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Sample records for consistent partly cracked

  1. A consistent partly cracked XFEM element for cohesive crack growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asferg, Jesper L.; Poulsen, Peter Noe; Nielsen, Leif Otto

    2007-01-01

    Present extended finite element method (XFEM) elements for cohesive crack growth may often not be able to model equal stresses on both sides of the discontinuity when acting as a crack-tip element. The authors have developed a new partly cracked XFEM element for cohesive crack growth with extra...... enrichments to the cracked elements. The extra enrichments are element side local and were developed by superposition of the standard nodal shape functions for the element and standard nodal shape functions for a sub-triangle of the cracked element. With the extra enrichments, the crack-tip element becomes...... capable of modelling variations in the discontinuous displacement field on both sides of the crack and hence also capable of modelling the case where equal stresses are present on each side of the crack. The enrichment was implemented for the 3-node constant strain triangle (CST) and a standard algorithm...

  2. A study on stress corrosion cracking of explosive plugged part

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaga, Seiichi; Fujii, Katsuhiro; Yamamoto, Yoshiaki; Sakuma, Koosuke; Hibi, Seiji; Morimoto, Hiroyoshi.

    1986-01-01

    Studies on the stress corrosion cracking of explosive plugged part are conducted. SUS 304 stainless steel is used as testing material. The distribution of residual stress in plug and tube plate after plugging is obtained. The effect of residual stress on the stress corrosion cracking is studied. Residual stress in tube plate near the plug is compressive and stress corrosion cracking dose not occur in the tube plate there, and it occurs on the inner surface of plug because of residual tensile stress in axial direction of the plug. Stress corrosion test in MgCl 2 solution under constant load is conducted. The susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking of the explosive bonded boundary is lower than that of base metal because of greater resistance to plastic deformation. Stress corrosion test in high temperature and high pressure pure water is also conducted by means of static type of autoclave but stress corrosion cracking does not occur under the testing condition used. (author)

  3. Notch fatigue crack propagation - A consistent concept for calculating flawed service life

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dankert, M.

    1999-01-01

    The research report presents a consistent concept of elastic-plastic fatigue fracture mechanics, to be used for numerical description of crack initiation and propagation behaviour within and out of notched areas of circular notched specimens for Woehler tests, two-phase fatigue tests and tests under service conditions. It is shown that a fracture-mechanics approach yields results capable of describing the load history over the whole service life of a structural member. A J-integral-related crack propagation model is derived that takes into account the crack opening and closure behaviour. The model is based on specially developed formulas, algorithms and approximation formulas required for description of crack opening and closure behaviour as well as calculation of the stress intensity factor K and the J-integral of cracks at notches. The values relating to crack opening were compared with experimental data, and those describing the stress intensity factor K and the J-integrals with 2D and 3D elastic-plastic FE calculations. Good and very good agreement of results was achieved. (orig./CB) [de

  4. Crack closure and growth behavior of short fatigue cracks under random loading (part I : details of crack closure behavior)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Shin Young; Song, Ji Ho

    2000-01-01

    Crack closure and growth behavior of physically short fatigue cracks under random loading are investigated by performing narrow-and wide-band random loading tests for various stress ratios. Artificially prepared two-dimensional, short through-thickness cracks are used. The closure behavior of short cracks under random loading is discussed, comparing with that of short cracks under constant-amplitude loading and also that of long cracks under random loading. Irrespective of random loading spectrum or block length, the crack opening load of short cracks is much lower under random loading than under constant-amplitude loading corresponding to the largest load cycle in a random load history, contrary to the behavior of long cracks that the crack opening load under random loading is nearly the same as or slightly higher than constant-amplitude results. This result indicates that the largest load cycle in a random load history has an effect to enhance crack opening of short cracks

  5. Crack

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... spending time in a rehab facility or getting cognitive-behavioral therapy or other treatments. Right now, there are no medicines to treat a crack addiction. If you smoke crack, talking with a counselor ...

  6. Fatigue cracks in Eurofer 97 steel: Part II. Comparison of small and long fatigue crack growth

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kruml, Tomáš; Hutař, Pavel; Náhlík, Luboš; Seitl, Stanislav; Polák, Jaroslav

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 412, 1 (2011), s. 7-12 ISSN 0022-3115 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/09/1954; GA ČR GA101/09/0867 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : ferritic-martensitic steel * long crack growth * small crack growth * crack closure Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics Impact factor: 2.052, year: 2011

  7. Two dimensional modeling of elastic wave propagation in solids containing cracks with rough surfaces and friction - Part II: Numerical implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delrue, Steven; Aleshin, Vladislav; Truyaert, Kevin; Bou Matar, Olivier; Van Den Abeele, Koen

    2018-01-01

    Our study aims at the creation of a numerical toolbox that describes wave propagation in samples containing internal contacts (e.g. cracks, delaminations, debondings, imperfect intergranular joints) of known geometry with postulated contact interaction laws including friction. The code consists of two entities: the contact model and the solid mechanics module. Part I of the paper concerns an in-depth description of a constitutive model for realistic contacts or cracks that takes into account the roughness of the contact faces and the associated effects of friction and hysteresis. In the crack model, three different contact states can be recognized: contact loss, total sliding and partial slip. Normal (clapping) interactions between the crack faces are implemented using a quadratic stress-displacement relation, whereas tangential (friction) interactions were introduced using the Coulomb friction law for the total sliding case, and the Method of Memory Diagrams (MMD) in case of partial slip. In the present part of the paper, we integrate the developed crack model into finite element software in order to simulate elastic wave propagation in a solid material containing internal contacts or cracks. We therefore implemented the comprehensive crack model in MATLAB® and introduced it in the Structural Mechanics Module of COMSOL Multiphysics®. The potential of the approach for ultrasound based inspection of solids with cracks showing acoustic nonlinearity is demonstrated by means of an example of shear wave propagation in an aluminum sample containing a single crack with rough surfaces and friction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Studies on the behavior of part-through circumferential crack at intrados in elbows under in-plane bending moment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, A.; Prabhakaran, K.M.; Ghosh, A.K.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Behavior of cracked elbows with part-through crack at intrados under bending moment is studied. → Some part of crack always opens and some part gets closed irrespective of mode of applied moment. → Fraction of the crack that opens basically decides the weakening effect of the cracked elbow. → Results will be useful for fracture studies and limit load estimation especially for LBB. - Abstract: This paper presents the behavior of part-through circumferential crack at intrados in elbows under in-plane bending moment. This is based on detailed non-linear (both material and geometric) finite element analysis performed on various sizes of elbows (generally used in piping industry), having different crack sizes. It is observed that some part of the crack always opens and some part gets closed irrespective of the mode of applied bending moment (opening/closing). The fraction of the crack that opens basically decides the weakening effect of the cracked elbow. It is observed that there is a threshold value of crack length and crack depth, before which no crack opening is observed under opening mode. Also as elbow becomes thinner, the threshold value of above two parameters increases. Quite interestingly, the part of crack which closes in opening mode opens under closing mode. The above mentioned study on the behavior of crack will be useful for fracture studies and limit load estimation especially when leak before break concept is to be employed.

  9. Crack growth in non-homogeneous transformable ceramics. Part II : Crack deflection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stam, Geert; Giessen, Erik van der

    1996-01-01

    Crack growth in transformation toughened ceramics is studied using a micromechanics based continuum model which accounts for both dilatant and shear transformation strain components. In the computations, the transformable phase is taken to be distributed non-homogeneously in order to model Zirconia

  10. A partly and fully cracked triangular XFEM element for modeling cohesive fracture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mougaard, Jens Falkenskov; Poulsen, Peter Noe; Nielsen, Leif Otto

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses the build‐up of a partly cracked cohesive crack tip element. The crack tip element is based on the principles of the eXtended Finite Element Method (XFEM) and is of Linear Strain Triangle (LST) type. The composition of the enrichment has been in focus to achieve as complete...... as a fully cracked element with a few restrictions in the displacement field. The performance of the developed element has been tested in three examples. One example is an infinite sheet with an initial flaw in pure tension, where a semianalytical solution exists. The two other examples are the two benchmark...

  11. Fatigue cracks in Eurofer 97 steel: Part I. Nucleation and small crack growth kinetics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kruml, Tomáš; Polák, Jaroslav

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 412, 1 (2011), s. 2-6 ISSN 0022-3115 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/09/1954; GA ČR GA101/09/0867 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : ferritic-martensitic steel * low cycle fatigue * small crack growth * fatigue life prediction Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics Impact factor: 2.052, year: 2011

  12. Self-consistent approximations beyond the CPA: Part II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplan, T.; Gray, L.J.

    1982-01-01

    This paper concentrates on a self-consistent approximation for random alloys developed by Kaplan, Leath, Gray, and Diehl. The construction of the augmented space formalism for a binary alloy is sketched, and the notation to be used derived. Using the operator methods of the augmented space, the self-consistent approximation is derived for the average Green's function, and for evaluating the self-energy, taking into account the scattering by clusters of excitations. The particular cluster approximation desired is derived by treating the scattering by the excitations with S /SUB T/ exactly. Fourier transforms on the disorder-space clustersite labels solve the self-consistent set of equations. Expansion to short range order in the alloy is also discussed. A method to reduce the problem to a computationally tractable form is described

  13. The ACR-program for automatic finite element model generation for part through cracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leinonen, M.S.; Mikkola, T.P.J.

    1989-01-01

    The ACR-program (Automatic Finite Element Model Generation for Part Through Cracks) has been developed at the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT) for automatic finite element model generation for surface flaws using three dimensional solid elements. Circumferential or axial cracks can be generated on the inner or outer surface of a cylindrical or toroidal geometry. Several crack forms are available including the standard semi-elliptical surface crack. The program can be used in the development of automated systems for fracture mechanical analyses of structures. The tests for the accuracy of the FE-mesh have been started with two-dimensional models. The results indicate that the accuracy of the standard mesh is sufficient for practical analyses. Refinement of the standard mesh is needed in analyses with high load levels well over the limit load of the structure

  14. The Mechanics of a Cantilever Beam with an Embedded Horizontal Crack Subjected to an End Transverse Force, Part A: Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panos G. Charalambides

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This study addresses the mechanics of a cracked cantilever beam subjected to a transverse force applied at it’s free end. In this Part A of a two Part series of papers, emphasis is placed on the development of a four-beam model for a beam with a fully embedded horizontal sharp crack. The beam aspect ratio, crack length and crack centre location appear as general model parameters. Rotary springs are introduced at the crack tip cross sections as needed to account for the changes in the structural compliance due to the presence of the sharp crack and augmented load transfer through the near-tip transition regions. Guided by recent finite element findings reported elsewhere, the four-beam model is advanced by recognizing two key observations, (a the free surface and neutral axis curvatures of the cracked beam at the crack center location match the curvature of a healthy beam (an identical beam without a crack under the same loading conditions, (b the neutral axis rotations (slope of the cracked beam in the region between the applied load and the nearest crack tip matches the corresponding slope of the healthy beam. The above observations led to the development of close form solutions for the resultant forces (axial and shear and moment acting in the beams above and below the crack. Axial force and bending moment predictions are found to be in excellent agreement with 2D finite element results for all normalized crack depths considered. Shear force estimates dominating the beams above and below the crack as well as transition region length estimates are also obtained. The model developed in this study is then used along with 2D finite elements in conducting parametric studies aimed at both validating the model and establishing the mechanics of the cracked system under consideration. The latter studies are reported in the companion paper Part B-Results and Discussion.

  15. Mechanical analysis of ceramic heat being part of hip prosthesis with presence of cracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravagli, E.

    1995-03-01

    This report still pursues the aim of carrying out a systematic mechanical analysis of a ceramic heat being part of a modular hig prosthesis, in order to characterize it exhaustively, i. e. to assess its performances and some of its main specifications. A mechanical analysis of a second case is carried out here, the presence of head cracks being taken into account. The evaluations made lead to the conclusion that the head should not show cracks bigger than 100 mm. This study is performed in the frame of the STRIDE-CETMA project, which is aimed at founding and developing a centre for technologically advanced materials in Brindisi technology park (Italy)

  16. Assessing edge cracking resistance in AHSS automotive parts by the Essential Work of Fracture methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frómeta, D.; Tedesco, M.; Calvo, J.; Lara, A.; Molas, S.; Casellas, D.

    2017-09-01

    Lightweight designs and demanding safety requirements in automotive industry are increasingly promoting the use of Advanced High Strength Steel (AHSS) sheets. Such steels present higher strength (above 800 MPa) but lower ductility than conventional steels. Their great properties allow the reduction of the thickness of automobile structural components without compromising the safety, but also introduce new challenges to parts manufacturers. The fabrication of most cold formed components starts from shear cut blanks and, due to the lower ductility of AHSS, edge cracking problems can appear during forming operations, forcing the stop of the production and slowing down the industrial process. Forming Limit Diagrams (FLD) and FEM simulations are very useful tools to predict fracture problems in zones with high localized strain, but they are not able to predict edge cracking. It has been observed that the fracture toughness, measured through the Essential Work of Fracture (EWF) methodology, is a good indicator of the stretch flangeability in AHSS and can help to foresee this type of fractures. In this work, a serial production automotive component has been studied. The component showed cracks in some flanged edges when using a dual phase steel. It is shown that the conventional approach to explain formability, based on tensile tests and FLD, fails in the prediction of edge cracking. A new approach, based on fracture mechanics, help to solve the problem by selecting steel grades with higher fracture toughness, measured by means of EWF. Results confirmed that fracture toughness, in terms of EWF, can be readily used as a material parameter to rationalize cracking related problems and select AHSS with improved edge cracking resistance.

  17. Comparison of theoretical estimates and experimental measurements of fatigue crack growth under severe thermal shock conditions (part one - experimental observations)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsh, D.; Green, D.; Parker, R.

    1984-01-01

    This paper reports the results of an experiment in which a severe thermal cycle comprising of alternate upshocks and downshocks has been applied to an axisymmetric feature with an internal, partial penetration weld and crevice. The direction of cracking and crack growth rate were observed experimentally and detailed records made of the thermal cycle. A second part to the paper, reported separately, compares a linear elastic fracture mechanics assessment of the cracking to the experimental observations

  18. Magnetic powder crack tests as a means of quality assurance in forged parts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deutsch, V.

    1979-01-01

    The magnetic powder process has been used for years for crack detection in forged parts, which are used as safety parts in car construction. The representation of the present state of technology appears useful, as terms and units have been redefined in DIN draft standards and guidelines, and because alternating field magnetisation has increasingly displaced earlier techniques. The correct choice of equipment, test materials and UV lamps, and the configuration of the working positions are discussed. As the complete automation of this test method is not possible at present, the organisation of the viewing process is of great importance. The comparison with other processes of non-destructive material testing proves the irreplaceability of the magnetic power crack testing at present. (orig.) [de

  19. The effect of potential upon the high-temperature fatigue crack growth response of low-alloy steels. Part 1: Crack growth results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, L.A.; Moshier, W.C.

    1997-01-01

    Corrosion-fatigue crack propagation experiments were conducted on several low-alloy steels in elevated temperature aqueous environments, and experimental parameters included temperature, sulfur content of the steel, applied potential level, and dissolved hydrogen (and in one case, dissolved oxygen) concentration in the water. Specimen potentials were controlled potentiostatically, and the observation (or non-observation) of accelerated fatigue crack growth rates was a complex function of the above parameters. Electrochemical results and the postulated explanation for the complex behavior are given in Part II

  20. Interface fatigue crack propagation in sandwich X-joints – Part I: Experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moslemian, Ramin; Berggreen, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Correlation technique was used to locate the crack tip and monitor the crack growth. For the specimens with H45 core, unstable crack growth took place initially. Following the unstable propagation, the crack propagated in the core underneath the resin-rich cell layer approaching the interface. However......, the crack did not kink into the interface. For the specimens with H100 core, the crack propagated initially in the core and then returned into the interface and continued to propagate in the interface. For the specimens with H250 core, the crack initially propagated in the core and then kinked...

  1. Alternative methodology for assessing part-through-wall cracks in carbon steel bends removed from Point Lepreau Generating Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan Xinjian, E-mail: duanx@aecl.c [Senior Engineer, Reactor Engineering Department, Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Mississauga, ON (Canada); Kozluk, Michael J., E-mail: kozlukm@aecl.c [Independent Consultant, Oakville, ON (Canada); Gendron, Tracy [Manager-HTS Materials Integrity, Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River, ON (Canada); Slade, John [Senior Technical Advisor, Point Lepreau Generating Station, Lepreau, NB (Canada)

    2011-03-15

    In 2008 April Point Lepreau Generating Station entered an extended refurbishment outage that will involve the replacement of key reactor components (fuel channels and connecting feeder pipes). Prior to the refurbishment outage, New Brunswick Power Nuclear had been successfully managing intergranular, axial cracking of carbon steel feeder piping, that were also experiencing thinning, in the Point Lepreau Generating Station, primarily by an aggressive program of inspection, repair and testing of ex-service material. For the previous three maintenance outages, a probabilistic safety evaluation (PSE) had been used to demonstrate that annual inspection of the highest risk locations maintains the nuclear safety risk from cracking at an acceptably low level. The PSE makes use of the Failure Assessment Diagram (FAD) model to predict the failure of part-through-wall cracks. Burst-pressure testing of two ex-service feeder pipe sections with part-through-wall cracks showed that this FAD model significantly under predicts the failure pressure measured in the component tests. Use of this FAD model introduces undesirable conservatism into PSE assessments that are used to optimize feeder piping inspection and maintenance plans. This paper describes an alternative finite element approach, which could be used to provide more representative structural models for use in PSE assessments. This alternative approach employs the elasto-plastic large strain finite element formulation; uses representative material properties; considers the spatial microstructural distribution; accounts for the effect of work hardening rate; models all deformation processes, i.e., uniform deformation, localized necking, and failure imitation and propagation. Excellent pre-test prediction was shown for the burst-pressure test performed in 2006. Although cold-worked feeder bends have reduced fracture toughness compared to the parent straight pipe, post-test metallurgical examinations showed that failure at the

  2. Fundamental study on repairing technique for cracked or damaged parts of structures by cold gas dynamic spray technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Kazuhiro; Amao, Satoshi; Ichikawa, Yuji; Shoji, Tetsuo

    2008-01-01

    This study proposes an innovative technique for repairing of cracked or damaged parts of structures, such as nuclear or thermal power plants, by means of cold gas dynamic spray (CS) technique. In the case of generation of cracks etc. in the structure, the cracks can be repaired by welding. However, the welding spends considerable time on repair, and also needs special skills. The CS technique is known as a new technique not only for coatings but also for thick depositions. It has many advantages, i.e. dense deposition, high deposition rate and low oxidation. Therefore, it has a possibility to apply the CS technique instead of welding to repair the cracks etc. In this study, the cold gas dynamic spray technique as a new repairing technique for some structures is introduced. (author)

  3. Elastic-Plastic Fracture Mechanics Analyses for Circumferential Part-Through Surface Cracks at the Interface Between elbows and Pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Tae Kwang; Oh, Chang Kyun; Kim, Yun Jae; Kim, Jong Sung; Jin, Tae Eun

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents plastic limit loads and approximate J-integral estimates for circumferential part-through surface crack at the interface between elbows and pipes. Based on finite element limit analyses using elastic-perfectly plastic materials, plastic limit moments under in-plane bending are obtained and it is found that they are similar those for circumferential part-through surface cracks in the center of elbow. Based on present FE results, closed-form limit load solutions are proposed. Welds are not explicitly considered and all materials are assumed to be homogeneous. And the method to estimate the elastic-plastic J-integral for circumferential part-through surface cracks at the interface between elbows and straight pipes is proposed based on the reference stress approach, which was compared with corresponding solutions for straight pipes

  4. Elastic-Plastic Fracture Mechanics Analyses For circumferential Part-through Surface Cracks At The Interface Between Elbows and Pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Tae Kwang; Kim, Yun Jae; Oh, Chang Kyun; Kim, Jong Sung; Jin, Tae Eun

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents plastic limit loads and approximate J-integral estimates for circumferential part-through surface crack at the interface between elbows and pipes. Based on finite element limit analyses using elastic-perfectly plastic materials, plastic limit moments under in-plane bending are obtained and it is found that they are similar those for circumferential part-through surface cracks in the center of elbow. Based on present FE results, closed-form limit load solutions are proposed. Welds are not explicitly considered and all materials are assumed to be homogeneous. And the method to estimate the elastic-plastic J-integral for circumferential part-through surface cracks at the interface between elbows and straight pipes is proposed based on the reference stress approach, which was compared with corresponding solutions for straight pipes

  5. Elastic-plastic analysis of part-through crack propagation in piping and pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, L.A. de; Ebecken, N.F.F.

    1986-01-01

    The shell structures, often used in the construction of reservoirs, pipings, pressure vessels, nuclear power plants, etc, with part-through crack along its thickness, are analysed, using a computer system developed by the finite element method. The surface is discretized with three-dimensional quadratic elements, degenerated in its mid-surface, such the fracture is simulated by scalar elements (non linear springs). The results are analysed by the stress intensity factor K Sub(I) and the strain energy release rate, which is known as J-integral. The analysis is performed in the elastic and elastic-plastic regime. The basic hipothesis and the formulation adopted in the derivation of the scalar elements are also shown. (Author) [pt

  6. The periglacial engine of mountain erosion – Part 1: Rates of frost cracking and frost creep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. Andersen

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available With accelerating climate cooling in the late Cenozoic, glacial and periglacial erosion became more widespread on the surface of the Earth. The resultant shift in erosion patterns significantly changed the large-scale morphology of many mountain ranges worldwide. Whereas the glacial fingerprint is easily distinguished by its characteristic fjords and U-shaped valleys, the periglacial fingerprint is more subtle but potentially prevails in some mid- to high-latitude landscapes. Previous models have advocated a frost-driven control on debris production at steep headwalls and glacial valley sides. Here we investigate the important role that periglacial processes also play in less steep parts of mountain landscapes. Understanding the influences of frost-driven processes in low-relief areas requires a focus on the consequences of an accreting soil mantle, which characterises such surfaces. We present a new model that quantifies two key physical processes: frost cracking and frost creep, as a function of both temperature and sediment thickness. Our results yield new insights into how climate and sediment transport properties combine to scale the intensity of periglacial processes. The thickness of the soil mantle strongly modulates the relation between climate and the intensity of mechanical weathering and sediment flux. Our results also point to an offset between the conditions that promote frost cracking and those that promote frost creep, indicating that a stable climate can provide optimal conditions for only one of those processes at a time. Finally, quantifying these relations also opens up the possibility of including periglacial processes in large-scale, long-term landscape evolution models, as demonstrated in a companion paper.

  7. Recommended ALIs and DACs for 10 CFR part 220: A consistent numerical set

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eckerman, K.F.

    1996-05-01

    Appendix B to 10 CFR Part 20 contains numerical data for controlling the intake of radionuclides in the workplace or in the environment. These data, derived from the recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), do not provide a numerically consistent basis for demonstrating compliance with the limitation on dose stated in the regulation. This situation is largely a consequence of the numerical procedures used by the ICRP which did not maintain, in a strict numerical sense, the hierarchial relationship among the radiation protection quantities. In this work recommended values of the quantities in Appendix B to CFR Part 20 are developed using the dose coefficients of the applicable ICRP publications and a numerical procedure which ensures that the tabulated quantities are numerically consistent.

  8. Standard Practice for Ensuring Test Consistency in Neutron-Induced Displacement Damage of Electronic Parts

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2007-01-01

    1.1 This practice sets forth requirements to ensure consistency in neutron-induced displacement damage testing of silicon and gallium arsenide electronic piece parts. This requires controls on facility, dosimetry, tester, and communications processes that affect the accuracy and reproducibility of these tests. It provides background information on the technical basis for the requirements and additional recommendations on neutron testing. In addition to neutrons, reactors are used to provide gamma-ray pulses of intensities and durations that are not achievable elsewhere. This practice also provides background information and recommendations on gamma-ray testing of electronics using nuclear reactors. 1.2 Methods are presented for ensuring and validating consistency in neutron displacement damage testing of electronic parts such as integrated circuits, transistors, and diodes. The issues identified and the controls set forth in this practice address the characterization and suitability of the radiation environm...

  9. Stress-Corrosion Cracking of Metallic Materials. Part III. Hydrogen Entry and Embrittlement in Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-04-01

    work of Kerns (36)] 29 22 Crack Velocity vs. Stress Intensity for AISI 4340 Steel (Martensitic and Bainitic Structures) in 314 NaCl Solution (pit = 6.0...magnitude greater for 4340 steel with a tempered martensite structure than for the lower bainite structure. Figure 22 shows crack velocity as a function of...applied stress intensity for martensitic and bainitic steels . The dif- ference was attributed to more effective trapping of hydrogen at coher- ently

  10. Applications of energy-release-rate techniques to part-through cracks in experimental pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bass, B.R.; Bryan, R.H.; Bryson, J.W.; Merkle, J.G.

    1982-01-01

    In nonlinear applications of computational fracture mechanics, energy release rate techniques are used increasingly for computing stress intensity parameters of crack configurations. Recently, deLorenzi used the virtual-crack-extension method to derive an analytical expression for the energy release rate that is better suited for three-dimensional calculations than the well-known J-integral. Certain studies of fracture phenomena, such as pressurized-thermal-shock of cracked structures, require that crack tip parameters be determined for combined thermal and mechanical loads. A method is proposed here that modifies the isothermal formulation of deLorenzi to account for thermal strains in cracked bodies. This combined thermo-mechanical formulation of the energy release rate is valid for general fracture, including nonplanar fracture, and applies to thermo-elastic as well as deformation plasticity material models. Two applications of the technique are described here. In the first, semi-elliptical surface cracks in an experimental test vessel are analyzed under elastic-plastic conditions using the finite element method. The second application is a thick-walled test vessel subjected to combined pressure and thermal shock loadings

  11. In defence of andragogy. Part 2: An educational process consistent with modern nursing's aims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milligan, F

    1997-12-01

    In 1987 the English National Board (1987) made it clear that it supported a move towards an andragogical approach to nurse education. Recently such moves have been questioned as has the validity of andragogy (Darbyshire 1993). In response to such challenges this paper extends some of the arguments made in the article 'In defence of andragogy' (Milligan 1995). It is argued that andragogy provides a framework within which care and other crucial aspects of the nurse-patient/client relationship can be mirrored and thereby facilitated in future practitioners. In the socialization processes inherent in nurse education, care is surely difficult to teach or facilitate unless the philosophy and methods are consistent with such ends. Furthermore, it is frequently argued that as educationalists we need to be consistent in our approach to students with that which we hope to see in their future practice (Bevis & Murray 1990). Andragogy offers a medium through which this can be facilitated. It is essentially a humanistic educational process that values the individual. The power relationship between the educator and student is much more horizontal than is found in the historically common hierarchical educational relationship. An educational process based upon andragogy therefore mirrors important parts of the nurse-patient/client relationship. It offers a theory of education consistent with the aims of modern day nursing practice. We should seek to improve our understanding of andragogy and no longer conceptualize it as one end of a false dichotomy with pedagogy.

  12. The periglacial engine of mountain erosion – Part 1: Rates of frost cracking and frost creep

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jane Lund; Egholm, David Lundbek; Knudsen, Mads Faurschou

    2015-01-01

    present a new model that quantifies two key physical processes: frost cracking and frost creep, as a function of both temperature and sediment thickness. Our results yield new insights into how climate and sediment transport properties combine to scale the intensity of periglacial processes. The thickness...... of the soil mantle strongly modulates the relation between climate and the intensity of mechanical weathering and sediment flux. Our results also point to an offset between the conditions that promote frost cracking and those that promote frost creep, indicating that a stable climate can provide optimal...

  13. Application of ultrasonic inspection technique for crack depth sizing on nickel based alloy weld. Part 3. Establishment of UT procedure for crack depth sizing by phased array UT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirasawa, Taiji; Okada, Hisao; Fukutomi, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    Recently, it is reported that the primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) was occurred at the nickel based alloy weld components such as steam generator safe end weld, reactor vessel safe end weld, and so on, in PWR. Defect detection and sizing is important in order to ensure the reliable operation and life extension of nuclear power plants. In the reactor vessel safe end weld, it was impossible to measure crack depth of PWSCC. The crack was detected in the axial direction of the safe end weld. Furthermore, the crack had some features such as shallow, large aspect ratio (ratio of crack depth and length), sharp geometry of crack tip, and so on. Therefore, development and improvement of defect detection and sizing capabilities for ultrasonic testing (UT) is required. Phased array technique was applied to nickel based alloy weld specimen with SCC cracks. From the experimental results, good accuracy of crack depth sizing by phased array UT for the inside inspection was shown. From these results, UT procedure for crack depth sizing was verified. Therefore, effectiveness of phased array UT for crack depth sizing in the nickel based alloy welds was shown. (author)

  14. Multispecimen fatigue crack propagation testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ermi, A.M.; Bauer, R.E.; Chin, B.A.; Straalsund, J.L.

    1981-01-01

    Chains of miniature center-cracked-tension specimens were tested on a conventional testing machine and on a prototypic in-reactor fatigue machine as part of the fusion reactor materials alloy development program. Annealed and 20 percent cold-worked 316 stainless steel specimens were cycled under various conditions of temperature, frequency, stress ratio and chain length. Crack growth rates determined from multispecimen visual measurements and from an electrical potential technique were consistent with those obtained by conventional test methods. Results demonstrate that multispecimen chain testing is a valid method of obtaining fatigue crack propagation information for alloy development. 8 refs

  15. Causes of Cracking in Quenching of the Parts Made of Steels and Cast Iron and Recommendations for Their Removal: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, A. A.; Rudnev, V. I.

    2017-12-01

    The domestic and foreign experience on revealing the causes of quenching cracking and its prevention is generalized. We consider the works performed on the machine parts made of carbon and alloyed pearlitic steel and quenchable cast irons.

  16. Crack initiation criteria for singular stress concentrations Part I: A universal assessment of singular stress concentrations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Knésl, Zdeněk; Klusák, Jan; Náhlík, Luboš

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 6 (2007), s. 399-408 ISSN 1802-1484 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA101/05/0320; GA ČR GA101/05/0227 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : fracture mechanics * stability criteria * singular stress concentrations * crack initiation * critical stress Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics

  17. Modelling and parameter estimation in reactive continuous mixtures: the catalytic cracking of alkanes - part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. C. PEIXOTO

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available Fragmentation kinetics is employed to model a continuous reactive mixture of alkanes under catalytic cracking conditions. Standard moment analysis techniques are employed, and a dynamic system for the time evolution of moments of the mixture's dimensionless concentration distribution function (DCDF is found. The time behavior of the DCDF is recovered with successive estimations of scaled gamma distributions using the moments time data.

  18. Electrochemical studies on stress corrosion cracking of incoloy-800 in caustic solution. Part II: Precracking samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinu Alice

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Stress corrosion cracking (SCC in a caustic medium may affect the secondary circuit tubing of a CANDU NPP cooled with river water, due to an accidental formation of a concentrated alkaline environment in the areas with restricted circulation, as a result of a leakage of cooling water from the condenser. To evaluate the susceptibility of Incoloy-800 (used to manufacture steam generator tubes for CANDU NPP to SCC, some accelerated corrosion tests were conducted in an alkaline solution (10% NaOH, pH = 13. These experiments were performed at ambient temperature and 85 °C. We used the potentiodynamic method and the potentiostatic method, simultaneously monitoring the variation of the open circuit potential during a time period (E corr/time curve. The C-ring method was used to stress the samples. In order to create stress concentrations, mechanical precracks with a depth of 100 or 250 μm were made on the outer side of the C-rings. Experimental results showed that the stressed samples were more susceptible to SCC than the unstressed samples whereas the increase in temperature and crack depth lead to an increase in SCC susceptibility. Incipient micro cracks of a depth of 30 μm were detected in the area of the highest peak of the mechanical precrack.

  19. Ultrasonic sectional imaging for crack identification. Part 1. Confirmation test of essential factors for ultrasonic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasahara, Toshihiko

    2008-01-01

    Since the first reports of inter-granular stress corrosion crack (IGSCC) in boiling water reactor (BWR) pipe in the 1970s, nuclear power industry has focused considerable attention on service induced crack detection and sizing using ultrasonic examination. In recent years, phased array systems, those reconstruct high quality flaw images at real time are getting to apply for crack detection and sizing. But because the price of phased array systems are expensive for inspection vendors, field application of phased array systems are limited and reliable ultrasonic imaging systems with reasonable price are expected. This paper will discuss cost effective ultrasonic equipment with sectional image (B-scan) presentation as the simplified imaging system for assisting ultrasonic examination personnel. To develop the simplified B-scan imaging system, the frequency characteristics of IGSCC echoes and neighboring geometry echoes such as base-metal to weld interface and inner surface of a pipe are studied. The experimental study confirmed the reflectors have different frequency characteristics and 2MHz is suitable to visualize IGSCC and 5MHz and higher frequency are suitable to reconstruct geometry images. The other study is the amplifier selection for the imaging system. To reconstruct images of IGSCC and geometry echoes, the ultrasonic imaging instrument with linear amplifier has to adjust gain setting to the target. On the other hand, the ultrasonic imaging instrument with logarithmic amplifier can collect and display wider dynamic range on a screen and this wider dynamic range are effective to visualize IGSCC and geometry echoes on a B-scan presentation at a time. (author)

  20. Small Crack Growth and Fatigue Life Predictions for High-Strength Aluminium Alloys. Part 1; Experimental and Fracture Mechanics Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, X. R.; Newman, J. C.; Zhao, W.; Swain, M. H.; Ding, C. F.; Phillips, E. P.

    1998-01-01

    The small crack effect was investigated in two high-strength aluminium alloys: 7075-T6 bare and LC9cs clad alloy. Both experimental and analytical investigations were conducted to study crack initiation and growth of small cracks. In the experimental program, fatigue tests, small crack and large crack tests A,ere conducted under constant amplitude and Mini-TWIST spectrum loading conditions. A pronounced small crack effect was observed in both materials, especially for the negative stress ratios. For all loading conditions, most of the fatigue life of the SENT specimens was shown to be crack propagation from initial material defects or from the cladding layer. In the analysis program, three-dimensional finite element and A weight function methods were used to determine stress intensity factors and to develop SIF equations for surface and corner cracks at the notch in the SENT specimens. A plastisity-induced crack-closure model was used to correlate small and large crack data, and to make fatigue life predictions, Predicted crack-growth rates and fatigue lives agreed well with experiments. A total fatigue life prediction method for the aluminum alloys was developed and demonstrated using the crack-closure model.

  1. Single-field consistency relations of large scale structure part III: test of the equivalence principle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Creminelli, Paolo [Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Strada Costiera 11, Trieste, 34151 (Italy); Gleyzes, Jérôme; Vernizzi, Filippo [CEA, Institut de Physique Théorique, Gif-sur-Yvette cédex, F-91191 France (France); Hui, Lam [Physics Department and Institute for Strings, Cosmology and Astroparticle Physics, Columbia University, New York, NY, 10027 (United States); Simonović, Marko, E-mail: creminel@ictp.it, E-mail: jerome.gleyzes@cea.fr, E-mail: lhui@astro.columbia.edu, E-mail: msimonov@sissa.it, E-mail: filippo.vernizzi@cea.fr [SISSA, via Bonomea 265, Trieste, 34136 (Italy)

    2014-06-01

    The recently derived consistency relations for Large Scale Structure do not hold if the Equivalence Principle (EP) is violated. We show it explicitly in a toy model with two fluids, one of which is coupled to a fifth force. We explore the constraints that galaxy surveys can set on EP violation looking at the squeezed limit of the 3-point function involving two populations of objects. We find that one can explore EP violations of order 10{sup −3}÷10{sup −4} on cosmological scales. Chameleon models are already very constrained by the requirement of screening within the Solar System and only a very tiny region of the parameter space can be explored with this method. We show that no violation of the consistency relations is expected in Galileon models.

  2. Role of cavity formation in SCC of cold worked carbon steel in high-temperature water. Part 2. Study of crack initiation behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Takuyo; Aoki, Masanori; Miyamoto, Tomoki; Arioka, Koji

    2013-01-01

    To consider the role of cavity formation in stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of cold worked (CW) carbon steel in high-temperature water, SCC and creep growth (part 1) and initiation (part 2) tests were performed. The part 2 crack initiation tests used blunt notched compact tension (CT) type specimens of CW carbon steel exposed under the static load condition in hydrogenated pure water and in air in the range of temperatures between 360 and 450°C. Inter-granular (IG) crack initiation was observed both in water and in air even in static load condition when steel specimens had been cold worked. 1/T type temperature dependencies of initiation times were observed for CW carbon steel, and the crack initiation times in an operating pressurized heavy water reactor, PHWR (Pt Lepreau) seemed to lie on the extrapolated line of the experimental results. Cavities were identified at the grain boundaries near the bottom of a notch (highly stressed location) before cracks initiated both in water and air. The cavities were probably formed by the condensation of vacancies and they affected the bond strength of the grain boundaries. To assess the mechanism of IGSCC initiation in high temperature water, the diffusion of vacancies driven by stress gradients was studied using a specially designed CT specimen. As a model for IGSCC in CW carbon steel in high temperature water, it was concluded that the formation of cavities from the collapse of vacancies offers the best interpretation of the present data. (author)

  3. K{sub I}-T estimation for embedded flaws in pipes - Part II: Circumferentially oriented cracks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qian Xudong, E-mail: cveqx@nus.edu.s [Department of Civil Engineering, National University of Singapore, 1 Engineering Drive 2, Singapore 117576 (Singapore)

    2010-04-15

    This paper, in parallel to the investigation on axially embedded cracks reported in the companion paper, presents a numerical study on the linear-elastic K{sub I} and T-stress values over the front of elliptical cracks circumferentially embedded in the wall of a pipe/cylindrical structure, under a uniform pressure applied on the inner surface of the pipe. The numerical procedure employs the interaction-integral approach to compute the linear-elastic stress-intensity factor (SIF) K{sub I} and T-stress values for embedded cracks with practical sizes at different locations in the wall of the pipe. The parametric study covers a wide range of geometric parameters for embedded cracks in the pipe, including: the wall thickness to the inner radius ratio (t/R{sub i}), the crack depth over the wall thickness ratio (a/t), the crack aspect ratio (a/c) and the ratio of the distance from the centerline of the crack to the outer surface of the pipe over the pipe wall thickness (e{sub M}/t). The parametric investigation identifies a significant effect of the remaining ligament length on both the T-stress and K{sub I} values at the crack-front location (denoted by point O) nearest to the outer surface of the pipe and at the crack-front location (denoted by point I) nearest to the inner surface of the pipe. The numerical investigation establishes the database to derive approximate functions from a nonlinear curve-fitting procedure to predict the T-stress and K{sub I} values at three critical front locations of the circumferentially embedded crack in a pipe: points O, I and M. The proposed T-stress and K{sub I} functions utilize a combined second-order polynomial and a power-law expression, which presents a close agreement with the T-stress and K{sub I} values computed from the very detailed finite element models. The comparison between the circumferentially embedded crack and the axially embedded crack indicates that both the T-stress and K{sub I} values at crack-front points O and

  4. Corrosion fatigue crack growth in clad low-alloy steels: Part 1, medium-sulfur forging steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, L.A.; Poskie, T.J.; Auten, T.A.; Cullen, W.H.

    1996-01-01

    Corrosion fatigue crack propagation tests were conducted on a medium- sulfur ASTM A508-2 forging steel overlaid with weld-deposited Alloy EN82H cladding. The specimens featured semi-elliptical surface cracks penetrating approximately 6.3 mm of cladding into the underlying steel. The initial crack sizes were relatively large with surface lengths of 30.3--38.3 mm, and depths of 13.1--16.8 mm. The experiments were conducted in a quasi-stagnant low-oxygen (O 2 < 10 ppb) aqueous environment at 243 degrees C, under loading conditions (ΔK, R, and cyclic frequency) conductive to environmentally-assisted cracking (EAC) in higher-sulfur steels under quasi-stagnant conditions. Earlier experiments on unclad compact tension specimens of this heat of steel did not exhibit EAC, and the present experiments on semi-elliptical surface cracks penetrating cladding also did not exhibit EAC

  5. Prediction of crack propagation and arrest in X100 natural gas transmission pipelines with a strain rate dependent damage model (SRDD). Part 2: Large scale pipe models with gas depressurisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oikonomidis, F.; Shterenlikht, A.; Truman, C.E.

    2014-01-01

    Part 1 of this paper described a specimen for the measurement of high strain rate flow and fracture properties of pipe material and for tuning a strain rate dependent damage model (SRDD). In part 2 the tuned SRDD model is used for the simulation of axial crack propagation and arrest in X100 natural gas pipelines. Linear pressure drop model was adopted behind the crack tip, and an exponential gas depressurisation model was used ahead of the crack tip. The model correctly predicted the crack initiation (burst) pressure, the crack speed and the crack arrest length. Strain rates between 1000 s −1 and 3000 s −1 immediately ahead of the crack tip are predicted, giving a strong indication that a strain rate material model is required for the structural integrity assessment of the natural gas pipelines. The models predict the stress triaxiality of about 0.65 for at least 1 m ahead of the crack tip, gradually dropping to 0.5 at distances of about 5–7 m ahead of the crack tip. Finally, the models predicted a linear drop in crack tip opening angle (CTOA) from about 11−12° at the onset of crack propagation down to 7−8° at crack arrest. Only the lower of these values agree with those reported in the literature for quasi-static measurements. This discrepancy might indicate substantial strain rate dependence in CTOA. - Highlights: • Finite element simulations of 3 burst tests of X100 pipes are detailed. • Strain rate dependent damage model, tuned on small scale X100 samples, was used. • The models correctly predict burst pressure, crack speed and crack arrest length. • The model predicts a crack length dependent critical CTOA. • The strain rate dependent damage model is verified as mesh independent

  6. K{sub I}-T estimations for embedded flaws in pipes - Part I: Axially oriented cracks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qian Xudong, E-mail: cveqx@nus.edu.s [Department of Civil Engineering, National University of Singapore, 1 Engineering Drive 2, Singapore 117576 (Singapore)

    2010-04-15

    This study reports a numerical investigation on the linear-elastic K{sub I} and T-stress values over the front of elliptical cracks axially embedded in the wall of a pipe/cylindrical structure, under a uniform pressure applied on the inner surface of the pipe. The numerical procedure employs an interaction integral approach to compute the linear-elastic stress intensity factor (SIF) K{sub I} and T-stress values from very detailed crack-front meshes. The verification study confirms the accuracy of the adopted numerical procedure in computing the K{sub I} values based on existing results for external axial surface cracks in the wall of a cylindrical structure. The parametric investigation covers a wide range of geometric parameters including: the wall thickness to the inner radius ratio of the pipe (t/R{sub i}), the crack depth over the wall thickness ratio (a/t), the crack aspect ratio (a/c) and the crack location measured by the ratio of the distance from the centerline of the crack to the outer surface of the pipe over the pipe wall thickness (e{sub M}/t). Subsequent efforts develop, from a nonlinear curve-fitting procedure, a new set of equations to estimate the T-stress and K{sub I} values at three critical front locations of the axial elliptical cracks: the crack-front point O nearest to the outer surface of the pipe, the crack-front point I nearest to the inner surface of the pipe and the crack-front point M on the centerline of the axial crack. These equations combine a second-order polynomial with a power-law expression to predict the pronounced variations in the T-stress and K{sub I} values with respect to the geometric parameters. The coefficients of the new K{sub I} and T-stress equations either take a constant value or incorporate the linear variation with respect to the pipe wall thickness over the inner radius ratio, t/R{sub i}. The proposed equations demonstrate a close agreement with the finite element (FE) results, which indicate very strong

  7. Relative amplitude preservation processing utilizing surface consistent amplitude correction. Part 3; Surface consistent amplitude correction wo mochiita sotai shinpuku hozon shori. 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saeki, T [Japan National Oil Corporation, Tokyo (Japan). Technology Research Center

    1996-10-01

    For the seismic reflection method conducted on the ground surface, generator and geophone are set on the surface. The observed waveforms are affected by the ground surface and surface layer. Therefore, it is required for discussing physical properties of the deep underground to remove the influence of surface layer, preliminarily. For the surface consistent amplitude correction, properties of the generator and geophone were removed by assuming that the observed waveforms can be expressed by equations of convolution. This is a correction method to obtain records without affected by the surface conditions. In response to analysis and correction of waveforms, wavelet conversion was examined. Using the amplitude patterns after correction, the significant signal region, noise dominant region, and surface wave dominant region would be separated each other. Since the amplitude values after correction of values in the significant signal region have only small variation, a representative value can be given. This can be used for analyzing the surface consistent amplitude correction. Efficiency of the process can be enhanced by considering the change of frequency. 3 refs., 5 figs.

  8. Relative amplitude preservation processing utilizing surface consistent amplitude correction. Part 4; Surface consistent amplitude correction wo mochiita sotai shinpuku hozon shori. 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saeki, T [Japan National Oil Corp., Tokyo (Japan). Technology Research Center

    1997-10-22

    Discussions were given on seismic exploration from the ground surface using the reflection method, for surface consistent amplitude correction from among effects imposed from the ground surface and a surface layer. Amplitude distribution on the reflection wave zone is complex. Therefore, items to be considered in making an analysis are multiple, such as estimation of spherical surface divergence effect and exponential attenuation effect, not only amplitude change through the surface layer. If all of these items are taken into consideration, burden of the work becomes excessive. As a method to solve this problem, utilization of amplitude in initial movement of a diffraction wave may be conceived. Distribution of the amplitude in initial movement of the diffraction wave shows a value relatively close to distribution of the vibration transmitting and receiving points. The reason for this is thought because characteristics of the vibration transmitting and receiving points related with waveline paths in the vicinity of the ground surface have no great difference both on the diffraction waves and on the reflection waves. The lecture described in this paper introduces an attempt of improving the efficiency of the surface consistent amplitude correction by utilizing the analysis of amplitude in initial movement of the diffraction wave. 4 refs., 2 figs.

  9. Corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goel, V.S.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a conference on alloy corrosion cracking. Topics considered at the conference included the effect of niobium addition on intergranular stress corrosion cracking, corrosion-fatigue cracking in fossil-fueled-boilers, fracture toughness, fracture modes, hydrogen-induced thresholds, electrochemical and hydrogen permeation studies, the effect of seawater on fatigue crack propagation of wells for offshore structures, the corrosion fatigue of carbon steels in seawater, and stress corrosion cracking and the mechanical strength of alloy 600

  10. A study on fatigue crack growth behavior subjected to a single tensile overload: Part II. Transfer of stress concentration and its role in overload-induced transient crack growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.Y.; Choo, H.; Liaw, P.K.; An, K.; Hubbard, C.R.

    2011-01-01

    The combined effects of overload-induced enlarged compressive residual stresses and crack tip blunting with secondary cracks are suggested to be responsible for the observed changes in the crack opening load and resultant post-overload transient crack growth behavior [Lee SY, Liaw PK, Choo H, Rogge RB, Acta Mater 2010;59:485-94]. In this article, in situ neutron diffraction experiments were performed to quantify the influence of the combined effects by investigating the internal-stress evolution at various locations away from the crack tip. In the overload-retardation period, stress concentration occurs in the crack blunting region (an overload point) until a maximum crack arrest load is reached. The stress concentration is then transferred from the blunting region to the propagating crack tip (following the overload), requiring a higher applied load, as the closed crack is gradually opened. The transfer phenomena of the stress concentration associated with a crack opening process account for the nonlinearity of strain response in the vicinity of the crack tip. The delaying action of stress concentration at the crack tip is understood in conjunction with the concept of a critical stress (i.e. the stress required to open the closed crack behind the crack tip). A linear relationship between Δε eff and ΔK eff provides experimental support for the hypothesis that ΔK eff can be considered as the fatigue crack tip driving force.

  11. Influence of Pitting Corrosion on Fatigue and Corrosion Fatigue of Ship and Offshore Structures, Part II: Load - Pit - Crack Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakubowski Marek

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In the paper has been discussed influence of stresses on general corrosion rate and corrosion pit nucleation rate and growth , whose presence has been questioned by some authors but accepted by most of them. Influence of roughness of pit walls on fatigue life of a plate suffering pit corrosion and presence of the so called „ non-damaging” pits which never lead to initiation of fatigue crack, has been presented. Possibility of prediction of pit-to-crack transition moment by two different ways, i.e. considering a pit a stress concentrator or an equivalent crack, has been analyzed. Also, influence of statistical distribution of depth of corrosion pits as well as anticorrosion protection on fatigue and corrosion fatigue has been described.

  12. Chloride-induced corrosion of steel in cracked concrete – Part I: Experimental studies under accelerated and natural marine environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otieno, M.; Beushausen, H.; Alexander, M.

    2016-01-01

    Parallel corrosion experiments were carried out for 2¼ years by exposing one half of 210 beam specimens (120 × 130 × 375 mm long) to accelerated laboratory corrosion (cyclic wetting and drying) while the other half underwent natural corrosion in a marine tidal zone. Experimental variables were crack width w cr (0, incipient crack, 0.4, 0.7 mm), cover c (20, 40 mm), binder type (PC, PC/GGBS, PC/FA) and w/b ratio (0.40, 0.55). Results show that corrosion rate (i corr ) was affected by the experimental variables in the following manner: i corr increased with increase in crack width, and decreased with increase in concrete quality and cover depth. The results also show that the corrosion performance of concretes in the field under natural corrosion cannot be inferred from its performance in the laboratory under accelerated corrosion. Other factors such as corrosion process should be taken into account.

  13. The radiation swelling effect on fracture properties and fracture mechanisms of irradiated austenitic steels. Part II. Fatigue crack growth rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margolin, B., E-mail: margolinbz@yandex.ru; Minkin, A.; Smirnov, V.; Sorokin, A.; Shvetsova, V.; Potapova, V.

    2016-11-15

    The experimental data on the fatigue crack growth rate (FCGR) have been obtained for austenitic steel of 18Cr-10Ni-Ti grade (Russian analog of AISI 321 steel) irradiated up to neutron dose of 150 dpa with various radiation swelling. The performed study of the fracture mechanisms for cracked specimens under cyclic loading has explained why radiation swelling affects weakly FCGR unlike its effect on fracture toughness. Mechanical modeling of fatigue crack growth has been carried out and the dependencies for prediction of FCGR in irradiated austenitic steel with and with no swelling are proposed and verified with the obtained experimental results. As input data for these dependencies, FCGR for unirradiated steel and the tensile mechanical properties for unirradiated and irradiated steels are used.

  14. Simulation of fatigue crack growth under large scale yielding conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweizer, Christoph; Seifert, Thomas; Riedel, Hermann

    2010-07-01

    A simple mechanism based model for fatigue crack growth assumes a linear correlation between the cyclic crack-tip opening displacement (ΔCTOD) and the crack growth increment (da/dN). The objective of this work is to compare analytical estimates of ΔCTOD with results of numerical calculations under large scale yielding conditions and to verify the physical basis of the model by comparing the predicted and the measured evolution of the crack length in a 10%-chromium-steel. The material is described by a rate independent cyclic plasticity model with power-law hardening and Masing behavior. During the tension-going part of the cycle, nodes at the crack-tip are released such that the crack growth increment corresponds approximately to the crack-tip opening. The finite element analysis performed in ABAQUS is continued for so many cycles until a stabilized value of ΔCTOD is reached. The analytical model contains an interpolation formula for the J-integral, which is generalized to account for cyclic loading and crack closure. Both simulated and estimated ΔCTOD are reasonably consistent. The predicted crack length evolution is found to be in good agreement with the behavior of microcracks observed in a 10%-chromium steel.

  15. Automated system for crack detection using infrared thermograph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starman, Stanislav

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was the development of the automated system for crack detection on square steel bars used in the automotive industry for axle and shaft construction. The automated system for thermographic crack detection uses brief pulsed eddy currents to heat steel components under inspection. Cracks, if present, will disturb the current flow and so generate changes in the temperature profile in the crack area. These changes of temperature are visualized using an infrared camera. The image acquired by the infrared camera is evaluated through an image processing system. The advantages afforded by the system are its inspection time, its excellent flaw detection sensitivity and its ability to detect hidden, subsurface cracks. The automated system consists of four IR cameras (each side of steel bar is evaluated at a time), coil, high frequency generator and control place with computers. The system is a part of the inspection line where the subsurface and surface cracks are searched. If the crack is present, the cracked place is automatically marked. The components without cracks are then deposited apart from defective blocks. The system is fully automated and its ability is to evaluate four meter blocks within 20 seconds. This is the real reason for using this system in real industrial applications. (author)

  16. Crack layer theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudnovsky, A.

    1987-01-01

    A damage parameter is introduced in addition to conventional parameters of continuum mechanics and consider a crack surrounded by an array of microdefects within the continuum mechanics framework. A system consisting of the main crack and surrounding damage is called crack layer (CL). Crack layer propagation is an irreversible process. The general framework of the thermodynamics of irreversible processes are employed to identify the driving forces (causes) and to derive the constitutive equation of CL propagation, that is, the relationship between the rates of the crack growth and damage dissemination from one side and the conjugated thermodynamic forces from another. The proposed law of CL propagation is in good agreement with the experimental data on fatigue CL propagation in various materials. The theory also elaborates material toughness characterization.

  17. Applications of energy-release-rate techniques to part-through cracks in plates and cylinders. Volume 2. ORVIRT: a finite element program for energy release rate calculations for 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional crack models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bass, B.R.; Bryson, J.W.

    1983-02-01

    Certain studies of fracture phenomena, such as pressurized-thermal-shock of cracked structures, require that crack tip parameters be determined for combined thermal and mechanical loads. A method is proposed here that modifies the isothermal formulation of deLorenzi to account for thermal strains in cracked bodies. The formulation has been implemented in the virtual-crack-extension program ORVIRT (Oak Ridge VIRTual-Crack-Extension). Program ORVIRT performs energy release rate calculations for both 2- and 3-dimensional nonlinear models of crack configurations in engineering structures. Two applications of the ORVIRT program are described. In the first, semielliptical surface cracks in an experimental test vessel are analyzed under elastic-plastic conditions using the finite element method. The second application is a thick-walled test vessel subjected to combined pressure and thermal shock loading

  18. Dynamic Crack Branching - A Photoelastic Evaluation,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-05-01

    0.41 mPai and a 0.18 MPa, and predicted a theoretical kinking angle of 84°whichagreed well with experimentally measured angle. After crack kinking...Consistent crack branching’at KIb = 2.04 MPaI -i- and r = 1.3 mm verified this crack branching criterion. The crack branching angle predicted by--.’ DD

  19. 49 CFR 536.10 - Treatment of dual-fuel and alternative fuel vehicles-consistency with 49 CFR part 538.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... vehicles-consistency with 49 CFR part 538. 536.10 Section 536.10 Transportation Other Regulations Relating... vehicles—consistency with 49 CFR part 538. (a) Statutory alternative fuel and dual-fuel vehicle fuel... economy in a particular compliance category by more than the limits set forth in 49 U.S.C. 32906(a), the...

  20. ORMGEN3D, 3-D Crack Geometry FEM Mesh Generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bass, B.R.; Bryson, J.W.

    1994-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: ORMGEN3D is a finite element mesh generator for computational fracture mechanics analysis. The program automatically generates a three-dimensional finite element model for six different crack geometries. These geometries include flat plates with straight or curved surface cracks and cylinders with part-through cracks on the outer or inner surface. Mathematical or user-defined crack shapes may be considered. The curved cracks may be semicircular, semi-elliptical, or user-defined. A cladding option is available that allows for either an embedded or penetrating crack in the clad material. 2 - Method of solution: In general, one eighth or one-quarter of the structure is modelled depending on the configuration or option selected. The program generates a core of special wedge or collapsed prism elements at the crack front to introduce the appropriate stress singularity at the crack tip. The remainder of the structure is modelled with conventional 20-node iso-parametric brick elements. Element group I of the finite element model consists of an inner core of special crack tip elements surrounding the crack front enclosed by a single layer of conventional brick elements. Eight element divisions are used in a plane orthogonal to the crack front, while the number of element divisions along the arc length of the crack front is user-specified. The remaining conventional brick elements of the model constitute element group II. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: Maxima of 5,500 nodes, 4 layers of clad elements

  1. Global limit load solutions for thick-walled cylinders with circumferential cracks under combined internal pressure, axial force and bending moment − Part II: Finite element validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Yuebing; Lei, Yuebao; Gao, Zengliang

    2014-01-01

    Global limit load solutions for thick-walled cylinders with circumferential internal/external surface and through-wall defects under combined positive/negative axial force, positive/negative global bending moment and internal pressure have been developed in Part I of this paper. In this Part II, elastic-perfectly plastic 3-D finite element (FE) analyses are performed for selected cases, covering a wide range of geometries and load combinations, to validate the developed limit load solutions. The results show that these limit load solutions can predict the FE data very well for the cases with shallow or deep and short cracks and are conservative. For the cases with very long and deep cracks, the predictions are reasonably accurate and more conservative. -- Highlights: • Elastic-perfectly plastic 3D finite element limiting analyses of cylinders. • Thin/thick-walled cylinders with circumferential surface defects. • Combined loading for pressure, end-force and global bending moment. • Totally 1458 cases analysed and tabulated normalised results provided. • Results used to validate the developed limit load solutions in Part I of this paper

  2. Ductile fracture behavior of 6-inch diameter type 304 stainless steel and STS 42 carbon steel piping containing a through-wall or part-through crack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Katsuyuki; Ohba, Toshihiro; Kawamura, Takaichi; Miyazono, Shohachiro; Kaneko, Tadashi; Yokoyama, Norio.

    1986-05-01

    The double ended guillotine break philosophy in the design base accident of the nuclear power plant is considered to be overly conservative from the view point of piping design. Through the past experiences and developments of the fabrication, inspection, and operation of nuclear power plants, it has been recognized that the Leak-Before-Break (LBB) concept can be justified in the LWR pressure boundary pipings. In order to verify the LBB concept, extensive experimental and theoretical works are being conducted in many countries. Furthermore, a revised piping design standard, in which LBB concept is introduced, is under preparation in Japan, U.S.A., and European countries. At JAERI, a research program to investigate the unstable ductile fracture behavior of LWR piping under bending load has been carried out as a part of the LBB verification researches since 1983. This report summarizes the result of the ductile fracture tests conducted at room temperature in 1983 and 84. The 6-inch diameter pipes of type 304 stainless steel and STS 42 carbon steel pipe with a through-wall or part-through crack were tested under bending load with low or high compliance condition at room temperature. Pipe fracture data were obtained from the test as regards to load- displacement curve, crack extension, net section stress, J-resistance curve, and so on. Besides, the influence of the compliance on the fracture behavior was examined. Discussions are performed on the ductile pipe fracture criterion, flaw evaluation criterion, and LBB evaluation method. (author)

  3. French RSE-M and RCC-MR code appendices for flaw analysis: Presentation of the fracture parameters calculation-Part IV: Cracked elbows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marie, S.; Chapuliot, S.; Kayser, Y.; Lacire, M.H.; Drubay, B.; Barthelet, B.; Le Delliou, P.; Rougier, V.; Naudin, C.; Gilles, P.; Triay, M.

    2007-01-01

    Two French nuclear codes include flaw assessment procedures: the RSE-M Code 'Rules for In-service Inspection of Nuclear Power Plant Components' and the RCC-MR code 'Design and Construction rules for mechanical components of FBR nuclear islands and high temperature applications'. Development of analytical methods has been made for the last 10 years through a collaboration between CEA, EDF and AREVA-NP, and through R and D actions involving CEA and IRSN. These activities have led to unification of the common methods of the two codes. The calculation of fracture mechanics parameters, and in particular the stress intensity factor K I and the J integral, has been widely developed for industrial configurations. All the developments have been integrated in the 2005 edition of RSE-M and in 2007 edition of RCC-MR. This series of papers is composed of five parts: the first presents an overview of the methods proposed in the RCC-MR and RSE-M codes. Parts II-IV provide compendia for specific components. The geometries are plates (part II), pipes (part III) and elbows (part IV). Part V presents validation of the methods, with details on their accuracy. This paper presents the stress intensity factor and J calculation for cracked elbows. General data applicable for all defect geometries are first presented, and then, compendia for K I and σ ref calculations are provided for the available defect geometries

  4. The effect of low energy protons on silicon solar cells with simulated coverglass cracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasner, S.; Anspaugh, B.; Francis, R.; Marvin, D.

    1991-01-01

    Results of a series of low-energy proton (LEP) tests are presented. The purpose of the tests was to investigate the effect of low-energy protons on the electrical performance of solar cells with simulated cracked covers. The results of the tests were then related to the space environment. A matrix of LEP tests was set up using solar cells with simulated cracks to determine the effect on electrical performance as a function of fluence, energy, crack width, coverglass adhesive shielding, crack location, and solar cell size. The results of the test were, for the most part, logical, and consistent.

  5. Electro chemical studies on stress corrosion cracking of Incoloy-800 in caustic solution, part I: As received samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinu Alice

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Many non-volatile impurities accidentally introduced into the steam generator tend to Concentrate on its surface in restricted flow areas. In this way these impurities can lead to stress corrosion cracking (SCC on stressed tubes of the steam generator. Such impurities can be strong alkaline or acid solutions. To evaluate the effect of alkaline concentrated environments on SCC of steam generator tubes, the tests were con ducted on stressed samples of Incoloy-800 in 10% NaOH solution. To accelerate the SCC process, stressed specimens were anodically polarised in a caustic solution in an electro chemical cell. The method of stressing of Incoloy-800 tubes used in our experiments was the C-ring. Using the cathodic zone of the potentiodynamic curves it was possible to calculate the most important electrochemical parameters: the corrosion current, the corrosion rate, and the polarization resistance. We found that the value of the corrosion potential to initiate the SCC microcracks was -100 mV. The tested samples were examined using the metallographic method. The main experimental results showed that the in crease of the stress state promoted the in crease of the SCC susceptibility of Incoloy-800 samples tested under the same conditions, and that the length of the SCC-type microcracks in creased with the growth of the stress value.

  6. The effect of potential on the high-temperature fatigue crack growth response of low alloy steels: Part II, electrochemical results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moshier, W.C.; James, L.A.

    1997-01-01

    Environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) in low alloy steels was found to be dependent on externally applied potential in low sulfur steels in high temperature water. EAC could be turned on when the specimen was polarized anodically above a critical potential. However, hydrogen (H) additions inhibited the ability of potential to affect EAC. The behavior was related to formation of H ions during H oxidation at the crack mouth. A mechanism based on formation of H sulfide at the crack tip and H ions at the crack mouth is presented to describe the process by which sulfides and H ions affect the critical sulfide concentration at the crack tip

  7. A consistent derivation of the real and imaginary parts of the heavy ion potential below and above the Coulomb barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinh Mau, N.

    1987-03-01

    In a model including approximately a large set of non elastic channels, the real and imaginary potentials are consistently derived. The anomaly of the real potential which sharply increases in the vicinity of the Coulomb barrier where the imaginary potential is strongly reduced is studied in 16 0+ 40 Ca and 16 O+ 208 Pb systems. The results on the imaginary potential are discussed and compared to our previous calculation

  8. [Discomfort associated with dental extraction surgery and development of a questionnaire (QCirDental). Part I: Impacts and internal consistency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortoluzzi, Marcelo Carlos; Martins, Luciana Dorochenko; Takahashi, André; Ribeiro, Bianca; Martins, Ligiane; Pinto, Marcia Helena Baldani

    2018-01-01

    The scope of this study was to develop and validate a questionnaire (QCirDental) to measure the impacts associated with dental extraction surgery. The QCirDental questionnaire was developed in two steps; (1) question and item generation and selection, and (2) pretest of the questionnaire with evaluation of the its measurement properties (internal consistency and responsiveness). The sample was composed of 123 patients. None of the patients had any difficulty in understanding the QCirDental. The instrument was found to have excellent internal consistency with Cronbach's alpha reliability coefficient of 0.83. The principal component analysis (Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin Measure of Sampling Adequacy 0,72 and Bartlett's Test of Sphericity with p < 0.001) showed six (6) dimensions explaining 67.5% of the variance. The QCirDental presented excellent internal consistency, being a questionnaire that is easy to read and understand with adequate semantic and content validity. More than 80% of the patients who underwent dental extraction reported some degree of discomfort within the perioperative period which highlights the necessity to assess the quality of care and impacts of dental extraction surgery.

  9. Coke Formation During Hydrocarbons Pyrolysis. Part Two: Methane Thermal Cracking Formation de coke pendant la pyrolyse des hydrocarbures. Deuxième partie : pyrolyse du méthane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Billaud F.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Part one of this article dealt with coking in a steam cracking furnace. In this process, coke deposition is a very complex phenomenon due to the number of parameters involved. Nevertheless, for this process, coke deposition is a secondary reaction which does not affect steam cracking yields. It is completely different for methane thermal cracking. Coke is one of the main products of this reaction. Part two of this article deals with coke deposition on the walls of the reactors used for methane thermal cracking. After a brief description of the different set-ups used to study coke deposition, the main parameters involved are listed. The importance of temperature, conversion, type of diluent, and hydrocarbon partial pressure will be enhanced. To conclude, two approaches to the mechanism are proposed to explain coke formation during methane thermal cracking. La première partie de cet article faisait le point sur les réactions indésirables de cokage dans les réacteurs de vapocraquage : dans le cadre de ce procédé, la formation de coke est un phénomène complexe du fait du nombre important de paramètres mis en jeu. Toutefois, pour ce procédé, la réaction de formation du coke à la paroi des réacteurs est une réaction secondaire qui n'affecte pas les rendements de vapocraquage. Ceci est complètement différent dans le cas de la pyrolyse thermique du méthane, procédé pour lequel le coke est un produit principal et indésirable de la réaction. La seconde partie de cet article est consacrée plus particulièrement à la formation du coke, lors de la pyrolyse du méthane et présente les principaux résultats expérimentaux décrits dans la littérature. Parmi les différents montages expérimentaux utilisés pour mesurer le dépôt de coke, il est mentionné, à partir des travaux de la littérature, les 2 techniques suivantes : - la technique de la paroi chaude, - la technique du fil chaud. Pour la première technique, les montages exp

  10. French RSE-M and RCC-MR code appendices for flaw analysis: Presentation of the fracture parameters calculation-Part II: Cracked plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marie, S.; Chapuliot, S.; Kayser, Y.; Lacire, M.H.; Drubay, B.; Barthelet, B.; Le Delliou, P.; Rougier, V.; Naudin, C.; Gilles, P.; Triay, M.

    2007-01-01

    French nuclear codes include flaw assessment procedures: the RSE-M Code 'Rules for In-service Inspection of Nuclear Power Plant Components' and the RCC-MR code 'Design and Construction rules for mechanical components of FBR nuclear islands and high temperature applications'. An important effort of development of these analytical methods has been made for the last 10 years in the frame of a collaboration between CEA, EDF and AREVA-NP, and in the frame of R and D actions involving CEA and IRSN. These activities have led to a unification of the common methods of the two codes. The calculation of fracture mechanics parameters, and in particular the stress intensity factor K I and the J integral, has been widely developed for industrial configurations. All the developments have been integrated in the 2005 edition of RSE-M and in the 2007 edition of RCC-MR. This series of articles is composed of 5 parts: the first part presents an overview of the methods proposed in the RCC-MR and RSE-M codes. Parts II-IV provide compendia for specific components. The geometries are plates (part II), pipes (part III) and elbows (part IV). Finally, part V presents the validation elements of the methods, with details on the process followed for the development and evaluation of the accuracy of the proposed analytical methods. This second article in the series presents all details for the stress intensity factor and J calculations for cracked plates. General data applicable for all defect geometries are first presented, and then, available defect geometries where compendia for K I and σ ref calculation are provided are given

  11. SSRI Facilitated Crack Dancing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Doobay

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Choreoathetoid movement secondary to cocaine use is a well-documented phenomenon better known as “crack dancing.” It consists of uncontrolled writhing movements secondary to excess dopamine from cocaine use. We present a 32-year-old male who had been using cocaine for many years and was recently started on paroxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI for worsening depression four weeks before presentation. He had been doing cocaine every 2 weeks for the last three years and had never “crack danced” before this episode. The authors have conducted a thorough literature review and cited studies that suggest “crack dancing” is associated with excess dopamine. There has never been a documented case report of an SSRI being linked with “crack dancing.” The authors propose that the excess dopaminergic effect of the SSRI lowered the dopamine threshold for “crack dancing.” There is a communication with the Raphe Nucleus and the Substantia Nigra, which explains how the SSRI increases dopamine levels. This is the first documented case of an SSRI facilitating the “crack dance.”

  12. Physico-chemical properties of Brazilian cocoa butter and industrial blends. Part I Chemical composition, solid fat content and consistency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ribeiro, A. P. B.

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available A comparative study of the primary properties of six cocoa butter samples, representative of industrial blends and cocoa butter extracted from fruits cultivated in different geographical areas in Brazil is presented. The samples were evaluated according to fatty acid composition, triacylglycerol composition, regiospecific distribution, melting point, solid fat content and consistency. The results allowed for differentiating the samples according to their chemical compositions, thermal resistance properties, hardness characteristics, as well as technological adequacies and potential use in regions with tropical climates.

    En este trabajo se presenta un estudio comparativo de las propiedades primarias de mantecas de cacao, representativas de las mezclas industriales, y de la manteca de cacao original de diferentes zonas geográficas de Brasil. Las muestras fueron evaluadas de acuerdo a la composición de ácidos grasos, composición de triglicéridos, distribución de los ácidos grasos en las moléculas de triglicéridos, punto de fusión, contenido de grasa sólida y consistencia. Los resultados permitieron diferenciar las muestras por su composición química, propiedades de resistencia térmica, características de dureza, así como en materia de adecuaciones tecnológicas y los usos potenciales en las regiones de clima tropical.

  13. STUDY ON ANTI-CRACKING PERFORMANCE EVALUATION METHOD OF STEEL FIBER REINFORCED CERAMSITE CONCRETE (SFRCC BASED ON PARTLY-RESTRAINED SHRINKAGE RING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Yi-fan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In the study of crack resistance of steel fiber reinforced concrete in steel fiber on concrete deformation ability and prevent the Angle of the micro cracks, and the lack of overall evaluation on the performance of steel fiber reinforced concrete crack. By tinder barrier-free restrain some experimental research on steel fiber ceramsite concrete shrinkage ring crack resistance, and use the test results within the definition of steel ring strain from expansion to contraction cut-off age for early and late ages, and the ages of the cut-off point for the early and the late steel fiber ceramsite concrete anti-cracking performance evaluation. The results show that the anti-cracking properties of the steel fiber ceramic concrete are improved with the increase of steel fiber content.

  14. Analysis of cracking in glass molds made of cast iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leushin, I. O.; Chistyakov, D. G.

    2014-09-01

    The cracking in the parts of cast iron molds intended for glass is considered, and this cracking substantially affects the operation of glass-blowing equipment, maintainability, and the replacement of mold sets. The processes that cause cracking in the parts of glass molds and initiate crack growth are studied.

  15. Corrosion fatigue crack growth in clad low-alloy steels. Part 2: Water flow rate effects in high-sulfur plate steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, L.A.; Lee, H.B.; Wire, G.L.; Novak, S.R.; Cullen, W.H.

    1997-01-01

    Corrosion fatigue crack propagation tests were conducted on a high-sulfur ASTM A302-B plate steel overlaid with weld-deposited Alloy EN82H cladding. The specimens featured semi-elliptical surface cracks penetrating approximately 6.3 mm of cladding into the underlying steel. The initial crack sizes were relatively large with surface lengths of 22.8--27.3 mm, and depths of 10.5--14.1 mm. The experiments were initiated in a quasi-stagnant low-oxygen (O 2 < 10 ppb) aqueous environment at 243 C, under loading conditions (ΔK, R, cyclic frequency) conducive to environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) under quasi-stagnant conditions. Following fatigue testing under quasi-stagnant conditions where EAC was observed, the specimens were then fatigue tested under conditions where active water flow of either 1.7 m/s or 4.7 m/s was applied parallel to the crack. Earlier experiments on unclad surface-cracked specimens of the same steel exhibited EAC under quasi-stagnant conditions, but water flow rates at 1.7 m/s and 5.0 m/s parallel to the crack mitigated EAC. In the present experiments on clad specimens, water flow at approximately the same as the lower of these velocities did not mitigate EAC, and a free stream velocity approximately the same as the higher of these velocities resulted in sluggish mitigation of EAC. The lack of robust EAC mitigation was attributed to the greater crack surface roughness in the cladding interfering with flow induced within the crack cavity. An analysis employing the computational fluid dynamics code, FIDAP, confirmed that frictional forces associated with the cladding crack surface roughness reduced the interaction between the free stream and the crack cavity

  16. Statistical crack mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dienes, J.K.

    1993-01-01

    Although it is possible to simulate the ground blast from a single explosive shot with a simple computer algorithm and appropriate constants, the most commonly used modelling methods do not account for major changes in geology or shot energy because mechanical features such as tectonic stresses, fault structure, microcracking, brittle-ductile transition, and water content are not represented in significant detail. An alternative approach for modelling called Statistical Crack Mechanics is presented in this paper. This method, developed in the seventies as a part of the oil shale program, accounts for crack opening, shear, growth, and coalescence. Numerous photographs and micrographs show that shocked materials tend to involve arrays of planar cracks. The approach described here provides a way to account for microstructure and give a representation of the physical behavior of a material at the microscopic level that can account for phenomena such as permeability, fragmentation, shear banding, and hot-spot formation in explosives

  17. Multiscale model of short cracks in a random polycrystalline aggregate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simonovski, I.; Cizelj, L.; Petric, Z.

    2006-01-01

    A plane-strain finite element crystal plasticity model of microstructurally small stationary crack emanating at a surface grain in a 316L stainless steel is proposed. The model consisting of 212 randomly shaped, sized and oriented grains is loaded monotonically in uniaxial tension to a maximum load of 1.12Rp0.2 (280MPa). The influence that a random grain structure imposes on a Stage I crack is assessed by calculating the crack tip opening (CTOD) and sliding displacements (CTSD) for single crystal as well as for polycrystal models, considering also different crystallographic orientations. In the single crystal case the CTOD and CTSD may differ by more than one order of magnitude. Near the crack tip slip is activated on all the slip planes whereby only two are active in the rest of the model. The maximum CTOD is directly related to the maximal Schmid factors. For the more complex polycrystal cases it is shown that certain crystallographic orientations result in a cluster of soft grains around the crack-containing grain. In these cases the crack tip can become a part of the localized strain, resulting in a large CTOD value. This effect, resulting from the overall grain orientations and sizes, can have a greater impact on the CTOD than the local grain orientation. On the other hand, when a localized soft response is formed away from the crack, the localized strain does not affect the crack tip directly, resulting in a small CTOD value. The resulting difference in CTOD can be up to a factor of 4, depending upon the crystallographic set. Grains as far as 6 times the value of crack length significantly influence that crack tip parameters. It was also found that a larger crack containing grain tends to increase the CTOD. Finally, smaller than expected drop in the CTOD (12.7%) was obtained as the crack approached the grain boundary. This could be due to the assumption of the unchanged crack direction, only monotonic loading and simplified grain boundary modelling. (author)

  18. Comparison of theoretical estimates and experimental measurements of fatigue crack growth under severe thermal shock conditions (part two - theoretical assessment and comparison with experiment)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, D.; Marsh, D.; Parker, R.

    1984-01-01

    This paper reports the theoretical assessment of cracking which may occur when a severe cycle comprising alternate upshocks and downshocks is applied to an axisymmetric feature with an internal, partial penetration weld and crevice. The experimental observations of cracking are reported separately. A good agreement was noted even though extensive cycle plasticity occurred at the location of cracking. It is concluded that the LEFM solution has correlated with the experiment mainly because of the axisymmetric geometry which allows a large hydrostatic stress to exist at the internal weld crevice end. Thus the stress at the crevice can approach the singular solution required for LEFM correlations without contributing to yielding

  19. Crack modeling of rotating blades with cracked hexahedral finite element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chao; Jiang, Dongxiang

    2014-06-01

    Dynamic analysis is the basis in investigating vibration features of cracked blades, where the features can be applied to monitor health state of blades, detect cracks in an early stage and prevent failures. This work presents a cracked hexahedral finite element method for dynamic analysis of cracked blades, with the purpose of addressing the contradiction between accuracy and efficiency in crack modeling of blades in rotor system. The cracked hexahedral element is first derived with strain energy release rate method, where correction of stress intensity factors of crack front and formulation of load distribution of crack surface are carried out to improve the modeling accuracy. To consider nonlinear characteristics of time-varying opening and closure effects caused by alternating loads, breathing function is proposed for the cracked hexahedral element. Second, finite element method with contact element is analyzed and used for comparison. Finally, validation of the cracked hexahedral element is carried out in terms of breathing effects of cracked blades and natural frequency in different crack depths. Good consistency is acquired between the results with developed cracked hexahedral element and contact element, while the computation time is significantly reduced in the previous one. Therefore, the developed cracked hexahedral element achieves good accuracy and high efficiency in crack modeling of rotating blades.

  20. Stability of cracked naphthas from thermal and catalytic processes and their additive response. Part 1. Evaluation of stability and additive response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagpal, J.M.; Joshi, G.C.; Rastogi, S.N. [Indian Institute of Petroleum, Dehradun (India)

    1995-05-01

    Olefinic naphthas derived from fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) or thermal cracking units are increasingly being used in high-octane motor gasoline with growing concern for resulting fuel quality. Hindered phenols and substituted arylamines are the two classes of antioxidants generally used for improving the stability of gasoline. The olefin types in cracked naphthas depend strongly on the process from which they are derived and hence are expected to show different responses with different antioxidants. However, systematic information on this aspect of antioxidant action is non-existent in the literature. Using two representative commercial antioxidants from each class with representative naphthas (FCC, visbreaking and coker), it was found that phenolic antioxidants gave a better response with thermally cracked naphthas. With amine-type antioxidants no clear preference could be observed. 28 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. Password cracking

    OpenAIRE

    Χριστοφάκης, Μιχαήλ Κ.

    2014-01-01

    Information security is the next big thing in computers society because of the rapidly growing security incidents and the outcomes of those. Hacking and cracking existed even from the start of the eighties decade when there was the first step of the interconnection through the internet between humans. From then and ever after there was a big explosion of such incidents mostly because of the worldwide web which was introduced in the early nineties. Following the huge steps forward of computers...

  2. Choked flow through cracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feburie, V.; Giot, M.; Granger, S.; Seynhaeve, J.M.

    1992-06-01

    The leaks through steam-generator cracks are the subject of a research carried out in cooperation between EDF and UCL. A software called ECREVISSE to predict the mass flow rate has been developed and has been successfully validated. The purpose of the paper is to present the mathematical model used in ECREVISSE as well as some comparison between the results and the presently available data. The model takes into account the persistence of some metastable liquid in the crack and the special flow pattern which appears in such particular geometry. Although the model involves the use of several correlations (friction, heat transfer), no adjustment of parameters against the data has been needed, neither in the single-phase part of the flow, or in the two-phase part. (authors). 8 figs., 1 tab., 20 refs

  3. The fatigue life and fatigue crack through thickness behavior of a surface cracked plate, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nam, Ki-Woo; Fujibayashi, Shinpei; Ando, Kotoji; Ogura, Nobukazu.

    1987-01-01

    Most structures have a region where stresses concentrate, and the probability of fatigue crack initiation may be higher than in other parts. Therefore, to improve the reliability of an LBB design, it is necessary to evaluate the growth and through thickness behavior of fatigue cracks in the stress concentration part. In this paper, a fatigue crack growth test at a stress concentration region has been made on 3 % NiCrMo and HT 80 steel. Stress concentration is caused by a fillet on the plate. The main results obtained are as follows : (1) Before cracking through the plate thickness, stress concentration has a remarkable effect on the fatigue crack growth behavior and it flatens the shape of a surface crack. The crack growth behavior can be explained quantatively by using the Newman-Raju equation and the stress resolving method proposed by ASME B and P Code SecXI. (2) The da/dN-ΔK relation obtained in a stress concentration specimen shows good agreement with that obtained in a surface cracked smooth specimen. (3) It is shown that stress concentration caused by a fillet has little effect on the crack growth rate after cracking through the plate thickness. (4) By using the K value based on eq. (1), (2), particular crack growth behavior and the change in crack shape after cracking through thickness can be explained quantatively. (author)

  4. Cracking hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forwood, G F; Lane, M; Taplay, J G

    1921-10-07

    In cracking and hydrogenating hydrocarbon oils by passing their vapors together with steam over heated carbon derived from shale, wood, peat or other vegetable or animal matter, the gases from the condenser are freed from sulfuretted hydrogen, and preferably also from carbon dioxide, and passed together with oil vapors and steam through the retort. Carbon dioxide may be removed by passage through slaked lime, and sulfuretted hydrogen by means of hydrated oxide of iron. Vapors from high-boiling oils and those from low-boiling oils are passed alternately through the retort, so that carbon deposited from the high-boiling oils is used up during treatment of low-boiling oils.

  5. Crack growth behaviour of low-alloy steels for pressure boundary components under transient light water reactor operating conditions - CASTOC, Part II: WWER conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ernestova, M.; Zamboch, M. [Nuclear Research Institute, NRI, Rez (Czech Republic); Devrient, B.; Roth, A. [Framatome ANP GmbH, Erlangen (Germany); Ehrnsten, U. [VTT Industrial Systems, Espoo (Finland); Foehl, J.; Weissenberg, T. [Staatliche Materialpruefungsanstalt, MPA, Stuttgart (Germany); Gomez-Briceno, D.; Lapena, J. [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas Medioambientales y Tecnologicas, CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Ritter, S.; Seifert, H.P. [Paul Scherrer Institute, PSI, Villigen (Switzerland)

    2004-07-01

    One of the ageing phenomena of pressure boundary components of light water reactors (LWRs) is environmentally-assisted cracking (EAC). The project CASTOC (5. Framework Programme of the EU) was launched September 2000 with six European partners and terminated August 2003. It focused in particular on the EAC behaviour of low-alloy steels (LAS) and to some extent to weld metal, heat affected zone and the influence of an austenitic cladding. The main objective was directed to the clarification of crack growth behavior of LAS in high-temperature water due to EAC under constant load (steady-state power operation), to study the effect of transient conditions (during operation or start-up/shut-down of a plant) using their impact on time-based and cycle-based crack growth rates and to a more detailed understanding of the acting mechanisms. Autoclave tests were performed with Western and Russian type reactor pressure vessel steels under simulated boiling water reactor (BWR)/normal water chemistry (NWC) and pressurized water reactor (WWER) conditions. The investigations were performed with fracture mechanics specimens of different sizes and geometries. The applied loading comprised cyclic loads, static loads and load spectra where the static load was periodically interrupted by partial unloading. With regard to water chemistry, the oxygen content (WWER) and impurities of sulphate and chlorides (BWR) were varied beyond allowable limits for continuous operation. The current paper summarizes the most important crack growth results obtained under simulated WWER conditions. The influence of oxygen content and the effect of specimen size (C(T)25 versus C(T)50 specimens) on the crack growth rates are shown. The results are discussed in the context of the current crack growth rate curves in the corresponding nuclear codes. (authors)

  6. Crack growth behaviour of low-alloy steels for pressure boundary components under transient light water reactor operating conditions - CASTOC, Part II: WWER conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ernestova, M.; Zamboch, M.; Devrient, B.; Roth, A.; Ehrnsten, U.; Foehl, J.; Weissenberg, T.; Gomez-Briceno, D.; Lapena, J.; Ritter, S.; Seifert, H.P.

    2004-01-01

    One of the ageing phenomena of pressure boundary components of light water reactors (LWRs) is environmentally-assisted cracking (EAC). The project CASTOC (5. Framework Programme of the EU) was launched September 2000 with six European partners and terminated August 2003. It focused in particular on the EAC behaviour of low-alloy steels (LAS) and to some extent to weld metal, heat affected zone and the influence of an austenitic cladding. The main objective was directed to the clarification of crack growth behavior of LAS in high-temperature water due to EAC under constant load (steady-state power operation), to study the effect of transient conditions (during operation or start-up/shut-down of a plant) using their impact on time-based and cycle-based crack growth rates and to a more detailed understanding of the acting mechanisms. Autoclave tests were performed with Western and Russian type reactor pressure vessel steels under simulated boiling water reactor (BWR)/normal water chemistry (NWC) and pressurized water reactor (WWER) conditions. The investigations were performed with fracture mechanics specimens of different sizes and geometries. The applied loading comprised cyclic loads, static loads and load spectra where the static load was periodically interrupted by partial unloading. With regard to water chemistry, the oxygen content (WWER) and impurities of sulphate and chlorides (BWR) were varied beyond allowable limits for continuous operation. The current paper summarizes the most important crack growth results obtained under simulated WWER conditions. The influence of oxygen content and the effect of specimen size (C(T)25 versus C(T)50 specimens) on the crack growth rates are shown. The results are discussed in the context of the current crack growth rate curves in the corresponding nuclear codes. (authors)

  7. The effect of residual thermal stresses on the fatigue crack growth of laser-surface-annealed AISI 304 stainless steel Part I: computer simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiue, R.K.; Chang, C.T.; Young, M.C.; Tsay, L.W.

    2004-01-01

    The effect of residual thermal stresses on the fatigue crack growth of the laser-surface-annealed AISI 304 stainless steel, especially the effect of stress redistribution ahead of the crack tip was extensively evaluated in the study. Based on the finite element simulation, the longitudinal residual tensile stress field has a width of roughly 20 mm on the laser-irradiated surface and was symmetric with respect to the centerline of the laser-annealed zone (LAZ). Meanwhile, residual compressive stresses distributed over a wide region away from the LAZ. After introducing a notch perpendicular to the LAZ, the distribution of longitudinal residual stresses became unsymmetrical about the centerline of LAZ. High residual compressive stresses exist within a narrow range ahead of notch tip. The improved crack growth resistance of the laser-annealed specimen might be attributed to those induced compressive stresses. As the notch tip passed through the centerline of the LAZ, the residual stress ahead of the notch tip was completely reverted into residual tensile stresses. The existence of unanimous residual tensile stresses ahead of the notch tip was maintained, even if the notch tip extended deeply into the LAZ. Additionally, the presence of the residual tensile stress ahead of the notch tip did not accelerate the fatigue crack growth rate in the compact tension specimen

  8. Detection of cracks with low vertical offset in clayey formations from galleries by using seismic methods. Tournemire experimental station. First part: problem analysis and measurement sizing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bretaudeau, Francois; Gelis, Celine; Cabrera, Justo; Leparoux, Donatienne; Cote, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Within the frame of the expertise of the ANDRA file on the project of storage of radioactive wastes in clayey formations, the detection of natural cracks which could locally alter the argillite containment properties is a crucial issue. As some previous studies showed that some cracks exhibiting a low vertical offset could not be detected in clayey formations from the surface, this document reports a study which aimed at assessing the possibility of detection of such a crack by means of seismic methods directly implemented from underground works. It reports a detailed analysis of the seismic imagery problem, the characterization of different areas of the investigated environment, the assessment and validation of various hypotheses by using experimental data obtained in an experimental station and numerical simulations. The potential of each envisaged method (migration, tomography, wave form inversion) is assessed, notably with respect to synthetic seismic data obtained by numerical modelling. Preliminary results are used to size a complete seismic measurement campaign aimed at the characterization of the crack area, and at the assessment of detection limitations of the different methods

  9. Crack growth behaviour of low-alloy steels for pressure boundary components under transient light water reactor operating conditions - CASTOC, Part I: BWR/NWC conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritter, S.; Seifert, H.P.; Devrient, B.; Roth, A.; Ehrnsten, U.; Ernestova, M.; Zamboch, M.; Foehl, J.; Weissenberg, T.; Gomez-Briceno, D.; Lapena, J.

    2004-01-01

    One of the ageing phenomena of pressure boundary components of light water reactors (LWR) is environmentally-assisted cracking (EAC). The project CASTOC (5. Framework Programme of the EU) was launched September 2000 with six European partners and terminated August 2003. It was focused in particular on the EAC behaviour of low-alloy steels (LAS) and to some extent to weld metal, heat affected zone and the influence of an austenitic cladding. The main objective was directed to the clarification of EAC crack growth behaviour/mechanism of LAS in high-temperature water under steady-state power operation (constant load) and transient operating conditions (e.g., start-up/shut-down, transients in water chemistry and load). Autoclave tests were performed with Western and Russian type reactor pressure vessel steels under simulated boiling water reactor (BWR)/normal water chemistry (NWC) and pressurised water reactor (VVER) conditions. The investigations were performed with fracture mechanics specimens of different sizes and geometries. The applied loading comprised cyclic loads, static loads and load spectra where the static load was periodically interrupted by partial unloading. With regard to water chemistry, the oxygen content (VVER) and impurities of sulphate and chlorides (BWR) were varied beyond allowable limits for continuous operation. The current paper summarises the most important crack growth results obtained under simulated BWR/NWC conditions. The results are discussed in the context of the current crack growth rate curves in the corresponding nuclear codes. (authors)

  10. Crack growth behaviour of low-alloy steels for pressure boundary components under transient light water reactor operating conditions - CASTOC, Part I: BWR/NWC conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritter, S.; Seifert, H.P. [Paul Scherrer Institute, PSI, Villigen (Switzerland); Devrient, B.; Roth, A. [Framatome ANP GmbH, Erlangen (Germany); Ehrnsten, U. [VTT Industrial Systems, Espoo (Finland); Ernestova, M.; Zamboch, M. [Nuclear Research Institute, NRI, Rez (Czech Republic); Foehl, J.; Weissenberg, T. [Staatliche Materialpruefungsanstalt, MPA, Stuttgart (Germany); Gomez-Briceno, D.; Lapena, J. [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas Medioambientales y Tecnologicas, CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain)

    2004-07-01

    One of the ageing phenomena of pressure boundary components of light water reactors (LWR) is environmentally-assisted cracking (EAC). The project CASTOC (5. Framework Programme of the EU) was launched September 2000 with six European partners and terminated August 2003. It was focused in particular on the EAC behaviour of low-alloy steels (LAS) and to some extent to weld metal, heat affected zone and the influence of an austenitic cladding. The main objective was directed to the clarification of EAC crack growth behaviour/mechanism of LAS in high-temperature water under steady-state power operation (constant load) and transient operating conditions (e.g., start-up/shut-down, transients in water chemistry and load). Autoclave tests were performed with Western and Russian type reactor pressure vessel steels under simulated boiling water reactor (BWR)/normal water chemistry (NWC) and pressurised water reactor (VVER) conditions. The investigations were performed with fracture mechanics specimens of different sizes and geometries. The applied loading comprised cyclic loads, static loads and load spectra where the static load was periodically interrupted by partial unloading. With regard to water chemistry, the oxygen content (VVER) and impurities of sulphate and chlorides (BWR) were varied beyond allowable limits for continuous operation. The current paper summarises the most important crack growth results obtained under simulated BWR/NWC conditions. The results are discussed in the context of the current crack growth rate curves in the corresponding nuclear codes. (authors)

  11. Damage and fatigue crack growth of Eurofer steel first wall mock-up under cyclic heat flux loads. Part 2: Finite element analysis of damage evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    You, Jeong-Ha

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The surface heat flux load of 3.5 MW/m 2 produced substantial stresses and inelastic strains in the heat-loaded surface region, especially at the notch root. • The notch root exhibited a typical notch effect such as stress concentration and localized inelastic yield leading to a preferred damage development. • The predicted damage evolution feature agrees well with the experimental observation. • The smooth surface also experiences considerable stresses and inelastic strains. However, the stress intensity and the amount of inelastic deformation are not high enough to cause any serious damage. • The level of maximum inelastic strain is higher at the notch root than at the smooth surface. On the other hand, the amplitude of inelastic strain variation is comparable at both positions. • The amount of inelastic deformation is significantly affected by the length of pulse duration time indicating the important role of creep. - Abstract: In the preceding companion article (part 1), the experimental results of the high-heat-flux (3.5 MW/m 2 ) fatigue tests of a Eurofer bare steel first wall mock-up was presented. The aim was to investigate the damage evolution and crack initiation feature. The mock-up used there was a simplified model having only basic and generic structural feature of an actively cooled steel FW component for DEMO reactor. In that study, it was found that microscopic damage was formed at the notch root already in the early stage of the fatigue loading. On the contrary, the heat-loaded smooth surface exhibited no damage up to 800 load cycles. In this paper, the high-heat-flux fatigue behavior is investigated with a finite element analysis to provide a theoretical interpretation. The thermal fatigue test was simulated using the coupled damage-viscoplastic constitutive model developed by Aktaa. The stresses, inelastic deformation and damage evolution at the notch groove and at the smooth surface are compared. The different damage

  12. Damage and fatigue crack growth of Eurofer steel first wall mock-up under cyclic heat flux loads. Part 1: Electron beam irradiation tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You, J.H., E-mail: you@ipp.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Euratom Association, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Höschen, T. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Euratom Association, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Pintsuk, G. [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, IEK2, Euratom Association, 52425 Jülich (Germany)

    2014-04-15

    Highlights: • Clear evidence of microscopic damage and crack formation at the notch root in the early stage of the fatigue loading (50–100 load cycles). • Propagation of fatigue crack at the notch root in the course of subsequent cyclic heat-flux loading followed by saturation after roughly 600 load cycles. • No sign of damage on the notch-free surface up to 800 load cycles. • No obvious effect of the pulse time duration on the crack extension. • Slight change in the grain microstructure due to the formation of sub-grain boundaries by plastic deformation. - Abstract: Recently, the idea of bare steel first wall (FW) is drawing attention, where the surface of the steel is to be directly exposed to high heat flux loads. Hence, the thermo-mechanical impacts on the bare steel FW will be different from those of the tungsten-coated one. There are several previous works on the thermal fatigue tests of bare steel FW made of austenitic steel with regard to the ITER application. In the case of reduced-activation steel Eurofer97, a candidate structural material for the DEMO FW, there is no report on high heat flux tests yet. The aim of the present study is to investigate the thermal fatigue behavior of the Eurofer-based bare steel FW under cyclic heat flux loads relevant to DEMO operation. To this end, we conducted a series of electron beam irradiation tests with heat flux load of 3.5 MW/m{sup 2} on water-cooled mock-ups with an engraved thin notch on the surface. It was found that the notch root region exhibited a marked development of damage and fatigue cracks whereas the notch-free surface manifested no sign of crack formation up to 800 load cycles. Results of extensive microscopic investigation are reported.

  13. Towards a European draft code of practice in creep crack growth testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikbin, K.M.

    2003-01-01

    Crack growth and initiation models as well as defect assessment codes need reliable and verifiable material properties data for use in their predictive methodologies. These data consist of uniaxial, multiaxial and crack initiation and growth data under static and cyclic loading at the relevant temperatures. International collaboration for developing standards in this field started in 1987 under the auspices of the VAMAS (Versailles Agreement for MAterials and Standards). Two technical Working Areas TWA11 and TWA19 committees ending 1998 have made substantial progress in unifying and standardising the methods for obtaining the relevant data. This collaboration has resulted in the development of ASTM E1457 creep crack growth testing standard. The European collaborative programme CRETE (see Acknowledgements), which began in 1999, is following up this valuable research in order to develop a European Code of Practice for elevated temperature crack growth which is planned to have a wider field of application. A Round Robin experimental, analytical and verification programme in CRETE will include testing a type 316 LN stainless steel at 550 degC and a Carbon-Manganese steel at 400 degC consisting of seven different geometries. The paper reviews the methods of analysis used for laboratory creep crack growth data and their relevance to long term crack initiation and growth in components. In addition, since design and life assessment and material properties under creep are an integral part of this project a short review of the models available for predicting creep and fatigue crack growth is presented. (author)

  14. Smart Patches for Monitoring Fatigue Crack Growth in Aircraft Structures

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ihn, Jeong-Beom

    2001-01-01

    A built-in cost-effective diagnostic system for monitoring crack growth in aircraft structures was developed, particularly for riveted fuselage joints and cracked aircraft parts with composite bonded patches...

  15. Interface Consistency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staunstrup, Jørgen

    1998-01-01

    This paper proposes that Interface Consistency is an important issue for the development of modular designs. Byproviding a precise specification of component interfaces it becomes possible to check that separately developedcomponents use a common interface in a coherent matter thus avoiding a very...... significant source of design errors. Awide range of interface specifications are possible, the simplest form is a syntactical check of parameter types.However, today it is possible to do more sophisticated forms involving semantic checks....

  16. Investigations of Low Temperature Time Dependent Cracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van der Sluys, W A; Robitz, E S; Young, B A; Bloom, J

    2002-09-30

    The objective of this project was to investigate metallurgical and mechanical phenomena associated with time dependent cracking of cold bent carbon steel piping at temperatures between 327 C and 360 C. Boiler piping failures have demonstrated that understanding the fundamental metallurgical and mechanical parameters controlling these failures is insufficient to eliminate it from the field. The results of the project consisted of the development of a testing methodology to reproduce low temperature time dependent cracking in laboratory specimens. This methodology was used to evaluate the cracking resistance of candidate heats in order to identify the factors that enhance cracking sensitivity. The resultant data was integrated into current available life prediction tools.

  17. Corrosion and Cracking of Reinforced Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    Modelling of the deterioration of reinforced concrete has in recent years changed from being a deterministic modelling based on experience to be stochastic modelling based on sound and consistent physical, chemical and mechanical principles. In this paper is presented a brief review of modern mod...... for time to initial corrosion, time to initial cracking, and time to a given crack width may be obtained....

  18. Probabilistic modeling of crack networks in thermal fatigue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malesys, N.

    2007-11-01

    Thermal superficial crack networks have been detected in mixing zone of cooling system in nuclear power plants. Numerous experimental works have already been led to characterize initiation and propagation of these cracks. The random aspect of initiation led to propose a probabilistic model for the formation and propagation of crack networks in thermal fatigue. In a first part, uniaxial mechanical test were performed on smooth and slightly notched specimens in order to characterize the initiation of multiple cracks, their arrest due to obscuration and the coalescence phenomenon by recovery of amplification stress zones. In a second time, the probabilistic model was established under two assumptions: the continuous cracks initiation on surface, described by a Poisson point process law with threshold, and the shielding phenomenon which prohibits the initiation or the propagation of a crack if this one is in the relaxation stress zone of another existing crack. The crack propagation is assumed to follow a Paris' law based on the computation of stress intensity factors at the top and the bottom of crack. The evolution of multiaxial cracks on the surface can be followed thanks to three quantities: the shielding probability, comparable to a damage variable of the structure, the initiated crack density, representing the total number of cracks per unit surface which can be compared to experimental observations, and the propagating crack density, representing the number per unit surface of active cracks in the network. The crack sizes distribution is also computed by the model allowing an easier comparison with experimental results. (author)

  19. Magnetic flux gradient observation during fatigue crack propagation: A case study of SAE 1045 carbon steel used for automotive transmission parts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad S.R.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to evaluate the application of the metal magnetic memory (MMM technique for investigations on fatigue crack propagation in a ferromagnetic material. Fatigue failure caused by stress concentration is serious in practical engineering. However, early fatigue damages cannot be detected by using traditional nondestructive testing (NDT methods. Therefore this paper study about NDT method called metal magnetic memory (MMM that has potentials for evaluating the fatigue damage at the early damage and critical fracture stages. While its capacity to evaluate the distribution of self-magnetic leakage field signals on the component’s surface is well-established, there remains a need to scrutinize the physical mechanism and quantitative analysis aspects of this method. To begin with, a fatigue test involving a loading of 7kN was conducted on a SAE 1045 carbon steel specimen. This material is frequently used in the manufacturing of automotive transmission components that include the axle and spline shaft. MMM signals were measured along a scanning distance of 100 mm and analysed during the propagation stage. Other than revealing that the value of the magnetic flux gradient signals dH(y/dx increased in tandem with the crack length, the results also led to the detection of the crack growth location. It was anticipated that the dH(y/dx value will also exhibit an upward trend with a rise in the fatigue growth rate of da/dN. A modified Paris equation was utilized to correlate dH(y/dx with da/dn through the replacement of the stress intensity factor range ΔK. This resulted in the log-log plot of da/dN versus dH(y/dx portraying an inclination similar to the log-log plot of da/dN versus ΔK. A linear relationship was established between dH(y/dx and ΔK with the R2 value as 0.96. Players in the automotive industry can benefit from the disclosure that dH(y/dx can effectively replace ΔK for the monitoring of fatigue crack growth

  20. Unsaturated Seepage Analysis of Cracked Soil including Development Process of Cracks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Cao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cracks in soil provide preferential pathways for water flow and their morphological parameters significantly affect the hydraulic conductivity of the soil. To study the hydraulic properties of cracks, the dynamic development of cracks in the expansive soil during drying and wetting has been measured in the laboratory. The test results enable the development of the relationships between the cracks morphological parameters and the water content. In this study, the fractal model has been used to predict the soil-water characteristic curve (SWCC of the cracked soil, including the developmental process of the cracks. The cracked expansive soil has been considered as a crack-pore medium. A dual media flow model has been developed to simulate the seepage characteristics of the cracked expansive soil. The variations in pore water pressure at different part of the model are quite different due to the impact of the cracks. This study proves that seepage characteristics can be better predicted if the impact of cracks is taken into account.

  1. Modified Dugdale cracks and Fictitious cracks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lauge Fuglsang

    1998-01-01

    A number of theories are presented in the literature on crack mechanics by which the strength of damaged materials can be predicted. Among these are theories based on the well-known Dugdale model of a crack prevented from spreading by self-created constant cohesive flow stressed acting in local...... areas, so-called fictitious cracks, in front of the crack.The Modified Dugdale theory presented in this paper is also based on the concept of Dugdale cracks. Any cohesive stress distribution, however, can be considered in front of the crack. Formally the strength of a material weakened by a modified...... Dugdale crack is the same as if it has been weakened by the well-known Griffith crack, namely sigma_CR = (EG_CR/phi)^1/2 where E and 1 are Young's modulus and crack half-length respectively, and G_CR is the so-called critical energy release rate. The physical significance of G_CR, however, is different...

  2. A global limit load solution for plates with surface cracks under combined end force and cross-thickness bending

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lei Yuebao; Fox, Mike J.H.

    2011-01-01

    A global limit load solution for rectangular surface cracks in plates under combined end force and cross-thickness bending is derived, which allows any combination of positive/negative end force and positive/negative cross-thickness moment. The solution is based on the net-section plastic collapse concept and, therefore, gives limit load values based on the Tresca yielding criterion. Solutions for both cases with and without crack face contact are derived when whole or part of the crack is located in the compressive stress zone. From the solution, particular global limit load solutions for plates with extended surface cracks and through-thickness cracks under the same loading conditions are obtained. The solution is consistent with the limit load solution for surface cracks in plates under combined tension and positive bending due to Goodall and Webster and Lei when both the applied end force and bending moment are positive. The solution reduces to the limit load solution for plain plates under combined end force and cross-thickness bending when the crack vanishes. - Highlights: → A global limit load solution for plates with surface cracks in plates is derived. → Combined positive/negative end force and positive/negative cross-thickness moment are considered. → The solution is based on the net-section plastic collapse concept.

  3. Cracking on anisotropic neutron stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setiawan, A. M.; Sulaksono, A.

    2017-07-01

    We study the effect of cracking of a local anisotropic neutron star (NS) due to small density fluctuations. It is assumed that the neutron star core consists of leptons, nucleons and hyperons. The relativistic mean field model is used to describe the core of equation of state (EOS). For the crust, we use the EOS introduced by Miyatsu et al. [1]. Furthermore, two models are used to describe pressure anisotropic in neutron star matter. One is proposed by Doneva-Yazadjiev (DY) [2] and the other is proposed by Herrera-Barreto (HB) [3]. The anisotropic parameter of DY and HB models are adjusted in order the predicted maximum mass compatible to the mass of PSR J1614-2230 [4] and PSR J0348+0432 [5]. We have found that cracking can potentially present in the region close to the neutron star surface. The instability due cracking is quite sensitive to the NS mass and anisotropic parameter used.

  4. Stability of cracked naphthas from thermal and catalytic processes and their additive response. Part II. Composition and effect of olefinic structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagpal, J.M.; Joshi, G.C.; Rastogi, S.N. [Indian Institute of Petroleum, Dehradun (India)

    1995-05-01

    Olefinic concentrates were separated from two naphthas, one from fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) and one thermal crackate, using column chromatography. The composition and structure of the olefins were determined by a combination of analytical techniques. FCC naphthas contain relatively higher levels of conjugated dienes. The monoolefins are highly branched. The thermal crackates have higher levels of {alpha}-olefins and abound in mono-, di-, tri- and conjugated cyclic olefins. Stability tests on these olefinic concentrates blended in low-S,N straight-run naphtha showed that cyclic olefins are very active gum formers. Representative commercial antioxidants (hindered phenols and phenylenediamines) both gave good responses to different olefin concentrate test blends. Hindered phenols had a marginally better effect. 14 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... That People Abuse » Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts Listen Cocaine is a white ... 69 KB) "My life was built around getting cocaine and getting high." ©istock.com/ Marjot Stacey is ...

  6. Catalytic cracking of lignites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seitz, M.; Nowak, S.; Naegler, T.; Zimmermann, J. [Hochschule Merseburg (Germany); Welscher, J.; Schwieger, W. [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ. (Germany); Hahn, T. [Halle-Wittenberg Univ., Halle (Germany)

    2013-11-01

    A most important factor for the chemical industry is the availability of cheap raw materials. As the oil price of crude oil is rising alternative feedstocks like coal are coming into focus. This work, the catalytic cracking of lignite is part of the alliance ibi (innovative Braunkohlenintegration) to use lignite as a raw material to produce chemicals. With this new one step process without an input of external hydrogen, mostly propylene, butenes and aromatics and char are formed. The product yield depends on manifold process parameters. The use of acid catalysts (zeolites like MFI) shows the highest amount of the desired products. Hydrogen rich lignites with a molar H/C ratio of > 1 are to be favoured. Due to primary cracking and secondary reactions the ratio between catalyst and lignite, temperature and residence time are the most important parameter to control the product distribution. Experiments at 500 C in a discontinuous rotary kiln reactor show yields up to 32 wt-% of hydrocarbons per lignite (maf - moisture and ash free) and 43 wt-% char, which can be gasified. Particularly, the yields of propylene and butenes as main products can be enhanced four times to about 8 wt-% by the use of catalysts while the tar yield decreases. In order to develop this innovative process catalyst systems fixed on beads were developed for an easy separation and regeneration of the used catalyst from the formed char. (orig.)

  7. Comparison of crack arrest methodologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    The ASTM Cooperative Test Program Data were used to compare the static (K/sub Ia/) and dynamic (K/sud ID/, K/sub IDm/) approaches to crack arrest. K/sub Ia/ is not dependent on K/sub Q/. This is consistent with the requirements of the static approach, but not the dynamic one which requires that K/sub Ia/ decrease with K/sub Q/ if K/sub ID/ (= K/sub IDm/) is a constant. K/sub ID/ increases systematically with K/sub Q/ at a rate that is consistent with calculations based on the use of a constant value for K/sub Ia/ which is equal to its measured mean value. Only in the limiting case of very short crack jumps (associated with very low average crack speeds) can K/sub ID/ be identified as a minimum value at which K/sub ID/ = K/sub IDm/. In this case K/sub IDm/ approx. K/sub Ia/ approx. K/sub Im/. The latter is the idealized minimum value of K that will support the continued propagation of a running crack

  8. Coke Formation During Hydrocarbons Pyrolysis. Part One: Steam Cracking Formation de coke pendant la pyrolise des hydrocarbures. Première partie : vapocraquage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weill J.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Thermal cracking is always accompanied by coke formation, which becomes deposited on the wall and limits heat transfers in the reactor while increasing pressure drops and possibly even plugging up the reactor. This review article covers undesirable coking operations in steam craking reactors. These coking reactions may take place in the gas phase and/or on the surface of the reactor, with coke being produced during pyrolysis by a complex mechanism that breaks down into a catalytic sequence and a noncatalytic sequence. After a brief description of different experimental set-ups used to measure the coke deposition, on the basis of research described in the literature, the different factors and their importance for coke formation are listed. In particular, we describe the effects of surface properties of stainless-steel and quartz reactors as well as the influence of the cracked feedstock, of temperature, of dilution, of residence time and of the conversion on coke deposition. Some findings about the morphology of coke are described and linked to formation mechanisms. To illustrate this review, some particularly interesting research is referred to concerning models developed to assess coke formation during propane steam cracking. Le craquage thermique est toujours accompagné de la formation de coke qui, en se déposant à la paroi, limite les transferts de chaleur au réacteur, augmente les pertes de charges et même peut boucher celui-ci. Cet article fait le point sur les réactions indésirables de cokage dans les réacteurs de vapocraquage. Ces réactions de cokage peuvent avoir lieu en phase gazeuse et/ou sur la surface du réacteur, le coke étant produit pendant la pyrolyse par un mécanisme complexe qui se décompose en une séquence catalytique et une séquence non catalytique. Après une brève présentation des différents montages expérimentaux utilisés pour mesurer le dépôt de coke, il est mentionné, à partir de travaux de la

  9. Fatigue test results of flat plate specimens with surface cracks and evaluation of crack growth in structural components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Katsuyuki; Yokoyama, Norio; Ohba, Toshihiro; Kawamura, Takaichi; Miyazono, Shohachiro

    1982-12-01

    Part-through surface cracks are most frequently observed in the inspection of structural components, and it is one of the important subjects in the assessment of safety to evaluate appropriately the growth of such cracks during the service life of structural components. Due to the complexity of the stress at the front free surface, the crack growth at the surface shows a different behavior from the other part. Besides, an effect of interaction is caused in the growth of multiple surface cracks. These effects should be included in the growth analysis of surface part-through cracks. Authors have carried out a series of fatigue tests on some kinds of pipes with multiple cracks in the inner surface, and subsequently the fatigue test of flat plate specimens, made of Type 304L stainless steel, with a single or double surface cracks was carried out to study the basic characteristics in the growth of multiple surface cracks. Based on the results of the flat plate test. the correction factors for the front free surface (Cs) and interaction (Ci) of surface cracks were derived quantitatively by the following empirical expressions; Cs = 0.824. Ci = (0.227(a/b) 2 (sec(PI X/2) - 1) + 1)sup(1/m). Using these two correction factors, a procedure to predict the growth of surface cracks was developed by applying the crack growth formula to both the thickness and surface directions. Besides, the crack growth predictions based on the procedure of ASME Code Sex. XI, and the above procedure without the correction of the free surface and interactions on the crack growth behaviors were compared with the test results of flat plate specimens. The crack growth behavior predicted by the procedure described in this report showed the best agreement with the test results in respects of the crack growth life and the change in the crack shape. The criteria of the ASME Code did not agree with the test results. (author)

  10. Quenching cracks - formation and possible causes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macherauch, E.; Mueller, H.; Voehringer, O.

    1976-01-01

    The most important principles controlling the martensitic hardening of steels containing carbon are presented, and their effects on the cracks formed by tempering are discussed. Micro-crack formation, influenced by any increase in the carbon content, is dependent on the variations of martensitic morphology; this factor is of decisive importance. Apart from micro residual stresses, macro residual stresses become increasingly involved in the crack development. This is dependent on the given content of carbon and increase in the dimensions of the samples. Based on the empirical values gained from experience about cracks formed by tempering and using a schematic diagram, the constructive influences on the propensity to cracks formed by tempering, with regard to materials and processing, are evaluated. Also the effects of thermic, mechanical and chemical after-treatments upon the propensity to tempering cracks are discussed. In conclusion, the problem of the formation of cracks in hardened parts, i.e. the elongation of the cracks under static stress, is treated briefly. (orig.) [de

  11. Oxidation-induced crack healing in Ti3AlC2 ceramics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Song, G.M.; Pei, Y.T.; Sloof, W.G.; Li, S.B.; Hosson, J.Th.M. De; Zwaag, S. van der

    Crack healing of Ti3AlC2 was investigated by oxidizing a partially pre-cracked sample. A crack near a notch was introduced into the sample by tensile deformation. After oxidation at 1100 degrees C in air for 2 h, the crack was completely healed, with oxidation products consisting primarily of

  12. Fatigue crack growth in additive manufactured products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Riemer

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Additive Manufacturing (AM is a new innovative technique that allows the direct fabrication of complex, individual, delicate and high-strength products, based on their 3D data. Selective Laser Melting (SLM is one of the AM processes that generates metallic components layer by layer using powder-bed technique. The irradiation and consequent melting of metallic powder is realised by the laser source. Employing SLM, especially complex and individual products, such as implants or aerospace parts, are well suited for economic production in small batches. The first important issue in this work was to analyse the fatigue crack growth (FCG in titanium alloy Ti-6-4 and stainless steel 316L processed by SLM. As a first step, stress intensity range decreasing tests were performed on SLM samples in their “as-built” condition. The next step was to adopt measures for optimisation of fatigue crack growth performance of SLM parts. For this purpose various heat treatments such as stress relief annealing and hot isostatic pressing (HIP were applied to the CT specimens. Finally, the strong impact of heat treatment on the residual lifetime was demonstrated by numerical fatigue crack growth simulations. For this purpose, the hip joint implant consisting of Ti-6-4 and processed by SLM was taken into account. It was found that residual stresses have a strong influence on the crack growth in Ti-6-4, while the influence of the micro-pores on the threshold values remains low. In contrast the results for 316L show that its fracturemechanical behaviour is not affected by residual stresses, whereas the microstructural features lead to modification in the da/dN-K-data. The second fundamental aim of this work was to demonstrate the possibilities of the SLM process. For that reason, the individually tailored bicycle crank was optimised regarding its weight and local stresses and finally manufactured using the SLM system. The iterative optimisation procedure was based on

  13. High Ice Water Content at Low Radar Reflectivity near Deep Convection. Part I ; Consistency of In Situ and Remote-Sensing Observations with Stratiform Rain Column Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridlind, A. M.; Ackerman, A. S.; Grandin, A.; Dezitter, F.; Weber, M.; Strapp, J. W.; Korolev, A. V.; Williams, C. R.

    2015-01-01

    Occurrences of jet engine power loss and damage have been associated with flight through fully glaciated deep convection at -10 to -50 degrees Centigrade. Power loss events commonly occur during flight through radar reflectivity (Zeta (sub e)) less than 20-30 decibels relative to Zeta (dBZ - radar returns) and no more than moderate turbulence, often overlying moderate to heavy rain near the surface. During 2010-2012, Airbus carried out flight tests seeking to characterize the highest ice water content (IWC) in such low-radar-reflectivity regions of large, cold-topped storm systems in the vicinity of Cayenne, Darwin, and Santiago. Within the highest IWC regions encountered, at typical sampling elevations (circa 11 kilometers), the measured ice size distributions exhibit a notably narrow concentration of mass over area-equivalent diameters of 100-500 micrometers. Given substantial and poorly quantified measurement uncertainties, here we evaluate the consistency of the Airbus in situ measurements with ground-based profiling radar observations obtained under quasi-steady, heavy stratiform rain conditions in one of the Airbus-sampled locations. We find that profiler-observed radar reflectivities and mean Doppler velocities at Airbus sampling temperatures are generally consistent with those calculated from in situ size-distribution measurements. We also find that column simulations using the in situ size distributions as an upper boundary condition are generally consistent with observed profiles of radar reflectivity (Ze), mean Doppler velocity (MDV), and retrieved rain rate. The results of these consistency checks motivate an examination of the microphysical pathways that could be responsible for the observed size-distribution features in Ackerman et al. (2015).

  14. Investigation of Helicopter Longeron Cracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, John A.; Baughman, James; Wallace, Terryl A.

    2009-01-01

    Four cracked longerons, containing a total of eight cracks, were provided for study. Cracked regions were cut from the longerons. Load was applied to open the cracks, enabling crack surface examination. Examination revealed that crack propagation was driven by fatigue loading in all eight cases. Fatigue crack initiation appears to have occurred on the top edge of the longerons near geometric changes that affect component bending stiffness. Additionally, metallurgical analysis has revealed a local depletion in alloying elements in the crack initiation regions that may be a contributing factor. Fatigue crack propagation appeared to be initially driven by opening-mode loading, but at a crack length of approximately 0.5 inches (12.7 mm), there is evidence of mixed-mode crack loading. For the longest cracks studied, shear-mode displacements destroyed crack-surface features of interest over significant portions of the crack surfaces.

  15. Crack detecting method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narita, Michiko; Aida, Shigekazu

    1998-01-01

    A penetration liquid or a slow drying penetration liquid prepared by mixing a penetration liquid and a slow drying liquid is filled to the inside of an artificial crack formed to a member to be detected such as of boiler power generation facilities and nuclear power facilities. A developing liquid is applied to the periphery of the artificial crack on the surface of a member to be detected. As the slow-drying liquid, an oil having a viscosity of 56 is preferably used. Loads are applied repeatedly to the member to be detected, and when a crack is caused to the artificial crack, the permeation liquid penetrates into the crack. The penetration liquid penetrated into the crack is developed by the developing liquid previously coated to the periphery of the artificial crack of the surface of the member to be detected. When a crack is caused, since the crack is developed clearly even if it is a small opening, the crack can be recognized visually reliably. (I.N.)

  16. A structural health monitoring fastener for tracking fatigue crack growth in bolted metallic joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakow, Alexi Schroder

    Fatigue cracks initiating at fastener hole locations in metallic components are among the most common form of airframe damage. The fastener hole site has been surveyed as the second leading initiation site for fatigue related accidents of fixed wing aircraft. Current methods for inspecting airframes for these cracks are manual, whereby inspectors rely on non-destructive inspection equipment or hand-held probes to scan over areas of a structure. Use of this equipment often demands disassembly of the vehicle to search appropriate hole locations for cracks, which elevates the complexity and cost of these maintenance inspections. Improved reliability, safety, and reduced cost of such maintenance can be realized by the permanent integration of sensors with a structure to detect this damage. Such an integrated system of sensors would form a structural health monitoring (SHM) system. In this study, an Additive, Interleaved, Multi-layer Electromagnetic (AIME) sensor was developed and integrated with the shank of a fastener to form a SHM Fastener, a new SHM technology targeted at detection of fastener hole cracks. The major advantages of the SHM Fastener are its installation, which does not require joint layer disassembly, its capability to detect inner layer cracks, and its capability to operate in a continuous autonomous mode. Two methods for fabricating the proposed SHM Fastener were studied. The first option consisted of a thin flexible printed circuit film that was bonded around a thin metallic sleeve placed around the fastener shank. The second option consisted of coating sensor materials directly to the shank of a part in an effort to increase the durability of the sensor under severe loading conditions. Both analytical and numerical models were developed to characterize the capability of the sensors and provide a design tool for the sensor layout. A diagnostic technique for crack growth monitoring was developed to complete the SHM system, which consists of the

  17. Molecular dynamics simulation of propagating cracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullins, M.

    1982-01-01

    Steady state crack propagation is investigated numerically using a model consisting of 236 free atoms in two (010) planes of bcc alpha iron. The continuum region is modeled using the finite element method with 175 nodes and 288 elements. The model shows clear (010) plane fracture to the edge of the discrete region at moderate loads. Analysis of the results obtained indicates that models of this type can provide realistic simulation of steady state crack propagation.

  18. Reactor vessel nozzle cracks: a photoelastic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, C.W.

    1979-01-01

    A method consisting of a marriage between the ''frozen stress'' photoelastic approach and the local stress field equations of linear elastic fracture mechanics for estimating stress intensity factor distributions in three dimensional, finite cracked body problems is reviewed and extensions of the method are indicated. The method is then applied to the nuclear reactor vessel nozzle corner crack problem for both Intermediate Test Vessel and Boiling Water Reactor geometries. Results are compared with those of other investigators. 35 refs

  19. Curvilinear crack layer propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudnovsky, Alexander; Chaoui, Kamel; Moet, Abdelsamie

    1987-01-01

    An account is given of an experiment designed to allow observation of the effect of damage orientation on the direction of crack growth in the case of crack layer propagation, using polystyrene as the model material. The direction of crack advance under a given loading condition is noted to be determined by a competition between the tendency of the crack to maintain its current direction and the tendency to follow the orientation of the crazes at its tip. The orientation of the crazes is, on the other hand, determined by the stress field due to the interaction of the crack, the crazes, and the hole. The changes in craze rotation relative to the crack define the active zone rotation.

  20. Crack monitoring method based on Cu coating sensor and electrical potential technique for metal structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hou Bo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Advanced crack monitoring technique is the cornerstone of aircraft structural health monitoring. To achieve real-time crack monitoring of aircraft metal structures in the course of service, a new crack monitoring method is proposed based on Cu coating sensor and electrical potential difference principle. Firstly, insulation treatment process was used to prepare a dielectric layer on structural substrate, such as an anodizing layer on 2A12-T4 aluminum alloy substrate, and then a Cu coating crack monitoring sensor was deposited on the structure fatigue critical parts by pulsed bias arc ion plating technology. Secondly, the damage consistency of the Cu coating sensor and 2A12-T4 aluminum alloy substrate was investigated by static tensile experiment and fatigue test. The results show that strain values of the coating sensor and the 2A12-T4 aluminum alloy substrate measured by strain gauges are highly coincident in static tensile experiment and the sensor has excellent fatigue damage consistency with the substrate. Thirdly, the fatigue performance discrepancy between samples with the coating sensor and original samples was investigated. The result shows that there is no obvious negative influence on the fatigue performance of the 2A12-T4 aluminum alloy after preparing the Cu coating sensor on its surface. Finally, crack monitoring experiment was carried out with the Cu coating sensor. The experimental results indicate that the sensor is sensitive to crack, and crack origination and propagation can be monitored effectively through analyzing the change of electrical potential values of the coating sensor.

  1. Crack detection using image processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moustafa, M.A.A

    2010-01-01

    This thesis contains five main subjects in eight chapters and two appendices. The first subject discus Wiener filter for filtering images. In the second subject, we examine using different methods, as Steepest Descent Algorithm (SDA) and the Wavelet Transformation, to detect and filling the cracks, and it's applications in different areas as Nano technology and Bio-technology. In third subject, we attempt to find 3-D images from 1-D or 2-D images using texture mapping with Open Gl under Visual C ++ language programming. The fourth subject consists of the process of using the image warping methods for finding the depth of 2-D images using affine transformation, bilinear transformation, projective mapping, Mosaic warping and similarity transformation. More details about this subject will be discussed below. The fifth subject, the Bezier curves and surface, will be discussed in details. The methods for creating Bezier curves and surface with unknown distribution, using only control points. At the end of our discussion we will obtain the solid form, using the so called NURBS (Non-Uniform Rational B-Spline); which depends on: the degree of freedom, control points, knots, and an evaluation rule; and is defined as a mathematical representation of 3-D geometry that can accurately describe any shape from a simple 2-D line, circle, arc, or curve to the most complex 3-D organic free-form surface or (solid) which depends on finding the Bezier curve and creating family of curves (surface), then filling in between to obtain the solid form. Another representation for this subject is concerned with building 3D geometric models from physical objects using image-based techniques. The advantage of image techniques is that they require no expensive equipment; we use NURBS, subdivision surface and mesh for finding the depth of any image with one still view or 2D image. The quality of filtering depends on the way the data is incorporated into the model. The data should be treated with

  2. BWR pipe crack remedies evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shack, W.J.; Kassner, T.F.; Maiya, P.S.; Park, J.Y.; Ruther, W.; Kuzay, T.; Rybicki, E.F.; Stonesifer, R.B.

    1988-01-01

    Piping in light-water-reactor power systems has been affected by several types of environmental degradation. This paper presents results from studies of (1) stress corrosion crack growth in fracture mechanics specimens of modified Type 347 SS and Type 304/308L SS weld overlay material, (2) heat-to-heat variations in stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of Types 316NG and 347 SS, (3) SCC of sensitized Type 304 SS in water with cupric ion or organic acid impurities, (4) electrochemical potential (ECP) measurements under gamma irradiation, (5) SCC of ferritic steels, (6) strain-controlled fatigue of Type 316NG SS in air at ambient temperature, and (7) through-wall residual stress measurements and finite-element calculation of residual stresses in weldments treated by a mechanical stress improvement process (MSIP). Fracture-mechanics crack-growth-rate tests on Type 316NG SS have shown that transgranular cracking can occur even in high purity environments, whereas no crack growth was observed in Type 347 SS even in impurity environments. In tests on weld overlay specimens, no cracks penetrated into the overlay even in impurity environments. Instead, the cracks branched when they approached the overlay, and then grew parallel to interface. In SCC tests on sensitized Type 304 SS, cupric ions at concentrations greater than ∼1 ppm were found to be deleterious, whereas organic acids at this concentration were not detrimental. Tests on several ferritic steels indicate a strong correlation between the sulfur content of the steels and susceptibility to SCC. External gamma radiation fields produced a large positive shift in the ECP of Type 304 SS at low dissolved-oxygen concentrations (<5 ppb), whereas in the absence of an external gamma field there was no difference in the ECP values of irradiated and nonirradiated material. Fatigue data for Type 316NG SS are consistent with the ASME code mean curve at high strains, but fall below the curve at low strains. Calculations of the

  3. Plasticity around an Axial Surface Crack in a Cylindrical Shell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krenk, Steen

    1979-01-01

    of the yield zone. The model is used to analyse published test data on surface cracked pressurised pipes. The analysis consists in COD evaluation and estimate of failure as a consequence of plastic instability. A method is proposed which deals with the problem by simultaneous analysis of a number of cracks......This paper presents a plasticity model for deep axial surface cracks in pressurised pipes. The model is used in an investigation of the relative merits of fracture criteria based on COD and plastic instability. Recent investigations have shown that the inconsistency of the singular bending stress...... on the bending stresses is considerable. In the case of surface cracks moments are induced due to the eccentricity of the crack and transverse shear effects should therefore be included. A plasticity model for a rectangular axial surface crack is developed. Like a previous surface crack model by Erdogen...

  4. Part of the hydrogen in the intergranular crack by stress corrosion in primary circuit for the 600 and 690 nickel base alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odemer, G.; Coudurier, A.; Jambon, F.; Chene, J.; Odemer, G.; Coudurier, A.; Chene, J.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study is, in a first part, to characterize the hydrogen embrittlement sensitivity of the 600 and 690 based alloys in order to better understand the hydrogen role in the stress corrosion mechanism which appears in theses alloys in the primary circuit of the PWR type reactors. The authors studies how the hydrogen embrittlement is resulting from an interaction between the hydrogen and the plastic deformation. (A.L.B.)

  5. Atomistics of crack propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sieradzki, K.; Dienes, G.J.; Paskin, A.; Massoumzadeh, B.

    1988-01-01

    The molecular dynamic technique is used to investigate static and dynamic aspects of crack extension. The material chosen for this study was the 2D triangular solid with atoms interacting via the Johnson potential. The 2D Johnson solid was chosen for this study since a sharp crack in this material remains stable against dislocation emission up to the critical Griffith load. This behavior allows for a meaningful comparison between the simulation results and continuum energy theorems for crack extension by appropriately defining an effective modulus which accounts for sample size effects and the non-linear elastic behavior of the Johnson solid. Simulation results are presented for the stress fields of moving cracks and these dynamic results are discussed in terms of the dynamic crack propagation theories, of Mott, Eshelby, and Freund

  6. Exploring How Weathering Related Stresses and Subcritical Crack Growth May Influence the Size of Sediment Produced From Different Rock Types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eppes, M. C.; Hallet, B.; Hancock, G. S.; Mackenzie-Helnwein, P.; Keanini, R.

    2016-12-01

    The formation and diminution of rock debris, sediment and soil at and near Earth's surface is driven in large part by in situ, non-transport related, rock cracking. Given the relatively low magnitude stresses that arise in surface and near-surface settings, this production and diminution of granular material is likely strongly influenced and/or driven by subcritical crack growth (Eppes et al., 2016), cracking that occurs under stress loading conditions much lower than a rock's strength as typically measured in the laboratory under rapid loading. Despite a relatively sound understanding of subcritical crack growth through engineering and geophysical studies, its geomorphic and sedimentologic implications have only been minimally explored. Here, based on existing studies, we formulate several hypotheses to predict how weathering-induced stresses combined with the subcritical crack growth properties of rock may influence sediment size distribution. For example, subcritical crack growth velocity (v) can be described by v = CKIn where KI is the mode I (simple opening mode) stress intensity factor, a function of tensile stress at the crack tip and crack length; C is a rock- and environment-dependent constant; and n is material constant, the subcritical crack growth index. Fracture length and spacing in rock is strongly dependent on n, where higher n values result in fewer, more distally spaced cracks (e.g. Olsen, 1993). Thus, coarser sediment might be expected from rocks with higher n values. Weathering-related stresses such as thermal stresses and mineral hydration, however, can disproportionally stress boundaries between minerals with contrasting thermal or chemical properties and orientation, resulting in granular disintegration. Thus, rocks with properties favorable to inducing these stresses might produce sediment whose size is reflective of its constituent grains. We begin to test these hypotheses through a detailed examination of crack and rock characteristics in

  7. Eddy current crack detection capability assessment approach using crack specimens with differing electrical conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshti, Ajay M.

    2018-03-01

    Like other NDE methods, eddy current surface crack detectability is determined using probability of detection (POD) demonstration. The POD demonstration involves eddy current testing of surface crack specimens with known crack sizes. Reliably detectable flaw size, denoted by, a90/95 is determined by statistical analysis of POD test data. The surface crack specimens shall be made from a similar material with electrical conductivity close to the part conductivity. A calibration standard with electro-discharged machined (EDM) notches is typically used in eddy current testing for surface crack detection. The calibration standard conductivity shall be within +/- 15% of the part conductivity. This condition is also applicable to the POD demonstration crack set. Here, a case is considered, where conductivity of the crack specimens available for POD testing differs by more than 15% from that of the part to be inspected. Therefore, a direct POD demonstration of reliably detectable flaw size is not applicable. Additional testing is necessary to use the demonstrated POD test data. An approach to estimate the reliably detectable flaw size in eddy current testing for part made from material A using POD crack specimens made from material B with different conductivity is provided. The approach uses additional test data obtained on EDM notch specimens made from materials A and B. EDM notch test data from the two materials is used to create a transfer function between the demonstrated a90/95 size on crack specimens made of material B and the estimated a90/95 size for part made of material A. Two methods are given. For method A, a90/95 crack size for material B is given and POD data is available. Objective of method A is to determine a90/95 crack size for material A using the same relative decision threshold that was used for material B. For method B, target crack size a90/95 for material A is known. Objective is to determine decision threshold for inspecting material A.

  8. Thermal fatigue crack growth analysis in a nozzle corner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blauel, J.G.; Hodulak, L.

    1983-01-01

    Calculations of the crack growth under local thermal shock fatigue are performed. Estimates of crack growth are based on stress distributions obtained by a finite element analysis for thermal transients in the structure without crack. Stress intensity factors are calculated using interpolation formulae derived from known basic solutions for part-through cracks under constant and linearly varying load. The crack propagation at selected parts of the crack front is calculated stepwise by integration of the Paris law with material constants C and n interpolated from test results on compact specimens at constant temperatures. Experimental results for the model vessel test MB1 at an internal pressure of 14 N/mm 2 and a temperature of 320 0 C exposed to a repeated local spraying with cold water are presented and compared to predictions

  9. Cracked gas generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abthoff, J; Schuster, H D; Gabler, R

    1976-11-17

    A small cracked-gas generator in a vehicle driven, in particular, by an air combustion engine has been proposed for the economic production of the gases necessary for low toxicity combustion from diesel fuel. This proceeds via catalytic crack-gasification and exploitation of residual heat from exhaust gases. This patent application foresees the insertion of one of the catalysts supporting the cracked-gas reaction in a container through which the reacting mixture for cracked-gas production flows in longitudinal direction. Further, air ducts are embedded in the catalyst through which exhaust gases and fresh air flow in counter direction to the cracked gas flow in the catalyst. The air vents are connected through heat conduction to the catalyst. A cracked gas constituting H/sub 2//CO/CO/sub 2//CH/sub 4/ and H/sub 2/O can be produced from the air-fuel mixture using appropriate catalysts. By the addition of 5 to 25% of cracked gas to the volume of air drawn in by the combustion engine, a more favourable combustion can be achieved compared to that obtained under normal combustion conditions.

  10. Cracks in Utopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Many of the craters found on the northern plains of Mars have been partly filled or buried by some material (possibly sediment). The Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image presented here (MOC2-136b, above left) shows a high-resolution view of a tiny portion of the floor of one of these northern plains craters. The crater, located in Utopia Planitia at 44oN, 258oW, is shown on the right (MOC2-136a)with a small white box to indicate the location of the MOC image. The MOC image reveals that the material covering the floor of this crater is cracked and pitted. The origin and source of material that has been deposited in this crater is unknown.The MOC image was acquired in June 1999 and covers an area only 1.1 kilometers (0.7 miles) wide at a resolution of 1.8 meters (6 feet) per pixel. The context picture is a mosaic of Viking 2 orbiter images 010B53 and 010B55, taken in 1976. Both images are illuminated from the left. Malin Space Science Systems and the California Institute of Technology built the MOC using spare hardware from the Mars Observer mission. MSSS operates the camera from its facilities in San Diego, CA. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Mars Surveyor Operations Project operates the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft with its industrial partner, Lockheed Martin Astronautics, from facilities in Pasadena, CA and Denver, CO.

  11. Three-dimensional shape of the early stages of fatigue cracks nucleated in nodular cast iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verdu, C. [GEMPPM, UMR 5510, INSA de Lyon, 20 Avenue Albert Einstein, 69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)], E-mail: catherine.verdu@insa-lyon.fr; Adrien, J.; Buffiere, J.Y. [GEMPPM, UMR 5510, INSA de Lyon, 20 Avenue Albert Einstein, 69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)

    2008-06-15

    High resolution synchrotron X-ray tomography has been used to obtain three-dimensional (3D) images of the early stages of fatigue crack nucleation in a nodular cast iron. Microcracks were observed to initiate at casting defects (microshrinkage) and graphite nodules. The 3D observations have shown that the microcracks form in the material ligament comprised between the specimen surface and the defect. The probability of a defect to initiate a crack was correlated with the size of the defect and its position with respect to the surface. This correlation has been explained on the basis of local stress concentrations in the vicinity of the defect. The 3D observations of samples submitted to different fatigue cycles revealed that a large part of the fatigue life consisted in the progressive fracture of the ligament. The majority of the observed cracks stopped after this fracture process and, therefore, their size did not exceed the initiating defect size even if the crack seemed larger than the defect on the optical surface observations. Only few microcracks, nucleated on the largest defects, continued to grow with short-crack behaviour.

  12. High temperature cracking of steels: effect of geometry on creep crack growth laws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kabiri, M.R.

    2003-12-01

    This study was performed at Centre des Materiaux de l'Ecole des Mines de Paris. It deals with identification and transferability of high temperature creep cracking laws of steels. A global approach, based on C * and J non-linear fracture mechanics parameters has been used to characterize creep crack initiation and propagation. The studied materials are: the ferritic steels 1Cr-1Mo-1/4V (hot and cold parts working at 540 and 250 C) used in the thermal power stations and the austenitic stainless steel 316 L(N) used in the nuclear power stations. During this thesis a data base was setting up, it regroups several tests of fatigue, creep, creep-fatigue, and relaxation. Its particularity is to contain several creep tests (27 tests), achieved at various temperatures (550 to 650 C) and using three different geometries. The relevance of the C * parameter to describe the creep crack propagation was analysed by a means of systematic study of elasto-viscoplastic stress singularities under several conditions (different stress triaxiality). It has been shown that, besides the C * parameter, a second non singular term, denoted here as Q * , is necessary to describe the local variables in the vicinity of the crack tip. Values of this constraint parameter are always negative. Consequently, application of typical creep crack growth laws linking the creep crack growth rate to the C * parameter (da/dt - C * ), will be conservative for industrial applications. Furthermore, we showed that for ferritic steels, crack incubation period is important, therefore a correlation of Ti - C * type has been kept to predict crack initiation time Ti. For the austenitic stainless steel, the relevant stage is the one of the crack propagation, so that a master curve (da/dt - C * ), using a new data analysis method, was established. Finally, the propagation of cracks has been simulated numerically using the node release technique, allowing to validate analytical expressions utilised for the experimental

  13. Inspecting cracks in foam insulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambell, L. W.; Jung, G. K.

    1979-01-01

    Dye solution indicates extent of cracking by penetrating crack and showing original crack depth clearly. Solution comprised of methylene blue in denatured ethyl alcohol penetrates cracks completely and evaporates quickly and is suitable technique for usage in environmental or structural tests.

  14. Modelling of Corrosion Cracks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    Modelling of corrosion cracking of reinforced concrete structures is complicated as a great number of uncertain factors are involved. To get a reliable modelling a physical and mechanical understanding of the process behind corrosion in needed.......Modelling of corrosion cracking of reinforced concrete structures is complicated as a great number of uncertain factors are involved. To get a reliable modelling a physical and mechanical understanding of the process behind corrosion in needed....

  15. Cracking the Gender Codes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rennison, Betina Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    extensive work to raise the proportion of women. This has helped slightly, but women remain underrepresented at the corporate top. Why is this so? What can be done to solve it? This article presents five different types of answers relating to five discursive codes: nature, talent, business, exclusion...... in leadership management, we must become more aware and take advantage of this complexity. We must crack the codes in order to crack the curve....

  16. Modelling of environmentally assisted cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aaltonen, P.; Saario, T.; Ehrnsten, U.; Haenninen, H.; Itaeaho, M.; Piippo, J.

    1998-01-01

    During the use of nuclear reactors the properties of the structural materials change. Variations in the operation environment, such as changes in water chemistry, may enhance the development and growth of flaws. Neutron radiation causes embrittlement for in-core vessel materials. Radiation, together with water chemistry, increases the possibility of stress corrosion cracking in stainless steels and superalloys used in the reactor internal parts. Research on structural materials endeavours to study the ageing mechanisms of materials, and the possibilities and methods of preventing or forecasting the damage caused to structures by ageing. (orig.)

  17. Natural zeolite bitumen cracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuznicki, S.M.; McCaffrey, W.C.; Bian, J.; Wangen, E.; Koenig, A. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Chemical and Materials Engineering

    2006-07-01

    A study was conducted to demonstrate how low cost heavy oil upgrading in the field could reduce the need for diluents while lowering the cost for pipelining. Low cost field upgrading could also contribute to lowering contaminant levels. The performance of visbreaking processes could be improved by using disposable cracking agents. In turn, the economics of field upgrading of in-situ derived bitumen would be improved. However, in order to be viable, such agents would have to be far less expensive than current commercial cracking catalysts. A platy natural zeolite was selected for modification and testing due to its unique chemical and morphological properties. A catalyst-bearing oil sand was then heat-treated for 1 hour at 400 degrees C in a sealed microreactor. Under these mild cracking conditions, the catalyst-bearing oil sand produced extractable products of much lower viscosity. The products also contained considerably more gas oil and middle distillates than raw oil sand processed under the same conditions as thermal cracking alone. According to model cracking studies using hexadecane, these modified mineral zeolites may be more active cracking agents than undiluted premium commercial FCC catalyst. These materials hold promise for partial upgrading schemes to reduce solvent requirements in the field. tabs., figs.

  18. Three-dimensional characterization of stress corrosion cracks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lozano-Perez, S.; Rodrigo, P.; Gontard, Lionel Cervera

    2011-01-01

    the best spatial resolution. To illustrate the power of these techniques, different parts of dominant stress corrosion cracks in Ni-alloys and stainless steels have been reconstructed in 3D. All relevant microstructural features can now be studied in detail and its relative orientation respect......Understanding crack propagation and initiation is fundamental if stress corrosion cracking (SCC) mechanisms are to be understood. However, cracking is a three-dimensional (3D) phenomenon and most characterization techniques are restricted to two-dimensional (2D) observations. In order to overcome...

  19. Mechanism of Fatigue Crack Growth of Bridge Steel Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu H.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out on the background of Sutong Bridge project based on fracture mechanics, aiming at analyzing the growth mechanism of fatigue cracks of a bridge under the load of vehicles. Stress intensity factor (SIF can be calculated by various methods. Three steel plates with different kinds of cracks were taken as the samples in this study. With the combination of finite element analysis software ABAQUS and the J integral method, SIF values of the samples were calculated. After that, the extended finite element method in the simulation of fatigue crack growth was introduced, and the simulation of crack growth paths under different external loads was analyzed. At last, we took a partial model from the Sutong Bridge and supposed its two dangerous parts already had fine cracks; then simulative vehicle load was added onto the U-rib to predict crack growth paths using the extended finite element method.

  20. Ultrasonic sizing of fatigue cracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, D.J.

    1983-12-01

    Surface and buried fatigue cracks in steel plates have been sized using immersion probes as transmitters-receivers, angled to produce shear waves in the steel. Sizes have been estimated by identifying the ultrasonic waves diffracted from the crack tip and by measuring the time taken for a signal to travel to and from the crack tip. The effects of compression normal to a fatigue crack and of crack front curvature are discussed. Another diffraction technique, developed by UKAEA, Harwell, is reviewed

  1. Thermal fatigue cracking of austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fissolo, A.

    2001-01-01

    This report deals with the thermal fatigue cracking of austenitic stainless steels as AISI 316 LN and 304 L. Such damage has been clearly observed for some components used in Fast Breeder reactors (FBR) and Pressure Water Reactor (PWR). In order to investigate thermal fatigue, quasi-structural specimen have been used. In this frame, facilities enforcing temperature variations similar to those found under the operation conditions have been progressively developed. As for components, loading results from impeded dilatation. In the SPLASH facility, the purpose was to establish accurate crack initiation conditions in order to check the relevance of the usual component design methodology. The tested specimen is continuously heated by the passage of an electrical DC current, and submitted to cyclic thermal down shock (up to 1000 deg C/s) by means of periodical spraying of water on two opposite specimen faces. The number of cycles to crack initiation N i is deduced from periodic examinations of the quenched surfaces, by means of optical microscopy. It is considered that initiation occurs when at least one 50μm to 150□m long crack is observed. Additional SPLASH tests were performed for N >> N i , with a view to investigate the evolution of a surface multiple cracking network with the number of cycles N. The CYTHIA test was mainly developed for the purpose of assessing crack growth dynamics of one isolated crack in thermal fatigue conditions. Specimens consist of thick walled tubes with a 1 mm circular groove is spark-machined at the specimen centre. During the test, the external wall of the tube is periodically heated by using a HF induction coil (1 MHz), while its internal wall is permanently cooled by flowing water. Total crack growth is derived from post-mortem examinations, whereby the thermal fatigue final rupture surface is oxidized at the end of the test. The specimen is broken afterwards under mechanical fatigue at room temperature. All the tests confirm that

  2. Kinetics of fatigue crack growth and crack paths in the old puddled steel after 100-years operating time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Lesiuk

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The goal of the authors’ investigations was determination of the fatigue crack growth in fragments of steel structures (of the puddled steel and its cyclic behavior. Tested steel elements coming from the turn of the 19th and 20th were gained from still operating ancient steel construction (a main hall of Railway Station, bridges etc.. This work is a part of investigations devoted to the phenomenon of microstructural degradation and its potential influence on their strength properties. The analysis of the obtained results indicated that those long operating steels subject to microstructure degradation processes consisting mainly in precipitation of carbides and nitrides inside ferrite grains, precipitation of carbides at ferrite grain boundaries and degeneration of pearlite areas [1, 2]. It is worth noticing that resistance of the puddled steel to fatigue crack propagation in the normalized state was higher. The authors proposed the new kinetic equation of fatigue crack growth rate in such a steel. Thus the relationship between the kinetics of degradation processes and the fatigue crack growth rate also have been shown. It is also confirmed by the materials research of the viaduct from 1885, which has not shown any significant changes in microstructure. The non-classical kinetic fatigue fracture diagrams (KFFD based on deformation ( or energy (W approach was also considered. In conjunction with the results of low- and high-cycle fatigue and gradual loss of ductility as a consequence (due to the microstructural degradation processes - it seems to be a promising construction of the new kinetics fatigue fracture diagrams with the energy approach.

  3. A crack growth evaluation method for interacting multiple cracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamaya, Masayuki

    2003-01-01

    When stress corrosion cracking or corrosion fatigue occurs, multiple cracks are frequently initiated in the same area. According to section XI of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, multiple cracks are considered as a single combined crack in crack growth analysis, if the specified conditions are satisfied. In crack growth processes, however, no prescription for the interference between multiple cracks is given in this code. The JSME Post-Construction Code, issued in May 2000, prescribes the conditions of crack coalescence in the crack growth process. This study aimed to extend this prescription to more general cases. A simulation model was applied, to simulate the crack growth process, taking into account the interference between two cracks. This model made it possible to analyze multiple crack growth behaviors for many cases (e.g. different relative position and length) that could not be studied by experiment only. Based on these analyses, a new crack growth analysis method was suggested for taking into account the interference between multiple cracks. (author)

  4. A 13 kA current lead, measuring 1.5 m in length. The lower part consists of a high-temperature superconductor (Bi-2223), operating at between 50 K and 4.5 K, while the heat-exchanger upper part allows the current to be brought from room temperature to 50 K.

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    A 13 kA current lead, measuring 1.5 m in length. The lower part consists of a high-temperature superconductor (Bi-2223), operating at between 50 K and 4.5 K, while the heat-exchanger upper part allows the current to be brought from room temperature to 50 K.

  5. Structural Consistency, Consistency, and Sequential Rationality.

    OpenAIRE

    Kreps, David M; Ramey, Garey

    1987-01-01

    Sequential equilibria comprise consistent beliefs and a sequentially ra tional strategy profile. Consistent beliefs are limits of Bayes ratio nal beliefs for sequences of strategies that approach the equilibrium strategy. Beliefs are structurally consistent if they are rationaliz ed by some single conjecture concerning opponents' strategies. Consis tent beliefs are not necessarily structurally consistent, notwithstan ding a claim by Kreps and Robert Wilson (1982). Moreover, the spirit of stru...

  6. Nonlinear crack mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khoroshun, L.P.

    1995-01-01

    The characteristic features of the deformation and failure of actual materials in the vicinity of a crack tip are due to their physical nonlinearity in the stress-concentration zone, which is a result of plasticity, microfailure, or a nonlinear dependence of the interatomic forces on the distance. Therefore, adequate models of the failure mechanics must be nonlinear, in principle, although linear failure mechanics is applicable if the zone of nonlinear deformation is small in comparison with the crack length. Models of crack mechanics are based on analytical solutions of the problem of the stress-strain state in the vicinity of the crack. On account of the complexity of the problem, nonlinear models are bason on approximate schematic solutions. In the Leonov-Panasyuk-Dugdale nonlinear model, one of the best known, the actual two-dimensional plastic zone (the nonlinearity zone) is replaced by a narrow one-dimensional zone, which is then modeled by extending the crack with a specified normal load equal to the yield point. The condition of finite stress is applied here, and hence the length of the plastic zone is determined. As a result of this approximation, the displacement in the plastic zone at the abscissa is nonzero

  7. Evaluation of the probability of crack initiation and crack instability for a pipe with a semi-elliptical crack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Delliou, P.; Hornet, P.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents some work conducted at EDF R and D Division to evaluate the probability that a semi-elliptical crack in a pipe not only initiates but also propagates when submitted to mechanical loading such as bending and pressure combined or not with a thermal shock. The first part is related to the description of the mechanical model: the simplified methods included in the French RSE-M Code used to evaluate the J-integral as well as the principle of the determination of the crack propagation. Then, the way this deterministic approach is combined to a reliability code is described. Finally, an example is shown: the initiation and the instability of a semi-elliptical crack in a pipe submitted to combined pressure and bending moment. (author)

  8. BWR feedwater nozzle and control-rod-drive return line nozzle cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    In its 1978 Annual Report to Congress, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission identified as an unresolved safety issue the appearance of cracks in feedwater nozzles at boiling-water reactors (BWRs). Later similar cracking, detected in return water lines for control-rod-drive systems at BWRs, was designated Part II of the issue. This article outlines the resolution of these cracking problems

  9. BWR alloy 182 stress Corrosion Cracking Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horn, R.M.; Hickling, J.

    2002-01-01

    Modern Boiling Water Reactors (BWR) have successfully operated for more than three decades. Over that time frame, different materials issues have continued to arise, leading to comprehensive efforts to understand the root cause while concurrently developing different mitigation strategies to address near-term, continued operation, as well as provide long-term paths to extended plant life. These activities have led to methods to inspect components to quantify the extent of degradation, appropriate methods of analysis to quantify structural margin, repair designs (or strategies to replace the component function) and improved materials for current and future application. The primary materials issue has been the occurrence of stress corrosion cracking (SCC). While this phenomenon has been primarily associated with austenitic stainless steel, it has also been found in nickel-base weldments used to join piping and reactor internal components to the reactor pressure vessel consistent with fabrication practices throughout the nuclear industry. The objective of this paper is to focus on the history and learning gained regarding Alloy 182 weld metal. The paper will discuss the chronology of weld metal cracking in piping components as well as in reactor internal components. The BWR industry has pro-actively developed inspection processes and procedures that have been successfully used to interrogate different locations for the existence of cracking. The recognition of the potential for cracking has also led to extensive studies to understand cracking behavior. Among other things, work has been performed to characterize crack growth rates in both oxygenated and hydrogenated environments. The latter may also be relevant to PWR systems. These data, along with the understanding of stress corrosion cracking processes, have led to extensive implementation of appropriate mitigation measures. (authors)

  10. Measuring process and knowledge consistency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edwards, Kasper; Jensen, Klaes Ladeby; Haug, Anders

    2007-01-01

    When implementing configuration systems, knowledge about products and processes are documented and replicated in the configuration system. This practice assumes that products are specified consistently i.e. on the same rule base and likewise for processes. However, consistency cannot be taken...... for granted; rather the contrary, and attempting to implement a configuration system may easily ignite a political battle. This is because stakes are high in the sense that the rules and processes chosen may only reflect one part of the practice, ignoring a majority of the employees. To avoid this situation......, this paper presents a methodology for measuring product and process consistency prior to implementing a configuration system. The methodology consists of two parts: 1) measuring knowledge consistency and 2) measuring process consistency. Knowledge consistency is measured by developing a questionnaire...

  11. Cracking the Cipher Challenge

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva. Audiovisual Unit; Singh, Simon

    2002-01-01

    In the back of 'The Code Book', a history of cryptography, Simon Singh included a series of 10 encoded messages, each from a different period of history. The first person to crack all 10 messages would win a prize of £10,000. Now that the prize has been won, Simon can reveal the story behind the Cipher Challenge. Along the way he will show how mathematics can be used to crack codes, the role it played in World War Two and how it helps to guarantee security in the Information Age.

  12. On the behavior of crack surface ligaments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsson, P.; Staahle, P.; Sundin, K.G.

    1998-01-01

    Small ligaments connecting the fracture surfaces just behind a moving crack front are assumed to exist under certain conditions. The ligaments are rapidly torn as the crack advances. Inelastic straining of such ligaments influences the energy balance in the fracture process. The rapid tearing of a single ligament is studied both numerically and experimentally. An elastic visco-plastic material model is adopted for finite-element calculations. The results show that relatively large amounts of energy are dissipated during the tearing process. Further, the energy needed to tear a ligament increases rapidly with increasing tearing rate. The computed behavior is partly verified in a few preliminary experiments. The implications for slow stable crack tip speeds during dynamic fracture are discussed. (orig.)

  13. Dynamic response of cracked hexagonal subassembly ducts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glazik, J.L.; Petroski, H.J.

    1979-01-01

    The hexagonal subassembly ducts (hexcans) of current Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) designs are typically made of 20% coldworked Type 316 stainless steel. Prolonged exposure of this initially tough and ductile material to a fast neutron flux at high temperatures can result in severe embrittlement. Under these conditions, the unstable crack propagation of flaws, which may have been introduced during fabrication or transportation of the hexcans, is a problem of interest in LMFBR safety analysis. The abnormal overpressurization resulting from certain interactions within a subassembly, or the rupture of one or more fuel pins, may be sufficient to overload an otherwise subcritical crack in an embrittled hexcan. This paper examines the dynamic elastic response of flawed and unflawed fast reactor subassembly ducts. A plane-strain finite element analysis was performed for ducts containing internal corner cracks, as well as external midflat cracks. Two worst case loading situations were considered: rapid uniform internal pressurization and suddenly applied point loads at opposite midflats. The finite-element code CHILES, which can accomodate the stress singularities that occur at crack tips, was given dynamic capabilities through the inclusion of a consistent mass matrix and step-by-step time integration scheme. The SAP IV code was also employed for eigenvalue analysis and modal response. Although this code does not contain singular elements in its element library, dynamic stress intensity factors were calculated by a technique requiring only ordinary isoparametric quadrilaterals

  14. Identification and management of cracking in 410 stainless turbine blade roots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, M.A.; Lehockey, E.M.; Thompson, I.; Massey, R.

    2003-01-01

    estimated that cracks had been propagating for between 6 and 10 years (of the total 20-year operating life). This is approximately consistent with general guidelines wherein cracks can be expected to initiate during the last 30% of fatigue life. On this basis, and in the absence of other compelling metallurgical evidence suggesting an alternate root-cause, these blades were believed to have reached end of fatigue life. Similitude in the beachmark patterns among the affected blades suggested stable and consistent growth characteristics. In addition, blades appeared to remain intact despite sustaining cracks that propagated through a large fraction of the root cross-section. The stable propagation characteristics combined with the apparently large 'safety' margins provided the opportunity for conducting regular inspections (phased array and MPI) to ensure reliable operation between turbine outages until replacement options could be developed and implemented. Subsequent inspections of row 10 blades in other identical turbines have not detected any other cracked blades to date. In contrast, two of the blades examined exhibited clear evidence of intergranular cracking along prior austenite grain boundaries consistent with stress corrosion cracking (Figure 3). Hardness on both of these blades approached or exceeded 400 HVN. Susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking increases significantly with hardness. Fracture surfaces contained elevated levels of Mo, 5, Cl, and F. Molybenum and sulfur were traced in part to the (Moly Paul) grease lubricant applied to mate the blade root to the turbine steeple during installation. Other contaminants established from Ion Chromatography included unusually high levels of carbon in the form of organics including formates, acetates, and glycolates as well as nitrates, sulfates, and oxalates. Origins of this contamination include throw from cation resins in the water treatment plant, thermal degradation and oxidation by air ingress of the volatile

  15. Microstructural modelling of creep crack growth from a blunted crack

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Onck, P.R.; Giessen, E. van der

    1998-01-01

    The effect of crack tip blunting on the initial stages of creep crack growth is investigated by means of a planar microstructural model in which grains are represented discretely. The actual linking-up process of discrete microcracks with the macroscopic crack is simulated, with full account of the

  16. Linear Cracking in Bridge Decks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-01

    Concrete cracking in bridge decks remains an important issue relative to deck durability. Cracks can allow increased penetration of chlorides, which can result in premature corrosion of the reinforcing steel and subsequent spalling of the concrete de...

  17. Crack detection '86

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    The participants of the conference heard 36 papers of which 13 were incorporated in INIS. The incorporated papers deal with the quality control of the equipment of nuclear power plants, with technical specifications and possibilities of diverse crack detection devices, as well as with personnel training for nondestructive materials testing. (E.S.)

  18. Influence of cracks on rebar corrosion in carbonated concretes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghantous, R.M.; L'Hostis, V.; Poyet, S.; Francois, R.; Tran, N.C.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental program allowing the determination of the effect of pre-cracks and their orientations on both initiation and propagation of reinforcement steel corrosion due to carbonation in different environmental conditions, in order to propose an operational model allowing the evaluation of the kinetic of corrosion of the reinforcement steel in cooling towers of nuclear power plants. The cracking mode that generates cracks which are representative of those appearing on the cooling towers is a three-point bending test performed on prismatic samples of 7*7*28 cm 3 size with 6 mm steel bars. The length of damaged steel / concrete interface, which appears following a three-point bending test, is then quantified. This length could be determining in the initiation and the propagation of corrosion. Results show that this length is dependent on the residual crack opening and that the length of damaged interface in its lower part is larger than that on the upper part due to the Top Bar effect. After cracking, the samples will be exposed to carbon dioxide to ensure carbonation of the steel bar localized at the bottom of the crack and the concrete/steel interface, damaged by the load applied during the three-point bending test. After carbonation of the interface, samples will be submitted to corrosion in different environmental conditions whose effect on the kinetics of corrosion will be determined. The work done so far permits the definition of the cracking protocol (three points bending) that allows obtaining cracks which are representative of those existing on cooling towers. Moreover, the length of steel/concrete damaged interface with respect to crack opening is quantified. It was found that this length is proportional to the crack opening. In addition, it was shown that the Top Bar effect increases the damaged interface length at the lower part of steel bars

  19. Crack closure, a literature study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmgren, M.

    1993-08-01

    In this report crack closure is treated. The state of the art is reviewed. Different empirical formulas for determining the crack closure are compared with each other, and their benefits are discussed. Experimental techniques for determining the crack closure stress are discussed, and some results from fatigue tests are also reported. Experimental data from the literature are reported.

  20. Crack initiation and growth in welded structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assire, A.

    2000-01-01

    This work concerns the remaining life assessment of a structure containing initial defects of manufacturing. High temperature crack initiation and growth are studied for austenitic stainless steels, and defect assessment methods are improved in order to take into account welded structures. For these one, the probability to have a defect is significant. Two kinds of approaches are commonly used for defect assessment analysis. Fracture mechanics global approach with an energetic criterion, and local approach with a model taking into account the physical damage mechanism. For both approaches mechanical fields (stress and strain) have to be computed everywhere within the structure. Then, Finite Element computation is needed. The first part of the thesis concerns the identification of non linear kinematic and isotropic constitutive models. A pseudo-analytical method is proposed for a 'Two Inelastic Strain' model. This method provides a strategy of identification with a mechanical meaning, and this enables to associate each parameter to a physical phenomenon. Existing identifications are improved for cyclic plasticity and creep on a large range of stress levels. The second part concerns high temperature crack initiation and growth in welded structures. Finite Element analysis on plate and tube experimental configuration enable to understand the phenomenons of interaction between base metal and weld metal under mechanical and thermal loading. Concerning global approach, criteria based on C* parameter (Rice integral for visco-plasticity) are used. Finite Element computations underline the fact that for a defect located in the weld metal, C* values strongly depend on the base metal creep strain rate, because widespread visco-plasticity is located in both metals. A simplified method, based on the reference stress approach, is proposed and validated with Finite Element results. Creep crack growth simplified assessment is a quite good validation of the experimental results

  1. Modeling moisture ingress through simplified concrete crack geometries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pease, Bradley Justin; Michel, Alexander; Geiker, Mette Rica

    2011-01-01

    , considered to have two parts; 1) a coalesced crack length which behaves as a free-surface for moisture ingress, and 2) an isolated microcracking length which resists ingress similarly to the bulk material. Transport model results are compared to experimental results from steel fibre reinforced concrete wedge......This paper introduces a numerical model for ingress in cracked steel fibre reinforced concrete. Details of a simplified crack are preset in the model’s geometry using the cracked hinge model (CHM). The total crack length estimated using the CHM was, based on earlier work on conventional concrete...... on moisture ingress. Results from the transport model indicate the length of the isolated microcracks was approximately 19 mm for the investigated concrete composition....

  2. Crack widths in concrete with fibers and main reinforcement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Frede; Ulfkjær, Jens Peder; Brincker, Rune

    2015-01-01

    The main object of the research work presented in this paper is to establish design tools for concrete structures where main reinforcement is combined with addition of short discrete steel fibers. The work is concerned with calculating and measuring crack widths in structural elements subjected...... to bending load. Thus, the aim of the work is to enable engineers to calculate crack widths for flexural concrete members and analyze how different combinations of amounts of fibers and amounts of main reinforcement can meet a given maximum crack width requirement. A mathematical model including...... the ductility of the fiber reinforced concrete (FRC) is set up and experimental work is conducted in order to verify the crack width model. The ductility of the FRC is taken into account by using the stress crack width relation. The constitutive model for the FRC is based on the idea that the initial part...

  3. Evaluation of cracking in steam generator feedwater piping in pressurized water reactor plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldberg, A.; Streit, R.D.

    1981-05-01

    Cracking in feedwater piping was detected near the inlet to steam generators in 15 pressurized water reactor plants. Sections with cracks from nine plants are examined with the objective of identifying the cracking mechanism and assessing various factors that might contribute to this cracking. Using transmission electron microscopy, fatigue striations are observed on replicas of cleaned crack surfaces. Calculations based on the observed striation spacings gave a cyclic stress value of 150 MPa (22 ksi) for one of the major cracks. The direction of crack propagation was invariably related to the piping surface and not to the piping axis. These two factors are consistent with the proposed concept of thermally induced, cyclic, tensile surface stresses and it is concluded that the overriding factor in the cracking problem was the presence of such undocumented cyclic loads

  4. Concrete Crack Measurement and Analysis Based on Terrestrial Laser Scanning Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangyang Xu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Terrestrial laser scanning (TLS has become one of the potential technologies for an object three-dimensional (3D information acquisition. The using vibration analysis for early detection of cracks has gained popularity over the years and in the last decade substantial progress has been made in that direction. However, the crack detection using TLS is also a good method. In the experimental part of this study, the effect of crack width and location on modal properties of the beam was investigated. The recent paper provides a method for automatic concrete cracks detection from the data that was obtained by TLS. The method of cracks detection is achieved by six steps. The objective of this study is to analyze the crack of concrete beams both experimentally and using MATLAB analysis. Besides this, information about the width, location and percentage of cracks in cracked concrete beams can be obtained using this technique.

  5. Evaluation of a leaking crack in an irradiated CANDU pressure tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coleman, C.E.; Simpson, L.A.

    1988-06-01

    Leak-before-break is used in CANDU reactors as part of the defence against rupture of the pressure tubes. Two important features of this technique are the action time available for detection of a leaking crack and the size of the leak allowing crack location. Support for continued reliance on leak-before-break is being obtained from experiments, on irradiated Zr-2.5 Nb pressure tubes attached to their end fittings, that simulate the behaviour of a leaking crack in a reactor. At reactor operating temperatures leaking cracks grow more slowly than dry cracks in the laboratory because they are cooled when pressurised water flashes to steam on their surface. These cracks remain stable till they are at least 70 mm long. From the results of these experiments the action time is at least 100 h. The leak rate increases rapidly when a through-wall crack extends a small amount, thus greatly assisting with crack location

  6. Experimental investigation on centrifugal compressor blade crack classification using the squared envelope spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongkun; Zhang, Xuefeng; Xu, Fujian

    2013-09-18

    Centrifugal compressors are a key piece of equipment for modern production. Among the components of the centrifugal compressor, the impeller is a pivotal part as it is used to transform kinetic energy into pressure energy. Blade crack condition monitoring and classification has been broadly investigated in the industrial and academic area. In this research, a pressure pulsation (PP) sensor arranged in close vicinity to the crack area and the corresponding casing vibration signals are used to monitor blade crack information. As these signals cannot directly demonstrate the blade crack, the method employed in this research is based on the extraction of weak signal characteristics that are induced by blade cracking. A method for blade crack classification based on the signals monitored by using a squared envelope spectrum (SES) is presented. Experimental investigations on blade crack classification are carried out to verify the effectiveness of this method. The results show that it is an effective tool for blade crack classification in centrifugal compressors.

  7. Cracked rotors. A survey on static and dynamic behaviour including modelling and diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachschmid, Nicolo; Pennacchi, Paolo; Tanzi, Ezio [Politecnico di Milano (Italy). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2010-07-01

    Cracks can develop in rotating shafts and can propagate to relevant depths without affecting consistently the normal operating conditions of the shaft. In order to avoid catastrophic failures, accurate vibration analyses have to be performed for crack detection. The identification of the crack location and depth is possible by means of a model based diagnostic approach, provided that the model of the crack and the model of the cracked shaft dynamical behavior are accurate and reliable. This monograph shows the typical dynamical behavior of cracked shafts and presents tests for detecting cracks. The book describes how to model cracks, how to simulate the dynamical behavior of cracked shaft, and compares the corresponding numerical with experimental results. All effects of cracks on the vibrations of rotating shafts are analyzed, and some results of a numerical sensitivity analysis of the vibrations to the presence and severity of the crack are shown. Finally the book describes some crack identification procedures and shows some results in model based crack identification in position and depth. The book is useful for higher university courses in mechanical and energetic engineering, but also for skilled technical people employed in power generation industries. (orig.)

  8. Ductile fracture of circumferentially cracked pipes subjected to bending loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zahoor, A.; Kanninen, M.F.

    1981-01-01

    A plastic fracture mechanics methodology is presented for part-through cracks in pipes under bending. A previous analysis result on the behavior of part-through cracks in pipes is reviewed. Example quantitative results for the initiation and instability of radial growth of part-through cracks are presented and compared with the experimental data to demonstrate the applicability of the method. The analyses in our previous work are further developed to include the instability of circumferential growth of part-through cracks. Numerical results are then presented for a compliant piping system, under displacement controlled bending, which focus on (1) instability of radial growth (unstable wall breakthrough) and (2) instability of circumferential growth of the resulting throughthe-thickness crack. The combined results of the above two types of analyses are presented on a safety assessment diagram. This diagram defines a curve of critical combination of length and depth of part-through cracks which delineates leak from fracture. The effect of piping compliance on the leak-before-break assessment is discussed

  9. Ductile fracture of circumferentially cracked pipes subjected to bending loads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zahoor, A.; Kanninen, M.F.

    1981-10-01

    A plastic fracture mechanics methodology is presented for part-through cracks in pipes under bending. A previous analysis result on the behavior of part-through cracks in pipes is reviewed. Example quantitative results for the initiation and instability of radial growth of part-through cracks are presented and compared with the experimental data to demonstrate the applicability of the method. The analyses in our previous work are further developed to include the instability of circumferential growth of part-through cracks. Numerical results are then presented for a compliant piping system, under displacement controlled bending, which focus on (1) instability of radial growth (unstable wall breakthrough) and (2) instability of circumferential growth of the resulting throughthe-thickness crack. The combined results of the above two types of analyses are presented on a safety assessment diagram. This diagram defines a curve of critical combination of length and depth of part-through cracks which delineates leak from fracture. The effect of piping compliance on the leak-before-break assessment is discussed.

  10. Research works on contamination transfers through cracked concrete walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelain, T.; Vendel, J.

    2006-01-01

    This study takes place within the framework of nuclear facilities containment assessment. The objectives are to determine gaseous and two-phase flow laws, aerosol deposition correlations into crack network, further to accidental situation (e.g. seism) and the real crack network characteristics considering the cracks as two infinite parallel plates. At first, we performed air flow experiments on three concrete walls (128 cm in width, 75 cm in height and 10 cm in thickness), cracked by shear stresses. Using 'aeraulic' crack network characteristics, the results are in good agreement with the Poiseuille law in laminar flow, but in the case of transition flow it has been necessary to determine a specific correlation for the friction factor. Then, we performed aerosol deposition experiments with one of the previous concrete walls to determine global aerosol deposition model in a crack network. Using these previous experiments and an experiment consisting in calculating the crack network volume by measuring transfer time, we could determine the real crack network characteristics in a good agreement with characteristics calculated by a structural mechanical code for our experimental configuration. (authors)

  11. Delayed hydride cracking: alternative pre-cracking method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mieza, Juan I.; Ponzoni, Lucio M.E.; Vigna, Gustavo L.; Domizzi, Gladys

    2009-01-01

    The internal components of nuclear reactors built-in Zr alloys are prone to a failure mechanism known as Delayed Hydride Cracking (DHC). This situation has triggered numerous scientific studies in order to measure the crack propagation velocity and the threshold stress intensity factor associated to DHC. Tests are carried out on fatigued pre-crack samples to ensure similar test conditions and comparable results. Due to difficulties in implementing the fatigue pre-crack method it would be desirable to replace it with a pre-crack produced by the same process of DHC, for which is necessary to demonstrate equivalence of this two methods. In this work tests on samples extracted from two Zr-2.5 Nb tubes were conducted. Some of the samples were heat treated to obtain a range in their metallurgical properties as well as different DHC velocities. A comparison between velocities measured in test samples pre-cracked by fatigue and RDIH is done, demonstrating that the pre-cracking method does not affect the measured velocity value. In addition, the incubation (t inc ), which is the time between the application of the load and the first signal of crack propagation, in samples pre-cracked by RDIH, was measured. It was found that these times are sufficiently short, even in the worst cases (lower speed) and similar to the ones of fatigued pre-cracked samples. (author)

  12. Effects of two-scale transverse crack systems on the non-linear behaviour of a 2D SiC-SiC composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morvan, J.-M.; Baste, S. [Bordeaux-1 Univ., 33 - Talence (France). Lab. de Mecanique Physique

    1998-07-31

    By using both an ultrasonic device and an extensometer, it is possible to know which stiffness coefficients change during the damage process of a material and which part of the global strain is either elastic or inelastic. The influence of the two damage mechanisms is described for a woven 2D SiC-SiC composite. It appears that the two scales of this composite have a great influence on its behaviour. Two elementary mechanisms occur at both scales of the material: at the mesostructure level consisting of the bundles as well as of the inter-bundle matrix and at the microstructure level made from both the fibres and the intra-bundle matrix. The inelastic strains are sensitive to this two-scale effect: an increment of strain at constant stress that comes to saturation corresponding to the inter-bundle damage process and a strain which needs an increase in stress as cracking occurs at the fibres scale. With the help of a model that predicts the compliance changes caused by a crack system in a solid, it is possible to predict the crack density variation at both scales as well as the geometry of the various crack systems during monotonous loading. Furthermore, when the crack opening is taken into account, it appears that the inelastic strain is governed by the transverse crack density. (orig.) 12 refs.

  13. Fatigue Crack Topography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    alloys (2). [--I Fig. 6. Fatigue fracture in Nitrile- butadien rubber ( NBR ). Fig. 7. The characteristic features of fatigue fracture in press moulded...in plastics and even in rubber . It follows therefore, that fatigue fractures must also occur in the mineral layers of our earth or in the rock on...effective until the weakest point yields and forms a crack. To get a feeling for this process, you can imagine that the stressed article is made of rubber

  14. Distributed password cracking

    OpenAIRE

    Crumpacker, John R.

    2009-01-01

    Approved for public release, distribution unlimited Password cracking requires significant processing power, which in today's world is located at a workstation or home in the form of a desktop computer. Berkeley Open Infrastructure for Network Computing (BOINC) is the conduit to this significant source of processing power and John the Ripper is the key. BOINC is a distributed data processing system that incorporates client-server relationships to generically process data. The BOINC structu...

  15. Utopia Cracks and Polygons

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-339, 23 April 2003This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a pattern of polygonal cracks and aligned, elliptical pits in western Utopia Planitia. The picture covers an area about 3 km (about 1.9 mi) wide near 44.9oN, 274.7oW. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the left.

  16. Cracking hydrocarbons. [British patent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heyl, G E

    1926-05-06

    The vapors from a still in which oils, coal tar, pitch, creosote, and c. or solid carbonaccous material such as coal or shale are cracked by being heated to 600/sup 0/ to 1000/sup 0/C. are passed through a fractionating column to remove high-boiling constituents which are passed into a second cracking still. The vapors from this still are treated to separate high-boiling fractions which are passed into a third still. The sills preferably contain removable troughs or liners, which are freed from carbon deposits either after removal from the still or by a scraping disc which is rotated in and moved along the trough. Oil to be cracked is forced by a pump through a preheater to a still. Vapours pass through a carbon separator and dephlegmator to a condenser. The reflux from the dephlegmator is forced by a pump to a still, the vapors from which pass through a carbon separator and a dephlegmator, the reflux from which is passed into a third still fitted with a separate carbon separator, dephlegmator and final condenser.

  17. Investigation of Cracks Found in Helicopter Longerons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, John A.; Baughman, James M.; Wallace, Terryl A.

    2009-01-01

    Four cracked longerons, containing a total of eight cracks, were provided for study. Cracked regions were cut from the longerons. Load was applied to open the cracks, enabling crack surface examination. Examination revealed that crack propagation was driven by fatigue loading in all eight cases. Fatigue crack initiation appears to have occurred on the top edge of the longerons near geometric changes that affect component bending stiffness. Additionally, metallurigical analysis has revealed a local depletion in alloying elements in the crack initiation regions that may be a contributing factor. Fatigue crack propagation appeared to be initially driven by opening-mode loading, but at a crack length of approximately 0.5 inches (12.7 mm), there is evidence of mixed-mode crack loading. For the longest cracks studied, shear-mode displacements destroyed crack-surface features of interest over significant portions of the crack surfaces.

  18. Modified Dugdale crack models - some easy crack relations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lauge Fuglsang

    1997-01-01

    the same strength as a plain Dugdale model. The critical energy release rates Gamma_CR, however, become different. Expressions (with easy computer algorithms) are presented in the paper which relate critical energy release rates and crack geometry to arbitrary cohesive stress distributions.For future...... lifetime analysis of viscoelastic materials strain energy release rates, crack geometries, and cohesive stress distributions are considered as related to sub-critical loads sigma stress-deformation tests......The Dugdale crack model is widely used in materials science to predict strength of defective (cracked) materials. A stable Dugdale crack in an elasto-plastic material is prevented from spreading by uniformly distributed cohesive stresses acting in narrow areas at the crack tips. These stresses...

  19. Crack resistance curve determination of zircaloy-4 cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertsch, J.; Alam, A.; Zubler, R.

    2009-03-01

    generated and characteristic values as J Q (crack onset) or the slope of the J-R curve have been determined. The deformation behaviour and the applicability of the ASTM standard for fracture toughness determination have been elucidated in detail with respect to a) the non-standard small (wall-) thickness, b) the non standard geometry (especially tube) and c) the special testing conditions (e.g. friction). As a first result it can be stated that at elevated temperatures the J values of the plates do not fall anymore in the interval, which is suggested by the ASTM standard and which is valid for the J-R curve construction; the values of the tubes fulfil this condition only partly. However, at all applied temperatures the differences in behaviour of tubes and plates could be very well identified. The plates exhibit a stronger crack resistance than the tubes. But the crack onset J Q of the plates increases with higher temperature whereas that of the tubes slightly decreases. The reason for that can be found in the higher constraints for the tube samples with respect to the deformation path. The tubes with their bent surface are forced to glide along the curvature of the deformation equipment which consists of two half cylinders fitted in the rod section. Because of these constraints blunting is reduced. In contrary, stronger blunting can be expected for free (non-contact) surfaces, i.e. for thin plates. This behaviour becomes more pronounced at higher temperatures which effect higher ductility of the tested material. Blunting consumes energy without significantly driving cracks and consequently, the plates deliver increased J Q values and J-R curves compared to the tubes. Another result is that the J-R curves at different temperatures look, for tube and plate separately, quite similar. Higher temperatures lead to lower loads and higher displacements in the load-displacement curves. The material deformation looks very soft. Load and displacement can partially compensate each

  20. Crack resistance curve determination of zircaloy-4 cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertsch, J.; Alam, A.; Zubler, R

    2009-03-15

    be generated and characteristic values as J{sub Q} (crack onset) or the slope of the J-R curve have been determined. The deformation behaviour and the applicability of the ASTM standard for fracture toughness determination have been elucidated in detail with respect to a) the non-standard small (wall-) thickness, b) the non standard geometry (especially tube) and c) the special testing conditions (e.g. friction). As a first result it can be stated that at elevated temperatures the J values of the plates do not fall anymore in the interval, which is suggested by the ASTM standard and which is valid for the J-R curve construction; the values of the tubes fulfil this condition only partly. However, at all applied temperatures the differences in behaviour of tubes and plates could be very well identified. The plates exhibit a stronger crack resistance than the tubes. But the crack onset J{sub Q} of the plates increases with higher temperature whereas that of the tubes slightly decreases. The reason for that can be found in the higher constraints for the tube samples with respect to the deformation path. The tubes with their bent surface are forced to glide along the curvature of the deformation equipment which consists of two half cylinders fitted in the rod section. Because of these constraints blunting is reduced. In contrary, stronger blunting can be expected for free (non-contact) surfaces, i.e. for thin plates. This behaviour becomes more pronounced at higher temperatures which effect higher ductility of the tested material. Blunting consumes energy without significantly driving cracks and consequently, the plates deliver increased J{sub Q} values and J-R curves compared to the tubes. Another result is that the J-R curves at different temperatures look, for tube and plate separately, quite similar. Higher temperatures lead to lower loads and higher displacements in the load-displacement curves. The material deformation looks very soft. Load and displacement can

  1. Fusing complementary images for pavement cracking measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, Ming; Zhao, Zuyun; Xu, Bugao; Yao, Xun

    2015-01-01

    Cracking is a major pavement distress that jeopardizes road serviceability and traffic safety. Automated pavement distress survey (APDS) systems have been developed using digital imaging technology to replace human surveys for more timely and accurate inspections. Most APDS systems require special lighting devices to illuminate pavements and prevent shadows of roadside objects that distort cracks in the image. Most artificial lighting devices are laser based, and are either hazardous to unprotected people or require dedicated power supplies on the vehicle. This study was aimed to develop a new imaging system that can scan pavement surface at highway speed and determine the level of severity of pavement cracking without using any artificial lighting. The new system consists of dual line-scan cameras that are installed side by side to scan the same pavement area as the vehicle moves. Cameras are controlled with different exposure settings so that both sunlit and shadowed areas can be visible in two separate images. The paired images contain complementary details useful for reconstructing an image in which the shadows are eliminated. This paper intends to present (1) the design of the dual line-scan camera system, (2) a new calibration method for line-scan cameras to rectify and register paired images, (3) a customized image-fusion algorithm that merges the multi-exposure images into one shadow-free image for crack detection, and (4) the results of the field tests on a selected road over a long period. (paper)

  2. Experimental study of the crack depth ratio threshold to analyze the slow crack growth by creep of high density polyethylene pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laiarinandrasana, Lucien; Devilliers, Clémence; Lucatelli, Jean Marc; Gaudichet-Maurin, Emmanuelle; Brossard, Jean Michel

    2014-01-01

    To assess the durability of drinking water connection pipes subjected to oxidation and slow crack growth, a comprehensive database was constructed on a novel specimen geometry: the pre-cracked NOL ring. 135 tests were carried out consisting of initial crack depth ratio ranging from 0.08 to 0.6; single or double longitudinal cracks: tensile with steady strain rate and creep loading. A threshold value of the crack depth ratio of 0.2, induced by the oxidation was determined by analyzing several mechanical parameters. This threshold value was shown to be independent on the strain rate effects, single or double crack configuration and the kind of loading: tensile or creep. Creep test results with crack depth ratio larger than 0.2 were then utilized to establish a failure assessment diagram. A methodology allowing the prediction of residual lifetime of in-service pipes was proposed, using this diagram. - Highlights: • Experimental data on pre-cracked rings featuring a longitudinally cracked HDPE pipe. • Crack depth ratio threshold for slow crack growth study consecutive to oxidation. • Investigation of the effects of the single/double notch(es) and of the strain rate. • Original results obtained from tests performed with tensile and creep loadings. • Correlation between creep initiation time and C* with DENT and ring specimens

  3. Crack retardation by load reduction during fatigue crack propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyun Soo; Nam, Ki Woo; Ahn, Seok Hwan; Do, Jae Yoon

    2003-01-01

    Fracture life and crack retardation behavior were examined experimentally using CT specimens of aluminum alloy 5083. Crack retardation life and fracture life were a wide difference between 0.8 and 0.6 in proportion to ratio of load reduction. The wheeler model retardation parameter was used successfully to predict crack growth behavior. By using a crack propagation rule, prediction of fracture life can be evaluated quantitatively. A statistical approach based on Weibull distribution was applied to the test data to evaluate the dispersion in the retardation life and fracture life by the change of load reduction

  4. Ductile crack growth simulation from near crack tip dissipated energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marie, S.; Chapuliot, S.

    2000-01-01

    A method to calculate ductile tearing in both small scale fracture mechanics specimens and cracked components is presented. This method is based on an estimation of the dissipated energy calculated near the crack tip. Firstly, the method is presented. It is shown that a characteristic parameter G fr can be obtained, relevant to the dissipated energy in the fracture process. The application of the method to the calculation of side grooved crack tip (CT) specimens of different sizes is examined. The value of G fr is identified by comparing the calculated and experimental load line displacement versus crack extension curve for the smallest CT specimen. With this identified value, it is possible to calculate the global behaviour of the largest specimen. The method is then applied to the calculation of a pipe containing a through-wall thickness crack subjected to a bending moment. This pipe is made of the same material as the CT specimens. It is shown that it is possible to simulate the global behaviour of the structure including the prediction of up to 90-mm crack extension. Local terms such as the equivalent stress or the crack tip opening angle are found to be constant during the crack extension process. This supports the view that G fr controls the fields in the vicinity near the crack tip. (orig.)

  5. Thermal fatigue crack growth on a thick wall tube containing a semi elliptical circumferential crack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deschanels, H.; Wakai, T.; Lacire, M.H.; Michel, B.

    2001-01-01

    In order to check the ability of the simplified assessment procedure (A16 guide) to predict fatigue crack growth, a benchmark problem was conducted. This work is carried out under the project ''agreement on the Exchange of Information and Collaboration in the field of Research and Development of Fast Breeder Reactor (FBR) between Europe (EU) and Japan''. Experimental work is conducted by PNC using Air cooled Thermal transient Test Facility (ATTF). Specimen is a thick wall tube containing a semi elliptical (3-D) circumferential crack and subjected to cyclic thermal transients. The constitutive material is the 304 austenitic stainless steel type SUS304. Due to thermal shock (650 C-300 C) the stress distribution through the wall is non-linear and well approximated using a 3 rd order polynomial. When comparing computations and tests data we observe a good agreement for the crack propagation in length. In crack depth, accurate results are obtained in the first part of the test, but on the later stage of the experiment the computations slightly underestimate the propagation (deep crack). In addition, we notice the importance of good evaluation of fracture mechanics parameters for non-linear stress distribution through the wall. At present A16 guide handbook gives stress intensity factor solutions for non-linear stress distribution through the wall. (author)

  6. Permeability and elastic properties of cracked glass under pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ougier-Simonin, A.; GuéGuen, Y.; Fortin, J.; Schubnel, A.; Bouyer, F.

    2011-07-01

    Fluid flow in rocks is allowed through networks of cracks and fractures at all scales. In fact, cracks are of high importance in various applications ranging from rock elastic and transport properties to nuclear waste disposal. The present work aims at investigating thermomechanical cracking effects on elastic wave velocities, mechanical strength, and permeability of cracked glass under pressure. We performed the experiments on a triaxial cell at room temperature which allows for independent controls of the confining pressure, the axial stress, and pore pressure. We produced cracks in original borosilicate glass samples with a reproducible method (thermal treatment with a thermal shock of 300°C). The evolution of the elastic and transport properties have been monitored using elastic wave velocity sensors, strain gage, and flow measurements. The results obtained evidence for (1) a crack family with identified average aspect ratio and crack aperture, (2) a very small permeability which decreases as a power (exponential) function of pressure, and depends on (3) the crack aperture cube. We also show that permeability behavior of a cracked elastic brittle solid is reversible and independent of the fluid nature. Two independent methods (permeability and elastic wave velocity measurements) give these consistent results. This study provides data on the mechanical and transport properties of an almost ideal elastic brittle solid in which a crack population has been introduced. Comparisons with similar data on rocks allow for drawing interesting conclusions. Over the timescale of our experiments, our results do not provide any data on stress corrosion, which should be considered in further study.

  7. Creep crack growth in phosphorus alloyed oxygen free copper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Rui; Seitisleam, Facredin (Swerea KIMAB (Sweden)); Sandstroem, Rolf; Jin, Lai-Zhe (Materials Science and Engineering, Royal Inst. of Technology (Sweden))

    2011-01-15

    Using standard compact tension (CT) specimens taken from a pierce and draw cylinder, creep crack growth (CCG) has been studied in phosphorus-alloyed oxygen-free copper (Cu-OFP) parent metal at 22, 75, 175, and 215 deg C. Pre- and post-test metallography are performed. At higher temperatures the rupture time of CCG is shorter by a factor up of 65 than that of uniaxial at same stress/reference stress. At 175 and 215 deg C, crack does grow by creep about 10 mm before final instantaneous failure. In contrast, there is hardly any visible crack growth at 22 and 75 deg C. The tests were interrupted after 5000 to 13000 hours. For ruptured tests at 175 and 215 deg C, strongly elongated and deformed grains are observed adjacent to crack. Extensive and intergranular creep cavities and microcracks are found several mm around crack. For interrupted tests at 22 and 75 deg C, strongly elongated and deformed grains, creep cavities, as well as microcracks are observed close to crack tip. Surface cracks from both sides have initiated and grown about 45 deg to the load direction towards inside. For the interrupted tests, hardness adjacent to crack tip has more than doubled because of work hardening, or heavy deformation. This is consistent with large crack tip opening. The true strain at the crack tip is estimated to 10 and 4 for the tests at 22 and 75 deg C, respectively. The stress state behind the crack tip has been modelled with FEM. Stress relaxation after loading has also been taken into account. A model for the creep damage based on the creep strain rate has been formulated that can describe the uniaxial creep rupture data without fitting parameters. Based on the formulation for the creep damage, a model for the crack propagation has been set up. When the creep damage has reached the value unity in front of the crack tip, the crack is assumed to propagate. Taking multiaxial effects into account the observed life times of the CT specimens can be well described. The multiaxial

  8. Creep crack growth in phosphorus alloyed oxygen free copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Rui; Seitisleam, Facredin; Sandstroem, Rolf; Jin, Lai-Zhe

    2011-01-01

    Using standard compact tension (CT) specimens taken from a pierce and draw cylinder, creep crack growth (CCG) has been studied in phosphorus-alloyed oxygen-free copper (Cu-OFP) parent metal at 22, 75, 175, and 215 deg C. Pre- and post-test metallography are performed. At higher temperatures the rupture time of CCG is shorter by a factor up of 65 than that of uniaxial at same stress/reference stress. At 175 and 215 deg C, crack does grow by creep about 10 mm before final instantaneous failure. In contrast, there is hardly any visible crack growth at 22 and 75 deg C. The tests were interrupted after 5000 to 13000 hours. For ruptured tests at 175 and 215 deg C, strongly elongated and deformed grains are observed adjacent to crack. Extensive and intergranular creep cavities and microcracks are found several mm around crack. For interrupted tests at 22 and 75 deg C, strongly elongated and deformed grains, creep cavities, as well as microcracks are observed close to crack tip. Surface cracks from both sides have initiated and grown about 45 deg to the load direction towards inside. For the interrupted tests, hardness adjacent to crack tip has more than doubled because of work hardening, or heavy deformation. This is consistent with large crack tip opening. The true strain at the crack tip is estimated to 10 and 4 for the tests at 22 and 75 deg C, respectively. The stress state behind the crack tip has been modelled with FEM. Stress relaxation after loading has also been taken into account. A model for the creep damage based on the creep strain rate has been formulated that can describe the uniaxial creep rupture data without fitting parameters. Based on the formulation for the creep damage, a model for the crack propagation has been set up. When the creep damage has reached the value unity in front of the crack tip, the crack is assumed to propagate. Taking multiaxial effects into account the observed life times of the CT specimens can be well described. The multiaxial

  9. Structure-property investigations on a laser beam welded dissimilar joint of aluminium AA6056 and titanium Ti6Al4V for aeronautical applications. Part II: resistance to fatigue crack propagation and fracture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horstmann, M.; Ventzke, V.; Petrovski, B.; Kocak, M. [GKSS Research Centre Geesthacht, Institute of Materials Research, Materials Mechanics, Geesthacht (Germany); Kocik, R.; Tempus, G. [AIRBUS Deutschland GmbH, Metal Technology, Bremen (Germany); Vaidya, W.V.

    2009-10-15

    Investigations were continued on the dissimilar laser beam welds of AA6056 and Ti6Al4V, fabricated by inserting Ti-sheet into the profiled Al-sheet and melting AA6056 alone. By using microstructure, hardness and strength as the criteria, sites exhibiting non-uniform microstructure and localized plastic deformation due to strength mismatch were investigated in two orientations: crack parallel to the weld and crack perpendicular to the weld for fatigue crack propagation and fracture toughness at room temperature. Effect of temper of AA6056 on these properties was studied for two conditions; welding in T4 followed by post weld heat treatment T6, and welding in T6 and naturally aged for a defined period. The orientation ''crack parallel to the weld'' was investigated in 3 locations on the side of AA6056: the interface and the two changeovers on the Al-side. Firstly, between the fusion zone and the heat affected zone (3 mm from the interface) and secondly, between (primary) heat affected zone and towards the base material (7 mm from the interface). Although brittle intermetallic TiAl{sub 3} had been formed at the interface, uncontrolled separation or debonding at the interface was not observed. Insofar the bond quality of the weld was good. However, the ranking of interface was the lowest since fatigue crack propagation was relatively faster than that in the fusion zone and heat affected zone, and fracture toughness was low. Therefore, unstable fatigue crack propagation is observed when the crack propagates perpendicular to the weld from AA6056 towards Ti6Al4V. The results have shown that the dissimilar joints exhibit improved performance when laser beam welded in the T6 condition. (Abstract Copyright [2009], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.) [German] Teil II: Widerstand gegen Ermuedungsrissausbreitung und Bruch Die Untersuchungen an der laserstrahlgeschweissten Mischverbindung aus AA6056 und Ti6Al4V wurden fortgesetzt. Fuer die Ermuedungsrissausbreitungs

  10. J-integral estimation analysis for circumferential throughwall cracked pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zahoor, A.

    1988-01-01

    J-integral estimation solution is derived for pipes containing a circumferential throughwall crack. Bending moment and axial tension loadings are considered. These solutions are useful for calculating J from single load-displacement record obtained as part of pipe fracture testing, and are applicable for a wide range of flaw length to pipe circumference ratios. Results for J at initiation of crack growth generated using the solution developed in this paper agree well with J results from finite elements analyses. (orig.)

  11. J-integral estimation analysis for circumferential throughwall cracked pipes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zahoor, A.

    J-integral estimation solution is derived for pipes containing a circumferential throughwall crack. Bending moment and axial tension loadings are considered. These solutions are useful for calculating J from single load-displacement record obtained as part of pipe fracture testing, and are applicable for a wide range of flaw length to pipe circumference ratios. Results for J at initiation of crack growth generated using the solution developed in this paper agree well with J results from finite elements analyses.

  12. Crack luminescence as an innovative method for detection of fatigue damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Makris

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Conventional non-destructive testing methods for crack detection provide just a snapshot of fatigue crack evolution at a specific location in the moment of examination. The crack luminescence coating realizes a clear visibility of the entire crack formation. The coating consists of two layers with different properties and functions. The bottom layer emits light as fluorescence under UV radiation. The top layer covers the fluorescing one and prevents the emitting of light in case of no damage at the surface. Several different experiments show that due to the sensitive coating even the early stage of crack formation can be detected. That makes crack luminescence helpful for investigating the incipient crack opening behavior. Cracks can be detected and observed during operation of a structure, making it also very interesting for continuous monitoring. Crack luminescence is a passive method and no skilled professionals are necessary to detect cracks, as for conventional methods. The luminescent light is clearly noticeable by unaided eye observations and also by standard camera equipment, which makes automated crack detection possible as well. It is expected that crack luminescence can reduce costs and time for preventive maintenance and inspection.

  13. Macro-mesoscopic Fracture and Strength Character of Pre-cracked Granite Under Stress Relaxation Condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Junfeng; Yang, Haiqing; Xiao, Yang; Zhou, Xiaoping

    2018-05-01

    The fracture characters are important index to study the strength and deformation behavior of rock mass in rock engineering. In order to investigate the influencing mechanism of loading conditions on the strength and macro-mesoscopic fracture character of rock material, pre-cracked granite specimens are prepared to conduct a series of uniaxial compression experiments. For parts of the experiments, stress relaxation tests of different durations are also conducted during the uniaxial loading process. Furthermore, the stereomicroscope is adopted to observe the microstructure of the crack surfaces of the specimens. The experimental results indicate that the crack surfaces show several typical fracture characters in accordance with loading conditions. In detail, some cleavage fracture can be observed under conventional uniaxial compression and the fractured surface is relatively rough, whereas as stress relaxation tests are attached, relative slip trace appears between the crack faces and some shear fracture starts to come into being. Besides, the crack faces tend to become smoother and typical terrace structures can be observed in local areas. Combining the macroscopic failure pattern of the specimens, it can be deduced that the duration time for the stress relaxation test contributes to the improvement of the elastic-plastic strain range as well as the axial peak strength for the studied material. Moreover, the derived conclusion is also consistent with the experimental and analytical solution for the pre-peak stage of the rock material. The present work may provide some primary understanding about the strength character and fracture mechanism of hard rock under different engineering environments.

  14. Microstructural characterization of hydrogen induced cracking in TRIP-assisted steel by EBSD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laureys, A., E-mail: Aurelie.Laureys@UGent.be [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Ghent University (UGent), Technologiepark 903, B-9052 Ghent (Belgium); Depover, T. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Ghent University (UGent), Technologiepark 903, B-9052 Ghent (Belgium); Petrov, R. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Ghent University (UGent), Technologiepark 903, B-9052 Ghent (Belgium); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 2, 2628 CD Delft (Netherlands); Verbeken, K. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Ghent University (UGent), Technologiepark 903, B-9052 Ghent (Belgium)

    2016-02-15

    The present work evaluates hydrogen induced cracking by performing an elaborate EBSD (Electron BackScatter Diffraction) study in a steel with transformation induced plasticity (TRIP-assisted steel). This type of steel exhibits a multiphase microstructure which undergoes a deformation induced phase transformation. Additionally, each microstructural constituent displays a different behavior in the presence of hydrogen. The aim of this study is to obtain a better understanding on the mechanisms governing hydrogen induced crack initiation and propagation in the hydrogen saturated multiphase structure. Tensile tests on notched samples combined with in-situ electrochemical hydrogen charging were conducted. The tests were interrupted at stresses just after reaching the tensile strength, i.e. before macroscopic failure of the material. This allowed to study hydrogen induced crack initiation and propagation by SEM (Scanning Electron Microscopy) and EBSD. A correlation was found between the presence of martensite, which is known to be very susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement, and the initiation of hydrogen induced cracks. Initiation seems to occur mostly by martensite decohesion. High strain regions surrounding the hydrogen induced crack tips indicate that further crack propagation may have occurred by the HELP (hydrogen-enhanced localized plasticity) mechanism. Small hydrogen induced cracks located nearby the notch are typically S-shaped and crack propagation was dominantly transgranularly. The second stage of crack propagation consists of stepwise cracking by coalescence of small hydrogen induced cracks. - Highlights: • Hydrogen induced cracking in TRIP-assisted steel is evaluated by EBSD. • Tensile tests were conducted on notched hydrogen saturated samples. • Crack initiation occurs by a H-Enhanced Interface DEcohesion (HEIDE) mechanism. • Crack propagation involves growth and coalescence of small cracks. • Propagation is governed by the characteristics of

  15. Microstructural characterization of hydrogen induced cracking in TRIP-assisted steel by EBSD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laureys, A.; Depover, T.; Petrov, R.; Verbeken, K.

    2016-01-01

    The present work evaluates hydrogen induced cracking by performing an elaborate EBSD (Electron BackScatter Diffraction) study in a steel with transformation induced plasticity (TRIP-assisted steel). This type of steel exhibits a multiphase microstructure which undergoes a deformation induced phase transformation. Additionally, each microstructural constituent displays a different behavior in the presence of hydrogen. The aim of this study is to obtain a better understanding on the mechanisms governing hydrogen induced crack initiation and propagation in the hydrogen saturated multiphase structure. Tensile tests on notched samples combined with in-situ electrochemical hydrogen charging were conducted. The tests were interrupted at stresses just after reaching the tensile strength, i.e. before macroscopic failure of the material. This allowed to study hydrogen induced crack initiation and propagation by SEM (Scanning Electron Microscopy) and EBSD. A correlation was found between the presence of martensite, which is known to be very susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement, and the initiation of hydrogen induced cracks. Initiation seems to occur mostly by martensite decohesion. High strain regions surrounding the hydrogen induced crack tips indicate that further crack propagation may have occurred by the HELP (hydrogen-enhanced localized plasticity) mechanism. Small hydrogen induced cracks located nearby the notch are typically S-shaped and crack propagation was dominantly transgranularly. The second stage of crack propagation consists of stepwise cracking by coalescence of small hydrogen induced cracks. - Highlights: • Hydrogen induced cracking in TRIP-assisted steel is evaluated by EBSD. • Tensile tests were conducted on notched hydrogen saturated samples. • Crack initiation occurs by a H-Enhanced Interface DEcohesion (HEIDE) mechanism. • Crack propagation involves growth and coalescence of small cracks. • Propagation is governed by the characteristics of

  16. The effect of pre-stress cycles on fatigue crack growth - An analysis of crack growth mechanism. [in Al alloy plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, T. S.; Liu, H. W.

    1974-01-01

    Cyclic prestress increases subsequent fatigue crack growth rate in 2024-T351 aluminum alloy. This increase in growth rate, caused by the prestress, and the increased rate, caused by temper embrittlement as observed by Ritchie and Knott (1973), cannot be explained by the crack tip blunting model alone. Each fatigue crack increment consists of two components, a brittle and a ductile component. They are controlled by the ductility of the material and its cyclic yield strength, respectively.

  17. Delayed hydride cracking in zirconium alloys in pressure tube nuclear reactors. Final report of a coordinated research project 1998-2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-10-01

    This report describes all of the research work undertaken as part of the IAEA coordinated research project on hydrogen and hydride induced degradation of the mechanical and physical properties of zirconium based alloys, and includes a review of the state of the art in understanding crack propagation by Delayed Hydride Cracking (DHC), and details of the experimental procedures that have produced the most consistent set of DHC rates reported in an international round-robin exercise to this date. It was concluded that 1) the techniques for performing measurements of the rate of delayed hydride cracking in zirconium alloys have been transferred from the host laboratory to other countries; 2) by following a strict procedure, a very consistent set of values of crack velocity were obtained by both individual laboratories and between the different laboratories; 3) the results over a wide range of test temperatures from materials with various microstructures fitted into the current theoretical framework for delayed hydride cracking; 4) an inter-laboratory comparison of hydrogen analysis revealed the importance of calibration and led to improvements in measurement in the participating laboratories and 5) the success of the CRP in achieving its goals has led to the initiation of some national programmes

  18. Cracking of anisotropic cylindrical polytropes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mardan, S.A. [University of the Management and Technology, Department of Mathematics, Lahore (Pakistan); Azam, M. [University of Education, Division of Science and Technology, Lahore (Pakistan)

    2017-06-15

    We study the appearance of cracking in charged anisotropic cylindrical polytropes with generalized polytropic equation. We investigate the existence of cracking in two different kinds of polytropes existing in the literature through two different assumptions: (a) local density perturbation with conformally flat condition, and (b) perturbing polytropic index, charge and anisotropy parameters. We conclude that cracking appears in both kinds of polytropes for a specific range of density and model parameters. (orig.)

  19. Cryptography cracking codes

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    While cracking a code might seem like something few of us would encounter in our daily lives, it is actually far more prevalent than we may realize. Anyone who has had personal information taken because of a hacked email account can understand the need for cryptography and the importance of encryption-essentially the need to code information to keep it safe. This detailed volume examines the logic and science behind various ciphers, their real world uses, how codes can be broken, and the use of technology in this oft-overlooked field.

  20. Stress corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietzel, W.; Turnbull, A.

    2007-01-01

    Comprehensive Structural Integrity is a reference work which covers all activities involved in the assurance of structural integrity. It provides engineers and scientists with an unparalleled depth of knowledge in the disciplines involved. The new online Volume 11 is dedicated to the mechanical characteristics of materials. This paper contains the chapter 11.03 and is structured as follows: General aspects of SCC testing; Non-precracked specimens; Precracked specimens - the fracture mechanics approach to SCC; Crack growth measurement; Limitations of the LEFM approach to SCC; The use of SCC data; Guide to selection of mechanical scc test method

  1. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Uuu of... - Metal HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic Cracking Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Metal HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic Cracking Units 1 Table 1 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Table 1 to Subpart UUU of Part 63—Metal HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic Cracking Units As stated in...

  2. 40 CFR Table 8 to Subpart Uuu of... - Organic HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic Cracking Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Organic HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic Cracking Units 8 Table 8 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL..., Table 8 Table 8 to Subpart UUU of Part 63—Organic HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic Cracking Units As...

  3. Consistent model driven architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niepostyn, Stanisław J.

    2015-09-01

    The goal of the MDA is to produce software systems from abstract models in a way where human interaction is restricted to a minimum. These abstract models are based on the UML language. However, the semantics of UML models is defined in a natural language. Subsequently the verification of consistency of these diagrams is needed in order to identify errors in requirements at the early stage of the development process. The verification of consistency is difficult due to a semi-formal nature of UML diagrams. We propose automatic verification of consistency of the series of UML diagrams originating from abstract models implemented with our consistency rules. This Consistent Model Driven Architecture approach enables us to generate automatically complete workflow applications from consistent and complete models developed from abstract models (e.g. Business Context Diagram). Therefore, our method can be used to check practicability (feasibility) of software architecture models.

  4. Bitcoin Meets Strong Consistency

    OpenAIRE

    Decker, Christian; Seidel, Jochen; Wattenhofer, Roger

    2014-01-01

    The Bitcoin system only provides eventual consistency. For everyday life, the time to confirm a Bitcoin transaction is prohibitively slow. In this paper we propose a new system, built on the Bitcoin blockchain, which enables strong consistency. Our system, PeerCensus, acts as a certification authority, manages peer identities in a peer-to-peer network, and ultimately enhances Bitcoin and similar systems with strong consistency. Our extensive analysis shows that PeerCensus is in a secure state...

  5. Crack Tip Parameters for Growing Cracks in Linear Viscoelastic Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brincker, Rune

    In this paper the problem of describing the asymptotic fields around a slowly growing crack in a linearly viscoelastic material is considered. It is shown that for plane mixed mode problems the asymptotic fields must be described by 6 parameters: 2 stress intensity factors and 4 deformation...... intensity factors. In the special case of a constant Poisson ratio only 2 deformation intensity factors are needed. Closed form solutions are given both for a slowly growing crack and for a crack that is suddenly arrested at a point at the crack extension path. Two examples are studied; a stress boundary...... value problem, and a displacement boundary value problem. The results show that the stress intensity factors and the displacement intensity factors do not depend explicitly upon the velocity of the crack tip....

  6. Optimization of ultrasonic array inspections using an efficient hybrid model and real crack shapes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felice, Maria V., E-mail: maria.felice@bristol.ac.uk [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Bristol, Bristol, U.K. and NDE Laboratory, Rolls-Royce plc., Bristol (United Kingdom); Velichko, Alexander, E-mail: p.wilcox@bristol.ac.uk; Wilcox, Paul D., E-mail: p.wilcox@bristol.ac.uk [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Bristol, Bristol (United Kingdom); Barden, Tim; Dunhill, Tony [NDE Laboratory, Rolls-Royce plc., Bristol (United Kingdom)

    2015-03-31

    Models which simulate the interaction of ultrasound with cracks can be used to optimize ultrasonic array inspections, but this approach can be time-consuming. To overcome this issue an efficient hybrid model is implemented which includes a finite element method that requires only a single layer of elements around the crack shape. Scattering Matrices are used to capture the scattering behavior of the individual cracks and a discussion on the angular degrees of freedom of elastodynamic scatterers is included. Real crack shapes are obtained from X-ray Computed Tomography images of cracked parts and these shapes are inputted into the hybrid model. The effect of using real crack shapes instead of straight notch shapes is demonstrated. An array optimization methodology which incorporates the hybrid model, an approximate single-scattering relative noise model and the real crack shapes is then described.

  7. Consistent classical supergravity theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muller, M.

    1989-01-01

    This book offers a presentation of both conformal and Poincare supergravity. The consistent four-dimensional supergravity theories are classified. The formulae needed for further modelling are included

  8. Crack opening area estimates in pressurized through-wall cracked elbows under bending

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franco, C.; Gilles, P.; Pignol, M.

    1997-01-01

    One of the most important aspects in the leak-before-break approach is the estimation of the crack opening area corresponding to potential through-wall cracks at critical locations during plant operation. In order to provide a reasonable lower bound to the leak area under such loading conditions, numerous experimental and numerical programs have been developed in USA, U.K. and FRG and widely discussed in literature. This paper aims to extend these investigations on a class of pipe elbows characteristic of PWR main coolant piping. The paper is divided in three main parts. First, a new simplified estimation scheme for leakage area is described, based on the reference stress method. This approach mainly developed in U.K. and more recently in France provides a convenient way to account for the non-linear behavior of the material. Second, the method is carried out for circumferential through-wall cracks located in PWR elbows subjected to internal pressure. Finite element crack area results are presented and comparisons are made with our predictions. Finally, in the third part, the discussion is extended to elbows under combined pressure and in plane bending moment

  9. Crack opening area estimates in pressurized through-wall cracked elbows under bending

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franco, C.; Gilles, P.; Pignol, M.

    1997-04-01

    One of the most important aspects in the leak-before-break approach is the estimation of the crack opening area corresponding to potential through-wall cracks at critical locations during plant operation. In order to provide a reasonable lower bound to the leak area under such loading conditions, numerous experimental and numerical programs have been developed in USA, U.K. and FRG and widely discussed in literature. This paper aims to extend these investigations on a class of pipe elbows characteristic of PWR main coolant piping. The paper is divided in three main parts. First, a new simplified estimation scheme for leakage area is described, based on the reference stress method. This approach mainly developed in U.K. and more recently in France provides a convenient way to account for the non-linear behavior of the material. Second, the method is carried out for circumferential through-wall cracks located in PWR elbows subjected to internal pressure. Finite element crack area results are presented and comparisons are made with our predictions. Finally, in the third part, the discussion is extended to elbows under combined pressure and in plane bending moment.

  10. Selective hydrogenation processes in steam cracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bender, M.; Schroeter, M.K.; Hinrichs, M.; Makarczyk, P. [BASF SE, Ludwigshafen (Germany)

    2010-12-30

    Hydrogen is the key elixir used to trim the quality of olefinic and aromatic product slates from steam crackers. Being co-produced in excess amounts in the thermal cracking process a small part of the hydrogen is consumed in the ''cold part'' of a steam cracker to selectively hydrogenate unwanted, unsaturated hydrocarbons. The compositions of the various steam cracker product streams are adjusted by these processes to the outlet specifications. This presentation gives an overview over state-of-art selective hydrogenation technologies available from BASF for these processes. (Published in summary form only) (orig.)

  11. Consistency of orthodox gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellucci, S. [INFN, Frascati (Italy). Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati; Shiekh, A. [International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste (Italy)

    1997-01-01

    A recent proposal for quantizing gravity is investigated for self consistency. The existence of a fixed-point all-order solution is found, corresponding to a consistent quantum gravity. A criterion to unify couplings is suggested, by invoking an application of their argument to more complex systems.

  12. Quasiparticles and thermodynamical consistency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shanenko, A.A.; Biro, T.S.; Toneev, V.D.

    2003-01-01

    A brief and simple introduction into the problem of the thermodynamical consistency is given. The thermodynamical consistency relations, which should be taken into account under constructing a quasiparticle model, are found in a general manner from the finite-temperature extension of the Hellmann-Feynman theorem. Restrictions following from these relations are illustrated by simple physical examples. (author)

  13. Probabilistic and microstructural aspects of fatigue cracks initiation in Inconel 718

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexandre, F.

    2004-03-01

    Thermomechanical treatments have been recently developed to produce Inconel 718DA (Direct Aged). This alloy optimisation leads to an increase of the fatigue life but also the scatter. The aim of this study is on the one hand the understanding of the fatigue crack initiation mechanisms and on the other hand the modelling of the fatigue life and the scatter. An experimental study showed that the fatigue cracks were initiated from carbide particles in fine grain alloy. Interrupted tensile tests show that the particles cracking occurred at the first quarter of the fatigue cycle. Fatigue behaviour tests were also performed on various grain size 718 alloys. The last experimental part was devoted to measurements of the low cycle fatigue crack growth rates using a high focal distance microscope. For these tests, EDM micro-defects were used for the fatigue crack initiation sites. This method was also used to observe the small fatigue crack coalescence. A fatigue life model is proposed. It is based on the three fatigue crack initiation mechanisms competition: particle crack initiation on the surface, internal particle crack initiation and Stade I crack initiation. The particle fatigue crack initiation is supposed instantaneous at a critical stress level. The Tanaka and Mura model is used for analysing the Stage I crack initiation number of cycles. The fatigue crack growth rate was analysed using the Tomkins model identified on the small fatigue crack growth rate measurements. The proposed fatigue life model decomposed in three levels: a deterministic one and two probabilistic with and without crack coalescence. (author)

  14. Micro-crack detection in high-performance cementitious materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lura, Pietro; Guang, Ye; Tanaka, Kyoji

    2005-01-01

    of high-performance cement pastes in silicone moulds that exert minimal external restraint. Cast-in steel rods with varying diameter internally restrain the autogenous shrinkage and lead to crack formation. Dimensions of the steel rods are chosen so that the size of this restraining inclusion resembles......-ray tomography, do not allow sufficient resolution of microcracks. A new technique presented in this paper allows detection of microcracks in cement paste while avoiding artefacts induced by unwanted restraint, drying or temperature variations. The technique consists in casting small circular cylindrical samples...... aggregate size. Gallium intrusion of the cracks and subsequent examination by electron probe micro analysis, EPMA, are used to identify the cracks. The gallium intrusion technique allows controllable impregnation of cracks in the cement paste. A distinct contrast between gallium and the surrounding material...

  15. Evolution Procedure of Multiple Rock Cracks under Seepage Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taoying Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In practical geotechnical engineering, most of rock masses with multiple cracks exist in water environment. Under such circumstance, these adjacent cracks could interact with each other. Moreover, the seepage pressure, produced by the high water pressure, can change cracks’ status and have an impact on the stress state of fragile rocks. According to the theory of fracture mechanics, this paper discusses the law of crack initiation and the evolution law of stress intensity factor at the tip of a wing crack caused by compression-shear stress and seepage pressure. Subsequently, considering the interaction of the wing cracks and the additional stress caused by rock bridge damage, this paper proposes the intensity factor evolution equation under the combined action of compression-shear stress and seepage pressure. In addition, this paper analyzes the propagation of cracks under different seepage pressure which reveals that the existence of seepage pressure facilitates the wing crack’s growth. The result indicates that the high seepage pressure converts wing crack growth from stable form to unstable form. Meanwhile, based on the criterion and mechanism for crack initiation and propagation, this paper puts forward the mechanical model for different fracture transfixion failure modes of the crag bridge under the combined action of seepage pressure and compression-shear stress. At the last part, this paper, through investigating the flexibility tensor of the rock mass’s initial damage and its damage evolution in terms of jointed rock mass's damage mechanics, deduces the damage evolution equation for the rock mass with multiple cracks under the combined action of compression-shear stress and seepage pressure. The achievement of this investigation provides a reliable theoretical principle for quantitative research of the fractured rock mass failure under seepage pressure.

  16. Cracking in Drying Colloidal Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Karnail B.; Tirumkudulu, Mahesh S.

    2007-05-01

    It has long been known that thick films of colloidal dispersions such as wet clays, paints, and coatings crack under drying. Although capillary stresses generated during drying have been recently identified as the cause for cracking, the existence of a maximum crack-free film thickness that depends on particle size, rigidity, and packing has not been understood. Here, we identify two distinct regimes for crack-free films based on the magnitude of compressive strain at the maximum attainable capillary pressure and show remarkable agreement of measurements with our theory. We anticipate our results to not only form the basis for design of coating formulations for the paints, coatings, and ceramics industry but also assist in the production of crack-free photonic band gap crystals.

  17. Crack tip stress and strain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francois, D.

    1975-01-01

    The study of potential energy variations in a loaded elastic solid containing a crack leads to determination of the crack driving force G. Generalization of this concept to cases other than linear elasticity leads to definition of the integral J. In a linear solid, the crack tip stress field is characterized by a single parameter: the stress-intensity factor K. When the crack tip plastic zone size is confined to the elastic singularity J=G, it is possible to establish relationship between these parameters and plastic strain (and in particular the crack tip opening displacement delta). The stress increases because of the triaxiality effect. This overload rises with increasing strain hardening. When the plastic zone size expands, using certain hypotheses, delta can be calculated. The plastic strain intensity is exclusively dependent on parameter J [fr

  18. Fatigue crack growth in austenitic stainless steel piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bethmont, M.; Cheissoux, J.L.; Lebey, J.

    1981-04-01

    The study presented in this paper is being carried out with a view to substantiating the calculations of the fatigue crack growth in pipes made of 316 L stainless steel. The results obtained may be applied to P.W.R. primary piping. It is divided into two parts. First, fatigue tests (cyclic pressure) are carried out under hot and cold conditions with straight pipes machined with notches of various dimensions. The crack propagation and the fatigue crack growth rate are measured here. Second, calculations are made in order to interpret experimental results. From elastic calculations the stress intensity factor is assessed to predict the crack growth rate. The results obtained until now and presented in this paper relate to longitudinal notches

  19. Absorption Voltages and Insulation Resistance in Ceramic Capacitors with Cracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teverovsky, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Time dependence of absorption voltages (Vabs) in different types of low-voltage X5R and X7R ceramic capacitors was monitored for a maximum duration of hundred hours after polarization. To evaluate the effect of mechanical defects on Vabs, cracks in the dielectric were introduced either mechanically or by thermal shock. The maximum absorption voltage, time to roll-off, and the rate of voltage decrease are shown to depend on the crack-related leakage currents and insulation resistance in the parts. A simple model that is based on the Dow equivalent circuit for capacitors with absorption has been developed to assess the insulation resistance of capacitors. Standard measurements of the insulation resistance, contrary to the measurements based on Vabs, are not sensitive to the presence of mechanical defects and fail to reveal capacitors with cracks. Index Terms: Ceramic capacitor, insulation resistance, dielectric absorption, cracking.

  20. Forced oscillations of cracked beam under the stochastic cyclic loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsko, I.; Javors'kyj, I.; Yuzefovych, R.; Zakrzewski, Z.

    2018-05-01

    An analysis of forced oscillations of cracked beam using statistical methods for periodically correlated random processes is presented. The oscillation realizations are obtained on the basis of numerical solutions of differential equations of the second order, for the case when applied force is described by a sum of harmonic and stationary random process. It is established that due to crack appearance forced oscillations acquire properties of second-order periodical non-stationarity. It is shown that in a super-resonance regime covariance and spectral characteristics, which describe non-stationary structure of forced oscillations, are more sensitive to crack growth than the characteristics of the oscillation's deterministic part. Using diagnostic indicators formed on their basis allows the detection of small cracks.

  1. Prediction of Crack Growth Aqueous Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-06-01

    ORGANIZATION NAME AND ADDRESS 10. PROGRAM ELEMENT. PROJECT. TASK AREA & WORK UNIT NUMBERS SRI International 333 Ravenswood Avenue Menlo Park, CA 94025 II...34no crack" has at least a vestigial rupture, associated with cyclic loading of the oxide film at the crack tip. The curve labeled "crack" was obtained...be an effect of crack opening. For the data set labeled "crack", the vestigial crack, although short, is very tight and the impedance is large. Under

  2. Tensile cracks in creeping solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riedel, H.; Rice, J.R.

    1979-02-01

    The loading parameter determining the stress and strain fields near a crack tip, and thereby the growth of the crack, under creep conditions is discussed. Relevant loading parameters considered are the stress intensity factor K/sub I/, the path-independent integral C*, and the net section stress sigma/sub net/. The material behavior is modelled as elastic-nonlinear viscous where the nonlinear term describes power law creep. At the time t = 0 load is applied to the cracked specimen, and in the first instant the stress distribution is elastic. Subsequently, creep deformation relaxes the initial stress concentration at the crack tip, and creep strains develop rapidly near the crack tip. These processes may be analytically described by self-similar solutions for short times t. Small scale yielding may be defined. In creep problems, this means that elastic strains dominate almost everywhere except in a small creep zone which grows around the crack tip. If crack growth ensues while the creep zone is still small compared with the crack length and the specimen size, the stress intensity factor governs crack growth behavior. If the calculated creep zone becomes larger than the specimen size, the stresses become finally time-independent and the elastic strain rates can be neglected. In this case, the stress field is the same as in the fully-plastic limit of power law hardening plasticity. The loading parameter which determines the near tip fields uniquely is then the path-independent integral C*.K/sub I/ and C* characterize opposite limiting cases. The case applied in a given situation is decided by comparing the creep zone size with the specimen size and the crack length. Besides several methods of estimating the creep zone size, a convenient expression for a characteristic time is derived, which characterizes the transition from small scale yielding to extensive creep of the whole specimen

  3. Application of a nonlinear spring element to analysis of circumferentially cracked pipe under dynamic loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, R.; Scott, P.; Wilkowski, G.M.

    1992-01-01

    As part of the US NRC's Degraded Piping Program, the concept of using a nonlinear spring element to simulate the response of cracked pipe in dynamic finite element pipe evaluations was initially proposed. The nonlinear spring element is used to represent the moment versus rotation response of the cracked pipe section. The moment-rotation relationship for the crack size and material of interest is determined from either J-estimation scheme analyses or experimental data. In this paper, a number of possible approaches for modeling the nonlinear stiffness of the cracked pipe section are introduced. One approach, modeling the cracked section moment rotation response with a series of spring-slider elements, is discussed in detail. As part of this discussion, results from a series of finite element predictions using the spring-slider nonlinear spring element are compared with the results from a series of dynamic cracked pipe system experiments from the International Piping Integrity Research Group (IPIRG) program

  4. Buckling Analysis of Edge Cracked Sandwich Plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasha Mohammed Hussein

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This work presents mainly the buckling load of sandwich plates with or without crack for different cases. The buckling loads are analyzed experimentally and numerically by using ANSYS 15. The experimental investigation was to fabricate the cracked sandwich plate from stainless steel and PVC to find mechanical properties of stainless steel and PVC such as young modulus. The buckling load for different aspect ratio, crack length, cracked location and plate without crack found. The experimental results were compared with that found from ANSYS program. Present of crack is decreased the buckling load and that depends on crack size, crack location and aspect ratio.

  5. Multi-cracking in uniaxial and biaxial fatigue of 304L stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rupil, J.

    2012-01-01

    When a mechanical part is subjected to a repeated mechanical stress, it may be damaged after a number of cycles by several cracks initiation and propagation of a main crack. This is the phenomenon of fatigue damage. The thesis deals specifically with possible damage to some components of nuclear plants due to thermal fatigue. Unlike conventional mechanical fatigue damage where a main crack breaks the part, the thermal fatigue damage usually results in the appearance of a surface crack network. Two aspects are discussed in the thesis. The first is the experimental study of fatigue multiple cracking stage also called multi-cracking. Two mechanical test campaigns with multi-cracking detection by digital image correlation were conducted. These campaigns involve uniaxial and equi-biaxial mechanical loads in tension/compression without mean stress. This work allows to monitor and to observe the evolution of different networks of cracks through mechanical solicitations. The second is the numerical simulation of the phenomenon of fatigue damage. Several types of model are used (stochastic, probabilistic, cohesive finite elements). The experimental results have led to identify a multiple crack initiation law in fatigue which is faced with the numerical results. This comparison shows the relevance of the use of an analytical probabilistic model to find statistical results on the density of cracks that can be initiated with thermal and mechanical fatigue loadings. (author) [fr

  6. Leak before break analysis for cracking at multiple weld locations in BWR recirculation piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zahoor, A.; Gamble, R.

    1984-01-01

    Periodically over the past decade, intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) has been found in austenitic stainless steel piping at Boiling Water Reactor facilities. The effect of IGSCC on piping integrity has been evaluated previously in various BWR Owners Group and NRC studies. In these studies, the analyses were performed assuming the presence of a crack at a single weld location in the pipe run. The purpose of this investigation was to compare the leak rate and potential for unstable crack extension associated with a throughwall crack for the following two conditions in a BWR recirculation system: (1) the recirculation piping contains part through cracks at multiple weld locations and a single throughwall crack, and (2) the piping contains only a throughwall crack at one weld location. Two type BWRs were evaluated; namely, the ring header and five individual loop designs. The results from the analyses indicate that the potential for unstable crack extension at large bending loads, and leak rate at normal operation are not affected by the presence of part through cracks at multiple weld locations. The differences in the respective calculated L/sub eff/ and leak rates for the single and multiply cracked conditions are less than 2%

  7. Susceptibility of ternary aluminum alloys to cracking during solidification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Jiangwei; Kou, Sindo

    2017-01-01

    The crack susceptibility map of a ternary Al alloy system provides useful information about which alloy compositions are most susceptible to cracking and thus should be avoided by using a filler metal with a significantly different composition. In the present study the crack susceptibility maps of ternary Al alloy systems were calculated based on the maximum |dT/d(f S ) 1/2 | as an index for the crack susceptibility, where T is temperature and f S fraction solid. Due to the complexity associated with ternary alloy solidification, commercial thermodynamic software Pandat and Al database PanAluminum, instead of analytical equations, were used to calculate f S as a function of T and hence the maximum |dT/d(f S ) 1/2 | for ternary Al-Mg-Si, Al-Cu-Mg and Al-Cu-Si alloy systems. A crack susceptibility map covering 121 alloy compositions was constructed for each of the three ternary alloy systems at each of the following three levels of back diffusion: no back diffusion, back diffusion under a 100 °C/s cooling rate, and back diffusion under 20° C/s. The location of the region of high crack susceptibility, which is the most important part of the map, was shown in each of the nine calculated maps. These locations were compared with those observed in crack susceptibility tests by previous investigators. With back diffusion considered, either under 20 or 100 °C/s, the agreement between the calculated and observed maps was good especially for Al-Mg-Si and Al-Cu-Mg. Thus, the maximum |dT/d(f S ) 1/2 | can be used as a crack susceptibility index to construct crack susceptibility maps for ternary Al alloys and to evaluate the effect of back diffusion on their crack susceptibility. - Graphical abstract: The crack susceptibility map of a ternary alloy system indicates the composition range most susceptible to cracking, which should be avoided in welding or casting. The crack susceptibility maps of ternary Al alloy systems Al-Mg-Si, Al-Cu-Mg and Al-Cu-Si were calculated based

  8. Fatigue Behavior of Long and Short Cracks in Wrought and Powder Aluminum Alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-05-01

    The effects of cyclic frequency, electrochemical potential and bulk solution composition on the kinetics of small corrosion fatigue cracks have not...threshold behavior between cast iron (co = 113 MPa) and maraging steel (co = 1906 MPa), as a function of surface roughness (to simulate crack size) (after...4130 steel the crack size effect on corrosion fatigue, Fig. 2, is predicted in part based on linear superposition of stress corrosion growth rates for

  9. Analysis of short and long crack behavior and single overload effect by crack opening stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Sam Hong; Lee, Kyeong Ro

    1999-01-01

    The study analyzed the behaviors of short and long crack as well as the effect of single tensile overload on the crack behaviors by using fatigue crack opening behavior. Crack opening stress is measured by an elastic compliance method which may precisely and continuously provide many data using strain gages during experiment. The unusual growth behaviors of short crack and crack after the single tensile overload applied, was explained by the variations of crack opening stress. In addition, fatigue crack growth rate was expressed as a linear form for short crack as for long crack by using effective stress intensity factor range as fracture mechanical parameter, which is based on crack closure concept. And investigation is performed with respect to the relation between plastic zone size formed at the crack tip and crack retardation, crack length and the number of cycles promoted or retarded, and the overload effect on the fatigue life

  10. Method for liquid catalytic cracking with double rising pipe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demmel, E J; Owen, H

    1975-01-23

    The invention deals with a method to crack hydrocarbon charges where the charge is introduced into a reaction zone together with a catalyst mass containing two components. One of these consists of a zeolite component, the catalyst mass is removed from the reaction products, the hydrocarbons removed from the reaction zone, the converted hydrocarbon charge separated off and the unconverted hydrocarbon charge introduced into a second reaction zone together with a catalyst mass. This mass contains two cracking components one of which consists of one of the zeolite components identified as zeolite of the ZSM-5 type.

  11. Shear crack formation and propagation in reinforced Engineered Cementitious Composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paegle, Ieva; Fischer, Gregor

    2011-01-01

    capacity of beams loaded primarily in shear. The experimental program consists of ECC with short randomly distributed polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) fiber beams with different stirrup arrangements and conventional reinforced concrete (R/C) counterparts for comparison. The shear crack formation mechanism of ECC......This paper describes an experimental investigation of the shear behaviour of beams consisting of steel reinforced Engineered Cementitious Composites (R/ECC). Based on the strain hardening and multiple cracking behaviour of ECC, this study investigates the extent to which ECC influences the shear...

  12. FASTRAN II - FATIGUE CRACK GROWTH STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS (UNIX VERSION)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, J. C.

    1994-01-01

    loads may be either tensile or compressive. Several standardized aircraft flight-load histories, such as TWIST, Mini-TWIST, FALSTAFF, Inverted FALSTAFF, Felix and Gaussian, are included as options. FASTRAN II also includes two other methods that will help the user input spectrum load histories. The two methods are: (1) a list of stress points, and (2) a flight-by-flight history of stress points. Examples are provided in the user manual. Developed as a research program, FASTRAN II has successfully predicted crack growth in many metallic materials under various aircraft spectrum loading. A computer program DKEFF which is a part of the FASTRAN II package was also developed to analyze crack growth rate data from laboratory specimens to obtain the effective stress-intensity factor against crack growth rate relations used in FASTRAN II. FASTRAN II is written in standard FORTRAN 77. It has been successfully compiled and implemented on Sun4 series computers running SunOS and on IBM PC compatibles running MS-DOS using the Lahey F77L FORTRAN compiler. Sample input and output data are included with the FASTRAN II package. The UNIX version requires 660K of RAM for execution. The standard distribution medium for the UNIX version (LAR-14865) is a .25 inch streaming magnetic tape cartridge in UNIX tar format. It is also available on a 3.5 inch diskette in UNIX tar format. The standard distribution medium for the MS-DOS version (LAR-14944) is a 5.25 inch 360K MS-DOS format diskette. The contents of the diskette are compressed using the PKWARE archiving tools. The utility to unarchive the files, PKUNZIP.EXE, is included. The program was developed in 1984 and revised in 1992. Sun4 and SunOS are trademarks of Sun Microsystems, Inc. IBM PC is a trademark of International Business Machines Corp. MS-DOS is a trademark of Microsoft, Inc. F77L is a trademark of the Lahey Computer Systems, Inc. UNIX is a registered trademark of AT&T Bell Laboratories. PKWARE and PKUNZIP are trademarks of PKWare

  13. FASTRAN II - FATIGUE CRACK GROWTH STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS (IBM PC VERSION)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, J. C.

    1994-01-01

    loads may be either tensile or compressive. Several standardized aircraft flight-load histories, such as TWIST, Mini-TWIST, FALSTAFF, Inverted FALSTAFF, Felix and Gaussian, are included as options. FASTRAN II also includes two other methods that will help the user input spectrum load histories. The two methods are: (1) a list of stress points, and (2) a flight-by-flight history of stress points. Examples are provided in the user manual. Developed as a research program, FASTRAN II has successfully predicted crack growth in many metallic materials under various aircraft spectrum loading. A computer program DKEFF which is a part of the FASTRAN II package was also developed to analyze crack growth rate data from laboratory specimens to obtain the effective stress-intensity factor against crack growth rate relations used in FASTRAN II. FASTRAN II is written in standard FORTRAN 77. It has been successfully compiled and implemented on Sun4 series computers running SunOS and on IBM PC compatibles running MS-DOS using the Lahey F77L FORTRAN compiler. Sample input and output data are included with the FASTRAN II package. The UNIX version requires 660K of RAM for execution. The standard distribution medium for the UNIX version (LAR-14865) is a .25 inch streaming magnetic tape cartridge in UNIX tar format. It is also available on a 3.5 inch diskette in UNIX tar format. The standard distribution medium for the MS-DOS version (LAR-14944) is a 5.25 inch 360K MS-DOS format diskette. The contents of the diskette are compressed using the PKWARE archiving tools. The utility to unarchive the files, PKUNZIP.EXE, is included. The program was developed in 1984 and revised in 1992. Sun4 and SunOS are trademarks of Sun Microsystems, Inc. IBM PC is a trademark of International Business Machines Corp. MS-DOS is a trademark of Microsoft, Inc. F77L is a trademark of the Lahey Computer Systems, Inc. UNIX is a registered trademark of AT&T Bell Laboratories. PKWARE and PKUNZIP are trademarks of PKWare

  14. Probabilistic Analysis of Crack Width

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Marková

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Probabilistic analysis of crack width of a reinforced concrete element is based on the formulas accepted in Eurocode 2 and European Model Code 90. Obtained values of reliability index b seem to be satisfactory for the reinforced concrete slab that fulfils requirements for the crack width specified in Eurocode 2. However, the reliability of the slab seems to be insufficient when the European Model Code 90 is considered; reliability index is less than recommended value 1.5 for serviceability limit states indicated in Eurocode 1. Analysis of sensitivity factors of basic variables enables to find out variables significantly affecting the total crack width.

  15. Monitoring crack growth using thermography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djedjiga, Ait Aouita; Abdeldjalil, Ouahabi

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to present a novel strategy for real-time monitoring crack growth of materials. The process is based on the use of thermal data extracted along the horizontal axis of symmetry of single edge notch tension (SENT) specimens, during fatigue tests. These data are exploited using an implemented program to detect in situ the growth of fatigue crack, with the critical size and propagation speed of the crack. This technique has the advantage to be applicable to a wide range of materials regardless of their electrical conductivity and their surface texture. (authors)

  16. Password Cracking Using Sony Playstations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinhans, Hugo; Butts, Jonathan; Shenoi, Sujeet

    Law enforcement agencies frequently encounter encrypted digital evidence for which the cryptographic keys are unknown or unavailable. Password cracking - whether it employs brute force or sophisticated cryptanalytic techniques - requires massive computational resources. This paper evaluates the benefits of using the Sony PlayStation 3 (PS3) to crack passwords. The PS3 offers massive computational power at relatively low cost. Moreover, multiple PS3 systems can be introduced easily to expand parallel processing when additional power is needed. This paper also describes a distributed framework designed to enable law enforcement agents to crack encrypted archives and applications in an efficient and cost-effective manner.

  17. Modelling the tearing crack growth in a ductile ferritic steel using X-FEM elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simatos, A.; Prabel, B.; Marie, S.; Nedelec, M.; Combescure, A.

    2012-01-01

    Extended Finite Element Method (X-FEM) is used to model a cracked structure without meshing explicitly the crack. Indeed, the crack is represented by a discontinuity of the displacement field through additional degrees of freedom using Heaviside type function or derived from the Irwin's singular fields. Initially, the stress integration in the XFEM framework supposed to divide the cut elements into sub-triangles that are conform to the crack. This was motivated in order to integrate the behaviour accurately on both sides of the crack in particular at proximity of the crack tip where singular enrichments are present. This strategy induces field projections from the usual Gauss point configuration to a variable new one that depends on the crack position in the element. For ductile fracture modelization, this approach is not applicable, because in presence of large scale yield, the projection of internal variable fields is not conservative, in particular at proximity of the crack tip. In order to circumvent this problem, a new integration strategy was proposed by B. Prabel. It consists in using 64 Gauss points that are placed without regards to the crack position. This simple integration scheme permits to take implicitly into account the crack position and the fields in the element in an accurate and consistent way. This strategy was used in problem calculation for which the plastic radius remained small. It allowed introducing the over integrated elements in the probable propagation zone, just before plastification. In the case of ductile tearing, the plasticity is not confined near the crack tip and an improvement of the proposed strategy is made. This is then used to model large ductile crack growth in a ductile ferritic steel. To validate the predictions, the modelization is compared to a second F.E. calculation using the node release technique for the crack propagation. It is then shown that the two predictions are strictly equivalents. (authors)

  18. Study on Cracking Mechanism of Hardened Planetary frame

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinghui

    2017-09-01

    Planetary carrier made by 45 steel appear quenching crack, which is analyzed in chemical composition, hardness test and metallographic microscopic structure. The reasons of quenching crack of planetary gear include the unreasonable structure of the planetary carrier, thinner annular wall on the base of the upper part, and in dangerous area of the 45 steel in the process of quenching. The faster cooling rate of quenching results in a centripetal stress with the thick-wall part, which is greater than the ultimate bearing capacity of the material.

  19. Consistency in PERT problems

    OpenAIRE

    Bergantiños, Gustavo; Valencia-Toledo, Alfredo; Vidal-Puga, Juan

    2016-01-01

    The program evaluation review technique (PERT) is a tool used to schedule and coordinate activities in a complex project. In assigning the cost of a potential delay, we characterize the Shapley rule as the only rule that satisfies consistency and other desirable properties.

  20. Subsurface metals fatigue cracking without and with crack tip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey Shanyavskiy

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Very-High-Cycle-Fatigue regime for metals was considered and mechanisms of the subsurface crack origination were introduced. In many metals first step of crack origination takes place with specific area formation because of material pressing and rotation that directed to transition in any volume to material ultra-high-plasticity with nano-structure appearing. Then by the border of the nano-structure takes place volume rotation and fracture surface creates with spherical particles which usually named Fine-Granular-Area. In another case there takes place First-Smooth-Facet occurring in area of origin due to whirls appearing by the one of the slip systems under discussed the same stress-state conditions. Around Fine-Granular-Area or First-Smooth-Facet there plastic zone appeared and, then, subsurface cracking develops by the same manner as for through cracks. In was discussed quantum-mechanical nature of fatigue crack growth in accordance with Yang’s modulus quantization for low level of deformations. New simply equation was considered for describing subsurface cracking in metals out of Fine-Granular-Area or Fist-Smooth-Facet.

  1. Fatigue crack propagation in self-assembling nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klingler, Andreas; Wetzel, Bernd [Institute for Composite Materials (IVW GmbH) Technical University of Kaiserslautern, 67633 Kaiserslautern (Germany)

    2016-05-18

    Self-assembling block-copolymers allow the easy manufacturing of nanocomposites due to the thermodynamically driven in situ formation of nanosized phases in thermosetting resins during the curing process. Complex mechanical dispersion processes can be avoided. The current study investigates the effect of a block-copolymer on the fatigue crack propagation resistance of a cycloaliphatic amine cured epoxy resin. It was found that a small amount of MAM triblock-copolymer significantly increases the resistance to fatigue crack propagation of epoxy. Crack growth rate and the Paris law exponent for fatigue-crack growth were considerably reduced from m=15.5 of the neat epoxy to m=8.1 of the nanocomposite. To identify the related reinforcing and fracture mechanisms structural analyses of the fractured surfaces were performed by scanning electron microscope. Characteristic features were identified to be deformation, debonding and fracture of the nano-phases as well as crack pinning. However, the highest resistance against fatigue crack propagation was achieved in a bi-continuous microstructure that consisted of an epoxy-rich phase with embedded submicron sized MAM inclusions, and which was surrounded by a block-copolymer-rich phase that showed rupture and plastic deformation.

  2. Induction and comparison of craving for tobacco, marijuana and crack

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Brasil Araujo

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The literature findings report that use of multiple substances can produce adverse clinical and behavioral effects, which may affect craving and the results of drug treatment. Also, the understanding of craving construct and its interaction in the use of smoked substances is underexplored. Objectives To induce and compare craving for tobacco, marijuana and crack-cocaine on hospitalized dependents whose drug of choice is crack-cocaine. Methods Quasi-experimental study with a convenience sample consisting of 210 males divided into 3 equal groups (Group-1: craving induced by crack; Group-2: craving induced by tobacco; and Group-3: craving induced by marijuana. All participants met ICD-10 dependence criteria for cocaine/crack, marijuana and tobacco, were aged between 18 and 65 and had used these substances for at least one year. Photos were used to induce craving and self-report instruments to evaluate possible alterations. Results This study showed that craving for tobacco was more intense than for marijuana and crack, when the groups were compared by VAS. Using specific scales, both craving for tobacco and craving for marijuana were more intense than craving for crack. Discussion These results would imply interventions at the initial stages of abstinence with cognitive-behavioural techniques and pharmacotherapy in order to reduce craving.

  3. Cross-validated detection of crack initiation in aerospace materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanniamparambil, Prashanth A.; Cuadra, Jefferson; Guclu, Utku; Bartoli, Ivan; Kontsos, Antonios

    2014-03-01

    A cross-validated nondestructive evaluation approach was employed to in situ detect the onset of damage in an Aluminum alloy compact tension specimen. The approach consisted of the coordinated use primarily the acoustic emission, combined with the infrared thermography and digital image correlation methods. Both tensile loads were applied and the specimen was continuously monitored using the nondestructive approach. Crack initiation was witnessed visually and was confirmed by the characteristic load drop accompanying the ductile fracture process. The full field deformation map provided by the nondestructive approach validated the formation of a pronounced plasticity zone near the crack tip. At the time of crack initiation, a burst in the temperature field ahead of the crack tip as well as a sudden increase of the acoustic recordings were observed. Although such experiments have been attempted and reported before in the literature, the presented approach provides for the first time a cross-validated nondestructive dataset that can be used for quantitative analyses of the crack initiation information content. It further allows future development of automated procedures for real-time identification of damage precursors including the rarely explored crack incubation stage in fatigue conditions.

  4. Analysis of cracking potential and micro-elongation of linerboard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supattra Panthai

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Folding cracks of linerboards in relation to their micro-elongation and the forming conditions were studied using an industrial linerboard machine with a top former. The experiments consisted of the study of various forming conditions by manipulating the jet/wire speed ratio to produce linerboard with differences in fiber structures that were related to the cracked and uncracked products. The results showed that changes to the jet/wire speed ratio of about 0.01–0.02 to improve the tested folding endurance in the machine direction potentially produced folding cracks in the linerboard, which indicated an ambiguous interpretation of the foldability tests. The delaminated cracked layers were found to have a high folding endurance and tensile strength, while the decrease in the micro-elongation formulated in this study was found to be related to cracking. A lower micro-elongation of about 350–500 μm/N·g was found in a range of products with folding cracks.

  5. Fatigue crack propagation in self-assembling nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingler, Andreas; Wetzel, Bernd

    2016-05-01

    Self-assembling block-copolymers allow the easy manufacturing of nanocomposites due to the thermodynamically driven in situ formation of nanosized phases in thermosetting resins during the curing process. Complex mechanical dispersion processes can be avoided. The current study investigates the effect of a block-copolymer on the fatigue crack propagation resistance of a cycloaliphatic amine cured epoxy resin. It was found that a small amount of MAM triblock-copolymer significantly increases the resistance to fatigue crack propagation of epoxy. Crack growth rate and the Paris law exponent for fatigue-crack growth were considerably reduced from m=15.5 of the neat epoxy to m=8.1 of the nanocomposite. To identify the related reinforcing and fracture mechanisms structural analyses of the fractured surfaces were performed by scanning electron microscope. Characteristic features were identified to be deformation, debonding and fracture of the nano-phases as well as crack pinning. However, the highest resistance against fatigue crack propagation was achieved in a bi-continuous microstructure that consisted of an epoxy-rich phase with embedded submicron sized MAM inclusions, and which was surrounded by a block-copolymer-rich phase that showed rupture and plastic deformation.

  6. Fatigue crack propagation in self-assembling nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klingler, Andreas; Wetzel, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    Self-assembling block-copolymers allow the easy manufacturing of nanocomposites due to the thermodynamically driven in situ formation of nanosized phases in thermosetting resins during the curing process. Complex mechanical dispersion processes can be avoided. The current study investigates the effect of a block-copolymer on the fatigue crack propagation resistance of a cycloaliphatic amine cured epoxy resin. It was found that a small amount of MAM triblock-copolymer significantly increases the resistance to fatigue crack propagation of epoxy. Crack growth rate and the Paris law exponent for fatigue-crack growth were considerably reduced from m=15.5 of the neat epoxy to m=8.1 of the nanocomposite. To identify the related reinforcing and fracture mechanisms structural analyses of the fractured surfaces were performed by scanning electron microscope. Characteristic features were identified to be deformation, debonding and fracture of the nano-phases as well as crack pinning. However, the highest resistance against fatigue crack propagation was achieved in a bi-continuous microstructure that consisted of an epoxy-rich phase with embedded submicron sized MAM inclusions, and which was surrounded by a block-copolymer-rich phase that showed rupture and plastic deformation.

  7. Analysis of Fatigue Crack Growth in Ship Structural Details

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leheta Heba W.

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Fatigue failure avoidance is a goal that can be achieved only if the fatigue design is an integral part of the original design program. The purpose of fatigue design is to ensure that the structure has adequate fatigue life. Calculated fatigue life can form the basis for meaningful and efficient inspection programs during fabrication and throughout the life of the ship. The main objective of this paper is to develop an add-on program for the analysis of fatigue crack growth in ship structural details. The developed program will be an add-on script in a pre-existing package. A crack propagation in a tanker side connection is analyzed by using the developed program based on linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM and finite element method (FEM. The basic idea of the developed application is that a finite element model of this side connection will be first analyzed by using ABAQUS and from the results of this analysis the location of the highest stresses will be revealed. At this location, an initial crack will be introduced to the finite element model and from the results of the new crack model the direction of the crack propagation and the values of the stress intensity factors, will be known. By using the calculated direction of propagation a new segment will be added to the crack and then the model is analyzed again. The last step will be repeated until the calculated stress intensity factors reach the critical value.

  8. Vibration analysis of partially cracked plate submerged in fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soni, Shashank; Jain, N. K.; Joshi, P. V.

    2018-01-01

    The present work proposes an analytical model for vibration analysis of partially cracked rectangular plates coupled with fluid medium. The governing equation of motion for the isotropic plate based on the classical plate theory is modified to accommodate a part through continuous line crack according to simplified line spring model. The influence of surrounding fluid medium is incorporated in the governing equation in the form of inertia effects based on velocity potential function and Bernoulli's equations. Both partially and totally submerged plate configurations are considered. The governing equation also considers the in-plane stretching due to lateral deflection in the form of in-plane forces which introduces geometric non-linearity into the system. The fundamental frequencies are evaluated by expressing the lateral deflection in terms of modal functions. The assessment of the present results is carried out for intact submerged plate as to the best of the author's knowledge the literature lacks in analytical results for submerged cracked plates. New results for fundamental frequencies are presented as affected by crack length, fluid level, fluid density and immersed depth of plate. By employing the method of multiple scales, the frequency response and peak amplitude of the cracked structure is analyzed. The non-linear frequency response curves show the phenomenon of bending hardening or softening and the effect of fluid dynamic pressure on the response of the cracked plate.

  9. Super oil cracking update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulraney, D.

    1997-01-01

    The conversion of residual fuel oil to usable middle distillates was discussed. The residue conversion processing paths are usually based on separation, carbon rejection, or hydrogen addition principles. Super Oil Cracking (SOC) uses a slurry catalyst system in a new, tubular reactor to achieve high levels of hydrothermal conversion. SOC can upgrade a variety of heavy, high metals residue feedstocks with high yields of middle distillates. The SOC products can also be further treated into feedstocks for FCC or hydrocracking. The SOC process can be incorporated easily into a refinery to obtain incremental residue conversion directly. It can also be integrated with other residue processes, acting as a demetallization and decarbonization step which results in enhanced overall conversion. The relative rate of coke formation and its handling are distinguishing characteristics between residue upgrading technologies. The SOC process operates at higher temperatures that other residue hydrocracking processes resulting in higher rates of thermal decomposition, thus preventing coke formation. SOC process can operate as a stand-alone upgrader or can be integrated with other bottoms processing steps to extend the refiner's range of options for increasing bottoms conversion.3 tabs., 14 figs

  10. Metallurgy of stress corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donovan, J.A.

    1973-01-01

    The susceptibility of metals and alloys to stress corrosion is discussed in terms of the relationship between structural characteristics (crystal structure, grains, and second phases) and defects (vacancies, dislocations, and cracks) that exist in metals and alloys. (U.S.)

  11. Peridynamic model for fatigue cracking.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silling, Stewart Andrew; Abe Askari (Boeing)

    2014-10-01

    The peridynamic theory is an extension of traditional solid mechanics in which the field equations can be applied on discontinuities, such as growing cracks. This paper proposes a bond damage model within peridynamics to treat the nucleation and growth of cracks due to cyclic loading. Bond damage occurs according to the evolution of a variable called the "remaining life" of each bond that changes over time according to the cyclic strain in the bond. It is shown that the model reproduces the main features of S-N data for typical materials and also reproduces the Paris law for fatigue crack growth. Extensions of the model account for the effects of loading spectrum, fatigue limit, and variable load ratio. A three-dimensional example illustrates the nucleation and growth of a helical fatigue crack in the torsion of an aluminum alloy rod.

  12. Shapes formed by interacting cracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Karen

    2012-02-01

    Brittle failure through multiple cracks occurs in a wide variety of contexts, from microscopic failures in dental enamel and cleaved silicon to geological faults and planetary ice crusts. In each of these situations, with complicated stress geometries and different microscopic mechanisms, pairwise interactions between approaching cracks nonetheless produce characteristically curved fracture paths. We investigate the origins of this widely observed ``en passant'' crack pattern by fracturing a rectangular slab which is notched on each long side and subjected to quasi-static uniaxial strain from the short side. The two cracks propagate along approximately straight paths until they pass each other, after which they curve and release a lens-shaped fragment. We find that, for materials with diverse mechanical properties, each curve has an approximately square-root shape, and that the length of each fragment is twice its width. We are able to explain the origins of this universal shape with a simple geometrical model.

  13. The crack growth mechanism in asphaltic mixes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, M.M.J.; Hopman, P.C.; Molenaar, A.A.A.

    1995-01-01

    The crack growth mechanism in asphalt concrete (Ac) mixes is studied. In cyclic tests on several asphaltic mixes crack growth is measured, both with crack foils and with cOD-gauges. It is found that crack growth in asphaltic mixes is described by three processes which are parallel in time: cohesive

  14. 21 CFR 137.190 - Cracked wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cracked wheat. 137.190 Section 137.190 Food and... Related Products § 137.190 Cracked wheat. Cracked wheat is the food prepared by so cracking or cutting into angular fragments cleaned wheat other than durum wheat and red durum wheat that, when tested by...

  15. Reporting consistently on CSR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Christa; Nielsen, Anne Ellerup

    2006-01-01

    This chapter first outlines theory and literature on CSR and Stakeholder Relations focusing on the different perspectives and the contextual and dynamic character of the CSR concept. CSR reporting challenges are discussed and a model of analysis is proposed. Next, our paper presents the results...... of a case study showing that companies use different and not necessarily consistent strategies for reporting on CSR. Finally, the implications for managerial practice are discussed. The chapter concludes by highlighting the value and awareness of the discourse and the discourse types adopted...... in the reporting material. By implementing consistent discourse strategies that interact according to a well-defined pattern or order, it is possible to communicate a strong social commitment on the one hand, and to take into consideration the expectations of the shareholders and the other stakeholders...

  16. Geometrically Consistent Mesh Modification

    KAUST Repository

    Bonito, A.

    2010-01-01

    A new paradigm of adaptivity is to execute refinement, coarsening, and smoothing of meshes on manifolds with incomplete information about their geometry and yet preserve position and curvature accuracy. We refer to this collectively as geometrically consistent (GC) mesh modification. We discuss the concept of discrete GC, show the failure of naive approaches, and propose and analyze a simple algorithm that is GC and accuracy preserving. © 2010 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics.

  17. Crack propagation in dynamic thermoelasticity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bui, H.D.

    1980-01-01

    We study the singular thermoelastic fields near the crack tip, in the linear strain assumption. The equations are coupled and non linear. The asymptotic expansions of the displacement and the temperature are given for the first and the second order. It is shown that the temperature is singular when the crack propagates. However, this field does not change the dominant singularity of the mechanical field which is the same as that obtained in the theory of isothermal elasticity [fr

  18. Machine Vision based Micro-crack Inspection in Thin-film Solar Cell Panel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Yinong

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Thin film solar cell consists of various layers so the surface of solar cell shows heterogeneous textures. Because of this property the visual inspection of micro-crack is very difficult. In this paper, we propose the machine vision-based micro-crack detection scheme for thin film solar cell panel. In the proposed method, the crack edge detection is based on the application of diagonal-kernel and cross-kernel in parallel. Experimental results show that the proposed method has better performance of micro-crack detection than conventional anisotropic model based methods on a cross- kernel.

  19. High resolution electron microscopy of a small crack at the superficial layer of enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Y

    1994-12-01

    A small enamel crack was investigated using a high resolution electron microscope. The inside of the crack was filled with aggregates of irregularly oriented plate-like crystals. Amorphous mineral deposits were observed among these aggregates at a low magnification. Selected area electron diffractions indicated that the plate-like crystals consisted of hydroxyapatite (OH-AP), and that the amorphous mineral deposits were a mixture of OH-AP and whitlockite. These findings indicate that this crack may have been formed by occlusal and/or masticatory stress, and that a natural occlusion might occur through mineral deposition at the small crack such as in this case.

  20. Mixed-Mode Crack Growth in Wood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Octavian POP

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In timber elements the mixed mode dependsessentially of wood anatomy and load configuration.In these conditions, in order to evaluate the materialbehavior and the fracture process, it’s necessary toseparate the part of each mode. The mixed modeseparation allows evaluating the amplitude offracture mode. In the present paper, using a mixedmodecrack growth specimen made in Douglas fir,the mixed mode crack growth process is studythanks to marks tracking method. Using the markstracking method the characteristic displacementsassociated to opening and shear mode aremeasured. From the experimental measurements,the energy release rate associated to opening andshear modes is calculated into to account the crackadvancement during the test.

  1. Thermoregulatory value of cracking-clay soil shelters for small vertebrates during extreme desert conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waudby, Helen P; Petit, Sophie

    2017-05-01

    Deserts exhibit extreme climatic conditions. Small desert-dwelling vertebrates have physiological and behavioral adaptations to cope with these conditions, including the ability to seek shelter. We investigated the temperature (T) and relative humidity (RH) regulating properties of the soil cracks that characterize the extensive cracking-clay landscapes of arid Australia, and the extent of their use by 2 small marsupial species: fat-tailed and stripe-faced dunnarts (Sminthopsis crassicaudata and Sminthopsis macroura). We measured hourly (over 24-h periods) the T and RH of randomly-selected soil cracks compared to outside conditions, during 2 summers and 2 winters. We tracked 17 dunnarts (8 Sminthopsis crassicaudata and 9 Sminthopsis macroura) to quantify their use of cracks. Cracks consistently moderated microclimate, providing more stable conditions than available from non-crack points, which often displayed comparatively dramatic fluctuations in T and RH. Both dunnart species used crack shelters extensively. Cracks constitute important shelter for small animals during extreme conditions by providing a stable microclimate, which is typically cooler than outside conditions in summer and warmer in winter. Cracks likely play a fundamental sheltering role by sustaining the physiological needs of small mammal populations. Globally, cracking-clay areas are dominated by agricultural land uses, including livestock grazing. Management of these systems should focus not only on vegetation condition, but also on soil integrity, to maintain shelter resources for ground-dwelling fauna. © 2016 International Society of Zoological Sciences, Institute of Zoology/Chinese Academy of Sciences and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  2. Analysis of Mode II Crack in Bilayered Composite Beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizov, Victor I.; Mladensky, Angel S.

    2012-06-01

    Mode II crack problem in cantilever bilayered composite beams is considered. Two configurations are analyzed. In the first configuration the crack arms have equal heights while in the second one the arms have different heights. The modulus of elasticity and the shear modulus of the beam un-cracked part in the former case and the moment of inertia in the latter are derived as functions of the two layers characteristics. The expressions for the strain energy release rate, G are obtained on the basis of the simple beam theory according to the hypotheses of linear elastic fracture mechanics. The validity of these expressions is established by comparison with a known solution. Parametrical investigations for the influence of the moduli of elasticity ratio as well as the moments of inertia ratio on the strain energy release rate are also performed. The present article is a part of comprehensive investigation in Fracture mechanics of composite beams.

  3. Evaluation of crack interaction effect for in-plane surface cracks using elastic finite element analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huh, Nam Su; Choi, Suhn; Park, Keun Bae; Kim, Jong Min; Choi, Jae Boong; Kim, Young Jin

    2008-01-01

    The crack-tip stress fields and fracture mechanics assessment parameters, such as the elastic stress intensity factor and the elastic-plastic J-integral, for a surface crack can be significantly affected by adjacent cracks. Such a crack interaction effect due to multiple cracks can magnify the fracture mechanics assessment parameters. There are many factors to be considered, for instance the relative distance between adjacent cracks, crack shape and loading condition, to quantify a crack interaction effect on the fracture mechanics assessment parameters. Thus, the current guidance on a crack interaction effect (crack combination rule), including ASME Sec. XI, BS7910, British Energy R6 and API RP579, provide different rules for combining multiple surface cracks into a single surface crack. The present paper investigates a crack interaction effect by evaluating the elastic stress intensity factor of adjacent surface cracks in a plate along the crack front through detailed 3-dimensional elastic finite element analyses. The effects of the geometric parameters, the relative distance between cracks and the crack shape, on the stress intensity factor are systematically investigated. As for the loading condition, only axial tension is considered. Based on the elastic finite element results, the acceptability of the crack combination rules provided in the existing guidance was investigated, and the relevant recommendations on a crack interaction for in-plane surface cracks in a plate were discussed

  4. Sheared semi-infinite crack originating at the boundary of a circular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The configuration studied is that of a non-homogeneous infinite solid containing a central hole and a semi-infinite crack, originating from one side of the hole. Longitudinal shear loads of magnitude Tj, j = 1, 2 are applied on parts of the crack surface. It is found that the dominant fracture characteristic is that of a hole or semi ...

  5. Effects of crust and cracks on simulated catchment discharge and soil loss

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolte, J.; Ritsema, C.J.; Roo, de A.P.J.

    1997-01-01

    Sealing, crusting and cracking of crusts of the soil surface has been observed in many parts of the world in areas with sandy, silty and loamy soils. Sealing and crust formation occurs under the influence of rain storm and drying weather. With prolonged drying, surface crusts might crack, leading to

  6. Modeling of a Curvilinear Planar Crack with a Curvature-Dependent Surface Tension

    KAUST Repository

    Zemlyanova, A. Y.; Walton, J. R.

    2012-01-01

    An approach to modeling fracture incorporating interfacial mechanics is applied to the example of a curvilinear plane strain crack. The classical Neumann boundary condition is augmented with curvature-dependent surface tension. It is shown that the considered model eliminates the integrable crack-tip stress and strain singularities of order 1/2 present in the classical linear fracture mechanics solutions, and also leads to the sharp crack opening that is consistent with empirical observations. Unlike for the case of a straight crack, for a general curvilinear crack some components of the stresses and the derivatives of the displacements may still possess weaker singularities of a logarithmic type. Generalizations of the present study that lead to complete removal of all crack-tip singularities, including logarithmic, are the subject of a future paper. © 2012 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics.

  7. A conductive grating sensor for online quantitative monitoring of fatigue crack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Peiyuan; Cheng, Li; Yan, Xiaojun; Jiao, Shengbo; Li, Yakun

    2018-05-01

    Online quantitative monitoring of crack damage due to fatigue is a critical challenge for structural health monitoring systems assessing structural safety. To achieve online quantitative monitoring of fatigue crack, a novel conductive grating sensor based on the principle of electrical potential difference is proposed. The sensor consists of equidistant grating channels to monitor the fatigue crack length and conductive bars to provide the circuit path. An online crack monitoring system is established to verify the sensor's capability. The experimental results prove that the sensor is suitable for online quantitative monitoring of fatigue crack. A finite element model for the sensor is also developed to optimize the sensitivity of crack monitoring, which is defined by the rate of sensor resistance change caused by the break of the first grating channel. Analysis of the model shows that the sensor sensitivity can be enhanced by reducing the number of grating channels and increasing their resistance and reducing the resistance of the conductive bar.

  8. Study of Hot Salt Stress Corrosion Crack Initiation of Alloy IMI 834 by using DC Potential Drop Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pustode, Mangesh D. [Bharat Forge Ltd., Pune (India); Dewangan, Bhupendra [Tata Steel, Jamshedpur (India); Raja, V. S. [Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai (India); Paulose, Neeta; Babu, Narendra [Gas Turbine Research Establishment (GTRE), Bangalore (India)

    2016-10-15

    DC potential drop technique was employed during the slow strain rate tests to study the hot salt stress corrosion crack (HSSCC) initiation at 300 and 400 ℃. Threshold stresses for HSSCC initiation were found to about 88 % of the yield strength at both temperatures, but the time from crack initiation to final failure (Δtscc) decreased significantly with temperature, which reflects larger tendency for brittle fracture and secondary cracking. The brittle fracture features consisted of transgranular cracking through the primary α grain and discontinuous faceted cracking through the transformed β grains.

  9. The Rucio Consistency Service

    CERN Document Server

    Serfon, Cedric; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    One of the biggest challenge with Large scale data management system is to ensure the consistency between the global file catalog and what is physically on all storage elements. To tackle this issue, the Rucio software which is used by the ATLAS Distributed Data Management system has been extended to automatically handle lost or unregistered files (aka Dark Data). This system automatically detects these inconsistencies and take actions like recovery or deletion of unneeded files in a central manner. In this talk, we will present this system, explain the internals and give some results.

  10. Fissura por crack: comportamentos e estratégias de controle de usuários e ex-usuários Ansia de consumo por crack: conductas y estrategias de control de usuarios y ex-usuarios Crack cocaine craving: behaviors and coping strategies among current and former users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tharcila V Chaves

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Compreender a fissura do usuário de crack, bem como descrever os comportamentos desenvolvidos sob fissura e estratégias utilizadas para seu controle. PROCEDIMENTOS METODOLÓGICOS: Estudo qualitativo com amostra intencional por critérios de 40 usuários e ex-usuários de crack em São Paulo, SP, nos anos de 2007 e 2008. Os entrevistados foram recrutados pela técnica da bola de neve e submetidos à entrevista semi-estruturada em profundidade, até a saturação teórica. Após transcrição literal, seguiu-se a análise do conteúdo das entrevistas para elaboração de inferências e hipóteses alicerçadas nessas narrativas. ANÁLISE DOS RESULTADOS: Os entrevistados estavam igualmente distribuídos quanto ao sexo, possuíam idade entre 18 e 50 anos, abrangeram todos os níveis de escolaridade e a maior parte possuía poucos recursos financeiros. Além da fissura sentida na abstinência de crack e da fissura induzida por pistas ambientais e emocionais, constatou-se um tipo de fissura que faz parte do próprio efeito do crack. Esta última apareceu como forte fator mantenedor dos binges de consumo, que foram os maiores responsáveis pelo rebaixamento de valores do usuário, sujeitando-o a práticas arriscadas para a obtenção da droga. Os métodos mais citados para a obtenção de crack ou dinheiro para comprá-lo foram: prostituição, manipulação de pessoas, endividamento, troca de pertences por crack e roubo. Foram relatadas estratégias para o alívio da fissura e táticas farmacológicas e comportamentais para evitar o seu desenvolvimento, como: comer, ter relação sexual, jogar futebol, trabalhar, evitar o contexto social de uso de crack e usar drogas que causam sonolência. CONCLUSÕES: Os binges de consumo de crack são causados pela fissura induzida durante o uso da droga. As medidas criadas pelo próprio usuário para lidar com a sua fissura melhoram sua relação com o crack e podem ser ferramenta importante para o

  11. Is cosmology consistent?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xiaomin; Tegmark, Max; Zaldarriaga, Matias

    2002-01-01

    We perform a detailed analysis of the latest cosmic microwave background (CMB) measurements (including BOOMERaNG, DASI, Maxima and CBI), both alone and jointly with other cosmological data sets involving, e.g., galaxy clustering and the Lyman Alpha Forest. We first address the question of whether the CMB data are internally consistent once calibration and beam uncertainties are taken into account, performing a series of statistical tests. With a few minor caveats, our answer is yes, and we compress all data into a single set of 24 bandpowers with associated covariance matrix and window functions. We then compute joint constraints on the 11 parameters of the 'standard' adiabatic inflationary cosmological model. Our best fit model passes a series of physical consistency checks and agrees with essentially all currently available cosmological data. In addition to sharp constraints on the cosmic matter budget in good agreement with those of the BOOMERaNG, DASI and Maxima teams, we obtain a heaviest neutrino mass range 0.04-4.2 eV and the sharpest constraints to date on gravity waves which (together with preference for a slight red-tilt) favor 'small-field' inflation models

  12. Consistent Quantum Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Robert B.

    2001-11-01

    Quantum mechanics is one of the most fundamental yet difficult subjects in physics. Nonrelativistic quantum theory is presented here in a clear and systematic fashion, integrating Born's probabilistic interpretation with Schrödinger dynamics. Basic quantum principles are illustrated with simple examples requiring no mathematics beyond linear algebra and elementary probability theory. The quantum measurement process is consistently analyzed using fundamental quantum principles without referring to measurement. These same principles are used to resolve several of the paradoxes that have long perplexed physicists, including the double slit and Schrödinger's cat. The consistent histories formalism used here was first introduced by the author, and extended by M. Gell-Mann, J. Hartle and R. Omnès. Essential for researchers yet accessible to advanced undergraduate students in physics, chemistry, mathematics, and computer science, this book is supplementary to standard textbooks. It will also be of interest to physicists and philosophers working on the foundations of quantum mechanics. Comprehensive account Written by one of the main figures in the field Paperback edition of successful work on philosophy of quantum mechanics

  13. Compressive failure with interacting cracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Guoping; Liu Xila

    1993-01-01

    The failure processes in concrete and other brittle materials are just the results of the propagation, coalescence and interaction of many preexisting microcracks or voids. To understand the real behaviour of the brittle materials, it is necessary to bridge the gap from the relatively matured one crack behaviour to the stochastically distributed imperfections, that is, to concern the crack propagation and interaction of microscopic mechanism with macroscopic parameters of brittle materials. Brittle failure in compression has been studied theoretically by Horii and Nemat-Nasser (1986), in which a closed solution was obtained for a preexisting flaw or some special regular flaws. Zaitsev and Wittmann (1981) published a paper on crack propagation in compression, which is so-called numerical concrete, but they did not take account of the interaction among the microcracks. As for the modelling of the influence of crack interaction on fracture parameters, many studies have also been reported. Up till now, some researcher are working on crack interaction considering the ratios of SIFs with and without consideration of the interaction influences, there exist amplifying or shielding effects of crack interaction which are depending on the relative positions of these microcracks. The present paper attempts to simulate the whole failure process of brittle specimen in compression, which includes the complicated coupling effects between the interaction and propagation of randomly distributed or other typical microcrack configurations step by step. The lengths, orientations and positions of microcracks are all taken as random variables. The crack interaction among many preexisting random microcracks is evaluated with the help of a simple interaction matrix (Yang and Liu, 1991). For the subcritically stable propagation of microcracks in mixed mode fracture, fairly known maximum hoop stress criterion is adopted to compute branching lengths and directions at each tip of the crack

  14. A model for high-cycle fatigue crack propagation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balbi, Marcela Angela [Rosario National Univ. (Argentina); National Council of Scientific Research and Technology (CONICET) (Argentina)

    2017-02-01

    This paper deals with the prediction of high-cycle fatigue behavior for four different materials (7075-T6 alloy, Ti-6Al-4 V alloy, JIS S10C steel and 0.4 wt.-% C steel) using Chapetti's approach to estimate the fatigue crack propagation curve. In the first part of the paper, a single integral equation for studying the entire propagation process is determined using the recent results of Santus and Taylor, which consider a double regime of propagation (short and long cracks) characterized by the model of El Haddad. The second part of the paper includes a comparison of the crack propagation behavior model proposed by Navarro and de los Rios with the one mentioned in the first half of this work. The results allow us to conclude that the approach presented in this paper is a good and valid estimation of high-cycle fatigue crack propagation using a single equation to describe the entire fatigue crack regime.

  15. Brutal crack propagation in dynamic fracture: industrial application to the length of the crack arrest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumouchel, P.E.

    2008-03-01

    This research thesis aims at understanding and analysing some mechanisms involved in the dynamic failure under various loadings which are notably present in industrial environment, and more particularly in some parts of EDF's plants where networks of micro-cracks may steadily grow: heterogeneous zones, defects under coating. The author presents a simplified model based on the de-bonding of a film to understand the mechanisms of a sudden failure under a quasi-static loading. He develops a similar model to explore the influence of a defect on crack propagation under a quasi-static loading, and then under a sudden loading. This model is then generalized to the case of several defects, and more particularly very small defects. Finally, the author gives a numerical interpretation of a sudden propagation under quasi-static loading

  16. B-scan technique for localization and characterization of fatigue cracks around fastener holes in multi-layered structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Deborah; Datuin, Marvin; Aldrin, John; Warchol, Mark; Warchol, Lyudmila; Forsyth, David

    2018-04-01

    The work presented here aims to develop and transition angled-beam shear-wave inspection techniques for crack localization at fastener sites in multi-layer aircraft structures. This requires moving beyond detection to achieve reliable crack location and size, thereby providing invaluable information for maintenance actions and service-life management. The technique presented is based on imaging cracks in "True" B-scans (depth view projected in the sheets along the beam path). The crack traces that contribute to localization in the True B-scans depend on small, diffracted signals from the crack edges and tips that are visible in simulations and experimental data acquired with sufficient gain. The most recent work shows that cracks rotated toward and away from the central ultrasonic beam also yield crack traces in True B-scans that allow localization in simulations, even for large obtuse angles where experimental and simulation results show very small or no indications in the C-scans. Similarly, for two sheets joined by sealant, simulations show that cracks in the second sheet can be located in True B-scans for all locations studied: cracks that intersect the front or back wall of the second sheet, as well as relatively small mid-bore cracks. These results are consistent with previous model verification and sensitivity studies that demonstrate crack localization in True B-scans for a single sheet and cracks perpendicular to the ultrasonic beam.

  17. The PACE-1450 experiment - Crack and leakage behavior of a pre-stressed concrete containment wall considering ageing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermann, N.; Mueller, H.S.; Niklasch, C.; Michel-Ponnelle, S.; Bento, C.; Masson, B.

    2015-01-01

    As an intermediate sized experiment the PACE-1450 experiment aims to investigate the behavior of a curved specimen (length: 3.5 m, width: 1.8 m, height: 1.2 m) which is representative for a 1450 MWe nuclear power plant containment under accidental loading conditions. One focus of this experimental test campaign is the consideration of the ageing of the structure which among other effects leads to a pre-stressing loss. The crack behavior of the realistically reinforced specimen is of as much interest as it is the leakage behavior when an inner pressure occurs within the containment. The reinforcement layout of the specimen is very similar to the original geometry and consists mainly of reinforcement meshes of bars near the inner and outer surface and four pre-stressing cables in the circumferential direction. During the tests the specimen is loaded by pressure which simulates the internal accidental containment pressure of up to 6 bars (absolute pressure). The resulting ring tensile stress in the cylindrical part of the containment is externally applied by hydraulic jacks. An initial pre-stressing of the specimen of 12 MPa is realized in such a way that decreasing the pre-stressing force for the purpose of simulating the ageing of the structure is possible. The facility allows for the cracking of the pre-stressed specimen and for leakage measurements at different controlled crack widths. The specimen is equipped with embedded optical fiber strain and temperature sensors and a sound detection system to record the initiation of cracks. The paper explains the test set-up and presents results of the ongoing test series regarding the cracking and leakage behavior of the specimen

  18. Fatigue crack propagation and delamination growth in Glare

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alderliesten, R.C.

    2005-01-01

    Fibre Metal Laminate Glare consists of thin aluminium layers bonded together with pre-impregnated glass fibre layers and shows an excellent fatigue crack growth behaviour compared to monolithic aluminium. The fibres are insensitive to the occurring fatigue loads and remain intact while the fatigue

  19. Improvement of elastic-plastic fatigue crack growth evaluation method. 2. Crack opening behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Yukio [Central Research Inst. of Electric Power Industry, Tokyo (Japan)

    2001-05-01

    Evaluation of crack growth behavior under cyclic loading is often required in the structural integrity assessment of cracked components. Closing and re-opening of the crack give large influence on crack growth rate through the change of fracture mechanics parameters. Based on the finite element analysis for a center-cracked plate, dependency of crack opening ratio on applied stress range and mean stress was examined. Simple formulae for representing the results were derived for plane stress and plane strain conditions. (author)

  20. Cracking in Flexural Reinforced Concrete Members

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Annette Beedholm; Fisker, Jakob; Hagsten, Lars German

    2017-01-01

    The system of cracks developing in reinforced concrete is in many aspects essential when modelling structures in both serviceability- and ultimate limit state. This paper discusses the behavior concerning crack development in flexural members observed from tests and associates it with two different...... existing models. From the investigations an approach is proposed on how to predict the crack pattern in flexural members involving two different crack systems; primary flexural cracks and local secondary cracks. The results of the approach is in overall good agreement with the observed tests and captures...... the pronounced size effect associated with flexural cracking in which the crack spacing and crack widths are approximately proportional to the depth of the member....

  1. Dynamic ductile fracture of a central crack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Y. M.

    1976-01-01

    A central crack, symmetrically growing at a constant speed in a two dimensional ductile material subject to uniform tension at infinity, is investigated using the integral transform methods. The crack is assumed to be the Dugdale crack, and the finite stress condition at the crack tip is satisfied during the propagation of the crack. Exact expressions of solution are obtained for the finite stress condition at the crack tip, the crack shape, the crack opening displacement, and the energy release rate. All those expressions are written as the product of explicit dimensional quantities and a nondimensional dynamic correction function. The expressions reduce to the associated static results when the crack speed tends to zero, and the nondimensional dynamic correction functions were calculated for various values of the parameter involved.

  2. Fatigue cracking in road pavement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackiewicz, P.

    2018-05-01

    The article presents the problem of modelling fatigue phenomena occurring in the road pavement. The example of two selected pavements shows the changes occurring under the influence of the load in different places of the pavement layers. Attention is paid to various values of longitudinal and transverse strains generated at the moment of passing the wheel on the pavement. It was found that the key element in the crack propagation analysis is the method of transferring the load to the pavement by the tire and the strain distribution in the pavement. During the passage of the wheel in the lower layers of the pavement, a complex stress state arises. Then vertical, horizontal and tangent stresses with various values appear. The numerical analyses carried out with the use of finite element methods allowed to assess the strain and stress changes occurring in the process of cracking road pavement. It has been shown that low-thickness pavements are susceptible to fatigue cracks arising "bottom to top", while pavements thicker are susceptible to "top to bottom" cracks. The analysis of the type of stress allowed to determine the cracking mechanism.

  3. Steel weldability. Underbead cold cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marquet, F.; Defourny, J.; Bragard, A.

    1977-01-01

    The problem of underbead cold cracking has been studied by the implant technique. This approach allows to take into account in a quantitative manner the different factors acting on the cold cracking phenomenon: structure under the weld bead, level of restraint, hydrogen content in the molten metal. The influence of the metallurgical factors depending from the chemical composition of the steel has been examined. It appeared that carbon equivalent is an important factor to explain cold cracking sensitivity but that it is not sufficient to characterize the steel. The results have shown that vanadium may have a deleterious effect on the resistance to cold cracking when the hydrogen content is high and that small silicon additions are beneficient. The influence of the diffusible hydrogen content has been checked and the important action of pre- and postheating has been shown. These treatments allow the hydrogen to escape from the weld before the metal has been damaged. Some inclusions (sulphides) may also decrease the influence of hydrogen. A method based on the implant tests has been proposed which allows to choose and to control safe welding conditions regarding cold cracking

  4. Role of hydrogen in stress corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehta, M.L.

    1981-01-01

    Electrochemical basis for differentiation between hydrogen embrittlement and active path corrosion or anodic dissolution crack growth mechanisms is examined. The consequences of recently demonstrated acidification in crack tip region irrespective of electrochemical conditions at the bulk surface of the sample are that the hydrogen can evolve within the crack and may be involved in the cracking process. There are basically three aspects of hydrogen involvement in stress corrosion cracking. In dissolution models crack propagation is assumed to be caused by anodic dissolution on the crack tip sustained by cathodic reduction of hydrogen from electrolyte within the crack. In hydrogen induced structural transformation models it is postulated that hydrogen is absorbed locally at the crack tip producing structural changes which facilitate crack propagation. In hydrogen embrittlement models hydrogen is absorbed by stressed metal from proton reduction from the electrolyte within the crack and there is interaction between lattice and hydrogen resulting in embrittlement of material at crack tip facilitating crack propagation. In the present paper, the role of hydrogen in stress corrosion crack growth in high strength steels, austenitic stainless steels, titanium alloys and high strength aluminium alloys is discussed. (author)

  5. A crack opening stress equation for fatigue crack growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    A general crack opening stress equation is presented which may be used to correlate crack growth rate data for various materials and thicknesses, under constant amplitude loading, once the proper constraint factor has been determined. The constraint factor, alpha, is a constraint on tensile yielding; the material yields when the stress is equal to the product of alpha and sigma. Delta-K (LEFM) is plotted against rate for 2024-T3 aluminum alloy specimens 2.3 mm thick at various stress ratios. Delta-K sub eff was plotted against rate for the same data with alpha = 1.8; the rates correlate well within a factor of two.

  6. Seismic behaviour of un-cracked and cracked thin pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blay, N.; Brunet, G.; Gantenbein, F.; Aguilar, J.

    1995-01-01

    In order to evaluate the seismic behaviour of un-cracked and cracked thin pipes, subjected to high acceleration levels, seismic tests and calculations have been performed on straight thin pipes made of 316L stainless steel, loaded in pure bending by a permanent static and dynamic loading. The seismic tests were carried out on the AZALEE shaking table of the CEA laboratory TAMARIS. The influence of the elasto-plastic model with isotropic or kinematic hardening are studied. 5 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  7. Ductile fracture of circumferentially cracked type-304 stainless steel pipes in tension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zahoor, A.; Norris, D.M.

    1984-11-01

    Circumferentially cracked pipes subjected to tensile load were analyzed for finite length and constant depth part-through cracks located at the inside of the pipe wall. The analysis postulated loads sufficient to cause net-section yielding of the flawed section. It was demonstrated that a propensity for predominantly radial growth exists for part-through cracks loaded in tension. This result is similar to the result for bend loading, except that bend loading causes more favorable conditions for wall breakthrough than tension loading. Numerical results were developed for 4-in. and 24-in-dia pipes. Safety margins for displacement controlled loads were described by a safety assessment diagram. This diagram defines a curve delineating leak from fracture in a space of nondimensional crack length and crack depth. 4-india schedule 80 Type-304 stainless steel pipes with length to radius ratio (L/R) of up to 100 exhibited leak-before-break behavior.

  8. Ductile fracture of circumferentially cracked type-304 stainless steel pipes in tension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zahoor, A.; Norris, D.M.

    1984-01-01

    Circumferentially cracked pipes subjected to tensile load were analyzed for finite length and constant depth part-through cracks located at the inside of the pipe wall. The analysis postulated loads sufficient to cause net-section yielding of the flawed section. It was demonstrated that a propensity for predominantly radial growth exists for part-through cracks loaded in tension. This result is similar to the result for bend loading, except that bend loading causes more favorable conditions for wall breakthrough than tension loading. Numerical results were developed for 4-in. and 24-in-dia pipes. Safety margins for displacement controlled loads were described by a safety assessment diagram. This diagram defines a curve delineating leak from fracture in a space of nondimensional crack length and crack depth. 4-india schedule 80 Type-304 stainless steel pipes with length to radius ratio (L/R) of up to 100 exhibited leak-before-break behavior

  9. Elastic interaction of a crack with a microcrack array. I - Formulation of the problem and general form of the solution. II - Elastic solution for two crack configurations (piecewise constant and linear approximations)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudnovsky, A.; Dolgopolsky, A.; Kachanov, M.

    1987-01-01

    The elastic interactions of a two-dimensional configuration consisting of a crack with an array of microcracks located near the tip are studied. The general form of the solution is based on the potential representations and approximations of tractions on the microcracks by polynomials. In the second part, the technique is applied to two simple two-dimensional configurations involving one and two microcracks. The problems of stress shielding and stress amplification (the reduction or increase of the effective stress intensity factor due to the presence of microcracks) are discussed, and the refinements introduced by higher order polynomial approximations are illustrated.

  10. Transport of lead to crack tips in steam generator tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adler, G.D.; Marks, C.R.; Fruzzetti, K.

    2009-01-01

    The mechanisms by which lead is transported from its ultimate source to steam generator tubes and into cracks are not well understood and, to date, a comprehensive evaluation of possible mechanisms has not previously been performed. Specifically, local lead concentrations up to 20 wt. percent have been measured at crack tips, and it is not fully understood how lead concentrations of this magnitude occur, since lead concentrations in SG feedwater are typically quite low (on the order of a few parts per trillion). Additionally, there is evidence that at secondary side conditions, lead is essentially entirely adsorbed onto solid surfaces. Furthermore, if lead were present in the liquid phase, it would not be expected to be in a form that would facilitate concentration in a crevice (crack) by electrochemical means. There has previously been some speculation that lead transport to crack tips may occur through surface diffusion of adsorbed species. It has also been postulated that lead transport may occur via diffusion through the oxide layer along crack walls or via diffusion of lead out of the bulk Alloy 600 to grain boundaries exposed to secondary water by advancing cracks. However, there have been no critical evaluations of these hypotheses. With the current state of knowledge, it is difficult for utilities to determine whether additional efforts to further reduce the inventory of lead in the secondary system are justified. Furthermore, specific sources of lead that are especially likely to accelerate SCC cannot be identified (e.g., significant masses of lead are present in SG deposits, but it is not known if this lead can be transported to crack tips). The work presented in this paper quantitatively evaluates (based on the published literature, not new experimental work) a number of hypothesized lead transport mechanisms, including: Liquid phase diffusion; Electrochemically influenced diffusion of cations and anions; Bulk alloy diffusion; Surface diffusion; Solid

  11. Desconfortos associados às cirurgias de extração dentária e construção de instrumento de medida (QCirDental. Parte I: impactos e consistência interna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Carlos Bortoluzzi

    Full Text Available Resumo O estudo objetivou criar um instrumento de medida que pudesse quantificar os desconfortos associados ao procedimento cirúrgico de pacientes submetidos a cirurgias dento-alveolares (QCirDental. O instrumento QCirDental foi desenvolvido em duas etapas iniciais: (1 geração e seleção das perguntas ou itens e, (2 teste do instrumento com avaliação das propriedades de medida (consistência interna e responsividade. A amostra foi composta por 123 pacientes. Nenhum deles apresentou qualquer dificuldade em entender o QCirDental. O instrumento mostrou excelente consistência interna com coeficiente alfa de Cronbach de 0,83. A análise de componentes principais (Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin Measure of Sampling Adequacy 0,72 e Bartlett's Test of Sphericity com p < 0,001 mostrou seis (6 dimensões do instrumento que explicam 67,5% da variância. O QCirDental possui excelente consistência interna, sendo um instrumento de fácil leitura e interpretação compatível com uma adequada validade semântica e de conteúdo. Mais de 80% dos pacientes submetidos a extrações dentárias de rotina odontológica apresentam algum desconforto ou incomodo no período transoperatório o que ressalta a necessidade de utilização de um instrumento para avaliação de cuidados.

  12. Mechanics of quasi-static crack growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rice, J R

    1978-10-01

    Results on the mechanics of quasi-static crack growth are reviewed. These include recent studies on the geometry and stability of crack paths in elastic-brittle solids, and on the thermodynamics of Griffith cracking, including environmental effects. The relation of crack growth criteria to non-elastic rheological models is considered and paradoxes with energy balance approaches, based on singular crack models, are discussed for visco-elastic, diffuso-elastic, and elastic-plastic materials. Also, recent approaches to prediction of stable crack growth in ductile, elastic-plastic solids are discussed.

  13. Description of the initiation and progress of cracks for hot cracks in temperature resistant 1% CrMoV castings under creep or fatigue stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bareiss, J.; Maile, K.; Berger, C.; Mayer, K.H.; Weiss, M.

    1994-01-01

    The results available so far have shown that under vibration stress at room temperature and at 530 C, the simplified equations of fracture mechanics are sufficient (in spite of the complicated fault geometries), in order to conservatively describe the behaviour of fault positions (open or partly-healed hot cracks) with regard to their crack initiation behaviour if combined with the findings US test technique. Here the sample castings which in the initial state showed fault indications of US type EET near the surface, tend to earlier initiation of a crack compared to lower fault positions of the samples. Internal fault positions (partially healed hot cracks) often only showed local cracks (trans-crystalline deformation cracks) within the fault area with an order of magnitude of about 10-50 μm, in spite of exceeding the threshold value Δ Ko. The comparison of the crack propagation behaviour of the sample castings, determined via the potential sensor method on medium lengths of fault with the results of crack growth of fracture mechanics samples in the da/dN- Δ K diagram showed for the evaluated sample castings with a relatively great initial depth or length of fault that the upper scatter band limit of the Paris Law determined for the material can be used to estimate the fault position behaviour. (orig./RHM) [de

  14. Cracks propagation by stress corrosion cracking in conditions of Boiling Water Reactor (BWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuentes C, P.

    2003-01-01

    This work presents the results of the assays carried out in the Laboratory of Hot Cells of the National Institute of Nuclear Research (ININ) to a type test tube Compact Tension (CT), built in steel austenitic stainless type 304L, simulating those conditions those that it operates a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR), at temperature 288 C and pressure of 8 MPa, to determine the speed to which the cracks spread in this material that is of the one that different components of a reactor are made, among those that it highlights the reactor core vessel. The application of the Hydrogen Chemistry of the Water is presented (HWC) that is one alternative to diminish the corrosion effect low stress in the component, this is gets controlling the quantity of oxygen and of hydrogen as well as the conductivity of the water. The rehearsal is made following the principles of the Mechanics of Elastic Lineal Fracture (LEFM) that considers a crack of defined size with little plastic deformation in the tip of this; the measurement of crack advance is continued with the technique of potential drop of direct current of alternating signal, this is contained inside the standard Astm E-647 (Method of Test Standard for the Measurement of Speed of Growth of Crack by fatigue) that is the one that indicates us as carrying out this test. The specifications that should complete the test tubes that are rehearsed as for their dimensions, it forms, finish and determination of mechanical properties (tenacity to the fracture mainly) they are contained inside the norm Astm E-399, the one which it is also based on the principles of the fracture mechanics. The obtained results were part of a database to be compared with those of other rehearsals under different conditions, Normal Chemistry of the Water (NWC) and it dilutes with high content of O 2 ; to determine the conditions that slow more the phenomena of stress corrosion cracking, as well as the effectiveness of the used chemistry and of the method of

  15. Nanoscale and submicron fatigue crack growth in nickel microbeams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Y.; Yao, N.; Imasogie, B.; Soboyejo, W.O.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a novel edge-notched microbeam technique for the study of short fatigue crack growth. The technique is used to study submicron and nanoscale fatigue in LIGA Ni thin films with columnar microstructures. The edge-notched microbeams were fabricated within LIGA Ni thin films, using focused ion beam (FIB) techniques. The microbeams were then cyclically deformed to failure at a stress ratio of 0.1. Different slip-band structures were observed below the nanoscale notches. Cyclic deformation resulted in the formation of primary slip bands below the notch. Subsequent crack growth then occurred by the unzipping of fatigue cracks along intersecting slip bands. The effects of the primary slip bands were idealized using dislocation-based models. These were used to estimate the intrinsic fatigue threshold and the fatigue endurance limit. The estimates from the model are shown to be consistent with experimental data from prior stress-life experiments and current/prior fatigue threshold estimates

  16. Stress-compatible embedded cohesive crack in CST element

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, John Forbes; Poulsen, Peter Noe

    2010-01-01

    A simple element with an embedded strong discontinuity for modeling cohesive cracking of concrete is presented. The element differs from previous elements of the embedded type, in that a consistent stress field is obtained by direct enforcement of stress continuity across the crack....... The displacement discontinuity is modeled in an XFEM fashion; however, the discontinuous displacement field is special, allowing for the direct enforcement of stress continuity. This in turn allows for elimination of extra degrees of freedom necessary for describing the crack deformations, thus the element has...... the same number of freedoms as its continuous basis: CST. The good performance of the element is demonstrated by its ability to simulate threepoint bending of a notched concrete beam. The advantage of the element is its simplicity and the straightforward implementation of it. Handling situations...

  17. Assessment and prediction of drying shrinkage cracking in bonded mortar overlays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beushausen, Hans, E-mail: hans.beushausen@uct.ac.za; Chilwesa, Masuzyo

    2013-11-15

    Restrained drying shrinkage cracking was investigated on composite beams consisting of substrate concrete and bonded mortar overlays, and compared to the performance of the same mortars when subjected to the ring test. Stress development and cracking in the composite specimens were analytically modeled and predicted based on the measurement of relevant time-dependent material properties such as drying shrinkage, elastic modulus, tensile relaxation and tensile strength. Overlay cracking in the composite beams could be very well predicted with the analytical model. The ring test provided a useful qualitative comparison of the cracking performance of the mortars. The duration of curing was found to only have a minor influence on crack development. This was ascribed to the fact that prolonged curing has a beneficial effect on tensile strength at the onset of stress development, but is in the same time not beneficial to the values of tensile relaxation and elastic modulus. -- Highlights: •Parameter study on material characteristics influencing overlay cracking. •Analytical model gives good quantitative indication of overlay cracking. •Ring test presents good qualitative indication of overlay cracking. •Curing duration has little effect on overlay cracking.

  18. Assessment and prediction of drying shrinkage cracking in bonded mortar overlays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beushausen, Hans; Chilwesa, Masuzyo

    2013-01-01

    Restrained drying shrinkage cracking was investigated on composite beams consisting of substrate concrete and bonded mortar overlays, and compared to the performance of the same mortars when subjected to the ring test. Stress development and cracking in the composite specimens were analytically modeled and predicted based on the measurement of relevant time-dependent material properties such as drying shrinkage, elastic modulus, tensile relaxation and tensile strength. Overlay cracking in the composite beams could be very well predicted with the analytical model. The ring test provided a useful qualitative comparison of the cracking performance of the mortars. The duration of curing was found to only have a minor influence on crack development. This was ascribed to the fact that prolonged curing has a beneficial effect on tensile strength at the onset of stress development, but is in the same time not beneficial to the values of tensile relaxation and elastic modulus. -- Highlights: •Parameter study on material characteristics influencing overlay cracking. •Analytical model gives good quantitative indication of overlay cracking. •Ring test presents good qualitative indication of overlay cracking. •Curing duration has little effect on overlay cracking

  19. Crack initiation behaviors of metallic walls subjected to high heat flux expected at plasma disruption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, Seiichiro; Uno, Masayoshi; Seki, Masahiro.

    1989-01-01

    Experimental and numerical studies were performed to investigate crack initiation behavior near a surface of stainless steel and tungsten when subjected to extremely high heat flux. The improved electron beam test facility was used as the heat source. Two-dimensional thermal and elasto-plastic stress analyses were also performed. From the results for stainless steel, micro-cracks about 0.1 mm deep only initiated in the resolidified layer along dendrites. No cracks propagated into the non-melted zone, and repeated heating of up to 20 times did not affect the depth and population of the cracks. According to the elasto-plastic stress analyses, no fatigue cracks were expected. Cracks with a depth of more than a few millimeters were observed in a tungsten plate. The cracks initiated at a boundary between heated and unheated areas. They grew into the non-melted zone, and curved towards the center part of the heated area. The elasto-plastic stress analyses indicated that the cracks were initiated due to the residual tensile strain after heated at the surface of the test specimen. When the heat flux was repeated, the cracks propagated and penetrated to the rear side of the test specimen in several repetition. (author)

  20. Surface crack growth in cylindrical hollow specimen subject to tension and torsion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Shlyannikov

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The subject for studies is an aluminium cylindrical hollow specimen with external axial and part circumferential semi-elliptical surface crack undergoing fatigue loads. Both the optical microscope measurements and the crack opening displacement (COD method are used to monitor and calculate both crack depth and crack length during the tests. The variation of crack growth behaviour is studied under cyclic axial tension, pure torsion and combined tension+torsion fatigue loading. For the particular surface flaw geometries considered, the elastic and plastic in-plane and out-of-plane constraint parameters, as well as the governing parameter for stress fields in the form of In-integral and plastic stress intensity factor, are obtained as a function of the aspect ratio, dimensionless crack length and crack depth. The combined effect of tension and torsion loading and initial surface flaw orientation on the crack growth for two type of aluminium alloys is made explicit. The experimental and numerical results of the present study provided the opportunity to explore the suggestion that fatigue crack propagation may be governed more strongly by the plastic stress intensity factor rather than the magnitude of the elastic SIFs alone. One advantage of the plastic SIF is its sensitivity to combined loading due to accounting for the plastic properties of the material.

  1. Dynamic experiments on cracked pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petit, M.; Brunet, G.; Buland, P.

    1991-01-01

    In order to apply the leak before break concept to piping systems, the behavior of cracked pipes under dynamic, and especially seismic loading must be studied. In a first phase, an experimental program on cracked stainless steel pipes under quasi-static monotonic loading has been conducted. In this paper, the dynamic tests on the same pipe geometry are described. These tests have been performed on a shaking table with a mono frequency input signal. The main parameter of the tests is the frequency of excitation versus the frequency of the system

  2. Cracking and corrosion recovery boiler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suik, H. [Tallinn Technical University, Horizon Pulp and Paper, Tallinn (Estonia)

    1998-12-31

    The corrosion of heat surfaces and the cracking the drums are the main problems of the recovery boiler. These phenomena have been appeared during long-term operation of boiler `Mitsubishi - 315` erected at 1964. Depth of the crack is depending on the number of shutdowns and on operation time. Corrosion intensity of different heat surfaces is varying depend on the metal temperature and the conditions at place of positioning of tube. The lowest intensity of corrosion is on the bank tubes and the greatest is on the tubes of the second stage superheater and on the tubes at the openings of air ports. (orig.) 5 refs.

  3. Cracking and corrosion recovery boiler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suik, H [Tallinn Technical University, Horizon Pulp and Paper, Tallinn (Estonia)

    1999-12-31

    The corrosion of heat surfaces and the cracking the drums are the main problems of the recovery boiler. These phenomena have been appeared during long-term operation of boiler `Mitsubishi - 315` erected at 1964. Depth of the crack is depending on the number of shutdowns and on operation time. Corrosion intensity of different heat surfaces is varying depend on the metal temperature and the conditions at place of positioning of tube. The lowest intensity of corrosion is on the bank tubes and the greatest is on the tubes of the second stage superheater and on the tubes at the openings of air ports. (orig.) 5 refs.

  4. Cracking and relocation of UO2 fuel during nuclear operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appelhans, A.D.; Dagbjartsson, S.J.

    1981-01-01

    Cracking and relocation of light water reactor (LWR) fuel pellets affect the axial gas flow path within nuclear reactor fuel rods and the thermal performance of the fuel. As part of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Water Reactor Safety Research Fuel Behavior Program, the Thermal Fuels Behavior Program of EG and G Idaho, Inc., is conducting fuel rod behavior studies in the Heavy Boiling Water Reactor in Halden, Norway. The Instrumental Fuel Assembly-430 (IFA-430) operated in that facility is a multipurpose assembly designed to provide information on fuel cracking and relocation, the long-term thermal response of LWR fuel rods subjected to various internal pressures and gas compositions, and the release of fission gases. This report presents the results of an analysis of fuel cracking and relocation phenomena as deduced from fuel rod axial gas flow and fuel temperature data from the first 6.5 GWd/tUO 2 burnup of the IFA-430

  5. Humidity Testing of PME and BME Ceramic Capacitors with Cracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teverovsky, Alexander A.; Herzberger, Jaemi

    2014-01-01

    Cracks in ceramic capacitors are one of the major causes of failures during operation of electronic systems. Humidity testing has been successfully used for many years to verify the absence of cracks and assure quality of military grade capacitors. Traditionally, only precious metal electrode (PME) capacitors were used in high reliability applications and the existing requirements for humidity testing were developed for this type of parts. With the advance of base metal electrode (BME) capacitors, there is a need for assessment of the applicability of the existing techniques for the new technology capacitors. In this work, variety of different PME and BME capacitors with introduced cracks were tested in humid environments at different voltages and temperatures. Analysis of the test results indicates differences in the behavior and failure mechanisms for BME and PME capacitors and the need for different testing conditions.

  6. Quantitative image analysis of WE43-T6 cracking behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, A; Yahya, Z

    2013-01-01

    Environment-assisted cracking of WE43 cast magnesium (4.2 wt.% Yt, 2.3 wt.% Nd, 0.7% Zr, 0.8% HRE) in the T6 peak-aged condition was induced in ambient air in notched specimens. The mechanism of fracture was studied using electron backscatter diffraction, serial sectioning and in situ observations of crack propagation. The intermetallic (rare earthed-enriched divorced intermetallic retained at grain boundaries and predominantly at triple points) material was found to play a significant role in initiating cracks which leads to failure of this material. Quantitative measurements were required for this project. The populations of the intermetallic and clusters of intermetallic particles were analyzed using image analysis of metallographic images. This is part of the work to generate a theoretical model of the effect of notch geometry on the static fatigue strength of this material.

  7. Crack arrest toughness measurements with A533B steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salonen, Seppo.

    1979-11-01

    This work covers crack arrest toughness measurements on A533B steel done at the Technical Research Centre of Finland. These measurements are one part of a multinational effort, involving 30 laboratories. The aim of the cooperative test program is to examine two test procedures for measuring the crack arrest toughness, to give information about their reproducibility, and to identify the factors affecting the interpretation. The principles given for the testing were easy to apply in general and the results were satisfactory. Some factors in the test runs and in the specimen's behaviour are indicated which can cause error in the results or make implementation of the test more difficult. By comparing the results from our laboratory with average values from the test program a good agreement can be seen. Crack arrest toughness values derived from the compared procedures with a static analysis agree closely, but values calculated using a dynamic analysis differ considerably. (author)

  8. Underclad cracks growth under fatigue loading in stainless steel cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard, J.L.; Bodson, F.; Doule, A.; Slama, G.; Bramat, M.; Doucet, J.P.; Maltrud, F.

    1981-01-01

    Hydrogen induced cracks have been found in HAZ of PWR vessel nozzles under stainless steel cladding. Fatigue tests were performed to collect a large amount of data on the possible propagation of this type of flaws. Tests were conducted in two steps. The aim of the first step was to set up the experimental equipment and to device an adequate method for following cracks during fatigue loading. Clad plates with electroerosion machined slots were used for this purpose. The second step was then undertaken with material taken out of an actual nozzle containing hydrogen induced cracks in the HAZ under stainless steel cladding or flaws simulated by electroerosion machined slots. The test loadings were comparable to in service loadings of the nozzles. Special attention was taken to get representative R ratios. Again for the sake of representativity, the tests were performed at 300 0 C (In service temperature) and the hydrotest was simulated. The main results are: It was possible to follow the whole failure process by combining non-destructive examinations during fatigue testing and fractographic observations of broken specimens. Different striation patterns, before and after air has penetrated the actual embedded cracks were observed. Numerical simulation of fatigue crack growth of actual or simulated defects were consistent with experimental data, provided mainly that defect shape, effect of R ratio and of environment were taken into account. (orig.)

  9. Potential drop technique for monitoring stress corrosion cracking growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neves, Celia F.C.; Schvartzman, Monica M.A.M.; Moreira, Pedro A.L.D.P.L.P.

    2002-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking is one of most severe damage mechanisms influencing the lifetime of components in the operation of nuclear power plants. To assess the initiation stages and kinetics of crack growth as the main parameters coming to residual lifetime determination, the testing facility should allow active loading of specimens in the environment which is close to the real operation conditions of assessed component. Under cooperation of CDTN/CNEN and International Atomic Energy Agency a testing system has been developed by Nuclear Research Institute, Czech Republic, that will be used for the environmentally assisted cracking testing at CDTN/CNEN. The facility allows high temperature autoclave corrosion mechanical testing in well-defined LWR water chemistry using constant load, slow strain rate and rising displacement techniques. The facility consists of autoclave and refreshing water loop enabling testing at temperatures up to 330 deg C. Active loading system allows the maximum load on a specimen as high as 60 kN. The potential drop measurement is used to determine the instant crack length and its growth rate. The paper presents the facility and describes the potential drop technique, that is one of the most used techniques to monitor crack growth in specimens under corrosive environments. (author)

  10. Shallow-crack toughness results for reactor pressure vessel steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theiss, T.J.; Shum, D.K.M.; Rolfe, S.T.

    1992-01-01

    The Heavy Section Steel Technology Program (HSST) is investigating the influence of flaw depth on the fracture toughness of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steel. To complete this investigation, techniques were developed to determine the fracture toughness from shallow-crack specimens. A total of 38 deep and shallow-crack tests have been performed on beam specimens about 100 mm deep loaded in 3-point bending. Two crack depths (a ∼ 50 and 9 mm) and three beam thicknesses (B ∼ 50, 100, and 150 mm) have been tested. Techniques were developed to estimate the toughness in terms of both the J-integral and crack-tip opening displacement (CTOD). Analytical J-integral results were consistent with experimental J-integral results, confirming the validity of the J-estimation schemes used and the effect of flaw depth on fracture toughness. Test results indicate a significant increase in the fracture toughness associated with the shallow flaw specimens in the lower transition region compared to the deep-crack fracture toughness. There is, however, little or no difference in toughness on the lower shelf where linear-elastic conditions exist for specimens with either deep or shallow flaws. The increase in shallow-flaw toughness compared with deep-flaw results appears to be well characterized by a temperature shift of 35 degree C

  11. Modeling of crack in concrete structures subjected to severe loadings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, T.G.

    2012-01-01

    Concrete is a construction materials are prevalent in the world. However, in many industries, it is becoming more common to study the safety margins of a structure with respect to solicitations. It becomes important to predict the failure mode of the structure. Much work has already been made in the world on this subject, leading to operational models in computer codes using finite elements. Nevertheless, difficulties remain, mainly related to concrete cracking. These difficulties lead to open problems concerning the location, initiation and crack propagation. The thesis explores two ways of improving methods of numerical simulation of crack propagation. The first possibility of improvement is the use of the extended finite element method, XFEM. A modeling of mechanical behavior of crack is introduced and leads to a description of crack propagation from one element to another. The second possibility is based on damage mechanics. As part of the modeling of damage generalized standard type, the localization phenomenon has been studied numerically for various behaviors: viscous or damage fragile. These behaviors are described in the same spirit that the laws of the visco-elastic or visco-plasticity or plasticity classics, from a general thermodynamic interpretation. In particular, the laws gradient of damage are also considered in conjunction with recent results from the literature. It is well known that a gradient model for interpreting the effects of scale structures under mechanical loading. It also plays an interesting role in the effects of strain localization. (author)

  12. Mechanical factors affecting reliability of pressure components (fatigue, cracking)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebey, J.; Garnier, C.; Roche, R.; Barrachin, B.

    1978-01-01

    The reliability of a pressure component can be seriously affected by the formation and development of cracks. The experimental studies presented in this paper are devoted to three different aspects of crack propagation phenomena which have been relatively little described. In close connection with safety analyses of PWR, the authors study the influence of the environment by carrying out fatigue tests with samples bathed in hot pressurized water. Ferritic, austenitic and Incolloy 800 steels were used and the results are presented in the form of fatigue curves in the oligocyclic region. The second part of the paper relates to crack initiation cirteria in ductile steels weakened by notches. The CT samples used make it possible to study almost all types of fracture (ductile, intermediate and brittle). The use of two criteria based on the load limit and on the toughness of the material constitutes a practical way of evaluating crack propagation conditions. A series of tests carried out on notched spherical vessels of different size shows that large vessels are relatively brittle; fast unstable fracture is observed as size increases. Crack growth rate in PWR primary circuits (3/6 steel) is studied on piping elements (0.25 scale) subjected to cyclic stress variations (285 0 C and with pressure varying between 1 and 160 bar in each cycle). By calculating the stress intensity factor, correlation with results obtained in the laboratory on CT samples is possible. (author)

  13. The Reflective Cracking in Flexible Pavements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pais Jorge

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Reflective cracking is a major concern for engineers facing the problem of road maintenance and rehabilitation. The problem appears due to the presence of cracks in the old pavement layers that propagate into the pavement overlay layer when traffic load passes over the cracks and due to the temperature variation. The stress concentration in the overlay just above the existing cracks is responsible for the appearance and crack propagation throughout the overlay. The analysis of the reflective cracking phenomenon is usually made by numerical modeling simulating the presence of cracks in the existing pavement and the stress concentration in the crack tip is assessed to predict either the cracking propagation rate or the expected fatigue life of the overlay. Numerical modeling to study reflective cracking is made by simulating one crack in the existing pavement and the loading is usually applied considering the shear mode of crack opening. Sometimes the simulation considers the mode I of crack opening, mainly when temperature effects are predominant.

  14. Recent advances in modelling creep crack growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riedel, H.

    1988-08-01

    At the time of the previous International Conference on Fracture, the C* integral had long been recognized as a promising load parameter for correlating crack growth rates in creep-ductile materials. The measured crack growth rates as a function of C* and of the temperature could be understood on the basis of micromechanical models. The distinction between C*-controlled and K I -controlled creep crack growth had been clarified and first attempts had been made to describe creep crack growth in the transient regime between elastic behavior and steady-state creep. This paper describes the progress in describing transient crack growth including the effect of primary creep. The effect of crack-tip geometry changes by blunting and by crack growth on the crack-tip fields and on the validity of C* is analyzed by idealizing the growing-crack geometry by a sharp notch and using recent solutions for the notch-tip fields. A few new three-dimensional calculations of C* are cited and important theoretical points are emphasized regarding the three-dimensional fields at crack tips. Finally, creep crack growth is described by continuum-damage models for which similarity solutions can be obtained. Crack growth under small-scale creep conditions turns out to be difficult to understand. Slightly different models yield very different crack growth rates. (orig.) With 4 figs

  15. Non-linear vibrations of cracked structures: application to turbine rotors; Vibrations non-lineaires des structures fissurees: application aux rotors de turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Arem, S.

    2006-01-15

    The aim of this work is to study the dynamic response of a cracked rotor to establish some possibilities for early on line crack detection. First, a review on experimental, numerical and analytical works on the dynamics of cracked rotors is given. Then, an original method of calculating the behavior of a cracked beam section in bending with shearing effects is presented. The nonlinear behavior relations are derived from a three-dimensional model taking into account the unilateral contact conditions on the crack's lips. Based on an energy formulation, this method could be applied to any geometry of crack. The exploration by different numerical integration methods of the vibratory response of some models of cracked rotors is presented in the third chapter of this thesis. The un-cracked parts of a rotor are represented by elements of bar or beam type, and the cracked section by a nonlinear spring taking into account the breathing mechanism of the cracks. At the end of this part, an original method of construction of a finite element of a cracked beam is presented. The final chapter is devoted to the analytical study of the system with 2 degrees of freedom. The breathing mechanism of the crack is taken into account by considering specific periodic variation of the global stiffness of the system. The differential equations system is solved using the harmonic balance method. The linear stability of the periodic solutions is studied by the Floquet theory. Some vibratory parameters are proposed as crack indicators. (author)

  16. Top-down cracking of rigid pavements constructed with fast setting hydraulic cement concrete

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Heath, AC

    2009-01-29

    Full Text Available Jointed plain concrete pavement (JPCP) test sections were constructed using fast setting hydrualic cement concrete (FSHCC) as part of the California accelerated pavement testing program (CAL/APT). Many of the longer slabs cracked under environmental...

  17. Cracking hydrocarbon oils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seigle, A A.F.M.

    1922-12-20

    Hydrocarbon oils such as petroleum, peat, shale, or lignite oils, heavy tars, resin oils, naphthalene oils, etc., are vaporized by being fed from a tank through a preheater to the lower part of a vertical annular retort heated by a flame projected down the central cavity from a burner. The oil vapors rise through annular passages formed by disks, on which are placed chips of copper, iron, aluminum, etc., to act as catalysts.

  18. Influence of surface defects on the fatigue crack initiation in pearlitic steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toribio Jesús

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Tensile fatigue tests were performed under load control, with constant stress range Δσ on pearlitic steel wires, from the hot rolled bar to the commercial prestressing steel wire (which has undergone seven cold drawing steps. Results show that fatigue cracks in pearlitic steels initiate at the wire surface starting from small defects, whose size decreases with the drawing process. Fatigue cracks created from defects (initiation phase exhibit a fractographic appearance consisting of ductile microtearing events which can be classified as tearing topography surface or TTS, and exhibit a remarkably lower spacing in the prestressing steel wire than in the hot rolled bar. In addition, some S-N tests were performed in both material forms under a stress range of about half the yield strength. In these tests, the main part of the fatigue life corresponds to the propagation stage in the hot rolled bar whereas such a main part of the life is associated with the initiation stage in the case of the prestressing steel wire.

  19. Factors Influencing Dwell Fatigue Cracking in Notches of Powder Metallurgy Superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabb, T. P.; Telesman, J.; Ghosn, L.; Garg, A.; Gayda, J.

    2011-01-01

    The influences of heat treatment and cyclic dwells on the notch fatigue resistance of powder metallurgy disk superalloys were investigated for low solvus high refractory (LSHR) and ME3 disk alloys. Disks were processed to produce material conditions with varied microstructures and associated mechanical properties. Notched specimens were first subjected to baseline dwell fatigue cycles having a dwell at maximum load, as well as tensile, stress relaxation, creep rupture, and dwell fatigue crack growth tests at 704 C. Several material heat treatments displayed a bimodal distribution of fatigue life with the lives varying by two orders-of-magnitude, while others had more consistent fatigue lives. This response was compared to other mechanical properties, in search of correlations. The wide scatter in baseline dwell fatigue life was observed only for material conditions resistant to stress relaxation. For selected materials and conditions, additional tests were then performed with the dwells shifted in part or in total to minimum tensile load. The tests performed with dwells at minimum load exhibited lower fatigue lives than max dwell tests, and also exhibited early crack initiation and a substantial increase in the number of initiation sites. These results could be explained in part by modeling evolution of peak stresses in the notch with continued dwell fatigue cycling. Fatigue-environment interactions were determined to limit life for the fatigue cycles with dwells.

  20. Anxiety symptoms in crack cocaine and inhalant users admitted to a psychiatric hospital in southern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubaran, Carlos; Foresti, Katia; Thorell, Mariana Rossi; Franceschini, Paulo Roberto

    2013-01-01

    The occurrence of psychiatric comorbidity among individuals with crack or inhalant dependence is frequently observed. The objective of this study was to investigate anxiety symptoms among crack cocaine and inhalant users in southern Brazil. The study investigated two groups of volunteers of equal size (n=50): one group consisted of crack cocaine users, and the other group consisted of inhalant users. Research volunteers completed the Portuguese versions of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HAM-A), and Self-Report Questionnaire (SRQ). Both crack and inhalant users experience significant symptoms of anxiety. Inhalant users presented significantly more anxiety symptoms than crack users according to the HAM-A questionnaire only. In contrast to the results of the HAM-A, the STAI failed to demonstrate a significant difference between the two groups of substance users. SRQ scores revealed that crack and inhalants users had significant degrees of morbidity. A significant difference regarding anxiety symptomatology, especially state anxiety, was observed among inhalant and crack users. Anxiety and overall mental psychopathology were significantly correlated in this sample. The results indicate that screening initiatives to detect anxiety and additional psychiatric comorbidities among crack and inhalant users are feasible and relevant. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  1. On multiple crack detection in beam structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moradi, Shapour; Kargozarfard, Mohammad [Shahid Chamran University, Ahvaz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-01-15

    This study presents an inverse procedure to identify multiple cracks in beams using an evolutionary algorithm. By considering the crack detection procedure as an optimization problem, an objective function can be constructed based on the change of the eigenfrequencies and some strain energy parameters. Each crack is modeled by a rotational spring. The changes in natural frequencies due to the presence of the cracks are related to a damage index vector. Then, the bees algorithm, a swarm-based evolutionary optimization technique, is used to optimize the objective function and find the damage index vector, whose positive components show the number and position of the cracks. A second objective function is also optimized to find the crack depths. Several experimental studies on cracked cantilever beams are conducted to ensure the integrity of the proposed method. The results show that the number of cracks as well as their sizes and locations can be predicted well through this method.

  2. 3D experimental and numerical study of fatigue of a slanted crack path in a thin sheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esnault, Jean-Baptiste

    2014-01-01

    Propagation of fatigue cracks in 7075-T6 aluminum and S355 steel were experimentally characterized in air and in a corrosive solution in a CCP specimen. A technique of crack front marking, coupled with a 3D topographic reconstruction of the crack, allowed to characterize the three-dimensional crack path and the crack growth rate at any point of the crack front. Transverse and longitudinal profiles at different propagation stages were used to calculate the twist and tilt angle. In an elastic XFEM framework, stress intensity factors I, II and III, were calculated. While the correlation of experimental crack growth rate with ΔKI is unsatisfactory, the correlation is correct with ΔKeq emphasizing the major contribution of shear modes to the crack driving force. A finite element analysis in elasto plasticity coupled with the application of a local fatigue criterion, which depend on the equivalent plastic strain ahead of the crack front, was qualitatively able to predict the shear lips growth. A modification of the XFEM method is proposed to improve computations with cyclic plasticity. This part is based on an analytical study which suggests to replace the discontinuous 'Heaviside' enrichment by a new continuous enrichment in the elements cut by the crack. The sub-division of the elements cut by the crack, inducing a field projection of the internal variables which introduces an error in the numerical computations, is thus avoided. Convergence test cases show the potentiality of this method. (author)

  3. Investigation on the Causes of Cracking in Earth Dams (Case study: Mahmood-Abad Earth Dam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Rahimi

    2016-09-01

    river base beneath the dam structure. In fact , this layer has not been considered in the analysis as well in design. Because of fully saturated condition of this layer in an operation period of dam it might subjected to liquefaction during the happening of the earthquake. Evaluation of liquefaction potential of this layer based on Seed and Idriss (1971 diagram showed probability of this phenomenon. To prove this hypothesis, the stability analysis had been conducted in two different conditions by including the thin sandy layer and without considering the mentioned layer. The analysis showed in the case of absence of sandy layer the required safety factor was satisfied, but including the sandy layer leads cause the safety factor dropped to 0.84 that means accruing of liquefaction in the thin layer would lead to structural instability of the studied dam. The simulation of the behavior of dam by employing the accrued earthquake acceleration confirmed the liquefaction has been accrued in the thin sandy layer. The results of finite element simulation showed the depth of the cracks on the crest is about 2 meters and also the upstream slope has slipped about 81 mm to the reservoir of the dam. These results was consistent with the observed values. To overcome the next risks, also to repair the damaged parts of the dam, 3 different methods had been proposed. The curing technics was deploying of the reservoir and removing of the damage part of the dam and as well the thin sandy layer and reconstructed that part of dam, Deploying of reservoir of the dam and adjusting the slope of the upper shoulder to stable condition and at least repairing the developed cracks by injecting cement slurry and tolerate the current condition without imposition any additional costs to the project. The third method has been selected, but for any probable risky condition monitoring of the dam has been advised. Conclusion: Based on the overall results of the investigations, it was concluded that cracking

  4. The analysis of cracked structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidson, I.

    1974-01-01

    A brief review of the general problem of stable crack systems in many classes of structures, notably reinforced concrete structures, is made. Very simple methods of analysis are derived and some elaboration is described, as well as methods of optimising the calculations. Analytical methods are compared with experiments

  5. Cracks in functionally graded materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahr, H.-A.; Balke, H.; Fett, T.; Hofinger, I.; Kirchhoff, G.; Munz, D.; Neubrand, A.; Semenov, A.S.; Weiss, H.-J.; Yang, Y.Y.

    2003-01-01

    The weight function method is described to analyze the crack growth behavior in functionally graded materials and in particular materials with a rising crack growth resistance curve. Further, failure of graded thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) under cyclic surface heating by laser irradiation is modeled on the basis of fracture mechanics. The damage of both graded and non-graded TBCs is found to develop in several distinct stages: vertical cracking→delamination→blistering→spalling. This sequence can be understood as an effect of progressive shrinkage due to sintering and high-temperature creep during thermal cycling, which increases the energy-release rate for vertical cracks which subsequently turn into delamination cracks. The results of finite element modeling, taking into account the TBC damage mechanisms, are compatible with experimental data. An increase of interface fracture toughness due to grading and a decrease due to ageing have been measured in a four-point bending test modified by a stiffening layer. Correlation with the damage observed in cyclic heating is discussed. It is explained in which way grading is able to reduce the damage

  6. Severity parameters for steam cracking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Golombok, M.; Bijl, J.L.M.; Kornegoor, M.

    2001-01-01

    There are several ways to measure severity in steam cracking which are all a function of residence time, temperature, and pressure. Many measures of severity are not practicable for experimental purposes. Our experimental study shows that methane make is the best measure of severity because it is an

  7. Steam hydrocarbon cracking and reforming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Golombok, M.

    2004-01-01

    Many industrial chemical processes are taught as distinct contrasting reactions when in fact the unifying comparisons are greater than the contrasts. We examine steam hydrocarbon reforming and steam hydrocarbon cracking as an example of two processes that operate under different chemical reactivity

  8. Petrochemical promoters in catalytic cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez, Maria; Vargas, Clemencia; Lizcano, Javier

    2010-01-01

    This study is based on the current scheme followed by a refinery with available Catalytic Cracking capacity to process new feedstocks such as Straight Run Naphtha and Naphthas from FCC. These feedstocks are of petrochemical interest to produce Ethane, Ethylene, Propylene, i-Butane, Toluene and Xylene. To evaluate the potential of these new streams versus the Cracking-charged Residues, it was performed a detailed chemical analysis on the structural groups in carbons [C1-C12] at the reactor product obtained in pilot plant. A catalyst with and without Propylene Promoter Additive was used. This study analyzes the differences in the chemical composition of the feedstocks, relating them to the yield of each petrochemical product. Straight Run Naphthas with a high content of Naphthenes, and Paraffines n[C5-C12] and i[C7-C12] are selective to the production of i-Butane and Propane, while Naphthas from FCC with a high content of n[C5-C12]Olefins, i-Olefins, and Aromatics are more selective to Propylene, Toluene, and Xylene. Concerning Catalytic Cracking of Naphthas, the Additive has similar selectivity for all the petrochemical products, their yields increase by about one point with 4%wt of Additive, while in cracking of Residues, the Additive increases in three points Propylene yield, corresponding to a selectivity of 50% (?C3= / ?LPG).

  9. Cracking Down on Bribery

    OpenAIRE

    Banuri, Sheheryar; Eckel, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Do crackdowns on bribery impact corrupt behavior in the long run? In this paper we observe the long-run impact of a short-term punishment institution (i.e., a crackdown) on bribery behavior in a lab setting. We conduct lab experiments in two countries with cultures that differ in corruption norms, and which experience very different levels of bribery: the US and Pakistan. Bribery is implemented in the laboratory as a repeated three-player sequential game, consisting of a firm, a government of...

  10. Fatigue crack growth in fiber reinforced plastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandell, J. F.

    1979-01-01

    Fatigue crack growth in fiber composites occurs by such complex modes as to frustrate efforts at developing comprehensive theories and models. Under certain loading conditions and with certain types of reinforcement, simpler modes of fatigue crack growth are observed. These modes are more amenable to modeling efforts, and the fatigue crack growth rate can be predicted in some cases. Thus, a formula for prediction of ligamented mode fatigue crack growth rate is available.

  11. Dynamic photoelastic investigation of crack arrest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irwin, G.R.; Dally, J.W.; Kobayashi, T.; Fourney, W.L.

    1977-01-01

    Crack arrest and crack arrest toughness are of great interest, particularly for studies pertaining to safety of nuclear reactor pressure vessels. Investigations are needed in which the instantaneous values of stress intensity factor (K) can be observed during crack propagation and arrest. Such observations are possible if the test specimens are made from plates of a transparent photoelastic sensitive material. Values of K as a function of crack speed are shown for Homalite 100 and various epoxy blends. 9 figures

  12. Crack Propagation by Finite Element Method

    OpenAIRE

    H. Ricardo, Luiz Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Crack propagation simulation began with the development of the finite element method; the analyses were conducted to obtain a basic understanding of the crack growth. Today structural and materials engineers develop structures and materials properties using this technique. The aim of this paper is to verify the effect of different crack propagation rates in determination of crack opening and closing stress of an ASTM specimen under a standard suspension spectrum loading from FD&E SAE Keyh...

  13. Correction to the crack extension direction in numerical modelling of mixed mode crack paths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lucht, Tore; Aliabadi, M.H.

    2007-01-01

    In order to avoid introduction of an error when a local crack-growth criterion is used in an incremental crack growth formulation, each straight crack extension would have to be infinitesimal or have its direction corrected. In this paper a new procedure to correct the crack extension direction...

  14. Fatigue crack growth from a cracked elastic particle into a ductile matrix

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groh, S.; Olarnrithinun, S.; Curtin, W. A.; Needleman, A.; Deshpande, V. S.; Van der Giessen, E.

    2008-01-01

    The monotonic and cyclic crack growth rate of cracks is strongly influenced by the microstructure. Here, the growth of cracks emanating from pre-cracked micron-scale elastic particles and growing into single crystals is investigated, with a focus on the effects of (i) plastic confinement due to the

  15. Fatigue crack growth rate studies on pipes and pipe welds made of austenitic stainless steel and carbon steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arora, Punit; Singh, P.K.; Bhasin, Vivek; Vaze, K.K.; Pukazhendhi, D.M.; Gandhi, P.; Raghava, G.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the present study is to understand the fatigue crack growth behavior in austenitic stainless steel and carbon steel pipes and pipe welds by carrying out analysis/predictions and experiments. The Paris law has been used for the prediction of fatigue crack growth life. To carry out the analysis, Paris constants have been determined for pipe (base) and pipe weld materials by using Compact Tension (CT)/Three Point Bend (TPB) specimens machined from the actual pipe/pipe weld. Analyses have been carried out to predict the fatigue crack growth life of pipes/pipe welds having part through cracks on the outer surface. In the analyses, Stress Intensity Factors (K) have been evaluated through two different schemes. The first scheme considers the 'K' evaluations at two points of the crack front i.e. maximum crack depth and crack tip at the outer surface. The second scheme accounts for the area averaged root mean square stress intensity factor (K RMS ) at deepest and surface points. In order to validate the analytical procedure/results, experiments have been carried out on full scale pipe and pipe welds with part through circumferential crack. Fatigue crack growth life evaluated using both schemes have been compared with experimental results. Use of stress intensity factor (K RMS ) evaluated using second scheme gives better fatigue crack growth life prediction compared to that of first scheme. (author)

  16. Assessment of cracking in dissimilar metal welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenssen, Anders; Norrgaard, K.; Lagerstroem, J.; Embring, G.; Tice, D.R.

    2001-08-01

    During the refueling in 2000, indications were observed by non-destructive testing at four locations in the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) nozzle to safe end weld in Ringhals 4. All indications were confined to the outlet nozzle (hotleg) oriented at 25 deg, a nozzle with documented repair welding. Six boat samples were removed from the four locations, and the samples were subsequently subjected to a metallographic examination. The objectives were to establish the fracture morphology, and if possible the root cause for cracking. The examination revealed that cracks were present at all four boat sample locations and that they all were confined to the weld metal, alloy 182. Cracking extended in the axial direction of the safe-end. There was no evidence of any cracks extending into the RPV-steel, or the stainless steel safe-end. All cracking was interdendritic and significantly branched. Among others, these observations strongly suggested crack propagation mainly was caused by interdendritic stress corrosion cracking. In addition, crack type defects and isolated areas on the fracture surfaces suggested the presence of hot cracking, which would have been formed during fabrication. The reason for crack initiation could not be established based on the boat samples examined. However, increased stress levels due to repair welding, cold work from grinding, and defects produced during fabrication, e. g. hot cracks, may alone or in combination have contributed to crack initiation

  17. Solidification cracking in austenitic stainless steel welds

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M. Senthilkumar (Newgen Imaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    Hot cracking in stainless steel welds is caused by low-melting eutectics containing impurities such as S, ... Total crack length (TCL), used extensively in hot cracking assessment, exhibits greater variability due to ... behaviour appear to be complex and the mechanisms thereof are not completely under- stood. Development of ...

  18. Universal Shapes formed by Interacting Cracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fender, Melissa; Lechenault, Frederic; Daniels, Karen

    2011-03-01

    Brittle failure through multiple cracks occurs in a wide variety of contexts, from microscopic failures in dental enamel and cleaved silicon to geological faults and planetary ice crusts. In each of these situations, with complicated curvature and stress geometries, pairwise interactions between approaching cracks nonetheless produce characteristically curved fracture paths known in the geologic literature as en passant cracks. While the fragmentation of solids via many interacting cracks has seen wide investigation, less attention has been paid to the details of individual crack-crack interactions. We investigate the origins of this widely observed crack pattern using a rectangular elastic plate which is notched on each long side and then subjected to quasistatic uniaxial strain from the short side. The two cracks propagate along approximately straight paths until the pass each other, after which they curve and release a lenticular fragment. We find that, for materials with diverse mechanical properties, the shape of this fragment has an aspect ratio of 2:1, with the length scale set by the initial cracks offset s and the time scale set by the ratio of s to the pulling velocity. The cracks have a universal square root shape, which we understand by using a simple geometric model and the crack-crack interaction.

  19. Problems of procedure for studying crack resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babak, A.V.; Uskov, E.I.

    1984-01-01

    Procedures are developed for studying crack resistance in sintered hot-worked tungsten within 20-2200 deg C. Certain structural properties of the installation for studying high-temperature crack resistance of tungsten are considered. Technological peculiarities of eccentric tensile strength of tungsten specimens and methodical peculiarities of initjation and fixation of initial cracks in specimens of different tungsten alloys are studied

  20. Consistency in multi-viewpoint architectural design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkman, R.M.; Dijkman, Remco Matthijs

    2006-01-01

    This thesis presents a framework that aids in preserving consistency in multi-viewpoint designs. In a multi-viewpoint design each stakeholder constructs his own design part. We call each stakeholder’s design part the view of that stakeholder. To construct his view, a stakeholder has a viewpoint.

  1. Crack Coalescence in Molded Gypsum and Carrara Marble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, N.; Einstein, H. H.

    2007-12-01

    This research investigates the fracturing and coalescence behavior in prismatic laboratory-molded gypsum and Carrara marble specimens, which consist of either one or two pre-existing open flaws, under uniaxial compression. The tests are monitored by a high speed video system with a frame rate up to 24,000 frames/second. It allows one to precisely observe the cracking mechanisms, in particular if shear or tensile fracturing takes place. Seven crack types and nine crack coalescence categories are identified. The flaw inclination angle, the ligament length and the bridging angle between two flaws have different extents of influence on the coalescence patterns. For coplanar flaws, as the flaw inclination angle increases, there is a general trend of variation from shear coalescence to tensile coalescence. For stepped flaws, as the bridging angle changes from negative to small positive, and further up to large positive values, the coalescence generally progresses from categories of no coalescence, indirect coalescence to direct coalescence. For direct coalescence, it generally progresses from shear, mixed shear-tensile to tensile as the bridging angle increases. Some differences in fracturing and coalescence processes are observed in gypsum and marble, particularly the crack initiation in marble is preceded by the development of macroscopic white patches, but not in gypsum. Scanning Electron Microprobe (SEM) study reveals that the white patches consist of zones of microcracks (process zones).

  2. Delayed hydride cracking of zirconium alloy fuel cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-10-01

    This report describes the work performed in a coordinated research project on Hydrogen and Hydride Degradation of the Mechanical and Physical Properties of Zirconium Alloys. It is the second in the series. In 2005-2009 that work was extended within a new CRP called Delayed Hydride Cracking in Zirconium Alloy Fuel Cladding. The project consisted of adding hydrogen to samples of Zircaloy-4 claddings representing light water reactors (LWRs), CANDU and Atucha, and measuring the rates of delayed hydride cracking (DHC) under specified conditions. The project was overseen by a supervisory group of experts in the field who provided advice and assistance to participants as required. All of the research work undertaken as part of the CRP is described in this report, which includes details of the experimental procedures that led to a consistent set of data for LWR cladding. The participants and many of their co-workers in the laboratories involved in the CRP contributed results and material used in this report, which compiles the results, their analysis, discussions of their interpretation and conclusions and recommendations for future work. The research was coordinated by an advisor and by representatives in three laboratories in industrialized Member States. Besides the basic goal to transfer the technology of the testing technique from an experienced laboratory to those unfamiliar with the methods, the CRP was set up to harmonize the experimental procedures to produce consistent sets of data, both within a single laboratory and between different laboratories. From the first part of this project it was demonstrated that by following a standard set of experimental protocols, consistent results could be obtained. Thus, experimental vagaries were minimized by careful attention to detail of microstructure, temperature history and stress state in the samples. The underlying idea for the test programme was set out at the end of the first part of the project on pressure tubes. The

  3. Nano-cracks in a synthetic graphite composite for nuclear applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dong; Cherns, David

    2018-05-01

    Mrozowski nano-cracks in nuclear graphite were studied by transmission electron microscopy and selected area diffraction. The material consisted of single crystal platelets typically 1-2 nm thick and stacked with large relative rotations around the c-axis; individual platelets had both hexagonal and cubic stacking order. The lattice spacing of the (0002) planes was about 3% larger at the platelet boundaries which were the source of a high fraction of the nano-cracks. Tilting experiments demonstrated that these cracks were empty, and not, as often suggested, filled by amorphous material. In addition to conventional Mrozowski cracks, a new type of nano-crack is reported, which originates from the termination of a graphite platelet due to crystallographic requirements. Both types are crucial to understanding the evolution of macro-scale graphite properties with neutron irradiation.

  4. Delayed hydride cracking: theoretical model testing to predict cracking velocity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mieza, Juan I.; Vigna, Gustavo L.; Domizzi, Gladys

    2009-01-01

    Pressure tubes from Candu nuclear reactors as any other component manufactured with Zr alloys are prone to delayed hydride cracking. That is why it is important to be able to predict the cracking velocity during the component lifetime from parameters easy to be measured, such as: hydrogen concentration, mechanical and microstructural properties. Two of the theoretical models reported in literature to calculate the DHC velocity were chosen and combined, and using the appropriate variables allowed a comparison with experimental results of samples from Zr-2.5 Nb tubes with different mechanical and structural properties. In addition, velocities measured by other authors in irradiated materials could be reproduced using the model described above. (author)

  5. Comparison of thermal cracking and hydro-cracking yield distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero, S.; Sayles, S. [KBC Advanced Technologies Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

    2009-07-01

    Operators of bitumen upgraders are faced with the challenge of obtaining maximum performance from existing equipment whose performance is already pushed to the limits. The main constraint is the primary upgrader processes, notably coking and hydrocracking. Under the current economic conditions, funding for new equipment is difficult. However, changes can be made to optimize unit performance by better understanding the basic kinetics in thermal cracking and hydrocracking. This paper reviewed the yield distribution differences between thermal cracking and hydrocracking to provide insight into the basic components of operational changes. The objective was to compare yields, product quality distributions and the elemental balances. The opportunities to increase production and improve performance were then analyzed quantitatively within the existing unit equipment limits. tabs., figs.

  6. Experimental investigation of flawed pipes with respect to fracture behavior and development of crack opening area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoppler, W [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Staatliche Materialpruefungsanstalt

    1993-12-31

    The critical length of a longitudinal through-wall flaw, defined as that causing rupture, was first determined hydro-statically on large experimental vessels under internal pressure; the leak before rupture diagram for the base material of the vessel is established by experiment and calculation; it gives a limit between the two modes of failure, leakage or rupture (catastrophic failure), depending on slit length and loading conditions. Tests under pneumatic pressure were then carried out to investigate crack arrest, with notched discs made of a brittle material welded in the cylindrical part of the vessel, and cracks triggered by means of a small charged ignited over the notch. In the case of discs of a diameter smaller than the critical slit length, crack arrest occurred when the crack entered the tough material, while a disc corresponding to the critical crack length of the vessel led to rupture. 5 refs., 16 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Fractographic Observations on the Mechanism of Fatigue Crack Growth in Aluminium Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alderliesten, R. C.; Schijve, J.; Krkoska, M.

    Special load histories are adopted to obtain information about the behavior of the moving crack tip during the increasing and decreasing part of a load cycle. It is associated with the crack opening and closure of the crack tip. Secondly, modern SEM techniques are applied for observations on the morphology of the fractures surfaces of a fatigue crack. Information about the cross section profiles of striations are obtained. Corresponding locations of the upper and the lower fracture surface are also explored in view of the crack extension mechanism. Most experiments are carried out on sheet specimens of aluminum alloys 2024-T3, but 7050-T7451 specimens are also tested in view of a different ductility of the two alloys.

  8. The use of COD and plastic instability in crack propagation and arrest in shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdogan, F.; Ratwani, M.

    1974-01-01

    The initiation, growth, and possible arrest of fracture in cylindrical shells containing initial defects are dealt with. For those defects which may be approximated by a part-through semi-elliptic surface crack which is sufficiently shallow so that part of the net ligament in the plane of the crack is still elastic, the existing flat plate solution is modified to take into account the shell curvature effect as well as the effect of the thickness and the small scale plastic deformations. The problem of large defects is then considered under the assumptions that the defect may be approximated by a relatively deep meridional part-through surface crack and the net ligament through the shell wall is fully yielded. The results given are based on an 8th order bending theory of shallow shells using a conventional plastic strip model to account for the plastic deformations around the crack border.

  9. Stress Corrosion Cracking and Fatigue Crack Growth Studies Pertinent to Spacecraft and Booster Pressure Vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, L. R.; Finger, R. W.

    1972-01-01

    This experimental program was divided into two parts. The first part evaluated stress corrosion cracking in 2219-T87 aluminum and 5Al-2.5Sn (ELI) titanium alloy plate and weld metal. Both uniform height double cantilever beam and surface flawed specimens were tested in environments normally encountered during the fabrication and operation of pressure vessels in spacecraft and booster systems. The second part studied compatibility of material-environment combinations suitable for high energy upper stage propulsion systems. Surface flawed specimens having thicknesses representative of minimum gage fuel and oxidizer tanks were tested. Titanium alloys 5Al-2.5Sn (ELI), 6Al-4V annealed, and 6Al-4V STA were tested in both liquid and gaseous methane. Aluminum alloy 2219 in the T87 and T6E46 condition was tested in fluorine, a fluorine-oxygen mixture, and methane. Results were evaluated using modified linear elastic fracture mechanics parameters.

  10. Analysis of crack opening stresses for center- and edge-crack tension specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong Di-Hua

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Accurate determination of crack opening stress is of central importance to fatigue crack growth analysis and life prediction based on the crack-closure model. This paper studies the crack opening behavior for center- and edge-crack tension specimens. It is found that the crack opening stress is affected by the crack tip element. By taking the crack tip element into account, a modified crack opening stress equation is given for the center-crack tension specimen. Crack surface displacement equations for an edge crack in a semi-infinite plate under remote uniform tension and partially distributed pressure are derived by using the weight function method. Based on these displacements, a crack opening stress equation for an edge crack in a semi-infinite plate under uniform tension has been developed. The study shows that the crack opening stress is geometry-dependent, and the weight function method provides an effective and reliable tool to deal with such geometry dependence.

  11. Acquisition of Inertia by a Moving Crack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Tamar; Livne, Ariel; Fineberg, Jay

    2010-03-01

    We experimentally investigate the dynamics of “simple” tensile cracks. Within an effectively infinite medium, a crack’s dynamics perfectly correspond to inertialess behavior predicted by linear elastic fracture mechanics. Once a crack interacts with waves that it generated at earlier times, this description breaks down. Cracks then acquire inertia and sluggishly accelerate. Crack inertia increases with crack speed v and diverges as v approaches its limiting value. We show that these dynamics are in excellent accord with an equation of motion derived in the limit of an infinite strip [M. Marder, Phys. Rev. Lett. 66, 2484 (1991)PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.66.2484].

  12. Factors controlling nitrate cracking of mild steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donovan, J.A.

    1977-01-01

    Nitrite and hydroxide ions inhibit the growth of nitrate stress corrosion cracks in mild steel. Crack growth measurements showed that sufficient concentrations of nitrite and hydroxide ions can prevent crack growth; however, insufficient concentrations of these ions did not influence the Stage II growth rate or the threshold stress intensity, but extended the initiation time. Stage III growth was discontinuous. Oxide formed in the grain boundaries ahead of the crack tip and oxide dissolution (Stage II) and fracture (Stage III) are the proposed mechanisms of nitrate stress corrosion crack growth

  13. Crack Propagation by Finite Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Carlos H. Ricardo

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Crack propagation simulation began with the development of the finite element method; the analyses were conducted to obtain a basic understanding of the crack growth. Today structural and materials engineers develop structures and materials properties using this technique. The aim of this paper is to verify the effect of different crack propagation rates in determination of crack opening and closing stress of an ASTM specimen under a standard suspension spectrum loading from FDandE SAE Keyhole Specimen Test Load Histories by finite element analysis. To understand the crack propagation processes under variable amplitude loading, retardation effects are observed

  14. Growth model for large branched three-dimensional hydraulic crack system in gas or oil shale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chau, Viet T.

    2016-01-01

    Recent analysis of gas outflow histories at wellheads shows that the hydraulic crack spacing must be of the order of 0.1 m (rather than 1 m or 10 m). Consequently, the existing models, limited to one or several cracks, are unrealistic. The reality is 105–106 almost vertical hydraulic cracks per fracking stage. Here, we study the growth of two intersecting near-orthogonal systems of parallel hydraulic cracks spaced at 0.1 m, preferably following pre-existing rock joints. One key idea is that, to model lateral cracks branching from a primary crack wall, crack pressurization, by viscous Poiseuille-type flow, of compressible (proppant-laden) frac water must be complemented with the pressurization of a sufficient volume of micropores and microcracks by Darcy-type water diffusion into the shale, to generate tension along existing crack walls, overcoming the strength limit of the cohesive-crack or crack-band model. A second key idea is that enforcing the equilibrium of stresses in cracks, pores and water, with the generation of tension in the solid phase, requires a new three-phase medium concept, which is transitional between Biot’s two-phase medium and Terzaghi’s effective stress and introduces the loading of the solid by pressure gradients of diffusing pore water. A computer program, combining finite elements for deformation and fracture with volume elements for water flow, is developed to validate the new model. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Energy and the subsurface’. PMID:27597791

  15. Analysis of weld solidification cracking in cast nickel aluminide alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santella, M.L.; Feng, Z.

    1995-01-01

    A study of the response of several nickel aluminide alloys to SigmaJig testing was done to examine their weld solidification cracking behavior and the effect of Zr concentration. The alloys were based on the Ni-8Al-7.7Cr-1.5Mo-0.003B wt% composition and contained Zr concentrations of 3, 4.5, and 6 wt%. Vacuum induction melted ingots with a diameter of 2.7 in and weight about 18 lb were made of each alloy, and were used to make 2 x 2 x 0.030 in specimens for the Sigmajig test. The gas tungsten arc welds were made at travel speeds of 10, 20, and 30 ipm with heat inputs of 2--2.5 kJ/in. When an arc was established before traveling onto the test specimen centerline cracking was always observed. This problem was overcome by initiating the arc directly on the specimens. Using this approach, the 3 wt% Zr alloy withstood an applied stress of 24 ksi without cracking at a welding speed of 10 ipm. This alloy cracked at 4 ksi applied at 20 ipm, and with no applied load at 30 ipm. Only limited testing was done on the remaining alloys, but the results indicate that resistance to solidification cracking increases with Zr concentration. Zirconium has limited solid solubility and segregates strongly to interdendritic regions during solidification where it forms a Ni solid solution-Ni 5 Zr eutectic. The volume fraction of the eutectic increases with Zr concentration. The solidification cracking behavior of these alloys is consistent with phenomenological theory, and is discussed in this context. The results from SigmaJig testing are analyzed using finite element modeling of the development of mechanical strains during solidification of welds. Experimental data from the test substantially agree with recent analysis results

  16. Environmentally assisted cracking of LWR materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopra, O.K.; Chung, H.M.; Kassner, T.F.; Shack, W.J.

    1995-12-01

    Research on environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) of light water reactor materials has focused on (a) fatigue initiation in pressure vessel and piping steels, (b) crack growth in cast duplex and austenitic stainless steels (SSs), (c) irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of austenitic SSs, and (d) EAC in high- nickel alloys. The effect of strain rate during different portions of the loading cycle on fatigue life of carbon and low-alloy steels in 289 degree C water was determined. Crack growth studies on wrought and cast SSs have been completed. The effect of dissolved-oxygen concentration in high-purity water on IASCC of irradiated Type 304 SS was investigated and trace elements in the steel that increase susceptibility to intergranular cracking were identified. Preliminary results were obtained on crack growth rates of high-nickel alloys in water that contains a wide range of dissolved oxygen and hydrogen concentrations at 289 and 320 degree C. The program on Environmentally Assisted Cracking of Light Water Reactor Materials is currently focused on four tasks: fatigue initiation in pressure vessel and piping steels, fatigue and environmentally assisted crack growth in cast duplex and austenitic SS, irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking of austenitic SSs, and environmentally assisted crack growth in high-nickel alloys. Measurements of corrosion-fatigue crack growth rates (CGRs) of wrought and cast stainless steels has been essentially completed. Recent progress in these areas is outlined in the following sections

  17. Finite element simulation for creep crack growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyazaki, Noriyuki; Sasaki, Toru; Nakagaki, Michihiko; Brust, F.W.

    1992-01-01

    A finite element method was applied to a generation phase simulation of creep crack growth. Experimental data on creep crack growth in a 1Cr-1Mo-1/4V steel compact tension specimen were numerically simulated using a node-release technique and the variations of various fracture mechanics parameters such as CTOA, J, C * and T * during creep crack growth were calculated. The path-dependencies of the integral parameters J, C * and T * were also obtained to examine whether or not they could characterize the stress field near the tip of a crack propagating under creep condition. The following conclusions were obtained from the present analysis. (1) The J integral shows strong path-dependency during creep crack growth, so that it is does not characterize creep crack growth. (2) The C * integral shows path-dependency to some extent during creep crack growth even in the case of Norton type steady state creep law. Strictly speaking, we cannot use it as a fracture mechanics parameter characterizing creep crack growth. It is, however, useful from the practical viewpoint because it correlates well the rate of creep crack growth. (3) The T * integral shows good path-independency during creep crack growth. Therefore, it is a candidate for a fracture mechanics parameter characterizing creep crack growth. (author)

  18. Causes of Early Age Cracking on Concrete Bridge Deck Expansion Joint Repair Sections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jared R. Wright

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cracking of newly placed binary Portland cement-slag concrete adjacent to bridge deck expansion dam replacements has been observed on several newly rehabilitated sections of bridge decks. This paper investigates the causes of cracking by assessing the concrete mixtures specified for bridge deck rehabilitation projects, as well as reviewing the structural design of decks and the construction and curing methods implemented by the contractors. The work consists of (1 a comprehensive literature review of the causes of cracking on bridge decks, (2 a review of previous bridge deck rehabilitation projects that experienced early-age cracking along with construction observations of active deck rehabilitation projects, and (3 an experimental evaluation of the two most commonly used bridge deck concrete mixtures. Based on the literature review, the causes of concrete bridge deck cracking can be classified into three categories: concrete material properties, construction practices, and structural design factors. The most likely causes of the observed early-age cracking were found to be inadequate curing and failure to properly eliminate the risk of plastic shrinkage cracking. These results underscore the significance of proper moist curing methods for concrete bridge decks, including repair sections. This document also provides a blueprint for future researchers to investigate early-age cracking of concrete structures.

  19. Fractal and multifractal approaches for the analysis of crack-size dependent scaling laws in fatigue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paggi, Marco [Politecnico di Torino, Department of Structural Engineering and Geotechnics, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy)], E-mail: marco.paggi@polito.it; Carpinteri, Alberto [Politecnico di Torino, Department of Structural Engineering and Geotechnics, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy)

    2009-05-15

    The enhanced ability to detect and measure very short cracks, along with a great interest in applying fracture mechanics formulae to smaller and smaller crack sizes, has pointed out the so-called anomalous behavior of short cracks with respect to their longer counterparts. The crack-size dependencies of both the fatigue threshold and the Paris' constant C are only two notable examples of these anomalous scaling laws. In this framework, a unified theoretical model seems to be missing and the behavior of short cracks can still be considered as an open problem. In this paper, we propose a critical reexamination of the fractal models for the analysis of crack-size effects in fatigue. The limitations of each model are put into evidence and removed. At the end, a new generalized theory based on fractal geometry is proposed, which permits to consistently interpret the short crack-related anomalous scaling laws within a unified theoretical formulation. Finally, this approach is herein used to interpret relevant experimental data related to the crack-size dependence of the fatigue threshold in metals.

  20. Fractal and multifractal approaches for the analysis of crack-size dependent scaling laws in fatigue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paggi, Marco; Carpinteri, Alberto

    2009-01-01

    The enhanced ability to detect and measure very short cracks, along with a great interest in applying fracture mechanics formulae to smaller and smaller crack sizes, has pointed out the so-called anomalous behavior of short cracks with respect to their longer counterparts. The crack-size dependencies of both the fatigue threshold and the Paris' constant C are only two notable examples of these anomalous scaling laws. In this framework, a unified theoretical model seems to be missing and the behavior of short cracks can still be considered as an open problem. In this paper, we propose a critical reexamination of the fractal models for the analysis of crack-size effects in fatigue. The limitations of each model are put into evidence and removed. At the end, a new generalized theory based on fractal geometry is proposed, which permits to consistently interpret the short crack-related anomalous scaling laws within a unified theoretical formulation. Finally, this approach is herein used to interpret relevant experimental data related to the crack-size dependence of the fatigue threshold in metals.

  1. Current results for the NRC's short cracks in piping and piping welds research program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkowski, G.; Krishnaswamy, P. Brust, F.; Francini, R.; Ghadiali, N.; Kilinski, T.; Marschall, C.; Rahman, S.; Rosenfield, A.; Scott, P.

    1994-01-01

    The overall objective of the Short Cracks in Piping and Piping Welds Program is to verify and improve engineering analyses to predict the fracture behavior of circumferentially cracked pipe under quasi-static loading with particular attention to crack lengths typically used in LBB or flaw evaluation criteria. The program consists of 8 technical tasks as listed below. Task 1 Short through-wall-cracked (TWC) pipe evaluations. Task 2 Short surface-cracked pipe evaluations. Task 3 Bi-metallic weld crack evaluations. Task 4 Dynamic strain aging and crack instabilities. Task 5 Fracture evaluations of anisotropic pipe. Task 6 Crack-opening-area evaluations. Task 7 NRCPIPE Code improvements. Task 8 Additional efforts. Since the last WRSM meeting several additional tasks have been initiated in this program. These are discussed in Task 8. Based on results to date, the first seven tasks have also been modified as deemed necessary. The most significant accomplishments in each of these tasks since the last WRSIM meeting are discussed below. The details of all the results presented here are published in the semiannual reports from this program

  2. A FEASIBILITY STUDY ON USE OF GENERIC MOBILE LASER SCANNING SYSTEM FOR DETECTING ASPHALT PAVEMENT CRACKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Chen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to automatically detect pavement cracks on urban roads by employing the 3D point clouds acquired by a mobile laser scanning (MLS system. Our method consists of four steps: ground point filtering, high-pass convolution, matched filtering, and noise removal. First, a voxel-based upward growing method is applied to construct Digital Terrain Model (DTM of the road surface. Then, a high-pass filter convolutes the DTM to detect local elevation changes that may embed cracking information. Next, a two-step matched filter is applied to extract crack features. Lastly, a noise removal process is conducted to refine the results. Instead of using MLS intensity, this study takes advantages of the MLS elevation information to perform automated crack detection from large-volume, mixed-density, unstructured MLS point clouds. Four types of cracks including longitudinal, transvers, random, and alligator cracks are detected. Our results demonstrated that the proposed method works well with the RIEGL VMX-450 point clouds and can detect cracks in moderate-to-severe severity (13 - 25 mm within a 200 m by 30 m urban road segment located in Kingston, Ontario, at one time. Due to the resolution capability, small cracks with slight severity remain unclear in the MLS point cloud.

  3. The conservatism of the net-section stress procedure for predicting the failure of cracked piping systems: The effect of crack location on the degree of conservatism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, E.

    1993-01-01

    Interest in the integrity of cracked piping systems fabricated from ductile materials has been motivated, in large part, by the technological problem of intergranular stress corrosion cracking of Type 304 stainless steel piping in boiling water nuclear reactor piping systems. The failure of cracked steel piping is often predicted by assuming that failure conforms to a net-section stress criterion using as input an appropriate value for the critical net-section stress together with a knowledge of the anticipated loadings. The stresses at the cracked section are usually calculated via a purely elastic analysis based on the piping being uncracked. However because the piping is built-in at the ends into a larger component, and since the onset of crack extension requires some plastic deformation, use of the net-section stress approach can give overly conservative failure predictions. An earlier paper has quantified the extent of this conservatism, and has shown how it depends on the material ductility and the elastic flexibility of a piping system. Using the results of analyses for simple model systems, the present paper shows that, for the same cracked section geometry, the degree of conservatism is markedly influenced by the location of the cracked section within the system

  4. Numerical modeling and experimental validation of seismic uplift pressure variations in cracked concrete dams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Javanmardi, F.; Leger, P. [Ecole Polytechnique, Montreal, PQ (Canada). Dept. of Civil, Mining and Geological Engineering; Tinawi, R. [Quebec Univ., Montreal, PQ (Canada)

    2004-07-01

    Concrete dams could sustain cracking and damage during maximum design earthquakes (MDE). Dam safety guidelines are established so that dams maintain a stable condition following MDE oscillatory motions. In this study, a theoretical model was developed to calculate the uplift pressure variations along concrete cracks with moving walls. The proposed model was verified using experimental crack test data. The model was applied in a finite element computer program for dynamic analysis of gravity dams considering hydro-mechanical water-crack coupling. An analysis of a typical 90 metre dam subjected to low and high frequency sinusoidal accelerations demonstrated that water can penetrate into part of a seismically initiated crack. Pressure tends to develop in a region close to the crack mouth, therefore detrimental effects for the global dam stability are unlikely to occur. The study showed that the seismic uplift force during the heel crack opening mode is small compared to the dam weight. This preliminary study suggests that the critical sliding safety factors (SSF) of the dam against downstream sliding could be computed by considering zero uplift pressure in the crack region subjected to tensile opening. 14 refs., 1 tab., 7 figs.

  5. Analysis of Crack Propagation Path on the Anisotropic Bi-Material Rock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao-Shi Chen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a single-domain boundary element method (SDBEM for linear elastic fracture mechanics analysis in the 2D anisotropic bimaterial. In this formulation, the displacement integral equation is collocated on the uncracked boundary only, and the traction integral equation is collocated on one side of the crack surface only. The complete fundamental solution (Green's function for anisotropic bi-materials was also derived and implemented into the boundary integral formulation so the discretization along the interface can be avoided except for the interfacial crack part. A special crack-tip element was introduced to capture exactly the crack-tip behavior. A computer program with the FORTRAN code has been developed to effectively calculate the stress intensity factors, crack initiation angle, and propagation path of an anisotropic bi-material. This SDBEM program has been verified having a good accuracy with the previous researches. In addition, a rock of type (1/(2 disk specimen with a central crack was made to conduct the Brazilian test under diametrical loading. The result shows that the numerical analysis can predict relatively well the direction of crack initiation and the path of crack propagation.

  6. An investigation into the change of shape of fatigue cracks initiated at surface flaws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Portch, D.J.

    1979-09-01

    Surface fatigue cracks found in plant can often be closely approximated in shape by a semi-ellipse. The stress intensity factor range at the deepest part of the surface crack is dependent upon a number of variables, including the crack aspect ratio. In fatigue life analysis, the aspect ratio of a propagating crack is frequently assumed to remain constant, possibly due to the complexity of estimating aspect ratio change on the basis of linear elastic fracture mechanics. This report describes the results of an experimental programme to examine the change of shape of fatigue cracks subjected to uniaxial tensile or bending stresses. The data obtained has been used to modify equations proposed by the author in a previous report to predict the change of aspect ratio of a crack propagating from a known defect. These modified equations, although not including terms to account for the effects of varying mean stress levels or material properties, generally give a good agreement with published experimental results. Crack propagation rate data obtained from the tensile fatigue tests has been used to estimate crack tip stress intensity factors. These are compared with values calculated from published solutions using both the constant geometry assumption and also the shape change equations proposed in this report. Use of these equations gives improved agreement with experiment in most cases. (author)

  7. Experimental Investigation on Centrifugal Compressor Blade Crack Classification Using the Squared Envelope Spectrum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuefeng Zhang

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Centrifugal compressors are a key piece of equipment for modern production. Among the components of the centrifugal compressor, the impeller is a pivotal part as it is used to transform kinetic energy into pressure energy. Blade crack condition monitoring and classification has been broadly investigated in the industrial and academic area. In this research, a pressure pulsation (PP sensor arranged in close vicinity to the crack area and the corresponding casing vibration signals are used to monitor blade crack information. As these signals cannot directly demonstrate the blade crack, the method employed in this research is based on the extraction of weak signal characteristics that are induced by blade cracking. A method for blade crack classification based on the signals monitored by using a squared envelope spectrum (SES is presented. Experimental investigations on blade crack classification are carried out to verify the effectiveness of this method. The results show that it is an effective tool for blade crack classification in centrifugal compressors.

  8. Nonlocal Effects of Crack Curving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-07-01

    close vTcinity of the crack tip. Supported by the Office of Naval Research. 2 For brittle solids, a fracture criterion based on the maximum tensile...Reidel Pubi. Co. Dordrecht. Holland. pp. 271-318, 1978. [13] A.S. Jayatilaka, Fracture of Engineering Brittle Materials, Appl. Sci. Publishers, London...Crescent leach Road, Glen Cove * Long Island, New Tork 11542 Commanding Officer (2) U.s Amy Research Office PO, Sax 12211 Research Triangle Park. C 27709 8

  9. Hydrogen-induced cracking: 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puls, M.P.

    1984-12-01

    There is a strong motivation for understanding the factors controlling zirconium hydride reorientation under stress because of the important role this plays in hydrogen-induced crack growth and/or crack initiation in zirconium and its alloys, particularly under thermal cycling conditions. Following an approach developed by Sauthoff, an analysis of the orienting effect of external stress on the nucleation, growth and coarsening of γ- and delta-zirconium hydride precipitates in zirconium and its alloys is presented. The analysis is based on a previous theoretical study of some of the factors affecting hydride solubility in stressed and unstressed solids. Expressions are derived for the effect of stress on nucleation, growth and coarsening. We conclude, on the basis of these that the preferential orientation of hydride precipitates under stress is most efficient during the nucleation stage. The reason for this is that the overall driving force for nucleation, for the chosen parameters and the usual experimental conditions, is fairly small. Therefore, the driving force for orientating under stress can be a substantial fraction of the overall driving force. The analysis shows that hydride growth is unlikely to play a role in preferential orientation, but coarsening could be important under carefully chosen experimental conditions, which may be relevant to the hydride-cracking process

  10. The Growth of Small Corrosion Fatigue Cracks in Alloy 7075

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piascik, Robert S.

    2015-01-01

    The corrosion fatigue crack growth characteristics of small (greater than 35 micrometers) surface and corner cracks in aluminum alloy 7075 is established. The early stage of crack growth is studied by performing in situ long focal length microscope (500×) crack length measurements in laboratory air and 1% sodium chloride (NaCl) environments. To quantify the "small crack effect" in the corrosive environment, the corrosion fatigue crack propagation behavior of small cracks is compared to long through-the-thickness cracks grown under identical experimental conditions. In salt water, long crack constant K(sub max) growth rates are similar to small crack da/dN.

  11. Quarter elliptical crack growth using three dimensional finite element method and crack closure technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gozin, Mohammad-Hosein; Aghaie-Khafri, Mehrdad [K. N. Toosi University of Technology, Tehran (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-15

    Shape evolution of a quarter-elliptical crack emanating from a hole is studied. Three dimensional elastic-plastic finite element analysis of the fatigue crack closure was considered and the stress intensity factor was calculated based on the duplicated elastic model at each crack tip node. The crack front node was advanced proportional to the imposed effective stress intensity factor. Remeshing was applied at each step of the crack growth and solution mapping algorithm was considered. Crack growth retardation at free surfaces was successfully observed. A MATLAB-ABAQUS interference code was developed for the first time to perform crack growth on the basis of crack closure. Simulation results indicated that crack shape is sensitive to the remeshing strategy. Predictions based on the proposed models were in good agreement with Carlson's experiments results.

  12. Crack propagation in teeth: a comparison of perimortem and postmortem behavior of dental materials and cracks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Cris E; White, Crystal A

    2009-03-01

    This study presents a new method for understanding postmortem heat-induced crack propagation patterns in teeth. The results demonstrate that patterns of postmortem heat-induced crack propagation differ from perimortem and antemortem trauma-induced crack propagation patterns. Dental material of the postmortem tooth undergoes dehydration leading to a shrinking and more brittle dentin material and a weaker dentin-enamel junction. Dentin intertubule tensile stresses are amplified by the presence of the pulp cavity, and initiates crack propagation from the internal dentin, through the dentin-enamel junction and lastly the enamel. In contrast, in vivo perimortem and antemortem trauma-induced crack propagation initiates cracking from the external surface of the enamel toward the dentin-enamel junction where the majority of the energy of the crack is dissipated, eliminating the crack's progress into the dentin. These unique patterns of crack propagation can be used to differentiate postmortem taphonomy-induced damage from antemortem and perimortem trauma in teeth.

  13. Vibration based algorithm for crack detection in cantilever beam containing two different types of cracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behzad, Mehdi; Ghadami, Amin; Maghsoodi, Ameneh; Michael Hale, Jack

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, a simple method for detection of multiple edge cracks in Euler-Bernoulli beams having two different types of cracks is presented based on energy equations. Each crack is modeled as a massless rotational spring using Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics (LEFM) theory, and a relationship among natural frequencies, crack locations and stiffness of equivalent springs is demonstrated. In the procedure, for detection of m cracks in a beam, 3m equations and natural frequencies of healthy and cracked beam in two different directions are needed as input to the algorithm. The main accomplishment of the presented algorithm is the capability to detect the location, severity and type of each crack in a multi-cracked beam. Concise and simple calculations along with accuracy are other advantages of this method. A number of numerical examples for cantilever beams including one and two cracks are presented to validate the method.

  14. Mathematical and computational analyses of cracking formation fracture morphology and its evolution in engineering materials and structures

    CERN Document Server

    Sumi, Yoichi

    2014-01-01

    This book is about the pattern formation and the evolution of crack propagation in engineering materials and structures, bridging mathematical analyses of cracks based on singular integral equations, to computational simulation of engineering design. The first two parts of this book focus on elasticity and fracture and provide the basis for discussions on fracture morphology and its numerical simulation, which may lead to a simulation-based fracture control in engineering structures. Several design concepts are discussed for the prevention of fatigue and fracture in engineering structures, including safe-life design, fail-safe design, damage tolerant design. After starting with basic elasticity and fracture theories in parts one and two, this book focuses on the fracture morphology that develops due to the propagation of brittle cracks or fatigue cracks.   In part three, the mathematical analysis of a curved crack is precisely described, based on the perturbation method. The stability theory of interactive ...

  15. Crack Features and Shear-Wave Splitting Associated with Fracture Extension during Hydraulic Stimulation of the Geothermal Reservoir in Soultz-sous-Forêts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adelinet M.

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The recent tomography results obtained within the scope of the Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS European Soultz project led us to revisit the meso-fracturing properties of Soultz test site. In this paper, we develop a novel approach coupling effective medium modeling and shear-wave splitting to characterize the evolution of crack properties throughout the hydraulic stimulation process. The stimulation experiment performed in 2000 consisted of 3 successive injection steps spanning over 6 days. An accurate 4-D tomographic image was first carried out based upon the travel-times measured for the induced seismicity [Calò M., Dorbath C., Cornet F.H., Cuenot N. (2011 Large-scale aseismic motion identified through 4-D P-wave tomography, Geophys. J. Int. 186, 1295-1314]. The current study shows how to take advantage of the resulting compressional wave (Calò et al., 2011 and shear-wave velocity models. These are given as input data to an anisotropic effective medium model and converted into crack properties. In short, the effective medium model aims to estimate the impact of cracks on velocities. It refers to a crack-free matrix and 2 families of penny-shaped cracks with orientations in agreement with the main observed geological features: North-South strike and dip of 65°East and 65°West [Genter A., Traineau H. (1996 Analysis of macroscopic fractures in granite in the HDR geothermal well EPS-1, Soultz-sous-Forêts, France, J. Vol. Geoth. Res. 72, 121-141], respectively. The resulting output data are the spatial distributions of crack features (lengths and apertures within the 3-D geological formation. We point out that a flow rate increase results in a crack shortening in the area imaged by both compressional and shear waves, especially in the upper part of the reservoir. Conversely, the crack length, estimated during continuous injection rate phases, is higher than during the increasing injection rate phases. A possible explanation for this is that

  16. 40 CFR Table 13 to Subpart Uuu of... - Continuous Compliance With Organic HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic Cracking Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Continuous Compliance With Organic HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic Cracking Units 13 Table 13 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of... HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic Cracking Units As stated in § 63.1565(c)(1), you shall meet each...

  17. 40 CFR Table 10 to Subpart Uuu of... - Continuous Monitoring Systems for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Continuous Monitoring Systems for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units 10 Table 10 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of... Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units As stated in § 63.1565(b)(1), you shall meet each...

  18. 40 CFR Table 12 to Subpart Uuu of... - Initial Compliance With Organic HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic Cracking Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Initial Compliance With Organic HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic Cracking Units 12 Table 12 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of... HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic Cracking Units As stated in § 63.1565(b)(4), you shall meet each...

  19. Application of acoustic emission to hydride cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagat, S.; Ambler, J.F.R.; Coleman, C.E.

    1986-07-01

    Acoustic emission has been used for over a decade to study delayed hydride cracking (DHC) in zirconium alloys. At first acoustic emission was used primarily to detect the onset of DHC. This was possible because DHC was accompanied by very little plastic deformation of the material and furthermore the amplitudes of the acoustic pulses produced during cracking of the brittle hydride phase were much larger than those from dislocation motion and twinning. Acoustic emission was also used for measuring crack growth when it was found that for a suitable amplitude threshold, the total number of acoustic emission counts was linearly related to the cracked area. Once the proportionality constant was established, the acoustic counts could be converted to the crack length. Now the proportionality between the count rate and the crack growth rate is used to provide feedback between the crack length and the applied load, using computer technology. In such a system, the stress at the crack tip can be maintained constant during the test by adjusting the applied load as the crack progresses, or it can be changed in a predetermined manner, for example, to measure the threshold stress for cracking

  20. Fatigue crack propagation behavior under creep conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohji, Kiyotsugu; Kubo, Shiro

    1991-01-01

    The crack propagation behavior of the SUS 304 stainless steel under creep-fatigue conditions was reviewed. Cracks propagated either in purely time-dependent mode or in purely cycle-dependent mode, depending on loading conditions. The time-dependent crack propagation rate was correlated with modified J-integral J * and the cycle-dependent crack propagation rate was correlated with J-integral range ΔJ f . Threshold was observed in the cycle-dependent crack propagation, and below this threshold the time-dependent crack propagation appeared. The crack propagation rates were uniquely characterized by taking the effective values of J * and ΔJ f , when crack closure was observed. Change in crack propagation mode occurred reversibly and was predicted by the competitive damage model. The threshold disappeared and the cycle-dependent crack propagation continued in a subthreshold region under variable amplitude conditions, where the threshold was interposed between the maximum and minimum ΔJ f . (orig.)

  1. Type IIIa cracking at 2CrMo welds in 1/2CrMoV pipework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brett, S.J.; Smith, P.A. [National Power plc, Swindon (United Kingdom)

    1998-12-31

    The most common form of in-service defect found today on the welds of National Power`s 1/2CrMoV pipework systems is Type IV cracking which occurs in intercritically transformed material at the edge of the heat affected zone. However an alternate form of cracking, termed IIIa, which occurs close to the weld fusion line in fully grain refined heat affected zones, has also been observed. The incidence of Type IIIa cracking has increased in recent years and these defects now constitute a significant part of the total recorded crack population. This presentation describes Type IIIa cracking and compares and contrasts it with the better documented Type IV cracking. Particular reference is made to the role of carbon diffusion at the weld fusion line in promoting Type IIIa damage in preference to Type IV. (orig.) 5 refs.

  2. Type IIIa cracking at 2CrMo welds in 1/2CrMoV pipework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brett, S J; Smith, P A [National Power plc, Swindon (United Kingdom)

    1999-12-31

    The most common form of in-service defect found today on the welds of National Power`s 1/2CrMoV pipework systems is Type IV cracking which occurs in intercritically transformed material at the edge of the heat affected zone. However an alternate form of cracking, termed IIIa, which occurs close to the weld fusion line in fully grain refined heat affected zones, has also been observed. The incidence of Type IIIa cracking has increased in recent years and these defects now constitute a significant part of the total recorded crack population. This presentation describes Type IIIa cracking and compares and contrasts it with the better documented Type IV cracking. Particular reference is made to the role of carbon diffusion at the weld fusion line in promoting Type IIIa damage in preference to Type IV. (orig.) 5 refs.

  3. Welding hot cracking in an austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerrouault, N.

    2001-01-01

    The occurrence of hot cracking is linked to several conditions, in particular, the composition of the material and the local strains due to clambering. The aim of this study is to better analyse the implied mechanisms and to lead to a local thermomechanical criterion for hot cracking. The example studied is an AISI 321-type stainless steel (X10CrNiTi18-12) strongly prone to cracking. Two weldability tests are studied: - the first one consists in carrying out a fusion line by the TIG process on a thin sheet. In the case of the defect occurrence, the crack is longitudinal and follows the back of the molten bath. The influence of the operating conditions welding (speed, welding heat input, width test sample) is studied. - the second one is the Varestraint test. It is widely used to evaluate the sensitivity of a material to hot cracking. It consists in loading the material by bending during a fusion line by the TIG process and in characterising the defects quantity (length, number). Various thermal and mechanical instrumentation methods were used. The possibilities of a local instrumentation instrumentation being limited because of the melting, the experimental results were complemented by a numerical modelling whose aim is to simulate the thermomechanical evolution of the loading thanks to the finite element analysis code ABAQUS. First, the heat input for thermal simulation is set by the use of an inverse method in order to optimise the energy deposit mode during welding in the calculation. Then, the mechanical simulation needs the input of a constitutive law that fits the mechanical behaviour over a wide temperature range from ambient to melting temperature. Thus, a mechanical characterization is performed by selecting strain values and strain rates representative of what the material undergoes during the tests. The results come from tensile and compressive tests and allow to settle an elasto-visco-plastic constitutive law over temperatures up to liquidus. Once

  4. Analysis of cracked pressure vessel nozzles by finite elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reynen, J.

    1975-01-01

    The paper describes various algorithms, their computer implementations and relative merits to define in an effective way strain energy release rates along the tip front of arbitrary 3D cracks under arbitrary load including thermal strains. These techniques are basically equivalent to substructuring techniques and consequently they can be implemented to any FEM program able to deal with the data handling problems of the substructuring technique. Special finite elements with a built-in stress-singularity are not necessary although their use contributes to accuracy and the mesh can be coarser. Examples are given carried out with a substructure version of the BERSAFE system. These examples include a corner crack in a pressure vessel nozzle loaded by internal pressure and by thermal stresses. Although not of any fundamental importance, in practice the difficulties consist in generating an appropriate mesh to represent the crack front. For the example of the corner crack in a nozzle the problem has been solved by developing a special purpose mesh generation program (EURCRACK)

  5. Asynchronous cracking with dissimilar paths in multilayer graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Bongkyun; Kim, Byungwoon; Kim, Jae-Hyun; Lee, Hak-Joo; Sumigawa, Takashi; Kitamura, Takayuki

    2017-11-16

    Multilayer graphene consists of a stack of single-atomic-thick monolayer graphene sheets bound with π-π interactions and is a fascinating model material opening up a new field of fracture mechanics. In this study, fracture behavior of single-crystalline multilayer graphene was investigated using an in situ mode I fracture test under a scanning electron microscope, and abnormal crack propagation in multilayer graphene was identified for the first time. The fracture toughness of graphene was determined from the measured load-displacement curves and the realistic finite element modelling of specimen geometries. Nonlinear fracture behavior of the multilayer graphene is discussed based on nonlinear elastic fracture mechanics. In situ scanning electron microscope images obtained during the fracture test showed asynchronous crack propagation along independent paths, causing interlayer shear stress and slippages. We also found that energy dissipation by interlayer slippages between the graphene layers is the reason for the enhanced fracture toughness of multilayer graphene. The asynchronous cracking with independent paths is a unique cracking and toughening mechanism for single-crystalline multilayer graphene, which is not observed for the monolayer graphene. This could provide a useful insight for the design and development of graphene-based composite materials for structural applications.

  6. Crack identification for rigid pavements using unmanned aerial vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahaddin Ersoz, Ahmet; Pekcan, Onur; Teke, Turker

    2017-09-01

    Pavement condition assessment is an essential piece of modern pavement management systems as rehabilitation strategies are planned based upon its outcomes. For proper evaluation of existing pavements, they must be continuously and effectively monitored using practical means. Conventionally, truck-based pavement monitoring systems have been in-use in assessing the remaining life of in-service pavements. Although such systems produce accurate results, their use can be expensive and data processing can be time consuming, which make them infeasible considering the demand for quick pavement evaluation. To overcome such problems, Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) can be used as an alternative as they are relatively cheaper and easier-to-use. In this study, we propose a UAV based pavement crack identification system for monitoring rigid pavements’ existing conditions. The system consists of recently introduced image processing algorithms used together with conventional machine learning techniques, both of which are used to perform detection of cracks on rigid pavements’ surface and their classification. Through image processing, the distinct features of labelled crack bodies are first obtained from the UAV based images and then used for training of a Support Vector Machine (SVM) model. The performance of the developed SVM model was assessed with a field study performed along a rigid pavement exposed to low traffic and serious temperature changes. Available cracks were classified using the UAV based system and obtained results indicate it ensures a good alternative solution for pavement monitoring applications.

  7. Fabrication and Performance Evaluation of a Thevetia Nut Cracking Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Odewole

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Thevetia seed contains about 64 percent of non-edible oil in its oily kernel and this oil can be used for various purposes such as biofuel and bio-oil; making of paints, insecticides, cosmetics, lubricants and cooling oil in electrical transformers. The cakes obtained after oil extraction are incorporated on the field as manure. In order to get quality oil kernels from the hard nuts, there is need to properly crack them; this process of cracking is still a great challenge. As result of the aforementioned problem, this work focused on the design, fabrication and performance evaluation of a thevetia nut cracking machine. The machine works based on the principle of attrition force. Some of the parts designed for were diameter of shaft (13 mm solid shaft and length of belt (A55, power required to operate the machine (2.5 hp, speed of operation (9.14 m/s and the appropriate dimension of angle iron bar of 45 mm × 45 mm × 3 mm was used for the structural support. The fabrication was done systematically followed by the performance evaluation of the machine. The result of the overall cracking efficiency and throughput capacity of the machine were evaluated to be 96.65 % and 510 g⁄min respectively.

  8. Studies on the disbonding initiation of interfacial cracks.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McAdams, Brian J. (Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA); Pearson, Raymond A. (Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA)

    2005-08-01

    With the continuing trend of decreasing feature sizes in flip-chip assemblies, the reliability tolerance to interfacial flaws is also decreasing. Small-scale disbonds will become more of a concern, pointing to the need for a better understanding of the initiation stage of interfacial delamination. With most accepted adhesion metric methodologies tailored to predict failure under the prior existence of a disbond, the study of the initiation phenomenon is open to development and standardization of new testing procedures. Traditional fracture mechanics approaches are not suitable, as the mathematics assume failure to originate at a disbond or crack tip. Disbond initiation is believed to first occur at free edges and corners, which act as high stress concentration sites and exhibit singular stresses similar to a crack tip, though less severe in intensity. As such, a 'fracture mechanics-like' approach may be employed which defines a material parameter--a critical stress intensity factor (K{sub c})--that can be used to predict when initiation of a disbond at an interface will occur. The factors affecting the adhesion of underfill/polyimide interfaces relevant to flip-chip assemblies were investigated in this study. The study consisted of two distinct parts: a comparison of the initiation and propagation phenomena and a comparison of the relationship between sub-critical and critical initiation of interfacial failure. The initiation of underfill interfacial failure was studied by characterizing failure at a free-edge with a critical stress intensity factor. In comparison with the interfacial fracture toughness testing, it was shown that a good correlation exists between the initiation and propagation of interfacial failures. Such a correlation justifies the continuing use of fracture mechanics to predict the reliability of flip-chip packages. The second aspect of the research involved fatigue testing of tensile butt joint specimens to determine lifetimes at sub

  9. Effects of δ-hydride precipitation at a crack tip on crack propagation in delayed hydride cracking of Zircaloy-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubo, T., E-mail: kubo@nfd.co.jp [Nippon Nuclear Fuel Development Co., Ltd., 2163 Narita-cho, Oarai-machi, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan); Kobayashi, Y. [M.O.X. Co., Ltd., 1828-520 Hirasu-cho, Mito, Ibaraki 311-0853 (Japan)

    2013-08-15

    Highlights: • Steady state crack velocity of delayed hydride cracking in Zircaloy-2 was analyzed. • A large stress peak is induced at an end of hydride by volume expansion of hydride. • Hydrogen diffuses to the stress peak, thereby accelerating steady hydride growth. • Crack velocity was estimated from the calculated hydrogen flux into the stress peak. • There was good agreement between calculation results and experimental data. -- Abstract: Delayed hydride cracking (DHC) of Zircaloy-2 is one possible mechanism for the failure of boiling water reactor fuel rods in ramp tests at high burnup. Analyses were made for hydrogen diffusion around a crack tip to estimate the crack velocity of DHC in zirconium alloys, placing importance on effects of precipitation of δ-hydride. The stress distribution around the crack tip is significantly altered by precipitation of hydride, which was strictly analyzed using a finite element computer code. Then, stress-driven hydrogen diffusion under the altered stress distribution was analyzed by a differential method. Overlapping of external stress and hydride precipitation at a crack tip induces two stress peaks; one at a crack tip and the other at the front end of the hydride precipitate. Since the latter is larger than the former, more hydrogen diffuses to the front end of the hydride precipitate, thereby accelerating hydride growth compared with that in the absence of the hydride. These results indicated that, after hydride was formed in front of the crack tip, it grew almost steadily accompanying the interaction of hydrogen diffusion, hydride growth and the stress alteration by hydride precipitation. Finally, crack velocity was estimated from the calculated hydrogen flux into the crack tip as a function of temperature, stress intensity factor and material strength. There was qualitatively good agreement between calculation results and experimental data.

  10. Stress intensity factors and weight functions for cracks in front of notches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fett, T.

    1993-12-01

    The knowledge of stress intensity factors for cracks at notch roots is important for the fracture mechanical treatment of real components. Stress intensity factor solutions are available only for special notches and externally applied loads. For the treatment of more complex loadings as thermal stresses near the notch root the weight function is needed in addition. In the first part of this report weight functions for cracks in front of internal notches are derived from stress intensity factor solutions under external loading available in the literature. The second part deals with cracks in front of edge notches. Limit cases of stress intensity factors are derived which allow to estimate stress intensity factors for cracks in front of internal elliptical notches with arbitrary aspect ratio of the ellipse and for external notches. (orig.) [de

  11. Enhancement of crack detection in stud bolts of nuclear reactor by ultrasonic signal processing technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.H.; Oh, W.D.; Choi, S.W.; Park, M.H.

    2004-01-01

    'Full-text:' The stud bolts is one of the most critical parts for safety of reactor vessels in the nuclear power plants. However, in the application of ultrasonic technique for crack detection in stud bolt, some difficulties encountered are classification of crack signal from the signals reflected from threads part in stud bolt. In this study, shadow effect technique combined with new signal processing method is Investigated to enhance the detectability of small crack initiated from root of thread in stud bolt. The key idea of signal processing is based on the fact that the shape of waveforms from the threads is uniform since the shape of the threads in a bolt is same. If some cracks exist in the thread, the flaw signals are different to the reference signals. It is demonstrated that the small flaws are efficiently detected by novel ultrasonic technique combined with this new signal processing concept. (author)

  12. Environmental stress cracking performance of polyether and PDMS-based polyurethanes in an in vitro oxidation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Genevieve; Padsalgikar, Ajay; Tkatchouk, Ekaterina; Jenney, Chris; Iacob, Ciprian; Runt, James

    2017-08-01

    Environmental stress cracking (ESC) was replicated in vitro on Optim™ (OPT) insulation, a polydimethylsiloxane-based polyurethane utilized clinically in cardiac leads, using a Zhao-type oxidation model. OPT performance was compared to that of two industry standard polyether urethanes: Pellethane ® 80A (P80A), and Pellethane ® 55D (P55D). Clinically relevant specimen configurations and strain states were utilized: low-voltage cardiac lead segments were held in a U-shape by placing them inside of vials. To study whether aging conditions impacted ESC formation, half of the samples were subjected to a pretreatment in human plasma for 7 days at 37°C; all samples were then aged in oxidative solutions containing 0.9% NaCl, 20% H 2 O 2 , and either 0 or 0.1M CoCl 2 , with or without glass wool for 72 days at 37°C. Visual and SEM inspection revealed significant surface cracking consistent with ESC on all P80A and P55D samples. Sixteen of twenty P80A and 10/20 P55D samples also exhibited breaches. Seven of 20 OPT samples exhibited shallow surface cracking consistent with ESC. ATR-FTIR confirmed surface changes consistent with oxidation for all materials. The number average molecular weight decreased an average of 31% for OPT, 86% for P80A, and 56% for P55D samples. OPT outperformed P80A and P55D in this Zhao-type in vitro ESC model. An aging solution of 0.9% NaCl, 20% H 2 O 2 , and 0.1M CoCl 2 , with glass wool provided the best combination of ESC replication and ease of use. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 105B: 1544-1558, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Crack turning in integrally stiffened aircraft structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettit, Richard Glen

    Current emphasis in the aircraft industry toward reducing manufacturing cost has created a renewed interest in integrally stiffened structures. Crack turning has been identified as an approach to improve the damage tolerance and fail-safety of this class of structures. A desired behavior is for skin cracks to turn before reaching a stiffener, instead of growing straight through. A crack in a pressurized fuselage encounters high T-stress as it nears the stiffener---a condition favorable to crack turning. Also, the tear resistance of aluminum alloys typically varies with crack orientation, a form of anisotropy that can influence the crack path. The present work addresses these issues with a study of crack turning in two-dimensions, including the effects of both T-stress and fracture anisotropy. Both effects are shown to have relation to the process zone size, an interaction that is central to this study. Following an introduction to the problem, the T-stress effect is studied for a slightly curved semi-infinite crack with a cohesive process zone, yielding a closed form expression for the future crack path in an infinite medium. For a given initial crack tip curvature and tensile T-stress, the crack path instability is found to increase with process zone size. Fracture orthotropy is treated using a simple function to interpolate between the two principal fracture resistance values in two-dimensions. An extension to three-dimensions interpolates between the six principal values of fracture resistance. Also discussed is the transition between mode I and mode II fracture in metals. For isotropic materials, there is evidence that the crack seeks out a direction of either local symmetry (pure mode I) or local asymmetry (pure mode II) growth. For orthotropic materials the favored states are not pure modal, and have mode mixity that is a function of crack orientation. Drawing upon these principles, two crack turning prediction approaches are extended to include fracture

  14. Crack blunting, cleavage fracture in transition area and stable crack growth - investigated using the nonlinear fracture mechanics method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heerens, J.

    1990-01-01

    A procedure is developed which allows to estimate crack tip blunting using the stress-strain curve of the material and the J-integral. The second part deals with cleavage fracture in a quenched and tempered pressure vessel steel. It was found that within the ductile to brittle transition regime the fracture toughness is controlled by cleavage initiated at 'weak spots of the material' and by the normal stresses at the weak spots. In the last part of the paper the influence of specimen size on J-, Jm- and δ 5 -R-curves for side grooved CT-specimens under fully plastic condition is investigated. In order to characterize constraint-effects the necking of the specimens was measured. For specimens having similar constraint the parameters Jm and δ 5 yielded size independent R-curves over substantial larger amounts of crack extension than the J-integral. (orig.) With 114 figs., 10 tabs [de

  15. On applicability of crack shape characterization rules for multiple in-plane surface cracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong Min; Choi, Suhn; Park, Keun Bae; Choi, Jae Boong; Huh, Nam Su

    2009-01-01

    The fracture mechanics assessment parameters, such as the elastic stress intensity factor and the elastic-plastic J-integral, for a surface crack can be significantly affected by adjacent cracks. Regarding such an interaction effect, the relative distance between adjacent cracks, crack aspect ratio and loading condition were known to be important factors for multiple cracks, which affects the fracture mechanics assessment parameters. Although several guidance (ASME Sec. XI, BS7910, British Energy R6 and API RP579) on a crack interaction effect (crack combination rule) have been proposed and used for assessing the interaction effect, each guidance provides different rules for combining multiple surface cracks into a single surface crack. Based on the systematic elastic and elastic-plastic finite element analyses, the present study investigated the acceptability of the crack combination rules provided in the existing guidance, and the relevant recommendations on a crack interaction for in-plane surface cracks in a plate were discussed. To quantify the interaction effect, the elastic stress intensity factor and elastic-plastic J-integral along the crack front were used. As for the loading condition, only axial tension was considered. As a result, BS7910 seems to provide the most relevant crack combination rule for in-plane dual surface cracks, whereas API RP579 provides the most conservative results. In particular, ASME Sec. XI still seems to have some room for a revision to shorten the critical distance between two adjacent cracks for a crack combination. The overall tendency of the elastic-plastic analyses results is identical to that of the elastic analyses results.

  16. Detecting cracks in aircraft engine fan blades using vibrothermography nondestructive evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Chunwang; Meeker, William Q.; Mayton, Donna

    2014-01-01

    Inspection is an important part of many maintenance processes, especially for safety-critical system components. This work was motivated by the need to develop more effective methods to detect cracks in rotating components of aircraft engines. This paper describes the analysis of data from vibrothermography inspections on aircraft engine turbine blades. Separate but similar analysis were done for two different purposes. In both analyses, we fit statistical models with random effects to describe the crack-to-crack variability and the effect that the experimental variables have on the responses. In the first analysis, the purpose of the study was to find vibrothermography equipment settings that will provide good crack detection capability over the population of similar cracks in the particular kind of aircraft engine turbine blades that were inspected. Then, the fitted model was used to determine the test conditions where the probability of detection (POD) is expected to be high and probability of alarm is expected to be low. In our second analysis, crack size information was added and a similar model was fit. This model provides an estimate of POD as a function of crack size for specified test conditions. This function is needed as an input to models for planning in-service inspection intervals. - Highlights: • Developed experimental design methods to optimize the inspection parameters for a vibrothermography inspection system. • Used mixed effects modeling to describe crack-to-crack variability. • Fit an extended model to provide estimates of the probability of detection as a function of crack length. • Investigated the coverage probability of confidence intervals for probability of detection

  17. Single fibre and multifibre unit cell analysis of strength and cracking of unidirectional composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, H.W.; Zhou, H.W.; Mishnaevsky, Leon

    2009-01-01

    damageable parts in composites (matrix cracks, fibre/matrix interface damage and fibre fracture) was observed in the simulations. The strength of interface begins to influence the deformation behaviour of the cell only after the fibre is broken. In this case, the higher interface layer strength leads...... to the higher stiffness of the damaged material. The damage in the composites begins by fibre breakage, which causes the interface damage, followed by matrix cracking....

  18. Crack formation and prevention in colloidal drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin Young; Cho, Kun; Ryu, Seul-A.; Kim, So Youn; Weon, Byung Mook

    2015-08-01

    Crack formation is a frequent result of residual stress release from colloidal films made by the evaporation of colloidal droplets containing nanoparticles. Crack prevention is a significant task in industrial applications such as painting and inkjet printing with colloidal nanoparticles. Here, we illustrate how colloidal drops evaporate and how crack generation is dependent on the particle size and initial volume fraction, through direct visualization of the individual colloids with confocal laser microscopy. To prevent crack formation, we suggest use of a versatile method to control the colloid-polymer interactions by mixing a nonadsorbing polymer with the colloidal suspension, which is known to drive gelation of the particles with short-range attraction. Gelation-driven crack prevention is a feasible and simple method to obtain crack-free, uniform coatings through drying-mediated assembly of colloidal nanoparticles.

  19. Online Bridge Crack Monitoring with Smart Film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benniu Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Smart film crack monitoring method, which can be used for detecting initiation, length, width, shape, location, and propagation of cracks on real bridges, is proposed. Firstly, the fabrication of the smart film is developed. Then the feasibility of the method is analyzed and verified by the mechanical sensing character of the smart film under the two conditions of normal strain and crack initiation. Meanwhile, the coupling interference between parallel enameled wires of the smart film is discussed, and then low-frequency detecting signal and the custom communication protocol are used to decrease interference. On this basis, crack monitoring system with smart film is designed, where the collected crack data is sent to the remote monitoring center and the cracks are simulated and recurred. Finally, the monitoring system is applied to six bridges, and the effects are discussed.

  20. Fluid structural response of axially cracked cylinders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garnich, M.R.; Simonen, F.A.

    1985-03-01

    The fluid structural (FS) response of a cylindrical pressure vessel to a suddenly occurring longitudinal through-wall crack is predicted. The effects of vessel internals and depressurization of the compressed water on dynamic crack opening displacements are investigated. A three dimensional (3D) structural finite element model is used as a basis for the development of a two dimensional (2D) FS model. A slice of the vessel taken at the crack midspan and normal to the cylinder axis is modeled. Crack opening displacements are compared between the 2D and 3D models, between the different assumptions about fluid depressurization, and between the static and dynamic solutions. The results show that effects of dynamic amplification associated with the sudden opening of the crack in the cylinder are largely offset by the local depressurization of the fluid adjacent to the crack

  1. Adaptive numerical modeling of dynamic crack propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adouani, H.; Tie, B.; Berdin, C.; Aubry, D.

    2006-01-01

    We propose an adaptive numerical strategy that aims at developing reliable and efficient numerical tools to model dynamic crack propagation and crack arrest. We use the cohesive zone theory as behavior of interface-type elements to model crack. Since the crack path is generally unknown beforehand, adaptive meshing is proposed to model the dynamic crack propagation. The dynamic study requires the development of specific solvers for time integration. As both geometry and finite element mesh of the studied structure evolve in time during transient analysis, the stability behavior of dynamic solver becomes a major concern. For this purpose, we use the space-time discontinuous Galerkin finite element method, well-known to provide a natural framework to manage meshes that evolve in time. As an important result, we prove that the space-time discontinuous Galerkin solver is unconditionally stable, when the dynamic crack propagation is modeled by the cohesive zone theory, which is highly non-linear. (authors)

  2. A probabilistic model of brittle crack formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudnovsky, A.; Kunin, B.

    1987-01-01

    Probability of a brittle crack formation in an elastic solid with fluctuating strength is considered. A set Omega of all possible crack trajectories reflecting the fluctuation of the strength field is introduced. The probability P(X) that crack penetration depth exceeds X is expressed as a functional integral over Omega of a conditional probability of the same event taking place along a particular path. Various techniques are considered to evaluate the integral. Under rather nonrestrictive assumptions, the integral is reduced to solving a diffusion-type equation. A new characteristic of fracture process, 'crack diffusion coefficient', is introduced. An illustrative example is then considered where the integration is reduced to solving an ordinary differential equation. The effect of the crack diffusion coefficient and of the magnitude of strength fluctuations on probability density of crack penetration depth is presented. Practical implications of the proposed model are discussed.

  3. Noncontact fatigue crack evaluation using thermoelastic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ji Min; An, Yun Kyu; Sohn, Hoon [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-12-15

    This paper proposes a noncontact thermography technique for fatigue crack evaluation under a cyclic tensile loading. The proposed technique identifies and localizes an invisible fatigue crack without scanning, thus making it possible to instantaneously evaluate an incipient fatigue crack. Based on a thermoelastic theory, a new fatigue crack evaluation algorithm is proposed for the fatigue crack tip localization. The performance of the proposed algorithm is experimentally validated. To achieve this, the cyclic tensile loading is applied to a dog bone shape aluminum specimen using a universal testing machine, and the corresponding thermal responses induced by thermoelastic effects are captured by an infrared camera. The test results confirm that the fatigue crack is well identified and localized by comparing with its microscopic images.

  4. Numerical Study of Corrosion Crack Opening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle; Frandsen, Henrik Lund; Svensson, Staffan

    2008-01-01

    is proportional. More recently, the constant of proportionality, the so-called crack-corrosion index, has been studied further with respect to its dependence on the diameter of the reinforcement and the concrete cover. In the present paper the above-mentioned work is presented and extended with more realistic 3D......-models of the cracked concrete beam. The crack-corrosion index is evaluated for a variation of different parameters, i.e. bar diameter, concrete cover, crack length and type of corrosion product. This paper is an extended version of a paper by Thoft-Christensen et al. (2005) presented at the IFIP WG 7.5 Conference...... for the corrosion crack opening. Experiments and theoretical analysis by a numerical method, FEM, support that the relation between the reduction of the reinforcement bar diameter due to corrosion and the corresponding increase in crack width for a given time interval, measured on the surface of a concrete specimen...

  5. A FIB/TEM study of butterfly crack formation and white etching area (WEA) microstructural changes under rolling contact fatigue in 100Cr6 bearing steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, M.-H.; Walker, J.C.; Ma, C.; Wang, L.; Wood, R.J.K.

    2013-01-01

    Butterflies are microscopic damage features forming at subsurface material imperfections induced during rolling contact fatigue (RCF) in rolling element bearings. Butterflies can lead to degradation of the load bearing capacity of the material by their associated cracks causing premature spalling failures. Recently, butterfly formation has been cited to be related to a premature failure mode in wind turbine gearbox bearings; white structure flaking (WSF). Butterflies consist of cracks with surrounding microstructural change called ‘white etching area’ (WEA) forming wings that revolve around their initiators. The formation mechanisms of butterflies in bearing steels have been studied over the last 50 years, but are still not fully understood. This paper presents a detailed microstructural analysis of a butterfly that has initiated from a void in standard 100Cr6 bearing steel under rolling contact fatigue on a laboratory two-roller test rig under transient operating conditions. Analysis was conducted using focused ion beam (FIB) tomography, 3D reconstruction and transmission electron microscopy (STEM/TEM) methods. FIB tomography revealed an extensive presence of voids/cavities immediately adjacent to the main crack on the non-WEA side and at the crack tip. This provides evidence for a void/cavity coalescence mechanism for the butterfly cracks formation. Spherical M 3 C carbide deformation and dissolution as part of the microstructural change in WEA were observed in both FIB and STEM/TEM analyses, where TEM analyses also revealed the formation of superfine nano-grains (3–15 nm diameter) intersecting a dissolving spherical M 3 C carbide. This is evidence of the early formation of nano-grains associated with the WEA formation mechanism

  6. A FIB/TEM study of butterfly crack formation and white etching area (WEA) microstructural changes under rolling contact fatigue in 100Cr6 bearing steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, M.-H., E-mail: martin.evans@soton.ac.uk [National Centre for Advanced Tribology at Southampton (nCATS), University of Southampton, SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Walker, J.C.; Ma, C.; Wang, L.; Wood, R.J.K. [National Centre for Advanced Tribology at Southampton (nCATS), University of Southampton, SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom)

    2013-05-15

    Butterflies are microscopic damage features forming at subsurface material imperfections induced during rolling contact fatigue (RCF) in rolling element bearings. Butterflies can lead to degradation of the load bearing capacity of the material by their associated cracks causing premature spalling failures. Recently, butterfly formation has been cited to be related to a premature failure mode in wind turbine gearbox bearings; white structure flaking (WSF). Butterflies consist of cracks with surrounding microstructural change called ‘white etching area’ (WEA) forming wings that revolve around their initiators. The formation mechanisms of butterflies in bearing steels have been studied over the last 50 years, but are still not fully understood. This paper presents a detailed microstructural analysis of a butterfly that has initiated from a void in standard 100Cr6 bearing steel under rolling contact fatigue on a laboratory two-roller test rig under transient operating conditions. Analysis was conducted using focused ion beam (FIB) tomography, 3D reconstruction and transmission electron microscopy (STEM/TEM) methods. FIB tomography revealed an extensive presence of voids/cavities immediately adjacent to the main crack on the non-WEA side and at the crack tip. This provides evidence for a void/cavity coalescence mechanism for the butterfly cracks formation. Spherical M{sub 3}C carbide deformation and dissolution as part of the microstructural change in WEA were observed in both FIB and STEM/TEM analyses, where TEM analyses also revealed the formation of superfine nano-grains (3–15 nm diameter) intersecting a dissolving spherical M{sub 3}C carbide. This is evidence of the early formation of nano-grains associated with the WEA formation mechanism.

  7. Energy analysis of crack-damage interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudnovsky, A.; Wu, Shaofu

    1989-01-01

    The energy release rates associated with a main crack propagating into a surrounding damage zone, and a damage zone translation relative to the main crack, as well as an energy of interaction between the two are analyzed. The displacement and stress fields for the crack-damage interaction problem are reconstructed employing a semi-empirical stress analysis and experimental evaluation of the average craze density in the crazed zone.

  8. Measuring Crack Length in Coarse Grain Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Jonathan A.; Ghosn, Louis J.

    2010-01-01

    Due to a coarse grain structure, crack lengths in precracked spinel specimens could not be measured optically, so the crack lengths and fracture toughness were estimated by strain gage measurements. An expression was developed via finite element analysis to correlate the measured strain with crack length in four-point flexure. The fracture toughness estimated by the strain gaged samples and another standardized method were in agreement.

  9. Outcome of Endodontically Treated Cracked Teeth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    directed by: CAPT Te!Ty Webb, D.D.S., M.S. A " cracked tooth" is defined as a thin surface enamel and dentin disruption of unknown depth, and is often...OUTCOME OF ENDODONTICALL Y TREATED CRACKED TEETH by David Michael Dow II, D.D.S. Lieutenant Commander, Dental Corps United States Navy A thesis...copyrighted material in the thesis manuscript titled: "Outcome ofEndodontically Treated Cracked Teeth" is appropriately acknowledged and, beyond

  10. Catalytic cracking of hydrocarbon oils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1940-09-12

    A process is described for the vapor phase catalytic cracking of hydrocarbon oils boiling substantially in the gas oil range. The reaction takes place in the presence of a solid catalyst between 700 to 900/sup 0/F under pressure between atmospheric and 400 psi. A gas containing between 20 and 90 mol % of free hydrogen is used. The reaction is allowed to proceed until consumption of the free begins. The reaction is discontinued at that point and the catalyst is regenerated for further use.

  11. Contribution to the determination of priority constructive influences on the hot crack initiation of welded components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gollnow, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The previous research results do not allow a general hot crack characterisation although a variety of experimental and numerical knowledge is available. The reason for this is mainly the large number of influencing factors that complicate a complete description of the hot cracking phenomenon and especially solidification cracking. The hot crack formation and thus the solidification crack initiation can be described by the interaction of process, metallurgy and design. However, the literature examination shows that in the solidifaction crack characterisation the influence of the design aspect is often underestimated. The pre-stresses of the structural components is up to now not considered as an essential cause for the formation of solidification cracks. The evaluation of the influence of the various parameters is presented partly inconsistent. In addition, the targeted presentation of the design influence with respect to the solidification cracks in the weld is because the limited transferability of the various component-specific stresses on a laboratory scale and thus to the respective hot cracking tests restricted. Hence, the difficulty to transfer the results between laboratory specimen and component as well as the general hot crack characterisation is given. In this work the different types of stresses from the component welding in the laboratory and to quantify experimentally the solidification crack critical values, displacements and displacement rates were detected. In this regard external loaded hot cracking tests were carried out by using the advantages of contactless measurement techniques close to the weld and to analyse the welding process with respect to various local and global design-specific factors influencing the formation of solidification cracks in high alloyed steel. These investigations were performed on austenitic (1.4828) and ferritic (1.4509) materials with different mechanical and technological properties. To reflect the praxis relevant

  12. T-stresses for internally cracked components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fett, T.

    1997-12-01

    The failure of cracked components is governed by the stresses in the vicinity of the crack tip. The singular stress contribution is characterised by the stress intensity factor K, the first regular stress term is represented by the so-called T-stress. T-stress solutions for components containing an internal crack were computed by application of the Bundary Collocation Method (BCM). The results are compiled in form of tables or approximative relations. In addition a Green's function of T-stresses is proposed for internal cracks which enables to compute T-stress terms for any given stress distribution in the uncracked body. (orig.) [de

  13. The detectability of cracks using sonic IR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morbidini, Marco; Cawley, Peter

    2009-05-01

    This paper proposes a methodology to study the detectability of fatigue cracks in metals using sonic IR (also known as thermosonics). The method relies on the validation of simple finite-element thermal models of the cracks and specimens in which the thermal loads have been defined by means of a priori measurement of the additional damping introduced in the specimens by each crack. This estimate of crack damping is used in conjunction with a local measurement of the vibration strain during ultrasonic excitation to retrieve the power released at the crack; these functions are then input to the thermal model of the specimens to find the resulting temperature rises (sonic IR signals). The method was validated on mild steel beams with two-dimensional cracks obtained in the low-cycle fatigue regime as well as nickel-based superalloy beams with three-dimensional "thumbnail" cracks generated in the high-cycle fatigue regime. The equivalent 40kHz strain necessary to obtain a desired temperature rise was calculated for cracks in the nickel superalloy set, and the detectability of cracks as a function of length in the range of 1-5mm was discussed.

  14. Semi-empirical crack tip analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudnovsky, A.; Ben Ouezdon, M.

    1988-01-01

    Experimentally observed crack opening displacements are employed as the solution of the multiple crack interaction problem. Then the near and far fields are reconstructed analytically by means of the double layer potential technqiue. Evaluation of the effective stress intensity factor resulting from the interaction of the main crack and its surrounding crazes in addition to the remotely applied load is presented as an illustrative example. It is shown that crazing (as well as microcracking) may constitute an alternative mechanism to Dugdale-Berenblatt models responsible for the cancellation of the singularity at the crack tip.

  15. On governing equations for crack layer propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudnovsky, A.; Botsis, J.

    1988-01-01

    Results of analysis on damage distribution of a crack layer, in a model material, supported the self-similarity hypothesis of damage evolution which has been adopted by the crack layer theory. On the basis of measurements of discontinuity density and the double layer potential technique, a solution to the crack damage interaction problem has been developed. Evaluation of the stress intensity factor illustrated the methodology. Analysis of experimental results showed that Arrhenius type constitutive relationship described very well the expansion of the active zone of a crack layer.

  16. An analysis for crack layer stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehanobish, K.; Botsis, J.; Moet, A.; Chudnovsky, A.

    1986-01-01

    The problem of uncontrolled crack propagation and crack arrest is considered with respect to crack layer (CL) translational stability. CL propagation is determined by the difference between the energy release rate and the amount of energy required for material transformation, and necessary and sufficient conditions for CL instability are derived. CL propagation in polystyrene is studied for two cases. For the case of remotely applied fixed load fatigue, the sufficient condition of instability is shown to be met before the necessary condition, and the necessary condition controls the stability. For the fixed displacement case, neither of the instability conditions are met, and CL propagation remains stable, resulting in crack arrest.

  17. On cracking of charged anisotropic polytropes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azam, M. [Division of Science and Technology, University of Education, Township Campus, Lahore-54590 (Pakistan); Mardan, S.A., E-mail: azam.math@ue.edu.pk, E-mail: syedalimardanazmi@yahoo.com [Department of Mathematics, University of the Management and Technology, C-II, Johar Town, Lahore-54590 (Pakistan)

    2017-01-01

    Recently in [1], the role of electromagnetic field on the cracking of spherical polytropes has been investigated without perturbing charge parameter explicitly. In this study, we have examined the occurrence of cracking of anisotropic spherical polytropes through perturbing parameters like anisotropic pressure, energy density and charge. We consider two different types of polytropes in this study. We discuss the occurrence of cracking in two different ways ( i ) by perturbing polytropic constant, anisotropy and charge parameter ( ii ) by perturbing polytropic index, anisotropy and charge parameter for each case. We conclude that cracking appears for a wide range of parameters in both cases. Also, our results are reduced to [2] in the absence of charge.

  18. Cracking of open traffic rigid pavement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niken Chatarina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The research is done by observing the growth of real structure cracking in Natar, Lampung, Indonesia compared to C. Niken’s et al research and literature study. The rigid pavement was done with open traffic system. There are two main crack types on Natar rigid pavement: cracks cross the road, and cracks spreads on rigid pavement surface. The observation of cracks was analyzed by analyzing material, casting, curing, loading and shrinkage mechanism. The relationship between these analysis and shrinkage mechanism was studied in concrete micro structure. Open traffic make hydration process occur under vibration; therefore, fresh concrete was compressed and tensioned alternately since beginning. High temperature together with compression, cement dissociation, the growth of Ca2+ at very early age leads abnormal swelling. No prevention from outside water movement leads hydration process occur with limited water which caused spreads fine cracks. Limited water improves shrinkage and plastic phase becomes shorter; therefore, rigid pavement can’t accommodate the abnormal swelling and shrinking alternately and creates the spread of cracks. Discontinuing casting the concrete makes both mix under different condition, the first is shrink and the second is swell and creates weak line on the border; so, the cracks appear as cracks across the road.

  19. Lateral rigidity of cracked concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castellani, A.; Chesi, C.

    1979-01-01

    Numerical results are discussed on the lateral rigidity of reinforced concrete structures with a given crack distribution. They have been favourably checked with experimental results for cylindrical shells under the effect of a thermal gradient producing vertical cracking or vertical plus horizontal cracking. The main effects characterizing the concrete behaviour are: (1) The shear transfer across a crack; (2) The shear transfer degradation after cyclic loading; (3) The tension stiffening provided by the concrete between crack and crack, in the normal stress transfer; (4) The temperature effect on the elastic moduli of concrete, when cracks are of thermal origin. Only the 1st effect is discussed on an experimental basis. Two broad cathegories of reinforced concrete structures have been investigated in this respect: shear walls of buildings and cylindrical containment structures. The main conclusions so far reached are: (1) Vertical cracks are unlikely to decrease the lateral rigidity to less than 80% of the original one, and to less than 90% when they do not involve the entire thickness of the wall; (2) The appearence of horizontal cracks can reduce the lateral rigidity by some 30% or more; (3) A noticeable but not yet evaluated influence is shown by cyclic loading. (orig.)

  20. Probabilistic fracture mechanics of nuclear structural components. Consideration of transition from embedded crack to surface crack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yagawa, Genki; Yoshimura, Shinobu; Kanto, Yasuhiro

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes a probabilistic fracture mechanics (PFM) analysis of aged nuclear reactor pressure vessel (RPV) material. New interpolation formulas are first derived for both embedded elliptical surface cracks and semi-elliptical surface cracks. To investigate effects of transition from embedded crack to surface crack in PFM analyses, one of PFM round-robin problems set by JSME-RC111 committee, i.e. 'aged RPV under normal and upset operating conditions' is solved, employing the interpolation formulas. (author)

  1. Statistical distribution of time to crack initiation and initial crack size using service data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, R. A.; Yang, J. N.

    1977-01-01

    Crack growth inspection data gathered during the service life of the C-130 Hercules airplane were used in conjunction with a crack propagation rule to estimate the distribution of crack initiation times and of initial crack sizes. A Bayesian statistical approach was used to calculate the fraction of undetected initiation times as a function of the inspection time and the reliability of the inspection procedure used.

  2. Modelling of stress corrosion cracking in zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fandeur, O.; Rouillon, L.; Pilvin, P.; Jacques, P.; Rebeyrolle, V.

    2001-01-01

    During normal and incidental operating conditions, PWR power plants must comply with the first safety requirement, which is to ensure that the cladding wall is sound. Indeed some severe power transients potentially induce Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) of the zirconium alloy clad, due to strong Pellet Cladding Interaction (PCI). Since, at present, the prevention of this risk has some consequences on the French reactors manoeuvrability, a better understanding and forecast of the clad damage related to SCC/PCI is needed. With this aim, power ramp tests are performed in experimental reactors to assess the fuel rod behaviour and evaluate PCI failure risks. To study in detail SCC mechanisms, additional laboratory experiments are carried out on non-irradiated and irradiated cladding tubes. Numerical simulations of these tests have been developed aiming, on the one hand, to evaluate mechanical state variables and, on the other hand, to study consistent mechanical parameters for describing stress corrosion clad failure. The main result of this simulation is the determination of the validity ranges of the stress intensity factor, which is frequently used to model SCC. This parameter appears to be valid only at the onset of crack growth, when crack length remains short. In addition, the role of plastic strain rate and plastic strain as controlling parameters of the SCC process has been analysed in detail using the above mechanical description of the crack tip mechanical fields. Finally, the numerical determination of the first-order parameter(s) in the crack propagation rate law is completed by the development of laboratory tests focused on these parameters. These tests aim to support experimentally the results of the FE simulation. (author)

  3. Chloride Penetration through Cracks in High-Performance Concrete and Surface Treatment System for Crack Healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    In-Seok Yoon

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available For enhancing the service life of concrete structures, it is very important to minimize crack at surface. Even if these cracks are very small, the problem is to which extend these cracks may jeopardize the durability of these decks. It was proposed that crack depth corresponding with critical crack width from the surface is a crucial factor in view of durability design of concrete structures. It was necessary to deal with chloride penetration through microcracks characterized with the mixing features of concrete. This study is devoted to examine the effect of high strength concrete and reinforcement of steel fiber on chloride penetration through cracks. High strength concrete is regarded as an excellent barrier to resist chloride penetration. However, durability performance of cracked high strength concrete was reduced seriously up to that of ordinary cracked concrete. Steel fiber reinforcement is effective to reduce chloride penetration through cracks because steel fiber reinforcement can lead to reduce crack depth significantly. Meanwhile, surface treatment systems are put on the surface of the concrete in order to seal the concrete. The key-issue is to which extend a sealing is able to ensure that chloride-induced corrosion can be prevented. As a result, penetrant cannot cure cracks, however, coating and combined treatment can prevent chloride from flowing in concrete with maximum crack width of 0.06 mm and 0.08 mm, respectively.

  4. Interfacial Crack Arrest in Sandwich Panels with Embedded Crack Stoppers Subjected to Fatigue Loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martakos, G.; Andreasen, J. H.; Berggreen, Christian

    2017-01-01

    A novel crack arresting device has been implemented in sandwich panels and tested using a special rig to apply out-of-plane loading on the sandwich panel face-sheets. Fatigue crack propagation was induced in the face-core interface of the sandwich panels which met the crack arrester. The effect o...

  5. On fatigue crack growth in ductile materials by crack-tip blunting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvergaard, Viggo

    2004-01-01

    One of the basic mechanisms for fatigue crack growth in ductile metals is that depending on crack-tip blunting under tensile loads and re-sharpening of the crack-tip during unloading. In a standard numerical analysis accounting for finite strains it is not possible to follow this process during...

  6. Crack-opening area calculations for circumferential through-wall pipe cracks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kishida, K.; Zahoor, A.

    1988-08-01

    This report describes the estimation schemes for crack opening displacement (COD) of a circumferential through-wall crack, then compares the COD predictions with pipe experimental data. Accurate predictions for COD are required to reliably predict the leak rate through a crack in leak-before-break applications.

  7. Crack-opening area calculations for circumferential through-wall pipe cracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishida, K.; Zahoor, A.

    1988-08-01

    This report describes the estimation schemes for crack opening displacement (COD) of a circumferential through-wall crack, then compares the COD predictions with pipe experimental data. Accurate predictions for COD are required to reliably predict the leak rate through a crack in leak-before-break applications

  8. Clay with Desiccation Cracks is an Advection Dominated Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baram, S.; Kurtzman, D.; Sher, Y.; Ronen, Z.; Dahan, O.

    2012-04-01

    Heavy clay sediments are regarded "safe" from the hydrological point of view due to their low hydraulic conductivities. However, the formation of desiccation cracks in dispersive clays may dramatically change their bulk hydraulic properties. The impact of desiccation cracks on water percolation, dissolved salts and contaminants transport and redox related reactions (microbial ammonium oxidation and denitrification) were investigated in 6 -12 m clay layer near a diary farm waste lagoon. The study implemented unique vadose-zone monitoring systems that enable in-situ measurements of the temporal variation of the sediment's water content along with frequent sampling of the sediment's pore water along the entire vadose zone (> 30 m). Results from four years of continuous measurements showed quick rises in sediment water content following rain events and temporal wastewater overflows. The percolation pattern indicated dominance of preferential flow through a desiccation-cracks network crossing the entire clay sediment layer. High water-propagation velocities (0.4 - 23.6 m h-1) were observed, indicating that the desiccation-crack network remains open and serves as a preferential flow pathway year-round, even at high sediment water content (~0.50 m3 m-3). The rapid percolation bypassed the most bio-geo-active parts of the soil, transporting even highly sorptive contaminants (testosterone and estrogen) in to the deep sections of the vadose zone, accelerating the underlying groundwater contamination. The ammonium and nitrate concentrations in the vadose zone and the high number of nitrifying and denitrifying bacteria (~108 gene copies gdry-sediemt-1, each) found in the sediment indicated that the entire vadose zone is aerated even at high water content conditions (~0.55 m3 m-3). The dissolved salts concentration in the pore-water and the δ2H-H2O and δ18O-H2O values of the pore-water substantially increased with depth (becoming less depleted) in the clay sediment

  9. Depth-Sizing Technique for Crack Indications in Steam Generator Tubing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Chan Hee; Lee, Hee Jeong; Kim, Hong Deok

    2009-01-01

    The nuclear power plants have been safely operated by plugging the steam generator tubes which have the crack indications. Tube rupture events can occur if analysts fail to detect crack indications during in-service inspection. There are various types of crack indication in steam generator tubes and they have been detected by the eddy current test. The integrity assessment should be performed using the crack-sizing results from eddy current data when the crack indication is detected. However, it is not easy to evaluate the crack-depth precisely and consistently due to the complexity of the methods. The current crack-sizing methods were reviewed in this paper and the suitable ones were selected through the laboratory tests. The retired steam generators of Kori Unit 1 were used for this study. The round robin tests by the domestic qualified analysts were carried out and the statistical models were introduced to establish the appropriate depth-sizing techniques. It is expected that the proposed techniques in this study can be utilized in the Steam Generator Management Program

  10. A new repair criterion for steam generator tubes with axial cracks based on probabilistic integrity assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun-Su; Oh, Chang-Kyun [KEPCO Engineering and Construction Company, Inc., 269, Hyeoksin-ro, Gimcheon, Gyeongsangbuk-do 39660 (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Yoon-Suk, E-mail: yschang@khu.ac.kr [Department of Nuclear Engineering, College of Engineering, Kyung Hee University, 1732 Deokyoungdaero, Giheung, Yongin, Gyeonggi 446-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • Probabilistic assessment was performed for axially cracked steam generator tubes. • The threshold crack sizes were determined based on burst pressures of the tubes. • A new repair criterion was suggested as a function of operation time. - Abstract: Steam generator is one of the major components in a nuclear power plant, and it consists of thousands of thin-walled tubes. The operating record of the steam generators has indicated that a number of axial cracks due to stress corrosion have been frequently detected in the tubes. Since the tubes are closely related to the safety and also the efficiency of a nuclear power plant, an establishment of the appropriate repair criterion for the defected tubes and its applications are necessary. The objective of this paper is to develop an accurate repair criterion for the tubes with axial cracks. To do this, a thorough review is performed on the key parameters affecting the tube integrity, and then the probabilistic integrity assessment is carried out by considering the various uncertainties. In addition, the sizes of critical crack are determined by comparing the burst pressure of the cracked tube with the required performance criterion. Based on this result, the new repair criterion for the axially cracked tubes is defined from the reasonably conservative value such that the required performance criterion in terms of the burst pressure is able to be met during the next operating period.

  11. Analysis on the Initial Cracking Parameters of Cross-Measure Hydraulic Fracture in Underground Coal Mines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiyu Lu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Initial cracking pressure and locations are important parameters in conducting cross-measure hydraulic fracturing to enhance coal seam permeability in underground coalmines, which are significantly influenced by in-situ stress and occurrence of coal seam. In this study, stress state around cross-measure fracturing boreholes was analyzed using in-situ stress coordinate transformation, then a mathematical model was developed to evaluate initial cracking parameters of borehole assuming the maximum tensile stress criterion. Subsequently, the influences of in-situ stress and occurrence of coal seams on initial cracking pressure and locations in underground coalmines were analyzed using the proposed model. Finally, the proposed model was verified with field test data. The results suggest that the initial cracking pressure increases with the depth cover and coal seam dip angle. However, it decreases with the increase in azimuth of major principle stress. The results also indicate that the initial cracking locations concentrated in the second and fourth quadrant in polar coordinate, and shifted direction to the strike of coal seam as coal seam dip angle and azimuth of maximum principle stress increase. Field investigation revealed consistent rule with the developed model that the initial cracking pressure increases with the coal seam dip angle. Therefore, the proposed mathematical model provides theoretical insight to analyze the initial cracking parameters during cross-measure hydraulic fracturing for underground coalmines.

  12. The influence of creep properties on crack propagation in thermal barrier coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baeker, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings are used to protect turbine blades from the high temperature of the process gas inside a turbine. They consist of a metallic bond coat and of a ceramic top coat with low thermal conductivity. During service, an additional oxide layer forms between bond coat and top coat that eventually causes failure. Finite element simulations show that the roughness of the interface between top and bond coat is crucial for determining the stress state. Lifetime models have been inferred that assume that cracks form in the peak positions at small oxide thickness and propagate when the oxide layer grows and the stress field shifts. A two-dimensional finite element model of crack propagation in the TBC layer is presented. Since the cracks propagate near a material interface and since plasticity may occur in the bond coat, standard tools of fracture mechanics for predicting the crack propagation direction are difficult to apply. This problem is circumvented in a very simple way by propagating short 'test cracks' in different directions and optimising to find the crack direction with the maximum energy release rate. It is shown that the energy release rate and the crack propagation direction are sensitive to the details of the stress state and especially to the creep properties of the materials. Implications for failure models are discussed.

  13. Threshold velocity for environmentally-assisted cracking in low alloy steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wire, G.L.; Kandra, J.T.

    1997-01-01

    Environmentally Assisted Cracking (EAC) in low alloy steels is generally believed to be activated by dissolution of MnS inclusions at the crack tip in high temperature LWR environments. EAC is the increase of fatigue crack growth rate of up to 40 to 100 times the rate in air that occurs in high temperature LWR environments. A steady state theory developed by Combrade, suggested that EAC will initiate only above a critical crack velocity and cease below this same velocity. A range of about twenty in critical crack tip velocities was invoked by Combrade, et al., to describe data available at that time. This range was attributed to exposure of additional sulfides above and below the crack plane. However, direct measurements of exposed sulfide densities on cracked specimens were performed herein and the results rule out significant additional sulfide exposure as a plausible explanation. Alternatively, it is proposed herein that localized EAC starting at large sulfide clusters reduces the calculated threshold velocity from the value predicted for a uniform distribution of sulfides. Calculations are compared with experimental results where the threshold velocity has been measured, and the predicted wide range of threshold values for steels of similar sulfur content but varying sulfide morphology is observed. The threshold velocity decreases with the increasing maximum sulfide particle size, qualitatively consistent with the theory. The calculation provides a basis for a conservative minimum velocity threshold tied directly to the steel sulfur level, in cases where no details of sulfide distribution are known

  14. Crack arrest within teeth at the dentinoenamel junction caused by elastic modulus mismatch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechtle, Sabine; Fett, Theo; Rizzi, Gabriele; Habelitz, Stefan; Klocke, Arndt; Schneider, Gerold A

    2010-05-01

    Enamel and dentin compose the crowns of human teeth. They are joined at the dentinoenamel junction (DEJ) which is a very strong and well-bonded interface unlikely to fail within healthy teeth despite the formation of multiple cracks within enamel during a lifetime of exposure to masticatory forces. These cracks commonly are arrested when reaching the DEJ. The phenomenon of crack arrest at the DEJ is described in many publications but there is little consensus on the underlying cause and mechanism. Explanations range from the DEJ having a larger toughness than both enamel and dentin up to the assumption that not the DEJ itself causes crack arrest but the so-called mantle dentin, a thin material layer close to the DEJ that is somewhat softer than the bulk dentin. In this study we conducted 3-point bending experiments with bending bars consisting of the DEJ and surrounding enamel and dentin to investigate crack propagation and arrest within the DEJ region. Calculated stress intensities around crack tips were found to be highly influenced by the elastic modulus mismatch between enamel and dentin and hence, the phenomenon of crack arrest at the DEJ could be explained accordingly via this elastic modulus mismatch. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Measures against concrete cracking in underground type light oil tank pit construction work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koike, Takeo; Kadowaki, Kazuhiko; Date, Masanao

    2017-01-01

    The underground type light oil tank pit set at Onagawa Nuclear Power Station is a tripartite underground pit structure made of reinforced concrete. This is a mass concrete made of deck slab / outer wall of 1.5 m in thickness and inner wall / top slab of 1.0 m in thickness. Since concrete placement season was July for the deck slab and October for the walls, the occurrence of thermal cracking was highly conceivable. As a result of investigating crack suppression measures based on the crack width of 0.2 mm or less as a guide, the application of fly ash cement and the addition of expansion material to the walls were judged effective and adopted. Thanks to these preliminary studies and careful construction control, it was possible to minimize the occurrence of cracks, but several through cracks of 0.2 mm or less were confirmed on part of the outer walls. As a countermeasure, repair by means of surface impregnation method was adopted, and quality and schedule could be secured. This paper outlines crack suppression measures and repair of the cracks that occurred after the implementation. (A.O.)

  16. Investigation and examination on the cracking of pipings in boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    This is the report made by the Reactor Safety Technology Expert Committee to the Atomic Energy Commission regarding the investigation and examination on stress corrosion cracking which seems to be the cause of the cracking of pipings in boiling water reactors, the measures to reduce it, and the subjects of research hereafter. Recently, the stress corrosion cracking of primary coolant pipings has been often observed, and this phenomenon occurred in the pressure boundary of primary coolant, consequently it is possible to be linked to the troubles of large scale. The Reactor Material Subcommittee was established on May 14, 1975, and investigated the cracking phenomena in the recirculating system and core spray system of BWRs in Japan and foreign countries. The recent cases have been concentrated to the heat-affected part due to welding of 304 type austenitic stainless steel pipings of from 4 in to 10 in diameter for BWRs. They are the stress corrosion cracking at grain boundaries occurred under the loaded condition and in the environment of high temperature, high pressure water. The cracking of this kind was never experienced in PWRs. The results of the technical examination, the consideration of the mechanism of stress corrosion cracking, and the countermeasures are described. (Kako, I.)

  17. Stress intensity factors for complete internal and external cracks in spherical shells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao, Y.J.; Chen, H.

    1989-01-01

    Cracks or flows found in the nuclear structure must be fully evaluated to assure the safety of the plant. The weight function method has been widely used in the determination of stress intensity factors for cracks under stress gradient e.g. for thermal shock loading. The unique features of the weight function method is that once the weight function for a particular cracked geometry is determined the stress intensity factors at the crack tip for any loading applied to the flawed structure can be calculated by a simple integration. In this paper the stress intensity factors of the complete, part-through internal and external cracks in a spherical shell are determined. The finite element method was used to develop the weight functions for the flawed geometry. The approximate crack surface profile was used to derive the weight functions. The stress intensity factors associated with the cracks in spherical shells under internal pressure are determined by both the weight functions and the direct finite element method

  18. Noncontact measurement of guided ultrasonic wave scattering for fatigue crack characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fromme, P.

    2013-04-01

    Fatigue cracks can develop in aerospace structures at locations of stress concentration such as fasteners. For the safe operation of the aircraft fatigue cracks need to be detected before reaching a critical length. Guided ultrasonic waves offer an efficient method for the detection and characterization of fatigue cracks in large aerospace structures. Noncontact excitation of guided waves was achieved using electromagnetic acoustic transducers (EMAT). The transducers were developed for the specific excitation of the A0 Lamb mode. Based on the induced eddy currents in the plate a simple theoretical model was developed and reasonably good agreement with the measurements was achieved. However, the detection sensitivity for fatigue cracks depends on the location and orientation of the crack relative to the measurement locations. Crack-like defects have a directionality pattern of the scattered field depending on the angle of the incident wave relative to the defect orientation and on the ratio of the characteristic defect size to wavelength. The detailed angular dependency of the guided wave field scattered at crack-like defects in plate structures has been measured using a noncontact laser interferometer. Good agreement with 3D Finite Element simulation predictions was achieved for machined part-through and through-thickness notches. The amplitude of the scattered wave was quantified for a variation of angle of the incident wave relative to the defect orientation and the defect depth. These results provide the basis for the defect characterization in aerospace structures using guided wave sensors.

  19. Constitutive equations for cracked reinforced concrete based on a refined model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geistefeldt, H.

    1977-01-01

    Nonlinear numerical methods to calculate structures of reinforced concrete or of prestressed concrete are mostly based on two idealizing assumptions: tension stiffness perpendicular to cracks is equal to the stiffness of reinforcement alone and shear modulus is taken as constant. In real reinforced concrete structures concrete contributes to the tension-stiffness perpendicular to cracks and thus to the global stiffness matrix because of bond action between concrete and reinforcement and shear transfer in cracks is depending on stresses acting in cracks. Only few authors are taking these aspects into account and only with rough semiempirical assumptions. In this paper a refined nonlinear three-dimensional mechanical model for reinforced concrete is presented which can include these effects, hitherto neglected, depending on the given state of stress. The model is composed of three model-elements: component u - uncracked reinforced concrete with perfect bond (stiffness equal to the sum of the stiffnesses of concrete and reinforcement), component r - reinforcement free in surrounding concrete (reinforcement and concrete are having equal normal strains in noncracked directions and equal shear strains), component c - crack-part (shear stiffnesses in cracks is equal to the sum of shear stiffnesses of the reinforcement mesh, interface shear transfer and dowel action in cracks). (Auth.)

  20. Investigations of mode I crack propagation in fibre-reinforced plastics with real time X-ray tests and simultaneous sound emission analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunner, A.; Nordstrom, R.; Flueeler, P.

    1992-01-01

    The described investigation of crack formation and crack propagation in mode I (tensile stress) in fibre-reinforced plastic samples, especially uni-directional carbon fibre reinforced polyether-ether ketone (PEEK) has several aims. On the one hand, the phenomena of crack formation and crack propagation in these materials are to be studied, and on the other hand, the draft standards for these tests are to be checked. It was found that the combination of real time X-ray tests and simultaneous sound emission analysis is excellently suited for the basic examination of crack formation and crack propagation in DCB samples. With the aid of picture processing and analysis of the video representation, consistent crack lengths and resulting G IC values can be determined. (orig./RHM) [de

  1. The concept of the average stress in the fracture process zone for the search of the crack path

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu.G. Matvienko

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The concept of the average stress has been employed to propose the maximum average tangential stress (MATS criterion for predicting the direction of fracture angle. This criterion states that a crack grows when the maximum average tangential stress in the fracture process zone ahead of the crack tip reaches its critical value and the crack growth direction coincides with the direction of the maximum average tangential stress along a constant radius around the crack tip. The tangential stress is described by the singular and nonsingular (T-stress terms in the Williams series solution. To demonstrate the validity of the proposed MATS criterion, this criterion is directly applied to experiments reported in the literature for the mixed mode I/II crack growth behavior of Guiting limestone. The predicted directions of fracture angle are consistent with the experimental data. The concept of the average stress has been also employed to predict the surface crack path under rolling-sliding contact loading. The proposed model considers the size and orientation of the initial crack, normal and tangential loading due to rolling–sliding contact as well as the influence of fluid trapped inside the crack by a hydraulic pressure mechanism. The MATS criterion is directly applied to equivalent contact model for surface crack growth on a gear tooth flank.

  2. Strain energy density-distance criterion for the initiation of stress corrosion cracking of alloy X-750

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, M.M. Jr.; Symons, D.M.

    1996-05-01

    A strain energy density-distance criterion was previously developed and used to correlate rising-load K{sub c} initiation data for notched and fatigue precracked specimens of hydrogen precharged Alloy X-750. This criterion, which was developed for hydrogen embrittlement (HE) cracking, is used here to correlate static-load stress corrosion cracking (SCC) initiation times obtained for smooth geometry, notched and fatigue precracked specimens. The onset of SCC crack growth is hypothesized to occur when a critical strain, which is due to environment-enhanced creep, is attained within the specimen interior. For notched and precracked specimens, initiation is shown by analysis to occur at a variable distance from notch and crack tips. The initiation site varies from very near the crack tip, for highly loaded sharp cracks, to a site that is one grain diameter from the notch, for lower loaded, blunt notches. The existence of hydrogen gradients, which are due to strain-induced hydrogen trapping in the strain fields of notch and crack tips, is argued to be controlling the site for initiation of cracking. By considering the sources of the hydrogen, these observations are shown to be consistent with those from the previous HE study, in which the characteristic distance for crack initiation was found to be one grain diameter from the notch tip, independent of notch radius, applied stress intensity factor and hydrogen level.

  3. Simulation of crack propagation in rock in plasma blasting technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikkurthi, V. R.; Tahiliani, K.; Chaturvedi, S.

    Plasma Blasting Technology (PBT) involves the production of a pulsed electrical discharge by inserting a blasting probe in a water-filled cavity drilled in a rock, which produces shocks or pressure waves in the water. These pulses then propagate into the rock, leading to fracture. In this paper, we present the results of two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations using the SHALE code to study crack propagation in rock. Three separate issues have been examined. Firstly, assuming that a constant pressure P is maintained in the cavity for a time τ , we have determined the P- τ curve that just cracks a given rock into at least two large-sized parts. This study shows that there exists an optimal pressure level for cracking a given rock-type and geometry. Secondly, we have varied the volume of water in which the initial energy E is deposited, which corresponds to different initial peak pressures Ppeak. We have determined the E- Ppeak curve that just breaks the rock into four large-sized parts. It is found that there must be an optimal Ppeak that lowers the energy consumption, but with acceptable probe damage. Thirdly, we have attempted to identify the dominant mechanism of rock fracture. We also highlight some numerical errors that must be kept in mind in such simulations.

  4. Development of crack shape: LBB methodology for cracked pipes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moulin, D.; Chapuliot, S.; Drubay, B. [Commissariat a l Energie Atomique, Gif sur Yvette (France)

    1997-04-01

    For structures like vessels or pipes containing a fluid, the Leak-Before-Break (LBB) assessment requires to demonstrate that it is possible, during the lifetime of the component, to detect a rate of leakage due to a possible defect, the growth of which would result in a leak before-break of the component. This LBB assessment could be an important contribution to the overall structural integrity argument for many components. The aim of this paper is to review some practices used for LBB assessment and to describe how some new R & D results have been used to provide a simplified approach of fracture mechanics analysis and especially the evaluation of crack shape and size during the lifetime of the component.

  5. Factors that lead to the use of crack cocaine in combination with marijuana in Brazil: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Janaina R; Nappo, Solange A

    2015-07-25

    In Brazil, crack cocaine use remains a healthcare challenge due to the rapid onset of its pleasurable effects, its ability to induce craving and addiction, and the fact that it is easily accessible. Delayed action on the part of the Brazilian Government in addressing the drug problem has led users to develop their own strategies for surviving the effects of crack cocaine use, particularly the drug craving and psychosis. In this context, users have sought the benefits of combining crack cocaine with marijuana. Our aim was to identify the reasons why users combine crack cocaine with marijuana and the health implications of doing so. The present study is a qualitative study, using in-depth interviews and criteria-based sampling, following 27 crack cocaine users who combined its use with marijuana. Participants were recruited using the snowball sampling technique, and the point of theoretical saturation was used to define the sample size. Data were analyzed using the content analysis technique. The interviewees reported that the combination of crack cocaine use with marijuana provided "protection" (reduced undesirable effects, improved sleep and appetite, reduced craving for crack cocaine, and allowed the patients to recover some quality of life). Combined use of cannabis as a strategy to reduce the effects of crack exhibited several significant advantages, particularly an improved quality of life, which "protected" users from the violence typical of the crack culture. Crack use is considered a serious public health problem in Brazil, and there are few solution strategies. Within that limited context, the combination of cannabis and crack deserves more thorough clinical investigation to assess its potential use as a strategy to reduce the damage associated with crack use.

  6. Failure Analysis of a Cracked UH-1 Tailboom Former, P/N 205-030-807-97

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Grendahl, Scott; Hardisky, Benjamin; Yocum, Russell

    2006-01-01

    .... Army Kwajalein Atoll Facility (USAKA) in the Marshall Islands for investigation. The component was being investigated due to the presence of cracks observed near bolt hole locations on the part...

  7. The effect of crack branching on the residual lifetime of machine components containing stress corrosion cracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magdowski, R.M.; Uggowitzer, P.J.; Speidel, M.O.

    1985-01-01

    A comparison is presented of theoretical, numerical and experimental investigations concerning the effect of crack branching on the reduction of stress intensity at the tip of single cracks. The results indicate that the division of a single crack into n branches reduces the stress intensity at the branch tips by a factor of about 1/√n. This permits branched cracks to grow to larger depths before becoming critical. The implication is that longer residual lifetimes and longer operating times between inspections can be calculated for machine components with growing branched stress corrosion cracks. (author)

  8. Shear crack propagation in MBC strengthened concrete beams”

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Täljsten, Björn; Blanksvärd, Thomas; Carolin, Anders

    2008-01-01

    thermal compatibility to the base concrete and are often sensitive to the surface nature and surrounding temperature. By using mineral based composites (MBC) some of these challenges can be overcome. MBC refers here to a cementitious bonding agent and a carbon FRP grid. This paper is a part of an ongoing......Repair and upgrading existing concrete structures using FRPs and an epoxy adhesive as the bonding agent has some disadvantages when it comes to compatibility to the base concrete. Epoxies are often restricted by regulations of use, have low permeability which may create freeze/thaw problems, poor...... study of MBC systems. Emphasis is placed on the cracking behavior of the MBC system used for shear strengthening of RC beams. Traditional foil strain gauges and photometric measurements have been used for monitoring of the cracking behavior. In this study it is shown that the use of mineral based shear...

  9. Evaluation of throughwall crack pipes under displacement controlled loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zahoor, A.

    1987-02-01

    Tearing modulus solutions are developed for flawed throughwall pipes subjected to displacement controlled loading. Two cases of loading were considered: (1) a displacement controlled bending loading, and (2) a displacement controlled axial tension loading. A revised version of the EPRI J-integral estimation scheme is used in the development of the solutions. These solutions can be used for the entire range of elastic-plastic loading, from linear elastic, contained yielding, to large scale yielding of the crack section. Experimental data from pipes in bending were used to assess the accuracy of the compliant loading solutions. The evaluations were performed using elastic plastic J-integral (J) and tearing modulus (T) analysis methods. These solutions are shown to have good accuracy when used to predict the experimental results. The methodology and procedure can also be applied to part-throughwall cracks. These solutions have application to the leak before break fracture mechanics analyses.

  10. Evaluation of throughwall crack pipes under displacement controlled loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zahoor, A.

    1987-01-01

    Tearing modulus solutions are developed for flawed throughwall pipes subjected to displacement controlled loading. Two cases of loading were considered: (1) a displacement controlled bending loading, and (2) a displacement controlled axial tension loading. A revised version of the EPRI J-integral estimation scheme is used in the development of the solutions. These solutions can be used for the entire range of elastic-plastic loading, from linear elastic, contained yielding, to large scale yielding of the crack section. Experimental data from pipes in bending were used to assess the accuracy of the compliant loading solutions. The evaluations were performed using elastic plastic J-integral (J) and tearing modulus (T) analysis methods. These solutions are shown to have good accuracy when used to predict the experimental results. The methodology and procedure can also be applied to part-throughwall cracks. These solutions have application to the leak before break fracture mechanics analyses. (orig.)

  11. Distributed crack analysis of ceramic inlays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, M.C.R.B.; Vree, de J.H.P.; Brekelmans, W.A.M.

    1993-01-01

    In all-ceramic restorations, crack formation and propagation phenomena are of major concern, since they may result in intra-oral fracture. The objective of this study was calculation of damage in porcelain MOD inlays by utilization of a finite-element (FE) implementation of the distributed crack

  12. In-reactor fatigue crack propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ermi, A.M.; Mervyn, D.A.; Straalsund, J.L.

    1979-08-01

    An in-reactor fatigue experiment is being designed to determine the effect of dynamic irradiation on the fatigue crack propagation (FCP) behavior of candidate fusion first wall materials. This investigation has been prompted by studies which show gross differences in crack growth characteristics of creep rupture specimens testing by postirradiation versus dynamic in-reactor methods. The experiment utilizes miniature center-cracked-tension specimens developed specifically for in-reactor studies. In the test, a chain of eight specimens, precracked to various initial crack lengths, is stressed during irradiation to determine crack growth rate as a function of stress intensity. Load levels were chosen which result in small crack growth rates encompassing a regime of the crack growth curve not previously investigated during irradiation studies of FCP. The test will be conducted on 20% cold worked 316 stainless steel at a temperature of 425 0 C, in a sodium environment, and at a frequency of 1 cycle/min. Irradiation will occur in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor, resulting in a He/dpa ratio similar to that expected at the first wall in a fusion reactor. Detailed design of the experiment is presented, along with crack growth data obtained from prototypic testing of the experimental apparatus. These results are compared to data obtained under similar conditions generated by conventional test methods

  13. Crack Tip Mechanics in Distortion Gradient Plasticity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuentes-Alonso, Sandra; Martínez Pañeda, Emilio

    2017-01-01

    Gradient Plasticity (DGP), the influence on crack tip mechanics of DGP's distinguishing features that entail superior modelling capabilities has not been investigated yet. In this work crack tip fields are thoroughly examined by implementing the higher order theory of DGP in an implicit finite element...

  14. Entering a Crack: An Encounter with Gossip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Linda

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, I enter a crack to think otherwise about the concept "gossip". Drawing on previous scholarship engaging with Deleuzian concepts to inform research methodologies, this paper builds on this body of work. Following Deleuze and Guattari, the paper undertakes a mapping of gossip, subsequent to an encounter with a crack.…

  15. 46 CFR 59.10-5 - Cracks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING REPAIRS TO BOILERS, PRESSURE VESSELS AND... consecutive cracked ligaments nor more than a total of six cracked ligaments in any one girth joint. (c... ligaments may be repaired by welding. (n) Welding repairs to drums of power boilers, except as otherwise...

  16. Crack velocity measurement by induced electromagnetic radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frid, V.; Rabinovitch, A.; Bahat, D.

    2006-01-01

    Our model of electromagnetic radiation (EMR) emanated from fracture implies that EMR amplitude is proportional to crack velocity. Soda lime glass samples were tested under uniaxial tension. Comparison of crack velocity observed by Wallner line analysis and the peak amplitude of EMR signals registered during the test, showed very good correlation, validating this proportionality

  17. Crack velocity measurement by induced electromagnetic radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frid, V. [Deichmann Rock Mechanics Laboratory of the Negev, Geological and Environmental Sciences Department, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva (Israel)]. E-mail: vfrid@bgu.ac.il; Rabinovitch, A. [Deichmann Rock Mechanics Laboratory of the Negev, Physics Department, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva (Israel); Bahat, D. [Deichmann Rock Mechanics Laboratory of the Negev, Geological and Environmental Sciences Department, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva (Israel)

    2006-07-31

    Our model of electromagnetic radiation (EMR) emanated from fracture implies that EMR amplitude is proportional to crack velocity. Soda lime glass samples were tested under uniaxial tension. Comparison of crack velocity observed by Wallner line analysis and the peak amplitude of EMR signals registered during the test, showed very good correlation, validating this proportionality.

  18. Positioning Community Art Practices in Urban Cracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verschelden, Griet; Van Eeghem, Elly; Steel, Riet; De Visscher, Sven; Dekeyrel, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    This article addresses the position of community art practices and the role of practitioners in urban cracks. Community art practices raise possibilities for a reconceptualisation of the concept of community and an extension of the concept of art in public space. Urban cracks are conceptualised as spatial, temporal and relational manifestations of…

  19. Mechanism for iodine cracking of zirconium claddings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novikov, V.V.

    1991-01-01

    The mechanism of iodine cracking of zirconium cladding is analyzed taking into account the effect of stresses on diffusion. A decisive effect of the stress gradiemt on crack propagation in an agressive medium is shown. The experimental data are compared with the proposed model

  20. Crack Formation in Grouted Annular Composite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Eigil V.

    The objective of the present analysis is to identify the reason for extensive crack formation which occurred during an annulus grouting performance test, to evaluate possible consequences of the cracking, and to recommend measures to be taken in order to avoid similar problems in the future....

  1. Crack Monitoring of Operational Wind Turbine Foundations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Marcus; McAlorum, Jack; Fusiek, Grzegorz; Niewczas, Pawel; McKeeman, Iain; Rubert, Tim

    2017-08-21

    The degradation of onshore, reinforced-concrete wind turbine foundations is usually assessed via above-ground inspections, or through lengthy excavation campaigns that suspend wind power generation. Foundation cracks can and do occur below ground level, and while sustained measurements of crack behaviour could be used to quantify the risk of water ingress and reinforcement corrosion, these cracks have not yet been monitored during turbine operation. Here, we outline the design, fabrication and field installation of subterranean fibre-optic sensors for monitoring the opening and lateral displacements of foundation cracks during wind turbine operation. We detail methods for in situ sensor characterisation, verify sensor responses against theoretical tower strains derived from wind speed data, and then show that measured crack displacements correlate with monitored tower strains. Our results show that foundation crack opening displacements respond linearly to tower strain and do not change by more than ±5 μ m. Lateral crack displacements were found to be negligible. We anticipate that the work outlined here will provide a starting point for real-time, long-term and dynamic analyses of crack displacements in future. Our findings could furthermore inform the development of cost-effective monitoring systems for ageing wind turbine foundations.

  2. Crack initiation under generalized plane strain conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shum, D.K.M.; Merkle, J.G.

    1991-01-01

    A method for estimating the decrease in crack-initiation toughness, from a reference plane strain value, due to positive straining along the crack front of a circumferential flaw in a reactor pressure vessel is presented in this study. This method relates crack initiation under generalized plane strain conditions with material failure at points within a distance of a few crack-tip-opening displacements ahead of a crack front, and involves the formulation of a micromechanical crack-initiation model. While this study is intended to address concerns regarding the effects of positive out-of- plane straining on ductile crack initiation, the approach adopted in this work can be extended in a straightforward fashion to examine conditions of macroscopic cleavage crack initiation. Provided single- parameter dominance of near-tip fields exists in the flawed structure, results from this study could be used to examine the appropriateness of applying plane strain fracture toughness to the evaluation of circumferential flaws, in particular to those in ring-forged vessels which have no longitudinal welds. In addition, results from this study could also be applied toward the analysis of the effects of thermal streaming on the fracture resistance of circumferentially oriented flaws in a pressure vessel. 37 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  3. Corrosion of steel in cracked concrete: a microscale study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pacheco, J.; Savija, B.; Schlangen, E.; Polder, R.B.

    2014-01-01

    The influence of concrete cracking upon reinforcement corrosion is complex. Cracks allow fast penetration of chlorides, potentially leading to a shorter initiation period of reinforcement corrosion. Structural regulations control acceptable crack width values based on the exposure class of the

  4. Crack growth by micropore coalescence at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beere, W.

    1981-01-01

    At high temperatures in the creep regime the stress distribution around a crack is different from the low temperature elastically generated distribution. The stress distribution ahead of the crack is calculated for a crack preceded by an array of growing cavities. The cavities maintain a displacement wedge ahead of the crack. When the displacement wedge is less than one-tenth the crack length the driving force for crack growth is similar to an all elastically loaded crack. When the deforming wedge exceeds the crack length the net section stress controls crack growth. An expression is derived for a crack growing by the growth and coalescence of cavities situated in the crack plane. It is predicted that at high temperatures above a critical stress intensity, the crack propagates in a brittle fashion. (author)

  5. Analysis of 3D crack propagation by microfocus computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ao Bo; Chen Fuxing; Deng Cuizhen; Zeng Yabin

    2014-01-01

    The three-point bending test of notched specimens of 2A50 forging aluminum was performed by high frequency fatigue tester, and the surface cracks of different stages were analyzed and contrasted by SEM. The crack was reconstructed by microfocus computed tomography, and its size, position and distribution were visually displayed through 3D visualization. The crack propagation behaviors were researched through gray value and position of crack front of 2D CT images in two adjacent stages, and the results show that crack propagation is irregular. The projection image of crack was obtained if crack of two stages projected onto the reference plane respectively, a significant increase of new crack propagation was observed compared with the previous projection of crack, and the distribution curve of crack front of two stages was displayed. The 3D increment distribution of the crack front propagation was obtained through the 3D crack analysis of two stages. (authors)

  6. Mitigation strategies for reflective cracking in pavements : [research project capsule].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Refl ection cracks are caused by discontinuities (cracks or joints) in underlying layers, : which propagate through hot-mix asphalt (HMA) overlay due to continuous movement : at the crack prompted by thermal expansion and traffi c loading. If the new...

  7. Stress corrosion cracking of Zircaloy-4 in non-aqueous iodine solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez Sanchez, Andrea V.

    2006-01-01

    In the present work the susceptibility to intergranular attack and stress corrosion cracking of Zircaloy-4 in different iodine alcoholic solutions was studied. The influence of different variables such as the molecular weight of the alcohols, the water content of the solutions, the alcohol type (primary, secondary or tertiary) and the temperature was evaluated. To determine the susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking the slow strain rate technique was used. Specimens of Zircaloy-4 were also exposed between 0.5 and 300 hours to the solutions without applied stress to evaluate the susceptibility to intergranular attack. The electrochemical behavior of the material in the corrosive media was studied by potentiodynamic polarization tests. It was determined that the active species responsible for the stress corrosion cracking of Zircaloy-4 in iodine alcoholic solutions is a molecular complex between the alcohol and iodine. The intergranular attack precedes the 'true' stress corrosion cracking phenomenon (which is associated to the transgranular propagation of the crack) and it is controlled by the diffusion of the active specie to the tip of the crack. Water acts as inhibitor to intergranular attack. Except for methanolic solutions, the minimum water content necessary to inhibit stress corrosion cracking was determined. This critical water content decreases when increasing the molecular weight of the alcohol. An explanation for this behavior is proposed. The susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking also depends on the type of the alcohol used as solvent. The temperature dependence of the crack propagation rate is in agreement with a thermal activated process, and the activation energy is consistent with a process controlled by the volume diffusion of the active species. (author) [es

  8. Comparison of Effective Medium Schemes For Seismic Velocities in Cracked Anisotropic Rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morshed, S.; Chesnokov, E.

    2017-12-01

    Understanding of elastic properties of reservoir rock is necessary for meaningful interpretation and analysis of seismic measurements. The elastic properties of a rock are controlled by the microstructural properties such as mineralogical composition, pore and crack distribution, texture and pore connectivity. However, seismic scale is much larger than microstructure scale. Understanding of macroscopic properties at relevant seismic scale (e.g. borehole sonic data) comes from effective medium theory (EMT). However, most of the effective medium theories fail at high crack density as the interactions of strain fields of the cracks can't be ignored. We compare major EMT schemes from low to high crack density. While at low crack density all method gives similar results, at high crack density they differ significantly. Then, we focus on generalized singular approximation (GSA) and effective field (EF) method as they allow cracks beyond the limit of dilute concentrations. Additionally, we use grain contact (GC) method to examine the stiffness constants of the rock matrix. We prepare simple models of a multiphase media containing low to high concentrations of isolated pores. Randomly oriented spherical pores and horizontally oriented ellipsoidal (aspect ratio =0.1) pores have been considered. For isolated spherical pores, all the three methods show exactly same or similar results. However, inclusion interactions are different in different directions in case of horizontal ellipsoidal pores and individual stiffness constants differ greatly from one method to another at different crack density. Stiffness constants remain consistent in GSA method whereas some components become unusual in EF method at a higher crack density (>0.15). Finally, we applied GSA method to interpret ultrasonic velocities of core samples. Mineralogical composition from X-ray diffraction (XRD) data and lab measured porosity data have been utilized. Both compressional and shear wave velocities from GSA

  9. Crack resistance behaviour of an intermetallic Ti-Al-Si-Nb alloy at room temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wittkowsky, B.U.; Pfuff, M.J.

    1996-01-01

    The room temperature crack growth behaviour of a Ti-Al-Si-Nb alloy consisting of the two intermetallic phases (Ti, Nb) 3 (Al, Si) and (Ti, Nb) 5 (Si, Al) 3 is investigated in the present paper. The material exhibits a heterogeneous disordered microstructure and fails in a brittle manner. Crack growth is associated with a pronounced crack resistance behaviour. For a sample of nominally identical specimens the R-curves scatter around a mean curve with a standard deviation which remains roughly constant as the crack grows. A natural extension of the bundle model introduced in a previous paper is used to simulate R-curves and their scatter is in reasonably good agreement with the experimental findings. (orig.)

  10. Estimation of Fatigue Crack Growth Behavior of Cracked Specimen Under Mixed-mode Loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Jeong Woo; Woo, Eun Taek; Han, Seung Ho

    2015-01-01

    To estimate the fatigue crack propagation behavior of compact tension shear (CTS) specimen under mixed-mode loads, crack path prediction theories and Tanaka’s equation were applied. The stress intensity factor at a newly created crack tip was calculated using a finite element method via ANSYS, and the crack path and crack increment were then obtained from the crack path prediction theories, Tanaka’s equation, and the Paris’ equation, which were preprogrammed in Microsoft Excel. A new method called the finite element crack tip updating method (FECTUM) was developed. In this method, the finite element method and Microsoft Excel are used to calculate the stress intensity factors and the crack path, respectively, at the crack tip per each crack increment. The developed FECTUM was applied to simulate the fatigue crack propagation of a single-edge notched bending (SENB) specimen under eccentric three-point bending loads. The results showed that the number of cycles to failure of the specimen obtained experimentally and numerically were in good agreement within an error range of less than 3%

  11. Estimation of Fatigue Crack Growth Behavior of Cracked Specimen Under Mixed-mode Loads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Jeong Woo [KIMM, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Woo, Eun Taek; Han, Seung Ho [Dong-A University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-15

    To estimate the fatigue crack propagation behavior of compact tension shear (CTS) specimen under mixed-mode loads, crack path prediction theories and Tanaka’s equation were applied. The stress intensity factor at a newly created crack tip was calculated using a finite element method via ANSYS, and the crack path and crack increment were then obtained from the crack path prediction theories, Tanaka’s equation, and the Paris’ equation, which were preprogrammed in Microsoft Excel. A new method called the finite element crack tip updating method (FECTUM) was developed. In this method, the finite element method and Microsoft Excel are used to calculate the stress intensity factors and the crack path, respectively, at the crack tip per each crack increment. The developed FECTUM was applied to simulate the fatigue crack propagation of a single-edge notched bending (SENB) specimen under eccentric three-point bending loads. The results showed that the number of cycles to failure of the specimen obtained experimentally and numerically were in good agreement within an error range of less than 3%.

  12. Sonic IR crack detection of aircraft turbine engine blades with multi-frequency ultrasound excitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Ding; Han, Xiaoyan; Newaz, Golam

    2014-01-01

    Effectively and accurately detecting cracks or defects in critical engine components, such as turbine engine blades, is very important for aircraft safety. Sonic Infrared (IR) Imaging is such a technology with great potential for these applications. This technology combines ultrasound excitation and IR imaging to identify cracks and flaws in targets. In general, failure of engine components, such as blades, begins with tiny cracks. Since the attenuation of the ultrasound wave propagation in turbine engine blades is small, the efficiency of crack detection in turbine engine blades can be quite high. The authors at Wayne State University have been developing the technology as a reliable tool for the future field use in aircraft engines and engine parts. One part of the development is to use finite element modeling to assist our understanding of effects of different parameters on crack heating while experimentally hard to achieve. The development has been focused with single frequency ultrasound excitation and some results have been presented in a previous conference. We are currently working on multi-frequency excitation models. The study will provide results and insights of the efficiency of different frequency excitation sources to foster the development of the technology for crack detection in aircraft engine components

  13. Process and device for magnetic crack testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seiler, D.; Meili, E.; Fuchs, E.

    1983-01-01

    There is a problem of sufficient crack depth discrimination to suppress fault signals or pictures due to unevenness not caused by cracks. To solve this, when magnetising in the preferred direction of adhesion, the effect depending on the direction of the crack, before magnetic powder detection, magnetic powder is blown on, showing the fault and for the comparison of the adhesion effect crack direction characteristics it is blown on parallel to the preferred direction, or if one wants to stress the directional characteristic, it is blown on transversely to the preferred direction. In both cases one blows with the same force, without removing the magnetic powder remnants relevant to faults in the intended crack areas. This strong blowing removes the magnetic powder remnants relevant to interference and not relevant to faults. (orig./HP) [de

  14. Strain rate effects in stress corrosion cracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parkins, R.N. (Newcastle upon Tyne Univ. (UK). Dept. of Metallurgy and Engineering Materials)

    1990-03-01

    Slow strain rate testing (SSRT) was initially developed as a rapid, ad hoc laboratory method for assessing the propensity for metals an environments to promote stress corrosion cracking. It is now clear, however, that there are good theoretical reasons why strain rate, as opposed to stress per se, will often be the controlling parameter in determining whether or not cracks are nucleated and, if so, are propagated. The synergistic effects of the time dependence of corrosion-related reactions and microplastic strain provide the basis for mechanistic understanding of stress corrosion cracking in high-pressure pipelines and other structures. However, while this may be readily comprehended in the context of laboratory slow strain tests, its extension to service situations may be less apparent. Laboratory work involving realistic stressing conditions, including low-frequency cyclic loading, shows that strain or creep rates give good correlation with thresholds for cracking and with crack growth kinetics.

  15. Compliance characteristics of cracked UO2 pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williford, R.E.; Mohr, C.L.; Lanning, D.D.

    1981-01-01

    The thermally induced cracking of UO 2 fuel pellets causes simultaneous reductions of the bulk (extrinsic) fuel thermal conductivity and elastic moduli to values significantly less than those for solid pellets. The magnitude of these bulk properly reductions was found to be primarily dependent on the amount of crack area in the transverse plane of the fuel. The model described herein uses a simple description of the crack geometry to couple the fuel rod thermal and mechanical behaviors by relating in-reactor data to Hooke's Law and a crack compliance model. Data from the NRC/PNL Halden experiment IFA-432 show that for a typical helium-filled BWR-design rod at 30 kW/m, the effective thermal conductivity and elastic moduli of the cracked fuel are 4/5 and 1/40 of that for solid pellets, respectively

  16. Design and fabrication of an apparatus to study stress corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buscarlet, Carol

    1977-01-01

    In this research thesis, the author first gives a large overview of tests methods of stress corrosion cracking: definition and generalities, stress corrosion cracking in the laboratory (test methods with imposed deformation, load or strain rate, theories of hydrogen embrittlement, of adsorption, of film breaking, and electrochemical theories), stress corrosion cracking in alkaline environment (in light water reactors, of austenitic stainless steels), and conventional tests on polycrystals and monocrystals of stainless steels in sodium hydroxide. The next parts address the core of this research, i.e. the design of an autoclave containing a tensile apparatus, the fabrication of this apparatus, the stress application device, the sample environment, pressurization, control and command, preliminary tests in a melt salt, and the first cracking tests [fr

  17. The effect of cracks on the limit load of pipe bends under in-plane bending

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffiths, J.E.

    1976-06-01

    The limit analysis of the in-plane bending of curved tubes had received attention previously, but the effect of defects in the tube has not been considered. A lower bound has been established which, with no defects present, is in agreement with previous theoretical work. The method of linear programming allows cracks to be introduced into analysis, and results have been obtained for various geometries of defect. The results show that the presence of cracks in the pipe bend can have a marked effect on the theoretical limit load: a part-through crack penetrating only half the wall thickness will reduce the limit moment by up to 10%. The worst possible case of a through-crack may reduce the limit load by 60%. (author)

  18. The effect of cracks on the limit load of pipe bends under in-plane bending

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffiths, J.E.

    1976-06-01

    The limit analysis of the in-plane bending of curved tubes had received attention previously, but the effect of defects in the tube has not been considered. A lower bound is established, which, with no defects present, is in agreement with previous theoretical work. The method of linear programming allows cracks to be introduced into the analysis. and results have been obtained for various geometries of defect. The results show that the presence of cracks in the pipe bend can have a marked effect on the theoretical limit load: a part-through crack penetrating only half the wall thickness will reduce the limit moment by up to 10%. The worst possible case of a through-crack may reduce the limit load by 60% (author)

  19. Crack shape developments and leak rates for circumferential complex-cracked pipes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brickstad, B.; Bergman, M. [SAQ Inspection Ltd., Stockholm (Sweden)

    1997-04-01

    A computerized procedure has been developed that predicts the growth of an initial circumferential surface crack through a pipe and further on to failure. The crack growth mechanism can either be fatigue or stress corrosion. Consideration is taken to complex crack shapes and for the through-wall cracks, crack opening areas and leak rates are also calculated. The procedure is based on a large number of three-dimensional finite element calculations of cracked pipes. The results from these calculations are stored in a database from which the PC-program, denoted LBBPIPE, reads all necessary information. In this paper, a sensitivity analysis is presented for cracked pipes subjected to both stress corrosion and vibration fatigue.

  20. Fully plastic crack opening analyses of complex-cracked pipes for Ramberg-Osgood materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Jae Uk; Choi, Jae Boong; Huh, Nam Su; Kim, Yun Jae

    2016-01-01

    The plastic influence functions for calculating fully plastic Crack opening displacement (COD) of complex-cracked pipes were newly proposed based on systematic 3-dimensional (3-D) elastic-plastic Finite element (FE) analyses using Ramberg-Osgood (R-O) relation, where global bending moment, axial tension and internal pressure are considered separately as a loading condition. Then, crack opening analyses were performed based on GE/EPRI concept by using the new plastic influence functions for complex-cracked pipes made of SA376 TP304 stainless steel, and the predicted CODs were compared with FE results based on deformation plasticity theory of tensile material behavior. From the comparison, the confidence of the proposed fully plastic crack opening solutions for complex-cracked pipes was gained. Therefore, the proposed engineering scheme for COD estimation using the new plastic influence functions can be utilized to estimate leak rate of a complex-cracked pipe for R-O material.

  1. Optimisation of the Crack Pattern in Continuously Reinforced Concrete Pavements

    OpenAIRE

    Ren, D.

    2015-01-01

    Recent field investigations on several new Continuously Reinforced Concrete Pavements (CRCP) in Belgium indicate that its crack pattern is characterized by low mean crack spacing along with a high percentage of clusters of closely spaced cracks. Field surveys also indicate that it is difficult to significantly reduce the probability of a non-uniform crack pattern - such as closely spaced cracks, meandering, and Y-cracks - by only slightly adjusting the amount of longitudinal steel. Non-unifor...

  2. Cracks assessment using ultrasonic technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, Maria Pia; Tomasella, Marcelo [OLDELVAL S.A. Oleoductos del Valle, Rio Negro (Argentina). Pipeline Integrity Dept.

    2005-07-01

    The goal of Oldelval Integrity Program is to prevent ruptures and leaks, developing strategies for a better handling of the integrity of our pipelines. In order to achieve it we have studied and modeled each process that involved in the integrity pipeline. Those processes are mainly based on defects reported by an internal inspection tool and supplied with field inspection and monitoring data. Years of evaluation, study and the continuous effort overturned towards a phenomenon that worries to the industry, as it is the SCC. Since 1998 up to 2004 SCC was included in the integrity program with some preventive maintenance programs. The accomplishment of the inspection based on ultrasound tools, is the culmination of years of evaluation and investigations supported by field digs and materials susceptibility. This paper describes Oldelval's results with ultrasonic crack detection tool, and how it can be reliably to detect SCC. (author)

  3. Consistency argued students of fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viyanti; Cari; Suparmi; Winarti; Slamet Budiarti, Indah; Handika, Jeffry; Widyastuti, Fatma

    2017-01-01

    Problem solving for physics concepts through consistency arguments can improve thinking skills of students and it is an important thing in science. The study aims to assess the consistency of the material Fluid student argmentation. The population of this study are College students PGRI Madiun, UIN Sunan Kalijaga Yogyakarta and Lampung University. Samples using cluster random sampling, 145 samples obtained by the number of students. The study used a descriptive survey method. Data obtained through multiple-choice test and interview reasoned. Problem fluid modified from [9] and [1]. The results of the study gained an average consistency argmentation for the right consistency, consistency is wrong, and inconsistent respectively 4.85%; 29.93%; and 65.23%. Data from the study have an impact on the lack of understanding of the fluid material which is ideally in full consistency argued affect the expansion of understanding of the concept. The results of the study as a reference in making improvements in future studies is to obtain a positive change in the consistency of argumentations.

  4. Coordinating user interfaces for consistency

    CERN Document Server

    Nielsen, Jakob

    2001-01-01

    In the years since Jakob Nielsen's classic collection on interface consistency first appeared, much has changed, and much has stayed the same. On the one hand, there's been exponential growth in the opportunities for following or disregarding the principles of interface consistency-more computers, more applications, more users, and of course the vast expanse of the Web. On the other, there are the principles themselves, as persistent and as valuable as ever. In these contributed chapters, you'll find details on many methods for seeking and enforcing consistency, along with bottom-line analys

  5. IGSCC crack propagation rate measurement in BWR environments. Executive summary of a Round Robin study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andresen, Peter L.

    1998-01-01

    Five of the world's best laboratories at performing stress corrosion crack growth studies - ABB Atom AB, AEA Technology, GE Corporate Research and Development Center, Studsvik Material AB, and VTT Manufacturing Technology, were selected to participate in a round robin to evaluate the quality and reproducibility of testing conditions and resulting stress corrosion crack growth rates in sensitized type 304 stainless steel in 288 deg C water. Heat treated, machined and fatigue pre-cracked specimens were provided to all laboratories, and detailed test procedures prescribed the use of active loading, reversed dc potential drop crack monitoring, a common reference electrode supplied to all laboratories by GE CRD (to be used along side each laboratory's own reference electrode), and highly specified water chemistry conditions. The ability of each laboratory to achieve optimal testing conditions varied, although all laboratories achieved an impressive standard of testing control. The most significant laboratory-to-laboratory differences were associated with their ability to achieve high purity autoclave outlet water, reproduce accurate measurements of corrosion potential on the test specimen, and provide high resolution crack following using a reversed dc potential drop. However, the most notable outcome of the program is the consistent observation by all laboratories that initiating and sustaining stress corrosion crack growth at constant load in sensitized type 304 stainless steel is difficult, despite the use of a moderately high stress intensity, and high dissolved oxygen and corrosion potential conditions. Concerns for specimen machining and pre-cracking were identified, although these factors were not the sole cause of difficulty in initiating and sustaining stress corrosion cracking. It was shown that many phases of specimen preparation and testing can have a large influence on the measured SCC response. Even under the best test conditions it is critical to ensure

  6. IGSCC crack propagation rate measurement in BWR environments. Executive summary of a Round Robin study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andresen, Peter L. [GE Corporate Research and Development, Schenectady, NY (United States)

    1998-12-31

    Five of the world`s best laboratories at performing stress corrosion crack growth studies - ABB Atom AB, AEA Technology, GE Corporate Research and Development Center, Studsvik Material AB, and VTT Manufacturing Technology, were selected to participate in a round robin to evaluate the quality and reproducibility of testing conditions and resulting stress corrosion crack growth rates in sensitized type 304 stainless steel in 288 deg C water. Heat treated, machined and fatigue pre-cracked specimens were provided to all laboratories, and detailed test procedures prescribed the use of active loading, reversed dc potential drop crack monitoring, a common reference electrode supplied to all laboratories by GE CRD (to be used along side each laboratory`s own reference electrode), and highly specified water chemistry conditions. The ability of each laboratory to achieve optimal testing conditions varied, although all laboratories achieved an impressive standard of testing control. The most significant laboratory-to-laboratory differences were associated with their ability to achieve high purity autoclave outlet water, reproduce accurate measurements of corrosion potential on the test specimen, and provide high resolution crack following using a reversed dc potential drop. However, the most notable outcome of the program is the consistent observation by all laboratories that initiating and sustaining stress corrosion crack growth at constant load in sensitized type 304 stainless steel is difficult, despite the use of a moderately high stress intensity, and high dissolved oxygen and corrosion potential conditions. Concerns for specimen machining and pre-cracking were identified, although these factors were not the sole cause of difficulty in initiating and sustaining stress corrosion cracking. It was shown that many phases of specimen preparation and testing can have a large influence on the measured SCC response. Even under the best test conditions it is critical to ensure

  7. Choice, internal consistency, and rationality

    OpenAIRE

    Aditi Bhattacharyya; Prasanta K. Pattanaik; Yongsheng Xu

    2010-01-01

    The classical theory of rational choice is built on several important internal consistency conditions. In recent years, the reasonableness of those internal consistency conditions has been questioned and criticized, and several responses to accommodate such criticisms have been proposed in the literature. This paper develops a general framework to accommodate the issues raised by the criticisms of classical rational choice theory, and examines the broad impact of these criticisms from both no...

  8. Self-consistent quark bags

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rafelski, J.

    1979-01-01

    After an introductory overview of the bag model the author uses the self-consistent solution of the coupled Dirac-meson fields to represent a bound state of strongly ineteracting fermions. In this framework he discusses the vivial approach to classical field equations. After a short description of the used numerical methods the properties of bound states of scalar self-consistent Fields and the solutions of a self-coupled Dirac field are considered. (HSI) [de

  9. Properties influencing cracking and separation of palm nuts in a mechanical cracker cum separator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JOSHUA OLANREWAJU OLAOYE

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Experimental studies of some properties influencing cracking and separation of palm kernel from the shell was conducted in a palm kernel dual processing machine. A mechanical cracking cum separating machine was developed for the study. The cracking unit consists of feed hopper, impeller shaft, cracking drum and impeller blade. The nut falls by gravity through the hopper channel into the cracking drum where the cracking process takes place through the help of impeller blades that flip the palm nut against the walls of cylindrical cracking drum. The mass of cracked nut flows through the separating unit that separates the kernel from the shell. The separation is induced by high current of air mass generated by an axial fan. A dura palm variety was selected and a total sample of eighteen thousand (18000 palm nuts were obtained and divided into two groups (feed rates, A and B, of eight thousand and ten thousand palm nuts respectively. Sample groups A and B were further divided into five sub – groups of four hundred (400 and five hundred (500 palm kernel nuts. Each sub group (feed rate was replicated four times at different shaft speeds (600, 900, 1200, 1500 and 1800 rpm. Results showed that cracking efficiencies increased with respect to speed. Un-cracked nuts percentage ranged from 1.3 to 5.3% at 7.1% moisture content, and 1.6 to 4.5% for 400 and 500 feed rates, respectively. Cracking time for both feed rates decreased with shaft speed. Throughput capacity of 11.49 kg/h was observed to be the lowest at 600 rpm and moisture content of 7.1% for both 400 feed rates and the highest throughput capacity of 37.16 kg/h was recorded at 1800 rpm at moisture contents of 9.3% and 16.1%. The results of this study shows that moisture content, engine speed and feed rate are significant parameters that influence cracking of nuts and separation of palm kernel from the shell.

  10. Extending the XFEM approach for fast transient three-dimensional crack propagation in ductile materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelee-De-Saint-Maurice, Romains

    2014-01-01

    This PhD thesis presents numerical methods is dedicated to three-dimensional crack propagation in the framework of fast explicit structural dynamics using EUROPLEXUS software (currently abbreviated EPX, co-owned by CEA and EC/JRC). An approach based on the well-known XFEM method is proposed, representing the crack through level set functions. Special care is given to the update of the level set functions from the propagation velocity expressed on the crack edge, since the most widely used method based on the solution of Hamilton-Jacobi equations lacks robustness for fast transient crack propagations, even when level-sets are computed on an auxiliary regular finite difference grid. It is therefore chosen instead to implement a 3D approximated geometric method to update both level-sets. As far as failure mechanics is concerned, a local stress criterion on the edge of the crack, first developed by Haboussa et al., gives characteristic parameters of the material fracture. Mechanical equivalent quantities (strain, deformation) around the crack front are weighted by a Gaussian function, which gives more importance to Gauss integration points located near the crack tip. The maximum of the equivalent stress tensor near the crack tip gives the direction of the crack, and the Kanninen equation gives the crack velocity. Besides, because of the discontinuous displacement field, the numerical integration for elements cut by the crack yields performance issues. Increasing the number of quadrature points is CPU time consuming and quite hard to handle if it is chosen to change the number of points only for elements in the vicinity of the crack. Another approach tested here consists in keeping constant the number and position of quadrature points and modifying their weights in cut elements to obtain an accurate integration of several reference discontinuous fields. The proposed methods are tested and validated on significant examples, both two-dimensional, to ensure the backward

  11. Temperature and environmentally assisted cracking in low alloy steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auten, T.A.; Monter, J.V.

    1995-01-01

    Environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) can be defined as the propagation of fatigue cracks in water at rates that are anywhere from 3 to over 40 times the growth rates expected in air. In the present work, five ASTM A 508 Class 2 forgings with ladle and check analyses that ranged from 0.010 to 0.019 wt% S were tested in high purity deaerated water in the temperature range of 93 to 260 C. At 260 C these forgings did not undergo EAC, reinforcing earlier results for two similar forgings. This broad sampling indicates a strong resistance to EAC for this class of forging at 260 C. On the other hand, EAC occurred consistently in the three of these forgings that were tested below 204 C, provided the test conditions were high enough to produce a high baseline fatigue crack growth rate (FCGR), where the baseline FCGR is that expected in air. At 149 C, EAC occurred at test conditions that combined to yield a baseline FCGR greater than ∼2E-6 mm/s. At 204, 121, and 93 C, this ''critical crack growth rate'' appeared to shift to lower baseline values. The EAC that occurred at lower temperatures was a factor of 3 to 12 times higher than baseline air rates, which was not as strong as the effect for higher sulfur steels at 240 to 290 C. Also, no plateau in the growth rates occurred as it does with the higher sulfur steels. In another approach, EAC was induced at 93 and at 260 C by raising the dissolved oxygen content of the water from 15 ppb. In this case, the EAC growth rates decreased to non-EAC levels when the oxygen supply was shut off. The oxygen-related EAC occurred over a broader range of baseline growth rates than found for the EAC driven by the baseline crack tip speed. Again, this can be rationalized by the buildup of sulfur in the crack tip water, which can be associated with the higher corrosion potential of the bulk water

  12. Dislocation model of a subsurface crack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, F.; Li, J.C.

    1997-01-01

    A dislocation model of a subsurface crack parallel to the surface is presented. For tensile loading, the results agree with those of previous workers except that we studied the crack very close to the surface and found that K II (mode II stress intensity factor) approaches K I (mode I stress intensity factor) to within about 22% (K II =0.78K I ). (Note that K II is zero when the crack is far away from the surface). Using bending theory for such situations, it is found that both stress intensity factors are inversely proportional to the 3/2 power of the distance between the subsurface crack and the free surface. For shear loading, the crack faces overlap each other for the free traction condition. This indicates the failure of the model. However, there was no overlap for tensile loading even though the stresses in front of the crack oscillate somewhat when the crack is very close to the surface. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  13. Identification of cracks in thick beams with a cracked beam element model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Chuanchuan; Lu, Yong

    2016-12-01

    The effect of a crack on the vibration of a beam is a classical problem, and various models have been proposed, ranging from the basic stiffness reduction method to the more sophisticated model involving formulation based on the additional flexibility due to a crack. However, in the damage identification or finite element model updating applications, it is still common practice to employ a simple stiffness reduction factor to represent a crack in the identification process, whereas the use of a more realistic crack model is rather limited. In this paper, the issues with the simple stiffness reduction method, particularly concerning thick beams, are highlighted along with a review of several other crack models. A robust finite element model updating procedure is then presented for the detection of cracks in beams. The description of the crack parameters is based on the cracked beam flexibility formulated by means of the fracture mechanics, and it takes into consideration of shear deformation and coupling between translational and longitudinal vibrations, and thus is particularly suitable for thick beams. The identification procedure employs a global searching technique using Genetic Algorithms, and there is no restriction on the location, severity and the number of cracks to be identified. The procedure is verified to yield satisfactory identification for practically any configurations of cracks in a beam.

  14. Radioisotope applications on fluidized catalytic cracking units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charlton, J.S.

    1997-01-01

    Radioisotopes are used to trace the flow of all the phases of Fluidized Catalytic Cracking process in oil refineries. The gaseous phases, steam, hydrocarbon vapour and air, are generally traced using a noble-gas isotope, 41 Ar, 79 Kr or 85 Kr. An appropriate tracer for the catalyst is produced by irradiating a catalyst sample in a nuclear reactor. The activation products, 140 La and 24 Na provide appropriate radioactive 'labels' for the catalyst, which is reinjected into the FCC. An advantage of this approach is that it facilitates the study of the behaviour of different particle size fractions. Radioisotopes as sealed sources of gamma radiation are used to measure catalyst density variations and density distributions in critical parts of the unit. An important trend in radioisotope applications is the increasing use of the information they produce as inputs to or as validation of, mathematical process models. In line with the increasing sophistication of the models, the technology is undergoing continuous refinement. Developments include the investigation of more efficient, more convenient tracers, the introduction of systems to facilitate more rapid and comprehensive data acquisition and software refinements for enhanced data analysis

  15. Examination and Improvement of Accuracy of Three-Dimensional Elastic Crack Solutions Obtained Using Finite Element Alternating Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jai Hak; Nikishkov, G. P.

    2010-01-01

    An SGBEM (symmetric Galerkin boundary element method)-FEM alternating method has been proposed by Nikishkov, Park and Atluri. This method can be used to obtain mixed-mode stress intensity factors for planar and nonplanar three-dimensional cracks having an arbitrary shape. For field applications, however, it is necessary to verify the accuracy and consistency of this method. Therefore, in this study, we investigate the effects of several factors on the accuracy of the stress intensity factors obtained using the above mentioned alternating method. The obtained stress intensity factors are compared with the known values provided in handbooks, especially in the case of internal and external circumferential semi-elliptical surface cracks. The results show that the SGBEM-FEM alternating method yields accurate stress intensity factors for three-dimensional cracks, including internal and external circumferential surface cracks and that the method can be used as a robust crack analysis tool for solving field problems

  16. Additive for vanadium and sulfur oxide capture in catalytic cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chin, A.A.; Sapre, A.V.; Sarli, M.S.

    1991-01-01

    This patent describes a fluid catalytic cracking process in which a hydrocarbon feedstock. It comprises: a vanadium contaminant in an amount of a least 2 ppmw is cracked under fluid catalytic cracking conditions with a solid, particulate cracking catalyst to produce cracking products of lower molecular weight while depositing carbonaceous material on the particles of cracking catalyst, separating the particles of cracking catalyst from the cracking products in the disengaging zone and oxidatively regenerating the cracking catalyst by burning off the deposited carbonaceous material in a regeneration zone, the improvement comprising reducing the make-up rate of the cracking catalyst by contacting the cracking feed with a particulate additive composition for passivating the vanadium content of the feed, comprising an alkaline earth metal oxide and an alkaline earth metal spinel

  17. Crack embryo formation before crack initiation and growth in high temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arioka, Koji; Yamada, Takuyo; Terachi, Takumi; Miyamoto, Tomoki

    2008-01-01

    Crack growth measurements were performed in high temperature water and in air to examine the role of creep on IGSCC growth using cold rolled non-sensitized Type316(UNS S31600), TT690 alloy, MA600 alloy, and Carbon steel (STPT42). In addition, crack initiation tests were performed also in high temperature water and in air using specially designed CT specimen. The obtained major results are as follows: (1) TT690 did crack in intergranularly in hydrogenated high temperature water if material is cold worked in heavily. (2) Cold worked carbon steel also cracked in intergranularly in dearated high temperature water. (3) Intergranular crack growth was recognized on cold worked 316, TT690, MA600, and carbon steel even in air which might be crack embryo of IGSCC. (4) Simple Arrhenius type temperature dependence was observed on IGSCC in high temperature water and creep crack growth in air. This suggested that intergranular crack growth rate was determined by some thermal activated reaction. (5) Vacancy condensation was recognized at just ahead of the crack tips of IGSCC and creep crack of cold worked steel. This showed that IGSCC and creep crack growth was controlled by same mechanism. (6) Clear evidence of vacancies condensation was recognized at just beneath the surface before crack initiation. This proved that crack did initiate as the result of diffusion of vacancies in the solid. And the incubation time seems to be controlled by the required time for the condensation of vacancies to the stress concentrated zone. (7) Diffusion of subsituational atoms was also driven by stress gradient. This is the important knowledge to evaluate the SCC initiation after long term operation in LWR's. Based on the observed results, IGSCC initiation and growth mechanism were proposed considering the diffusion process of cold worked induced vacancies. (author)

  18. Time-consistent and market-consistent evaluations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pelsser, A.; Stadje, M.A.

    2014-01-01

    We consider evaluation methods for payoffs with an inherent financial risk as encountered for instance for portfolios held by pension funds and insurance companies. Pricing such payoffs in a way consistent to market prices typically involves combining actuarial techniques with methods from

  19. Fatigue crack growth in fiber-metal laminates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, YuE; Xia, ZhongChun; Xiong, XiaoFeng

    2014-01-01

    Fiber-metal laminates (FMLs) consist of three layers of aluminum alloy 2024-T3 and two layers of glass/epoxy prepreg, and it (it means FMLs) is laminated by Al alloy and fiber alternatively. Fatigue crack growth rates in notched fiber-metal laminates under constant amplitude fatigue loading were studied experimentally and numerically and were compared with them in monolithic 2024-T3 Al alloy plates. It is shown that the fatigue life of FMLs is about 17 times longer than monolithic 2024-T3 Al alloy plate; and crack growth rates in FMLs panels remain constant mostly even when the crack is long, unlike in the monolithic 2024-T3 Al alloy plates. The formula to calculate bridge stress profiles of FMLs was derived based on the fracture theory. A program by Matlab was developed to calculate the distribution of bridge stress in FMLs, and then fatigue growth lives were obtained. Finite element models of FMLs were built and meshed finely to analyze the stress distributions. Both results were compared with the experimental results. They agree well with each other.

  20. Propagation of stress-corrosion cracks in unirradiated zircaloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norring, K.; Haag, Y.; Wikstroem, C.

    1982-01-01

    Propagation of iodine-induced stress-corrosion cracks in Zircaloy was studied using pre-cracked and internally pressurized cladding tubes. These were recrystallized at different temperatures, to obtain grain sizes between 4 μm and 10 μm. No statistically significant difference in propagation rate due to the difference in grain size was observed. If the obtained data, with Ksub(I) values ranging from 4 to 11 MNmsup(-3/2), were log-log plotted (da/dt = CKsub(I)sup(N)), as usual, they fell within the scatter-band of data reported earlier. But from this plot it could also be seen that the Ksub(I) interval can be divided into two separate parts having different da/dt-Ksub(I) relations. The transition takes place at a Ksub(I) value of about 8 MNmsup(-3/2). The region with lower Ksub(I) values shows a substantially lower n value than the upper region (2.4 and 9.8 respectively), and earlier reported values (n = 7 to 10). This transition is in good agreement with a transition from an intergranular to a transgranular propagation mode of the stress-corrosion crack. (orig.)