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Sample records for consolidex magnorth oakwood

  1. Cooperative Education: Entrepreneurial Development by Colleges and Universities. A Case Study of Oakwood College, Huntsville, Alabama.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Frank

    The entrepreneurial development and experiential education environments of Oakwood College, Huntsville, Alabama, are described. The college-owned industries of the dairy, farm, garment and linen service, bakery, food manufacturing, convenience store, and snack bar are discussed in terms of markets and marketing, permissions and protections,…

  2. Continuity and change in the vegetation of a Central European oakwood

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jamrichová, Eva; Szabó, Péter; Hédl, Radim; Kuneš, P.; Bobek, P.; Pelánková, Barbora

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 1 (2013), s. 46-56 ISSN 0959-6836 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA600050812 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : temperate oakwoods * palaeoecology * written sources Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 3.794, year: 2013

  3. Open oakwoods facing modern threats: Will they survive the next fifty years?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chudomelová, Markéta; Hédl, Radim; Zouhar, V.; Szabó, Péter

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 210, Part A (2017), s. 163-173 ISSN 0006-3207 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA17-09283S EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 278065 - LONGWOOD Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : community change * open oakwoods * canopy closure Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour OBOR OECD: Ecology Impact factor: 4.022, year: 2016

  4. Geohydrology of the Keechi, Mount Sylvan, Oakwood, and Palestine salt domes in the northeast Texas salt-dome basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carr, J.E.; Halasz, S.J.; Peters, H.B.

    1980-01-01

    The salt within these domes has penetrated as much as 20,000 feet of Mesozoic and Cenozoic strata, and presently extends to within 120 to 800 feet of the land surface. The salt penetrates or closely underlies major freshwater and salinewater aquifers within the basin. To provide a safe repository for radioactive wastes within one or more of these domes, a thorough understanding of the geohydrology needs to be obtained, and the hydrologic stability of the domes needs to be established for the expected life of the storage facility. Dissolution may exist at all four candidate salt domes, possibly through contact with Cretaceous or Tertiary aquifers, or through fault systems in the vicinity of the domes. Strata overlying and surrounding Palestine and Keechi Salt Domes have been arched into steeply-dipping folds that are complexly faulted. Similar conditions exist at Oakwood and Mount Sylvan Domes, except that the Tertiary strata have been only moderately disturbed. Additional problems concerning the hydrologic stability of Oakwood and Palestine Salt Domes have resulted from the disposal of oil-field salinewater in the cap rock at the Oakwood Dome and previous solution mining of salt at the Palestine Dome

  5. "Managed Retreat" in Response to Superstorm Sandy: The Oakwood Beach Story

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirone, J.

    2017-12-01

    This presentation shares lessons learned from firsthand experience of the home buyout process in New York City after Superstorm Sandy. Many have described Sandy as "the perfect storm" from a meteorological perspective, but it was also the perfect storm from a government-buyout perspective. For a buyout to work in New York City, with its high property values and dense housing and population, many conditions had to be in place before the storm. Before Sandy hit, Oakwood Beach on Staten Island had already had enough. Hurricane Isaac flooded streets and basements in 2010, followed by Hurricane Irene in 2011. Many residents of this multi-generational neighborhood had just finished fixing their homes. A few years before, a brush fire spread through the invasive and highly flammable Phragmites reeds, destroying a protective berm installed by the Army Corps of Engineers in 2000 and threatening to damage many homes. An aerial view would show how these homes incredulously sat in the middle of a marsh, a marsh designated as part of the Bluebelt wetlands storm water management system by New York City's Department of Environmental Protection. Even more incredulously, while New York City was buying up unimproved lots to expand the Bluebelt to improve drainage for inland homes, the City was also issuing building permits to developers - sometimes for lots directly in the Bluebelt's path. Welcome to Staten Island, where the political influence of developers made any effort to retreat from the waterfront especially difficult and contentious. Before the storm, no one knew what a buyout was, never mind how to go about seeking one. For the most part, this included local officials. Managed retreat is typically understood as a top-down directive, but in this case the buyout plan was initiated from the bottom up by eight ordinary citizens who used research, trust, and networking to get their voices heard and, against all odds, to drive a highly successful State-supported buyout program.

  6. Water-quality data for aquifers, streams, and lakes in the vicinity of Keechi, Mount Sylvan, Oakwood, and Palestine salt domes, northeast Texas salt-dome basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carr, J.E.; Halasz, S.J.; Liscum, F.

    1980-11-01

    This report contains water-quality data for aquifers, streams, and lakes in the vicinity of Keechi, Mount Sylvan, Oakwood, and Palestine Salt Domes in the northeast Texas salt-dome basin. Water-quality data were compiled for aquifers in the Wilcox Group, the Carrizo Sand, and the Queen City Sand. The data include analyses for dissolved solids, pH, temperature, hardness, calcium, magnesium, sodium, bicarbonate, chloride, and sulfate. Water-quality and streamflow data were obtained from 63 surface-water sites in the vicinity of the domes. These data include water discharge, specific conductance, pH, water temperature, and dissolved oxygen. Samples were collected at selected sites for analysis of principal and selected minor dissolved constituents

  7. Grid-trapping of the wood mouse (Apodemus sylvaticus in a mediterranean oak-wood (Sicily / Analisi del popolamento di topo selvatico (Apodemus sylvaticus in un querceto mediterraneo (Sicilia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio Sarà

    1993-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A grid-trapping (CMR Method of the Wood Mouse (A. sylvaticus resident population was carried on three sample areas in a Mediterranean Oak-wood (Bosco della Ficuzza, Palermo. Fifty live traps were settled on a 0.5 ha grid at each sample area and permitted to calculate the Petersen-Lincoln Index (modified by Chapman. The relative density in the typical oak-wooded area (20.4/ha is highest than in the ecotonal and gazed sample area (12.6/ha. Analysis of ground permanence shows that the population in the wooded area is more dinamic than in the other area; in the former area a large number of new captures occurs, in fact, each month and the monthly variation of the relative density has a different trend. These results would confirm the indirect data coming from pellets analysis showing how in Sicily the highest densities occur in woodlands (oak-woods, as well as beech forests. The ecological niche of the Wood Mouse, due also to the apparent lack of A. flavicollis, is thus larger than in peninsular Italy and continental Europe. The reproductive season lasts over the whole year but the birth peaks occurred in summer (1988 and late fall (1989. Population each year stabilizes for overwintering and later (Jun-Nov is almost completely renowed. Moreover, differences in sex and age trappability in relation to the two mode1 of traps utilized and a low mortality due to the cautions in handling the trapped mice, were recorded. Riassunto Allo scopo di evidenziare le differenze tra i popolamenti di Apodemus sylvaticus (Linnaeus, 1758 in relazione all'habitat, sono state effettuate in una tipica querceta mediterranea (Bosco della Ficuzza, PA griglie di trappolamento in tre aree campione, ciascuna con differenti caratteristiche ambientali e morfologiche. Il campionamento, che si è protratto per circa due anni, è stato condotto con il metodo CMR (cattura-marcaggio-ricattura. I risultati ottenuti

  8. Lithology, microstructures, fluid inclusions, and geochemistry of rock salt and of the cap-rock contact in Oakwood Dome, East Texas: significance for nuclear waste storage. Report of investigations No. 120

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dix, O.R.; Jackson, M.P.A.

    1982-01-01

    Oakwood salt dome in Leon and Freestone Counties, Texas, has a core composed of a diapiric salt stock at a depth of 355 m. A vertical borehole in the center of the salt stock yielded 57.3 m of continuous rock-salt core overlain by 137 m of anhydrite-calcite cap rock. The lower 55.3 m of rock salt exhibits a strong, penetrative schistosity and parallel cleavage dipping at 30 to 40 0 and more than 60 variably dipping layers of disseminated anhydrite. Anhydrite constitutes 1.3 +- 0.7 percent of the rock-salt core. The upper 2 m of rock salt is unfoliated, comprising a lower 1.4-m interval of medium-grained granoblastic rock salt and an upper 0.6-m interval of coarse-grained granoblastic rock salt. An abrupt, cavity-free contact separates rock salt from laminated cap rock consisting of granoblastic-polygonal anhydrite virtually devoid of halite or pore space. Microstructures and concentration gradients of fluid inclusions suggest that the unfoliated rock salt at the crest of the salt stock was once strongly foliated, but that this fabric was destroyed by solid-state recrystallization. Downward movement of brine from the rock-salt - cap-rock contact was apparently accompanied by two recrystallization fronts. Dissolution of halite at the contact released disseminated anhydrite that presumably accumulated as sand on the floor of the dissolution cavity. Renewed rise of the salt stock closed the cavity, and the anhydrite sand was accreted against the base of the cap rock. Much, if not all, of the lamination in the 80 m of anhydrite cap rock may result from cycles of dissolution, recrystallization, and upward movement in the salt stock, followed by accretion of anhydrite residuum as laminae against the base of the cap rock. These processes, which are strongly influenced by fluids, act both to breach waste repositories and to geologically isolate them

  9. Half a century of succession in a temperate oakwood: from species-rich community to mesic forest

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hédl, Radim; Kopecký, M.; Komárek, J.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 16, č. 2 (2010), s. 267-276 ISSN 1366-9516 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA600050812; GA ČR GD206/08/H049 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : homogenization * long-term change * biodiversity loss Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 4.248, year: 2010

  10. 77 FR 3280 - National Register of Historic Places; Notification of Pending Nominations and Related Actions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-23

    ... review, we cannot guarantee that we will be able to do so. J. Paul Loether, Chief, National Register of... Goodhue County Oakwood Cemetery, 1258 Cherry St., Red Wing, 12000005 Kandiyohi County Lakeland Hotel, 407...

  11. Identification of Viruses Present in Tissues Collected from Chickens with Hypoglycemia-Spiking Mortality Syndrome (H-SMS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tissues were collected, over a 10-year period, from broiler chickens diagnosed with severe H-SMS at the Georgia Poultry Lab, in Oakwood, GA. All samples were stored in tissue culture media, with antibiotics and 15% fetal bovine serum, in an ultra-cold freezer @ -80F. Specimens were homogenized,...

  12. Geology and geohydrology of the East Texas Basin. A report on the progress of nuclear waste isolation feasibility studies (1980)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreitler, C.W.; Collins, E.W.; Davidson, E.D. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The third year of research was highlighted by the integration of regional basinal studies with growth histories for specific domes, studies of cap-rock diagenesis and salt deformation, preliminary studies of ground-water flow and geochemistry around Oakwood Dome, and preliminary studies of microseismicity in the Mount Enterprise fault zone. 119 figures, 15 tables

  13. Human impact on open temperate woodlands during the middle Holocene in Central Europe

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jamrichová, Eva; Hédl, Radim; Kolář, Jan; Tóth, P.; Bobek, Přemysl; Hajnalová, M.; Procházka, J.; Kadlec, Jaroslav; Szabó, Péter

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 245, OCT 2017 (2017), s. 55-68 ISSN 0034-6667 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 278065 - LONGWOOD Institutional support: RVO:67985939 ; RVO:67985530 Keywords : temperate oakwoods * Quercus * human impact Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour; DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography (GFU-E) OBOR OECD: Ecology; Physical geography (GFU-E) Impact factor: 1.817, year: 2016

  14. NREL: News - Students Recognized for Creativity during Energy Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Event Recognized for Creativity during Energy Education Event Golden, Colo., May 13, 2002 Tapping the power of the sun was the theme of the May 11 Solarbrate Education event at the U.S. Department Assistance Foundation, Oakwood Homes, Home Depot, E-Star Colorado, Governor's Office of Energy Management

  15. Quality of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Treatment Plans Using a (60)Co Magnetic Resonance Image Guidance Radiation Therapy System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wooten, H Omar; Green, Olga; Yang, Min

    2015-01-01

    : The ViewRay treatment planning system (Oakwood Village, OH) was used to create (60)Co IMRT treatment plans for 33 cancer patients with disease in the abdominal, pelvic, thorax, and head and neck regions using physician-specified patient-specific target coverage and organ at risk (OAR) objectives. Backup...

  16. Comparing Differences in Math Achievement and Attitudes toward Math in a Sixth Grade Mathematics Enrichment Pilot Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tow, Tamara

    2011-01-01

    High-stakes assessments have encouraged educators to ignore the needs of the top performers. Therefore, the Oakwood School District decided to implement a mathematics pilot enrichment program in order to meet the needs of the advanced mathematics students. As a result, this study used quantitative data to determine if there was a significant…

  17. El Impacto de Textos en Contextos Familiares en Comunidades de Practica para la Adquisicion de Vocabulario y Estructuras Gramaticales de Español Inicial Acelerado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgos, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    This study, which involved classroom-based experimental research conducted during the Fall semester of 2013 in a Spanish class at Oakwood University, aimed at extending the findings of previous studies on the use of familiar texts in reading and writing (Brown 2007, Vygotsky 1978, Kern 2000, Rollins & Villamil 2001, McCourt 2006, Morris, Beck…

  18. Teaching wound care to family medicine residents on a wound care service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Little SH

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Sahoko H Little,1,2 Sunil S Menawat,1,3 Michael Worzniak,1 Michael D Fetters2 1Oakwood Annapolis Family Medicine Residency, Wayne, Michigan, USA; 2University of Michigan, Department of Family Medicine, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA; 3Ghent Family Medicine Residency, Eastern Virginia Medical School, Norfolk, Virginia, USA Abstract: Primary care physicians often care for patients with chronic wounds, and they can best serve patients if they have knowledge and proficient skills in chronic wound care, including sharp debridement. The Oakwood Annapolis Family Medicine Residency in Michigan, USA developed a Wound Care Service, incorporating wound care training during the surgical rotation. Effectiveness of the wound care training was evaluated through pre- and posttesting of residents, to assess changes in knowledge and comfort in treating chronic wounds. The results demonstrate significant improvement in residents’ knowledge and comfort in wound care. This innovation demonstrates the feasibility of educating residents in chronic wound care through hands-on experience. Keywords: wound care education, primary care, residency education, surgery rotation, curriculum development

  19. HYGROTOPE AND TROPHOTOPE OF THE STEPPE PRIDNIPROVIE BIOGEOCEONOSIS AS DETERMINANTS OF THE EARTHWORMS (LUMBRICIDAE COMMUNITIES β-DIVERSITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Zhukov

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The role of the hygrotope and trophotope of the steppe Pridniprovie biogeoceonosis has been discussed in present article as being determinants of the β-diversity of earthworms (Lumbricidae communities. Material has been colected to the period 1997-2015. 180 sample polygons have been studied which located in various types of biogeoceonosis. Biogeoceonotic characteristic of the sample polygons have been made on the basis of professor A.L. Belgard forest typology of a steppe zone of Ukraine. Earthworm communities of the steppe Pridniprovie have been established to be presented by 16 species. Hygrotopes, trophotopes and bitope ceonosis features have been shown to be able to explain 72.4 % of a communities’ abundance variation and 73.7 of their % α-diversity by means of second order model. Earthworm communities’ abundance reache their maximum values at a combination of conditions of humidity from hygromesophilous to hygrophilous and conditions of edaphotope trophicity from Dc (linden oakwood to Dn (elm-ashen oakwood and alder forests. The maximum diversity of earthworm communities has been stated to be characteristic for a combination of mesohygrophilous conditions and a trophicity mode Dc, that there corresponds to forest type a linden oakwood with aegopodium. The coenomorphic structure of the biogeocoenosis is statistically significant predictors of both abundance and α-diversity of earthworm communities. Earthworm communities of marsh monocoenosis, meadow-steppe amphicoenosis and steppe monocoenosis have been found as being characterised by minimum abundance and diversity. Moderate level abundance and diversity are characteristic for meadow-forest amphicoenosis, forest pseudomonocoenosis with elements of transformation to steppe and forest-steppe amphicoenosis. High levels of these indexes are typical for forest monocoenosis. Given other conditions of humidity and edaphotope trophicity being equal in forest monocoenosis abundance and

  20. Geological evaluation of Gulf Coast salt domes: overall assessment of the Gulf Interior Region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-10-01

    The three major phases in site characterization and selection are regional studies, area studies, and location studies. This report characterizes regional geologic aspects of the Gulf Coast salt dome basins. It includes general information from published sources on the regional geology; the tectonic, domal, and hydrologic stability; and a brief description the salt domes to be investigated. After a screening exercise, eight domes were chosen for further characterization: Keechi, Oakwood, and Palestine Domes in Texas; Vacherie and Rayburn's domes in North Louisiana; and Cypress Creek and Richton domes in Mississippi. A general description of each, maps of the location, property ownership, and surface geology, and a geologic cross section were presented for each dome

  1. Evaluation of Crawlspace Retrofits in Multifamily Buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudd, Armin [Building Science Corporation, Somerville, MA (United States)

    2014-09-01

    In 2011 and early 2012, Building Science Corporation (BSC) collaborated with Innova Services Corporation on a multifamily community unvented crawlspace retrofit project at Oakwood Gardens in Lansdale, Pennsylvania. BSC provided design consulting services and pre- and post-retrofit evaluation, testing, and data monitoring. The existing condition was a vented crawlspace with an uninsulated floor between the crawlspace and the dwelling units above. The crawlspace was therefore a critically weak link in the building enclosure and was ripe for improvement. Saving energy was the primary interest and goal, but the greatest challenge in this unvented crawlspace retrofit project was working through a crawlspace bulk water intrusion problem caused by inadequate site drainage, window well drainage, foundation wall drainage, and a rising water table during rainy periods.

  2. Geological evaluation of Gulf Coast salt domes: overall assessment of the Gulf Interior Region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1981-10-01

    The three major phases in site characterization and selection are regional studies, area studies, and location studies. This report characterizes regional geologic aspects of the Gulf Coast salt dome basins. It includes general information from published sources on the regional geology; the tectonic, domal, and hydrologic stability; and a brief description the salt domes to be investigated. After a screening exercise, eight domes were chosen for further characterization: Keechi, Oakwood, and Palestine Domes in Texas; Vacherie and Rayburn's domes in North Louisiana; and Cypress Creek and Richton domes in Mississippi. A general description of each, maps of the location, property ownership, and surface geology, and a geologic cross section were presented for each dome.

  3. Studies of the suitability of salt domes in east Texas basin for geologic isolation of nuclear wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreitler, C.W.

    1979-01-01

    The suitability of salt domes in the east Texas basin (Tyler basin), Texas, for long-term isolation of nulear wastes is being evaluated. The major issues concern hydrogeologic and tectonic stability of the domes and potential natural resources in the basin. These issues are being approached by integration of dome-specific and regional hydrogeolgic, geologic, geomorphic, and remote-sensing investigations. Hydrogeologic studies are evaluating basinal hydrogeology and ground-water flow around the domes in order to determine the degree to which salt domes may be dissolving, their rates of solution, and the orientation of saline plumes in the fresh-water aquifers. Subsurface geologic studies are being conducted: (1) to determine the size and shape of specific salt domes, the geology of the strata immediately surrounding the domes, and the regional geology of the east Texas basin; (2) to understand the geologic history of dome growth and basin infilling; and (3) to evaluate potential natural resources. Geomorphic and surficial geology studies are determining whether there has been any dome growth or tectonic movement in the basin during the Quaternary. Remote-sensing studies are being conducted to determine: (1) if dome uplift has altered regional lineation patterns in Quaternary sediments; and (2) whether drainage density indicates Quaternary structural movement. On the basis of the screening criteria of Brunton et al (1978), Oakwood and Keechi domes have been chosen as possible candidate domes. Twenty-three domes have been eliminated because of insufficient size, too great a depth to salt, major hydrocarbon production, or previous use (such as liquid propane storage or salt mining or brining). Detailed geologic, hydrogeologic, and geomorphic investigations are now being conducted around Oakwood and Keechi salt domes

  4. Wastewater centrate ammonia removal by chemisorption processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbachem, M.J.

    2002-01-01

    'Full text:' This presentation will describe the nature, scope, and findings of a third-party evaluation of a patent-protected wastewater treatment technology identified as the ThermoEnergy Ammonia Recovery Process TM (ARP). The ARP is a reversible chemisorption process using a zinc-impregnated ion exchange resin, and it is unique in that it removes/reduces the ammonia-nitrogen load in the solids processing liquor of municipal sewage treatment plants and recycles the recovered product into a pelletized ammonium salt that can be used as an agricultural fertilizer. The primary objective of the ARP evaluation was to perform well-defined field and laboratory tests to provide data on process performance. The evaluation process was overseen and coordinated by the Environmental Technology Evaluation Center (EvTEC), a program of the Civil Engineering Research Foundation (CERF), the research and technology transfer arm of the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE). EvTEC is a pilot program evaluating innovative environmental technologies under the US Environmental Protection Agency's (USEPA) Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) Program. A pilot scale ARP treatment facility was constructed and tested at the Oakwood Beach Water Pollution Control Plant (WPCP) in Staten Island, New York, from September through December of 1998. While operating during the 3 month period using the anaerobically digested centrate normally produced at the WPCP, the pilot study demonstrated that the ARP process was capable of removing/recovering ammonia with efficiencies ranging from 75-99+ % at influent concentrations exceeding 400 mg/L. During the pilot plant operations, forty-eight (48) complete validated runs of centrate processing were performed. The plant processed the centrate under normal day-to-day conditions at the WPCP, and no special operational considerations were given to the centrifuge operation to accommodate the ARP pilot plant. The Oakwood WPCP operated exactly the way

  5. ThermoEnergy Ammonia Recovery Process for Municipal and Agricultural Wastes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex G. Fassbender

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The Ammonia Recovery Process (ARP is an award-winning, low-cost, environmentally responsible method of recovering nitrogen, in the form of ammonia, from various dilute waste streams and converting it into concentrated ammonium sulfate. The ThermoEnergy Biogas System utilizes the new chemisorption-based ARP to recover ammonia from anaerobically digested wastes. The process provides for optimal biogas production and significantly reduced nitrogen levels in the treated water discharge. Process flows for the ammonia recovery and ThermoEnergy biogas processes are presented and discussed. A comparison with other techniques such as biological nitrogen removal is made. The ARP technology uses reversible chemisorption and double salt crystal precipitation to recover and concentrate the ammonia. The ARP technology was successfully proven in a recent large-scale field demonstration at New York City’s Oakwood Beach Wastewater Treatment Plant, located on Staten Island. This project was a joint effort with Foster Wheeler Environmental Corporation, the Civil Engineering Research Foundation, and New York City Department of Environmental Protection. Independent validated plant data show that ARP consistently recovers up to 99.9% of the ammonia from the city’s centrate waste stream (derived from dewatering of sewage sludge, as ammonium sulfate. ARP technology can reduce the nitrogen (ammonia discharged daily into local bodies of water by municipalities, concentrated animal farming operations, and industry. Recent advances to ARP enhance its performance and economic competitiveness in comparison to stripping or ammonia destruction technologies.

  6. Borehole locations on seven interior salt domes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simcox, A.C.; Wampler, S.L.

    1982-08-01

    This report is designed as an inventory of all wells known to have been drilled within a five-mile radius of each of seven salt domes within the Interior Salt Basin in east Texas, northern Louisiana and Mississippi. There are 72 boreholes that entered salt above an elevation of -3000 feet mean sea level. For these, details of location, drilling dates, depth of casing and cement, elevation of top of caprock and salt, etc., are given on tables in the appendix. Of the seven domes, Oakwood has the largest number of boreholes, thirty-eight (including two sidetracked wells) that enter the salt stock above -3000 feet mean sea level; another dome in northeast Texas, Keechi, has eight; in northern Louisiana, Rayburn's has four and Vacherie has five; in southern Mississippi, Cypress Creek has seven, Lampton has one, and Richton has nine. In addition, all wells known outside the supra-domal area, but within a five-mile radius of the center of the 7 domes are separately catalogued

  7. Site characterization plan: Gulf Coast salt domes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-12-01

    The National Waste Terminal Storage (NWTS) program of the US Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for developing technology and providing facilities for safe, environmentally acceptable, permanent disposal of high-level nuclear waste. The Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation has been intensively investigating Gulf Coast Salt Dome Basin salt domes and bedded salt in Texas and Utah since 1978. In the Gulf Coast, the application of screening criteria in the region phase led to selection of eight domes for further study in the location phase. Further screening in the area phase identified four domes for more intensive study in the location phase: Oakwood Dome, Texas; Vacherie Dome, Louisiana; and Richton Dome and Cypress Creek Dome, Mississippi. For each dome, this Site Characterization Plan identifies specific hydrologic, geologic, tectonic, geochemical, and environmental key issues that are related to the DOE/NWTS screening criteria or affect the feasibility of constructing an exploratory shaft. The Site Characterization Plan outlines studies need to: (1) resolve issues sufficiently to allow one or more salt domes to be selected and compared to bedded salt sites in order to determine a prime salt site for an exploratory shaft; (2) conduct issue-related studies to provide a higher level of confidence that the preferred salt dome site is viable for construction of an exploratory shaft; and (3) provide a vehicle for state input to issues. Extensive references, 7 figures, 20 tables

  8. Gulf Coast Salt Domes geologic Area Characterization Report, East Texas Study Area. Volume II. Technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-07-01

    The East Texas Area Characterization Report (ACR) is a compilation of data gathered during the Area Characterization phase of the Department of Energy's National Waste Terminal Storage program in salt. The characterization of Gulf Coast Salt Domes as a potential site for storage of nuclear waste is an ongoing process. This report summarizes investigations covering an area of approximately 2590 km 2 (1000 mi 2 ). Data on Oakwood, Keechi, and Palestine Domes are given. Subsequent phases of the program will focus on smaller land areas and fewer specific salt domes, with progressively more detailed investigations, possibly culminating with a license application to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The data in this report are a result of drilling and sampling, geophysical and geologic field work, and intensive literature review. The ACR contains text discussing data usage, interpretations, results and conclusions based on available geologic and hydrologic data, and figures including diagrams showing data point locations, geologic and hydrologic maps, geologic cross sections, and other geologic and hydrologic information. An appendix contains raw data gathered during this phase of the project and used in the preparation of these reports

  9. Quality of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Treatment Plans Using a ⁶⁰Co Magnetic Resonance Image Guidance Radiation Therapy System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooten, H Omar; Green, Olga; Yang, Min; DeWees, Todd; Kashani, Rojano; Olsen, Jeff; Michalski, Jeff; Yang, Deshan; Tanderup, Kari; Hu, Yanle; Li, H Harold; Mutic, Sasa

    2015-07-15

    This work describes a commercial treatment planning system, its technical features, and its capabilities for creating (60)Co intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment plans for a magnetic resonance image guidance radiation therapy (MR-IGRT) system. The ViewRay treatment planning system (Oakwood Village, OH) was used to create (60)Co IMRT treatment plans for 33 cancer patients with disease in the abdominal, pelvic, thorax, and head and neck regions using physician-specified patient-specific target coverage and organ at risk (OAR) objectives. Backup plans using a third-party linear accelerator (linac)-based planning system were also created. Plans were evaluated by attending physicians and approved for treatment. The (60)Co and linac plans were compared by evaluating conformity numbers (CN) with 100% and 95% of prescription reference doses and heterogeneity indices (HI) for planning target volumes (PTVs) and maximum, mean, and dose-volume histogram (DVH) values for OARs. All (60)Co IMRT plans achieved PTV coverage and OAR sparing that were similar to linac plans. PTV conformity for (60)Co was within 20 Gy. The mean doses for all (60)Co plan OARs were within clinical tolerances. A commercial (60)Co MR-IGRT device can produce highly conformal IMRT treatment plans similar in quality to linac IMRT for a variety of disease sites. Additional work is in progress to evaluate the clinical benefit of other novel features of this MR-IGRT system. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Evaluation of Crawlspace Retrofits in Multifamily Buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudd, A.

    2014-09-01

    In 2011 and early 2012, Building Science Corporation (BSC) collaborated with Innova Services Corporation on a multifamily community unvented crawlspace retrofit project at Oakwood Gardens in Lansdale, Pennsylvania. BSC provided design consulting services and pre- and post-retrofit evaluation, testing, and data monitoring. The existing condition was a vented crawlspace with an uninsulated floor between the crawlspace and the dwelling units above. The crawlspace was therefore a critically weak link in the building enclosure and was ripe for improvement. Saving energy was the primary interest and goal, but the greatest challenge in this unvented crawlspace retrofit project was working through a crawlspace bulk water intrusion problem caused by inadequate site drainage, window well drainage, foundation wall drainage, and a rising water table during rainy periods. While the unvented crawlspace retrofit was effective in reducing heat loss, and the majority of the bulk water drainage problems had been resolved, the important finding was that some of the wood joists embedded in masonry pockets behind the brick veneer were showing signs of moisture damage.

  11. The Devil Is in the Details: Linking Home Buyout Policy, Practice, and Experience After Hurricane Sandy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherri Brokopp Binder

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Federal housing recovery policy bounds many of the decisions made by households after a disaster. Within this policy domain, home buyout programs are increasingly used to encourage residents to permanently relocate out of areas considered at risk for future hazards. While buyouts offer homeowners and governments potential benefits, research exploring the impacts of these policies is limited. In this paper, we present an in-depth examination of the community experience of buyouts, a perspective that is noticeably lacking in the literature. Using data from two mixed-method empirical studies, we explored the implications of buyout program design and implementation for Oakwood Beach, New York, a community offered a buyout after Hurricane Sandy. We found that  design decisions made at program conception significantly impacted participants’ experience of the buyout, including their understanding of program goals and their progression through the buyout and relocation process. We conclude with recommendations for future buyouts, including increased inclusion of affected communities in the process of and pre-event planning for recovery, along with recommendations for future research.

  12. Extracellular Enzymes Produced by the Cultivated Mushroom Lentinus edodes during Degradation of a Lignocellulosic Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leatham, Gary F.

    1985-01-01

    Although the commercially important mushroom Lentinus (= Lentinula) edodes (Berk.) Sing. can be rapidly cultivated on supplemented wood particles, fruiting is not reliable. This study addressed the problem by developing more information about growth and development on a practical oakwood-oatmeal medium. The study determined (i) the components degraded during a 150-day incubation at 22°C, (ii) the apparent vegetative growth pattern, (iii) the likely growth-limiting nutrient, and (iv) assays that can be used to study key extracellular enzymes. All major components of the medium were degraded, lignin selectively so. The vegetative growth rate was most rapid during the initial 90 days, during which weight loss correlated with glucosamine accumulation (assayed after acid hydrolysis). The rate then slowed; in apparent preparation for fruiting, the cultures rapidly accumulated glucosamine (or its oligomer or polymer). Nitrogen was growth limiting. Certain enzyme activities were associated with the pattern of medium degradation, with growth, or with development. They included cellulolytic system enzymes, hemicellulases, the ligninolytic system, (gluco-)amylase, pectinase, acid protease, cell wall lytic enzymes (laminarinase, 1,4-β-d-glucosidase, β-N-acetyl-d-glucosaminidase, α-d-galactosidase, β-d-mannosidase), acid phosphatase, and laccase. Enzyme activities over the 150-day incubation period with and without a fruiting stimulus are reported. These results provide a basis for future investigations into the physiology and biochemistry of growth and fruiting. PMID:16346918

  13. Extreme Wildfire Spread and Behaviour: Case Studies from North Sardinia, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salis, M.; Arca, B.; Ager, A.; Fois, C.; Bacciu, V.; Duce, P.; Spano, D.

    2012-04-01

    Worldwide, fire seasons are usually characterized by the occurrence of one or more days with extreme environmental conditions, such as heat waves associated with strong winds. On these days, fires can quickly get out of hand originating large and severe wildfires. In these cases, containment and extinguishment phases are critical, considering that the imperative goal is to keep fire crews, people and animals safe. In this work we will present a set of large and severe wildfires occurred with extreme environmental conditions in the northern area of Sardinia. The most recent wildfire we will describe was ignited on July 13, 2011 in the Oschiri municipality (40°43' N; 9°06' E), and burned about 2,500 ha of wooded and herbaceous pastures and oakwoods in few hours. The second wildfire we will present was ignited on July 23, 2009 in the Bonorva municipality (40°25' N; 8° 46' E), and was responsible for the death of two people and several damages to houses, animals and farms. This wildfire lasted on July 25, and burned about 10,000 ha of wooded and herbaceous pastures; the most of the area was burned during the first day. The last wildfire we will describe was ignited on July 23, 2007 in the Oniferi municipality (40°16' N; 9° 16' E) and burned about 9,000 ha of wooded and herbaceous pastures and oakwoods; about 8,000 ha were burned after 11 hours of propagation. All these wildfires were ignited in days characterized by very hot temperatures associated to the effect of air masses moving from inland North Africa to the Mediterranean Basin, and strong winds from west-south west. This is one of the typical weather pattern associated with large and severe wildfires in North Sardinia, and is well documented in the last years. Weather conditions, fuels and topography factors related to each case study will be accurately analyzed. Moreover, a detailed overview of observed fire spread and behavior and post-fire vegetation recovery will be presented. The fire spread and

  14. Modeling and evaluation of chromium remediation from water using low cost bio-char, a green adsorbent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohan, Dinesh; Rajput, Shalini; Singh, Vinod K.; Steele, Philip H.; Pittman, Charles U.

    2011-01-01

    Oak wood and oak bark chars were obtained from fast pyrolysis in an auger reactor at 400-450 deg. C. These chars were characterized and utilized for Cr(VI) remediation from water. Batch sorption studies were performed at different temperatures, pH values and solid to liquid ratios. Maximum chromium was removed at pH 2.0. A kinetic study yielded an optimum equilibrium time of 48 h with an adsorbent dose of 10 g/L. Sorption studies were conducted over a concentration range of 1-100 mg/L. Cr(VI) removal increased with an increase in temperature (Q Oakwood o : 25 deg. C = 3.03 mg/g; 35 deg. C = 4.08 mg/g; 45 deg. C = 4.93 mg/g and Q Oakbark o : 25 deg. C = 4.62 mg/g; 35 deg. C = 7.43 mg/g; 45 deg. C = 7.51 mg/g). More chromium was removed with oak bark than oak wood. The char performances were evaluated using the Freundlich, Langmuir, Redlich-Peterson, Toth, Radke and Sips adsorption isotherm models. The Sips adsorption isotherm model best fits the experimental data [high regression (R 2 ) coefficients]. The overall kinetic data was satisfactorily explained by a pseudo second order rate expression. Water penetrated into the char walls exposing Cr(VI) to additional adsorption sites that were not on the surfaces of dry char pores. It is remarkable that oak chars (S BET : 1-3 m 2 g -1 ) can remove similar amounts of Cr(VI) as activated carbon (S BET : ∼1000 m 2 g -1 ). Thus, byproduct chars from bio-oil production might be used as inexpensive adsorbents for water purification. Char samples were successfully used for chromium remediation from contaminated surface water with dissolved interfering ions.

  15. Organic and inorganic speciation of particulate matter formed during different combustion phases in an improved cookstove.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leavey, Anna; Patel, Sameer; Martinez, Raul; Mitroo, Dhruv; Fortenberry, Claire; Walker, Michael; Williams, Brent; Biswas, Pratim

    2017-10-01

    Residential solid fuel combustion in cookstoves has established health impacts including bladder and lung cancers, cataracts, low birth weight, and pneumonia. The chemical composition of particulate matter (PM) from 4 commonly-used solid fuels (coal, dung, ambient/dry applewood, and oakwood pellets), emitted from a gasifier cookstove, as well as propane, were examined. Temporal changes between the different cookstove burn-phases were also explored. Normalized concentrations of non-refractory PM 1 , total organics, chloride, ammonium, nitrate, sulfate, and 41 particle-phase polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were measured using a High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) and a Thermal desorption Aerosol Gas chromatograph (TAG), respectively. Coal demonstrated the highest fraction of organic matter in its particulate emission composition (98%), followed by dung (94%). Coal and dung also demonstrated the highest numbers and concentrations of PAHs. While dry applewood emitted ten times lower organic matter compared to ambient applewood, a higher fraction of these organics was composed of PAHs, especially the more toxic ones such as benzo(a)pyrene (9.63ng/L versus 0.04ng/L), and benzo(b)fluoranthene (31.32ng/L versus 0.19ng/L). Data from the AMS demonstrated no clear trends for any of the combustion fuels over the different combustion phases unlike the previously reported trends observed for the physical characteristics. Of the solid fuels, pellets demonstrated the lowest emissions. Emissions from propane were below the quantification limit of the instruments. This work highlights the benefits of incorporating additional metrics into the cookstove evaluation process, thus enriching the existing PM data inventory. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. TU-H-BRA-01: The Physics of High Power Radiofrequency Isolation in a Novel Compact Linear Accelerator Based MRI Guided Radiation Therapy System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamb, J; Low, D [University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Mutic, S [Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO (United States); Shvartsman, S; Chmielewski, T; Fought, G; Sharma, A; Dempsey, J [ViewRay, Inc., Oakwood Village, OH (United States)

    2016-06-15

    funded by ViewRay, Inc., Oakwood, OH.

  17. Anatomic and dosimetric changes in patients with head and neck cancer treated with an integrated MRI-tri-60Co teletherapy device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghavan, Govind; Kishan, Amar U; Cao, Minsong; Chen, Allen M

    2016-11-01

    Prior studies have relied on CT to assess alterations in anatomy among patients undergoing radiation for head and neck cancer. We sought to determine the feasibility of using MRI-based image-guided radiotherapy to quantify these changes and to ascertain their potential dosimetric implications. 6 patients with head and neck cancer were treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) on a novel tri- 60 Co teletherapy system equipped with a 0.35-T MRI (VR, ViewRay Incorporated, Oakwood Village, OH) to 66-70 Gy in 33 fractions (fx). Pre-treatment MRIs on Fx 1, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30 and 33 were imported into a contouring interface, where the primary gross tumour volume (GTV) and parotid glands were delineated. The centre of mass (COM) shifts for these structures were assessed relative to Day 1. Dosimetric data were co-registered with the MRIs, and doses to the GTV and parotid glands were assessed. Primary GTVs decreased significantly over the course of IMRT (median % volume loss, 38.7%; range, 29.5-72.0%; p < 0.05) at a median rate of 1.2%/fx (range, 0.92-2.2%/fx). Both the ipsilateral and contralateral parotid glands experienced significant volume loss (p < 0.05, for all) and shifted medially during IMRT. Weight loss correlated significantly with parotid gland volume loss and medial COM shift (p < 0.05). Integrated on-board MRI can be used to accurately contour and analyze primary GTVs and parotid glands over the course of IMRT. COM shifts and significant volume reductions were observed, confirming the results of prior CT-based exercises. Advances in knowledge: The superior resolution of on-board MRI may facilitate online adaptive replanning in the future.

  18. Quality of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Treatment Plans Using a 60Co Magnetic Resonance Image Guidance Radiation Therapy System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wooten, H. Omar; Green, Olga; Yang, Min; DeWees, Todd; Kashani, Rojano; Olsen, Jeff; Michalski, Jeff; Yang, Deshan; Tanderup, Kari; Hu, Yanle; Li, H. Harold; Mutic, Sasa

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This work describes a commercial treatment planning system, its technical features, and its capabilities for creating 60 Co intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment plans for a magnetic resonance image guidance radiation therapy (MR-IGRT) system. Methods and Materials: The ViewRay treatment planning system (Oakwood Village, OH) was used to create 60 Co IMRT treatment plans for 33 cancer patients with disease in the abdominal, pelvic, thorax, and head and neck regions using physician-specified patient-specific target coverage and organ at risk (OAR) objectives. Backup plans using a third-party linear accelerator (linac)-based planning system were also created. Plans were evaluated by attending physicians and approved for treatment. The 60 Co and linac plans were compared by evaluating conformity numbers (CN) with 100% and 95% of prescription reference doses and heterogeneity indices (HI) for planning target volumes (PTVs) and maximum, mean, and dose-volume histogram (DVH) values for OARs. Results: All 60 Co IMRT plans achieved PTV coverage and OAR sparing that were similar to linac plans. PTV conformity for 60 Co was within <1% and 3% of linac plans for 100% and 95% prescription reference isodoses, respectively, and heterogeneity was on average 4% greater. Comparisons of OAR mean dose showed generally better sparing with linac plans in the low-dose range <20 Gy, but comparable sparing for organs with mean doses >20 Gy. The mean doses for all 60 Co plan OARs were within clinical tolerances. Conclusions: A commercial 60 Co MR-IGRT device can produce highly conformal IMRT treatment plans similar in quality to linac IMRT for a variety of disease sites. Additional work is in progress to evaluate the clinical benefit of other novel features of this MR-IGRT system

  19. TU-H-BRA-01: The Physics of High Power Radiofrequency Isolation in a Novel Compact Linear Accelerator Based MRI Guided Radiation Therapy System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamb, J; Low, D; Mutic, S; Shvartsman, S; Chmielewski, T; Fought, G; Sharma, A; Dempsey, J

    2016-01-01

    funded by ViewRay, Inc., Oakwood, OH

  20. Relationship between plant biodiversity and heavy metal bioavailability in grasslands overlying an abandoned mine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, A J; Pastor, J

    2008-04-01

    Abandoned metal mines in the Sierra de Guadarrama, Madrid, Spain, are often located in areas of high ecological value. This is true of an abandoned barium mine situated in the heart of a bird sanctuary. Today the area sustains grasslands, interspersed with oakwood formations of Quercus ilex and heywood scrub (Retama sphaerocarpa L.), used by cattle, sheep and wild animals. Our study was designed to establish a relationship between the plant biodiversity of these grasslands and the bioavailability of heavy metals in the topsoil layer of this abandoned mine. We conducted soil chemical analyses and performed a greenhouse evaluation of the effects of different soil heavy metal concentrations on biodiversity. The greenhouse bioassays were run for 6 months using soil samples obtained from the mine polluted with heavy metals (Cu, Zn, Pb and Cd) and from a control pasture. Soil heavy metal and Na concentrations, along with the pH, had intense negative effects on plant biodiversity, as determined through changes in the Shannon index and species richness. Numbers of grasses, legumes, and composites were reduced, whilst other species (including ruderals) were affected to a lesser extent. Zinc had the greatest effect on biodiversity, followed by Cd and Cu. When we compared the sensitivity of the biodiversity indicators to the different metal content variables, pseudototal metal concentrations determined by X-ray fluorescence (XRF) were the most sensitive, followed by available and soluble metal contents. Worse correlations between biodiversity variables and metal variables were shown by pseudototal contents obtained by plasma emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES). Our results highlight the importance of using as many different indicators as possible to reliably assess the response shown by plants to heavy metal soil pollution.

  1. TU-AB-202-06: Quantitative Evaluation of Deformable Image Registration in MRI-Guided Adaptive Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mooney, K; Zhao, T; Green, O; Mutic, S; Yang, D; Duan, Y; Zhang, M

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the performance of the deformable image registration algorithm used for MRI-guided adaptive radiation therapy using image feature analysis. Methods: MR images were collected from five patients treated on the MRIdian (ViewRay, Inc., Oakwood Village, OH), a three head Cobalt-60 therapy machine with an 0.35 T MR system. The images were acquired immediately prior to treatment with a uniform 1.5 mm resolution. Treatment sites were as follows: head/neck, lung, breast, stomach, and bladder. Deformable image registration was performed using the ViewRay software between the first fraction MRI and the final fraction MRI, and the DICE similarity coefficient (DSC) for the skin contours was reported. The SIFT and Harris feature detection and matching algorithms identified point features in each image separately, then found matching features in the other image. The target registration error (TRE) was defined as the vector distance between matched features on the two image sets. Each deformation was evaluated based on comparison of average TRE and DSC. Results: Image feature analysis produced between 2000–9500 points for evaluation on the patient images. The average (± standard deviation) TRE for all patients was 3.3 mm (±3.1 mm), and the passing rate of TRE<3 mm was 60% on the images. The head/neck patient had the best average TRE (1.9 mm±2.3 mm) and the best passing rate (80%). The lung patient had the worst average TRE (4.8 mm±3.3 mm) and the worst passing rate (37.2%). DSC was not significantly correlated with either TRE (p=0.63) or passing rate (p=0.55). Conclusions: Feature matching provides a quantitative assessment of deformable image registration, with a large number of data points for analysis. The TRE of matched features can be used to evaluate the registration of many objects throughout the volume, whereas DSC mainly provides a measure of gross overlap. We have a research agreement with ViewRay Inc.

  2. WE-G-17A-01: Improving Tracking Image Spatial Resolution for Onboard MR Image Guided Radiation Therapy Using the WHISKEE Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Y; Mutic, S; Du, D; Green, O; Zeng, Q; Nana, R; Patrick, J; Shvartsman, S; Dempsey, J

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of using the weighted hybrid iterative spiral k-space encoded estimation (WHISKEE) technique to improve spatial resolution of tracking images for onboard MR image guided radiation therapy (MR-IGRT). Methods: MR tracking images of abdomen and pelvis had been acquired from healthy volunteers using the ViewRay onboard MRIGRT system (ViewRay Inc. Oakwood Village, OH) at a spatial resolution of 2.0mm*2.0mm*5.0mm. The tracking MR images were acquired using the TrueFISP sequence. The temporal resolution had to be traded off to 2 frames per second (FPS) to achieve the 2.0mm in-plane spatial resolution. All MR images were imported into the MATLAB software. K-space data were synthesized through the Fourier Transform of the MR images. A mask was created to selected k-space points that corresponded to the under-sampled spiral k-space trajectory with an acceleration (or undersampling) factor of 3. The mask was applied to the fully sampled k-space data to synthesize the undersampled k-space data. The WHISKEE method was applied to the synthesized undersampled k-space data to reconstructed tracking MR images at 6 FPS. As a comparison, the undersampled k-space data were also reconstructed using the zero-padding technique. The reconstructed images were compared to the original image. The relatively reconstruction error was evaluated using the percentage of the norm of the differential image over the norm of the original image. Results: Compared to the zero-padding technique, the WHISKEE method was able to reconstruct MR images with better image quality. It significantly reduced the relative reconstruction error from 39.5% to 3.1% for the pelvis image and from 41.5% to 4.6% for the abdomen image at an acceleration factor of 3. Conclusion: We demonstrated that it was possible to use the WHISKEE method to expedite MR image acquisition for onboard MR-IGRT systems to achieve good spatial and temporal resolutions simultaneously. Y. Hu and O. green

  3. WE-G-17A-01: Improving Tracking Image Spatial Resolution for Onboard MR Image Guided Radiation Therapy Using the WHISKEE Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Y; Mutic, S; Du, D; Green, O [Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO (United States); Zeng, Q; Nana, R; Patrick, J; Shvartsman, S; Dempsey, J [ViewRay Incorporated, Oakwood Village, OH (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of using the weighted hybrid iterative spiral k-space encoded estimation (WHISKEE) technique to improve spatial resolution of tracking images for onboard MR image guided radiation therapy (MR-IGRT). Methods: MR tracking images of abdomen and pelvis had been acquired from healthy volunteers using the ViewRay onboard MRIGRT system (ViewRay Inc. Oakwood Village, OH) at a spatial resolution of 2.0mm*2.0mm*5.0mm. The tracking MR images were acquired using the TrueFISP sequence. The temporal resolution had to be traded off to 2 frames per second (FPS) to achieve the 2.0mm in-plane spatial resolution. All MR images were imported into the MATLAB software. K-space data were synthesized through the Fourier Transform of the MR images. A mask was created to selected k-space points that corresponded to the under-sampled spiral k-space trajectory with an acceleration (or undersampling) factor of 3. The mask was applied to the fully sampled k-space data to synthesize the undersampled k-space data. The WHISKEE method was applied to the synthesized undersampled k-space data to reconstructed tracking MR images at 6 FPS. As a comparison, the undersampled k-space data were also reconstructed using the zero-padding technique. The reconstructed images were compared to the original image. The relatively reconstruction error was evaluated using the percentage of the norm of the differential image over the norm of the original image. Results: Compared to the zero-padding technique, the WHISKEE method was able to reconstruct MR images with better image quality. It significantly reduced the relative reconstruction error from 39.5% to 3.1% for the pelvis image and from 41.5% to 4.6% for the abdomen image at an acceleration factor of 3. Conclusion: We demonstrated that it was possible to use the WHISKEE method to expedite MR image acquisition for onboard MR-IGRT systems to achieve good spatial and temporal resolutions simultaneously. Y. Hu and O. green

  4. TU-AB-202-06: Quantitative Evaluation of Deformable Image Registration in MRI-Guided Adaptive Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mooney, K; Zhao, T; Green, O; Mutic, S; Yang, D [Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO (United States); Duan, Y [University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri (United States); Zhang, M [Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To assess the performance of the deformable image registration algorithm used for MRI-guided adaptive radiation therapy using image feature analysis. Methods: MR images were collected from five patients treated on the MRIdian (ViewRay, Inc., Oakwood Village, OH), a three head Cobalt-60 therapy machine with an 0.35 T MR system. The images were acquired immediately prior to treatment with a uniform 1.5 mm resolution. Treatment sites were as follows: head/neck, lung, breast, stomach, and bladder. Deformable image registration was performed using the ViewRay software between the first fraction MRI and the final fraction MRI, and the DICE similarity coefficient (DSC) for the skin contours was reported. The SIFT and Harris feature detection and matching algorithms identified point features in each image separately, then found matching features in the other image. The target registration error (TRE) was defined as the vector distance between matched features on the two image sets. Each deformation was evaluated based on comparison of average TRE and DSC. Results: Image feature analysis produced between 2000–9500 points for evaluation on the patient images. The average (± standard deviation) TRE for all patients was 3.3 mm (±3.1 mm), and the passing rate of TRE<3 mm was 60% on the images. The head/neck patient had the best average TRE (1.9 mm±2.3 mm) and the best passing rate (80%). The lung patient had the worst average TRE (4.8 mm±3.3 mm) and the worst passing rate (37.2%). DSC was not significantly correlated with either TRE (p=0.63) or passing rate (p=0.55). Conclusions: Feature matching provides a quantitative assessment of deformable image registration, with a large number of data points for analysis. The TRE of matched features can be used to evaluate the registration of many objects throughout the volume, whereas DSC mainly provides a measure of gross overlap. We have a research agreement with ViewRay Inc.

  5. Seal evaluation and confinement screening criteria for beneficial carbon dioxide storage with enhanced coal bed methane recovery in the Pocahontas Basin, Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, R.P.; Eriksson, K.A.; Ripepi, N.; Eble, C.; Greb, S.F.

    2012-01-01

    The geological storage of carbon dioxide in Appalachian basin coal seams is one possible sink for sequestration of greenhouse gases, with the added benefit of enhanced-coal bed methane (ECBM) recovery. The Pocahontas Basin (part of the central Appalachian Basin) of southwestern Virginia is a major coal bed methane (CBM) province with production mostly from coal beds in the Lower Pennsylvanian Pocahontas and New River formations. As part of the Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership's Phase II research program, a CO 2-injection demonstration well was installed into Lower Pennsylvanian coal bed-methane producing strata in southwest Virginia. Samples of siliciclastic lithologies above coal beds in this Oakwood Field well, and from several other cores in the Nora Field were taken to establish a baseline of the basic confinement properties of overlying strata to test seal competency at local and regional scales.Strata above CBM-producing coal beds in the Pocahontas and New River formations consist of dark-gray shales; silty gray shales; heterolithic siltstones, sandstones, and shales; lithic sandstones, and quartzose sandstones. Standard measurements of porosity, permeability and petrography were used to evaluate potential leakage hazards and any possible secondary storage potential for typical lithologies. Both lithic- and quartz-rich sandstones exhibit only minor porosity, with generally low permeability (Member. Analyses of 1500 geophysical logs in southwest Virginia indicate that this unit is moderately thick (>50ft, 15m), laterally continuous (>3000km 2), and a homogenous shale, which coarsens upward into siltstone and sandstone, or is truncated by sandstone. Calculations from two mercury injection capillary porosimetry tests of the shale indicate that a displacement entry pressure of 207psi (1427kPa) would generate an estimated seal capacity of 1365ft (416m) of CO 2 before buoyant leakage. Scanning electron microscopy indicates a microfabric of narrow

  6. Evidence of sealing and brine distribution at grain boundaries in natural fine-grained Halite (Qum Kuh salt fountain, Central Iran): implications for rheology of salt extrusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desbois, Guillaume; Urai, Janos L.; de Bresser, J. H. P.

    2010-05-01

    When grain boundary movement is stopped, surface energy related forces reassert themselves driving the system to its equilibrium conditions ([2], [6], [7], [8]). This could result in growth of islands and shrinking of channels and hence in healing the boundary by internal redistribution of fluid and solid in the contact region. Such islands are proposed to grow preferentially close to the contact rim and promote the healing of the grain-grain contact, which in turn prevents transport in or out the boundary region and thus traps the fluids in isolated inclusions. This contribution is focused on observation of grain boundary microstructures in natural mylonitic rocksalt collected from the distal part of Kum-Quh salt fountain (central Iran) in order to give unprecedented insight of grain boundary microstructures using argon-beam cross-sectioning to prepare high quality polished surfaces suitable for high-resolution SEM imaging. The possibility to use our SEM under cryogenic conditions allows also imaging the in-situ distribution of fluids. Results show that brine at grain boundaries occurs as thick layers (> µm in scale) corresponding to cross-sectioned wetted triple junction tubes, as filling at triple junction and as array of isolated fluids inclusions at grain-grain contacts. Close observations at islands contacts suggest the presence of a very thin fluid film (Journal of Structural Geology. [2] Ghoussoub J., and Leroy Y.M. (2001), Solid-fluid phase transformation within grain boundaries during compaction by pressure solution, J. Mech. Phys. Solids, 49, 737 2385-2430. 738 [3] Jackson, M.P.A., (1985). Natural strain in diapiric and glacial rock salt, with emphasis on Oakwood dome, East Texas, Bureau of Economic Geology, The University of Texas at Austin, Texas. [4] Schléder Z. and Urai J.L. (2007). Deformation and recrystallization mechanisms in mylonitic shear zones in naturally deformed extrusive Eocene-Oligocene rock salt from Eyvanekey plateau and Garmsar

  7. Development of a 3D remote dosimetry protocol compatible with MRgIMRT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mein, Stewart; Rankine, Leith; Adamovics, John; Li, Harold; Oldham, Mark

    2017-11-01

    To develop a novel remote 3D dosimetry protocol to verify Magnetic Resonance-guided Radiation Therapy (MRgRT) treatments. The protocol was applied to investigate the accuracy of TG-119 IMRT irradiations delivered by the MRIdian ® system (ViewRay ® , Oakwood Village, OH, USA) allowing for a 48-hour delay between irradiation at a field institution and subsequent readout at a base institution. The 3D dosimetry protocol utilizes a novel formulation of PRESAGE ® radiochromic dosimeters developed for high postirradiation stability and compatibility with optical-CT readout. Optical-CT readout was performed with an in-house system utilizing telecentric lenses affording high-resolution scanning. The protocol was developed from preparatory experiments to characterize PRESAGE ® response in relevant conditions. First, linearity and sensitivity of PRESAGE ® dose-response in the presence of a magnetic field was evaluated in a small volume study (4 ml cuvettes) conducted under MRgRT conditions and irradiated with doses 0-15 Gy. Temporal and spatial stability of the dose-response were investigated in large volume studies utilizing large field-of-view (FOV) 2 kg cylindrical PRESAGE ® dosimeters. Dosimeters were imaged at t = 1 hr and t = 48 hrs enabling the development of correction terms to model any observed spatial and temporal changes postirradiation. Polynomial correction factors for temporal and spatial changes in PRESAGE ® dosimeters (C T and C R respectively) were obtained by numerical fitting to time-point data acquired in six irradiated dosimeters. A remote dosimetry protocol was developed where PRESAGE ® change in optical-density (ΔOD) readings at time t = X (the irradiation to return shipment time interval) were corrected back to a convenient standard time t = 1 hr using the C T and C R corrections. This refined protocol was then applied to TG-119 (American Association of Physicists in Medicine, Task Group 119) plan deliveries on the MRIdian

  8. Modification of soil microbial activity and several hydrolases in a forest soil artificially contaminated with copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellas, Rosa; Leirós, Mā Carmen; Gil-Sotres, Fernando; Trasar-Cepeda, Carmen

    2010-05-01

    Soils have long been exposed to the adverse effects of human activities, which negatively affect soil biological activity. As a result of their functions and ubiquitous presence microorganisms can serve as environmental indicators of soil pollution. Some features of soil microorganisms, such as the microbial biomass size, respiration rate, and enzyme activity are often used as bioindicators of the ecotoxicity of heavy metals. Although copper is essential for microorganisms, excessive concentrations have a negative influence on processes mediated by microorganisms. In this study we measured the response of some microbial indicators to Cu pollution in a forest soil, with the aim of evaluating their potential for predicting Cu contamination. Samples of an Ah horizon from a forest soil under oakwood vegetation (Quercus robur L.) were contaminated in the laboratory with copper added at different doses (0, 120, 360, 1080 and 3240 mg kg-1) as CuCl2×2H2O. The soil samples were kept for 7 days at 25 °C and at a moisture content corresponding to the water holding capacity, and thereafter were analysed for carbon and nitrogen mineralization capacity, microbial biomass C, seed germination and root elongation tests, and for urease, phosphomonoesterase, catalase and ß-glucosidase activities. In addition, carbon mineralization kinetics were studied, by plotting the log of residual C against incubation time, and the metabolic coefficient, qCO2, was estimated. Both organic carbon and nitrogen mineralization were lower in polluted samples, with the greatest decrease observed in the sample contaminated with 1080 mg kg-1. In all samples carbon mineralization followed first order kinetics; the C mineralization constant was lower in contaminated than in uncontaminated samples and, in general, decreased with increasing doses of copper. Moreover, it appears that copper contamination not only reduced the N mineralization capacity, but also modified the N mineralization process, since in