxymethylcellulose as sole carbon source. The microbial community composition of this consortium was investigated by shotgun metagenomics and genome-centric analysis. Six near-complete (over 90%) genomes were reconstructed. Similarity and phylogenetic analyses show that four of these six genomes are novel, with the following hypothesized identifications: a new Thermobacillus species; the first Bacillus thermozeamaize genome (for which currently only 16S sequences are available) or else the first representative of a new family in the Bacillales order; the first representative of a new genus in the Paenibacillaceae family; and the first representative of a new deep-branching family in the Clostridia class. The reconstructed genomes from known species were identified as Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius and Caldibacillus debilis. The metabolic potential of these recovered genomes based on COG and CAZy analyses show that these genomes encode several glycoside hydrolases (GHs) as well as other genes related to lignocellulose breakdown. The new Thermobacillus species stands out for being the richest in diversity and abundance of GHs, possessing the greatest potential for biomass degradation among the six recovered genomes. We also investigated the presence and activity of the organisms corresponding to these genomes in the composting operation from which the consortium was built

  4. 25 CFR 1000.29 - What happens if a Tribe/Consortium is selected from the applicant pool but does not execute a...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Selection of Additional Tribes for Participation in Tribal Self-Governance Admission into the Applicant Pool... compact and annual funding agreement at any time unless: (1) It notifies the Director in writing that it no longer wishes to be eligible to participate in the Tribal Self-Governance Program; (2) Fails to...

  5. Spent fuel pool risk analysis for the Dukovany NPP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hust' ak, S.; Jaros, M.; Kubicek, J. [UJV Rez, a.s., Husinec-Rez (Czech Republic)

    2013-07-01

    UJV Rez, a.s. maintains a Living Probabilistic Safety Assessment (Living PSA) program for Dukovany Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) in the Czech Republic. This project has been established as a framework for activities related to risk assessment and to support for risk-informed decision making at this plant. The most extensively used PSA application at Dukovany NPP is risk monitoring of instantaneous (point-in-time) risk during plant operation, especially for the purpose of configuration risk management during plant scheduled outages to avoid risk significant configurations. The scope of PSA for Dukovany NPP includes also determination of a risk contribution from spent fuel pool (SFP) operation to provide recommendations for the prevention and mitigation of SFP accidents and to be applicable for configuration risk management. This paper describes the analysis of internal initiating events (IEs) in PSA for Dukovany NPP, which can contribute to the risk from SFP operation. The analysis of those IEs was done more thoroughly in the PSA for Dukovany NPP in order to be used in instantaneous risk monitoring. (orig.)

  6. Analysis of natural convection in volumetrically-heated melt pools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sehgal, B.R.; Dinh, T.N.; Nourgaliev, R.R.

    1996-12-01

    Results of series of studies on natural convection heat transfer in decay-heated core melt pools which form in a reactor lower plenum during the progression of a core meltdown accident are described. The emphasis is on modelling and prediction of turbulent heat transfer characteristics of natural convection in a liquid pool with an internal energy source. Methods of computational fluid dynamics, including direct numerical simulation, were applied for investigation

  7. Analysis of natural convection in volumetrically-heated melt pools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sehgal, B.R.; Dinh, T.N.; Nourgaliev, R.R. [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Div. of Nuclear Power Safety

    1996-12-01

    Results of series of studies on natural convection heat transfer in decay-heated core melt pools which form in a reactor lower plenum during the progression of a core meltdown accident are described. The emphasis is on modelling and prediction of turbulent heat transfer characteristics of natural convection in a liquid pool with an internal energy source. Methods of computational fluid dynamics, including direct numerical simulation, were applied for investigation. Refs, figs, tabs.

  8. Analysis of mammalian gene function through broad based phenotypic screens across a consortium of mouse clinics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, David J; Adams, Niels C; Adler, Thure; Aguilar-Pimentel, Antonio; Ali-Hadji, Dalila; Amann, Gregory; André, Philippe; Atkins, Sarah; Auburtin, Aurelie; Ayadi, Abdel; Becker, Julien; Becker, Lore; Bedu, Elodie; Bekeredjian, Raffi; Birling, Marie-Christine; Blake, Andrew; Bottomley, Joanna; Bowl, Mike; Brault, Véronique; Busch, Dirk H; Bussell, James N; Calzada-Wack, Julia; Cater, Heather; Champy, Marie-France; Charles, Philippe; Chevalier, Claire; Chiani, Francesco; Codner, Gemma F; Combe, Roy; Cox, Roger; Dalloneau, Emilie; Dierich, André; Di Fenza, Armida; Doe, Brendan; Duchon, Arnaud; Eickelberg, Oliver; Esapa, Chris T; El Fertak, Lahcen; Feigel, Tanja; Emelyanova, Irina; Estabel, Jeanne; Favor, Jack; Flenniken, Ann; Gambadoro, Alessia; Garrett, Lilian; Gates, Hilary; Gerdin, Anna-Karin; Gkoutos, George; Greenaway, Simon; Glasl, Lisa; Goetz, Patrice; Da Cruz, Isabelle Goncalves; Götz, Alexander; Graw, Jochen; Guimond, Alain; Hans, Wolfgang; Hicks, Geoff; Hölter, Sabine M; Höfler, Heinz; Hancock, John M; Hoehndorf, Robert; Hough, Tertius; Houghton, Richard; Hurt, Anja; Ivandic, Boris; Jacobs, Hughes; Jacquot, Sylvie; Jones, Nora; Karp, Natasha A; Katus, Hugo A; Kitchen, Sharon; Klein-Rodewald, Tanja; Klingenspor, Martin; Klopstock, Thomas; Lalanne, Valerie; Leblanc, Sophie; Lengger, Christoph; le Marchand, Elise; Ludwig, Tonia; Lux, Aline; McKerlie, Colin; Maier, Holger; Mandel, Jean-Louis; Marschall, Susan; Mark, Manuel; Melvin, David G; Meziane, Hamid; Micklich, Kateryna; Mittelhauser, Christophe; Monassier, Laurent; Moulaert, David; Muller, Stéphanie; Naton, Beatrix; Neff, Frauke; Nolan, Patrick M; Nutter, Lauryl MJ; Ollert, Markus; Pavlovic, Guillaume; Pellegata, Natalia S; Peter, Emilie; Petit-Demoulière, Benoit; Pickard, Amanda; Podrini, Christine; Potter, Paul; Pouilly, Laurent; Puk, Oliver; Richardson, David; Rousseau, Stephane; Quintanilla-Fend, Leticia; Quwailid, Mohamed M; Racz, Ildiko; Rathkolb, Birgit; Riet, Fabrice; Rossant, Janet; Roux, Michel; Rozman, Jan; Ryder, Ed; Salisbury, Jennifer; Santos, Luis; Schäble, Karl-Heinz; Schiller, Evelyn; Schrewe, Anja; Schulz, Holger; Steinkamp, Ralf; Simon, Michelle; Stewart, Michelle; Stöger, Claudia; Stöger, Tobias; Sun, Minxuan; Sunter, David; Teboul, Lydia; Tilly, Isabelle; Tocchini-Valentini, Glauco P; Tost, Monica; Treise, Irina; Vasseur, Laurent; Velot, Emilie; Vogt-Weisenhorn, Daniela; Wagner, Christelle; Walling, Alison; Weber, Bruno; Wendling, Olivia; Westerberg, Henrik; Willershäuser, Monja; Wolf, Eckhard; Wolter, Anne; Wood, Joe; Wurst, Wolfgang; Yildirim, Ali Önder; Zeh, Ramona; Zimmer, Andreas; Zimprich, Annemarie

    2015-01-01

    The function of the majority of genes in the mouse and human genomes remains unknown. The mouse ES cell knockout resource provides a basis for characterisation of relationships between gene and phenotype. The EUMODIC consortium developed and validated robust methodologies for broad-based phenotyping of knockouts through a pipeline comprising 20 disease-orientated platforms. We developed novel statistical methods for pipeline design and data analysis aimed at detecting reproducible phenotypes with high power. We acquired phenotype data from 449 mutant alleles, representing 320 unique genes, of which half had no prior functional annotation. We captured data from over 27,000 mice finding that 83% of the mutant lines are phenodeviant, with 65% demonstrating pleiotropy. Surprisingly, we found significant differences in phenotype annotation according to zygosity. Novel phenotypes were uncovered for many genes with unknown function providing a powerful basis for hypothesis generation and further investigation in diverse systems. PMID:26214591

  9. Structural analysis of a reflux pool-boiler solar receiver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, E.L.; Stone, C.M.

    1991-06-01

    Coupled thermal-structural finite element calculations of a reflux pool-boiler solar receiver were performed to characterize the operating stresses and to address issues affecting the service life of the receiver. Analyses performed using shell elements provided information for receiver material selection and design optimization. Calculations based on linear elastic fracture mechanics principles were performed using continuum elements to assess the vulnerability of a seam-weld to fatigue crack growth. All calculations were performed using ABAQUS, a general purpose finite element code, and elements specifically formulated for coupled thermal-structural analysis. Two materials were evaluated: 316L SS and Haynes 230 alloys. The receiver response was simulated for a combination of structural and thermal loads that represent the startup and operating conditions of the receiver. For both materials, maximum stresses in the receiver developed shortly after startup due to uneven temperature distribution across the receiver surface. The largest effective stress was near yield in the 316L SS receiver and below 39 percent of yield in the Haynes 230 receiver. The calculations demonstrated that stress reductions of over 25 percent could be obtained by reducing the aft dome thickness to one closer to the absorber. The fatigue calculations demonstrated that the stress distribution near the seam-weld notch depends primarily on the structural load created by internal pressurization of the receiver rather than the thermal, indicating that the thermal loads can be neglected when assessing the stress intensity near the seam-weld notch. The stress intensity factor, computed using the J-integral method and crack opening-displacement field equations, was significantly below the fatigue threshold for most steels. The calculations indicated that the weld notch was always loaded in compression, a condition which is not conducive to fatigue crack growth. 15 refs., 30 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Safety analysis of a pool Genesis II irradiator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues Junior, Ary de A.

    2011-01-01

    The Genesis II Irradiator manufactured by GRAT * STAR Inc. (USA) is a category III gamma irradiator in which the sealed source is contained in a water filled storage pool and is shielded permanently, i.e. the material has to move down to the source. Even though the pool is 5.6 m deep, what would happen if the water level lowered? There are a series of safety devices that will avoid this situation and calculations show that the water level has to be very low in order to deliver a significant dose; moreover, only in case a person remains at the border of the pool for a long time this would be risky. In conclusion, it is practically impossible for someone to be exposed to radiation from a Genesis II Irradiator source. (author)

  11. Iron deficiency in chronic heart failure : An international pooled analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klip, IJsbrand T.; Comin-Colet, Josep; Voors, Adriaan A.; Ponikowski, Piotr; Enjuanes, Cristina; Banasiak, Waldemar; Lok, Dirk J.; Rosentryt, Piotr; Torrens, Ainhoa; Polonski, Lech; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; van der Meer, Peter; Jankowska, Ewa A.

    Background Iron deficiency (ID) is an emerging problem in patients with chronic heart failure (HF) and can be a potential therapeutic target. However, not much is known about the prevalence, predictors, and prognosis of ID in patients with chronic HF. Methods In an international pooled cohort

  12. Pooling data for the analysis of dynamic marketing systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horvath, C.; Wieringa, J.E.

    Vector autoregressive (VAR) models have become popular in marketing literature for analyzing the behavior of competitive marketing systems. One drawback of these models is that the number of parameters can become very large, potentially leading to estimation problems. Pooling data for multiple

  13. Technology for analysis of sodium pool fire characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Byung Ho; Jeong, K C; Jeong, J Y; Kim, T J; Choi, J H; Choi, Y D; Hwang, S T

    2000-09-01

    Basic and detail design for medium sodium fire test facility was carried out and medium sodium fire test facility was constructed. Design data is as follows. - Test cell material : Concrete with high strength - Test cell dimension ; 48m{sup 3} (3x4x4m) - Design temp. ; 700 deg C - Operation temp. ; 530 deg C - Design pressure ; 1 bar (max.) - Dimension(Inside) : 3 x 4 x 4(m) - Test cell thickness ; 45cm - Liner plate with (Thickness : 3mm) In this study, sodium fire characteristics was analyzed and data for validation of computer code was produced. Oxygen and sodium filled in pool pan didn't burns instantly, but pool fire occurred through pre-ignition. Distribution of temperature in test cell was divided by two parts, and temperature at upper position appeared to be higher than temperature at lower position. The temperature in test cell increased with the feed of sodium. The pressure in test cell increased with the feed of sodium. When the feed of sodium was 8kg, peak pressure was 0.075 bar. Peak temperature in sodium pool appeared to be 854 deg C regardless of the feed of sodium. Decrease of 1% in oxygen concentration showed the rise of 0.036bar in pressure.

  14. Technology for analysis of sodium pool fire characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Byung Ho; Jeong, K. C.; Jeong, J. Y.; Kim, T. J.; Choi, J. H.; Choi, Y. D.; Hwang, S. T.

    2000-09-01

    Basic and detail design for medium sodium fire test facility was carried out and medium sodium fire test facility was constructed. Design data is as follows. - Test cell material : Concrete with high strength - Test cell dimension ; 48m 3 (3x4x4m) - Design temp. ; 700 deg C - Operation temp. ; 530 deg C - Design pressure ; 1 bar (max.) - Dimension(Inside) : 3 x 4 x 4(m) - Test cell thickness ; 45cm - Liner plate with (Thickness : 3mm) In this study, sodium fire characteristics was analyzed and data for validation of computer code was produced. Oxygen and sodium filled in pool pan didn't burns instantly, but pool fire occurred through pre-ignition. Distribution of temperature in test cell was divided by two parts, and temperature at upper position appeared to be higher than temperature at lower position. The temperature in test cell increased with the feed of sodium. The pressure in test cell increased with the feed of sodium. When the feed of sodium was 8kg, peak pressure was 0.075 bar. Peak temperature in sodium pool appeared to be 854 deg C regardless of the feed of sodium. Decrease of 1% in oxygen concentration showed the rise of 0.036bar in pressure

  15. Technology for analysis of sodium pool fire characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Byung Ho; Jeong, K. C.; Jeong, J. Y.; Kim, T. J.; Choi, J. H.; Choi, Y. D.; Hwang, S. T

    2000-09-01

    Basic and detail design for medium sodium fire test facility was carried out and medium sodium fire test facility was constructed. Design data is as follows. - Test cell material : Concrete with high strength - Test cell dimension ; 48m{sup 3} (3x4x4m) - Design temp. ; 700 deg C - Operation temp. ; 530 deg C - Design pressure ; 1 bar (max.) - Dimension(Inside) : 3 x 4 x 4(m) - Test cell thickness ; 45cm - Liner plate with (Thickness : 3mm) In this study, sodium fire characteristics was analyzed and data for validation of computer code was produced. Oxygen and sodium filled in pool pan didn't burns instantly, but pool fire occurred through pre-ignition. Distribution of temperature in test cell was divided by two parts, and temperature at upper position appeared to be higher than temperature at lower position. The temperature in test cell increased with the feed of sodium. The pressure in test cell increased with the feed of sodium. When the feed of sodium was 8kg, peak pressure was 0.075 bar. Peak temperature in sodium pool appeared to be 854 deg C regardless of the feed of sodium. Decrease of 1% in oxygen concentration showed the rise of 0.036bar in pressure.

  16. International Lymphoma Epidemiology Consortium (InterLymph)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A consortium designed to enhance collaboration among epidemiologists studying lymphoma, to provide a forum for the exchange of research ideas, and to create a framework for collaborating on analyses that pool data from multiple studies

  17. Monitoring Consortiums: A Cost-Effective Means to Enhancing Watershed Data Collection and Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monitoring is essential for tracking overall watershed health, but monitoring costs are a limiting factor. As demonstrated in the four case studies, consortiums can reduce costs and improve cooperation among partners.

  18. Simplified analysis of trasients in pool type liquid metal reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botelho, D.A.

    1987-01-01

    The conceptual design of a liquid metal fast breeder reactor will require a great effort of development in several technical disciplines. One of them is the thermal-hydraulic design of the reactor and of the heat and fluid transport components inside the reactor vessel. A simplified model to calculate the maximum sodium temperatures is presented in this paper. This model can be used to optimize the layout of components inside the reactor vessel and was easily programmed in a small computer. Illustrative calculations of two transients of a typical hot pool type fast reactor are presented and compared with the results of other researchers. (author) [pt

  19. Analysis of SBO accident for a swimming pool reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Guimin; Li Weiwei; Li Ning; Guo Wenhui

    2015-01-01

    The RELAP5/MOD3.3 code was adopted to compute the SBO accident condition of a swimming pool reactor. The coolant flow reversal process was calculated, and the influence of parameters of the flow between the core leakage and components on the flow reversal in the SBO accident condition was analyzed. The calculated results show that in the situation the reactor loses all forced flow, the residual heat of the reactor can be removed by the natural circulation flow, and the fuel subassembly will not be damaged. (authors)

  20. 3-dimensional thermohydraulic analysis of KALIMER reactor pool during unprotected accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yong Bum; Hahn Do Hee

    2003-01-01

    During a normal reactor scram, the heat generation is reduced almost instantaneously while the coolant flow rate follows the pump coastdown. This mismatch between power and flow results in a situation where the core flow entering the hot pool is at a lower temperature than the temperature of the bulk pool sodium. This temperature difference leads to thermal stratification. Thermal stratification can occur in the hot pool region if the entering coolant is colder than the existing hot pool coolant and the flow momentum is not large enough to overcome the negative buoyancy force. Since the fluid of hot pool enters IHXs, the temperature distribution of hot pool can alter the overall system response. Hence, it is necessary to predict the pool coolant temperature distribution with sufficient accuracy to determine the inlet temperature conditions for the IHXs and its contribution to the net buoyancy head. Therefore, two-dimensional hot pool thermohydraulic model named HP2D has been developed. In this report code-to-code comparison analysis between HP2D and COMMIX-1AR/P has been performed in the case of steady-state and UTOP.

  1. Validation analysis of pool fire experiment (Run-F7) using SPHINCS code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, Akira; Tajima, Yuji

    1998-04-01

    SPHINCS (Sodium Fire Phenomenology IN multi-Cell System) code has been developed for the safety analysis of sodium fire accident in a Fast Breeder Reactor. The main features of the SPHINCS code with respect to the sodium pool fire phenomena are multi-dimensional modeling of the thermal behavior in sodium pool and steel liner, modeling of the extension of sodium pool area based on the sodium mass conservation, and equilibrium model for the chemical reaction of pool fire on the flame sheet at the surface of sodium pool during. Therefore, the SPHINCS code is capable of temperature evaluation of the steel liner in detail during the small and/or medium scale sodium leakage accidents. In this study, Run-F7 experiment in which the sodium leakage rate is 11.8 kg/hour has been analyzed. In the experiment the diameter of the sodium pool is approximately 60 cm and the maximum steel liner temperature was 616 degree C. The analytical results tell us the agreement between the SPHINCS analysis and the experiment is excellent with respect to the time history and spatial distribution of the liner temperature, sodium pool extension behavior, as well as atmosphere gas temperature. It is concluded that the pool fire modeling of the SPHINCS code has been validated for this experiment. The SPHINCS code is currently applicable to the sodium pool fire phenomena and the temperature evaluation of the steel liner. The experiment series are continued to check some parameters, i.e., sodium leakage rate and the height of sodium leakage. Thus, the author will analyze the subsequent experiments to check the influence of the parameters and applies SPHINCS to the sodium fire consequence analysis of fast reactor. (author)

  2. Genomic analysis reveals key aspects of prokaryotic symbiosis in the phototrophic consortium "Chlorochromatium aggregatum"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Zhenfeng; Müller, Johannes; Li, Tao

    2013-01-01

    'Chlorochromatium aggregatum' is a phototrophic consortium, a symbiosis that may represent the highest degree of mutual interdependence between two unrelated bacteria not associated with a eukaryotic host. 'Chlorochromatium aggregatum' is a motile, barrel-shaped aggregate formed from a single cell...

  3. Pathways to smoking behaviours : biological insights from the Tobacco and Genetics Consortium meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minicã, C C; Mbarek, H; Pool, R; Dolan, C V; Boomsma, D I; Vink, J M

    By running gene and pathway analyses for several smoking behaviours in the Tobacco and Genetics Consortium (TAG) sample of 74 053 individuals, 21 genes and several chains of biological pathways were implicated. Analyses were carried out using the HYbrid Set-based Test (HYST) as implemented in the

  4. Meta-Analysis of Mismatch Repair Polymorphisms within the Cogent Consortium for Colorectal Cancer Susceptibility

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Picelli, S.; Bermejo, J. L.; Chang-Claude, J.; Hoffmeister, M.; Fernandez-Rozadilla, C.; Carracedo, A.; Castells, A.; Castellví-Bel, S.; Naccarati, Alessio; Pardini, Barbara; Vodičková, Ludmila; Müller, H.; Talseth-Palmer, B. A.; Stibbard, G.; Peterlongo, P.; Nici, C.; Veneroni, S.; Li, L.; Casey, G.; Tenesa, A.; Farrington, S.M.; Tomlinson, I.; Moreno, V.; van Wezel, T.; Wijnen, J.; Dunlop, M.; Radice, P.; Scott, R. J.; Vodička, Pavel; Ruiz-Ponte, C.; Brenner, H.; Buch, S.; Völzke, H.; Hampe, J.; Schafmayer, C.; Lindblom, A.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 9 (2013), e72091 E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP304/10/1286; GA ČR GA310/07/1430 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : colerectal cancer * The EPICOLON Consortium Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.534, year: 2013

  5. BACTERIAL CONSORTIUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payel Sarkar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Petroleum aromatic hydrocarbons like benzen e, toluene, ethyl benzene and xylene, together known as BTEX, has almost the same chemical structure. These aromatic hydrocarbons are released as pollutants in th e environment. This work was taken up to develop a solvent tolerant bacterial cons ortium that could degrade BTEX compounds as they all share a common chemical structure. We have isolated almost 60 different types of bacterial strains from different petroleum contaminated sites. Of these 60 bacterial strains almost 20 microorganisms were screene d on the basis of capability to tolerate high concentration of BTEX. Ten differe nt consortia were prepared and the compatibility of the bacterial strains within the consortia was checked by gram staining and BTEX tolerance level. Four successful mi crobial consortia were selected in which all the bacterial strains concomitantly grew in presence of high concentration of BTEX (10% of toluene, 10% of benzene 5% ethyl benzene and 1% xylene. Consortium #2 showed the highest growth rate in pr esence of BTEX. Degradation of BTEX by consortium #2 was monitored for 5 days by gradual decrease in the volume of the solvents. The maximum reduction observed wa s 85% in 5 days. Gas chromatography results also reveal that could completely degrade benzene and ethyl benzene within 48 hours. Almost 90% degradation of toluene and xylene in 48 hours was exhibited by consortium #2. It could also tolerate and degrade many industrial solvents such as chloroform, DMSO, acetonitrile having a wide range of log P values (0.03–3.1. Degradation of aromatic hydrocarbon like BTEX by a solvent tolerant bacterial consortium is greatly significant as it could degrade high concentration of pollutants compared to a bacterium and also reduces the time span of degradation.

  6. Imported malaria in pregnant women: a retrospective pooled analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Käser, Annina K.; Arguin, Paul M.; Chiodini, Peter L.; Smith, Valerie; Delmont, Jean; Jiménez, Beatriz C.; Färnert, Anna; Kimura, Mikio; Ramharter, Michael; Grobusch, Martin P.; Schlagenhauf, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Data on imported malaria in pregnant women are scarce. Method A retrospective, descriptive study of pooled data on imported malaria in pregnancy was done, using data from 1977 to 2014 from 8 different collaborators in Europe, the United States and Japan. Most cases were from the period 1991–2014. National malaria reference centresas well as specialists on this topic were asked to search their archives for cases of imported malaria in pregnancy. A total of 632 cases were collated, providing information on Plasmodium species, region of acquisition, nationality, country of residence, reason for travel, age, gestational age, prophylactic measures and treatment used, as well as on complications and outcomes in mother and child. Results Datasets from some sources were incomplete. The predominant Plasmodium species was P. falciparum in 72% of cases. Among the 543 cases where information on the use of chemoprophylaxis was known, 471 (74.5%) did not use chemoprophylaxis or used incorrect or incomplete chemoprophylaxis. The main reason for travelling was “visiting friends and relatives” VFR (48.6%) and overall, most cases of malaria were imported from West Africa (85.9%). Severe anaemia was the most frequent complication in the mother. Data on offspring outcome was limited, but spontaneous abortion was a frequently reported foetal outcome (n = 14). A total of 50 different variants of malaria treatment regimens were reported. Conclusion Imported cases of malaria in pregnancy are mainly P. falciparum acquired in sub-Saharan Africa. Malaria prevention and treatment in pregnant travellers is a challenge for travel medicine due to few data on medication safety and maternal and foetal outcomes. International, collaborative efforts are needed to capture standardized data on imported malaria cases in pregnant women. PMID:26227740

  7. A general framework for the regression analysis of pooled biomarker assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan; McMahan, Christopher; Gallagher, Colin

    2017-07-10

    As a cost-efficient data collection mechanism, the process of assaying pooled biospecimens is becoming increasingly common in epidemiological research; for example, pooling has been proposed for the purpose of evaluating the diagnostic efficacy of biological markers (biomarkers). To this end, several authors have proposed techniques that allow for the analysis of continuous pooled biomarker assessments. Regretfully, most of these techniques proceed under restrictive assumptions, are unable to account for the effects of measurement error, and fail to control for confounding variables. These limitations are understandably attributable to the complex structure that is inherent to measurements taken on pooled specimens. Consequently, in order to provide practitioners with the tools necessary to accurately and efficiently analyze pooled biomarker assessments, herein, a general Monte Carlo maximum likelihood-based procedure is presented. The proposed approach allows for the regression analysis of pooled data under practically all parametric models and can be used to directly account for the effects of measurement error. Through simulation, it is shown that the proposed approach can accurately and efficiently estimate all unknown parameters and is more computational efficient than existing techniques. This new methodology is further illustrated using monocyte chemotactic protein-1 data collected by the Collaborative Perinatal Project in an effort to assess the relationship between this chemokine and the risk of miscarriage. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Development of Lower Plenum Molten Pool Module of Severe Accident Analysis Code in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Son, Donggun; Kim, Dong-Ha; Park, Rae-Jun; Bae, Jun-Ho; Shim, Suk-Ku; Marigomen, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    To simulate a severe accident progression of nuclear power plant and forecast reactor pressure vessel failure, we develop computational software called COMPASS (COre Meltdown Progression Accident Simulation Software) for whole physical phenomena inside the reactor pressure vessel from a core heat-up to a vessel failure. As a part of COMPASS project, in the first phase of COMPASS development (2011 - 2014), we focused on the molten pool behavior in the lower plenum, heat-up and ablation of reactor vessel wall. Input from the core module of COMPASS is relocated melt composition and mass in time. Molten pool behavior is described based on the lumped parameter model. Heat transfers in between oxidic, metallic molten pools, overlying water, steam and debris bed are considered in the present study. The models and correlations used in this study are appropriately selected by the physical conditions of severe accident progression. Interaction between molten pools and reactor vessel wall is also simulated based on the lumped parameter model. Heat transfers between oxidic pool, thin crust of oxidic pool and reactor vessel wall are considered and we solve simple energy balance equations for the crust thickness of oxidic pool and reactor vessel wall. As a result, we simulate a benchmark calculation for APR1400 nuclear power plant, with assumption of relocated mass from the core is constant in time such that 0.2ton/sec. We discuss about the molten pool behavior and wall ablation, to validate our models and correlations used in the COMPASS. Stand-alone SIMPLE program is developed as the lower plenum molten pool module for the COMPASS in-vessel severe accident analysis code. SIMPLE program formulates the mass and energy balance for water, steam, particulate debris bed, molten corium pools and oxidic crust from the first principle and uses models and correlations as the constitutive relations for the governing equations. Limited steam table and the material properties are provided

  9. Analysis of accidental loss of pool coolant due to leakage in a PWR SFP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Xiaoli; Li, Wei; Zhang, Yapei; Tian, Wenxi; Su, Guanghui; Qiu, Suizheng

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Accidental loss of pool coolant due to leakage in a PWR SFP was studied using MAAP5. • The effect of emergency ventilation on the accident progression was investigated. • The effect of emergency injection on the accident progression was discussed. - Abstract: A large loss of pool coolant/water accident may be caused by extreme accidents such as the pool wall or bottom floor punctures due to a large aircraft strike. The safety of SFP under this circumstance is very important. Large amounts of radioactive materials would be easily released into the environment if a severe accident happened in the SFP, because the spent fuel pool (SFP) in a PWR nuclear power station (NPS) is often located in the fuel handing building outside the reactor containment. To gain insight into the loss of pool coolant accident progression for a pressurized water reactor (PWR) SFP, a computational model was established by using the Modular Accident Analysis Program (MAAP5). Important factors such as Zr oxidation by air, air natural circulation and thermal radiation were considered for partial and complete drainage accidents without mitigation measures. The calculation indicated that even if the residual water level was in the active fuel region, there was a chance to effectively remove the decay heat through axial heat conduction (if the pool cooling system failed) or steam cooling (if the pool cooling system was working). For sensitivity study, the effects of emergency ventilation and water injection on the accident progression were analyzed. The analysis showed that for the current configuration of high-density storage racks, it was difficult to cool the spent fuels by air natural circulation. Enlarging the space between the adjacent assemblies was a way of increasing air natural circulation flow rate and maintaining the coolability of SFP. Water injection to the bottom of the SFP helped to recover water inventory, quenching the high temperature assemblies to prevent

  10. An Analysis of COSPA – A Consortium for Open Source in the Public Administration

    OpenAIRE

    Morgan, Lorraine

    2005-01-01

    peer-reviewed This paper reflects on a two-year EU funded specific research targeted project that officially began in January 2004 entitled COSPA, a Consortium for studying, evaluating and supporting the introduction of Open Source Software and Open Data Standards in the Public Administration. COSPA focuses on office automation and desktop system software and aims at rigorously measuring the effort, costs and benefits of a transition to Open Source. The project invo...

  11. Comparative metagenomic analysis of PAH degradation in soil by a mixed microbial consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafra, German; Taylor, Todd D; Absalón, Angel E; Cortés-Espinosa, Diana V

    2016-11-15

    In this study, we used a taxonomic and functional metagenomic approach to analyze some of the effects (e.g. displacement, permanence, disappearance) produced between native microbiota and a previously constructed Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH)-degrading microbial consortium during the bioremediation process of a soil polluted with PAHs. Bioaugmentation with a fungal-bacterial consortium and biostimulation of native microbiota using corn stover as texturizer produced appreciable changes in the microbial diversity of polluted soils, shifting native microbial communities in favor of degrading specific populations. Functional metagenomics showed changes in gene abundance suggesting a bias towards aromatic hydrocarbon and intermediary degradation pathways, which greatly favored PAH mineralization. In contrast, pathways favoring the formation of toxic intermediates such as cytochrome P450-mediated reactions were found to be significantly reduced in bioaugmented soils. PAH biodegradation in soil using the microbial consortium was faster and reached higher degradation values (84% after 30 d) as a result of an increased co-metabolic degradation when compared with other mixed microbial consortia. The main differences between inoculated and non-inoculated soils were observed in aromatic ring-hydroxylating dioxygenases, laccase, protocatechuate, salicylate and benzoate-degrading enzyme genes. Based on our results, we propose that several concurrent metabolic pathways are taking place in soils during PAH degradation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. DNA adducts and cancer risk in prospective studies: a pooled analysis and a meta-analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veglia, Fabrizio; Loft, Steffen; Matullo, Giuseppe

    2008-01-01

    in which bulky DNA adducts have been measured in blood samples collected from healthy subjects (N = 1947; average follow-up 51-137 months). In addition, we have performed a meta-analysis by identifying all articles on the same subject published up to the end of 2006, including case-control studies......). The association was evident only in current smokers and was absent in former smokers. Also the meta-analysis, which included both lung and bladder cancers, showed a statistically significant association in current smokers, whereas the results in never smokers were equivocal; in former smokers, no association......Bulky DNA adducts are biomarkers of exposure to aromatic compounds and of the ability of the individual to metabolically activate carcinogens and to repair DNA damage. Their ability to predict cancer onset is uncertain. We have performed a pooled analysis of three prospective studies on cancer risk...

  13. Low frequency of cigarette smoking and the risk of head and neck cancer in the INHANCE consortium pooled analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthiller, Julien; Straif, Kurt; Agudo, Antonio; Ahrens, Wolfgang; Bezerra Dos Santos, Alexandre; Boccia, Stefania; Cadoni, Gabriella; Canova, Cristina; Castellsague, Xavier; Chen, Chu; Conway, David; Curado, Maria Paula; Dal Maso, Luigino; Daudt, Alexander W; Fabianova, Eleonora; Fernandez, Leticia; Franceschi, Silvia; Fukuyama, Erica E; Hayes, Richard B; Healy, Claire; Herrero, Rolando; Holcatova, Ivana; Kelsey, Karl; Kjaerheim, Kristina; Koifman, Sergio; Lagiou, Pagona; La Vecchia, Carlo; Lazarus, Philip; Levi, Fabio; Lissowska, Jolanta; Macfarlane, Tatiana; Mates, Dana; McClean, Michael; Menezes, Ana; Merletti, Franco; Morgenstern, Hal; Muscat, Joshua; Olshan, Andrew F; Purdue, Mark; Ramroth, Heribert; Rudnai, Peter; Schwartz, Stephen M; Serraino, Diego; Shangina, Oxana; Smith, Elaine; Sturgis, Erich M; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila; Thomson, Peter; Vaughan, Thomas L; Vilensky, Marta; Wei, Qingyi; Winn, Deborah M; Wünsch-Filho, Victor; Zhang, Zuo-Feng; Znaor, Ariana; Ferro, Gilles; Brennan, Paul; Boffetta, Paolo; Hashibe, Mia; Lee, Yuan-Chin Amy

    2016-06-01

    Cigarette smoking is a major risk factor for head and neck cancer (HNC). To our knowledge, low cigarette smoking (frequency of cigarette consumption was categorized as follows: never cigarette users, >0-3, >3-5, >5-10 cigarettes per day. Smoking >0-3 cigarettes per day was associated with a 50% increased risk of HNC in the study population [odds ratio (OR) = 1.52, 95% confidence interval (CI): (1.21, 1.90). Smoking >3-5 cigarettes per day was associated in each subgroup from OR = 2.01 (95% CI: 1.22, 3.31) among never alcohol drinkers to OR = 2.74 (95% CI: 2.01, 3.74) among women and in each cancer site, particularly laryngeal cancer (OR = 3.48, 95% CI: 2.40, 5.05). However, the observed increased risk of HNC for low smoking frequency was not found among smokers with smoking duration shorter than 20 years. Our results suggest a public health message that low frequency of cigarette consumption contributes to the development of HNC. However, smoking duration seems to play at least an equal or a stronger role in the development of HNC. © The Author 2015; all rights reserved. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Epidemiological Association.

  14. Associations of breast cancer risk factors with tumor subtypes: a pooled analysis from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Xiaohong R; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Goode, Ellen L

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that breast cancer risk factors are associated with estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) expression status of the tumors.......Previous studies have suggested that breast cancer risk factors are associated with estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) expression status of the tumors....

  15. Seismic analysis and design of spent subassembly storage bay (SSSB) pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdul Gani, H.I.; Ramanjaneyulu, K.V.S.; Pillai, C.S.; Chetal, S.C.

    2003-01-01

    Fuel bundles, after their specified stay in reactor core, are replaced by fresh fuel for sustaining power generation at rated levels. The irradiated fuel subassembly, removed fresh from core, known as spent fuel sub assembly, is radioactive and decay heat generating. It needs to be cooled before it becomes amenable for handling, either for reprocessing or for immobilisation. For this purpose, it is immersed in a pool of water, retained in a concrete structure referred as Spent Subassembly Storage Bay (SSSB) pool. The height of water column above fuel bundles is arrived from shielding considerations. SSSB pool is one of the nuclear safety related structures and warrants rigorous analysis and design. The SSSB pool, in case of PFBR 500 MW(e) is located in fuel building. It is a stainless steel lined. water retaining rectangular R.C.C. open tank of size 7.5 X 29.0 m, with a height of 11.0 m. This structure is analysed for two levels of site specific earthquakes taking in to account liquid structure interactions as per ASCE-4, 1998. The design of walls and bottom slab is carried out satisfying the AERB code for nuclear safety related structures. Analysis and design of SSSB pool of PFBR is presented in the following paper. (author)

  16. Meta-analysis of human genome-microbiome association studies: the MiBioGen consortium initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Kurilshikov, Alexander; Radjabzadeh, Djawad; Turpin, Williams; Croitoru, Kenneth; Bonder, Marc Jan; Jackson, Matthew A; Medina-Gomez, Carolina; Frost, Fabian; Homuth, Georg; Rühlemann, Malte; Hughes, David; Kim, Han-Na; Spector, Tim D; Bell, Jordana T; Steves, Claire J; Timpson, Nicolas; Franke, Andre; Wijmenga, Cisca; Meyer, Katie; Kacprowski, Tim; Franke, Lude; Paterson, Andrew D; Raes, Jeroen; Kraaij, Robert; Zhernakova, Alexandra

    2018-06-08

    In recent years, human microbiota, especially gut microbiota, have emerged as an important yet complex trait influencing human metabolism, immunology, and diseases. Many studies are investigating the forces underlying the observed variation, including the human genetic variants that shape human microbiota. Several preliminary genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been completed, but more are necessary to achieve a fuller picture. Here, we announce the MiBioGen consortium initiative, which has assembled 18 population-level cohorts and some 19,000 participants. Its aim is to generate new knowledge for the rapidly developing field of microbiota research. Each cohort has surveyed the gut microbiome via 16S rRNA sequencing and genotyped their participants with full-genome SNP arrays. We have standardized the analytical pipelines for both the microbiota phenotypes and genotypes, and all the data have been processed using identical approaches. Our analysis of microbiome composition shows that we can reduce the potential artifacts introduced by technical differences in generating microbiota data. We are now in the process of benchmarking the association tests and performing meta-analyses of genome-wide associations. All pipeline and summary statistics results will be shared using public data repositories. We present the largest consortium to date devoted to microbiota-GWAS. We have adapted our analytical pipelines to suit multi-cohort analyses and expect to gain insight into host-microbiota cross-talk at the genome-wide level. And, as an open consortium, we invite more cohorts to join us (by contacting one of the corresponding authors) and to follow the analytical pipeline we have developed.

  17. Birth order and childhood type 1 diabetes risk: a pooled analysis of 31 observational studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cardwell, Chris R; Stene, Lars C; Joner, Geir

    2011-01-01

    The incidence rates of childhood onset type 1 diabetes are almost universally increasing across the globe but the aetiology of the disease remains largely unknown. We investigated whether birth order is associated with the risk of childhood diabetes by performing a pooled analysis of previous...

  18. Phase analysis in gated blood pool tomography. Detection of accessory conduction pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakajima, Kenichi; Bunko, Hisashi; Tada, Akira; Taki, Junichi; Nanbu, Ichiro (Kanazawa Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1984-02-01

    Phase analysis of gated blood pool study has been applied to detect the site of accessory conduction pathway (ACP) in the Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome; however, there was a limitation to detect the precise location of ACP by phase analysis alone. In this study, we applied phase analysis to gated blood pool tomography using seven pin hole tomography (7PT) and gated emission computed tomography (GECT) in 21 patients with WPW syndrome and 3 normal subjects. In 17 patients, the sites of ACPs were confirmed by epicardial mapping and the result of the surgical division of ACP. In 7PT, the site of ACP grossly agreed to the abnormal initial phase in phase image in 5 out of 6 patients with left cardiac type. In GECT, phase images were generated in short axial, vertical and horizontal long axial sections. In 8 out of 9 patients, the site of ACP was correctly identified by phase images, and in a patient who had two ACPs, initial phase corresponded to one of the two locations. Phase analysis of gated blood pool tomography has advantages for avoiding overlap of blood pools and for estimating three-dimensional propagation of the contraction, and can be a good adjunctive method in patients with WPW syndrome.

  19. Programmed Ventricular Stimulation for Risk Stratification in the Brugada Syndrome: A Pooled Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sroubek, Jakub; Probst, Vincent; Mazzanti, Andrea; Delise, Pietro; Hevia, Jesus Castro; Ohkubo, Kimie; Zorzi, Alessandro; Champagne, Jean; Kostopoulou, Anna; Yin, Xiaoyan; Napolitano, Carlo; Milan, David J.; Wilde, Arthur; Sacher, Frederic; Borggrefe, Martin; Ellinor, Patrick T.; Theodorakis, George; Nault, Isabelle; Corrado, Domenico; Watanabe, Ichiro; Antzelevitch, Charles; Allocca, Giuseppe; Priori, Silvia G.; Lubitz, Steven A.

    2016-01-01

    The role of programmed ventricular stimulation in identifying patients with Brugada syndrome at the highest risk for sudden death is uncertain. We performed a systematic review and pooled analysis of prospective, observational studies of patients with Brugada syndrome without a history of sudden

  20. An analysis of postulated accident for 49-2 Swimming Pool Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yongqing; Cu Shaochu; Wang Liugui; Zhang Zengqing

    1990-01-01

    The thermal hydrodynamic code RETRAN-02 is used for safety analysis of Swimming Pool Reactor. Accident of partial-loss of flow, loss of offsite electric power and unexpected reactivity insertion are analysed and discussed. These results will be helpful for operation safety of the reactor

  1. Trace element analysis at the Livermore pool-type reactor using neutron activation techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ragaini, R.C.; Ralston, R.; Garvis, D.

    1975-01-01

    The capabilities of trace element analysis at the Livermore Pool-Type Reactor (LPTR) using instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) are discussed. A description is given of the technology and the methods employed, including sample preparation, irradiation, and analysis. Applications of the INAA technique in past and current projects are described. A computer program, GAMANAL, has been used for nuclide identification and quantification. (U.S.)

  2. Extra-binomial variation approach for analysis of pooled DNA sequencing data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Chris

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: The invention of next-generation sequencing technology has made it possible to study the rare variants that are more likely to pinpoint causal disease genes. To make such experiments financially viable, DNA samples from several subjects are often pooled before sequencing. This induces large between-pool variation which, together with other sources of experimental error, creates over-dispersed data. Statistical analysis of pooled sequencing data needs to appropriately model this additional variance to avoid inflating the false-positive rate. Results: We propose a new statistical method based on an extra-binomial model to address the over-dispersion and apply it to pooled case-control data. We demonstrate that our model provides a better fit to the data than either a standard binomial model or a traditional extra-binomial model proposed by Williams and can analyse both rare and common variants with lower or more variable pool depths compared to the other methods. Availability: Package ‘extraBinomial’ is on http://cran.r-project.org/ Contact: chris.wallace@cimr.cam.ac.uk Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics Online. PMID:22976083

  3. Sodium pool fire analysis of sodium-cooled fast reactor by calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Hong; Xu Mi; Jin Degui

    2002-01-01

    Theoretical models were established according to the characteristic of sodium pool fire, and the SPOOL code was created independently. Some transient processes in sodium pool fire were modeled, including chemical reaction of sodium and oxygen; sodium combustion heat transfer modes in several kids of media; production, deposition and discharge of sodium aerosol; mass and energy exchange between different media in different ventilating conditions. The important characteristic parameters were calculated, such as pressure and temperature of gas, temperature of building materials, mass concentration of sodium aerosol, and so on. The SPOOL code, which provided available safety analysis tool for sodium pool fire accidents in sodium-cooled fast reactor, was well demonstrated with experimental data

  4. Analysis of a Mark II containment structure for hydrodynamic loads in suppression pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bedrosian, B.

    1978-01-01

    During pressure-relief modes of BWR plant operation forcing signals are introduced into the suppression pool at discrete locations: exit nozzles of SRV discharge pipes (quenchers or ramsheads). These forcing signals are transmitted through the water of the suppression pool and, after reaching the pool boundaries, act as loadings on the containment structure wetted perimeter. The response of the containment structure is influenced by the presence of water as it interacts with the structure during application of the load. An adequate analysis must account for fluid-structure interaction (FSI) effects. This paper presents an exact formulation for solving the problem. FSI effects may become significant for a given geometry if the time history of loading and the dynamic properties of the coupled fluid-structure system satisfy a defined (system related) relationship. Results of analyses and parametric/sensitivity studies performed for the steel containment structure of an 1100 Mwe BWR nuclear plant of Mark II configuration are presented. (Author)

  5. Fluid-structure interaction analysis of a water pool under loading caused by steam injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timperi, A.; Paettikangas, T.; Niemi, J.; Ilvonen, M.

    2006-04-01

    CFD and structural analysis codes. MpCCI 3.0 was used for coupling Fluent CFD code with ABAQUS FE code. ES-FSI was used for coupling Star-CD CFD code with ABAQUS. FSI analyses, in which the calculation was carried out entirely in ABAQUS, were also performed. In this case, acoustic elements were used for the fluid and the acoustic and structural domains were coupled. FSI calculations were performed for simple test cases and for a test pool at Lappeenranta University of Technology. The Method of Images was studied as an alternative method for the analyses of the pool. Particularly, the determination of pressure source for the method was studied. Earlier work carried out with the homogenous two-phase model was continued by testing the model with Fluent. Calculation of condensation of steam in a water pool was tested with a new implementation. The two-directionally coupled simulations of the pool with MpCCI and ES-FSI were found to be numerically instable. It was concluded that an implicit coupling method may have to be used in order to avoid the instability. Calculations of the pool were finally performed by using one directional coupling. In the simulations with MpCCI, the incompressible and compressible VOF models of Fluent were used. With ES-FSI, the incompressible VOF model of Star-CD was used for modelling the beginning of a steam injection experiment. The magnitudes of pressure and stress peaks in the simulation and experiment were of comparable size. Otherwise, however, differences between the simulation and experiment were large due to the simplifications used in the simulation. Results obtained with the acoustic-structural FE analyses were compared to analytical and experimental results. The results indicated that the coupled acoustic-structural analysis can be used for calculating the coupled Eigenmodes of BWR pressure suppression pools. (au)

  6. Fluid-structure interaction analysis of a water pool under loading caused by steam injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timperi, A.; Paettikangas, T.; Niemi, J.; Ilvonen, M. [VTT Technical Researc Centre of Finland (Finland)

    2006-04-15

    CFD and structural analysis codes. MpCCI 3.0 was used for coupling Fluent CFD code with ABAQUS FE code. ES-FSI was used for coupling Star-CD CFD code with ABAQUS. FSI analyses, in which the calculation was carried out entirely in ABAQUS, were also performed. In this case, acoustic elements were used for the fluid and the acoustic and structural domains were coupled. FSI calculations were performed for simple test cases and for a test pool at Lappeenranta University of Technology. The Method of Images was studied as an alternative method for the analyses of the pool. Particularly, the determination of pressure source for the method was studied. Earlier work carried out with the homogenous two-phase model was continued by testing the model with Fluent. Calculation of condensation of steam in a water pool was tested with a new implementation. The two-directionally coupled simulations of the pool with MpCCI and ES-FSI were found to be numerically instable. It was concluded that an implicit coupling method may have to be used in order to avoid the instability. Calculations of the pool were finally performed by using one directional coupling. In the simulations with MpCCI, the incompressible and compressible VOF models of Fluent were used. With ES-FSI, the incompressible VOF model of Star-CD was used for modelling the beginning of a steam injection experiment. The magnitudes of pressure and stress peaks in the simulation and experiment were of comparable size. Otherwise, however, differences between the simulation and experiment were large due to the simplifications used in the simulation. Results obtained with the acoustic-structural FE analyses were compared to analytical and experimental results. The results indicated that the coupled acoustic-structural analysis can be used for calculating the coupled Eigenmodes of BWR pressure suppression pools. (au)

  7. A Probabilistic Analysis Methodology and Its Application to A Spent Fuel Pool System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyowon; Jae, Moosung [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Ho G. [Daedeok R and D Center, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    There was a similar accident occurring at the 2{sup nd} unit of PAKS nuclear power station in Hungary on the 10{sup th} April 2003. Insufficient cooling of spent fuel caused the spent fuel burn up or partly melting. There were many previous studies performed for analyzing and measuring the risk of spent fuel damage. In the 1980s, there are changes in conditions such as development of high density storage racks and new information concerning the possibility of cladding fires in the drained spent fuel pools. The US NRC assessed the spent fuel pool risk under the Generic Issue 82. In the 1990s, under the US NRC sponsorship, the risk assessment about the spent fuel pool at Susquehanna Steam Electric Station (SSES) has been performed and Analysis Evaluation of Operational Data (AEOD) has been organized for accumulating the reliability data. A methodology for assessing the risk associated with the spent fuel pool facility has been developed and is applied to the reference plant. It is shown that the methodology developed in this study might contribute to assessing these kinds of the SFP facilities. In this probabilistic risk analysis, the LINV Initial event results in the high frequent occurrence. The most dominant cut-sets include the human errors. The result of this analysis might contribute to identifying the weakness of the preventive and mitigating system in the SFP facility.

  8. CFD aided analysis of a scaled down model of the Brazilian Multipurpose Reactor (RMB) pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schweizer, Fernando L.A.; Lima, Claubia P.B.; Costa, Antonella L.; Veloso, Maria A.F.

    2013-01-01

    Research reactors are commonly built inside deep pools that provide radiological and thermal protection and easy access to its core. Reactors with thermal power in the order of MW usually use an auxiliary thermal-hydraulic circuit at the top of its pool to create a purified hot water layer (HWL). Thermal-hydraulic analysis of the flow configuration in the pool and HWL is paramount to insure radiological protection. A useful tool for these analyses is the application of CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics). To obtain satisfactory results using CFD it is necessary the verification and validation of the CFD numerical model. Verification is divided in code and solution verifications. In the first one establishes the correctness of the CFD code implementation and in the former estimates the numerical accuracy of a particular calculation. Validation is performed through comparison of numerical and experimental results. This paper presents a dimensional analysis of the RMB (Brazilian Multipurpose Reactor) pool to determine a scaled down experimental installation able to aid in the HWL numerical investigation. Two CFD models were created one with the same dimensions and boundary conditions of the reactor prototype and the other with 1/10 proportion size and boundary conditions set to achieve the same inertial and buoyant forces proportions represented by Froude Number between the two models. Results comparing the HWL thickness show consistence between the prototype and the scaled down model behavior. (author)

  9. Validating genetic risk associations for ovarian cancer through the international Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pearce, C L; Near, A M; Van Den Berg, D J

    2009-01-01

    The search for genetic variants associated with ovarian cancer risk has focused on pathways including sex steroid hormones, DNA repair, and cell cycle control. The Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium (OCAC) identified 10 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes in these pathways, which had...... been genotyped by Consortium members and a pooled analysis of these data was conducted. Three of the 10 SNPs showed evidence of an association with ovarian cancer at P... and risk of ovarian cancer suggests that this pathway may be involved in ovarian carcinogenesis. Additional follow-up is warranted....

  10. Molecular analysis of the bacterial diversity in a specialized consortium for diesel oil degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paixao, Douglas Antonio Alvaredo; Accorsini, Fabio Raphael; Vidotti, Maria Benincasa; Lemos, Eliana Gertrudes de Macedo [Universidade Estadual Paulista (FCAV/UNESP), Jaboticabal, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Ciencias Agrarias e Veterinarias], Emails: douglas_unespfcav@yahoo.com.br, vidotti@netsite.com.bregerle@fcav.unesp.br; Dimitrov, Mauricio Rocha [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil)], Email: mau_dimitrov@yahoo.com.br; Pereira, Rodrigo Matheus [EMBRAPARA Soybean - Empresa Brasileira de Pesquisa Agropecuaria (EMBRAPA - Soja), Londrina, PR (Brazil)], Email: poetbr@gmail.com

    2010-05-15

    Diesel oil is a compound derived from petroleum, consisting primarily of hydrocarbons. Poor conditions in transportation and storage of this product can contribute significantly to accidental spills causing serious ecological problems in soil and water and affecting the diversity of the microbial environment. The cloning and sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene is one of the molecular techniques that allows estimation and comparison of the microbial diversity in different environmental samples. The aim of this work was to estimate the diversity of microorganisms from the Bacteria domain in a consortium specialized in diesel oil degradation through partial sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. After the extraction of DNA metagenomics, the material was amplified by PCR reaction using specific oligonucleotide primers for the 16S rRNA gene. The PCR products were cloned into a pGEM-T-Easy vector (Promega), and Escherichia coli was used as the host cell for recombinant DNAs. The partial clone sequencing was obtained using universal oligonucleotide primers from the vector. The genetic library obtained generated 431 clones. All the sequenced clones presented similarity to phylum Proteobacteria, with Gammaproteobacteria the most present group (49.8 % of the clones), followed by Alphaproteobacteira (44.8 %) and Betaproteobacteria (5.4 %). The Pseudomonas genus was the most abundant in the metagenomics library, followed by the Parvibaculum and the Sphingobium genus, respectively. After partial sequencing of the 16S rRNA, the diversity of the bacterial consortium was estimated using DOTUR software. When comparing these sequences to the database from the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), a strong correlation was found between the data generated by the software used and the data deposited in NCBI. (author)

  11. Monitoring organic loading to swimming pools by fluorescence excitation–emission matrix with parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seredynska-Sobecka, Bozena; Stedmon, Colin; Boe-Hansen, Rasmus

    2011-01-01

    Fluorescence Excitation–Emission Matrix spectroscopy combined with parallel factor analysis was employed to monitor water quality and organic contamination in swimming pools. The fluorescence signal of the swimming pool organic matter was low but increased slightly through the day. The analysis...... revealed that the organic matter fluorescence was characterised by five different components, one of which was unique to swimming pool organic matter and one which was specific to organic contamination. The latter component had emission peaks at 420nm and was found to be a sensitive indicator of organic...... loading in swimming pool water. The fluorescence at 420nm gradually increased during opening hours and represented material accumulating through the day....

  12. Pooling Data from Multiple Longitudinal Studies: The Role of Item Response Theory in Integrative Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, Patrick J.; Hussong, Andrea M.; Cai, Li; Huang, Wenjing; Chassin, Laurie; Sher, Kenneth J.; Zucker, Robert A.

    2010-01-01

    There are a number of significant challenges encountered when studying development over an extended period of time including subject attrition, changing measurement structures across group and developmental period, and the need to invest substantial time and money. Integrative data analysis is an emerging set of methodologies that overcomes many of the challenges of single sample designs through the pooling of data drawn from multiple existing developmental studies. This approach is characterized by a host of advantages, but this also introduces several new complexities that must be addressed prior to broad adoption by developmental researchers. In this paper we focus on methods for fitting measurement models and creating scale scores using data drawn from multiple longitudinal studies. We present findings from the analysis of repeated measures of internalizing symptomatology that were pooled from three existing developmental studies. We describe and demonstrate each step in the analysis and we conclude with a discussion of potential limitations and directions for future research. PMID:18331129

  13. IPD-Work consortium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kivimäki, Mika; Singh-Manoux, Archana; Virtanen, Marianna

    2015-01-01

    of countries. The aim of the consortium is to estimate reliably the associations of work-related psychosocial factors with chronic diseases, disability, and mortality. Our findings are highly cited by the occupational health, epidemiology, and clinical medicine research community. However, some of the IPD-Work......'s findings have also generated disagreement as they challenge the importance of job strain as a major target for coronary heart disease (CHD) prevention, this is reflected in the critical discussion paper by Choi et al (1). In this invited reply to Choi et al, we aim to (i) describe how IPD-Work seeks......Established in 2008 and comprising over 60 researchers, the IPD-Work (individual-participant data meta-analysis in working populations) consortium is a collaborative research project that uses pre-defined meta-analyses of individual-participant data from multiple cohort studies representing a range...

  14. Analysis of mammalian gene function through broad-based phenotypic screens across a consortium of mouse clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Angelis, Martin Hrabě; Nicholson, George; Selloum, Mohammed; White, Jacqui; Morgan, Hugh; Ramirez-Solis, Ramiro; Sorg, Tania; Wells, Sara; Fuchs, Helmut; Fray, Martin; Adams, David J; Adams, Niels C; Adler, Thure; Aguilar-Pimentel, Antonio; Ali-Hadji, Dalila; Amann, Gregory; André, Philippe; Atkins, Sarah; Auburtin, Aurelie; Ayadi, Abdel; Becker, Julien; Becker, Lore; Bedu, Elodie; Bekeredjian, Raffi; Birling, Marie-Christine; Blake, Andrew; Bottomley, Joanna; Bowl, Mike; Brault, Véronique; Busch, Dirk H; Bussell, James N; Calzada-Wack, Julia; Cater, Heather; Champy, Marie-France; Charles, Philippe; Chevalier, Claire; Chiani, Francesco; Codner, Gemma F; Combe, Roy; Cox, Roger; Dalloneau, Emilie; Dierich, André; Di Fenza, Armida; Doe, Brendan; Duchon, Arnaud; Eickelberg, Oliver; Esapa, Chris T; El Fertak, Lahcen; Feigel, Tanja; Emelyanova, Irina; Estabel, Jeanne; Favor, Jack; Flenniken, Ann; Gambadoro, Alessia; Garrett, Lilian; Gates, Hilary; Gerdin, Anna-Karin; Gkoutos, George; Greenaway, Simon; Glasl, Lisa; Goetz, Patrice; Da Cruz, Isabelle Goncalves; Götz, Alexander; Graw, Jochen; Guimond, Alain; Hans, Wolfgang; Hicks, Geoff; Hölter, Sabine M; Höfler, Heinz; Hancock, John M; Hoehndorf, Robert; Hough, Tertius; Houghton, Richard; Hurt, Anja; Ivandic, Boris; Jacobs, Hughes; Jacquot, Sylvie; Jones, Nora; Karp, Natasha A; Katus, Hugo A; Kitchen, Sharon; Klein-Rodewald, Tanja; Klingenspor, Martin; Klopstock, Thomas; Lalanne, Valerie; Leblanc, Sophie; Lengger, Christoph; le Marchand, Elise; Ludwig, Tonia; Lux, Aline; McKerlie, Colin; Maier, Holger; Mandel, Jean-Louis; Marschall, Susan; Mark, Manuel; Melvin, David G; Meziane, Hamid; Micklich, Kateryna; Mittelhauser, Christophe; Monassier, Laurent; Moulaert, David; Muller, Stéphanie; Naton, Beatrix; Neff, Frauke; Nolan, Patrick M; Nutter, Lauryl Mj; Ollert, Markus; Pavlovic, Guillaume; Pellegata, Natalia S; Peter, Emilie; Petit-Demoulière, Benoit; Pickard, Amanda; Podrini, Christine; Potter, Paul; Pouilly, Laurent; Puk, Oliver; Richardson, David; Rousseau, Stephane; Quintanilla-Fend, Leticia; Quwailid, Mohamed M; Racz, Ildiko; Rathkolb, Birgit; Riet, Fabrice; Rossant, Janet; Roux, Michel; Rozman, Jan; Ryder, Ed; Salisbury, Jennifer; Santos, Luis; Schäble, Karl-Heinz; Schiller, Evelyn; Schrewe, Anja; Schulz, Holger; Steinkamp, Ralf; Simon, Michelle; Stewart, Michelle; Stöger, Claudia; Stöger, Tobias; Sun, Minxuan; Sunter, David; Teboul, Lydia; Tilly, Isabelle; Tocchini-Valentini, Glauco P; Tost, Monica; Treise, Irina; Vasseur, Laurent; Velot, Emilie; Vogt-Weisenhorn, Daniela; Wagner, Christelle; Walling, Alison; Weber, Bruno; Wendling, Olivia; Westerberg, Henrik; Willershäuser, Monja; Wolf, Eckhard; Wolter, Anne; Wood, Joe; Wurst, Wolfgang; Yildirim, Ali Önder; Zeh, Ramona; Zimmer, Andreas; Zimprich, Annemarie; Holmes, Chris; Steel, Karen P; Herault, Yann; Gailus-Durner, Valérie; Mallon, Ann-Marie; Brown, Steve Dm

    2015-09-01

    The function of the majority of genes in the mouse and human genomes remains unknown. The mouse embryonic stem cell knockout resource provides a basis for the characterization of relationships between genes and phenotypes. The EUMODIC consortium developed and validated robust methodologies for the broad-based phenotyping of knockouts through a pipeline comprising 20 disease-oriented platforms. We developed new statistical methods for pipeline design and data analysis aimed at detecting reproducible phenotypes with high power. We acquired phenotype data from 449 mutant alleles, representing 320 unique genes, of which half had no previous functional annotation. We captured data from over 27,000 mice, finding that 83% of the mutant lines are phenodeviant, with 65% demonstrating pleiotropy. Surprisingly, we found significant differences in phenotype annotation according to zygosity. New phenotypes were uncovered for many genes with previously unknown function, providing a powerful basis for hypothesis generation and further investigation in diverse systems.

  15. Red meat intake, NAT2, and risk of colorectal cancer: A pooled analysis of 11 studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ananthakrishnan, Ashwin N.; Du, Mengmeng; Berndt, Sonja I.; Brenner, Hermann; Caan, Bette J.; Casey, Graham; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Duggan, David; Fuchs, Charles S.; Gallinger, Steven; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Harrison, Tabitha A.; Hayes, Richard B.; Hoffmeister, Michael; Hopper, John L.; Hou, Lifang; Hsu, Li; Jenkins, Mark A.; Kraft, Peter; Ma, Jing; Nan, Hongmei; Newcomb, Polly A.; Ogino, Shuji; Potter, John D.; Seminara, Daniela; Slattery, Martha L.; Thornquist, Mark; White, Emily; Wu, Kana; Peters, Ulrike; Chan, Andrew T.

    2014-01-01

    Background Red meat intake has been associated with risk of colorectal cancer (CRC), potentially mediated through heterocyclic amines. The metabolic efficiency of N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2) required for the metabolic activation of such amines is influenced by genetic variation. The interaction between red meat intake, NAT2 genotype, and CRC has been inconsistently reported. Methods We used pooled individual-level data from the Colon Cancer Family Registry (CCFR) and the Genetics and Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer Consortium (GECCO). Red meat intake was collected by each study. We inferred NAT2 phenotype based on polymorphism at rs1495741, highly predictive of enzyme activity. Interaction was assessed using multiplicative interaction terms in multivariate-adjusted models. Results From 11 studies, 8,290 CRC cases and 9,115 controls were included. The highest quartile of red meat intake was associated with increased risk of CRC compared to the lowest quartile (OR 1.41, 95%CI 1.29 – 1.55). However, a significant association was observed only for studies with retrospective diet data, not for studies with diet prospectively assessed before cancer diagnosis. Combining all studies, high red meat intake was similarly associated with CRC in those with a rapid/intermediate NAT2 genotype (OR 1.38, 95%CI 1.20 – 1.59) as with a slow genotype (OR 1.43, 95%CI 1.28 – 1.61) (p- interaction=0.9). Conclusion We found that high red meat intake was associated with increased risk of CRC only from retrospective case-control studies and not modified by NAT2 enzyme activity. Impact Our results suggest no interaction between NAT2 genotype and red-meat intake in mediating risk of CRC. PMID:25342387

  16. Bacterial community analysis in chlorpyrifos enrichment cultures via DGGE and use of bacterial consortium for CP biodegradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbar, Shamsa; Sultan, Sikander; Kertesz, Michael

    2014-10-01

    The organophosphate pesticide chlorpyrifos (CP) has been used extensively since the 1960s for insect control. However, its toxic effects on mammals and persistence in environment necessitate its removal from contaminated sites, biodegradation studies of CP-degrading microbes are therefore of immense importance. Samples from a Pakistani agricultural soil with an extensive history of CP application were used to prepare enrichment cultures using CP as sole carbon source for bacterial community analysis and isolation of CP metabolizing bacteria. Bacterial community analysis (denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis) revealed that the dominant genera enriched under these conditions were Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter and Stenotrophomonas, along with lower numbers of Sphingomonas, Agrobacterium and Burkholderia. Furthermore, it revealed that members of Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, α- and γ-Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria were present at initial steps of enrichment whereas β-Proteobacteria appeared in later steps and only Proteobacteria were selected by enrichment culturing. However, when CP-degrading strains were isolated from this enrichment culture, the most active organisms were strains of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus, Pseudomonas mendocina and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. These strains degraded 6-7.4 mg L(-1) day(-1) of CP when cultivated in mineral medium, while the consortium of all four strains degraded 9.2 mg L(-1) day(-1) of CP (100 mg L(-1)). Addition of glucose as an additional C source increased the degradation capacity by 8-14 %. After inoculation of contaminated soil with CP (200 mg kg(-1)) disappearance rates were 3.83-4.30 mg kg(-1) day(-1) for individual strains and 4.76 mg kg(-1) day(-1) for the consortium. These results indicate that these organisms are involved in the degradation of CP in soil and represent valuable candidates for in situ bioremediation of contaminated soils and waters.

  17. Integrated Genomic Analysis of Diverse Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells from the Progenitor Cell Biology Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomonis, Nathan; Dexheimer, Phillip J; Omberg, Larsson; Schroll, Robin; Bush, Stacy; Huo, Jeffrey; Schriml, Lynn; Ho Sui, Shannan; Keddache, Mehdi; Mayhew, Christopher; Shanmukhappa, Shiva Kumar; Wells, James; Daily, Kenneth; Hubler, Shane; Wang, Yuliang; Zambidis, Elias; Margolin, Adam; Hide, Winston; Hatzopoulos, Antonis K; Malik, Punam; Cancelas, Jose A; Aronow, Bruce J; Lutzko, Carolyn

    2016-07-12

    The rigorous characterization of distinct induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) derived from multiple reprogramming technologies, somatic sources, and donors is required to understand potential sources of variability and downstream potential. To achieve this goal, the Progenitor Cell Biology Consortium performed comprehensive experimental and genomic analyses of 58 iPSC from ten laboratories generated using a variety of reprogramming genes, vectors, and cells. Associated global molecular characterization studies identified functionally informative correlations in gene expression, DNA methylation, and/or copy-number variation among key developmental and oncogenic regulators as a result of donor, sex, line stability, reprogramming technology, and cell of origin. Furthermore, X-chromosome inactivation in PSC produced highly correlated differences in teratoma-lineage staining and regulator expression upon differentiation. All experimental results, and raw, processed, and metadata from these analyses, including powerful tools, are interactively accessible from a new online portal at https://www.synapse.org to serve as a reusable resource for the stem cell community. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Cardiothoracic ratio for prediction of left ventricular dilation: a systematic review and pooled analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loomba, Rohit S; Shah, Parinda H; Nijhawan, Karan; Aggarwal, Saurabh; Arora, Rohit

    2015-03-01

    Increased cardiothoracic ratio noted on chest radiographs often prompts concern and further evaluation with additional imaging. This study pools available data assessing the utility of cardiothoracic ratio in predicting left ventricular dilation. A systematic review of the literature was conducted to identify studies comparing cardiothoracic ratio by chest x-ray to left ventricular dilation by echocardiography. Electronic databases were used to identify studies which were then assessed for quality and bias, with those with adequate quality and minimal bias ultimately being included in the pooled analysis. The pooled data were used to determine the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of cardiomegaly in predicting left ventricular dilation. A total of six studies consisting of 466 patients were included in this analysis. Cardiothoracic ratio had 83.3% sensitivity, 45.4% specificity, 43.5% positive predictive value and 82.7% negative predictive value. When a secondary analysis was conducted with a pediatric study excluded, a total of five studies consisting of 371 patients were included. Cardiothoracic ratio had 86.2% sensitivity, 25.2% specificity, 42.5% positive predictive value and 74.0% negative predictive value. Cardiothoracic ratio as determined by chest radiograph is sensitive but not specific for identifying left ventricular dilation. Cardiothoracic ratio also has a strong negative predictive value for identifying left ventricular dilation.

  19. Uncertainty analysis of suppression pool heating during an ATWS in a BWR-5 plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wulff, W.; Cheng, H.S.; Mallen, A.N.; Johnsen, G.W.; Lellouche, G.S.

    1994-03-01

    The uncertainty has been estimated of predicting the peak temperature in the suppression pool of a BWR power plant, which undergoes an NRC-postulated Anticipated Transient Without Scram (ATWS). The ATWS is initiated by recirculation-pump trips, and then leads to power and flow oscillations as they had occurred at the LaSalle-2 Power Station in March of 1988. After limit-cycle oscillations have been established, the turbines are tripped, but without MSIV closure, allowing steam discharge through the turbine bypass into the condenser. Postulated operator actions, namely to lower the reactor vessel pressure and the level elevation in the downcomer, are simulated by a robot model which accounts for operator uncertainty. All balance of plant and control systems modeling uncertainties were part of the statistical uncertainty analysis that was patterned after the Code Scaling, Applicability and Uncertainty (CSAU) evaluation methodology. The analysis showed that the predicted suppression-pool peak temperature of 329.3 K (133 degrees F) has a 95-percentile uncertainty of 14.4 K (26 degrees F), and that the size of this uncertainty bracket is dominated by the experimental uncertainty of measuring Safety and Relief Valve mass flow rates under critical-flow conditions. The analysis showed also that the probability of exceeding the suppression-pool temperature limit of 352.6 K (175 degrees F) is most likely zero (it is estimated as < 5-104). The square root of the sum of the squares of all the computed peak pool temperatures is 350.7 K (171.6 degrees F)

  20. Analysis of loads and fluid-structure interactions in a condensation pool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timperi, A.; Paettikangas, T.; Niemi, J. [VTT, Technical Research Centre of Finland (Finland)

    2007-04-15

    A simplified direct contact condensation model was implemented into the Volume of Fluid model of the Fluent CFD code. Transient three-dimensional test runs for the POOLEX experiments, where steam is blown into a water pool were performed. The model was found to provide too small condensation rate for steam when compared to experiments. In addition, the calculated back and forth oscillation of the steam water interface was much smaller than in the experiments. The model was found to be numerically quite robust. The discrepancies of the simulation, such as the too small condensation rate, could be to some extent cured by making improvements into the condensation model. As an alternative estimation method of thermohydraulic loads in condensation pools, the SILA code based on potential flow theory, was taken into use. SILA solves the pressure distribution caused by oscillating bubbles in a pool, and is easier to use and more flexible than Method of Images studied earlier. SILA has been modified for pools without an inner cylinder and test simulations for the POOLEX water pool were performed. The MpCCI FSI coupling software employs an explicit coupling scheme, which results in numerical instability in the case of the POOLEX facility. In order to improve stability, ways for implementing an implicit coupling scheme with MpCCI were examined. It was found that such a scheme is difficult to achieve without access to the source codes. An implicit coupling scheme is expected to be available with MpCCI in forthcoming years. A method was developed which can be used for analysing two-way FSI problems realistically by using only one-way coupling of CFD and structural analysis codes. In the method, the mass of the fluid is accounted for in the structural motion by adding the fluid to the structural model as an acoustic medium. Validity of the method was examined with promising results mathematically by an order of magnitude analysis and by comparing numerical results with a full

  1. One-Dimensional Analysis of Thermal Stratification in AHTR and SFR Coolant Pools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haihua Zhao; Per F. Peterson

    2007-01-01

    Thermal stratification phenomena are very common in pool type reactor systems, such as the liquid-salt cooled Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR) and liquid-metal cooled fast reactor systems such as the Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR). It is important to accurately predict the temperature and density distributions both for design optimation and accident analysis. Current major reactor system analysis codes such as RELAP5 (for LWR's, and recently extended to analyze high temperature reactors), TRAC (for LWR's), and SASSYS (for liquid metal fast reactors) only provide lumped-volume based models which can only give very approximate results and can only handle simple cases with one mixing source. While 2-D or 3-D CFD methods can be used to analyze simple configurations, these methods require very fine grid resolution to resolve thin substructures such as jets and wall boundaries, yet such fine grid resolution is difficult or impossible to provide for studying the reactor response to transients due to computational expense. Therefore, new methods are needed to support design optimization and safety analysis of Generation IV pool type reactor systems. Previous scaling has shown that stratified mixing processes in large stably stratified enclosures can be described using one-dimensional differential equations, with the vertical transport by free and wall jets modeled using standard integral techniques. This allows very large reductions in computational effort compared to three-dimensional numerical modeling of turbulent mixing in large enclosures. The BMIX++ (Berkeley mechanistic MIXing code in C++) code was originally developed at UC Berkeley to implement such ideas. This code solves mixing and heat transfer problems in stably stratified enclosures. The code uses a Lagrangian approach to solve 1-D transient governing equations for the ambient fluid and uses analytical or 1-D integral models to compute substructures. By including liquid salt properties, BMIX++ code is

  2. Genome Sequence of Bacillus endophyticus and Analysis of Its Companion Mechanism in the Ketogulonigenium vulgare-Bacillus Strain Consortium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Jia

    Full Text Available Bacillus strains have been widely used as the companion strain of Ketogulonigenium vulgare in the process of vitamin C fermentation. Different Bacillus strains generate different effects on the growth of K. vulgare and ultimately influence the productivity. First, we identified that Bacillus endophyticus Hbe603 was an appropriate strain to cooperate with K. vulgare and the product conversion rate exceeded 90% in industrial vitamin C fermentation. Here, we report the genome sequencing of the B. endophyticus Hbe603 industrial companion strain and speculate its possible advantage in the consortium. The circular chromosome of B. endophyticus Hbe603 has a size of 4.87 Mb with GC content of 36.64% and has the highest similarity with that of Bacillus megaterium among all the bacteria with complete genomes. By comparing the distribution of COGs with that of Bacillus thuringiensis, Bacillus cereus and B. megaterium, B. endophyticus has less genes related to cell envelope biogenesis and signal transduction mechanisms, and more genes related to carbohydrate transport and metabolism, energy production and conversion, as well as lipid transport and metabolism. Genome-based functional studies revealed the specific capability of B. endophyticus in sporulation, transcription regulation, environmental resistance, membrane transportation, extracellular proteins and nutrients synthesis, which would be beneficial for K. vulgare. In particular, B. endophyticus lacks the Rap-Phr signal cascade system and, in part, spore coat related proteins. In addition, it has specific pathways for vitamin B12 synthesis and sorbitol metabolism. The genome analysis of the industrial B. endophyticus will help us understand its cooperative mechanism in the K. vulgare-Bacillus strain consortium to improve the fermentation of vitamin C.

  3. Testing Homeopathy in Mouse Emotional Response Models: Pooled Data Analysis of Two Series of Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Bellavite

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Two previous investigations were performed to assess the activity of Gelsemium sempervirens (Gelsemium s. in mice, using emotional response models. These two series are pooled and analysed here. Gelsemium s. in various homeopathic centesimal dilutions/dynamizations (4C, 5C, 7C, 9C, and 30C, a placebo (solvent vehicle, and the reference drugs diazepam (1 mg/kg body weight or buspirone (5 mg/kg body weight were delivered intraperitoneally to groups of albino CD1 mice, and their effects on animal behaviour were assessed by the light-dark (LD choice test and the open-field (OF exploration test. Up to 14 separate replications were carried out in fully blind and randomised conditions. Pooled analysis demonstrated highly significant effects of Gelsemium s. 5C, 7C, and 30C on the OF parameter “time spent in central area” and of Gelsemium s. 5C, 9C, and 30C on the LD parameters “time spent in lit area” and “number of light-dark transitions,” without any sedative action or adverse effects on locomotion. This pooled data analysis confirms and reinforces the evidence that Gelsemium s. regulates emotional responses and behaviour of laboratory mice in a nonlinear fashion with dilution/dynamization.

  4. An international pooled analysis for obtaining a benchmark dose for environmental lead exposure in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Budtz-Jørgensen, Esben; Bellinger, David; Lanphear, Bruce

    2013-01-01

    Lead is a recognized neurotoxicant, but estimating effects at the lowest measurable levels is difficult. An international pooled analysis of data from seven cohort studies reported an inverse and supra-linear relationship between blood lead concentrations and IQ scores in children. The lack...... of a clear threshold presents a challenge to the identification of an acceptable level of exposure. The benchmark dose (BMD) is defined as the dose that leads to a specific known loss. As an alternative to elusive thresholds, the BMD is being used increasingly by regulatory authorities. Using the pooled data...... yielding lower confidence limits (BMDLs) of about 0.1-1.0 μ g/dL for the dose leading to a loss of one IQ point. We conclude that current allowable blood lead concentrations need to be lowered and further prevention efforts are needed to protect children from lead toxicity....

  5. Ovarian Cancer Risk Factors by Histologic Subtype: An Analysis From the Ovarian Cancer Cohort Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wentzensen, Nicolas; Poole, Elizabeth M; Trabert, Britton; White, Emily; Arslan, Alan A; Patel, Alpa V; Setiawan, V Wendy; Visvanathan, Kala; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Adami, Hans-Olov; Black, Amanda; Bernstein, Leslie; Brinton, Louise A; Buring, Julie; Butler, Lesley M; Chamosa, Saioa; Clendenen, Tess V; Dossus, Laure; Fortner, Renee; Gapstur, Susan M; Gaudet, Mia M; Gram, Inger T; Hartge, Patricia; Hoffman-Bolton, Judith; Idahl, Annika; Jones, Michael; Kaaks, Rudolf; Kirsh, Victoria; Koh, Woon-Puay; Lacey, James V; Lee, I-Min; Lundin, Eva; Merritt, Melissa A; Onland-Moret, N Charlotte; Peters, Ulrike; Poynter, Jenny N; Rinaldi, Sabina; Robien, Kim; Rohan, Thomas; Sandler, Dale P; Schairer, Catherine; Schouten, Leo J; Sjöholm, Louise K; Sieri, Sabina; Swerdlow, Anthony; Tjonneland, Anna; Travis, Ruth; Trichopoulou, Antonia; van den Brandt, Piet A; Wilkens, Lynne; Wolk, Alicja; Yang, Hannah P; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Tworoger, Shelley S

    2016-08-20

    An understanding of the etiologic heterogeneity of ovarian cancer is important for improving prevention, early detection, and therapeutic approaches. We evaluated 14 hormonal, reproductive, and lifestyle factors by histologic subtype in the Ovarian Cancer Cohort Consortium (OC3). Among 1.3 million women from 21 studies, 5,584 invasive epithelial ovarian cancers were identified (3,378 serous, 606 endometrioid, 331 mucinous, 269 clear cell, 1,000 other). By using competing-risks Cox proportional hazards regression stratified by study and birth year and adjusted for age, parity, and oral contraceptive use, we assessed associations for all invasive cancers by histology. Heterogeneity was evaluated by likelihood ratio test. Most risk factors exhibited significant heterogeneity by histology. Higher parity was most strongly associated with endometrioid (relative risk [RR] per birth, 0.78; 95% CI, 0.74 to 0.83) and clear cell (RR, 0.68; 95% CI, 0.61 to 0.76) carcinomas (P value for heterogeneity [P-het] < .001). Similarly, age at menopause, endometriosis, and tubal ligation were only associated with endometrioid and clear cell tumors (P-het ≤ .01). Family history of breast cancer (P-het = .008) had modest heterogeneity. Smoking was associated with an increased risk of mucinous (RR per 20 pack-years, 1.26; 95% CI, 1.08 to 1.46) but a decreased risk of clear cell (RR, 0.72; 95% CI, 0.55 to 0.94) tumors (P-het = .004). Unsupervised clustering by risk factors separated endometrioid, clear cell, and low-grade serous carcinomas from high-grade serous and mucinous carcinomas. The heterogeneous associations of risk factors with ovarian cancer subtypes emphasize the importance of conducting etiologic studies by ovarian cancer subtypes. Most established risk factors were more strongly associated with nonserous carcinomas, which demonstrate challenges for risk prediction of serous cancers, the most fatal subtype. © 2016 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  6. Analysis of small sample size studies using nonparametric bootstrap test with pooled resampling method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwivedi, Alok Kumar; Mallawaarachchi, Indika; Alvarado, Luis A

    2017-06-30

    Experimental studies in biomedical research frequently pose analytical problems related to small sample size. In such studies, there are conflicting findings regarding the choice of parametric and nonparametric analysis, especially with non-normal data. In such instances, some methodologists questioned the validity of parametric tests and suggested nonparametric tests. In contrast, other methodologists found nonparametric tests to be too conservative and less powerful and thus preferred using parametric tests. Some researchers have recommended using a bootstrap test; however, this method also has small sample size limitation. We used a pooled method in nonparametric bootstrap test that may overcome the problem related with small samples in hypothesis testing. The present study compared nonparametric bootstrap test with pooled resampling method corresponding to parametric, nonparametric, and permutation tests through extensive simulations under various conditions and using real data examples. The nonparametric pooled bootstrap t-test provided equal or greater power for comparing two means as compared with unpaired t-test, Welch t-test, Wilcoxon rank sum test, and permutation test while maintaining type I error probability for any conditions except for Cauchy and extreme variable lognormal distributions. In such cases, we suggest using an exact Wilcoxon rank sum test. Nonparametric bootstrap paired t-test also provided better performance than other alternatives. Nonparametric bootstrap test provided benefit over exact Kruskal-Wallis test. We suggest using nonparametric bootstrap test with pooled resampling method for comparing paired or unpaired means and for validating the one way analysis of variance test results for non-normal data in small sample size studies. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Safety analysis of LWR irradiated fuel element pool storages before reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lefort, G.; Leclerc, J.; Hoffman, A.; Frejaville, C.; Domage, M.

    1984-01-01

    The protection of operators and environment requires imperatively that the safety must be taken into account as early as the design of the pools takes place and working conditions are defined. The analysis of criticality, irradiation, contamination, external or internal aggression hazards... allows to draw the main constraints which must be retained in the sizing of these pools: the criticality risk needs distances between fuel elements which results in a not very good utilization of the available area which leads to the utilization of neutron shieldings or requires a safe knowledge of the fuel elements burn up; the irradiation and contamination risks require a special quality of the pool water (temperature, activity, purity...) a good tightness of the basins to locate and to isolate the dubions fuel elements; the external or internal aggression risks such as earthquakes, missiles or loads drops, explosion, imply the civil engineering and involve the use of special technical devices. A brief presentation of the pool storages of the next UP2-800 and UP3 A reprocessing plants allows to show how the requirement drawn by safety analysis have been enforced, while carrying out civil engineering works without equivalent in the world, in this field. The foreseeable evolution of the uranium enrichment rate and burn-up of next PWR fuel elements have an effect upon the risk evaluations; a device apparatus, developed in CEA, for the measurement of burn up and cooling time is presented. At least, a short presentation of the mechanical structure durability studies of the reception and storage spent fuels installations are allowed to improve our knowledge in working conditions and in case of serious accidents

  8. Analysis of closed-pool boilup using the TRANSIT-HYDRO code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graff, D.L.

    1983-01-01

    The benign termination of the transition phase of a hypothetical LMFBR accident rests on the avoidance of highly energetic recriticalities prior to escape of bottled molten core materials from the active core region. In scenarios where molten fuel is trapped due to axial blockages, the maintenance of subcritical configurations until radial flow paths develop requires stable boil-up of the molten fuel/steel mixture. This paper describes the analysis of an experiment investigating the behavior of closed boiling pools using the two-fluid hydrodynamics module of TRANSIT-HYDRO, a deterministic transition-phase analysis code

  9. Local flow distribution analysis inside the reactor pools of KALIMER-600 and PDRC performance test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Ji Hwan; Hwang, Seong Won; Choi, Kyeong Sik

    2010-05-01

    In the study, 3-dimensional thermal hydraulic analysis was carried out focusing on the thermal hydraulic behavior inside the reactor pools for both KALIMER-600 and one-fifth scale-down test facility. STAR-CD, one of the commercial CFD codes, was used to analyze 3-dimensional incompressible steady-state thermal hydraulic behavior in both designs of KALIMER-600 and the scale-down test facility. In the KALIMER-600 CFD analysis, the pressure drops in the core and IHX gave a good agreement within 1% error range. It was found that the porous media model was appropriate to analyze the pressure distribution inside reactor core and IHX. Also, a validation analysis showed the pressure drop through the porous media under the condition of 80% flow rate and thermal power was calculated 64% less than in 100% condition giving a physically reasonable analytic result. Since the temperatures in the hot-side pool and cold-side pool were estimated to be very close to 540 and 390 .deg. C specified on the design values respectively, the CFD models of heat source and sink was confirmed. Through the study, the methodology of 3-dimensional CFD analysis about KALIMER-600 has been established and proven. Performed with the methodology, the analysis data such as flow velocity, temperature and pressure distribution were compared by normalizing those data for the actual sized modeling and scale-down modeling. As a result, the characteristics of thermal hydraulic behavior were almost identical for the actual sized modeling and scale-down modeling and the similarity scaling law used in the design of the sodium test facility by KAERI was found to be correct

  10. Criticality analysis of the CAREM-25 reactor irradiated fuel elements storage pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albornoz, A.F.; Jatuff, F.E.; Gho, C.J.

    1993-01-01

    A criticality safety analysis of the irradiated fuel element pool storage of the CAREM-25 reactor was performed. The CAREM project is property of the Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (CNEA) of Argentine, and it is being executed by INVAP S.E. difficult evaluation of the CAREM core (relatively high -3,4%- enriched U O 2 , Gd 2 O 3 burnable absorber in different densities, or criticality achievement with as few as 7 fuel elements is inherited by the pool storage. The lattice code CONDOR 1.1 was used for investigating the problem scene, and some results compared on the Monte Carlo codes MONK 5.0 and MONK 6.3. Circular and square tubes of 304-L stainless steel, borated steel and boral B 4 C in Al) were tested as suitable channels for fuel element containment, in square and hexagonal arrays; in addition, burnup, burnable absorber concentration, Sm and leakage credits were determined. It was found that the critical is strongly dependent on the separation of the fuel elements in the pool. Out-of-nominal conditions were investigated too, showing that the loss of coolant and the change in temperature and density conditions in the storage lead to an increase in reactivity, but the system's reactivity remains near the safety limits. (author)

  11. Sample distillation/graphitization system for carbon pool analysis by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pohlman, J.W.; Knies, D.L.; Grabowski, K.S.; DeTurck, T.M.; Treacy, D.J.; Coffin, R.B.

    2000-01-01

    A facility at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), Washington, DC, has been developed to extract, trap, cryogenically distill and graphitize carbon from a suite of organic and inorganic carbon pools for analysis by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). The system was developed to investigate carbon pools associated with the formation and stability of methane hydrates. However, since the carbon compounds found in hydrate fields are ubiquitous in aquatic ecosystems, this apparatus is applicable to a number of oceanographic and environmental sample types. Targeted pools are dissolved methane, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), solid organic matrices (e.g., seston, tissue and sediments), biomarkers and short chained (C 1 -C 5 ) hydrocarbons from methane hydrates. In most instances, the extraction, distillation and graphitization events are continuous within the system, thus, minimizing the possibility of fractionation or contamination during sample processing. A variety of methods are employed to extract carbon compounds and convert them to CO 2 for graphitization. Dissolved methane and DIC from the same sample are sparged and cryogenically separated before the methane is oxidized in a high temperature oxygen stream. DOC is oxidized to CO 2 by 1200 W ultraviolet photo-oxidation lamp, and solids oxidized in sealed, evacuated tubes. Hydrocarbons liberated from the disassociation of gas hydrates are cryogenically separated with a cryogenic temperature control unit, and biomarkers separated and concentrated by preparative capillary gas chromatography (PCGC). With this system, up to 20 samples, standards or blanks can be processed per day

  12. Post-accident cooling capacity analysis of the AP1000 passive spent fuel pool cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su Xia

    2013-01-01

    The passive design is used in AP1000 spent fuel pool cooling system. The decay heat of the spent fuel is removed by heating-boiling method, and makeup water is provided passively and continuously to ensure the safety of the spent fuel. Based on the analysis of the post-accident cooling capacity of the spent fuel cooling system, it is found that post-accident first 72-hour cooling under normal refueling condition and emergency full-core offload condition can be maintained by passive makeup from safety water source; 56 hours have to be waited under full core refueling condition to ensure the safety of the core and the spent fuel pool. Long-term cooling could be conducted through reserved safety interface. Makeup measure is available after accident and limited operation is needed. Makeup under control could maintain the spent fuel at sub-critical condition. Compared with traditional spent fuel pool cooling system design, the AP1000 design respond more effectively to LOCA accidents. (authors)

  13. A pooling-LiNGAM algorithm for effective connectivity analysis of fMRI data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lele eXu

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The Independent Component Analysis - linear non-Gaussian acyclic model (LiNGAM, an algorithm that can be used to estimate the causal relationship among non-Gaussian distributed data, has the potential value to detect the effective connectivity of human brain areas. Under the assumptions that (a: the data generating process is linear, (b there are no unobserved confounders, and (c data have non-Gaussian distributions, LiNGAM can be used to discover the complete causal structure of data. Previous studies reveal that the algorithm could perform well when the data points being analyzed is relatively long. However, there are too few data points in most neuroimaging recordings, especially functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI, to allow the algorithm to converge. Smith’s study speculates a method by pooling data points across subjects may be useful to address this issue (Smith et al., 2011. Thus this study focus on validating Smith’s proposal of pooling data points across subjects for the use of LiNGAM, and this method is named as pooling-LiNGAM (pLiNGAM. Using both simulated and real fMRI data, our current study demonstrates the feasibility and efficiency of the pLiNGAM on the effective connectivity estimation.

  14. International Lymphoma Epidemiology Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    The InterLymph Consortium, or formally the International Consortium of Investigators Working on Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma Epidemiologic Studies, is an open scientific forum for epidemiologic research in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

  15. Automated vessel segmentation using cross-correlation and pooled covariance matrix analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Jiang; Karimi, Afshin; Wu, Yijing; Korosec, Frank R; Grist, Thomas M; Mistretta, Charles A

    2011-04-01

    Time-resolved contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA) provides contrast dynamics in the vasculature and allows vessel segmentation based on temporal correlation analysis. Here we present an automated vessel segmentation algorithm including automated generation of regions of interest (ROIs), cross-correlation and pooled sample covariance matrix analysis. The dynamic images are divided into multiple equal-sized regions. In each region, ROIs for artery, vein and background are generated using an iterative thresholding algorithm based on the contrast arrival time map and contrast enhancement map. Region-specific multi-feature cross-correlation analysis and pooled covariance matrix analysis are performed to calculate the Mahalanobis distances (MDs), which are used to automatically separate arteries from veins. This segmentation algorithm is applied to a dual-phase dynamic imaging acquisition scheme where low-resolution time-resolved images are acquired during the dynamic phase followed by high-frequency data acquisition at the steady-state phase. The segmented low-resolution arterial and venous images are then combined with the high-frequency data in k-space and inverse Fourier transformed to form the final segmented arterial and venous images. Results from volunteer and patient studies demonstrate the advantages of this automated vessel segmentation and dual phase data acquisition technique. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Metastatic involvement of the pituitary gland: a systematic review with pooled individual patient data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wenzhuan; Chen, Fangxiang; Dalm, Brian; Kirby, Patricia A; Greenlee, Jeremy D W

    2015-02-01

    To report a rare case of pituitary metastasis (PM) from hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and help better understand the incidence of PM and its most common presenting symptoms through a pooled individual patient data analysis. Literature regarding PM was systematically reviewed with a pooled individual patient data analysis conducted. Pooled individual data analysis result is also compared with the result in a most recent systematic review. Our results demonstrate that the incidence of PM among all intracranial metastases is 0.87% (95% CI 0.56, 1.18); it is 1.9% (95% CI 1.46, 2.34) among all autopsied cancer cases; it is 11.56% (95% CI 7.08, 16.04) among all breast cancer patients who had hypophysectomies and 12.83% (95% CI 10.5, 15.16) among all autopsied breast cancer patients. The fixed effect model showed that the incidence of PM in breast cancer patients group is significantly higher (p anterior hypopituitarism (23.68 vs 39.66%, p = 0.015), visual deterioration (27.89 vs 41.38%, p = 0.039), cranial nerve palsies (21.58 vs 41.38%, p = 0.003) and headaches (15.79 vs 32.76%, p = 0.005) were reported significantly higher than previously described in the literature. Pituitary metastasis is rare in patients with cancer, and the pituitary gland is an uncommonly involved location in patients with intracranial metastases. With advanced diagnostic imaging techniques and increased awareness about the manifestation of sellar lesions, the incidence of cranial nerve palsies and anterior pituitarism are higher than reported. This information may allow earlier diagnosis of PM.

  17. Predictors of migraine headache recurrence: A pooled analysis from the eletriptan database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dodick, D.W.; Lipton, R.B.; Goadsby, P.J.

    2008-01-01

    Objective.-To identify clinical variables associated with risk of headache recurrence within 22 hours of initial successful treatment of a migraine attack (2-hour headache response), and to analyze the effect of eletriptan in reducing the incidence of recurrence. Methods.-Data were pooled from 10...... evaluable. A multivariable logistic regression analysis identified significant predictors of headache recurrence (return to moderate/severe pain intensity within 22 hours of initial headache response). Treatment response was assessed in two high-risk subgroups, defined by the presence of significant...

  18. Probabilistic analysis of some safety aspects of a swimming pool reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lieber, K.; Nicolescu, T.

    1984-01-01

    A probabilistic risk analysis of some safety aspects without the investigation of radioactivity release has been performed for the 10 MW (thermal) swimming-pool research reactor SAPHIR. Our presentation is focused on the 7 internal initiating events found to be relevant with respect to accident sequences that could result with core melt due to loss of coolant or overcriticality. The results are given by the core melt frequencies for the investigated accident sequences. It could be demonstrated by our investigation that the core melt hazard of the reactor is extremely low. (author)

  19. The OncoArray Consortium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amos, Christopher I; Dennis, Joe; Wang, Zhaoming

    2017-01-01

    by Illumina to facilitate efficient genotyping. The consortium developed standard approaches for selecting SNPs for study, for quality control of markers, and for ancestry analysis. The array was genotyped at selected sites and with prespecified replicate samples to permit evaluation of genotyping accuracy...... among centers and by ethnic background. RESULTS: The OncoArray consortium genotyped 447,705 samples. A total of 494,763 SNPs passed quality control steps with a sample success rate of 97% of the samples. Participating sites performed ancestry analysis using a common set of markers and a scoring...

  20. Mammographic density and ageing: A collaborative pooled analysis of cross-sectional data from 22 countries worldwide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anya Burton

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Mammographic density (MD is one of the strongest breast cancer risk factors. Its age-related characteristics have been studied in women in western countries, but whether these associations apply to women worldwide is not known.We examined cross-sectional differences in MD by age and menopausal status in over 11,000 breast-cancer-free women aged 35-85 years, from 40 ethnicity- and location-specific population groups across 22 countries in the International Consortium on Mammographic Density (ICMD. MD was read centrally using a quantitative method (Cumulus and its square-root metrics were analysed using meta-analysis of group-level estimates and linear regression models of pooled data, adjusted for body mass index, reproductive factors, mammogram view, image type, and reader. In all, 4,534 women were premenopausal, and 6,481 postmenopausal, at the time of mammography. A large age-adjusted difference in percent MD (PD between post- and premenopausal women was apparent (-0.46 cm [95% CI: -0.53, -0.39] and appeared greater in women with lower breast cancer risk profiles; variation across population groups due to heterogeneity (I2 was 16.5%. Among premenopausal women, the √PD difference per 10-year increase in age was -0.24 cm (95% CI: -0.34, -0.14; I2 = 30%, reflecting a compositional change (lower dense area and higher non-dense area, with no difference in breast area. In postmenopausal women, the corresponding difference in √PD (-0.38 cm [95% CI: -0.44, -0.33]; I2 = 30% was additionally driven by increasing breast area. The study is limited by different mammography systems and its cross-sectional rather than longitudinal nature.Declines in MD with increasing age are present premenopausally, continue postmenopausally, and are most pronounced over the menopausal transition. These effects were highly consistent across diverse groups of women worldwide, suggesting that they result from an intrinsic biological, likely hormonal, mechanism common to

  1. Analysis of Phenix End-of-Life asymmetry test with multi-dimensional pool modeling of MARS-LMR code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, H.-Y.; Ha, K.-S.; Choi, C.-W.; Park, M.-G.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Pool behaviors under asymmetrical condition in an SFR were evaluated with MARS-LMR. • The Phenix asymmetry test was analyzed one-dimensionally and multi-dimensionally. • One-dimensional modeling has limitation to predict the cold pool temperature. • Multi-dimensional modeling shows improved prediction of stratification and mixing. - Abstract: The understanding of complicated pool behaviors and its modeling is essential for the design and safety analysis of a pool-type Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor. One of the remarkable recent efforts on the study of pool thermal–hydraulic behaviors is the asymmetrical test performed as a part of Phenix End-of-Life tests by the CEA. To evaluate the performance of MARS-LMR code, which is a key system analysis tool for the design of an SFR in Korea, in the prediction of thermal hydraulic behaviors during an asymmetrical condition, the Phenix asymmetry test is analyzed with MARS-LMR in the present study. Pool regions are modeled with two different approaches, one-dimensional modeling and multi-dimensional one, and the prediction results are analyzed to identify the appropriateness of each modeling method. The prediction with one-dimensional pool modeling shows a large deviation from the measured data at the early stage of the test, which suggests limitations to describe the complicated thermal–hydraulic phenomena. When the pool regions are modeled multi-dimensionally, the prediction gives improved results quite a bit. This improvement is explained by the enhanced modeling of pool mixing with the multi-dimensional modeling. On the basis of the results from the present study, it is concluded that an accurate modeling of pool thermal–hydraulics is a prerequisite for the evaluation of design performance and safety margin quantification in the future SFR developments

  2. Upper arm circumference development in Chinese children and adolescents: a pooled analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Fang; Fu, Tong

    2015-05-30

    Upper arm development in children is different in different ethnic groups. There have been few reports on upper arm circumference (UAC) at different stages of development in children and adolescents in China. The purpose of this study was to provide a reference for growth with weighted assessment of the overall level of development. Using a pooled analysis, an authoritative journal database search and reports of UAC, we created a new database on developmental measures in children. In conducting a weighted analysis, we compared reference values for 0~60 months of development according to the World Health Organization (WHO) statistics considering gender and nationality and used Z values as interval values for the second sampling to obtain an exponential smooth curve to analyze the mean, standard deviation, and sites of attachment. Ten articles were included in the pooled analysis, and these articles included participants from different areas of China. The point of intersection with the WHO curve was 3.5 years with higher values at earlier ages and lower values at older ages. Boys curve was steeper after puberty. The curves in the studies had a merged line compatible. The Z values of exponential smoothing showed the curves were similar for body weight and had a right normal distribution. The integrated index of UAC in Chinese children and adolescents indicated slightly variations with regions. Exponential curve smoothing was suitable for assessment at different developmental stages.

  3. Meat intake and cause-specific mortality: a pooled analysis of Asian prospective cohort studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung Eun; McLerran, Dale F; Rolland, Betsy; Chen, Yu; Grant, Eric J; Vedanthan, Rajesh; Inoue, Manami; Tsugane, Shoichiro; Gao, Yu-Tang; Tsuji, Ichiro; Kakizaki, Masako; Ahsan, Habibul; Ahn, Yoon-Ok; Pan, Wen-Harn; Ozasa, Kotaro; Yoo, Keun-Young; Sasazuki, Shizuka; Yang, Gong; Watanabe, Takashi; Sugawara, Yumi; Parvez, Faruque; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Chuang, Shao-Yuan; Ohishi, Waka; Park, Sue K; Feng, Ziding; Thornquist, Mark; Boffetta, Paolo; Zheng, Wei; Kang, Daehee; Potter, John; Sinha, Rashmi

    2013-10-01

    Total or red meat intake has been shown to be associated with a higher risk of mortality in Western populations, but little is known of the risks in Asian populations. We examined temporal trends in meat consumption and associations between meat intake and all-cause and cause-specific mortality in Asia. We used ecological data from the United Nations to compare country-specific meat consumption. Separately, 8 Asian prospective cohort studies in Bangladesh, China, Japan, Korea, and Taiwan consisting of 112,310 men and 184,411 women were followed for 6.6 to 15.6 y with 24,283 all-cause, 9558 cancer, and 6373 cardiovascular disease (CVD) deaths. We estimated the study-specific HRs and 95% CIs by using a Cox regression model and pooled them by using a random-effects model. Red meat consumption was substantially lower in the Asian countries than in the United States. Fish and seafood consumption was higher in Japan and Korea than in the United States. Our pooled analysis found no association between intake of total meat (red meat, poultry, and fish/seafood) and risks of all-cause, CVD, or cancer mortality among men and women; HRs (95% CIs) for all-cause mortality from a comparison of the highest with the lowest quartile were 1.02 (0.91, 1.15) in men and 0.93 (0.86, 1.01) in women. Ecological data indicate an increase in meat intake in Asian countries; however, our pooled analysis did not provide evidence of a higher risk of mortality for total meat intake and provided evidence of an inverse association with red meat, poultry, and fish/seafood. Red meat intake was inversely associated with CVD mortality in men and with cancer mortality in women in Asian countries.

  4. Meat intake and cause-specific mortality: a pooled analysis of Asian prospective cohort studies123

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung Eun; McLerran, Dale F; Rolland, Betsy; Chen, Yu; Grant, Eric J; Vedanthan, Rajesh; Inoue, Manami; Tsugane, Shoichiro; Gao, Yu-Tang; Tsuji, Ichiro; Kakizaki, Masako; Ahsan, Habibul; Ahn, Yoon-Ok; Pan, Wen-Harn; Ozasa, Kotaro; Yoo, Keun-Young; Sasazuki, Shizuka; Yang, Gong; Watanabe, Takashi; Sugawara, Yumi; Parvez, Faruque; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Chuang, Shao-Yuan; Ohishi, Waka; Park, Sue K; Feng, Ziding; Thornquist, Mark; Boffetta, Paolo; Zheng, Wei; Kang, Daehee; Potter, John; Sinha, Rashmi

    2013-01-01

    Background: Total or red meat intake has been shown to be associated with a higher risk of mortality in Western populations, but little is known of the risks in Asian populations. Objective: We examined temporal trends in meat consumption and associations between meat intake and all-cause and cause-specific mortality in Asia. Design: We used ecological data from the United Nations to compare country-specific meat consumption. Separately, 8 Asian prospective cohort studies in Bangladesh, China, Japan, Korea, and Taiwan consisting of 112,310 men and 184,411 women were followed for 6.6 to 15.6 y with 24,283 all-cause, 9558 cancer, and 6373 cardiovascular disease (CVD) deaths. We estimated the study-specific HRs and 95% CIs by using a Cox regression model and pooled them by using a random-effects model. Results: Red meat consumption was substantially lower in the Asian countries than in the United States. Fish and seafood consumption was higher in Japan and Korea than in the United States. Our pooled analysis found no association between intake of total meat (red meat, poultry, and fish/seafood) and risks of all-cause, CVD, or cancer mortality among men and women; HRs (95% CIs) for all-cause mortality from a comparison of the highest with the lowest quartile were 1.02 (0.91, 1.15) in men and 0.93 (0.86, 1.01) in women. Conclusions: Ecological data indicate an increase in meat intake in Asian countries; however, our pooled analysis did not provide evidence of a higher risk of mortality for total meat intake and provided evidence of an inverse association with red meat, poultry, and fish/seafood. Red meat intake was inversely associated with CVD mortality in men and with cancer mortality in women in Asian countries. PMID:23902788

  5. Cash pooling

    OpenAIRE

    Lozovaya, Karina

    2009-01-01

    This work makes a mention of cash management. At next chapter describes two most known theoretical models of cash management -- Baumol Model and Miller-Orr Model. Principal part of work is about cash pooling, types of cash pooling, cash pooling at Czech Republic and influence of cash pooling over accounting and taxes.

  6. Adherence to a Mediterranean-style diet and incident fractures: pooled analysis of observational evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunutsor, Setor K; Laukkanen, Jari A; Whitehouse, Michael R; Blom, Ashley W

    2018-06-01

    The Mediterranean diet is associated with decreased morbidity and mortality from various chronic diseases. Adherence to a Mediterranean-style diet has been suggested to have protective effects on bone health and decreases the incidence of bone fractures, but the evidence is not clear. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of available observational studies to quantify the association between adherence to a Mediterranean-style diet, as assessed by the Mediterranean Diet Score (MDS), and the risk of fractures in the general population. Relevant studies were identified in a literature search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science, and reference lists of relevant studies to October 2016. Relative risks (RRS) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were aggregated using random-effects models. Five observational studies with data on 353,076 non-overlapping participants and 33,576 total fractures (including 6,881 hip fractures) were included. The pooled fully adjusted RR (95% CI) for hip fractures per 2-point increment in adherence to the MDS was 0.82 (0.71-0.96). Adherence to the MDS was not associated with the risk of any or total fractures based on pooled analysis of only two studies. Limited observational evidence supports a beneficial effect of adherence to a Mediterranean-style diet on the incidence of hip fractures. Well-designed intervention studies are needed to elucidate the relationship between adherence to a Mediterranean-style diet and the risk of adverse bone health outcomes such as fractures.

  7. Melt pool and keyhole behaviour analysis for deep penetration laser welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabbro, R

    2010-01-01

    One usually defines the main characteristic of the welding performances of a given laser system by its 'penetration curve' that corresponds to the welding depth as a function of the welding speed V w for a given set of operating parameters. Analysis of a penetration curve is interesting and gives very fruitful results. Coupled with high-speed video imaging of melt pool surface and ejected plume behaviour, the analysis of this penetration curve on a very large range of welding speeds, typically from 0 to 50 m min -1 , has allowed us to observe very different and characteristic regimes. These regimes are mainly characterized by the physical processes by which they impede the laser beam penetration inside the material. We show that it is only at rather high welding speeds that these limiting processes are reduced. Consequently, the scaling law of welding depth with welding speed is in agreement with adapted modelling of this process. On the other hand, as the welding speed is reduced, different effects depending on the weld pool dynamics and plume interaction strongly disturb the keyhole stability and are responsible for the deviation of the penetration curve from the previous modelling that agrees with a 1/V w scaling law. A corresponding criterion for the occurrence of this effect is defined.

  8. Multiplexed resequencing analysis to identify rare variants in pooled DNA with barcode indexing using next-generation sequencer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsui, Jun; Fukuda, Yoko; Azuma, Kyo; Tozaki, Hirokazu; Ishiura, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Yuji; Goto, Jun; Tsuji, Shoji

    2010-07-01

    We have recently found that multiple rare variants of the glucocerebrosidase gene (GBA) confer a robust risk for Parkinson disease, supporting the 'common disease-multiple rare variants' hypothesis. To develop an efficient method of identifying rare variants in a large number of samples, we applied multiplexed resequencing using a next-generation sequencer to identification of rare variants of GBA. Sixteen sets of pooled DNAs from six pooled DNA samples were prepared. Each set of pooled DNAs was subjected to polymerase chain reaction to amplify the target gene (GBA) covering 6.5 kb, pooled into one tube with barcode indexing, and then subjected to extensive sequence analysis using the SOLiD System. Individual samples were also subjected to direct nucleotide sequence analysis. With the optimization of data processing, we were able to extract all the variants from 96 samples with acceptable rates of false-positive single-nucleotide variants.

  9. Maternal age at birth and childhood type 1 diabetes: a pooled analysis of 30 observational studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cardwell, Chris R; Stene, Lars C; Joner, Geir

    2009-01-01

    for potential confounders. Meta-analysis techniques were used to derive combined odds ratios and to investigate heterogeneity among studies. RESULTS: Data were available for 5 cohort and 25 case-control studies, including 14,724 cases of type 1 diabetes. Overall, there was, on average, a 5% (95% CI 2......OBJECTIVE: The aim if the study was to investigate whether children born to older mothers have an increased risk of type 1 diabetes by performing a pooled analysis of previous studies using individual patient data to adjust for recognized confounders. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Relevant studies...... published before June 2009 were identified from MEDLINE, Web of Science, and EMBASE. Authors of studies were contacted and asked to provide individual patient data or conduct prespecified analyses. Risk estimates of type 1 diabetes by maternal age were calculated for each study, before and after adjustment...

  10. Efficacy of Alteplase in a Mouse Model of Acute Ischemic Stroke: A Retrospective Pooled Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orset, Cyrille; Haelewyn, Benoit; Allan, Stuart M; Ansar, Saema; Campos, Francesco; Cho, Tae Hee; Durand, Anne; El Amki, Mohamad; Fatar, Marc; Garcia-Yébenes, Isaac; Gauberti, Maxime; Grudzenski, Saskia; Lizasoain, Ignacio; Lo, Eng; Macrez, Richard; Margaill, Isabelle; Maysami, Samaneh; Meairs, Stephen; Nighoghossian, Norbert; Orbe, Josune; Paramo, Jose Antonio; Parienti, Jean-Jacques; Rothwell, Nancy J; Rubio, Marina; Waeber, Christian; Young, Alan R; Touzé, Emmanuel; Vivien, Denis

    2016-05-01

    The debate over the fact that experimental drugs proposed for the treatment of stroke fail in the translation to the clinical situation has attracted considerable attention in the literature. In this context, we present a retrospective pooled analysis of a large data set from preclinical studies, to examine the effects of early versus late administration of intravenous recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator. We collected data from 26 individual studies from 9 international centers (13 researchers; 716 animals) that compared recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator with controls, in a unique mouse model of thromboembolic stroke induced by an in situ injection of thrombin into the middle cerebral artery. Studies were classified into early (stroke in mice. The power analysis reveals that a multicenter trial would require 123 animals per group instead of 40 for a single-center trial. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. Application of neutron noise analysis to a swimming pool research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behringer, K.; Lescano, V.H.; Meier, F.; Phildius, J.; Winkler, H.

    1982-01-01

    This work is part of a programme of establishing practical applications of neutron noise techniques to a swimming pool research reactor and deals with two different items: (1) The identification of local boiling caused e.g. by a partial blockage of the coolant flow in a fuel element. Local boiling can easily lead to a burn-out situation. The onset of boiling can be detected by neutron noise analysis and a boiling detection system is presently under development. (2) The measurement of the time evolution of the reactivity induced by xenon after reactor shut-down by an on-line reactivity meter based on neutron noise analysis. From the data, the prompt neutron decay constant at delayed critical, the equilibrium xenon reactivity worth, and an estimate of the average steady-state power flux in the core before reactor shut-down were obtained. (author)

  12. Birth order and childhood type 1 diabetes risk: a pooled analysis of 31 observational studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cardwell, Chris R; Stene, Lars C; Joner, Geir

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The incidence rates of childhood onset type 1 diabetes are almost universally increasing across the globe but the aetiology of the disease remains largely unknown. We investigated whether birth order is associated with the risk of childhood diabetes by performing a pooled analysis...... and after adjustment for confounders, and investigate heterogeneity. RESULTS: Data were available for 6 cohort and 25 case-control studies, including 11¿955 cases of type 1 diabetes. Overall, there was no evidence of an association prior to adjustment for confounders. After adjustment for maternal age...... at birth and other confounders, a reduction in the risk of diabetes in second- or later born children became apparent [fully adjusted OR¿=¿0.90 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.83-0.98; P¿=¿0.02] but this association varied markedly between studies (I(2)¿=¿67%). An a priori subgroup analysis showed...

  13. PWR core and spent fuel pool analysis using scale and nestle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, J. E.; Maldonado, G. I.; St Clair, R.; Orr, D.

    2012-01-01

    The SCALE nuclear analysis code system [SCALE, 2011], developed and maintained at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is widely recognized as high quality software for analyzing nuclear systems. The SCALE code system is composed of several validated computer codes and methods with standard control sequences, such as the TRITON/NEWT lattice physics sequence, which supplies dependable and accurate analyses for industry, regulators, and academia. Although TRITON generates energy-collapsed and space-homogenized few group cross sections, SCALE does not include a full-core nodal neutron diffusion simulation module within. However, in the past few years, the open-source NESTLE core simulator [NESTLE, 2003], originally developed at North Carolina State Univ. (NCSU), has been updated and upgraded via collaboration between ORNL and the Univ. of Tennessee (UT), so it now has a growingly seamless coupling to the TRITON/NEWT lattice physics [Galloway, 2010]. This study presents the methodology used to couple lattice physics data between TRITON and NESTLE in order to perform a three-dimensional full-core analysis employing a 'real-life' Duke Energy PWR as the test bed. The focus for this step was to compare the key parameters of core reactivity and radial power distribution versus plant data. Following the core analysis, following a three cycle burn, a spent fuel pool analysis was done using information generated from NESTLE for the discharged bundles and was compared to Duke Energy spent fuel pool models. The KENO control module from SCALE was employed for this latter stage of the project. (authors)

  14. PWR core and spent fuel pool analysis using scale and nestle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, J. E.; Maldonado, G. I. [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-2300 (United States); St Clair, R.; Orr, D. [Duke Energy, 526 S. Church St, Charlotte, NC 28202 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The SCALE nuclear analysis code system [SCALE, 2011], developed and maintained at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is widely recognized as high quality software for analyzing nuclear systems. The SCALE code system is composed of several validated computer codes and methods with standard control sequences, such as the TRITON/NEWT lattice physics sequence, which supplies dependable and accurate analyses for industry, regulators, and academia. Although TRITON generates energy-collapsed and space-homogenized few group cross sections, SCALE does not include a full-core nodal neutron diffusion simulation module within. However, in the past few years, the open-source NESTLE core simulator [NESTLE, 2003], originally developed at North Carolina State Univ. (NCSU), has been updated and upgraded via collaboration between ORNL and the Univ. of Tennessee (UT), so it now has a growingly seamless coupling to the TRITON/NEWT lattice physics [Galloway, 2010]. This study presents the methodology used to couple lattice physics data between TRITON and NESTLE in order to perform a three-dimensional full-core analysis employing a 'real-life' Duke Energy PWR as the test bed. The focus for this step was to compare the key parameters of core reactivity and radial power distribution versus plant data. Following the core analysis, following a three cycle burn, a spent fuel pool analysis was done using information generated from NESTLE for the discharged bundles and was compared to Duke Energy spent fuel pool models. The KENO control module from SCALE was employed for this latter stage of the project. (authors)

  15. Community analysis of plant biomass-degrading microorganisms from Obsidian Pool, Yellowstone National Park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishnivetskaya, Tatiana A; Hamilton-Brehm, Scott D; Podar, Mircea; Mosher, Jennifer J; Palumbo, Anthony V; Phelps, Tommy J; Keller, Martin; Elkins, James G

    2015-02-01

    The conversion of lignocellulosic biomass into biofuels can potentially be improved by employing robust microorganisms and enzymes that efficiently deconstruct plant polysaccharides at elevated temperatures. Many of the geothermal features of Yellowstone National Park (YNP) are surrounded by vegetation providing a source of allochthonic material to support heterotrophic microbial communities adapted to utilize plant biomass as a primary carbon and energy source. In this study, a well-known hot spring environment, Obsidian Pool (OBP), was examined for potential biomass-active microorganisms using cultivation-independent and enrichment techniques. Analysis of 33,684 archaeal and 43,784 bacterial quality-filtered 16S rRNA gene pyrosequences revealed that archaeal diversity in the main pool was higher than bacterial; however, in the vegetated area, overall bacterial diversity was significantly higher. Of notable interest was a flooded depression adjacent to OBP supporting a stand of Juncus tweedyi, a heat-tolerant rush commonly found growing near geothermal features in YNP. The microbial community from heated sediments surrounding the plants was enriched in members of the Firmicutes including potentially (hemi)cellulolytic bacteria from the genera Clostridium, Anaerobacter, Caloramator, Caldicellulosiruptor, and Thermoanaerobacter. Enrichment cultures containing model and real biomass substrates were established at a wide range of temperatures (55-85 °C). Microbial activity was observed up to 80 °C on all substrates including Avicel, xylan, switchgrass, and Populus sp. Independent of substrate, Caloramator was enriched at lower (65 °C) temperatures.

  16. Analysis of a total loss of pool water accident in MTR-type research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yilmazer, A.; Yavuz, H.

    2004-01-01

    In this study, the transient in which the pool water is lost throughout one or more of the main coolant pipes which are supposed to be broken guillotine-like is investigated for the TR-2 research reactor in Istanbul. The applicability of the methods used for other similar types of research reactors is shown. Decrease of the pool water level until the top of the core, and from the top to the bottom of the core are examined as two successive phases of the accident. Finite difference scheme and integral methods are employed to solve energy equations and the results of both methods are compared. The finite difference solution uses an explicit form for the analysis of the first phase, and a moving boundary approach for the second phase. The integral method is based on the assumption that the temperatures appearing in the energy equations have the same profiles during the transient as the steady state ones. Analyses are done both for nominal and hot channel, and the results of both methods are observed to be in agreement. (orig.)

  17. Analysis of a total loss of pool water accident in MTR-type research reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yilmazer, A. [Hacettepe University, Ankara (Turkey). Nuclear Engineering Department; Yavuz, H. [Istanbul Technical University (Turkey). Energy Institute

    2004-08-01

    In this study, the transient in which the pool water is lost throughout one or more of the main coolant pipes which are supposed to be broken guillotine-like is investigated for the TR-2 research reactor in Istanbul. The applicability of the methods used for other similar types of research reactors is shown. Decrease of the pool water level until the top of the core, and from the top to the bottom of the core are examined as two successive phases of the accident. Finite difference scheme and integral methods are employed to solve energy equations and the results of both methods are compared. The finite difference solution uses an explicit form for the analysis of the first phase, and a moving boundary approach for the second phase. The integral method is based on the assumption that the temperatures appearing in the energy equations have the same profiles during the transient as the steady state ones. Analyses are done both for nominal and hot channel, and the results of both methods are observed to be in agreement. (orig.)

  18. Analysis of the Processes in Spent Fuel Pools in Case of Loss of Heat Removal due to Water Leakage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Algirdas Kaliatka

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The safe storage of spent fuel assemblies in the spent fuel pools is very important. These facilities are not covered by leaktight containment; thus, the consequences of overheating and melting of fuel in the spent fuel pools can be very severe. On the other hand, due to low decay heat of fuel assemblies, the processes in pools are slow in comparison with processes in reactor core during LOCA accident. Thus, the accident management measures play a very important role in case of some accidents in spent fuel pools. This paper presents the analysis of possible consequences of fuel overheating due to leakage of water from spent fuel pool. Also, the accident mitigation measure, the late injection of water was evaluated. The analysis was performed for the Ignalina NPP Unit 2 spent fuel pool, using system thermal hydraulic code for severe accident analysis ATHLET-CD. The phenomena, taking place during such accident, are discussed. Also, benchmarking of results of the same accident calculation using ASTEC and RELAP/SCDAPSIM codes is presented here.

  19. Peroral endoscopic myotomy for the treatment of esophageal achalasia: systematic review and pooled analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, K; Abbassi-Ghadi, N; Markar, S; Kumar, S; Jethwa, P; Zaninotto, G

    2016-10-01

    Peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) is a novel approach to performing esophageal myotomy for the treatment of achalasia. This review aims to assess subjective and objective metrics of achalasia treatment efficacy, perioperative adverse events and the incidence of postoperative gastroesophageal reflux disease in patients treated with POEM. Secondary aims include a pooled analysis comparison of the clinical outcomes and procedural safety of POEM versus laparoscopic Heller's myotomy (LHM). A systematic review of the literature, up to and including January 15, 2015, was conducted for studies reporting POEM outcomes. Studies comparing POEM to LHM were also included for the purpose of pooled analysis. Outcomes from 1122 POEM patients, from 22 studies, are reported in this systematic review. Minor operative adverse events included capno/pneumo-peritoneum (30.6%), capno/pneumo-thorax (11.0%) and subcutaneous emphysema (31.6%). Major operative adverse events included mediastinal leak (0.3%), postoperative bleeding (1.1%) and a single mortality (0.09%). There was an improvement in lower esophageal sphincter pressure and timed barium esophagram column height of 66% and 80% post-POEM, respectively. Symptom improvement was demonstrated with a pre- and post-POEM Eckardt score ± standard deviation of 6.8 ± 1.0 and 1.2 ± 0.6, respectively. Pre- and post-POEM endoscopy showed esophagitis in 0% and 19% of patients, respectively. The median (interquartile range) points scored for study quality was 15 (14-16) out of total of 32. Pooled analysis of three comparative studies between LHM and POEM showed similar results for adverse events, perforation rate, operative time and a nonsignificant trend toward a reduced length of hospital stay in the POEM group. In conclusion, POEM is a safe and effective treatment for achalasia, showing significant improvements in objective metrics and achalasia-related symptoms. Randomized comparative studies of LHM and POEM are required to determine the

  20. A pooled analysis of sequential therapies with sorafenib and sunitinib in metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenner, Frank; Chastonay, Rahel; Liewen, Heike; Haile, Sarah R; Cathomas, Richard; Rothermundt, Christian; Siciliano, Raffaele D; Stoll, Susanna; Knuth, Alexander; Buchler, Tomas; Porta, Camillo; Renner, Christoph; Samaras, Panagiotis

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the optimal sequence for the receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors (rTKIs) sorafenib and sunitinib in metastatic renal cell cancer. We performed a retrospective analysis of patients who had received sequential therapy with both rTKIs and integrated these results into a pooled analysis of available data from other publications. Differences in median progression-free survival (PFS) for first- (PFS1) and second-line treatment (PFS2), and for the combined PFS (PFS1 plus PFS2) were examined using weighted linear regression. In the pooled analysis encompassing 853 patients, the median combined PFS for first-line sunitinib and 2nd-line sorafenib (SuSo) was 12.1 months compared with 15.4 months for the reverse sequence (SoSu; 95% CI for difference 1.45-5.12, p = 0.0013). Regarding first-line treatment, no significant difference in PFS1 was noted regardless of which drug was initially used (0.62 months average increase on sorafenib, 95% CI for difference -1.01 to 2.26, p = 0.43). In second-line treatment, sunitinib showed a significantly longer PFS2 than sorafenib (average increase 2.66 months, 95% CI 1.02-4.3, p = 0.003). The SoSu sequence translates into a longer combined PFS compared to the SuSo sequence. Predominantly the superiority of sunitinib regarding PFS2 contributed to the longer combined PFS in sequential use. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Exciting Pools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Bradford L.

    1975-01-01

    Advocates the creation of swimming pool oscillations as part of a general investigation of mechanical oscillations. Presents the equations, procedure for deriving the slosh modes, and methods of period estimation for exciting swimming pool oscillations. (GS)

  2. Meta-analysis of mismatch repair polymorphisms within the cogent consortium for colorectal cancer susceptibility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Picelli

    Full Text Available In the last four years, Genome-Wide Association Studies (GWAS have identified sixteen low-penetrance polymorphisms on fourteen different loci associated with colorectal cancer (CRC. Due to the low risks conferred by known common variants, most of the 35% broad-sense heritability estimated by twin studies remains unexplained. Recently our group performed a case-control study for eight Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs in 4 CRC genes. The present investigation is a follow-up of that study. We have genotyped six SNPs that showed a positive association and carried out a meta-analysis based on eight additional studies comprising in total more than 8000 cases and 6000 controls. The estimated recessive odds ratio for one of the SNPs, rs3219489 (MUTYH Q338H, decreased from 1.52 in the original Swedish study, to 1.18 in the Swedish replication, and to 1.08 in the initial meta-analysis. Since the corresponding summary probability value was 0.06, we decided to retrieve additional information for this polymorphism. The incorporation of six further studies resulted in around 13000 cases and 13000 controls. The newly updated OR was 1.03. The results from the present large, multicenter study illustrate the possibility of decreasing effect sizes with increasing samples sizes. Phenotypic heterogeneity, differential environmental exposures, and population specific linkage disequilibrium patterns may explain the observed difference of genetic effects between Sweden and the other investigated cohorts.

  3. Leisure time physical activity and mortality: a detailed pooled analysis of the dose-response relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arem, Hannah; Moore, Steven C; Patel, Alpa; Hartge, Patricia; Berrington de Gonzalez, Amy; Visvanathan, Kala; Campbell, Peter T; Freedman, Michal; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Adami, Hans Olov; Linet, Martha S; Lee, I-Min; Matthews, Charles E

    2015-06-01

    The 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans recommended a minimum of 75 vigorous-intensity or 150 moderate-intensity minutes per week (7.5 metabolic-equivalent hours per week) of aerobic activity for substantial health benefit and suggested additional benefits by doing more than double this amount. However, the upper limit of longevity benefit or possible harm with more physical activity is unclear. To quantify the dose-response association between leisure time physical activity and mortality and define the upper limit of benefit or harm associated with increased levels of physical activity. We pooled data from 6 studies in the National Cancer Institute Cohort Consortium (baseline 1992-2003). Population-based prospective cohorts in the United States and Europe with self-reported physical activity were analyzed in 2014. A total of 661,137 men and women (median age, 62 years; range, 21-98 years) and 116,686 deaths were included. We used Cox proportional hazards regression with cohort stratification to generate multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% CIs. Median follow-up time was 14.2 years. Leisure time moderate- to vigorous-intensity physical activity. The upper limit of mortality benefit from high levels of leisure time physical activity. Compared with individuals reporting no leisure time physical activity, we observed a 20% lower mortality risk among those performing less than the recommended minimum of 7.5 metabolic-equivalent hours per week (HR, 0.80 [95% CI, 0.78-0.82]), a 31% lower risk at 1 to 2 times the recommended minimum (HR, 0.69 [95% CI, 0.67-0.70]), and a 37% lower risk at 2 to 3 times the minimum (HR, 0.63 [95% CI, 0.62-0.65]). An upper threshold for mortality benefit occurred at 3 to 5 times the physical activity recommendation (HR, 0.61 [95% CI, 0.59-0.62]); however, compared with the recommended minimum, the additional benefit was modest (31% vs 39%). There was no evidence of harm at 10 or more times the recommended minimum (HR

  4. Framework for the analysis of reactive power dispatch in energy pools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salgado, R.S.; Irving, M.R.

    2004-01-01

    This paper proposes a framework for the simulation and analysis of the reactive power distribution in electric energy markets of the pool type. Firstly, the analytical formulation of the OPF problem, with three optional performance indexes for the reactive power dispatch, is discussed. These OPF objectives are used to determine the reactive power distribution for a given active power dispatch (obtained through merit-order strategy, for instance). An allocation strategy is used to assess the participation of each power system agent in the loss/reactive power distribution. This strategy uses the premise of co-operative game theory. Numerical results obtained with the Ward-Hale 6-bus test system illustrate the main aspects of the proposed methodology. (author)

  5. Investigations of new cardiac functional imaging using Fourier analysis of gated blood-pool study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, H.; Takeda, K.; Nakagawa, T.; Yamaguchi, N.; Taguchi, M.; Konishi, T.; Hamada, M.

    1982-01-01

    A new cardiac functional imaging, using temporal Fourier analysis of 28-frame gated cardiac blood-pool studies, was developed. A time-activity curve of each pixel was approximated by its Fourier series. Approximation by the sum for terms to the 3rd frequency of its Fourier series was considered to be most reasonable because of having the least aberration due to statistical fluctuation and close agreement between the global left ventricular curve and the regional fitted curves in normal subjects. To evaluate the ventricular systolic and diastolic performances, 9 parameters were analyzed from thus fitted curves on a pixel-by-pixel basis and displayed on a colour CRT in 64x64 matrix form. In patients with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy and other cardiac lesions, detailed information on the regional ventricular systolic and diastolic performances was clearly visualized by this method, which was difficult to obtain from the usual functional images of phase and amplitude at the fundamental frequency alone

  6. System seismic analysis of an innovative primary system for a large pool type LMFBR plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, Y.C.; Wu, T.S.; Cha, B.K.; Burelbach, J.; Seidensticker, R.

    1984-01-01

    The system seismic analysis of an innovative primary system for a large pool type liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) plant is presented. In this primary system, the reactor core is supported in a way which differs significantly from that used in previous designs. The analytical model developed for this study is a three-dimensional finite element model including one-half of the primary system cut along the plane of symmetry. The model includes the deck and deck mounted components,the reactor vessel, the core support structure, the core barrel, the radial neutron shield, the redan, and the conical support skirt. The sodium contained in the primary system is treated as a lumped mass appropriately distributed among various components. The significant seismic behavior as well as the advantages of this primary system design are discussed in detail

  7. ORIGAMI Automator Primer. Automated ORIGEN Source Terms and Spent Fuel Storage Pool Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wieselquist, William A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Thompson, Adam B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bowman, Stephen M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Peterson, Joshua L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Source terms and spent nuclear fuel (SNF) storage pool decay heat load analyses for operating nuclear power plants require a large number of Oak Ridge Isotope Generation and Depletion (ORIGEN) calculations. SNF source term calculations also require a significant amount of bookkeeping to track quantities such as core and assembly operating histories, spent fuel pool (SFP) residence times, heavy metal masses, and enrichments. The ORIGEN Assembly Isotopics (ORIGAMI) module in the SCALE code system provides a simple scheme for entering these data. However, given the large scope of the analysis, extensive scripting is necessary to convert formats and process data to create thousands of ORIGAMI input files (one per assembly) and to process the results into formats readily usable by follow-on analysis tools. This primer describes a project within the SCALE Fulcrum graphical user interface (GUI) called ORIGAMI Automator that was developed to automate the scripting and bookkeeping in large-scale source term analyses. The ORIGAMI Automator enables the analyst to (1) easily create, view, and edit the reactor site and assembly information, (2) automatically create and run ORIGAMI inputs, and (3) analyze the results from ORIGAMI. ORIGAMI Automator uses the standard ORIGEN binary concentrations files produced by ORIGAMI, with concentrations available at all time points in each assembly’s life. The GUI plots results such as mass, concentration, activity, and decay heat using a powerful new ORIGEN Post-Processing Utility for SCALE (OPUS) GUI component. This document includes a description and user guide for the GUI, a step-by-step tutorial for a simplified scenario, and appendices that document the file structures used.

  8. Diclofenac topical solution compared with oral diclofenac: a pooled safety analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roth SH

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Sanford H Roth1, Philip Fuller21Arizona Research and Education, Arthritis Laboratory, Arizona State University, Phoenix, AZ, USA; 2Medical Affairs, Covidien, Hazelwood, MO, USABackground: Topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID formulations, which produce less systemic exposure compared with oral formulations, are an option for the management of osteoarthritis (OA. However, the overall safety and efficacy of these agents compared with oral or systemic therapy remains controversial.Methods: Two 12-week, double-blind, double-dummy, randomized, controlled, multicenter studies compared the safety and efficacy profiles of diclofenac topical solution (TDiclo with oral diclofenac (ODiclo. Each study independently showed that TDiclo had similar efficacy to ODiclo. To compare the safety profiles of TDiclo and ODiclo, a pooled safety analysis was performed for 927 total patients who had radiologically confirmed symptomatic OA of the knee. This pooled analysis included patients treated with TDiclo, containing 45.5% dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO, and those treated with ODiclo. Safety assessments included monitoring of adverse events (AEs, recording of vital signs, dermatologic evaluation of the study knee, and clinical laboratory evaluation.Results: AEs occurred in 312 (67.1% patients using TDiclo versus 298 (64.5% of those taking ODiclo. The most common AE with TDiclo was dry skin at the application site (24.1% vs 1.9% with ODiclo; P < 0.0001. Fewer gastrointestinal (25.4% vs 39.0%; P < 0.0001 and cardiovascular (1.5% vs 3.5%; P = 0.055 AEs occurred with TDiclo compared with ODiclo. ODiclo was associated with significantly greater increases in liver enzymes and creatinine, and greater decreases in creatinine clearance and hemoglobin (P < 0.001 for all.Conclusions: These findings suggest that TDiclo represents a useful alternative to oral NSAID therapy in the management of OA, with a more favorable safety profile.Keywords: diclofenac, gastropathy

  9. Inverse Association Between Gluteofemoral Obesity and Risk of Barrett's Esophagus in a Pooled Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, Bradley J; Rubenstein, Joel H; Cook, Michael B; Vaughan, Thomas L; Anderson, Lesley A; Murray, Liam J; Shaheen, Nicholas J; Corley, Douglas A; Chandar, Apoorva K; Li, Li; Greer, Katarina B; Chak, Amitabh; El-Serag, Hashem B; Whiteman, David C; Thrift, Aaron P

    2016-10-01

    Gluteofemoral obesity (determined by measurement of subcutaneous fat in the hip and thigh regions) could reduce risks of cardiovascular and diabetic disorders associated with abdominal obesity. We evaluated whether gluteofemoral obesity also reduces the risk of Barrett's esophagus (BE), a premalignant lesion associated with abdominal obesity. We collected data from non-Hispanic white participants in 8 studies in the Barrett's and Esophageal Adenocarcinoma Consortium. We compared measures of hip circumference (as a proxy for gluteofemoral obesity) from cases of BE (n = 1559) separately with 2 control groups: 2557 population-based controls and 2064 individuals with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD controls). Study-specific odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were estimated using individual participant data and multivariable logistic regression and combined using a random-effects meta-analysis. We found an inverse relationship between hip circumference and BE (OR per 5-cm increase, 0.88; 95% CI, 0.81-0.96), compared with population-based controls in a multivariable model that included waist circumference. This association was not observed in models that did not include waist circumference. Similar results were observed in analyses stratified by frequency of GERD symptoms. The inverse association with hip circumference was statistically significant only among men (vs population-based controls: OR, 0.85; 95% CI, 0.76-0.96 for men; OR, 0.93; 95% CI, 0.74-1.16 for women). For men, within each category of waist circumference, a larger hip circumference was associated with a decreased risk of BE. Increasing waist circumference was associated with an increased risk of BE in the mutually adjusted population-based and GERD control models. Although abdominal obesity is associated with an increased risk of BE, there is an inverse association between gluteofemoral obesity and BE, particularly among men. Copyright © 2016 AGA Institute. Published by

  10. Analysis of implementing phase change materials in open-air swimming pools

    OpenAIRE

    Zsembinszki, Gabriel; Farid, Mohammed M.; Cabeza, Luisa F.

    2012-01-01

    Open-air swimming pools in Mediterranean climate regions are heated by direct solar radiation with no auxiliary heating systems. In order to extend the swimming season or improve comfort conditions, solar collectors or pool coverings may be used. In this paper, another approach was followed through the use of phase change materials (PCM). Two methods of introducing the PCM were considered: (1) encapsulated in the sidewalls and bottom of the pool, and (2) use the PCM in an external he...

  11. Phase analysis of gated blood pool scintigraphy in traumatic myocardial contusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimaki, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Akiyoshi

    1994-01-01

    It is not easy to make a diagnosis of myocardial contusion following blunt chest trauma, because most patients have many other concurrent injuries with diverse symptoms. The usefulness of phase analysis of gated blood pool scintigraphy (GBPS) for myocardial contusion following blunt chest trauma was evaluated. Thirty-eight patients who had been strongly suspected of having myocardial contusion from clinical symptoms and electrocardiograms underwent phase analysis of GBPS. The results of phase analysis were compared with those of two-dimensional echocardiography (2-D Echo) and CPK-MB fraction measurement in all patients, with those of 201 TlCl myocardial scintigraphy in 35 patients and with those of 99m Tc-pyrophosphate scintigraphy in 10 patients. In 29 patients (76.3%), the results of phase analysis matched those of 2-D Echo. Two patients (5.3%) who were judged as positive by 2-D Echo and as negative by phase analysis had only rupture of the chordae. Only one of two other patients who were judged as negative by 2-D Echo and as positive by phase analysis was judged as positive by 201 TlCl myocardial scintigraphy. The results of both 2-D Echo and phase analysis were not well correlated with those of CPK-MB fraction measurement and 99m Tc pyrophosphate scintigraphy. It is concluded that phase analysis of GBPS, as well as 2-D Echo, is useful for diagnosing myocardial contusion, and that phase analysis is most useful for diagnosing myocardial contusion in patients who cannot be examined by 2-D Echo because of the presence of pneumothorax and/or subcutaneous emphysema in the anterior chest wall. (author)

  12. Phase analysis of gated blood pool scintigraphy in traumatic myocardial contusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimaki, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Akiyoshi (Kitasato Univ., Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1994-01-01

    It is not easy to make a diagnosis of myocardial contusion following blunt chest trauma, because most patients have many other concurrent injuries with diverse symptoms. The usefulness of phase analysis of gated blood pool scintigraphy (GBPS) for myocardial contusion following blunt chest trauma was evaluated. Thirty-eight patients who had been strongly suspected of having myocardial contusion from clinical symptoms and electrocardiograms underwent phase analysis of GBPS. The results of phase analysis were compared with those of two-dimensional echocardiography (2-D Echo) and CPK-MB fraction measurement in all patients, with those of [sup 201]TlCl myocardial scintigraphy in 35 patients and with those of [sup 99m]Tc-pyrophosphate scintigraphy in 10 patients. In 29 patients (76.3%), the results of phase analysis matched those of 2-D Echo. Two patients (5.3%) who were judged as positive by 2-D Echo and as negative by phase analysis had only rupture of the chordae. Only one of two other patients who were judged as negative by 2-D Echo and as positive by phase analysis was judged as positive by [sup 201]TlCl myocardial scintigraphy. The results of both 2-D Echo and phase analysis were not well correlated with those of CPK-MB fraction measurement and [sup 99m]Tc pyrophosphate scintigraphy. It is concluded that phase analysis of GBPS, as well as 2-D Echo, is useful for diagnosing myocardial contusion, and that phase analysis is most useful for diagnosing myocardial contusion in patients who cannot be examined by 2-D Echo because of the presence of pneumothorax and/or subcutaneous emphysema in the anterior chest wall. (author).

  13. Analysis of mammalian gene function through broad-based phenotypic screens across a consortium of mouse clinics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Angelis, Martin Hrabě; Nicholson, George; Selloum, Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    The function of the majority of genes in the mouse and human genomes remains unknown. The mouse embryonic stem cell knockout resource provides a basis for the characterization of relationships between genes and phenotypes. The EUMODIC consortium developed and validated robust methodologies...

  14. Predictors of Local Recurrence Following Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation: A Pooled Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, Chirag; Wilkinson, John Ben; Lyden, Maureen; Beitsch, Peter; Vicini, Frank A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze a pooled set of nearly 2,000 patients treated on the American Society of Breast Surgeons (ASBS) Mammosite Registry Trial and at William Beaumont Hospital (WBH) to identify factors associated with local recurrence following accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). Methods and Materials: A total of 1,961 women underwent partial breast irradiation between April 1993 and November 2010 as part of the ASBS Registry Trial or at WBH. Rates of ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR), regional recurrence (RR), distant metastases (DM), disease-free survival (DFS), cause-specific survival (CSS), and overall survival (OS) were analyzed for each group and for the pooled cohort. Clinical, pathologic, and treatment-related variables were analyzed including age, tumor stage/size, estrogen receptor status, surgical margins, and lymph node status to determine their association with IBTR. Results: The two groups weres similar, but WBH patients were more frequently node positive, had positive margins, and were less likely to be within the American Society for Radiation Oncology-unsuitable group. At 5 years, the rates of IBTR, RR, DM, DFS, CSS, and OS for the pooled group of patients were 2.9%, 0.5%, 2.4%, 89.1%, 98.5%, and 91.8%, respectively. The 5-year rate of true recurrence/marginal miss was 0.8%. Univariate analysis of IBTR found that negative estrogen receptor status (odds ratio [OR], 2.83, 95% confidence interval 1.55–5.13, p = 0.0007) was the only factor significantly associated with IBTR, while a trend was seen for age less than 50 (OR 1.80, 95% confidence interval 0.90–3.58, p = 0.10). Conclusions: Excellent 5-year outcomes were seen following APBI in over 1,900 patients. Estrogen receptor negativity was the only factor associated with IBTR, while a trend for age less than 50 was noted. Significant differences in factors associated with IBTR were noted between cohorts, suggesting that factors driving IBTR may be predicated based on the risk

  15. BWR MARK I pressure suppression pool mixing and stratification analysis using GOTHIC lumped parameter modeling methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozdemir, Ozkan Emre; George, Thomas L.

    2015-01-01

    As a part of the GOTHIC (GOTHIC incorporates technology developed for the electric power industry under the sponsorship of EPRI.) Fukushima Technical Evaluation project (EPRI, 2014a, b, 2015), GOTHIC (EPRI, 2014c) has been benchmarked against test data for pool stratification (EPRI, 2014a, b, Ozdemir and George, 2013). These tests confirmed GOTHIC’s ability to simulate pool mixing and stratification under a variety of anticipated suppression pool operating conditions. The multidimensional modeling requires long simulation times for events that may occur over a period of hours or days. For these scenarios a lumped model of the pressure suppression chamber is desirable to maintain reasonable simulation times. However, a lumped model for the pool is not able to predict the effects of pool stratification that can influence the overall containment response. The main objective of this work is on the development of a correlation that can be used to estimate pool mixing and stratification effects in a lumped modeling approach. A simplified lumped GOTHIC model that includes a two zone model for the suppression pool with controlled circulation between the upper and lower zones was constructed. A pump and associated flow connections are included to provide mixing between the upper and lower pool volumes. Using numerically generated data from a multidimensional GOTHIC model for the suppression pool, a correlation was developed for the mixing rate between the upper and lower pool volumes in a two-zone, lumped model. The mixing rate depends on the pool subcooling, the steam injection rate and the injection depth

  16. Analysis of a molten pool natural convection in the APR1400 RPV at a severe accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong Tae; Park, Rae Joon; Kim, Sang Baik

    2005-01-01

    During a hypothetical severe accident, reactor fuel rods and structures supporting them are melted and relocated in the lower head of the reactor vessel. These relocated molten materials could be separated by their density difference and construct metal/oxide stratified pools in the lower head. A decay heat generated from the fuel material is transferred to the vessel wall and upper structures remaining in the reactor vessel by natural convection. As shown in Fig. 1 two-layered stratified molten pool is developed in the reactor lower vessel. The oxidic pool usually constructed by the mixture of uranium oxide and zirconium oxide. The melting temperature of the oxidic material is very high compared to the steel vessel and metallic layer. And highly turbulent natural convection generated by the decay heat enhances heat transfer to the boundary of the oxidic pool. By this thermal mechanism, oxide curst is developed around the oxidic layer as shown in Fig. 1. The oxidic pool is bounded thermally and fluid-dynamically by the developed crust. By this boundedness, the heat transfer structure in the stratified oxidic/metallic pool can be solved separately. The thermal boundary condition of the oxidic pool is isothermal with constant melting temperature of the oxidic material. The decay heat is transfer to side wall and upper interface between oxidic and metallic layer. Turbulent natural convection is dominant heat transfer mechanism in the oxidic pool. The heat transferred from the bottom oxidic layer is imposed to the upper metallic layer. This transferred heat in the metallic pool is removed through side and upper surface, which is augmented also by natural convection developed in the pool. In this study, a molten pool natural convection in the APR1400 RPV during a severe accident is simulated using the Lilac code and the calculated heat flux distribution on the reactor vessel wall is compared with a lumped-parameter (LP) prediction

  17. Self-expandable metal stents for malignant gastric outlet obstruction: A pooled analysis of prospective literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Halsema, Emo E; Rauws, Erik A J; Fockens, Paul; van Hooft, Jeanin E

    2015-11-21

    To provide an overview of the clinical outcomes of self-expandable metal stent (SEMS) placement for malignant gastric outlet obstruction (MGOO). A systematic literature search was performed in PubMed of the literature published between January 2009 and March 2015. Only prospective studies that reported on the clinical success of stent placement for MGOO were included. The primary endpoint was clinical success, defined according to the definition used in the original article. Data were pooled and analyzed using descriptive statistics. Subgroup analyses were performed for partially covered SEMSs (PCSEMSs) and uncovered SEMSs (UCSEMSs) using Fisher's exact test. A total of 19 studies, including 1281 patients, were included in the final analysis. Gastric (42%) and pancreatic (37%) cancer were the main causes of MGOO. UCSEMSs were used in 76% of patients and PCSEMSs in 24%. The overall pooled technical success rate was 97.3% and the clinical success rate was 85.7%. Stent dysfunction occurred in 19.6% of patients, mainly caused by re-obstruction (12.6%) and stent migration (4.3%), and was comparable between PCSEMSs and UCSEMSs (21.2% vs 19.1%, respectively, P = 0.412). Re-obstruction was more common with UCSEMSs (14.9% vs 5.1%, P stent migration was more frequent after PCSEMS placement (10.9% vs 2.2%, P stent patency ranged from 68 to 307 d in five studies. The median overall survival ranged from 49 to 183 d in 13 studies. The clinical outcomes in this large population showed that enteral stent placement was feasible, effective and safe. Therefore, stent placement is a valid treatment option for the palliation of MGOO.

  18. Prevalence of metabolic syndrome and metabolic syndrome components in young adults: A pooled analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul B. Nolan

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic syndrome (MetSyn represents a clustering of different metabolic abnormalities. MetSyn prevalence is present in approximately 25% of all adults with increased prevalence in advanced ages. The presence of one component of MetSyn increases the risk of developing MetSyn later in life and likely represents a high lifetime burden of cardiovascular disease risk. Therefore we pooled data from multiple studies to establish the prevalence of MetSyn and MetSyn component prevalence across a broad range of ethnicities. PubMed, SCOPUS and Medline databases were searched to find papers presenting MetSyn and MetSyn component data for 18–30 year olds who were apparently healthy, free of disease, and MetSyn was assessed using either the harmonized, National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP-ATPIII, American Heart Association/National Heart, Blood and Lung Institute (AHA/NHBLI, or International Diabetes Federation (IDF definitions of MetSyn. After reviewing returned articles, 26,609 participants' data from 34 studies were included in the analysis and the data were pooled. MetSyn was present in 4.8–7% of young adults. Atherogenic dyslipidaemia defined as low high density lipoprotein (HDL cholesterol was the most prevalent MetSyn component (26.9–41.2%, followed by elevated blood pressure (16.6–26.6%, abdominal obesity (6.8–23.6%, atherogenic dyslipidaemia defined as raised triglycerides (8.6–15.6%, and raised fasting glucose (2.8–15.4%. These findings highlight that MetSyn is prevalent in young adults. Establishing the reason why low HDL is the most prevalent component may represent an important step in promoting primary prevention of MetSyn and reducing the incidence of subsequent clinical disease.

  19. Analysis of raft foundations for spent fuel pool in nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subramanian, K.V.; Kashikar, A.V.; Nath, C.; Shintre, C.C.

    2005-01-01

    Foundation rafts are analysed as a plate on elastic foundation with the representation of the foundation media using the Winkler idealisation i.e. series of linear uncoupled springs. The elastic constant of the Winkler springs is derived using the sub-grade modulus. However, the Winkler approach has limitations due to incompatibility of the deflections at raft-soil interface. The deflection of the raft at the point of contact and the deformation of the foundation media at this point of contact are incompatible in this approach. This particularly influences flexible rafts and further if the foundation media is soil. This paper discusses the analysis of raft, in general, and the analysis of the foundation raft for a Spent Fuel pool facility using 'variable k approach' where deformations at a node and influencing nodes are computed using Boussinesq's theory. The limitations stated above are overcome in this approach. Some studies on the sensitivity of parameters were carried out in the form of variation of moduli of elasticity of concrete and deformation modulus of soil. Analysis is also performed with conventional method using 'Winkler' soil springs. It is concluded that the Winkler model does not correctly predict the behaviour of the mat both qualitatively and quantitatively and could lead to underestimation of soil pressures leading to unconservative design. The approach involving soil structure interaction like the one presented here is hence recommended for important structures like those involved in Nuclear facilities. (authors)

  20. Birth order and childhood type 1 diabetes risk: a pooled analysis of 31 observational studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardwell, Chris R; Stene, Lars C; Joner, Geir; Bulsara, Max K; Cinek, Ondrej; Rosenbauer, Joachim; Ludvigsson, Johnny; Svensson, Jannet; Goldacre, Michael J; Waldhoer, Thomas; Jarosz-Chobot, Przemyslawa; Gimeno, Suely Ga; Chuang, Lee-Ming; Roberts, Christine L; Parslow, Roger C; Wadsworth, Emma Jk; Chetwynd, Amanda; Brigis, Girts; Urbonaite, Brone; Sipetic, Sandra; Schober, Edith; Devoti, Gabriele; Ionescu-Tirgoviste, Constantin; de Beaufort, Carine E; Stoyanov, Denka; Buschard, Karsten; Radon, Katja; Glatthaar, Christopher; Patterson, Chris C

    2011-04-01

    The incidence rates of childhood onset type 1 diabetes are almost universally increasing across the globe but the aetiology of the disease remains largely unknown. We investigated whether birth order is associated with the risk of childhood diabetes by performing a pooled analysis of previous studies. Relevant studies published before January 2010 were identified from MEDLINE, Web of Science and EMBASE. Authors of studies provided individual patient data or conducted pre-specified analyses. Meta-analysis techniques were used to derive combined odds ratios (ORs), before and after adjustment for confounders, and investigate heterogeneity. Data were available for 6 cohort and 25 case-control studies, including 11,955 cases of type 1 diabetes. Overall, there was no evidence of an association prior to adjustment for confounders. After adjustment for maternal age at birth and other confounders, a reduction in the risk of diabetes in second- or later born children became apparent [fully adjusted OR = 0.90 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.83-0.98; P = 0.02] but this association varied markedly between studies (I² = 67%). An a priori subgroup analysis showed that the association was stronger and more consistent in children birth order, particularly in children aged < 5 years. This finding could reflect increased exposure to infections in early life in later born children.

  1. Numerical analysis of weld pool for galvanized steel with lap joint in GTAW

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Hunchul; Park, Kyungbae; Kim, Yougjun; Cho, Jungho [Chungbuk National University, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong-Yoon; Kang, Moon-Jin [Korea Institute of Industrial Technology, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    Galvanized steel is widely used and its demand is growing in automotive industry due to high quality requirement for corrosion resistance. Although there are a lot of demands on using galvanized steel as automotive parts especially for outer body, it has a grave flaw in its welding process. The difficulty is low weldability due to various defects such as porosities and blow holes in weldment, which occurred during welding. A solution to prevent these defects is using hybrid welding process, with two more welding processes. One of the hybrid solutions is using Gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) as leading position in order to remove the zinc (Zn) coating on the surface before the followed practical fusion welding process. In this research, a numerical analysis model which can predict the eliminated Zn coated layers and the area of Fusion zone (FZ). Developed numerical analysis model was validated through comparing experiment to simulation. Basically, arc heat flux, arc pressure, electromagnetic force and Marangoni flow were employed as the boundary conditions and body force terms. Governing equations such as the continuity, momentum, Volume of fluid (VOF) and energy equations were adopted as usual. In addition to previous model, concentrated arc heat flux and contact thermal conductance models are newly suggested and showed successful result. They are adopted to realize edge concentrated arc and interfacial thermal conductance in lap joint fillet arc welding. Developed numerical analysis model successfully simulated the weld pool and temperature profile therefore the predicted Zn removed area considerably coincided with experimental result.

  2. Numerical analysis of weld pool for galvanized steel with lap joint in GTAW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Hunchul; Park, Kyungbae; Kim, Yougjun; Cho, Jungho; Kim, Dong-Yoon; Kang, Moon-Jin

    2017-01-01

    Galvanized steel is widely used and its demand is growing in automotive industry due to high quality requirement for corrosion resistance. Although there are a lot of demands on using galvanized steel as automotive parts especially for outer body, it has a grave flaw in its welding process. The difficulty is low weldability due to various defects such as porosities and blow holes in weldment, which occurred during welding. A solution to prevent these defects is using hybrid welding process, with two more welding processes. One of the hybrid solutions is using Gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) as leading position in order to remove the zinc (Zn) coating on the surface before the followed practical fusion welding process. In this research, a numerical analysis model which can predict the eliminated Zn coated layers and the area of Fusion zone (FZ). Developed numerical analysis model was validated through comparing experiment to simulation. Basically, arc heat flux, arc pressure, electromagnetic force and Marangoni flow were employed as the boundary conditions and body force terms. Governing equations such as the continuity, momentum, Volume of fluid (VOF) and energy equations were adopted as usual. In addition to previous model, concentrated arc heat flux and contact thermal conductance models are newly suggested and showed successful result. They are adopted to realize edge concentrated arc and interfacial thermal conductance in lap joint fillet arc welding. Developed numerical analysis model successfully simulated the weld pool and temperature profile therefore the predicted Zn removed area considerably coincided with experimental result.

  3. Clinical phenotypes of perinatal depression and time of symptom onset: analysis of data from an international consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putnam, Karen T; Wilcox, Marsha; Robertson-Blackmore, Emma; Sharkey, Katherine; Bergink, Veerle; Munk-Olsen, Trine; Deligiannidis, Kristina M; Payne, Jennifer; Altemus, Margaret; Newport, Jeffrey; Apter, Gisele; Devouche, Emmanuel; Viktorin, Alexander; Magnusson, Patrik; Penninx, Brenda; Buist, Anne; Bilszta, Justin; O’Hara, Michael; Stuart, Scott; Brock, Rebecca; Roza, Sabine; Tiemeier, Henning; Guille, Constance; Epperson, C Neill; Kim, Deborah; Schmidt, Peter; Martinez, Pedro; Di Florio, Arianna; Wisner, Katherine L; Stowe, Zachary; Jones, Ian; Sullivan, Patrick F; Rubinow, David; Wildenhaus, Kevin; Meltzer-Brody, Samantha

    2018-01-01

    Summary Background The perinatal period is a time of high risk for onset of depressive disorders and is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality, including maternal suicide. Perinatal depression comprises a heterogeneous group of clinical subtypes, and further refinement is needed to improve treatment outcomes. We sought to empirically identify and describe clinically relevant phenotypic subtypes of perinatal depression, and further characterise subtypes by time of symptom onset within pregnancy and three post-partum periods. Methods Data were assembled from a subset of seven of 19 international sites in the Postpartum Depression: Action Towards Causes and Treatment (PACT) Consortium. In this analysis, the cohort was restricted to women aged 19–40 years with information about onset of depressive symptoms in the perinatal period and complete prospective data for the ten-item Edinburgh postnatal depression scale (EPDS). Principal components and common factor analysis were used to identify symptom dimensions in the EPDS. The National Institute of Mental Health research domain criteria functional constructs of negative valence and arousal were applied to the EPDS dimensions that reflect states of depressed mood, anhedonia, and anxiety. We used k-means clustering to identify subtypes of women sharing symptom patterns. Univariate and bivariate statistics were used to describe the subtypes. Findings Data for 663 women were included in these analyses. We found evidence for three underlying dimensions measured by the EPDS: depressed mood, anxiety, and anhedonia. On the basis of these dimensions, we identified five distinct subtypes of perinatal depression: severe anxious depression, moderate anxious depression, anxious anhedonia, pure anhedonia, and resolved depression. These subtypes have clear differences in symptom quality and time of onset. Anxiety and anhedonia emerged as prominent symptom dimensions with post-partum onset and were notably severe

  4. ENT COBRA (Consortium for Brachytherapy Data Analysis: interdisciplinary standardized data collection system for head and neck patients treated with interventional radiotherapy (brachytherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Tagliaferri

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : Aim of the COBRA (Consortium for Brachytherapy Data Analysis project is to create a multicenter group (consortium and a web-based system for standardized data collection. Material and methods: GEC-ESTRO (Groupe Européen de Curiethérapie – European Society for Radiotherapy & Oncology Head and Neck (H&N Working Group participated in the project and in the implementation of the consortium agreement, the ontology (data-set and the necessary COBRA software services as well as the peer reviewing of the general anatomic site-specific COBRA protocol. The ontology was defined by a multicenter task-group. Results : Eleven centers from 6 countries signed an agreement and the consortium approved the ontology. We identified 3 tiers for the data set: Registry (epidemiology analysis, Procedures (prediction models and DSS, and Research (radiomics. The COBRA-Storage System (C-SS is not time-consuming as, thanks to the use of “brokers”, data can be extracted directly from the single center’s storage systems through a connection with “structured query language database” (SQL-DB, Microsoft Access®, FileMaker Pro®, or Microsoft Excel®. The system is also structured to perform automatic archiving directly from the treatment planning system or afterloading machine. The architecture is based on the concept of “on-purpose data projection”. The C-SS architecture is privacy protecting because it will never make visible data that could identify an individual patient. This C-SS can also benefit from the so called “distributed learning” approaches, in which data never leave the collecting institution, while learning algorithms and proposed predictive models are commonly shared. Conclusions : Setting up a consortium is a feasible and practicable tool in the creation of an international and multi-system data sharing system. COBRA C-SS seems to be well accepted by all involved parties, primarily because it does not influence the center’s own

  5. Development of Methodology for Spent Fuel Pool Severe Accident Analysis Using MELCOR Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Won-Tae; Shin, Jae-Uk [RETech. Co. LTD., Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Kwang-Il [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    The general reason why SFP severe accident analysis has to be considered is that there is a potential great risk due to the huge number of fuel assemblies and no containment in a SFP building. In most cases, the SFP building is vulnerable to external damage or attack. In contrary, low decay heat of fuel assemblies may make the accident processes slow compared to the accident in reactor core because of a great deal of water. In short, its severity of consequence cannot exclude the consideration of SFP risk management. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has performed the consequence studies of postulated spent fuel pool accident. The Fukushima-Daiichi accident has accelerated the needs for the consequence studies of postulated spent fuel pool accidents, causing the nuclear industry and regulatory bodies to reexamine several assumptions concerning beyond-design basis events such as a station blackout. The tsunami brought about the loss of coolant accident, leading to the explosion of hydrogen in the SFP building. Analyses of SFP accident processes in the case of a loss of coolant with no heat removal have studied. Few studies however have focused on a long term process of SFP severe accident under no mitigation action such as a water makeup to SFP. USNRC and OECD have co-worked to examine the behavior of PWR fuel assemblies under severe accident conditions in a spent fuel rack. In support of the investigation, several new features of MELCOR model have been added to simulate both BWR fuel assembly and PWR 17 x 17 assembly in a spent fuel pool rack undergoing severe accident conditions. The purpose of the study in this paper is to develop a methodology of the long-term analysis for the plant level SFP severe accident by using the new-featured MELCOR program in the OPR-1000 Nuclear Power Plant. The study is to investigate the ability of MELCOR in predicting an entire process of SFP severe accident phenomena including the molten corium and concrete reaction. The

  6. Sensory impairments of the lower limb after stroke: a pooled analysis of individual patient data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyson, Sarah F; Crow, J Lesley; Connell, Louise; Winward, Charlotte; Hillier, Susan

    2013-01-01

    To obtain more generalizable information on the frequency and factors influencing sensory impairment after stroke and their relationship to mobility and function. A pooled analysis of individual data of stroke survivors (N = 459); mean (SD) age = 67.2 (14.8) years, 54% male, mean (SD) time since stroke = 22.33 (63.1) days, 50% left-sided weakness. Where different measurement tools were used, data were recorded. Descriptive statistics described frequency of sensory impairments, kappa coefficients investigated relationships between sensory modalities, binary logistic regression explored the factors influencing sensory impairments, and linear regression assessed the impact of sensory impairments on activity limitations. Most patients' sensation was intact (55%), and individual sensory modalities were highly associated (κ = 0.60, P sensory impairment (P analysis showed sensation of the lower limb is grossly preserved in most stroke survivors but, when present, it affects function. Sensory modalities are highly interrelated; interventions that treat the motor system during functional tasks may be as effective at treating the sensory system as sensory retraining alone.

  7. Methodology for thermal-hydraulics analysis of pool type MTR fuel research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umbehaun, Pedro Ernesto

    2000-01-01

    This work presents a methodology developed for thermal-hydraulic analysis of pool type MTR fuel research reactors. For this methodology a computational program, FLOW, and a model, MTRCR-IEAR1 were developed. FLOW calculates the cooling flow distribution in the fuel elements, control elements, irradiators, and through the channels formed among the fuel elements and among the irradiators and reflectors. This computer program was validated against experimental data for the IEA-R1 research reactor core at IPEN-CNEN/SP. MTRCR-IEAR1 is a model based on the commercial program Engineering Equation Solver (EES). Besides the thermal-hydraulic analyses of the core in steady state accomplished by traditional computational programs like COBRA-3C/RERTR and PARET, this model allows to analyze parallel channels with different cooling flow and/or geometry. Uncertainty factors of the variables from neutronic and thermalhydraulic calculation and also from the fabrication of the fuel element are introduced in the model. For steady state analyses MTRCR-IEAR1 showed good agreement with the results of COBRA-3C/RERTR and PARET. The developed methodology was used for the calculation of the cooling flow distribution and the thermal-hydraulic analysis of a typical configuration of the IEA-R1 research reactor core. (author)

  8. Population Health Metrics Research Consortium gold standard verbal autopsy validation study: design, implementation, and development of analysis datasets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ohno Summer

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Verbal autopsy methods are critically important for evaluating the leading causes of death in populations without adequate vital registration systems. With a myriad of analytical and data collection approaches, it is essential to create a high quality validation dataset from different populations to evaluate comparative method performance and make recommendations for future verbal autopsy implementation. This study was undertaken to compile a set of strictly defined gold standard deaths for which verbal autopsies were collected to validate the accuracy of different methods of verbal autopsy cause of death assignment. Methods Data collection was implemented in six sites in four countries: Andhra Pradesh, India; Bohol, Philippines; Dar es Salaam, Tanzania; Mexico City, Mexico; Pemba Island, Tanzania; and Uttar Pradesh, India. The Population Health Metrics Research Consortium (PHMRC developed stringent diagnostic criteria including laboratory, pathology, and medical imaging findings to identify gold standard deaths in health facilities as well as an enhanced verbal autopsy instrument based on World Health Organization (WHO standards. A cause list was constructed based on the WHO Global Burden of Disease estimates of the leading causes of death, potential to identify unique signs and symptoms, and the likely existence of sufficient medical technology to ascertain gold standard cases. Blinded verbal autopsies were collected on all gold standard deaths. Results Over 12,000 verbal autopsies on deaths with gold standard diagnoses were collected (7,836 adults, 2,075 children, 1,629 neonates, and 1,002 stillbirths. Difficulties in finding sufficient cases to meet gold standard criteria as well as problems with misclassification for certain causes meant that the target list of causes for analysis was reduced to 34 for adults, 21 for children, and 10 for neonates, excluding stillbirths. To ensure strict independence for the validation of

  9. Pooled Analysis of Six Pharmacologic and Nonpharmacologic Interventions for Vasomotor Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthrie, Katherine A.; LaCroix, Andrea Z.; Ensrud, Kristine E.; Joffe, Hadine; Newton, Katherine M.; Reed, Susan D.; Caan, Bette; Carpenter, Janet S.; Cohen, Lee S.; Freeman, Ellen W.; Larson, Joseph C.; Manson, JoAnn E.; Rexrode, Kathy; Skaar, Todd C.; Sternfeld, Barbara; Anderson, Garnet L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe the effects of six interventions for menopausal vasomotor symptoms relative to control in a pooled analysis, facilitating translation of the results for clinicians and symptomatic women. The MsFLASH (Menopause Strategies: Finding Lasting Answers for Symptoms and Health) network tested these interventions in three randomized clinical trials (RCTs). Methods An analysis of pooled individual-level data from three RCTs is presented. Participants were 899 peri- and postmenopausal women with at least 14 bothersome vasomotor symptoms/week. Interventions included escitalopram 10–20 mg/day, non-aerobic yoga, aerobic exercise, 1.8 g/day omega-3 fatty acid supplementation, low-dose oral 17-beta-estradiol 0.5-mg/day, and low-dose venlafaxine XR 75-mg/day. The main outcome measures were changes from baseline in mean daily vasomotor symptoms frequency and bother during 8–12 weeks of treatment. Linear regression models estimated differences in outcomes between each intervention and corresponding control group, adjusted for baseline characteristics. Models included trial-specific intercepts, effects of the baseline outcome measure, and time. Results The 8-week reduction in vasomotor symptoms frequency from baseline relative to placebo was similar for escitalopram at −1.4/day (95% CI: −2.7 to −0.2), low-dose estradiol at −2.4 (95% CI: −3.4 to −1.3), and venlafaxine at −1.8 (95% CI: −2.8 to −0.8); vasomotor symptoms bother reduction was minimal and did not vary across these three pharmacologic interventions (means −0.2 to −0.3 relative to placebo). No effects on vasomotor symptoms frequency or bother were seen with aerobic exercise, yoga or omega-3 supplements. Conclusions These analyses suggest that escitalopram, low-dose estradiol, and venlafaxine provide comparable, modest reductions in vasomotor symptoms frequency and bother among women with moderate hot flushes. Clinical Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov, www

  10. Sociodemographic Differences Between Alcohol Use and Sickness Absence: Pooled Analysis of Four Cohort Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ervasti, Jenni; Kivimäki, Mika; Head, Jenny; Goldberg, Marcel; Airagnes, Guillaume; Pentti, Jaana; Oksanen, Tuula; Salo, Paula; Suominen, Sakari; Jokela, Markus; Vahtera, Jussi; Zins, Marie; Virtanen, Marianna

    2018-01-01

    We examined differences in sickness absence in relation to at-risk drinking and abstinence, taking into account potential changes in consumption. We used individual-participant data (n = 46,514) from four prospective cohort studies from Finland, France and the UK. Participants responded to a survey on alcohol use at two time points 4-6 years apart, and were linked to records of sickness absence for an ~6-year follow-up after the latter survey. Abstainers were those reporting no alcohol use in either survey. At-risk drinkers at T1 were labelled as 'former', at-risk drinkers at T2 as 'current' and at-risk drinkers at both times as 'consistent' at-risk drinkers. The reference group was low-risk drinkers at both times. Study-specific analyses were stratified by sex and socioeconomic status (SES) and the estimates were pooled using meta-analysis. Among men (n = 17,285), abstainers (6%), former (5%), current (5%) and consistent (7%) at-risk drinkers had an increased risk of sickness absence compared with consistent low-risk drinkers (77%). Among women (n = 29,229), only abstainers (12%) had a higher risk of sickness absence compared to consistent low-risk drinkers (74%). After adjustment for lifestyle and health, abstaining from alcohol was associated with sickness absence among people with intermediate and high SES, but not among people with low SES. The U-shaped alcohol use-sickness absence association is more consistent in men than women. Abstinence is a risk factor for sickness absence among people with higher rather than lower SES. Healthy worker effect and health selection may partly explain the observed differences. In a pooled analysis from four cohort studies from three European countries, we demonstrated a U-shaped association between alcohol use and sickness absence, particularly among men. Abstinence from alcohol was associated with increased sickness absenteeism among both sexes and across socioeconomic strata, except those with low SES. © The Author 2017

  11. Thermal-hydraulic analysis of the OSURR pool for power upgrade with natural convection core cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha, J.J.; Aldemir, T.

    1988-01-01

    Natural convection mode core cooling will be maintained in the LEU conversion/power upgrade of The Ohio State University Research Reactor (OSURR) to 250-500 kW. The pool water will be cooled by a water-glycol-air and a water-water heat exchanger. A plume disperser will be installed in the pool to minimize evaporation from the pool top and to maintain the dose rate due to N-16 activity within allowable levels. The minimization of the pool heat removal system operation costs necessitates maximizing the inlet temperature to the water-glycol-air heat exchanger. For the maximization process, the change in the pool temperature and velocity fields have to be investigated as a function of: location and orientation of the heat removal system components and the plume disperser in the pool; mass flow rate through the plume disperser. The velocity and temperature fields in the pool are determined using COMMIX-1A. The computational system model accounts for the presence of all the pool components (i.e. core, thermal column, beam ports, ion chamber, guide tubes, rabbit, neutron source etc.). The results show that: (1) Both the heat removal system inlet point and the plume disperser have to be located close to the top of the core. (2) Using a disperser system consisting of several pipes may be more feasible than a single unit. (3) For high disperser flow, the disperser jet has to be almost parallel to the top of the core to prevent flow reversal in coolant channels. (4) More than one disperser system may be necessary to create an inversion layer in the pool

  12. Analysis of key hardware factors and countermeasure for restricting 49-2 swimming pool reactor lifetime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yadong; Guo Yue; Yang Xiao; Wang Yiwei; Wang Zhanwen

    2013-01-01

    Safe operation is the most important factor to determine the lifetime of aged 49-2 swimming pool reactor. In this paper, the hardware factors of lifetime were analyzed, such as the pool concrete aging, corrosion of aluminum container and primary coolant system, and graphite swelling etc., and then the corresponding measures such as surveillance, prevention and maintenance were purposed. The results show that 49-2 swimming pool reactor can continue to operate safely due to that container is safe under 8 degree earthquake, the reactor is safe on flood level of once per millennium, adding dam break, and the ageing condition of primary coolant system and container is acceptable. (authors)

  13. Rivaroxaban for the prevention of venous thromboembolism after hip or knee arthroplasty. Pooled analysis of four studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turpie, A G G; Lassen, M R; Eriksson, Birgit

    2011-01-01

    Four phase III studies compared oral rivaroxaban with subcutaneous enoxaparin for the prevention of venous thromboembolism (VTE) after total hip or knee arthroplasty (THA or TKA). A pooled analysis of these studies compared the effect of rivaroxaban with enoxaparin on symptomatic VTE plus all-cau...

  14. Semi-Professional Rugby League Players have Higher Concussion Risk than Professional or Amateur Participants: A Pooled Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Doug; Hume, Patria; Gissane, Conor; Clark, Trevor

    2017-02-01

    A combined estimate of injuries within a specific sport through pooled analysis provides more precise evidence and meaningful information about the sport, whilst controlling for between-study variation due to individual sub-cohort characteristics. The objective of this analysis was to review all published rugby league studies reporting injuries from match and training participation and report the pooled data estimates for rugby league concussion injury epidemiology. A systematic literature analysis of concussion in rugby league was performed on published studies from January 1990 to October 2015. Data were extracted and pooled from 25 studies that reported the number and incidence of concussions in rugby league match and training activities. Amateur rugby league players had the highest incidence of concussive injuries in match activities (19.1 per 1000 match hours) while semi-professional players had the highest incidence of concussive injuries in training activities (3.1 per 1000 training hours). This pooled analysis showed that, during match participation activities, amateur rugby league participants had a higher reported concussion injury rate than professional and semi-professional participants. Semi-professional participants had nearly a threefold greater concussion injury risk than amateur rugby league participants during match participation. They also had nearly a 600-fold greater concussion injury risk than professional rugby league participants during training participation.

  15. Individual and combined effects of multiple global change drivers on terrestrial phosphorus pools: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Kai; Yang, Wanqin; Peng, Yan; Peng, Changhui; Tan, Bo; Xu, Zhenfeng; Zhang, Li; Ni, Xiangyin; Zhou, Wei; Wu, Fuzhong

    2018-07-15

    Human activity-induced global change drivers have dramatically changed terrestrial phosphorus (P) dynamics. However, our understanding of the interactive effects of multiple global change drivers on terrestrial P pools remains elusive, limiting their incorporation into ecological and biogeochemical models. We conducted a meta-analysis using 1751 observations extracted from 283 published articles to evaluate the individual, combined, and interactive effects of elevated CO 2 , warming, N addition, P addition, increased rainfall, and drought on P pools of plant (at both single-plant and plant-community levels), soil and microbial biomass. Our results suggested that (1) terrestrial P pools showed the most sensitive responses to the individual effects of warming and P addition; (2) P pools were consistently stimulated by P addition alone or in combination with simultaneous N addition; (3) environmental and experimental setting factors such as ecosystem type, climate, and latitude could significantly influence both the individual and combined effects; and (4) the interactive effects of two-driver pairs across multiple global change drivers are more likely to be additive rather than synergistic or antagonistic. Our findings highlighting the importance of additive interactive effects among multiple global change drivers on terrestrial P pools would be useful for incorporating P as controls on ecological processes such as photosynthesis and plant growth into ecosystem models used to analyze effects of multiple drivers under future global change. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Identifying sexual orientation health disparities in adolescents: analysis of pooled data from the Youth Risk Behavior Survey, 2005 and 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustanski, Brian; Van Wagenen, Aimee; Birkett, Michelle; Eyster, Sandra; Corliss, Heather L

    2014-02-01

    We studied sexual orientation disparities in health outcomes among US adolescents by pooling multiple Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) data sets from 2005 and 2007 for 14 jurisdictions. Here we describe the methodology for pooling and analyzing these data sets. Sexual orientation-related items assessed sexual orientation identity, gender of sexual contacts, sexual attractions, and harassment regarding sexual orientation. Wording of items varied across jurisdictions, so we created parallel variables and composite sexual minority variables. We used a variety of statistical approaches to address issues with the analysis of pooled data and to meet the aims of individual articles, which focused on a range of health outcomes and behaviors related to cancer, substance use, sexual health, mental health, violence, and injury.

  17. Research on Optimization of Pooling System and Its Application in Drug Supply Chain Based on Big Data Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, DengFeng; Mao, Hongyi

    2017-01-01

    Reform of drug procurement is being extensively implemented and expanded in China, especially in today's big data environment. However, the pattern of supply mode innovation lags behind procurement improvement. Problems in financial strain and supply break frequently occur, which affect the stability of drug supply. Drug Pooling System is proposed and applied in a few pilot cities to resolve these problems. From the perspective of supply chain, this study analyzes the process of setting important parameters and sets out the tasks of involved parties in a pooling system according to the issues identified in the pilot run. The approach is based on big data analysis and simulation using system dynamic theory and modeling of Vensim software to optimize system performance. This study proposes a theoretical framework to resolve problems and attempts to provide a valuable reference for future application of pooling systems.

  18. Sensitisation to common allergens and respiratory symptoms in endotoxin exposed workers: a pooled analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Basinas, I.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/313908206; Schlünssen, V.; Heederik, D.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/072910542; Sigsgaard, T.; Smit, L.A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/311470882; Samadi, S.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304838551; Omland, O.; Hjort, C.; Madsen, A.M.; Skov, S.; Wouters, I.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/274156652

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To test the hypotheses that current endotoxin exposure is inversely associated with allergic sensitisation and positively associated with non-allergic respiratory diseases in four occupationally exposed populations using a standardised analytical approach. METHODS: Data were pooled from

  19. Spent fuel pool thermal-hydraulic analysis using RELAP5-3D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramos, M. C.; Fernandes, G.H.N.; Costa, A.L.; Pereira, F.; Pereira, C., E-mail: marc5663@gmail.com, E-mail: ghnfernandes@pq.cnpq.br, E-mail: claubia@nuclear.ufmg.br, E-mail: antonella@nuclear.ufmg.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear

    2017-07-01

    In order to analyze the thermo-hydraulic behavior of spent fuel pools, and taking as reference a hypothetic PWR nuclear plant, a model of RELAP-3D for a spent fuel pool has been built. This model has been used to simulate a loss of coolant in SPF. This study focuses on the loss of coolant flow accident in spent fuel storage pool which is modelled by using RELAP5-3D code to observe the coolant level reduction and fuel uncovery because of decay heat generation of the spent fuel in the pool. The results have been compared with the available data. The developed model demonstrated that the RELAP5-3D is capable of reproduce the thermal behavior of SPF in a transient scenario. (author)

  20. Dietary sugar/starches intake and Barrett's esophagus: a pooled analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Nan; Petrick, Jessica Leigh; Steck, Susan Elizabeth; Bradshaw, Patrick Terrence; McClain, Kathleen Michele; Niehoff, Nicole Michelle; Engel, Lawrence Stuart; Shaheen, Nicholas James; Corley, Douglas Allen; Vaughan, Thomas Leonard; Gammon, Marilie Denise

    2017-11-01

    Barrett's esophagus (BE) is the key precursor lesion of esophageal adenocarcinoma, a lethal cancer that has increased rapidly in westernized countries over the past four decades. Dietary sugar intake has also been increasing over time, and may be associated with these tumors by promoting hyperinsulinemia. The study goal was to examine multiple measures of sugar/starches intake in association with BE. This pooled analysis included 472 BE cases and 492 controls from two similarly conducted case-control studies in the United States. Dietary intake data, collected by study-specific food frequency questionnaires, were harmonized across studies by linking with the University of Minnesota Nutrient Database, and pooled based on study-specific quartiles. Logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs), adjusting for age, sex, race, total energy intake, study indicator, body mass index, frequency of gastro-esophageal reflux, and fruit/vegetable intake. In both studies, intake of sucrose (cases vs. controls, g/day: 36.07 vs. 33.51; 36.80 vs. 35.06, respectively) and added sugar (46.15 vs. 41.01; 44.18 vs. 40.68, respectively) were higher in cases than controls. BE risk was increased 79% and 71%, respectively, for associations comparing the fourth to the first quartile of intake of sucrose (OR Q4vs.Q1  = 1.79, 95% CI = 1.07-3.02, P trend  = 0.01) and added sugar (OR Q4vs.Q1  = 1.71, 95% CI = 1.05-2.80, P trend  = 0.15). Intake of sweetened desserts/beverages was associated with 71% increase in BE risk (OR Q4vs.Q1  = 1.71, 95% CI = 1.07-2.73, P trend  = 0.04). Limiting dietary intake of foods and beverages that are high in added sugar, especially refined table sugar, may reduce the risk of developing BE.

  1. Power analysis of QTL detection in half-sib families using selective DNA pooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    López Teresa

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Individual loci of economic importance (QTL can be detected by comparing the inheritance of a trait and the inheritance of loci with alleles readily identifiable by laboratory methods (genetic markers. Data on allele segregation at the individual level are costly and alternatives have been proposed that make use of allele frequencies among progeny, rather than individual genotypes. Among the factors that may affect the power of the set up, the most important are those intrinsic to the QTL: the additive effect of the QTL, and its dominance, and distance between markers and QTL. Other factors are relative to the choice of animals and markers, such as the frequency of the QTL and marker alleles among dams and sires. Data collection may affect the detection power through the size of half-sib families, selection rate within families, and the technical error incurred when estimating genetic frequencies. We present results for a sensitivity analysis for QTL detection using pools of DNA from selected half-sibs. Simulations showed that conclusive detection may be achieved with families of at least 500 half-sibs if sires are chosen on the criteria that most of their marker alleles are either both missing, or one is fixed, among dams.

  2. Sensitisation to common allergens and respiratory symptoms in endotoxin exposed workers: a pooled analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basinas, Ioannis; Schlünssen, Vivi; Heederik, Dick; Sigsgaard, Torben; Smit, Lidwien A M; Samadi, Sadegh; Omland, Oyvind; Hjort, Charlotte; Madsen, Anne Mette; Skov, Simon; Wouters, Inge M

    2012-02-01

    To test the hypotheses that current endotoxin exposure is inversely associated with allergic sensitisation and positively associated with non-allergic respiratory diseases in four occupationally exposed populations using a standardised analytical approach. Data were pooled from four epidemiological studies including 3883 Dutch and Danish employees in veterinary medicine, agriculture and power plants using biofuel. Endotoxin exposure was estimated by quantitative job-exposure matrices specific for the study populations. Dose-response relationships between exposure, IgE-mediated sensitisation to common allergens and self-reported health symptoms were assessed using logistic regression and generalised additive modelling. Adjustments were made for study, age, sex, atopic predisposition, smoking habit and farm childhood. Heterogeneity was assessed by analysis stratified by study. Current endotoxin exposure was dose-dependently associated with a reduced prevalence of allergic sensitisation (ORs of 0.92, 0.81 and 0.66 for low mediate, high mediate and high exposure) and hay fever (ORs of 1.16, 0.81 and 0.58). Endotoxin exposure was a risk factor for organic dust toxic syndrome, and levels above 100 EU/m(3) significantly increased the risk of chronic bronchitis (pOccupational endotoxin exposure has a protective effect on allergic sensitisation and hay fever but increases the risk for organic dust toxic syndrome and chronic bronchitis. Endotoxin's protective effects are most clearly observed among agricultural workers.

  3. Community Hospital Telehealth Consortium

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Williams, Elton

    2004-01-01

    The Community Hospital Telehealth Consortium is a unique, forward-thinking, community-based healthcare service project organized around 5 not-for-profit community hospitals located throughout Louisiana and Mississippi...

  4. Community Hospital Telehealth Consortium

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Williams, Elton

    2003-01-01

    The Community Hospital Telehealth Consortium is a unique, forward-thinking, community-based healthcare service project organized around 5 not-for-profit community hospitals located throughout Louisiana and Mississippi...

  5. Community Hospital Telehealth Consortium

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Williams, Jr, Elton L

    2007-01-01

    The Community Hospital Telehealth Consortium is a unique, forward-thinking, community-based healthcare service project organized around 5 not-for-profit community hospitals located throughout Louisiana and Mississippi...

  6. Effectiveness of Vildagliptin in Clinical Practice: Pooled Analysis of Three Korean Observational Studies (the VICTORY Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunghwan Suh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The present observational study aimed to evaluate the clinical effectiveness of vildagliptin with metformin in Korean patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. Data were pooled from the vildagliptin postmarketing survey (PMS, the vildagliptin/metformin fixed drug combination (DC PMS, and a retrospective observational study of vildagliptin/metformin (fixed DC or free DC. The effectiveness endpoint was the proportion of patients who achieved a glycemic target (HbA1c of ≤7.0% at 24 weeks. In total, 4303 patients were included in the analysis; of these, 2087 patients were eligible. The mean patient age was 56.99 ± 11.25 years. Overall, 58.94% patients achieved an HbA1c target of ≤7.0% at 24 weeks. The glycemic target achievement rate was significantly greater in patients with baseline HbA1c < 7.5% versus ≥7.5% (84.64% versus 43.97%, receiving care at the hospital versus clinic (67.95% versus 52.33%, and receiving vildagliptin/metformin fixed DC versus free DC (70.69% versus 55.42%. Multivariate logistic regression analysis indicated that disease duration (P<0.0001, baseline HbA1c (P<0.0001, and DC type (P=0.0103 had significant effects on drug effectiveness. Vildagliptin plus metformin appeared as an effective treatment option for patients with T2DM in clinical practice settings in Korea.

  7. Virginia ADS consortium - thorium utilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myneni, Ganapati

    2015-01-01

    A Virginia ADS consortium, consisting of Virginia Universities (UVa, VCU, VT), Industry (Casting Analysis Corporation, GEM*STAR, MuPlus Inc.), Jefferson Lab and not-for-profit ISOHIM, has been organizing International Accelerator-Driven Sub-Critical Systems (ADS) and Thorium Utilization (ThU) workshops. The third workshop of this series was hosted by VCU in Richmond, Virginia, USA Oct 2014 with CBMM and IAEA sponsorship and was endorsed by International Thorium Energy Committee (IThEC), Geneva and Virginia Nuclear Energy Consortium Authority. In this presentation a brief summary of the successful 3 rd International ADS and ThU workshop proceedings and review the worldwide ADS plans and/or programs is given. Additionally, a report on new start-ups on Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) systems is presented. Further, a discussion on potential simplistic fertile 232 Th to fissile 233 U conversion is made

  8. Dog Ownership and Mortality in England: A Pooled Analysis of Six Population-based Cohorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Ding; Bauman, Adrian E; Sherrington, Cathie; McGreevy, Paul D; Edwards, Kate M; Stamatakis, Emmanuel

    2018-02-01

    Dog ownership may be associated with reduced risk for cardiovascular disease. However, data are scant on the relationship between dog ownership and all-cause and cause-specific mortality risk. Data from six separate cohorts (1995-1997, 2001-2002, 2004) of the Health Survey for England were pooled and analyzed in 2017. Participants were 59,352 adults (mean age 46.5, SD=17.9 years) who consented to be linked to the National Death Registry. Living in a household with a dog was reported at baseline. Outcomes included all-cause and cardiovascular disease mortality (determined using ICD-9 codes 390-459, ICD-10 codes I01-I99). Multilevel Weibull survival analysis was used to examine the associations between dog ownership and mortality, adjusted for various sociodemographic and lifestyle variables. Potential effect modifiers, including age, sex, education, living circumstances, longstanding illness, and prior diagnosis of cardiovascular disease, were also examined. During 679,441 person-years of follow-up (mean 11.5, SD=3.8 years), 8,169 participants died from all causes and 2,451 from cardiovascular disease. In the fully adjusted models, there was no statistically significant association between dog ownership and mortality outcomes (hazard ratio=1.03, 95% CI=0.98, 1.09, for all-cause mortality; and hazard ratio=1.07, 95% CI=0.96, 1.18, for cardiovascular disease mortality) and no significant effect modification. There is no evidence for an association between living in a household with a dog and all-cause or cardiovascular disease mortality in this large sample. These results should be interpreted in light of limitations in the measurement of dog ownership and its complexity in potential long-term health implications. Future studies should measure specific aspects of ownership, such as caring responsibilities and temporality. Copyright © 2017 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. External beam radiotherapy for painful osseous metastases: pooled data dose response analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Josef, Edgar; Shamsa, Falah; Youssef, Emad; Porter, Arthur T.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: Although the effectiveness of external beam irradiation in palliation of pain from osseous metastases is well established, the optimal fractionation schedule has not been determined. Clinical studies to date have failed to demonstrate an advantage for higher doses. To further address this issue, we conducted a pooled dose response analysis using data from published Phase III clinical trials. Methods and Materials: Complete response (CR) was used as an endpoint because it was felt to be least susceptible to inconsistencies in assessment.The biological effective dose (BED) was calculated for each schedule using the linear-quadratic model and an α/β of 10. Using SAS version 6.12, the data were fitted using a weighted linear regression, a logistic model, and the spline technique. Finally, BED was categorized, and odds ratios for each level were calculated. Results: CR was assessed early and late in 383 and 1,007 patients, respectively. Linear regression on the early-response data yielded a poor fit and a nonsignificant dose coefficient. With the late-response data, there was an excellent fit (R-square = 0.842) and a highly significant dose coefficient (p = 0.0002). Fitting early CR to a logistic model, we could not establish a significant dose response relationship. However, with the late-response data there was an excellent fit and the dose coefficient was significantly different from zero (0.017 ± 0.00524; p = 0.0012). Application of the spline technique or removal of an outlier resulted in an improved fit (p 0.048 and p = 0.0001, respectively). Using BED of < 14.4 Gy as a reference level, the odds ratios for late CR were 2.29-3.32 (BED of 19.5-51.4 Gy, respectively). Conclusion: Our results demonstrate a clear dose-response for pain relief. Further testing of high intensity regiments is warranted

  10. Synoptic climatological analysis of persistent cold air pools over the Carpathian Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabóné André, Karolina; Bartholy, Judit; Pongrácz, Rita

    2016-04-01

    A persistent cold air pool (PCAP) is a winter-time, anticyclone-related weather event over a relatively large basin. During this time the air is colder near the surface than aloft. This inversion near the surface can last even for weeks. As the cold air cools down, relative humidity increases and fog forms. The entire life cycle of a PCAP depends on the large scale circulation pattern. PCAP usually appears when an anticyclone builds up after a cold front passed over the examined basin, and it is usually destructed by a coming strong cold front of another midlatitude cyclone. Moreover, the intensity of the anticyclone affects the intensity of the PCAP. PCAP may result in different hazards for the population: (1) Temperature inversion in the surface layers together with weak wind may lead to severe air pollution causing health problems for many people, especially, elderly and children. (2) The fog and/or smog during chilly weather conditions often results in freezing rain. Both fog and freezing rain can distract transportation and electricity supply. Unfortunately, the numerical weather prediction models have difficulties to predict PCAP formation and destruction. One of the reasons is that PCAP is not defined objectively with a simple formula, which could be easily applied to the numerical output data. However, according to some recommendations from the synoptic literature, the shallow convective potential energy (SCPE) can be used to mathematically describe PCAP. In this study, we used the ERA-Interim reanalysis datasets to examine this very specific weather event (i.e., PCAP) over the Carpathian Basin. The connection between the mean sea level pressure and some PCAP measures (e.g., SCPE, energy deficit, etc.) is evaluated. For instance, we used logistic regression to identify PCAP periods over the Carpathian Basin. Then, further statistical analysis includes the evaluation of the length and intensity of these PCAP periods.

  11. Analysis of natural convection heat transfer and flows in internally heated stratified liquid pools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gubaidullin, A.A. Jr.; Dinh, T.N.; Sehgal, B.R.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper, natural convection flows and heat transfer in a liquid pool, with two superposed immiscible fluid layers, are analyzed. The objective of the study is to examine the effect of interfacial hydrodynamics and to develop a method which enables energy splitting to be evaluated in a stratified liquid pool. The thermal convection, with and without an internal heat source, in a rectangular cavity with different pairs of fluids was numerically simulated by a CFD code FLOW-3D. It was found that the code performs very well for prediction of heat transfer coefficients for different conditions. The hydrodynamic coupling between immiscible layers was found to have minor, if any, impact on the natural convection heat transfer for the conditions examined. Calculated results were used to develop, and validate, a new correlation for energy splitting and for heat transfer in stratified liquid pools

  12. Report of the 4th Workshop for Technology Transfer for Intelligent Compaction Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    On October 2728, 2015, the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet (KYTC) hosted the 4th workshop for : the Technology Transfer for Intelligent Compaction Consortium (TTICC), a Transportation Pooled Fund : (TPF5(233)) initiative designed to identify, s...

  13. Circulating Carotenoids and Risk of Breast Cancer: Pooled Analysis of Eight Prospective Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Carotenoids, micronutrients in fruits and vegetables, may reduce breast cancer risk. Most, but not all, past studies of circulating carotenoids and breast cancer have found an inverse association with at least one carotenoid, although the specific carotenoid has varied across studies. Methods We conducted a pooled analysis of eight cohort studies comprising more than 80% of the world’s published prospective data on plasma or serum carotenoids and breast cancer, including 3055 case subjects and 3956 matched control subjects. To account for laboratory differences and examine population differences across studies, we recalibrated participant carotenoid levels to a common standard by reassaying 20 plasma or serum samples from each cohort together at the same laboratory. Using conditional logistic regression, adjusting for several breast cancer risk factors, we calculated relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) using quintiles defined among the control subjects from all studies. All P values are two-sided. Results Statistically significant inverse associations with breast cancer were observed for α-carotene (top vs bottom quintile RR = 0.87, 95% CI = 0.71 to 1.05, Ptrend = .04), β-carotene (RR = 0.83, 95% CI = 0.70 to 0.98, Ptrend = .02), lutein+zeaxanthin (RR = 0.84, 95% CI = 0.70 to 1.01, Ptrend = .05), lycopene (RR = 0.78, 95% CI = 0.62 to 0.99, Ptrend = .02), and total carotenoids (RR = 0.81, 95% CI = 0.68 to 0.96, Ptrend = .01). β-Cryptoxanthin was not statistically significantly associated with risk. Tests for heterogeneity across studies were not statistically significant. For several carotenoids, associations appeared stronger for estrogen receptor negative (ER−) than for ER+ tumors (eg, β-carotene: ER−: top vs bottom quintile RR = 0.52, 95% CI = 0.36 to 0.77, Ptrend = .001; ER+: RR = 0.83, 95% CI = 0.66 to 1.04, Ptrend = .06; Pheterogeneity = .01). Conclusions This comprehensive prospective analysis suggests women with

  14. A pooled analysis to define vitamin D dose requirements for fracture prevention in seniors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meta-analyses reached conflicting results regarding vitamin D and fracture reduction. We pooled individual participant-level data from 11 double-blind RCTs of oral vitamin D supplementation (daily, weekly, 4-monthly) with or without calcium compared with placebo or calcium in seniors age 65 and olde...

  15. Dairy foods, calcium, and colorectal cancer: A pooled analysis of 10 cohort studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cho, E.; Smith-Warner, S.A.; Spiegelman, D.; Beeson, W.L.; Brandt, P.A. van den; Colditz, G.A.; Folsom, A.R.; Fraser, G.E.; Freudenheim, J.L.; Giovannucci, E.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Graham, S.; Miller, A.B.; Pietinen, P.; Potter, J.D.; Rohan, T.E.; Terry, P.; Toniolo, P.; Virtanen, M.J.; Willet, W.C.; Wolk, A.; Wu, K.; Yaun, S.-S.; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, A.; Hunter, D.J.

    2004-01-01

    Background: Studies in animals have suggested that calcium may reduce the risk of colorectal cancer. However, results from epidemiologic studies of intake of calcium or dairy foods and colorectal cancer risk have been inconclusive. Methods: We pooled the primary data from 10 cohort studies in five

  16. Experimental and computational analysis of the hot water layer for the radiological protection in swimming pool reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribeiro, Rogerio.

    1995-01-01

    Pool reactors are research reactors, which allow easy access to the core and rare simple to operate. Reactors of this kind operating at power levels higher than about one megawatt need a hot water layer at the surface of the pool, in order to keep surface activity below acceptable levels and enable free access to the upper part of the reactor. An experimental apparatus was constructed to study the hot water layer stability. Thermocouples were used to measure the temperature field. A numerical analysis was conducted simultaneously. Regarding experimental results, representative temperature contour lines of the hot water layer were plotted. The temperature field was determined in the numerical analysis and temperature contour lines corresponding to those of the experimental results were plotted. The hot water layer kept stable for experimental and numerical results. Good agreement between the results for the hot water layer position and thickness has been obtained. (author). 21 refs., 40 figs., 15 tabs

  17. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacogenetics of the MEK1/2 inhibitor, selumetinib, in Asian and Western healthy subjects: a pooled analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dymond, Angela W; Elks, Cathy; Martin, Paul; Carlile, David J; Mariani, Gabriella; Lovick, Susan; Huang, Yifan; Lorch, Ulrike; Brown, Helen; So, Karen

    2017-06-01

    Emerging data on selumetinib, a MEK1/2 inhibitor in clinical development, suggest a possible difference in pharmacokinetics (PK) between Japanese and Western patients. This pooled analysis sought to assess the effect of ethnicity on selumetinib exposure in healthy Western and Asian subjects, and to identify any association between genetic variants in the UGT1A1, CYP2C19 and ABCG2 genes and observed differences in selumetinib PK. A pooled analysis of data from ten Phase I studies, one in Asian subjects (encompassing Japanese, non-Japanese Asian and Indian Asian subjects) and nine in Western subjects, was conducted. Key findings were derived from the collective exposure data across doses of 25, 35, 50 and 75 mg selumetinib; primary variables were dose-normalized AUC and C max . PK data from 308 subjects (10 studies) were available for the pooled analysis; genetic data from 87 subjects (3 studies) were available for the pharmacogenetic analysis. Dose-normalized AUC and C max were 35% (95% CI: 25-47%) and 39% (95% CI: 24-56%) higher in the pooled Asian group, respectively, compared with Western subjects. PK exposure parameters were similar between the Japanese, non-Japanese Asian and Indian groups. There was no evidence that the polymorphisms assessed in the genes UGT1A1, CYP2C19 and ABCG2 account for observed PK differences. Selumetinib exposure was higher in healthy Asian subjects compared with Western subjects, and these data provide valuable insight for clinicians to consider when treating patients of Asian ethnicity with selumetinib.

  18. Development of a self-report physical function instrument for disability assessment: item pool construction and factor analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonough, Christine M; Jette, Alan M; Ni, Pengsheng; Bogusz, Kara; Marfeo, Elizabeth E; Brandt, Diane E; Chan, Leighton; Meterko, Mark; Haley, Stephen M; Rasch, Elizabeth K

    2013-09-01

    To build a comprehensive item pool representing work-relevant physical functioning and to test the factor structure of the item pool. These developmental steps represent initial outcomes of a broader project to develop instruments for the assessment of function within the context of Social Security Administration (SSA) disability programs. Comprehensive literature review; gap analysis; item generation with expert panel input; stakeholder interviews; cognitive interviews; cross-sectional survey administration; and exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses to assess item pool structure. In-person and semistructured interviews and Internet and telephone surveys. Sample of SSA claimants (n=1017) and a normative sample of adults from the U.S. general population (n=999). Not applicable. Model fit statistics. The final item pool consisted of 139 items. Within the claimant sample, 58.7% were white; 31.8% were black; 46.6% were women; and the mean age was 49.7 years. Initial factor analyses revealed a 4-factor solution, which included more items and allowed separate characterization of: (1) changing and maintaining body position, (2) whole body mobility, (3) upper body function, and (4) upper extremity fine motor. The final 4-factor model included 91 items. Confirmatory factor analyses for the 4-factor models for the claimant and the normative samples demonstrated very good fit. Fit statistics for claimant and normative samples, respectively, were: Comparative Fit Index=.93 and .98; Tucker-Lewis Index=.92 and .98; and root mean square error approximation=.05 and .04. The factor structure of the physical function item pool closely resembled the hypothesized content model. The 4 scales relevant to work activities offer promise for providing reliable information about claimant physical functioning relevant to work disability. Copyright © 2013 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The analysis of the RA reactor irradiated fuel cooling in the spent fuel pool; Analiza hladjenja ozracenog goriva u bazenu za odlaganje reaktora RA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vrhovac, M; Afgan, N; Spasojevic, D; Jovic, V [Institute of nuclear sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Yugoslavia)

    1985-07-01

    According to the RA reactor exploitation plan the great quantity of the irradiated spent fuel will be disposed in the reactor spent fuel pool after each reactor campaign which will including the present spent fuel inventory increase the residual power level in the pool and will soon cause the pool capacity shortage. To enable the analysis of the irradiated fuel cooling the pool and characteristic spent fuel canister temperature distribution at the residual power maximum was done. The results obtained under the various spent fuel cooling conditions in the pit indicate the normal spent fuel thermal load even in the most inconvenient cooling conditions. (author)

  20. MinION Analysis and Reference Consortium: Phase 2 data release and analysis of R9.0 chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Miten; Tyson, John R; Loose, Matthew; Ip, Camilla L C; Eccles, David A; O'Grady, Justin; Malla, Sunir; Leggett, Richard M; Wallerman, Ola; Jansen, Hans J; Zalunin, Vadim; Birney, Ewan; Brown, Bonnie L; Snutch, Terrance P; Olsen, Hugh E

    2017-01-01

    Long-read sequencing is rapidly evolving and reshaping the suite of opportunities for genomic analysis. For the MinION in particular, as both the platform and chemistry develop, the user community requires reference data to set performance expectations and maximally exploit third-generation sequencing. We performed an analysis of MinION data derived from whole genome sequencing of Escherichia coli K-12 using the R9.0 chemistry, comparing the results with the older R7.3 chemistry. We computed the error-rate estimates for insertions, deletions, and mismatches in MinION reads. Run-time characteristics of the flow cell and run scripts for R9.0 were similar to those observed for R7.3 chemistry, but with an 8-fold increase in bases per second (from 30 bps in R7.3 and SQK-MAP005 library preparation, to 250 bps in R9.0) processed by individual nanopores, and less drop-off in yield over time. The 2-dimensional ("2D") N50 read length was unchanged from the prior chemistry. Using the proportion of alignable reads as a measure of base-call accuracy, 99.9% of "pass" template reads from 1-dimensional ("1D")  experiments were mappable and ~97% from 2D experiments. The median identity of reads was ~89% for 1D and ~94% for 2D experiments. The total error rate (miscall + insertion + deletion ) decreased for 2D "pass" reads from 9.1% in R7.3 to 7.5% in R9.0 and for template "pass" reads from 26.7% in R7.3 to 14.5% in R9.0. These Phase 2 MinION experiments serve as a baseline by providing estimates for read quality, throughput, and mappability. The datasets further enable the development of bioinformatic tools tailored to the new R9.0 chemistry and the design of novel biological applications for this technology. K: thousand, Kb: kilobase (one thousand base pairs), M: million, Mb: megabase (one million base pairs), Gb: gigabase (one billion base pairs).

  1. An Innovative Hybrid Loop-Pool SFR Design and Safety Analysis Methods: Today and Tomorrow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hongbin Zhang; Haihua Zhao; Vincent Mousseau

    2008-01-01

    Investment in commercial sodium cooled fast reactor (SFR) power plants will become possible only if SFRs achieve economic competitiveness as compared to light water reactors and other Generation IV reactors. Toward that end, we have launched efforts to improve the economics and safety of SFRs from the thermal design and safety analyses perspectives at Idaho National Laboratory. From the thermal design perspective, an innovative hybrid loop-pool SFR design has been proposed. This design takes advantage of the inherent safety of a pool design and the compactness of a loop design to further improve economics and safety. From the safety analyses perspective, we have initiated an effort to develop a high fidelity reactor system safety code

  2. Design and computational analysis of passive siphon breaker for 49-2 swimming pool reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yue Zhiting; Song Yunpeng; Liu Xingmin; Zou Yao; Wu Yuanyuan

    2014-01-01

    Based on safety considerations, a passive siphon breaker will be added to the primary cooling system of 49-2 Swimming Pool Reactor (SPR). With the breaker location determined, the capability of siphon breakers with diameters of 1.5 cm and 2.0 cm was calculated and analyzed respectively by RELAP5/MOD3.3 code. The results show that in the condition of large break loss of coolant accident these two sizes of siphon breakers are able to break the siphon phenomena, and maintain the pool water level above the reactor core when the reactor and the pump are shutdown. In the end, to be conservative, the siphon breaker with diameter of 2.0 cm is adopted. (authors)

  3. Efficacy and safety of intermittent preventive treatment with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine for malaria in African infants: a pooled analysis of six randomised, placebo-controlled trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aponte, John J.; Schellenberg, David; Egan, Andrea; Breckenridge, Alasdair; Carneiro, Ilona; Critchley, Julia; Danquah, Ina; Dodoo, Alexander; Kobbe, Robin; Lell, Bertrand; May, Jürgen; Premji, Zul; Sanz, Sergi; Sevene, Esperanza; Soulaymani-Becheikh, Rachida; Winstanley, Peter; Adjei, Samuel; Anemana, Sylvester; Chandramohan, Daniel; Issifou, Saadou; Mockenhaupt, Frank; Owusu-Agyei, Seth; Greenwood, Brian; Grobusch, Martin P.; Kremsner, Peter G.; Macete, Eusebio; Mshinda, Hassan; Newman, Robert D.; Slutsker, Laurence; Tanner, Marcel; Alonso, Pedro; Menendez, Clara

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Intermittent preventive treatment (IPT) is a promising strategy for malaria control in infants. We undertook a pooled analysis of the safety and efficacy of IPT in infants (IPTi) with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine in Africa. METHODS: We pooled data from six double-blind, randomised,

  4. Quantitative analysis of low-density SNP data for parentage assignment and estimation of family contributions to pooled samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henshall, John M; Dierens, Leanne; Sellars, Melony J

    2014-09-02

    While much attention has focused on the development of high-density single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) assays, the costs of developing and running low-density assays have fallen dramatically. This makes it feasible to develop and apply SNP assays for agricultural species beyond the major livestock species. Although low-cost low-density assays may not have the accuracy of the high-density assays widely used in human and livestock species, we show that when combined with statistical analysis approaches that use quantitative instead of discrete genotypes, their utility may be improved. The data used in this study are from a 63-SNP marker Sequenom® iPLEX Platinum panel for the Black Tiger shrimp, for which high-density SNP assays are not currently available. For quantitative genotypes that could be estimated, in 5% of cases the most likely genotype for an individual at a SNP had a probability of less than 0.99. Matrix formulations of maximum likelihood equations for parentage assignment were developed for the quantitative genotypes and also for discrete genotypes perturbed by an assumed error term. Assignment rates that were based on maximum likelihood with quantitative genotypes were similar to those based on maximum likelihood with perturbed genotypes but, for more than 50% of cases, the two methods resulted in individuals being assigned to different families. Treating genotypes as quantitative values allows the same analysis framework to be used for pooled samples of DNA from multiple individuals. Resulting correlations between allele frequency estimates from pooled DNA and individual samples were consistently greater than 0.90, and as high as 0.97 for some pools. Estimates of family contributions to the pools based on quantitative genotypes in pooled DNA had a correlation of 0.85 with estimates of contributions from DNA-derived pedigree. Even with low numbers of SNPs of variable quality, parentage testing and family assignment from pooled samples are

  5. Analysis of the LBLOCAs in the HANARO pool for the 3-pin fuel test loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, S. K.; Chi, D. Y.; Sim, B. S.; Park, K. N.; Ahn, S. H.; Lee, J. M.; Lee, C. Y.; Kim, Y. J.

    2004-12-01

    The Fuel Test Loop(FTL) has been developed to meet the increasing demand on fuel irradiation and burn up test required the development of new fuels in Korea. It is designed to provide the test conditions of high pressure and temperature like the commercial PWR and CANDU power plants. And also the FTL have the cooling capability to sufficiently remove the thermal power of the in-pile test section for normal operation, Anticipated Operational Occurrences(AOOs), and Design Basis Accidents(DBAs). This report deals with the Large Break Loss of Coolant Accidents (LBLOCAs) in HANARO pool for the 3-pin fuel test loop. The MARS code has been used for the prediction of the emergency core cooling capability of the FTL and the peak cladding temperature of the test fuels for the LBLOCAs. The location of the pipe break is assumed at the hill taps connecting the cold and hot legs in HANARO pool to the inlet and outlet nozzles of the In-Pile test Section (IPS). Double ended guillotine break is assumed for the large break loss of coolant accidents. The discharge coefficients of 0.1, 0.33, 0.67, 1.0 are investigated for the LBLOCAs. The test fuels for PWR and CANDU test modes are not heated up for the LBLOCAs caused by the double ended guillotine break in the HANARO pool. The reason is that the sufficient emergency cooling water to cool down the test fuels is supplied continuously to the in-pile test section. Therefore the PCTs for the LBLOCAs in the HANARO pool meet the design criterion of commercial PWR fuel that maximum PCT is lower than 1204 .deg. C

  6. Birth order and Risk of Childhood Cancer: A Pooled Analysis from Five U.S. States

    OpenAIRE

    Von Behren, Julie; Spector, Logan G.; Mueller, Beth A.; Carozza, Susan E.; Chow, Eric J.; Fox, Erin E.; Horel, Scott; Johnson, Kimberly J.; McLaughlin, Colleen; Puumala, Susan E.; Ross, Julie A.; Reynolds, Peggy

    2010-01-01

    The causes of childhood cancers are largely unknown. Birth order has been used as a proxy for prenatal and postnatal exposures, such as frequency of infections and in utero hormone exposures. We investigated the association between birth order and childhood cancers in a pooled case-control dataset. The subjects were drawn from population-based registries of cancers and births in California, Minnesota, New York, Texas, and Washington. We included 17,672 cases less than 15 years of age who were...

  7. Numerical analysis of isothermal JET injection into a denser liquid pool using RD-MPS Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, S. [KEPCO Nuclear Fuel, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, H. S. [POSTECH, Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Jeun, G. [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    In this study, the rigid body dynamics coupled moving particle semi-implicit (RD-MPS) method was used to simulate a plunging liquid jet penetrating into a denser liquid pool. The phenomenon is related to fuel-coolant interactions (FCI) during severe accidents in nuclear power plants when coolant water is forcedly injected into a melt pool. A numerical particle method like MPS enables to simulate the complex multiphase flow in that significant deformation of fluids occurs due to its inherent grid less algorithm. However, the MPS method alone cannot continue the calculation for a long time as shown in the Ikea's work due to the large deformation of fluid surfaces and the difference in both liquid densities. In the RD-MPS method, the rigid body dynamics was coupled with the moving particle semi-implicit method to increase the overall stability of calculations and to calculate the multi-phase behavior of fluids. We performed two and three dimensional calculations to simulate jet penetration behaviors in a denser liquid pool, and the result was in good agreement with that of experiment. The simulation results suggested that the coupled model be useful in simulating dynamic interactions of multi-phase incompressible fluids as well as that the 3-D simulation for the plunging jet in a confined geometry predicted better agreement with experimental results than the 2-D simulation did.

  8. Numerical analysis of isothermal JET injection into a denser liquid pool using RD-MPS Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, S.; Park, H. S.; Jeun, G.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the rigid body dynamics coupled moving particle semi-implicit (RD-MPS) method was used to simulate a plunging liquid jet penetrating into a denser liquid pool. The phenomenon is related to fuel-coolant interactions (FCI) during severe accidents in nuclear power plants when coolant water is forcedly injected into a melt pool. A numerical particle method like MPS enables to simulate the complex multiphase flow in that significant deformation of fluids occurs due to its inherent grid less algorithm. However, the MPS method alone cannot continue the calculation for a long time as shown in the Ikea's work due to the large deformation of fluid surfaces and the difference in both liquid densities. In the RD-MPS method, the rigid body dynamics was coupled with the moving particle semi-implicit method to increase the overall stability of calculations and to calculate the multi-phase behavior of fluids. We performed two and three dimensional calculations to simulate jet penetration behaviors in a denser liquid pool, and the result was in good agreement with that of experiment. The simulation results suggested that the coupled model be useful in simulating dynamic interactions of multi-phase incompressible fluids as well as that the 3-D simulation for the plunging jet in a confined geometry predicted better agreement with experimental results than the 2-D simulation did

  9. Quantification of wall motion and phase of contraction in tomographic gated blood pool studies using length-based Fourier analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakajima, Kenichi; Bunko, Hisashi; Taki, Junichi; Nambu, Ichiro; Shiire, Yasushi; Tonami, Norihisa; Hisada, Kinichi; Tada, Akira; Kojima, Kazuhkio

    1985-03-01

    Length-based Fourier analysis, a new method for quantification of wall motion and timing of contraction, was applied to tomographic gated blood pool study. Two parameters, percent-length shortening (%LS) and length-based phase were calculated based on the time-length curves from a center to ventricular edges, and compared with the count-based method. In mathematical models for tomographic gated blood pool images, the severity of asynergy was easily determined by length-based method, and the accuracy of the parameters was good. As to the setting of the center, fixed center provided more reliable parameters than the method using movable center, i.e., when a center of gravity was determined in each frame. By length-based Fourier analysis, quantification of wall motion was easily performed, and the initial inward movement caused by the accessory conduction pathway was assessed in patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome. Length-based approach was considered to be reasonable and effective because the movements of the ventricular edges are essential in tomographic gated blood pool images.

  10. Quantification of wall motion and phase of contraction in tomographic gated blood pool studies using length-based Fourier analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, Kenichi; Bunko, Hisashi; Taki, Junichi; Nambu, Ichiro; Shiire, Yasushi; Tonami, Norihisa; Hisada, Kinichi; Tada, Akira; Kojima, Kazuhiko.

    1985-01-01

    Length-based Fourier analysis, a new method for quantification of wall motion and timing of contraction, was applied to tomographic gated blood pool study. Two parameters, percent-length shortening (%LS) and length-based phase were calculated based on the time-length curves from a center to ventricular edges, and compared with the count-based method. In mathematical models for tomographic gated blood pool images, the severity of asynergy was easily determined by length-based method, and the accuracy of the parameters was good. As to the setting of the center, fixed center provided more reliable parameters than the method using movable center, i.e., when a center of gravity was determined in each frame. By length-based Fourier analysis, quantification of wall motion was easily performed, and the initial inward movement caused by the accessory conduction pathway was assessed in patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome. Length-based approach was considered to be reasonable and effective because the movements of the ventricular edges are essential in tomographic gated blood pool images. (author)

  11. Citalopram and escitalopram in the treatment of major depressive disorder: a pooled analysis of 3 clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huafang; Li, Ting; Li, Guanjun; Luo, Jianfeng

    2014-11-01

    Pooled analysis is a powerful technique that is increasingly used to detect differences in efficacy between pharmacologic agents. Some studies have compared the efficacy and tolerability of citalopram and escitalopram, with contradictory results. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy and tolerability of citalopram and escitalopram in the treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD) using pooled analyses. Data from 3 randomized, double-blind studies that compared citalopram (20 to 40 mg/d) and escitalopram (10 to 20 mg/d) were pooled and analyzed. The primary efficacy parameter was change from baseline in the 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D-17) total score. Efficacy assessments were made at weeks 0 (baseline), 1, 2, 4, and 6. Based on the mean change from baseline in the HAM-D-17 at weeks 1, 2, 4, and 6, the efficacy of citalopram, 20 to 40 mg/d, was equivalent to escitalopram, 10 to 20 mg/d (P > .05). Similar results were seen for severely depressed patients, with a mean treatment difference of 13.9 (SE = 7.6) vs 15.9 (SE = 7.5). Response and remission rates at week 6 were similar (response, 72.4% for citalopram, compared with 73.5% for escitalopram; remission, 52.6% vs 54.5%, respectively). The pooled analysis showed that over a 6-week treatment period, citalopram, 20 to 40 mg/d, is equivalent to escitalopram, 10 to 20 mg/d, in both efficacy and tolerability.

  12. The Genomic Standards Consortium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Field, Dawn; Amaral-Zettler, Linda; Cochrane, Guy

    2011-01-01

    Standards Consortium (GSC), an open-membership organization that drives community-based standardization activities, Here we provide a short history of the GSC, provide an overview of its range of current activities, and make a call for the scientific community to join forces to improve the quality...

  13. External RNA Controls Consortium Beta Version Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hangnoh; Pine, P Scott; McDaniel, Jennifer; Salit, Marc; Oliver, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Spike-in RNAs are valuable controls for a variety of gene expression measurements. The External RNA Controls Consortium developed test sets that were used in a number of published reports. Here we provide an authoritative table that summarizes, updates, and corrects errors in the test version that ultimately resulted in the certified Standard Reference Material 2374. We have noted existence of anti-sense RNA controls in the material, corrected sub-pool memberships, and commented on control RNAs that displayed inconsistent behavior.

  14. Analysis on the Role of RSG-GAS Pool Cooling System during Partial Loss of Heat Sink Accident

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susyadi; Endiah, P. H.; Sukmanto, D.; Andi, S. E.; Syaiful, B.; Hendro, T.; Geni, R. S.

    2018-02-01

    RSG-GAS is a 30 MW reactor that is mostly used for radioisotope production and experimental activities. Recently, it is regularly operated at half of its capacity for efficiency reason. During an accident, especially loss of heat sink, the role of its pool cooling system is very important to dump decay heat. An analysis using single failure approach and partial modeling of RELAP5 performed by S. Dibyo, 2010 shows that there is no significant increase in the coolant temperature if this system is properly functioned. However lessons learned from the Fukushima accident revealed that an accident can happen due to multiple failures. Considering ageing of the reactor, in this research the role of pool cooling system is to be investigated for a partial loss of heat sink accident which is at the same time the protection system fails to scram the reactor when being operated at 15 MW. The purpose is to clarify the transient characteristics and the final state of the coolant temperature. The method used is by simulating the system in RELAP5 code. Calculation results shows the pool cooling systems reduce coolant temperature for about 1 K as compared without activating them. The result alsoreveals that when the reactor is being operated at half of its rated power, it is still in safe condition for a partial loss of heat sink accident without scram.

  15. Analysis of pools of targeted Salmonella deletion mutants identifies novel genes affecting fitness during competitive infection in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos A Santiviago

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Pools of mutants of minimal complexity but maximal coverage of genes of interest facilitate screening for genes under selection in a particular environment. We constructed individual deletion mutants in 1,023 Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium genes, including almost all genes found in Salmonella but not in related genera. All mutations were confirmed simultaneously using a novel amplification strategy to produce labeled RNA from a T7 RNA polymerase promoter, introduced during the construction of each mutant, followed by hybridization of this labeled RNA to a Typhimurium genome tiling array. To demonstrate the ability to identify fitness phenotypes using our pool of mutants, the pool was subjected to selection by intraperitoneal injection into BALB/c mice and subsequent recovery from spleens. Changes in the representation of each mutant were monitored using T7 transcripts hybridized to a novel inexpensive minimal microarray. Among the top 120 statistically significant spleen colonization phenotypes, more than 40 were mutations in genes with no previously known role in this model. Fifteen phenotypes were tested using individual mutants in competitive assays of intraperitoneal infection in mice and eleven were confirmed, including the first two examples of attenuation for sRNA mutants in Salmonella. We refer to the method as Array-based analysis of cistrons under selection (ABACUS.

  16. Probabilistic risk analysis for Test Area North Hot Shop Storage Pool Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meale, B.M.; Satterwhite, D.G.

    1990-01-01

    A storage pool facility used for storing spent fuel and radioactive debris from the Three Mile Island (TMI) accident was evaluated to determine the risk associated with its normal operations. Several hazards were identified and examined to determine if any any credible accident scenarios existed. Expected annual occurrence frequencies were calculated for hazards for which accident scenarios were identified through use of fault trees modeling techniques. Fault tree models were developed for two hazards: (1) increased radiation field and (2) spread of contamination. The models incorporated facets of the operations within the facility as well as the facility itself. 6 refs

  17. Analysis of SBO accident and natural circulation of 49-2 swimming pool reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Yuanyuan; Liu Tiancai; Sun Wei

    2012-01-01

    The transient thermal hydraulic characteristics of 49-2 Swimming Pool Reactor (SPR) were analyzed by RELAP5/MOD3.3 code to verify the capability of natural circulation and minus reactivity feedback for accident mitigation under the condition of station blackout (SBO). Then, the effects on accident consequence and sequence for core channels and primary pumps were briefly discussed. The calculation results show that the reactor can be shutdown by the effect of minus reactivity feedback, and the residual heat can be removed through the stable natural circulation. Therefore, it demonstrates that the 49-2 SPR is safe during the accident of SBO. (authors)

  18. Patent pool analysis based on technical standards: A case study of indigenous alliances in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DUAN Yuzhen

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available China has set up only two sorts of patent pools (PLs with technical standards, namely, the AVS alliance and IGRS alliance. Both PLs are applied in the IT industry. Statistics of patent alliances with global technical standards show that Chinese enterprises cannot easily form and develop an international PL. This study analyzes the formation process of the AVS and IGRS patent alliance, and points out the challenges in building and developing Chinese PL. The study offers suggestions on alliance management, government guidance, and international cooperation.

  19. PDA: Pooled DNA analyzer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Chin-Yu

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Association mapping using abundant single nucleotide polymorphisms is a powerful tool for identifying disease susceptibility genes for complex traits and exploring possible genetic diversity. Genotyping large numbers of SNPs individually is performed routinely but is cost prohibitive for large-scale genetic studies. DNA pooling is a reliable and cost-saving alternative genotyping method. However, no software has been developed for complete pooled-DNA analyses, including data standardization, allele frequency estimation, and single/multipoint DNA pooling association tests. This motivated the development of the software, 'PDA' (Pooled DNA Analyzer, to analyze pooled DNA data. Results We develop the software, PDA, for the analysis of pooled-DNA data. PDA is originally implemented with the MATLAB® language, but it can also be executed on a Windows system without installing the MATLAB®. PDA provides estimates of the coefficient of preferential amplification and allele frequency. PDA considers an extended single-point association test, which can compare allele frequencies between two DNA pools constructed under different experimental conditions. Moreover, PDA also provides novel chromosome-wide multipoint association tests based on p-value combinations and a sliding-window concept. This new multipoint testing procedure overcomes a computational bottleneck of conventional haplotype-oriented multipoint methods in DNA pooling analyses and can handle data sets having a large pool size and/or large numbers of polymorphic markers. All of the PDA functions are illustrated in the four bona fide examples. Conclusion PDA is simple to operate and does not require that users have a strong statistical background. The software is available at http://www.ibms.sinica.edu.tw/%7Ecsjfann/first%20flow/pda.htm.

  20. Analysis of Exoelectrogenic Bacterial Communities Present in Different Brine Pools of the Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Ortiz Medina, Juan F.

    2014-05-01

    One contemporary issue experienced worldwide is the climate change due to the combustion of fossil fuels. Microbial Electrochemical Systems pose as an alternative for energy generation. In this technology, microorganisms are primarily responsible for electricity production. To improve the performance it is reasonable to think that bacteria from diverse environments, such as the brine pools of the Red Sea, can be utilized in these systems. Samples from three brine pools: Atlantis II, Valdivia, and Kebrit Deeps, were analyzed using Microbial Electrochemical Cells, with a poised potential at +0.2 V (vs. Ag/AgCl) and acetate as electron donor, to evaluate the exoelectrogenic activity by the present microorganisms. Only samples from Valdivia Deep were able to produce a noticeable current of 6 A/m2. This result, along with acetate consumption and changes on the redox activity measured with cyclic voltammetry, provides arguments to con rm the presence of exoelectrogenic bacteria in this environment. Further characterization using microscopy and molecular biology techniques is required, to obtain the most amount of information about these microorganisms and their potential use in bioelectrochemical technologies.

  1. Thyroid Cancer after Childhood Exposure to External Radiation: An Updated Pooled Analysis of 12 Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veiga, Lene H. S.; Holmberg, Erik; Anderson, Harald; Pottern, Linda; Sadetzki, Siegal; Adams, M. Jacob; Sakata, Ritsu; Schneider, Arthur B.; Inskip, Peter; Bhatti, Parveen; Johansson, Robert; Neta, Gila; Shore, Roy; de Vathaire, Florent; Damber, Lena; Kleinerman, Ruth; Hawkins, Michael M.; Tucker, Margaret; Lundell, Marie; Lubin, Jay H.

    2016-01-01

    Studies have causally linked external thyroid radiation exposure in childhood with thyroid cancer. In 1995, investigators conducted relative risk analyses of pooled data from seven epidemiologic studies. Doses were mostly 50 Gy. We pooled data from 12 studies of thyroid cancer patients who were exposed to radiation in childhood (ages <20 years), more than doubling the data, including 1,070 (927 exposed) thyroid cancers and 5.3 million (3.4 million exposed) person-years. Relative risks increased supralinearly through 2–4 Gy, leveled off between 10–30 Gy and declined thereafter, remaining significantly elevated above 50 Gy. There was a significant relative risk trend for doses <0.10 Gy (P < 0.01), with no departure from linearity (P = 0.36). We observed radiogenic effects for both papillary and nonpapillary tumors. Estimates of excess relative risk per Gy (ERR/Gy) were homogeneous by sex (P = 0.35) and number of radiation treatments (P = 0.84) and increased with decreasing age at the time of exposure. The ERR/Gy estimate was significant within ten years of radiation exposure, 2.76 (95% CI, 0.94–4.98), based on 42 exposed cases, and remained elevated 50 years and more after exposure. Finally, exposure to chemotherapy was significantly associated with thyroid cancer, with results supporting a nonsynergistic (additive) association with radiation. PMID:27128740

  2. Thermal analysis and modeling of a swimming pool heating system by utilizing waste energy rejected from a chiller unit of an ice rink

    OpenAIRE

    Kuyumcu Muhammed Enes; Yumrutaş Recep

    2017-01-01

    This study deals with the thermal analysis and modeling of a swimming pool heating system in which the waste energy rejected from the chiller unit of an ice rink is used as an energy source. The system consists of a swimming pool and an ice rink coupled by a chiller unit. The swimming pool and the ice rink both indoor types and were constructed in city of Gaziantep, Turkey. The thermal energy requirement for each section is determined by thermal analysis of each component of the system. Effec...

  3. Study of structural attachments of a pool type LMFBR vessel through seismic analysis of a simplified three dimensional finite element model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, H.; Ma, D.

    1979-01-01

    A simplified three dimensional finite element model of a pool type LMFBR in conjunction with the computer program ANSYS is developed and scoping results of seismic analysis are produced. Through this study various structural attachments of a pool type LMFBR like the reactor vessel skirt support, the pump support and reactor shell-support structure interfaces are studied. This study also provides some useful results on equivalent viscous damping approach and some improvements to the treatment of equivalent viscous damping are recommended. This study also sets forth pertinent guidelines for detailed three dimensional finite element seismic analysis of pool type LMFBR

  4. Pool scrubbing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez-Jimenez, J.; Herranz, J.; Escudero, M.J.; Espigares, M.M.; Peyres, V.; Polo, J.; Kortz, Ch.; Koch, M.K.; Brockmeier, U.; Unger, H.; Dutton, L.M.C.; Smedley, Ch.; Trow, W.; Jones, A.V.; Bonanni, E.; Calvo, M.; Alonso, A.

    1996-12-01

    The Source Term Project in the Third Frame Work Programme of the European Union Was conducted under and important joined effort on pool scrubbing research. CIEMAT was the Task Manager of the project and several other organizations participated in it: JRC-Ispra, NNC Limited, RUB-NES and UPM. The project was divided into several tasks. A peer review of the models in the pool scrubbing codes SPARC90 and BUSCA-AUG92 was made, considering the different aspects in the hydrodynamic phenomenology, particle retention and fission product vapor abortions. Several dominant risk accident sequences were analyzed with MAAP, SPARC90 and BUSCA-AUG92 codes, and the predictions were compared. A churn-turbulent model was developed for the hydrodynamic behaviour of the pool. Finally, an experimental programme in the PECA facility of CIEMAT was conducted in order to study the decontamination factor under jet injection regime, and the experimental observations were compared with the SPARC and BUSCA codes. (Author)

  5. Pre-Travel Health Preparation of Pediatric International Travelers: Analysis From the Global TravEpiNet Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagmann, Stefan; LaRocque, Regina C; Rao, Sowmya R; Jentes, Emily S; Sotir, Mark J; Brunette, Gary; Ryan, Edward T

    2013-12-01

    Children frequently travel internationally. Health-related data on such children are limited. We sought to investigate the demographics, health characteristics, and preventive interventions of outbound US international pediatric travelers. We analyzed data from 32 099 travelers presenting for pre-travel healthcare at the Global TravEpiNet (GTEN), a national consortium of 19 travel clinics, from January 1, 2009 to June 6, 2012. A total of 3332 (10%) of all GTEN travelers were children (traveled mostly for leisure (36%) or to visit friends or relatives (VFR) (36%). Most popular destination regions were Africa (41%), Southeast Asia (16%), Central America (16%), and the Caribbean (16%). Compared with children traveling for leisure, VFR children were more likely to present travel consultation (44% vs 28%), intended to travel for 28 days or longer (70% vs 22%), and to travel to Africa (62% vs 32%). Nearly half of the pediatric travelers (46%) received at least 1 routine vaccine, and most (83%) received at least 1 travel-related vaccine. Parents or guardians of one third of the children (30%) refused at least 1 recommended travel-related vaccine. Most pediatric travelers visiting a malaria-endemic country (72%) received a prescription for malaria chemoprophylaxis. Ten percent of travelers seeking pre-travel healthcare at GTEN sites are children. VFR-travel, pre-travel consultation close to time of departure, and refusal of recommended vaccines may place children at risk for travel-associated illness. Strategies to engage pediatric travelers in timely, pre-travel care and improve acceptance of pre-travel healthcare interventions are needed. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Kansas Wind Energy Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruenbacher, Don [Kansas State Univ., Manhattan, KS (United States)

    2015-12-31

    This project addresses both fundamental and applied research problems that will help with problems defined by the DOE “20% Wind by 2030 Report”. In particular, this work focuses on increasing the capacity of small or community wind generation capabilities that would be operated in a distributed generation approach. A consortium (KWEC – Kansas Wind Energy Consortium) of researchers from Kansas State University and Wichita State University aims to dramatically increase the penetration of wind energy via distributed wind power generation. We believe distributed generation through wind power will play a critical role in the ability to reach and extend the renewable energy production targets set by the Department of Energy. KWEC aims to find technical and economic solutions to enable widespread implementation of distributed renewable energy resources that would apply to wind.

  7. Effect of donepezil on cognition in severe Alzheimer's disease: a pooled data analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cummings, Jeffrey; Jones, Roy; Wilkinson, David

    2010-01-01

    To better characterize response to donepezil in patients with severe AD, Severe Impairment Battery (SIB) data were pooled from four donepezil clinical trials (N=904). Changes in SIB total and domain scores from baseline to week 24 were compared between placebo and donepezil treatment groups...... between donepezil- and placebo-treated patients in least squares (LS) mean change in SIB total scores from baseline to week 24 was 6.22 (p Treatment-placebo differences were statistically significant for each baseline severity stratum, being greatest for the MMSE 6-9 stratum (LS...... mean difference, 7.60; p Treatment-placebo differences in LS mean change in SIB domain scores significantly favored donepezil for seven of nine domains (range, p = 0.0056 to p

  8. Analysis of the SBLOCAs in HANARO pool for the 3-pin fuel test loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, S. K.; Chi, D. Y.; Sim, B. S.; Park, K. N.; Ahn, S. H.; Lee, J. M.; Lee, C. Y.; Kim, Y. J.

    2004-09-01

    Fuel Test Loop(FTL) has been developed to meet the increasing demand on fuel irradiation and burn up test required the development of new fuels in Korea. It is designed to provide the test conditions of high pressure and temperature like the commercial PWR and CANDU power plants. And also the FTL have the cooling capability to sufficiently remove the thermal power of the in-pile test section for normal operation, Anticipated Operational Occurrences(AOOs), and Design Basis Accidents(DBAs). This report deals with the Small Break Loss Of Coolant Accidents (SBLOCAs) in HANARO pool for the 3-pin fuel test loop. The MARS code has been used for the prediction of the emergency core cooling capability of the FTL and the peak cladding temperature of the test fuels for the SBLOCAs. The location of the pipe break is assumed at the hill taps connecting the cold and hot legs in HANARO pool to the inlet and outlet nozzles of the In-Pile test Section (IPS). The break size is also assumed less than 20% of the cross section area of the pipe. The test fuels are heated up when the cold leg break occur. However, they are not heated up when the hot leg break occur. The maximum Peak Cladding Temperatures (PCT) are predicted to be about 906.9 .deg. C for the cold leg break accident in PWR fuel test mode and 971.9 .deg. C in CANDU fuel test mode respectively. The critical break size is about the 6% of the cross section area of the pipe for PWR fuel test mode and the 8% for CANDU fuel test mode. The PCTs meet the design criterion of commercial PWR fuel that the maximum PCT is lower than 1204 .deg. C

  9. 3D-QSAR comparative molecular field analysis on opioid receptor antagonists: pooling data from different studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Youyi; Keenan, Susan M; Zhang, Qiang; Kholodovych, Vladyslav; Welsh, William J

    2005-03-10

    Three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) models were constructed using comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) on a series of opioid receptor antagonists. To obtain statistically significant and robust CoMFA models, a sizable data set of naltrindole and naltrexone analogues was assembled by pooling biological and structural data from independent studies. A process of "leave one data set out", similar to the traditional "leave one out" cross-validation procedure employed in partial least squares (PLS) analysis, was utilized to study the feasibility of pooling data in the present case. These studies indicate that our approach yields statistically significant and highly predictive CoMFA models from the pooled data set of delta, mu, and kappa opioid receptor antagonists. All models showed excellent internal predictability and self-consistency: q(2) = 0.69/r(2) = 0.91 (delta), q(2) = 0.67/r(2) = 0.92 (mu), and q(2) = 0.60/r(2) = 0.96 (kappa). The CoMFA models were further validated using two separate test sets: one test set was selected randomly from the pooled data set, while the other test set was retrieved from other published sources. The overall excellent agreement between CoMFA-predicted and experimental binding affinities for a structurally diverse array of ligands across all three opioid receptor subtypes gives testimony to the superb predictive power of these models. CoMFA field analysis demonstrated that the variations in binding affinity of opioid antagonists are dominated by steric rather than electrostatic interactions with the three opioid receptor binding sites. The CoMFA steric-electrostatic contour maps corresponding to the delta, mu, and kappa opioid receptor subtypes reflected the characteristic similarities and differences in the familiar "message-address" concept of opioid receptor ligands. Structural modifications to increase selectivity for the delta over mu and kappa opioid receptors have been predicted on the

  10. What’s old is new again: yeast mutant screens in the era of pooled segregant analysis by genome sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Curtin

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available While once de-rigueur for identification of genes involved in biological processes, screening of chemically induced mutant populations is an approach that has largely been superseded for model organisms such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Availability of single gene deletion/overexpression libraries and combinatorial synthetic genetic arrays provide yeast researchers more structured ways to probe genetic networks. Furthermore, in the age of inexpensive DNA sequencing, methodologies such as mapping of quantitative trait loci (QTL by pooled segregant analysis and genome-wide association enable the identification of multiple naturally occurring allelic variants that contribute to polygenic phenotypes of interest. This is, however, contingent on the capacity to screen large numbers of individuals and existence of sufficient natural phenotypic variation within the available population. The latter cannot be guaranteed and non-selectable, industrially relevant phenotypes, such as production of volatile aroma compounds, pose severe limitations on the use of modern genetic techniques due to expensive and time-consuming downstream analyses. An interesting approach to overcome these issues can be found in Den Abt et al.[1] (this issue of Microbial Cell, where a combination of repeated rounds of chemical mutagenesis and pooled segregant analysis by whole genome sequencing was applied to identify genes involved in ethyl acetate formation, demonstrating a new path for industrial yeast strain development and bringing classical mutant screens into the 21st century.

  11. Sputum colour and bacteria in chronic bronchitis exacerbations: a pooled analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miravitlles, Marc; Kruesmann, Frank; Haverstock, Daniel; Perroncel, Renee; Choudhri, Shurjeel H; Arvis, Pierre

    2012-06-01

    We examined the correlation between sputum colour and the presence of potentially pathogenic bacteria in acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis (AECBs). Data were pooled from six multicentre studies comparing moxifloxacin with other antimicrobials in patients with an AECB. Sputum was collected before antimicrobial therapy, and bacteria were identified by culture and Gram staining. Association between sputum colour and bacteria was determined using logistic regression. Of 4,089 sputum samples, a colour was reported in 4,003; 1,898 (46.4%) were culture-positive. Green or yellow sputum samples were most likely to yield bacteria (58.9% and 45.5% of samples, respectively), compared with 18% of clear and 39% of rust-coloured samples positive for potentially pathogenic microorganisms. Factors predicting a positive culture were sputum colour (the strongest predictor), sputum purulence, increased dyspnoea, male sex and absence of fever. Green or yellow versus white sputum colour was associated with a sensitivity of 94.7% and a specificity of 15% for the presence of bacteria. Sputum colour, particularly green and yellow, was a stronger predictor of potentially pathogenic bacteria than sputum purulence and increased dyspnoea in AECB patients. However, it does not necessarily predict the need for antibiotic treatment in all patients with AECB.

  12. Second pancreatectomy for recurrent pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma in the remnant pancreas: A pooled analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yanming; Song, Ailing; Wu, Lupeng; Si, Xiaoying; Li, Yumin

    The aim of this study was to examine the outcomes of second pancreatectomy for the treatment of recurrent pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) in the remnant pancreas. Search of the PubMed database was undertaken to identify relevant English language studies. Pooled individually data were examined for clinical outcomes after second pancreatectomy for recurrent PDAC. A total of 19 articles involving 55 patients were eligible for inclusion. The median disease-free interval after initial resection was 33 (range 7-143) months. Of the 55 patients reported, 52 (94.5%) patients underwent completion total pancreatectomy in the second operation for recurrences, including 15 patients who developed recurrences more than 5 years after the initial operation. There was no perioperative death. The 1-, 3- and 5-year overall survival rate after the second pancreatectomy was 82.2%, 49.2% and 40.6% respectively. Second pancreatectomy for recurrent PDAC can be performed safely with long-term survival in selected patients. Copyright © 2016 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. The regulating power market on the Nordic power exchange Nord Pool. An econometric analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skytte, K.

    1999-08-01

    What differentiates the structure of Nord Pool from other power exchanges around the world is the way the balance from the spot market is maintained until the actual, physical delivery takes place, via the regulating power market in Norway. This paper reveals the pattern of the prices on the regulating power market, by analysing the cost of being unable to fulfil the commitments made on the spot market. Some power producers with unpredictable fluctuations (e.g. wind) will need to buy regulation services. The disclosed pattern implies that these producers must pay a limited premium of readiness in addition to the spot price; this premium is independent of the amount of regulation. The level of the premium of readiness for down-regulation is shown to be strongly influenced by the level of the spot price. On the other hand, it is demonstrated that the premium for up-regulation is less correlated to the spot price. Furthermore, it is found that the amount of regulation affects the price of regulating power for up-regulation more strongly than it does for down-regulation. The disclosed cost of using the regulating power market is a quadratic function of the amount of regulation. This asymmetric cost may encourage bidders with fluctuating production to be more strategic in their way of bidding on the spot market. By using such strategies the extra costs (for example wind power) needed to counter unpredictable fluctuations may be limited. 12 refs

  14. Sensitivity Analysis of Depletion Parameters for Heat Load Evaluation of PWR Spent Fuel Storage Pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, In Young; Lee, Un Chul

    2011-01-01

    As necessity of safety re-evaluation for spent fuel storage facility has emphasized after the Fukushima accident, accuracy improvement of heat load evaluation has become more important to acquire reliable thermal-hydraulic evaluation results. As groundwork, parametric and sensitivity analyses of various storage conditions for Kori Unit 4 spent fuel storage pool and spent fuel depletion parameters such as axial burnup effect, operation history, and specific heat are conducted using ORIGEN2 code. According to heat load evaluation and parametric sensitivity analyses, decay heat of last discharged fuel comprises maximum 80.42% of total heat load of storage facility and there is a negative correlation between effect of depletion parameters and cooling period. It is determined that specific heat is most influential parameter and operation history is secondly influential parameter. And decay heat of just discharged fuel is varied from 0.34 to 1.66 times of average value and decay heat of 1 year cooled fuel is varied from 0.55 to 1.37 times of average value in accordance with change of specific power. Namely depletion parameters can cause large variation in decay heat calculation of short-term cooled fuel. Therefore application of real operation data instead of user selection value is needed to improve evaluation accuracy. It is expected that these results could be used to improve accuracy of heat load assessment and evaluate uncertainty of calculated heat load.

  15. Measurement and analysis of the neutron noise of the pool research reactor at IPEN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simoes, Graciete Pedro

    1979-01-01

    Variations in the neutron density or power of a nuclear reactor (the neutron noise) operating at nominally constant power are generally random and can only be described in terms of statistical parameters. Random variations in the power of a power reactor are produced by one or more driving functions. In this work the neutron noise of the pool reactor IEAR-1 (2 MW nominal power) has been studied using two compensated ionization chambers ( Westinghouse VJL6377) and related to three possible-driving functions, namely vibration of the control bar and reactor support bridge and the temperature of the water entering the core. The CIC detectors were located in rigid tubes in turn positively located in the reactor lattice plate. Conventional accelerometers were used. Temperature measurements were made with a NiCr/Ni thermocouple (wire diam ∼ 0.2mm) located 10 mm above the top of a fuel element. Although the correlation between the measured neutron signals was high ( > 0,4) for frequencies in the range 0 to 10 Hz no resonances were identified in the neutron noise. A significant correlation (> 0,4) between the control bar acceleration and the neutron flux was obtained in the frequency range 0 to 10 Hz. The measured correlation between the neutron noise and both the bridge vibration and the reactor water inlet temperature was insignificant. (author)

  16. Correlating changes in lung function with patient outcomes in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a pooled analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones Paul W

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Relationships between improvements in lung function and other clinical outcomes in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD are not documented extensively. We examined whether changes in trough forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1 are correlated with changes in patient-reported outcomes. Methods Pooled data from three indacaterol studies (n = 3313 were analysed. Means and responder rates for outcomes including change from baseline in Transition Dyspnoea Index (TDI, St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ scores (at 12, 26 and 52 weeks, and COPD exacerbation frequency (rate/year were tabulated across categories of ΔFEV1. Also, generalised linear modelling was performed adjusting for covariates such as baseline severity and inhaled corticosteroid use. Results With increasing positive ΔFEV1, TDI and ΔSGRQ improved at all timepoints, exacerbation rate over the study duration declined (P 1 was associated with improved TDI (0.46 units, ΔSGRQ (1.3-1.9 points and exacerbation rate (12% decrease. Overall, adjustments for baseline covariates had little impact on the relationship between ΔFEV1 and outcomes. Conclusions These results suggest that larger improvements in FEV1 are likely to be associated with larger patient-reported benefits across a range of clinical outcomes. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00393458, NCT00463567, and NCT00624286

  17. Vocal Fold Immobility due to Birth Trauma: A Systematic Review and Pooled Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbour, Jad; North, Lauren M; Bougie, David; Robey, Thomas

    2017-12-01

    Objectives To describe the present understanding of birth trauma-related vocal fold immobility and quantitatively compare it with idiopathic congenital vocal fold immobility to explore whether it is a discrete entity. Data Sources PubMed, Ovid, and Cochrane databases. Review Methods English-language, observational, or experimental studies involving infants with idiopathic congenital or birth trauma-related vocal fold immobility were included. Data from these studies were pooled with our institution's vocal fold immobility database, with the resultant idiopathic congenital and birth trauma cohorts compared regarding patterns and outcomes of immobility. Results The search returned 288 articles, with 24 meeting inclusion criteria. Of studies reviewing all-cause immobility, 8 of 9 (88.9%) identified birth trauma as an etiology, although birth trauma definitions and proposed mechanisms of immobility varied. The study subjects, combined with our institution's database, yielded 188 idiopathic congenital and 113 birth trauma cases. Compared with idiopathic congenital cases, birth trauma cases had a higher proportion of unilateral immobility (72 of 113 [63.7%] vs 52 of 188 [27.7%], P vocal fold immobility warrant further investigation, these findings suggest that it is distinct from idiopathic congenital vocal fold immobility, with a unique presentation and potentially more favorable outcomes. This can inform counseling and management for infants with otherwise unexplained immobility but known birth trauma.

  18. Birth order and risk of childhood cancer: a pooled analysis from five US States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Von Behren, Julie; Spector, Logan G; Mueller, Beth A; Carozza, Susan E; Chow, Eric J; Fox, Erin E; Horel, Scott; Johnson, Kimberly J; McLaughlin, Colleen; Puumala, Susan E; Ross, Julie A; Reynolds, Peggy

    2011-06-01

    The causes of childhood cancers are largely unknown. Birth order has been used as a proxy for prenatal and postnatal exposures, such as frequency of infections and in utero hormone exposures. We investigated the association between birth order and childhood cancers in a pooled case-control dataset. The subjects were drawn from population-based registries of cancers and births in California, Minnesota, New York, Texas and Washington. We included 17,672 cases confidence intervals using logistic regression, adjusted for sex, birth year, maternal race, maternal age, multiple birth, gestational age and birth weight. Overall, we found an inverse relationship between childhood cancer risk and birth order. For children in the fourth or higher birth order category compared to first-born children, the adjusted OR was 0.87 (95% CI: 0.81, 0.93) for all cancers combined. When we examined risks by cancer type, a decreasing risk with increasing birth order was seen in the central nervous system tumors, neuroblastoma, bilateral retinoblastoma, Wilms tumor and rhabdomyosarcoma. We observed increased risks with increasing birth order for acute myeloid leukemia but a slight decrease in risk for acute lymphoid leukemia. These risk estimates were based on a very large sample size, which allowed us to examine rare cancer types with greater statistical power than in most previous studies, however the biologic mechanisms remain to be elucidated. Copyright © 2010 UICC.

  19. Chemotherapy and targeted therapy in advanced biliary tract carcinoma: a pooled analysis of clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckel, Florian; Schmid, Roland M

    2014-01-01

    In biliary tract cancer, gemcitabine platinum (GP) doublet palliative chemotherapy is the current standard treatment. The aim of this study was to analyze recent trials, even those small and nonrandomized, and identify superior new regimens. Trials published in English between January 2000 and January 2014 were analyzed, as well as ASCO abstracts from 2010 to 2013. In total, 161 trials comprising 6,337 patients were analyzed. The pooled results of standard therapy GP (no fluoropyrimidine, F, or other drug) were as follows: the median response rate (RR), tumor control rate (TCR), time to tumor progression (TTP) and overall survival (OS) were 25.9 and 63.5%, and 5.3 and 9.5 months, respectively. GFP triplets as well as G-based chemotherapy plus targeted therapy were significantly superior to GP concerning tumor control (TCR, TTP) and OS, with no difference in RR. Triplet combinations of GFP as well as G-based chemotherapy with (predominantly EGFR) targeted therapy are most effective concerning tumor control and survival.

  20. Thermal analysis and modeling of a swimming pool heating system by utilizing waste energy rejected from a chiller unit of an ice rink

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuyumcu Muhammed Enes

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study deals with the thermal analysis and modeling of a swimming pool heating system in which the waste energy rejected from the chiller unit of an ice rink is used as an energy source. The system consists of a swimming pool and an ice rink coupled by a chiller unit. The swimming pool and the ice rink both indoor types and were constructed in city of Gaziantep, Turkey. The thermal energy requirement for each section is determined by thermal analysis of each component of the system. Effects of different design parameters such as ceiling insulation thickness, ceiling emissivity, Carnot efficiency factor and size of the ice rink on the thermal energy requirements and coefficient of performance of the chiller unit are investigated. As a result of analyses of the system, the minimum ice rink area is determined in order to meet annual total heat energy demand of the olympic-sized swimming pool.

  1. Stability analysis of NbTi-Ta-based high field conductor cooled by pool boiling below 4 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, W.Y.; Alcorn, J.S.; Hsu, Y.H.; Purcell, J.R.

    1980-09-01

    Stability analysis has been performed for cabled NbTi-Ta-based superconductors intended for the high field (12 T) toroidal field coils for a large scale tokamak device such as ETF. Ternary NbTi-Ta was selected as the superconductor because of its superior critical current density at high field as compared to the binary alloy NbTi. The operating temperature was chosen to be 2.5 K or below to optimize the performance of the superconductor. A cabled conductor was selected to minimize the pulsed field losses. The conductor is cooled by pool boiling in a subcooled (approx. 2.5 K, 0.25 atm) bath, or in a superfluid helium (He-II) bath (approx. 1.8 K, 0.02 atm). The analysis was based on numerically simulating the evolution of a normal zone in the conductor. Appropriate superconductor properties and heat transfer characteristics were utilized in the simulation

  2. Analysis of an open-air swimming pool solar heating system by using an experimentally validated TRNSYS model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz, Elisa; Martinez, Pedro J. [Universidad Miguel Hernandez - Edificio Torreblanca, Avda. de la Universidad s/n, 03202 Elche (Spain)

    2010-01-15

    In the case of private outdoor swimming pools, seldom larger than 100 m{sup 2}, conventional auxiliary heating systems are being installed less and less. Solar heating is an option to extend the swimming season. The temperature evolution of an open-air swimming pool highly depends on the wind speed directly on the water surface, which at the same time is influenced by the surroundings of the pool. In this paper, the TRNSYS model of a private open-air pool with a 50-m{sup 2} surface was validated by registering the water temperature evolution and the meteorological data at the pool site. Evaporation is the main component of energy loss in swimming pools. Six different sets of constants found in literature were considered to evaluate the evaporative heat transfer coefficient with the purpose of finding the most suitable one for the TRNSYS pool model. In order to do that, the evolution of the pool water temperature predicted by the TRNSYS pool model was compared with the experimentally registered one. The simulation with TRNSYS of the total system, including the swimming pool and the absorber circuit integrated into the existing filter circuit, provided information regarding the increase of the pool temperature for different collector areas during the swimming season. This knowledge, together with the economic costs, support the decision about the absorber field size. (author)

  3. Deoxyribonucleotide pool analysis: functional association of thymidylate synthase with the other enzymes of DNA biosynthesis in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reddy, G.P.V.; Christiansen, E.

    1986-01-01

    Allosteric interaction between thymidylate synthase (TS) and the other enzymes of DNA biosynthesis was suggested from the authors observation that inhibitors of ribonucleotide reductase, topoisomerase of DNA polymerase-α inhibit TS in intact S phase CHEF/18 cells, but not in their soluble extracts. In addition the authors observed that 4'-(9-acridinylamino)-methanesulfon-m-anisidide (m-AMSA), a poison of topoisomerase II, had similar effects on TS activity in mammalian cells. They have examined if the inhibitory effects of these antimetabolites on TS is due to the accumulation of thymidine nucleotide(s) in intact cells, rather than to an allosteric interaction in the replitase complex. A novel method of nucleotide pool analysis revealed that in the presence of these antimetabolites the incorporation of radioactivity from 3 H-deoxyuridine (dUrd) into thymidine nucleotide pools inside the cell did not increase as compared to the control. Furthermore, TS activity as measured in-vitro was not inhibited by supraphysiological concentrations (50μM) of thymidine mono- or tri-phosphates. None of these antimetabolites dramatically influenced the uptake of dUrd and its subsequent phosphorylation to deoxyuridine monophosphate. Therefore, they suggest that the inhibitory effect of these antimetabolites is due to the functional association of their target enzymes with TS

  4. Birth order and Risk of Childhood Cancer: A Pooled Analysis from Five U.S. States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Von Behren, Julie; Spector, Logan G.; Mueller, Beth A.; Carozza, Susan E.; Chow, Eric J.; Fox, Erin E.; Horel, Scott; Johnson, Kimberly J.; McLaughlin, Colleen; Puumala, Susan E.; Ross, Julie A.; Reynolds, Peggy

    2010-01-01

    The causes of childhood cancers are largely unknown. Birth order has been used as a proxy for prenatal and postnatal exposures, such as frequency of infections and in utero hormone exposures. We investigated the association between birth order and childhood cancers in a pooled case-control dataset. The subjects were drawn from population-based registries of cancers and births in California, Minnesota, New York, Texas, and Washington. We included 17,672 cases less than 15 years of age who were diagnosed from1980-2004 and 57,966 randomly selected controls born 1970-2004, excluding children with Down syndrome. We calculated odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals using logistic regression, adjusted for sex, birth year, maternal race, maternal age, multiple birth, gestational age, and birth weight. Overall, we found an inverse relationship between childhood cancer risk and birth order. For children in the fourth or higher birth order category compared to first-born children, the adjusted OR was 0.87 (95% CI: 0.81, 0.93) for all cancers combined. When we examined risks by cancer type, a decreasing risk with increasing birth order was seen in the central nervous system (CNS) tumors, neuroblastoma, bilateral retinoblastoma, Wilms tumor, and rhabdomyosarcoma. We observed increased risks with increasing birth order for acute myeloid leukemia but a slight decrease in risk for acute lymphoid leukemia. These risk estimates were based on a very large sample size which allowed us to examine rare cancer types with greater statistical power than in most previous studies, however the biologic mechanisms remain to be elucidated. PMID:20715170

  5. Tracking of accelerometry-measured physical activity during childhood: ICAD pooled analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwon Soyang

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding of physical activity (PA tracking during childhood is important to predict PA behaviors and design appropriate interventions. We compared tracking of PA according to PA level and type of day (weekday/weekend in a pool of five children’s cohort studies. Methods Data from ALSPAC, CLAN, Iowa Bone Development Study, HEAPS, PEACH were extracted from the International Children’s Accelerometry Database (ICAD, resulting in 5,016 participants with age, gender, and accelerometry data at both baseline and follow-up (mean age: 10.3 years at baseline, 12.5 years at follow-up. Daily minutes spent in moderate- and vigorous-intensity PA (MVPA and vigorous-intensity PA (VPA was categorized into quintiles. Multinomial logistic regression models were fit to predict follow-up (MVPA from baseline (MVPA (reference: 20-  Results For the weekday, VPA tracking for boys with high baseline VPA was higher than boys with low baseline VPA (ORs: 3.9 [95% CI: 3.1, 5.0] vs. 2.1 [95% CI: 1.6, 2.6]. Among girls, high VPA was less stable when compared low VPA (ORs: 1.8 [95% CI: 1.4, 2.2] vs. 2.6 [95% CI: 2.1, 3.2]. The pattern was similar for MVPA among girls (ORs: 1.6 [95% CI: 1.2, 2.0] vs. 2.8 [95% CI: 2.3, 3.6]. Overall, tracking was lower for the weekend. Conclusions PA tracking was higher on the weekday than the weekend, and among inactive girls than active girls. The PA “routine” of weekdays should be used to help children establish healthy PA patterns. Supports for PA increase and maintenance of girls are needed.

  6. Dynamic simulation and thermo-economic analysis of a PhotoVoltaic/Thermal collector heating system for an indoor–outdoor swimming pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buonomano, Annamaria; De Luca, Giuseppina; Figaj, Rafal Damian; Vanoli, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A PV/T heating system for indoor–outdoor swimming pools is proposed. • A comparison among some thermal pool models available in literature is carried out. • Dynamic simulations of the thermal behavior of the swimming-pools are performed. • PV/T thermal energy is used to heat the swimming pool and for DHW production. • Energy and economic parametric analyses of the proposed system are presented. - Abstract: This paper presents an analysis of an innovative renewable energy plant serving an existing indoor/outdoor swimming pool located in Naples. The proposed solar hybrid system is designed in order to balance the remarkable energy demand of the swimming pool facility and to ensure suitable comfort conditions for swimmers. With the aim to accomplish such goals, the dynamic thermal behavior of the swimming pool was analyzed as a function of the thermo-hygrometric conditions of the indoor space and on the meteorological conditions of the pool site. In order to properly design and size the proposed renewable energy system, different thermal pool loss formulations for the calculation of the swimming pool thermal balance, in indoor and outdoor regimes, are adopted. The solar hybrid system consists of a water cooled photovoltaic/thermal collectors plant (PV/T), designed to meet a part of the facility demands of electricity and heat. Electricity is completely utilized by the facility, while the produced thermal energy is primarily used to meet the pool thermal demand and secondarily for sanitary hot water scopes. In order to carry out dynamic simulations and sensitivity analyses, the system performance is designed and dynamically simulated in TRNSYS environment. The developed simulation model enables the calculation of both the indoor and outdoor swimming pool thermal losses and the overall energy and economic system performance. Such results are obtained as a function of the thermo-hygrometric conditions of the environment, of the occupants and the

  7. Risk of pneumonia with budesonide-containing treatments in COPD: an individual patient-level pooled analysis of interventional studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollis, Sally; Jorup, Carin; Lythgoe, Dan; Martensson, Gunnar; Regnell, Pontus; Eckerwall, Göran

    2017-01-01

    Concerns have been raised that treatment of COPD with inhaled corticosteroids may increase pneumonia risk. Responding to a request from the European Medicines Agency Pharmacovigilance Risk Assessment Committee, a pooled analysis of interventional studies compared pneumonia risk with inhaled budesonide-containing versus non-budesonide-containing treatments and the impact of other clinically relevant factors. AstraZeneca-sponsored, parallel-group, double-blind, randomized controlled trials meeting the following criteria were included: >8 weeks' duration; ≥60 patients with COPD; inhaled budesonide treatment arm (budesonide/formoterol or budesonide); and non-budesonide-containing comparator arm (formoterol or placebo). Primary and secondary outcomes were time to first pneumonia treatment-emergent serious adverse event (TESAE) and treatment-emergent adverse event (TEAEs), respectively, analyzed using Cox regression models stratified by study. Eleven studies were identified; 10,570 out of 10,574 randomized patients receiving ≥1 dose of study treatment were included for safety analysis (budesonide-containing, n=5,750; non-budesonide-containing, n=4,820). Maximum exposure to treatment was 48 months. The overall pooled hazard ratio (HR), comparing budesonide versus non-budesonide-containing treatments, was 1.15 for pneumonia TESAEs (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.83, 1.57) and 1.13 for pneumonia TEAEs (95% CI: 0.94, 1.36). The annual incidence of pneumonia TESAEs was 1.9% and 1.5% for budesonide-containing and non-budesonide-containing treatments, respectively. Comparing budesonide/formoterol with non-budesonide-containing treatment, the HRs for pneumonia TESAEs and TEAEs were 1.00 (95% CI: 0.69, 1.44) and 1.21 (95% CI: 0.93, 1.57), respectively. For budesonide versus placebo, HRs were 1.57 for pneumonia TESAEs (95% CI: 0.90, 2.74) and 1.07 for pneumonia TEAEs (95% CI: 0.83, 1.38). This pooled analysis found no statistically significant increase in overall risk for

  8. Pelvic Inflammatory Disease and the Risk of Ovarian Cancer and Borderline Ovarian Tumors: A Pooled Analysis of 13 Case-Control Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Christina B.; Kjaer, Susanne K.; Albieri, Vanna; Bandera, Elisa V.; Doherty, Jennifer A.; Høgdall, Estrid; Webb, Penelope M.; Jordan, Susan J.; Rossing, Mary Anne; Wicklund, Kristine G.; Goodman, Marc T.; Modugno, Francesmary; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Ness, Roberta B.; Edwards, Robert P.; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Berchuck, Andrew; Olson, Sara H.; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Massuger, Leon F. A. G.; Narod, Steven A.; Phelan, Catherine M.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Wu, Anna H.; Pearce, Celeste L.; Risch, Harvey A.; Jensen, Allan

    2017-01-01

    Inflammation has been implicated in ovarian carcinogenesis. However, studies investigating the association between pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) and ovarian cancer risk are few and inconsistent. We investigated the association between PID and the risk of epithelial ovarian cancer according to tumor behavior and histotype. We pooled data from 13 case-control studies, conducted between 1989 and 2009, from the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium (OCAC), including 9,162 women with ovarian cancers, 2,354 women with borderline tumors, and 14,736 control participants. Study-specific odds ratios were estimated and subsequently combined into a pooled odds ratio using a random-effects model. A history of PID was associated with an increased risk of borderline tumors (pooled odds ratio (pOR) = 1.32, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.10, 1.58). Women with at least 2 episodes of PID had a 2-fold increased risk of borderline tumors (pOR = 2.14, 95% CI: 1.08, 4.24). No association was observed between PID and ovarian cancer risk overall (pOR = 0.99, 95% CI: 0.83, 1.19); however, a statistically nonsignificantly increased risk of low-grade serous tumors (pOR = 1.48, 95% CI: 0.92, 2.38) was noted. In conclusion, PID was associated with an increased risk of borderline ovarian tumors, particularly among women who had had multiple episodes of PID. Although our results indicated a histotype-specific association with PID, the association of PID with ovarian cancer risk is still somewhat uncertain and requires further investigation. PMID:27941069

  9. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer: A Systematic Review and Pooled Analysis of 19 Trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrelli, Fausto; Comito, Tiziana; Ghidini, Antonio; Torri, Valter; Scorsetti, Marta; Barni, Sandro

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Although surgery is the standard of care for resectable pancreatic cancer (PC), standard-dose chemoradiation therapy and chemotherapy alone are suitable for patients with unresectable disease. Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is an alternative, focused local therapy that delivers high radiation doses within a few fractions to the cancer, sparing the surrounding critical tissue. We performed a systematic review and pooled analysis of published trials to evaluate the efficacy and safety of this emerging treatment modality. Methods and Materials: We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, PubMed, EMBASE, SCOPUS, the Web of Science, and CINAHL for publications regarding SBRT for locally advanced PC. The 1-year overall survival (OS) rate was the primary endpoint, and the median OS, 2-year OS rate, 1-year locoregional control (LRC) rate, and grade 3 to 4 toxicities were the secondary endpoints. A multivariate random-effects meta-analysis was performed to calculate the aggregated OS rates at 1 and 2 years and the 1-year LRC rate. Results: A total of 19 studies, encompassing 1009 patients, were included in the present analysis. The pooled 1-year OS was 51.6% in 13 trials with data available. The median OS ranged from 5.7 to 47 months (median 17). The LRC rate at 1 year was 72.3%. Overall, the occurrence of severe adverse events did not exceed 10%. LRC appeared to correlate with the total SBRT dose and the number of fractions. Conclusions: The advantages of SBRT in terms of treatment time, satisfactory OS, and LRC indicate that it is an effective option for inoperable PC. However, a definitive validation of this treatment modality in large randomized studies is required, owing to the nonrandomized nature of the included studies and the limitations of small single-center series that include mixed populations.

  10. Efficacy of Alteplase® in a mouse model of acute ischemic stroke: a retrospective pooled analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orset, Cyrille; Haelewyn, Benoit; Allan, Stuart M.; Ansar, Saema; Campos, Francesco; Cho, Tae Hee; Durand, Anne; El Amki, Mohamad; Fatar, Marc; Garcia-Yébenes, Isaac; Gauberti, Maxime; Grudzenski, Saskia; Lizasoain, Ignacio; Lo, Eng; Macrez, Richard; Margaill, Isabelle; Maysami, Samaneh; Meairs, Stephen; Nighoghossian, Norbert; Orbe, Josune; Paramo, Jose Antonio; Parienti, Jean-Jacques; Rothwell, Nancy J.; Rubio, Marina; Waeber, Christian; Young, Alan R.

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose The debate over the fact that experimental drugs proposed for the treatment of stroke fail in the translation to the clinical situation, has attracted considerable attention in the literature. In this context, we present a retrospective pooled analysis of a large dataset from pre-clinical studies, in order to examine the effects of early versus late administration of intravenous recombinant tissue type plasminogen activator (rt-PA). Methods We collected data from 26 individual studies from 9 international centers (13 researchers, 716 animals) that compared rt-PA to controls, in a unique mouse model of thromboembolic stroke induced by an in situ injection of thrombin into the middle cerebral artery. Studies were classified into early (<3h) versus late (≥3h) drug administration. Final infarct volumes, assessed by histology or MRI, were compared in each study and the absolute differences were pooled in a random-effect meta-analysis. The influence of time of administration was tested. Results When compared to saline controls, early rt-PA administration was associated with a significant benefit (absolute difference = −6.63 mm3; 95%CI, −9.08 to −4.17; I2=76%) whereas late rt-PA treatment showed a deleterious effect (+5.06 mm3; 95%CI, +2.78 to +7.34; I2=42%, Pint<0.00001). Results remained unchanged following subgroup analyses. Conclusion Our results provide the basis needed for the design of future pre-clinical studies on recanalization therapies using this model of thromboembolic stroke in mice. The power analysis reveals that a multi-center trial would require 123 animals per group instead of 40 for a single center trial. PMID:27032444

  11. A meta-analysis of soil salinization effects on nitrogen pools, cycles and fluxes in coastal ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Minghua; Butterbach-Bahl, Klaus; Vereecken, Harry; Brüggemann, Nicolas

    2017-03-01

    Salinity intrusion caused by land subsidence resulting from increasing groundwater abstraction, decreasing river sediment loads and increasing sea level because of climate change has caused widespread soil salinization in coastal ecosystems. Soil salinization may greatly alter nitrogen (N) cycling in coastal ecosystems. However, a comprehensive understanding of the effects of soil salinization on ecosystem N pools, cycling processes and fluxes is not available for coastal ecosystems. Therefore, we compiled data from 551 observations from 21 peer-reviewed papers and conducted a meta-analysis of experimental soil salinization effects on 19 variables related to N pools, cycling processes and fluxes in coastal ecosystems. Our results showed that the effects of soil salinization varied across different ecosystem types and salinity levels. Soil salinization increased plant N content (18%), soil NH 4 + (12%) and soil total N (210%), although it decreased soil NO 3 - (2%) and soil microbial biomass N (74%). Increasing soil salinity stimulated soil N 2 O fluxes as well as hydrological NH 4 + and NO 2 - fluxes more than threefold, although it decreased the hydrological dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) flux (59%). Soil salinization also increased the net N mineralization by 70%, although salinization effects were not observed on the net nitrification, denitrification and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium in this meta-analysis. Overall, this meta-analysis improves our understanding of the responses of ecosystem N cycling to soil salinization, identifies knowledge gaps and highlights the urgent need for studies on the effects of soil salinization on coastal agro-ecosystem and microbial N immobilization. Additional increases in knowledge are critical for designing sustainable adaptation measures to the predicted intrusion of salinity intrusion so that the productivity of coastal agro-ecosystems can be maintained or improved and the N losses and pollution of the natural

  12. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer: A Systematic Review and Pooled Analysis of 19 Trials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrelli, Fausto, E-mail: faupe@libero.it [Oncology Unit, Department of Oncology, ASST Bergamo Ovest, Treviglio (Italy); Comito, Tiziana [Department of Radiosurgery and Radiotherapy, Istituto Clinico Humanitas Cancer Center and Research Hospital, Milan (Italy); Ghidini, Antonio [Oncology Unit, Igea Hospital, Milan (Italy); Torri, Valter [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Humanitas University and Radiotherapy and Radiosurgery Department-Humanitas Research Hospital, Milan (Italy); Scorsetti, Marta [Department of Radiosurgery and Radiotherapy, Istituto Clinico Humanitas Cancer Center and Research Hospital, Milan (Italy); Barni, Sandro [Oncology Unit, Department of Oncology, ASST Bergamo Ovest, Treviglio (Italy)

    2017-02-01

    Purpose: Although surgery is the standard of care for resectable pancreatic cancer (PC), standard-dose chemoradiation therapy and chemotherapy alone are suitable for patients with unresectable disease. Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is an alternative, focused local therapy that delivers high radiation doses within a few fractions to the cancer, sparing the surrounding critical tissue. We performed a systematic review and pooled analysis of published trials to evaluate the efficacy and safety of this emerging treatment modality. Methods and Materials: We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, PubMed, EMBASE, SCOPUS, the Web of Science, and CINAHL for publications regarding SBRT for locally advanced PC. The 1-year overall survival (OS) rate was the primary endpoint, and the median OS, 2-year OS rate, 1-year locoregional control (LRC) rate, and grade 3 to 4 toxicities were the secondary endpoints. A multivariate random-effects meta-analysis was performed to calculate the aggregated OS rates at 1 and 2 years and the 1-year LRC rate. Results: A total of 19 studies, encompassing 1009 patients, were included in the present analysis. The pooled 1-year OS was 51.6% in 13 trials with data available. The median OS ranged from 5.7 to 47 months (median 17). The LRC rate at 1 year was 72.3%. Overall, the occurrence of severe adverse events did not exceed 10%. LRC appeared to correlate with the total SBRT dose and the number of fractions. Conclusions: The advantages of SBRT in terms of treatment time, satisfactory OS, and LRC indicate that it is an effective option for inoperable PC. However, a definitive validation of this treatment modality in large randomized studies is required, owing to the nonrandomized nature of the included studies and the limitations of small single-center series that include mixed populations.

  13. Liquid sodium pool fires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casselman, C [DSN/SESTR, Centre de Cadarache, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    1979-03-01

    Experimental sodium pool combustion results have led to a definition of the combustion kinetics, and have revealed the hazards of sodium-concrete contact reactions and the possible ignition of organic matter (paint) by hydration of sodium peroxide aerosols. Analysis of these test results shows that the controlling mechanism is sodium evaporation diffusion. (author)

  14. Liquid sodium pool fires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casselman, C.

    1979-01-01

    Experimental sodium pool combustion results have led to a definition of the combustion kinetics, and have revealed the hazards of sodium-concrete contact reactions and the possible ignition of organic matter (paint) by hydration of sodium peroxide aerosols. Analysis of these test results shows that the controlling mechanism is sodium evaporation diffusion. (author)

  15. Alert but less alarmed: a pooled analysis of terrorism threat perception in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barr Margo

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous Australian research has highlighted disparities in community perceptions of the threat posed by terrorism. A study with a large sample size is needed to examine reported concerns and anticipated responses of community sub-groups and to determine their consistency with existing Australian and international findings. Methods Representative samples of New South Wales (NSW adults completed terrorism perception questions as part of computer assisted telephone interviews (CATI in 2007 (N = 2081 and 2010 (N = 2038. Responses were weighted against the NSW population. Data sets from the two surveys were pooled and multivariate multilevel analyses conducted to identify health and socio-demographic factors associated with higher perceived risk of terrorism and evacuation response intentions, and to examine changes over time. Results In comparison with 2007, Australians in 2010 were significantly more likely to believe that a terrorist attack would occur in Australia (Adjusted Odd Ratios (AOR = 1.24, 95%CI:1.06-1.45 but felt less concerned that they would be directly affected by such an incident (AOR = 0.65, 95%CI:0.55-0.75. Higher perceived risk of terrorism and related changes in living were associated with middle age, female gender, lower education and higher reported psychological distress. Australians of migrant background reported significantly lower likelihood of terrorism (AOR = 0.52, 95%CI:0.39-0.70 but significantly higher concern that they would be personally affected by such an incident (AOR = 1.57, 95%CI:1.21-2.04 and having made changes in the way they live due to this threat (AOR = 2.47, 95%CI:1.88-3.25. Willingness to evacuate homes and public places in response to potential incidents increased significantly between 2007 and 2010 (AOR = 1.53, 95%CI:1.33-1.76. Conclusion While an increased proportion of Australians believe that the national threat of terrorism remains high, concern about being personally affected

  16. The impact of caudate lobe resection on margin status and outcomes in patients with hilar cholangiocarcinoma: a multi-institutional analysis from the US Extrahepatic Biliary Malignancy Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhutiani, Neal; Scoggins, Charles R; McMasters, Kelly M; Ethun, Cecilia G; Poultsides, George A; Pawlik, Timothy M; Weber, Sharon M; Schmidt, Carl R; Fields, Ryan C; Idrees, Kamran; Hatzaras, Ioannis; Shen, Perry; Maithel, Shishir K; Martin, Robert C G

    2018-04-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the impact of caudate resection on margin status and outcomes during resection of extrahepatic hilar cholangiocarcinoma. A database of 1,092 patients treated for biliary malignancies at institutions of the Extrahepatic Biliary Malignancy Consortium was queried for individuals undergoing curative-intent resection for extrahepatic hilar cholangiocarcinoma. Patients who did versus did not undergo concomitant caudate resection were compared with regard to demographic, baseline, and tumor characteristics as well as perioperative outcomes. A total of 241 patients underwent resection for a hilar cholangiocarcinoma, of whom 85 underwent caudate resection. Patients undergoing caudate resection were less likely to have a final positive margin (P = .01). Kaplan-Meier curve of overall survival for patients undergoing caudate resection indicated no improvement over patients not undergoing caudate resection (P = .16). On multivariable analysis, caudate resection was not associated with improved overall survival or recurrence-free survival, although lymph node positivity was associated with worse overall survival and recurrence-free survival, and adjuvant chemoradiotherapy was associated with improved overall survival and recurrence-free survival. Caudate resection is associated with a greater likelihood of margin-negative resection in patients with extrahepatic hilar cholangiocarcinoma. Precise preoperative imaging is critical to assess the extent of biliary involvement, so that all degrees of hepatic resections are possible at the time of the initial operation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Integrating knowledge generation with knowledge diffusion and utilization: a case study analysis of the Consortium for Applied Research and Evaluation in Mental Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vingilis, Evelyn; Hartford, Kathleen; Schrecker, Ted; Mitchell, Beth; Lent, Barbara; Bishop, Joan

    2003-01-01

    Knowledge diffusion and utilization (KDU) have become a key focus in the health research community because of the limited success to date of research findings to inform health policies, programs and services. Yet, evidence indicates that successful KDU is often predicated on the early involvement of potential knowledge users in the conceptualization and conduct of the research and on the development of a "partnership culture". This study describes the integration of KDU theory with practice via a case study analysis of the Consortium for Applied Research and Evaluation in Mental Health (CAREMH). This qualitative study, using a single-case design, included a number of data sources: proposals, meeting minutes, presentations, publications, reports and curricula vitae of CAREMH members. CAREMH has adopted the following operational strategies to increase KDU capacity: 1) viewing research as a means and not as an end; 2) bringing the university and researcher to the community; 3) using participatory research methods; 4) embracing transdisciplinary research and interactions; and 5) using connectors. Examples of the iterative process between researchers and potential knowledge users in their contribution to knowledge generation, diffusion and utilization are provided. This case study supports the importance of early and ongoing involvement of relevant potential knowledge users in research to enhance its utilization potential. It also highlights the need for re-thinking research funding approaches.

  18. Development and optimization of SPECT gated blood pool cluster analysis for the prediction of CRT outcome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lalonde, Michel, E-mail: mlalonde15@rogers.com; Wassenaar, Richard [Department of Physics, Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario K1S 5B6 (Canada); Wells, R. Glenn; Birnie, David; Ruddy, Terrence D. [Division of Cardiology, University of Ottawa Heart Institute, Ottawa, Ontario K1Y 4W7 (Canada)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Phase analysis of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) radionuclide angiography (RNA) has been investigated for its potential to predict the outcome of cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). However, phase analysis may be limited in its potential at predicting CRT outcome as valuable information may be lost by assuming that time-activity curves (TAC) follow a simple sinusoidal shape. A new method, cluster analysis, is proposed which directly evaluates the TACs and may lead to a better understanding of dyssynchrony patterns and CRT outcome. Cluster analysis algorithms were developed and optimized to maximize their ability to predict CRT response. Methods: About 49 patients (N = 27 ischemic etiology) received a SPECT RNA scan as well as positron emission tomography (PET) perfusion and viability scans prior to undergoing CRT. A semiautomated algorithm sampled the left ventricle wall to produce 568 TACs from SPECT RNA data. The TACs were then subjected to two different cluster analysis techniques, K-means, and normal average, where several input metrics were also varied to determine the optimal settings for the prediction of CRT outcome. Each TAC was assigned to a cluster group based on the comparison criteria and global and segmental cluster size and scores were used as measures of dyssynchrony and used to predict response to CRT. A repeated random twofold cross-validation technique was used to train and validate the cluster algorithm. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to calculate the area under the curve (AUC) and compare results to those obtained for SPECT RNA phase analysis and PET scar size analysis methods. Results: Using the normal average cluster analysis approach, the septal wall produced statistically significant results for predicting CRT results in the ischemic population (ROC AUC = 0.73;p < 0.05 vs. equal chance ROC AUC = 0.50) with an optimal operating point of 71% sensitivity and 60% specificity. Cluster

  19. Development and optimization of SPECT gated blood pool cluster analysis for the prediction of CRT outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lalonde, Michel; Wassenaar, Richard; Wells, R. Glenn; Birnie, David; Ruddy, Terrence D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Phase analysis of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) radionuclide angiography (RNA) has been investigated for its potential to predict the outcome of cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). However, phase analysis may be limited in its potential at predicting CRT outcome as valuable information may be lost by assuming that time-activity curves (TAC) follow a simple sinusoidal shape. A new method, cluster analysis, is proposed which directly evaluates the TACs and may lead to a better understanding of dyssynchrony patterns and CRT outcome. Cluster analysis algorithms were developed and optimized to maximize their ability to predict CRT response. Methods: About 49 patients (N = 27 ischemic etiology) received a SPECT RNA scan as well as positron emission tomography (PET) perfusion and viability scans prior to undergoing CRT. A semiautomated algorithm sampled the left ventricle wall to produce 568 TACs from SPECT RNA data. The TACs were then subjected to two different cluster analysis techniques, K-means, and normal average, where several input metrics were also varied to determine the optimal settings for the prediction of CRT outcome. Each TAC was assigned to a cluster group based on the comparison criteria and global and segmental cluster size and scores were used as measures of dyssynchrony and used to predict response to CRT. A repeated random twofold cross-validation technique was used to train and validate the cluster algorithm. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to calculate the area under the curve (AUC) and compare results to those obtained for SPECT RNA phase analysis and PET scar size analysis methods. Results: Using the normal average cluster analysis approach, the septal wall produced statistically significant results for predicting CRT results in the ischemic population (ROC AUC = 0.73;p < 0.05 vs. equal chance ROC AUC = 0.50) with an optimal operating point of 71% sensitivity and 60% specificity. Cluster

  20. FOLFOXIRI Plus Bevacizumab as Conversion Therapy for Patients With Initially Unresectable Metastatic Colorectal Cancer: A Systematic Review and Pooled Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasello, Gianluca; Petrelli, Fausto; Ghidini, Michele; Russo, Alessandro; Passalacqua, Rodolfo; Barni, Sandro

    2017-07-13

    The combination of fluorouracil, oxaliplatin, and irinotecan plus bevacizumab (FOLFOXIRI-Bev) is an established and effective first-line chemotherapy regimen for metastatic colorectal cancer. However, resection rates of metastases and overall survival with this schedule have never been systematically evaluated in published studies including, but not limited to, the TRIBE (TRIplet plus BEvacizumab) trial. To assess the clinical efficacy of FOLFOXIRI-Bev, including outcomes and rates of surgical conversions. A systematic review was conducted in October 2016 in concordance with the PRISMA guidelines of PubMed, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, SCOPUS, Web of Science, Google Scholar, CINAHL, Ovid, and EMBASE using the terms FOLFOXIRI and bevacizumab and (colorectal cancer). Clinical trials, retrospective case series, and prospective case series that used FOLFOXIRI-Bev for the treatment of initially unresectable metastatic colorectal cancer in humans were included. Individual case reports and retrospective case series with fewer than 10 patients were excluded. Data were extracted independently by 2 reviewers on a predesigned, standardized form. Ultimately, data were aggregated to obtain the pooled effect size of efficacy, according to the random-effects model and weighted for the number of patients included in each trial. Median overall survival and progression-free survival, overall response rates, and rates of R0 surgical conversions and overall surgical conversions. Eleven FOLFOXIRI-Bev studies published between 2010 and 2016 met the inclusion criteria and were pooled for analysis. The studies included 889 patients, with 877 patients clinically evaluable for overall response rates. The objective response rate to FOLFOXIRI-Bev was 69% (95% CI, 65%-72%; I2 = 25%). The rate of overall surgical conversions was 39.1% (95% CI, 26.9%-52.8%), and the rate of R0 surgical conversions was 28.1% (95% CI, 18.1%-40.8%). Median pooled overall survival was 30

  1. Analysis of dose rates received around the storage pool for irradiated control rods in a BWR nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodenas, J.; Abarca, A.; Gallardo, S.

    2011-01-01

    BWR control rods are activated by neutron reactions in the reactor. The dose produced by this activity can affect workers in the area surrounding the storage pool, where activated rods are stored. Monte Carlo (MC) models for neutron activation and dose assessment around the storage pool have been developed and validated. In this work, the MC models are applied to verify the expected reduction of dose when the irradiated control rod is hanged in an inverted position into the pool.

  2. The International Human Epigenome Consortium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stunnenberg, Hendrik G; Hirst, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The International Human Epigenome Consortium (IHEC) coordinates the generation of a catalog of high-resolution reference epigenomes of major primary human cell types. The studies now presented (see the Cell Press IHEC web portal at http://www.cell.com/consortium/IHEC) highlight the coordinated ac...

  3. Hawaii Space Grant Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Luke P.

    2005-01-01

    The Hawai'i Space Grant Consortium is composed of ten institutions of higher learning including the University of Hawai'i at Manoa, the University of Hawai'i at Hilo, the University of Guam, and seven Community Colleges spread over the 4 main Hawaiian islands. Geographic separation is not the only obstacle that we face as a Consortium. Hawai'i has been mired in an economic downturn due to a lack of tourism for almost all of the period (2001 - 2004) covered by this report, although hotel occupancy rates and real estate sales have sky-rocketed in the last year. Our challenges have been many including providing quality educational opportunities in the face of shrinking State and Federal budgets, encouraging science and technology course instruction at the K-12 level in a public school system that is becoming less focused on high technology and more focused on developing basic reading and math skills, and assembling community college programs with instructors who are expected to teach more classes for the same salary. Motivated people can overcome these problems. Fortunately, the Hawai'i Space Grant Consortium (HSGC) consists of a group of highly motivated and talented individuals who have not only overcome these obstacles, but have excelled with the Program. We fill a critical need within the State of Hawai'i to provide our children with opportunities to pursue their dreams of becoming the next generation of NASA astronauts, engineers, and explorers. Our strength lies not only in our diligent and creative HSGC advisory board, but also with Hawai'i's teachers, students, parents, and industry executives who are willing to invest their time, effort, and resources into Hawai'i's future. Our operational philosophy is to FACE the Future, meaning that we will facilitate, administer, catalyze, and educate in order to achieve our objective of creating a highly technically capable workforce both here in Hawai'i and for NASA. In addition to administering to programs and

  4. GAS STORAGE TECHNOLOGY CONSORTIUM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert W. Watson

    2004-10-18

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. To accomplish this objective, the project is divided into three phases that are managed and directed by the GSTC Coordinator. The first phase, Phase 1A, was initiated on September 30, 2003, and was completed on March 31, 2004. Phase 1A of the project included the creation of the GSTC structure, development and refinement of a technical approach (work plan) for deliverability enhancement and reservoir management. This report deals with Phase 1B and encompasses the period July 1, 2004, through September 30, 2004. During this time period there were three main activities. First was the

  5. Safety analysis methodology for Chinshan nuclear power plant spent fuel pool under Fukushima-like accident condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Hao-Tzu [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China). Research Atomic Energy Council; Li, Wan-Yun; Wang, Jong-Rong; Tseng, Yung-Shin; Chen, Hsiung-Chih; Shih, Chunkuan; Chen, Shao-Wen [National Tsing Hua Univ., HsinChu, Taiwan (China). Inst. of Nuclear Engineering and Science

    2017-03-15

    Chinshan nuclear power plant (NPP), a BWR/4 plant, is the first NPP in Taiwan. After Fukushima NPP disaster occurred, there is more concern for the safety of NPPs in Taiwan. Therefore, in order to estimate the safety of Chinshan NPP spent fuel pool (SFP), by using TRACE, MELCOR, CFD, and FRAPTRAN codes, INER (Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Atomic Energy Council, R.O.C.) performed the safety analysis of Chinshan NPP SFP. There were two main steps in this research. The first step was the establishment of Chinshan NPP SFP models. And the transient analysis under the SFP cooling system failure condition (Fukushima-like accident) was performed. In addition, the sensitive study of the time point for water spray was also performed. The next step was the fuel rod performance analysis by using FRAPTRAN and TRACE's results. Finally, the animation model of Chinshan NPP SFP was presented by using the animation function of SNAP with MELCOR analysis results.

  6. Nighttime exposure to electromagnetic fields and childhood leukemia: an extended pooled analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schüz, Joachim; Svendsen, Anne Louise; Linet, Martha S

    2007-01-01

    analysis of case-control studies on ELF EMF exposure and risk of childhood leukemia to examine nighttime residential exposures. Data from four countries (Canada, Germany, the United Kingdom, and the United States) were included in the analysis, comprising 1,842 children diagnosed with leukemia and 3......,099 controls (diagnosis dates ranged from 1988 to 1996). The odds ratios for nighttime ELF EMF exposure for categories of 0.1-or=0.4 microT as compared with ... that nighttime measures are more appropriate; hence, the observed association between ELF EMF and childhood leukemia still lacks a plausible explanation....

  7. Effect of donepezil on cognition in severe Alzheimer's disease: a pooled data analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cummings, Jeffrey; Jones, Roy; Wilkinson, David

    2010-01-01

    (observed case analysis). Analyses were stratified by baseline severity (Mini-Mental State Examination [MMSE] scores 1-5, 6-9, 10-12 and 13-17) to allow investigation of responses at different stages of cognitive impairment. Relationships to global and functional measures were explored. The difference...

  8. Nuclear Fabrication Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levesque, Stephen [EWI, Columbus, OH (United States)

    2013-04-05

    This report summarizes the activities undertaken by EWI while under contract from the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) for the management and operation of the Nuclear Fabrication Consortium (NFC). The NFC was established by EWI to independently develop, evaluate, and deploy fabrication approaches and data that support the re-establishment of the U.S. nuclear industry: ensuring that the supply chain will be competitive on a global stage, enabling more cost-effective and reliable nuclear power in a carbon constrained environment. The NFC provided a forum for member original equipment manufactures (OEM), fabricators, manufacturers, and materials suppliers to effectively engage with each other and rebuild the capacity of this supply chain by : Identifying and removing impediments to the implementation of new construction and fabrication techniques and approaches for nuclear equipment, including system components and nuclear plants. Providing and facilitating detailed scientific-based studies on new approaches and technologies that will have positive impacts on the cost of building of nuclear plants. Analyzing and disseminating information about future nuclear fabrication technologies and how they could impact the North American and the International Nuclear Marketplace. Facilitating dialog and initiate alignment among fabricators, owners, trade associations, and government agencies. Supporting industry in helping to create a larger qualified nuclear supplier network. Acting as an unbiased technology resource to evaluate, develop, and demonstrate new manufacturing technologies. Creating welder and inspector training programs to help enable the necessary workforce for the upcoming construction work. Serving as a focal point for technology, policy, and politically interested parties to share ideas and concepts associated with fabrication across the nuclear industry. The report the objectives and summaries of the Nuclear Fabrication Consortium

  9. Risk of lung cancer and consumption of vegetables and fruit in Japanese: A pooled analysis of cohort studies in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakai, Kenji; Sugawara, Yumi; Tsuji, Ichiro; Tamakoshi, Akiko; Shimazu, Taichi; Matsuo, Keitaro; Nagata, Chisato; Mizoue, Tetsuya; Tanaka, Keitaro; Inoue, Manami; Tsugane, Shoichiro; Sasazuki, Shizuka

    2015-01-01

    International reviews have concluded that consumption of fruit and vegetables might decrease the risk of lung cancer. However, the relevant epidemiological evidence still remains insufficient in Japan. Therefore, we performed a pooled analysis of data from four population-based cohort studies in Japan with >200 000 participants and >1700 lung cancer cases. We computed study-specific hazard ratios by quintiles of vegetable and fruit consumption as assessed by food frequency questionnaires. Summary hazard ratios were estimated by pooling the study-specific hazard ratios with a fixed-effect model. In men, we found inverse associations between fruit consumption and the age-adjusted and area-adjusted risk of mortality or incidence of lung cancer. However, the associations were largely attenuated after adjustment for smoking and energy intake. The significant decrease in risk among men remained only for a moderate level of fruit consumption; the lowest summary hazard ratios were found in the third quintile of intake (mortality: 0.71, 95% confidence interval 0.60–0.84; incidence: 0.83, 95% confidence interval 0.70–0.98). This decrease in risk was mainly detected in ever smokers. Conversely, vegetable intake was positively correlated with the risk of incidence of lung cancer after adjustment for smoking and energy intake in men (trend P, 0.024); the summary hazard ratio for the highest quintile was 1.26 (95% confidence interval 1.05–1.50). However, a similar association was not detected for mortality from lung cancer. In conclusion, a moderate level of fruit consumption is associated with a decreased risk of lung cancer in men among the Japanese population. PMID:26033436

  10. Cardiovascular safety of linagliptin in type 2 diabetes: a comprehensive patient-level pooled analysis of prospectively adjudicated cardiovascular events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenstock, Julio; Marx, Nikolaus; Neubacher, Dietmar; Seck, Thomas; Patel, Sanjay; Woerle, Hans-Juergen; Johansen, Odd Erik

    2015-05-21

    The cardiovascular (CV) safety of linagliptin was evaluated in subjects with type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Pre-specified patient-level pooled analysis of all available double-blind, randomized, controlled trials, ≥ 12 weeks' duration (19 trials, 9459 subjects) of linagliptin versus placebo/active treatment. Primary end point: composite of prospectively adjudicated CV death, non-fatal myocardial infarction, non-fatal stroke, and hospitalization for unstable angina (4P-MACE). Hospitalization for congestive heart failure (CHF) was also evaluated; adjudication of CHF was introduced during the phase 3 program (8 trials; 3314 subjects). 4P-MACE was assessed in placebo-controlled trials (subgroup of 18 trials; 7746 subjects). Investigator-reported events suggestive of CHF from 24 placebo-controlled trials (including trials 4P-MACE incidence rates: 13.4 per 1000 patient-years, linagliptin (60 events), 18.9, total comparators (62 events); overall hazard ratio (HR), 0.78 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.55-1.12). HR for adjudicated hospitalization for CHF (n = 21): 1.04 (0.43-2.47). For placebo-controlled trials, 4P-MACE incidence rates: 14.9 per 1000 patient-years, linagliptin (43 events), 16.4, total comparators (29 events); overall HR, 1.09 (95% CI, 0.68-1.75). Occurrence of investigator-reported events suggestive of CHF was low for linagliptin- (26 events, 0.5%; serious: 16 events, 0.3%) and placebo-treated (8 events, 0.2%; serious: 6 events, 0.2%) patients. Linagliptin is not associated with increased CV risk versus pooled active comparators or placebo in patients with T2DM.

  11. Pooled analysis of menstrual irregularities from three major clinical studies evaluating everolimus for the treatment of tuberous sclerosis complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Sparagana

    Full Text Available To determine the impact of everolimus on female fertility, including menstrual irregularities, secondary amenorrhea, and luteinizing and follicle stimulating hormone levels in female patients.A pooled analysis from 3 prospective studies consisting of a core phase (≥6 months and a long-term follow-up open-label extension.One phase 2 single-center and two phase 3 multicenter studies.Data were obtained from female participants, restricted to those between 10 and 55 years of age, during 1 of 3 of the described clinical trials of everolimus. Patients had received ≥ 1 dose of everolimus.Incidence of fertility events.A total of 43/112 patients (38.4% experienced at least 1 menstrual irregularity. The most common events were amenorrhea (24.1% and irregular menstruation (17.0%. Seven patients (6.3% experienced grade 3/4 amenorrhea. When only the longest duration period of amenorrhea for each patient was considered, the median duration was 291 days. Fifteen patients attained menarche during the treatment period in any of the pooled studies. The mean age of menarche for this group was 12.4 years, similar to that of patients who were postmenarche at study entry (12.2 years. A total of 19/92 patients (20.7% who were postmenarche at baseline or during the study experienced an irregular menstruation event. An increased luteinizing hormone level was reported as an adverse event in 3/112 patients (3%, and follicle-stimulating hormone levels were within normal limits for these patients.No new safety concerns emerged regarding endocrine function and menstruation in female patients with tuberous sclerosis complex-associated subependymal giant cell astrocytoma or angiomyolipoma, who were receiving everolimus.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00411619, NCT00789828, NCT00790400.

  12. Baseline participant characteristics and risk for dropout from ten obesity randomized controlled trials: a pooled analysis of individual level data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Kathryn A; Affuso, Olivia; Desmond, Renee; Allison, David B

    Understanding participant demographic characteristics that inform the optimal design of obesity RCTs have been examined in few studies. The objective of this study was to investigate the association of individual participant characteristics and dropout rates (DORs) in obesity randomized controlled trials (RCT) by pooling data from several publicly available datasets for analyses. We comprehensively characterize DORs and patterns in obesity RCTs at the individual study level, and describe how such rates and patterns vary as a function of individual-level characteristics. We obtained and analyzed nine publicly-available, obesity RCT datasets that examined weight loss or weight gain prevention as a primary or secondary endpoint. Four risk factors for dropout were examined by Cox proportional hazards including sex, age, baseline BMI, and race/ethnicity. The individual study data were pooled in the final analyses with a random effect for study, and HR and 95% CIs were computed. Results of the multivariate analysis indicated that the risk of dropout was significantly higher for females compared to males (HR= 1.24, 95% CI = 1.05, 1.46). Hispanics and Non-Hispanic blacks had a significantly higher dropout rate compared to non-Hispanic whites (HR= 1.62, 95% CI = 1.37, 1.91; HR= 1.22, 95% CI = 1.11, 1.35, respectively). There was a significantly increased risk of dropout associated with advancing age (HR= 1.02, 95% CI = 1.01, 1.02) and increasing BMI (HR= 1.03, 95% CI = 1.03, 1.04). As more studies may focus on special populations, researchers designing obesity RCTs may wish to oversample in certain demographic groups if attempting to match comparison groups based on generalized estimates of expected dropout rates, or otherwise adjust a priori power estimates. Understanding true reasons for dropout may require additional methods of data gathering not generally employed in obesity RCTs, e.g. time on treatment.

  13. Weak and Strong Compensation for the Prioritization of Public Investments: Multidimensional Analysis for Pools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluigi De Mare

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite the economic crisis still heavily affecting most of Europe, a possible resumption can be found in the revitalization of public and private investments. These investments should be directed not only towards the strategic areas of infrastructures and production, but also to those which allow for a higher level of the quality of life (sports facilities, parks, etc.. In such cases, the need to balance the reasons of financial sustainability with environmental and social profiles is even more evident. Thus, multicriteria techniques, supporting complex assessments, should be implemented together with a monetary feasibility study (cost-benefit analysis. Multidimensional methods allow for the aggregation of different profiles into overall indicators. This study gives an account of how the application and comparison of multi-criteria approaches based on tools characterized by a higher or lower level of compensation between criteria can broaden the spectrum of analysis of the problems and lead to a more subtle logic of funding for public works and works of public utility, with a more current and mature sharing of profitability between private investors and users of community infrastructures.

  14. Seismic analysis of a large pool-type LMR [liquid metal reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, C.Y.; Gvildys, J.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes the seismic study of a 450-MWe liquid metal reactor (LMR) under 0.3-g SSE ground excitation. Two calculations were performed using the new design configuration. They deal with the seismic response of the reactor vessel, the guard vessel and support skirt, respectively. In both calculations, the stress and displacement fields at important locations of those components are investigated. Assessments are also made on the elastic and inelastic structural capabilities for other beyond-design basis seismic loads. Results of the reactor vessel analysis reveal that the maximum equivalent stress is only about half of the material yield stress. For the guard vessel and support skirt, the stress level is very small. Regarding the analysis if inelastic structural capability, solutions of the Newmark-Hall ductility modification method show that the reactor vessel can withstand seismics with ground ZPAs ranging from 1.015 to 1.31 g, which corresponds to 3.37 to 4.37 times the basic 0.3-g SSE. Thus, the reactor vessel and guard vessel are strong enough to resist seismic loads. 4 refs., 10 figs., 5 tabs

  15. Pooled Bayesian analysis of 28 studies on radon induced lung cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fornalski, K.W.; Dobrzyński, L.

    2010-01-01

    The influence of ionizing radiation of radon-222 and its daughters on the lung cancer incidence and mortality published in 28 papers was reanalyzed, for two ranges of low annual radiation dose of below 70 mSv per year (391 Bq m -3 ) and 150 mSv per year (838 Bq m -3 ). The seven popular models of dose-effect relationship were tested. The assumption-free Bayesian statistical methods were used for all curve fittings. Also the Model Selection algorithm was used to verify the relative probability of all seven models. The results of the analysis demonstrate that in this ranges of doses (below 70 and 150 mSv/ year) the published data do not show the presence of a risk of lung cancer induction. The most probable dose-effect relationship is constant one (risk ratio, RR=1). The statistical analysis shows that there is no basis for increase the risk of lung cancer in low dose area. The final conclusion results from the fact that the model assuming no dependence of the lung cancer induction on the radiation doses is at least 100 times more likely than six other models tested, including the Linear No-Threshold (LNT) model

  16. Validation of Numerical Schemes in a Thermal-Hydraulic Analysis Code for a Natural Convection Heat Transfer of a Molten Pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong Tae; Ha, Kwang Soon; Kim, Hwan Yeol; Park, Rae Joon; Song, Jin Ho

    2010-01-01

    It is postulated that a fuel of a water-cooled nuclear reactor can be melted during a hypothetical severe accident. There are two strategies for cooling the molten corium, which are in-vessel corium cooling and exvessel corium cooling. They can be chosen depending on cooling characteristics of the reactor. The coolability of the molten pool is determined by comparing the thermal load from the pool and the maximum heat flux removable by cooling mechanism such as radiative or boiling heat transfer on the pool boundaries. In order to evaluate the molten pool coolability, it is important to correctly expect the thermal load by a natural convection heat transfer of the corium pool. Many correlations have been developed by conducting experiments for the natural convection of a pool. The main parameters of the heat transfer by the natural convection are Rayleigh (Ra) number, Prandtl (Pr) number and the geometry of the pool. Sometimes, the use of the correlations for the evaluation of the thermal load from the molten pool is limited by a high Ra number of the pool and its different shape from the existing correlations. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has been used for the analysis of the heat transfer by a natural convection. In principle, CFD is applicable to the corium pool analysis. But unfortunately, some difficulties are encountered during the analysis, which are from numerical and physical instabilities. The physical instability is from turbulence fluctuation and inverted thermal layer near the upper surface of the volumetric-heated molten pool with a high Ra number. In order to resolve turbulent natural convection, buoyancy-modified two-equation turbulence models such as a k-e or k-w model with time-averaged Navier- Stokes equations are commonly used. Because an unsteadiness of a natural convection becomes nontrivial in a high Ra number pool, it is very difficult to get accurate heat flux on the pool surface with the time averaged turbulence model. Recently

  17. Multi-institutional Pooled Analysis on Adjuvant Chemoradiation in Pancreatic Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morganti, Alessio G.; Falconi, Massimo; Stiphout, Ruud G.P.M. van; Mattiucci, Gian-Carlo; Alfieri, Sergio; Calvo, Felipe A.; Dubois, Jean-Bernard; Fastner, Gerd; Herman, Joseph M.; Maidment, Bert W.; Miller, Robert C.; Regine, William F.; Reni, Michele; Sharma, Navesh K.; Ippolito, Edy

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the impact of chemoradiation therapy (CRT) on overall survival (OS) after resection of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Methods and Materials: A multicenter retrospective review of 955 consecutive patients who underwent complete resection with macroscopically negative margins (R0-1) for invasive carcinoma (T1-4; N0-1; M0) of the pancreas was performed. Exclusion criteria included metastatic or unresectable disease at surgery, macroscopic residual disease (R2), treatment with intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT), and a histological diagnosis of no ductal carcinoma, or postoperative death (within 60 days of surgery). In all, 623 patients received postoperative radiation therapy (RT), 575 patients received concurrent chemotherapy (CT), and 462 patients received adjuvant CT. Results: Median follow-up was 21.0 months. Median OS after adjuvant CRT was 39.9 versus 24.8 months after no adjuvant CRT (P<.001) and 27.8 months after CT alone (P<.001). Five-year OS was 41.2% versus 24.8% with and without postoperative CRT, respectively. The positive impact of CRT was confirmed by multivariate analysis (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.72; confidence interval [CI], 0.60-0.87; P=.001). Adverse prognostic factors identified by multivariate analysis included the following: R1 resection (HR = 1.17; CI = 1.07-1.28; P<.001), higher pT stage (HR = 1.23; CI = 1.11-1.37; P<.001), positive lymph nodes (HR = 1.27; CI = 1.15-1.41; P<.001), and tumor diameter >20 mm (HR = 1.14; CI = 1.05-1.23; P=.002). Multivariate analysis also showed a better prognosis in patients treated in centers with >10 pancreatic resections per year (HR = 0.87; CI = 0.78-0.97; P=.014) Conclusion: This study represents the largest comparative study on adjuvant therapy in patients after resection of carcinoma of the pancreas. Overall survival was better in patients who received adjuvant CRT

  18. Multi-institutional Pooled Analysis on Adjuvant Chemoradiation in Pancreatic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morganti, Alessio G. [Department of Radiotherapy, Università Cattolica S. Cuore, Rome (Italy); Unit of Radiotherapy, Unit of General Oncology, Fondazione Giovanni Paolo II, Campobasso (Italy); Falconi, Massimo [Department of Surgery, University of Verona, Verona (Italy); Stiphout, Ruud G.P.M. van [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW, University Medical Centre Maastricht (Netherlands); Mattiucci, Gian-Carlo, E-mail: gcmattiucci@rm.unicatt.it [Department of Radiotherapy, Università Cattolica S. Cuore, Rome (Italy); Alfieri, Sergio [Department of Surgery, Università Cattolica S. Cuore, Rome (Italy); Calvo, Felipe A. [Department of Oncology, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón, Complutense University, Madrid (Spain); Dubois, Jean-Bernard [Département de Radiothérapie, CRLC, Montpellier Cedex (France); Fastner, Gerd [Department of Radiotherapy, PMU, Salzburg (Austria); Herman, Joseph M. [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Maidment, Bert W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia (United States); Miller, Robert C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Regine, William F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland Medical Center, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Reni, Michele [Department of Oncology, S. Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Sharma, Navesh K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland Medical Center, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Ippolito, Edy [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Campus Biomedico, Roma (Italy); and others

    2014-11-15

    Purpose: To determine the impact of chemoradiation therapy (CRT) on overall survival (OS) after resection of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Methods and Materials: A multicenter retrospective review of 955 consecutive patients who underwent complete resection with macroscopically negative margins (R0-1) for invasive carcinoma (T1-4; N0-1; M0) of the pancreas was performed. Exclusion criteria included metastatic or unresectable disease at surgery, macroscopic residual disease (R2), treatment with intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT), and a histological diagnosis of no ductal carcinoma, or postoperative death (within 60 days of surgery). In all, 623 patients received postoperative radiation therapy (RT), 575 patients received concurrent chemotherapy (CT), and 462 patients received adjuvant CT. Results: Median follow-up was 21.0 months. Median OS after adjuvant CRT was 39.9 versus 24.8 months after no adjuvant CRT (P<.001) and 27.8 months after CT alone (P<.001). Five-year OS was 41.2% versus 24.8% with and without postoperative CRT, respectively. The positive impact of CRT was confirmed by multivariate analysis (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.72; confidence interval [CI], 0.60-0.87; P=.001). Adverse prognostic factors identified by multivariate analysis included the following: R1 resection (HR = 1.17; CI = 1.07-1.28; P<.001), higher pT stage (HR = 1.23; CI = 1.11-1.37; P<.001), positive lymph nodes (HR = 1.27; CI = 1.15-1.41; P<.001), and tumor diameter >20 mm (HR = 1.14; CI = 1.05-1.23; P=.002). Multivariate analysis also showed a better prognosis in patients treated in centers with >10 pancreatic resections per year (HR = 0.87; CI = 0.78-0.97; P=.014) Conclusion: This study represents the largest comparative study on adjuvant therapy in patients after resection of carcinoma of the pancreas. Overall survival was better in patients who received adjuvant CRT.

  19. Discrimination between stages of Alzheimer's disease with subsets of Mini-Mental State Examination items. An analysis of Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer's Disease data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fillenbaum, G G; Wilkinson, W E; Welsh, K A; Mohs, R C

    1994-09-01

    To identify minimal sets of Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) items that can distinguish normal control subjects from patients with mild Alzheimer's disease (AD), patients with mild from those with moderate AD, and those with moderate from those with severe AD. Two randomly selected equivalent half samples. Results of logistic regression analysis from data from the first half of the sample were confirmed by receiver operating characteristic curves on the second half. Memory disorders clinics at major medical centers in the United States affiliated with the Consortium to establish a Registry for Alzheimer's Disease (CERAD). White, normal control subjects (n = 412) and patients with AD (n = 621) who met CERAD criteria; nonwhite subjects (n = 165) and persons with missing data (n = 27) were excluded. Three four-item sets of MMSE items that discriminate, respectively, (1) normal controls from patients with mild AD, (2) patients with mild from those with moderate AD, and (3) patients with moderate from those with severe AD. The MMSE items discriminating normal controls from patients with mild AD were day, date, recall of apple, and recall of penny; those discriminating patients with mild from those with moderate AD were month, city, spelling world backward, and county, and those discriminating patients with moderate from those with severe AD were floor of building, repeating the word table, naming watch, and folding paper in half. Performance on the first two four-item sets was comparable with that of the full MMSE; the third set distinguished patients with moderate from those with severe AD better than chance. A minimum set of MMSE items can effectively discriminate normal controls from patients with mild AD and between successive levels of severity of AD. Data apply only to white patients with AD. Performance in minorities, more heterogeneous groups, or normal subjects with questionable cognitive status has not been assessed.

  20. MiRNA-Related SNPs and Risk of Esophageal Adenocarcinoma and Barrett's Esophagus: Post Genome-Wide Association Analysis in the BEACON Consortium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew F Buas

    Full Text Available Incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EA has increased substantially in recent decades. Multiple risk factors have been identified for EA and its precursor, Barrett's esophagus (BE, such as reflux, European ancestry, male sex, obesity, and tobacco smoking, and several germline genetic variants were recently associated with disease risk. Using data from the Barrett's and Esophageal Adenocarcinoma Consortium (BEACON genome-wide association study (GWAS of 2,515 EA cases, 3,295 BE cases, and 3,207 controls, we examined single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs that potentially affect the biogenesis or biological activity of microRNAs (miRNAs, small non-coding RNAs implicated in post-transcriptional gene regulation, and deregulated in many cancers, including EA. Polymorphisms in three classes of genes were examined for association with risk of EA or BE: miRNA biogenesis genes (157 SNPs, 21 genes; miRNA gene loci (234 SNPs, 210 genes; and miRNA-targeted mRNAs (177 SNPs, 158 genes. Nominal associations (P0.50, and we did not find evidence for interactions between variants analyzed and two risk factors for EA/BE (smoking and obesity. This analysis provides the most extensive assessment to date of miRNA-related SNPs in relation to risk of EA and BE. While common genetic variants within components of the miRNA biogenesis core pathway appear unlikely to modulate susceptibility to EA or BE, further studies may be warranted to examine potential associations between unassessed variants in miRNA genes and targets with disease risk.

  1. PmagPy: Software Package for Paleomagnetic Data Analysis and Gateway to the Magnetics Information Consortium (MagIC) Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonestrask, L.; Tauxe, L.; Shaar, R.; Jarboe, N.; Minnett, R.; Koppers, A. A. P.

    2014-12-01

    There are many data types and methods of analysis in rock and paleomagnetic investigations. The MagIC database (http://earthref.org/MAGIC) was designed to accommodate the vast majority of data used in such investigations. Yet getting data from the laboratory into the database, and visualizing and re-analyzing data downloaded from the database, makes special demands on data formatting. There are several recently published programming packages that deal with single types of data: demagnetization experiments (e.g., Lurcock et al., 2012), paleointensity experiments (e.g., Leonhardt et al., 2004), and FORC diagrams (e.g., Harrison et al., 2008). However, there is a need for a unified set of open source, cross-platform software that deals with the great variety of data types in a consistent way and facilitates importing data into the MagIC format, analyzing them and uploading them into the MagIC database. The PmagPy software package (http://earthref.org/PmagPy/cookbook/) comprises a such a comprehensive set of tools. It facilitates conversion of many laboratory formats into the common MagIC format and allows interpretation of demagnetization and Thellier-type experimental data. With some 175 programs and over 250 functions, it can be used to create a wide variety of plots and allows manipulation of downloaded data sets as well as preparation of new contributions for uploading to the MagIC database.

  2. Hawaii ESI: POOLS (Anchialine Pool Points)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for anchialine pools in Hawaii. Anchialine pools are small, relatively shallow coastal ponds that occur...

  3. Virtual pools for interactive analysis and software development through an integrated Cloud environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grandi, C; Italiano, A; Salomoni, D; Melcarne, A K Calabrese

    2011-01-01

    WNoDeS, an acronym for Worker Nodes on Demand Service, is software developed at CNAF-Tier1, the National Computing Centre of the Italian Institute for Nuclear Physics (INFN) located in Bologna. WNoDeS provides on demand, integrated access to both Grid and Cloud resources through virtualization technologies. Besides the traditional use of computing resources in batch mode, users need to have interactive and local access to a number of systems. WNoDeS can dynamically select these computers instantiating Virtual Machines, according to the requirements (computing, storage and network resources) of users through either the Open Cloud Computing Interface API, or through a web console. An interactive use is usually limited to activities in user space, i.e. where the machine configuration is not modified. In some other instances the activity concerns development and testing of services and thus implies the modification of the system configuration (and, therefore, root-access to the resource). The former use case is a simple extension of the WNoDeS approach, where the resource is provided in interactive mode. The latter implies saving the virtual image at the end of each user session so that it can be presented to the user at subsequent requests. This work describes how the LHC experiments at INFN-Bologna are testing and making use of these dynamically created ad-hoc machines via WNoDeS to support flexible, interactive analysis and software development at the INFN Tier-1 Computing Centre.

  4. Comparison of dust related respiratory effects in Dutch and Canadian grain handling industries: a pooled analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peelen, S J; Heederik, D; Dimich-Ward, H D; Chan-Yeung, M; Kennedy, S M

    1996-08-01

    Four previously conducted epidemiological studies in more than 1200 grain workers were used to compare exposure-response relations between exposure to grain dust and respiratory health. The studies included Dutch workers from an animal feed mill and a transfer grain elevator and Canadian workers from a terminal grain elevator and the docks. Relations between forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) and exposure were analysed with multiple regression analysis corrected for smoking, age, and height. Exposure variables examined included cumulative and current dust exposure and the numbers of years a subject was employed in the industry. Sampling efficiencies of the Dutch and Canadian measurement techniques were compared in a pilot study. Results of this study were used to correct slopes of exposure-response relations for differences in dust fractions sampled by Dutch and Canadian personal dust samplers. Negative exposure-response relations were shown for regressions of FEV1 on cumulative and current exposure and years employed. Slopes of the exposure-response relations differed by a factor of three to five between industries, apart from results for cumulative exposure. Here the variation in slopes differed by a factor of 100, from -1 to -0.009 ml/mg.y/m3. The variation in slopes between industries reduced to between twofold to fivefold when the Dutch transfer elevator workers were not considered. There was evidence that the small exposure-response slope found for this group is caused by misclassification of exposure and a strong healthy worker effect. Alternative, but less likely explanations for the variation in slopes were differences in exposure concentrations, composition of grain dust, exposure characteristics, and measurement techniques. In conclusion, this study showed moderately similar negative exposure-response relations for four different populations from different countries, despite differences in methods of exposure assessment and exposure estimation.

  5. Depth of Response in Multiple Myeloma: A Pooled Analysis of Three PETHEMA/GEM Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahuerta, Juan-Jose; Paiva, Bruno; Vidriales, Maria-Belen; Cordón, Lourdes; Cedena, Maria-Teresa; Puig, Noemi; Martinez-Lopez, Joaquin; Rosiñol, Laura; Gutierrez, Norma C; Martín-Ramos, María-Luisa; Oriol, Albert; Teruel, Ana-Isabel; Echeveste, María-Asunción; de Paz, Raquel; de Arriba, Felipe; Hernandez, Miguel T; Palomera, Luis; Martinez, Rafael; Martin, Alejandro; Alegre, Adrian; De la Rubia, Javier; Orfao, Alberto; Mateos, María-Victoria; Blade, Joan; San-Miguel, Jesus F

    2017-09-01

    Purpose To perform a critical analysis on the impact of depth of response in newly diagnosed multiple myeloma (MM). Patients and Methods Data were analyzed from 609 patients who were enrolled in the GEM (Grupo Español de Mieloma) 2000 and GEM2005MENOS65 studies for transplant-eligible MM and the GEM2010MAS65 clinical trial for elderly patients with MM who had minimal residual disease (MRD) assessments 9 months after study enrollment. Median follow-up of the series was 71 months. Results Achievement of complete remission (CR) in the absence of MRD negativity was not associated with prolonged progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) compared with near-CR or partial response (median PFS, 27, 27, and 29 months, respectively; median OS, 59, 64, and 65 months, respectively). MRD-negative status was strongly associated with prolonged PFS (median, 63 months; P < .001) and OS (median not reached; P < .001) overall and in subgroups defined by prior transplantation, disease stage, and cytogenetics, with prognostic superiority of MRD negativity versus CR particularly evident in patients with high-risk cytogenetics. Accordingly, Harrell C statistics showed higher discrimination for both PFS and OS in Cox models that included MRD (as opposed to CR) for response assessment. Superior MRD-negative rates after different induction regimens anticipated prolonged PFS. Among 34 MRD-negative patients with MM and a phenotypic pattern of bone marrow involvement similar to monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance at diagnosis, the probability of "operational cure" was high; median PFS was 12 years, and the 10-year OS rate was 94%. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that MRD-negative status surpasses the prognostic value of CR achievement for PFS and OS across the disease spectrum, regardless of the type of treatment or patient risk group. MRD negativity should be considered as one of the most relevant end points for transplant-eligible and elderly fit patients

  6. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joel Morrison; Elizabeth Wood; Barbara Robuck

    2010-09-30

    The EMS Energy Institute at The Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) has managed the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC) since its inception in 2003. The GSTC infrastructure provided a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. The GSTC received base funding from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Oil & Natural Gas Supply Program. The GSTC base funds were highly leveraged with industry funding for individual projects. Since its inception, the GSTC has engaged 67 members. The GSTC membership base was diverse, coming from 19 states, the District of Columbia, and Canada. The membership was comprised of natural gas storage field operators, service companies, industry consultants, industry trade organizations, and academia. The GSTC organized and hosted a total of 18 meetings since 2003. Of these, 8 meetings were held to review, discuss, and select proposals submitted for funding consideration. The GSTC reviewed a total of 75 proposals and committed co-funding to support 31 industry-driven projects. The GSTC committed co-funding to 41.3% of the proposals that it received and reviewed. The 31 projects had a total project value of $6,203,071 of which the GSTC committed $3,205,978 in co-funding. The committed GSTC project funding represented an average program cost share of 51.7%. Project applicants provided an average program cost share of 48.3%. In addition to the GSTC co-funding, the consortium provided the domestic natural gas storage industry with a technology transfer and outreach infrastructure. The technology transfer and outreach were conducted by having project mentoring teams and a GSTC website, and by working closely with the Pipeline Research Council International (PRCI) to

  7. A simplified approach to the pooled analysis of calibration of clinical prediction rules for systematic reviews of validation studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrov BD

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Borislav D Dimitrov,1,2 Nicola Motterlini,2,† Tom Fahey2 1Academic Unit of Primary Care and Population Sciences, University of Southampton, Southampton, United Kingdom; 2HRB Centre for Primary Care Research, Department of General Medicine, Division of Population Health Sciences, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Dublin, Ireland †Nicola Motterlini passed away on November 11, 2012 Objective: Estimating calibration performance of clinical prediction rules (CPRs in systematic reviews of validation studies is not possible when predicted values are neither published nor accessible or sufficient or no individual participant or patient data are available. Our aims were to describe a simplified approach for outcomes prediction and calibration assessment and evaluate its functionality and validity. Study design and methods: Methodological study of systematic reviews of validation studies of CPRs: a ABCD2 rule for prediction of 7 day stroke; and b CRB-65 rule for prediction of 30 day mortality. Predicted outcomes in a sample validation study were computed by CPR distribution patterns (“derivation model”. As confirmation, a logistic regression model (with derivation study coefficients was applied to CPR-based dummy variables in the validation study. Meta-analysis of validation studies provided pooled estimates of “predicted:observed” risk ratios (RRs, 95% confidence intervals (CIs, and indexes of heterogeneity (I2 on forest plots (fixed and random effects models, with and without adjustment of intercepts. The above approach was also applied to the CRB-65 rule. Results: Our simplified method, applied to ABCD2 rule in three risk strata (low, 0–3; intermediate, 4–5; high, 6–7 points, indicated that predictions are identical to those computed by univariate, CPR-based logistic regression model. Discrimination was good (c-statistics =0.61–0.82, however, calibration in some studies was low. In such cases with miscalibration, the under

  8. Draft paper: On the analysis of diffusive mass transfer in ex-vessel corium pools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frolov, Kyrill N.

    2003-01-01

    In case of a severe accident at a nuclear power plant (NPP) involving the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) melt-through, confident solidification of ex-vessel corium is the imperative condition of its safe retention within the plant containment. The rate-determining process for solidification of ex-vessel coriums in the long-term is the chemical diffusion in the liquid phase at the solid-liquid interface. The process of chemical diffusion in the diffusive boundary layer can evolve taking on different rates, depending on the boundary conditions and the melt composition. Nonetheless, the chemical diffusion rates would entwine the self-diffusivities of corium constituents, which in turn would depend on the melt chemical composition. This work looks at some aspects of analytical and experimental determination of self-diffusivities of corium constituents. Following the corium-concrete interaction, an ex-vessel corium melt would contain several chemical components, including a fraction of silica. Accordingly, ex-vessel corium is considered in this paper as a silicate melts. In the realm of the geological and glass sciences, where silicate melts are most often discussed, the diffusive transport and viscous flow are conceived interrelated from a phenomenological point of view. Though the viscous and diffusive mass transfer mechanisms are not identical for different species even in the same melt, a combination of semi-empirical models can still provide an estimation of the diffusion thresholds in ex-vessel corium melts. Thus, the first part of this paper presents an analysis of the applicability of such empirical models for simple silicate melts based on the published data. This is followed by an estimation of diffusivities in melt compositions typical of ex-vessel coriums. Alternatively, although the general trend towards a coupled description of the viscous flow and diffusion for ex-vessel corium melts seems promising, it is limited to published data on self-diffusivities of

  9. Peak oxygen uptake in Paralympic sitting sports: A systematic literature review, meta- and pooled-data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgart, Julia Kathrin; Brurok, Berit; Sandbakk, Øyvind

    2018-01-01

    Peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak) in Paralympic sitting sports athletes represents their maximal ability to deliver energy aerobically in an upper-body mode, with values being influenced by sex, disability-related physiological limitations, sport-specific demands, training status and how they are tested. To identify VO2peak values in Paralympic sitting sports, examine between-sports differences and within-sports variations in VO2peak and determine the influence of sex, age, body-mass, disability and test-mode on VO2peak. Systematic literature review and meta-analysis. PubMed, CINAHL, SPORTDiscusTM and EMBASE were systematically searched in October 2016 using relevant medical subject headings, keywords and a Boolean. Studies that assessed VO2peak values in sitting sports athletes with a disability in a laboratory setting were included. Data was extracted and pooled in the different sports disciplines, weighted by the Dersimonian and Laird random effects approach. Quality of the included studies was assessed with a modified version of the Downs and Black checklist by two independent reviewers. Meta-regression and pooled-data multiple regression analyses were performed to assess the influence of sex, age, body-mass, disability, test mode and study quality on VO2peak. Of 6542 retrieved articles, 57 studies reporting VO2peak values in 14 different sitting sports were included in this review. VO2peak values from 771 athletes were used in the data analysis, of which 30% participated in wheelchair basketball, 27% in wheelchair racing, 15% in wheelchair rugby and the remaining 28% in the 11 other disciplines. Fifty-six percent of the athletes had a spinal cord injury and 87% were men. Sports-discipline-averaged VO2peak values ranged from 2.9 L∙min-1 and 45.6 mL∙kg-1∙min-1 in Nordic sit skiing to 1.4 L∙min-1 and 17.3 mL∙kg-1∙min-1 in shooting and 1.3 L∙min-1 and 18.9 mL∙kg-1∙min-1 in wheelchair rugby. Large within-sports variation was found in sports with few

  10. Peak oxygen uptake in Paralympic sitting sports: A systematic literature review, meta- and pooled-data analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Kathrin Baumgart

    Full Text Available Peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak in Paralympic sitting sports athletes represents their maximal ability to deliver energy aerobically in an upper-body mode, with values being influenced by sex, disability-related physiological limitations, sport-specific demands, training status and how they are tested.To identify VO2peak values in Paralympic sitting sports, examine between-sports differences and within-sports variations in VO2peak and determine the influence of sex, age, body-mass, disability and test-mode on VO2peak.Systematic literature review and meta-analysis.PubMed, CINAHL, SPORTDiscusTM and EMBASE were systematically searched in October 2016 using relevant medical subject headings, keywords and a Boolean.Studies that assessed VO2peak values in sitting sports athletes with a disability in a laboratory setting were included.Data was extracted and pooled in the different sports disciplines, weighted by the Dersimonian and Laird random effects approach. Quality of the included studies was assessed with a modified version of the Downs and Black checklist by two independent reviewers. Meta-regression and pooled-data multiple regression analyses were performed to assess the influence of sex, age, body-mass, disability, test mode and study quality on VO2peak.Of 6542 retrieved articles, 57 studies reporting VO2peak values in 14 different sitting sports were included in this review. VO2peak values from 771 athletes were used in the data analysis, of which 30% participated in wheelchair basketball, 27% in wheelchair racing, 15% in wheelchair rugby and the remaining 28% in the 11 other disciplines. Fifty-six percent of the athletes had a spinal cord injury and 87% were men. Sports-discipline-averaged VO2peak values ranged from 2.9 L∙min-1 and 45.6 mL∙kg-1∙min-1 in Nordic sit skiing to 1.4 L∙min-1 and 17.3 mL∙kg-1∙min-1 in shooting and 1.3 L∙min-1 and 18.9 mL∙kg-1∙min-1 in wheelchair rugby. Large within-sports variation was found in

  11. Peak oxygen uptake in Paralympic sitting sports: A systematic literature review, meta- and pooled-data analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brurok, Berit; Sandbakk, Øyvind

    2018-01-01

    Background Peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak) in Paralympic sitting sports athletes represents their maximal ability to deliver energy aerobically in an upper-body mode, with values being influenced by sex, disability-related physiological limitations, sport-specific demands, training status and how they are tested. Objectives To identify VO2peak values in Paralympic sitting sports, examine between-sports differences and within-sports variations in VO2peak and determine the influence of sex, age, body-mass, disability and test-mode on VO2peak. Design Systematic literature review and meta-analysis. Data sources PubMed, CINAHL, SPORTDiscusTM and EMBASE were systematically searched in October 2016 using relevant medical subject headings, keywords and a Boolean. Eligibility criteria Studies that assessed VO2peak values in sitting sports athletes with a disability in a laboratory setting were included. Data synthesis Data was extracted and pooled in the different sports disciplines, weighted by the Dersimonian and Laird random effects approach. Quality of the included studies was assessed with a modified version of the Downs and Black checklist by two independent reviewers. Meta-regression and pooled-data multiple regression analyses were performed to assess the influence of sex, age, body-mass, disability, test mode and study quality on VO2peak. Results Of 6542 retrieved articles, 57 studies reporting VO2peak values in 14 different sitting sports were included in this review. VO2peak values from 771 athletes were used in the data analysis, of which 30% participated in wheelchair basketball, 27% in wheelchair racing, 15% in wheelchair rugby and the remaining 28% in the 11 other disciplines. Fifty-six percent of the athletes had a spinal cord injury and 87% were men. Sports-discipline-averaged VO2peak values ranged from 2.9 L∙min-1 and 45.6 mL∙kg-1∙min-1 in Nordic sit skiing to 1.4 L∙min-1 and 17.3 mL∙kg-1∙min-1 in shooting and 1.3 L∙min-1 and 18.9 mL∙kg-1

  12. Vitamin D and mortality: Individual participant data meta-analysis of standardized 25-hydroxyvitamin D in 26916 individuals from a European consortium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Gaksch

    Full Text Available Vitamin D deficiency may be a risk factor for mortality but previous meta-analyses lacked standardization of laboratory methods for 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D concentrations and used aggregate data instead of individual participant data (IPD. We therefore performed an IPD meta-analysis on the association between standardized serum 25(OHD and mortality.In a European consortium of eight prospective studies, including seven general population cohorts, we used the Vitamin D Standardization Program (VDSP protocols to standardize 25(OHD data. Meta-analyses using a one step procedure on IPD were performed to study associations of 25(OHD with all-cause mortality as the primary outcome, and with cardiovascular and cancer mortality as secondary outcomes. This meta-analysis is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT02438488.We analysed 26916 study participants (median age 61.6 years, 58% females with a median 25(OHD concentration of 53.8 nmol/L. During a median follow-up time of 10.5 years, 6802 persons died. Compared to participants with 25(OHD concentrations of 75 to 99.99 nmol/L, the adjusted hazard ratios (with 95% confidence interval for mortality in the 25(OHD groups with 40 to 49.99, 30 to 39.99, and <30 nmol/L were 1.15 (1.00-1.29, 1.33 (1.16-1.51, and 1.67 (1.44-1.89, respectively. We observed similar results for cardiovascular mortality, but there was no significant linear association between 25(OHD and cancer mortality. There was also no significantly increased mortality risk at high 25(OHD levels up to 125 nmol/L.In the first IPD meta-analysis using standardized measurements of 25(OHD we observed an association between low 25(OHD and increased risk of all-cause mortality. It is of public health interest to evaluate whether treatment of vitamin D deficiency prevents premature deaths.

  13. Accident conditions analysis of spent fuel storage pool RA research reactor in Vinca; Analiza udesnih stanja u odlagalistu isluzenog goriva istrazivackog rektora RA u Vinci

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jovic, V; Jovic, L [Institute of Nuclear Sciences VINCA, Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro)

    2000-07-01

    Based on Safety analysis of the spent fuel pool RA research reactor in Vinca, conditions and possibilities accident sequences in present configuration storage facility are considered (author) [Serbo-Croat] Na osnovu Analize sigurnosti odlagalista isluzenog goriva istrazivackog reaktora RA u Vinci razmatraju se uslovi i mogucnosti pojave udesnih stanja u postojecoj konfiguraciji odlagalista (author)

  14. Atlantic Coast Environmental Indicators Consortium

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — n 2000, the US EPA granted authority to establish up to five Estuarine Indicator Research Programs. These Programs were designed to identify, evaluate, recommend and...

  15. NCI Pediatric Preclinical Testing Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI has awarded grants to five research teams to participate in its Pediatric Preclinical Testing Consortium, which is intended to help to prioritize which agents to pursue in pediatric clinical trials.

  16. Hickory Consortium 2001 Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2003-02-01

    As with all Building America Program consortia, systems thinking is the key to understanding the processes that Hickory Consortium hopes to improve. The Hickory Consortium applies this thinking to more than the whole-building concept. Their systems thinking embraces the meta process of how housing construction takes place in America. By understanding the larger picture, they are able to identify areas where improvements can be made and how to implement them.

  17. A pooled analysis of CYP2D6 genotype in breast cancer prevention trials of low-dose tamoxifen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Harriet; Gandini, Sara; Serrano, Davide; Gjerde, Jennifer; Lattanzi, Monia; Macis, Debora; Guerrieri-Gonzaga, Aliana; Aristarco, Valentina; Mellgren, Gunnar; Lien, Ernst; DeCensi, Andrea; Bonanni, Bernardo

    2016-08-01

    Decreased CYP2D6 activity is associated with lower levels of active tamoxifen metabolites. We examined the impact of CYP2D6 genotype on tamoxifen pharmacokinetics, biomarker activity, and efficacy in a pooled analysis of low-dose tamoxifen. Four randomized breast cancer prevention trials of very-low-dose (1 mg/day, n = 52 or 10 mg/week, n = 152) or low-dose tamoxifen (5 mg/day, n = 171) were pooled. DNA from 367 subjects was genotyped for CYP2D6 alleles associated with absent (PM allele: *3, *4, *5, *6, *7, *8, *12, and *14), reduced (IM allele: *9, *10, *17, *29, *41), normal (EM allele), or increased (UM: *XN) enzyme activity. Associations of tamoxifen, metabolites, activity biomarkers, and event-free survival with rapid (UM/EM, UM/IM, EM/EM, EM/IM, or EM/PM alleles) versus slow metabolizers (PM/IM or PM/PM) were investigated through random effects models, with 'study' as the random factor, and Cox regression models, adjusting for confounders. Rapid metabolizers had higher endoxifen levels than slow metabolizers: 15.3 versus 12.2 ng/mL (P = 0.018) with 5 mg/day, and 3.8 versus 2.8 ng/mL (P = 0.004) with 1 mg/day or 10 mg/week tamoxifen. The IGF-I decrease correlated with endoxifen (P = 0.002) and 4-hydroxytamoxifen levels, demonstrating steeper decreases at higher metabolite levels (P = 0.001). After a median follow-up of 12 years, rapid metabolizers with prior history of breast neoplasms allocated to tamoxifen 5 mg/day had a 60 % reduction of risk of recurrences (HR = 0.40, 95 % CI: 0.16-0.99) compared to slow metabolizers. CYP2D6 genotype may have an impact on tamoxifen efficacy at low doses. Trials investigating tamoxifen dose adjustments based on the woman's hormonal context and CYP2D6 genotype are warranted.

  18. Baseline participant characteristics and risk for dropout from ten obesity randomized controlled trials: a pooled analysis of individual level data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn Ann Kaiser

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Understanding participant demographic characteristics that inform the optimal design of obesity RCTs have been examined in few studies. The objective of this study was to investigate the association of individual participant characteristics and dropout rates (DORs in obesity randomized controlled trials (RCT by pooling data from several publicly available datasets for analyses. We comprehensively characterize DORs and patterns in obesity RCTs at the individual study level, and describe how such rates and patterns vary as a function of individual-level characteristics. Methods: We obtained and analyzed nine publicly-available, obesity RCT datasets that examined weight loss or weight gain prevention as a primary or secondary endpoint. Four risk factors for dropout were examined by Cox proportional hazards including sex, age, baseline BMI, and race/ethnicity. The individual study data were pooled in the final analyses with a random effect for study, and HR and 95% CIs were computed. Results: Results of the multivariate analysis indicated that the risk of dropout was significantly higher for females compared to males (HR= 1.24, 95% CI = 1.05, 1.46. Hispanics and Non-Hispanic blacks had a significantly higher dropout rate compared to non-Hispanic whites (HR= 1.62, 95% CI = 1.37, 1.91; HR= 1.22, 95% CI = 1.11, 1.35, respectively. There was a significantly increased risk of dropout associated with advancing age (HR= 1.02, 95% CI = 1.01, 1.02 and increasing BMI (HR= 1.03, 95% CI = 1.03, 1.04. Conclusion/Significance: As more studies may focus on special populations, researchers designing obesity RCTs may wish to oversample in certain demographic groups if attempting to match comparison groups based on generalized estimates of expected dropout rates, or otherwise adjust a priori power estimates. Understanding true reasons for dropout may require additional methods of data gathering not generally employed in obesity RCTs, e.g. time on

  19. Liposome bupivacaine for improvement in economic outcomes and opioid burden in GI surgery: IMPROVE Study pooled analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cohen SM

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Stephen M Cohen,1 Jon D Vogel,2 Jorge E Marcet,3 Keith A Candiotti4 1Atlanta Colon and Rectal Surgery, PA, Atlanta, GA, USA; 2General Surgery Clinic, University of Colorado, Aurora, CO, USA; 3Department of Surgery, Morsani College of Medicine, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, USA; 4Department of Anesthesiology, University of Miami Leonard Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL, USA Abstract: Postsurgical pain management remains a significant challenge. Liposome bupivacaine, as part of a multimodal analgesic regimen, has been shown to significantly reduce postsurgical opioid consumption, hospital length of stay (LOS, and hospitalization costs in gastrointestinal (GI surgery, compared with intravenous (IV opioid-based patient-controlled analgesia (PCA. Pooled results from open-label studies comparing a liposome bupivacaine-based multimodal analgesic regimen with IV opioid PCA were analyzed. Patients (n=191 who underwent planned surgery and received study drug (IV opioid PCA, n=105; multimodal analgesia, n=86 were included. Liposome bupivacaine-based multimodal analgesia compared with IV opioid PCA significantly reduced mean (standard deviation [SD] postsurgical opioid consumption (38 [55] mg versus [vs] 96 [85] mg; P<0.0001, postsurgical LOS (median 2.9 vs 4.3 days; P<0.0001, and mean hospitalization costs (US$8,271 vs US$10,726; P=0.0109. The multimodal analgesia group reported significantly fewer patients with opioid-related adverse events (AEs than the IV opioid PCA group (P=0.0027; there were no significant between-group differences in patient satisfaction scores at 30 days. A liposome bupivacaine-based multimodal analgesic regimen was associated with significantly less opioid consumption, opioid-related AEs, and better health economic outcomes compared with an IV opioid PCA-based regimen in patients undergoing GI surgery. Study registration: This pooled analysis is based on data from Phase IV clinical trials registered on the US National

  20. Acute, subacute and long-term subjective effects of psilocybin in healthy humans: a pooled analysis of experimental studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studerus, Erich; Kometer, Michael; Hasler, Felix; Vollenweider, Franz X

    2011-11-01

    Psilocybin and related hallucinogenic compounds are increasingly used in human research. However, due to limited information about potential subjective side effects, the controlled medical use of these compounds has remained controversial. We therefore analysed acute, short- and long-term subjective effects of psilocybin in healthy humans by pooling raw data from eight double-blind placebo-controlled experimental studies conducted between 1999 and 2008. The analysis included 110 healthy subjects who had received 1-4 oral doses of psilocybin (45-315 µg/kg body weight). Although psilocybin dose-dependently induced profound changes in mood, perception, thought and self-experience, most subjects described the experience as pleasurable, enriching and non-threatening. Acute adverse drug reactions, characterized by strong dysphoria and/or anxiety/panic, occurred only in the two highest dose conditions in a relatively small proportion of subjects. All acute adverse drug reactions were successfully managed by providing interpersonal support and did not need psychopharmacological intervention. Follow-up questionnaires indicated no subsequent drug abuse, persisting perception disorders, prolonged psychosis or other long-term impairment of functioning in any of our subjects. The results suggest that the administration of moderate doses of psilocybin to healthy, high-functioning and well-prepared subjects in the context of a carefully monitored research environment is associated with an acceptable level of risk.

  1. Digital subtraction radiographic analysis of the combination of bioabsorbable membrane and bovine morphogenetic protein pool in human periodontal infrabony defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria do Carmo Machado Guimarães

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: This study assessed the bone density gain and its relationship with the periodontal clinical parameters in a case series of a regenerative therapy procedure. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Using a split-mouth study design, 10 pairs of infrabony defects from 15 patients were treated with a pool of bovine bone morphogenetic proteins associated with collagen membrane (test sites or collagen membrane only (control sites. The periodontal healing was clinically and radiographically monitored for six months. Standardized pre-surgical and 6-month postoperative radiographs were digitized for digital subtraction analysis, which showed relative bone density gain in both groups of 0.034 ± 0.423 and 0.105 ± 0.423 in the test and control group, respectively (p>0.05. RESULTS: As regards the area size of bone density change, the influence of the therapy was detected in 2.5 mm² in the test group and 2 mm² in the control group (p>0.05. Additionally, no correlation was observed between the favorable clinical results and the bone density gain measured by digital subtraction radiography (p>0.05. CONCLUSIONS: The findings of this study suggest that the clinical benefit of the regenerative therapy observed did not come with significant bone density gains. Long-term evaluation may lead to a different conclusions.

  2. A new method for studying population genetics of cyst nematodes based on Pool-Seq and genomewide allele frequency analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mimee, Benjamin; Duceppe, Marc-Olivier; Véronneau, Pierre-Yves; Lafond-Lapalme, Joël; Jean, Martine; Belzile, François; Bélair, Guy

    2015-11-01

    Cyst nematodes are important agricultural pests responsible for billions of dollars of losses each year. Plant resistance is the most effective management tool, but it requires a close monitoring of population genetics. Current technologies for pathotyping and genotyping cyst nematodes are time-consuming, expensive and imprecise. In this study, we capitalized on the reproduction mode of cyst nematodes to develop a simple population genetic analysis pipeline based on genotyping-by-sequencing and Pool-Seq. This method yielded thousands of SNPs and allowed us to study the relationships between populations of different origins or pathotypes. Validation of the method on well-characterized populations also demonstrated that it was a powerful and accurate tool for population genetics. The genomewide allele frequencies of 23 populations of golden nematode, from nine countries and representing the five known pathotypes, were compared. A clear separation of the pathotypes and fine genetic relationships between and among global populations were obtained using this method. In addition to being powerful, this tool has proven to be very time- and cost-efficient and could be applied to other cyst nematode species. © 2015 Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada Molecular Ecology Resources © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd Reproduced with the permission of the Minister of Agriculture and Agri-food.

  3. Treatment factors affecting outcomes in HIV-associated non-Hodgkin lymphomas: a pooled analysis of 1546 patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Xiaonan; Wang, Dan; Tamari, Roni; Lee, Jeannette Y.; Mounier, Nicolas; Kaplan, Lawrence D.; Ribera, Josep-Maria; Spina, Michele; Tirelli, Umberto; Weiss, Rudolf; Galicier, Lionel; Boue, Francois; Wilson, Wyndham H.; Wyen, Christoph; Oriol, Albert; Navarro, José-Tomás; Dunleavy, Kieron; Little, Richard F.; Ratner, Lee; Garcia, Olga; Morgades, Mireia; Remick, Scot C.; Noy, Ariela; Sparano, Joseph A.

    2013-01-01

    Limited comparative data exist for the treatment of HIV-associated non-Hodgkin lymphoma. We analyzed pooled individual patient data for 1546 patients from 19 prospective clinical trials to assess treatment-specific factors (type of chemotherapy, rituximab, and concurrent combination antiretroviral [cART] use) and their influence on the outcomes complete response (CR), progression free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS). In our analysis, rituximab was associated with a higher CR rate (odds ratio [OR] 2.89; P < .001), improved PFS (hazard ratio [HR] 0.50; P < .001), and OS (HR 0.51; P < .0001). Compared with cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (CHOP), initial therapy with more dose-intense regimens resulted in better CR rates (ACVBP [doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, vindesine, bleomycin and prednisolone]: OR 1.70; P < .04), PFS (ACVBP: HR 0.72; P = .049; “intensive regimens”: HR 0.35; P < .001) and OS (“intensive regimens”: HR 0.54; P < .001). Infusional etoposide, prednisone, infusional vincristine, infusional doxorubicin, and cyclophosphamide (EPOCH) was associated with significantly better OS in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (HR 0.33; P = .03). Concurrent use of cART was associated with improved CR rates (OR 1.89; P = .005) and trended toward improved OS (HR 0.78; P = .07). These findings provide supporting evidence for current patterns of care where definitive evidence is unavailable. PMID:24014242

  4. Overcoming the challenges of conventional dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction: analysis of THMs in chlorinated swimming pools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faraji, Hakim; Helalizadeh, Masoumeh; Kordi, Mohammad Reza

    2018-01-01

    A rapid, simple, and sensitive approach to the analysis of trihalomethanes (THMs) in swimming pool water samples has been developed. The main goal of this study was to overcome or to improve the shortcomings of conventional dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) and to maximize the realization of green analytical chemistry principles. The method involves a simple vortex-assisted microextraction step, in the absence of the dispersive solvent, followed by salting-out effect for the elimination of the centrifugation step. A bell-shaped device and a solidifiable solvent were used to simplify the extraction solvent collection after phase separation. Optimization of the independent variables was performed by using chemometric methods in three steps. The method was statistically validated based on authentic guidance documents. The completion time for extraction was less than 8 min, and the limits of detection were in the range between 4 and 72 ng L -1 . Using this method, good linearity and precision were achieved. The results of THMs determination in different real samples showed that in some cases the concentration of total THMs was more than threshold values of THMs determined by accredited healthcare organizations. This method indicated satisfactory analytical figures of merit. Graphical Abstract A novel green microextraction technique for overcoming the challenges of conventional DLLME. The proposed procedure complies with the principles of green/sustainable analytical chemistry, comprising decreasing the sample size, making easy automation of the process, reducing organic waste, diminishing energy consumption, replacing toxic reagents with safer reagents, and enhancing operator safety.

  5. Health system outcomes and determinants amenable to public health in industrialized countries: a pooled, cross-sectional time series analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Westert Gert P

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Few studies have tried to assess the combined cross-sectional and temporal contributions of a more comprehensive set of amenable factors to population health outcomes for wealthy countries during the last 30 years of the 20th century. We assessed the overall ecological associations between mortality and factors amenable to public health. These amenable factors included addictive and nutritional lifestyle, air quality, public health spending, healthcare coverage, and immunizations. Methods We used a pooled cross-sectional, time series analysis with corrected fixed effects regression models in an ecological design involving eighteen member countries of the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development during the period 1970 to 1999. Results Alcohol, tobacco, and fat consumption, and sometimes, air pollution were significantly associated with higher all-cause mortality and premature death. Immunizations, health care coverage, fruit/vegetable and protein consumption, and collective health expenditure had negative effects on mortality and premature death, even after controlling for the elderly, density of practicing physicians, doctor visits and per capita GDP. However, tobacco, air pollution, and fruit/vegetable intake were sometimes sensitive to adjustments. Conclusion Mortality and premature deaths could be improved by focusing on factors that are amenable to public health policies. Tackling these issues should be reflected in the ongoing assessments of health system performance.

  6. Acute liver failure caused by hepatitis E virus genotype 3 and 4: A systematic review and pooled analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haffar, Samir; Shalimar; Kaur, Ravinder J; Wang, Zhen; Prokop, Larry J; Murad, Mohammad H; Bazerbachi, Fateh

    2018-04-19

    Acute liver failure caused by hepatitis E virus genotype 3 and 4 has been rarely described. Because of the presence of a short golden therapeutic window in patients with viral acute liver failure from other causes, it is possible that early recognition and treatment might reduce the morbidity and mortality. We performed a systematic review and pooled analysis of acute liver failure caused by hepatitis E virus genotype 3 and 4. Two reviewers appraised studies after searching multiple databases on June 12th, 2017. Appropriate tests were used to compare hepatitis E virus genotype 3 vs 4, suspected vs confirmed genotypes, hepatitis E virus-RNA positive vs negative, and to discern important mortality risk factors. We identified 65 patients, with median age 58 years (range: 3-79), and a male to female ratio of 1.2:1. The median bilirubin, ALT, AST and alkaline phosphatase (expressed by multiplication of the upper limit of normal) levels were 14.8, 45.3, 34.8 and 1.63 respectively. Antihepatitis E virus IgG, antihepatitis E virus IgM and hepatitis E virus-RNA were positive in 84%, 91% and 86% of patients respectively. The median interval from symptoms onset to acute liver failure was 23 days, and 16 patients underwent liver transplantation. Final outcome was reported in 58 patients and mortality was 46%. Age was a predictor of poor prognosis in multivariate analysis. No important differences were found between patients infected with genotype 3 vs 4, patients with confirmed vs suspected genotypes, or patients with positive vs negative RNA. Acute liver failure caused by hepatitis E virus genotype 3 and 4 is rare, similar between genotypes, occurs commonly in middle-aged/elderly patients and has a very high mortality. Age is predictive of poor prognosis in multivariate analysis. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Evidence of association of APOE with age-related macular degeneration - a pooled analysis of 15 studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Gareth J.; Patterson, Chris C.; Chakravarthy, Usha; Dasari, Shilpa; Klaver, Caroline C.; Vingerling, Johannes R.; Ho, Lintje; de Jong, Paulus T.V.M.; Fletcher, Astrid E.; Young, Ian S.; Seland, Johan H.; Rahu, Mati; Soubrane, Gisele; Tomazzoli, Laura; Topouzis, Fotis; Vioque, Jesus; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Sofat, Reecha; Dean, Michael; Sawitzke, Julie; Seddon, Johanna M.; Peter, Inga; Webster, Andrew R.; Moore, Anthony T.; Yates, John R.W.; Cipriani, Valentina; Fritsche, Lars G.; Weber, Bernhard H.F.; Keilhauer, Claudia N.; Lotery, Andrew J.; Ennis, Sarah; Klein, Michael L.; Francis, Peter J.; Stambolian, Dwight; Orlin, Anton; Gorin, Michael B.; Weeks, Daniel E.; Kuo, Chia-Ling; Swaroop, Anand; Othman, Mohammad; Kanda, Atsuhiro; Chen, Wei; Abecasis, Goncalo R.; Wright, Alan F.; Hayward, Caroline; Baird, Paul N.; Guymer, Robyn H.; Attia, John; Thakkinstian, Ammarin; Silvestri, Giuliana

    2011-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the most common cause of incurable visual impairment in high-income countries. Previous studies report inconsistent associations between AMD and apolipoprotein E (APOE), a lipid transport protein involved in low-density cholesterol modulation. Potential interaction between APOE and sex, and smoking status, has been reported. We present a pooled analysis (n=21,160) demonstrating associations between late AMD and APOε4 (OR=0.72 per haplotype; CI: 0.65–0.74; P=4.41×10−11) and APOε2 (OR=1.83 for homozygote carriers; CI: 1.04–3.23; P=0.04), following adjustment for age-group and sex within each study and smoking status. No evidence of interaction between APOE and sex or smoking was found. Ever smokers had significant increased risk relative to never smokers for both neovascular (OR=1.54; CI: 1.38–1.72; P=2.8×10−15) and atrophic (OR=1.38; CI: 1.18–1.61; P=3.37×10−5) AMD but not early AMD (OR=0.94; CI: 0.86–1.03; P=0.16), implicating smoking as a major contributing factor to disease progression from early signs to the visually disabling late forms. Extended haplotype analysis incorporating rs405509 did not identify additional risks beyondε2 and ε4 haplotypes. Our expanded analysis substantially improves our understanding of the association between the APOE locus and AMD. It further provides evidence supporting the role of cholesterol modulation, and low-density cholesterol specifically, in AMD disease etiology. PMID:21882290

  8. Weld pool and keyhole dynamic analysis based on visual system and neural network during laser keyhole welding

    OpenAIRE

    Luo, Masiyang

    2014-01-01

    In keyhole fiber laser welding processes, the weld pool behavior and keyhole dynamics are essential to determining welding quality. To observe and control the welding process, the accurate extraction of the weld pool boundary as well as the width is required. In addition, because of the cause-and-effect relationship between the welding defects and stability of the keyhole, which is primarily determined by keyhole geometry during the welding process, the stability of keyhole needs to be consid...

  9. Design and Construction of Pool Door for Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Kwangsub; Lee, Sangjin; Choi, Jinbok; Oh, Jinho; Lee, Jongmin [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The pool door is a structure to isolate the reactor pool from the service pool for maintenance. The pool door is installed before the reactor pool is drained. The pool door consists of structural component and sealing component. The main structures of the pool door are stainless steel plates and side frames. The plates and frames are assembled by welded joints. Lug is welded at the top of the plate. The pool door is submerged in the pool water when it is used. Materials of the pool door should be resistive to corrosion and radiation. Stainless steel is used in structural components and air nozzle assemblies. Features of design and construction of the pool door for the research reactor are introduced. The pool door is designed to isolate the reactor pool for maintenance. Structural analysis is performed to evaluate the structural integrity during earthquake. Tests and inspections are also carried out during construction to identify the safety and function of the pool door.

  10. Design and Construction of Pool Door for Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Kwangsub; Lee, Sangjin; Choi, Jinbok; Oh, Jinho; Lee, Jongmin

    2016-01-01

    The pool door is a structure to isolate the reactor pool from the service pool for maintenance. The pool door is installed before the reactor pool is drained. The pool door consists of structural component and sealing component. The main structures of the pool door are stainless steel plates and side frames. The plates and frames are assembled by welded joints. Lug is welded at the top of the plate. The pool door is submerged in the pool water when it is used. Materials of the pool door should be resistive to corrosion and radiation. Stainless steel is used in structural components and air nozzle assemblies. Features of design and construction of the pool door for the research reactor are introduced. The pool door is designed to isolate the reactor pool for maintenance. Structural analysis is performed to evaluate the structural integrity during earthquake. Tests and inspections are also carried out during construction to identify the safety and function of the pool door

  11. Consortium for Verification Technology Fellowship Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadler, Lorraine E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-06-01

    As one recipient of the Consortium for Verification Technology (CVT) Fellowship, I spent eight days as a visiting scientist at the University of Michigan, Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences (NERS). During this time, I participated in multiple department and research group meetings and presentations, met with individual faculty and students, toured multiple laboratories, and taught one-half of a one-unit class on Risk Analysis in Nuclear Arms control (six 1.5 hour lectures). The following report describes some of the interactions that I had during my time as well as a brief discussion of the impact of this fellowship on members of the consortium and on me/my laboratory’s technical knowledge and network.

  12. Thermal analysis of the modified Hallum Nuclear Power Facility cask using experimentally obtained thermal boundary conditions corresponding to an engulfing open pool fire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longenbaugh, R.S.; Sanchez, L.C.; Gregory, J.J.

    1987-08-01

    This report presents the two-dimensional heat transfer analysis of an open pool fire surrounding a modified radioactive materials transport cask. The cask is an older cask that was used by the Hallum Nuclear Power Facility (HNPF). The HNPF cask did not have a neutron shielding region but was modified to include one for testing purposes. Analysis of the thermal effects of an engulfing open pool fire was performed with the use of the heat transfer code Q/TRAN, which had previously been used in thermal benchmarking problems for spent nuclear fuel casks. Boundary condition data for the analysis were derived from experimental open pool fire tests of large-scale calorimeter test articles performed at SNL that produced information about cask surface heat flux versus surface temperature relationships. Data analysis was directed toward a determination of the thermal response of the cask, particularly the extent of lead melt since lead is used within the HNPF cask's gamma-shielding region. Parameters, such as surface emissivity and internal heat generation rate, can affect the results of the thermal analysis which control the amount of lead melt. A parameter sensitivity analysis was performed using a one-dimensional model to describe how surface emissivity and internal heat generation rates affect the temperature distribution within the cask. The information from this analysis was used to determine the range of parameters for the two-dimensional thermal analysis. 13 refs., 57 figs., 8 tabs

  13. Structural integrity assessment of HANARO pool cover

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Jeong Soo

    2001-11-01

    This report is for the seismic analysis and the structural integrity evaluation of HANARO Pool Cover in accordances with the requirement of the Technical Specification for Seismic Analysis of HANARO Pool Cover. For performing the seismic analysis and evaluating the structural integrity for HANARO Pool Cover, the finite element analysis model using ANSYS 5.7 was developed and the dynamic characteristics were analyzed. The seismic response spectrum analyses of HANARO Pool Cover under the design floor response spectrum loads of OBE and SSE were performed. The analysis results show that the stress values in HANARO Pool Cover for the seismic loads are within the ASME Code limits. It is also confirmed that the fatigue usage factor is less than 1.0. Therefore any damage on structural integrity is not expected when an HANARO Pool Cover is installed in the upper part of the reactor pool

  14. Tiotropium HandiHaler® and Respimat® in COPD: a pooled safety analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halpin DMG

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available David MG Halpin,1 Ronald Dahl,2 Christoph Hallmann,3 Achim Mueller,3 Donald Tashkin4 1NHS SW, Royal Devon and Exeter Hospital, Exeter, Devon, England, UK; 2Allergy Centre, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark; 3Boehringer Ingelheim Pharma GmbH & Co KG, Ingelheim am Rhein, Germany; 4Department of Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, USAIntroduction: Tiotropium is prescribed for the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and delivered via HandiHaler® (18 µg once daily or Respimat® Soft Mist™ inhaler (5 µg once daily. The recent TIOtropium Safety and Performance In Respimat® (TIOSPIR™ study demonstrated that both exhibit similar safety profiles. This analysis provides an updated comprehensive safety evaluation of tiotropium® using data from placebo-controlled HandiHaler® and Respimat® trials.Methods: Pooled analysis of adverse event (AE data from tiotropium HandiHaler® 18 µg and Respimat® 5 µg randomized, double-blind, parallel-group, placebo-controlled, clinical trials in patients with COPD (treatment duration ≥4 weeks. Incidence rates, rate ratios (RRs, and 95% confidence intervals (CIs were determined for HandiHaler® and Respimat® trials, both together and separately.Results: In the 28 HandiHaler® and 7 Respimat® trials included in this analysis, 11,626 patients were treated with placebo and 12,929 with tiotropium, totaling 14,909 (12,469 with HandiHaler®; 2,440 with Respimat® patient-years of tiotropium exposure. Mean age was 65 years, and mean prebronchodilator forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1 was 1.16 L (41% predicted. The risk (RR [95% CI] of AEs (0.90 [0.87, 0.93] and of serious AEs (SAEs (0.94 [0.89, 0.99] was significantly lower in the tiotropium than in the placebo group (HandiHaler® and Respimat® pooled results, and there was a numerically lower risk of fatal AEs (FAEs (0.90 [0.79, 1.01]. The risk of cardiac AEs (0.93 [0.85, 1.02] was numerically

  15. Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziemkiewicz, Paul; Vandivort, Tamara; Pflughoeft-Hassett, Debra; Chugh, Y Paul; Hower, James

    2008-08-31

    Each year, over 100 million tons of solid byproducts are produced by coal-burning electric utilities in the United States. Annual production of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) byproducts continues to increase as the result of more stringent sulfur emission restrictions. In addition, stricter limits on NOx emissions mandated by the 1990 Clean Air Act have resulted in utility burner/boiler modifications that frequently yield higher carbon concentrations in fly ash, which restricts the use of the ash as a cement replacement. Controlling ammonia in ash is also of concern. If newer, “clean coal” combustion and gasification technologies are adopted, their byproducts may also present a management challenge. The objective of the Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium (CBRC) is to develop and demonstrate technologies to address issues related to the recycling of byproducts associated with coal combustion processes. A goal of CBRC is that these technologies, by the year 2010, will lead to an overall ash utilization rate from the current 34% to 50% by such measures as increasing the current rate of FGD byproduct use and increasing in the number of uses considered “allowable” under state regulations. Another issue of interest to the CBRC would be to examine the environmental impact of both byproduct utilization and disposal. No byproduct utilization technology is likely to be adopted by industry unless it is more cost-effective than landfilling. Therefore, it is extremely important that the utility industry provide guidance to the R&D program. Government agencies and privatesector organizations that may be able to utilize these materials in the conduct of their missions should also provide input. The CBRC will serve as an effective vehicle for acquiring and maintaining guidance from these diverse organizations so that the proper balance in the R&D program is achieved.

  16. Primary Hepatic Small Cell Carcinoma: Two Case Reports, Molecular Characterization and Pooled Analysis of Known Clinical Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shastri, Aditi; Msaouel, Pavlos; Montagna, Cristina; White, Sherry; Delio, Maria; Patel, Kunjan; Alexis, Karenza; Strakhan, Marianna; Elrafei, Tarek N; Reed, Louis Juden

    2016-01-01

    Primary hepatic small cell carcinoma (HSCC) is a rare malignancy that has previously been described in only few case reports. The clinicopathological course, natural history, molecular markers and ideal treatment strategy for this tumor have not been fully elucidated. Herein, we report on two cases of spontaneously arising, metastatic primary HSCC that were treated at our Institution. Both patients succumbed to their disease within two months of initial presentation. Both cases underwent postmortem examination and no evidence of a pulmonary or other non-hepatic small cell primary was found. Unlike pulmonary small cell tumors, these two hepatic primaries showed only locoregional spread and very few distant metastases. Formalin-fixed samples were obtained at autopsy and sequenced using single-nucleotide polymorphism arrays and whole-genome sequencing. Four mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene known to be associated with response to tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) were detected in one of the two HSCC samples. A systematic review and pooled analysis of all previously reported cases of primary HSCCs was conducted. The median overall survival was estimated at 4 months. Surgical resection was significantly associated with longer overall survival (hazard ratio =0.13, 95% confidence interval=0.03-0.69). Although several case reports of primary HSCC have been reported prior to this publication, to our knowledge this is the first time that molecular and systematic analysis has been conducted in order to more fully characterize this rare disease. Our results indicate that surgical resection, when feasible, may be a valid option in primary HSCC, and that some tumors may respond to TKIs against EGFR. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  17. Weight change during long-term treatment with lurasidone: pooled analysis of studies in patients with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Jonathan M; Mao, Yongcai; Pikalov, Andrei; Cucchiaro, Josephine; Loebel, Antony

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this analysis was to evaluate the effect of 12 months of treatment with lurasidone on weight in patients with schizophrenia. Post-hoc, observed-case analysis included pooled data from six studies on 40-160 mg/day lurasidone; two studies included active comparators (2-6 mg/day risperidone or 200-800 mg/day quetiapine XR). Overall, 593 patients completed 12 months of treatment (N=471 lurasidone, N = 89 risperidone, N = 33 quetiapine XR). The mean baseline weight was 72.8, 80.8, and 72.4 kg in the lurasidone, risperidone, and quetiapine XR groups, respectively. The mean weight change at month 12 was -0.4 kg with lurasidone, +2.6 kg with risperidone, and +1.2 kg with quetiapine XR. Weight gain of at least 7% from study baseline was observed in 16.0, 25.8, and 15.2% of patients, and weight loss of at least 7% was seen in 18.5, 6.7, and 9.1% of patients treated with lurasidone, risperidone, and quetiapine XR, respectively. A shift from normal/underweight baseline BMI status to overweight/obese at month 12 occurred in 10.2, 27.6, and 15.0% of patients in the lurasidone, risperidone, and quetiapine XR groups, respectively. Conversely, 14.3, 1.7, and 7.7% of patients, respectively, shifted from overweight/obese to normal/underweight. In summary, a low potential for clinically significant weight gain was observed in patients with schizophrenia treated continuously with lurasidone for 12 months.

  18. Job strain and blood pressure in employed men and women: a pooled analysis of four northern italian population samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesana, Giancarlo; Sega, Roberto; Ferrario, Marco; Chiodini, Paolo; Corrao, Giovanni; Mancia, Giuseppe

    2003-01-01

    The extent to which psychosocial stress concurs to raise blood pressure is still uncertain. Here the association between job strain and office blood pressure in a pooled analysis of four population samples from northern Italy is assessed. Four surveys assessing prevalence of major coronary risk factors were performed in 1986, 1990, 1991, and 1993 in area "Brianza" (Milan), a World Health Organization-MONItoring cardiovascular disease (WHO-MONICA) Project collaborating center. Ten year age- and gender-stratified independent samples were randomly recruited from the 25- to 64-year-old residents. The methods used to assess coronary risk factors strictly adhered to the MONICA manual, were kept constant, and underwent internal and external quality controls. Job strain was investigated through the administration to employed participants of a questionnaire derived from the Karasek model, assessing job demand/control latitude. Analysis was restricted to 25- to 54-year-old participants, untreated for hypertension (1799 men and 1010 women). Among men, there was a 3 mm Hg increase of systolic blood pressure (pjob categories. This difference was independent from age, education, body mass index, alcohol intake, smoking habits, leisure time physical activity, and survey. No relevant differences among job strain categories were found in women and for diastolic blood pressure in both gender groups. These results carried out on a large population-based sample confirm previous findings obtained adopting ambulatory blood pressure measurements in more restricted samples of population or patients. Further research is needed to clarify the relationship between perceived work stress and blood pressure in women.

  19. Gene Ontology Consortium: going forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The Gene Ontology (GO; http://www.geneontology.org) is a community-based bioinformatics resource that supplies information about gene product function using ontologies to represent biological knowledge. Here we describe improvements and expansions to several branches of the ontology, as well as updates that have allowed us to more efficiently disseminate the GO and capture feedback from the research community. The Gene Ontology Consortium (GOC) has expanded areas of the ontology such as cilia-related terms, cell-cycle terms and multicellular organism processes. We have also implemented new tools for generating ontology terms based on a set of logical rules making use of templates, and we have made efforts to increase our use of logical definitions. The GOC has a new and improved web site summarizing new developments and documentation, serving as a portal to GO data. Users can perform GO enrichment analysis, and search the GO for terms, annotations to gene products, and associated metadata across multiple species using the all-new AmiGO 2 browser. We encourage and welcome the input of the research community in all biological areas in our continued effort to improve the Gene Ontology. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  20. Removal of Triphenylmethane Dyes by Bacterial Consortium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jihane Cheriaa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A new consortium of four bacterial isolates (Agrobacterium radiobacter; Bacillus spp.; Sphingomonas paucimobilis, and Aeromonas hydrophila-(CM-4 was used to degrade and to decolorize triphenylmethane dyes. All bacteria were isolated from activated sludge extracted from a wastewater treatment station of a dyeing industry plant. Individual bacterial isolates exhibited a remarkable color-removal capability against crystal violet (50 mg/L and malachite green (50 mg/L dyes within 24 h. Interestingly, the microbial consortium CM-4 shows a high decolorizing percentage for crystal violet and malachite green, respectively, 91% and 99% within 2 h. The rate of chemical oxygen demand (COD removal increases after 24 h, reaching 61.5% and 84.2% for crystal violet and malachite green, respectively. UV-Visible absorption spectra, FTIR analysis and the inspection of bacterial cells growth indicated that color removal by the CM-4 was due to biodegradation. Evaluation of mutagenicity by using Salmonella typhimurium test strains, TA98 and TA100 studies revealed that the degradation of crystal violet and malachite green by CM-4 did not lead to mutagenic products. Altogether, these results demonstrated the usefulness of the bacterial consortium in the treatment of the textile dyes.

  1. Smoking and subsequent risk of acute myeloid leukaemia: A pooled analysis of 9 cohort studies in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugai, Tomotaka; Matsuo, Keitaro; Oze, Isao; Ito, Hidemi; Wakai, Kenji; Wada, Keiko; Nagata, Chisato; Nakayama, Tomio; Liu, Rong; Kitamura, Yuri; Tamakoshi, Akiko; Tsuji, Ichiro; Sugawara, Yumi; Sawada, Norie; Sadakane, Atsuko; Tanaka, Keitaro; Mizoue, Tetsuya; Inoue, Manami; Tsugane, Shoichiro; Shimazu, Taichi

    2018-02-01

    Smoking has been identified as a significant risk factor for acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). However, epidemiological evidence for the effect of smoking on the risk of AML among Asians is scarce. Here, we investigated the impact of smoking habits on the risk of AML by conducting a pooled analysis of 9 population-based prospective cohort studies in Japan. We analysed original data on smoking habits at baseline from 9 cohort studies. Hazard ratios (HRs) in the individual studies were calculated using a Cox proportional hazard model adjusted for potential confounders and combined using a random-effects model. During 4 808 175 person-years of follow-up for a total of 344 676 participants (165 567 men and 179 109 women), 245 AML cases (139 men and 106 women) were identified. For both sexes combined, current smokers had a marginally significant increased risk of AML compared to never smokers (HR = 1.44, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.97-2.14). Ever smokers with more than 30 pack-years had a statistically significant increased risk of AML compared to never smokers among both sexes combined (HR = 1.66, 95% CI, 1.06-2.63). By sex, this significant association was observed only among men, with an HR of 1.69 (95% CI, 1.00-2.87) for ever smokers with more than 30 pack-years relative to never smokers. In conclusion, this study confirmed that cigarette smoking increases the risk of AML in Japanese. This study provides important evidence that smoking increases the risk of AML among Asians, which has already been shown in Western populations. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Ventricular emptying performance in patients with tetralogy of Fallot; Assessment with Fourier analysis of gated blood-pool data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeda, Kan; Maeda, Hisato; Nakagawa, Tsuyoshi; Ito, Tsunao; Yamaguchi, Nobuo; Matsuda, Akira (Mie Univ., Tsu (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1989-12-01

    Comparison of emptying patterns between left and right ventricles (LV, RV) was performed with Fourier analysis of gated blood-pool data in patients with tetralogy of Fallot (TF). Using global time-activity curves, the phase and amplitude at the first-harmonic component of Fourier series were calculated and emptying patterns of both ventricles were evaluated by phase difference {l brace}D(phase)=RV phase minus LV phase{r brace} and RV/LV amplitude ratio {l brace}R(amp){r brace}. In 20 patients with normal cardiac function, D(phase) was minimal (mean 2.0{plus minus}6.6 degrees) and R(amp) was less than 1.0 (mean 0.60{plus minus}0.19). In 11 patients with TF, D(phase) was significantly larger than normal, with a mean value of 24.3{plus minus}10.0 degrees (p<0.01) and became greater in a reversed proportion to the ratio of the pulmonary-to-systemic blood flow (p<0.01). In all but one cases with TF, R(amp) was greater than 1.0 with a mean value of 1.4{plus minus}0.4, significantly larger than normal (p<0.001). Furthermore, using time-activity curves approximated by terms up to the 3rd-harmonic component, the temporal difference in emptying patterns between both ventricles was investigated. In TF cases, the time from end-diastole to minimum count (T2) was significantly larger in RV than in LV (p<0.001). The elongated T2 interval of RV seemed to play an important role in producing RV phase lag. Thus, this non-invasive method is valuable for pathophysiologic investigation of patients with TF and can be of help in estimating the severity of their disease. (author).

  3. Development of an instrument to measure behavioral health function for work disability: item pool construction and factor analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marfeo, Elizabeth E; Ni, Pengsheng; Haley, Stephen M; Jette, Alan M; Bogusz, Kara; Meterko, Mark; McDonough, Christine M; Chan, Leighton; Brandt, Diane E; Rasch, Elizabeth K

    2013-09-01

    To develop a broad set of claimant-reported items to assess behavioral health functioning relevant to the Social Security disability determination processes, and to evaluate the underlying structure of behavioral health functioning for use in development of a new functional assessment instrument. Cross-sectional. Community. Item pools of behavioral health functioning were developed, refined, and field tested in a sample of persons applying for Social Security disability benefits (N=1015) who reported difficulties working because of mental or both mental and physical conditions. None. Social Security Administration Behavioral Health (SSA-BH) measurement instrument. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) specified that a 4-factor model (self-efficacy, mood and emotions, behavioral control, social interactions) had the optimal fit with the data and was also consistent with our hypothesized conceptual framework for characterizing behavioral health functioning. When the items within each of the 4 scales were tested in CFA, the fit statistics indicated adequate support for characterizing behavioral health as a unidimensional construct along these 4 distinct scales of function. This work represents a significant advance both conceptually and psychometrically in assessment methodologies for work-related behavioral health. The measurement of behavioral health functioning relevant to the context of work requires the assessment of multiple dimensions of behavioral health functioning. Specifically, we identified a 4-factor model solution that represented key domains of work-related behavioral health functioning. These results guided the development and scale formation of a new SSA-BH instrument. Copyright © 2013 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Five-Year Pooled Data Analysis of the Ahmed Baerveldt Comparison Study and the Ahmed Versus Baerveldt Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christakis, Panos G; Zhang, Dongyu; Budenz, Donald L; Barton, Keith; Tsai, James C; Ahmed, Iqbal I K

    2017-04-01

    To determine the relative efficacy of the Ahmed-FP7 and Baerveldt BG101-350 implants. Pooled analysis of 2 multicenter, randomized clinical trials. A total of 514 patients aged 18 or older with uncontrolled glaucoma that had failed or were at high risk of failing trabeculectomy were randomized to receive an Ahmed implant (n = 267) or Baerveldt implant (n = 247). Cumulative failure rates (using an intraocular pressure [IOP] target of 6-18 mm Hg inclusive), de novo glaucoma surgery rates, mean IOP, mean glaucoma medication use, and visual acuity were compared. Baseline characteristics were similar between groups. Mean preoperative IOP of the study population was 31.5 ± 11.3 mm Hg on an average of 3.3 ± 1.1 glaucoma medications. At 5 years, mean IOP was 15.8 ± 5.2 mm Hg in the Ahmed group and 13.2 ± 4.7 mm Hg in the Baerveldt group (P glaucoma medication use was 1.9 ± 1.5 in the Ahmed group and 1.5 ± 1.4 in the Baerveldt group (P = .007). The cumulative failure rate at 5 years was 49% in the Ahmed group and 37% in the Baerveldt group (P = .007). High IOP was the most common reason for failure in both groups, and de novo glaucoma surgery was required in 16% of the Ahmed group and 8% of the Baerveldt group (P = .006). Failure owing to hypotony occurred in 0.4% of the Ahmed group and 4.5% of the Baerveldt group (P = .002). Visual outcomes were similar between groups (P = .90). The Baerveldt group had a lower failure rate, lower rate of de novo glaucoma surgery, and lower mean IOP on fewer medications than the Ahmed group. Baerveldt implantation carried a higher risk of hypotony. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Hepatitis E virus seroprevalence rate among Eastern Mediterranean and middle eastern countries; A systematic review and pooled analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karbalaie Niya, Mohammad Hadi; Rezaee-Zavareh, Mohammad Saeid; Ranaei, Alireza; Alavian, Seyed Moayed

    2017-09-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) as a hepatotropic virus is one of the major global health concerns. Autochthonous HEV transmitted by oral fecal-route in poor sanitation conditions as well as vertical and rarely blood transfusion. HEV occurrence is more common in developing countries and recently increased in developed countries too. Middle East (ME) and Eastern Mediterranean region (EMR) of WHO have been an endemic region for HEV infection. In this regard, we aimed to design a systematic review and pooled analysis to determine seroprevalence of anti-HEV antibody in ME and EMR countries. By using PRISMA guideline, data were collected from papers identified through PubMed, Web of Science, Science Direct, Scopus and also from some national and regional databases from January 1990 to June 2016. Serum anti-HEV antibody (IgG) used for HEV prevalence estimation. HEV prevalence in the ME, WHO EMR countries, and in total, calculated by each country population size based on 2015 UN report. overall, 62 papers with a total sample size of 31,673 were fulfilled our eligibility criteria and included in our project. Considering anti-HEV antibody (IgG), prevalence of HEV infection in the countries of ME, WHO EMR and in total were 12.17% (95% CI: 11.79-12.57), 11.81% (95% CI: 11.43-12.21), and 11.87% (95% CI: 11.52-12.23) respectively. HEV seroprevalence in WHO EMR and ME countries has high rate and more considerations are needed for the prevention and control of this infection especially in high-risk groups such as pregnant women. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Overweight in childhood, adolescence and adulthood and cardiovascular risk in later life: pooled analysis of three british birth cohorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Min Hae; Sovio, Ulla; Viner, Russell M; Hardy, Rebecca J; Kinra, Sanjay

    2013-01-01

    Overweight and obesity in adulthood are established risk factors for adverse cardiovascular outcomes, but the contribution of overweight in childhood to later cardiovascular risk is less clear. Evidence for a direct effect of childhood overweight would highlight early life as an important target for cardiovascular disease prevention. The aim of this study was to assess whether overweight and obesity in childhood and adolescence contribute to excess cardiovascular risk in adults. Data from three British birth cohorts, born in 1946, 1958 and 1970, were pooled for analysis (n = 11,447). Individuals were categorised, based on body mass index (BMI), as being of normal weight or overweight/obese in childhood, adolescence and adulthood. Eight patterns of overweight were defined according to weight status at these three stages. Logistic regression models were fitted to assess the associations of patterns of overweight with self-reported type 2 diabetes, hypertension, and coronary heart disease (CHD) in adulthood (34-53 years). Compared to cohort members who were never overweight, those who were obese in adulthood had increased risk of all outcomes. For type 2 diabetes, the odds ratio was higher for obese adults who were also overweight or obese in childhood and adolescence (OR 12.6; 95% CI 6.6 to 24.0) than for those who were obese in adulthood only (OR 5.5; 95% CI 3.4 to 8.8). There was no such effect of child or adolescent overweight on hypertension. For CHD, there was weak evidence of increased risk among those with overweight in childhood. The main limitations of this study concern the use of self-reported outcomes and the generalisability of findings to contemporary child populations. Type 2 diabetes and to a lesser extent CHD risk may be affected by overweight at all stages of life, while hypertension risk is associated more strongly with weight status in adulthood.

  7. Proposing the lymphatic target volume for elective radiation therapy for pancreatic cancer: a pooled analysis of clinical evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Jiade J

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Radiation therapy is an important cancer treatment modality in both adjuvant and definitive setting, however, the use of radiation therapy for elective treatment of regional lymph nodes is controversial for pancreatic cancer. No consensus on proper selection and delineation of subclinical lymph nodal areas in adjuvant or definitive radiation therapy has been suggested either conclusively or proposed for further investigation. This analysis aims to study the pattern of lymph node metastasis through a pooled analysis of published results after radical tumor and lymph nodal resection with histological study in pancreatic cancer. Methods Literature search using electronic databases including MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CANCERLIT from January 1970 to June 2009 was performed, supplemented by review of references. Eighteen original researches and a total of 5954 pancreatic cancer patients underwent radical surgical resection were included in this analysis. The probability of metastasis in regional lymph nodal stations (using Japan Pancreas Society [JPS] Classification was calculated and analyzed based on the location and other characteristics of the primary disease. Results Commonly involved nodal regions in patients with pancreatic head tumor include lymph nodes around the common hepatic artery (Group 8, 9.79%, posterior pancreaticoduodenal lymph nodes (Group 13, 32.31%, lymph nodes around the superior mesenteric artery (Group 14, 15.85%, paraaortic lymph nodes (Group 16, 10.92%, and anterior pancreaticoduodenal lymph nodes (Group 17, 19.78%; The probability of metastasis in other lymph nodal regions were Commonly involved nodal regions in patients with pancreatic body/tail tumor include lymph nodes around the common hepatic artery (Group 8, 15.07%, lymph nodes around the celiac trunk (Group 9, 9.59%, lymph nodes along the splenic artery (Group 11, 35.62%, lymph nodes around the superior mesenteric artery (Group 14, 9.59%, paraaortic

  8. The National Astronomy Consortium (NAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Von Schill, Lyndele; Ivory, Joyce

    2017-01-01

    The National Astronomy Consortium (NAC) program is designed to increase the number of underrepresented minority students into STEM and STEM careers by providing unique summer research experiences followed by long-term mentoring and cohort support. Hallmarks of the NAC program include: research or internship opportunities at one of the NAC partner sites, a framework to continue research over the academic year, peer and faculty mentoring, monthly virtual hangouts, and much more. NAC students also participate in two professional travel opportunities each year: the annual NAC conference at Howard University and poster presentation at the annual AAS winter meeting following their summer internship.The National Astronomy Consortium (NAC) is a program led by the National Radio Astronomy Consortium (NRAO) and Associated Universities, Inc. (AUI), in partnership with the National Society of Black Physicist (NSBP), along with a number of minority and majority universities.

  9. Characterizing sexual function in patients with generalized anxiety disorder: a pooled analysis of three vilazodone studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clayton AH

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Anita H Clayton,1 Suresh Durgam,2 Xiongwen Tang,2 Changzheng Chen,2 Adam Ruth,3 Carl Gommoll2 1Department of Psychiatry and Neurobehavioral Sciences, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, 2Forest Research Institute, Jersey City, NJ, 3Prescott Medical Communications Group, Chicago, IL, USA Background: Vilazodone has been shown to reduce core symptoms of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD in three randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials. Since sexual dysfunction (SD is not well characterized in GAD, a post hoc analysis of these trials was conducted to evaluate the effects of vilazodone on sexual functioning in GAD patients. Materials and methods: Data were pooled from one fixed-dose trial of vilazodone 20 and 40 mg/day (NCT01629966 and two flexible-dose studies of vilazodone 20–40 mg/day (NCT01766401, NCT01844115 in adults with GAD. Sexual functioning was assessed using the Changes in Sexual Functioning Questionnaire (CSFQ. Outcomes included mean change from baseline to end of treatment (EOT in CSFQ total score and percentage of patients shifting from SD at baseline (CSFQ total score ≤47 for males, ≤41 for females to normal functioning at EOT. Treatment-emergent adverse events related to sexual functioning were also analyzed. Results: A total of 1,373 patients were included in the analyses. SD at baseline was more common in females (placebo, 46.4%; vilazodone, 49% than in males (placebo, 35.1%; vilazodone, 40.9%. CSFQ total score improvement was found in both females (placebo, +1.2; vilazodone, +1.6 and males (placebo, +2.1; vilazodone, +1.0, with no statistically significant differences between treatment groups. The percentage of patients who shifted from SD at baseline to normal sexual functioning at EOT was higher in males (placebo, 40.6%; vilazodone, 35.7% than in females (placebo, 24.9%; vilazodone, 34.9%; no statistical testing was performed. Except for erectile dysfunction and delayed ejaculation in vilazodone

  10. Pooled analysis of phase II trials evaluating weekly or conventional cisplatin as first-line therapy for advanced urothelial carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maughan, Benjamin L; Agarwal, Neeraj; Hussain, Syed A

    2013-01-01

    Weekly gemcitabine with GC every 3-4 weeks is considered conventional first-line chemotherapy for advanced urothelial carcinoma (UC). Weekly split-dose cisplatin with wGC might be less toxic and have similar activity, but has not been compared with GC. We pooled published phase II trials of GC an...

  11. Efficacy of anidulafungin in 539 patients with invasive candidiasis: a patient-level pooled analysis of six clinical trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kullberg, B.J.; Vasquez, J.; Mootsikapun, P.; Nucci, M.; Paiva, J.A.; Garbino, J.; Yan, J.L.; Aram, J.; Capparella, M.R.; Conte, U.; Schlamm, H.; Swanson, R.; Herbrecht, R.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the efficacy of anidulafungin for the treatment of candidaemia and invasive candidiasis in a large dataset, including patients with deep-seated tissue candidiasis, neutropenia and infection due to non- albicans Candida species. Methods: Data were pooled from six prospective,

  12. Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul Ziemkiewicz; Tamara Vandivort; Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Y. Paul Chugh; James Hower

    2008-08-31

    The Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium (CBRC) program was developed as a focused program to remove and/or minimize the barriers for effective management of over 123 million tons of coal combustion byproducts (CCBs) annually generated in the USA. At the time of launching the CBRC in 1998, about 25% of CCBs were beneficially utilized while the remaining was disposed in on-site or off-site landfills. During the ten (10) year tenure of CBRC (1998-2008), after a critical review, 52 projects were funded nationwide. By region, the East, Midwest, and West had 21, 18, and 13 projects funded, respectively. Almost all projects were cooperative projects involving industry, government, and academia. The CBRC projects, to a large extent, successfully addressed the problems of large-scale utilization of CCBs. A few projects, such as the two Eastern Region projects that addressed the use of fly ash in foundry applications, might be thought of as a somewhat smaller application in comparison to construction and agricultural uses, but as a novel niche use, they set the stage to draw interest that fly ash substitution for Portland cement might not attract. With consideration of the large increase in flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum in response to EPA regulations, agricultural uses of FGD gypsum hold promise for large-scale uses of a product currently directed to the (currently stagnant) home construction market. Outstanding achievements of the program are: (1) The CBRC successfully enhanced professional expertise in the area of CCBs throughout the nation. The enhanced capacity continues to provide technology and information transfer expertise to industry and regulatory agencies. (2) Several technologies were developed that can be used immediately. These include: (a) Use of CCBs for road base and sub-base applications; (b) full-depth, in situ stabilization of gravel roads or highway/pavement construction recycled materials; and (c) fired bricks containing up to 30%-40% F

  13. The ocean sampling day consortium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kopf, Anna; Bicak, Mesude; Kottmann, Renzo

    2015-01-01

    Ocean Sampling Day was initiated by the EU-funded Micro B3 (Marine Microbial Biodiversity, Bioinformatics, Biotechnology) project to obtain a snapshot of the marine microbial biodiversity and function of the world’s oceans. It is a simultaneous global mega-sequencing campaign aiming to generate...... the largest standardized microbial data set in a single day. This will be achievable only through the coordinated efforts of an Ocean Sampling Day Consortium, supportive partnerships and networks between sites. This commentary outlines the establishment, function and aims of the Consortium and describes our...

  14. Sugammadex efficacy for reversal of rocuronium- and vecuronium-induced neuromuscular blockade: A pooled analysis of 26 studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herring, William Joseph; Woo, Tiffany; Assaid, Christopher A; Lupinacci, Robert J; Lemmens, Hendrikus J; Blobner, Manfred; Khuenl-Brady, Karin S

    2017-09-01

    To summarize and compare efficacy of sugammadex with neostigmine or placebo for reversal of rocuronium- or vecuronium-induced neuromuscular blockade (NMB), and to demonstrate consistency of sugammadex results across various patient populations. Pooled analysis on data from 26 multicenter, randomized, Phase II and III studies. Operating room. 1855 adults undergoing surgery under general anesthesia and receiving rocuronium or vecuronium for NMB. Sugammadex (2.0mg/kg at second twitch reappearance [T 2 ; moderate NMB], 4.0mg/kg at 1-2 post-tetanic counts [PTC; deep NMB] or 16.0mg/kg at 3min after rocuronium 1.2mg/kg), neostigmine or placebo. Time to recovery of the train-of-four (TOF) ratio to 0.9. Geometric mean (95% CI) times to recovery to TOF ratio of 0.9 were 1.9 (1.8-2.0) min following sugammadex 2.0mg/kg and 10.6 (9.8-11.6) min following neostigmine administration at T 2 after rocuronium, and 2.9 (2.5-3.4) min and 17.4 (13.4-22.6) min, respectively, after vecuronium. Recovery times were 2.2 (2.1-2.3) min following sugammadex 4.0mg/kg and 19.0 (14.8-24.6) min following neostigmine administered at a target of 1-2 PTC after rocuronium, and 3.8 (3.0-5.0) min and 67.6 (56.3-81.2) min after vecuronium. Sugammadex administered 3min after rocuronium 1.2mg/kg resulted in rapid recovery (1.7 [1.5-2.0] min). Modest increases in mean recovery time were associated with vecuronium use (+1.6min [78%; (61%-98%)] versus rocuronium), mild-to-moderate renal impairment (+0.4min [20%; (9%-32%)] versus normal renal function) and geographic location (+1.0min [38%; (25%-52%)] in subjects in USA/Canada versus Europe/Japan). Sugammadex administered at recommended doses provides rapid and predictable reversal of rocuronium and vecuronium-induced moderate and deep NMB, and effective reversal 3min after rocuronium 1.2mg/kg. Robust recovery was seen across various patient factors, providing further confirmation of labeled dose recommendations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  15. Human leukocyte antigen class I and II alleles and cervical adenocarcinoma: a pooled analysis of two epidemiologic studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahboobeh eSafaeian

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Associations between human leukocyte antigens (HLA alleles and cervical cancer are largely representative of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC, the major histologic subtype. We evaluated the association between HLA class I (A, B, and C and class II (DRB1 and DQB1 loci and risk of cervical adenocarcinoma (ADC, a less common but aggressive histologic subtype.We pooled data from the Eastern and Western US cervical cancer studies, and evaluated the association between individual alleles and allele combinations and ADC (n=630 ADC; n=775 controls. Risk estimates were calculated for 11 a priori (based on known associations with cervical cancer regardless of histologic type and 38 non a priori common alleles, as odds ratios (OR and 95% confidence intervals (CI, adjusted for age and study. In exploratory analysis, we compared the risk associations between subgroups with HPV16 or HPV18 DNA in ADC tumor tissues in the Western US study cases and controls. Three of the a priori alleles were significantly associated with decreased risk of ADC (DRB1*13:01 (OR=0.61; 95%CI:0.41-0.93, DRB1*13:02 (OR=0.49; 95%CI:0.31-0.77, and DQB1*06:03 (OR=0.64; 95%CI:0.42-0.95; one was associated with increased risk (B*07:02(OR=1.39; 95%CI:1.07-1.79. Among alleles not previously reported, DQB1*06:04 (OR=0.46; 95%CI: 0.27-0.78 was associated with decreased risk of ADC and C*07:02 (OR=1.41; 95%CI:1.09-1.81 was associated with increased risk. We did not observe a difference by histologic subtype. ADC was most strongly associated with increased risk with B*07:02/C*07:02 alleles (OR=1.33; 95%CI:1.01-1.76 and decreased risk with DRB1*13:02/DQB1*06:04 (OR=0.41; 95%CI:0.21-0.80. Results suggest that HLA allele associations with cervical ADC are similar to those for cervical SCC. An intriguing finding was the difference in risk associated with several alleles restricted to HPV16 or HPV18 related tumors, consistent with the hypothesis that HLA recognition is HPV type specific.

  16. Health insurance in South Africa: an empirical analysis of trends in risk-pooling and efficiency following deregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söderlund, N; Hansl, B

    2000-12-01

    This paper reports an empirical investigation into the pattern of private health insurance coverage in South Africa before and after deregulation of the health insurance industry. More specifically, we sought to measure trends in risk-pooling over the period 1985-95, and to assess the impact of risk pooling on the costs of health insurance cover over this period. South African mutual health insurers (Medical Schemes) have existed for over 100 years, and have been regulated under a specific Act since 1967. Up until 1989, health insurers were required by law to community rate their premiums, and were not allowed to exclude high-risk enrolees from cover. In 1989 these regulations were removed, effectively allowing health insurers to risk-rate the cover which they provided, and exclude 'medically uninsurables'. Data were obtained from the office of the health insurance regulator (the Registrar of Medical Schemes) for the period 1985-95, and consisted of the statutory returns from all registered medical schemes for each year during the study period. Multiple regression methods were used to assess the determinants of changes in the risk pools of insurers, and their costs. Both cross-sectional and longitudinal models were estimated. Unadjusted data suggest changes in risk-pooling since the deregulation period after 1985. Health insurers with open enrolment had worse than average risk profiles in the 1980s, but this reversed by the early 1990s, leaving them with significantly better risk profiles by 1995. Worsening risk profiles were associated with decreasing fund size, higher loss-ratios and past premium increases. Most models showed that risk rating of premiums was consistently associated with higher premiums, after adjustment for risk, quality, scale and other environmental differences between insurers. Likely explanations include the additional costs required for marketing and underwriting risk-rated policies, insufficient incentives to use cost-control techniques

  17. Fetal Growth and Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: Findings from the Childhood Leukemia International Consortium (CLIC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milne, Elizabeth; Greenop, Kathryn R.; Metayer, Catherine; Schüz, Joachim; Petridou, Eleni; Pombo-de-Oliveira, Maria S.; Infante-Rivard, Claire; Roman, Eve; Dockerty, John D.; Spector, Logan G.; Koifman, Sérgio; Orsi, Laurent; Rudant, Jérémie; Dessypris, Nick; Simpson, Jill; Lightfoot, Tracy; Kaatsch, Peter; Baka, Margarita; Faro, Alessandra; Armstrong, Bruce K.; Clavel, Jacqueline; Buffler, Patricia A.

    2013-01-01

    Positive associations have been reported between measures of accelerated fetal growth and risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). We investigated this association by pooling individual-level data from 12 case-control studies participating in the Childhood Leukemia International Consortium. Two measures of fetal growth – weight-for-gestational-age and proportion of optimal birth weight (POBW) – were analysed. Study-specific odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using multivariable logistic regression, and combined in fixed effects meta-analyses. Pooled analyses of all data were also undertaken using multivariable logistic regression. Subgroup analyses were undertaken when possible. Data on weight for gestational age were available for 7,348 cases and 12,489 controls from all 12 studies and POBW data were available for 1,680 cases and 3,139 controls from three studies. The summary ORs from the meta-analyses were 1.24 (95% CI 1.13, 1.36) for children who were large for gestational age relative to appropriate for gestational age, and 1.16 (95% CI: 1.09, 1.24) for a one standard deviation increase in POBW. The pooled analyses produced similar results. The summary and pooled ORs for small-for-gestational-age children were 0.83 (95% CI: 0.75, 0.92) and 0.86 (95% CI 0.77, 0.95) respectively. Results were consistent across subgroups defined by sex, ethnicity and immunophenotype, and when the analysis was restricted to children who did not have high birth weight. The evidence that accelerated fetal growth is associated with a modest increased risk of childhood ALL is strong and consistent with known biological mechanisms involving insulin like growth factors. PMID:23754574

  18. Massachusetts Institute of Technology Consortium Agreement

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Asada, Haruhiko

    1999-01-01

    ... of Phase 2 of the Home Automation and Healthcare Consortium. This report describes all major research accomplishments within the last six months since we launched the second phase of the consortium...

  19. Brain Tumor Epidemiology Consortium (BTEC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Brain Tumor Epidemiology Consortium is an open scientific forum organized to foster the development of multi-center, international and inter-disciplinary collaborations that will lead to a better understanding of the etiology, outcomes, and prevention of brain tumors.

  20. Swimming pool cleaner poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swimming pool cleaner poisoning occurs when someone swallows this type of cleaner, touches it, or breathes in ... The harmful substances in swimming pool cleaner are: Bromine ... copper Chlorine Soda ash Sodium bicarbonate Various mild acids

  1. Swimming pool granuloma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001357.htm Swimming pool granuloma To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A swimming pool granuloma is a long-term (chronic) skin ...

  2. Efficacy and Safety of Nivolumab Alone or in Combination With Ipilimumab in Patients With Mucosal Melanoma: A Pooled Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Angelo, Sandra P; Larkin, James; Sosman, Jeffrey A

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Mucosal melanoma is an aggressive malignancy with a poor response to conventional therapies. The efficacy and safety of nivolumab (a programmed death-1 checkpoint inhibitor), alone or combined with ipilimumab (a cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 checkpoint inhibitor), have not been reported...... in this rare melanoma subtype. Patients and Methods Data were pooled from 889 patients who received nivolumab monotherapy in clinical studies, including phase III trials; 86 (10%) had mucosal melanoma and 665 (75%) had cutaneous melanoma. Data were also pooled for patients who received nivolumab combined...... with ipilimumab (n = 35, mucosal melanoma; n = 326, cutaneous melanoma). Results Among patients who received nivolumab monotherapy, median progression-free survival was 3.0 months (95% CI, 2.2 to 5.4 months) and 6.2 months (95% CI, 5.1 to 7.5 months) for mucosal and cutaneous melanoma, with objective response...

  3. SPOOL-FIRE: an IBM 370/195 code for the analysis of combined spray and pool burning of sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charak, I.; Person, L.W.

    1976-01-01

    A code for the computation of the pressure and temperatures within a containment building as a result of a sodium fire is described. The fire is assumed to occur in two distinct phases: a spray and a pool. The spray fire is conservatively assumed to occur instantaneously. The pool fire model used is the SOFIRE-II model developed by Atomics International. The code calculates all important temperatures, accounting for heat loss from the building to the environment, as well as leakage of the containment atmosphere under conditions of internal overpressure. The IBM CSMP methodology is used to solve the set of ordinary differential equations which model the system. The use of CSMP allows the user considerable flexibility in modifying the models employed

  4. Development of two-dimensional hot pool model and analysis of the ULOHS accident in KALIMER design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yong Bum; Jeong, K. S.; Hahn, H. D

    2000-10-01

    In the new version of HP2D program, the variation model of the hot pool sodium level is added so that the temperature and velocity profiles can be predicted more accurately than old version. To verify and validate the developed new version model, comparison of the MONJU experimental data with the predicted one is performed and analyzed. And also the ULOHS(Unprotected Loss of Heat Sink) accident in the KALIMER design is performed and analyzed.

  5. Development of two-dimensional hot pool model and analysis of the ULOHS accident in KALIMER design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yong Bum; Jeong, K. S.; Hahn, H. D.

    2000-10-01

    In the new version of HP2D program, the variation model of the hot pool sodium level is added so that the temperature and velocity profiles can be predicted more accurately than old version. To verify and validate the developed new version model, comparison of the MONJU experimental data with the predicted one is performed and analyzed. And also the ULOHS(Unprotected Loss of Heat Sink) accident in the KALIMER design is performed and analyzed

  6. Estimation of the algal-available phosphorus pool in sediments of a large, shallow eutrophic lake (Taihu, China) using profiled SMT fractional analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Mengyuan; Zhu Guangwei; Li Wei; Zhang Yunlin; Zhao Linlin; Gu Zhao

    2013-01-01

    Because large, shallow lakes are heavily influenced by wind–wave disturbance, it is difficult to estimate internal phosphorus load using traditional methods. To estimate the potential contribution of phosphorus from sediment to overlying water in eutrophic Lake Taihu, phosphorus fractions of surface and deep layer sediments were quantified and analyzed for algal bloom potential using a Standard Measurements and Testing (SMT) sequential extraction method and incubation experiments. Phosphorus bound to Fe, Al and Mn oxides and hydroxides (Fe–P) and organic phosphorus (OP) were to be found bioactive. The difference in Fe–P and OP contents between surface and deep layers equates to the sediment pool of potentially algal-available phosphorus. This pool was estimated at 5168 tons for the entire lake and was closely related to pollution input and algal blooms. Profiled SMT fractionation analysis is thus a potentially useful tool for estimating internal phosphorus loading in large, shallow lakes. - Highlights: ► We used profiled sediment P activity by SMT fractionation to evaluate the P release potential in large and shallow lakes. ► We built the relationship between sediment SMT fractionations of P and the P release by algal bloom degradation process. ► We discussed the supporting mechanism of sediment P release to Microcystis algal bloom in a large and shallow lake. ► We discussed the nutrient control strategy of algal bloom in shallow lakes in highly human activities disturbance catchment. - Profiled SMT fractional analysis of internal phosphorus pool in large, shallow lake.

  7. Postoperative opioid sparing with injectable hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin-diclofenac: pooled analysis of data from two Phase III clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gan TJ

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Tong J Gan,1 Neil Singla,2 Stephen E Daniels,3 Douglas A Hamilton,4,5 Peter G Lacouture,6,7 Christian RD Reyes,8 Daniel B Carr4,9 1Department of Anesthesiology, Stony Brook University, NY, 2Lotus Clinical Research, LLC, Pasadena, CA, 3Premier Research, Austin, TX, 4Javelin Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Cambridge, MA, 5New Biology Ventures, LLC, San Mateo, CA, 6Magidom Discovery, LLC, St Augustine, FL, 7Department of Emergency Medicine, Brown University School of Medicine, Providence, RI, 8Hospira Inc., Lake Forest, IL, 9Department of Anesthesiology, Tufts Medical Center, Boston, MA, USA Purpose: Use of nonopioid analgesics (including nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for postoperative pain management can reduce opioid consumption and potentially prevent opioid-related adverse events. This study examined the postoperative opioid-sparing effect of repeated-dose injectable diclofenac formulated with hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HPβCD-diclofenac. Patients and methods: Pooled data from two double-blind, randomized, placebo- and active comparator-controlled Phase III trials were analyzed. Patients received HPβCD-diclofenac, placebo, or ketorolac by intravenous injection every 6 hours for up to 5 days following abdominal/pelvic or orthopedic surgery. Rescue opioid use was evaluated from the time of first study drug administration to up to 120 hours following the first dose in the overall study population and in subgroups defined by baseline pain severity, age, and HPβCD-diclofenac dose. Results: Overall, 608 patients received ≥1 dose of study medication and were included in the analysis. While 93.2% of patients receiving placebo required opioids, the proportion of patients requiring opioids was significantly lower for patients receiving HPβCD-diclofenac (18.75, 37.5, or 50 mg or ketorolac (P<0.005 for all comparisons. Mean cumulative opioid dose and number of doses were significantly lower among patients receiving HPβCD-diclofenac versus placebo

  8. Paraoxonase polymorphisms PON1 192 and 55 and longevity in Italian centenarians and Irish nonagenarians. A pooled analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rea, Irene M; McKeown, Pascal P; McMaster, Dorothy; Young, Ian S; Patterson, Chris; Savage, Maurice J; Belton, Christine; Marchegiani, Francesca; Olivieri, Fabiola; Bonafe, Massimiliano; Franceschi, Claudio

    2004-04-01

    PON1, an arylesterase, associated with high density lipoprotein (HDL), protects low density lipoprotein (LDL) against oxidative modification. Common polymorphisms PON1 55 (L/M) and 192 (Q/R) in the PON1 gene associate with atherosclerosis and heart disease. Because long-lived people seem protected from premature vascular death, we conducted a pooled statistical analysis to assess any association between these polymorphisms and longevity in a large combined group of Italian centenarians and octo/nonagenarians from Northern Ireland (NI). Separated DNA was available from 1479 subjects from Italy and Northern Ireland (NI). In Italy 308 centenarians (males 67, females 241, mean age 100.8, SD2.1 years) and 579 young controls (males 347, females 232, mean age 40.7, SD 12.7 years) were included in the study. In NI, 296 octo/nonagenarians (males 92, females 204, mean age 89.8, SD 5.7 years) and 296 young sex-matched subjects (mean age 13.0, SD 1.4 years) had available DNA. PON1 55 (L/M) and 192 (Q/R) polymorphisms were studied using a PCR-RFLP approach. There was a significant difference in PON1 192 genotypes in Italian centenarians compared to younger controls (X(2)= 6.8, df = 2 p= 0.03) and a similar but non significant trend between octo/nonagenarian and young subjects in NI (X(2) = 4.0, df=2, p=0.14). Using logistic regression analysis on the combined Italian and Irish datasets, there was a small survival advantage for centenarian and octo/nonagenarian subjects who were heterozygous for PON1 192 R allele, (OR 1.3, CI 1-1.6; p=0.04 with a stepwise increase for RR homozygous subjects (OR 1.7, CI 1.1-2.6; p = 0.02) compared to QQ subjects. Comparing R and Q alleles there was a survival advantage for octo/nonagenarian/centenarian subjects who carried the R allele (OR 1.3, CI 1.1-1.5; p = 0.007) but there was no sex-specific effect p =0.77) LL, LM and MM genotypes of PON 55 polymorphisms showed similar frequencies in Italy (39.9, 47.0, 13.1%) and Ireland (39.5, 48.6, 11

  9. Pretreatment Neutrophil-Lymphocyte Ratio as a Predictor in Bladder Cancer and Metastatic or Unresectable Urothelial Carcinoma Patients: a Pooled Analysis of Comparative Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shuiqing; Zhao, Xiaokun; Wang, Yinhuai; Zhong, Zhaohui; Zhang, Lei; Cao, Jian; Ai, Kai; Xu, Ran

    2018-01-01

    Emerging studies have shown that the neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) is a potential predictor in various tumors. Our study was conducted to assess the prognostic value of the pretreatment NLR in bladder cancer and metastatic or unresectable urothelial carcinoma (mUC or uUC) patients up to July 2017. The correlation between the pretreatment NLR and pathological characteristics was also evaluated in bladder cancer patients. The hazard ratio (HR) and odds ratio (OR) with the 95% confidence interval (CI) were extracted or calculated from the included studies for further pooled analysis. A total of 21 studies were included in a pooled analysis. The pooled results indicated that a high pretreatment NLR was associated with reduced overall survival (OS) (HR=1.27, 95% CI=1.12-1.43), relapse-free survival (RFS) (HR=1.41, 95% CI=1.23-1.60), progression-free survival (PFS) (HR=1.75, 95% CI=1.36-2.15), disease-specific survival (DSS) and cancer-specific survival (CSS) (HR=1.27, 95% CI=1.19-1.35) in the bladder cancer patients. Additionally, an elevated pretreatment NLR suggested a worse OS rate in the mUC or uUC patients (HR=1.63, 95% CI=1.34-1.91). The pooled ORs and 95% CIs showed that a high pretreatment NLR could be a risk indicator for certain pathological features, such as lymphovascular invasion, a positive margin status and advanced tumor stage. our results showed that a high pretreatment NLR predicted poor prognosis in bladder cancer, mUC and uUC patients. © 2018 The Author(s). Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. A Pooled Analysis of 15 Prospective Cohort Studies on the Association between Fruit, Vegetable, and Mature Bean Consumption and Risk of Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petimar, Joshua; Wilson, Kathryn M; Wu, Kana; Wang, Molin; Albanes, Demetrius; van den Brandt, Piet A; Cook, Michael B; Giles, Graham G; Giovannucci, Edward L; Goodman, Gary E; Goodman, Phyllis J; Håkansson, Niclas; Helzlsouer, Kathy; Key, Timothy J; Kolonel, Laurence N; Liao, Linda M; Männistö, Satu; McCullough, Marjorie L; Milne, Roger L; Neuhouser, Marian L; Park, Yikyung; Platz, Elizabeth A; Riboli, Elio; Sawada, Norie; Schenk, Jeannette M; Tsugane, Shoichiro; Verhage, Bas; Wang, Ying; Wilkens, Lynne R; Wolk, Alicja; Ziegler, Regina G; Smith-Warner, Stephanie A

    2017-08-01

    Background: Relationships between fruit, vegetable, and mature bean consumption and prostate cancer risk are unclear. Methods: We examined associations between fruit and vegetable groups, specific fruits and vegetables, and mature bean consumption and prostate cancer risk overall, by stage and grade, and for prostate cancer mortality in a pooled analysis of 15 prospective cohorts, including 52,680 total cases and 3,205 prostate cancer-related deaths among 842,149 men. Diet was measured by a food frequency questionnaire or similar instrument at baseline. We calculated study-specific relative risks using Cox proportional hazards regression, and then pooled these estimates using a random effects model. Results: We did not observe any statistically significant associations for advanced prostate cancer or prostate cancer mortality with any food group (including total fruits and vegetables, total fruits, total vegetables, fruit and vegetable juice, cruciferous vegetables, and tomato products), nor specific fruit and vegetables. In addition, we observed few statistically significant results for other prostate cancer outcomes. Pooled multivariable relative risks comparing the highest versus lowest quantiles across all fruit and vegetable exposures and prostate cancer outcomes ranged from 0.89 to 1.09. There was no evidence of effect modification for any association by age or body mass index. Conclusions: Results from this large, international, pooled analysis do not support a strong role of collective groupings of fruits, vegetables, or mature beans in prostate cancer. Impact: Further investigation of other dietary exposures, especially indicators of bioavailable nutrient intake or specific phytochemicals, should be considered for prostate cancer risk. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 26(8); 1276-87. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  11. Diabetes diagnosis and care in sub-Saharan Africa: pooled analysis of individual data from 12 countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manne-Goehler, Jennifer; Atun, Rifat; Stokes, Andrew; Goehler, Alexander; Houinato, Dismand; Houehanou, Corine; Hambou, Mohamed Msaidie Salimani; Mbenza, Benjamin Longo; Sobngwi, Eugène; Balde, Naby; Mwangi, Joseph Kibachio; Gathecha, Gladwell; Ngugi, Paul Waweru; Wesseh, C Stanford; Damasceno, Albertino; Lunet, Nuno; Bovet, Pascal; Labadarios, Demetre; Zuma, Khangelani; Mayige, Mary; Kagaruki, Gibson; Ramaiya, Kaushik; Agoudavi, Kokou; Guwatudde, David; Bahendeka, Silver K; Mutungi, Gerald; Geldsetzer, Pascal; Levitt, Naomi S; Salomon, Joshua A; Yudkin, John S; Vollmer, Sebastian; Bärnighausen, Till

    2016-11-01

    Despite widespread recognition that the burden of diabetes is rapidly growing in many countries in sub-Saharan Africa, nationally representative estimates of unmet need for diabetes diagnosis and care are in short supply for the region. We use national population-based survey data to quantify diabetes prevalence and met and unmet need for diabetes diagnosis and care in 12 countries in sub-Saharan Africa. We further estimate demographic and economic gradients of met need for diabetes diagnosis and care. We did a pooled analysis of individual-level data from nationally representative population-based surveys that met the following inclusion criteria: the data were collected during 2005-15; the data were made available at the individual level; a biomarker for diabetes was available in the dataset; and the dataset included information on use of core health services for diabetes diagnosis and care. We first quantified the population in need of diabetes diagnosis and care by estimating the prevalence of diabetes across the surveys; we also quantified the prevalence of overweight and obesity, as a major risk factor for diabetes and an indicator of need for diabetes screening. Second, we determined the level of met need for diabetes diagnosis, preventive counselling, and treatment in both the diabetic and the overweight and obese population. Finally, we did survey fixed-effects regressions to establish the demographic and economic gradients of met need for diabetes diagnosis, counselling, and treatment. We pooled data from 12 nationally representative population-based surveys in sub-Saharan Africa, representing 38 311 individuals with a biomarker measurement for diabetes. Across the surveys, the median prevalence of diabetes was 5% (range 2-14) and the median prevalence of overweight or obesity was 27% (range 16-68). We estimated seven measures of met need for diabetes-related care across the 12 surveys: (1) percentage of the overweight or obese population who received a

  12. Military Suicide Research Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    were analyzed using Comprehensive Meta-Analysis (CMA) 2.0 statistical software (Borenstein, Hedges, Higgins , & Rothstein, 2005). Hedges g was... Higgins , J., & Rothstein, H. (2005). Comprehensive meta-analysis (Version 2). Englewood, NJ: Biostat. Bostwick, J. M., & Pankratz, V. S. (2000...Cerel a,n, Judy G. van de Venne a, Melinda M. Moore b, Myfanwy J. Maple c, Chris Flaherty a, Margaret M. Brown d a College of Social Work, University

  13. EGFR-TKI therapy for patients with brain metastases from non-small-cell lung cancer: a pooled analysis of published data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Y

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Yun Fan,1,2 Xiaoling Xu,3 Conghua Xie4 1Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, Department of Radiation Oncology, Wuhan, People's Republic of China; 2Department of Chemotherapy, Zhejiang Cancer Hospital, Hangzhou, People’s Republic of China; 3Zhejiang Cancer Hospital, Hangzhou, People’s Republic of China; 4Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, Department of Radiation Oncology, Wuhan, People’s Republic of China Introduction: Brain metastases are one of the leading causes of death from non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC. The use of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs to treat brain metastases remains controversial. Thus, we performed a pooled analysis of published data to evaluate the efficacy of EGFR-TKIs in NSCLC patients with brain metastases, particularly for tumors with activating EGFR mutations. Methods: Several data sources were searched, including PubMed, Web of Science, and ASCO Annual Meetings databases. The end points were intracranial overall response rate (ORR, disease control rate (DCR, progression-free survival (PFS, overall survival (OS, and adverse events. The pooled ORR, DCR, PFS, and OS with 95% confidence intervals (CIs were calculated employing fixed- or random-effect models, depending on the heterogeneity of the included studies. Results: Sixteen published studies were included in this analysis, with a total of 464 enrolled patients. The EGFR mutational status was unknown for 362 (unselected group, and 102 had activating EGFR mutations. The pooled intracranial ORR and DCR were 51.8% (95% CI: 45.8%–57.8% and 75.7% (95% CI: 70.3%–80.5%, respectively. A higher ORR was observed in the EGFR mutation group than in the unselected group (85.0% vs 45.1%; a similar trend was observed for the DCR (94.6% vs 71.3%. The pooled median PFS and OS were 7.4 months (95% CI, 4.9–9.9 and 11.9 months (95% CI, 7.7–16.2, respectively, with longer PFS (12.3 months vs 5.9 months and OS (16.2 months vs

  14. Corn in consortium with forages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cássia Maria de Paula Garcia

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The basic premises for sustainable agricultural development with focus on rural producers are reducing the costs of production and aggregation of values through the use crop-livestock system (CLS throughout the year. The CLS is based on the consortium of grain crops, especially corn with tropical forages, mainly of the genus Panicum and Urochloa. The study aimed to evaluate the grain yield of irrigated corn crop intercropped with forage of the genus Panicum and Urochloa. The experiment was conducted at the Fazenda de Ensino, Pesquisa e Extensão – FEPE  of the Faculdade de Engenharia - UNESP, Ilha Solteira in an Oxisol in savannah conditions and in the autumn winter of 2009. The experimental area was irrigated by a center pivot and had a history of no-tillage system for 8 years. The corn hybrid used was simple DKB 390 YG at distances of 0.90 m. The seeds of grasses were sown in 0.34 m spacing in the amount of 5 kg ha-1, they were mixed with fertilizer minutes before sowing  and placed in a compartment fertilizer seeder and fertilizers were mechanically deposited in the soil at a depth of 0.03 m. The experimental design used was a randomized block with four replications and five treatments: Panicum maximum cv. Tanzania sown during the nitrogen fertilization (CTD of the corn; Panicum maximum cv. Mombaça sown during the nitrogen fertilization (CMD of the corn; Urochloa brizantha cv. Xaraés sown during the occasion of nitrogen fertilization (CBD of the corn; Urochloa ruziziensis cv. Comumsown during the nitrogen fertilization (CRD of the corn and single corn (control. The production components of corn: plant population per hectare (PlPo, number of ears per hectare (NE ha-1, number of rows per ear (NRE, number of kernels per row on the cob (NKR, number of grain in the ear (NGE and mass of 100 grains (M100G were not influenced by consortium with forage. Comparing grain yield (GY single corn and maize intercropped with forage of the genus Panicum

  15. Quality of Online Chat Reference Answers Differ between Local and Consortium Library Staff: Providing Consortium Staff with More Local Information Can Mitigate these Differences. A Review of: Meert, D.L., & Given, L.M. (2009. Measuring quality in chat reference consortia: A comparative analysis of responses to users’ queries.” College & Research Libraries, 70(1, 71‐84.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Newton Miller

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective – To evaluate the quality of answers from a 24/7 online chat reference service by comparing the responses given by local and consortia library staff using in‐house reference standards, and by assessing whether or not the questions were answered in real time.Design – Comparative analysis of online chat reference transcripts.Setting – Large academic library in Alberta, Canada.Subjects – A total of online chat reference transcripts from the first year of consortium service were analyzed for this study. Of these, 252 were answered by local library staff and 226 from consortia (non‐local library staff.Methods – A stratified random sample of 1,402 transcripts were collected from the first year of consortium service (beginning of October to end of April. This method was then applied monthly, resulting in a sample size of 478 transcripts. In the first part of the study, responses were coded within the transcripts with a “yes” or “no” label to determine if they met the standards set by the local university library’s reference management. Reference transaction standards included questions regarding whether or not correct information or instructions were given and if not, whether the user was referred to an authoritative source for the correct information. The second part of the study coded transcripts with a “yes” or “no” designation as to whether the user received an answer from the staff member in “real time” and if not, was further analyzed to determine why the user did not receive a real‐time response. Each transcript was coded as reflecting one of four “question categories” that included library user information, request for instruction, request for academic information, and miscellaneous/non‐library questions.Main Results – When all question types were integrated, analysis revealed that local library staff met reference transaction standards 94% of the time. Consortia staff met these same

  16. Prognostic role of acellular mucin pools in patients with rectal cancer after pathological complete response to preoperative chemoradiation: systematic review and meta-analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatti, A.B.H.

    2017-01-01

    The prognostic implication of acellular mucin pools (AMP) in rectal cancer is controversial. There is no Level-I evidence regarding their prognostic impact. This systematic review was performed to determine the impact of AMP on survival in patients with rectal cancer, who demonstrate pathological complete response (PCR) to preoperative chemoradiation (CRT). A systematic literature review was performed by searching MEDLINE and EMBASE database. For overall survival, the overall random effect model favored mucin negative tumors (HR=2, 95% CI=0.8-4.8) with heterogeneity (I-squared=0, p=0.6). However, the pooled analysis was not significant due to small sample. For disease-free survival, four studies showed HR >1; however, the pooled random effect model indicated little difference in risk (HR=1.06, 95% CI=0.4-2.4) with heterogeneity (I-squared=49.5%, p=0.07). No definite prognostic role of AMP in rectal cancer patients with PCR was found. These results, however, should be interpreted with caution. (author)

  17. Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia and Indicators of Early Immune Stimulation: A Childhood Leukemia International Consortium Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudant, Jérémie; Lightfoot, Tracy; Urayama, Kevin Y.; Petridou, Eleni; Dockerty, John D.; Magnani, Corrado; Milne, Elizabeth; Spector, Logan G.; Ashton, Lesley J.; Dessypris, Nikolaos; Kang, Alice Y.; Miller, Margaret; Rondelli, Roberto; Simpson, Jill; Stiakaki, Eftichia; Orsi, Laurent; Roman, Eve; Metayer, Catherine; Infante-Rivard, Claire; Clavel, Jacqueline

    2015-01-01

    The associations between childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and several proxies of early stimulation of the immune system, that is, day-care center attendance, birth order, maternally reported common infections in infancy, and breastfeeding, were investigated by using data from 11 case-control studies participating in the Childhood Leukemia International Consortium (enrollment period: 1980–2010). The sample included 7,399 ALL cases and 11,181 controls aged 2–14 years. The data were collected by questionnaires administered to the parents. Pooled odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were estimated by unconditional logistic regression adjusted for age, sex, study, maternal education, and maternal age. Day-care center attendance in the first year of life was associated with a reduced risk of ALL (odds ratio = 0.77, 95% confidence interval: 0.71, 0.84), with a marked inverse trend with earlier age at start (P < 0.0001). An inverse association was also observed with breastfeeding duration of 6 months or more (odds ratio = 0.86, 95% confidence interval: 0.79, 0.94). No significant relationship with a history of common infections in infancy was observed even though the odds ratio was less than 1 for more than 3 infections. The findings of this large pooled analysis reinforce the hypothesis that day-care center attendance in infancy and prolonged breastfeeding are associated with a decreased risk of ALL. PMID:25731888

  18. Standardization of clinical enzyme analysis using frozen human serum pools with values assigned by the International Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine reference measurement procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Qing; Chen, Baorong; Zhang, Rui; Zuo, Chang

    Variation in clinical enzyme analysis, particularly across different measuring systems and laboratories, represents a critical but long-lasting problem in diagnosis. Calibrators with traceability and commutability are imminently needed to harmonize analysis in laboratory medicine. Fresh frozen human serum pools were assigned values for alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT), creatine kinase (CK) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) by six laboratories with established International Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine reference measurement procedures. These serum pools were then used across 76 laboratories as a calibrator in the analysis of five enzymes. Bias and imprecision in the measurement of the five enzymes tested were significantly reduced by using the value-assigned serum in analytical systems with open and single-point calibration. The median (interquartile range) of the relative biases of ALT, AST, GGT, CK and LDH were 2.0% (0.6-3.4%), 0.8% (-0.8-2.3%), 1.0% (-0.5-2.0%), 0.2% (-0.3-1.0%) and 0.2% (-0.9-1.1%), respectively. Before calibration, the interlaboratory coefficients of variation (CVs) in the analysis of patient serum samples were 8.0-8.2%, 7.3-8.5%, 8.1-8.7%, 5.1-5.9% and 5.8-6.4% for ALT, AST, GGT, CK and LDH, respectively; after calibration, the CVs decreased to 2.7-3.3%, 3.0-3.6%, 1.6-2.1%, 1.8-1.9% and 3.3-3.5%, respectively. The results suggest that the use of fresh frozen serum pools significantly improved the comparability of test results in analytical systems with open and single-point calibration.

  19. Feasibility analysis of the Primary Loop of Pool-Type Natural Circulating Nuclear Reactor Dedicated to Seawater Desalination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Woonho; Jeong, Yong Hoon [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    In this study, the feasibility of natural circulation was evaluated for the reference plant AHR400 (Advanced Heating Reactor 400MWth). AHR400 is a pool-type desalination-dedicated nuclear reactor. As a consequence, AHR400 has low operating pressure and temperature which provides large safety margin. Removal of the reactor coolant pump from the AHR400 will enforce integrity of the reactor vessel and passive safety feature. Therefore, the study also tried to find out optimized primary loop design to achieve total natural circulation of the coolant. Natural circulation capacity of the primary loop of the desalination dedicated nuclear reactor AHR400 was evaluated. It was concluded that to remove RCP from the AHR400 and operates the reactor only by natural circulation of the coolant is impossible. Decreased core power as half make removal of RCP possible with 15m central height difference between the core and IHXs. Furthermore, validation and modification of pressure loss coefficients by small-scaled natural circulation experiment at a pool-type reactor would provide more accurate results.

  20. Recreational Physical Activity and Differentiated Thyroid Cancer Risk: A Pooled Analysis of Two Case-Control Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xhaard, Constance; Lence-Anta, Juan J.; Ren, Yan; Borson-Chazot, Françoise; Sassolas, Geneviève; Schvartz, Claire; Colonna, Marc; Lacour, Brigitte; Danzon, Arlette; Velten, Michel; Clero, Enora; Maillard, Stéphane; Marrer, Emilie; Bailly, Laurent; Mariné Barjoan, Eugènia; Schlumberger, Martin; Orgiazzi, Jacques; Adjadj, Elisabeth; Pereda, Celia M.; Turcios, Silvia; Velasco, Milagros; Chappe, Mae; Infante, Idalmis; Bustillo, Marlene; García, Anabel; Salazar, Sirced; Rodriguez, Regla; Benadjaoud, Mohamed Amine; Ortiz, Rosa M.; Rubino, Carole; de Vathaire, Florent

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Physical activity has been hypothesized to influence cancer occurrence through several mechanisms. To date, its relation with thyroid cancer risk has been examined in relatively few studies. We pooled 2 case-control studies conducted in Cuba and Eastern France to assess the relationship between self-reported practice of recreational physical activity since childhood and thyroid cancer risk. Methods This pooled study included 1,008 cases of differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) matched with 1,088 controls (age range 9-35 and 17-60 years in the French and Cuban studies, respectively). Risk factors associated with the practice of recreational physical activity were estimated using OR and 95% CI. Logistic regressions were stratified by age class, country, and gender and were adjusted for ethnic group, level of education, number of pregnancies for women, height, BMI, and smoking status. Results Overall, the risk of thyroid cancer was slightly reduced among subjects who reported recreational physical activity (OR = 0.8; 95% CI 0.5-1.0). The weekly frequency (i.e. h/week) seems to be more relevant than the duration (years). Conclusion Long-term recreational physical activity, practiced since childhood, may reduce the DTC risk. However, the mechanisms whereby the DTC risk decreases are not yet entirely clear. PMID:27493888

  1. John Glenn Biomedical Engineering Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nall, Marsha

    2004-01-01

    The John Glenn Biomedical Engineering Consortium is an inter-institutional research and technology development, beginning with ten projects in FY02 that are aimed at applying GRC expertise in fluid physics and sensor development with local biomedical expertise to mitigate the risks of space flight on the health, safety, and performance of astronauts. It is anticipated that several new technologies will be developed that are applicable to both medical needs in space and on earth.

  2. Solar swimming pool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-01-01

    This report examines the feasibility of using solar collectors to heat the water in a previously unheated outdoor swimming pool. The solar system is used in conjunction with a pool blanket, to conserve heat when the pool is not in use. Energy losses through evaporation can be reduced by as much as 70% by a pool blanket. A total of 130 m{sup 2} of highly durable black synthetic collectors were installed on a support structure at a 30{degree} angle from the horizontal, oriented to the south. Circulation of pool water though the collectors, which is controlled by a differential thermostat, was done with the existing pool pump. Before installation the pool temperature averaged 16{degree}C; after installation it ranged from 20{degree} to 26{degree}C. It was hard to distinguish how much pool heating was due to the solar system and how much heat was retained by the pool blanket. However, the pool season was extended by five weeks and attendance tripled. 2 figs.

  3. Appalachian clean coal technology consortium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutz, K.; Yoon, Roe-Hoan

    1995-01-01

    The Appalachian Clean Coal Technology Consortium (ACCTC) has been established to help U.S. coal producers, particularly those in the Appalachian region, increase the production of lower-sulfur coal. The cooperative research conducted as part of the consortium activities will help utilities meet the emissions standards established by the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments, enhance the competitiveness of U.S. coals in the world market, create jobs in economically-depressed coal producing regions, and reduce U.S. dependence on foreign energy supplies. The research activities will be conducted in cooperation with coal companies, equipment manufacturers, and A ampersand E firms working in the Appalachian coal fields. This approach is consistent with President Clinton's initiative in establishing Regional Technology Alliances to meet regional needs through technology development in cooperation with industry. The consortium activities are complementary to the High-Efficiency Preparation program of the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, but are broader in scope as they are inclusive of technology developments for both near-term and long-term applications, technology transfer, and training a highly-skilled work force

  4. Appalachian clean coal technology consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kutz, K.; Yoon, Roe-Hoan [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States)

    1995-11-01

    The Appalachian Clean Coal Technology Consortium (ACCTC) has been established to help U.S. coal producers, particularly those in the Appalachian region, increase the production of lower-sulfur coal. The cooperative research conducted as part of the consortium activities will help utilities meet the emissions standards established by the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments, enhance the competitiveness of U.S. coals in the world market, create jobs in economically-depressed coal producing regions, and reduce U.S. dependence on foreign energy supplies. The research activities will be conducted in cooperation with coal companies, equipment manufacturers, and A&E firms working in the Appalachian coal fields. This approach is consistent with President Clinton`s initiative in establishing Regional Technology Alliances to meet regional needs through technology development in cooperation with industry. The consortium activities are complementary to the High-Efficiency Preparation program of the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, but are broader in scope as they are inclusive of technology developments for both near-term and long-term applications, technology transfer, and training a highly-skilled work force.

  5. International Childhood Cancer Cohort Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    An alliance of several large-scale prospective cohort studies of children to pool data and biospecimens from individual cohorts to study various modifiable and genetic factors in relation to cancer risk

  6. Swimming-pool piles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trioulaire, M.

    1959-01-01

    In France two swimming-pool piles, Melusine and Triton, have just been set in operation. The swimming-pool pile is the ideal research tool for neutron fluxes of the order of 10 13 . This type of pile can be of immediate interest to many research centres, but its cost must be reduced and a break with tradition should be observed in its design. It would be an advantage: - to bury the swimming-pool; - to reject the experimental channel; - to concentrate the cooling circuit in the swimming-pool; - to carry out all manipulations in the water; - to double the core. (author) [fr

  7. A Simulation Based Analysis of Motor Unit Number Index (MUNIX) Technique Using Motoneuron Pool and Surface Electromyogram Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoyan; Rymer, William Zev; Zhou, Ping

    2013-01-01

    Motor unit number index (MUNIX) measurement has recently achieved increasing attention as a tool to evaluate the progression of motoneuron diseases. In our current study, the sensitivity of the MUNIX technique to changes in motoneuron and muscle properties was explored by a simulation approach utilizing variations on published motoneuron pool and surface electromyogram (EMG) models. Our simulation results indicate that, when keeping motoneuron pool and muscle parameters unchanged and varying the input motor unit numbers to the model, then MUNIX estimates can appropriately characterize changes in motor unit numbers. Such MUNIX estimates are not sensitive to different motor unit recruitment and rate coding strategies used in the model. Furthermore, alterations in motor unit control properties do not have a significant effect on the MUNIX estimates. Neither adjustment of the motor unit recruitment range nor reduction of the motor unit firing rates jeopardizes the MUNIX estimates. The MUNIX estimates closely correlate with the maximum M wave amplitude. However, if we reduce the amplitude of each motor unit action potential rather than simply reduce motor unit number, then MUNIX estimates substantially underestimate the motor unit numbers in the muscle. These findings suggest that the current MUNIX definition is most suitable for motoneuron diseases that demonstrate secondary evidence of muscle fiber reinnervation. In this regard, when MUNIX is applied, it is of much importance to examine a parallel measurement of motor unit size index (MUSIX), defined as the ratio of the maximum M wave amplitude to the MUNIX. However, there are potential limitations in the application of the MUNIX methods in atrophied muscle, where it is unclear whether the atrophy is accompanied by loss of motor units or loss of muscle fiber size. PMID:22514208

  8. Mutation analysis with random DNA identifiers (MARDI) catalogs Pig-a mutations in heterogeneous pools of CD48-deficient T cells derived from DMBA-treated rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revollo, Javier R; Crabtree, Nathaniel M; Pearce, Mason G; Pacheco-Martinez, M Monserrat; Dobrovolsky, Vasily N

    2016-03-01

    Identification of mutations induced by xenotoxins is a common task in the field of genetic toxicology. Mutations are often detected by clonally expanding potential mutant cells and genotyping each viable clone by Sanger sequencing. Such a "clone-by-clone" approach requires significant time and effort, and sometimes is even impossible to implement. Alternative techniques for efficient mutation identification would greatly benefit both basic and regulatory genetic toxicology research. Here, we report the development of Mutation Analysis with Random DNA Identifiers (MARDI), a novel high-fidelity Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) approach that circumvents clonal expansion and directly catalogs mutations in pools of mutant cells. MARDI uses oligonucleotides carrying Random DNA Identifiers (RDIs) to tag progenitor DNA molecules before PCR amplification, enabling clustering of descendant DNA molecules and eliminating NGS- and PCR-induced sequencing artifacts. When applied to the Pig-a cDNA analysis of heterogeneous pools of CD48-deficient T cells derived from DMBA-treated rats, MARDI detected nearly all Pig-a mutations that were previously identified by conventional clone-by-clone analysis and discovered many additional ones consistent with DMBA exposure: mostly A to T transversions, with the mutated A located on the non-transcribed DNA strand. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. p-STAT3 in luminal breast cancer: Integrated RNA-protein pooled analysis and results from the BIG 2-98 phase III trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnenblick, Amir; Salgado, Roberto; Brohée, Sylvain; Zahavi, Tamar; Peretz, Tamar; Van den Eynden, Gert; Rouas, Ghizlane; Salmon, Asher; Francis, Prudence A; Di Leo, Angelo; Crown, John P A; Viale, Giuseppe; Daly, Laura; Javdan, Bahar; Fujisawa, Sho; De Azambuja, Evandro; Lieveke, Ameye; Piccart, Martine J; Bromberg, Jacqueline F; Sotiriou, Christos

    2018-02-01

    In the present study, in order to investigate the role of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) in estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer prognosis, we evaluated the phosphorylated STAT3 (p-STAT3) status and investigated its effect on the outcome in a pooled analysis and in a large prospective adjuvant trial. By using the TCGA repository, we developed gene signatures that reflected the level of p-STAT3. Using pooled analysis of the expression data from luminal breast cancer patients, we assessed the effects of the p-STAT3 expression signature on prognosis. We further validated the p-STAT3 prognostic effect using immunohistochemistry (IHC) and immunofluorescence staining of p-STAT3 tissue microarrays from a large randomised prospective trial. Our analysis demonstrated that p-STAT3 expression was elevated in luminal A-type breast cancer (Kruskal-Wallis test, PBIG 2-98 randomised trial. With a median follow-up of 10.1 years, p-STAT3 was associated with a reduced risk of recurrence in ER-positive/HER2-negative breast cancer (Cox univariate HR, 0.66; 95% CI, 0.44-0.98; P=0.04). On the whole, our data indicate that p-STAT3 is associated with an improved outcome in ER-positive breast cancer.

  10. Exposure to pesticides as risk factor for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and hairy cell leukemia: pooled analysis of two Swedish case-control studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardell, Lennart; Eriksson, Mikael; Nordstrom, Marie

    2002-05-01

    Increased risk for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) following exposure to certain pesticides has previously been reported. To further elucidate the importance of phenoxyacetic acids and other pesticides in the etiology of NHL a pooled analysis was performed on two case-control studies, one on NHL and another on hairy cell leukemia (HCL), a rare subtype of NHL. The studies were population based with cases identified from cancer registry and controls from population registry. Data assessment was ascertained by questionnaires supplemented over the telephone by specially trained interviewers. The pooled analysis of NHL and HCL was based on 515 cases and 1141 controls. Increased risks in univariate analysis were found for subjects exposed to herbicides (OR 1.75, CI 95% 1.26-2.42), insecticides (OR 1.43, CI 95% 1.08-1.87), fungicides (OR 3.11, CI 95% 1.56-6.27) and impregnating agents (OR 1.48, CI 95% 1.11-1.96). Among herbicides, significant associations were found for glyphosate (OR 3.04, CI 95% 1.08-8.52) and 4-chloro-2-methyl phenoxyacetic acid (MCPA) (OR 2.62, CI 95% 1.40-4.88). For several categories of pesticides the highest risk was found for exposure during the latest decades before diagnosis. However, in multivariate analyses the only significantly increased risk was for a heterogeneous category of other herbicides than above.

  11. The International Human Epigenome Consortium Data Portal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bujold, David; Morais, David Anderson de Lima; Gauthier, Carol; Côté, Catherine; Caron, Maxime; Kwan, Tony; Chen, Kuang Chung; Laperle, Jonathan; Markovits, Alexei Nordell; Pastinen, Tomi; Caron, Bryan; Veilleux, Alain; Jacques, Pierre-Étienne; Bourque, Guillaume

    2016-11-23

    The International Human Epigenome Consortium (IHEC) coordinates the production of reference epigenome maps through the characterization of the regulome, methylome, and transcriptome from a wide range of tissues and cell types. To define conventions ensuring the compatibility of datasets and establish an infrastructure enabling data integration, analysis, and sharing, we developed the IHEC Data Portal (http://epigenomesportal.ca/ihec). The portal provides access to >7,000 reference epigenomic datasets, generated from >600 tissues, which have been contributed by seven international consortia: ENCODE, NIH Roadmap, CEEHRC, Blueprint, DEEP, AMED-CREST, and KNIH. The portal enhances the utility of these reference maps by facilitating the discovery, visualization, analysis, download, and sharing of epigenomics data. The IHEC Data Portal is the official source to navigate through IHEC datasets and represents a strategy for unifying the distributed data produced by international research consortia. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Spent fuel storage pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, Naoshi.

    1996-01-01

    Fences are disposed to a fuel exchange floor surrounding the upper surface of a fuel pool for preventing overflow of pool water. The fences comprise a plurality of flat boards arranged in parallel with each other in the longitudinal direction while being vertically inclined, and slits are disposed between the boards for looking down the pool. Further, the fences comprise wide boards and are constituted so as to be laid horizontally on the fuel exchange floor in a normal state and uprisen by means of the signals from an earthquake sensing device. Even if pool water is overflow from the fuel pool by the vibrations occurred upon earthquake and flown out to the floor of the fuel exchange floor, the overflow from the fuel exchange floor is prevented by the fences. An operator who monitors the fuel pool can observe the inside of the fuel pool through the slits formed to the fences during normal operation. The fences act as resistance against overflowing water upon occurrence of an earthquake thereby capable of reducing the overflowing amount of water due to the vibrations of pool water. The effect of preventing overflowing water can be enhanced. (N.H.)

  13. Collaborative Car Pooling System

    OpenAIRE

    João Ferreira; Paulo Trigo; Porfírio Filipe

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the architecture for a collaborative Car Pooling System based on a credits mechanism to motivate the cooperation among users. Users can spend the accumulated credits on parking facilities. For this, we propose a business model to support the collaboration between a car pooling system and parking facilities. The Portuguese Lisbon-s Metropolitan area is used as application scenario.

  14. The Age-Specific Quantitative Effects of Metabolic Risk Factors on Cardiovascular Diseases and Diabetes: A Pooled Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farzadfar, Farshad; Stevens, Gretchen A.; Woodward, Mark; Wormser, David; Kaptoge, Stephen; Whitlock, Gary; Qiao, Qing; Lewington, Sarah; Di Angelantonio, Emanuele; vander Hoorn, Stephen; Lawes, Carlene M. M.; Ali, Mohammed K.; Mozaffarian, Dariush; Ezzati, Majid

    2013-01-01

    Background The effects of systolic blood pressure (SBP), serum total cholesterol (TC), fasting plasma glucose (FPG), and body mass index (BMI) on the risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) have been established in epidemiological studies, but consistent estimates of effect sizes by age and sex are not available. Methods We reviewed large cohort pooling projects, evaluating effects of baseline or usual exposure to metabolic risks on ischemic heart disease (IHD), hypertensive heart disease (HHD), stroke, diabetes, and, as relevant selected other CVDs, after adjusting for important confounders. We pooled all data to estimate relative risks (RRs) for each risk factor and examined effect modification by age or other factors, using random effects models. Results Across all risk factors, an average of 123 cohorts provided data on 1.4 million individuals and 52,000 CVD events. Each metabolic risk factor was robustly related to CVD. At the baseline age of 55–64 years, the RR for 10 mmHg higher SBP was largest for HHD (2.16; 95% CI 2.09–2.24), followed by effects on both stroke subtypes (1.66; 1.39–1.98 for hemorrhagic stroke and 1.63; 1.57–1.69 for ischemic stroke). In the same age group, RRs for 1 mmol/L higher TC were 1.44 (1.29–1.61) for IHD and 1.20 (1.15–1.25) for ischemic stroke. The RRs for 5 kg/m2 higher BMI for ages 55–64 ranged from 2.32 (2.04–2.63) for diabetes, to 1.44 (1.40–1.48) for IHD. For 1 mmol/L higher FPG, RRs in this age group were 1.18 (1.08–1.29) for IHD and 1.14 (1.01–1.29) for total stroke. For all risk factors, proportional effects declined with age, were generally consistent by sex, and differed by region in only a few age groups for certain risk factor-disease pairs. Conclusion Our results provide robust, comparable and precise estimates of the effects of major metabolic risk factors on CVD and diabetes by age group. PMID:23935815

  15. Clinical outcomes of self-expandable stent placement for benign esophageal diseases: A pooled analysis of the literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Halsema, Emo E; van Hooft, Jeanin E

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the outcomes of self-expandable stent placement for benign esophageal strictures and benign esophageal leaks in the literature. METHODS: The PubMed, Embase and Cochrane databases were searched for relevant articles published between January 2000 and July 2014. Eight prospective studies were identified that analyzed the outcomes of stent placement for refractory benign esophageal strictures. The outcomes of stent placement for benign esophageal leaks, perforations and fistulae were extracted from 20 retrospective studies that were published after the inclusion period of a recent systematic review. Data were pooled and analyzed using descriptive statistics. RESULTS: Fully covered self-expandable metal stents (FC SEMS) (n = 85), biodegradable (BD) stents (n = 77) and self-expandable plastic stents (SEPS) (n = 70) were inserted in 232 patients with refractory benign esophageal strictures. The overall clinical success rate was 24.2% and according to stent type 14.1% for FC SEMS, 32.9% for BD stents and 27.1% for SEPS. Stent migration occurred in 24.6% of cases. The overall complication rate was 31.0%, including major (17.7%) and minor (13.4%) complications. A total of 643 patients were treated with self-expandable stents mainly for postsurgical leaks (64.5%), iatrogenic perforations (19.6%), Boerhaave’s syndrome (7.8%) and fistulae (3.7%). FC SEMS and partially covered SEMS were used in the majority of patients. Successful closure of the defect was achieved in 76.8% of patients and according to etiology in 81.4% for postsurgical leaks, 86.0% for perforations and 64.7% for fistulae. The pooled stent migration rate was 16.5%. Stent-related complications occurred in 13.4% of patients, including major (7.8%) and minor (5.5%) complications. CONCLUSION: The outcomes of stent placement for refractory benign esophageal strictures were poor. However, randomized trials are needed to put this into perspective. The evidence on successful stent placement for benign

  16. Clinical outcomes of self-expandable stent placement for benign esophageal diseases: A pooled analysis of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Halsema, Emo E; van Hooft, Jeanin E

    2015-02-16

    To analyze the outcomes of self-expandable stent placement for benign esophageal strictures and benign esophageal leaks in the literature. The PubMed, Embase and Cochrane databases were searched for relevant articles published between January 2000 and July 2014. Eight prospective studies were identified that analyzed the outcomes of stent placement for refractory benign esophageal strictures. The outcomes of stent placement for benign esophageal leaks, perforations and fistulae were extracted from 20 retrospective studies that were published after the inclusion period of a recent systematic review. Data were pooled and analyzed using descriptive statistics. Fully covered self-expandable metal stents (FC SEMS) (n = 85), biodegradable (BD) stents (n = 77) and self-expandable plastic stents (SEPS) (n = 70) were inserted in 232 patients with refractory benign esophageal strictures. The overall clinical success rate was 24.2% and according to stent type 14.1% for FC SEMS, 32.9% for BD stents and 27.1% for SEPS. Stent migration occurred in 24.6% of cases. The overall complication rate was 31.0%, including major (17.7%) and minor (13.4%) complications. A total of 643 patients were treated with self-expandable stents mainly for postsurgical leaks (64.5%), iatrogenic perforations (19.6%), Boerhaave's syndrome (7.8%) and fistulae (3.7%). FC SEMS and partially covered SEMS were used in the majority of patients. Successful closure of the defect was achieved in 76.8% of patients and according to etiology in 81.4% for postsurgical leaks, 86.0% for perforations and 64.7% for fistulae. The pooled stent migration rate was 16.5%. Stent-related complications occurred in 13.4% of patients, including major (7.8%) and minor (5.5%) complications. The outcomes of stent placement for refractory benign esophageal strictures were poor. However, randomized trials are needed to put this into perspective. The evidence on successful stent placement for benign esophageal leaks, perforations and

  17. Simple Factors Associated With Radiation-Induced Lung Toxicity After Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy of the Thorax: A Pooled Analysis of 88 Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Jing [Department of Radiation Oncology, GRU Cancer Center/Medical College of Georgia, Georgia Regents University, Augusta, Georgia (United States); Department of Oncology, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Yorke, Ellen D. [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Li, Ling [Department of Radiation Oncology, GRU Cancer Center/Medical College of Georgia, Georgia Regents University, Augusta, Georgia (United States); Department of Shanghai Cancer Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Kavanagh, Brian D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado, Denver, Colorado (United States); Li, X. Allen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States); Das, Shiva [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Miften, Moyed [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado, Denver, Colorado (United States); Rimner, Andreas [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York City, New York (United States); Campbell, Jeffrey [Department of Radiation Oncology, GRU Cancer Center/Medical College of Georgia, Georgia Regents University, Augusta, Georgia (United States); Xue, Jinyu [Department of Radiation Oncology, MD Anderson Cancer Center at Cooper, Camden, New Jersey (United States); Jackson, Andrew [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Grimm, Jimm [Bott Cancer Center, Holy Redeemer Hospital, Meadowbrook, Pennsylvania (United States); Milano, Michael T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York (United States); and others

    2016-08-01

    Purpose: To study the risk factors for radiation-induced lung toxicity (RILT) after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) of the thorax. Methods and Materials: Published studies on lung toxicity in patients with early-stage non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) or metastatic lung tumors treated with SBRT were pooled and analyzed. The primary endpoint was RILT, including pneumonitis and fibrosis. Data of RILT and risk factors were extracted from each study, and rates of grade 2 to 5 (G2+) and grade 3 to 5 (G3+) RILT were computed. Patient, tumor, and dosimetric factors were analyzed for their correlation with RILT. Results: Eighty-eight studies (7752 patients) that reported RILT incidence were eligible. The pooled rates of G2+ and G3+ RILT from all 88 studies were 9.1% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 7.15-11.4) and 1.8% (95% CI: 1.3-2.5), respectively. The median of median tumor sizes was 2.3 (range, 1.4-4.1) cm. Among the factors analyzed, older patient age (P=.044) and larger tumor size (the greatest diameter) were significantly correlated with higher rates of G2+ (P=.049) and G3+ RILT (P=.001). Patients with stage IA versus stage IB NSCLC had significantly lower risks of G2+ RILT (8.3% vs 17.1%, odds ratio = 0.43, 95% CI: 0.29-0.64, P<.0001). Among studies that provided detailed dosimetric data, the pooled analysis demonstrated a significantly higher mean lung dose (MLD) (P=.027) and V20 (P=.019) in patients with G2+ RILT than in those with grade 0 to 1 RILT. Conclusions: The overall rate of RILT is relatively low after thoracic SBRT. Older age and larger tumor size are significant adverse risk factors for RILT. Lung dosimetry, specifically lung V20 and MLD, also significantly affect RILT risk.

  18. Enzyme replacement therapy for Anderson-Fabry disease: A complementary overview of a Cochrane publication through a linear regression and a pooled analysis of proportions from cohort studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Dib, Regina; Gomaa, Huda; Ortiz, Alberto; Politei, Juan; Kapoor, Anil; Barreto, Fellype

    2017-01-01

    Anderson-Fabry disease (AFD) is an X-linked recessive inborn error of glycosphingolipid metabolism caused by a deficiency of alpha-galactosidase A. Renal failure, heart and cerebrovascular involvement reduce survival. A Cochrane review provided little evidence on the use of enzyme replacement therapy (ERT). We now complement this review through a linear regression and a pooled analysis of proportions from cohort studies. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of ERT for AFD. For the systematic review, a literature search was performed, from inception to March 2016, using Medline, EMBASE and LILACS. Inclusion criteria were cohort studies, patients with AFD on ERT or natural history, and at least one patient-important outcome (all-cause mortality, renal, cardiovascular or cerebrovascular events, and adverse events) reported. The pooled proportion and the confidence interval (CI) are shown for each outcome. Simple linear regressions for composite endpoints were performed. 77 cohort studies involving 15,305 participants proved eligible. The pooled proportions were as follows: a) for renal complications, agalsidase alfa 15.3% [95% CI 0.048, 0.303; I2 = 77.2%, p = 0.0005]; agalsidase beta 6% [95% CI 0.04, 0.07; I2 = not applicable]; and untreated patients 21.4% [95% CI 0.1522, 0.2835; I2 = 89.6%, plinear regression showed that Fabry patients receiving agalsidase alfa are more likely to have higher rates of composite endpoints compared to those receiving agalsidase beta. Agalsidase beta is associated to a significantly lower incidence of renal, cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events than no ERT, and to a significantly lower incidence of cerebrovascular events than agalsidase alfa. In view of these results, the use of agalsidase beta for preventing major organ complications related to AFD can be recommended.

  19. Consortium for Health and Military Performance (CHAMP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Center's work addresses a wide scope of trauma exposure from the consequences of combat, operations other than war, terrorism, natural and humanmade disasters,...

  20. Outcomes in 370 patients with mantle cell lymphoma treated with ibrutinib: a pooled analysis from three open-label studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rule, Simon; Dreyling, Martin; Goy, Andre; Hess, Georg; Auer, Rebecca; Kahl, Brad; Cavazos, Nora; Liu, Black; Yang, Shiyi; Clow, Fong; Goldberg, Jenna D; Beaupre, Darrin; Vermeulen, Jessica; Wildgust, Mark; Wang, Michael

    2017-11-01

    Ibrutinib is highly active in treating mantle cell lymphoma (MCL), an aggressive B-cell lymphoma. We pooled data from three ibrutinib studies to explore the impact of baseline patient characteristics on treatment response. Patients with relapsed/refractory MCL (n = 370) treated with ibrutinib had an objective response rate (ORR) of 66% (20% complete response; 46% partial response); median duration of response (DOR), progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were 18·6, 12·8 and 25·0 months, respectively. Univariate analyses showed patients with one versus >one prior line of therapy had longer OS. Multivariate analyses identified that one prior line of therapy affected PFS; Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status, simplified MCL international prognostic index (sMIPI) score, bulky disease, and blastoid histology affected OS and PFS. Patients with blastoid versus non-blastoid histology had similar time to best response, but lower ORR, DOR, PFS and OS. OS and PFS were longer in patients with better sMIPI, patients with ECOG performance status 0-1, non-bulky disease and non-blastoid histology. Additionally, the proportion of patients with poor prognostic factors increased with increasing lines of therapy. Together, results suggest that patient outcomes following treatment failure with ibrutinib are related to the natural biological evolution of the disease. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Placebo response in binge eating disorder: a pooled analysis of 10 clinical trials from one research group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blom, Thomas J; Mingione, Carolyn J; Guerdjikova, Anna I; Keck, Paul E; Welge, Jeffrey A; McElroy, Susan L

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to gain further understanding of placebo response in binge eating disorder. We pooled participant-level data from 10 double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trials of medications for binge eating disorder. The primary outcomes were response (75% reduction in binge eating episodes), cessation of binge eating episodes, change in mean weekly binge eating episodes and binge eating episodes per week. Of 234 participants receiving placebo, 89 (38%) were responders and 59 (26%) attained cessation. Placebo-treated participants significantly reduced their binge eating. The mean (SD) binge eating episodes per week at baseline was 5.2 (3.2) and at endpoint was 2.2 (2.6). Lower baseline binge eating episode frequency and longer study participation were significantly associated with response and cessation. Less severe eating pathology at baseline was associated with higher placebo response and cessation rates. Future clinical trials may want to stipulate that participants exceed a threshold of illness severity, which may lead to better placebo and drug separation. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association.

  2. Determinants of reduced child stunting in Cambodia: analysis of pooled data from three demographic and health surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Nayu; Irie, Yuki; Shibuya, Kenji

    2013-05-01

    To assess how changes in socioeconomic and public health determinants may have contributed to the reduction in stunting prevalence seen among Cambodian children from 2000 to 2010. A nationally representative sample of 10 366 children younger than 5 years was obtained from pooled data of cross-sectional surveys conducted in Cambodia in 2000, 2005, and 2010. The authors used a multivariate hierarchical logistic model to examine the association between the prevalence of childhood stunting over time and certain determinants. They estimated those changes in the prevalence of stunting in 2010 that could have been achieved through further improvements in public health indicators. Child stunting was associated with the child's sex and age, type of birth, maternal height, maternal body mass index, previous birth intervals, number of household members, household wealth index score, access to improved sanitation facilities, presence of diarrhoea, parents' education, maternal tobacco use and mother's birth during the Khmer Rouge famine. The reduction in stunting prevalence during the past decade was attributable to improvements in household wealth, sanitation, parental education, birth spacing and maternal tobacco use. The prevalence of stunting would have been further reduced by scaling up the coverage of improved sanitation facilities, extending birth intervals, and eradicating maternal tobacco use. Child stunting in Cambodia has decreased owing to socioeconomic development and public health improvements. Effective policy interventions for sanitation, birth spacing and maternal tobacco use, as well as equitable economic growth and education, are the keys to further improvement in child nutrition.

  3. Cardiovascular safety of liraglutide assessed in a patient-level pooled analysis of phase 2: 3 liraglutide clinical development studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marso, Steven P; Lindsey, Jason B; Stolker, Joshua M; House, John A; Martinez Ravn, Gabriela; Kennedy, Kevin F; Jensen, Troels M; Buse, John B

    2011-07-01

    We assessed the cardiovascular safety of liraglutide, a glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist, using existing clinical data. Patient-level results from all completed phase 2 and 3 studies from the liraglutide clinical development programme were pooled to determine rates of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE): cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, stroke. MACE were identified by querying the study database using Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities (MedDRA) terms combined with serious adverse events recorded by study investigators. Broad, narrow, and custom groups of MedDRA queries were used. Candidate events from each query were independently adjudicated post hoc. In 15 studies (6638 patients; 4257 liraglutide treated), there were 114 patients with MACE identified using the broad MedDRA query. Of these, 44 were classified as serious adverse events and 39 were adjudicated as MACE. The incidence ratio for adjudicated broad/serious MACE associated with liraglutide was 0.73 (95% CI 0.38-1.41) versus all comparator drugs (metformin, glimepiride, rosiglitazone, insulin glargine, placebo), within cardiovascular safety limits defined by the United States Food & Drug Administration for diabetes therapies under current investigation.

  4. 13 CFR 120.611 - Pools backing Pool Certificates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pools backing Pool Certificates. 120.611 Section 120.611 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION BUSINESS LOANS Secondary Market Certificates § 120.611 Pools backing Pool Certificates. (a) Pool characteristics. As set...

  5. Determination of human and Sprague-Dawley rat trimethylseleonium ion and total selenium urine concentrations from endogenous body selenium pool by neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blotcky, A.J.; Claassen, J.P.; Rack, E.P.

    1992-01-01

    This study determined trimethylselenonium ion [TMSe,(CH 3 ) 3 Se + ] and total organic selenium cationic species urinary excretion values for healthy human subjects and Sprague-Dawley rats fed regular diets. The only source of TMSe was from the endogenous selenium body pool. Total selenium concentration in urine was determined by instrumental neutron activation analysis. TMSe and total selenium cationic species concentrations and percent of total selenium urine excretion were determined by chemical neutron activation analysis and coupled anion-cation exchange chromatography and anion-exchange chromatography, respectively. Within experimental error, mean values for TMSe and cationic species as percent selenium were comparable for both human subjects and Sprague-Dawley rats. This study suggested that TMSe excreated in urine by healthy human subjects and Sprague-Dawley rats fed a normal diet is not a minor but a general metabolite of selenium ingested in a normal diet. (author) 27 refs.; 1 fig.; 2 tabs

  6. Exploring new potentials and generating hypothesis for management of locally advanced head neck cancer: Analysis of pooled data from two phase II trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chufal Kundan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: To study the long term results of two phase II concurrent chemoradiotherapy protocols and conduct pooled data analysis with special emphasis on nodal density. Materials and Methods: In the period from April 2001 to May 2003, phase II Mitomycin C (MMC and late chemo-intensification (LCI protocols were started in the same institute, enrolling 69 and 74 patients respectively. Long term results for these individual trials are reported along with pooled data analysis. Results: Median follow-up time for whole group, MMC protocol and LCI protocol was 43.8 months (SD619.8, 55 months (SD 618.5 and 47.5 months (SD 620.9 respectively. LRFS, DFS and OS at five years for whole group was 59.4, 43.5 and 47.1% respectively, for MMC protocol was 59.9, 45.5 and 49.5% respectively and for LCI, protocol was 53.6%, 41.5% and 44.4% respectively. Subgroup analysis revealed that MMC protocol was more effective than LCI protocol in terms of DFS and OS in patients with hypo dense nodes while opposite was true for Isodense nodes. Multivariate analysis revealed nodal density as an independent variable that had an impact on treatment outcome. Risk of death in patients with hypo dense nodes was 2.91 times that of Isodense nodes. Conclusions: Innovative and pragmatic approach is required to address locally advanced head neck cancer. Long term results for MMC and LCI protocols are encouraging. Integrating the basic concepts of these protocols may help develop new protocols, which will facilitate the search for the optimal solution.

  7. COFFEE, TEA AND SUGAR-SWEETENED CARBONATED SOFT DRINK INTAKE AND PANCREATIC CANCER RISK: A POOLED ANALYSIS OF 14 COHORT STUDIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genkinger, Jeanine M.; Li, Ruifeng; Spiegelman, Donna; Anderson, Kristin E.; Albanes, Demetrius; Bergkvist, Leif; Bernstein, Leslie; Black, Amanda; van den Brandt, Piet A.; English, Dallas R.; Freudenheim, Jo L.; Fuchs, Charles S.; Giles, Graham G.; Giovannucci, Edward; Goldbohm, R. Alexandra; Horn-Ross, Pamela L.; Jacobs, Eric J.; Koushik, Anita; Männistö, Satu; Marshall, James R.; Miller, Anthony B.; Patel, Alpa V.; Robien, Kim; z, Thomas E.; Schairer, Catherine; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael; Wolk, Alicja; Ziegler, Regina G.; Smith-Warner, Stephanie A.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Coffee has been hypothesized to have pro- and anti-carcinogenic properties, while tea may contain anti-carcinogenic compounds. Studies assessing coffee intake and pancreatic cancer risk have yielded mixed results, while findings for tea intake have mostly been null. Sugar-sweetened carbonated soft drink (abbreviated as SSB) intake has been associated with higher circulating levels of insulin, which may promote carcinogenesis. Few prospective studies have examined SSB intake and pancreatic cancer risk; results have been heterogeneous. METHODS In this pooled analysis from 14 prospective cohort studies, 2,185 incident pancreatic cancer cases were identified among 853,894 individuals during follow-up. Multivariate (MV) study-specific relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using Cox proportional hazards models and then pooled using a random effects model. RESULTS No statistically significant associations were observed between pancreatic cancer risk and intake of coffee (MVRR=1.10, 95% CI=0.81-1.48 comparing ≥900 to 0.05). These associations were consistent across levels of sex, smoking status and body mass index. When modeled as a continuous variable, a positive association was evident for SSB (MVRR=1.06, 95% CI=1.02-1.12). CONCLUSION AND IMPACT Overall, no associations were observed for intakes of coffee or tea during adulthood and pancreatic cancer risk. Although we were only able to examine modest intake of SSB, there was a suggestive, modest positive association for risk of pancreatic cancer for intakes of SSB. PMID:22194529

  8. Reversal of hepatorenal syndrome type 1 with terlipressin plus albumin vs. placebo plus albumin in a pooled analysis of the OT-0401 and REVERSE randomised clinical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanyal, A J; Boyer, T D; Frederick, R T; Wong, F; Rossaro, L; Araya, V; Vargas, H E; Reddy, K R; Pappas, S C; Teuber, P; Escalante, S; Jamil, K

    2017-06-01

    The goal of hepatorenal syndrome type 1 (HRS-1) treatment is to improve renal function. Terlipressin, a synthetic vasopressin analogue, is a systemic vasoconstrictor used for the treatment of HRS-1, where it is available. To compare the efficacy of terlipressin plus albumin vs. placebo plus albumin in patients with HRS-1. Pooled patient-level data from two large phase 3, randomised, placebo-controlled studies were analysed for HRS reversal [serum creatinine (SCr) value ≤133 μmol/L], 90-day survival, need for renal replacement therapy and predictors of HRS reversal. Patients received intravenous terlipressin 1-2 mg every 6 hours plus albumin or placebo plus albumin up to 14 days. The pooled analysis comprised 308 patients (terlipressin: n = 153; placebo: n = 155). HRS reversal was significantly more frequent with terlipressin vs. placebo (27% vs. 14%; P = 0.004). Terlipressin was associated with a more significant improvement in renal function from baseline until end of treatment, with a mean between-group difference in SCr concentration of -53.0 μmol/L (P albumin resulted in a significantly higher rate of HRS reversal vs. albumin alone in patients with HRS-1. Terlipressin treatment is associated with improved renal function. (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: OT-0401, NCT00089570; REVERSE, NCT01143246). © 2017 The Authors. Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Prenatal and Postnatal Exposure to Persistent Organic Pollutants and Infant Growth: A Pooled Analysis of Seven European Birth Cohorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iszatt, Nina; Stigum, Hein; Verner, Marc-André; White, Richard A; Govarts, Eva; Murinova, Lubica Palkovicova; Schoeters, Greet; Trnovec, Tomas; Legler, Juliette; Pelé, Fabienne; Botton, Jérémie; Chevrier, Cécile; Wittsiepe, Jürgen; Ranft, Ulrich; Vandentorren, Stéphanie; Kasper-Sonnenberg, Monika; Klümper, Claudia; Weisglas-Kuperus, Nynke; Polder, Anuschka; Eggesbø, Merete

    2015-07-01

    Infant exposure to persistent organic pollutants (POPs) may contribute to obesity. However, many studies so far have been small, focused on transplacental exposure, used an inappropriate measure to assess postnatal exposure through breastfeeding if any, or did not discern between prenatal and postnatal effects. We investigated prenatal and postnatal exposure to POPs and infant growth (a predictor of obesity). We pooled data from seven European birth cohorts with biomarker concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyl 153 (PCB-153) (n = 2,487), and p,p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (p,p'-DDE) (n = 1,864), estimating prenatal and postnatal POPs exposure using a validated pharmacokinetic model. Growth was change in weight-for-age z-score between birth and 24 months. Per compound, multilevel models were fitted with either POPs total exposure from conception to 24 months or prenatal or postnatal exposure. We found a significant increase in growth associated with p,p'-DDE, seemingly due to prenatal exposure (per interquartile increase in exposure, adjusted β = 0.12; 95% CI: 0.03, 0.22). Due to heterogeneity across cohorts, this estimate cannot be considered precise, but does indicate that an association with infant growth is present on average. In contrast, a significant decrease in growth was associated with postnatal PCB-153 exposure (β = -0.10; 95% CI: -0.19, -0.01). To our knowledge, this is the largest study to date of POPs exposure and infant growth, and it contains state-of-the-art exposure modeling. Prenatal p,p'-DDE was associated with increased infant growth, and postnatal PCB-153 with decreased growth at European exposure levels.

  10. Intra-arterial vasodilators to prevent radial artery spasm: a systematic review and pooled analysis of clinical studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwok, Chun Shing, E-mail: shingkwok@doctors.org.uk [Keele Cardiovascular Research Group, Keele University, Stoke-on-Trent (United Kingdom); Rashid, Muhammad [St. Helens & Knowsley Teaching Hospital (NHS) Trust, Whiston Hospital, Prescot (United Kingdom); Fraser, Doug [Manchester Heart Centre, Manchester Royal Infirmary (United Kingdom); Nolan, James [University Hospital of North Midlands, Stoke-on-Trent (United Kingdom); Mamas, Mamas [Keele Cardiovascular Research Group, Keele University, Stoke-on-Trent (United Kingdom); Farr Institute, Institute of Population Health, University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom)

    2015-12-15

    Objectives: The aim of this study is to review the available literature on the efficacy and safety of agents used for prevention of RAS. Background: Different vasodilator agents have been used to prevent radial artery spasm (RAS) in patients undergoing transradial cardiac catheterization. Methods: We included studies that evaluated any intra-arterial drug administered in the setting cardiac catheterization that was undertaken through the transradial access site (TRA). We also compared studies for secondary outcomes of major bleeding, procedure time, and procedure failure rate in setting of RAS prevention, patent hemostasis and radial artery occlusion. Results: 22 clinical studies met the inclusion criteria. For placebo, RAS rate was 12% (4 studies, 638 participants), which was similar to 2.5 mg of verapamil 12% (3 studies, 768 participants) but greater than 5 mg of verapamil (4%, 2 studies, 497 participants). For nicorandil, there was a much higher RAS rate compared to placebo (16%, 3 studies, 447 participants). The lowest rates of RAS was found for nitroglycerin at both 100 μg (4%) and 200 μg (2%) doses, isosorbide mononitrate (4%) and nicardipine (3%). We found no information regarding the procedure failure rates, patent hemostasis, and radial artery occlusion in these studies. Conclusions: In this largest and up-to-date review on intra-arterial vasodilators use to reduce RAS, we have found that the verapamil at a dose of 5 mg or verapamil in combination with nitroglycerine are the best combinations to reduce RAS. - Highlights: • Radial artery spasm (RAS) causes procedural failure in transradial catheterization. • RAS may complicate 10–15% procedures undertaken through the radial approach. • We reviewed the efficacy of vasodilators that have been used to minimize RAS. • The pooled RAS rate was lowest with 5 mg of verapamil (4%) compared to placebo (12%). • The best combination of drugs to minimize RAS is nitroglycerine and verapamil.

  11. An analysis of warm pool and cold tongue El Ninos: air-sea coupling processes, global influences, and recent trends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Zeng-Zhen; Kumar, Arun; Wang, Wanqiu [NCEP/NWS/NOAA, Climate Prediction Center, Camp Springs, MD (United States); Jha, Bhaskar; Huang, Boyin [NCEP/NWS/NOAA, Climate Prediction Center, Camp Springs, MD (United States); Wyle Information Systems, Camp Springs, MD (United States); Huang, Bohua [George Mason University, Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Earth Sciences, College of Science, Fairfax, VA (United States); Center for Ocean-Land-Atmosphere Studies, Calverton, MD (United States)

    2012-05-15

    The differences in tropical air-sea interactions and global climate connection as well as the hindcast skills for the warm pool (WP) and cold tongue (CT) El Ninos are investigated based on observed, (re)analyzed, and model hindcast data. The robustness of observed global climate connection is established from the model simulations. Lastly, variations of atmosphere and ocean conditions in the recent decades, and their possible connection with the frequency increase of the WP El Nino are discussed. Consistent with previous results, our individual case study and composite results suggest that stronger (weaker) and more eastward extended (westward confined) westerly wind along the equatorial Pacific in early months of a year is associated with active (suppressed) air-sea interaction over the cold tongue/the Intertropical Convergence Zone complex, as well as more (less) intensive oceanic thermocline feedback, favoring the CT (WP) El Nino development. The preceding westerly wind signal and air-sea interaction differences may be responsible for the predication skill difference with higher (lower) overall hindcast skill for the CT (WP) El Nino in the Climate Forecast System of National Centers for Environmental Prediction. Our model experiments show that, in addition to the tropics, the eastern Pacific, North America and North Atlantic are the major regions having robust climate differences between the CT and WP El Ninos. Nevertheless, the climate contrasts seem not robust over the Eurasian continent. Also, the frequency increase of the WP El Nino in the recent decades may not be directly connected with the linear trend of the tropical climate. (orig.)

  12. Descriptive Analysis of a Baseline Concussion Battery Among U.S. Service Academy Members: Results from the Concussion Assessment, Research, and Education (CARE) Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Kathryn L; Dain Allred, C; Cameron, Kenneth L; Campbell, Darren E; D'Lauro, Christopher J; Houston, Megan N; Johnson, Brian R; Kelly, Tim F; McGinty, Gerald; O'Donnell, Patrick G; Peck, Karen Y; Svoboda, Steven J; Pasquina, Paul; McAllister, Thomas; McCrea, Michael; Broglio, Steven P

    2018-03-28

    The prevalence and possible long-term consequences of concussion remain an increasing concern to the U.S. military, particularly as it pertains to maintaining a medically ready force. Baseline testing is being used both in the civilian and military domains to assess concussion injury and recovery. Accurate interpretation of these baseline assessments requires one to consider other influencing factors not related to concussion. To date, there is limited understanding, especially within the military, of what factors influence normative test performance. Given the significant physical and mental demands placed on service academy members (SAM), and their relatively high risk for concussion, it is important to describe demographics and normative profile of SAMs. Furthermore, the absence of available baseline normative data on female and non-varsity SAMs makes interpretation of post-injury assessments challenging. Understanding how individuals perform at baseline, given their unique individual characteristics (e.g., concussion history, sex, competition level), will inform post-concussion assessment and management. Thus, the primary aim of this manuscript is to characterize the SAM population and determine normative values on a concussion baseline testing battery. All data were collected as part of the Concussion Assessment, Research and Education (CARE) Consortium. The baseline test battery included a post-concussion symptom checklist (Sport Concussion Assessment Tool (SCAT), psychological health screening inventory (Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI-18) and neurocognitive evaluation (ImPACT), Balance Error Scoring System (BESS), and Standardized Assessment of Concussion (SAC). Linear regression models were used to examine differences across sexes, competition levels, and varsity contact levels while controlling for academy, freshman status, race, and previous concussion. Zero inflated negative binomial models estimated symptom scores due to the high frequency of zero scores

  13. Reference values and age and sex differences in physical performance measures for community-dwelling older Japanese: a pooled analysis of six cohort studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Seino

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To determine age- and sex-specific reference values for six physical performance measures, i.e. hand-grip strength, one-legged stance, and gait speed and step length at both usual and maximum paces, and to investigate age and sex differences in these measures among community-dwelling older Japanese adults. METHODS: We conducted a pooled analysis of data from six cohort studies collected between 2002 and 2011 as part of the Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology-Longitudinal Interdisciplinary Study on Aging. The pooled analysis included cross-sectional data from 4683 nondisabled, community-dwelling adults aged 65 years or older (2168 men, 2515 women; mean age: 74.0 years in men and 73.9 years in women. RESULTS: Unweighted simple mean (standard deviation hand-grip strength, one-legged stance, usual gait speed, usual gait step length, maximum gait speed, and maximum gait step length were 31.7 (6.7 kg, 39.3 (23.0 s, 1.29 (0.25 m/s, 67.7 (10.0 cm, 1.94 (0.38 m/s, and 82.3 (11.6 cm, respectively, in men and 20.4 (5.0 kg, 36.8 (23.4 s, 1.25 (0.27 m/s, 60.8 (10.0 cm, 1.73 (0.36 m/s, and 69.7 (10.8 cm, respectively, in women. All physical performance measures showed significant decreasing trends with advancing age in both sexes (all P<0.001 for trend. We also constructed age- and sex-specific appraisal standards according to quintiles. With increasing age, the sex difference in hand-grip strength decreased significantly (P<0.001 for age and sex interaction. In contrast, sex differences significantly increased in all other measures (all P<0.05 for interactions except step length at maximum pace. CONCLUSION: Our pooled analysis yielded inclusive age- and sex-specific reference values and appraisal standards for major physical performance measures in nondisabled, community-dwelling, older Japanese adults. The characteristics of age-related decline in physical performance measures differed between sexes.

  14. Atomoxetine treatment outcomes in adolescents and young adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: results from a post hoc, pooled analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Lenard A; Wilens, Timothy; Zhang, Shuyu; Dittmann, Ralf W; D'Souza, Deborah N; Schuh, Leslie; Durell, Todd M

    2012-02-01

    Many children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) continue to experience this disorder as adults, which may, in part, be due to the discontinuity of health care that often occurs during the transition period between late adolescence and young adulthood. Although atomoxetine is reported to be efficacious in both adolescents and young adults, no longitudinal studies have been designed to assess directly the effects of atomoxetine treatment during this transition period. As a first step, we present the results of a post hoc, pooled analysis that compared the efficacy and safety profile of atomoxetine in these 2 patient populations. The aim of the present study was to assess the efficacy and safety profile of atomoxetine treatment in adolescents and young adults with ADHD. A post hoc, pooled analysis was conducted by combining data from 6 double-blind trials (6-9 weeks in duration) that studied adolescents (12-17 years of age; atomoxetine, n = 154; placebo, n = 88; mean final dose = 1.38 mg/kg) and 3 trials (10 weeks in duration) that studied young adults (18-30 years of age; atomoxetine, n = 117; placebo, n = 125; mean final dose = 1.21 mg/kg). Efficacy measures used in these analyses were ADHD Rating Scale (ADHDRS) for adolescents, Conners' Adult ADHD Rating Scale (CAARS) for young adults, and Clinical Global Impressions-ADHD-Severity (CGI-ADHD-S) for both age groups. Treatment response was defined as ≥30% reduction from baseline in total ADHD symptom score. In adolescents (mean age, 13.4 years), atomoxetine improved ADHD significantly compared with placebo (ADHDRS total score change, -12.9 vs -7.5; P young adults (mean age, 24.7 years), atomoxetine improved ADHD significantly (CAARS total score change, -13.6 vs -7.7; P young adults (13.7% vs 4.8%, respectively; P = 0.024); in adolescents no statistically significant differences were observed in frequency of nausea between atomoxetine and placebo treatment (4.5% vs 10.2%, respectively; P = 0

  15. Endovascular Therapy is Effective and Safe for Patients with Severe Ischemic Stroke: Pooled Analysis of IMS III and MR CLEAN Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broderick, Joseph P.; Berkhemer, Olvert A.; Palesch, Yuko Y.; Dippel, Diederik W.J.; Foster, Lydia D.; Roos, Yvo B.W.E.M.; van der Lugt, Aad; Tomsick, Thomas A.; Majoie, Charles B.L.M.; van Zwam, Wim H.; Demchuk, Andrew M.; van Oostenbrugge, Robert J.; Khatri, Pooja; Lingsma, Hester F.; Hill, Michael D.; Roozenbeek, Bob; Jauch, Edward C.; Jovin, Tudor G.; Yan, Bernard; von Kummer, Rüdiger; Molina, Carlos A.; Goyal, Mayank; Schonewille, Wouter J.; Mazighi, Mikael; Engelter, Stefan T.; Anderson, Craig S.; Spilker, Judith; Carrozzella, Janice; Ryckborst, Karla J.; Janis, L. Scott; Simpson, Kit

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose We assessed the effect of endovascular treatment in acute ischemic stroke patients with severe neurological deficit (NIHSS ≥20) following a pre-specified analysis plan. Methods The pooled analysis of the IMS III and MR CLEAN trial included participants with an NIHSS ≥20 prior to intravenous (IV) t-PA treatment (IMS III) or randomization (MR CLEAN) who were treated with IV t-PA ≤ 3 hours of stroke onset. Our hypothesis was that participants with severe stroke randomized to endovascular therapy following IV t-PA would have improved 90-day outcome (distribution of modified Rankin scale [mRS] scores), as compared to those who received IV t-PA alone. Results Among 342 participants in the pooled analysis (194 from IMS III, 148 from MR CLEAN), an ordinal logistic regression model showed that the endovascular group had superior 90-day outcome compared to the IV t-PA group (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 1.78; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.20-2.66). In the logistic regression model of the dichotomous outcome (mRS 0-2, or ‘functional independence’), the endovascular group had superior outcomes (aOR 1.97; 95% CI 1.09-3.56). Functional independence (mRS ≤2) at 90 days was 25% in the endovascular group as compared to 14% in the IV t-PA group. Conclusions Endovascular therapy following IV t-PA within 3 hours of symptom onset improves functional outcome at 90 days after severe ischemic stroke. PMID:26486865

  16. Tri-District Arts Consortium Summer Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, Charlotte O.

    1990-01-01

    The Tri-District Arts Consortium in South Carolina was formed to serve artistically gifted students in grades six-nine. The consortium developed a summer program offering music, dance, theatre, and visual arts instruction through a curriculum of intense training, performing, and hands-on experiences with faculty members and guest artists. (JDD)

  17. Increasing Sales by Developing Production Consortiums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Christopher A.; Russo, Robert

    Intended to help rehabilitation facility administrators increase organizational income from manufacturing and/or contracted service sources, this document provides a decision-making model for the development of a production consortium. The document consists of five chapters and two appendices. Chapter 1 defines the consortium concept, explains…

  18. NASA Systems Engineering Research Consortium: Defining the Path to Elegance in Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Michael D.; Farrington, Phillip A.

    2016-01-01

    The NASA Systems Engineering Research Consortium was formed at the end of 2010 to study the approaches to producing elegant systems on a consistent basis. This has been a transformative study looking at the engineering and organizational basis of systems engineering. The consortium has engaged in a variety of research topics to determine the path to elegant systems. In the second year of the consortium, a systems engineering framework emerged which structured the approach to systems engineering and guided our research. This led in the third year to set of systems engineering postulates that the consortium is continuing to refine. The consortium has conducted several research projects that have contributed significantly to the understanding of systems engineering. The consortium has surveyed the application of the NASA 17 systems engineering processes, explored the physics and statistics of systems integration, and considered organizational aspects of systems engineering discipline integration. The systems integration methods have included system exergy analysis, Akaike Information Criteria (AIC), State Variable Analysis, Multidisciplinary Coupling Analysis (MCA), Multidisciplinary Design Optimization (MDO), System Cost Modelling, System Robustness, and Value Modelling. Organizational studies have included the variability of processes in change evaluations, margin management within the organization, information theory of board structures, social categorization of unintended consequences, and initial looks at applying cognitive science to systems engineering. Consortium members have also studied the bidirectional influence of policy and law with systems engineering.

  19. Safety Overview of a Recombinant Live-Attenuated Tetravalent Dengue Vaccine: Pooled Analysis of Data from 18 Clinical Trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophia Gailhardou

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available A recombinant live attenuated tetravalent dengue vaccine (CYD-TDV has been shown to be efficacious in preventing virologically-confirmed dengue disease, severe dengue disease and dengue hospitalization in children aged 2-16 years in Asia and Latin America. We analyzed pooled safety data from 18 phase I, II and III clinical trials in which the dengue vaccine was administered to participants aged 2-60 years, including long-term safety follow-up in three efficacy trials. The participants were analyzed according to their age at enrollment. The percentage of participants aged 2-60 years reporting ≥1 solicited injection-site or systemic reactions was slightly higher in the CYD-TDV group than in the placebo group. The most common solicited injection-site reactions were pain. Headache and malaise were the most common solicited systemic reactions. In both groups 0.3% of participants discontinued for safety reasons. The most common unsolicited adverse events were injection-site reactions, gastrointestinal disorders, and infections. Reactogenicity did not increase with successive doses of CYD-TDV. The frequency and nature of SAEs occurring within 28 days of any dose were similar in the CYD-TDV and placebo groups and were common medical conditions that could be expected as a function of age. Baseline dengue virus serostatus did not appear to influence the safety profile. No vaccine-related anaphylactic reactions, neurotropic events or viscerotropic events were reported. In year 3 after dose 1, an imbalance for dengue hospitalization, including for severe dengue, observed in participants aged <9 years in the CYD-TDV group compared with the placebo group was not observed for participants aged ≥9 years. In Year 4, this imbalance in participants aged <9 years was less marked, giving an overall lower risk of dengue hospitalization or severe dengue from dose 1 to Year 4 in the CYD-TDV group. These results have contributed to the definition of the target

  20. Metabolic and Transcriptional Analysis of Acid Stress in Lactococcus lactis, with a Focus on the Kinetics of Lactic Acid Pools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Ana Lúcia; Turner, David L.; Fonseca, Luís L.; Solopova, Ana; Catarino, Teresa; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Voit, Eberhard O.; Neves, Ana Rute; Santos, Helena

    2013-01-01

    The effect of pH on the glucose metabolism of non-growing cells of L. lactis MG1363 was studied by in vivo NMR in the range 4.8 to 6.5. Immediate pH effects on glucose transporters and/or enzyme activities were distinguished from transcriptional/translational effects by using cells grown at the optimal pH of 6.5 or pre-adjusted to low pH by growth at 5.1. In cells grown at pH 5.1, glucose metabolism proceeds at a rate 35% higher than in non-adjusted cells at the same pH. Besides the upregulation of stress-related genes (such as dnaK and groEL), cells adjusted to low pH overexpressed H+-ATPase subunits as well as glycolytic genes. At sub-optimal pHs, the total intracellular pool of lactic acid reached approximately 500 mM in cells grown at optimal pH and about 700 mM in cells grown at pH 5.1. These high levels, together with good pH homeostasis (internal pH always above 6), imply intracellular accumulation of the ionized form of lactic acid (lactate anion), and the concomitant export of the equivalent protons. The average number, n, of protons exported with each lactate anion was determined directly from the kinetics of accumulation of intra- and extracellular lactic acid as monitored online by 13C-NMR. In cells non-adjusted to low pH, n varies between 2 and 1 during glucose consumption, suggesting an inhibitory effect of intracellular lactate on proton export. We confirmed that extracellular lactate did not affect the lactate: proton stoichiometry. In adjusted cells, n was lower and varied less, indicating a different mix of lactic acid exporters less affected by the high level of intracellular lactate. A qualitative model for pH effects and acid stress adaptation is proposed on the basis of these results. PMID:23844205

  1. Monitoring Recent Fluctuations of the Southern Pool of Lake Chad Using Multiple Remote Sensing Data: Implications for Water Balance Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenbin Zhu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The drought episodes in the second half of the 20th century have profoundly modified the state of Lake Chad and investigation of its variations is necessary under the new circumstances. Multiple remote sensing observations were used in this paper to study its variation in the recent 25 years. Unlike previous studies, only the southern pool of Lake Chad (SPLC was selected as our study area, because it is the only permanent open water area after the serious lake recession in 1973–1975. Four satellite altimetry products were used for water level retrieval and 904 Landsat TM/ETM+ images were used for lake surface area extraction. Based on the water level (L and surface area (A retrieved (with coinciding dates, linear regression method was used to retrieve the SPLC’s L-A curve, which was then integrated to estimate water volume variations ( Δ V . The results show that the SPLC has been in a relatively stable phase, with a slight increasing trend from 1992 to 2016. On annual average scale, the increase rate of water level, surface area and water volume is 0.5 cm year−1, 0.14 km2 year−1 and 0.007 km3 year−1, respectively. As for the intra-annual variations of the SPLC, the seasonal variation amplitude of water level, lake area and water volume is 1.38 m, 38.08 km2 and 2.00 km3, respectively. The scatterplots between precipitation and Δ V indicate that there is a time lag of about one to two months in the response of water volume variations to precipitation, which makes it possible for us to predict Δ V . The water balance of the SPLC is significantly different from that of the entire Lake Chad. While evaporation accounts for 96% of the lake’s total water losses, only 16% of the SPLC’s losses are consumed by evaporation, with the other 84% offset by outflow.

  2. Episodic therapy for genital herpes in sub-saharan Africa: a pooled analysis from three randomized controlled trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen A Weiss

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A randomized controlled trial in South Africa found a beneficial effect of acyclovir on genital ulcer healing, but no effect was seen in trials in Ghana, Central African Republic and Malawi. The aim of this paper is to assess whether the variation in impact of acyclovir on ulcer healing in these trials can be explained by differences in the characteristics of the study populations. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Pooled data were analysed to estimate the impact of acyclovir on the proportion of ulcers healed seven days after randomisation by HIV/CD4 status, ulcer aetiology, size and duration before presentation; and impact on lesional HIV-1. Risk ratios (RR were estimated using Poisson regression with robust standard errors. Of 1478 patients with genital ulcer, most (63% had herpetic ulcers (16% first episode HSV-2 ulcers, and a further 3% chancroid, 2% syphilis, 0.7% lymphogranuloma venereum and 31% undetermined aetiology. Over half (58% of patients were HIV-1 seropositive. The median duration of symptoms before presentation was 6 days. Patients on acyclovir were more likely to have a healed ulcer on day 7 (63% vs 57%, RR = 1.08, 95% CI 0.98-1.18, shorter time to healing (p = 0.04 and less lesional HIV-1 RNA (p = 0.03. Small ulcers (<50 mm(2, HSV-2 ulcers, first episode HSV-2 ulcers, and ulcers in HIV-1 seropositive individuals responded best but the better effectiveness in South Africa was not explained by differences in these factors. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: There may be slight benefit in adding acyclovir to syndromic management in settings where most ulcers are genital herpes. The stronger effect among HIV-1 infected individuals suggests that acyclovir may be beneficial for GUD/HIV-1 co-infected patients. The high prevalence in this population highlights that genital ulceration in patients with unknown HIV status provides a potential entry point for provider-initiated HIV testing.

  3. Chronic Recreational Physical Inactivity and Epithelial Ovarian Cancer Risk: Evidence from the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannioto, Rikki; LaMonte, Michael J; Risch, Harvey A; Hong, Chi-Chen; Sucheston-Campbell, Lara E; Eng, Kevin H; Brian Szender, J; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Schmalfeldt, Barbara; Klapdor, Ruediger; Gower, Emily; Minlikeeva, Albina N; Zirpoli, Gary R; Bandera, Elisa V; Berchuck, Andrew; Cramer, Daniel; Doherty, Jennifer A; Edwards, Robert P; Fridley, Brooke L; Goode, Ellen L; Goodman, Marc T; Hogdall, Estrid; Hosono, Satoyo; Jensen, Allan; Jordan, Susan; Kjaer, Susanne K; Matsuo, Keitaro; Ness, Roberta B; Olsen, Catherine M; Olson, Sara H; Leigh Pearce, Celeste; Pike, Malcolm C; Anne Rossing, Mary; Szamreta, Elizabeth A; Thompson, Pamela J; Tseng, Chiu-Chen; Vierkant, Robert A; Webb, Penelope M; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Wicklund, Kristine G; Winham, Stacey J; Wu, Anna H; Modugno, Francesmary; Schildkraut, Joellen M; Terry, Kathryn L; Kelemen, Linda E; Moysich, Kirsten B

    2016-07-01

    Despite a large body of literature evaluating the association between recreational physical activity and epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) risk, the extant evidence is inconclusive, and little is known about the independent association between recreational physical inactivity and EOC risk. We conducted a pooled analysis of nine studies from the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium to investigate the association between chronic recreational physical inactivity and EOC risk. In accordance with the 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans, women reporting no regular, weekly recreational physical activity were classified as inactive. Multivariable logistic regression was utilized to estimate the ORs and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the association between inactivity and EOC risk overall and by subgroups based upon histotype, menopausal status, race, and body mass index. The current analysis included data from 8,309 EOC patients and 12,612 controls. We observed a significant positive association between inactivity and EOC risk (OR = 1.34; 95% CI, 1.14-1.57), and similar associations were observed for each histotype. In this large pooled analysis examining the association between recreational physical inactivity and EOC risk, we observed consistent evidence of an association between chronic inactivity and all EOC histotypes. These data add to the growing body of evidence suggesting that inactivity is an independent risk factor for cancer. If the apparent association between inactivity and EOC risk is substantiated, additional work via targeted interventions should be pursued to characterize the dose of activity required to mitigate the risk of this highly fatal disease. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 25(7); 1114-24. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  4. Chronic Recreational Physical Inactivity and Epithelial Ovarian Cancer Risk: Evidence from the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannioto, Rikki; LaMonte, Michael J.; Risch, Harvey A.; Hong, Chi-Chen; Sucheston-Campbell, Lara E.; Eng, Kevin H.; Szender, J. Brian; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Schmalfeldt, Barbara; Klapdor, Ruediger; Gower, Emily; Minlikeeva, Albina N.; Zirpoli, Gary; Bandera, Elisa V.; Berchuck, Andrew; Cramer, Daniel; Doherty, Jennifer A.; Edwards, Robert P.; Fridley, Brooke L.; Goode, Ellen L.; Goodman, Marc T.; Hogdall, Estrid; Hosono, Satoyo; Jensen, Allan; Jordan, Susan; Kjaer, Susanne K.; Matsuo, Keitaro; Ness, Roberta B.; Olsen, Catherine M.; Olson, Sara H.; Pearce, Celeste Leigh; Pike, Malcolm C.; Rossing, Mary Anne; Szamreta, Elizabeth A.; Thompson, Pamela J.; Tseng, Chiu-Chen; Vierkant, Robert A.; Webb, Penelope M.; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Wicklund, Kristine G.; Winham, Stacey J.; Wu, Anna H.; Modugno, Francesmary; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Terry, Kathryn L.; Kelemen, Linda E.; Moysich, Kirsten B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite a large body of literature evaluating the association between recreational physical activity and epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) risk, the extant evidence is inconclusive and little is known about the independent association between recreational physical inactivity and EOC risk. We conducted a pooled analysis of nine studies from the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium (OCAC) to investigate the association between chronic recreational physical inactivity and EOC risk. Methods In accordance with the 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans, women reporting no regular, weekly recreational physical activity were classified as inactive. Multivariable logistic regression was utilized to estimate the odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the association between inactivity and EOC risk overall and by subgroups based upon histotype, menopausal status, race and body mass index (BMI). Results The current analysis included data from 8,309 EOC patients and 12,612 controls. We observed a significant positive association between inactivity and EOC risk (OR=1.34, 95% CI: 1.14-1.57) and similar associations were observed for each histotype. Conclusions In this large pooled analysis examining the association between recreational physical inactivity and EOC risk, we observed consistent evidence of an association between chronic inactivity and all EOC histotypes. Impact These data add to the growing body of evidence suggesting that inactivity is an independent risk factor for cancer. If the apparent association between inactivity and EOC risk is substantiated, additional work via targeted interventions should be pursued to characterize the dose of activity required to mitigate the risk of this highly fatal disease. PMID:27197285

  5. Swimming Pool Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Spread the Word Shop AAP Find a Pediatrician Safety & Prevention Immunizations All Around At Home At Play ... Español Text Size Email Print Share Swimming Pool Safety Page Content ​What is the best way to ...

  6. Vitamin D Pooling Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Vitamin D Pooling Project of Rarer Cancers brought together investigators from 10 cohorts to conduct a large prospective epidemiologic study of the association between vitamin D status and seven rarer cancers.

  7. Swimming pool special; Zwembadspecial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-05-15

    This issue includes a few articles and messages on the use of heat pump systems in swimming pools. [Dutch] Dit nummer bevat onder meer een paar artikelen over het gebruik van warmtepompsystemen in zwembaden.

  8. Consortium for military LCD display procurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echols, Gregg

    2002-08-01

    International Display Consortium (IDC) is the joining together of display companies to combined their buying power and obtained favorable terms with a major LCD manufacturer. Consolidating the buying power and grouping the demand enables the rugged display industry of avionics, ground vehicles, and ship based display manufacturers to have unencumbered access to high performance AMLCDs while greatly reducing risk and lowering cost. With an unrestricted supply of AMLCD displays, the consortium members have total control of their risk, cost, deliveries and added value partners. Every display manufacturer desires a very close relationship with a display vender. With IDC each consortium member achieves a close relationship. Consortium members enjoy cost effective access to high performance, industry standard sized LCD panels, and modified commercial displays with 100 degree C clearing points and portrait configurations. Consortium members also enjoy proposal support, technical support and long-term support.

  9. Promoting Academic Development: A History of the International Consortium for Educational Development (ICED)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason O'Connor, Kristine

    2016-01-01

    This essay traces the history of the International Consortium for Educational Development (ICED) through document analysis and email interviews with founding and prominent ICED members. It also provides a summary of the themes and locations of all the ICED conferences.

  10. Indacaterol/glycopyrronium in symptomatic patients with COPD (GOLD B and GOLD D versus salmeterol/fluticasone: ILLUMINATE/LANTERN pooled analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vogelmeier C

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Claus Vogelmeier,1 Nanshan Zhong,2 Michael J Humphries,3 Karen Mezzi,4 Robert Fogel,5 Giovanni Bader,4 Francesco Patalano,4 Donald Banerji5 1Department of Medicine, Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, University Medical Center Giessen and Marburg, Philipps-University Marburg, Member of the German Center for Lung Research (DZL, Marburg, Germany; 2State Key Laboratory, Guangzhou Institute of Respiratory Diseases, First Affiliated Hospital, Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou, 3Beijing Novartis Pharma Co. Ltd., Shanghai, People’s Republic of China; 4Novartis Pharma AG, Basel, Switzerland; 5Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation, East Hanover, NJ, USA Background: Indacaterol/glycopyrronium (IND/GLY is approved for maintenance treatment of adult patients with COPD. This post hoc analysis explored the efficacy and safety of IND/GLY versus salmeterol/fluticasone (SFC in symptomatic (Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease [GOLD] B and GOLD D patients with moderate-to-severe COPD.Patients and methods: Data from LANTERN and ILLUMINATE studies were pooled and analyzed. In both studies, symptomatic COPD patients were randomized to once-daily IND/GLY 110 µg/50 µg or twice-daily SFC 50 µg/500 µg. End points were pre-dose trough forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1, standardized area under the curve for FEV1 from 0 to 12 hours (FEV1 AUC0–12 hours, peak FEV1, peak forced vital capacity (FVC, pre-dose trough FVC, Transition Dyspnea Index (TDI total score, St George’s Respiratory Questionnaire total score, rescue medication use and safety.Results: A total of 1,263 patients were classified as either GOLD B (n=809 or GOLD D (n=454. At week 26, IND/GLY demonstrated statistically significant improvement in all lung function parameters versus SFC in patients in both the GOLD B and GOLD D subgroups. TDI total score and rescue medication use were significantly improved with IND/GLY versus SFC in the overall population and in the

  11. Correlations between FEV1 and patient-reported outcomes: A pooled analysis of 23 clinical trials in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donohue, James F; Jones, Paul W; Bartels, Christian; Marvel, Jessica; D'Andrea, Peter; Banerji, Donald; Morris, David G; Patalano, Francesco; Fogel, Robert

    2018-04-01

    In clinical trials of inhaled bronchodilators, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) guidelines recommend that patient-reported outcomes (PROs) are assessed alongside lung function. How these endpoints are related is unclear. Pooled longitudinal data from 23 randomised controlled COPD studies were analyzed (N = 23,213). Treatments included long-acting β 2 agonists, long-acting muscarinic antagonists (LABAs or LAMAs) and the LABA/LAMA combination QVA149. Outcome measures were Transition Dyspnoea Index (TDI) and St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ) scores, COPD exacerbation frequency and rescue medication use. Relationships between changes in trough forced expiratory volume in one second (ΔFEV 1 ) and outcomes following treatment were assessed using correlations of data summaries and model-based analysis: generalized linear mixed-effect regression modelling to determine if ΔFEV 1 could predict patient outcomes with different treatments. Mean age was 64 years, 73% were male, and most had moderate (45%) or severe (52%) disease. Statistically significant correlations were observed between ΔFEV 1 and each outcome measure (exacerbations Rs = 0.05; rescue medication, SGRQ, TDI, r = 0.11-0.16; all p < .001). Patients with greater improvements in trough FEV 1 had on average better SGRQ and TDI scores, fewer exacerbations, and used less rescue medication. For SGRQ and TDI scores, minimal clinically important differences were observed over the range of pooled ΔFEV 1 values. Model-based predictions confirmed the treatment effect was partly explained by changes in FEV 1 from baseline with improvements in PROs observed across all treatments when trough FEV 1 improved. Across all endpoints active treatments were better than placebo (p < .0001), and LABA/LAMA treatment resulted in numerically better treatment outcomes than either monocomponent. These data suggest that FEV 1 improvements post-bronchodilation correlate with PRO improvements

  12. Safety of the 2D/3D direct-acting antiviral regimen in HCV-induced Child-Pugh A cirrhosis - A pooled analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poordad, Fred; Nelson, David R; Feld, Jordan J; Fried, Michael W; Wedemeyer, Heiner; Larsen, Lois; Cohen, Daniel E; Cohen, Eric; Mobashery, Niloufar; Tatsch, Fernando; Foster, Graham R

    2017-10-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected patients with cirrhosis are a high-priority population for treatment. To help inform the benefit-risk profile of the all-oral direct-acting antiviral (DAA) combination regimen of ombitasvir, paritaprevir, and ritonavir, with or without dasabuvir (OBV/PTV/r±DSV) in patients with Child-Pugh A cirrhosis, we undertook a comprehensive review of AbbVie-sponsored clinical trials enrolling patients with Child-Pugh A cirrhosis. Twelve phase II or III clinical trials of the 2-DAA regimen of OBV/PTV/r±ribavirin (RBV) or the 3-DAA regimen of OBV/PTV/r+DSV±RBV that included patients with Child-Pugh A cirrhosis were reviewed; patients who completed treatment by November 16, 2015 were included in a pooled, post hoc safety assessment. The number and percentage of patients with treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs), serious TEAEs, and TEAEs consistent with hepatic decompensation were reported. In 1,066 patients with Child-Pugh A cirrhosis, rates of serious TEAEs and TEAEs leading to study drug discontinuation were 5.3% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 4.1-6.8) and 2.2% (95% CI: 1.4-3.2), respectively. Thirteen patients (1.2%; 95% CI: 0.7-2.1) had a TEAE that was consistent with hepatic decompensation. The most frequent TEAEs consistent with hepatic decompensation were ascites (n=8), esophageal variceal hemorrhage (n=4), and hepatic encephalopathy (n=2). This pooled analysis in 1,066 HCV-infected patients with Child-Pugh A cirrhosis confirms the safety of OBV/PTV/r±DSV±RBV in this population. These results support the use of OBV/PTV/r±DSV±RBV in this high-priority population. Lay summary: This pooled safety analysis in 1,066 HCV-infected patients with compensated cirrhosis, receiving treatment with ombitasvir, paritaprevir, and ritonavir with or without dasabuvir, with or without ribavirin, shows that the rate of hepatic decompensation events was similar to previously reported rates in untreated patients. Copyright © 2017 European

  13. Rapid Blood Pressure Lowering According to Recovery at Different Time Intervals after Acute Intracerebral Hemorrhage: Pooled Analysis of the INTERACT Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xia; Arima, Hisatomi; Al-Shahi Salman, Rustam; Woodward, Mark; Heeley, Emma; Stapf, Christian; Lavados, Pablo M; Robinson, Thompson; Huang, Yining; Wang, Jiguang; Delcourt, Candice; Anderson, Craig S

    2015-01-01

    Early intensive blood pressure (BP) lowering has been shown to improve functional outcome in acute intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), but the treatment effect is modest and without a clearly defined underlying explanatory mechanism. We aimed at more reliably quantifying the benefits of this treatment according to different time periods in the recovery of participants in the Intensive Blood Pressure Reduction in Acute Cerebral Hemorrhage Trial (INTERACT) studies. Pooled analysis of the pilot INTERACT1 (n = 404) and main INTERACT2 (n = 2,839) involving patients with spontaneous ICH (patient characteristic subgroups, with trends favoring those randomized early, and with higher SBP and milder neurological severity at baseline. Intensive BP lowering provides beneficial effects on physical functioning that manifests consistently through the early and later phases of recovery from ICH. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Comparison of the Effectiveness of Radiofrequency Ablation With Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Inoperable Stage I Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Systemic Review and Pooled Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bi, Nan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital and Institute, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Shedden, Kerby [Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Zheng, Xiangpeng [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Kong, Feng-Ming, E-mail: fskong@iupui.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University, Indianapolis (United States)

    2016-08-01

    Purpose: To performed a systematic review and pooled analysis to compare clinical outcomes of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and radiofrequency ablation (RFA) for the treatment of medically inoperable stage I non-small cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: A comprehensive literature search for published trials from 2001 to 2012 was undertaken. Pooled analyses were performed to obtain overall survival (OS) and local tumor control rates (LCRs) and adverse events. Regression analysis was conducted considering each study's proportions of stage IA and age. Results: Thirty-one studies on SBRT (2767 patients) and 13 studies on RFA (328 patients) were eligible. The LCR (95% confidence interval) at 1, 2, 3, and 5 years for RFA was 77% (70%-85%), 48% (37%-58%), 55% (47%-62%), and 42% (30%-54%) respectively, which was significantly lower than that for SBRT: 97% (96%-98%), 92% (91%-94%), 88% (86%-90%), and 86% (85%-88%) (P<.001). These differences remained significant after correcting for stage IA and age (P<.001 at 1 year, 2 years, and 3 years; P=.04 at 5 years). The effect of RFA was not different from that of SBRT on OS (P>.05). The most frequent complication of RFA was pneumothorax, occurring in 31% of patients, whereas that for SBRT (grade ≥3) was radiation pneumonitis, occurring in 2% of patients. Conclusions: Compared with RFA, SBRT seems to have a higher LCR but similar OS. More studies with larger sample sizes are warranted to validate such findings.

  15. Saturation of an intra-gene pool linkage map: towards a unified consensus linkage map for fine mapping and synteny analysis in common bean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeano, Carlos H; Fernandez, Andrea C; Franco-Herrera, Natalia; Cichy, Karen A; McClean, Phillip E; Vanderleyden, Jos; Blair, Matthew W

    2011-01-01

    Map-based cloning and fine mapping to find genes of interest and marker assisted selection (MAS) requires good genetic maps with reproducible markers. In this study, we saturated the linkage map of the intra-gene pool population of common bean DOR364 × BAT477 (DB) by evaluating 2,706 molecular markers including SSR, SNP, and gene-based markers. On average the polymorphism rate was 7.7% due to the narrow genetic base between the parents. The DB linkage map consisted of 291 markers with a total map length of 1,788 cM. A consensus map was built using the core mapping populations derived from inter-gene pool crosses: DOR364 × G19833 (DG) and BAT93 × JALO EEP558 (BJ). The consensus map consisted of a total of 1,010 markers mapped, with a total map length of 2,041 cM across 11 linkage groups. On average, each linkage group on the consensus map contained 91 markers of which 83% were single copy markers. Finally, a synteny analysis was carried out using our highly saturated consensus maps compared with the soybean pseudo-chromosome assembly. A total of 772 marker sequences were compared with the soybean genome. A total of 44 syntenic blocks were identified. The linkage group Pv6 presented the most diverse pattern of synteny with seven syntenic blocks, and Pv9 showed the most consistent relations with soybean with just two syntenic blocks. Additionally, a co-linear analysis using common bean transcript map information against soybean coding sequences (CDS) revealed the relationship with 787 soybean genes. The common bean consensus map has allowed us to map a larger number of markers, to obtain a more complete coverage of the common bean genome. Our results, combined with synteny relationships provide tools to increase marker density in selected genomic regions to identify closely linked polymorphic markers for indirect selection, fine mapping or for positional cloning.

  16. Trends in obesity and diabetes across Africa from 1980 to 2014: an analysis of pooled population-based studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    The 2016 Dar Es Salaam Call to Action on Diabetes and Other non-communicable diseases (NCDs) advocates national multi-sectoral NCD strategies and action plans based on available data and information from countries of sub-Saharan Africa and beyond. We estimated trends from 1980 to 2014 in age-standardized mean body mass index (BMI) and diabetes prevalence in these countries, in order to assess the co-progression and assist policy formulation. We pooled data from African and worldwide population-based studies which measured height, weight and biomarkers to assess diabetes status in adults aged ≥ 18 years. A Bayesian hierarchical model was used to estimate trends by sex for 200 countries and territories including 53 countries across five African regions (central, eastern, northern, southern and western), in mean BMI and diabetes prevalence (defined as either fasting plasma glucose of ≥ 7.0 mmol/l, history of diabetes diagnosis, or use of insulin or oral glucose control agents). African data came from 245 population-based surveys (1.2 million participants) for BMI and 76 surveys (182 000 participants) for diabetes prevalence estimates. Countries with the highest number of data sources for BMI were South Africa (n = 17), Nigeria (n = 15) and Egypt (n = 13); and for diabetes estimates, Tanzania (n = 8), Tunisia (n = 7), and Cameroon, Egypt and South Africa (all n = 6). The age-standardized mean BMI increased from 21.0 kg/m2 (95% credible interval: 20.3-21.7) to 23.0 kg/m2 (22.7-23.3) in men, and from 21.9 kg/m2 (21.3-22.5) to 24.9 kg/m2 (24.6-25.1) in women. The age-standardized prevalence of diabetes increased from 3.4% (1.5-6.3) to 8.5% (6.5-10.8) in men, and from 4.1% (2.0-7.5) to 8.9% (6.9-11.2) in women. Estimates in northern and southern regions were mostly higher than the global average; those in central, eastern and western regions were lower than global averages. A positive association (correlation coefficient ≃ 0

  17. Study of the clinical utility and potential problems of quantitative phase analysis using multiple gated cardiac blood pool image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabuchi, Hiromi

    1987-01-01

    The temporal Fourier fitting at the fundamental frequency (Fourier analysis) and the Chebyshev polynomials for order 9 (Chebyshev analysis) were performed in 24 patients with myocardial infarction (MI) and 10 normal subjects. Fourier analysis showed a significantly delayed regional phase values (RPV), only when corrected in R-R interval, in the MI group. In both Fourier and Chebyshev analyses, a significantly decreased regional ejection fraction was noted in the MI group. Regional ejection time calculated by Chebyshev analysis was significantly delayed as well in the MI group. Fourier and Chebyshev analyses were useful in early detecting and precisely analysing MI contraction abnormality, respectively, although the former method required the correction in R-R interval. The second series of Fourier analysis was made on 11 patients with right ventricular endocardial pacing (RVEP), 7 patients with left bundle branch block (LBBB), and 10 normal subjects. The LBBB group had markedly delayed RPV in the whole ventricular area. The RVEP group had initial contraction at the apex of right ventricle, with tendency for wave-like contraction spreading basal portions of both ventricles. Patients with type RS on QRS waves at pacing tended to have slight differences in RPV between the right and left ventricles. Fourier analysis was useful in evaluating ventricular contraction pattern in patients with miscellaneous cardiac diseases. (Namekawa, K.) 70 refs

  18. Pooled Analysis of Multiple Crossover Trials To Optimize Individual Therapy Response to Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone System Intervention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petrykiv, Sergei I; Laverman, Gozewijn Dirk; Persson, Frederik

    2017-01-01

    to angiotensin receptor blockers; n=5) or NSAIDs (n=1), changing from RAASi to NSAIDs (n=2), and changing from high to low sodium intake (n=5). A two-stage meta-analysis was conducted: Deming regression was conducted in each study to assess correlations in response, and individual study results were then meta...

  19. Flashing oscillation in pool water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takamasa, Tomoji; Kondo, Koichi; Hazuku, Tatsuya

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental study of high-pressure saturated water discharging into the pool water. The purpose of the experiment is to clarify the phenomena that occur in blow-down of high-pressure saturated water from the pressure vessel into the water-filled containment in the case of a wall-crack accident or a LOCA in an advanced reactor. The results revealed that a flashing oscillation (FO) occurs when high-pressure saturated water discharges into the pool water, under specified experimental settings. The range of the flashing oscillates between a point very close to and some distance from the vent hole. The pressures in the vent tube and pool water vary according to the flashing oscillation. The pressure oscillation and frequency of flashing position might be caused by the balancing action between the supply of saturated water, flashing at the control volume and its condensation on the steam-water interface. A linear analysis was conducted using a spherical flashing bubble model. The period of the flashing oscillation in the experiments can be explained by theoretical analysis

  20. US Food and Drug Administration Pooled Analysis to Assess the Impact of Bone-Only Metastatic Breast Cancer on Clinical Trial Outcomes and Radiographic Assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedam, Suparna B; Beaver, Julia A; Amiri-Kordestani, Laleh; Bloomquist, Erik; Tang, Shenghui; Goldberg, Kirsten B; Sridhara, Rajeshwari; Ibrahim, Amna; Kim, Geoffrey; Kluetz, Paul; McKee, Amy; Pazdur, Richard

    2018-04-20

    Purpose The outcome and proportion of patients with bone-only (BO) metastatic breast cancer (MBC) has not been well described. We sought to describe the differential outcomes of patients with BO MBC in clinical trials and explore whether there was a discrepancy in radiographic reads between investigator and blinded independent central review. Methods We pooled and analyzed data on 10,521 patients from 13 prospective trials submitted for MBC treatment in initial or supplemental New Drug or Biologics License Applications from 2005. Three subsets were evaluated: BO, bone with other metastases (BWO), and no bone metastases (NBM). Early discordance rate and late discordance rate were calculated from 3,733 and 2,813 patients subject to a blinded independent central review, respectively. Results Bone metastases were identified in 49% (range: 42% to 73%) of patients across trials. BO disease was present in 12.5% (range: 4% to 26%), dependent on subtype. Investigator-assessed progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) for the pooled trials demonstrated improved outcomes for the BO subgroup compared with other subgroups (BO v BWO PFS hazard ratio [HR], 0.64; 95% CI, 0.591 to 0.696; BO v NBM PFS HR, 0.70; 95% CI, 0.65 to 0.76; BO v BWO OS HR, 0.56; 95% CI, 0.50 to 0.61; BO v NBM OS HR, 0.68; 95% CI, 0.61 to 0.76). The BO subgroup has a higher early discordance rate and lower late discordance rate than the BWO and NBM subgroups. Conclusion To our knowledge, this review is the largest analysis to date of the BO subgroup of MBC and suggests this subgroup may have a distinct natural history. There also seems to be a difference in how the local investigators assessed progression events in the BO subgroup when compared with the other two groups.

  1. One- and two-stage surgical revision of peri-prosthetic joint infection of the hip: a pooled individual participant data analysis of 44 cohort studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunutsor, Setor K; Whitehouse, Michael R; Blom, Ashley W; Board, Tim; Kay, Peter; Wroblewski, B Mike; Zeller, Valérie; Chen, Szu-Yuan; Hsieh, Pang-Hsin; Masri, Bassam A; Herman, Amir; Jenny, Jean-Yves; Schwarzkopf, Ran; Whittaker, John-Paul; Burston, Ben; Huang, Ronald; Restrepo, Camilo; Parvizi, Javad; Rudelli, Sergio; Honda, Emerson; Uip, David E; Bori, Guillem; Muñoz-Mahamud, Ernesto; Darley, Elizabeth; Ribera, Alba; Cañas, Elena; Cabo, Javier; Cordero-Ampuero, José; Redó, Maria Luisa Sorlí; Strange, Simon; Lenguerrand, Erik; Gooberman-Hill, Rachael; Webb, Jason; MacGowan, Alasdair; Dieppe, Paul; Wilson, Matthew; Beswick, Andrew D

    2018-04-05

    One-stage and two-stage revision strategies are the two main options for treating established chronic peri-prosthetic joint infection (PJI) of the hip; however, there is uncertainty regarding which is the best treatment option. We aimed to compare the risk of re-infection between the two revision strategies using pooled individual participant data (IPD). Observational cohort studies with PJI of the hip treated exclusively by one- or two-stage revision and reporting re-infection outcomes were retrieved by searching MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science, The Cochrane Library, and the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform; as well as email contact with investigators. We analysed IPD of 1856 participants with PJI of the hip from 44 cohorts across four continents. The primary outcome was re-infection (recurrence of infection by the same organism(s) and/or re-infection with a new organism(s)). Hazard ratios (HRs) for re-infection were calculated using Cox proportional frailty hazards models. After a median follow-up of 3.7 years, 222 re-infections were recorded. Re-infection rates per 1000 person-years of follow-up were 16.8 (95% CI 13.6-20.7) and 32.3 (95% CI 27.3-38.3) for one-stage and two-stage strategies respectively. The age- and sex-adjusted HR of re-infection for two-stage revision was 1.70 (0.58-5.00) when compared with one-stage revision. The association remained consistently absent after further adjustment for potential confounders. The HRs did not vary importantly in clinically relevant subgroups. Analysis of pooled individual patient data suggest that a one-stage revision strategy may be as effective as a two-stage revision strategy in treating PJI of the hip.

  2. Risk of neuroblastoma, birth-related characteristics, congenital malformations and perinatal exposures: A pooled analysis of the ESCALE and ESTELLE French studies (SFCE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios, Paula; Bailey, Helen D; Orsi, Laurent; Lacour, Brigitte; Valteau-Couanet, Dominique; Levy, Dominique; Corradini, Nadège; Leverger, Guy; Defachelles, Anne-Sophie; Gambart, Marion; Sirvent, Nicolas; Thebaud, Estelle; Ducassou, Stéphane; Clavel, Jacqueline

    2016-11-01

    Neuroblastoma (NB), an embryonic tumour arising from neural crest cells, is the most common malignancy among infants. The aetiology of NB is largely unknown. We conducted a pooled analysis to explore whether there is an association between NB and preconception and perinatal factors using data from two French national population-based case-control studies. The mothers of 357 NB cases and 1783 controls younger than 6 years, frequency-matched by age and gender, responded to a telephone interview that focused on demographic, socioeconomic and perinatal characteristics, childhood environment, life-style and maternal reproductive history. Unconditional logistic regression was used to estimate pooled odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals. After controlling for matching variables, study of origin and potential confounders, being born either small (OR 1.4 95% CI 1.0-2.0) or large (OR 1.5 95% CI 1.1-2.2) for gestational age and, among children younger than 18 months, having congenital malformations (OR 3.6 95% CI 1.3-8.9), were significantly associated with NB. Inverse associations were observed with breastfeeding (OR 0.7 95% CI 0.5-1.0) and maternal use of any supplements containing folic acid, vitamins or minerals (OR 0.5 95% CI 0.3-0.9) during the preconception period. Our findings reinforce the hypothesis that fetal growth anomalies and congenital malformations may be associated with an increased risk of NB. Further investigations are needed in order to clarify the role of folic acid supplementation and breastfeeding, given their potential importance in NB prevention. © 2016 UICC.

  3. Pooled analysis of clinical trial data evaluating the safety and effectiveness of diclofenac epolamine topical patch 1.3% for the treatment of acute ankle sprain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lionberger DR

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available David R Lionberger1, Eric Joussellin2, Jillmarie Yanchick3, Merrell Magelli3,4, Arturo Lanzarotti51Southwest Orthopedic Group, LLP, Houston, TX, USA; 2Institut National du Sport, Paris, France; 3Formerly Alpharma Pharmaceuticals LLC, Piscataway, NJ, USA; 4GTx, Inc., Memphis, TN, USA; 5Institut Biochimique SA, SwitzerlandAbstract: This pooled analysis assessed the efficacy and safety of the diclofenac epolamine topical patch 1.3% (DETP for the treatment of acute mild-to-moderate ankle sprain. Data from 2 randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies enrolling 274 male and female patients aged 18 to 65 years with acute ankle sprain were pooled and evaluated. The primary end point was pain reduction on movement assessed using a 100 mm visual analog scale (VAS. Safety and tolerability were also assessed. Beginning approximately 3 hours after initial treatment, DETP-treated patients experienced statistically significant and sustained lower mean VAS scores in pain intensity on movement (mean ± SD, 54.1 ± 20.0 mm versus 60.3 ± 16.8 mm compared with placebo-treated patients, representing a 20% versus 13% reduction in VAS pain scores from baseline (P = 0.012. This statistically significant difference in mean VAS score was maintained through day 7 (9.4 ± 14.4 mm versus 18.4 ± 18.2 mm, P < 0.0001. The DETP and placebo patches were well tolerated. These results further confirm the efficacy and safety of DETP for the treatment of acute pain from ankle sprains.Keywords: soft tissue injury, acute pain, visual analog scale, clinical trial, double-blind, safety

  4. A model based on Rock-Eval thermal analysis to quantify the size of the centennially persistent organic carbon pool in temperate soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cécillon, Lauric; Baudin, François; Chenu, Claire; Houot, Sabine; Jolivet, Romain; Kätterer, Thomas; Lutfalla, Suzanne; Macdonald, Andy; van Oort, Folkert; Plante, Alain F.; Savignac, Florence; Soucémarianadin, Laure N.; Barré, Pierre

    2018-05-01

    Changes in global soil carbon stocks have considerable potential to influence the course of future climate change. However, a portion of soil organic carbon (SOC) has a very long residence time ( > 100 years) and may not contribute significantly to terrestrial greenhouse gas emissions during the next century. The size of this persistent SOC reservoir is presumed to be large. Consequently, it is a key parameter required for the initialization of SOC dynamics in ecosystem and Earth system models, but there is considerable uncertainty in the methods used to quantify it. Thermal analysis methods provide cost-effective information on SOC thermal stability that has been shown to be qualitatively related to SOC biogeochemical stability. The objective of this work was to build the first quantitative model of the size of the centennially persistent SOC pool based on thermal analysis. We used a unique set of 118 archived soil samples from four agronomic experiments in northwestern Europe with long-term bare fallow and non-bare fallow treatments (e.g., manure amendment, cropland and grassland) as a sample set for which estimating the size of the centennially persistent SOC pool is relatively straightforward. At each experimental site, we estimated the average concentration of centennially persistent SOC and its uncertainty by applying a Bayesian curve-fitting method to the observed declining SOC concentration over the duration of the long-term bare fallow treatment. Overall, the estimated concentrations of centennially persistent SOC ranged from 5 to 11 g C kg-1 of soil (lowest and highest boundaries of four 95 % confidence intervals). Then, by dividing the site-specific concentrations of persistent SOC by the total SOC concentration, we could estimate the proportion of centennially persistent SOC in the 118 archived soil samples and the associated uncertainty. The proportion of centennially persistent SOC ranged from 0.14 (standard deviation of 0.01) to 1 (standard deviation

  5. Pool water cleaning facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshikawa, Kazuhiro; Kinoshita, Shoichiro [Hitachi Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Asano, Takashi

    1998-05-29

    Only one system comprising a suppression poor water cleaning system (SPCU) and a filtration desalting tower (F/D) is connected for a plurality of nuclear power plants. Pipelines/valves for connecting the one system of the SPCU pump, the F/D and the plurality of nuclear power plants are disposed, and the system is used in common with the plurality of nuclear power plants. Pipelines/valves for connecting a pipeline for passing SP water to the commonly used SPCU pump and a skimmer surge tank are disposed, and fuel pool water is cooled and cleaned by the commonly used SPCU pump and the commonly used F/D. The number of SPCU pumps and the F/D facilities can be reduced, and a fuel pool water cooling operation mode and a fuel pool water cleaning operation mode which were conducted by an FPC pump so far are conducted by the SPCU pump. (N.H.)

  6. Pool size measurements facilitate the determination of fluxes at branching points in nonstationary metabolic flux analysis: The case of Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert eHeise

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Pool size measurements are important for the estimation of absolute intracellular fluxes in particular scenarios based on data from heavy carbon isotope experiments. Recently, steady-state fluxes estimates were obtained for central carbon metabolism in an intact illuminated rosette of Arabidopsis thaliana grown photoautotrophically (Szecowka et al., 2013; Heise et al., 2014. Fluxes were estimated therein by integrating mass-spectrometric data of the dynamics of the unlabeled metabolic fraction, data on metabolic pool sizes, partitioning of metabolic pools between cellular compartments and estimates of photosynthetically inactive pools, with a simplified model of plant central carbon metabolism. However, the fluxes were determined by treating the pool sizes as fixed parameters. Here we investigated whether and, if so, to what extent the treatment of pool sizes as parameters to be optimized in three scenarios may affect the flux estimates. The results are discussed in terms of benchmark values for canonical pathways and reactions, including starch and sucrose synthesis as well as the ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylation and oxygenation reactions. In addition, we discuss pathways emerging from a divergent branch point for which pool sizes are required for flux estimation, irrespective of the computational approach used for the simulation of the observable labelling pattern. Therefore, our findings indicate the necessity for development of techniques for accurate pool size measurements to improve the quality of flux estimates from nonstationary flux estimates in intact plant cells in the absence of alternative flux measurements.

  7. Effects of diabetes definition on global surveillance of diabetes prevalence and diagnosis: a pooled analysis of 96 population-based studies with 331,288 participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Diabetes has been defined on the basis of different biomarkers, including fasting plasma glucose (FPG), 2-h plasma glucose in an oral glucose tolerance test (2hOGTT), and HbA1c. We assessed the effect of different diagnostic definitions on both the population prevalence of diabetes and the classification of previously undiagnosed individuals as having diabetes versus not having diabetes in a pooled analysis of data from population-based health examination surveys in different regions. We used data from 96 population-based health examination surveys that had measured at least two of the biomarkers used for defining diabetes. Diabetes was defined using HbA1c (HbA1c ≥6·5% or history of diabetes diagnosis or using insulin or oral hypoglycaemic drugs) compared with either FPG only or FPG-or-2hOGTT definitions (FPG ≥7·0 mmol/L or 2hOGTT ≥11·1 mmol/L or history of diabetes or using insulin or oral hypoglycaemic drugs). We calculated diabetes prevalence, taking into account complex survey design and survey sample weights. We compared the prevalences of diabetes using different definitions graphically and by regression analyses. We calculated sensitivity and specificity of diabetes diagnosis based on HbA1c compared with diagnosis based on glucose among previously undiagnosed individuals (ie, excluding those with history of diabetes or using insulin or oral hypoglycaemic drugs). We calculated sensitivity and specificity in each survey, and then pooled results using a random-effects model. We assessed the sources of heterogeneity of sensitivity by meta-regressions for study characteristics selected a priori. Population prevalence of diabetes based on FPG-or-2hOGTT was correlated with prevalence based on FPG alone (r=0·98), but was higher by 2-6 percentage points at different prevalence levels. Prevalence based on HbA1c was lower than prevalence based on FPG in 42·8% of age-sex-survey groups and higher in another 41·6%; in the other 15·6%, the two definitions

  8. Predictive factors for the placebo effect in clinical trials for dry eye: a pooled analysis of three clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imanaka, Takahiro; Sato, Izumi; Tanaka, Shiro; Kawakami, Koji

    2017-11-01

    Placebo effect is one of the methodological difficulties in dry eye clinical trials. If we could elucidate the tendencies of the placebo response and find predictors, we could reduce the placebo response in clinical trials for dry eye. In this study, we investigated the predictive factors for the placebo effect in dry eye clinical trials. A total of 205 patients with dry eye assigned to the placebo arms of three placebo-controlled randomised clinical trials were analysed by simple and multivariable regression analysis. The corneal fluorescein (FL) staining score and dry eye symptoms were studied at week 4. The variables of interest included gender, age, complications of Sjögren's syndrome, Schirmer's test I value, tear break-up time and conjunctival hyperaemia score. We also conducted a stratified analysis according to the patients' age. Among all the studied endpoints, the baseline scores were significantly related to the corresponding placebo response. In addition, for the FL score and the dryness score, age was a significant predictor of the placebo response (p=0.04 and p<0.0001, respectively). Stratified analysis by age showed that patients more than 40 years of age are more likely to have a stronger placebo response in the FL and dryness scores. The baseline scores and age were predictive factors of the placebo response in frequently used endpoints, such as FL score or dryness symptoms. These patient characteristics can be controlled by study design, and our findings enable the design of more efficient placebo-controlled studies with good statistical power. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  9. FY 1998 report on the results of the development of the utilization technology of biological resources such as bioconsortia. Development of the consortium based analysis technology; 1998 nendo fukugo seibutsukei nado seibutsu shigen riyo gijutsu kaihatsu seika hokokusho. Fukugo seibutsukei kaiseki gijutsu no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    For the purpose of establishing the analysis technology and industrial utilization technology required for the establishment of the utilization technology of consortia's high functions which are already used in the fermentation technology field over the limit of the conventional bio-technology using functions of single biological species, study was made to look for the consortium based analysis technology by which the consortium base can be analyzed as it is using the molecular biological method. Studies were made in the following four fields: 1) new identification technology of eucaryote using II DNA topoisomerase genes (PCR amplification method of II DNA topoisomerase genes); 2) method to detect new recognition peptide activated microorganism (adjustment of cortical antigen); 3) technology to elucidate detection/response mechanism of the specific environment and adaptation/resistance mechanism of the specific environment; 4) incubation method inside 3D matrices. In 3), studies were made of the analysis of inhibition mechanism of korormicin and separation of solvent-resistant oil degradable bacteria. In 4), for the settlement and dynamic analysis of microorganism consortium by studying incubation conditions, conducted was the molecular system analysis of bacteria and eumycetes inhabiting in sponge. (NEDO)

  10. Reference Values and Age Differences in Body Composition of Community-Dwelling Older Japanese Men and Women: A Pooled Analysis of Four Cohort Studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Seino

    Full Text Available To determine age- and sex-specific body composition reference values and investigate age differences in these parameters for community-dwelling older Japanese men and women, using direct segmental multi-frequency bioelectrical impedance analysis.We conducted a pooled analysis of data collected in four cohort studies between 2008 and 2012: Kusatsu Longitudinal Study, Hatoyama Cohort Study, Itabashi Cohort Study, and Kashiwa Cohort Study. The pooled analysis included cross-sectional data from 4478 nondisabled, community-dwelling adults aged 65-94 years (2145 men, 2333 women; mean age: 72.9 years in men and 72.6 years in women. Body weight, fat mass (FM, percentage FM, fat-free mass (FFM, and appendicular lean soft tissue mass were measured using the InBody 720 and 430 (Biospace Co. Ltd, Seoul, Korea. The values were then normalized by height in meters squared to determine body mass index (BMI, FM index (FMI, FFM index (FFMI, and skeletal muscle mass index (SMI.