WorldWideScience

Sample records for conserved threonine residues

  1. Bridge helix bending promotes RNA polymerase II backtracking through a critical and conserved threonine residue

    KAUST Repository

    Da, Lin-Tai

    2016-04-19

    The dynamics of the RNA polymerase II (Pol II) backtracking process is poorly understood. We built a Markov State Model from extensive molecular dynamics simulations to identify metastable intermediate states and the dynamics of backtracking at atomistic detail. Our results reveal that Pol II backtracking occurs in a stepwise mode where two intermediate states are involved. We find that the continuous bending motion of the Bridge helix (BH) serves as a critical checkpoint, using the highly conserved BH residue T831 as a sensing probe for the 3′-terminal base paring of RNA:DNA hybrid. If the base pair is mismatched, BH bending can promote the RNA 3′-end nucleotide into a frayed state that further leads to the backtracked state. These computational observations are validated by site-directed mutagenesis and transcript cleavage assays, and provide insights into the key factors that regulate the preferences of the backward translocation.

  2. Bridge helix bending promotes RNA polymerase II backtracking through a critical and conserved threonine residue

    KAUST Repository

    Da, Lin-Tai; Pardo-Avila, Fá tima; Xu, Liang; Silva, Daniel-Adriano; Zhang, Lu; Gao, Xin; Wang, Dong; Huang, Xuhui

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of the RNA polymerase II (Pol II) backtracking process is poorly understood. We built a Markov State Model from extensive molecular dynamics simulations to identify metastable intermediate states and the dynamics of backtracking at atomistic detail. Our results reveal that Pol II backtracking occurs in a stepwise mode where two intermediate states are involved. We find that the continuous bending motion of the Bridge helix (BH) serves as a critical checkpoint, using the highly conserved BH residue T831 as a sensing probe for the 3′-terminal base paring of RNA:DNA hybrid. If the base pair is mismatched, BH bending can promote the RNA 3′-end nucleotide into a frayed state that further leads to the backtracked state. These computational observations are validated by site-directed mutagenesis and transcript cleavage assays, and provide insights into the key factors that regulate the preferences of the backward translocation.

  3. Identification of an evolutionarily conserved extracellular threonine residue critical for surface expression and its potential coupling of adjacent voltage-sensing and gating domains in voltage-gated potassium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckeown, Lynn; Burnham, Matthew P; Hodson, Charlotte; Jones, Owen T

    2008-10-31

    The dynamic expression of voltage-gated potassium channels (Kvs) at the cell surface is a fundamental factor controlling membrane excitability. In exploring possible mechanisms controlling Kv surface expression, we identified a region in the extracellular linker between the first and second of the six (S1-S6) transmembrane-spanning domains of the Kv1.4 channel, which we hypothesized to be critical for its biogenesis. Using immunofluorescence microscopy, flow cytometry, patch clamp electrophysiology, and mutagenesis, we identified a single threonine residue at position 330 within the Kv1.4 S1-S2 linker that is absolutely required for cell surface expression. Mutation of Thr-330 to an alanine, aspartate, or lysine prevented surface expression. However, surface expression occurred upon co-expression of mutant and wild type Kv1.4 subunits or mutation of Thr-330 to a serine. Mutation of the corresponding residue (Thr-211) in Kv3.1 to alanine also caused intracellular retention, suggesting that the conserved threonine plays a generalized role in surface expression. In support of this idea, sequence comparisons showed conservation of the critical threonine in all Kv families and in organisms across the evolutionary spectrum. Based upon the Kv1.2 crystal structure, further mutagenesis, and the partial restoration of surface expression in an electrostatic T330K bridging mutant, we suggest that Thr-330 hydrogen bonds to equally conserved outer pore residues, which may include a glutamate at position 502 that is also critical for surface expression. We propose that Thr-330 serves to interlock the voltage-sensing and gating domains of adjacent monomers, thereby yielding a structure competent for the surface expression of functional tetramers.

  4. Identification of a highly reactive threonine residue at the active site of γ-glutamyl transpeptidase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stole, E.; Seddon, A.P.; Wellner, D.; Meister, A.

    1990-01-01

    γ-Glutamyl transpeptidase an enzyme of major importance in glutathione metabolism, was inactivated by treating it with L-(αS,5S)-α-amino-3-chloro-4,5-dihydro-5-[3- 14 C]isoxazoleacetic acid. This selective reagent binds stoichiometrically to the enzyme; more than 90% of the label was bound to its light subunit. Enzymatic digestion of the light subunit gave a 14 C-labeled peptide that corresponds to amino acid residues 517-527 of the enzyme and two incomplete digestion products that contain this labeled peptide moiety. The radioactivity associated with this peptide was released with threonine-523 during sequencing by the automated gas-phase Edman method. The light subunit contains 14 other threonine residues and a total of 19 serine residues; these were not labeled. Threonine-523 is situated in the enzyme in an environment that greatly increases its reactivity, indicating that other amino acid residues of the enzyme must also participate in the active-site chemistry of the enzyme

  5. Cross-phosphorylation of bacterial serine/threonine and tyrosine protein kinases on key regulatory residues

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    Lei eShi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria possess protein serine/threonine and tyrosine kinases which resemble eukaryal kinases in their capacity to phosphorylate multiple substrates. We hypothesized that the analogy might extend further, and bacterial kinases may also undergo mutual phosphorylation and activation, which is currently considered as a hallmark of eukaryal kinase networks. In order to test this hypothesis, we explored the capacity of all members of four different classes of serine/threonine and tyrosine kinases present in the firmicute model organism Bacillus subtilis to phosphorylate each other in vitro and interact with each other in vivo. The interactomics data suggested a high degree of connectivity among all types of kinases, while phosphorylation assays revealed equally wide-spread cross-phosphorylation events. Our findings suggest that the Hanks-type kinases PrkC, PrkD and YabT exhibit the highest capacity to phosphorylate other B. subtilis kinases, while the BY-kinase PtkA and the two-component-like kinases RsbW and SpoIIAB show the highest propensity to be phosphorylated by other kinases. Analysis of phosphorylated residues on several selected recipient kinases suggests that most cross-phosphorylation events concern key regulatory residues. Therefore, cross-phosphorylation events are very likely to influence the capacity of recipient kinases to phosphorylate substrates downstream in the signal transduction cascade. We therefore conclude that bacterial serine/threonine and tyrosine kinases probably engage in a network-type behavior previously described only in eukaryal cells.

  6. Threonine 89 Is an Important Residue of Profilin-1 That Is Phosphorylatable by Protein Kinase A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Gau

    Full Text Available Dynamic regulation of actin cytoskeleton is at the heart of all actin-based cellular events. In this study, we sought to identify novel post-translational modifications of Profilin-1 (Pfn1, an important regulator of actin polymerization in cells.We performed in vitro protein kinase assay followed by mass-spectrometry to identify Protein Kinase A (PKA phosphorylation sites of Pfn1. By two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2D-GE analysis, we further examined the changes in the isoelectric profile of ectopically expressed Pfn1 in HEK-293 cells in response to forskolin (FSK, an activator of cAMP/PKA pathway. Finally, we combined molecular dynamics simulations (MDS, GST pull-down assay and F-actin analyses of mammalian cells expressing site-specific phosphomimetic variants of Pfn1 to predict the potential consequences of phosphorylation of Pfn1.We identified several PKA phosphorylation sites of Pfn1 including Threonine 89 (T89, a novel site. Consistent with PKA's ability to phosphorylate Pfn1 in vitro, FSK stimulation increased the pool of the most negatively charged form of Pfn1 in HEK-293 cells which can be attenuated by PKA inhibitor H89. MDS predicted that T89 phosphorylation destabilizes an intramolecular interaction of Pfn1, potentially increasing its affinity for actin. The T89D phosphomimetic mutation of Pfn1 elicits several changes that are hallmarks of proteins folded into alternative three-dimensional conformations including detergent insolubility, protein aggregation and accelerated proteolysis, suggesting that T89 is a structurally important residue of Pfn1. Expression of T89D-Pfn1 induces actin:T89D-Pfn1 co-clusters and dramatically reduces overall actin polymerization in cells, indicating an actin-sequestering action of T89D-Pfn1. Finally, rendering T89 non-phosphorylatable causes a positive charge shift in the isoelectric profile of Pfn1 in a 2D gel electrophoresis analysis of cell extracts, a finding that is consistent with

  7. Crystal structure of Arabidopsis thaliana Dawdle forkhead-associated domain reveals a conserved phospho-threonine recognition cleft for dicer-like 1 binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machida, Satoru; Yuan, Y Adam

    2013-07-01

    Dawdle (DDL) is a microRNA processing protein essential for the development of Arabidopsis. DDL contains a putative nuclear localization signal at its amino-terminus and forkhead-associated (FHA) domain at the carboxyl-terminus. Here, we report the crystal structure of the FHA domain of Arabidopsis Dawdle, determined by multiple-wavelength anomalous dispersion method at 1.7-Å resolution. DDL FHA structure displays a seven-stranded β-sandwich architecture that contains a unique structural motif comprising two long anti-parallel strands. Strikingly, crystal packing of the DDL FHA domain reveals that a glutamate residue from the symmetry-related DDL FHA domain, a structural mimic of the phospho-threonine, is specifically recognized by the structurally conserved phospho-threonine binding cleft. Consistently with the structural observations, co-immuno-precipitation experiments performed in Nicotiana benthamiana show that the DDL FHA domain co-immuno-precipitates with DCL1 fragments containing the predicted pThr+3(Ile/Val/Leu/Asp) motif. Taken together, we count the recognition of the target residue by the canonical binding cleft of the DDL FHA domain as the key molecular event to instate FHA domain-mediated protein-protein interaction in plant miRNA processing.

  8. Tracking protons from respiratory chain complexes to ATP synthase c-subunit: The critical role of serine and threonine residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panfoli, Isabella; Ponassi, Marco; Ravera, Silvia; Calzia, Daniela; Beitia, Maider; Morelli, Alessandro; Rosano, Camillo

    2017-01-22

    F 1 F o -ATP synthase is a multisubunit enzyme responsible for the synthesis of ATP. Among its multiple subunits (8 in E. coli, 17 in yeast S. cerevisiae, 16 in vertebrates), two subunits a and c are known to play a central role controlling the H + flow through the inner mitochondrial membrane which allows the subsequent synthesis of ATP, but the pathway followed by H + within the two proteins is still a matter of debate. In fact, even though the structure of ATP synthase is now well defined, the molecular mechanisms determining the function of both F 1 and F O domains are still largely unknown. In this study, we propose a pathway for proton migration along the ATP synthase by hydrogen-bonded chain mechanism, with a key role of serine and threonine residues, by X-ray diffraction data on the subunit a of E. coli Fo. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Combining specificity determining and conserved residues improves functional site prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gelfand Mikhail S

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Predicting the location of functionally important sites from protein sequence and/or structure is a long-standing problem in computational biology. Most current approaches make use of sequence conservation, assuming that amino acid residues conserved within a protein family are most likely to be functionally important. Most often these approaches do not consider many residues that act to define specific sub-functions within a family, or they make no distinction between residues important for function and those more relevant for maintaining structure (e.g. in the hydrophobic core. Many protein families bind and/or act on a variety of ligands, meaning that conserved residues often only bind a common ligand sub-structure or perform general catalytic activities. Results Here we present a novel method for functional site prediction based on identification of conserved positions, as well as those responsible for determining ligand specificity. We define Specificity-Determining Positions (SDPs, as those occupied by conserved residues within sub-groups of proteins in a family having a common specificity, but differ between groups, and are thus likely to account for specific recognition events. We benchmark the approach on enzyme families of known 3D structure with bound substrates, and find that in nearly all families residues predicted by SDPsite are in contact with the bound substrate, and that the addition of SDPs significantly improves functional site prediction accuracy. We apply SDPsite to various families of proteins containing known three-dimensional structures, but lacking clear functional annotations, and discusse several illustrative examples. Conclusion The results suggest a better means to predict functional details for the thousands of protein structures determined prior to a clear understanding of molecular function.

  10. Phosphorylation of threonine residues on Shc promotes ligand binding and mediates crosstalk between MAPK and Akt pathways in breast cancer cells

    KAUST Repository

    Suen, K.M.

    2017-12-06

    Scaffold proteins play important roles in regulating signalling network fidelity, the absence of which is often the basis for diseases such as cancer. In the present work, we show that the prototypical scaffold protein Shc is phosphorylated by the extracellular signal-regulated kinase, Erk. In addition, Shc threonine phosphorylation is specifically up-regulated in two selected triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) cell lines. To explore how Erk-mediated threonine phosphorylation on Shc might play a role in the dysregulation of signalling events, we investigated how Shc affects pathways downstream of EGF receptor. Using an in vitro model and biophysical analysis, we show that Shc threonine phosphorylation is responsible for elevated Akt and Erk signalling, potentially through the recruitment of the 14-3-3 ζ and Pin-1 proteins.

  11. Phosphorylation of threonine residues on Shc promotes ligand binding and mediates crosstalk between MAPK and Akt pathways in breast cancer cells

    KAUST Repository

    Suen, K.M.; Lin, C.C.; Seiler, C.; George, R.; Poncet-Montange, G.; Biter, A.B.; Ahmed, Z.; Arold, Stefan T.; Ladbury, J.E.

    2017-01-01

    Scaffold proteins play important roles in regulating signalling network fidelity, the absence of which is often the basis for diseases such as cancer. In the present work, we show that the prototypical scaffold protein Shc is phosphorylated by the extracellular signal-regulated kinase, Erk. In addition, Shc threonine phosphorylation is specifically up-regulated in two selected triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) cell lines. To explore how Erk-mediated threonine phosphorylation on Shc might play a role in the dysregulation of signalling events, we investigated how Shc affects pathways downstream of EGF receptor. Using an in vitro model and biophysical analysis, we show that Shc threonine phosphorylation is responsible for elevated Akt and Erk signalling, potentially through the recruitment of the 14-3-3 ζ and Pin-1 proteins.

  12. Residual distribution for general time-dependent conservation laws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ricchiuto, Mario; Csik, Arpad; Deconinck, Herman

    2005-01-01

    We consider the second-order accurate numerical solution of general time-dependent hyperbolic conservation laws over unstructured grids in the framework of the Residual Distribution method. In order to achieve full conservation of the linear, monotone and first-order space-time schemes of (Csik et al., 2003) and (Abgrall et al., 2000), we extend the conservative residual distribution (CRD) formulation of (Csik et al., 2002) to prismatic space-time elements. We then study the design of second-order accurate and monotone schemes via the nonlinear mapping of the local residuals of linear monotone schemes. We derive sufficient and necessary conditions for the well-posedness of the mapping. We prove that the schemes obtained with the CRD formulation satisfy these conditions by construction. Thus the nonlinear schemes proposed in this paper are always well defined. The performance of the linear and nonlinear schemes are evaluated on a series of test problems involving the solution of the Euler equations and of a two-phase flow model. We consider the resolution of strong shocks and complex interacting flow structures. The results demonstrate the robustness, accuracy and non-oscillatory character of the proposed schemes. d schemes

  13. Relationships between residue Voronoi volume and sequence conservation in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jen-Wei; Cheng, Chih-Wen; Lin, Yu-Feng; Chen, Shao-Yu; Hwang, Jenn-Kang; Yen, Shih-Chung

    2018-02-01

    Functional and biophysical constraints can cause different levels of sequence conservation in proteins. Previously, structural properties, e.g., relative solvent accessibility (RSA) and packing density of the weighted contact number (WCN), have been found to be related to protein sequence conservation (CS). The Voronoi volume has recently been recognized as a new structural property of the local protein structural environment reflecting CS. However, for surface residues, it is sensitive to water molecules surrounding the protein structure. Herein, we present a simple structural determinant termed the relative space of Voronoi volume (RSV); it uses the Voronoi volume and the van der Waals volume of particular residues to quantify the local structural environment. RSV (range, 0-1) is defined as (Voronoi volume-van der Waals volume)/Voronoi volume of the target residue. The concept of RSV describes the extent of available space for every protein residue. RSV and Voronoi profiles with and without water molecules (RSVw, RSV, VOw, and VO) were compared for 554 non-homologous proteins. RSV (without water) showed better Pearson's correlations with CS than did RSVw, VO, or VOw values. The mean correlation coefficient between RSV and CS was 0.51, which is comparable to the correlation between RSA and CS (0.49) and that between WCN and CS (0.56). RSV is a robust structural descriptor with and without water molecules and can quantitatively reflect evolutionary information in a single protein structure. Therefore, it may represent a practical structural determinant to study protein sequence, structure, and function relationships. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Highly conserved small subunit residues influence rubisco large subunit catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genkov, Todor; Spreitzer, Robert J

    2009-10-30

    The chloroplast enzyme ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) catalyzes the rate-limiting step of photosynthetic CO(2) fixation. With a deeper understanding of its structure-function relationships and competitive inhibition by O(2), it may be possible to engineer an increase in agricultural productivity and renewable energy. The chloroplast-encoded large subunits form the active site, but the nuclear-encoded small subunits can also influence catalytic efficiency and CO(2)/O(2) specificity. To further define the role of the small subunit in Rubisco function, the 10 most conserved residues in all small subunits were substituted with alanine by transformation of a Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutant that lacks the small subunit gene family. All the mutant strains were able to grow photosynthetically, indicating that none of the residues is essential for function. Three of the substitutions have little or no effect (S16A, P19A, and E92A), one primarily affects holoenzyme stability (L18A), and the remainder affect catalysis with or without some level of associated structural instability (Y32A, E43A, W73A, L78A, P79A, and F81A). Y32A and E43A cause decreases in CO(2)/O(2) specificity. Based on the x-ray crystal structure of Chlamydomonas Rubisco, all but one (Glu-92) of the conserved residues are in contact with large subunits and cluster near the amino- or carboxyl-terminal ends of large subunit alpha-helix 8, which is a structural element of the alpha/beta-barrel active site. Small subunit residues Glu-43 and Trp-73 identify a possible structural connection between active site alpha-helix 8 and the highly variable small subunit loop between beta-strands A and B, which can also influence Rubisco CO(2)/O(2) specificity.

  15. Threonine phosphorylation of rat liver glycogen synthase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arino, J.; Arro, M.; Guinovart, J.J.

    1985-01-01

    32 P-labeled glycogen synthase specifically immunoprecipitated from 32 P-phosphate incubated rat hepatocytes contains, in addition to [ 32 P] phosphoserine, significant levels of [ 32 P] phosphothreonine. When the 32 P-immunoprecipitate was cleaved with CNBr, the [ 32 P] phosphothreonine was recovered in the large CNBr fragment (CB-2, Mapp 28 Kd). Homogeneous rat liver glycogen synthase was phosphorylated by all the protein kinases able to phosphorylate CB-2 in vitro. After analysis of the immunoprecipitated enzyme for phosphoaminoacids, it was observed that only casein kinase II was able to phosphorylate on threonine and 32 P-phosphate was only found in CB-2. These results demonstrate that rat liver glycogen synthase is phosphorylated at threonine site(s) contained in CB-2 and strongly indicate that casein kinase II may play a role in the ''in vivo'' phosphorylation of liver glycogen synthase. This is the first protein kinase reported to phosphorylate threonine residues in liver glycogen synthase

  16. On the relationship between residue structural environment and sequence conservation in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jen-Wei; Lin, Jau-Ji; Cheng, Chih-Wen; Lin, Yu-Feng; Hwang, Jenn-Kang; Huang, Tsun-Tsao

    2017-09-01

    Residues that are crucial to protein function or structure are usually evolutionarily conserved. To identify the important residues in protein, sequence conservation is estimated, and current methods rely upon the unbiased collection of homologous sequences. Surprisingly, our previous studies have shown that the sequence conservation is closely correlated with the weighted contact number (WCN), a measure of packing density for residue's structural environment, calculated only based on the C α positions of a protein structure. Moreover, studies have shown that sequence conservation is correlated with environment-related structural properties calculated based on different protein substructures, such as a protein's all atoms, backbone atoms, side-chain atoms, or side-chain centroid. To know whether the C α atomic positions are adequate to show the relationship between residue environment and sequence conservation or not, here we compared C α atoms with other substructures in their contributions to the sequence conservation. Our results show that C α positions are substantially equivalent to the other substructures in calculations of various measures of residue environment. As a result, the overlapping contributions between C α atoms and the other substructures are high, yielding similar structure-conservation relationship. Take the WCN as an example, the average overlapping contribution to sequence conservation is 87% between C α and all-atom substructures. These results indicate that only C α atoms of a protein structure could reflect sequence conservation at the residue level. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Ranking multiple docking solutions based on the conservation of inter-residue contacts

    KAUST Repository

    Oliva, Romina M.; Vangone, Anna; Cavallo, Luigi

    2013-01-01

    ) conformations in the top positions is still an open problem. Herein we present CONSRANK, a simple and effective tool to rank multiple docking solutions, which relies on the conservation of inter-residue contacts in the analyzed decoys ensemble. First

  18. Reverse Conservation Analysis Reveals the Specificity Determining Residues of Cytochrome P450 Family 2 (CYP 2

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    Tai-Sung Lee

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The concept of conservation of amino acids is widely used to identify important alignment positions of orthologs. The assumption is that important amino acid residues will be conserved in the protein family during the evolutionary process. For paralog alignment, on the other hand, the opposite concept can be used to identify residues that are responsible for specificity. Assuming that the function-specific or ligand-specific residue positions will have higher diversity since they are under evolutionary pressure to fit the target specificity, these function-specific or ligand-specific residues positions will have a lower degree of conservation than other positions in a highly conserved paralog alignment. This study assessed the ability of reverse conservation analysis to identify function-specific and ligand-specific residue positions in closely related paralog. Reverse conservation analysis of paralog alignments successfully identified all six previously reported substrate recognition sites (SRSs in cytochrome P450 family 2 (CYP 2. Further analysis of each subfamily identified the specificity-determining residues (SDRs that have been experimentally found. New potential SDRs were also predicted and await confirmation by further experiments or modeling calculations. This concept may be also applied to identify SDRs in other protein families.

  19. The Influence of Repeat Surgery and Residual Disease on Recurrence After Breast-Conserving Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bodilsen, Anne; Bjerre, Karsten; Offersen, Birgitte V

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A significant proportion of women who have breast-conserving surgery (BCS) subsequently undergo re-excision or proceed to mastectomy. This study aimed to identify factors associated with residual disease after repeat surgery and to determine their effect on ipsilateral breast tumor re...

  20. Case studies in residual use and energy conservation at wastewater treatment plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, D. [Science Applications International Corp., Los Altos, CA (United States)

    1995-06-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) for the US Department of Energy (DOE) funded a study to document energy conservation activities and their effects on operation costs, regulatory compliance, and process optimization at several wastewater treatment plants (WWTPS). The purpose of this report is to review the efforts of wastewater treatment Facilities that use residuals as fuels. Case histories are presented for facilities that have taken measures to reduce energy consumption during wastewater treatment. Most of the WWTPs discussed in this report have retrofitted existing facilities to achieve energy conservation. The case studies of energy conservation measures found no effects on the facilities` ability to comply with NPDES permits. Indeed, energy conservation activities enhance environmental compliance in several ways.

  1. Conserved residues of the human mitochondrial holocytochrome c synthase mediate interactions with heme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babbitt, Shalon E; San Francisco, Brian; Bretsnyder, Eric C; Kranz, Robert G

    2014-08-19

    C-type cytochromes are distinguished by the covalent attachment of a heme cofactor, a modification that is typically required for its subsequent folding, stability, and function. Heme attachment takes place in the mitochondrial intermembrane space and, in most eukaryotes, is mediated by holocytochrome c synthase (HCCS). HCCS is the primary component of the eukaryotic cytochrome c biogenesis pathway, known as System III. The catalytic function of HCCS depends on its ability to coordinate interactions between its substrates: heme and cytochrome c. Recent advancements in the recombinant expression and purification of HCCS have facilitated comprehensive analyses of the roles of conserved residues in HCCS, as demonstrated in this study. Previously, we proposed a four-step model describing HCCS-mediated cytochrome c assembly, identifying a conserved histidine residue (His154) as an axial ligand to the heme iron. In this study, we performed a systematic mutational analysis of 17 conserved residues in HCCS, and we provide evidence that the enzyme contains two heme-binding domains. Our data indicate that heme contacts mediated by residues within these domains modulate the dynamics of heme binding and contribute to the stability of the HCCS-heme-cytochrome c steady state ternary complex. While some residues are essential for initial heme binding (step 1), others impact the subsequent release of the holocytochrome c product (step 4). Certain HCCS mutants that were defective in heme binding were corrected for function by exogenous aminolevulinic acid (ALA, the precursor to heme). This chemical "correction" supports the proposed role of heme binding for the corresponding residues.

  2. Residue management practices and planter attachments for corn production in a conservation agriculture system

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    J. Nejadi

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Seed placement and failure to establish a uniform plant stand are critical problems associated with production of corn (Zea mays following wheat (Triticum aestivum in a conservation agriculture system in Iran. Our objectives were to evaluate the performance of a corn row- crop planter equipped with two planter attachments (smooth/toothed coulters at six wheat residue management systems (three tillage systems and two levels of surface residue at two forward speeds of 5 and 7 km h-1. Residue retained after planting, seeding depth, emergence rate index (ERI and seed spacing indices were determined. The baled residue plots tilled by chisel plow followed by disc harrow (BRCD resulted in minimum residue after planting as compared to other residue treatments. Furthermore, the maximum values of the ERI and uniformity of plant spacing pertained to this treatment. Other results showed that the ERI increased up to 18% for the toothed coulter as compared to the smooth coulter. The toothed coulter also established a deeper seed placement as compared to the smooth coulter. Planting at forward speed of 5 km h-1 resulted in deeper seeding depth as compared to a forward speed of 7 km h-1. However, lower values of miss and precision indices were obtained at forward speed of 7 km h-1, indicating a more uniformity of plant spacing. Results of this study showed that equipping the conventional planter with toothed coulter and planting in soil prepared under the BRCD residue management system can result in a satisfactory conservation crop production system.

  3. Using a consensus approach based on the conservation of inter-residue contacts to rank CAPRI models

    KAUST Repository

    Vangone, Anna; Cavallo, Luigi; Oliva, Romina M.

    2013-01-01

    Herein we propose the use of a consensus approach, CONSRANK, for ranking CAPRI models. CONSRANK relies on the conservation of inter-residue contacts in the analyzed decoys ensemble. Models are ranked according to their ability to match the most

  4. Disentangling evolutionary signals: conservation, specificity determining positions and coevolution. Implication for catalytic residue prediction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teppa, Elin; Wilkins, Angela D.; Nielsen, Morten

    2012-01-01

    Background: A large panel of methods exists that aim to identify residues with critical impact on protein function based on evolutionary signals, sequence and structure information. However, it is not clear to what extent these different methods overlap, and if any of the methods have higher...... predictive potential compared to others when it comes to, in particular, the identification of catalytic residues (CR) in proteins. Using a large set of enzymatic protein families and measures based on different evolutionary signals, we sought to break up the different components of the information content......-value Evolutionary Trace (rvET) methods and conservation, another containing mutual information (MI) methods, and the last containing methods designed explicitly for the identification of specificity determining positions (SDPs): integer-value Evolutionary Trace (ivET), SDPfox, and XDET. In terms of prediction of CR...

  5. Conserved Aromatic Residue Confers Cation Selectivity in Claudin-2 and Claudin-10b*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiahua; Zhuo, Min; Pei, Lei; Yu, Alan S. L.

    2013-01-01

    In tight junctions, both claudin-2 and claudin-10b form paracellular cation-selective pores by the interaction of the first ECL 1 with permeating ions. We hypothesized that a highly conserved aromatic residue near the pore selectivity filter of claudins contributes to cation selectivity by cation-π interaction with the permeating cation. To test this, we generated MDCK I Tet-off cells stably transfected with claudin-2 Tyr67 mutants. The Y67L mutant showed reduced cation selectivity compared with wild-type claudin-2 due to a decrease in Na+ permeability, without affecting the Cl− permeability. The Y67A mutant enlarged the pore size and further decreased the charge selectivity due to an increase in Cl− permeability. The Y67F mutant restored the Na+ permeability, Cl− permeability, and pore size back to wild-type. The accessibility of Y67C to methanethiosulfonate modification indicated that its side chain faces the lumen of the pore. In claudin-10b, the F66L mutant reduced cation selectivity, and the F66A mutant lost pore conductance. We conclude that the conserved aromatic residue near the cation pore domain of claudins contributes to cation selectivity by a dual role of cation-π interaction and a luminal steric effect. Our findings provide new insight into how ion selectivity is achieved in the paracellular pore. PMID:23760508

  6. Residue conservation and dimer-interface analysis of olfactory receptor molecular models

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    Ramanathan Sowdhamini

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Olfactory Receptors (ORs are members of the Class A rhodopsin like G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs which are the initial players in the signal transduction cascade, leading to the generation of nerve impulses transmitted to the brain and resulting in the detection of odorant molecules. Despite the accumulation of thousands of olfactory receptor sequences, no crystal structures of ORs are known tο date. However, the recent availability of crystallographic models of a few GPCRs allows us to generate homology models of ORs and analyze their amino acid patterns, as there is a huge diversity in OR sequences. In this study, we have generated three-dimensional models of 100 representative ORs from Homo sapiens, Mus musculus, Drosophila melanogaster, Caenorhabditis elegans and Sacharomyces cerevisiae which were selected on the basis of a composite classification scheme and phylogenetic analysis. The crystal structure of bovine rhodopsin was used as a template and it was found that the full-length models have more than 90% of their residues in allowed regions of the Ramachandran plot. The structures were further used for analysis of conserved residues in the transmembrane and extracellular loop regions in order to identify functionally important residues. Several ORs are known to be functional as dimers and hence dimer interfaces were predicted for OR models to analyse their oligomeric functional state.

  7. Role of conserved cysteine residues in Herbaspirillum seropedicae NifA activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Marco A S; Baura, Valter A; Aquino, Bruno; Huergo, Luciano F; Kadowaki, Marco A S; Chubatsu, Leda S; Souza, Emanuel M; Dixon, Ray; Pedrosa, Fábio O; Wassem, Roseli; Monteiro, Rose A

    2009-01-01

    Herbaspirillum seropedicae is an endophytic diazotrophic bacterium that associates with economically important crops. NifA protein, the transcriptional activator of nif genes in H. seropedicae, binds to nif promoters and, together with RNA polymerase-sigma(54) holoenzyme, catalyzes the formation of open complexes to allow transcription initiation. The activity of H. seropedicae NifA is controlled by ammonium and oxygen levels, but the mechanisms of such control are unknown. Oxygen sensitivity is attributed to a conserved motif of cysteine residues in NifA that spans the central AAA+ domain and the interdomain linker that connects the AAA+ domain to the C-terminal DNA binding domain. Here we mutagenized this conserved motif of cysteines and assayed the activity of mutant proteins in vivo. We also purified the mutant variants of NifA and tested their capacity to bind to the nifB promoter region. Chimeric proteins between H. seropedicae NifA, an oxygen-sensitive protein, and Azotobacter vinelandii NifA, an oxygen-tolerant protein, were constructed and showed that the oxygen response is conferred by the central AAA+ and C-terminal DNA binding domains of H. seropedicae NifA. We conclude that the conserved cysteine motif is essential for NifA activity, although single cysteine-to-serine mutants are still competent at binding DNA.

  8. Identification of conserved regions and residues within Hedgehog acyltransferase critical for palmitoylation of Sonic Hedgehog.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John A Buglino

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Sonic hedgehog (Shh is a palmitoylated protein that plays key roles in mammalian development and human cancers. Palmitoylation of Shh is required for effective long and short range Shh-mediated signaling. Attachment of palmitate to Shh is catalyzed by Hedgehog acyltransferase (Hhat, a member of the membrane bound O-acyl transferase (MBOAT family of multipass membrane proteins. The extremely hydrophobic composition of MBOAT proteins has limited their biochemical characterization. Except for mutagenesis of two conserved residues, there has been no structure-function analysis of Hhat, and the regions of the protein required for Shh palmitoylation are unknown.Here we undertake a systematic approach to identify residues within Hhat that are required for protein stability and/or enzymatic activity. We also identify a second, novel MBOAT homology region (residues 196-234 that is required for Hhat activity. In total, ten deletion mutants and eleven point mutants were generated and analyzed. Truncations at the N- and C-termini of Hhat yielded inactive proteins with reduced stability. Four Hhat mutants with deletions within predicted loop regions and five point mutants retained stability but lost palmitoylation activity. We purified two point mutants, W378A and H379A, with defective Hhat activity. Kinetic analyses revealed alterations in apparent K(m and V(max for Shh and/or palmitoyl CoA, changes that likely explain the catalytic defects observed for these mutants.This study has pinpointed specific regions and multiple residues that regulate Hhat stability and catalysis. Our findings should be applicable to other MBOAT proteins that mediate lipid modification of Wnt proteins and ghrelin, and should serve as a model for understanding how secreted morphogens are modified by palmitoyl acyltransferases.

  9. Intragenic suppressor of Osiaa23 revealed a conserved tryptophan residue crucial for protein-protein interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Ni

    Full Text Available The Auxin/Indole-3-Acetic Acid (Aux/IAA and Auxin Response Factor (ARF are two important families that play key roles in auxin signal transduction. Both of the families contain a similar carboxyl-terminal domain (Domain III/IV that facilitates interactions between these two families. In spite of the importance of protein-protein interactions among these transcription factors, the mechanisms involved in these interactions are largely unknown. In this study, we isolated six intragenic suppressors of an auxin insensitive mutant, Osiaa23. Among these suppressors, Osiaa23-R5 successfully rescued all the defects of the mutant. Sequence analysis revealed that an amino acid substitution occurred in the Tryptophan (W residue in Domain IV of Osiaa23. Yeast two-hybrid experiments showed that the mutation in Domain IV prevents the protein-protein interactions between Osiaa23 and OsARFs. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the W residue is conserved in both OsIAAs and OsARFs. Next, we performed site-specific amino acid substitutions within Domain IV of OsARFs, and the conserved W in Domain IV was exchanged by Serine (S. The mutated OsARF(WSs can be released from the inhibition of Osiaa23 and maintain the transcriptional activities. Expression of OsARF(WSs in Osiaa23 mutant rescued different defects of the mutant. Our results suggest a previously unknown importance of Domain IV in both families and provide an indirect way to investigate functions of OsARFs.

  10. Ranking multiple docking solutions based on the conservation of inter-residue contacts

    KAUST Repository

    Oliva, Romina M.

    2013-06-17

    Molecular docking is the method of choice for investigating the molecular basis of recognition in a large number of functional protein complexes. However, correctly scoring the obtained docking solutions (decoys) to rank native-like (NL) conformations in the top positions is still an open problem. Herein we present CONSRANK, a simple and effective tool to rank multiple docking solutions, which relies on the conservation of inter-residue contacts in the analyzed decoys ensemble. First it calculates a conservation rate for each inter-residue contact, then it ranks decoys according to their ability to match the more frequently observed contacts. We applied CONSRANK to 102 targets from three different benchmarks, RosettaDock, DOCKGROUND, and Critical Assessment of PRedicted Interactions (CAPRI). The method performs consistently well, both in terms of NL solutions ranked in the top positions and of values of the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve. Its ideal application is to solutions coming from different docking programs and procedures, as in the case of CAPRI targets. For all the analyzed CAPRI targets where a comparison is feasible, CONSRANK outperforms the CAPRI scorers. The fraction of NL solutions in the top ten positions in the RosettaDock, DOCKGROUND, and CAPRI benchmarks is enriched on average by a factor of 3.0, 1.9, and 9.9, respectively. Interestingly, CONSRANK is also able to specifically single out the high/medium quality (HMQ) solutions from the docking decoys ensemble: it ranks 46.2 and 70.8% of the total HMQ solutions available for the RosettaDock and CAPRI targets, respectively, within the top 20 positions. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Characterization of a rabbit polyclonal antibody against threonine-AMPylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Yi-Heng; Chuang, Trinette; Ball, Haydn L.; Luong, Phi; Li, Yan; Flores-Saaib, Ruben D.; Orth, Kim

    2014-01-01

    An antibody against the posttranslational modification AMPylation was produced using a peptide corresponding to human Rac1 switch I region with AMPylated threonine-35 residue as an antigen. The resulting rabbit antiserum was tested for its abilities to recognize AMPylated proteins by western blot and immunoprecipitation. The antiserum is highly specific for threonine-AMPylated proteins and weakly recognizes tyrosine-AMPylated proteins. Depletion of serum with modified protein abolished its activity against tyrosine-AMPylated proteins. The antiserum also recognized native proteins with modification in an immunoprecipitation experiment. Interactions of the antiserum could be inhibited by competition with AMP but not with GMP or UMP. This antiserum had potential utility for the identification of unknown AMPylated proteins. PMID:21185336

  12. FragKB: structural and literature annotation resource of conserved peptide fragments and residues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish V Tendulkar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: FragKB (Fragment Knowledgebase is a repository of clusters of structurally similar fragments from proteins. Fragments are annotated with information at the level of sequence, structure and function, integrating biological descriptions derived from multiple existing resources and text mining. METHODOLOGY: FragKB contains approximately 400,000 conserved fragments from 4,800 representative proteins from PDB. Literature annotations are extracted from more than 1,700 articles and are available for over 12,000 fragments. The underlying systematic annotation workflow of FragKB ensures efficient update and maintenance of this database. The information in FragKB can be accessed through a web interface that facilitates sequence and structural visualization of fragments together with known literature information on the consequences of specific residue mutations and functional annotations of proteins and fragment clusters. FragKB is accessible online at http://ubio.bioinfo.cnio.es/biotools/fragkb/. SIGNIFICANCE: The information presented in FragKB can be used for modeling protein structures, for designing novel proteins and for functional characterization of related fragments. The current release is focused on functional characterization of proteins through inspection of conservation of the fragments.

  13. A case of postirradiation angiosarcoma developed in the residual breast after breast-conserving surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, Shinji; Okazaki, Yoshikazu; Fujii, Masakazu; Akiyama, Norio; Tomozawa, Naofumi; Morishige, Ichiro

    2008-01-01

    The patient was a 50-year-old woman who had undergone breast-conserving surgery for right breast cancer (C area, Bp+Ax, T2N0M0, Stage I, and scirrhous carcinoma), followed by irradiation at a total dose of 50 Gy in 1998. When 6 years 5 months had elapsed after the operation, redness and induration developed in the A area of the right breast. A biopsy via wedge resection was performed and the histopathological diagnosis was angiosarcoma. We could not rule out a possibility of positive surgical stump, and performed additional resection+skin grafting. No sarcoma remnant was demonstrated in the material resected additionally, but 2 years later, the patient experienced recurrence. Thus mastectomy+extended resection of the full thickness of the skin+skin grafting were performed. Postirradiation sarcoma involving the skin and vessels is a rare entity and occurs in 0.03-0.8% of all cases after radiation therapy. It metastasizes to the distant organs in an early stage and carries poor prognosis. No standard therapy for the disease has been established as yet. Early detection and extended resection are considered to contribute to an improvement of the prognosis. This paper deals with such a rare entity as postirradiation angiosarcoma developed in the residual breast after breast-conserving surgery. (author)

  14. Functional identification of conserved residues involved in Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain GG sortase specificity and pilus biogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douillard, François P; Rasinkangas, Pia; von Ossowski, Ingemar; Reunanen, Justus; Palva, Airi; de Vos, Willem M

    2014-05-30

    In Gram-positive bacteria, sortase-dependent pili mediate the adhesion of bacteria to host epithelial cells and play a pivotal role in colonization, host signaling, and biofilm formation. Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain GG, a well known probiotic bacterium, also displays on its cell surface mucus-binding pilus structures, along with other LPXTG surface proteins, which are processed by sortases upon specific recognition of a highly conserved LPXTG motif. Bioinformatic analysis of all predicted LPXTG proteins encoded by the L. rhamnosus GG genome revealed a remarkable conservation of glycine residues juxtaposed to the canonical LPXTG motif. Here, we investigated and defined the role of this so-called triple glycine (TG) motif in determining sortase specificity during the pilus assembly and anchoring. Mutagenesis of the TG motif resulted in a lack or an alteration of the L. rhamnosus GG pilus structures, indicating that the TG motif is critical in pilus assembly and that they govern the pilin-specific and housekeeping sortase specificity. This allowed us to propose a regulatory model of the L. rhamnosus GG pilus biogenesis. Remarkably, the TG motif was identified in multiple pilus gene clusters of other Gram-positive bacteria, suggesting that similar signaling mechanisms occur in other, mainly pathogenic, species. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Molecular Basis for Enzymatic Sulfite Oxidation -- HOW THREE CONSERVED ACTIVE SITE RESIDUES SHAPE ENZYME ACTIVITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, Susan; Rapson, Trevor; Johnson-Winters, Kayunta; Astashkin, Andrei; Enemark, John; Kappler, Ulrike

    2008-11-10

    Sulfite dehydrogenases (SDHs) catalyze the oxidation and detoxification of sulfite to sulfate, a reaction critical to all forms of life. Sulfite-oxidizing enzymes contain three conserved active site amino acids (Arg-55, His-57, and Tyr-236) that are crucial for catalytic competency. Here we have studied the kinetic and structural effects of two novel and one previously reported substitution (R55M, H57A, Y236F) in these residues on SDH catalysis. Both Arg-55 and His-57 were found to have key roles in substrate binding. An R55M substitution increased Km(sulfite)(app) by 2-3 orders of magnitude, whereas His-57 was required for maintaining a high substrate affinity at low pH when the imidazole ring is fully protonated. This effect may be mediated by interactions of His-57 with Arg-55 that stabilize the position of the Arg-55 side chain or, alternatively, may reflect changes in the protonation state of sulfite. Unlike what is seen for SDHWT and SDHY236F, the catalytic turnover rates of SDHR55M and SDHH57A are relatively insensitive to pH (~;;60 and 200 s-1, respectively). On the structural level, striking kinetic effects appeared to correlate with disorder (in SDHH57A and SDHY236F) or absence of Arg-55 (SDHR55M), suggesting that Arg-55 and the hydrogen bonding interactions it engages in are crucial for substrate binding and catalysis. The structure of SDHR55M has sulfate bound at the active site, a fact that coincides with a significant increase in the inhibitory effect of sulfate in SDHR55M. Thus, Arg-55 also appears to be involved in enabling discrimination between the substrate and product in SDH.

  16. Distinct kinetics of serine and threonine dephosphorylation are essential for mitosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hein, Jamin B; Hertz, Emil P T; Garvanska, Dimitriya H

    2017-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) in complex with B55 regulatory subunits reverses cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1) phosphorylations at mitotic exit. Interestingly, threonine and serine residues phosphorylated by Cdk1 display distinct phosphorylation dynamics, but the biological significance remains ...

  17. Proteome-wide mapping of the Drosophila acetylome demonstrates a high degree of conservation of lysine acetylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weinert, Brian T; Wagner, Sebastian A; Horn, Heiko

    2011-01-01

    Posttranslational modification of proteins by acetylation and phosphorylation regulates most cellular processes in living organisms. Surprisingly, the evolutionary conservation of phosphorylated serine and threonine residues is only marginally higher than that of unmodified serines and threonines....... With high-resolution mass spectrometry, we identified 1981 lysine acetylation sites in the proteome of Drosophila melanogaster. We used data sets of experimentally identified acetylation and phosphorylation sites in Drosophila and humans to analyze the evolutionary conservation of these modification sites...... between flies and humans. Site-level conservation analysis revealed that acetylation sites are highly conserved, significantly more so than phosphorylation sites. Furthermore, comparison of lysine conservation in Drosophila and humans with that in nematodes and zebrafish revealed that acetylated lysines...

  18. A highly Conserved Aspartic Acid Residue of the Chitosanase from Bacillus Sp. TS Is Involved in the Substrate Binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhanping; Zhao, Shuangzhi; Liu, Yang; Chang, Zhengying; Ma, Yanhe; Li, Jian; Song, Jiangning

    2016-11-01

    The chitosanase from Bacillus sp. TS (CsnTS) is an enzyme belonging to the glycoside hydrolase family 8. The sequence of CsnTS shares 98 % identity with the chitosanase from Bacillus sp. K17. Crystallography analysis and site-direct mutagenesis of the chitosanase from Bacillus sp. K17 identified the important residues involved in the catalytic interaction and substrate binding. However, despite progress in understanding the catalytic mechanism of the chitosanase from the family GH8, the functional roles of some residues that are highly conserved throughout this family have not been fully elucidated. This study focused on one of these residues, i.e., the aspartic acid residue at position 318. We found that apart from asparagine, mutation of Asp318 resulted in significant loss of enzyme activity. In-depth investigations showed that mutation of this residue not only impaired enzymatic activity but also affected substrate binding. Taken together, our results showed that Asp318 plays an important role in CsnTS activity.

  19. The economics of soil conservation in developing countries: the case of crop residue mulching

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erenstein, O.C.A.

    1999-01-01

    The study contributes to the search for a methodology to assess soil conservation, particularly in developing countries. The study first assesses the economics of soil conservation in general - with special emphasis on the relationships between technology, economic analysis and policy implications.

  20. L-allo-threonine aldolase with an H128Y/S292R mutation from Aeromonas jandaei DK-39 reveals the structural basis of changes in substrate stereoselectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Hui-Min; Imai, Fabiana Lica; Miyakawa, Takuya; Kataoka, Michihiko; Kitamura, Nahoko; Urano, Nobuyuki; Mori, Koji; Kawabata, Hiroshi; Okai, Masahiko; Ohtsuka, Jun; Hou, Feng; Nagata, Koji; Shimizu, Sakayu; Tanokura, Masaru

    2014-06-01

    L-allo-Threonine aldolase (LATA), a pyridoxal-5'-phosphate-dependent enzyme from Aeromonas jandaei DK-39, stereospecifically catalyzes the reversible interconversion of L-allo-threonine to glycine and acetaldehyde. Here, the crystal structures of LATA and its mutant LATA_H128Y/S292R were determined at 2.59 and 2.50 Å resolution, respectively. Their structures implied that conformational changes in the loop consisting of residues Ala123-Pro131, where His128 moved 4.2 Å outwards from the active site on mutation to a tyrosine residue, regulate the substrate specificity for L-allo-threonine versus L-threonine. Saturation mutagenesis of His128 led to diverse stereoselectivity towards L-allo-threonine and L-threonine. Moreover, the H128Y mutant showed the highest activity towards the two substrates, with an 8.4-fold increase towards L-threonine and a 2.0-fold increase towards L-allo-threonine compared with the wild-type enzyme. The crystal structures of LATA and its mutant LATA_H128Y/S292R reported here will provide further insights into the regulation of the stereoselectivity of threonine aldolases targeted for the catalysis of L-allo-threonine/L-threonine synthesis.

  1. Enhancement of L-Threonine Production by Controlling Sequential Carbon-Nitrogen Ratios during Fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyeok-Won; Lee, Hee-Suk; Kim, Chun-Suk; Lee, Jin-Gyeom; Kim, Won-Kyo; Lee, Eun-Gyo; Lee, Hong-Weon

    2018-02-28

    Controlling the residual glucose concentration is important for improving productivity in L-threonine fermentation. In this study, we developed a procedure to automatically control the feeding quantity of glucose solution as a function of ammonia-water consumption rate. The feeding ratio (R C/N ) of glucose and ammonia water was predetermined via a stoichiometric approach, on the basis of glucose-ammonia water consumption rates. In a 5-L fermenter, 102 g/l L -threonine was obtained using our glucose-ammonia water combined feeding strategy, which was then successfully applied in a 500-L fermenter (89 g/l). Therefore, we conclude that an automatic combination feeding strategy is suitable for improving L-threonine production.

  2. Characterization of threonine side chain dynamics in an antifreeze protein using natural abundance {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daley, Margaret E.; Sykes, Brian D. [University of Alberta, Department of Biochemistry, CIHR Group in Protein Structure and Function and Protein Engineering Network of Centres of Excellence (Canada)

    2004-06-15

    The dynamics of threonine side chains of the Tenebrio molitor antifreeze protein (TmAFP) were investigated using natural abundance {sup 13}C NMR. In TmAFP, the array of threonine residues on one face of the protein is responsible for conferring its ability to bind crystalline ice and inhibit its growth. Heteronuclear longitudinal and transverse relaxation rates and the {sup 1}H-{sup 13}C NOE were determined in this study. The C{alpha}H relaxation measurements were compared to the previously measured {sup 15}N backbone parameters and these are found to be in agreement. For the analysis of the threonine side chain motions, the model of restricted rotational diffusion about the {chi}{sub 1} dihedral angle was employed [London and Avitabile (1978) J. Am. Chem. Soc., 100, 7159-7165]. We demonstrate that the motion experienced by the ice binding threonine side chains is highly restricted, with an approximate upper limit of less than {+-}25 deg.

  3. Characterization of threonine side chain dynamics in an antifreeze protein using natural abundance 13C NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daley, Margaret E.; Sykes, Brian D.

    2004-01-01

    The dynamics of threonine side chains of the Tenebrio molitor antifreeze protein (TmAFP) were investigated using natural abundance 13 C NMR. In TmAFP, the array of threonine residues on one face of the protein is responsible for conferring its ability to bind crystalline ice and inhibit its growth. Heteronuclear longitudinal and transverse relaxation rates and the 1 H- 13 C NOE were determined in this study. The CαH relaxation measurements were compared to the previously measured 15 N backbone parameters and these are found to be in agreement. For the analysis of the threonine side chain motions, the model of restricted rotational diffusion about the χ 1 dihedral angle was employed [London and Avitabile (1978) J. Am. Chem. Soc., 100, 7159-7165]. We demonstrate that the motion experienced by the ice binding threonine side chains is highly restricted, with an approximate upper limit of less than ±25 deg

  4. A conserved residue cluster that governs kinetics of ATP-dependent gating of Kir6.2 potassium channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Roger S; Wright, Jordan; Pless, Stephan Alexander

    2015-01-01

    modest effects on gating kinetics despite significant changes in ATP sensitivity and open probability. However, we identified a pair of highly conserved neighboring amino acids (Trp68, Lys170) that control the rate of channel opening and inhibition in response to ATP. Paradoxically, mutations of Trp68...... or Lys170 markedly slow the kinetics of channel opening (500 ms and 700 ms for Trp68Leu and Lys170Asn, respectively), while increasing channel open probability. Examining the functional effects of these residues using phi-value analysis revealed a steep negative slope. This finding implies...

  5. Substitution of cysteine for a conserved alanine residue in the catalytic center of type II iodothyronine deiodinase alters interaction with reducing cofactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W. Klootwijk (Willem); T.J. Visser (Theo); G.G.J.M. Kuiper (George)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractHuman type II iodothyronine deiodinase (D2) catalyzes the activation of T(4) to T(3). The D2 enzyme, like the type I (D1) and type III (D3) deiodinases, contains a selenocysteine (SeC) residue (residue 133 in D2) in the highly conserved catalytic center. Remarkably, all

  6. Long-term impact of reduced tillage and residue management on soil carbon stabilization: Implications for conservation agriculture on contrasting soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chivenge, P.P.; Murwira, H.K.; Giller, K.E.; Mapfumo, P.; Six, J.

    2007-01-01

    Residue retention and reduced tillage are both conservation agricultural management options that may enhance soil organic carbon (SOC) stabilization in tropical soils. Therefore, we evaluated the effects of long-term tillage and residue management on SOC dynamics in a Chromic Luvisol (red clay soil)

  7. A conserved residue of l-alanine dehydrogenase from Bacillus pseudofirmus, Lys-73, participates in the catalytic reaction through hydrogen bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Guangzheng; Xu, Shujing; Wang, Shanshan; Zhang, Qing; Liu, Dong; Chen, Yuling; Ju, Jiansong; Zhao, Baohua

    2018-03-01

    A multiple protein sequence alignment of l-alanine dehydrogenases from different bacterial species revealed that five highly conserved amino acid residues Arg-15, Lys-73, Lys-75, His-96 and Asp-269 are potential catalytic residues of l-alanine dehydrogenase from Bacillus pseudofirmus OF4. In this study, recombinant OF4Ald and its mutants of five conserved residues were constructed, expressed in Escherichia coli, purified by His 6 -tag affinity column and gel filtration chromatography, structure homology modeling, and characterized. The purified protein OF4Ald displayed high specificity to l-alanine (15Umg -1 ) with an optimal temperature and pH of 40°C and 10.5, respectively. Enzymatic assay and activity staining in native gels showed that mutations at four conserved residue Arg-15, Lys-75, His-96 and Asp-269 (except residue Lys-73) resulted in a complete loss in enzymatic activity, which signified that these predicted active sites are indispensable for OF4Ald activity. In contrast, the mutant K73A resulted in 6-fold improvement in k cat /K m towards l-alanine as compared to the wild type protein. Further research of the residue Lys-73 substituted by various amino acids and structural modeling revealed that residue Lys-73 might be involved in the catalytic reaction of the enzyme by influencing the enzyme-substrate binding through the hydrogen-bonding interaction with conserved residue Lys-75. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Residue management increases fallow water conservation and yield deficit irrigated crops grown in rotation with wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    No-tillage (NT) residue management provides cover to increase precipitation capture compared with disk tillage (DT) or in the absence of a cover crop. Therefore, NT has the potential to reduce irrigation withdrawals from the declining Ogallala Aquifer. In a 4-year study, we quantified DT and NT effe...

  9. Crop residue is key for sustaining maximum food production and for conservation of our biosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crop residue is key in our efforts to move towards agricultural sustainability. This paper provides a quick overview of some selected references and looks at some of the newest advances related to cover crops. Several authors have described in detail the benefits derived from improving soil quality ...

  10. Conservation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noteboom, H.P.

    1985-01-01

    The IUCN/WWF Plants Conservation Programme 1984 — 1985. World Wildlife Fund chose plants to be the subject of their fund-raising campaign in the period 1984 — 1985. The objectives were to: 1. Use information techniques to achieve the conservation objectives of the Plants Programme – to save plants;

  11. Conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Audubon Society, New York, NY.

    This set of teaching aids consists of seven Audubon Nature Bulletins, providing the teacher and student with informational reading on various topics in conservation. The bulletins have these titles: Plants as Makers of Soil, Water Pollution Control, The Ground Water Table, Conservation--To Keep This Earth Habitable, Our Threatened Air Supply,…

  12. Contributions of conserved residues at the gating interface of glycine receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pless, Stephan Alexander; Leung, Ada W Y; Galpin, Jason D

    2011-01-01

    and the in vivo nonsense suppression method to incorporate unnatural amino acids to probe the electrostatic and hydrophobic contributions of five highly conserved side chains near the interface, Glu-53, Phe-145, Asp-148, Phe-187, and Arg-218. Our results suggest a salt bridge between Asp-148 in loop 7 and Arg-218......Glycine receptors (GlyRs) are chloride channels that mediate fast inhibitory neurotransmission and are members of the pentameric ligand-gated ion channel (pLGIC) family. The interface between the ligand binding domain and the transmembrane domain of pLGICs has been proposed to be crucial...

  13. The conserved Lysine69 residue plays a catalytic role in Mycobacterium tuberculosis shikimate dehydrogenase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigues Valnês

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The shikimate pathway is an attractive target for the development of antitubercular agents because it is essential in Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis, but absent in humans. M. tuberculosis aroE-encoded shikimate dehydrogenase catalyzes the forth reaction in the shikimate pathway. Structural and functional studies indicate that Lysine69 may be involved in catalysis and/or substrate binding in M. tuberculosis shikimate dehydrogenase. Investigation of the kinetic properties of mutant enzymes can bring important insights about the role of amino acid residues for M. tuberculosis shikimate dehydrogenase. Findings We have performed site-directed mutagenesis, steady-state kinetics, equilibrium binding measurements and molecular modeling for both the wild-type M. tuberculosis shikimate dehydrogenase and the K69A mutant enzymes. The apparent steady-state kinetic parameters for the M. tuberculosis shikimate dehydrogenase were determined; the catalytic constant value for the wild-type enzyme (50 s-1 is 68-fold larger than that for the mutant K69A (0.73 s-1. There was a modest increase in the Michaelis-Menten constant for DHS (K69A = 76 μM; wild-type = 29 μM and NADPH (K69A = 30 μM; wild-type = 11 μM. The equilibrium dissociation constants for wild-type and K69A mutant enzymes are 32 (± 4 μM and 134 (± 21, respectively. Conclusion Our results show that the residue Lysine69 plays a catalytic role and is not involved in substrate binding for the M. tuberculosis shikimate dehydrogenase. These efforts on M. tuberculosis shikimate dehydrogenase catalytic mechanism determination should help the rational design of specific inhibitors, aiming at the development of antitubercular drugs.

  14. A computational tool to predict the evolutionarily conserved protein-protein interaction hot-spot residues from the structure of the unbound protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Neeraj J; Helk, Bernhard; Trout, Bernhardt L

    2014-01-21

    Identifying hot-spot residues - residues that are critical to protein-protein binding - can help to elucidate a protein's function and assist in designing therapeutic molecules to target those residues. We present a novel computational tool, termed spatial-interaction-map (SIM), to predict the hot-spot residues of an evolutionarily conserved protein-protein interaction from the structure of an unbound protein alone. SIM can predict the protein hot-spot residues with an accuracy of 36-57%. Thus, the SIM tool can be used to predict the yet unknown hot-spot residues for many proteins for which the structure of the protein-protein complexes are not available, thereby providing a clue to their functions and an opportunity to design therapeutic molecules to target these proteins. Copyright © 2013 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Conductive component after cochlear implantation in patients with residual hearing conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chole, Richard A; Hullar, Timothy E; Potts, Lisa G

    2014-12-01

    Changes in auditory thresholds following cochlear implantation are generally assumed to be due to damage to neural elements. Theoretical studies have suggested that placement of a cochlear implant can cause a conductive hearing loss. Identification of a conductive component following cochlear implantation could guide improvements in surgical techniques or device designs. The purpose of this study is to characterize new-onset conductive hearing losses after cochlear implantation. In a prospective study, air- and bone-conduction audiometric testing were completed on cochlear implant recipients. An air-bone gap equal to or greater than 15 dB HL at 2 frequencies determined the presence of a conductive component. Of the 32 patients with preoperative bone-conduction hearing, 4 patients had a new-onset conductive component resulting in a mixed hearing loss, with air-conduction thresholds ranging from moderate to profound and an average air-bone gap of 30 dB HL. One had been implanted through the round window, 2 had an extended round window, and 1 had a separate cochleostomy. Loss of residual hearing following cochlear implantation may be due in part to a conductive component. Identifying the mechanism for this conductive component may help minimize hearing loss. Postoperative hearing evaluation should measure both air- and bone-conduction thresholds.

  16. The Effect of Conservation Tillage and Cover Crop Residue on Beneficial Arthropods and Weed Seed Predation in Acorn Squash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, N F; Brainard, D C; Szendrei, Z

    2016-12-01

    Conservation tillage combined with cover crops or mulching may enhance natural enemy activity in agroecosystems by reducing soil disturbance and increasing habitat structural complexity. In particular, weed seed predation can increase with vegetation cover and reduced tillage, indicating that mulches may improve the quality of the habitat for weed seed foraging. The purpose of this study was to quantify the effects of tillage and mulching for conservation biological control in cucurbit fields. The effects of mulch and reduced tillage on arthropods and rates of weed seed loss from arenas were examined in field trials on sandy soils in 2014 and 2015. Experimental factors included tillage and cover crop, each with two levels: strip-tillage or full-tillage, and cover crop mulch (rye residue) or no cover crop mulch (unmulched). Arthropod abundance on the crop foliage was not affected by tillage or cover crops. Contrary to expectations, epigeal natural enemies of insects and rates of weed seed removal either did not respond to treatments or were greater in full-tilled plots and plots without mulch. Our study demonstrates the potential importance of weed seed predators in reducing weed seedbanks in vegetable agroecosystems, and suggests that early-season tillage may not be detrimental to epigeal predator assemblages. © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. The formation of a native-like structure containing eight conserved hydrophobic residues is rate limiting in two-state protein folding of ACBP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragelund, Birthe Brandt; Osmark, Peter; Neergaard, Thomas B.

    1999-01-01

    The acyl-coenzyme A-binding proteins (ACBPs) contain 26 highly conserved sequence positions. The majority of these have been mutated in the bovine protein, and their influence on the rate of two-state folding and unfolding has been measured. The results identify eight sequence positions, out of 24...... probed, that are critical for fast productive folding. The residues are all hydrophobic and located in the interface between the N- and C-terminal helices. The results suggest that one specific site dominated by conserved hydrophobic residues forms the structure of the productive rate-determining folding...... step and that a sequential framework model can describe the protein folding reaction....

  18. Impact of Serine/Threonine Protein Kinases on the Regulation of Sporulation in Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pompeo, Frédérique; Foulquier, Elodie; Galinier, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria possess many kinases that catalyze phosphorylation of proteins on diverse amino acids including arginine, cysteine, histidine, aspartate, serine, threonine, and tyrosine. These protein kinases regulate different physiological processes in response to environmental modifications. For example, in response to nutritional stresses, the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis can differentiate into an endospore; the initiation of sporulation is controlled by the master regulator Spo0A, which is activated by phosphorylation. Spo0A phosphorylation is carried out by a multi-component phosphorelay system. These phosphorylation events on histidine and aspartate residues are labile, highly dynamic and permit a temporal control of the sporulation initiation decision. More recently, another kind of phosphorylation, more stable yet still dynamic, on serine or threonine residues, was proposed to play a role in spore maintenance and spore revival. Kinases that perform these phosphorylation events mainly belong to the Hanks family and could regulate spore dormancy and spore germination. The aim of this mini review is to focus on the regulation of sporulation in B. subtilis by these serine and threonine phosphorylation events and the kinases catalyzing them.

  19. Highly conserved serine residue 40 in HIV-1 p6 regulates capsid processing and virus core assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solbak Sara MØ

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The HIV-1 p6 Gag protein regulates the final abscission step of nascent virions from the cell membrane by the action of two late assembly (L- domains. Although p6 is located within one of the most polymorphic regions of the HIV-1 gag gene, the 52 amino acid peptide binds at least to two cellular budding factors (Tsg101 and ALIX, is a substrate for phosphorylation, ubiquitination, and sumoylation, and mediates the incorporation of the HIV-1 accessory protein Vpr into viral particles. As expected, known functional domains mostly overlap with several conserved residues in p6. In this study, we investigated the importance of the highly conserved serine residue at position 40, which until now has not been assigned to any known function of p6. Results Consistently with previous data, we found that mutation of Ser-40 has no effect on ALIX mediated rescue of HIV-1 L-domain mutants. However, the only feasible S40F mutation that preserves the overlapping pol open reading frame (ORF reduces virus replication in T-cell lines and in human lymphocyte tissue cultivated ex vivo. Most intriguingly, L-domain mediated virus release is not dependent on the integrity of Ser-40. However, the S40F mutation significantly reduces the specific infectivity of released virions. Further, it was observed that mutation of Ser-40 selectively interferes with the cleavage between capsid (CA and the spacer peptide SP1 in Gag, without affecting cleavage of other Gag products. This deficiency in processing of CA, in consequence, led to an irregular morphology of the virus core and the formation of an electron dense extra core structure. Moreover, the defects induced by the S40F mutation in p6 can be rescued by the A1V mutation in SP1 that generally enhances processing of the CA-SP1 cleavage site. Conclusions Overall, these data support a so far unrecognized function of p6 mediated by Ser-40 that occurs independently of the L-domain function, but selectively

  20. Threonine and lysine requirements for maintenance in chickens ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The maintenance requirement for threonine and lysine were estimated in two different experiments by measuring the nitrogen balance of adult male cockerels. Measured amounts of a diet first-limiting in threonine or lysine were fed by intubation each day for 4 d to give a range of intakes (unbalanced series) of from 0 to 239 ...

  1. Minor Threonine Dehydratase Encoded Within the Threonine Synthetic Region of Bacillus subtilis1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vapnek, Daniel; Greer, Sheldon

    1971-01-01

    Challenging auxotrophs on metabolites that are precursors of a biosynthetic step involving a mutated enzyme has revealed a new class of suppressor mutations which act by derepressing a minor enzyme activity not normally detected in the wild-type strain. These indirect, partial suppressor mutations which allow isoleucine auxotrophs to grow on homoserine or threonine have been analyzed to determine their effect on enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of these amino acids. It has been found that one class of these suppressor mutations (sprA) leads to the derepression of homoserine kinase, homoserine dehydrogenase, and a minor threonine dehydratase that is not sufficiently active to be detected in the wild-type strain. The gene encoding this second threonine dehydratase activity has been found to be located between the structural genes for homoserine kinase and homoserine dehydrogenase. The results of these experiments indicate that plating of auxotrophs on precursors of a biosynthetic step involving mutated enzymes could prove to be a valuable method for the detection of regulatory mutants as well as a possible tool in studying the evolution of biochemical pathways. PMID:4997544

  2. Conserved Residues Lys57 and Lys401 of Protein Disulfide Isomerase Maintain an Active Site Conformation for Optimal Activity: Implications for Post-Translational Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cody Caba

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Despite its study since the 1960's, very little is known about the post-translational regulation of the multiple catalytic activities performed by protein disulfide isomerase (PDI, the primary protein folding catalyst of the cell. This work identifies a functional role for the highly conserved CxxC-flanking residues Lys57 and Lys401 of human PDI in vitro. Mutagenesis studies have revealed these residues as modulating the oxidoreductase activity of PDI in a pH-dependent manner. Non-conservative amino acid substitutions resulted in enzyme variants upwards of 7-fold less efficient. This attenuated activity was found to translate into a 2-fold reduction of the rate of electron shuttling between PDI and the intraluminal endoplasmic reticulum oxidase, ERO1α, suggesting a functional significance to oxidative protein folding. In light of this, the possibility of lysine acetylation at residues Lys57 and Lys401 was assessed by in vitro treatment using acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin. A total of 28 acetyllysine residues were identified, including acLys57 and acLys401. The kinetic behavior of the acetylated protein form nearly mimicked that obtained with a K57/401Q double substitution variant providing an indication that acetylation of the active site-flanking lysine residues can act to reversibly modulate PDI activity.

  3. Conserved Residues Lys57 and Lys401 of Protein Disulfide Isomerase Maintain an Active Site Conformation for Optimal Activity: Implications for Post-Translational Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caba, Cody; Ali Khan, Hyder; Auld, Janeen; Ushioda, Ryo; Araki, Kazutaka; Nagata, Kazuhiro; Mutus, Bulent

    2018-01-01

    Despite its study since the 1960's, very little is known about the post-translational regulation of the multiple catalytic activities performed by protein disulfide isomerase (PDI), the primary protein folding catalyst of the cell. This work identifies a functional role for the highly conserved CxxC-flanking residues Lys 57 and Lys 401 of human PDI in vitro . Mutagenesis studies have revealed these residues as modulating the oxidoreductase activity of PDI in a pH-dependent manner. Non-conservative amino acid substitutions resulted in enzyme variants upwards of 7-fold less efficient. This attenuated activity was found to translate into a 2-fold reduction of the rate of electron shuttling between PDI and the intraluminal endoplasmic reticulum oxidase, ERO1α, suggesting a functional significance to oxidative protein folding. In light of this, the possibility of lysine acetylation at residues Lys 57 and Lys 401 was assessed by in vitro treatment using acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin). A total of 28 acetyllysine residues were identified, including acLys 57 and acLys 401 . The kinetic behavior of the acetylated protein form nearly mimicked that obtained with a K57/401Q double substitution variant providing an indication that acetylation of the active site-flanking lysine residues can act to reversibly modulate PDI activity.

  4. Using a consensus approach based on the conservation of inter-residue contacts to rank CAPRI models

    KAUST Repository

    Vangone, Anna

    2013-10-17

    Herein we propose the use of a consensus approach, CONSRANK, for ranking CAPRI models. CONSRANK relies on the conservation of inter-residue contacts in the analyzed decoys ensemble. Models are ranked according to their ability to match the most frequently observed contacts. We applied CONSRANK to 19 CAPRI protein-protein targets, covering a wide range of prediction difficulty and involved in a variety of biological functions. CONSRANK results are consistently good, both in terms of native-like (NL) solutions ranked in the top positions and of values of the Area Under the receiver operating characteristic Curve (AUC). For targets having a percentage of NL solutions above 3%, an excellent performance is found, with AUC values approaching 1. For the difficult target T46, having only 3.4% NL solutions, the number of NL solutions in the top 5 and 10 ranked positions is enriched by a factor 30, and the AUC value is as high as 0.997. AUC values below 0.8 are only found for targets featuring a percentage of NL solutions within 1.1%. Remarkably, a false consensus emerges only in one case, T42, which happens to be an artificial protein, whose assembly details remain uncertain, based on controversial experimental data. We also show that CONSRANK still performs very well on a limited number of models, provided that more than 1 NL solution is included in the ensemble, thus extending its applicability to cases where few dozens of models are available.© 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Characterization of conserved arginine residues on Cdt1 that affect licensing activity and interaction with Geminin or Mcm complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Zhiying; Ode, Koji L; Shindo, Mayumi; Takisawa, Haruhiko; Masai, Hisao

    2016-05-02

    All organisms ensure once and only once replication during S phase through a process called replication licensing. Cdt1 is a key component and crucial loading factor of Mcm complex, which is a central component for the eukaryotic replicative helicase. In higher eukaryotes, timely inhibition of Cdt1 by Geminin is essential to prevent rereplication. Here, we address the mechanism of DNA licensing using purified Cdt1, Mcm and Geminin proteins in combination with replication in Xenopus egg extracts. We mutagenized the 223th arginine of mouse Cdt1 (mCdt1) to cysteine or serine (R-S or R-C, respectively) and 342nd and 346th arginines constituting an arginine finger-like structure to alanine (RR-AA). The RR-AA mutant of Cdt1 could not only rescue the DNA replication activity in Cdt1-depleted extracts but also its specific activity for DNA replication and licensing was significantly increased compared to the wild-type protein. In contrast, the R223 mutants were partially defective in rescue of DNA replication and licensing. Biochemical analyses of these mutant Cdt1 proteins indicated that the RR-AA mutation disabled its functional interaction with Geminin, while R223 mutations resulted in ablation in interaction with the Mcm2∼7 complex. Intriguingly, the R223 mutants are more susceptible to the phosphorylation-induced inactivation or chromatin dissociation. Our results show that conserved arginine residues play critical roles in interaction with Geminin and Mcm that are crucial for proper conformation of the complexes and its licensing activity.

  6. Insulin treatment promotes tyrosine phosphorylation of PKR and inhibits polyIC induced PKR threonine phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swetha, Medchalmi; Ramaiah, Kolluru V A

    2015-11-01

    Tyrosine phosphorylation of insulin receptor beta (IRβ) in insulin treated HepG2 cells is inversely correlated to ser(51) phosphorylation in the alpha-subunit of eukaryotic initiation factor 2 (eIF2α) that regulates protein synthesis. Insulin stimulates interaction between IRβ and PKR, double stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase, also known as EIF2AK2, and phosphorylation of tyrosine residues in PKR, as analyzed by immunoprecipitation and pull down assays using anti-IRβ and anti-phosphotyrosine antibodies, recombinant IRβ and immunopurified PKR. Further polyIC or synthetic double stranded RNA-induced threonine phosphorylation or activation of immunopurified and cellular PKR is suppressed in the presence of insulin treated purified IRβ and cell extracts. Acute, but not chronic, insulin treatment enhances tyrosine phosphorylation of IRβ, its interaction with PKR and tyrosine phosphorylation of PKR. In contrast, lipopolysaccharide that stimulates threonine phosphorylation of PKR and eIF2α phosphorylation and AG 1024, an inhibitor of the tyrosine kinase activity of IRβ, reduces PKR association with the receptor, IRβ in HepG2 cells. These findings therefore may suggest that tyrosine phosphorylated PKR plays a role in the regulation of insulin induced protein synthesis and in maintaining insulin sensitivity, whereas, suppression of polyIC-mediated threonine phosphorylation of PKR by insulin compromises its ability to fight against virus infection in host cells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Role of Conserved Disulfide Bridges and Aromatic Residues in Extracellular Loop 2 of Chemokine Receptor CCR8 for Chemokine and Small Molecule Binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barington, Line; Rummel, Pia C; Lückmann, Michael

    2016-01-01

    and aromatic residues in extracellular loop 2 (ECL2) for ligand binding and activation in the chemokine receptor CCR8. We used IP3 accumulation and radioligand binding experiments to determine the impact of receptor mutagenesis on both chemokine and small molecule agonist and antagonist binding and action...... in CCR8. We find that the 7 transmembrane (7TM) receptor conserved disulfide bridge (7TM bridge) linking transmembrane helix (TM)III and ECL2 is crucial for chemokine and small molecule action, whereas the chemokine receptor conserved disulfide bridge between the N terminus and TMVII is needed only...

  8. Alanine substitution of conserved residues in the cytoplasmic tail of herpes simplex virus gB can enhance or abolish cell fusion activity and viral entry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruel, Nancy; Zago, Anna; Spear, Patricia G.

    2006-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) glycoprotein B (gB) is one of the four viral glycoproteins required for viral entry and cell fusion and is highly conserved among herpesviruses. Mutants of HSV type 2 gB were generated by substituting conserved residues in the cytoplasmic tail with alanine or by deleting 41 amino acids from the C-terminus. Some of the mutations abolished cell fusion activity and also prevented transport of gB to the cell surface, identifying residues in the gB cytoplasmic tail that are critical for intracellular transport of this glycoprotein. These mutations also prevented production of infectious virus, possibly because the mutant forms of gB were not transported to the site of envelopment. Other mutations, particularly the deletion, significantly enhanced cell fusion activity. These mutations, as well as others described previously, identify regions of the gB cytoplasmic domain that modulate cell fusion activity

  9. FHA domains as phospho-threonine binding modules in cell signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammet, Andrew; Pike, Brietta L; McNees, Carolyn J; Conlan, Lindus A; Tenis, Nora; Heierhorst, Jörg

    2003-01-01

    Forkhead-associated (FHA) domains are present in >200 diverse proteins in all phyla from bacteria to mammals and seem to be particularly prevalent in proteins with cell cycle control functions. Recent work from several laboratories has considerably improved our understanding of the structure and function of these domains that were virtually unknown a few years ago, and the first disease associations of FHA domains have now emerged. FHA domains form 11-stranded beta-sandwiches that contain some 100-180 amino acid residues with a high degree of sequence diversity. FHA domains act as phosphorylation-dependent protein-protein interaction modules that preferentially bind to phospho-threonine residues in their targets. Interestingly, point mutations in the human CHK2 gene that lead to single-residue amino acid substitutions in the FHA domain of this cell cycle checkpoint kinase have been found to cause a subset of cases of the Li-Fraumeni multi-cancer syndrome.

  10. Individual responses of growing pigs to threonine intake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renan Di Giovanni Isola

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT A nitrogen balance test was performed to evaluate the individual responses of growing pigs to threonine intake. Eight commercial barrows were used (body weight ranging from 15 to 20 kg. A dose-response study was performed, in which the threonine supply increased in seven equidistant steps (the seven dietary threonine levels ranged from 50 to 120% of the requirements every three days for each pig. The levels of all other amino acids were 20% higher than the tested amino acid. Nitrogen retention as a function of threonine intake was calculated per individual and per group (NLIN and NLMixed, respectively using a linear plateau model. The highest break point value was 42.42 g of threonine intake (the most demanding individual, whereas the lowest value was 34.16 g (the least demanding individual, corresponding to a difference of 19%. In terms of N retention, the highest plateau value was 66.71 g and the lowest was 49.48 g, with a difference of 25%. There was no significant correlation between slope and plateau values or between slope and break point values. When using the model in which all parameters were random effects, the variations in threonine intake and nitrogen retention were 1.68±1.30 and 0.01±0.10 g, respectively, and no variance in the slope of the curve was detected. The average daily threonine intake values for the maximum response obtained in the group, as calculated by the NLIN and NLMixed procedures, were 13.96 and 14.02 g/day, respectively. The threonine intake for the maximum N retention between individuals ranged from 34.16 to 42.42 g, corresponding to a difference of 19%. The current recommended intake to optimize N retention is 14.02 g/day. The group responses obtained by the NLMixed procedures are very similar to those estimated by the NLIN procedure (all individuals.

  11. Conserved residues in the coiled-coil pocket of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gp41 are essential for viral replication and interhelical interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mo Hongmei; Konstantinidis, Alex K.; Stewart, Kent D.; Dekhtyar, Tatyana; Ng, Teresa; Swift, Kerry; Matayoshi, Edmund D.; Kati, Warren; Kohlbrenner, William; Molla, Akhteruzzaman

    2004-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) gp41 plays an important role in mediating the fusion of HIV with host cells. During the fusion process, three N-terminal helices and three C-terminal helices pack in an anti-parallel direction to form a six-helix bundle. X-ray crystallographic analysis of the gp41 core demonstrated that within each coiled-coil interface, there is a deep and large pocket, formed by a cluster of residues in the N-helix coiled-coil. In this report, we systematically analyzed the role of seven conserved residues that are either lining or packing this pocket on the infectivity and interhelical interaction using novel approaches. Our results show that residues L568, V570, W571, and K574 of the N-helix that are lining the side chain and right wall of the pocket are important for establishing a productive infection. Mutations V570A and W571A completely abolished replication, while replication of the L568A and K574A mutants was significantly attenuated relative to wild type. Similarly, residues W628, W631, and I635 of the C-helix that insert into the pocket are essential for infectivity. The impaired infectivity of these seven mutants is in part attributed to the loss in binding affinity of the interhelical interaction. Molecular modeling of the crystal structure of the coiled-coil further shows that alanine substitution of those residues disrupts the hydrophobic interaction between the N- and C-helix. These results suggest that the conserved residues in the coiled-coil domain play a key role in HIV infection and this coiled-coil pocket is a good target for development of inhibitors against HIV. In addition, our data indicate that the novel fluorescence polarization assay described in this study could be valuable in screening for inhibitors that block the interhelical interaction and HIV entry

  12. Increasing L-threonine production in Escherichia coli by engineering the glyoxylate shunt and the L-threonine biosynthesis pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hui; Fang, Yu; Wang, Xiaoyuan; Zhao, Lei; Wang, Jianli; Li, Ye

    2018-04-30

    L-threonine is an important amino acid that can be added in food, medicine, or feed. Here, the influence of glyoxylate shunt on an L-threonine producing strain Escherichia coli TWF001 has been studied. The gene iclR was deleted, and the native promoter of the aceBA operon was replaced by the trc promoter in the chromosome of TWF001, the resulting strainTWF004 could produce 0.39 g L-threonine from1 g glucose after 36-h flask cultivation. Further replacing the native promoter of aspC by the trc promoter in the chromosome of TWF004 resulted in the strain TWF006. TWF006 could produce 0.42 g L-threonine from 1 g glucose after 36-h flask cultivation. Three key genes in the biosynthetic pathway of L-threonine, thrA * (a mutated thrA), thrB, and thrC were overexpressed in TWF006, resulting the strain TWF006/pFW01-thrA * BC. TWF006/pFW01-thrA * BC could produce 0.49 g L-threonine from 1 g glucose after 36-h flask cultivation. Next, the genes asd, rhtA, rhtC, or thrE were inserted into the plasmid TWF006/pFW01-thrA * BC, and TWF006 was transformed with these plasmids, resulting the strains TWF006/pFW01-thrA * BC-asd, TWF006/pFW01-thrA * BC-rhtA, TWF006/pFW01-thrA * BC-rhtC, and TWF006/pFW01-thrA * BC-thrE, respectively. These four strains could produce more L-threonine than the control strain, and the highest yield was produced by TWF006/pFW01-thrA * BC-asd; after 36-h flask cultivation, TWF006/pFW01-thrA * BC-asd could produce 15.85 g/l L-threonine, i.e., 0.53 g L-threonine per 1 g glucose, which is a 70% increase relative to the control strain TWF001. The results suggested that the combined engineering of glyoxylate shunt and L-threonine biosynthesis pathway could significantly increase the L-threonine production in E. coli.

  13. The conserved glycine residues in the transmembrane domain of the Semliki Forest virus fusion protein are not required for assembly and fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao Maofu; Kielian, Margaret

    2005-01-01

    The alphavirus Semliki Forest virus (SFV) infects cells via a low pH-triggered fusion reaction mediated by the viral E1 protein. Both the E1 fusion peptide and transmembrane (TM) domain are essential for membrane fusion, but the functional requirements for the TM domain are poorly understood. Here we explored the role of the five TM domain glycine residues, including the highly conserved glycine pair at E1 residues 415/416. SFV mutants with alanine substitutions for individual or all five glycine residues (5G/A) showed growth kinetics and fusion pH dependence similar to those of wild-type SFV. Mutants with increasing substitution of glycine residues showed an increasingly more stringent requirement for cholesterol during fusion. The 5G/A mutant showed decreased fusion kinetics and extent in fluorescent lipid mixing assays. TM domain glycine residues thus are not required for efficient SFV fusion or assembly but can cause subtle effects on the properties of membrane fusion

  14. The conserved residue Arg46 in the N-terminal heptad repeat domain of HIV-1 gp41 is critical for viral fusion and entry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyi Wang

    Full Text Available During the process of HIV-1 fusion with the target cell, the N-terminal heptad repeat (NHR of gp41 interacts with the C-terminal heptad repeat (CHR to form fusogenic six-helix bundle (6-HB core. We previously identified a crucial residue for 6-HB formation and virus entry--Lys63 (K63 in the C-terminal region of NHR (aa 54-70, which forms a hydrophobic cavity. It can form an important salt bridge with Asp121 (D121 in gp41 CHR. Here, we found another important conserved residue for virus fusion and entry, Arg46 (R46, in the N-terminal region of NHR (aa 35-53, which forms a hydrogen bond with a polar residue, Asn43 (N43, in NHR, as a part of the hydrogen-bond network. R46 can also form a salt bridge with a negatively charged residue, Glu137 (E137, in gp41 CHR. Substitution of R46 with the hydrophobic residue Ala (R46A or the negatively charged residue Glu (R46E resulted in disruption of the hydrogen bond network, breakage of the salt bridge and reduction of 6-HB's stability, leading to impairment of viral fusion and decreased inhibition of N36, an NHR peptide. Similarly, CHR peptide C34 with substitution of E137 for Ala (E137A or Arg (E137R also exhibited reduced inhibitory activity against HIV-1 infection and HIV-1-mediated cell-to-cell fusion. These results suggest that the positively charged residue R46 and its hydrogen bond network, together with the salt bridge between R46 and E137, are important for viral fusion and entry and may therefore serve as a target for designing novel HIV fusion/entry inhibitors.

  15. The conserved basic residues and the charged amino acid residues at the α-helix of the zinc finger motif regulate the nuclear transport activity of triple C2H2 zinc finger proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chih-Ying

    2018-01-01

    Zinc finger (ZF) motifs on proteins are frequently recognized as a structure for DNA binding. Accumulated reports indicate that ZF motifs contain nuclear localization signal (NLS) to facilitate the transport of ZF proteins into nucleus. We investigated the critical factors that facilitate the nuclear transport of triple C2H2 ZF proteins. Three conserved basic residues (hot spots) were identified among the ZF sequences of triple C2H2 ZF proteins that reportedly have NLS function. Additional basic residues can be found on the α-helix of the ZFs. Using the ZF domain (ZFD) of Egr-1 as a template, various mutants were constructed and expressed in cells. The nuclear transport activity of various mutants was estimated by analyzing the proportion of protein localized in the nucleus. Mutation at any hot spot of the Egr-1 ZFs reduced the nuclear transport activity. Changes of the basic residues at the α-helical region of the second ZF (ZF2) of the Egr-1 ZFD abolished the NLS activity. However, this activity can be restored by substituting the acidic residues at the homologous positions of ZF1 or ZF3 with basic residues. The restored activity dropped again when the hot spots at ZF1 or the basic residues in the α-helix of ZF3 were mutated. The variations in nuclear transport activity are linked directly to the binding activity of the ZF proteins with importins. This study was extended to other triple C2H2 ZF proteins. SP1 and KLF families, similar to Egr-1, have charged amino acid residues at the second (α2) and the third (α3) positions of the α-helix. Replacing the amino acids at α2 and α3 with acidic residues reduced the NLS activity of the SP1 and KLF6 ZFD. The reduced activity can be restored by substituting the α3 with histidine at any SP1 and KLF6 ZFD. The results show again the interchangeable role of ZFs and charge residues in the α-helix in regulating the NLS activity of triple C2H2 ZF proteins. PMID:29381770

  16. NMR WaterLOGSY Reveals Weak Binding of Bisphenol A with Amyloid Fibers of a Conserved 11 Residue Peptide from Androgen Receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Asencio-Hernández

    Full Text Available There is growing evidence that bisphenol A (BPA, a molecule largely released in the environment, has detrimental effects on ecosystems and on human health. It acts as an endocrine disruptor targeting steroid hormone receptors, such as the estrogen receptor (ER, estrogen-related receptor (ERR and androgen receptor (AR. BPA-derived molecules have recently been shown to interact with the AR N-terminal domain (AR-NTD, which is known to be largely intrinsically disordered. This N-terminal domain contains an 11 residue conserved domain that forms amyloid fibers upon oxidative dimerisation through its strictly conserved Cys240 residue. We investigate here the interaction of BPA, and other potential endocrine disruptors, with AR-NTD amyloid fibers using the WaterLOGSY NMR experiment. We observed a selective binding of these compounds to the amyloid fibers formed by the AR-NTD conserved region and glutamine homopolymers. This observation suggests that the high potency of endocrine disruptors may result, in part, from their ability to bind amyloid forms of nuclear receptors in addition to their cognate binding sites. This property may be exploited to design future therapeutic strategies targeting AR related diseases such as the spinal bulbar muscular atrophy or prostate cancer. The ability of NMR WaterLOGSY experiments to detect weak interactions between small ligands and amyloid fibers may prove to be of particular interest for identifying promising hit molecules.

  17. Bacillus subtilis single-stranded DNA-binding protein SsbA is phosphorylated at threonine 38 by the serine/threonine kinase YabT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Derouiche, Abderahmane; Petranovic, Dina; Macek, Boris

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose: Single-stranded DNA-binding proteins participate in all stages of DNA metabolism that involve single-stranded DNA, from replication, recombination, repair of DNA damage, to natural competence in species such as Bacillus subtilis. B. subtilis single-stranded DNA......-binding proteins have previously been found to be phosphorylated on tyrosine and arginine residues. While tyrosine phosphorylation was shown to enhance the DNA-binding properties of SsbA, arginine phosphorylation was not functionally characterized.Materials and methods: We used mass spectrometry analysis to detect...... phosphorylation of SsbA purified from B. subtilis cells. The detected phosphorylation site was assessed for its influence on DNA-binding in vitro, using electrophoretic mobility shift assays. The ability of B. subtilis serine/threonine kinases to phosphorylate SsbA was assessed using in vitro phosphorylation...

  18. Computational analysis of perturbations in the post-fusion Dengue virus envelope protein highlights known epitopes and conserved residues in the Zika virus [version 2; referees: 3 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Chakraborty

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The dramatic transformation of the Zika virus (ZIKV from a relatively unknown virus to a pathogen generating global-wide panic has exposed the dearth of detailed knowledge about this virus. Decades of research in the related Dengue virus (DENV, finally culminating in a vaccine registered for use in endemic regions (CYD-TDV in three countries, provides key insights in developing strategies for tackling ZIKV, which has caused global panic to microcephaly and Guillain-Barre Syndrome. Dengue virus (DENV, a member of the family Flaviviridae, the causal agent of the self-limiting Dengue fever and the potentially fatal hemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome, has been a scourge in tropical countries for many centuries. The recently solved structure of mature ZIKV (PDB ID:5IRE has provided key insights into the structure of the envelope (E and membrane (M proteins, the primary target of neutralizing antibodies. The previously established MEPP methodology compares two conformations of the same protein and identifies residues with significant spatial and electrostatic perturbations. In the current work, MEPP analyzed the pre-and post-fusion DENV type 2 envelope (E protein, and identified several known epitopes (His317, Tyr299, Glu26, Arg188, etc. (MEPPitope. These residues are overwhelmingly conserved in ZIKV and all DENV serotypes, and also enumerates residue pairs that undergo significant polarity reversal. Characterization of α-helices in E-proteins show that α1 is not conserved in the sequence space of ZIKV and DENV. Furthermore, perturbation of α1 in the post-fusion DENV structure includes a known epitope Asp215, a residue absent in the pre-fusion α1. A cationic β-sheet in the GAG-binding domain that is stereochemically equivalent in ZIKV and all DENV serotypes is also highlighted due to a residue pair (Arg286-Arg288 that has a significant electrostatic polarity reversal upon fusion. Finally, two highly conserved residues (Thr32 and Thr40, with

  19. Structural basis for new pattern of conserved amino acid residues related to chitin-binding in the antifungal peptide from the coconut rhinoceros beetle Oryctes rhinoceros.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmi, Hikaru; Ishibashi, Jun; Tomie, Tetsuya; Yamakawa, Minoru

    2003-06-20

    Scarabaecin isolated from hemolymph of the coconut rhinoceros beetle Oryctes rhinoceros is a 36-residue polypeptide that has antifungal activity. The solution structure of scarabaecin has been determined from twodimensional 1H NMR spectroscopic data and hybrid distance geometry-simulated annealing protocol calculation. Based on 492 interproton and 10 hydrogen-bonding distance restraints and 36 dihedral angle restraints, we obtained 20 structures. The average backbone root-mean-square deviation for residues 4-35 is 0.728 +/- 0.217 A from the mean structure. The solution structure consists of a two-stranded antiparallel beta-sheet connected by a type-I beta-turn after a short helical turn. All secondary structures and a conserved disulfide bond are located in the C-terminal half of the peptide, residues 18-36. Overall folding is stabilized by a combination of a disulfide bond, seven hydrogen bonds, and numerous hydrophobic interactions. The structural motif of the C-terminal half shares a significant tertiary structural similarity with chitin-binding domains of plant and invertebrate chitin-binding proteins, even though scarabaecin has no overall sequence similarity to other peptide/polypeptides including chitin-binding proteins. The length of its primary structure, the number of disulfide bonds, and the pattern of conserved functional residues binding to chitin in scarabaecin differ from those of chitin-binding proteins in other invertebrates and plants, suggesting that scarabaecin does not share a common ancestor with them. These results are thought to provide further strong experimental evidence to the hypothesis that chitin-binding proteins of invertebrates and plants are correlated by a convergent evolution process.

  20. Quantitative partition of threonine oxidation in pigs: Effect of dietary threonine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballevre, O.; Cadenhead, A.; Calder, A.G.; Rees, W.D.; Lobley, G.E.; Fuller, M.F.; Garlick, P.J.

    1990-01-01

    Kinetic aspects of threonine (Thr) metabolism were examined in eight pigs fed hourly with a diet containing either 0.68% (LT group) or 0.81% (HT group) of Thr (wt/wt), corresponding to 10 and 30% Thr excess, respectively, compared with an ideal diet. Primary production (PR) and disposal (DR) rates were obtained for Thr, glycine (Gly), and 2-keto-butyrate (KB) after a 12-h continuous infusion of L-[U-14C]-Thr together with [1-13C]Gly and a 6-h continuous infusion of [1-14C]KB. Transfer of Thr into secondary pools was also monitored, and from these the rates of Thr oxidation through the catabolic pathways of L-Thr 3-dehydrogenase (DR(Thr-Gly)) and threonine dehydratase (DR(Thr-KB)) were estimated. For the LT group the results were (mumol.kg-1.h-1) PR(Thr) 314 +/- 3, PR(Gly) 551 +/- 24, PR(KB) 41 +/- 3, DR(Thr-Gly) 22 +/- 2, and DR(Thr-KB) 7 +/- 1. For the HT group they were PR(Thr) 301 +/- 23, PR(Gly) 598 +/- 55, PR(KB) 39 +/- 4, DR(Thr-Gly) 32 +/- 2, and DR(Thr-KB) 8 +/- 1. The increase in Thr intake (14 mumol.kg-1.h-1, P less than 0.01) induced a commensurate increase in the sum of DR(Thr-Gly) and DR(Thr-KB) (14 mumol.kg-1.h-1, P less than 0.001) when liver was used as the precursor pool. This was mainly due to the increased DR(Thr-Gly) (13 mumol.kg-1.h-1, P less than 0.01); the change in DR(Thr-KB) was not statistically significant. By comparison of intracellular-to-plasma ratios of specific activities (or enrichments) for different tissues with each type of infusion, liver was shown to be the major site of production of Gly and KB from Thr. These data suggest that in fed growing pigs a 30% excess of Thr in the diet does not alter the partition of Thr oxidation, since 80% of Thr oxidation occurs through the L-Thr 3-dehydrogenase pathway for both LT and HT groups

  1. Energy conservation and production from solid residues - alternative for two problems: wastes and energy; Conservacao e producao de energia a partir de residuos solidos - alternativa para dois problemas: lixo e energia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reno, Francisco de Assis Grillo [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia Mecanica. Planejamento de Sistemas Energeticos]. E-mail: fgrillo@fem.unicamp.br; Streb, Cleci Schalemberger [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia Mecanica; Piunti, Regina Celia [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: repiunti@ig.com.br

    2002-07-01

    This paper explores possibilities of energy conservation and production through the using domestic solid residues, aiming the disposal impacts and improvement the energy supplying as well. For energy conservation,the recycling, reduction and re utilization will be mentioned. For the energy recovering the burning of organic material in sanitary landfill and incineration of plastics and tires.

  2. Conserved residues and their role in the structure, function, and stability of acyl-coenzyme A binding protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragelund, B B; Poulsen, K; Andersen, K V

    1999-01-01

    In the family of acyl-coenzyme A binding proteins, a subset of 26 sequence sites are identical in all eukaryotes and conserved throughout evolution of the eukaryotic kingdoms. In the context of the bovine protein, the importance of these 26 sequence positions for structure, function, stability...

  3. Effects of dietary L-threonine and Saccharomyces cerevisiae on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    threonine (0, 2.5, 5 and 7.5 g/kg) with or without Saccharomyces cerevisiae (SC) on performance, carcass characteristics, intestinal morphology and immune system of broiler chickens. A total of 360 1-d-old male broiler chicks were randomly ...

  4. Realizing Serine/Threonine Ligation: Scope and Limitations and Mechanistic Implication Thereof

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarence T. T. Wong

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Serine/Threonine ligation (STL has emerged as an alternative tool for protein chemical synthesis, bioconjugations as well as macrocyclization of peptides of various sizes. Owning to the high abundance of Ser/Thr residues in natural peptides and proteins, STL is expected to find a wide range of applications in chemical biology research. Herein, we have fully investigated the compatibility of the serine/threonine ligation strategy for X-Ser/Thr ligation sites, where X is any of the 20 naturally occurring amino acids. Our studies have shown that 17 amino acids are suitable for ligation, while Asp, Glu, and Lys are not compatible. Among the working 17 C-terminal amino acids, the retarded reaction resulted from the bulky β-branched amino acid (Thr, Val and Ile is not seen under the current ligation condition. We have also investigated the chemoselectivity involving the amino group of the internal lysine which may compete with the N-terminal Ser/Thr for reaction with the C-terminal salicylaldehyde (SAL ester aldehyde group. The result suggested that the free internal amino group does not adversely slow down the ligation rate.

  5. Evolutionary analysis of a novel zinc ribbon in the N-terminal region of threonine synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Gurmeet; Subramanian, Srikrishna

    2017-10-18

    Threonine synthase (TS) catalyzes the terminal reaction in the biosynthetic pathway of threonine and requires pyridoxal phosphate as a cofactor. TSs share a common catalytic domain with other fold type II PALP dependent enzymes. TSs are broadly grouped into two classes based on their sequence, quaternary structure, and enzyme regulation. We report the presence of a novel zinc ribbon domain in the N-terminal region preceding the catalytic core in TS. The zinc ribbon domain is present in TSs belonging to both classes. Our sequence analysis reveals that archaeal TSs possess all zinc chelating residues to bind a metal ion that are lacking in the structurally characterized homologs. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that TSs with an N-terminal zinc ribbon likely represents the ancestral state of the enzyme while TSs without a zinc ribbon must have diverged later in specific lineages. The zinc ribbon and its N- and C-terminal extensions are important for enzyme stability, activity and regulation. It is likely that the zinc ribbon domain is involved in higher order oligomerization or mediating interactions with other biomolecules leading to formation of larger metabolic complexes.

  6. A conserved serine residue regulates the stability of Drosophila Salvador and human WW domain-containing adaptor 45 through proteasomal degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Di, E-mail: DiWu@mail.nankai.edu.cn; Wu, Shian

    2013-04-19

    Highlights: •Ser-17 is key for the stability of Drosophila Sav. •Ala mutation of Ser-17 promotes the proteasomal degradation of Sav. •Ser-17 residue is not the main target of Hpo-induced Sav stabilization. •Hpo-dependent and -independent mechanisms regulate Sav stability. •This mechanism is conserved in the homologue of Sav, human WW45. -- Abstract: The Hippo (Hpo) pathway is a conserved tumor suppressor pathway that controls organ size through the coordinated regulation of apoptosis and proliferation. Drosophila Salvador (Sav), which limits organ size, is a core component of the Hpo pathway. In this study, Ser-17 was shown to be important for the stability of Sav. Alanine mutation of Ser-17 promoted the proteasomal degradation of Sav. Destabilization and stabilization of the Sav protein mediated by alanine mutation of Ser-17 and by Hpo, respectively, were independent of each other. This implies that the stability of Sav is controlled by two mechanisms, one that is Ser-17-dependent and Hpo-independent, and another that is Ser-17-independent and Hpo-dependent. These dual mechanisms also regulated the human counterpart of Drosophila Sav, WW domain-containing adaptor 45 (WW45). The conservation of this regulation adds to its significance in normal physiology and tumorigenesis.

  7. Evolutionary conservation of P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 primary structure and function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schapira Marc

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1 plays a critical role in recruiting leukocytes in inflammatory lesions by mediating leukocyte rolling on selectins. Core-2 O-glycosylation of a N-terminal threonine and sulfation of at least one tyrosine residue of PSGL-1 are required for L- and P-selectin binding. Little information is available on the intra- and inter-species evolution of PSGL-1 primary structure. In addition, the evolutionary conservation of selectin binding site on PSGL-1 has not been previously examined in detail. Therefore, we performed multiple sequence alignment of PSGL-1 amino acid sequences of 14 mammals (human, chimpanzee, rhesus monkey, bovine, pig, rat, tree-shrew, bushbaby, mouse, bat, horse, cat, sheep and dog and examined mammalian PSGL-1 interactions with human selectins. Results A signal peptide was predicted in each sequence and a propeptide cleavage site was found in 9/14 species. PSGL-1 N-terminus is poorly conserved. However, each species exhibits at least one tyrosine sulfation site and, except in horse and dog, a T [D/E]PP [D/E] motif associated to the core-2 O-glycosylation of a N-terminal threonine. A mucin-like domain of 250–280 amino acids long was disclosed in all studied species. It lies between the conserved N-terminal O-glycosylated threonine (Thr-57 in human and the transmembrane domain, and contains a central region exhibiting a variable number of decameric repeats (DR. Interspecies and intraspecies polymorphisms were observed. Transmembrane and cytoplasmic domain sequences are well conserved. The moesin binding residues that serve as adaptor between PSGL-1 and Syk, and are involved in regulating PSGL-1-dependent rolling on P-selectin are perfectly conserved in all analyzed mammalian sequences. Despite a poor conservation of PSGL-1 N-terminal sequence, CHO cells co-expressing human glycosyltransferases and human, bovine, pig or rat PSGL-1 efficiently rolled on human L- or P

  8. Analysis of Margin Index as a Method for Predicting Residual Disease After Breast-Conserving Surgery in a European Cancer Center.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bolger, Jarlath C

    2011-06-03

    INTRODUCTION: Breast-conserving surgery (BCS), followed by appropriate adjuvant therapies is established as a standard treatment option for women with early-stage invasive breast cancers. A number of factors have been shown to correlate with local and regional disease recurrence. Although margin status is a strong predictor of disease recurrence, consensus is yet to be established on the optimum margin necessary. Margenthaler et al. recently proposed the use of a "margin index," combining tumor size and margin status as a predictor of residual disease after BCS. We applied this new predictive tool to a population of patients with primary breast cancer who presented to a symptomatic breast unit to determine its suitability in predicting those who require reexcision surgery. METHODS: Retrospective analysis of our breast cancer database from January 1, 2000 to June 30, 2010 was performed, including all patients who underwent BCS. Of 531 patients who underwent BCS, 27.1% (144\\/531) required further reexcision procedures, and 55 were eligible for inclusion in the study. Margin index was calculated as: margin index = closest margin (mm)\\/tumor size (mm) × 100, with index >5 considered optimum. RESULTS: Of the 55 patients included, 31% (17\\/55) had residual disease. Fisher\\'s exact test showed margin index not to be a significant predictor of residual disease on reexcision specimen (P = 0.57). Of note, a significantly higher proportion of our patients presented with T2\\/3 tumors (60% vs. 38%). CONCLUSIONS: Although an apparently elegant tool for predicting residual disease after BCS, we have shown that it is not applicable to a symptomatic breast unit in Ireland.

  9. Analysis of margin index as a method for predicting residual disease after breast-conserving surgery in a European cancer center.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bolger, Jarlath C

    2012-02-01

    INTRODUCTION: Breast-conserving surgery (BCS), followed by appropriate adjuvant therapies is established as a standard treatment option for women with early-stage invasive breast cancers. A number of factors have been shown to correlate with local and regional disease recurrence. Although margin status is a strong predictor of disease recurrence, consensus is yet to be established on the optimum margin necessary. Margenthaler et al. recently proposed the use of a "margin index," combining tumor size and margin status as a predictor of residual disease after BCS. We applied this new predictive tool to a population of patients with primary breast cancer who presented to a symptomatic breast unit to determine its suitability in predicting those who require reexcision surgery. METHODS: Retrospective analysis of our breast cancer database from January 1, 2000 to June 30, 2010 was performed, including all patients who underwent BCS. Of 531 patients who underwent BCS, 27.1% (144\\/531) required further reexcision procedures, and 55 were eligible for inclusion in the study. Margin index was calculated as: margin index = closest margin (mm)\\/tumor size (mm) x 100, with index >5 considered optimum. RESULTS: Of the 55 patients included, 31% (17\\/55) had residual disease. Fisher\\'s exact test showed margin index not to be a significant predictor of residual disease on reexcision specimen (P = 0.57). Of note, a significantly higher proportion of our patients presented with T2\\/3 tumors (60% vs. 38%). CONCLUSIONS: Although an apparently elegant tool for predicting residual disease after BCS, we have shown that it is not applicable to a symptomatic breast unit in Ireland.

  10. The Replacement of 10 Non-Conserved Residues in the Core Protein of JFH-1 Hepatitis C Virus Improves Its Assembly and Secretion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loïc Etienne

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV assembly is still poorly understood. It is thought that trafficking of the HCV core protein to the lipid droplet (LD surface is essential for its multimerization and association with newly synthesized HCV RNA to form the viral nucleocapsid. We carried out a mapping analysis of several complete HCV genomes of all genotypes, and found that the genotype 2 JFH-1 core protein contained 10 residues different from those of other genotypes. The replacement of these 10 residues of the JFH-1 strain sequence with the most conserved residues deduced from sequence alignments greatly increased virus production. Confocal microscopy of the modified JFH-1 strain in cell culture showed that the mutated JFH-1 core protein, C10M, was present mostly at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER membrane, but not at the surface of the LDs, even though its trafficking to these organelles was possible. The non-structural 5A protein of HCV was also redirected to ER membranes and colocalized with the C10M core protein. Using a Semliki forest virus vector to overproduce core protein, we demonstrated that the C10M core protein was able to form HCV-like particles, unlike the native JFH-1 core protein. Thus, the substitution of a few selected residues in the JFH-1 core protein modified the subcellular distribution and assembly properties of the protein. These findings suggest that the early steps of HCV assembly occur at the ER membrane rather than at the LD surface. The C10M-JFH-1 strain will be a valuable tool for further studies of HCV morphogenesis.

  11. Importance of a Conserved Lys/Arg Residue for Ligand/PDZ Domain Interactions as Examined by Protein Semisynthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Søren W; Moran, Griffin E; Sereikaité, Vita

    2016-01-01

    PDZ domains are ubiquitous small protein domains that are mediators of numerous protein-protein interactions, and play a pivotal role in protein trafficking, synaptic transmission, and the assembly of signaling-transduction complexes. In recent years, PDZ domains have emerged as novel and exciting...... drug targets for diseases (in the brain in particular), so understanding the molecular details of PDZ domain interactions is of fundamental importance. PDZ domains bind to a protein partner at either a C-terminal peptide or internal peptide motifs. Here, we examined the importance of a conserved Lys...

  12. Mechanistic Basis for Type 2 Long QT Syndrome Caused by KCNH2 Mutations that Disrupt Conserved Arginine Residue in the Voltage Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Christie M.; Smith, Ashley M.; Smith, Jennifer L.; Reloj, Allison R.; Velasco, Ellyn J.; Powell, Jonathan; Elayi, Claude S.; Bartos, Daniel C.; Burgess, Don E.

    2013-01-01

    KCNH2 encodes the Kv11.1 channel, which conducts the rapidly activating delayed rectifier K+ current (IKr) in the heart. KCNH2 mutations cause type 2 long QT syndrome (LQT2), which increases the risk for life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias. LQT2 mutations are predicted to prolong the cardiac action potential (AP) by reducing IKr during repolarization. Kv11.1 contains several conserved basic amino acids in the fourth transmembrane segment (S4) of the voltage sensor that are important for normal channel trafficking and gating. This study sought to determine the mechanism(s) by which LQT2 mutations at conserved arginine residues in S4 (R531Q, R531W or R534L) alter Kv11.1 function. Western blot analyses of HEK293 cells transiently expressing R531Q, R531W or R534L suggested that only R534L inhibited Kv11.1 trafficking. Voltage-clamping experiments showed that R531Q or R531W dramatically altered Kv11.1 current (IKv11.1) activation, inactivation, recovery from inactivation and deactivation. Coexpression of wild type (to mimic the patients’ genotypes) mostly corrected the changes in IKv11.1 activation and inactivation, but deactivation kinetics were still faster. Computational simulations using a human ventricular AP model showed that accelerating deactivation rates was sufficient to prolong the AP, but these effects were minimal compared to simply reducing IKr. These are the first data to demonstrate that coexpressing wild type can correct activation and inactivation dysfunction caused by mutations at a critical voltage-sensing residue in Kv11.1. We conclude that some Kv11.1 mutations might accelerate deactivation to cause LQT2 but that the ventricular AP duration is much more sensitive to mutations that decrease IKr. This likely explains why most LQT2 mutations are nonsense or trafficking-deficient. PMID:23546015

  13. Mechanistic basis for type 2 long QT syndrome caused by KCNH2 mutations that disrupt conserved arginine residues in the voltage sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Christie M; Smith, Ashley M; Smith, Jennifer L; Reloj, Allison R; Velasco, Ellyn J; Powell, Jonathan; Elayi, Claude S; Bartos, Daniel C; Burgess, Don E; Delisle, Brian P

    2013-05-01

    KCNH2 encodes the Kv11.1 channel, which conducts the rapidly activating delayed rectifier K+ current (I Kr) in the heart. KCNH2 mutations cause type 2 long QT syndrome (LQT2), which increases the risk for life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias. LQT2 mutations are predicted to prolong the cardiac action potential (AP) by reducing I Kr during repolarization. Kv11.1 contains several conserved basic amino acids in the fourth transmembrane segment (S4) of the voltage sensor that are important for normal channel trafficking and gating. This study sought to determine the mechanism(s) by which LQT2 mutations at conserved arginine residues in S4 (R531Q, R531W or R534L) alter Kv11.1 function. Western blot analyses of HEK293 cells transiently expressing R531Q, R531W or R534L suggested that only R534L inhibited Kv11.1 trafficking. Voltage-clamping experiments showed that R531Q or R531W dramatically altered Kv11.1 current (I Kv11.1) activation, inactivation, recovery from inactivation and deactivation. Coexpression of wild type (to mimic the patients' genotypes) mostly corrected the changes in I Kv11.1 activation and inactivation, but deactivation kinetics were still faster. Computational simulations using a human ventricular AP model showed that accelerating deactivation rates was sufficient to prolong the AP, but these effects were minimal compared to simply reducing I Kr. These are the first data to demonstrate that coexpressing wild type can correct activation and inactivation dysfunction caused by mutations at a critical voltage-sensing residue in Kv11.1. We conclude that some Kv11.1 mutations might accelerate deactivation to cause LQT2 but that the ventricular AP duration is much more sensitive to mutations that decrease I Kr. This likely explains why most LQT2 mutations are nonsense or trafficking-deficient.

  14. Using mutagenesis to explore conserved residues in the RNA-binding groove of influenza A virus nucleoprotein for antiviral drug development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chia-Lin; Hung, Hui-Chen; Lo, Shou-Chen; Chiang, Ching-Hui; Chen, I.-Jung; Hsu, John T.-A.; Hou, Ming-Hon

    2016-02-01

    Nucleoprotein (NP) is the most abundant type of RNA-binding viral protein in influenza A virus-infected cells and is necessary for viral RNA transcription and replication. Recent studies demonstrated that influenza NP is a valid target for antiviral drug development. The surface of the groove, covered with numerous conserved residues between the head and body domains of influenza A NP, plays a crucial role in RNA binding. To explore the mechanism by which NP binds RNA, we performed a series of site-directed mutagenesis in the RNA-binding groove, followed by surface plasmon resonance (SPR), to characterize the interactions between RNA and NP. Furthermore, a role of Y148 in NP stability and NP-RNA binding was evaluated. The aromatic residue of Y148 was found to stack with a nucleotide base. By interrupting the stacking interaction between Y148 and an RNA base, we identified an influenza virus NP inhibitor, (E, E)-1,7-bis(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl) -1,6-heptadiene-3,5-dione; this inhibitor reduced the NP’s RNA-binding affinity and hindered viral replication. Our findings will be useful for the development of new drugs that disrupt the interaction between RNA and viral NP in the influenza virus.

  15. Insights into the smooth-to-rough transitioning in Mycobacterium bolletii unravels a functional Tyr residue conserved in all mycobacterial MmpL family members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernut, Audrey; Viljoen, Albertus; Dupont, Christian; Sapriel, Guillaume; Blaise, Mickaël; Bouchier, Christiane; Brosch, Roland; de Chastellier, Chantal; Herrmann, Jean-Louis; Kremer, Laurent

    2016-03-01

    In mycobacteria, MmpL proteins represent key components that participate in the biosynthesis of the complex cell envelope. Whole genome analysis of a spontaneous rough morphotype variant of Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. bolletii identified a conserved tyrosine that is crucial for the function of MmpL family proteins. Isogenic smooth (S) and rough (R) variants differed by a single mutation linked to a Y842H substitution in MmpL4a. This mutation caused a deficiency in glycopeptidolipid production/transport in the R variant and a gain in the capacity to produce cords in vitro. In zebrafish, increased virulence of the M. bolletii R variant over the parental S strain was found, involving massive production of serpentine cords, abscess formation and rapid larval death. Importantly, this finding allowed us to demonstrate an essential role of Tyr842 in several different MmpL proteins, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis MmpL3. Structural homology models of MmpL4a and MmpL3 identified two additional critical residues located in the transmembrane regions TM10 and TM4 that are facing each other. We propose that these central residues are part of the proton-motive force that supplies the energy for substrate transport. Hence, we provide important insights into mechanistic/structural aspects of MmpL proteins as lipid transporters and virulence determinants in mycobacteria. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Highly Conserved Arg Residue of ERFNIN Motif of Pro-Domain is Important for pH-Induced Zymogen Activation Process in Cysteine Cathepsins K and L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aich, Pulakesh; Biswas, Sampa

    2018-06-01

    Pro-domain of a cysteine cathepsin contains a highly conserved Ex 2 Rx 2 Fx 2 Nx 3 Ix 3 N (ERFNIN) motif. The zymogen structure of cathepsins revealed that the Arg(R) residue of the motif is a central residue of a salt-bridge/H-bond network, stabilizing the scaffold of the pro-domain. Importance of the arginine is also demonstrated in studies where a single mutation (Arg → Trp) in human lysosomal cathepsin K (hCTSK) is linked to a bone-related genetic disorder "Pycnodysostosis". In the present study, we have characterized in vitro Arg → Trp mutant of hCTSK and the same mutant of hCTSL. The R → W mutant of hCTSK revealed that this mutation leads to an unstable zymogen that is spontaneously activated and auto-proteolytically degraded rapidly. In contrast, the same mutant of hCTSL is sufficiently stable and has proteolytic activity almost like its wild-type counterpart; however it shows an altered zymogen activation condition in terms of pH, temperature and time. Far and near UV circular dichroism and intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence experiments have revealed that the mutation has minimal effect on structure of the protease hCTSL. Molecular modeling studies shows that the mutated Trp31 in hCTSL forms an aromatic cluster with Tyr23 and Trp30 leading to a local stabilization of pro-domain and supplements the loss of salt-bridge interaction mediated by Arg31 in wild-type. In hCTSK-R31W mutant, due to presence of a non-aromatic Ser30 residue such interaction is not possible and may be responsible for local instability. These differences may cause detrimental effects of R31W mutation on the regulation of hCTSK auto-activation process compared to altered activation process in hCTSL.

  17. Role of four conserved aspartic acid residues of EF-loops in the metal ion binding and in the self-assembly of ciliate Euplotes octocarinatus centrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wen; Duan, Lian; Sun, Tijian; Yang, Binsheng

    2016-12-01

    Ciliate Euplotes octocarinatus centrin (EoCen) is an EF-hand calcium-binding protein closely related to the prototypical calcium sensor protein calmodulin. Four mutants (D37K, D73K, D110K and D146K) were created firstly to elucidate the importance of the first aspartic acid residues (Asp37, Asp73, Asp110 and Asp146) in the beginning of the four EF-loops of EoCen. Aromatic-sensitized Tb 3+ fluorescence indicates that the aspartic acid residues are very important for the metal-binding of EoCen, except for Asp73 (in EF-loop II). Resonance light scattering (RLS) measurements for different metal ions (Ca 2+ and Tb 3+ ) binding proteins suggest that the order of four conserved aspartic acid residues for contributing to the self-assembly of EoCen is Asp37 > Asp146 > Asp110 > Asp73. Cross-linking experiment also exhibits that Asp37 and Asp146 play critical role in the self-assembly of EoCen. Asp37, in site I, which is located in the N-terminal domain, plays the most important role in the metal ion-dependent self-assembly of EoCen, and there is cooperativity between N-terminal and C-terminal domain (especially the site IV). In addition, the dependence of Tb 3+ induced self-assembly of EoCen and the mutants on various factors, including ionic strength and pH, were characterized using RLS. Finally, 2-p-toluidinylnaphthalene-6-sulfonate (TNS) binding, ionic strength and pH control experiments indicate that in the process of EoCen self-assembly, molecular interactions are mediated by both electrostatic and hydrophobic forces, and the hydrophobic interaction has the important status.

  18. P300/CBP acts as a coactivator to cartilage homeoprotein-1 (Cart1), paired-like homeoprotein, through acetylation of the conserved lysine residue adjacent to the homeodomain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iioka, Takashi; Furukawa, Keizo; Yamaguchi, Akira; Shindo, Hiroyuki; Yamashita, Shunichi; Tsukazaki, Tomoo

    2003-08-01

    The paired-like homeoprotein, Cart1, is involved in skeletal development. We describe here that the general coactivator p300/CBP controls the transcription activity of Cart1 through acetylation of a lysine residue that is highly conserved in other homeoproteins. Acetylation of this residue increases the interaction between p300/CBP and Cart1 and enhances its transcriptional activation. Cart1 encodes a paired-like homeoprotein expressed selectively in chondrocyte lineage during embryonic development. Although its target gene remains unknown, gene disruption studies have revealed that Cart1 plays an important role for craniofacial bone formation as well as limb development by cooperating with another homeoprotein, Alx4. In this report, we study the functional involvement of p300/CBP, coactivators with intrinsic histone acetyltransferase (HAT) activity, in the transcriptional control of Cart1. To study the transcription activity of Cart1, a reporter construct containing a putative Cart1 binding site was transiently transfected with the expression vectors of each protein. The interaction between p300/CBP and Cart1 was investigated by glutathione S-transferase (GST) pull-down, yeast two-hybrid, and immunoprecipitation assays. In vitro acetylation assay was performed with the recombinant p300-HAT domain and Cart1 in the presence of acetyl-CoA. p300 and CBP stimulate Cart1-dependent transcription activity, and this transactivation is inhibited by E1A and Tax, oncoproteins that suppress the activity of p300/CBP. Cart1 binds to p300 in vivo and in vitro, and this requires the homeodomain of Cart 1 and N-terminal 139 amino acids of p300. Confocal microscopy analysis shows that Cart1 recruits overexpressed and endogenous p300 to a Cart1-specific subnuclear compartment. Cart1 is acetylated in vivo and sodium butyrate and trichostatin A, histone deacetylase inhibitors, markedly enhance the transcription activity of Cart1. Deletion and mutagenesis analysis identifies the 131st

  19. Familial hypofibrinogenaemia associated with heterozygous substitution of a conserved arginine residue; Bbeta255 Arg-->His (Fibrinogen Merivale).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maghzal, Ghassan J; Brennan, Stephen O; Fellowes, Andrew P; Spearing, Ruth; George, Peter M

    2003-02-21

    Sequencing of all three fibrinogen genes from an individual with hypofibrinogenaemia led to the identification of two new point mutations in the Bbeta gene. Family studies showed the mutations Bbeta255 Arg-->His (Fibrinogen Merivale) and Bbeta148 Lys-->Asn (Fibrinogen Merivale II) were on different alleles and that only the Bbeta255 Arg-->His mutation segregated with hypofibrinogenaemia. Three simple heterozygotes for this mutation had mean fibrinogen concentrations of 1.4 mg/ml, while heterozygotes for the Bbeta148 Lys-->Asn mutation had normal fibrinogen concentrations. ESI MS analysis of endoproteinase Asp-N digests of Bbeta chains showed that the Bbeta255 Arg-->His substitution was not expressed in plasma, confirming it as the cause of the hypofibrinogenaemia. The Bbeta148 Lys-->Asn chains, on the other hand, were equally expressed with wild-type Bbeta chains in simple heterozygotes. Genotype analysis failed to detect either substitution in 182 healthy controls. Arg(255) is located in the first strand of the five-stranded sheet that forms the main feature of the betaD domain and appears to form an essential H bond with Gly(414). Both the Arg and Gly are absolutely conserved, not only in all known Bbeta chains, but also in all homologous alphaE and gamma chains and in all fibrinogen-related proteins. Protein instability from loss of this contact could easily explain the association of this mutation with hypofibrinogenaemia.

  20. Evolutionary conservativeness of electric field in the Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase active site. Evidence for co-ordinated mutation of charged amino acid residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desideri, A; Falconi, M; Polticelli, F; Bolognesi, M; Djinovic, K; Rotilio, G

    1992-01-05

    Equipotential lines were calculated, using the Poisson-Boltzmann equation, for six Cu,Zn superoxide dismutases with different protein electric charge and various degrees of sequence homology, namely those from ox, pig, sheep, yeast, and the isoenzymes A and B from the amphibian Xenopus laevis. The three-dimensional structures of the porcine and ovine superoxide dismutases were obtained by molecular modelling reconstruction using the structure of the highly homologous bovine enzyme as a template. The three-dimensional structure of the evolutionary distant yeast Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase was recently resolved by us, while computer-modelled structures are available for X. laevis isoenzymes. The six proteins display large differences in the net protein charge and distribution of electrically charged surface residues but the trend of the equipotential lines in the proximity of the active sites was found to be constant in all cases. These results are in line with the very similar catlytic rate constants experimentally measured for the corresponding enzyme activities. This analysis shows that electrostatic guidance for the enzyme-substrate interaction in Cu,Zn superoxide dismutases is related to a spatial distribution of charges, arranged so as to maintain, in the area surrounding the active sites, an identical electrostatic potential distribution, which is conserved in the evolution of this protein family.

  1. Dual Regulation of a Chimeric Plant Serine/Threonine Kinase by Calcium and Calcium/Calmodulin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takezawa, D.; Ramachandiran, S.; Paranjape, V.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1996-01-01

    A chimeric Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) gene characterized by a catalytic domain, a calmodulin-binding domain, and a neural visinin-like Ca(2+)-binding domain was recently cloned from plants. The Escherichia coli-expressed CCaMK phosphorylates various protein and peptide substrates in a Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent manner. The calmodulin-binding region of CCAMK has similarity to the calmodulin-binding region of the alpha-subunit of multifunctional Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMKII). CCaMK exhibits basal autophosphorylation at the threonine residue(s) (0.098 mol of P-32/mol) that is stimulated 3.4-fold by Ca(2+) (0.339 mol of P-32/mol), while calmodulin inhibits Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation to the basal level. A deletion mutant lacking the visinin-like domain did not show Ca(2+)-simulated autophosphorylation activity but retained Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase activity at a reduced level. Ca(2+)-dependent mobility shift assays using E.coli-expressed protein from residues 358-520 revealed that Ca(2+) binds to the visinin-like domain. Studies with site-directed mutants of the visinin-like domain indicated that EF-hands II and III are crucial for Ca(2+)-induced conformational changes in the visinin-like domain. Autophosphorylation of CCaMK increases Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase activity by about 5-fold, whereas it did not affect its C(2+)-independent activity. This report provides evidence for the existence of a protein kinase in plants that is modulated by Ca(2+) and Ca(2+)/calmodulin. The presence of a visinin-like Ca(2+)-binding domain in CCaMK adds an additional Ca(2+)-sensing mechanism not previously known to exist in the Ca(2+)/calmodulin-mediated signaling cascade in plants.

  2. pH-induced conformational change of IscU at low pH correlates with protonation/deprotonation of two conserved histidine residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Ziqi; Kim, Jin Hae; Tonelli, Marco; Ali, Ibrahim K; Markley, John L

    2014-08-19

    IscU, the scaffold protein for the major iron-sulfur cluster biosynthesis pathway in microorganisms and mitochondria (ISC pathway), plays important roles in the formation of [2Fe-2S] and [4Fe-4S] clusters and their delivery to acceptor apo-proteins. Our laboratory has shown that IscU populates two distinct, functionally relevant conformational states, a more structured state (S) and a more dynamic state (D), that differ by cis/trans isomerizations about two peptidyl-prolyl peptide bonds [Kim, J. H., Tonelli, M., and Markley, J. L. (2012) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A., 109, 454-459. Dai Z., Tonelli, M., and Markley, J. L. (2012) Biochemistry, 51, 9595-9602. Cai, K., Frederick, R. O., Kim, J. H., Reinen, N. M., Tonelli, M., and Markley, J. L. (2013) J. Biol. Chem., 288, 28755-28770]. Here, we report our findings on the pH dependence of the D ⇄ S equilibrium for Escherichia coli IscU in which the D-state is stabilized at low and high pH values. We show that the lower limb of the pH dependence curve results from differences in the pKa values of two conserved histidine residues (His10 and His105) in the two states. The net proton affinity of His10 is about 50 times higher and that of His105 is 13 times higher in the D-state than in the S-state. The origin of the high limb of the D ⇄ S pH dependence remains to be determined. These results show that changes in proton inventory need to be taken into account in the steps in iron-sulfur cluster assembly and transfer that involve transitions of IscU between its S- and D-states.

  3. Structural and functional studies of the biotin protein ligase from Aquifex aeolicus reveal a critical role for a conserved residue in target specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tron, Cecile M; McNae, Iain W; Nutley, Margaret; Clarke, David J; Cooper, Alan; Walkinshaw, Malcolm D; Baxter, Robert L; Campopiano, Dominic J

    2009-03-20

    Biotin protein ligase (BPL; EC 6.3.4.15) catalyses the formation of biotinyl-5'-AMP from biotin and ATP, and the succeeding biotinylation of the biotin carboxyl carrier protein. We describe the crystal structures, at 2.4 A resolution, of the class I BPL from the hyperthermophilic bacteria Aquifex aeolicus (AaBPL) in its ligand-free form and in complex with biotin and ATP. The solvent-exposed beta- and gamma-phosphates of ATP are located in the inter-subunit cavity formed by the N- and C-terminal domains. The Arg40 residue from the conserved GXGRXG motif is shown to interact with the carboxyl group of biotin and to stabilise the alpha- and beta-phosphates of the nucleotide. The structure of the mutant AaBPL R40G in both the ligand-free and biotin-bound forms reveals that the mutated loop has collapsed, thus hindering ATP binding. Isothermal titration calorimetry indicated that the presence of biotin is not required for ATP binding to wild-type AaBPL in the absence of Mg(2+), and the binding of biotin and ATP has been determined to occur via a random but cooperative process. The affinity for biotin is relatively unaffected by the R40G mutation. In contrast, the thermodynamic data indicate that binding of ATP to AaBPL R40G is very weak in the absence or in the presence of biotin. The AaBPL R40G mutant remains catalytically active but shows poor substrate specificity; mass spectrometry and Western blot studies revealed that the mutant biotinylates both the target A. aeolicus BCCPDelta67 fragment and BSA, and is subject to self-biotinylation.

  4. The valine and lysine residues in the conserved FxVTxK motif are important for the function of phylogenetically distant plant cellulose synthases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slabaugh, Erin; Scavuzzo-Duggan, Tess; Chaves, Arielle; Wilson, Liza; Wilson, Carmen; Davis, Jonathan K.; Cosgrove, Daniel J.; Anderson, Charles T.; Roberts, Alison W.; Haigler, Candace H.

    2015-12-08

    Cellulose synthases (CESAs) synthesize the β-1,4-glucan chains that coalesce to form cellulose microfibrils in plant cell walls. In addition to a large cytosolic (catalytic) domain, CESAs have eight predicted transmembrane helices (TMHs). However, analogous to the structure of BcsA, a bacterial CESA, predicted TMH5 in CESA may instead be an interfacial helix. This would place the conserved FxVTxK motif in the plant cell cytosol where it could function as a substrate-gating loop as occurs in BcsA. To define the functional importance of the CESA region containing FxVTxK, we tested five parallel mutations in Arabidopsis thaliana CESA1 and Physcomitrella patens CESA5 in complementation assays of the relevant cesa mutants. In both organisms, the substitution of the valine or lysine residues in FxVTxK severely affected CESA function. In Arabidopsis roots, both changes were correlated with lower cellulose anisotropy, as revealed by Pontamine Fast Scarlet. Analysis of hypocotyl inner cell wall layers by atomic force microscopy showed that two altered versions of Atcesa1 could rescue cell wall phenotypes observed in the mutant background line. Overall, the data show that the FxVTxK motif is functionally important in two phylogenetically distant plant CESAs. The results show that Physcomitrella provides an efficient model for assessing the effects of engineered CESA mutations affecting primary cell wall synthesis and that diverse testing systems can lead to nuanced insights into CESA structure–function relationships. Although CESA membrane topology needs to be experimentally determined, the results support the possibility that the FxVTxK region functions similarly in CESA and BcsA.

  5. Evaluating acetaldehyde synthesis from L-14C(U)] threonine by Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus bulgaricus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkins, D.W.; Schmidt, R.H.; Shireman, R.B.; Smith, K.L.; Jezeski, J.J.

    1986-01-01

    To evaluate the synthesis of acetaldehyde from threonine during growth of yogurt cultures, Streptococcus thermophilus MS1 and Lactobacillus bulgaricus MR1 were grown in defined medium in which 10% of the total threonine was composed of L-[carbon-14(U)]threonine. Acetaldehyde production was monitored by formation of 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazone followed by separation and analysis using high performance liquid chromatography. After growth for 8 h at 42 0 C, approximately 2.0% of the total acetaldehyde (780.4 nmol) produced was from L-[carbon-14]threonine. Threonine aldolase activity was determined in cell-free extracts from S. thermophilus and L. bulgaricus grown in Elliker broth. Increasing incubation temperature from 30 to 42 0 C decreased threonine aldolase activity in cells of the streptococcus harvested after 8 h of incubation. Effect of incubation temperature was more dramatic in cells harvested after 18 h where the activity of cells grown at 48 0 C was 89% lower than that of cells grown at 30 0 C. Cell extracts from S. thermophilus MS1 possessed higher threonine aldolase activity than did those from L. bulgaricus MR1. Increased assay temperature from 30 to 42 0 C increased threonine aldolase activity in S. thermophilus MS1

  6. Cryopreservation of common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.) sperm induces protein phosphorylation in tyrosine and threonine residues

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Li, P.; Hulák, M.; Li, Z.; H.; Šulc, Miroslav; Pšenička, M.; Rodina, M.; Gela, D.; Linhart, O.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 80, č. 2 (2013), s. 84-89 ISSN 0093-691X Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Cryopreservation * Sperm * Phosphorylation Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 1.845, year: 2013

  7. Nutritional requirements of digestible threonine for growing meat-type quails

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Silva Ton

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to estimate the nutrient requirements of digestible threonine for meat-type quails (Coturnix coturnix sp in the growth phase. A total of 1350 not sexed meat-type quails were distributed in a completely randomized design with six threonine levels (10.80, 11.50, 12.20, 12.90, 13.60 and 14.30 g/kg as fed, five replications and 45 quails per experimental unit, from 1 to 14 days of age. The threonine levels in the diet had a quadratic effect on body weight, feed intake and weight gain. Estimates for highest body weight (79.41 g, feed intake (128.96 g/bird and weight gain (70.73 g were observed with diets containing 12.60 g/kg of digestible threonine. According to the LRP model, the threonine intake was estimated at 13.40 g/kg of digestible threonine. Protein deposition rate and energy retained in the carcass showed quadratic effect, with estimated digestible threonine levels of 11.80 and 12.00 g/kg in the diet for maximum protein deposition rate (2.00 g/bird and retained energy in the carcass (15.88 kcal/g, respectively. There was a linear effect on feed cost per kg of live weight gain as threonine levels were increased. Nutritional requirement of digestible threonine for meat-type quails for maximum growth is 12.60 g/kg, corresponding to a digestible threonine:digestible lysine ratio of 67.02.

  8. The Mycobacterium tuberculosis transcriptional repressor EthR is negatively regulated by Serine/Threonine phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiba, Jade; Carrère-Kremer, Séverine; Blondiaux, Nicolas; Dimala, Martin Moune; Wohlkönig, Alexandre; Baulard, Alain; Kremer, Laurent; Molle, Virginie

    2014-04-18

    Recent efforts have underlined the role of Serine/Threonine Protein Kinases (STPKs) in growth, pathogenesis and cell wall metabolism in mycobacteria. Herein, we demonstrated that the Mycobacterium tuberculosis EthR, a transcriptional repressor that regulates the activation process of the antitubercular drug ethionamide (ETH) is a specific substrate of the mycobacterial kinase PknF. ETH is a prodrug that must undergo bioactivation by the monooxygenease EthA to exert its antimycobacterial activity and previous studies reported that EthR represses transcription of ethA by binding to the ethA-ethR intergenic region. Mass spectrometry analyses and site-directed mutagenesis identified a set of four phosphoacceptors, namely Thr2, Thr3, Ser4 and Ser7. This was further supported by the complete loss of PknF-dependent phosphorylation of a phosphoablative EthR mutant protein. Importantly, a phosphomimetic version of EthR, in which all phosphosites were replaced by Asp residues, exhibited markedly decreased DNA-binding activity compared with the wild-type protein. Together, these findings are the first demonstration of EthR phosphorylation and indicate that phosphorylation negatively affects its DNA-binding activity, which may impact ETH resistance levels in M. tb. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Digestible Threonine Levels in the Starter Diet of Broilers Derived from Breeders of Different Ages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CBGS Tanure

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of digestible threonine supplementation in the starter diet on the performance, intestinal parameters, and nutrient metabolism of broilers derived from breeders of different ages. In total, 480 one-day-old Cobb chicks, derived from 38-or 49-week-oldbreeders, were housed in experimental battery cages until 21 days of age and fed four different threonine levels (800, 900, 1,000, or 1,100 mg/kg in the starter feed. A completely randomized experimental design in a 2x4 factorial arrangement (breeder age x threonine levels was applied, totaling eight treatments with five replicates of 12 birds each. Broilers from older breeders fed 800 mg digestible threonine/kg of diet presented higher weight gain, with a positive linear effect. There was also an interaction between breeder age and threonine levels for the weight gain of 21-d-old broilers supplemented at maximum level of 1,003 mg Thr/kg diet during the starter phase. There was no effect of breeder age or threonine levels on nutrient metabolism during the period of 17-21 days. There was no influence of breeder age or threonine levels in the starter diet on intestinal morphometric measurements, absorption area, or percentage of goblet cells.

  10. DETERMINATION OF OPTIMUM THREONINE REQUIREMENTS OF JAPANESE QUAIL (Coturnix coturnix japonica CHICKS REARED UNDER TROPICAL ENVIRONMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaac Samuel

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Threonine, like most amino acids, is traditionally noted for its role in protein synthesis. However, dietary threonine concentration required for the maximum performance of Japanese quails is yet to be determined, therefore, a study was conducted to determine the optimum threonine requirement of Japanese quail chicks in the tropical environment. A total of four hundred and fifty, two weeks old quail chicks (mixed sexes were randomly allocated to five dietary treatments (0.67, 0.81, 0.95, 1.08 and 1.22 % total threonine and replicated thrice in a completely randomized design (CRD. There were no significant differences (P>0.05 in average weight gain, average feed intake, feed conversion ratio and age at first lay of quails fed the dietary treatments. Weight of first egg laid was significantly (P0.05 similar for all treatments. There were significant differences (P0.05. It was concluded that the performance of birds were not influenced by the dietary treatments up to the highest dietary level of threonine studied (1.22%. Therefore, it is possible that the optimum dietary level of threonine may be above 1.22 %. Further studies will be necessary to establish higher doses of dietary threonine requirement of Japanese quails reared under tropical climatic environment.

  11. Estimation of L-threonine requirements for Longyan laying ducks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Fouad

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective A study was conducted to test six threonine (Thr levels (0.39%, 0.44%, 0.49%, 0.54%, 0.59%, and 0.64% to estimate the optimal dietary Thr requirements for Longyan laying ducks from 17 to 45 wk of age. Methods Nine hundred Longyan ducks aged 17 wk were assigned randomly to the six dietary treatments, where each treatment comprised six replicate pens with 25 ducks per pen. Results Increasing the Thr level enhanced egg production, egg weight, egg mass, and the feed conversion ratio (FCR (linearly or quadratically; p<0.05. The Haugh unit score, yolk color, albumen height, and the weight, percentage, thickness, and breaking strength of the eggshell did not response to increases in the Thr levels, but the albumen weight and its proportion increased significantly (p<0.05, whereas the yolk weight and its proportion decreased significantly as the Thr levels increased. Conclusion According to a regression model, the optimal Thr requirement for egg production, egg mass, and FCR in Longyan ducks is 0.57%, while 0.58% is the optimal level for egg weight from 17 to 45 wk of age.

  12. Identification, sequence analysis, and characterization of serine/threonine protein kinase 17A from Clonorchis sinensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lisi; Lv, Xiaoli; Huang, Yan; Hu, Yue; Yan, Haiyan; Zheng, Minghui; Zeng, Hua; Li, Xuerong; Liang, Chi; Wu, Zhongdao; Yu, Xinbing

    2014-05-01

    This is the first report of a novel protein from Clonorchis sinensis (C. sinensis), serine/threonine protein kinase 17A (CsSTK17A), which belongs to a member of the death-associated protein kinase (DAPK) family known to regulate diverse biological processes. The full-length sequence encoding CsSTK17A was isolated from C. sinensis adult cDNA plasmid library. Two transcribed isoforms of the gene were identified from the genome of C. sinensis. CsSTK17A contains a kinase domain at the N-terminus that shares a degree of conservation with the DAPK families. Besides, the catalytic domain contains 11 subdomains conserved among STKs and shares the highest identity with STK from Schistosoma mansoni (55.9%). Three-dimensional structure of CsSTK17A displays the canonical STK fold, including the helix C, P-loop, and the activation loop. We obtained recombinant CsSTK17A (rCsSTK17A) and anti-rCsSTK17A IgG. The rCsSTK17A could be probed by anti-rCsSTK17A rat serum, C. sinensis-infected rat serum and the sera from rats immunized with C. sinensis excretory-secretory products, indicating that it is a circulating antigen possessing a strong immunocompetence. Moreover, quantitative RT-PCR and western blotting analyses revealed that CsSTK17A exhibited the highest mRNA and protein expression level in eggs, followed by metacercariae and adult worms. Intriguingly, in the immunolocalization assay, CsSTK17A was intensively localized to the operculum region of eggs in uterus, as well as the vitelline gland of both adult worm and metacercaria, implying that the protein was associated with the reproduction and development of C. sinensis. Overall, these fundamental studies might contribute to further researches on signaling systems of the parasite.

  13. Threonine 53 in α-synuclein is conserved in long-living non-primate animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Knud; Hedegaard, Claus; Bertelsen, Mads Frost

    2009-01-01

    α-Synuclein is the main constituent of Lewy bodies in familial and sporadic cases of Parkinson's disease (PD). Autosomal dominant point mutations, gene duplications or triplications in the α-synuclein (SNCA) gene cause hereditary forms of PD. One of the α-synuclein point mutations, Ala53Thr, is a...... that 53Thr is not a molecular adaptation for long-living animals to minimize the risk of developing PD...

  14. Pseudomonas aeruginosa 4-amino-4-deoxychorismate lyase: spatial conservation of an active site tyrosine and classification of two types of enzyme.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick E F O'Rourke

    Full Text Available 4-Amino-4-deoxychorismate lyase (PabC catalyzes the formation of 4-aminobenzoate, and release of pyruvate, during folate biosynthesis. This is an essential activity for the growth of gram-negative bacteria, including important pathogens such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa. A high-resolution (1.75 Å crystal structure of PabC from P. aeruginosa has been determined, and sequence-structure comparisons with orthologous structures are reported. Residues around the pyridoxal 5'-phosphate cofactor are highly conserved adding support to aspects of a mechanism generic for enzymes carrying that cofactor. However, we suggest that PabC can be classified into two groups depending upon whether an active site and structurally conserved tyrosine is provided from the polypeptide that mainly forms an active site or from the partner subunit in the dimeric assembly. We considered that the conserved tyrosine might indicate a direct role in catalysis: that of providing a proton to reduce the olefin moiety of substrate as pyruvate is released. A threonine had previously been suggested to fulfill such a role prior to our observation of the structurally conserved tyrosine. We have been unable to elucidate an experimentally determined structure of PabC in complex with ligands to inform on mechanism and substrate specificity. Therefore we constructed a computational model of the catalytic intermediate docked into the enzyme active site. The model suggests that the conserved tyrosine helps to create a hydrophobic wall on one side of the active site that provides important interactions to bind the catalytic intermediate. However, this residue does not appear to participate in interactions with the C atom that undergoes an sp(2 to sp(3 conversion as pyruvate is produced. The model and our comparisons rather support the hypothesis that an active site threonine hydroxyl contributes a proton used in the reduction of the substrate methylene to pyruvate methyl in the final stage of

  15. [The importance of C-terminal aspartic acid residue (D141) to the antirestriction activity of the ArdB (R64) protein].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudryavtseva, A A; Osetrova, M S; Livinyuk, V Ya; Manukhov, I V; Zavilgelsky, G B

    2017-01-01

    Antirestriction proteins of the ArdB/KlcA family are specific inhibitors of restriction (endonuclease) activity of type-I restriction/modification enzymes. The effect of conserved amino acid residues on the antirestriction activity of the ArdB protein encoded by the transmissible R64 (IncI1) plasmid has been investigated. An analysis of the amino acid sequences of ArdB homologues demonstrated the presence of four groups of conserved residues ((1) R16, E32, and W51; (2) Y46 and G48; (3) S81, D83 and E132, and (4) N77, L(I)140, and D141) on the surface of the protein globule. Amino acid residues of the fourth group showed a unique localization pattern with the terminal residue protruding beyond the globule surface. The replacement of two conserved amino acids (D141 and N77) located in the close vicinity of each other on the globule surface showed that the C-terminal D141 is essential for the antirestriction activity of ArdB. The deletion of this residue, as well as replacement by a hydrophobic threonine residue (D141T), completely abolished the antirestriction activity of ArdB. The synonymous replacement of D141 by a glutamic acid residue (D141E) caused an approximately 30-fold decrease of the antirestriction activity of ArdB, and the point mutation N77A caused an approximately 20-fold decrease in activity. The residues D141 and N77 located on the surface of the protein globule are presumably essential for the formation of a contact between ArdB and a currently unknown factor that modulates the activity of type-I restriction/modification enzymes.

  16. Long-term impact of reduced tillage and residue management on soil carbon stabilization: Implications for conservation agriculture on contrasting soils

    OpenAIRE

    Chivenge, P.P.; Murwira, H.K.; Giller, K.E.; Mapfumo, P.; Six, J.

    2007-01-01

    Metadata only record The long-term effects of tillage system and residue management on soil organic carbon stabilization are studied in two tropical soils in Zimbabwe, a red clay and a sandy soil. The four tillage systems evaluated were conventional tillage (CT), mulch ripping (MR), clean ripping (CR) and tied ridging (TR). Soil organic carbon (SOC) content was measured for each size fraction as well as total SOC. Based on the findings, the authors conclude that residue management - mainta...

  17. Reciprocally coupled residues crucial for protein kinase Pak2 activity calculated by statistical coupling analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-Hao Hsu

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Regulation of Pak2 activity involves at least two mechanisms: (i phosphorylation of the conserved Thr(402 in the activation loop and (ii interaction of the autoinhibitory domain (AID with the catalytic domain. We collected 482 human protein kinase sequences from the kinome database and globally mapped the evolutionary interactions of the residues in the catalytic domain with Thr(402 by sequence-based statistical coupling analysis (SCA. Perturbation of Thr(402 (34.6% suggests a communication pathway between Thr(402 in the activation loop, and Phe(387 (DeltaDeltaE(387F,402T = 2.80 in the magnesium positioning loop, Trp(427 (DeltaDeltaE(427W,402T = 3.12 in the F-helix, and Val(404 (DeltaDeltaE(404V,402T = 4.43 and Gly(405 (DeltaDeltaE(405G,402T = 2.95 in the peptide positioning loop. When compared to the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA and Src, the perturbation pattern of threonine phosphorylation in the activation loop of Pak2 is similar to that of PKA, and different from the tyrosine phosphorylation pattern of Src. Reciprocal coupling analysis by SCA showed the residues perturbed by Thr(402 and the reciprocal coupling pairs formed a network centered at Trp(427 in the F-helix. Nine pairs of reciprocal coupling residues crucial for enzymatic activity and structural stabilization were identified. Pak2, PKA and Src share four pairs. Reciprocal coupling residues exposed to the solvent line up as an activation groove. This is the inhibitor (PKI binding region in PKA and the activation groove for Pak2. This indicates these evolutionary conserved residues are crucial for the catalytic activity of PKA and Pak2.

  18. Can conservation agriculture improve phosphorus (P) availability in weathered soils? Effects of tillage and residue management on soil P status after 9 years in a Kenyan Oxisol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Margenot, Andrew; Paul, B.K.; Pulleman, M.M.; Parikh, Sanjai; Fonte, Steven J.

    2017-01-01

    The widespread promotion of conservation agriculture (CA) in regions with weathered soils prone to phosphorus (P) deficiency merits explicit consideration of its effect on P availability. A long-term CA field trial located on an acid, weathered soil in western Kenya was evaluated for effects of

  19. The MurC ligase essential for peptidoglycan biosynthesis is regulated by the serine/threonine protein kinase PknA in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiuza, Maria; Canova, Marc J; Patin, Delphine; Letek, Michal; Zanella-Cléon, Isabelle; Becchi, Michel; Mateos, Luís M; Mengin-Lecreulx, Dominique; Molle, Virginie; Gil, José A

    2008-12-26

    The Mur ligases play an essential role in the biosynthesis of bacterial cell-wall peptidoglycan and thus represent attractive targets for the design of novel antibacterials. These enzymes catalyze the stepwise formation of the peptide moiety of the peptidoglycan disaccharide peptide monomer unit. MurC is responsible of the addition of the first residue (L-alanine) onto the nucleotide precursor UDP-MurNAc. Phosphorylation of proteins by Ser/Thr protein kinases has recently emerged as a major physiological mechanism of regulation in prokaryotes. Herein, the hypothesis of a phosphorylation-dependent mechanism of regulation of the MurC activity was investigated in Corynebacterium glutamicum. We showed that MurC was phosphorylated in vitro by the PknA protein kinase. An analysis of the phosphoamino acid content indicated that phosphorylation exclusively occurred on threonine residues. Six phosphoacceptor residues were identified by mass spectrometry analysis, and we confirmed that mutagenesis to alanine residues totally abolished PknA-dependent phosphorylation of MurC. In vitro and in vivo ligase activity assays showed that the catalytic activity of MurC was impaired following mutation of these threonine residues. Further in vitro assays revealed that the activity of the MurC-phosphorylated isoform was severely decreased compared with the non-phosphorylated protein. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of a MurC ligase phosphorylation in vitro. The finding that phosphorylation is correlated with a decrease in MurC enzymatic activity could have significant consequences in the regulation of peptidoglycan biosynthesis.

  20. The MurC Ligase Essential for Peptidoglycan Biosynthesis Is Regulated by the Serine/Threonine Protein Kinase PknA in Corynebacterium glutamicum*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiuza, Maria; Canova, Marc J.; Patin, Delphine; Letek, Michal; Zanella-Cléon, Isabelle; Becchi, Michel; Mateos, Luís M.; Mengin-Lecreulx, Dominique; Molle, Virginie; Gil, José A.

    2008-01-01

    The Mur ligases play an essential role in the biosynthesis of bacterial cell-wall peptidoglycan and thus represent attractive targets for the design of novel antibacterials. These enzymes catalyze the stepwise formation of the peptide moiety of the peptidoglycan disaccharide peptide monomer unit. MurC is responsible of the addition of the first residue (l-alanine) onto the nucleotide precursor UDP-MurNAc. Phosphorylation of proteins by Ser/Thr protein kinases has recently emerged as a major physiological mechanism of regulation in prokaryotes. Herein, the hypothesis of a phosphorylation-dependent mechanism of regulation of the MurC activity was investigated in Corynebacterium glutamicum. We showed that MurC was phosphorylated in vitro by the PknA protein kinase. An analysis of the phosphoamino acid content indicated that phosphorylation exclusively occurred on threonine residues. Six phosphoacceptor residues were identified by mass spectrometry analysis, and we confirmed that mutagenesis to alanine residues totally abolished PknA-dependent phosphorylation of MurC. In vitro and in vivo ligase activity assays showed that the catalytic activity of MurC was impaired following mutation of these threonine residues. Further in vitro assays revealed that the activity of the MurC-phosphorylated isoform was severely decreased compared with the non-phosphorylated protein. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of a MurC ligase phosphorylation in vitro. The finding that phosphorylation is correlated with a decrease in MurC enzymatic activity could have significant consequences in the regulation of peptidoglycan biosynthesis. PMID:18974047

  1. Digestible threonine to lysine ratio in diets for laying hens aged 24-40 weeks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Cristina da Rocha

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Two-hundred sixteen white laying hens were used to assess the ideal ratio of digestible threonine:lysine in diets for laying hens at 24 to 40 weeks of age. Birds were assigned to a randomized block design, with six treatments, six replicates per treatment and six birds per experimental unit. The cage was used as the blocking criterion. Experimental diets contained different digestible threonine:digestible lysine ratios (65, 70, 75, 80, 85 and 90% with 142 g/kg of crude protein. Experimental diets were formulated to be isonitrogenous and isocaloric with different contents of L-glutamic acid. Feed intake (g/hen/d, egg production (%, egg weight (g, egg mass (g/hen/d, feed conversion ratio (kg/dozen and kg/kg egg, eggshell weight (g, albumen weight (g, yolk weight (g and body weight gain (g were assessed. The maximum egg production was observed at 78% digestible threonine:digestible lysine ratio, while the best values of feed conversion ratio (kg/dozen egg and feed conversion ratio (kg/kg of egg were observed at 77.6% and 75%, respectively. Feed intake, egg mass and egg contents (yolk, albumen and eggshell were not affected by treatments. The estimated digestible threonine:digestible lysine ratio of Hy-Line W36 laying hens at 24 to 40 weeks of age is 78%, corresponding to 5.70 g/kg of dietary digestible threonine.

  2. Global alteration of the drug-binding pocket of human P-glycoprotein (ABCB1) by substitution of fifteen conserved residues reveals a negative correlation between substrate size and transport efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahedi, Shahrooz; Chufan, Eduardo E; Ambudkar, Suresh V

    2017-11-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp), an ATP-dependent efflux pump, is linked to the development of multidrug resistance in cancer cells. However, the drug-binding sites and translocation pathways of this transporter are not yet well-characterized. We recently demonstrated the important role of tyrosine residues in regulating P-gp ATP hydrolysis via hydrogen bond formations with high affinity modulators. Since tyrosine is both a hydrogen bond donor and acceptor, and non-covalent interactions are key in drug transport, in this study we investigated the global effect of enrichment of tyrosine residues in the drug-binding pocket on the drug binding and transport function of P-gp. By employing computational analysis, 15 conserved residues in the drug-binding pocket of human P-gp that interact with substrates were identified and then substituted with tyrosine, including 11 phenylalanine (F72, F303, F314, F336, F732, F759, F770, F938, F942, F983, F994), two leucine (L339, L975), one isoleucine (I306), and one methionine (M949). Characterization of the tyrosine-rich P-gp mutant in HeLa cells demonstrated that this major alteration in the drug-binding pocket by introducing fifteen additional tyrosine residues is well tolerated and has no measurable effect on total or cell surface expression of this mutant. Although the tyrosine-enriched mutant P-gp could transport small to moderate size (transport large (>1000 Daltons) substrates such as NBD-cyclosporine A, Bodipy-paclitaxel and Bodipy-vinblastine was significantly decreased. This was further supported by the physico-chemical characterization of seventeen tested substrates, which revealed a negative correlation between drug transport and molecular size for the tyrosine-enriched P-gp mutant. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. A retroviral oncogene, akt, encoding a serine-threonine kinase containing an SH2-like region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellacosa, A; Testa, J R; Staal, S P; Tsichlis, P N

    1991-10-11

    The v-akt oncogene codes for a 105-kilodalton fusion phosphoprotein containing Gag sequences at its amino terminus. Sequence analysis of v-akt and biochemical characterization of its product revealed that it codes for a protein kinase C-related serine-threonine kinase whose cellular homolog is expressed in most tissues, with the highest amount found in thymus. Although Akt is a serine-threonine kinase, part of its regulatory region is similar to the Src homology-2 domain, a structural motif characteristic of cytoplasmic tyrosine kinases that functions in protein-protein interactions. This suggests that Akt may form a functional link between tyrosine and serine-threonine phosphorylation pathways.

  4. Influence of Threonine Metabolism on S-adenosyl-methionine and Histone Methylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shyh-Chang, Ng; Locasale, Jason W.; Lyssiotis, Costas A.; Zheng, Yuxiang; Teo, Ren Yi; Ratanasirintrawoot, Sutheera; Zhang, Jin; Onder, Tamer; Unternaehrer, Juli J.; Zhu, Hao; Asara, John M.; Daley, George Q.; Cantley, Lewis C.

    2013-01-01

    Threonine is the only amino acid critically required for the pluripotency of mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) but the detailed mechanism remains unclear. We found that threonine (Thr) and S-adenosyl-methionine (SAM) metabolism are coupled in pluripotent stem cells, resulting in regulation of histone methylation. Isotope labeling of mESCs revealed that Thr provides a substantial fraction of both the cellular glycine (Gly) and the acetyl-coenzyme A (CoA) needed for SAM synthesis. Depletion of Thr from the culture medium or threonine dehydrogenase (Tdh) from mESCs decreased accumulation of SAM and decreased tri-methylation of histone H3 lysine-4 (H3K4me3), leading to slowed growth, and increased differentiation. Thus abundance of SAM appears to influence H3K4me3, providing a possible mechanism by which modulation of a metabolic pathway might influence stem cell fate. PMID:23118012

  5. Threonine deaminase from extremely halophilic bacteria - Cooperative substrate kinetics and salt dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, M. M.; Lanyi, J. K.

    1972-01-01

    The effect of salt on the activity, stability, and allosteric properties of catabolic threonine deaminase from Halobacterium cutirubrum was studied. The enzyme exhibits sigmoidal kinetics with the substrate, threonine. The Hill slope is 1.55 at pH 10. The enzyme is activated by ADP at low substrate concentrations. In the presence of this effector, sigmoidal kinetics are no longer observed. At pH 10, in the absence of ADP, enzyme activity increases with increasing NaCl concentration from 0 to 4 M.

  6. Alternatives to crop residues for soil amendment

    OpenAIRE

    Powell, J.M.; Unger, P.W.

    1997-01-01

    Metadata only record In semiarid agroecosystems, crop residues can provide important benefits of soil and water conservation, nutrient cycling, and improved subsequent crop yields. However, there are frequently multiple competing uses for residues, including animal forage, fuel, and construction material. This chapter discusses the various uses of crop residues and examines alternative soil amendments when crop residues cannot be left on the soil.

  7. Mutational properties of amino acid residues: implications for evolvability of phosphorylatable residues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Creixell, Pau; Schoof, Erwin M.; Tan, Chris Soon Heng

    2012-01-01

    in terms of their mutational activity. Moreover, we highlight the importance of the genetic code and physico-chemical properties of the amino acid residues as likely causes of these inequalities and uncover serine as a mutational hot spot. Finally, we explore the consequences that these different......; it is typically assumed that all amino acid residues are equally likely to mutate or to result from a mutation. Here, by reconstructing ancestral sequences and computing mutational probabilities for all the amino acid residues, we refute this assumption and show extensive inequalities between different residues...... mutational properties have on phosphorylation site evolution, showing that a higher degree of evolvability exists for phosphorylated threonine and, to a lesser extent, serine in comparison with tyrosine residues. As exemplified by the suppression of serine's mutational activity in phosphorylation sites, our...

  8. Evaluating acetaldehyde synthesis from L-/sup 14/C(U)) threonine by Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus bulgaricus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkins, D.W.; Schmidt, R.H.; Shireman, R.B.; Smith, K.L.; Jezeski, J.J.

    1986-05-01

    To evaluate the synthesis of acetaldehyde from threonine during growth of yogurt cultures, Streptococcus thermophilus MS1 and Lactobacillus bulgaricus MR1 were grown in defined medium in which 10% of the total threonine was composed of L-(carbon-14(U))threonine. Acetaldehyde production was monitored by formation of 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazone followed by separation and analysis using high performance liquid chromatography. After growth for 8 h at 42/sup 0/C, approximately 2.0% of the total acetaldehyde (780.4 nmol) produced was from L-(carbon-14)threonine. Threonine aldolase activity was determined in cell-free extracts from S. thermophilus and L. bulgaricus grown in Elliker broth. Increasing incubation temperature from 30 to 42/sup 0/C decreased threonine aldolase activity in cells of the streptococcus harvested after 8 h of incubation. Effect of incubation temperature was more dramatic in cells harvested after 18 h where the activity of cells grown at 48/sup 0/C was 89% lower than that of cells grown at 30/sup 0/C. Cell extracts from S. thermophilus MS1 possessed higher threonine aldolase activity than did those from L. bulgaricus MR1. Increased assay temperature from 30 to 42/sup 0/C increased threonine aldolase activity in S. thermophilus MS1.

  9. Flow synthesis of phenylserine using threonine aldolase (TA) immobilized on Eupergit support

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tibhe, J.; Fu, Hui; Noel, T.; Wang, Q.; Meuldijk, J.; Hessel, V.

    2013-01-01

    Threonine aldolase (TA) from Thermotoga maritima was immobilized on Eupergit support by both a direct and an indirect method. The incubation time for the direct immobilization method was optimized for the highest amount of enzyme on the support. By introducing the immobilized TA in a packed-bed

  10. Investigations on the optical, thermal and surface modifications of electron irradiated L-threonine single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramesh Kumar, G.; Gokul Raj, S. [Department of Physics, Presidency College, Chepauk, Chennai 600005 (India); Bogle, K.A.; Dhole, S.D.; Bhoraskar, V.N. [Department of Physics, University of Pune, Pune 411007 (India); Mohan, R. [Department of Physics, Presidency College, Chepauk, Chennai 600005 (India)], E-mail: professormohan@yahoo.co.in

    2008-06-15

    L-Threonine single crystals have been irradiated by 6 MeV electrons. Irradiated crystals at various electron fluences were subjected to various techniques such as UV-vis-NIR, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and thermomechanical analyses. Thermal strength of the irradiated crystals has also been studied through differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) measurements. The results have been discussed in detail.

  11. Generation of serine/threonine check points in HN(C)N spectra

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    ing to generate alanine. 6 and serine/threonine specific peak patterns. 7 have enhanced the speed of assign- ment quite substantially. These developments involved a simple modification to the pulse sequence. Continuing such efforts for rapid resonance as- signments, we have implemented here the tuning ideas.

  12. Distribution of PASTA domains in penicillin-binding proteins and serine/threonine kinases of Actinobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawara, Hiroshi

    2016-09-01

    PASTA domains (penicillin-binding protein and serine/threonine kinase-associated domains) have been identified in penicillin-binding proteins and serine/threonine kinases of Gram-positive Firmicutes and Actinobacteria. They are believed to bind β-lactam antibiotics, and be involved in peptidoglycan metabolism, although their biological function is not definitively clarified. Actinobacteria, especially Streptomyces species, are distinct in that they undergo complex cellular differentiation and produce various antibiotics including β-lactams. This review focuses on the distribution of PASTA domains in penicillin-binding proteins and serine/threonine kinases in Actinobacteria. In Actinobacteria, PASTA domains are detectable exclusively in class A but not in class B penicillin-binding proteins, in sharp contrast to the cases in other bacteria. In penicillin-binding proteins, PASTA domains distribute independently from taxonomy with some distribution bias. Particularly interesting thing is that no Streptomyces species have penicillin-binding protein with PASTA domains. Protein kinases in Actinobacteria possess 0 to 5 PASTA domains in their molecules. Protein kinases in Streptomyces can be classified into three groups: no PASTA domain, 1 PASTA domain and 4 PASTA domain-containing groups. The 4 PASTA domain-containing groups can be further divided into two subgroups. The serine/threonine kinases in different groups may perform different functions. The pocket region in one of these subgroup is more dense and extended, thus it may be involved in binding of ligands like β-lactams more efficiently.

  13. Oxytocin analogues with O-glycosylated serine and threonine in position 4

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Marcinkowska, A.; Borovičková, Lenka; Slaninová, Jiřina; Grzonka, Z.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 81, č. 7 (2007), s. 1335-1344 ISSN 0137- 5083 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506; CEZ:AV0Z90210515 Keywords : oxytocin * glycosylated serin * glycosylated threonin * position 4 Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 0.483, year: 2007

  14. Recurrence and mortality according to Estrogen Receptor status for breast cancer patients undergoing conservative surgery. Ipsilateral breast tumour recurrence dynamics provides clues for tumour biology within the residual breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demicheli, Romano; Ardoino, Ilaria; Boracchi, Patrizia; Coradini, Danila; Agresti, Roberto; Ferraris, Cristina; Gennaro, Massimiliano; Hrushesky, William JM; Biganzoli, Elia

    2010-01-01

    the study was designed to determine how tumour hormone receptor status affects the subsequent pattern over time (dynamics) of breast cancer recurrence and death following conservative primary breast cancer resection. Time span from primary resection until both first recurrence and death were considered among 2825 patients undergoing conservative surgery with or without breast radiotherapy. The hazard rates for ipsilateral breast tumour recurrence (IBTR), distant metastasis (DM) and mortality throughout 10 years of follow-up were assessed. DM dynamics displays the same bimodal pattern (first early peak at about 24 months, second late peak at the sixth-seventh year) for both estrogen receptor (ER) positive (P) and negative (N) tumours and for all local treatments and metastatic sites. The hazard rates for IBTR maintain the bimodal pattern for ERP and ERN tumours; however, each IBTR recurrence peak for ERP tumours is delayed in comparison to the corresponding timing of recurrence peaks for ERN tumours. Mortality dynamics is markedly different for ERP and ERN tumours with more early deaths among patients with ERN than among patients with ERP primary tumours. DM dynamics is not influenced by the extent of conservative primary tumour resection and is similar for both ER phenotypes across different metastatic sites, suggesting similar mechanisms for tumour development at distant sites despite apparently different microenvironments. The IBTR risk peak delay observed in ERP tumours is an exception to the common recurrence risk rhythm. This suggests that the microenvironment within the residual breast tissue may enforce more stringent constraints upon ERP breast tumour cell growth than other tissues, prolonging the latency of IBTR. This local environment is, however, apparently less constraining to ERN cells, as IBTR dynamics is similar to the corresponding recurrence dynamics among other distant tissues

  15. Tumor residual pós-quimioterapia neoadjuvante para câncer de mama: impacto sobre o tratamento cirúrgico conservador Residual tumor after neoadjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer: impact on conservative surgical treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edison Mantovani Barbosa

    1999-05-01

    regression occurred irregularly, several refractory tumor cells remaining at the primary tumor site. Resistant tumor cells, independent of the primary tumor, were found in mammary tissue. Other histopathological findings, resulting from chemotherapy in tumoral and mammary tissues, such as calcifications and fibrosis, and in axillary homolateral lymph nodes were obtained. Conclusion: the effect of neoadjuvant chemotherapy is not uniform, refratory tumor cells remaining not only at primary tumor site, but also in distant regions. Furthermore, we found no correlation between the regression of the tumor and the axillary metastatic lymph nodes. Thus, a conservative surgery after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (FEC should be avoided.

  16. Refractometry of TGS crystals doped with L-threonine impurity under uniaxial pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stadnyk, V. I.; Kiryk, Yu. I.

    2013-01-01

    The temperature and spectral dependences of the refractive indices of triglycine sulphate (TGS) crystals doped with L-threonine impurity have been investigated. It is established that the introduction of an impurity weakens the temperature dependence of refractive indices. The electronic polarizability, refractions, and parameters of UV oscillators of mechanically deformed impurity crystals are calculated. The temperature coefficients of the phase transition shift are determined

  17. Refractometry of TGS crystals doped with L-threonine impurity under uniaxial pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stadnyk, V. I., E-mail: vasylstadnyk@ukr.net; Kiryk, Yu. I. [Lviv National University (Ukraine)

    2013-07-15

    The temperature and spectral dependences of the refractive indices of triglycine sulphate (TGS) crystals doped with L-threonine impurity have been investigated. It is established that the introduction of an impurity weakens the temperature dependence of refractive indices. The electronic polarizability, refractions, and parameters of UV oscillators of mechanically deformed impurity crystals are calculated. The temperature coefficients of the phase transition shift are determined.

  18. Phosphorylation of histone H3 at threonine 11 establishes a novel chromatin mark for transcriptional regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Metzger, Eric; Yin, Na; Wissmann, Melanie; Kunowska, Natalia; Fischer, Kristin; Friedrichs, Nicolaus; Patnaik, Debasis; Higgins, Jonathan M.G.; Potier, Noelle; Scheidtmann, Karl-Heinz; Buettner, Reinhard; Schüle, Roland

    2007-01-01

    Posttranslational modifications of histones such as methylation, acetylation, and phosphorylation regulate chromatin structure and gene expression. Here we show that protein kinase C-related kinase 1 (PRK1) phosphorylates histone H3 at threonine 11 (H3T11) upon ligand-dependent recruitment to androgen receptor (AR) target genes. PRK1 is pivotal to AR function since PRK1 knockdown or inhibition impedes AR-dependent transcription. Blocking PRK1 function abrogates androgen-induced H3T11 phosphor...

  19. Preparative resolution of D,L-threonine catalyzed by immobilized phosphatase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scollar, M P; Sigal, G; Klibanov, A M

    1985-03-01

    Hydrolysis of L- and D-O-phosphothreonines catalyzed by four different phosphatases, alkaline phosphatases from calf intestine and E. coli and acid phosphatases from wheat germ and potato, has been kinetically studied. Alkaline phosphatases were found to have comparable reactivities towards the optical isomers. On the other hand, both acid phosphatases displayed a marked stereoselectivity, hydrolyzing the L-ester much faster than its D counterpart. Wheat germ acid phosphatase was the most stereoselective enzyme: V(L)/V(D) = 24 and K(m,L)/K(m,D) = 0.17. This enzyme was immobilized (in k-carrageenan gel, followed by crosslinking with glutaraldehyde) and used for the preparative resolution of D,L-threonine: the latter was first chemically O-phosphorylated and then asymmetrically hydrolyzed by the immobilized phosphatase. As a result, gram quantities of L-threonine of high optical purity and O-phospho-D-threonine were prepared. Immobilized wheat germ phosphatase has been tested for the resolution of other racemic alcohols: serine, 2-amino-1-butanol, 1-amino-2-propanol, 2-octanol, and menthol. In all those cases, the enzyme was either not sufficiently stereoselective or too slow for preparative resolutions.

  20. Identification of critical residues of the serotype modifying O-acetyltransferase of Shigella flexneri

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thanweer Farzaana

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Thirteen serotypes of Shigella flexneri (S. flexneri have been recognised, all of which are capable of causing bacillary dysentery or shigellosis. With the emergence of the newer S. flexneri serotypes, the development of an effective vaccine has only become more challenging. One of the factors responsible for the generation of serotype diversity is an LPS O-antigen modifying, integral membrane protein known as O-acetyltransferase or Oac. Oac functions by adding an acetyl group to a specific O-antigen sugar, thus changing the antigenic signature of the parent S. flexneri strain. Oac is a membrane protein, consisting of hydrophobic and hydrophilic components. Oac bears homology to several known and predicted acetyltransferases with most homology existing in the N-terminal transmembrane (TM regions. Results In this study, the conserved motifs in the TM regions and in hydrophilic loops of S. flexneri Oac were targeted for mutagenesis with the aim of identifying the amino acid residues essential for the function of Oac. We previously identified three critical arginines–R73, R75 and R76 in the cytoplasmic loop 3 of Oac. Re-establishing that these arginines are critical, in this study we suggest a catalytic role for R73 and a structural role for R75 and R76 in O-acetylation. Serine-glycine motifs (SG 52–53, GS 138–139 and SYG 274–276, phenylalanine-proline motifs (FP 78–79 and FPV 282–84 and a tryptophan-threonine motif (WT141-142 found in TM segments and residues RK 110–111, GR 269–270 and D333 found in hydrophilic loops were also found to be critical to Oac function. Conclusions By studying the effect of the mutations on Oac’s function and assembly, an insight into the possible roles played by the chosen amino acids in Oac was gained. The transmembrane serine-glycine motifs and hydrophilic residues (RK 110–111, GR 269–270 and D333 were shown to have an affect on Oac assembly which suggests a structural role

  1. Cycling of grain legume residue nitrogen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, E.S.

    1995-01-01

    Symbiotic nitrogen fixation by legumes is the main input of nitrogen in ecological agriculture. The cycling of N-15-labelled mature pea (Pisum sativum L.) residues was studied during three years in small field plots and lysimeters. The residual organic labelled N declined rapidly during the initial...... management methods in order to conserve grain legume residue N sources within the soil-plant system....

  2. Activation of the LRR Receptor-Like Kinase PSY1R Requires Transphosphorylation of Residues in the Activation Loop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian B. Oehlenschlæger

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available PSY1R is a leucine-rich repeat (LRR receptor-like kinase (RLK previously shown to act as receptor for the plant peptide hormone PSY1 (peptide containing sulfated tyrosine 1 and to regulate cell expansion. PSY1R phosphorylates and thereby regulates the activity of plasma membrane-localized H+-ATPases. While this mechanism has been studied in detail, little is known about how PSY1R itself is activated. Here we studied the activation mechanism of PSY1R. We show that full-length PSY1R interacts with members of the SERK co-receptor family in planta. We identified seven in vitro autophosphorylation sites on serine and threonine residues within the kinase domain of PSY1R using mass spectrometry. We furthermore show that PSY1R autophosphorylation occurs in trans and that the initial transphosphorylation takes place within the activation loop at residues Ser951, Thr959, and Thr963. While Thr959 and Thr963 are conserved among other related plant LRR RLKs, Ser951 is unique to PSY1R. Based on homology modeling we propose that phosphorylation of Ser951 stabilize the inactive conformation of PSY1R.

  3. Residual stresses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahotra, I.M.

    2006-01-01

    The principal effect of unloading a material strained into the plastic range is to create a permanent set (plastic deformation), which if restricted somehow, gives rise to a system of self-balancing within the same member or reaction balanced by other members of the structure., known as residual stresses. These stresses stay there as locked-in stresses, in the body or a part of it in the absence of any external loading. Residual stresses are induced during hot-rolling and welding differential cooling, cold-forming and extruding: cold straightening and spot heating, fabrication and forced fitting of components constraining the structure to a particular geometry. The areas which cool more quickly develop residual compressive stresses, while the slower cooling areas develop residual tensile stresses, and a self-balancing or reaction balanced system of residual stresses is formed. The phenomenon of residual stresses is the most challenging in its application in surface modification techniques determining endurance mechanism against fracture and fatigue failures. This paper discusses the mechanism of residual stresses, that how the residual stresses are fanned and what their behavior is under the action of external forces. Such as in the case of a circular bar under limit torque, rectangular beam under limt moment, reclaiming of shafts welds and peening etc. (author)

  4. Functional Differentiation of Antiporter-Like Polypeptides in Complex I; a Site-Directed Mutagenesis Study of Residues Conserved in MrpA and NuoL but Not in MrpD, NuoM, and NuoN.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Sperling

    Full Text Available It has long been known that the three largest subunits in the membrane domain (NuoL, NuoM and NuoN of complex I are homologous to each other, as well as to two subunits (MrpA and MrpD from a Na+/H+ antiporter, Mrp. MrpA and NuoL are more similar to each other and the same is true for MrpD and NuoN. This suggests a functional differentiation which was proven experimentally in a deletion strain model system, where NuoL could restore the loss of MrpA, but not that of MrpD and vice versa. The simplest explanation for these observations was that the MrpA and MrpD proteins are not antiporters, but rather single subunit ion channels that together form an antiporter. In this work our focus was on a set of amino acid residues in helix VIII, which are only conserved in NuoL and MrpA (but not in any of the other antiporter-like subunits. and to compare their effect on the function of these two proteins. By combining complementation studies in B. subtilis and 23Na-NMR, response of mutants to high sodium levels were tested. All of the mutants were able to cope with high salt levels; however, all but one mutation (M258I/M225I showed differences in the efficiency of cell growth and sodium efflux. Our findings showed that, although very similar in sequence, NuoL and MrpA seem to differ on the functional level. Nonetheless the studied mutations gave rise to interesting phenotypes which are of interest in complex I research.

  5. Residual stresses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macherauch, E.

    1978-01-01

    Residual stresses are stresses which exist in a material without the influence of external powers and moments. They come into existence when the volume of a material constantly changes its form as a consequence of mechanical, thermal, and/or chemical processes and is hindered by neighbouring volumes. Bodies with residual stress are in mechanical balance. These residual stresses can be manifested by means of all mechanical interventions disturbing this balance. Acoustical, optical, radiological, and magnetical methods involving material changes caused by residual stress can also serve for determining residual stress. Residual stresses have an ambivalent character. In technical practice, they are feared and liked at the same time. They cause trouble because they can be the cause for unexpected behaviour of construction elements. They are feared since they can cause failure, in the worst case with catastrophical consequences. They are appreciated, on the other hand, because, in many cases, they can contribute to improvements of the material behaviour under certain circumstances. But they are especially liked for their giving convenient and (this is most important) mostly uncontrollable explanations. For only in very few cases we have enough knowledge and possibilities for the objective evaluation of residual stresses. (orig.) [de

  6. Bacterial Serine/Threonine Protein Kinases in Host-Pathogen Interactions*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canova, Marc J.; Molle, Virginie

    2014-01-01

    In bacterial pathogenesis, monitoring and adapting to the dynamically changing environment in the host and an ability to disrupt host immune responses are critical. The virulence determinants of pathogenic bacteria include the sensor/signaling proteins of the serine/threonine protein kinase (STPK) family that have a dual role of sensing the environment and subverting specific host defense processes. STPKs can sense a wide range of signals and coordinate multiple cellular processes to mount an appropriate response. Here, we review some of the well studied bacterial STPKs that are essential virulence factors and that modify global host responses during infection. PMID:24554701

  7. Bacterial serine/threonine protein kinases in host-pathogen interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canova, Marc J; Molle, Virginie

    2014-04-04

    In bacterial pathogenesis, monitoring and adapting to the dynamically changing environment in the host and an ability to disrupt host immune responses are critical. The virulence determinants of pathogenic bacteria include the sensor/signaling proteins of the serine/threonine protein kinase (STPK) family that have a dual role of sensing the environment and subverting specific host defense processes. STPKs can sense a wide range of signals and coordinate multiple cellular processes to mount an appropriate response. Here, we review some of the well studied bacterial STPKs that are essential virulence factors and that modify global host responses during infection.

  8. Correction: β-Amyrin synthase from Euphorbia tirucalli L. functional analyses of the highly conserved aromatic residues Phe413, Tyr259 and Trp257 disclose the importance of the appropriate steric bulk, and cation-π and CH-π interactions for the efficient catalytic action of the polyolefin cyclization cascade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Ryousuke; Nakada, Chika; Hoshino, Tsutomu

    2017-01-18

    Correction for 'β-Amyrin synthase from Euphorbia tirucalli L. functional analyses of the highly conserved aromatic residues Phe413, Tyr259 and Trp257 disclose the importance of the appropriate steric bulk, and cation-π and CH-π interactions for the efficient catalytic action of the polyolefin cyclization cascade' by Ryousuke Ito et al., Org. Biomol. Chem., 2017, 15, 177-188.

  9. Localized hydroxylamine mutagenesis, and cotransduction of threonine and lysine genes, in Streptomyces venezuelae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuttard, C

    1983-01-01

    A lysate of the generalized transducing phage SV1, grown on the prototrophic type strain 10712 of Streptomyces venezuelae, was mutagenized with hydroxylamine and used to transduce a lysineless auxotroph to lysine independence on supplemented minimal agar. A complex threonine mutant, strain VS95, was isolated from among the transductants and was shown to be carrying at least two different thr mutations. These were about 50% cotransducible with alleles of four independently isolated lysA mutations, as were two other independently isolated threonine mutations, thr-1 and hom-5. The location of thr genes close to lysA occurs in at least three other streptomycetes, but apparently not in Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2), in which the lysA and thr loci are at diametrically opposite locations on the linkage map. This first observation of cotransduction between loci governing the biosynthesis of different amino acids in the genus Streptomyces demonstrates the feasibility of fine-structure genetic analysis by transduction in these antibiotic-producing bacteria. PMID:6411685

  10. Two novel pyrrolooxazole pigments formed by the Maillard reaction between glucose and threonine or serine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noda, Kyoko; Murata, Masatsune

    2017-02-01

    Pyrrolothiazolate formed by the Maillard reaction between l-cysteine and d-glucose has a pyrrolothiazole skeleton as a chromophore. We searched for a Maillard pigment having a pyrrolooxazole skeleton formed from l-threonine or l-serine instead of l-cysteine in the presence of d-glucose. As a result, two novel yellow pigments, named pyrrolooxazolates A and B, were isolated from model solutions of the Maillard reaction containing l-threonine and d-glucose, and l-serine and d-glucose, respectively, and identified as (2R,3S,7aS)-2,3,7,7a-tetrahydro-6-hydroxy-2,5,7a-trimethyl-7-oxo-pyrrolo[2,1-b]oxazole-3-calboxylic acid and (3S,7aS)-2,3,7,7a-tetrahydro-6-hydroxy-5,7a-dimethyl-7-oxo-pyrrolo[2,1-b]oxazole-3-calboxylic acid by instrumental analyses. These compounds were pyrrolooxazole derivatives carrying a carboxy group, and showed the absorption maxima at 300-360 nm under acidic and neutral conditions and at 320-390 nm under alkaline conditions.

  11. Adaptive evolution of threonine deaminase in plant defense against insect herbivores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzales-Vigil, Eliana; Bianchetti, Christopher M.; Phillips, Jr., George N.; Howe, Gregg A. (MSU); (UW)

    2011-11-07

    Gene duplication is a major source of plant chemical diversity that mediates plant-herbivore interactions. There is little direct evidence, however, that novel chemical traits arising from gene duplication reduce herbivory. Higher plants use threonine deaminase (TD) to catalyze the dehydration of threonine (Thr) to {alpha}-ketobutyrate and ammonia as the committed step in the biosynthesis of isoleucine (Ile). Cultivated tomato and related Solanum species contain a duplicated TD paralog (TD2) that is coexpressed with a suite of genes involved in herbivore resistance. Analysis of TD2-deficient tomato lines showed that TD2 has a defensive function related to Thr catabolism in the gut of lepidopteran herbivores. During herbivory, the regulatory domain of TD2 is removed by proteolysis to generate a truncated protein (pTD2) that efficiently degrades Thr without being inhibited by Ile. We show that this proteolytic activation step occurs in the gut of lepidopteran but not coleopteran herbivores, and is catalyzed by a chymotrypsin-like protease of insect origin. Analysis of purified recombinant enzymes showed that TD2 is remarkably more resistant to proteolysis and high temperature than the ancestral TD1 isoform. The crystal structure of pTD2 provided evidence that electrostatic interactions constitute a stabilizing feature associated with adaptation of TD2 to the extreme environment of the lepidopteran gut. These findings demonstrate a role for gene duplication in the evolution of a plant defense that targets and co-opts herbivore digestive physiology.

  12. Osmostress induces autophosphorylation of Hog1 via a C-terminal regulatory region that is conserved in p38α.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inbal Maayan

    Full Text Available Many protein kinases require phosphorylation at their activation loop for induction of catalysis. Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs are activated by a unique mode of phosphorylation, on neighboring Tyrosine and Threonine residues. Whereas many kinases obtain their activation via autophosphorylation, MAPKs are usually phosphorylated by specific, dedicated, MAPK kinases (MAP2Ks. Here we show however, that the yeast MAPK Hog1, known to be activated by the MAP2K Pbs2, is activated in pbs2Δ cells via an autophosphorylation activity that is induced by osmotic pressure. We mapped a novel domain at the Hog1 C-terminal region that inhibits this activity. Removal of this domain provides a Hog1 protein that is partially independent of MAP2K, namely, partially rescues osmostress sensitivity of pbs2Δ cells. We further mapped a short domain (7 amino acid residues long that is critical for induction of autophosphorylation. Its removal abolishes autophosphorylation, but maintains Pbs2-mediated phosphorylation. This 7 amino acids stretch is conserved in the human p38α. Similar to the case of Hog1, it's removal from p38α abolishes p38α's autophosphorylation capability, but maintains, although reduces, its activation by MKK6. This study joins a few recent reports to suggest that, like many protein kinases, MAPKs are also regulated via induced autoactivation.

  13. Osmostress induces autophosphorylation of Hog1 via a C-terminal regulatory region that is conserved in p38α.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maayan, Inbal; Beenstock, Jonah; Marbach, Irit; Tabachnick, Shira; Livnah, Oded; Engelberg, David

    2012-01-01

    Many protein kinases require phosphorylation at their activation loop for induction of catalysis. Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) are activated by a unique mode of phosphorylation, on neighboring Tyrosine and Threonine residues. Whereas many kinases obtain their activation via autophosphorylation, MAPKs are usually phosphorylated by specific, dedicated, MAPK kinases (MAP2Ks). Here we show however, that the yeast MAPK Hog1, known to be activated by the MAP2K Pbs2, is activated in pbs2Δ cells via an autophosphorylation activity that is induced by osmotic pressure. We mapped a novel domain at the Hog1 C-terminal region that inhibits this activity. Removal of this domain provides a Hog1 protein that is partially independent of MAP2K, namely, partially rescues osmostress sensitivity of pbs2Δ cells. We further mapped a short domain (7 amino acid residues long) that is critical for induction of autophosphorylation. Its removal abolishes autophosphorylation, but maintains Pbs2-mediated phosphorylation. This 7 amino acids stretch is conserved in the human p38α. Similar to the case of Hog1, it's removal from p38α abolishes p38α's autophosphorylation capability, but maintains, although reduces, its activation by MKK6. This study joins a few recent reports to suggest that, like many protein kinases, MAPKs are also regulated via induced autoactivation.

  14. Loss of second and sixth conserved cysteine residues from trypsin inhibitor-like cysteine-rich domain-type protease inhibitors in Bombyx mori may induce activity against microbial proteases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Youshan; Liu, Huawei; Zhu, Rui; Xia, Qingyou; Zhao, Ping

    2016-12-01

    Previous studies have indicated that most trypsin inhibitor-like cysteine-rich domain (TIL)-type protease inhibitors, which contain a single TIL domain with ten conserved cysteines, inhibit cathepsin, trypsin, chymotrypsin, or elastase. Our recent findings suggest that Cys 2nd and Cys 6th were lost from the TIL domain of the fungal-resistance factors in Bombyx mori, BmSPI38 and BmSPI39, which inhibit microbial proteases and the germination of Beauveria bassiana conidia. To reveal the significance of these two missing cysteines in relation to the structure and function of TIL-type protease inhibitors in B. mori, cysteines were introduced at these two positions (D36 and L56 in BmSPI38, D38 and L58 in BmSPI39) by site-directed mutagenesis. The homology structure model of TIL domain of the wild-type and mutated form of BmSPI39 showed that two cysteine mutations may cause incorrect disulfide bond formation of B. mori TIL-type protease inhibitors. The results of Far-UV circular dichroism (CD) spectra indicated that both the wild-type and mutated form of BmSPI39 harbored predominantly random coil structures, and had slightly different secondary structure compositions. SDS-PAGE and Western blotting analysis showed that cysteine mutations affected the multimerization states and electrophoretic mobility of BmSPI38 and BmSPI39. Activity staining and protease inhibition assays showed that the introduction of cysteine mutations dramaticly reduced the activity of inhibitors against microbial proteases, such as subtilisin A from Bacillus licheniformis, protease K from Engyodontium album, protease from Aspergillus melleus. We also systematically analyzed the key residue sites, which may greatly influence the specificity and potency of TIL-type protease inhibitors. We found that the two missing cysteines in B. mori TIL-type protease inhibitors might be crucial for their inhibitory activities against microbial proteases. The genetic engineering of TIL-type protease inhibitors may be

  15. Solid residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulder, E.; Duin, P.J. van; Grootenboer, G.J.

    1995-01-01

    A summary is presented of the many investigations that have been done on solid residues of atmospheric fluid bed combustion (AFBC). These residues are bed ash, cyclone ash and bag filter ash. Physical and chemical properties are discussed and then the various uses of residues (in fillers, bricks, gravel, and for recovery of aluminium) are summarised. Toxicological properties of fly ash and stack ash are discussed as are risks of pneumoconiosis for workers handling fly ash, and contamination of water by ashes. On the basis of present information it is concluded that risks to public health from exposure to emissions of coal fly ash from AFBC appear small or negligible as are health risk to workers in the coal fly ash processing industry. 35 refs., 5 figs., 12 tabs

  16. Functional evidence for the critical amino-terminal conserved domain and key amino acids of Arabidopsis 4-HYDROXY-3-METHYLBUT-2-ENYL DIPHOSPHATE REDUCTASE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Wei-Yu; Sung, Tzu-Ying; Wang, Hsin-Tzu; Hsieh, Ming-Hsiun

    2014-09-01

    The plant 4-HYDROXY-3-METHYLBUT-2-ENYL DIPHOSPHATE REDUCTASE (HDR) catalyzes the last step of the methylerythritol phosphate pathway to synthesize isopentenyl diphosphate and its allyl isomer dimethylallyl diphosphate, which are common precursors for the synthesis of plastid isoprenoids. The Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) genomic HDR transgene-induced gene-silencing lines are albino, variegated, or pale green, confirming that HDR is essential for plants. We used Escherichia coli isoprenoid synthesis H (Protein Data Bank code 3F7T) as a template for homology modeling to identify key amino acids of Arabidopsis HDR. The predicted model reveals that cysteine (Cys)-122, Cys-213, and Cys-350 are involved in iron-sulfur cluster formation and that histidine (His)-152, His-241, glutamate (Glu)-242, Glu-243, threonine (Thr)-244, Thr-312, serine-379, and asparagine-381 are related to substrate binding or catalysis. Glu-242 and Thr-244 are conserved only in cyanobacteria, green algae, and land plants, whereas the other key amino acids are absolutely conserved from bacteria to plants. We used site-directed mutagenesis and complementation assay to confirm that these amino acids, except His-152 and His-241, were critical for Arabidopsis HDR function. Furthermore, the Arabidopsis HDR contains an extra amino-terminal domain following the transit peptide that is highly conserved from cyanobacteria, and green algae to land plants but not existing in the other bacteria. We demonstrated that the amino-terminal conserved domain was essential for Arabidopsis and cyanobacterial HDR function. Further analysis of conserved amino acids in the amino-terminal conserved domain revealed that the tyrosine-72 residue was critical for Arabidopsis HDR. These results suggest that the structure and reaction mechanism of HDR evolution have become specific for oxygen-evolving photosynthesis organisms and that HDR probably evolved independently in cyanobacteria versus other prokaryotes. © 2014

  17. Structural analysis of Staphylococcus aureus serine/threonine kinase PknB.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonja Rakette

    Full Text Available Effective treatment of infections caused by the bacterium Staphylococcus aureus remains a worldwide challenge, in part due to the constant emergence of new strains that are resistant to antibiotics. The serine/threonine kinase PknB is of particular relevance to the life cycle of S. aureus as it is involved in the regulation of purine biosynthesis, autolysis, and other central metabolic processes of the bacterium. We have determined the crystal structure of the kinase domain of PknB in complex with a non-hydrolyzable analog of the substrate ATP at 3.0 Å resolution. Although the purified PknB kinase is active in solution, it crystallized in an inactive, autoinhibited state. Comparison with other bacterial kinases provides insights into the determinants of catalysis, interactions of PknB with ligands, and the pathway of activation.

  18. Distribution of serine/threonine kinase SAD-B in mouse peripheral nerve synapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagiwara, Akari; Harada, Kenu; Hida, Yamato; Kitajima, Isao; Ohtsuka, Toshihisa

    2011-05-11

    The serine/threonine kinase SAD regulates neural functions such as axon/dendrite polarization and neurotransmitter release. In the vertebrate central nervous system, SAD-B, a homolog of Caenorhabditis elegans SAD-1, is associated with synaptic vesicles and the active zone cytomatrix in nerve terminals. However, the distribution of SAD-B in the peripheral nervous system remains elusive. Here, we show that SAD-B is specifically localized to neuromuscular junctions. Although the active zone protein bassoon showed a punctated signal indicating its localization to motor end plates, SAD-B shows relatively diffuse localization indicating its association with both the active zone and synaptic vesicles. Therefore, SAD kinase may regulate neurotransmitter release from motor end plates in a similar manner to its regulation of neurotransmitter release in the central nervous system.

  19. Promoter library-based module combination (PLMC) technology for optimization of threonine biosynthesis in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Liang; Xu, Ning; Wang, Yiran; Zhou, Wei; Han, Guoqiang; Ma, Yanhe; Liu, Jun

    2018-05-01

    Due to the lack of efficient control elements and tools, the fine-tuning of gene expression in the multi-gene metabolic pathways is still a great challenge for engineering microbial cell factories, especially for the important industrial microorganism Corynebacterium glutamicum. In this study, the promoter library-based module combination (PLMC) technology was developed to efficiently optimize the expression of genes in C. glutamicum. A random promoter library was designed to contain the putative - 10 (NNTANANT) and - 35 (NNGNCN) consensus motifs, and refined through a three-step screening procedure to achieve numerous genetic control elements with different strength levels, including fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) screening, agar plate screening, and 96-well plate screening. Multiple conventional strategies were employed for further precise characterizations of the promoter library, such as real-time quantitative PCR, sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, FACS analysis, and the lacZ reporter system. These results suggested that the established promoter elements effectively regulated gene expression and showed varying strengths over a wide range. Subsequently, a multi-module combination technology was created based on the efficient promoter elements for combination and optimization of modules in the multi-gene pathways. Using this technology, the threonine biosynthesis pathway was reconstructed and optimized by predictable tuning expression of five modules in C. glutamicum. The threonine titer of the optimized strain was significantly improved to 12.8 g/L, an approximate 6.1-fold higher than that of the control strain. Overall, the PLMC technology presented in this study provides a rapid and effective method for combination and optimization of multi-gene pathways in C. glutamicum.

  20. C. elegans serine-threonine kinase KIN-29 modulates TGFβ signaling and regulates body size formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cohen Stephen

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Background In C. elegans there are two well-defined TGFβ-like signaling pathways. The Sma/Mab pathway affects body size morphogenesis, male tail development and spicule formation while the Daf pathway regulates entry into and exit out of the dauer state. To identify additional factors that modulate TGFβ signaling in the Sma/Mab pathway, we have undertaken a genetic screen for small animals and have identified kin-29. Results kin-29 encodes a protein with a cytoplasmic serine-threonine kinase and a novel C-terminal domain. The kinase domain is a distantly related member of the EMK (ELKL motif kinase family, which interacts with microtubules. We show that the serine-threonine kinase domain has in vitro activity. kin-29 mutations result in small animals, but do not affect male tail morphology as do several of the Sma/Mab signal transducers. Adult worms are smaller than the wild-type, but also develop more slowly. Rescue by kin-29 is achieved by expression in neurons or in the hypodermis. Interaction with the dauer pathway is observed in double mutant combinations, which have been seen with Sma/Mab pathway mutants. We show that kin-29 is epistatic to the ligand dbl-1, and lies upstream of the Sma/Mab pathway target gene, lon-1. Conclusion kin-29 is a new modulator of the Sma/Mab pathway. It functions in neurons and in the hypodermis to regulate body size, but does not affect all TGFβ outputs, such as tail morphogenesis.

  1. The Conformational Landscape of L-Threonine Matrix Isolation Infrared and {AB-INITIO Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, Pankaj; Mukhopadhyay, Anamika; Viswanathan, K. S.

    2017-06-01

    Amino acids, containing hydroxy side chains such as L-threonine and tyrosine play an important role in molecular recognition, such as in the docking of propofol, which is a commonly used anaesthetic. A rich conformational landscape of these amino acids makes them interesting candidates in the study of intra and intermolecular interactions. In this work, the conformational landscape of L-threonine was studied, as it can be expected to serve as a basis for understanding structure and functions of polypeptides and other biomolecules. The matrix isolation technique (MI) coupled with a high temperature effusive molecular beam (EMB) nozzle was used to trap conformers of amino acid, which were then characterized using FTIR spectroscopy. The usefulness of MI-EMB-FTIR spectroscopy is that it can trap structures corresponding to the local minima along with the global minimum and hence allows for a better exploration of the potential energy surface. A major challenge in conformational analysis of amino acids using matrix isolation FTIR arises from its non-volatile nature. A home built heating system which was mounted close to the cryotip, was used to evaporate the non-volatile amino acids. Our infrared spectra show that three conformations were trapped in the matrix. Experimental results were supported by {ab-initio calculations performed using the CCSD(T), MP2 and M06-2X methods together with 6-311++G(d,p) and aug/cc-pVDZ basis sets. The side chains of the amino acids appeared to have an influence on the preferential stabilisation of a particular backbone structure of amino acids. Factors such as entropy, anomeric effect and intramolecular H-bonding were also found to play an important role in determining conformal preferences, which will be discussed.

  2. LFA-1 and Mac-1 integrins bind to the serine/threonine-rich domain of thrombomodulin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawamoto, Eiji [Department of Molecular Pathobiology and Cell Adhesion Biology, Mie University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-174 Edobashi, Tsu, Mie 514-8507 (Japan); Emergency and Critical Care Center, Mie University Hospital, 2-174 Edobashi, Tsu 514-8507 (Japan); Okamoto, Takayuki, E-mail: okamotot@doc.medic.mie-u.ac.jp [Department of Molecular Pathobiology and Cell Adhesion Biology, Mie University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-174 Edobashi, Tsu, Mie 514-8507 (Japan); Takagi, Yoshimi [Department of Molecular Pathobiology and Cell Adhesion Biology, Mie University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-174 Edobashi, Tsu, Mie 514-8507 (Japan); Honda, Goichi [Medical Affairs Department, Asahi Kasei Pharma Corporation, 1-105 Kanda Jinbo-cho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-8101 (Japan); Suzuki, Koji [Faculty of Pharmaceutical Science, Suzuka University of Medical Science, 3500-3, Minamitamagaki-cho, Suzuka, Mie 513-8679 (Japan); Imai, Hiroshi [Emergency and Critical Care Center, Mie University Hospital, 2-174 Edobashi, Tsu 514-8507 (Japan); Shimaoka, Motomu, E-mail: shimaoka@doc.medic.mie-u.ac.jp [Department of Molecular Pathobiology and Cell Adhesion Biology, Mie University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-174 Edobashi, Tsu, Mie 514-8507 (Japan)

    2016-05-13

    LFA-1 (αLβ2) and Mac-1 (αMβ2) integrins regulate leukocyte trafficking in health and disease by binding primarily to IgSF ligand ICAM-1 and ICAM-2 on endothelial cells. Here we have shown that the anti-coagulant molecule thrombomodulin (TM), found on the surface of endothelial cells, functions as a potentially new ligand for leukocyte integrins. We generated a recombinant extracellular domain of human TM and Fc fusion protein (TM-domains 123-Fc), and showed that pheripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) bind to TM-domains 123-Fc dependent upon integrin activation. We then demonstrated that αL integrin-blocking mAb, αM integrin-blocking mAb, and β2 integrin-blocking mAb inhibited the binding of PBMCs to TM-domains 123-Fc. Furthermore, we show that the serine/threonine-rich domain (domain 3) of TM is required for the interaction with the LFA-1 (αLβ2) and Mac-1 (αMβ2) integrins to occur on PBMCs. These results demonstrate that the LFA-1 and Mac-1 integrins on leukocytes bind to TM, thereby establishing the molecular and structural basis underlying LFA-1 and Mac-1 integrin interaction with TM on endothelial cells. In fact, integrin-TM interactions might be involved in the dynamic regulation of leukocyte adhesion with endothelial cells. - Highlights: • LFA-1 and Mac-1 integrins bind to the anti-coagulant molecule thrombomodulin. • The serine/threonine-rich domain of thrombomodulin is essential to interact with the LFA-1 and Mac-1 integrins on PBMCs. • Integrin-TM interactions might be involved in the dynamic regulation of leukocyte adhesion with endothelial cells.

  3. Identification of essential amino acid residues in the nisin dehydratase NisB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rustem eKhusainov

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Nisin is a posttranslationally-modified antimicrobial peptide that has the ability to induce its own biosynthesis. Serines and threonines in the modifiable core peptide part of precursor nisin are dehydrated to dehydroalanines and dehydrobutyrines by the dehydratase NisB, and subsequently cysteines are coupled to the dehydroamino acids by the cyclase NisC. In this study, we applied extensive site-directed mutagenesis, together with direct binding studies, to investigate the molecular mechanism of the dehydratase NisB. We use a natural nisin-producing strain as a host to probe mutant-NisB functionality. Importantly, we are able to differentiate between intracellular and secreted fully dehydrated precursor nisin, enabling investigation of the NisB properties needed for the release of dehydrated precursor nisin to its devoted secretion system NisT. We report that single amino acid substitutions of conserved residues, i.e. R83A, R83M and R87A result in incomplete dehydration of precursor nisin and prevention of secretion. Single point NisB mutants Y80F and H961A, result in a complete lack of dehydration of precursor nisin, but do not abrogate precursor nisin binding. The data indicate that residues Y80 and H961 are directly involved in catalysis, fitting well with their position in the recently published 3D-structure of NisB. We confirm, by in vivo studies, results that were previously obtained from in vitro experiments and NisB structure elucidation and show that previous findings translate well to effects seen in the original production host.

  4. Basal Levels of AMPA Receptor GluA1 Subunit Phosphorylation at Threonine 840 and Serine 845 in Hippocampal Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babiec, Walter E.; Guglietta, Ryan; O'Dell, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    Dephosphorylation of AMPA receptor (AMPAR) GluA1 subunits at two sites, serine 845 (S845) and threonine 840 (T840), is thought to be involved in NMDA receptor-dependent forms of long-term depression (LTD). Importantly, the notion that dephosphorylation of these sites contributes to LTD assumes that a significant fraction of GluA1 subunits are…

  5. [The influence of fasting, of a hyperprotein diet and of nicotinamide on hepatic L-threonine deaminase].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleo, M F; Casella, A; Marinello, E

    1981-09-15

    The induction of L-threonine deaminase, following nicotinamide injection has been studied: the effect of fasting and of hyperproteic diet have been also taken in consideration. Maximal induction is observed after 5 days hyperproteic diet, and is additional only with nicotinamide treatment. Results are interpreted assuming a different hepatic content and behavior of multiple forms of the enzyme.

  6. Effect of threonine on secretory immune system using a chicken intestinal ex vivo model with lipopolysaccharide challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secretory IgA (sIgA) and its transcytosis receptor, polymeric immunoglobulin receptor (pIgR), along with mucus, form the first lines of intestinal defense. Threonine (Thr) is a major constituent component of intestinal mucins and IgA, which are highly secreted under lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced ...

  7. Mutations that cause threonine sensitivity identify catalytic and regulatory regions of the aspartate kinase of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arévalo-Rodríguez, M; Calderón, I L; Holmberg, S

    1999-01-01

    The HOM3 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes aspartate kinase, which catalyses the first step in the branched pathway leading to the synthesis of threonine and methionine from aspartate. Regulation of the carbon flow into this pathway takes place mainly by feedback inhibition of this enzyme ...

  8. Residual basins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Elboux, C.V.; Paiva, I.B.

    1980-01-01

    Exploration for uranium carried out over a major portion of the Rio Grande do Sul Shield has revealed a number of small residual basins developed along glacially eroded channels of pre-Permian age. Mineralization of uranium occurs in two distinct sedimentary units. The lower unit consists of rhythmites overlain by a sequence of black shales, siltstones and coal seams, while the upper one is dominated by sandstones of probable fluvial origin. (Author) [pt

  9. ThrR, a DNA-binding transcription factor involved in controlling threonine biosynthesis in Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Jonathan; Müller, Peter; Lentes, Sabine; Thiele, Martin J; Zeigler, Daniel R; Tödter, Dominik; Paulus, Henry; Brantl, Sabine; Stülke, Jörg; Commichau, Fabian M

    2016-09-01

    The threonine dehydratase IlvA is part of the isoleucine biosynthesis pathway in the Gram-positive model bacterium Bacillus subtilis. Consequently, deletion of ilvA causes isoleucine auxotrophy. It has been reported that ilvA pseudo-revertants having a derepressed hom-thrCB operon appear in the presence of threonine. Here we have characterized two classes of ilvA pseudo-revertants. In the first class the hom-thrCB operon was derepressed unmasking the threonine dehydratase activity of the threonine synthase ThrC. In the second class of mutants, threonine biosynthesis was more broadly affected. The first class of ilvA pseudo-revertants had a mutation in the Phom promoter (P*hom ), resulting in constitutive expression of the hom-thrCB operon. In the second class of ilvA pseudo-revertants, the thrR gene encoding a putative DNA-binding protein was inactivated, also resulting in constitutive expression of the hom-thrCB operon. Here we demonstrate that ThrR is indeed a DNA-binding transcription factor that regulates the hom-thrCB operon and the thrD aspartokinase gene. DNA binding assays uncovered the DNA-binding site of ThrR and revealed that the repressor competes with the RNA polymerase for DNA binding. This study also revealed that ThrR orthologs are ubiquitous in genomes from the Gram-positive phylum Firmicutes and in some Gram-negative bacteria. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. The small serine-threonine protein SIP2 interacts with STE12 and is involved in ascospore germination in Sordaria macrospora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elleuche, Skander; Bernhards, Yasmine; Schäfers, Christian; Varghese, Jans Manjali; Nolting, Nicole; Pöggeler, Stefanie

    2010-12-01

    In fungi, the homoeodomain protein STE12 controls diverse developmental processes, and derives its regulatory specificity from different protein interactions. We recently showed that in the homothallic ascomycete Sordaria macrospora, STE12 is essential for ascospore development, and is able to interact with the alpha-domain mating-type protein SMTA-1 and the MADS box protein MCM1. To further evaluate the functional roles of STE12, we used the yeast two-hybrid approach to identify new STE12-interacting partners. Using STE12 as bait, a small, serine-threonine-rich protein (designated STE12-interacting protein 2, SIP2) was identified. SIP2 is conserved among members of the fungal class Sordariomycetes. In vivo localization studies revealed that SIP2 was targeted to the nucleus and cytoplasm. The STE12/SIP2 interaction was further confirmed in vivo by bimolecular fluorescence complementation. Nuclear localization of SIP2 was apparently mediated by STE12. Unlike deletion of ste12, deletion of sip2 in S. macrospora led to only a slight decrease in ascospore germination, and no other obvious morphological phenotype. In comparison to the Δste12 single knockout strain, ascospore germination was significantly increased in a Δsip2/ste12 double knockout strain. Our data provide evidence for a regulatory role of the novel fungal protein SIP2 in ascospore germination. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  11. Conservation Value

    OpenAIRE

    Tisdell, Clement A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper outlines the significance of the concept of conservation value and discusses ways in which it is determined paying attention to views stemming from utilitarian ethics and from deontological ethics. The importance of user costs in relation to economic decisions about the conservation and use of natural resources is emphasised. Particular attention is given to competing views about the importance of conserving natural resources in order to achieve economic sustainability. This then l...

  12. Beyond the Dopamine Receptor: Regulation and Roles of Serine/Threonine Protein Phosphatases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven I Walaas

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Dopamine plays an important modulatory role in the central nervous system, helping to control critical aspects of motor function and reward learning. Alteration in normal dopaminergic neurotransmission underlies multiple neurological diseases including schizophrenia, Huntington's disease and Parkinson's disease. Modulation of dopamine-regulated signaling pathways is also important in the addictive actions of most drugs of abuse. Our studies over the last 30 years have focused on the molecular actions of dopamine acting on medium spiny neurons, the predominant neurons of the neostriatum. Striatum-enriched phosphoproteins, particularly DARPP-32, RCS (Regulator of Calmodulin Signaling and ARPP-16, mediate pleiotropic actions of dopamine. Notably, each of these proteins, either directly or indirectly, regulates the activity of one of the three major subclasses of serine/threonine protein phosphatases, PP1, PP2B and PP2A, respectively. For example, phosphorylation of DARPP-32 at Thr34 by protein kinase A results in potent inhibition of PP1, leading to potentiation of dopaminergic signaling at multiple steps from the dopamine receptor to the nucleus. The discovery of DARPP-32 and its emergence as a critical molecular integrator of striatal signaling will be discussed, as will more recent studies that highlight novel roles for RCS and ARPP-16 in dopamine-regulated striatal signaling pathways.

  13. Identification and characterization of a novel serine-threonine kinase gene from the Xp22 region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montini, E; Andolfi, G; Caruso, A; Buchner, G; Walpole, S M; Mariani, M; Consalez, G; Trump, D; Ballabio, A; Franco, B

    1998-08-01

    Eukaryotic protein kinases are part of a large and expanding family of proteins. Through our transcriptional mapping effort in the Xp22 region, we have isolated and sequenced the full-length transcript of STK9, a novel cDNA highly homologous to serine-threonine kinases. A number of human genetic disorders have been mapped to the region where STK9 has been localized including Nance-Horan (NH) syndrome, oral-facial-digital syndrome type 1 (OFD1), and a novel locus for nonsyndromic sensorineural deafness (DFN6). To evaluate the possible involvement of STK9 in any of the above-mentioned disorders, a 2416-bp full-length cDNA was assembled. The entire genomic structure of the gene, which is composed of 20 coding exons, was determined. Northern analysis revealed a transcript larger than 9.5 kb in several tissues including brain, lung, and kidney. The mouse homologue (Stk9) was identified and mapped in the mouse in the region syntenic to human Xp. This location is compatible with the location of the Xcat mutant, which shows congenital cataracts very similar to those observed in NH patients. Sequence homologies, expression pattern, and mapping information in both human and mouse make STK9 a candidate gene for the above-mentioned disorders. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  14. Flow synthesis of phenylserine using threonine aldolase immobilized on Eupergit support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagdish D. Tibhe

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Threonine aldolase (TA from Thermotoga maritima was immobilized on an Eupergit support by both a direct and an indirect method. The incubation time for the direct immobilization method was optimized for the highest amount of enzyme on the support. By introducing the immobilized TA in a packed-bed microreactor, a flow synthesis of phenylserine was developed, and the effects of temperature and residence time were studied in particular. Calculations of the Damköhler number revealed that no mass transfer limitations are given in the micro-interstices of the packed bed. The yield does not exceed 40% and can be rationalized by the natural equilibrium as well as product inhibition which was experimentally proven. The flow synthesis with the immobilized enzyme was compared with the corresponding transformation conducted with the free enzyme. The product yield was further improved by operating under slug flow conditions which is related to the very short residence time distribution. In all cases 20% diastereomeric excess (de and 99% enantiomeric excess (ee were observed. A continuous run of the reactant solution was carried out for 10 hours in order to check enzyme stability at higher temperature. Stable operation was achieved at 20 minute residence time. Finally, the productivity of the reactor was calculated, extrapolated to parallel run units, and compared with data collected previously.

  15. Growth and spectroscopic, thermodynamic and nonlinear optical studies of L-threonine phthalate crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theras, J. Elberin Mary; Kalaivani, D.; Jayaraman, D.; Joseph, V.

    2015-10-01

    L-threonine phthalate (LTP) single crystal has been grown using a solution growth technique at room temperature. Single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis reveals that LTP crystallizes in monoclinic crystal system with space group C2/c. The optical absorption studies show that the crystal is transparent in the entire visible region with a cut-off wavelength 309 nm. The optical band gap is found to be 4.05 eV. The functional groups of the synthesized compound have been identified by FTIR spectral analysis. The functional groups present in the material were also confirmed by FT-RAMAN spectroscopy. Surface morphology and the presence of various elements were studied by SEM-EDAX analysis. The thermal stability of LTP single crystal has been analyzed by TGA/DTA studies. The thermodynamic parameters such as activation energy, entropy, enthalpy and Gibbs free energy were determined for the grown material using TG data and Coats-Redfern relation. Since the grown crystal is centrosymmetric, Z-Scan studies were carried out for analyzing the third order nonlinear optical property. The nonlinear absorption coefficient, nonlinear refractive index and susceptibility have been measured using Z-Scan technique.

  16. Flow synthesis of phenylserine using threonine aldolase immobilized on Eupergit support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibhe, Jagdish D; Fu, Hui; Noël, Timothy; Wang, Qi; Meuldijk, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Summary Threonine aldolase (TA) from Thermotoga maritima was immobilized on an Eupergit support by both a direct and an indirect method. The incubation time for the direct immobilization method was optimized for the highest amount of enzyme on the support. By introducing the immobilized TA in a packed-bed microreactor, a flow synthesis of phenylserine was developed, and the effects of temperature and residence time were studied in particular. Calculations of the Damköhler number revealed that no mass transfer limitations are given in the micro-interstices of the packed bed. The yield does not exceed 40% and can be rationalized by the natural equilibrium as well as product inhibition which was experimentally proven. The flow synthesis with the immobilized enzyme was compared with the corresponding transformation conducted with the free enzyme. The product yield was further improved by operating under slug flow conditions which is related to the very short residence time distribution. In all cases 20% diastereomeric excess (de) and 99% enantiomeric excess (ee) were observed. A continuous run of the reactant solution was carried out for 10 hours in order to check enzyme stability at higher temperature. Stable operation was achieved at 20 minute residence time. Finally, the productivity of the reactor was calculated, extrapolated to parallel run units, and compared with data collected previously. PMID:24204429

  17. Nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of the HSV-2 serine/threonine kinase Us3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finnen, Renee L.; Johnston, Susan M.; Neron, Casey E.; Banfield, Bruce W.

    2011-01-01

    The alphaherpesvirus serine/threonine kinase Us3 plays diverse roles in virus multiplication and modifies both nuclear and cytoplasmic substrates. We recently reported that treatment of HSV-2 Us3-transfected and HSV-2-infected cells with leptomycin B, an inhibitor of nuclear export mediated by interaction of chromosomal regional maintenance protein (CRM1) with leucine rich nuclear export signals (NESs), resulted in nuclear trapping of Us3. Here, we utilized fluorescence loss in photobleaching to monitor nuclear export of HSV-2 Us3 and confirm that this process proceeds solely via a CRM1-mediated mechanism. Analysis of deletion derivatives of HSV-2 Us3 fused to a nuclear export reporter protein implicated the involvement of NES-like sequences in nuclear export. However, nuclear trapping of HSV-2 Us3 proteins carrying mutations in these potential NESs was not observed, indicating that these sequences are not functional in the context of full-length protein. Our analyses also revealed previously unidentified regions of HSV-2 Us3 that contribute to its kinase activity.

  18. HIV-1 incorporates and proteolytically processes human NDR1 and NDR2 serine-threonine kinases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devroe, Eric; Silver, Pamela A.; Engelman, Alan

    2005-01-01

    Mammalian genomes encode two related serine-threonine kinases, nuclear Dbf2 related (NDR)1 and NDR2, which are homologous to the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Dbf2 kinase. Recently, a yeast genetic screen implicated the Dbf2 kinase in Ty1 retrotransposition. Since several virion-incorporated kinases regulate the infectivity of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), we speculated that the human NDR1 and NDR2 kinases might play a role in the HIV-1 life cycle. Here we show that the NDR1 and NDR2 kinases were incorporated into HIV-1 particles. Furthermore, NDR1 and NDR2 were cleaved by the HIV-1 protease (PR), both within virions and within producer cells. Truncation at the PR cleavage site altered NDR2 subcellular localization and inhibited NDR1 and NDR2 enzymatic activity. These studies identify two new virion-associated host cell enzymes and suggest a novel mechanism by which HIV-1 alters the intracellular environment of human cells

  19. Inter-row Adsorption Configuration and Stability of Threonine Adsorbed on the Ge(100) Surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Myungjin; Park, Youngchan; Jeong, Hyuk; Lee, Hangil

    2013-01-01

    The adsorption structures of threonine on the Ge(100) surface were investigated using core-level photoemission spectroscopy (CLPES) in conjunction with density functional theory (DFT) calculations. CLPES measurements were performed to identify the experimentally preferred adsorption structure. The preferred structure indicated the relative reactivities of the carboxyl and hydroxymethyl groups as electron donors to the Ge(100) surface during adsorption. The core-level C 1s, N 1s, and O 1s CLPES spectra indicated that the carboxyl oxygen competed more strongly with the hydroxymethyl oxygen during the adsorption reaction. Three among six possible adsorption structures were identified as energetically favorable using DFT calculation methods that considered the inter- and intra-bonding configurations upon adsorption onto the Ge(100) surface. These structures were O-H dissociated N dative inter bonding, O-H dissociated N dative intra bonding, O-H dissociation bonding. One of the adsorption structures: O-H dissociated N dative inter bonding was predicted to be stable in light of the transition state energies. We thus confirmed that the most favorable adsorption structure is the O-H dissociated N dative-inter bonding structure using CLPES and DFT calculation

  20. Molecular characterization and functional analysis of serine/threonine protein phosphatase of Toxocara canis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Guang Xu; Zhou, Rong Qiong; Hu, Shi Jun; Huang, Han Cheng; Zhu, Tao; Xia, Qing You

    2014-06-01

    Toxocara canis (T. canis) is a widely prevalent zoonotic parasite that infects a wide range of mammalian hosts, including humans. We generated the full-length complementary DNA (cDNA) of the serine/threonine phosphatase gene of T. canis (Tc stp) using 5' rapid amplification of the cDNA ends. The 1192-bp sequence contained a continuous 942-nucleotide open reading frame, encoding a 313-amino-acid polypeptide. The Tc STP polypeptide shares a high level of amino-acid sequence identity with the predicted STPs of Loa loa (89%), Brugia malayi (86%), Oesophagostomum columbianum (76%), and Oesophagostomumdentatum (76%). The Tc STP contains GDXHG, GDXVDRG, GNHE motifs, which are characteristic of members of the phosphoprotein phosphatase family. Our quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis showed that the Tc STP was expressed in six different tissues in the adult male, with high-level expression in the spermary, vas deferens, and musculature, but was not expressed in the adult female, suggesting that Tc STP might be involved in spermatogenesis and mating behavior. Thus, STP might represent a potential molecular target for controlling T. canis reproduction. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Phosphopeptide derivatization signatures to identify serine and threonine phosphorylated peptides by mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molloy, M P; Andrews, P C

    2001-11-15

    The development of rapid, global methods for monitoring states of protein phosphorylation would provide greater insight for understanding many fundamental biological processes. Current best practices use mass spectrometry (MS) to profile digests of purified proteins for evidence of phosphorylation. However, this approach is beset by inherent difficulties in both identifying phosphopeptides from within a complex mixture containing many other unmodified peptides and ionizing phosphopeptides in positive-ion MS. We have modified an approach that uses barium hydroxide to rapidly eliminate the phosphoryl group of serine and threonine modified amino acids, creating dehydroamino acids that are susceptible to nucleophilic derivatization. By derivatizing a protein digest with a mixture of two different alkanethiols, phosphopeptide-specific derivatives were readily distinguished by MS due to their characteristic ion-pair signature. The resulting tagged ion pairs accommodate simple and rapid screening for phosphopeptides in a protein digest, obviating the use of isotopically labeled samples for qualitative phosphopeptide detection. MALDI-MS is used in a first pass manner to detect derivatized phosphopeptides, while the remaining sample is available for tandem MS to reveal the site of derivatization and, thus, phosphorylation. We demonstrated the technique by identifying phosphopeptides from beta-casein and ovalbumin. The approach was further used to examine in vitro phosphorylation of recombinant human HSP22 by protein kinase C, revealing phosphorylation of Thr-63.

  2. [Effect of inhibitors serine/threonine protein kinases and protein phosphatases on mitosis progression of synchronized tobacco by-2 cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheremet, Ia A; Emets, A I; Azmi, A; Vissenberg, K; Verbelen, J-P; Blium, Ia B

    2012-01-01

    In order to investigate the role of various serine/ threonine protein kinases and protein phosphatases in the regulation of mitosis progression in plant cells the influence of cyclin-dependent (olomoucine) and Ca2+ -calmodulin-dependent (W7) protein kinases inhibitors, as well as protein kinase C inhibitors (H7 and staurosporine) and protein phosphatases inhibitor (okadaic acid) on mitosis progression in synchronized tobacco BY-2 cells has been studied. It was found that BY-2 culture treatment with inhibitors of cyclin dependent protein kinases and protein kinase C causes prophase delay, reduces the mitotic index and displaces of mitotic peak as compare with control cells. Inhibition of Ca2+ -calmodulin dependent protein kinases enhances the cell entry into prophase and delays their exit from mitosis. Meanwhile inhibition of serine/threonine protein phosphatases insignificantly enhances of synchronized BY-2 cells entering into all phases of mitosis.

  3. AKT phosphorylates H3-threonine 45 to facilitate termination of gene transcription in response to DNA damage

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Jong-Hyuk; Kang, Byung-Hee; Jang, Hyonchol; Kim, Tae Wan; Choi, Jinmi; Kwak, Sojung; Han, Jungwon; Cho, Eun-Jung; Youn, Hong-Duk

    2015-01-01

    Post-translational modifications of core histones affect various cellular processes, primarily through transcription. However, their relationship with the termination of transcription has remained largely unknown. In this study, we show that DNA damage-activated AKT phosphorylates threonine 45 of core histone H3 (H3-T45). By genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq) analysis, H3-T45 phosphorylation was distributed throughout DNA damage-responsive gene loci, particularly ...

  4. L-Threonine-derived novel bifunctional phosphine-sulfonamide catalyst-promoted enantioselective aza-morita-Baylis-Hillman reaction

    KAUST Repository

    Zhong, Fangrui

    2011-03-18

    A series of novel bifunctional phosphine-sulfonamide organic catalysts were designed and readily prepared from natural amino acids, and they were utilized to promote enantioselective aza-Morita-Baylis-Hillman (MBH) reactions. l-Threonine-derived phosphine-sulfonamide 9b was found to be the most efficient catalyst, affording the desired aza-MBH adducts in high yields and with excellent enantioselectivities. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  5. Residual nilpotence and residual solubility of groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikhailov, R V

    2005-01-01

    The properties of the residual nilpotence and the residual solubility of groups are studied. The main objects under investigation are the class of residually nilpotent groups such that each central extension of these groups is also residually nilpotent and the class of residually soluble groups such that each Abelian extension of these groups is residually soluble. Various examples of groups not belonging to these classes are constructed by homological methods and methods of the theory of modules over group rings. Several applications of the theory under consideration are presented and problems concerning the residual nilpotence of one-relator groups are considered.

  6. Regulation of hemolysin expression and virulence of Staphylococcus aureus by a serine/threonine kinase and phosphatase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kellie Burnside

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Exotoxins, including the hemolysins known as the alpha (alpha and beta (beta toxins, play an important role in the pathogenesis of Staphylococcus aureus infections. A random transposon library was screened for S. aureus mutants exhibiting altered hemolysin expression compared to wild type. Transposon insertions in 72 genes resulting in increased or decreased hemolysin expression were identified. Mutations inactivating a putative cyclic di-GMP synthetase and a serine/threonine phosphatase (Stp1 were found to reduce hemolysin expression, and mutations in genes encoding a two component regulator PhoR, LysR family transcriptional regulator, purine biosynthetic enzymes and a serine/threonine kinase (Stk1 increased expression. Transcription of the hla gene encoding alpha toxin was decreased in a Deltastp1 mutant strain and increased in a Deltastk1 strain. Microarray analysis of a Deltastk1 mutant revealed increased transcription of additional exotoxins. A Deltastp1 strain is severely attenuated for virulence in mice and elicits less inflammation and IL-6 production than the Deltastk1 strain. In vivo phosphopeptide enrichment and mass spectrometric analysis revealed that threonine phosphorylated peptides corresponding to Stk1, DNA binding histone like protein (HU, serine-aspartate rich fibrinogen/bone sialoprotein binding protein (SdrE and a hypothetical protein (NWMN_1123 were present in the wild type and not in the Deltastk1 mutant. Collectively, these studies suggest that Stk1 mediated phosphorylation of HU, SrdE and NWMN_1123 affects S. aureus gene expression and virulence.

  7. Meal Pattern of Male Rats Maintained on Amino Acid Supplemented Diets: The Effect of Tryptophan, Lysine, Arginine, Proline and Threonine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghad Ayaso

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The macronutrient composition of the diet has been shown to affect food intake, with proteins having distinct effects. The present study investigated the effect of diet supplementation with individual amino acids (tryptophan, lysine, arginine, proline and threonine on meal pattern among male rats. Meal pattern and body weight were monitored for two weeks. Proline and threonine had minimal effects on meal pattern, while the most pronounced changes were observed in the tryptophan group. Both tryptophan and lysine decreased overall food intake, which was translated into a reduction in body weight. The reduced food intake of the tryptophan group was associated with an increase in meal size, intermeal intervals (IMI and meal time and a decrease in meal number. The decrease in the food intake of the lysine group was associated with a reduction in both IMI and meal number, and this was accompanied by an increase in meal time. Arginine increased meal number, while decreasing IMI. Proline and threonine had a minimal effect on meal pattern. Lysine seems to increase satiety, and arginine seems to decrease it, while tryptophan seems to increase satiety and decrease satiation. Accordingly, changes in meal patterns are associated with the type of amino acid added to the diet.

  8. Characterizing the hydration state of L-threonine in solution using terahertz time-domain attenuated total reflection spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Huachuan; Liu, Qiao; Zhu, Liguo; Li, Zeren

    2018-01-01

    The hydration of biomolecules is closely related to the dynamic process of their functional expression, therefore, characterizing hydration phenomena is a subject of keen interest. However, direct measurements on the global hydration state of biomolecules couldn't have been acquired using traditional techniques such as thermodynamics, ultrasound, microwave spectroscopy or viscosity, etc. In order to realize global hydration characterization of amino acid such as L-threonine, terahertz time-domain attenuated total reflectance spectroscopy (THz-TDS-ATR) was adopted in this paper. By measuring the complex permittivity of L-threonine solutions with various concentrations in the THz region, the hydration state and its concentration dependence were obtained, indicating that the number of hydrous water decreased with the increase of concentration. The hydration number was evaluated to be 17.8 when the molar concentration of L-threonine was 0.34 mol/L, and dropped to 13.2 when the molar concentration increased to 0.84 mol/L, when global hydration was taken into account. According to the proposed direct measurements, it is believed that the THz-TDS-ATR technique is a powerful tool for studying the picosecond molecular dynamics of amino acid solutions.

  9. Membrane skeletal proteins and their integral membrane protein anchors are targets for tyrosine and threonine kinases in Euglena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazio, M J; Da Silva, A C; Rosiere, T K; Bouck, G B

    1995-01-01

    Proteins of the membrane skeleton of Euglena gracilis were extensively phosphorylated in vivo and in vitro after incubation with [32P]-orthophosphate or gamma-[32P] ATP. Endogenous protein threonine/serine activity phosphorylated the major membrane skeletal proteins (articulins) and the putative integral membrane protein (IP39) anchor for articulins. The latter was also the major target for endogenous protein tyrosine kinase activity. A cytoplasmic domain of IP39 was specifically phosphorylated, and removal of this domain with papain eliminated the radiolabeled phosphoamino acids and eliminated or radically shifted the PI of the multiple isoforms of IP39. In gel kinase assays IP39 autophosphorylated and a 25 kDa protein which does not autophosphorylate was identified as a threonine/serine (casein) kinase. Plasma membranes from the membrane skeletal protein complex contained threonine/serine (casein) kinase activity, and cross-linking experiments suggested that IP39 was the likely source for this membrane activity. pH optima, cation requirements and heparin sensitivity of the detergent solubilized membrane activity were determined. Together these results suggest that protein kinases may be important modulators of protein assembly and function of the membrane skeleton of these protistan cells.

  10. Structures of Preferred Human IgV Genes-Based Protective Antibodies Identify How Conserved Residues Contact Diverse Antigens and Assign Source of Specificity to CDR3 Loop Variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryson, Steve; Thomson, Christy A; Risnes, Louise F; Dasgupta, Somnath; Smith, Kenneth; Schrader, John W; Pai, Emil F

    2016-06-01

    The human Ab response to certain pathogens is oligoclonal, with preferred IgV genes being used more frequently than others. A pair of such preferred genes, IGVK3-11 and IGVH3-30, contributes to the generation of protective Abs directed against the 23F serotype of the pneumonococcal capsular polysaccharide of Streptococcus pneumoniae and against the AD-2S1 peptide of the gB membrane protein of human CMV. Structural analyses of Fab fragments of mAbs 023.102 and pn132p2C05 in complex with portions of the 23F polysaccharide revealed five germline-encoded residues in contact with the key component, l-rhamnose. In the case of the AD-2S1 peptide, the KE5 Fab fragment complex identified nine germline-encoded contact residues. Two of these germline-encoded residues, Arg91L and Trp94L, contact both the l-rhamnose and the AD-2S1 peptide. Comparison of the respective paratopes that bind to carbohydrate and protein reveals that stochastic diversity in both CDR3 loops alone almost exclusively accounts for their divergent specificity. Combined evolutionary pressure by human CMV and the 23F serotype of S. pneumoniae acted on the IGVK3-11 and IGVH3-30 genes as demonstrated by the multiple germline-encoded amino acids that contact both l-rhamnose and AD-2S1 peptide. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  11. Formation of new heterocyclic amine mutagens by heating creatinine, alanine, threonine and glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skog, K; Knize, M G; Felton, J S; Jägerstad, M

    1992-08-01

    A mixture of alanine, threonine, creatinine and glucose was heated in diethylene glycol and water (5:1, v/v) for 15 min at 200 degrees C. The mutagens formed were purified by high-performance liquid chromatography using the Ames/Salmonella mutagenic activity to guide the purification. The structures of the purified mutagens were determined using UV absorption, mass and NMR spectrometry. A new mutagenic compound with a mass number of 217 was found and its mass spectrum did not correspond to any known mutagen derived from food. This new compound accounted for 4% of the total mutagenic activity. Other mutagenic compounds were identified as MeIQx (2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline), 4,8-DiMeIQx (2-amino-3,4,8-trimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline), and a new mutagen 4,7,8-TriMeIQx (2-amino-3,4,7,8-tetramethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline) with a mutagenic activity of 73,000 TA98 revertants per microgram. The percentage of the mutagenic activity attributable to MeIQx, 4,8-DiMeIQx and 4,7,8-TriMeIQx was 10%, 70% and 3%, respectively. The yield of MeIQx, 4,8-DiMeIQx and 4,7,8-TriMeIQx was 10, 36 and 6 nmole/mmole creatinine. The formation of TriMeIQx from natural meat components suggests that this new quinoxaline mutagen may be present in cooked foods.

  12. Effect of dietary nutrients on ileal endogenous losses of threonine, cysteine, methionine, lysine, leucine and protein in broiler chicks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerrate, S; Vignale, S K; Ekmay, R; England, J; Coon, C

    2018-04-01

    An isotope dose technique was utilized (i) to determine endogenous amino acid (AA) and protein losses and (ii) to propose adjusted values for AA requirements. The endogenous flow rate was calculated from the pool of enrichment in plasma AA, assuming similitude to enrichment of endogenous AA. In experiment 1, chicks were orally administered D4-lysine at 2% of estimated lysine intake from 16 to 24 days to find the isotopic steady state of the atom percent excess (APE) of lysine for plasma and jejunal and ileal digesta. The APE of D4-lysine in plasma, jejunal digesta and ileal digesta reached the isotopic steady state at 5.5, 3.4 and 2.0 days, respectively, by using the broken-line model. It was assumed that the isotopic steady state at 5 days identified for D4-lysine is also representative for the 15N-labeled AA. In experiment 2, chicks were fed diets from 1 to 21 days with increasing levels of fat (6%, 8%, 12%, 13% extract ether), protein (26%, 28.5%, 31% CP) or fiber (14%, 16%, 18% NDF) by adding poultry fat, soybean meal, blended animal protein or barley. Chicks were orally administered 15N-threonine, 15N-cysteine, 15N-methionine, 15N-lysine and 15N-leucine at 2% of estimated daily intake for 5 days from 17 to 21 days of age. Dietary nutrients influenced endogenous losses (EL), where dietary fat stimulated EL of lysine (P=0.06), leucine and protein (P=0.07); dietary protein enhanced EL of leucine and protein; and finally the dietary fiber increased EL of leucine. Dietary nutrients also affected apparent ileal digestibility (AID). Dietary fat increased AID of cysteine but decreased AID of lysine. Dietary protein reduced AID of protein, threonine, lysine and leucine, and similarly dietary fiber decreased AID of protein, threonine, methionine, lysine and leucine. In contrast, dietary fat or protein did not affect real ileal digestibility (RID) of protein and AA except threonine and leucine. The dietary fiber reduced the RID of protein, threonine and leucine. This

  13. Complementation of a threonine dehydratase-deficient Nicotiana plumbaginifolia mutant after Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transfer of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae ILV1 gene.

    OpenAIRE

    Colau, D; Negrutiu, I; Van Montagu, M; Hernalsteens, J P

    1987-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae ILV1 gene, encoding threonine dehydratase (EC 4.2.1.16) was fused to the transferred DNA nopaline synthase promoter and the 3' noncoding region of the octopine synthase gene. It was introduced, by Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated gene transfer, into an isoleucine-requiring Nicotiana plumbaginifolia auxotroph deficient in threonine dehydratase. Functional complementation by the ILV1 gene product was demonstrated by the selection of several transformed lines on a ...

  14. An evaluation of preservation of residual hearing using the suprameatal approach for cochlear implantation: can this implantation technique be used for preservation of residual hearing?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postelmans, Job T. F.; van Spronsen, Erik; Grolman, Wilko; Stokroos, Robert J.; Tange, Rinze A.; Maré, Marcel J.; Dreschler, Wouter A.

    2011-01-01

    The preservation of residual hearing has become a high priority in cochlear implant surgery. This study was designed to substantiate whether conservation of residual hearing can be preserved after cochlear implantation using the suprameatal approach. Retrospective chart review. Retrospective chart

  15. A conserved glutamine plays a central role in LOV domain signal transmission and duration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Abigail I.; Ko, Wen-Huang; Harper, Shannon M.; Gardner, Kevin H.

    2009-01-01

    Light is a key stimulus for plant biological functions, several of which are controlled by light-activated kinases known as phototropins, a group of kinases that contain two light-sensing domains (LOV, Light-Oxygen-Voltage domains) and a C-terminal serine/threonine kinase domain. The second sensory domain, LOV2, plays a key role in regulating kinase enzymatic activity via the photochemical formation of a covalent adduct between a LOV2 cysteine residue and an internally-bound flavin mononucleotide (FMN) chromophore. Subsequent conformational changes in LOV2 lead to the unfolding of a peripheral Jα helix, and ultimately, phototropin kinase activation. To date, the mechanism coupling bond formation and helix dissociation has remained unclear. Previous studies found that a conserved glutamine residue (Q513 in the Avena sativa phototropin 1 LOV2 (AsLOV2) domain) switches its hydrogen-bonding pattern with FMN upon light stimulation. Located in the immediate vicinity of the FMN binding site, this Gln residue is provided by the Iβ strand that interacts with the Jα helix, suggesting a route for signal propagation from the core of the LOV domain to its peripheral Jα helix. To test whether Q513 plays a key role in tuning the photochemical and transduction properties of AsLOV2, we designed two point mutations, Q513L and Q513N, and monitored the effects on the chromophore and protein using a combination of UV-visible absorbance and circular dichroism spectroscopy, limited proteolysis, and solution NMR. The results show that these mutations significantly dampen the changes between the dark and lit state AsLOV2 structures, leaving the protein in a pseudo-dark state (Q513L) or a pseudo-lit state (Q513N) conformation. Further, both mutations changed the photochemical properties of this receptor, particularly the lifetime of the photoexcited signaling states. Together, these data establish that this residue plays a central role in both spectral tuning and signal propagation from

  16. Importance of uncharged polar residues and proline in the proximal two-thirds (Pro107–Ser128 of the highly conserved region of mouse ileal Na+-dependent bile acid transporter, Slc10a2, in transport activity and cellular expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeki Tohru

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background SLC10A2-mediated reabsorption of bile acids at the distal end of the ileum is the first step in enterohepatic circulation. Because bile acids act not only as detergents but also as signaling molecules in lipid metabolism and energy production, SLC10A2 is important as the key transporter for understanding the in vivo kinetics of bile acids. SLC10A family members and the homologous genes of various species share a highly conserved region corresponding to Gly104–Pro142 of SLC10A2. The functional importance of this region has not been fully elucidated. Results To elucidate the functional importance of this region, we previously performed mutational analysis of the uncharged polar residues and proline in the distal one-third (Thr130–Pro142 of the highly conserved region in mouse Slc10a2. In this study, proline and uncharged polar residues in the remaining two-thirds of this region in mouse Slc10a2 were subjected to mutational analysis, and taurocholic acid uptake and cell surface localization were examined. Cell surface localization of Slc10a2 is necessary for bile acid absorption. Mutants in which Asp or Leu were substituted for Pro107 (P107N or P107L were abundantly expressed, but their cell surface localization was impaired. The S126A mutant was completely impaired in cellular expression. The T110A and S128A mutants exhibited remarkably enhanced membrane expression. The S112A mutant was properly expressed at the cell surface but transport activity was completely lost. Replacement of Tyr117 with various amino acids resulted in reduced transport activity. The degree of reduction roughly depended on the van der Waals volume of the side chains. Conclusions The functional importance of proline and uncharged polar residues in the highly conserved region of mouse Slc10a2 was determined. This information will contribute to the design of bile acid-conjugated prodrugs for efficient drug delivery or SLC10A2 inhibitors for

  17. Protein structure based prediction of catalytic residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajardo, J Eduardo; Fiser, Andras

    2013-02-22

    Worldwide structural genomics projects continue to release new protein structures at an unprecedented pace, so far nearly 6000, but only about 60% of these proteins have any sort of functional annotation. We explored a range of features that can be used for the prediction of functional residues given a known three-dimensional structure. These features include various centrality measures of nodes in graphs of interacting residues: closeness, betweenness and page-rank centrality. We also analyzed the distance of functional amino acids to the general center of mass (GCM) of the structure, relative solvent accessibility (RSA), and the use of relative entropy as a measure of sequence conservation. From the selected features, neural networks were trained to identify catalytic residues. We found that using distance to the GCM together with amino acid type provide a good discriminant function, when combined independently with sequence conservation. Using an independent test set of 29 annotated protein structures, the method returned 411 of the initial 9262 residues as the most likely to be involved in function. The output 411 residues contain 70 of the annotated 111 catalytic residues. This represents an approximately 14-fold enrichment of catalytic residues on the entire input set (corresponding to a sensitivity of 63% and a precision of 17%), a performance competitive with that of other state-of-the-art methods. We found that several of the graph based measures utilize the same underlying feature of protein structures, which can be simply and more effectively captured with the distance to GCM definition. This also has the added the advantage of simplicity and easy implementation. Meanwhile sequence conservation remains by far the most influential feature in identifying functional residues. We also found that due the rapid changes in size and composition of sequence databases, conservation calculations must be recalibrated for specific reference databases.

  18. Conservation endocrinology

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Stephen; Romero, L. Michael

    2017-01-01

    Endocrinologists can make significant contributions to conservation biology by helping to understand the mechanisms by which organisms cope with changing environments. Field endocrine techniques have advanced rapidly in recent years and can provide substantial information on the growth, stress, and reproductive status of individual animals, thereby providing insight into current and future responses of populations to changes in the environment. Environmental stressors and reproductive status can be detected nonlethally by measuring a number of endocrine-related endpoints, including steroids in plasma, living and nonliving tissue, urine, and feces. Information on the environmental or endocrine requirements of individual species for normal growth, development, and reproduction will provide critical information for species and ecosystem conservation. For many taxa, basic information on endocrinology is lacking, and advances in conservation endocrinology will require approaches that are both “basic” and “applied” and include integration of laboratory and field approaches.

  19. Threonine supplementation reduces dietary protein and improves lipid metabolism in Pekin ducks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Y; Tang, J; Xie, M; Wen, Z G; Qiao, S Y; Hou, S S

    2017-12-01

    1. This study was conducted to investigate the efficiency of threonine (Thr) supplementation on reducing dietary crude protein (CP) content and the effects of Thr on lipid metabolism in Pekin ducks. The effects of dietary CP concentration (160, 190 and 220 g/kg) and Thr supplemental concentration (0, 0.7, 1.4, 2.1 and 2.8 g/kg) on growth performance, carcass, liver lipid and plasma profiles were determined in Pekin ducks from 1-21 d of age. 2. A total of 720-d-old male Pekin ducks were randomly allotted to 1 of 15 dietary treatments with 6 replicate cages of 8 birds per cage for each treatment according to average body weight. 3. Dietary Thr supplementation improved growth performance and breast muscle percentage at all CP diets, and ducks fed Thr-supplemented diets had higher plasma concentrations of some plasma amino acids. Thr supplementation reduced the concentrations of total lipid, triglyceride, cholesterol in liver, and plasma low density lipoprotein cholesterin concentration at 160 and 190 g/kg CP, whereas it increased triglyceride concentration at 160 g/kg CP. 4. Thr requirements based on quadratic broken-line model estimation were 6.6 and 7.0 g/kg for optimal average daily gain (ADG), and 6.7 and 7.3 g/kg for breast muscle percentage of Pekin ducks from 1-21 d of age at 190 and 220 g/kg CP, respectively. The dietary Thr requirements and estimated ADG (55.18 vs. 55.86 g/d/bird) and breast muscle percentage (2.79% vs. 2.75%) of Pekin ducks did not differ between 190 and 220 g/kg CP according to the t-test results. 5. Dietary CP level could be reduced to 190 g/kg in Pekin ducks from 1-21 d of age with Thr supplementation to balance dietary amino acids, and Thr supplementation prevented excess liver lipid deposition in this instance.

  20. Convergent signaling pathways – interaction between methionine oxidation and serine/threonine/tyrosine O-phosphorylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxidation of Methionine (Met) to Met sulfoxide (MetSO) is a frequently found reversible post-translational modification. It has been presumed that the major functional role for oxidation-labile Met residues is to protect proteins/cells from oxidative stress. However, Met oxidation has been establi...

  1. The threonine protease activity of testes-specific protease 50 (TSP50 is essential for its function in cell proliferation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Yin Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Testes-specific protease 50 (TSP50, a newly discovered threonine enzyme, has similar amino acid sequences and enzymatic structures to those of many serine proteases. It may be an oncogene. TSP50 is up-regulated in breast cancer epithelial cells, and ectopic expression of TSP50 in TSP50-deficient Chinese hamster ovary (CHO cells has been found to promote cell proliferation. However, the mechanisms by which TSP50 exerts its growth-promoting effects are not yet fully understood. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To delineate whether the threonine protease activity of TSP50 is essential to its function in cell proliferation, we constructed and characterized a mutant TSP50, called TSP50 T310A, which was identified as a protease-dead mutant of TSP50. By a series of proliferation analyses, colony formation assays and apoptosis analyses, we showed that T310A mutation significantly depresses TSP50-induced cell proliferation in vitro. Next, the CHO stable cell line expressing either wild-type or T310A mutant TSP50 was injected subcutaneously into nude mice. We found that the T310A mutation could abolish the tumorigenicity of TSP50 in vivo. A mechanism investigation revealed that the T310A mutation prevented interaction between TSP50 and the NF-κBIκBα complex, which is necessary for TSP50 to perform its function in cell proliferation. CONCLUSION: Our data highlight the importance of threonine 310, the most critical protease catalytic site in TSP50, to TSP50-induced cell proliferation and tumor formation.

  2. [Conservation Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texas Education Agency, Austin.

    Each of the six instructional units deals with one aspect of conservation: forests, water, rangeland, minerals (petroleum), and soil. The area of the elementary school curriculum with which each correlates is indicated. Lists of general and specific objectives are followed by suggested teaching procedures, including ideas for introducing the…

  3. Creative conservation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bentham, Roelof J.

    1968-01-01

    The increasing exploitation of our natural resources, the unlimited occupation of ever more new areas, and the intensification of land-use, make it necessary for us to expand the concept of conservation. But we also need to reconsider that concept itself. For the changing conditions in the

  4. Reshaping conservation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Funder, Mikkel; Danielsen, Finn; Ngaga, Yonika

    2013-01-01

    members strengthen the monitoring practices to their advantage, and to some extent move them beyond the reach of government agencies and conservation and development practitioners. This has led to outcomes that are of greater social and strategic value to communities than the original 'planned' benefits...

  5. Regulation of tumor cell migration by protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP)-proline-, glutamate-, serine-, and threonine-rich sequence (PEST)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yanhua; Lu, Zhimin

    2013-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP)–proline-, glutamate-, serine-, and threonine-rich sequence (PEST) is ubiquitously expressed and is a critical regulator of cell adhesion and migration. PTP-PEST activity can be regulated transcriptionally via gene deletion or mutation in several types of human cancers or via post-translational modifications, including phosphorylation, oxidation, and caspase-dependent cleavage. PTP-PEST interacts with and dephosphorylates cytoskeletal and focal adhesion-associated proteins. Dephosphorylation of PTP-PEST substrates regulates their enzymatic activities and/or their interaction with other proteins and plays an essential role in the tumor cell migration process. PMID:23237212

  6. Human ribosomal protein L37 has motifs predicting serine/threonine phosphorylation and a zinc-finger domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard, G F; Staniunas, R J; Puder, M; Steele, G D; Chen, L B

    1994-08-02

    Ribosomal protein L37 mRNA is overexpressed in colon cancer. The nucleotide sequences of human L37 from several tumor and normal, colon and liver cDNA sources were determined to be identical. L37 mRNA was approximately 375 nucleotides long encoding 97 amino acids with M(r) = 11,070, pI = 12.6, multiple potential serine/threonine phosphorylation sites and a zinc-finger domain. The human sequence is compared to other species.

  7. High-temperature Raman study of L-alanine, L-threonine and taurine crystals related to thermal decomposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavaignac, A.L.O. [Centro de Ciências Sociais, Saúde e Tecnologia, Universidade Federal do Maranhão, Imperatriz, MA 65900-410 (Brazil); Lima, R.J.C., E-mail: ricardo.lima.ufma@gmail.com [Centro de Ciências Sociais, Saúde e Tecnologia, Universidade Federal do Maranhão, Imperatriz, MA 65900-410 (Brazil); Façanha Filho, P.F. [Centro de Ciências Sociais, Saúde e Tecnologia, Universidade Federal do Maranhão, Imperatriz, MA 65900-410 (Brazil); Moreno, A.J.D. [Coordenação de Ciências Naturais, Universidade Federal do Maranhão, Bacabal, MA 65700-000 (Brazil); Freire, P.T.C. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Ceará, Fortaleza, CE 60455-760 (Brazil)

    2016-03-01

    In this work high-temperature Raman spectra are used to compare temperature dependence of the lattice mode wavenumber of L-alanine, L-threonine and taurine crystals. Anharmonic effects observed are associated with intermolecular N-H· · ·O hydrogen bond that plays an important role in thermal decomposition process of these materials. Short and strong hydrogen bonds in L-alanine crystal were associated with anharmonic effects in lattice modes leading to low thermal stability compared to taurine crystals. Connection between thermal decomposition process and anharmonic effects is furnished for the first time.

  8. L-Threonine and its analogue added to autoclaved solid medium suppress trichothecene production by Fusarium graminearum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Kazuyuki; Nakajima, Yuichi; Tanahashi, Yoshikazu; Kitou, Yoshiyuki; Miwa, Akihiro; Kanamaru, Kyoko; Kobayashi, Tetsuo; Nishiuchi, Takumi; Kimura, Makoto

    2017-08-01

    Fusarium graminearum produces trichothecene mycotoxins under certain nutritional conditions. When L-Thr and its analogue L-allo-threonine were added to brown rice flour solid medium before inoculation, trichothecene production after 4 days of incubation was suppressed. A time-course analysis of gene expression demonstrated that L-Thr suppressed transcription of Tri6, a trichothecene master regulator gene, and a terpene cyclase Tri5 gene. Regulation of trichothecene biosynthesis by altering major primary metabolic processes may open up the possibility to develop safe chemicals for the reduction of mycotoxin contamination might be developed.

  9. High-temperature Raman study of L-alanine, L-threonine and taurine crystals related to thermal decomposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavaignac, A.L.O.; Lima, R.J.C.; Façanha Filho, P.F.; Moreno, A.J.D.; Freire, P.T.C.

    2016-01-01

    In this work high-temperature Raman spectra are used to compare temperature dependence of the lattice mode wavenumber of L-alanine, L-threonine and taurine crystals. Anharmonic effects observed are associated with intermolecular N-H· · ·O hydrogen bond that plays an important role in thermal decomposition process of these materials. Short and strong hydrogen bonds in L-alanine crystal were associated with anharmonic effects in lattice modes leading to low thermal stability compared to taurine crystals. Connection between thermal decomposition process and anharmonic effects is furnished for the first time.

  10. Analysis of Histones H3 and H4 Reveals Novel and Conserved Post-Translational Modifications in Sugarcane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraes, Izabel; Yuan, Zuo-Fei; Liu, Shichong; Souza, Glaucia Mendes; Garcia, Benjamin A; Casas-Mollano, J Armando

    2015-01-01

    Histones are the main structural components of the nucleosome, hence targets of many regulatory proteins that mediate processes involving changes in chromatin. The functional outcome of many pathways is "written" in the histones in the form of post-translational modifications that determine the final gene expression readout. As a result, modifications, alone or in combination, are important determinants of chromatin states. Histone modifications are accomplished by the addition of different chemical groups such as methyl, acetyl and phosphate. Thus, identifying and characterizing these modifications and the proteins related to them is the initial step to understanding the mechanisms of gene regulation and in the future may even provide tools for breeding programs. Several studies over the past years have contributed to increase our knowledge of epigenetic gene regulation in model organisms like Arabidopsis, yet this field remains relatively unexplored in crops. In this study we identified and initially characterized histones H3 and H4 in the monocot crop sugarcane. We discovered a number of histone genes by searching the sugarcane ESTs database. The proteins encoded correspond to canonical histones, and their variants. We also purified bulk histones and used them to map post-translational modifications in the histones H3 and H4 using mass spectrometry. Several modifications conserved in other plants, and also novel modified residues, were identified. In particular, we report O-acetylation of serine, threonine and tyrosine, a recently identified modification conserved in several eukaryotes. Additionally, the sub-nuclear localization of some well-studied modifications (i.e., H3K4me3, H3K9me2, H3K27me3, H3K9ac, H3T3ph) is described and compared to other plant species. To our knowledge, this is the first report of histones H3 and H4 as well as their post-translational modifications in sugarcane, and will provide a starting point for the study of chromatin regulation in

  11. Making conservation work for everyone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiersma, J. [Veridian Corp., Ajax, ON (Canada)

    2004-07-01

    This presentation discussed the economic value of conservation, the optimal deployment of energy conservation. A sample load profile was presented to demonstrate how much electricity the average residential customer uses on a summer day. The average customer does not have the tools to understand the financial consequences of conservation for different types of equipment at different times of the day. Smart metering technology could help in this regard. Accurate unsubsidized prices are also considered to be the best incentive to conserve because customers will reduce electricity use when the prices are high. It was also suggested that standards for new appliances should be increased effectively to their economic value. The enablers to energy conservation include solid consumer education programs, real time metering in places where it is cost effective, real time pricing in places where it is practical, and power rates that reflect real costs. Barriers to energy conservation include the residual economic advantage that may be insufficient to justify investment; support from local distribution companies and transmission companies if the lost revenue adjustment mechanism (LRAM) is not sufficient to recover lost revenue and if LDCs are not sufficiently involved in the design of the electricity conservation program. 7 figs.

  12. Conservation of Charge and Conservation of Current

    OpenAIRE

    Eisenberg, Bob

    2016-01-01

    Conservation of current and conservation of charge are nearly the same thing: when enough is known about charge movement, conservation of current can be derived from conservation of charge, in ideal dielectrics, for example. Conservation of current is enforced implicitly in ideal dielectrics by theories that conserve charge. But charge movement in real materials like semiconductors or ionic solutions is never ideal. We present an apparently universal derivation of conservation of current and ...

  13. Interaction of biodegradative threonine dehydratase (TD) of Escherichia coli with 8-azido-AMP, a photoaffinity analog of AMP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patil, R.V.; Datta, P.

    1987-01-01

    Stimulation of TD activity by AMP (Ka = 40 μM) is known to accompany the conversion of monomeric form of the enzyme to its tetramer and a decrease in the Km for threonine. In comparison, 8-azido-AMP (N 3 AMP) simulated TD activity only partially, lowered the Km for threonine and stabilized a dimeric form of the protein. Competition experiments revealed that N 3 AMP exerted an apparent dominant effect in counteracting the AMP-mediated enzyme activation, indicating complex mutual interactions between these ligands. UV irradiation of TD with increasing concentrations of 3 H-N 3 AMP (up to 150 μM) resulted in gradual loss of enzyme activity and concomitant incorporation of N 3 AMP into protein; upon complete inactivation, 0.75 mol of N 3 AMP was bound per mol tetramer. The presence of AMP during photolysis reduced the extent of enzyme inactivation as well as the incorporation of N 3 AMP into protein. Photolabeling of TD with 20 μM 3 H-N 3 AMP revealed one labeled tryptic peptide; at higher N 3 AMP concentrations (>300 μM), two labeled peptides were found, one of which was identical to that found with low N 3 AMP concentration. The cumulative results suggest that N 3 AMP can act as an allosteric modifier and that the peptide labeled at low N 3 AMP may represent the AMP binding site on the protein molecule

  14. Convergence of a residual based artificial viscosity finite element method

    KAUST Repository

    Nazarov, Murtazo

    2013-02-01

    We present a residual based artificial viscosity finite element method to solve conservation laws. The Galerkin approximation is stabilized by only residual based artificial viscosity, without any least-squares, SUPG, or streamline diffusion terms. We prove convergence of the method, applied to a scalar conservation law in two space dimensions, toward an unique entropy solution for implicit time stepping schemes. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Reducing crude protein content with supplementation of synthetic lysine and threonine in barley - rapeseed meal - pea diets for growing pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarmo Valaja

    1993-03-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to determine the possibility to use synthetic amino acids to lower the nitrogen output from pig production. A performance experiment was carried out with 120triplet-fed growing pigs whose dietary crude protein was reduced from 179 g/feed unit (FU= 0.7 kg starch equivalent to 160, 140 and 122 g/FU, respectively. The diets were supplemented with synthetic lysine and threonine to keep the level of these amino acids constant. Dietary protein reduction did not affect the growth performance or feed conversion ratio of the pigs, but it did linearly increase the portion of fat to lean in the carcass. Significant linear effect was found in back fat (p

  16. The external PASTA domain of the essential serine/threonine protein kinase PknB regulates mycobacterial growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turapov, Obolbek; Loraine, Jessica; Jenkins, Christopher H; Barthe, Philippe; McFeely, Daniel; Forti, Francesca; Ghisotti, Daniela; Hesek, Dusan; Lee, Mijoon; Bottrill, Andrew R; Vollmer, Waldemar; Mobashery, Shahriar; Cohen-Gonsaud, Martin; Mukamolova, Galina V

    2015-07-01

    PknB is an essential serine/threonine protein kinase required for mycobacterial cell division and cell-wall biosynthesis. Here we demonstrate that overexpression of the external PknB_PASTA domain in mycobacteria results in delayed regrowth, accumulation of elongated bacteria and increased sensitivity to β-lactam antibiotics. These changes are accompanied by altered production of certain enzymes involved in cell-wall biosynthesis as revealed by proteomics studies. The growth inhibition caused by overexpression of the PknB_PASTA domain is completely abolished by enhanced concentration of magnesium ions, but not muropeptides. Finally, we show that the addition of recombinant PASTA domain could prevent regrowth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and therefore offers an alternative opportunity to control replication of this pathogen. These results suggest that the PknB_PASTA domain is involved in regulation of peptidoglycan biosynthesis and maintenance of cell-wall architecture.

  17. Investigations on growth morphology, bulk growth and crystalline perfection of L-threonine, an organic nonlinear optical material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linet, J. Mary; Das, S. Jerome

    2010-01-01

    L-threonine single crystal was successfully grown from aqueous solution. The morphology of the grown crystal was compared with the predicted morphology using Bravais-Friedel-Donnay-Harker law and was found to be in good agreement with the predicted morphology. Good optical quality bulk single crystal of enhanced size has been grown using unidirectional crystal growth method. High-resolution X-ray analysis study resulted in a rocking curve with a full width half maximum of 20 arc sec exhibiting the good crystalline quality of the grown crystal. The optical transmission study shows 90% of transmission in the entire visible region that exhibits the good optical quality of the grown crystal. The mechanical properties were analyzed by Vicker's microhardness method.

  18. One-dimensional poly(L-lysine)-block-poly(L-threonine) assemblies exhibit potent anticancer activity by enhancing membranolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Fon; Shiau, Ai-Li; Chang, Sue-Joan; Fan, Nai-Shin; Wang, Chung-Teng; Wu, Chao-Liang; Jan, Jeng-Shiung

    2017-06-01

    Herein, we report the oncolytic activity of cationic, one-dimensional (1D) fibril assemblies formed from coil-sheet poly(L-lysine)-block-poly(L-threonine) (PLL-b-PLT) block copolypeptides for cancer therapy. The 1D fibril assemblies can efficiently interact with negatively charged cellular and mitochondrial membranes via electrostatic interactions, leading to necrosis via membrane lysis and apoptosis via the mitochondria-lytic effect. The concept is analogous to that of 1D drug carriers that exhibit enhanced cell penetration. In comparison to free PLL chains, PLL-b-PLT fibril assemblies exhibit selective cytotoxicity toward cancer cells, low hemolysis activity, enhanced membranolytic activity, and a different apoptosis pathway, which may be due to differences in the peptide-membrane interactions. Antitumor studies using a metastatic LL2 lung carcinoma model indicate that the fibril assemblies significantly inhibited tumor growth, improved survival in tumor-bearing mice and suppressed lung metastasis without obvious body weight loss. An additive efficacy was also observed for treatment with both PLL-b-PLT and cisplatin. These results support the feasibility of using 1D fibril assemblies as potential apoptotic anticancer therapeutics. We report that cationic, one-dimensional (1D) fibril assemblies formed by coil-sheet poly(L-lysine)-block-poly(L-threonine) (PLL-b-PLT) block copolypeptides exhibited potent anticancer activity by enhancing membranolysis. The 1D fibril assemblies can efficiently interact with negatively charged cellular and mitochondrial membranes via electrostatic interactions, leading to necrosis via membrane lysis and apoptosis via mitochondria-lytic effect. Moreover, the fibril assemblies exhibited low hemolytic activity and selective cytotoxicity toward cancer cell, which is advantageous as compared to PLL and most antimicrobial/anticancerous peptides. This study provides a new concept of using cationic, 1D fibril assemblies for cancer therapy

  19. The apotheosis of conservation agriculture- A review

    OpenAIRE

    Hossain, M.M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper focuses on conservation agriculture (CA), defined as minimal soil disturbance (no-till) and crop residue retention (mulch) combined with crop rotations. The paper then describes the principles based on which CA runs with briefing suggested improvement on conservation tillage, where no-till, mulch and rotations significantly improve soil properties and other biotic factors. This paper also describes some cons of CA with its future strategies. A Case study from the rice-wheat areas o...

  20. Serine/Threonine protein kinases from bacteria, archaea and eukarya share a common evolutionary origin deeply rooted in the tree of life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stancik, Ivan Andreas; Šestak, Martin Sebastijan; Ji, Boyang

    2018-01-01

    The main family of serine/threonine/tyrosine protein kinases present in eukarya was defined and described by Hanks et al. in 1988. It was initially believed that these kinases do not exist in bacteria, but extensive genome sequencing revealed their existence in many bacteria. For historical reaso...

  1. A mass spectrometry-based proteomic approach for identification of serine/threonine-phosphorylated proteins by enrichment with phospho-specific antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønborg, Mads; Kristiansen, Troels Zakarias; Stensballe, Allan

    2002-01-01

    /threonine-phosphorylated proteins including drebrin 1, alpha-actinin 4, and filamin-1. We also identified a protein, poly(A)-binding protein 2, which was previously not known to be phosphorylated, in addition to a novel protein without any obvious domains that we designate as Frigg. Frigg is widely expressed and was demonstrated...

  2. Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase Phosphorylation at Threonine 495 and Mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species Formation in Response to a High H2O2 Concentration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guterbaum, Thomas Jeremy; Braunstein, Thomas Hartig; Fossum, A

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) is produced in vessels during ischemia/reperfusion and during inflammation, both leading to vascular dysfunction. We investigated cellular pathways involved in endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) phosphorylation at Threonine 495 (Thr(495)) in human umbilical vein end...

  3. Regulation of Serine-Threonine Kinase Akt Activation by NAD+-Dependent Deacetylase SIRT7

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Yu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The Akt pathway is a central regulator that promotes cell survival in response to extracellular signals. Depletion of SIRT7, an NAD+-dependent deacetylase that is the least-studied sirtuin, is known to significantly increase Akt activity in mice through unknown mechanisms. In this study, we demonstrate that SIRT7 depletion in breast cancer cells results in Akt hyper-phosphorylation and increases cell survival following genotoxic stress. Mechanistically, SIRT7 specifically interacts with and deacetylates FKBP51 at residue lysines 28 and 155 (K28 and K155, resulting in enhanced interactions among FKBP51, Akt, and PHLPP, as well as Akt dephosphorylation. Mutating both lysines to arginines abolishes the effect of SIRT7 on Akt activity through FKBP51 deacetylation. Finally, energy stress strengthens SIRT7-mediated effects on Akt dephosphorylation through FKBP51 and thus sensitizes cancer cells to cytotoxic agents. These results reveal a direct role of SIRT7 in Akt regulation and raise the possibility of using the glucose analog 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2DG as a chemo-sensitizing agent.

  4. Níveis de treonina digestível em dietas para codorna japonesa em postura Digestible threonine levels in diets for laying Japanese quail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Tie Umigi

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available O experimento foi conduzido para estimar o nível de treonina digestível para codornas japonesas em postura, durante 63 dias. Quatrocentas codornas, com idade inicial de 57 dias, foram distribuídas em delineamento inteiramente casualizado com cinco tratamentos, oito repetições e 10 aves por unidade experimental. A dieta basal, deficiente em treonina e com 20% PB, 2.910 kcal EM/kg, foi suplementada com cinco níveis de L-treonina 98% (0,018; 0,074; 0,128; 0,183 e 0,239%, correspondendo à relação treonina digestível:lisina digestível de 0,65; 0,70; 0,75; 0,80 e 0,85, respectivamente, para compor os tratamentos experimentais. As características estudadas foram: consumo de ração, consumo de treonina, produção de ovos, produção de ovos comercializáveis, peso do ovo, massa de ovos, conversão alimentar por massa de ovos, conversão alimentar por dúzia de ovos, qualidade dos ovos (gema, albúmen e casca, altura e diâmetro dos ovos e gravidade específica. Observou-se efeito linear dos tratamentos somente sobre o consumo de treonina. Concluiu-se que, para proporcionar os melhores resultados de desempenho e de qualidade de ovos, a codorna japonesa não exige mais que 0,65% de treonina digestível para um consumo de 149,2 mg de treonina digestível/dia ou um consumo diário de 14,34 mg de treonina digestível/g ovo, correspondendo à relação treonina digestível:lisina digestível de 0,65.The experiment was carried out to estimate the level of digestible threonine for laying japanese quail during 63 days. A total of 400 japanese quails, with inicial age of 57 days were allotted to a complete randomized experimental design with five treatments, eight replicates and ten birds per experimental unit. The basal diet, deficient in threonine and with 20% C, 2,910kcal ME/kg, was supplemented with five levels of L-threonine 98% (0.018, 0.074, 0.128, 0.183, and 0.239%, corresponding to digestible threonine: digestible lysine ratios 0.65, 0

  5. Residual gas analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berecz, I.

    1982-01-01

    Determination of the residual gas composition in vacuum systems by a special mass spectrometric method was presented. The quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) and its application in thin film technology was discussed. Results, partial pressure versus time curves as well as the line spectra of the residual gases in case of the vaporization of a Ti-Pd-Au alloy were demonstrated together with the possible construction schemes of QMS residual gas analysers. (Sz.J.)

  6. Conservation agriculture effects on soil pore characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munkholm, Lars Juhl; Abdollahi, Lotfollah

    ploughing to a depth of 20 cm (MP), harrowing to a depth of 8-10 cm (H) and direct drilling (D). Minimally disturbed core samples were taken at 4-8, 12-16 and 18-27 cm depths 11 years after experimental start. Water retention characteristics were measured for a range of matric potential ranging from -10......Conservation tillage in combination with crop rotation, residue management and cover crops are key components of conservation agriculture. A positive long-term effect of applying all components of conservation agriculture on soil structural quality is expected. However, there is a lack...... of quantitative knowledge to support this statement. This study examines the long-term effects of crop rotations, residue management and tillage on soil pore characteristics of two sandy loam soils in Denmark. Results are reported from a split plot field experiment rotation as main plot factor and tillage...

  7. Relative Stabilities of Conserved and Non-Conserved Structures in the OB-Fold Superfamily

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    Andrei T. Alexandrescu

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The OB-fold is a diverse structure superfamily based on a β-barrel motif that is often supplemented with additional non-conserved secondary structures. Previous deletion mutagenesis and NMR hydrogen exchange studies of three OB-fold proteins showed that the structural stabilities of sites within the conserved β-barrels were larger than sites in non-conserved segments. In this work we examined a database of 80 representative domain structures currently classified as OB-folds, to establish the basis of this effect. Residue-specific values were obtained for the number of Cα-Cα distance contacts, sequence hydrophobicities, crystallographic B-factors, and theoretical B-factors calculated from a Gaussian Network Model. All four parameters point to a larger average flexibility for the non-conserved structures compared to the conserved β-barrels. The theoretical B-factors and contact densities show the highest sensitivity.Our results suggest a model of protein structure evolution in which novel structural features develop at the periphery of conserved motifs. Core residues are more resistant to structural changes during evolution since their substitution would disrupt a larger number of interactions. Similar factors are likely to account for the differences in stability to unfolding between conserved and non-conserved structures.

  8. Serine/threonine-protein phosphatase 1 α levels are paralleling olfactory memory formation in the CD1 mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winding, Christiana; Sun, Yanwei; Höger, Harald; Bubna-Littitz, Hermann; Pollak, Arnold; Schmidt, Peter; Lubec, Gert

    2011-06-01

    Although olfactory discrimination has already been studied in several mouse strains, data on protein levels linked to olfactory memory are limited. Wild mouse strains Mus musculus musculus, Mus musculus domesticus and CD1 laboratory outbred mice were tested in a conditioned odor preference task and trained to discriminate between two odors, Rose and Lemon, by pairing one odor with a sugar reward. Six hours following the final test, mice were sacrificed and olfactory bulbs (OB) were taken for gel-based proteomics analyses and immunoblotting. OB proteins were extracted, separated by 2-DE and quantified using specific software (Proteomweaver). Odor-trained mice showed a preference for the previously rewarded odor suggesting that conditioned odor preference occurred. In CD1 mice levels, one out of 482 protein spots was significantly increased in odor-trained mice as compared with the control group; it was in-gel digested by trypsin and chymotrypsin and analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry (nano-ESI-LC-MS/MS). The spot was unambiguously identified as serine/threonine-protein phosphatase PP1-α catalytic subunit (PP-1A) and differential levels observed in gel-based proteomic studies were verified by immunoblotting. PP-1A is a key signalling element in synaptic plasticity and memory processes and is herein shown to be paralleling olfactory discrimination representing olfactory memory. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. PASTA in Penicillin Binding Proteins and Serine/Threonine Kinases: A Recipe of Structural, Dynamic and Binding Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvanese, Luisa; Falcigno, Lucia; Squeglia, Flavia; D'Auria, Gabriella; Berisio, Rita

    2017-11-24

    Penicillin binding proteins (PBPs) and Serine Threonine kinases (STPKs) are two classes of bacterial enzymes whose involvement in a series of vital processes in bacterial growth and division is well assessed. Many PBPs and STPKs show linked an ancillary domain named PASTA, whose functional role is not completely deciphered so far. It has been proposed that PASTAs are sensor modules that by binding opportune ligands (i.e. muropeptides) activate the cognate proteins to their functions. However, based on recent data, the sensor annotation sounds true for PASTA from STPKs, and false for PASTA from PBPs. Different PASTA domains, belonging or not to different protein classes, sharing or not appreciable sequence identities, always show identical folds. This survey of the structural, binding and dynamic properties of PASTA domains pursues the reasons why identical topologies may turn in different roles. Amino acid compositions, total charges and distribution of the hydrophobic/hydrophilic patches on the surface, significantly vary among PASTAs from STPKs and PBPs and appear to correlate with different functions. A possible criterion to discriminate between PASTA modules of STPKs or PBPs solely based on their sequences is proposed. Possibly reflecting different species as well as functional roles and evolutionary profile, our routine represents a fast even though approximate method to distinguish between PASTA belonging to different classes. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  10. AKT phosphorylates H3-threonine 45 to facilitate termination of gene transcription in response to DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong-Hyuk; Kang, Byung-Hee; Jang, Hyonchol; Kim, Tae Wan; Choi, Jinmi; Kwak, Sojung; Han, Jungwon; Cho, Eun-Jung; Youn, Hong-Duk

    2015-05-19

    Post-translational modifications of core histones affect various cellular processes, primarily through transcription. However, their relationship with the termination of transcription has remained largely unknown. In this study, we show that DNA damage-activated AKT phosphorylates threonine 45 of core histone H3 (H3-T45). By genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq) analysis, H3-T45 phosphorylation was distributed throughout DNA damage-responsive gene loci, particularly immediately after the transcription termination site. H3-T45 phosphorylation pattern showed close-resemblance to that of RNA polymerase II C-terminal domain (CTD) serine 2 phosphorylation, which establishes the transcription termination signal. AKT1 was more effective than AKT2 in phosphorylating H3-T45. Blocking H3-T45 phosphorylation by inhibiting AKT or through amino acid substitution limited RNA decay downstream of mRNA cleavage sites and decreased RNA polymerase II release from chromatin. Our findings suggest that AKT-mediated phosphorylation of H3-T45 regulates the processing of the 3' end of DNA damage-activated genes to facilitate transcriptional termination. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  11. Identification of Key Residues for Enzymatic Carboxylate Reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holly Stolterfoht

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Carboxylate reductases (CARs, E.C. 1.2.1.30 generate aldehydes from their corresponding carboxylic acid with high selectivity. Little is known about the structure of CARs and their catalytically important amino acid residues. The identification of key residues for carboxylate reduction provides a starting point to gain deeper understanding of enzymatic carboxylate reduction. A multiple sequence alignment of CARs with confirmed activity recently identified in our lab and from the literature revealed a fingerprint of conserved amino acids. We studied the function of conserved residues by multiple sequence alignments and mutational replacements of these residues. In this study, single-site alanine variants of Neurospora crassa CAR were investigated to determine the contribution of conserved residues to the function, expressability or stability of the enzyme. The effect of amino acid replacements was investigated by analyzing enzymatic activity of the variants in vivo and in vitro. Supported by molecular modeling, we interpreted that five of these residues are essential for catalytic activity, or substrate and co-substrate binding. We identified amino acid residues having significant impact on CAR activity. Replacement of His 237, Glu 433, Ser 595, Tyr 844, and Lys 848 by Ala abolish CAR activity, indicating their key role in acid reduction. These results may assist in the functional annotation of CAR coding genes in genomic databases. While some other conserved residues decreased activity or had no significant impact, four residues increased the specific activity of NcCAR variants when replaced by alanine. Finally, we showed that NcCAR wild-type and mutants efficiently reduce aliphatic acids.

  12. Volumetric, ultrasonic and viscometric studies of solute–solute and solute–solvent interactions of l-threonine in aqueous-sucrose solutions at different temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nain, Anil Kumar; Pal, Renu; Neetu

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • The study reports density, ultrasonic speed and viscosity data of l-threonine in aqueous-sucrose solutions. • The study elucidates interactions of l-threonine with sucrose in aqueous media. • Provides data to estimate physicochemical properties of proteins in these media. • Correlates physicochemical properties of l-threonine with its behaviour in aqueous-sucrose solutions. -- Abstract: Densities, ρ of solutions of l-threonine in aqueous-sucrose solvents 5%, 10%, 15%, and 20% of sucrose, w/w in water at T = (293.15, 298.15, 303.15, 308.15, 313.15, and 318.15) K; and ultrasonic speeds, u and viscosities, η of these solutions at 298.15, 303.15, 308.15, 313.15, and 318.15 K were measured at atmospheric pressure. From these experimental results, the apparent molar volume, V ϕ , limiting apparent molar volume, V ϕ ∘ and the slope, S v , apparent molar compressibility, K s,ϕ , limiting apparent molar compressibility, K s,ϕ ∘ and the slope, S k , transfer volume, V ϕ,tr ∘ , transfer compressibility, K s,ϕ,tr ∘ , limiting apparent molar expansivity, E ϕ ∘ , Hepler’s constant, (∂ 2 V ϕ ∘ /dT 2 ), Falkenhagen coefficient, A, Jones–Dole coefficient, B and hydration number, n H have been calculated. The results have been interpreted in terms of solute–solvent and solute–solute interactions in these systems. The Gibbs energies of activation of viscous flow per mole of solvent, Δμ 1 ∘number sign and per mole of solute, Δμ 2 ∘number sign were also calculated and discussed in terms of transition state theory. It has been observed that there exist strong solute–solvent interactions in these systems and these interactions increase with increase in sucrose concentration in solution

  13. Influence of the O-phosphorylation of serine, threonine and tyrosine in proteins on the amidic N-15 chemical shielding anisotropy tensors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Emmer, J.; Vavrinská, A.; Sychrovský, Vladimír; Benda, Ladislav; Kříž, Z.; Koča, J.; Boelens, R.; Sklenář, V.; Trantírek, L.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 1 (2013), s. 59-70 ISSN 0925-2738 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP205/10/0228 Grant - others:CEITEC(XE) CZ.1.05/1.1.00/02.0068 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : CSA * phosphorylation * amidic nitrogen * serine * threonine * tyrosine * protein * NMR Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 3.305, year: 2013

  14. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of two Streptococcus agalactiae proteins: the family II inorganic pyrophosphatase and the serine/threonine phosphatase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rantanen, Mika K.; Lehtiö, Lari; Rajagopal, Lakshmi; Rubens, Craig E.; Goldman, Adrian

    2006-01-01

    Two S. agalactiae proteins, the inorganic pyrophosphatase and the serine/threonine phosphatase, were crystallized and diffraction data were collected and processed from these crystals. The data from the two protein crystals extended to 2.80 and 2.65 Å, respectively. Streptococcus agalactiae, which infects human neonates and causes sepsis and meningitis, has recently been shown to possess a eukaryotic-like serine/threonine protein phosphorylation signalling cascade. Through their target proteins, the S. agalactiae Ser/Thr kinase and Ser/Thr phosphatase together control the growth as well as the morphology and virulence of this organism. One of the targets is the S. agalactiae family II inorganic pyrophosphatase. The inorganic pyrophosphatase and the serine/threonine phosphatase have therefore been purified and crystallized and diffraction data have been collected from their crystals. The data were processed using XDS. The inorganic pyrosphosphatase crystals diffracted to 2.80 Å and the Ser/Thr phosphatase crystals to 2.65 Å. Initial structure-solution experiments indicate that structure solution will be successful in both cases. Solving the structure of the proteins involved in this cascade is the first step towards understanding this phenomenon in atomic detail

  15. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of two Streptococcus agalactiae proteins: the family II inorganic pyrophosphatase and the serine/threonine phosphatase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rantanen, Mika K.; Lehtiö, Lari [Institute of Biotechnology, University of Helsinki, PO Box 65, FIN-00014, Helsinki (Finland); Rajagopal, Lakshmi; Rubens, Craig E. [Division of Infectious Disease, Children’s Hospital and Regional Medical Center, Seattle, Washington 98105 (United States); Goldman, Adrian, E-mail: adrian.goldman@helsinki.fi [Institute of Biotechnology, University of Helsinki, PO Box 65, FIN-00014, Helsinki (Finland)

    2006-09-01

    Two S. agalactiae proteins, the inorganic pyrophosphatase and the serine/threonine phosphatase, were crystallized and diffraction data were collected and processed from these crystals. The data from the two protein crystals extended to 2.80 and 2.65 Å, respectively. Streptococcus agalactiae, which infects human neonates and causes sepsis and meningitis, has recently been shown to possess a eukaryotic-like serine/threonine protein phosphorylation signalling cascade. Through their target proteins, the S. agalactiae Ser/Thr kinase and Ser/Thr phosphatase together control the growth as well as the morphology and virulence of this organism. One of the targets is the S. agalactiae family II inorganic pyrophosphatase. The inorganic pyrophosphatase and the serine/threonine phosphatase have therefore been purified and crystallized and diffraction data have been collected from their crystals. The data were processed using XDS. The inorganic pyrosphosphatase crystals diffracted to 2.80 Å and the Ser/Thr phosphatase crystals to 2.65 Å. Initial structure-solution experiments indicate that structure solution will be successful in both cases. Solving the structure of the proteins involved in this cascade is the first step towards understanding this phenomenon in atomic detail.

  16. Prevention of pulmonary vascular and myocardial remodeling by the combined tyrosine and serine-/threonine kinase inhibitor, sorafenib, in pulmonary hypertension and right heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Klein

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Inhibition of tyrosine kinases can reverse pulmonary hypertension but little is known about the role of serine-/threonine kinases in vascular and myocardial remodeling. We investigated the effects of sorafenib, an inhibitor of the tyrosine kinases VEGFR, PDGFR and c-kit as well as the serine-/threonine kinase Raf-1, in pulmonary hypertension and right ventricular (RV pressure overload. In monocrotaline treated rats, sorafenib (10 mg·kg–1·d–1 p.o. reduced pulmonary arterial pressure, pulmonary artery muscularization and RV hypertrophy, and improved systemic hemodynamics (table 1. Sorafenib prevented phosphorylation of Raf-1 and suppressed activation of downstream signaling pathways (Erk 1/2. After pulmonary banding, sorafenib, but not the PDGFR/c-KIT/ABL-inhibitor imatinib reduced RV mass and RV filling pressure significantly. Congruent with these results, sorafenib only prevented ERK phosphorylation and vasopressin induced hypertrophy of the cardiomyocyte cell line H9c2 dose dependently (IC50 = 300 nM. Combined inhibition of tyrosine and serine-/threonine kinases by sorafenib prevents vascular and cardiac remodeling in pulmonary hypertension, which is partly mediated via inhibition of the Raf kinase pathway.

  17. Handling of Solid Residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medina Bermudez, Clara Ines

    1999-01-01

    The topic of solid residues is specifically of great interest and concern for the authorities, institutions and community that identify in them a true threat against the human health and the atmosphere in the related with the aesthetic deterioration of the urban centers and of the natural landscape; in the proliferation of vectorial transmitters of illnesses and the effect on the biodiversity. Inside the wide spectrum of topics that they keep relationship with the environmental protection, the inadequate handling of solid residues and residues dangerous squatter an important line in the definition of political and practical environmentally sustainable. The industrial development and the population's growth have originated a continuous increase in the production of solid residues; of equal it forms, their composition day after day is more heterogeneous. The base for the good handling includes the appropriate intervention of the different stages of an integral administration of residues, which include the separation in the source, the gathering, the handling, the use, treatment, final disposition and the institutional organization of the administration. The topic of the dangerous residues generates more expectation. These residues understand from those of pathogen type that are generated in the establishments of health that of hospital attention, until those of combustible, inflammable type, explosive, radio-active, volatile, corrosive, reagent or toxic, associated to numerous industrial processes, common in our countries in development

  18. The effects of threonine phosphorylation on the stability and dynamics of the central molecular switch region of 18.5-kDa myelin basic protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenrick A Vassall

    Full Text Available The classic isoforms of myelin basic protein (MBP are essential for the formation and maintenance of myelin in the central nervous system of higher vertebrates. The protein is involved in all facets of the development, compaction, and stabilization of the multilamellar myelin sheath, and also interacts with cytoskeletal and signaling proteins. The predominant 18.5-kDa isoform of MBP is an intrinsically-disordered protein that is a candidate auto-antigen in the human demyelinating disease multiple sclerosis. A highly-conserved central segment within classic MBP consists of a proline-rich region (murine 18.5-kDa sequence -T92-P93-R94-T95-P96-P97-P98-S99- containing a putative SH3-ligand, adjacent to a region that forms an amphipathic α-helix (P82-I90 upon interaction with membranes, or under membrane-mimetic conditions. The T92 and T95 residues within the proline-rich region can be post-translationally modified through phosphorylation by mitogen-activated protein (MAP kinases. Here, we have investigated the structure of the α-helical and proline-rich regions in dilute aqueous buffer, and have evaluated the effects of phosphorylation at T92 and T95 on the stability and dynamics of the α-helical region, by utilizing four 36-residue peptides (S72-S107 with differing phosphorylation status. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy reveals that both the α-helical as well as the proline-rich regions are disordered in aqueous buffer, whereas they are both structured in a lipid environment (cf., Ahmed et al., Biochemistry 51, 7475-9487, 2012. Thermodynamic analysis of trifluoroethanol-titration curves monitored by circular dichroism spectroscopy reveals that phosphorylation, especially at residue T92, impedes formation of the amphipathic α-helix. This conclusion is supported by molecular dynamics simulations, which further illustrate that phosphorylation reduces the folding reversibility of the α-helix upon temperature perturbation and affect the

  19. Conservation potential of agricultural water conservation subsidies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffaker, Ray

    2008-07-01

    A current policy subsidizes farmers to invest in improved on-farm irrigation efficiency, expecting water to be conserved off farm. Contrary to expectation, water has been increasingly depleted in some regions after such improvements. This paper investigates the policy's failure to conserve water consistently by (1) formulating an economic model of irrigated crop production to determine a profit-maximizing irrigator's range of responses to a subsidy and (2) embedding these responses into hypothetical streamflow diagrams to ascertain their potential to conserve water under various hydrologic regimes. Testable hypotheses are developed to predict the conservation potential of a subsidy in real-world application.

  20. Serine/threonine phosphatase tapp2cs might be served as an early signal molecule for water stress in wheat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, K. H.; Tian, W. L.; Hou, B. Z.; Guo, J. X.; Mei, X. R.; Li, Y. Z.

    2015-01-01

    Much progress has been made towards understanding the role of serine/threonine phosphatases type 2C (PP2Cs) in abscisic acid (ABA) signaling transduction. However, how the negative regulator, PP2Cs, responds to plant water loss remains unclear. Here, we used a series of relative soil moisture (RSM: 85 percentage (well watered), 65 percentage (moderate stress), 45 percentage (severe stress) potted winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and the detached leaves to detect ABA levels and transcripts of PP2Cs, including PP2C40, PP2C45, PP2C59 and PP2C6 as well as the core downstream signals of ABA, including ABF, SnRK2.4 and SnRK2.5. The results showed that the continual loss of water led to a consistent increase in ABA levels, and that the mRNA expression levels of PP2Cs were dependent on plant water condition. PP2Cs expression could be induced by a slight loss of water, and inhibited under severe loss of water. These results were further confirmed by the transcripts of ABF, SnRK2.4 and SnRK2.5. Furthermore, in slight loss of water, 100 μM exogenous ABA could promote PP2Cs expression; in severe loss of water, it inhibited PP2Cs expression. In conclusion, ABA accumulation is controlled by water condition and the PP2C expression is dependent on plant water condition, suggesting that PP2Cs might be served as an early signal molecule for water stress in wheat. (author)

  1. A novel tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR containing PP5 serine/threonine protein phosphatase in the malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adams Brian

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The malarial parasite, Plasmodium falciparum (Pf, is responsible for nearly 2 million deaths worldwide. However, the mechanisms of cellular signaling in the parasite remain largely unknown. Recent discovery of a few protein kinases and phosphatases point to a thriving reversible phosphorylation system in the parasite, although their function and regulation need to be determined. Results We provide biochemical and sequence evidence for a protein serine/threonine phosphatase type PP5 in Plasmodium falciparum, and named it PfPP5. The 594-amino acid polypeptide was encoded by a 1785 nucleotide long intronless gene in the parasite. The recombinant protein, expressed in bacteria, was indistinguishable from native PfPP5. Sequencing comparison indicated that the extra-long N-terminus of PfPP5 outside the catalytic core contained four tetratricopeptide repeats (TPRs, compared to three such repeats in other PP5 phosphatases. The PfPP5 N-terminus was required for stimulation of the phosphatase activity by polyunsaturated fatty acids. Co-immunoprecipitation demonstrated an interaction between native PfPP5 and Pf heat shock protein 90 (hsp90. PfPP5 was expressed in all the asexual erythrocytic stages of the parasite, and was moderately sensitive to okadaic acid. Conclusions This is the first example of a TPR-domain protein in the Apicomplexa family of parasites. Since TPR domains play important roles in protein-protein interaction, especially relevant to the regulation of PP5 phosphatases, PfPP5 is destined to have a definitive role in parasitic growth and signaling pathways. This is exemplified by the interaction between PfPP5 and the cognate chaperone hsp90.

  2. Incorporation in vivo of 1-14C-acetate into lipids of rats fed threonine imbalanced diet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Hideo; Sugano, Michihiro

    1975-01-01

    In order to investigate the mechanism of the fatty liver production in rats fed the thereonine imbalanced diet, time course of lipogenesis was followed after intraperitoneal injection of 1- 14 C-acetate into rats that had been reared on the imbalanced diet for 7 days. 1) The rate of the incorporation of 1- 14 C-acetate into hepatic triglyceride, estimated either on the base of unit weight of liver or of whole liver, in comparison with that of the control rats, did not increase by feeding the imbalanced diet under the condition where the extent of lipogenesis could be measured (30 min after the dose of the label). Also, the specific activity of triglyceride was by no means high at this point. The rate of disappearance of the radioactivity, between 60 min and 180 min after the label injection, from triglyceride was evidently slower in rats fed the imbalanced diet, thus the radioactivity of triglyceride in this animal being to some extent higher after 180 min. 2) The incorporation of radioactivity into phospholipid was not influenced by the imbalanced diet. 3) There was no difference in the incorporation of the radioactivity into kidney lipids between the control and imbalanced groups. 4) From the distribution of the radioactivity in the hepatic lipid fractions, it appeared that the relative incorporation into triglyceride tended to increase after feeding the imbalanced diet. 5) There were no demonstrable differences in the activity of plasma total lipids at any times after the injection of the label. The ratio of the label incorporation into whole plasma and liver total lipids tended to decrease in the imbalanced rat after 180 min. These results suggested that, although alternative explanations are possible, the decreased turnover in hepatic triglyceride, rather than the increased hepatic lipogenesis, would largely be responsible for the production of fatty liver in rats fed the threonine imbalanced diet. (auth.)

  3. Phosphorylation of Threonine 794 on Tie1 by Rac1/PAK1 Reveals a Novel Angiogenesis Regulatory Pathway.

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    Jessica L Reinardy

    Full Text Available The endothelial receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK Tie1 was discovered over 20 years ago, yet its precise function and mode of action remain enigmatic. To shed light on Tie1's role in endothelial cell biology, we investigated a potential threonine phosphorylation site within the juxtamembrane domain of Tie1. Expression of a non-phosphorylatable mutant of this site (T794A in zebrafish (Danio rerio significantly disrupted vascular development, resulting in fish with stunted and poorly branched intersomitic vessels. Similarly, T794A-expressing human umbilical vein endothelial cells formed significantly shorter tubes with fewer branches in three-dimensional Matrigel cultures. However, mutation of T794 did not alter Tie1 or Tie2 tyrosine phosphorylation or downstream signaling in any detectable way, suggesting that T794 phosphorylation may regulate a Tie1 function independent of its RTK properties. Although T794 is within a consensus Akt phosphorylation site, we were unable to identify a physiological activator of Akt that could induce T794 phosphorylation, suggesting that Akt is not the physiological Tie1-T794 kinase. However, the small GTPase Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (Rac1, which is required for angiogenesis and capillary morphogenesis, was found to associate with phospho-T794 but not the non-phosphorylatable T794A mutant. Pharmacological activation of Rac1 induced downstream activation of p21-activated kinase (PAK1 and T794 phosphorylation in vitro, and inhibition of PAK1 abrogated T794 phosphorylation. Our results provide the first demonstration of a signaling pathway mediated by Tie1 in endothelial cells, and they suggest that a novel feedback loop involving Rac1/PAK1 mediated phosphorylation of Tie1 on T794 is required for proper angiogenesis.

  4. Exigências em treonina para frangos de corte de 22 a 42 dias de idade Threonine requirements of 22 to 42-day-old broilers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Ferreira Duarte

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Um experimento foi realizado com o objetivo de estabelecer critérios de avaliação das exigências de treonina digestível para frangos de corte de 22 a 42 dias de idade utilizando-se diferentes modelos de regressão (quadrático, exponencial e de retas segmentadas ou Linear Response Plateau. Foram utilizados 1.920 frangos de corte machos com 22 dias de idade, distribuídos em delineamento inteiramente ao acaso, com seis tratamentos (seis níveis de treonina digestível: 0,5904; 0,6441; 0,6977; 0,7514; 0,8051 e 0,8588% e oito repetições de 40 aves. Utilizou-se como padrão o nível de 0,6977% de treonina digestível. Foram avaliados dados de desempenho e características de carcaça. Com base nos dados, o nível de 0,7642% de treonina digestível, correspondente às relação treonina:lisina digestível de 71,19%, promoveu o melhor resultado de conversão alimentar de acordo com o modelo Linear Response Plateau.The objective of this experiment was to establish different criteria for evaluation of the requirements of digestible threonine for broilers from 22 to 42 d of age, using different regression models (quadratic, exponential, and Linear Response Plateau. A total of 1,920 22-day-old male Cobb broilers were distributed in randomized experimental design, with six treatments (six threonine levels: 0.5904, 0.6441, 0.6977, 0.7514, 0.8051, and 0.8588% and 8 replications containing 40 broilers each one. The level of 0.6977% digestible threonine was used as standard. Data on performance and carcass characteristics were evaluated. Based on the data, the threonine level of 0.7642%, corresponding to the threonine:digestible lysine ratio of 71.19% had the best result for feed conversion, according to the Linear Response Plateau model.

  5. Development of a two-stage feeding strategy based on the kind and level of feeding nutrients for improving fed-batch production of L-threonine by Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuwen; Liang, Yong; Liu, Qian; Tao, Tongtong; Lai, Shujuan; Chen, Ning; Wen, Tingyi

    2013-01-01

    Fed-batch fermentation is the predominant method for industrial production of amino acids. In this study, we comprehensively investigated the effects of four kinds of feeding nutrients and developed an accurate optimization strategy for fed-batch production of L-threonine. The production of L-threonine was severely inhibited when cell growth ceased in the bath culture. Similarly, L-threonine production was also associated with cell growth in the carbon-, phosphate-, and sulfate-limited fed-batch cultures, but the accumulation of L-threonine was markedly increased because of the extended production time in the growth stage. Interestingly, auxotrophic amino acid (L-isoleucine)-limited feeding promoted L-threonine production over the non-growth phase. Metabolite analysis indicates that substantial production of acetate and glutamate and the resulting accumulation of ammonium may lead to the inhibition of L-threonine production. During the growth phase, the levels of L-isoleucine were accurately optimized by balancing cell growth and production with Pontryagin's maximum principle, basing on the relationship between the specific growth rate μ and specific production rate ρ. Furthermore, the depletion of L-isoleucine and phosphate at the end of the growth phase favored the synthesis of L-threonine in the subsequent non-growth phase. Combining the two-stage feeding profiles, the final L-threonine concentration and conversion rate were increased by 5.9- and 2.1-fold, respectively, compared to batch processes without feeding control. The identification of efficient feeding nutrient and the development of accurate feeding strategies provide potential guidelines for microbial production of amino acids.

  6. Characterization of Hospital Residuals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanco Meza, A.; Bonilla Jimenez, S.

    1997-01-01

    The main objective of this investigation is the characterization of the solid residuals. A description of the handling of the liquid and gassy waste generated in hospitals is also given, identifying the source where they originate. To achieve the proposed objective the work was divided in three stages: The first one was the planning and the coordination with each hospital center, in this way, to determine the schedule of gathering of the waste can be possible. In the second stage a fieldwork was made; it consisted in gathering the quantitative and qualitative information of the general state of the handling of residuals. In the third and last stage, the information previously obtained was organized to express the results as the production rate per day by bed, generation of solid residuals for sampled services, type of solid residuals and density of the same ones. With the obtained results, approaches are settled down to either determine design parameters for final disposition whether for incineration, trituration, sanitary filler or recycling of some materials, and storage politics of the solid residuals that allow to determine the gathering frequency. The study concludes that it is necessary to improve the conditions of the residuals handling in some aspects, to provide the cleaning personnel of the equipment for gathering disposition and of security, minimum to carry out this work efficiently, and to maintain a control of all the dangerous waste, like sharp or polluted materials. In this way, an appreciable reduction is guaranteed in the impact on the atmosphere. (Author) [es

  7. Water conservation in semiarid dryland agriculture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willis, W.O.

    1980-01-01

    Factors affecting water conservation in semiarid dryland regions are discussed. Because precipitation is the only source of water for plant growth in most semiarid regions, a good understanding of precipitation patterns (quantity, distribution, and their probable frequency) is needed for each dryland area. The various dryland practices, e.g. tillage, cultivars, residue management, fertility, erosion control, and grazing, must be considered as integral parts of an entire system to develop best management practices and to gain most efficient water conservation for food and fiber production. (author)

  8. Management of NORM Residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-06-01

    The IAEA attaches great importance to the dissemination of information that can assist Member States in the development, implementation, maintenance and continuous improvement of systems, programmes and activities that support the nuclear fuel cycle and nuclear applications, and that address the legacy of past practices and accidents. However, radioactive residues are found not only in nuclear fuel cycle activities, but also in a range of other industrial activities, including: - Mining and milling of metalliferous and non-metallic ores; - Production of non-nuclear fuels, including coal, oil and gas; - Extraction and purification of water (e.g. in the generation of geothermal energy, as drinking and industrial process water; in paper and pulp manufacturing processes); - Production of industrial minerals, including phosphate, clay and building materials; - Use of radionuclides, such as thorium, for properties other than their radioactivity. Naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) may lead to exposures at some stage of these processes and in the use or reuse of products, residues or wastes. Several IAEA publications address NORM issues with a special focus on some of the more relevant industrial operations. This publication attempts to provide guidance on managing residues arising from different NORM type industries, and on pertinent residue management strategies and technologies, to help Member States gain perspectives on the management of NORM residues

  9. Serine/threonine kinase 15 gene polymorphism and risk of digestive system cancers: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jianfei; Yan, Ruicheng; Zou, Li

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have reported an association between the two coding polymorphisms (91T>A and 169G>A) of the serine/threonine kinase 15 (STK15) gene and the risk of digestive system cancers; however, the results are inconsistent. In the present study, a meta-analysis was carried out to assess the association between the two STK15 polymorphisms and the risk of digestive system cancers. Relevant studies were identified using PubMed, Web of Science, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, WanFang and VIP databases up to February 18, 2014. The pooled odds ratio (OR) with a 95% confidence interval (CI) was calculated using the fixed or random effects model. A total of 15 case-control studies from 14 publications were included. Of these, 15 studies concerned the 91T>A polymorphism and included 7,619 cases and 7,196 controls and four studies concerned the 161G>A polymorphism and included 826 cases and 713 controls. A significantly increased risk of digestive system cancers was observed for the 91T>A polymorphism (recessive model: OR, 1.19; 95% CI, 1.07-1.31). In subgroup analysis by ethnicity, a significant association was detected in Asian populations (recessive model: OR, 1.21; 95% CI, 1.08-1.36) but not in Caucasian and mixed populations. Stratification by tumor type indicated that the 91T>A polymorphism was associated with an increased risk of esophageal and colorectal cancers under the recessive model (OR, 1.19; 95% CI, 1.03-1.38; and OR, 1.24; 95% CI, 1.04-1.46; respectively); however, no significant association was observed between the 169G>A polymorphism and the risk of digestive system cancers in any of the genetic models. Furthermore, in subgroup analysis by ethnicity, similar results were observed in the Asian and Caucasian populations. The present meta-analysis demonstrated that the STK15 gene 91T>A polymorphism, but not the 169G>A polymorphism, may be a risk factor for digestive system cancers, particularly for esophageal and colorectal cancers.

  10. Serine/Threonine Kinase 35, a Target Gene of STAT3, Regulates the Proliferation and Apoptosis of Osteosarcoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong Wu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Serine/threonine kinase 35 (STK35 may be associated with Parkinson disease and human colorectal cancer, but there have been no reports on the expression levels or roles of STK35 in osteosarcoma. Methods: STK35 mRNA expression was determined in osteosarcoma and bone cyst tissues by real-time PCR. Cell proliferation and apoptosis were assessed by Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8 assay and flow cytometry analysis, respectively. Results: STK35 was up-regulated in osteosarcoma tissues as indicated by analyzing publicly available expression data (GEO dataset E-MEXP-3628 and real-time PCR analysis on our own cohort. We subsequently investigated the effects of STK35 knockdown on two osteosarcoma cell lines, MG63 and U2OS. STK35 knockdown inhibited the growth of osteosarcoma cells in vitro and in xenograft tumors. Meanwhile, STK35 knockdown enhanced apoptosis. Expression of the active forms and the activity of two major executioner caspases, caspase 3 and caspase 7, were also increased in osteosarcoma cells with STK35 silenced. Additionally, Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA identified that the JAK/STAT signaling pathway was positively correlated with STK35 expression. The mRNA expression of STK35 was repressed by STAT3 small interfering RNA (siRNA, but not by siRNA of STAT4, STAT5A or STAT6. A luciferase reporter assay further demonstrated that STAT3 transcriptionally regulated STK35 expression. A chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP assay confirmed the direct recruitment of STAT3 to the STK35 promoter. The promotion effects of STAT3 knockdown on cell apoptosis were partially abolished by STK35 overexpression. Furthermore, STK35 mRNA expression was positively correlated with STAT3 mRNA expression in osteosarcoma tissues by Pearson correlation analysis. Conclusions: These results collectively reveal that STAT3 regulates the transcription of STK35 in osteosarcoma. STK35 may exert an oncogenic role in osteosarcoma.

  11. The presence of modifiable residues in the core peptide part of precursor nisin is not crucial for precursor nisin interactions with NisB- and NisC.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rustem Khusainov

    Full Text Available Precursor nisin is a model posttranslationally modified precursor lantibiotic that can be structurally divided into a leader peptide sequence and a modifiable core peptide part. The nisin core peptide clearly plays an important role in the precursor nisin-nisin modification enzymes interactions, since it has previously been shown that the construct containing only the nisin leader sequence is not sufficient to pull-down the nisin modification enzymes NisB and NisC. Serines and threonines in the core peptide part are the residues that NisB specifically dehydrates, and cysteines are the residues that NisC stereospecifically couples to the dehydrated amino acids. Here, we demonstrate that increasing the number of negatively charged residues in the core peptide part of precursor nisin, which are absent in wild-type nisin, does not abolish binding of precursor nisin to the modification enzymes NisB and NisC, but dramatically decreases the antimicrobial potency of these nisin mutants. An unnatural precursor nisin variant lacking all serines and threonines in the core peptide part and an unnatural precursor nisin variant lacking all cysteines in the core peptide part still bind the nisin modification enzymes NisB and NisC, suggesting that these residues are not essential for direct interactions with the nisin modification enzymes NisB and NisC. These results are important for lantibiotic engineering studies.

  12. Inhibition of protein phosphatase 2A induces serine/threonine phosphorylation, subcellular redistribution, and functional inhibition of STAT3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woetmann, A; Nielsen, M; Christensen, S T

    1999-01-01

    Signal transducers and activators of transcription (STATs) are rapidly phosphorylated on tyrosine residues in response to cytokine and growth factor stimulation of cell surface receptors. STATs hereafter are translocated to the nucleus where they act as transcription factors. Recent reports suggest...

  13. Residual-stress measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ezeilo, A N; Webster, G A [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Webster, P J [Salford Univ. (United Kingdom)

    1997-04-01

    Because neutrons can penetrate distances of up to 50 mm in most engineering materials, this makes them unique for establishing residual-stress distributions non-destructively. D1A is particularly suited for through-surface measurements as it does not suffer from instrumental surface aberrations commonly found on multidetector instruments, while D20 is best for fast internal-strain scanning. Two examples for residual-stress measurements in a shot-peened material, and in a weld are presented to demonstrate the attractive features of both instruments. (author).

  14. Wetting of nonconserved residue-backbones: A feature indicative of aggregation associated regions of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Mohan R; Pal, Arumay; Hu, Zhongqiao; Kannan, Srinivasaraghavan; Chee Keong, Kwoh; Lane, David P; Verma, Chandra S

    2016-02-01

    Aggregation is an irreversible form of protein complexation and often toxic to cells. The process entails partial or major unfolding that is largely driven by hydration. We model the role of hydration in aggregation using "Dehydrons." "Dehydrons" are unsatisfied backbone hydrogen bonds in proteins that seek shielding from water molecules by associating with ligands or proteins. We find that the residues at aggregation interfaces have hydrated backbones, and in contrast to other forms of protein-protein interactions, are under less evolutionary pressure to be conserved. Combining evolutionary conservation of residues and extent of backbone hydration allows us to distinguish regions on proteins associated with aggregation (non-conserved dehydron-residues) from other interaction interfaces (conserved dehydron-residues). This novel feature can complement the existing strategies used to investigate protein aggregation/complexation. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. The effects of added sulphur amino acids, threonine and an ideal amino acid ratio on nitrogen metabolism in mature, overweight dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohaty, Robin E; de Godoy, Maria R C; McLeod, Kyle R; Harmon, David L

    2012-02-01

    The objectives of this study were to investigate the effects of added essential amino acids in conjunction with a dietary lysine/MJ of 0.72 on nitrogen (N) metabolism in dogs. Treatments were; a control diet, a diet that provided an ideal amino acid profile (IAA), a diet with added total sulphur amino acids (TSAA), and a diet with added TSAA and threonine (TT). Diets were fed to eight overweight, mature, female hounds using a replicated 4 x 4 Latin Square design. Food intake was similar across treatments, however, food N intake was higher (p dogs formulated to provide a 0.72 g lysine/MJ ME ratio.

  16. The origin of enantioselectivity in the l-threonine-derived phosphine-sulfonamide catalyzed aza-Morita-Baylis-Hillman reaction: Effects of the intramolecular hydrogen bonding

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, Richmond

    2013-01-01

    l-Threonine-derived phosphine-sulfonamide 4 was identified as the most efficient catalyst to promote enantioselective aza-Morita-Baylis-Hillman (MBH) reactions, affording the desired aza-MBH adducts with excellent enantioselectivities. Density functional theory (DFT) studies were carried out to elucidate the origin of the observed enantioselectivity. The importance of the intramolecular N-H⋯O hydrogen-bonding interaction between the sulfonamide and enolate groups was identified to be crucial in inducing a high degree of stereochemical control in both the enolate addition to imine and the subsequent proton transfer step, affording aza-MBH reactions with excellent enantioselectivity. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  17. MHC-I-induced apoptosis in human B-lymphoma cells is dependent on protein tyrosine and serine/threonine kinases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders Elm; Bregenholt, S; Johansen, B

    1999-01-01

    B lymphoma cells, is dependent on protein tyrosine kinases and the phosphatidylinositol 3 (PI-3) kinase. Functional studies showed that MHC-I crosslinking induced almost complete inhibition of the spontaneous proliferation of the B lymphoma cells as early as 6 h post-crosslinking and apoptosis 24 h...... post-crosslinking. Preincubation with either protein tyrosine kinase or protein serine/threonine kinase inhibitors reduced the MHC-I-induced apoptosis to background levels, whereas inhibition of PI-3 kinase had no effect. These data demonstrate a pivotal role for protein tyrosine and serine...

  18. Conservation: Toward firmer ground

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    The following aspects of energy conservation were reviewed in order to place the problems in proper perspective: history and goals, conservation accounting-criteria, and a method to overcome obstacles. The effect of changing prices and available supplies of energy sources and their causes on consumption levels during the last few decades were described. Some examples of attainable conservation goals were listed and justified. A number of specific criteria applicable to conservation accounting were given. Finally, a discussion was presented to relate together the following aspects of energy conservation: widespread impact, involvement of government, industry, politics, moral and ethical aspects, urgency and time element.

  19. Designing with residual materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walhout, W.; Wever, R.; Blom, E.; Addink-Dölle, L.; Tempelman, E.

    2013-01-01

    Many entrepreneurial businesses have attempted to create value based on the residual material streams of third parties. Based on ‘waste’ materials they designed products, around which they built their company. Such activities have the potential to yield sustainable products. Many of such companies

  20. Ethics of conservation triage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerrie A Wilson

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Conservation triage seems to be at a stalemate between those who accept triage based on utilitarian rationalization, and those that reject it based on a number of ethical principles. We argue that without considered attention to the ethics of conservation triage we risk further polarization in the field of conservation. We draw lessons from the medical sector, where triage is more intuitive and acceptable, and also from disaster planning, to help navigate the challenges that triage entails for conservation science, practice, and policy. We clarify the consequentialist, deontological, and virtue ethical stances that influence the level of acceptance of triage. We emphasize the ethical dimensions of conservation triage in principle and in practice, particularly in the context of stakeholder diversity, a wide range of possible objectives and actions, broader institutions, and significant uncertainties. A focus on a more diverse set of ethics, more considered choice of triage as a conservation tool, open communication of triage objectives and protocols, greater consideration of risk preferences, and regular review and adaptation of triage protocols is required for conservation triage to become more acceptable among diverse conservation practitioners, institutions, and the general public. Accepting conservation triage as fundamentally an ethical problem would foster more open dialogue and constructive debate about the role of conservation triage in a wider system of care.

  1. Overexpression of DJ-1/PARK7, the Parkinson's disease-related protein, improves mitochondrial function via Akt phosphorylation on threonine 308 in dopaminergic neuron-like cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Gong, Xiao-Gang; Wang, Zhen-Zhen; Sun, Hong-Mei; Guo, Zhen-Yu; Hu, Jing-Hong; Ma, Ling; Li, Ping; Chen, Nai-Hong

    2016-05-01

    DJ-1/PARK7, the Parkinson's disease-related protein, plays an important role in mitochondrial function. However, the mechanisms by which DJ-1 affects mitochondrial function are not fully understood. Akt is a promoter of neuron survival and is partly involved in the neurodegenerative process. This research aimed at investigating a possible relationship between DJ-1 and Akt signalling in regulating mitochondrial function in the dopaminergic neuron-like cells SH-SY5Y and PC-12. Overexpression of DJ-1 was firstly validated at both the transcriptional and translational levels after transit transfection with plasmid pcDNA3-Flag-DJ-1. Confocal fluorescence microscopy demonstrated that overexpression of DJ-1 increased the mitochondrial mass, but did not disrupt the mitochondrial morphology. In addition, mitochondrial complex I activity was raised in DJ-1-overexpressing cells, and this rise occurred with an increase in cellular adenosine 5'-triphosphate content. Moreover, immunoblotting demonstrated that the levels of phosphoinositide 3-kinase and the total Akt were not altered in DJ-1-overexpressing cells, and nor was the Akt phosphorylation on serine 473 changed. By contrast, Akt phosphorylation on threonine 308 was significantly augmented by overexpression of DJ-1, and the expression of glycogen synthase kinase-3beta, a downstream effector of Akt, was suppressed. In summary, these results suggest that overexpression of DJ-1 improves the mitochondrial function, at least in part, through a mechanism involving Akt phosphorylation on threonine 308. © 2016 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Room temperature Q-band electron magnetic resonance study of radicals in X-ray-irradiated L-threonine single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanhaelewyn, Gauthier; Vrielinck, Henk; Callens, Freddy

    2014-01-01

    In the past, decennia radiation-induced radicals were successfully identified by electron magnetic resonance (EMR) in several solid-state amino acids and sugars. The authors present a room temperature (RT) EMR study of the stable radicals produced by X-ray-irradiation in the amino acid L-threonine (CH 3 CH(OH)CH(NH3 + )COO - ). Its chemical structure is similar to that of the well-known dosimetric material L-alanine (CH 3 CH(NH3 + )COO - ), and radiation defects in L-threonine may straightforwardly be compared with the extensively studied L-alanine radicals. The hyperfine coupling tensors of three different radicals were determined at RT using electron nuclear double resonance. These results indicate that the two most abundant radicals share the same basic structure CH 3 .C(OH)CH(NH3 + )COO - , obtained by H-abstraction, but are stabilised in slightly different conformations. The third radical is most probably obtained by deamination (CH 3 CH(OH).CHCOO - ), similar in structure to the stable alanine radical. (authors)

  3. Serine/Threonine Protein Phosphatase PstP of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Is Necessary for Accurate Cell Division and Survival of Pathogen*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Aditya K.; Arora, Divya; Singh, Lalit K.; Gangwal, Aakriti; Sajid, Andaleeb; Molle, Virginie; Singh, Yogendra; Nandicoori, Vinay Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Protein phosphatases play vital roles in phosphorylation-mediated cellular signaling. Although there are 11 serine/threonine protein kinases in Mycobacterium tuberculosis, only one serine/threonine phosphatase, PstP, has been identified. Although PstP has been biochemically characterized and multiple in vitro substrates have been identified, its physiological role has not yet been elucidated. In this study, we have investigated the impact of PstP on cell growth and survival of the pathogen in the host. Overexpression of PstP led to elongated cells and partially compromised survival. We find that depletion of PstP is detrimental to cell survival, eventually leading to cell death. PstP depletion results in elongated multiseptate cells, suggesting a role for PstP in regulating cell division events. Complementation experiments performed with PstP deletion mutants revealed marginally compromised survival, suggesting that all of the domains, including the extracellular domain, are necessary for complete rescue. On the other hand, the catalytic activity of PstP is absolutely essential for the in vitro growth. Mice infection experiments establish a definitive role for PstP in pathogen survival within the host. Depletion of PstP from established infections causes pathogen clearance, indicating that the continued presence of PstP is necessary for pathogen survival. Taken together, our data suggest an important role for PstP in establishing and maintaining infection, possibly via the modulation of cell division events. PMID:27758870

  4. Evaluation of residue-residue contact predictions in CASP9

    KAUST Repository

    Monastyrskyy, Bohdan; Fidelis, Krzysztof; Tramontano, Anna; Kryshtafovych, Andriy

    2011-01-01

    This work presents the results of the assessment of the intramolecular residue-residue contact predictions submitted to CASP9. The methodology for the assessment does not differ from that used in previous CASPs, with two basic evaluation measures

  5. Conservation: Toward firmer ground

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    The following aspects of energy conservation were discussed: conservation history and goals, conservation modes, conservation accounting-criteria, and a method to overcome obstacles. The conservation modes tested fall into one of the following categories: reduced energy consumption, increased efficiency of energy utilization, or substitution of one or more forms of energy for another which is in shorter supply or in some sense thought to be of more value. The conservation accounting criteria include net energy reduction, economic, and technical criteria. A method to overcome obstacles includes (approaches such as: direct personal impact (life style, income, security, aspiration), an element of crisis, large scale involvement of environmental, safety, and health issues, connections to big government, big business, big politics, involvement of known and speculative science and technology, appeal to moral and ethical standards, the transient nature of opportunities to correct the system.

  6. Econometric modelling of conservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parker, J.C.; Seal, D.J.

    1990-01-01

    The issue of energy conservation in general, and conservation in the natural gas markets in particular, has recently had a much lower profile than in the past, when energy prices were significantly higher and energy costs composed a much larger proportion of industrial operating costs than today. The recent downward trend in energy prices has diverted attention away from this issue. In the face of expected significant real price increases, increasing pressure from environmental groups, and directives on the part of regulator authorities, conservation is once again becoming a topic of consideration in the energy industry. From the point of view of gas demand forecasting, conservation has received too little attention. The intentions of this paper are to establish the need for forecasting conservation in the natural gas utility sector, and to construct a model of industrial demand which incorporates conservation and is appropriate for use as a forecasting tool

  7. Sharing Residual Liability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carbonara, Emanuela; Guerra, Alice; Parisi, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Economic models of tort law evaluate the efficiency of liability rules in terms of care and activity levels. A liability regime is optimal when it creates incentives to maximize the value of risky activities net of accident and precaution costs. The allocation of primary and residual liability...... for policy makers and courts in awarding damages in a large number of real-world accident cases....

  8. Handbook on energy conservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-12-01

    This book shows energy situation in recent years, which includes reserves of energy resource in the world, crude oil production records in OPEC and non OPEC, supply and demand of energy in important developed countries, prospect of supply and demand of energy and current situation of energy conservation in developed countries. It also deals with energy situation in Korea reporting natural resources status, energy conservation policy, measurement for alternative energy, energy management of Korea, investment in equipment and public education for energy conservation.

  9. Collision-Induced Dissociation of Deprotonated Peptides. Relative Abundance of Side-Chain Neutral Losses, Residue-Specific Product Ions, and Comparison with Protonated Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yuxue; Neta, Pedatsur; Yang, Xiaoyu; Stein, Stephen E

    2018-03-01

    High-accuracy MS/MS spectra of deprotonated ions of 390 dipeptides and 137 peptides with three to six residues are studied. Many amino acid residues undergo neutral losses from their side chains. The most abundant is the loss of acetaldehyde from threonine. The abundance of losses from the side chains of other amino acids is estimated relative to that of threonine. While some amino acids lose the whole side chain, others lose only part of it, and some exhibit two or more different losses. Side-chain neutral losses are less abundant in the spectra of protonated peptides, being significant mainly for methionine and arginine. In addition to the neutral losses, many amino acid residues in deprotonated peptides produce specific negative ions after peptide bond cleavage. An expanded list of fragment ions from protonated peptides is also presented and compared with those of deprotonated peptides. Fragment ions are mostly different for these two cases. These lists of fragments are used to annotate peptide mass spectral libraries and to aid in the confirmation of specific amino acids in peptides. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  10. Biodiversity Conservation and Conservation Biotechnology Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    This special issue is dedicated to the in vitro tools and methods used to conserve the genetic diversity of rare and threatened species from around the world. Species that are on the brink of extinction, due to the rapid loss of genetic diversity and habitat, come mainly from resource poor areas the...

  11. Paradigms for parasite conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty, Eric R; Carlson, Colin J; Bueno, Veronica M; Burgio, Kevin R; Cizauskas, Carrie A; Clements, Christopher F; Seidel, Dana P; Harris, Nyeema C

    2016-08-01

    Parasitic species, which depend directly on host species for their survival, represent a major regulatory force in ecosystems and a significant component of Earth's biodiversity. Yet the negative impacts of parasites observed at the host level have motivated a conservation paradigm of eradication, moving us farther from attainment of taxonomically unbiased conservation goals. Despite a growing body of literature highlighting the importance of parasite-inclusive conservation, most parasite species remain understudied, underfunded, and underappreciated. We argue the protection of parasitic biodiversity requires a paradigm shift in the perception and valuation of their role as consumer species, similar to that of apex predators in the mid-20th century. Beyond recognizing parasites as vital trophic regulators, existing tools available to conservation practitioners should explicitly account for the unique threats facing dependent species. We built upon concepts from epidemiology and economics (e.g., host-density threshold and cost-benefit analysis) to devise novel metrics of margin of error and minimum investment for parasite conservation. We define margin of error as the risk of accidental host extinction from misestimating equilibrium population sizes and predicted oscillations, while minimum investment represents the cost associated with conserving the additional hosts required to maintain viable parasite populations. This framework will aid in the identification of readily conserved parasites that present minimal health risks. To establish parasite conservation, we propose an extension of population viability analysis for host-parasite assemblages to assess extinction risk. In the direst cases, ex situ breeding programs for parasites should be evaluated to maximize success without undermining host protection. Though parasitic species pose a considerable conservation challenge, adaptations to conservation tools will help protect parasite biodiversity in the face of

  12. Machine for compacting solid residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herzog, J.

    1981-11-01

    Machine for compacting solid residues, particularly bulky radioactive residues, constituted of a horizontally actuated punch and a fixed compression anvil, in which the residues are first compacted horizontally and then vertically. Its salient characteristic is that the punch and the compression anvil have embossments on the compression side and interpenetrating plates in the compression position [fr

  13. Quadratic residues and non-residues selected topics

    CERN Document Server

    Wright, Steve

    2016-01-01

    This book offers an account of the classical theory of quadratic residues and non-residues with the goal of using that theory as a lens through which to view the development of some of the fundamental methods employed in modern elementary, algebraic, and analytic number theory. The first three chapters present some basic facts and the history of quadratic residues and non-residues and discuss various proofs of the Law of Quadratic Reciprosity in depth, with an emphasis on the six proofs that Gauss published. The remaining seven chapters explore some interesting applications of the Law of Quadratic Reciprocity, prove some results concerning the distribution and arithmetic structure of quadratic residues and non-residues, provide a detailed proof of Dirichlet’s Class-Number Formula, and discuss the question of whether quadratic residues are randomly distributed. The text is a valuable resource for graduate and advanced undergraduate students as well as for mathematicians interested in number theory.

  14. Introducing Conservation of Momentum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunt, Marjorie; Brunt, Geoff

    2013-01-01

    The teaching of the principle of conservation of linear momentum is considered (ages 15 + ). From the principle, the momenta of two masses in an isolated system are considered. Sketch graphs of the momenta make Newton's laws appear obvious. Examples using different collision conditions are considered. Conservation of momentum is considered…

  15. Water Conservation Resource List.

    Science.gov (United States)

    NJEA Review, 1981

    1981-01-01

    Alarmed by the growing water shortage, the New Jersey State Office of Dissemination has prepared this annotated list of free or inexpensive instructional materials for teaching about water conservation, K-l2. A tipsheet for home water conservation is appended. (Editor/SJL)

  16. Controllability of conservative behaviours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rao, Shodhan

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we first define the class of J-conservative behaviours with observable storage functions, where J is a symmetric two-variable polynomial matrix. We then provide two main results. The first result states that if J(-xi,xi) is nonsingular, the input cardinality of a J-conservative

  17. Conservation Science Fair Projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil Conservation Society of America, Ankeny, IA.

    Included are ideas, suggestions, and examples for selecting and designing conservation science projects. Over 70 possible conservation subject areas are presented with suggested projects. References are cited with each of these subject areas, and a separate list of annotated references is included. The references pertain to general subject…

  18. Fixism and conservation science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, Alexandre; Fontaine, Colin; Veron, Simon; Monnet, Anne-Christine; Legrand, Marine; Clavel, Joanne; Chantepie, Stéphane; Couvet, Denis; Ducarme, Frédéric; Fontaine, Benoît; Jiguet, Frédéric; le Viol, Isabelle; Rolland, Jonathan; Sarrazin, François; Teplitsky, Céline; Mouchet, Maud

    2017-08-01

    The field of biodiversity conservation has recently been criticized as relying on a fixist view of the living world in which existing species constitute at the same time targets of conservation efforts and static states of reference, which is in apparent disagreement with evolutionary dynamics. We reviewed the prominent role of species as conservation units and the common benchmark approach to conservation that aims to use past biodiversity as a reference to conserve current biodiversity. We found that the species approach is justified by the discrepancy between the time scales of macroevolution and human influence and that biodiversity benchmarks are based on reference processes rather than fixed reference states. Overall, we argue that the ethical and theoretical frameworks underlying conservation research are based on macroevolutionary processes, such as extinction dynamics. Current species, phylogenetic, community, and functional conservation approaches constitute short-term responses to short-term human effects on these reference processes, and these approaches are consistent with evolutionary principles. © 2016 Society for Conservation Biology.

  19. Setting conservation priorities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Kerrie A; Carwardine, Josie; Possingham, Hugh P

    2009-04-01

    A generic framework for setting conservation priorities based on the principles of classic decision theory is provided. This framework encapsulates the key elements of any problem, including the objective, the constraints, and knowledge of the system. Within the context of this framework the broad array of approaches for setting conservation priorities are reviewed. While some approaches prioritize assets or locations for conservation investment, it is concluded here that prioritization is incomplete without consideration of the conservation actions required to conserve the assets at particular locations. The challenges associated with prioritizing investments through time in the face of threats (and also spatially and temporally heterogeneous costs) can be aided by proper problem definition. Using the authors' general framework for setting conservation priorities, multiple criteria can be rationally integrated and where, how, and when to invest conservation resources can be scheduled. Trade-offs are unavoidable in priority setting when there are multiple considerations, and budgets are almost always finite. The authors discuss how trade-offs, risks, uncertainty, feedbacks, and learning can be explicitly evaluated within their generic framework for setting conservation priorities. Finally, they suggest ways that current priority-setting approaches may be improved.

  20. Madagascar Conservation & Development

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Madagascar Conservation & Development welcomes the results of original research, field surveys, advances in field and laboratory techniques, book reviews, and informal status reports from research, conservation, development and management programs and in-field projects in Madagascar. In addition, notes on changes ...

  1. Resource Conservation Glossary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil Conservation Society of America, Ankeny, IA.

    This glossary is a composite of terms selected from 13 technologies, and is the expanded revision of the original 1952 edition of "The Soil and Water Conservation Glossary." The terms were selected from these areas: agronomy, biology, conservation, ecology, economics, engineering, forestry, geology, hydrology, range, recreation, soils, and…

  2. Creative Soil Conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Martha

    2010-01-01

    Take plant lessons outdoors with this engaging and inquiry-based activity in which third-grade students learn how to apply soil conservation methods to growing plants. They also collect data and draw conclusions about the effectiveness of their method of soil conservation. An added benefit to this activity is that the third-grade students played…

  3. Networks of High Mutual Information Define the Structural Proximity of Catalytic Sites: Implications for Catalytic Residue Identification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buslje, Cristina Marino; Teppa, Elin; Di Doménico, Tomas

    2010-01-01

    other non-functional conserved residues. Using a data set of 434 Pfam families included in the catalytic site atlas (CSA) database, we tested this hypothesis and demonstrated that MI can complement amino acid conservation scores to detect CR. The Kullback-Leibler (KL) conservation measurement was shown.......90, the Cls method was found to have a sensitivity of 0.816. In summary, we demonstrate that networks of residues with high MI provide a distinct signature on CR and propose that such a signature should be present in other classes of functional residues where the requirement to maintain a particular function...

  4. Japan's energy conservation policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoda, Kenichi

    1990-01-01

    This article reviews developments in Japanese energy conservation since the 1970s. The industrial sector has achieved the greatest success, due to industrial restructuring as well as improvements in energy efficiency. In the residential/commercial sector, the efficiency of appliances has been much improved. Although improvements have been made in the fuel efficiency of passenger cars, energy consumption in the transportation sector has risen slightly owing to increased transport of passengers and freight. The overall responsibility for energy conservation policy rests with the Ministry of International Trade and Industry. MITI is also responsible for implementing specific conservation policies in regard to the industrial and commercial sectors. In the residential sector, MITI works with the Ministry of Construction and in the transportation sector with the Ministry of Transport. To realize the goals of energy conservation policy through general research, dissemination of public information and other activities, MITI works with the Energy Conservation Center (ECC). (author). 2 figs, 3 tabs

  5. Tests of conservation laws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldhaber, M.

    1988-01-01

    For quite a while it has been realized that some discrete quantum numbers are conserved in some interactions but not in others. The most conspicuous cases are parity P, charge conjugation C, and the product CP which are conserved in strong and electromagnetic interactions but not in weak interactions. The question arises whether for some of the other conserved quantities, which are conserved in strong, electromagnetic and weak interactions, there is an interaction intermediate in strength between weak and gravitational which violates these quantum numbers, e.g., baryon number B and lepton number L. The possibility exists that these conservation laws, if they are broken at all, are only broken by the gravitational force which would make the mass of an intermediate boson which induces the break-down equal to the Planck mass. (orig.)

  6. Bioenergy from sisal residues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jungersen, G. [Dansk Teknologisk Inst. (Denmark); Kivaisi, A.; Rubindamayugi, M. [Univ. of Dar es Salaam (Tanzania, United Republic of)

    1998-05-01

    The main objectives of this report are: To analyse the bioenergy potential of the Tanzanian agro-industries, with special emphasis on the Sisal industry, the largest producer of agro-industrial residues in Tanzania; and to upgrade the human capacity and research potential of the Applied Microbiology Unit at the University of Dar es Salaam, in order to ensure a scientific and technological support for future operation and implementation of biogas facilities and anaerobic water treatment systems. The experimental work on sisal residues contains the following issues: Optimal reactor set-up and performance; Pre-treatment methods for treatment of fibre fraction in order to increase the methane yield; Evaluation of the requirement for nutrient addition; Evaluation of the potential for bioethanol production from sisal bulbs. The processing of sisal leaves into dry fibres (decortication) has traditionally been done by the wet processing method, which consumes considerable quantities of water and produces large quantities of waste water. The Tanzania Sisal Authority (TSA) is now developing a dry decortication method, which consumes less water and produces a waste product with 12-15% TS, which is feasible for treatment in CSTR systems (Continously Stirred Tank Reactors). (EG)

  7. Additional Surgery after Breast-Conserving Surgery Varies Widely

    Science.gov (United States)

    A study published in the Feb. 1, 2012, issue of JAMA found that the number of women who have one or more additional surgeries to remove suspected residual tumor tissue (re-excisions) following breast-conserving surgery (BCS) for breast cancer varies widely across surgeons and hospitals.

  8. beta2-adaptin is constitutively de-phosphorylated by serine/threonine protein phosphatase PP2A and phosphorylated by a staurosporine-sensitive kinase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritsen, Jens Peter Holst; Menné, C; Kastrup, J

    2000-01-01

    Clathrin-mediated endocytosis includes cycles of assembly and disassembly of the clathrin-coated vesicle constituents. How these cycles are regulated is still not fully known but previous studies have indicated that phosphorylation of coat subunits may play a role. Here we describe that beta2-ada...... the hypothesis that phosphorylation/de-phosphorylation of coat proteins plays a regulatory role in the assembly/disassembly cycle of clathrin-coated vesicles.......Clathrin-mediated endocytosis includes cycles of assembly and disassembly of the clathrin-coated vesicle constituents. How these cycles are regulated is still not fully known but previous studies have indicated that phosphorylation of coat subunits may play a role. Here we describe that beta2......-adaptin undergoes cycles of phosphorylation/de-phosphorylation in intact cells. Thus, beta2-adaptin was constitutively de-phosphorylated by serine/threonine protein phosphatase 2A and phosphorylated by a staurosporine-sensitive kinase in vivo. Confocal laser scanning microscopy demonstrated...

  9. A Resource Conservation Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Philip D.

    1979-01-01

    Describes a variety of learning activities for teaching elementary and junior high students about air, water, and energy conservation techniques. Suggests community resources, social studies objectives, language skills, and 20 activities. (CK)

  10. Hearing Conservation Team

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Hearing Conservation Team focuses on ways to identify the early stages of noise-induced damage to the human ear.Our current research involves the evaluation of...

  11. Madagascar Conservation & Development

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Madagascar Conservation & Development. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 9, No 1 (2014) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  12. Metro Conservation Corridors

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — The Metro Conservation Corridors (MeCC) grow out of the natural resource analysis work done by the DNR in the late '90's, documented in the Metro Greenprint...

  13. Madagascar Conservation & Development

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    www.journalmcd.com

    2012-02-19

    Feb 19, 2012 ... MADAGASCAR CONSERVATION & DEVELOPMENT. VOLUME 7 ... die within a short period of time (e.g., infanticide) (Erhart and. Overdorff 1998 .... been as deep or may have healed by the time of examination. Falls during ...

  14. Birds of Conservation Concern

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of the Interior — The 1988 amendment to the Fish and Wildlife Conservation Act mandates the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) to “identify species, subspecies, and populations of...

  15. Mesocycles in conserving plastics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shashoua, Yvonne

    2016-01-01

    driven by the need to balance the requirements for reversibility in conservation practices with the artist’s intent and significance. Developments within each of the three mesocycles from the 1990s to date are discussed in this article. Environmental science and toxicology of waste plastics offer a novel...... source of information about real time degradation in terrestrial and marine microenvironments that seems likely to contribute to the conservation of similar materials in contemporary artworks....

  16. Soil conservation measures: exercises

    OpenAIRE

    Figueiredo, Tomás de; Fonseca, Felícia

    2009-01-01

    Exercises proposed under the topic of Soil Conservation Measures addresses to the design of structural measure, namely waterways in the context of a soil conservation plan. However, to get a better insight on the actual meaning of soil loss as a resource loss, a prior exercise is proposed to students. It concerns calculations of soil loss due to sheet (interrill) erosion and to gully erosion, and allows the perception through realistic number of the impact of these mechanism...

  17. Nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of STK16 (PKL12), a Golgi-resident serine/threonine kinase involved in VEGF expression regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guinea, Barbara; Ligos, Jose Manuel; Lain de Lera, Teresa; Martin-Caballero, Juan; Flores, Juana; Gonzalez de la Pena, Manuel; Garcia-Castro, Javier; Bernad, Antonio

    2006-01-01

    PKL12/STK16 protein is the first identified mammalian member of a ser/thr kinase subfamily that is conserved across several kingdoms, with a broad expression pattern in murine tissues and cell types. Endogenous STK16 subcellular localization was evaluated by indirect immunofluorescence in NIH/3T3 and NRK cells, demonstrating a Golgi-associated pattern that appears to be independent of signals provided by integrin pathways. When cells were treated with brefeldin A (BFA) or nocodazole, drugs that promote Golgi disorganization, we observed STK16 translocation to the nuclear compartment. Constitutive overexpression of this protein by retroviral vectors also promotes accumulation of STK16 in the nuclear compartment, as shown by subfractionation studies. A kinase-dead STK16 mutant (E202A) was used to demonstrate that both the Golgi association and the nuclear translocation capabilities seem to be independent of the STK16 kinase activity. In addition, we show that STK16 overexpression in several cell lines enhances their capacity to produce and secrete VEGF. To confirm these data in vivo, we injected tumor cells overexpressing STK16 into immunodeficient BALBc/SCID mice. HT1080-derived tumors overexpressing STK16 showed increased volume and number of blood vessels compared to controls. Altogether, these data concur with previous reports suggesting a potential role for STK16 as a transcriptional co-activator

  18. Immobilization of acid digestion residue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenhalgh, W.O.; Allen, C.R.

    1983-01-01

    Acid digestion treatment of nuclear waste is similar to incineration processes and results in the bulk of the waste being reduced in volume and weight to some residual solids termed residue. The residue is composed of various dispersible solid materials and typically contains the resultant radioactivity from the waste. This report describes the immobilization of the residue in portland cement, borosilicate glass, and some other waste forms. Diagrams showing the cement and glass virtification parameters are included in the report as well as process steps and candidate waste product forms. Cement immobilization is simplest and probably least expensive; glass vitrification exhibits the best overall volume reduction ratio

  19. Cover crop residue effects on machine-induced soil compaction

    OpenAIRE

    Ess, Daniel R.

    1994-01-01

    Crop production systems which utilize the biomass produced by rye (Secale cereale ) to suppress weed growth and conserve soil moisture have been developed at Virginia Tech. The success of alternative, reduced-input crop production systems has encouraged research into the potential for breaking the traffic-tillage cycle associated with conventional tillage crop production systems. The fragile residues encountered in agricultural crop production, whether incorporated into the ...

  20. Evaluation of residue-residue contact predictions in CASP9

    KAUST Repository

    Monastyrskyy, Bohdan

    2011-01-01

    This work presents the results of the assessment of the intramolecular residue-residue contact predictions submitted to CASP9. The methodology for the assessment does not differ from that used in previous CASPs, with two basic evaluation measures being the precision in recognizing contacts and the difference between the distribution of distances in the subset of predicted contact pairs versus all pairs of residues in the structure. The emphasis is placed on the prediction of long-range contacts (i.e., contacts between residues separated by at least 24 residues along sequence) in target proteins that cannot be easily modeled by homology. Although there is considerable activity in the field, the current analysis reports no discernable progress since CASP8.

  1. Hydrology and Conservation Ecology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, M.

    2006-12-01

    Responses to change in the behavior of ecological systems are largely governed by interactions at different levels. Research is essential and is to be necessarily designed to gain insights into various interactions at the community level. Sustainable resource management is only possible if conservation of biodiversity can be accomplished by properly using the knowledge discovered. It is well known that the United States Department of Agriculture provides technical information, resources, and data necessary to assist the researchers in addressing their conservation needs. Conservation aims to protect, preserve and conserve the earth's natural resources. These include, but not limited to the conservation of soil, water, minerals, air, plants and all living beings. The United States Department of Agriculture also encourages farmers and ranchers to voluntarily address threats to soil and water. Protection of wetlands and wildlife habitat has been on the radar screen of conservation experts for a very long time. The main objective has always been to help farmers and landowners conform and comply with federal and state environmental laws. During the implementation phase, farmers should be encouraged to make beneficial, cost-effective changes to methods of irrigation systems. In some cases, the hydrologic regime of the project area can be thought of as principally an issue of river flow regimes for floodplain forests. In this presentation, the author tries to focus on the impact of hydrology and conservation ecology on global warming. He also discusses the impact of hydrology and conservation ecology global air concerns such as greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere. References: Chow, V. T, D. R. Maidment, and L. W. Mays. 1988. Applied Hydrology. McGraw-Hill, Inc. U.S. Soil Conservation Service. Technical Release 55: Urban Hydrology for Small Watersheds. USDA (U.S. Department of Agriculture). June 1986. Lehner, B. and P. Döll (2004). Development and validation

  2. Annotating Protein Functional Residues by Coupling High-Throughput Fitness Profile and Homologous-Structure Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yushen; Wu, Nicholas C; Jiang, Lin; Zhang, Tianhao; Gong, Danyang; Shu, Sara; Wu, Ting-Ting; Sun, Ren

    2016-11-01

    Identification and annotation of functional residues are fundamental questions in protein sequence analysis. Sequence and structure conservation provides valuable information to tackle these questions. It is, however, limited by the incomplete sampling of sequence space in natural evolution. Moreover, proteins often have multiple functions, with overlapping sequences that present challenges to accurate annotation of the exact functions of individual residues by conservation-based methods. Using the influenza A virus PB1 protein as an example, we developed a method to systematically identify and annotate functional residues. We used saturation mutagenesis and high-throughput sequencing to measure the replication capacity of single nucleotide mutations across the entire PB1 protein. After predicting protein stability upon mutations, we identified functional PB1 residues that are essential for viral replication. To further annotate the functional residues important to the canonical or noncanonical functions of viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (vRdRp), we performed a homologous-structure analysis with 16 different vRdRp structures. We achieved high sensitivity in annotating the known canonical polymerase functional residues. Moreover, we identified a cluster of noncanonical functional residues located in the loop region of the PB1 β-ribbon. We further demonstrated that these residues were important for PB1 protein nuclear import through the interaction with Ran-binding protein 5. In summary, we developed a systematic and sensitive method to identify and annotate functional residues that are not restrained by sequence conservation. Importantly, this method is generally applicable to other proteins about which homologous-structure information is available. To fully comprehend the diverse functions of a protein, it is essential to understand the functionality of individual residues. Current methods are highly dependent on evolutionary sequence conservation, which is

  3. Landfilling of waste incineration residues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Astrup, Thomas; Cai, Zuansi

    2002-01-01

    Residues from waste incineration are bottom ashes and air-pollution-control (APC) residues including fly ashes. The leaching of heavy metals and salts from the ashes is substantial and a wide spectrum of leaching tests and corresponding criteria have been introduced to regulate the landfilling...

  4. Tourism and Conservation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Budeanu, Adriana

    2017-01-01

    Tourism is promoted by policy makers and international organizations as a tool for advancing conservation agendas, while contributing to poverty alleviation and human development, under the banner of ecotourism or sustainable tourism. However, the indiscriminating use of complex and ambiguous...... concepts such as “poverty” and “sustainability” hide important nuances with regards to the variety of processes and subsequent effects that are triggered when tourism and conservation are being adjoined. Experiences with tourism developments show that destinations that are weak economically find it harder...... to draw benefits from tourism developments or to decline participation in tourism with only little or no losses of sources of income and wealth. If tourism should fulfil sustainability goals related to conservation, poverty, and human development, it needs consistent governmental intervention...

  5. Conservation of Mangifera sylvatica

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Akhter, Sayma

    and conservation of these valuable species. The present study considers an underutilised and threatened species of Bangladesh, namely wild mango (Mangifera sylvatica Roxb.). Although this wild mango is one of the genetically closest species to the common mango (Mangifera indica L.) research is very limited...... and mostly focused on wood quality and phylogenetic relationships. Therefore, this study investigated the conservation potential of wild mango considering its contribution for food, nutrition and livelihoods. To do so, an assessment was made of the current and future distribution of the species, which...... explored. The study conveyed five key messages: 1. Wild mango may become extinct under future climate change scenarios so it is high time to start thinking about conservation initiatives. 2. Wild mango is a small sized mango with a large kernel in relation to other Mangifera species which provides...

  6. Resource conservation management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, W.

    1999-01-01

    Resource conservation management is a management program similar to financial management in that its success requires commitment by all levels of the organization to the process as well as an accounting procedure and auditing of critical components. Resource conservation management provides a framework for all elements of efficient building operations and maintenance. The savings connected with the program are principally connected with changes in the way buildings are operated and maintained. Given the reduction in rebates for the installation of energy-efficient equipment, this approach has considerable promise. This paper discusses the evolution of the resource conservation management service and the savings associated with a two-year pilot effort with seven school districts, as well as the critical components of a successful program

  7. ARPP-16 Is a Striatal-Enriched Inhibitor of Protein Phosphatase 2A Regulated by Microtubule-Associated Serine/Threonine Kinase 3 (Mast 3 Kinase).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Erika C; Musante, Veronica; Horiuchi, Atsuko; Matsuzaki, Hideo; Brody, A Harrison; Wu, Terence; Greengard, Paul; Taylor, Jane R; Nairn, Angus C

    2017-03-08

    ARPP-16 (cAMP-regulated phospho-protein of molecular weight 16 kDa) is one of several small acid-soluble proteins highly expressed in medium spiny neurons of striatum that are phosphorylated in response to dopamine acting via D1 receptor/protein kinase A (PKA) signaling. We show here that ARPP-16 is also phosphorylated in vitro and in vivo by microtubule-associated serine/threonine kinase 3 (MAST3 kinase), an enzyme of previously unknown function that is enriched in striatum. We find that ARPP-16 interacts directly with the scaffolding A subunit of the serine/threonine protein phosphatase, PP2A, and that phosphorylation of ARPP-16 at Ser46 by MAST3 kinase converts the protein into a selective inhibitor of B55α- and B56δ-containing heterotrimeric forms of PP2A. Ser46 of ARPP-16 is phosphorylated to a high basal stoichiometry in striatum, suggestive of basal inhibition of PP2A in striatal neurons. In support of this hypothesis, conditional knock-out of ARPP-16 in CaMKIIα::cre/floxed ARPP-16/19 mice results in dephosphorylation of a subset of PP2A substrates including phospho-Thr75-DARPP-32, phospho-T308-Akt, and phospho-T202/Y204-ERK. Conditional knock-out of ARPP-16/19 is associated with increased motivation measured on a progressive ratio schedule of food reinforcement, yet an attenuated locomotor response to acute cocaine. Our previous studies have shown that ARPP-16 is phosphorylated at Ser88 by PKA. Activation of PKA in striatal slices leads to phosphorylation of Ser88, and this is accompanied by marked dephosphorylation of Ser46. Together, these studies suggest that phospho-Ser46-ARPP-16 acts to basally control PP2A in striatal medium spiny neurons but that dopamine acting via PKA inactivates ARPP-16 leading to selective potentiation of PP2A signaling. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT We describe a novel mechanism of signal transduction enriched in medium spiny neurons of striatum that likely mediates effects of the neurotransmitter dopamine acting on these cells. We

  8. Conservation reaches new heights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepall, J; Khanal, P

    1992-10-01

    The conservation program with the management assistance of the Woodlands Mountain Institute in 2 contiguous parks, the Mount Everest National Park in Nepal and the Qomolangma Nature Reserve in China, in 2 countries is described. The focus is on conservation of the complex ecosystem with sustainable development by showing local people how to benefit from the park without environmental damage. Cultural diversity is as important as biological diversity. The area has been designated by UNESCO as a World Heritage Site with the "last pure ecological seed" of the Himalayas. The regional geography and culture are presented. Population growth has impacted natural resources through overgrazing, cultivation of marginal land, and deforestation; future plans to build a dam and road bordering the nature reserve pose other threats. Proposed management plans for the Makalu-Barun Nature Park (established in November 1991) and Conservation Area include a division of the park into nature reserve areas free of human activity, protected areas which permit traditional land use, and special sites and trail for tourists and religious pilgrims. The conservation area will act as a buffer for the park and provide economic opportunities; further subdivisions include land use for biodiversity protection, community forest and pasture, agroforestry, and agriculture and settlement. Efforts will be made to increase the welfare of women and local people; proposed projects include the introduction of higher milk-producing animals for stall feeding. Also proposed is a cultural and natural history museum. 70% of the project's resources will be directed to local community participation in consultation and park maintenance. The project is a model of how conservation and protection of natural resources can coexist with local economic development and participation; an integration of preservation of biological diversity, mountain wisdom, and the value of local people as resources for conservation.

  9. Statistical inference on residual life

    CERN Document Server

    Jeong, Jong-Hyeon

    2014-01-01

    This is a monograph on the concept of residual life, which is an alternative summary measure of time-to-event data, or survival data. The mean residual life has been used for many years under the name of life expectancy, so it is a natural concept for summarizing survival or reliability data. It is also more interpretable than the popular hazard function, especially for communications between patients and physicians regarding the efficacy of a new drug in the medical field. This book reviews existing statistical methods to infer the residual life distribution. The review and comparison includes existing inference methods for mean and median, or quantile, residual life analysis through medical data examples. The concept of the residual life is also extended to competing risks analysis. The targeted audience includes biostatisticians, graduate students, and PhD (bio)statisticians. Knowledge in survival analysis at an introductory graduate level is advisable prior to reading this book.

  10. Energy conservation in industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pembleton, P.

    1992-01-01

    Energy Conservation in Industry is the first number in the Energy and Environmental Series of the Industrial and Technological Information Bank (INTIB). The Series supersedes the INECA Journal and reflects the broader information programme undertaken by INTIB. The present number of the Series contains contributions from three major international databases and five topic-specific sources, including three United Nations Organizations. The present publication consists of a recent technical report on a current topic: reducing energy loss in four industrial sectors and improving energy conservation through waste-heat recovery, followed by two sections containing abstracts of technical materials

  11. Local instant conservation equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delaje, Dzh.

    1984-01-01

    Local instant conservation equations for two-phase flow are derived. Derivation of the equation starts from the recording of integral laws of conservation for a fixed reference volume, containing both phases. Transformation of the laws, using the Leibniz rule and Gauss theory permits to obtain the sum of two integrals as to the volume and integral as to the surface. Integrals as to the volume result in local instant differential equations, in particular derivatives for each phase, and integrals as to the surface reflect local instant conditions of a jump on interface surface

  12. Diesel conservation: GSRTC'S experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramesh Kumar, I V

    1980-01-01

    The Gujarat State Road Transport Corporation (GSRTC) in India has a fleet of about 6000 buses. The increasing cost of fuel and lubricants added to uncertainty in supplies, has necessitated the need for conserving High Speed Diesel Oil (HSD). GSRTC had achieved an overall average Kilometre Per Litre (kmpl) of 4.44 in the year 1976-1977 due to a variety of measures. In the year 1978-1979 the average kmpl was 4.52 and it is expected to be 4.60 for 1979-1980. The case study outlined describes the measures taken by GSRTC in conserving high speed diesel oil by various methods.

  13. Information, conservation and retrieval

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eng, T [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden); Norberg, E [National Swedish Archives, Stockholm (Sweden); Torbacke, J [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of History; Jensen, M [Swedish Radiation Protection Inst., Stockholm (Sweden)

    1996-12-01

    The seminar took place on the Swedish ship for transportation of radioactive wastes, M/S Sigyn, which at summer time is used for exhibitions. The seminar treated items related to general information needs in society and questions related to radioactive waste, i.e. how knowledge about a waste repository should be passed on to future generations. Three contributions are contained in the report from the seminar and are indexed separately: `Active preservation - otherwise no achieves`; `The conservation and dissemination of information - A democratic issue`; and, `Conservation and retrieval of information - Elements of a strategy to inform future societies about nuclear waste repositories`.

  14. Information, conservation and retrieval

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eng, T.; Norberg, E.; Torbacke, J.

    1996-12-01

    The seminar took place on the Swedish ship for transportation of radioactive wastes, M/S Sigyn, which at summer time is used for exhibitions. The seminar treated items related to general information needs in society and questions related to radioactive waste, i.e. how knowledge about a waste repository should be passed on to future generations. Three contributions are contained in the report from the seminar and are indexed separately: 'Active preservation - otherwise no achieves'; 'The conservation and dissemination of information - A democratic issue'; and, 'Conservation and retrieval of information - Elements of a strategy to inform future societies about nuclear waste repositories'

  15. Stereophysicochemical variability plots highlight conserved antigenic areas in Flaviviruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Bin

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Flaviviruses, which include Dengue (DV and West Nile (WN, mutate in response to immune system pressure. Identifying escape mutants, variant progeny that replicate in the presence of neutralizing antibodies, is a common way to identify functionally important residues of viral proteins. However, the mutations typically occur at variable positions on the viral surface that are not essential for viral replication. Methods are needed to determine the true targets of the neutralizing antibodies. Results Stereophysicochemical variability plots (SVPs, 3-D images of protein structures colored according to variability, as determined by our PCPMer program, were used to visualize residues conserved in their physical chemical properties (PCPs near escape mutant positions. The analysis showed 1 that escape mutations in the flavivirus envelope protein are variable residues by our criteria and 2 two escape mutants found at the same position in many flaviviruses sit above clusters of conserved residues from different regions of the linear sequence. Conservation patterns in T-cell epitopes in the NS3- protease suggest a similar mechanism of immune system evasion. Conclusion The SVPs add another dimension to structurally defining the binding sites of neutralizing antibodies. They provide a useful aid for determining antigenically important regions and designing vaccines.

  16. Behaviour and fate of animal waste nitrogen and soluble ions in the agricultural environment with particular reference to rice. Part of a coordinated programme on agricultural nitrogen residues with particular reference to their conservation as fertilizers and behaviour as potential pollutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, H.

    1976-11-01

    The fate of residual nitrogen and its fertilizer efficiency following application to rice plants in pots under controlled laboratory conditions have been studied. Nitrogen was applied as 15 N labelled fecal waste from goat and hog, and as chemical fertilizer (ammonium sulphate) respectively. Animal waste nitrogen was less effective than ammonium sulphate nitrogen in terms of rice yield. On the other hand residual nitrogen in the high soil layers was much higher for the organic nitrogen application and there appeared to be lower losses by volatilization (20-30% for animal waste N, 30-40% for ammonium sulphate nitrogen). Leaching losses were minimal and similar for both kinds of N-application (ca. 1%). Similar results were obtained under field conditions with alluvial, and ''sandy'' soils respectively. Plant recovery of N was greater from ammonium sulphate than from animal waste but overall losses in total balance studies appeared greater for N applied as ammonium sulphate under otherwise comparable conditions (30-40% of N applied as ammonium sulphate and 19-32% of N applied as fecal waste)

  17. Mass spectrometry and site-directed mutagenesis identify several autophosphorylated residues required for the activity of PrkC, a Ser/Thr kinase from Bacillus subtilis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madec, Edwige; Stensballe, Allan; Kjellström, Sven

    2003-01-01

    We have shown recently that PrkC, which is involved in developmental processes in Bacillus subtilis, is a Ser/Thr kinase with features of the receptor kinase family of eukaryotic Hanks kinases. In this study, we expressed and purified from Escherichia coli the cytoplasmic domain of PrkC containing...... the kinase and a short juxtamembrane region. This fragment, which we designate PrkCc, undergoes autophosphorylation in E.coli. PrkCc is further autophosphorylated in vitro, apparently through a trans-kinase, intermolecular reaction. PrkC also displays kinase activity with myelin basic protein. Using high...... mass accuracy electrospray tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and nanoelectrospray tandem mass spectrometry, we identified seven phosphorylated threonine and one serine residue in PrkCc. All the corresponding residues were replaced by systematic site-directed mutagenesis and the purified mutant...

  18. Science Experience Unit: Conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson-Florissant School District, Ferguson, MO.

    GRADES OR AGES: Intermediate grades. SUBJECT MATTER: Conservation. ORGANIZATION AND PHYSICAL APPEARANCE: The guide is divided into 24 experiments. It is mimeographed and staple-bound with a paper cover. OBJECTIVES AND ACTIVITIES: A specific skill or knowledge objective is stated at the beginning of each experiment. Detailed procedures are listed…

  19. (ICTs) And Environmental Conservation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ICTs have a potential for improving the accessibility of environmental information, and if appropriately applied, they can empower local people to make informed decisions regarding environmental issues, thus enhancing environmental conservation. However, the challenge is on how to define particular roles that ...

  20. Conservative Delta Hedging

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-09-01

    an exact method for converting such intervals into arbitrage based prices of financial derivatives or industrial or contractual options. We call this...procedure conservative delta hedging . As existing procedures are of an ad hoc nature, the proposed approach will permit an institution’s man agement a greater oversight of its exposure to risk.

  1. [Lateral epicondylitis: conservative - operative].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altintas, Burak; Greiner, Stefan

    2016-10-01

    Lateral epicondylitis is a common disease of the common extensor origin at the lateral humerus. Despite its common self-limitation it can lead to chronic therapy-resistant pain with remarkable functional disability of the affected arm. Different conservative and operative treatment options of lateral epicondylitis are described and compared regarding benefits and risks. Additionally, recent surgical techniques and their complications are mentioned. Based on the current literature, it is shown which treatment option can be recommended. This review was based on the literature analysis in PubMed regarding "conservative and operative therapy of lateral epicondylitis" as well as the clinical experience of the authors. Conservative treatment is the primary choice for the treatment of lateral epicondylitis if concomitant pathologies such as instability among others can be excluded. It should include strengthening against resistance with eccentric stretching of the extensor group. In persistent cases, operative treatment is warranted. Resection of the pathologic tissue at the extensor origin with debridement and refixation of the healthy tendinous tissue yields good results. Most patients with lateral epicondylitis can be treated conservatively with success. Radiological evaluation should be performed in therapy-resistant cases. In the case of partial or complete rupture of the extensor origin, operative therapy is indicated.

  2. Biological science in conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    David M. Johns

    2000-01-01

    Large-scale wildlands reserve systems offer one of the best hopes for slowing, if not reversing, the loss of biodiversity and wilderness. Establishing such reserves requires both sound biology and effective advocacy. Attempts by The Wildlands Project and its cooperators to meld science and advocacy in the service of conservation is working, but is not without some...

  3. Speyeria (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae Conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven R. Sims

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Speyeria (Nymphalidae are a conspicuous component of the North American butterfly fauna. There are approximately 16 species and >100 associated subspecies (or geographical variants. Speyeria are univoltine, occupy a wide range of habitats, overwinter as first instar larvae, and feed only on native violets. Speyeria species have become a model group for studies of evolution, speciation, and conservation. Several species and subspecies are threatened or endangered. The reasons for this vary with the taxa involved, but always involve the degradation or loss of quality habitat for larvae and adults. The impacts of climate change must be considered among the causes for habitat degradation and in the establishment of conservation measures. In addition to increasing the available habitat, conservation efforts should consider maintaining habitat in a seral “disturbed” successional stage that selectively favors the growth of violets and preferred adult nectar sources. A major future challenge will be determining the most effective allocation of conservation resources to those species and subspecies that have the greatest potential to respond favorably to these efforts.

  4. Conservation and gene banking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant conservation has several objectives the main ones include safeguarding our food supply, preserving crop wild relatives for breeding and selection of new cultivars, providing material for industrial and pharmaceutical uses and preserving the beauty and diversity of our flora for generations to ...

  5. Crowdfunding biodiversity conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo-Cajiao, E; Archibald, C; Friedman, R; Steven, R; Fuller, R A; Game, E T; Morrison, T H; Ritchie, E G

    2018-05-26

    Raising funds is critical for conserving biodiversity and hence so too is scrutinizing emerging financial mechanisms that might help achieve this goal. In this context, anecdotal evidence indicates crowdfunding is being used to support a variety of activities needed for biodiversity conservation, yet its magnitude and allocation remain largely unknown. We conducted a global analysis to help address this knowledge gap, based on empirical data from conservation-focused projects extracted from crowdfunding platforms. For each project, we determined the funds raised, date, country of implementation, proponent characteristics, activity type, biodiversity realm, and target taxa. We identified 72 relevant platforms and 577 conservation-focused projects that have raised US$4 790 634 since 2009. Whilst proponents were based in 38 countries, projects were delivered across 80 countries, indicating a potential mechanism of resource mobilization. Proponents were from non-governmental organizations (35%), universities (30%), or were freelancers (26%). Most projects were for research (40%), persuasion (31%), and on-ground actions (21%). Projects have focused primarily on species (57.7%) and terrestrial ecosystems (20.3%), and less on marine (8.8%) and freshwater ecosystems (3.6%). Projects have focused on 208 species, including a disproportionate number of threatened bird and mammal species. Crowdfunding for biodiversity conservation has now become a global phenomenon and presents signals for potential expansion, despite possible pitfalls. Opportunities arise from its spatial amplifying effect, steady increase over time, inclusion of Cinderella species, adoption by multiple actors, and funding of a range of activities beyond research. Our study paves the way for further research on key questions, such as campaign success rates, effectiveness, and drivers of adoption. Even though the capital input of crowdfunding so far has been modest compared to other conservation finance

  6. Residual stress by repair welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mochizuki, Masahito; Toyoda, Masao

    2003-01-01

    Residual stress by repair welds is computed using the thermal elastic-plastic analysis with phase-transformation effect. Coupling phenomena of temperature, microstructure, and stress-strain fields are simulated in the finite-element analysis. Weld bond of a plate butt-welded joint is gouged and then deposited by weld metal in repair process. Heat source is synchronously moved with the deposition of the finite-element as the weld deposition. Microstructure is considered by using CCT diagram and the transformation behavior in the repair weld is also simulated. The effects of initial stress, heat input, and weld length on residual stress distribution are studied from the organic results of numerical analysis. Initial residual stress before repair weld has no influence on the residual stress after repair treatment near weld metal, because the initial stress near weld metal releases due to high temperature of repair weld and then stress by repair weld regenerates. Heat input has an effect for residual stress distribution, for not its magnitude but distribution zone. Weld length should be considered reducing the magnitude of residual stress in the edge of weld bead; short bead induces high tensile residual stress. (author)

  7. Measurement of the fluorescence of crop residues: A tool for controlling soil erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daughtry, C. S. T.; Mcmurtrey, J. E., III; Chappelle, E. W.; Hunter, W. J.

    1994-01-01

    Management of crop residues, the portion of a crop left in the field after harvest, is an important conservation practice for minimizing soil erosion and for improving water quality. Quantification of crop residue cover is required to evaluate the effectiveness of conservation tillage practices. Methods are needed to quantify residue cover that are rapid, accurate, and objective. The fluorescence of crop residue was found to be a broadband phenomenon with emission maxima at 420 to 495 nm for excitations of 350 to 420 nm. Soils had low intensity broadband emissions over the 400 to 690 nm region for excitations of 300 to 600 nm. The range of relative fluorescence intensities for the crop residues was much greater than the fluorescence observed of the soils. As the crop residues decompose their blue fluorescence values approach the fluorescence of the soil. Fluorescence techniques are concluded to be less ambiguous and better suited for discriminating crop residues and soils than reflectance methods. If properly implemented, fluorescence techniques can be used to quantify, not only crop residue cover, but also photosynthetic efficiency in the field.

  8. RESIDUAL RISK ASSESSMENT: ETHYLENE OXIDE ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document describes the residual risk assessment for the Ethylene Oxide Commercial Sterilization source category. For stationary sources, section 112 (f) of the Clean Air Act requires EPA to assess risks to human health and the environment following implementation of technology-based control standards. If these technology-based control standards do not provide an ample margin of safety, then EPA is required to promulgate addtional standards. This document describes the methodology and results of the residual risk assessment performed for the Ethylene Oxide Commercial Sterilization source category. The results of this analyiss will assist EPA in determining whether a residual risk rule for this source category is appropriate.

  9. Calyculins and Related Marine Natural Products as Serine- Threonine Protein Phosphatase PP1 and PP2A Inhibitors and Total Syntheses of Calyculin A, B, and C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ari M. P. Koskinen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Calyculins, highly cytotoxic polyketides, originally isolated from the marine sponge Discodermia calyx by Fusetani and co-workers, belong to the lithistid sponges group. These molecules have become interesting targets for cell biologists and synthetic organic chemists. The serine/threonine protein phosphatases play an essential role in the cellular signalling, metabolism, and cell cycle control. Calyculins express potent protein phosphatase 1 and 2A inhibitory activity, and have therefore become valuable tools for cellular biologists studying intracellular processes and their control by reversible phosphorylation. Calyculins might also play an important role in the development of several diseases such as cancer, neurodegenerative diseases, and type 2-diabetes mellitus. The fascinating structures of calyculins have inspired various groups of synthetic organic chemists to develop total syntheses of the most abundant calyculins A and C. However, with fifteen chiral centres, a cyano-capped tetraene unit, a phosphate-bearing spiroketal, an anti, anti, anti dipropionate segment, an α-chiral oxazole, and a trihydroxylated γ-amino acid, calyculins reach versatility that only few natural products can surpass, and truly challenge modern chemists’ asymmetric synthesis skills.

  10. Disruption of δ-opioid receptor phosphorylation at threonine 161 attenuates morphine tolerance in rats with CFA-induced inflammatory hypersensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hai-Jing; Xie, Wei-Yan; Hu, Fang; Zhang, Ying; Wang, Jun; Wang, Yun

    2012-04-01

    Our previous study identified Threonine 161 (Thr-161), located in the second intracellular loop of the δ-opioid receptor (DOR), as the only consensus phosphorylation site for cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5). The aim of this study was to assess the function of DOR phosphorylation by Cdk5 in complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-induced inflammatory pain and morphine tolerance. Dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons of rats with CFA-induced inflammatory pain were acutely dissociated and the biotinylation method was used to explore the membrane localization of phosphorylated DOR at Thr-161 (pThr-161-DOR), and paw withdrawal latency was measured after intrathecal delivery of drugs or Tat-peptide, using a radiant heat stimulator in rats with CFA-induced inflammatory pain. Both the total amount and the surface localization of pThr-161-DOR were significantly enhanced in the ipsilateral DRG following CFA injection. Intrathecal delivery of the engineered Tat fusion-interefering peptide corresponding to the second intracellular loop of DOR (Tat-DOR-2L) increased inflammatory hypersensitivity, and inhibited DOR- but not µ-opioid receptor-mediated spinal analgesia in CFA-treated rats. However, intrathecal delivery of Tat-DOR-2L postponed morphine antinociceptive tolerance in rats with CFA-induced inflammatory pain. Phosphorylation of DOR at Thr-161 by Cdk5 attenuates hypersensitivity and potentiates morphine tolerance in rats with CFA-induced inflammatory pain, while disruption of the phosphorylation of DOR at Thr-161 attenuates morphine tolerance.

  11. Angiotensin II-induced hypertension blunts thick ascending limb NO production by reducing NO synthase 3 expression and enhancing threonine 495 phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramseyer, Vanesa D; Gonzalez-Vicente, Agustin; Carretero, Oscar A; Garvin, Jeffrey L

    2015-01-15

    Thick ascending limbs reabsorb 30% of the filtered NaCl load. Nitric oxide (NO) produced by NO synthase 3 (NOS3) inhibits NaCl transport by this segment. In contrast, chronic angiotensin II (ANG II) infusion increases net thick ascending limb transport. NOS3 activity is regulated by changes in expression and phosphorylation at threonine 495 (T495) and serine 1177 (S1177), inhibitory and stimulatory sites, respectively. We hypothesized that NO production by thick ascending limbs is impaired by chronic ANG II infusion, due to reduced NOS3 expression, increased phosphorylation of T495, and decreased phosphorylation of S1177. Rats were infused with 200 ng·kg(-1)·min(-1) ANG II or vehicle for 1 and 5 days. ANG II infusion for 5 days decreased NOS3 expression by 40 ± 12% (P thick ascending limbs from ANG II-infused animals [ANG II -0.01 ± 0.06 arbitrary fluorescence units (AFU)/min vs. 0.17 ± 0.02 AFU/min in controls; P thick ascending limbs is impaired due to decreased NOS3 expression and altered phosphorylation. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  12. Effect of dietary threonine on laying performance and intestinal immunity of laying hens fed low-crude-protein diets during the peak production period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzam, M M M; Dong, X Y; Zou, X T

    2017-10-01

    Threonine (Thr) may be a limiting amino acid for laying hens fed diets with lowered protein level. An experiment was conducted to examine laying performance, and the intestinal immune function of laying hens provided diets varying in digestible Thr levels. Lohmann Brown laying hens (n = 480), 28 weeks of age, were allocated to six dietary treatments, each of which included five replicates of 16 hens. Dietary crude protein (CP) 16.18% diet was offered as the positive control diet. L-Thr was added to the negative diet (14.16% CP) by 0, 1.0, 2.0, 3.0 and 4.0 g/kg, corresponding 0.44%, 0.43%, 0.49%, 0.57%, 0.66% and 0.74% digestible Thr. At 40 weeks, a reduction in CP level decreased laying performance (p hens fed 0.66% Thr showed the lowest value (p feed conversion ratio (FCR). Serum level of uric acid showed the lowest values (p hens fed the low-CP diet compared with hens fed CP (16.18%) and hens fed 0.57-0.66%. Expressions of ileal MUC2 mRNA maximized (p hens during the peak production period. Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  13. Regulated phosphorylation of the K-Cl cotransporter KCC3 at dual C-terminal threonines is a potent switch of intracellular potassium content and cell volume homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norma C. Adragna

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The defense of cell volume against excessive shrinkage or swelling is a requirement for cell function and organismal survival. Cell swelling triggers a coordinated homeostatic response termed regulatory volume decrease (RVD, resulting in K+ and Cl– efflux via the activation of K+ channels, volume-regulated anion channels (VRACs, and the K+-Cl– cotransporters, including KCC3. Here, we show genetic alanine (Ala substitution at threonines (Thr 991 and 1048 in the KCC3a isoform carboxyl-terminus, preventing inhibitory phosphorylation at these sites, not only significantly up-regulates KCC3a activity up to 25-fold in normally inhibitory isotonic conditions, but is also accompanied by reversal of activity of the related bumetanide-sensitive Na+-K+-2Cl– cotransporter isoform 1 (NKCC1. This results in a rapid (90 % reduction in intracellular K+ content (Ki via both Cl-dependent (KCC3a + NKCC1 and Cl-independent (DCPIB [VRAC inhibitor]-sensitive pathways, which collectively renders cells less prone to acute swelling in hypotonic osmotic stress. Together, these data demonstrate the phosphorylation state of Thr991/Thr1048 in the KCC3a encodes a potent switch of transporter activity, Ki homeostasis, and cell volume regulation, and reveal novel observations into the functional interaction among ion transport molecules involved in RVD.

  14. Hydrologic Modeling of Conservation Farming Practices on the Palouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wie, J.; Adam, J. C.; Ullman, J.

    2009-12-01

    The production of dryland crops such as wheat and barley in a semi-arid region requires a reliable and adequate water supply. This supply of water available for crop use is of heightened importance in areas such as the Palouse region of eastern Washington and northern Idaho where the majority of annual rainfall occurs during the winter months and must be retained in the soil through the dry summer growing season. Farmers can increase conservation of water at the field and watershed scales through the adoption of best management practices that incorporate tillage and crop residue management. This research analyzes conservation farming practices that may be implemented by representing them in a watershed-scale hydrologic model in order to determine whether these practices will effectively save water so that a stable crop yield may be insured. The Distributed Hydrology Soil Vegetation Model (DHSVM) is applied and calibrated to represent the physical changes to infiltration, evaporation, and runoff that result from altered soil and vegetation characteristics brought on by management practices. The model is calibrated with field observations at the basin scale as well as the point scale over individual plots that are under various implementations of conservation management scenarios. Conservation practices are accounted for in DHSVM by adjusting input parameters such as the porosity, roughness, and hydraulic conductivity of the soil to characterize varying levels of tillage. Vegetation parameters such as leaf area index and albedo are altered to represent different amounts of crop residue left on the field through the winter months. After calibration, the model is applied over the entire basin under scenarios representing traditional agricultural methods and a region-wide shift to conservation practices. The resulting water balance suggests that there is a potential to retain water in the seed-zone during the winter months by decreasing evaporation and runoff through

  15. Conservation businesses and conservation planning in a biological diversity hotspot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Minin, Enrico; Macmillan, Douglas Craig; Goodman, Peter Styan; Escott, Boyd; Slotow, Rob; Moilanen, Atte

    2013-08-01

    The allocation of land to biological diversity conservation competes with other land uses and the needs of society for development, food, and extraction of natural resources. Trade-offs between biological diversity conservation and alternative land uses are unavoidable, given the realities of limited conservation resources and the competing demands of society. We developed a conservation-planning assessment for the South African province of KwaZulu-Natal, which forms the central component of the Maputaland-Pondoland-Albany biological diversity hotspot. Our objective was to enhance biological diversity protection while promoting sustainable development and providing spatial guidance in the resolution of potential policy conflicts over priority areas for conservation at risk of transformation. The conservation-planning assessment combined spatial-distribution models for 646 conservation features, spatial economic-return models for 28 alternative land uses, and spatial maps for 4 threats. Nature-based tourism businesses were competitive with other land uses and could provide revenues of >US$60 million/year to local stakeholders and simultaneously help meeting conservation goals for almost half the conservation features in the planning region. Accounting for opportunity costs substantially decreased conflicts between biological diversity, agricultural use, commercial forestry, and mining. Accounting for economic benefits arising from conservation and reducing potential policy conflicts with alternative plans for development can provide opportunities for successful strategies that combine conservation and sustainable development and facilitate conservation action. © 2013 Society for Conservation Biology.

  16. Methods of equipment conservation of a carboelectric

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurtado Higuera, Julio Cesar

    2001-01-01

    Several conservation methods are mentioned like they are those of conservation in dry, in humid, conservation of bombs of water conservation, of turbines, of generators, of transformers, of electric motors and conservation of coal piles

  17. Nitrogen availability of biogas residues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Sayed Fouda, Sara

    2011-09-07

    The objectives of this study were to characterize biogas residues either unseparated or separated into a liquid and a solid phase from the fermentation of different substrates with respect to their N and C content. In addition, short and long term effects of the application of these biogas residues on the N availability and N utilization by ryegrass was investigated. It is concluded that unseparated or liquid separated biogas residues provide N at least corresponding to their ammonium content and that after the first fertilizer application the C{sub org}:N{sub org} ratio of the biogas residues was a crucial factor for the N availability. After long term application, the organic N accumulated in the soil leads to an increased release of N.

  18. Conservation and Role of Electrostatics in Thymidylate Synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Divita; Skouloubris, Stephane; Briffotaux, Julien; Myllykallio, Hannu; Wade, Rebecca C

    2015-11-27

    Conservation of function across families of orthologous enzymes is generally accompanied by conservation of their active site electrostatic potentials. To study the electrostatic conservation in the highly conserved essential enzyme, thymidylate synthase (TS), we conducted a systematic species-based comparison of the electrostatic potential in the vicinity of its active site. Whereas the electrostatics of the active site of TS are generally well conserved, the TSs from minimal organisms do not conform to the overall trend. Since the genomes of minimal organisms have a high thymidine content compared to other organisms, the observation of non-conserved electrostatics was surprising. Analysis of the symbiotic relationship between minimal organisms and their hosts, and the genetic completeness of the thymidine synthesis pathway suggested that TS from the minimal organism Wigglesworthia glossinidia (W.g.b.) must be active. Four residues in the vicinity of the active site of Escherichia coli TS were mutated individually and simultaneously to mimic the electrostatics of W.g.b TS. The measured activities of the E. coli TS mutants imply that conservation of electrostatics in the region of the active site is important for the activity of TS, and suggest that the W.g.b. TS has the minimal activity necessary to support replication of its reduced genome.

  19. Vesícula residual

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Júlio C. U. Coelho

    Full Text Available Our objective is to report three patients with recurrent severe upper abdominal pain secondary to residual gallbladder. All patients had been subjected to cholecystectomy from 1 to 20 years before. The diagnosis was established after several episodes of severe upper abdominal pain by imaging exams: ultrasonography, tomography, or endoscopic retrograde cholangiography. Removal of the residual gallbladder led to complete resolution of symptoms. Partial removal of the gallbladder is a very rare cause of postcholecystectomy symptoms.

  20. Residual number processing in dyscalculia ?

    OpenAIRE

    Cappelletti, Marinella; Price, Cathy J.

    2013-01-01

    Developmental dyscalculia – a congenital learning disability in understanding numerical concepts – is typically associated with parietal lobe abnormality. However, people with dyscalculia often retain some residual numerical abilities, reported in studies that otherwise focused on abnormalities in the dyscalculic brain. Here we took a different perspective by focusing on brain regions that support residual number processing in dyscalculia. All participants accurately performed semantic and ca...

  1. Americium recovery from reduction residues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conner, W.V.; Proctor, S.G.

    1973-12-25

    A process for separation and recovery of americium values from container or bomb'' reduction residues comprising dissolving the residues in a suitable acid, adjusting the hydrogen ion concentration to a desired level by adding a base, precipitating the americium as americium oxalate by adding oxalic acid, digesting the solution, separating the precipitate, and thereafter calcining the americium oxalate precipitate to form americium oxide. (Official Gazette)

  2. Suitability of peanut residue as a nitrogen source for a rye cover crop

    OpenAIRE

    Balkcom,Kipling Shane; Wood,Charles Wesley; Adams,James Fredrick; Meso,Bernard

    2007-01-01

    Leguminous winter cover crops have been utilized in conservation systems to partially meet nitrogen (N) requirements of succeeding summer cash crops, but the potential of summer legumes to reduce N requirements of a winter annual grass, used as a cover crop, has not been extensively examined. This study assessed the N contribution of peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) residues to a subsequent rye (Secale cereale L.) cover crop grown in a conservation system on a Dothan sandy loam (fine-loamy, kaoli...

  3. On momentum conservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karastoyanov, A.

    1990-01-01

    The relativistic law of momentum transformation shows that the sum of momenta of even isolated particles is not invariable in all inertial reference systems. This is connected with the relativistic change of kinetic energy and mass of a system of particles in result of internal interactions. The paper proposes a short and simple proof on the necessity of potential momentum. The momentum conservation law (for all interactions in the Minkowski world) is expressed in a generalized form. The constancy of the sum of kinetic and potential momentum of closed system of particles is shown. The energy conservation is a necessary condition. The potential momentum is defined as usual (e.g. as in the Berkeley Physics Course). (author). 13 refs

  4. Conservation laws shape dissipation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Riccardo; Esposito, Massimiliano

    2018-02-01

    Starting from the most general formulation of stochastic thermodynamics—i.e. a thermodynamically consistent nonautonomous stochastic dynamics describing systems in contact with several reservoirs—we define a procedure to identify the conservative and the minimal set of nonconservative contributions in the entropy production. The former is expressed as the difference between changes caused by time-dependent drivings and a generalized potential difference. The latter is a sum over the minimal set of flux-force contributions controlling the dissipative flows across the system. When the system is initially prepared at equilibrium (e.g. by turning off drivings and forces), a finite-time detailed fluctuation theorem holds for the different contributions. Our approach relies on identifying the complete set of conserved quantities and can be viewed as the extension of the theory of generalized Gibbs ensembles to nonequilibrium situations.

  5. Promoting household energy conservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steg, Linda

    2008-01-01

    It is commonly assumed that households must change their behaviour to reduce the problems caused by increasing levels of fossil energy use. Strategies for behaviour change will be more effective if they target the most important causes of the behaviour in question. Therefore, this paper first discusses the factors influencing household energy use. Three barriers to fossil fuel energy conservation are discussed: insufficient knowledge of effective ways to reduce household energy use, the low priority and high costs of energy savings, and the lack of feasible alternatives. Next, the paper elaborates on the effectiveness and acceptability of strategies aimed to promote household energy savings. Informational strategies aimed at changing individuals' knowledge, perceptions, cognitions, motivations and norms, as well as structural strategies aimed at changing the context in which decisions are made, are discussed. This paper focuses on the psychological literature on household energy conservation, which mostly examined the effects of informational strategies. Finally, this paper lists important topics for future research

  6. A CROSS-SECTIONAL RESEARCH ON THE WEAK ASSOCIATION OF SERENE THREONINE KINASE – 39 GENE TO ESSENTIAL HYPERTENSION (EHTN) WITH RESPECT TO INCREASING AGE FACTOR, BMI AND DIABETES IN THE ABSENCE OF EXERCISE AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY

    OpenAIRE

    Dr Muhammad Waqar Anjum, Dr. Sehar Fatima , Dr. Mehak Ali

    2018-01-01

    Objective: This research was aimed to study the (Serine Threonine Kinase-39) A-G prevalence polymorphism in the population that is settled in the rural areas. Methods: Nature of the research was cross-sectional, random which was completed in the time span of 2015 – 2017 on 528 participants. We excluded secondary hypertension cases from the record of this research. Controls and cases were respectively Normotensives and Hypertensives. We performed genotyping by tetra-primer amplification re...

  7. Annotating Protein Functional Residues by Coupling High-Throughput Fitness Profile and Homologous-Structure Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yushen Du

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Identification and annotation of functional residues are fundamental questions in protein sequence analysis. Sequence and structure conservation provides valuable information to tackle these questions. It is, however, limited by the incomplete sampling of sequence space in natural evolution. Moreover, proteins often have multiple functions, with overlapping sequences that present challenges to accurate annotation of the exact functions of individual residues by conservation-based methods. Using the influenza A virus PB1 protein as an example, we developed a method to systematically identify and annotate functional residues. We used saturation mutagenesis and high-throughput sequencing to measure the replication capacity of single nucleotide mutations across the entire PB1 protein. After predicting protein stability upon mutations, we identified functional PB1 residues that are essential for viral replication. To further annotate the functional residues important to the canonical or noncanonical functions of viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (vRdRp, we performed a homologous-structure analysis with 16 different vRdRp structures. We achieved high sensitivity in annotating the known canonical polymerase functional residues. Moreover, we identified a cluster of noncanonical functional residues located in the loop region of the PB1 β-ribbon. We further demonstrated that these residues were important for PB1 protein nuclear import through the interaction with Ran-binding protein 5. In summary, we developed a systematic and sensitive method to identify and annotate functional residues that are not restrained by sequence conservation. Importantly, this method is generally applicable to other proteins about which homologous-structure information is available.

  8. Evaluation of residue-residue contact prediction in CASP10

    KAUST Repository

    Monastyrskyy, Bohdan

    2013-08-31

    We present the results of the assessment of the intramolecular residue-residue contact predictions from 26 prediction groups participating in the 10th round of the CASP experiment. The most recently developed direct coupling analysis methods did not take part in the experiment likely because they require a very deep sequence alignment not available for any of the 114 CASP10 targets. The performance of contact prediction methods was evaluated with the measures used in previous CASPs (i.e., prediction accuracy and the difference between the distribution of the predicted contacts and that of all pairs of residues in the target protein), as well as new measures, such as the Matthews correlation coefficient, the area under the precision-recall curve and the ranks of the first correctly and incorrectly predicted contact. We also evaluated the ability to detect interdomain contacts and tested whether the difficulty of predicting contacts depends upon the protein length and the depth of the family sequence alignment. The analyses were carried out on the target domains for which structural homologs did not exist or were difficult to identify. The evaluation was performed for all types of contacts (short, medium, and long-range), with emphasis placed on long-range contacts, i.e. those involving residues separated by at least 24 residues along the sequence. The assessment suggests that the best CASP10 contact prediction methods perform at approximately the same level, and comparably to those participating in CASP9.

  9. Water Well Locations - Conservation Wells

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — The conservation well layer identifies the permitted surface location of oil and gas conservation wells that have not been plugged. These include active, regulatory...

  10. Networks of high mutual information define the structural proximity of catalytic sites: implications for catalytic residue identification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Marino Buslje

    Full Text Available Identification of catalytic residues (CR is essential for the characterization of enzyme function. CR are, in general, conserved and located in the functional site of a protein in order to attain their function. However, many non-catalytic residues are highly conserved and not all CR are conserved throughout a given protein family making identification of CR a challenging task. Here, we put forward the hypothesis that CR carry a particular signature defined by networks of close proximity residues with high mutual information (MI, and that this signature can be applied to distinguish functional from other non-functional conserved residues. Using a data set of 434 Pfam families included in the catalytic site atlas (CSA database, we tested this hypothesis and demonstrated that MI can complement amino acid conservation scores to detect CR. The Kullback-Leibler (KL conservation measurement was shown to significantly outperform both the Shannon entropy and maximal frequency measurements. Residues in the proximity of catalytic sites were shown to be rich in shared MI. A structural proximity MI average score (termed pMI was demonstrated to be a strong predictor for CR, thus confirming the proposed hypothesis. A structural proximity conservation average score (termed pC was also calculated and demonstrated to carry distinct information from pMI. A catalytic likeliness score (Cls, combining the KL, pC and pMI measures, was shown to lead to significantly improved prediction accuracy. At a specificity of 0.90, the Cls method was found to have a sensitivity of 0.816. In summary, we demonstrate that networks of residues with high MI provide a distinct signature on CR and propose that such a signature should be present in other classes of functional residues where the requirement to maintain a particular function places limitations on the diversification of the structural environment along the course of evolution.

  11. Networks of high mutual information define the structural proximity of catalytic sites: implications for catalytic residue identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino Buslje, Cristina; Teppa, Elin; Di Doménico, Tomas; Delfino, José María; Nielsen, Morten

    2010-11-04

    Identification of catalytic residues (CR) is essential for the characterization of enzyme function. CR are, in general, conserved and located in the functional site of a protein in order to attain their function. However, many non-catalytic residues are highly conserved and not all CR are conserved throughout a given protein family making identification of CR a challenging task. Here, we put forward the hypothesis that CR carry a particular signature defined by networks of close proximity residues with high mutual information (MI), and that this signature can be applied to distinguish functional from other non-functional conserved residues. Using a data set of 434 Pfam families included in the catalytic site atlas (CSA) database, we tested this hypothesis and demonstrated that MI can complement amino acid conservation scores to detect CR. The Kullback-Leibler (KL) conservation measurement was shown to significantly outperform both the Shannon entropy and maximal frequency measurements. Residues in the proximity of catalytic sites were shown to be rich in shared MI. A structural proximity MI average score (termed pMI) was demonstrated to be a strong predictor for CR, thus confirming the proposed hypothesis. A structural proximity conservation average score (termed pC) was also calculated and demonstrated to carry distinct information from pMI. A catalytic likeliness score (Cls), combining the KL, pC and pMI measures, was shown to lead to significantly improved prediction accuracy. At a specificity of 0.90, the Cls method was found to have a sensitivity of 0.816. In summary, we demonstrate that networks of residues with high MI provide a distinct signature on CR and propose that such a signature should be present in other classes of functional residues where the requirement to maintain a particular function places limitations on the diversification of the structural environment along the course of evolution.

  12. Characterisation and expression of a PP1 serine/threonine protein phosphatase (PfPP1 from the malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum: demonstration of its essential role using RNA interference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musiyenko Alla

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reversible protein phosphorylation is relatively unexplored in the intracellular protozoa of the Apicomplexa family that includes the genus Plasmodium, to which belong the causative agents of malaria. Members of the PP1 family represent the most highly conserved protein phosphatase sequences in phylogeny and play essential regulatory roles in various cellular pathways. Previous evidence suggested a PP1-like activity in Plasmodium falciparum, not yet identified at the molecular level. Results We have identified a PP1 catalytic subunit from P. falciparum and named it PfPP1. The predicted primary structure of the 304-amino acid long protein was highly similar to PP1 sequences of other species, and showed conservation of all the signature motifs. The purified recombinant protein exhibited potent phosphatase activity in vitro. Its sensitivity to specific phosphatase inhibitors was characteristic of the PP1 class. The authenticity of the PfPP1 cDNA was further confirmed by mutational analysis of strategic amino acid residues important in catalysis. The protein was expressed in all erythrocytic stages of the parasite. Abrogation of PP1 expression by synthetic short interfering RNA (siRNA led to inhibition of parasite DNA synthesis. Conclusions The high sequence similarity of PfPP1 with other PP1 members suggests conservation of function. Phenotypic gene knockdown studies using siRNA confirmed its essential role in the parasite. Detailed studies of PfPP1 and its regulation may unravel the role of reversible protein phosphorylation in the signalling pathways of the parasite, including glucose metabolism and parasitic cell division. The use of siRNA could be an important tool in the functional analysis of Apicomplexan genes.

  13. Conservation Education: A Position Statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil Conservation Society of America, Ankeny, IA.

    The Soil Conservation Society of America's (SCSA) aim is to advance the science and art of good land and water use. Conservation education has a significant role in achieving the wise use of these resources. In this report, perspectives are offered on: (1) the requirements for effective conservation education programs; (2) rationale for…

  14. Madagascar Conservation & Development: Editorial Policies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... of the Madagascar Conservation & Development community. Finally, Madagascar Conservation & Development serves as a conduit for debate and discussion and welcomes contributions on any aspect of the legal or scientific status of any species living in Madagascar, or on conservation and development philosophy.

  15. Integrating conservation costs into sea level rise adaptive conservation prioritization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingjian Zhu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Biodiversity conservation requires strategic investment as resources for conservation are often limited. As sea level rises, it is important and necessary to consider both sea level rise and costs in conservation decision making. In this study, we consider costs of conservation in an integrated modeling process that incorporates a geomorphological model (SLAMM, species habitat models, and conservation prioritization (Zonation to identify conservation priorities in the face of landscape dynamics due to sea level rise in the Matanzas River basin of northeast Florida. Compared to conservation priorities that do not consider land costs in the analysis process, conservation priorities that consider costs in the planning process change significantly. The comparison demonstrates that some areas with high conservation values might be identified as lower priorities when integrating economic costs in the planning process and some areas with low conservation values might be identified as high priorities when considering costs in the planning process. This research could help coastal resources managers make informed decisions about where and how to allocate conservation resources more wisely to facilitate biodiversity adaptation to sea level rise.

  16. Potential ligand-binding residues in rat olfactory receptors identified by correlated mutation analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, M. S.; Oliveira, L.; Vriend, G.; Shepherd, G. M.

    1995-01-01

    A family of G-protein-coupled receptors is believed to mediate the recognition of odor molecules. In order to identify potential ligand-binding residues, we have applied correlated mutation analysis to receptor sequences from the rat. This method identifies pairs of sequence positions where residues remain conserved or mutate in tandem, thereby suggesting structural or functional importance. The analysis supported molecular modeling studies in suggesting several residues in positions that were consistent with ligand-binding function. Two of these positions, dominated by histidine residues, may play important roles in ligand binding and could confer broad specificity to mammalian odor receptors. The presence of positive (overdominant) selection at some of the identified positions provides additional evidence for roles in ligand binding. Higher-order groups of correlated residues were also observed. Each group may interact with an individual ligand determinant, and combinations of these groups may provide a multi-dimensional mechanism for receptor diversity.

  17. A Single-Nucleotide Polymorphism in Serine-Threonine Kinase 11, the Gene Encoding Liver Kinase B1, Is a Risk Factor for Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne I. Boullerne

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available We identified a family in which five siblings were diagnosed with multiple sclerosis (MS or clinically isolated syndrome. Several women in the maternal lineage have comorbidities typically associated with Peutz Jeghers Syndrome, a rare autosomal-dominant disease caused by mutations in the serine-threonine-kinase 11 (STK11 gene, which encodes liver kinase B1. Sequence analysis of DNA from one sibling identified a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP within STK11 intron 5. This SNP (dbSNP ID: rs9282860 was identified by TaqMan polymerase chain reaction (PCR assays in DNA samples available from two other siblings. Further screening was carried out in samples from 654 relapsing-remitting MS patients, 100 primary progressive MS patients, and 661 controls. The STK11-SNP has increased frequency in all female patients versus controls (odds ratio = 1.66, 95% CI = 1.05, 2.64, p = .032. The STK11-SNP was not associated with disease duration or onset; however, it was significantly associated with reduced severity (assessed by MS severity scores, with the lowest scores in patients who also harbored the HLA-DRB1*1501 allele. In vitro studies showed that peripheral blood mononuclear cells from members of the family were more sensitive to the mitochondrial inhibitor metformin than cells from MS patients with the major STK11 allele. The increased association of SNP rs9282860 in women with MS defines this variant as a genetic risk factor. The lower disease severity observed in the context of HLA-DRB1*1501 combined with limited in vitro studies raises the provocative possibility that cells harboring the STK11-SNP could be targeted by drugs which increase metabolic stress.

  18. Threonine modulates immune response, antioxidant status and gene expressions of antioxidant enzymes and antioxidant-immune-cytokine-related signaling molecules in juvenile blunt snout bream (Megalobrama amblycephala).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habte-Tsion, Habte-Michael; Ren, Mingchun; Liu, Bo; Ge, Xianping; Xie, Jun; Chen, Ruli

    2016-04-01

    A 9-week feeding trial was conducted to investigate the effects of graded dietary threonine (Thr) levels (0.58-2.58%) on the hematological parameters, immune response, antioxidant status and hepatopancreatic gene expression of antioxidant enzymes and antioxidant-immune-cytokine-related signaling molecules in juvenile blunt snout bream. For this purpose, 3 tanks were randomly arranged and assigned to each experimental diet. Fish were fed with their respective diet to apparent satiation 4 times daily. The results indicated that white blood cell, red blood cell and haemoglobin significantly responded to graded dietary Thr levels, while hematocrit didn't. Complement components (C3 and C4), total iron-binding capacity (TIBC), immunoglobulin M (IgM), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), catalase (CAT) increased with increasing dietary Thr levels up to 1.58-2.08% and thereafter tended to decrease. Dietary Thr regulated the gene expressions of Cu/Zn-SOD, Mn-SOD and CAT, GPx1, glutathione S-transferase mu (GST), nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), heat shock protein-70 (Hsp70), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), apolipoprotein A-I (ApoA1), glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and fructose-bisphosphate aldolase B (ALDOB); while the gene expression of peroxiredoxin II (PrxII) was not significantly modified by graded Thr levels. These genes are involved in different functions including antioxidant, immune, and defense responses, energy metabolism and protein synthesis. Therefore, this study could provide a new molecular tool for studies in fish immunonutrition and shed light on the regulatory mechanisms that dietary Thr improved the antioxidant and immune capacities of fish. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Transfiguring structural, optical and dielectric properties of cadmium thiourea acetate crystal by the addition of L-threonine for laser assisted device applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Rupali B.; Anis, Mohd; Hussaini, S. S.; Shirsat, Mahendra D.

    2018-03-01

    Present investigation reports the growth of pure and L-threonine (LT) doped cadmium thiourea acetate (CTA) crystals by slow solution evaporation technique followed by structural, optical and dielectric characterization studies. A bulk single crystal of LT-CTA has been grown at temperature 38 °C. The single crystal x-ray diffraction technique has been employed to confirm the structural parameters of pure and LT doped CTA crystals. The increase in optical transparency of LT-CTA crystal was ascertained in the range of 200 to 900 nm using UV-visible spectral analysis. The widened optical band gap of the LT-CTA crystal is found to be 4.7 eV. Pure and doped crystals are subjected to FT-IR analysis to indicate the presence of functional groups quantitatively. Appreciable enhancement in second harmonic generation (SHG) efficiency of LT-CTA crystal with reference to parent CTA was confirmed from Kurtz-Perry SHG test (1.31 times of CTA crystal). The assertive influence of LT on electrical properties of grown crystals has been investigated in the temperature range 35 °C-120 °C. Electronic purity and the color centered photoluminescence emission nature of pure and IA-CTA crystals were justified by luminescence analysis. With the aid of single beam Z-scan analysis, the Kerr lensing nonlinearity was identified and the magnitude of TONLO parameters has been determined. The cubic susceptibility (χ3) and figure of merit (FOM) was found to be 4.81 × 10-4esu and 978.35. Results vitalize LT-CTA for laser stabilization systems.

  20. Effects of different levels of dietary crude protein and threonine on performance, humoral immune responses and intestinal morphology of broiler chicks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MA Abbasi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed at investigating the effects of different dietary crude protein (CP and threonine (Thr levels on the performance, immune responses and jejunal morphology of broiler chicks. A total of 432 broiler chicks were randomly assigned to a 3×3 factorial arrangement of treatments including three different CP dietary levels (90, 95, and 100% of Ross 308 recommendations and Thr (100, 110, and 120% of Ross specifications dietary levels. Performance parameters were recorded for the starter (1-12 days, grower (13-24 days and finisher (25-42 days periods. Birds were subjected to different antigen inoculations to evaluate antibody responses. At day 42 of age, two randomly-selected birds per replicate were slaughtered to measure carcass traits. Although Thr dietary supplementation had no marked effect on Newcastle antibody titers, particularly the supplementation of Thr up to 110% of Ross specifications improved (p<0.05 antibody titers against sheep red blood cells during both primary and secondary responses. Reduction of dietary CP level resulted in significant decrease in villus height (p<0.05 and crypt depth (p<0.01 in jejunal epithelial cells, but the supplementation of low-CP diets with Thr up to 110 and 120% of the recommended values allowed overcoming these changes. Except for the starter period, reducing dietary CP level to 90% of Ross recommendations had no harmful effects on performance parameters; however, the best values were obtained with diets containing 110% Thr. The present results indicate that it is possible to reduce dietary CP level up to 10% after the starter period without any detrimental impact on growth performance, and dietary Thr supplementation up to 110% of Ross values may compensate for low CP-induced growth delay in broiler chicks.

  1. Molecular mechanism of serine/threonine protein phosphatase 1 (PP1cα-PP1r7) in spermatogenesis of Toxocara canis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Guang Xu; Zhou, Rong Qiong; Song, Zhen Hui; Zhu, Hong Hong; Zhou, Zuo Yong; Zeng, Yuan Qin

    2015-09-01

    Toxocariasis is one of the most important, but neglected, zoonoses, which is mainly caused by Toxocara canis. To better understand the role of serine/threonine protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) in reproductive processes of male adult T. canis, differential expression analysis was used to reveal the profiles of PP1 catalytic subunit α (PP1cα) gene Tc-stp-1 and PP1 regulatory subunit 7 (PP1r7) gene TcM-1309. Indirect fluorescence immunocytochemistry was carried out to determine the subcellular distribution of PP1cα. Double-stranded RNA interference (RNAi) assays were employed to illustrate the function and mechanism of PP1cα in male adult reproduction. Real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) showed transcriptional consistency of Tc-stp-1 and TcM-1309 in sperm-producing germline tissues and localization research showed cytoplasmic distribution of PP1cα in sf9 cells, which indicated relevant involvements of PP1cα and PP1r7 in spermatogenesis. Moreover, spatiotemporal transcriptional differences of Tc-stp-1 were determined by gene knockdown analysis, which revealed abnormal morphologies and blocked meiotic divisions of spermatocytes by phenotypic aberration scanning, thereby highlighting the crucial involvement of PP1cα in spermatogenesis. These results revealed a PP1cα-PP1r7 mechanism by which PP1 regulates kinetochore-microtubule interactions in spermatogenesis and provided important clues to identify novel drug or vaccine targets for toxocariasis control. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Dietary l-threonine supplementation attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory responses and intestinal barrier damage of broiler chickens at an early age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yueping; Zhang, Hao; Cheng, Yefei; Li, Yue; Wen, Chao; Zhou, Yanmin

    2018-06-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the protective effects of l-threonine (l-Thr) supplementation on growth performance, inflammatory responses and intestinal barrier function of young broilers challenged with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). A total of 144 1-d-old male chicks were allocated to one of three treatments: non-challenged broilers fed a basal diet (control group), LPS-challenged broilers fed a basal diet without l-Thr supplementation and LPS-challenged broilers fed a basal diet supplemented with 3·0 g/kg l-Thr. LPS challenge was performed intraperitoneally at 17, 19 and 21 d of age, whereas the control group received physiological saline injection. Compared with the control group, LPS challenge impaired growth performance of broilers, and l-Thr administration reversed LPS-induced increase in feed/gain ratio. LPS challenge elevated blood cell counts related to inflammation, and pro-inflammatory cytokine concentrations in serum (IL-1β and TNF-α), spleen (IL-1β and TNF-α) and intestinal mucosa (jejunal interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and ileal IL-1β). The concentrations of intestinal cytokines in LPS-challenged broilers were reduced by l-Thr supplementation. LPS administration increased circulating d-lactic acid concentration, whereas it reduced villus height, the ratio between villus height and crypt depth and goblet density in both jejunum and ileum. LPS-induced decreases in jejunal villus height, intestinal villus height:crypt depth ratio and ileal goblet cell density were reversed with l-Thr supplementation. Similarly, LPS-induced alterations in the intestinal mRNA abundances of genes related to intestinal inflammation and barrier function (jejunal toll-like receptor 4, IFN- γ and claudin-3, and ileal IL-1 β and zonula occludens-1) were normalised with l-Thr administration. It can be concluded that l-Thr supplementation could attenuate LPS-induced inflammatory responses and intestinal barrier damage of young broilers.

  3. Spatiotemporal proteomic analyses during pancreas cancer progression identifies serine/threonine stress kinase 4 (STK4) as a novel candidate biomarker for early stage disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirus, Justin E; Zhang, Yuzheng; Hollingsworth, Michael A; Solan, Joell L; Lampe, Paul D; Hingorani, Sunil R

    2014-12-01

    Pancreas cancer, or pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, is the deadliest of solid tumors, with a five-year survival rate of pancreas cancer. Mouse models that accurately recapitulate the human condition allow disease tracking from inception to invasion and can therefore be useful for studying early disease stages in which surgical resection is possible. Using a highly faithful mouse model of pancreas cancer in conjunction with a high-density antibody microarray containing ∼2500 antibodies, we interrogated the pancreatic tissue proteome at preinvasive and invasive stages of disease. The goal was to discover early stage tissue markers of pancreas cancer and follow them through histologically defined stages of disease using cohorts of mice lacking overt clinical signs and symptoms and those with end-stage metastatic disease, respectively. A panel of seven up-regulated proteins distinguishing pancreas cancer from normal pancreas was validated, and their levels were assessed in tissues collected at preinvasive, early invasive, and moribund stages of disease. Six of the seven markers also differentiated pancreas cancer from an experimental model of chronic pancreatitis. The levels of serine/threonine stress kinase 4 (STK4) increased between preinvasive and invasive stages, suggesting its potential as a tissue biomarker, and perhaps its involvement in progression from precursor pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia to pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Immunohistochemistry of STK4 at different stages of disease revealed a dynamic expression pattern further implicating it in early tumorigenic events. Immunohistochemistry of a panel of human pancreas cancers confirmed that STK4 levels were increased in tumor epithelia relative to normal tissue. Overall, this integrated approach yielded several tissue markers that could serve as signatures of disease stage, including early (resectable), and therefore clinically meaningful, stages. © 2014 by The American Society for

  4. Residual stresses around Vickers indents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pajares, A.; Guiberteau, F.; Steinbrech, R.W.

    1995-01-01

    The residual stresses generated by Vickers indentation in brittle materials and their changes due to annealing and surface removal were studied in 4 mol% yttria partially stabilized zirconia (4Y-PSZ). Three experimental methods to gain information about the residual stress field were applied: (i) crack profile measurements based on serial sectioning, (ii) controlled crack propagation in post indentation bending tests and (iii) double indentation tests with smaller secondary indents located around a larger primary impression. Three zones of different residual stress behavior are deduced from the experiments. Beneath the impression a crack free spherical zone of high hydrostatic stresses exists. This core zone is followed by a transition regime where indentation cracks develop but still experience hydrostatic stresses. Finally, in an outward third zone, the crack contour is entirely governed by the tensile residual stress intensity (elastically deformed region). Annealing and surface removal reduce this crack driving stress intensity. The specific changes of the residual stresses due to the post indentation treatments are described and discussed in detail for the three zones

  5. Minimization of zirconium chlorinator residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, G.K.; Harbuck, D.D.

    1995-01-01

    Zirconium chlorinator residues contain an array of rare earths, scandium, unreacted coke, and radioactive thorium and radium. Because of the radioactivity, the residues must be disposed in special waste containment facilities. As these sites become more congested, and with stricter environmental regulations, disposal of large volumes of wastes may become more difficult. To reduce the mass of disposed material, the US Bureau of Mines (USBM) developed technology to recover rare earths, thorium and radium, and unreacted coke from these residues. This technology employs an HCl leach to solubilize over 99% of the scandium and thorium, and over 90% of the rare earths. The leach liquor is processed through several solvent extraction stages to selectively recover scandium, thorium, and rare earths. The leach residue is further leached with an organic acid to solubilize radium, thus allowing unreacted coke to be recycled to the chlorinator. The thorium and radium waste products, which comprise only 2.1% of the original residue mass, can then be sent to the radioactive waste facility

  6. Hearing Conservation Live #2430

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chochoms, Michael [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-08-09

    Occupational hearing loss is one of the most common work-related illnesses in the United States (US). From 22 to 30 million US workers are exposed to hazardous noise levels at work, and 25% of these workers will develop permanent hearing loss. Hearing loss from noise is slow and painless, and you can have a disability before you notice it. This course presents the hazards associated with workplace noise, the purpose and elements of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Hearing Conservation Program (HCP), and controls that are available to reduce your exposure to hazardous levels of noise.

  7. Energy conservation technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Courtright, H.A. [Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    1993-12-31

    The conservation of energy through the efficiency improvement of existing end-uses and the development of new technologies to replace less efficient systems is an important component of the overall effort to reduce greenhouse gases which may contribute to global climate change. Even though uncertainties exist on the degree and causes of global warming, efficiency improvements in end-use applications remain in the best interest of utilities, their customers and society because efficiency improvements not only reduce environmental exposures but also contribute to industrial productivity, business cost reductions and consumer savings in energy costs.

  8. Integrating Agriculture and Conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandever, Mark W.

    2010-01-01

    The USGS produces the needed science-based information to guide management actions and policy decisions that support wildlife habitat and other environmental services compatible with USDA conservation goals and farm operations. The Policy Analysis and Science Assistance Branch of the Fort Collins Science Center (FORT) has conducted research involving a national landowner survey and numerous short- and long-term evaluations regarding vegetation responses to land management practices. This research helps land and resource managers to make informed decisions and resolve resource management conflicts.

  9. Spectrum Fatigue Lifetime and Residual Strength for Fiberglass Laminates; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    WAHL, NEIL K.; MANDELL, JOHN F.; SAMBORSKY, DANIEL D.

    2002-01-01

    This report addresses the effects of spectrum loading on lifetime and residual strength of a typical fiberglass laminate configuration used in wind turbine blade construction. Over 1100 tests have been run on laboratory specimens under a variety of load sequences. Repeated block loading at two or more load levels, either tensile-tensile, compressive-compressive, or reversing, as well as more random standard spectra have been studied. Data have been obtained for residual strength at various stages of the lifetime. Several lifetime prediction theories have been applied to the results. The repeated block loading data show lifetimes that are usually shorter than predicted by the most widely used linear damage accumulation theory, Miner's sum. Actual lifetimes are in the range of 10 to 20 percent of predicted lifetime in many cases. Linear and nonlinear residual strength models tend to fit the data better than Miner's sum, with the nonlinear providing a better fit of the two. Direct tests of residual strength at various fractions of the lifetime are consistent with the residual strength models. Load sequencing effects are found to be insignificant. The more a spectrum deviates from constant amplitude, the more sensitive predictions are to the damage law used. The nonlinear model provided improved correlation with test data for a modified standard wind turbine spectrum. When a single, relatively high load cycle was removed, all models provided similar, though somewhat non-conservative correlation with the experimental results. Predictions for the full spectrum, including tensile and compressive loads were slightly non-conservative relative to the experimental data, and accurately captured the trend with varying maximum load. The nonlinear residual strength based prediction with a power law S-N curve extrapolation provided the best fit to the data in most cases. The selection of the constant amplitude fatigue regression model becomes important at the lower stress, higher

  10. Actinide recovery from pyrochemical residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avens, L.R.; Clifton, D.G.; Vigil, A.R.

    1984-01-01

    A new process for recovery of plutonium and americium from pyrochemical waste has been demonstrated. It is based on chloride solution anion exchange at low acidity, which eliminates corrosive HCl fumes. Developmental experiments of the process flowsheet concentrated on molten salt extraction (MSE) residues and gave >95% plutonium and >90% americium recovery. The recovered plutonium contained 6 = from high chloride-low acid solution. Americium and other metals are washed from the ion exchange column with 1N HNO 3 -4.8M NaCl. The plutonium is recovered, after elution, via hydroxide precipitation, while the americium is recovered via NaHCO 3 precipitation. All filtrates from the process are discardable as low-level contaminated waste. Production-scale experiments are now in progress for MSE residues. Flow sheets for actinide recovery from electrorefining and direct oxide reduction residues are presented and discussed

  11. Actinide recovery from pyrochemical residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avens, L.R.; Clifton, D.G.; Vigil, A.R.

    1985-05-01

    We demonstrated a new process for recovering plutonium and americium from pyrochemical waste. The method is based on chloride solution anion exchange at low acidity, or acidity that eliminates corrosive HCl fumes. Developmental experiments of the process flow chart concentrated on molten salt extraction (MSE) residues and gave >95% plutonium and >90% americium recovery. The recovered plutonium contained 6 2- from high-chloride low-acid solution. Americium and other metals are washed from the ion exchange column with lN HNO 3 -4.8M NaCl. After elution, plutonium is recovered by hydroxide precipitation, and americium is recovered by NaHCO 3 precipitation. All filtrates from the process can be discardable as low-level contaminated waste. Production-scale experiments are in progress for MSE residues. Flow charts for actinide recovery from electro-refining and direct oxide reduction residues are presented and discussed

  12. Coking of residue hydroprocessing catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, M.R.; Zhao, Y.X. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; McKnight, C.A. [Syncrude Canada Ltd., Edmonton, AB (Canada); Komar, D.A.; Carruthers, J.D. [Cytec Industries Inc., Stamford, CT (United States)

    1997-11-01

    One of the major causes of deactivation of Ni/Mo and Co/Mo sulfide catalysts for hydroprocessing of heavy petroleum and bitumen fractions is coke deposition. The composition and amount of coke deposited on residue hydroprocessing catalysts depends on the composition of the liquid phase of the reactor. In the Athabasca bitumen, the high molecular weight components encourage coke deposition at temperatures of 430 to 440 degrees C and at pressures of 10 to 20 MPa hydrogen pressure. A study was conducted to determine which components in the heavy residual oil fraction were responsible for coking of catalysts. Seven samples of Athabasca vacuum residue were prepared by supercritical fluid extraction with pentane before being placed in the reactor. Carbon content and hydrodesulfurization activity was measured. It was concluded that the deposition of coke depended on the presence of asphaltenes and not on other compositional variables such as content of nitrogen, aromatic carbon or vanadium.

  13. What is a conservation actor?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Jepson

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available As a crisis-oriented discipline, conservation biology needs actions to understand the state of nature and thwart declines in biodiversity. Actors-traditionally individuals, institutions, and collectives-have been central to delivering such goals in practice. However, the definition of actors within the discipline has been narrow and their role in influencing conservation outcomes inadequately conceptualised. In this paper, we examine the question ′What is a conservation actor?′ Who or what creates the capacity to influence conservation values and actions? Drawing from theoretical developments in Actor-Network Theory and collective governance, we argue that the concept of an actor in conservation biology should be broadened to include non-humans, such as species and devices, because they have the agency and ability to influence project goals and outcomes. We illustrate this through four examples: the Asian elephant, International Union for Conservation of Nature red lists, the High Conservation Value approach, and an Integrated Conservation and Development Project. We argue that a broader conceptualisation of actors in conservation biology will produce new forms of understanding that could open up new areas of conservation research, enhance practice and draw attention to spheres of conservation activity that might require stronger oversight and governance.

  14. Leaching From Biomass Gasification Residues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allegrini, Elisa; Boldrin, Alessio; Polletini, A.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present work is to attain an overall characterization of solid residues from biomass gasification. Besides the determination of chemical and physical properties, the work was focused on the study of leaching behaviour. Compliance and pH-dependence leaching tests coupled with geoche......The aim of the present work is to attain an overall characterization of solid residues from biomass gasification. Besides the determination of chemical and physical properties, the work was focused on the study of leaching behaviour. Compliance and pH-dependence leaching tests coupled...

  15. Carbaryl residues in maize products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zayed, S.M.A.D.; Mansour, S.A.; Mostafa, I.Y.; Hassan, A.

    1976-01-01

    The 14 C-labelled insecticide carbaryl was synthesized from [1- 14 C]-1-naphthol at a specific activity of 3.18mCig -1 . Maize plants were treated with the labelled insecticide under simulated conditions of agricultural practice. Mature plants were harvested and studied for distribution of total residues in untreated grains as popularly roasted and consumed, and in the corn oil and corn germ products. Total residues found under these conditions in the respective products were 0.2, 0.1, 0.45 and 0.16ppm. (author)

  16. Combinatorial construction of toric residues

    OpenAIRE

    Khetan, Amit; Soprounov, Ivan

    2004-01-01

    The toric residue is a map depending on n+1 semi-ample divisors on a complete toric variety of dimension n. It appears in a variety of contexts such as sparse polynomial systems, mirror symmetry, and GKZ hypergeometric functions. In this paper we investigate the problem of finding an explicit element whose toric residue is equal to one. Such an element is shown to exist if and only if the associated polytopes are essential. We reduce the problem to finding a collection of partitions of the la...

  17. Beyond conservation agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giller, Ken E; Andersson, Jens A; Corbeels, Marc; Kirkegaard, John; Mortensen, David; Erenstein, Olaf; Vanlauwe, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Global support for Conservation Agriculture (CA) as a pathway to Sustainable Intensification is strong. CA revolves around three principles: no-till (or minimal soil disturbance), soil cover, and crop rotation. The benefits arising from the ease of crop management, energy/cost/time savings, and soil and water conservation led to widespread adoption of CA, particularly on large farms in the Americas and Australia, where farmers harness the tools of modern science: highly-sophisticated machines, potent agrochemicals, and biotechnology. Over the past 10 years CA has been promoted among smallholder farmers in the (sub-) tropics, often with disappointing results. Growing evidence challenges the claims that CA increases crop yields and builds-up soil carbon although increased stability of crop yields in dry climates is evident. Our analyses suggest pragmatic adoption on larger mechanized farms, and limited uptake of CA by smallholder farmers in developing countries. We propose a rigorous, context-sensitive approach based on Systems Agronomy to analyze and explore sustainable intensification options, including the potential of CA. There is an urgent need to move beyond dogma and prescriptive approaches to provide soil and crop management options for farmers to enable the Sustainable Intensification of agriculture.

  18. Beyond conservation agriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giller, Ken E.; Andersson, Jens A.; Corbeels, Marc; Kirkegaard, John; Mortensen, David; Erenstein, Olaf; Vanlauwe, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Global support for Conservation Agriculture (CA) as a pathway to Sustainable Intensification is strong. CA revolves around three principles: no-till (or minimal soil disturbance), soil cover, and crop rotation. The benefits arising from the ease of crop management, energy/cost/time savings, and soil and water conservation led to widespread adoption of CA, particularly on large farms in the Americas and Australia, where farmers harness the tools of modern science: highly-sophisticated machines, potent agrochemicals, and biotechnology. Over the past 10 years CA has been promoted among smallholder farmers in the (sub-) tropics, often with disappointing results. Growing evidence challenges the claims that CA increases crop yields and builds-up soil carbon although increased stability of crop yields in dry climates is evident. Our analyses suggest pragmatic adoption on larger mechanized farms, and limited uptake of CA by smallholder farmers in developing countries. We propose a rigorous, context-sensitive approach based on Systems Agronomy to analyze and explore sustainable intensification options, including the potential of CA. There is an urgent need to move beyond dogma and prescriptive approaches to provide soil and crop management options for farmers to enable the Sustainable Intensification of agriculture. PMID:26579139

  19. Beyond Conservation Agriculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken E Giller

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Global support for Conservation Agriculture (CA as a pathway to Sustainable Intensification is strong. CA revolves around three principles: no-till (or minimal soil disturbance, soil cover, and crop rotation. The benefits arising from the ease of crop management, energy/cost/time savings and soil and water conservation led to widespread adoption of CA, particularly on large farms in the Americas and Australia, where farmers harness the tools of modern science: highly-sophisticated machines, potent agrochemicals and biotechnology. Over the past ten years CA has been promoted among smallholder farmers in the (sub- tropics, often with disappointing results. Growing evidence challenges the claims that CA increases crop yields and builds-up soil carbon although increased stability of crop yields in dry climates is evident. Our analyses suggest pragmatic adoption on larger mechanized farms, and limited uptake of CA by smallholder farmers in developing countries. We propose a rigorous, context-sensitive approach based on Systems Agronomy to analyze and explore sustainable intensification options, including the potential of CA. There is an urgent need to move beyond dogma and prescriptive approaches to provide soil and crop management options for farmers to enable the Sustainable Intensification of agriculture.

  20. Selling energy conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinrichsen, D

    1995-01-01

    This article concerns the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) crisis and its impact on energy efficiency measures in the US. In 1985, when the OPEC collapsed, the US government had avoided the need to construct 350 gigawatts of new electric capacity. The most successful efficiency improvements, especially in household appliances and equipment, lighting and tightened energy efficiency standards in new buildings, resulted from the OPEC event. The real innovation of that time was the change in profit rules for utilities. This revolution and the way some US utilities view energy have not caught on elsewhere. Despite the initiative toward improving energy efficiency in homes, offices and industries, the change has been slow. Partly to blame are the big development banks, which pointed out that short-term conservation and efficiency measures could save at least 15% of the total energy demand without the need for major investment. The benefits of energy conservation was shown during the oil shock when per capita energy consumption fell by 5% in the member states of the Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development, while the per capita gross domestic product grew by a third. There has been a decrease in energy expenditure worldwide, and the scope for further energy savings is enormous, but governments need to recognize and seize the opportunity.

  1. Lyme disease and conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginsberg, H.

    1994-01-01

    Lyme disease is a tick-borne illness that is wide-spread in North America, especially in the northeastern and northcentral United States. This disease could negatively influence efforts to conserve natural populations in two ways: (1) the disease could directly affect wild animal health; and (2) tick control efforts could adversely affect natural populations and communities. Lyme disease affects several domestic animals, but symptoms have been reported in only a few wild species. Direct effects of Lyme disease on wild animal populations have not been reported, but the disease should be considered as a possible cause in cases of unexplained population declines in endemic areas. Methods available to manage ticks and Lyme disease include human self-protection techniques, manipulation of habitats and hosts species populations, biological control, and pesticide applications. The diversity of available techniques allows selection of approaches to minimize environmental effects by (1) emphasizing personal protection techniques, (2) carefully targeting management efforts to maximize efficiency, and (3) integrating environmentally benign techniques to improve management while avoiding broad-scale environmentally destructive approaches. The environmental effects of Lyme disease depend, to a large extent, on the methods chosen to minimize human exposure to infected ticks. Conservation biologists can help design tick management programs that effectively lower the incidence of human Lyme disease while simultaneously minimizing negative effects on natural populations.

  2. Intensity Conserving Spectral Fitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimchuk, J. A.; Patsourakos, S.; Tripathi, D.

    2015-01-01

    The detailed shapes of spectral line profiles provide valuable information about the emitting plasma, especially when the plasma contains an unresolved mixture of velocities, temperatures, and densities. As a result of finite spectral resolution, the intensity measured by a spectrometer is the average intensity across a wavelength bin of non-zero size. It is assigned to the wavelength position at the center of the bin. However, the actual intensity at that discrete position will be different if the profile is curved, as it invariably is. Standard fitting routines (spline, Gaussian, etc.) do not account for this difference, and this can result in significant errors when making sensitive measurements. Detection of asymmetries in solar coronal emission lines is one example. Removal of line blends is another. We have developed an iterative procedure that corrects for this effect. It can be used with any fitting function, but we employ a cubic spline in a new analysis routine called Intensity Conserving Spline Interpolation (ICSI). As the name implies, it conserves the observed intensity within each wavelength bin, which ordinary fits do not. Given the rapid convergence, speed of computation, and ease of use, we suggest that ICSI be made a standard component of the processing pipeline for spectroscopic data.

  3. Residual Structures in Latent Growth Curve Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, Kevin J.; Widaman, Keith F.

    2010-01-01

    Several alternatives are available for specifying the residual structure in latent growth curve modeling. Two specifications involve uncorrelated residuals and represent the most commonly used residual structures. The first, building on repeated measures analysis of variance and common specifications in multilevel models, forces residual variances…

  4. Computing Decoupled Residuals for Compact Disc Players

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odgaard, Peter Fogh; Stoustrup, Jakob; Andersen, Palle

    2006-01-01

    a pair of residuals generated by Compact Disc Player. However, these residuals depend on the performance of position servos in the Compact Disc Player. In other publications of the same authors a pair of decoupled residuals is derived. However, the computation of these alternative residuals has been...

  5. Rapid effector function of circulating CD4+T cells specific for immunodominant regions of the conserved serine/threonine kinase found in Streptococcus pneumoniae (StkP) in healthy adults

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Aslam, A.; Mason, A.; Zemenides, S.; Chan, H.; Nováková, Linda; Branny, Pavel; Finn, A.; Chapel, H.; Ogg, G. S.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 60, č. 2 (2010), s. 113-122 ISSN 0928-8244 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP204/07/P082; GA ČR GA204/08/0783 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : epitopes * pneumococcus * ELISpot Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.494, year: 2010

  6. 77 FR 3653 - Import Tolerances for Residues of Unapproved New Animal Drugs in Food

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-25

    ... find a safe import tolerance. It could look at toxicity and residue data and build in a conservative... drugs covered by import tolerances are manufactured under good manufacturing practices (GMP)-like... resistant bacteria in or on the target animal and the potential impact on human health. C. International...

  7. PKC phosphorylates residues in the N-terminal of the DA transporter to regulate amphetamine-induced DA efflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiang; Bubula, Nancy; Brown, Jason; Wang, Yunliang; Kondev, Veronika; Vezina, Paul

    2016-05-27

    The DA transporter (DAT), a phosphoprotein, controls extracellular dopamine (DA) levels in the central nervous system through transport or reverse transport (efflux). Multiple lines of evidence support the claim that PKC significantly contributes to amphetamine-induced DA efflux. Other signaling pathways, involving CaMKII and ERK, have also been shown to regulate DAT mediated efflux. Here we assessed the contribution of putative PKC residues (S4, S7, S13) in the N-terminal of the DAT to amphetamine-induced DA efflux by transfecting DATs containing different serine to alanine (S-A) point mutations into DA pre-loaded HEK-293 cells and incubating these cells in amphetamine (2μM). The effects of a S-A mutation at the non-PKC residue S12 and a threonine to alanine (T-A) mutation at the ERK T53 residue were also assessed for comparison. WT-DATs were used as controls. In an initial experiment, we confirmed that inhibiting PKC with Go6976 (130nM) significantly reduced amphetamine-induced DA efflux. In subsequent experiments, cells transfected with the S4A, S12A, S13A, T53A and S4,7,13A mutants showed a reduction in amphetamine-induced DA efflux similar to that observed with Go6976. Interestingly, cells transfected with the S7A mutant, identified by some as a PKC-PKA residue, showed unperturbed WT-DAT levels of amphetamine-induced DA efflux. These results indicate that phosphorylation by PKC of select residues in the DAT N-terminal can regulate amphetamine-induced efflux. PKC can act either independently or in concert with other kinases such as ERK to produce this effect. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Genome Analysis of Conserved Dehydrin Motifs in Vascular Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad A. Malik

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Dehydrins, a large family of abiotic stress proteins, are defined by the presence of a mostly conserved motif known as the K-segment, and may also contain two other conserved motifs known as the Y-segment and S-segment. Using the dehydrin literature, we developed a sequence motif definition of the K-segment, which we used to create a large dataset of dehydrin sequences by searching the Pfam00257 dehydrin dataset and the Phytozome 10 sequences of vascular plants. A comprehensive analysis of these sequences reveals that lysine residues are highly conserved in the K-segment, while the amino acid type is often conserved at other positions. Despite the Y-segment name, the central tyrosine is somewhat conserved, but can be substituted with two other small aromatic amino acids (phenylalanine or histidine. The S-segment contains a series of serine residues, but in some proteins is also preceded by a conserved LHR sequence. In many dehydrins containing all three of these motifs the S-segment is linked to the K-segment by a GXGGRRKK motif (where X can be any amino acid, suggesting a functional linkage between these two motifs. An analysis of the sequences shows that the dehydrin architecture and several biochemical properties (isoelectric point, molecular mass, and hydrophobicity score are dependent on each other, and that some dehydrin architectures are overexpressed during certain abiotic stress, suggesting that they may be optimized for a specific abiotic stress while others are involved in all forms of dehydration stress (drought, cold, and salinity.

  9. Managing woodwaste: Yield from residue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielson, E. [LNS Services, Inc., North Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Rayner, S. [Pacific Waste Energy Inc., Burnaby, British Columbia (Canada)

    1993-12-31

    Historically, the majority of sawmill waste has been burned or buried for the sole purpose of disposal. In most jurisdictions, environmental legislation will prohibit, or render uneconomic, these practices. Many reports have been prepared to describe the forest industry`s residue and its environmental effect; although these help those looking for industry-wide or regional solutions, such as electricity generation, they have limited value for the mill manager, who has the on-hands responsibility for generation and disposal of the waste. If the mill manager can evaluate waste streams and break them down into their usable components, he can find niche market solutions for portions of the plant residue and redirect waste to poor/no-return, rather than disposal-cost, end uses. In the modern mill, residue is collected at the individual machine centre by waste conveyors that combine and mix sawdust, shavings, bark, etc. and send the result to the hog-fuel pile. The mill waste system should be analyzed to determine the measures that can improve the quality of residues and determine the volumes of any particular category before the mixing, mentioned above, occurs. After this analysis, the mill may find a niche market for a portion of its woodwaste.

  10. Residual stress in polyethylene pipes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Poduška, Jan; Hutař, Pavel; Kučera, J.; Frank, A.; Sadílek, J.; Pinter, G.; Náhlík, Luboš

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 54, SEP (2016), s. 288-295 ISSN 0142-9418 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LM2015069; GA MŠk(CZ) LQ1601 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : polyethylene pipe * residual stress * ring slitting method * lifetime estimation Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics Impact factor: 2.464, year: 2016

  11. Solow Residuals Without Capital Stocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burda, Michael C.; Severgnini, Battista

    2014-01-01

    We use synthetic data generated by a prototypical stochastic growth model to assess the accuracy of the Solow residual (Solow, 1957) as a measure of total factor productivity (TFP) growth when the capital stock in use is measured with error. We propose two alternative measurements based on curren...

  12. Solidification process for sludge residue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearce, K.L.

    1998-01-01

    This report investigates the solidification process used at 100-N Basin to solidify the N Basin sediment and assesses the N Basin process for application to the K Basin sludge residue material. This report also includes a discussion of a solidification process for stabilizing filters. The solidified matrix must be compatible with the Environmental Remediation Disposal Facility acceptance criteria

  13. Leptogenesis and residual CP symmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Peng; Ding, Gui-Jun; King, Stephen F.

    2016-01-01

    We discuss flavour dependent leptogenesis in the framework of lepton flavour models based on discrete flavour and CP symmetries applied to the type-I seesaw model. Working in the flavour basis, we analyse the case of two general residual CP symmetries in the neutrino sector, which corresponds to all possible semi-direct models based on a preserved Z 2 in the neutrino sector, together with a CP symmetry, which constrains the PMNS matrix up to a single free parameter which may be fixed by the reactor angle. We systematically study and classify this case for all possible residual CP symmetries, and show that the R-matrix is tightly constrained up to a single free parameter, with only certain forms being consistent with successful leptogenesis, leading to possible connections between leptogenesis and PMNS parameters. The formalism is completely general in the sense that the two residual CP symmetries could result from any high energy discrete flavour theory which respects any CP symmetry. As a simple example, we apply the formalism to a high energy S 4 flavour symmetry with a generalized CP symmetry, broken to two residual CP symmetries in the neutrino sector, recovering familiar results for PMNS predictions, together with new results for flavour dependent leptogenesis.

  14. Identification and analysis of 21 novel disease-causing amino acid substitutions in the conserved part of ATP7A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moller, L.B.; Bukrinsky, J.T.; Mølgaard, Anne

    2005-01-01

    ATP7A encodes a copper. translocating ATPase that belongs to the large family of P-type ATPases. Eight conserved regions define the core of the P-type ATPase superfamily. We report here the identification of 21 novel missense mutations in the conserved part of ATP7A that encodes the residues p.V842...... clustered three-dimensionally than expected from the primary sequence. The location of the substituted residues in conserved regions supports the functional similarities between the two types of P-type ATPases. An immunofluorescence analysis of Menkes fibroblasts suggested that the localization of a large...

  15. The Study of Residual Voltage of Induction Motor and the Influence of Various Parameters on the Residual Voltage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuping; Zhao, Chen; Tan, Weipu

    2017-05-01

    The majority important load of industrial area is mainly composed of induction motor, it is more common that induction motor becomes sluggishness and even tripping due to the lose of power supply or other malfunction in the practical work. In this paper, space vector method is used to establish a reduced order model of induction motor, and then study the changes of motor electromagnetic after losing electricity. Based on motion equations of the rotor and magnetic flux conservation principle, it uses mathematical methods to deduce the expression of rotor current, rotor flux, the stator flux and the residual voltage of stator side. In addition, relying on thermal power plants, it uses the actual data of power plants, takes DIgsilent software to simulate the residual voltage of motor after losing electricity. analyses the influence on the residual voltage with the changes of the moment of inertia, load ratio, initial size of slip and the load characteristic of induction motor. By analysis of these, it has a more detailed understanding about the changes of residual voltage in practical application, in additional, it is more beneficial to put into standby power supply safely and effectively, moreover, reduce the influence of the input process to the whole system.

  16. Conservation and ethnobotanical exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, G J

    1994-01-01

    In recent years conservationists have realized that the maintenance of protected areas is closely linked to rural development. As part of their efforts to improve local people's standards of living, they have sought the advice of researchers who work in communities, especially those that border on nature reserves. Ethnobotanists, who are turning their attention to the cultural and ecological crises confronting the regions in which they work, are natural allies in this venture. The joint efforts of conservationists and ethnobotanists are being supported by non-profit organizations, intergovernmental agencies and research institutes. The search for new drugs and other natural products from plants is an important element in this collaboration, but it cannot be divorced from the broader objective of promoting the survival of biological and cultural diversity. Conservationists will support biodiversity prospecting and related efforts only if there is a clear benefit for local communities and protected areas. An example of the concrete actions being taken by conservation agencies is the People and Plants Initiative, a joint effort of the World Wide Fund for Nature, the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization and the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. The main objective is to support the work of ethnobotanists in developing countries in studies of sustainable plant use and application of their work to conservation and community development. The initiative provides training workshops and relevant literature; coordinators work in collaboration with local people to create inventories of useful plants and appraise the impact of harvesting specific plant resources in and around protected areas. Phytochemical screening of medicinal plants and preparation of extracts are carried out as part of some projects.

  17. Why not energy conservation?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, Shawn

    2016-01-01

    Energy conservation is a deep principle that is obeyed by all of the fundamental forces of nature. It puts stringent constraints on all systems, particularly systems that are ‘isolated,’ meaning that no energy can enter or escape. Notwithstanding the success of the principle of stationary action, it is fair to wonder to what extent physics can be formulated from the principle of stationary energy. We show that if one interprets mechanical energy as a state function, then its stationarity leads to a novel formulation of classical mechanics. However, unlike Lagrangian and Hamiltonian mechanics, which deliver their state functions via algebraic proscriptions (i.e., the Lagrangian is always the difference between a system’s kinetic and potential energies), this new formalism identifies its state functions as the solutions to a differential equation. This is an important difference because differential equations can generate more general solutions than algebraic recipes. When applied to Newtonian systems for which the energy function is separable, these state functions are always the mechanical energy. However, while the stationary state function for a charged particle moving in an electromagnetic field proves not to be energy, the function nevertheless correctly encodes the dynamics of the system. Moreover, the stationary state function for a free relativistic particle proves not to be the energy either. Rather, our differential equation yields the relativistic free-particle Lagrangian (plus a non-dynamical constant) in its correct dynamical context. To explain how this new formalism can consistently deliver stationary state functions that give the correct dynamics but that are not always the mechanical energy, we propose that energy conservation is a specific realization of a deeper principle of stationarity that governs both relativistic and non-relativistic mechanics. (paper)

  18. Conservative management of epithelial ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dexeus, S; Labastida, R; Dexeus, D

    2005-01-01

    We are currently faced with a progressive delay in the age at which women conceive for the first time. This raises the possibility of the appearance of gynecologic disorders that may affect fertility, including neoplasms of the ovary. Fertility-sparing surgery is defined as the preservation of ovarian tissue in one or both adnexa and/or the uterus. Borderline ovarian tumor should be treated with conservative surgery. Salpingo-oophorectomy, or even ovarian cystectomy, are the procedures of choice, with recurrence rates of 2-3% and up to 20% if a simple cystectomy is performed. Cystectomy is indicated in patients with bilateral borderline tumors or in patients with a residual ovary. Borderline tumors with invasive peritoneal implants behave as an invasive cancer in 10-30% of cases with a survival rate of 10-66% compared with 100% in borderline tumors without invasive implants. Prophylactic oophorectomy is recommended when desire of conception has been accomplished. Conservative surgery in invasive epithelial ovarian cancer is limited to Stage IA, grade 1 tumor, and in some highly selected grade 2 tumors of serous, mucinous or endometrioid type, well-encapsulated and free of adhesions. The standard oncological surgical procedure with preservation of the uterus and normal appearing ovary is recommended. This includes salpingo-oophorectomy, excision of any suspicious peritoneal lesion, multiple peritoneal biopsies, appendectomy (particularly in mucinous tumors), and pelvic and paraaortic lymphadenectomy.

  19. Knockdown of human serine/threonine kinase 33 suppresses human small cell lung carcinoma by blocking RPS6/BAD signaling transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, E L; Liu, C X; Ma, Z X; Mou, X Y; Mu, X A; Ni, Y H; Li, X L; Zhang, D; Ju, Y R

    2017-01-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is characterized by rapid growth rate and a tendency to metastasize to distinct sites of patients' bodies. The human serine/threonine kinase 33 (STK33) gene has shown its potency as a therapeutic target for prevention of lung carcinomas including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), but its function in the oncogenesis and development of SCLC remains unrevealed. In the current study, it was hypothesized that STK33 played a key role in the proliferation, survival, and invasion of SCLC cells. The expression of STK33 in human SCLC cell lines NCI-H466 and DMS153 was inhibited by specific shRNA. The cell proliferation, cell apoptosis, and cell invasion of the cells were assessed with a series of in vitro assays. To explore the mechanism through which STK33 gene exerted its function in the carcinogenesis of SCLC cells, the effect of STK33 knockdown on the activity of S6K1/RPS6/BAD signaling was detected. Then the results were further confirmed with STK33 inhibitor ML281 and in vivo assays. The results demonstrated that inhibition of STK33 in SCLC cells suppressed the cell proliferation and invasion while induced cell apoptosis. Associated with the change in the phenotypic features, knockdown of STK33 also decreased the phosphorylation of RPS6 and BAD while increased the expression of cleaved caspase 9, indicating that apoptosis induced by STK33 suppression was mediated via mitochondrial pathway. Similar to the results of STK33 knockdown, incubating NCI-H466 cells with STK33 inhibitor also reduced the cell viability by suppressing RPS6/BAD pathways. Additionally, STK33 knockdown also inhibited tumor growth and RPS6/BAD activity in mice models. Findings outlined in our study were different from that in NSCLC to some extent: knockdown of STK33 in SCLC cells induced the apoptosis through mitochondrial pathway but independent of S6K1 function, inferring that the function of STK33 might be cancer type specific.

  20. Un-catalyzed peptide bond formation between two monomers of glycine, alanine, serine, threonine, and aspartic acid in gas phase: a density functional theory study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhunia, Snehasis; Singh, Ajeet; Ojha, Animesh K.

    2016-05-01

    In the present report, un-catalyzed peptide bond formation between two monomers of glycine (Gly), alanine (Ala), serine (Ser), threonine (Thr), and aspartic acid (Asp) has been investigated in gas phase via two steps reaction mechanism and concerted mechanism at B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) and M062X/6-31G(d,p) level of theories. The peptide bond is formed through a nucleophilic reaction via transition states, TS1 and TS2 in stepwise mechanism. The TS1 reveals formation of a new C-N bond while TS2 illustrate the formation of C=O bond. In case of concerted mechanism, C-N bond is formed by a single four-centre transition state (TS3). The energy barrier is used to explain the involvement of energy at each step of the reaction. The energy barrier (20-48 kcal/mol) is required for the transformation of reactant state R1 to TS1 state and intermediate state I1 to TS2 state. The large value of energy barrier is explained in terms of distortion and interaction energies for stepwise mechanism. The energy barrier of TS3 in concerted mechanism is very close to the energy barrier of the first transition state (TS1) of the stepwise mechanism for the formation of Gly-Gly and Ala-Ala di- peptide. However, in case of Ser-Ser, Thr-Thr and Asp-Asp di-peptide, the energy barrier of TS3 is relatively high than that of the energy barrier of TS1 calculated at B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) and M062X/6-31G(d,p) level of theories. In both the mechanisms, the value of energy barrier calculated at B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) level of theory is greater than that of the value calculated at M062X/6-31G(d,p) level of theory.

  1. Extreme sequence divergence but conserved ligand-binding specificity in Streptococcus pyogenes M protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Many pathogenic microorganisms evade host immunity through extensive sequence variability in a protein region targeted by protective antibodies. In spite of the sequence variability, a variable region commonly retains an important ligand-binding function, reflected in the presence of a highly conserved sequence motif. Here, we analyze the limits of sequence divergence in a ligand-binding region by characterizing the hypervariable region (HVR of Streptococcus pyogenes M protein. Our studies were focused on HVRs that bind the human complement regulator C4b-binding protein (C4BP, a ligand that confers phagocytosis resistance. A previous comparison of C4BP-binding HVRs identified residue identities that could be part of a binding motif, but the extended analysis reported here shows that no residue identities remain when additional C4BP-binding HVRs are included. Characterization of the HVR in the M22 protein indicated that two relatively conserved Leu residues are essential for C4BP binding, but these residues are probably core residues in a coiled-coil, implying that they do not directly contribute to binding. In contrast, substitution of either of two relatively conserved Glu residues, predicted to be solvent-exposed, had no effect on C4BP binding, although each of these changes had a major effect on the antigenic properties of the HVR. Together, these findings show that HVRs of M proteins have an extraordinary capacity for sequence divergence and antigenic variability while retaining a specific ligand-binding function.

  2. Radioactive material in residues of health services residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa R, A. Jr.; Recio, J.C.

    2006-01-01

    The work presents the operational actions developed by the one organ responsible regulator for the control of the material use radioactive in Brazil. Starting from the appearance of coming radioactive material of hospitals and clinical with services of nuclear medicine, material that that is picked up and transported in specific trucks for the gathering of residuals of hospital origin, and guided one it manufactures of treatment of residuals of services of health, where they suffer radiological monitoring before to guide them for final deposition in sanitary embankment, in the city of Sao Paulo, Brazil. The appearance of this radioactive material exposes a possible one violation of the norms that govern the procedures and practices in that sector in the country. (Author)

  3. Electric energy utilization and conservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tripathy, S.C.

    1991-01-01

    Various aspects of electric energy utilization and conservation are discussed. First chapter reviews thermodynamic aspects of energy conservation. Subsequent chapters describe possibilities and methods of energy conservation in thermal power plants, airconditioning and ventilation systems, electric lighting systems, electric heating systems in industries, and railway electrification. Chapter 8 describes various modes of energy storage and compares their economies. The next chapter discusses various facets of energy economics and the last chapter discusses the practical aspects of energy conservation in different industries and power utilities. (M.G.B.). 100 refs

  4. Prairie Conservation in Canada: The Prairie Conservation Action Plan Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean Nernberg; David Ingstrup

    2005-01-01

    In Canada, grassland conservation has been mobilized and directed through the development of Prairie Conservation Action Plans and Action Plan Committees in the three prairie provinces of Alberta (45 partner agencies and organizations), Saskatchewan (26 partners), and Manitoba (26 partners). In Alberta, 43 percent of the native prairie remains; in Saskatchewan and...

  5. Community markets for conservation: Markets to advance conservation mission

    OpenAIRE

    Fay, J.

    2008-01-01

    This presentation describes the function and economics of COMACO (Community Markets for Conservation), discusses the current reality of climate change, and then explores how possible market mechanism approaches to ameliorating climate change may fit into COMACO's work and research. LTRA-2 (An Agricultural Markets Model for Biodiversity Conservation)

  6. Multi-Seasonal Nitrogen Recoveries from Crop Residue in Soil and Crop in a Temperate Agro-Ecosystem.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoqing Hu

    Full Text Available In conservation tillage systems, at least 30% of the soil surface was covered by crop residues which generally contain significant amounts of nitrogen (N. However, little is known about the multi-seasonal recoveries of the N derived from these crop residues in soil-crop systems, notably in northeastern China. In a temperate agro-ecosystem, 15N-labeled maize residue was applied to field surfaces in the 1st year (2009. From the 2nd to 4th year (2010-2012, one treatment halted the application of maize residue, whereas the soil in the second treatment was re-applied with unlabeled maize residue. Crop and soil samples were collected after each harvest, and their 15N enrichments were determined on an isotope ratio mass spectrometer to trace the allocation of N derived from the initially applied maize residue in the soil-crop systems. On average, 8.4% of the maize residue N was recovered in the soil-crop in the 1st year, and the vast majority (61.9%-91.9% was recovered during subsequent years. Throughout the experiment, the cumulative recovery of the residue N in the crop increased gradually (18.2%-20.9%, but most of the residue N was retained in the soil, notably in the 0-10 cm soil layer. Compared to the single application, the sequential residue application significantly increased the recovery of the residue N in the soil profile (73.8% vs. 40.9% and remarkably decreased the total and the initially applied residue derived mineral N along the soil profile. Our results suggested that the residue N was actively involved in N cycling, and its release and recovery in crop and soil profile were controlled by the decomposition process. Sequential residue application significantly enhanced the retention and stabilization of the initially applied residue N in the soil and retarded its translocation along the soil profile.

  7. Multi-Seasonal Nitrogen Recoveries from Crop Residue in Soil and Crop in a Temperate Agro-Ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Guoqing; Liu, Xiao; He, Hongbo; Zhang, Wei; Xie, Hongtu; Wu, Yeye; Cui, Jiehua; Sun, Ci; Zhang, Xudong

    2015-01-01

    In conservation tillage systems, at least 30% of the soil surface was covered by crop residues which generally contain significant amounts of nitrogen (N). However, little is known about the multi-seasonal recoveries of the N derived from these crop residues in soil-crop systems, notably in northeastern China. In a temperate agro-ecosystem, 15N-labeled maize residue was applied to field surfaces in the 1st year (2009). From the 2nd to 4th year (2010-2012), one treatment halted the application of maize residue, whereas the soil in the second treatment was re-applied with unlabeled maize residue. Crop and soil samples were collected after each harvest, and their 15N enrichments were determined on an isotope ratio mass spectrometer to trace the allocation of N derived from the initially applied maize residue in the soil-crop systems. On average, 8.4% of the maize residue N was recovered in the soil-crop in the 1st year, and the vast majority (61.9%-91.9%) was recovered during subsequent years. Throughout the experiment, the cumulative recovery of the residue N in the crop increased gradually (18.2%-20.9%), but most of the residue N was retained in the soil, notably in the 0-10 cm soil layer. Compared to the single application, the sequential residue application significantly increased the recovery of the residue N in the soil profile (73.8% vs. 40.9%) and remarkably decreased the total and the initially applied residue derived mineral N along the soil profile. Our results suggested that the residue N was actively involved in N cycling, and its release and recovery in crop and soil profile were controlled by the decomposition process. Sequential residue application significantly enhanced the retention and stabilization of the initially applied residue N in the soil and retarded its translocation along the soil profile.

  8. The Cauchy method of residues

    CERN Document Server

    Mitrinović, Dragoslav S

    1993-01-01

    Volume 1, i. e. the monograph The Cauchy Method of Residues - Theory and Applications published by D. Reidel Publishing Company in 1984 is the only book that covers all known applications of the calculus of residues. They range from the theory of equations, theory of numbers, matrix analysis, evaluation of real definite integrals, summation of finite and infinite series, expansions of functions into infinite series and products, ordinary and partial differential equations, mathematical and theoretical physics, to the calculus of finite differences and difference equations. The appearance of Volume 1 was acknowledged by the mathematical community. Favourable reviews and many private communications encouraged the authors to continue their work, the result being the present book, Volume 2, a sequel to Volume 1. We mention that Volume 1 is a revised, extended and updated translation of the book Cauchyjev raeun ostataka sa primenama published in Serbian by Nau~na knjiga, Belgrade in 1978, whereas the greater part ...

  9. Calcination/dissolution residue treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knight, R.C.; Creed, R.F.; Patello, G.K.; Hollenberg, G.W.; Buehler, M.F.; O'Rourke, S.M.; Visnapuu, A.; McLaughlin, D.F.

    1994-09-01

    Currently, high-level wastes are stored underground in steel-lined tanks at the Hanford site. Current plans call for the chemical pretreatment of these wastes before their immobilization in stable glass waste forms. One candidate pretreatment approach, calcination/dissolution, performs an alkaline fusion of the waste and creates a high-level/low-level partition based on the aqueous solubilities of the components of the product calcine. Literature and laboratory studies were conducted with the goal of finding a residue treatment technology that would decrease the quantity of high-level waste glass required following calcination/dissolution waste processing. Four elements, Fe, Ni, Bi, and U, postulated to be present in the high-level residue fraction were identified as being key to the quantity of high-level glass formed. Laboratory tests of the candidate technologies with simulant high-level residues showed reductive roasting followed by carbonyl volatilization to be successful in removing Fe, Ni, and Bi. Subsequent bench-scale tests on residues from calcination/dissolution processing of genuine Hanford Site tank waste showed Fe was separated with radioelement decontamination factors of 70 to 1,000 times with respect to total alpha activity. Thermodynamic analyses of the calcination of five typical Hanford Site tank waste compositions also were performed. The analyses showed sodium hydroxide to be the sole molten component in the waste calcine and emphasized the requirement for waste blending if fluid calcines are to be achieved. Other calcine phases identified in the thermodynamic analysis indicate the significant thermal reconstitution accomplished in calcination

  10. Residue management at Rocky Flats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olencz, J.

    1995-01-01

    Past plutonium production and manufacturing operations conducted at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) produced a variety of plutonium-contaminated by-product materials. Residues are a category of these materials and were categorized as open-quotes materials in-processclose quotes to be recovered due to their inherent plutonium concentrations. In 1989 all RFETS plutonium production and manufacturing operations were curtailed. This report describes the management of plutonium bearing liquid and solid wastes

  11. Amphoteric surfactants containing ?-hydroxy ester group and an amino acid residue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eissa, A. M. F.

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available A series of amphoteric surfactants containing α-hydroxy ester group and an amino acid residue were prepared with the addition of epoxy derivatives (which were prepared from epoxidation of alkyl methacrylate to different types of amino acids (glycine, alanine, valine, isoleucine, phenylalanine, tyrosine, serine, threonine, aspartic and anthranilic acid.The structures of the prepared compounds were confirmed by infrared spectra, proton magnetic resonance spectra, Mass spectra and elementary analysis. Surface tension, Kraft point, foaming power, critical micelle concentration emulsion and Ca++ stabilities were determined. Antimicrobial activity and biodegradability were also screened.Se prepararon una serie de tensioactivos anfóteros conteniendo un grupo alfa hidroxi éster y un residuo de aminoácido por adición de derivados epoxy (obtenidos mediante epoxidación de metacrilato de alquilo a diferentes tipos de aminoácidos (glicina, alanina, valina, isoleucina, fenilalanina, tirosina, serina, treonina y ácidos aspártico y antranílico. Las estructuras de los compuestos preparados se confirmaron por los espectros de infrarrojo, de masa, resonancia magnética nuclear de protones y análisis elemental. Se determinaron la tensión superficial, el punto de Kraft, el poder espumante, la concentración micelar crítica en emulsión y las estabilidades de Ca++. También se estudiaron la actividad antimicrobiana y la biodegradabilidad.

  12. Residual life management. Maintenance improvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sainero Garcia, J.; Hevia Ruperez, F.

    1995-01-01

    The terms Residual Life Management, Life Cycle Management and Long-Term Management are synonymous with a concept which aims to establish efficient maintenance for the profitable and safe operation of a power plant for as long as possible. A Residual Life Management programme comprises a number of stages, of which Maintenance Evaluation focuses on how power plant maintenance practices allow the mitigation and control of component ageing. with this objective in mind, a methodology has been developed for the analysis of potential degradative phenomena acting on critical components in terms of normal power plant maintenance practices. This methodology applied to maintenance evaluation enables the setting out of a maintenance programme based on the Life Management concept, and the programme's subsequent up-dating to allow for new techniques and methods. Initial applications have shown that although, in general terms, power plant maintenance is efficient, the way in which Residual Life Management is approached requires changes in maintenance practices. These changes range from modifications to existing inspection and surveillance methods or the establishment of new ones, to the monitoring of trends or the performance of additional studies, the purpose of which is to provide an accurate evaluation of the condition of the installations and the possibility of life extension. (Author)

  13. Intergenerational equity and conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otoole, R. P.; Walton, A. L.

    1980-01-01

    The issue of integenerational equity in the use of natural resources is discussed in the context of coal mining conversion. An attempt to determine if there is a clear-cut benefit to future generations in setting minimum coal extraction efficiency standards in mining is made. It is demonstrated that preserving fossil fuels beyond the economically efficient level is not necessarily beneficial to future generations even in terms of their own preferences. Setting fossil fuel conservation targets for intermediate products (i.e. energy) may increase the quantities of fossil fuels available to future generations and hence lower the costs, but there may be serious disadvantages to future generations as well. The use of relatively inexpensive fossil fuels in this generation may result in more infrastructure development and more knowledge production available to future generations. The value of fossil fuels versus these other endowments in the future depends on many factors which cannot possibly be evaluated at present. Since there is no idea of whether future generations are being helped or harmed, it is recommended that integenerational equity not be used as a factor in setting coal mine extraction efficiency standards, or in establishing requirements.

  14. Energy conservation in SIMMER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, L.A.; Knowles, J.B.

    1983-11-01

    The SIMMER code contains models of the many interacting thermo-hydraulic processes that occur during a hypothetical core disruptive accident (HCDA), to provide an overall picture from accident initiation to containment loading. In calculations of roof loadings following the HCDA, errors in computing the overall energy balance were found to be up to ten times the kinetic energy of the sodium slug which creates the loading. On this account, the results were considered to be seriously compromised. This report describes a systematic investigation into the effect, nature and origin of the energy discrepancies. Its main conclusion are that, the errors stem from a systematic rather than a random source, energy errors for individual cells can be two decades larger than the mean value provided by the code, and cellular mass and energy errors are strongly correlated and they can actually increase when the mesh is refined. A likely cause of the conservation errors is identified as the solution of the liquid phase mass and energy equations at effectively different time instants during each timestep. (author)

  15. Eleven years' effect of conservation practices for temperate sandy loams: II. Soil pore characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdollahi, Lotfallah; Munkholm, Lars Juhl

    2017-01-01

    Conservation agriculture (CA) is regarded by many as a sustainable intensification strategy. Minimal soil disturbance in combination with residue retention are important CA components. This study examined the long-term effects of crop rotation, residue retention, and tillage on soil pore characte......Conservation agriculture (CA) is regarded by many as a sustainable intensification strategy. Minimal soil disturbance in combination with residue retention are important CA components. This study examined the long-term effects of crop rotation, residue retention, and tillage on soil pore...... characteristics of two Danish sandy loams. Rotation R2 is a rotation of winter crops (mainly cereals) with residues retained, rotation R3 a mix of winter and spring crops (mainly cereals) with residues removed, and rotation R4 the same mix of winter and spring crops, but with residues retained. Each rotation...... included the tillage treatments: moldboard plowing to 20-cm depth (MP), harrowing to 8- to 10-cm depth (H) and direct drilling (D). Soil cores were taken from the topsoil (4–8, 12–16, 18–27 cm) in mid-autumn 2013 and early spring 2014. Water retention, air permeability, and gas diffusivity was determined...

  16. Concrete: Too young for conservation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heineman, H.A.; Hees, R.P.J. van; Nijland, T.G.

    2008-01-01

    The 20th century built heritage is one of the new conservation challenges, due to its architectural differences from the traditional heritage and new materials. One major new material is concrete; its quantity and importance for the new heritage requires a tailored conservation approach. Until now,

  17. Habitat modeling for biodiversity conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce G. Marcot

    2006-01-01

    Habitat models address only 1 component of biodiversity but can be useful in addressing and managing single or multiple species and ecosystem functions, for projecting disturbance regimes, and in supporting decisions. I review categories and examples of habitat models, their utility for biodiversity conservation, and their roles in making conservation decisions. I...

  18. Relativistic dynamics without conservation laws

    OpenAIRE

    Rothenstein, Bernhard; Popescu, Stefan

    2006-01-01

    We show that relativistic dynamics can be approached without using conservation laws (conservation of momentum, of energy and of the centre of mass). Our approach avoids collisions that are not easy to teach without mnemonic aids. The derivations are based on the principle of relativity and on its direct consequence, the addition law of relativistic velocities.

  19. Educating Astronauts About Conservation Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Julie A.

    2001-01-01

    This article reviews the training of astronauts in the interdisciplinary work of conservation biology. The primary responsibility of the conservation biologist at NASA is directing and supporting the photography of the Earth and maintaining the complete database of the photographs. In order to perform this work, the astronauts who take the pictures must be educated in ecological issues.

  20. N-glycosylation of asparagine 8 regulates surface expression of major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related protein A (MICA) alleles dependent on threonine 24

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Maiken Mellergaard; Skovbakke, Sarah Line; Schneider, Christine L.

    2014-01-01

    for cell-surface expression and sought to identify the essential residues. We found that a single N-glycosylation site (N8) was important for MICA018 surface expression. The frequently expressed MICA allele 008, with an altered transmembrane and intracellular domain, was not affected by mutation of this N......-glycosylation site. Mutational analysis revealed that a single amino acid (T24) in the extracellular domain of MICA018 was essential for the N-glycosylation dependency, while the intracellular domain was not involved. The HHV7 immunoevasin, U21, was found to inhibit MICA018 surface expression by affecting N......-glycosylation and the retention was rescued by T24A substitution. Our study reveals N-glycosylation as an allele-specific regulatory mechanism important for regulation of surface expression of MICA018 and we pinpoint the residues essential for this N-glycosylation dependency. In addition we show that this regulatory mechanism...

  1. Is international conservation aid enough?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Elizabeth A.

    2016-02-01

    Bare et al (2015 Environ. Res. Lett. 10 125010) ask an important question: is international conservation enough? Since the 1990’s international conservation donors have spent over 3.4 billion on biodiversity conservation related projects in sub-Saharan Africa. Both donors and recipients have a right to know if this is effective. Surprisingly, this question is rarely asked. It is a difficult question—involving many rival social, environmental, and economic explanations. Bare, Kauffman and Miller uncover some interesting associations, supporting existing hypotheses and proposing their own: that conservation aid alone is insufficient to mitigate drivers of deforestation (and in some cases may even exacerbate forest loss). This controversial result warrants further investigation—but what is needed now is nuance and robustness in further analyses, to have more confidence in the critique and it’s implications for international conservation aid.

  2. Characterisation and management of concrete grinding residuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluge, Matt; Gupta, Nautasha; Watts, Ben; Chadik, Paul A; Ferraro, Christopher; Townsend, Timothy G

    2018-02-01

    Concrete grinding residue is the waste product resulting from the grinding, cutting, and resurfacing of concrete pavement. Potential beneficial applications for concrete grinding residue include use as a soil amendment and as a construction material, including as an additive to Portland cement concrete. Concrete grinding residue exhibits a high pH, and though not hazardous, it is sufficiently elevated that precautions need to be taken around aquatic ecosystems. Best management practices and state regulations focus on reducing the impact on such aquatic environment. Heavy metals are present in concrete grinding residue, but concentrations are of the same magnitude as typically recycled concrete residuals. The chemical composition of concrete grinding residue makes it a useful product for some soil amendment purposes at appropriate land application rates. The presence of unreacted concrete in concrete grinding residue was examined for potential use as partial replacement of cement in new concrete. Testing of Florida concrete grinding residue revealed no dramatic reactivity or improvement in mortar strength.

  3. FINITE ELEMENT MODEL FOR PREDICTING RESIDUAL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FINITE ELEMENT MODEL FOR PREDICTING RESIDUAL STRESSES IN ... the transverse residual stress in the x-direction (σx) had a maximum value of 375MPa ... the finite element method are in fair agreement with the experimental results.

  4. Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCB) Residue Effects Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The PCB Residue Effects (PCBRes) Database was developed to assist scientists and risk assessors in correlating PCB and dioxin-like compound residues with toxic...

  5. The MurC Ligase Essential for Peptidoglycan Biosynthesis Is Regulated by the Serine/Threonine Protein Kinase PknA in Corynebacterium glutamicum*

    OpenAIRE

    Fiuza, Maria; Canova, Marc J.; Patin, Delphine; Letek, Michal; Zanella-Cléon, Isabelle; Becchi, Michel; Mateos, Luís M.; Mengin-Lecreulx, Dominique; Molle, Virginie; Gil, José A.

    2008-01-01

    The Mur ligases play an essential role in the biosynthesis of bacterial cell-wall peptidoglycan and thus represent attractive targets for the design of novel antibacterials. These enzymes catalyze the stepwise formation of the peptide moiety of the peptidoglycan disaccharide peptide monomer unit. MurC is responsible of the addition of the first residue (l-alanine) onto the nucleotide precursor UDP-MurNAc. Phosphorylation of proteins by Ser/Thr protein kinases has recen...

  6. Optimal conservation of migratory species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tara G Martin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Migratory animals comprise a significant portion of biodiversity worldwide with annual investment for their conservation exceeding several billion dollars. Designing effective conservation plans presents enormous challenges. Migratory species are influenced by multiple events across land and sea-regions that are often separated by thousands of kilometres and span international borders. To date, conservation strategies for migratory species fail to take into account how migratory animals are spatially connected between different periods of the annual cycle (i.e. migratory connectivity bringing into question the utility and efficiency of current conservation efforts. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we report the first framework for determining an optimal conservation strategy for a migratory species. Employing a decision theoretic approach using dynamic optimization, we address the problem of how to allocate resources for habitat conservation for a Neotropical-Nearctic migratory bird, the American redstart Setophaga ruticilla, whose winter habitat is under threat. Our first conservation strategy used the acquisition of winter habitat based on land cost, relative bird density, and the rate of habitat loss to maximize the abundance of birds on the wintering grounds. Our second strategy maximized bird abundance across the entire range of the species by adding the constraint of maintaining a minimum percentage of birds within each breeding region in North America using information on migratory connectivity as estimated from stable-hydrogen isotopes in feathers. We show that failure to take into account migratory connectivity may doom some regional populations to extinction, whereas including information on migratory connectivity results in the protection of the species across its entire range. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We demonstrate that conservation strategies for migratory animals depend critically upon two factors: knowledge of

  7. 9 CFR 311.39 - Biological residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Biological residues. 311.39 Section... Biological residues. Carcasses, organs, or other parts of carcasses of livestock shall be condemned if it is determined that they are adulterated because of the presence of any biological residues. ...

  8. Neutron residual stress measurements in linepipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Law, Michael; Gnaepel-Herold, Thomas; Luzin, Vladimir; Bowie, Graham

    2006-01-01

    Residual stresses in gas pipelines are generated by manufacturing and construction processes and may affect the subsequent pipe integrity. In the present work, the residual stresses in eight samples of linepipe were measured by neutron diffraction. Residual stresses changed with some coating processes. This has special implications in understanding and mitigating stress corrosion cracking, a major safety and economic problem in some gas pipelines

  9. Labelled compounds for agrochemical residue studies in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    Potential applications of stable and radioactive isotopic tracers for assessing undesirable contaminants in agriculture, fisheries and food are discussed as related to developing countries. Sources and types of residues are considered, and their local implications; also, the availability of suitably labelled compounds, including possible international cooperation to facilitate more centralized and economic preparation, and the distribution of labelled intermediates and compounds for use by local scientists. The provision of training courses and their syllabus are reviewed. Experience in the Joint FAO/IAEA chemical residue and pollution programme has indicated a need for longer-lived radioisotopically labelled pesticides (insecticides, acaricides, fungicides, herbicides, fumigants, etc.) for studying their behaviour. 15 N-, 13 C- or 2 H-labelled fertilizers and fertilizer additives such as nitrification inhibitors will shortly be needed, for studying the behaviour of fertilizer nitrogen residues, and their regulation and conservation, under conditions prevailing in the developing countries. Compounds labelled with stable isotopes are considered particularly valuable under field conditions. The report reviews the present situation and presents specific recommendations to the Directors General of FAO and IAEA

  10. UTILIZATION OF AGROINDUSTRIALES RESIDUES AS BIOFUELS AND BIOREFINERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deyanira Muñoz-Muñoz

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of residues generated in the process agro-industrials are interest worldwide. At present, research is this in lignocellulosic biomass for energy, fuels, chemicals and biomaterials through clean technologies and closed systems that conserve the environment. In this research, based on the characteristics of the typical agro-industrial residues of Cauca Department, sugarcane bagasse, sisal dust, cassava bran and the mixtures, was evaluated use as biorefinery. Were determined the thermal, physical chemical and morphologic properties in seven samples of residues, were performed exploratory tests, were determined pretreatments and applications and the possible use were identified. We conclude that the sample M6 with 9,93 % moisture, 4,12% ash, 43,97% carbon, 5,86% hydrogen, 0,43% nitrogen, 15 MJ/kg of lower heating value and 22,25%of cellulose, 9,30% of hemicellulose and 4,56% lignin, presents characteristics appropriate to be used in furnaces and boilers less power for the rural sector by the amount of ash, which keeps the low heating power stable and reduces the emission of particulate matter. For the thermal, physical, chemical and morphological characteristics, all the samples of M1 to M7, they can be hydrolyzed, densified and taken advantage like biofuel and / or biorefinery

  11. Applied exposure modeling for residual radioactivity and release criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, D.W.

    1989-01-01

    The protection of public health and the environment from the release of materials with residual radioactivity for recycle or disposal as wastes without radioactive contents of concern presents a formidable challenge. Existing regulatory criteria are based on technical judgment concerning detectability and simple modeling. Recently, exposure modeling methodologies have been developed to provide a more consistent level of health protection. Release criteria derived from the application of exposure modeling methodologies share the same basic elements of analysis but are developed to serve a variety of purposes. Models for the support of regulations for all applications rely on conservative interpretations of generalized conditions while models developed to show compliance incorporate specific conditions not likely to be duplicated at other sites. Research models represent yet another type of modeling which strives to simulate the actual behavior of released material. In spite of these differing purposes, exposure modeling permits the application of sound and reasoned principles of radiation protection to the release of materials with residual levels of radioactivity. Examples of the similarities and differences of these models are presented and an application to the disposal of materials with residual levels of uranium contamination is discussed. 5 refs., 2 tabs

  12. The coffee diterpene kahweol suppresses the cell proliferation by inducing cyclin D1 proteasomal degradation via ERK1/2, JNK and GKS3β-dependent threonine-286 phosphorylation in human colorectal cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Gwang Hun; Song, Hun Min; Jeong, Jin Boo

    2016-09-01

    Kahweol as a coffee-specific diterpene has been reported to exert anti-cancer properties. However, the mechanism responsible for the anti-cancer effects of kahweol is not fully understood. The main aim of this investigation was to determine the effect of kahweol on cell proliferation and the possible mechanisms in human colorectal cancer cells. Kahweol inhibited markedly the proliferation of human colorectal cancer cell lines such as HCT116, SW480. Kahweol decreased cyclin D1 protein level in HCT116 and SW480 cells. Contrast to protein levels, cyclin D1 mRNA level and promoter activity did not be changed by kahweol treatment. MG132 treatment attenuated kahweol-mediated cyclin D1 downregulation and the half-life of cyclin D1 was decreased in kahweol-treated cells. Kahweol increased phosphorylation of cyclin D1 at threonine-286 and a point mutation of threonine-286 to alanine attenuated cyclin D1 degradation by kahweol. Inhibition of ERK1/2 by PD98059, JNK by SP600125 or GSK3β by LiCl suppressed cyclin D1 phosphorylation and downregulation by kahweol. Furthermore, the inhibition of nuclear export by LMB attenuated cyclin D1 degradation by kahweol. In conclusion, kahweol-mediated cyclin D1 degradation may contribute to the inhibition of the proliferation in human colorectal cancer cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Pulmonary stenosis and pulmonary regurgitation: both ends of the spectrum in residual hemodynamic impairment after tetralogy of Fallot repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Han Ki

    2013-01-01

    Repair of tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) has shown excellent outcomes. However it leaves varying degrees of residual hemodynamic impairment, with severe pulmonary stenosis (PS) and free pulmonary regurgitation (PR) at both ends of the spectrum. Since the 1980s, studies evaluating late outcomes after TOF repair revealed the adverse impacts of residual chronic PR on RV volume and function; thus, a turnaround of operational strategies has occurred from aggressive RV outflow tract (RVOT) reconstruction for complete relief of RVOT obstruction to conservative RVOT reconstruction for limiting PR. This transformation has raised the question of how much residual PS after conservative RVOT reconstruction is acceptable. Besides, as pulmonary valve replacement (PVR) increases in patients with RV deterioration from residual PR, there is concern regarding when it should be performed. Regarding residual PS, several studies revealed that PS in addition to PR was associated with less PR and a small RV volume. This suggests that PS combined with PR makes RV diastolic property to protect against dilatation through RV hypertrophy and supports conservative RVOT enlargement despite residual PS. Also, several studies have revealed the pre-PVR threshold of RV parameters for the normalization of RV volume and function after PVR, and based on these results, the indications for PVR have been revised. Although there is no established strategy, better understanding of RV mechanics, development of new surgical and interventional techniques, and evidence for the effect of PVR on RV reverse remodeling and its late outcome will aid us to optimize the management of TOF. PMID:23807889

  14. Pulmonary stenosis and pulmonary regurgitation: both ends of the spectrum in residual hemodynamic impairment after tetralogy of Fallot repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Byung Won; Park, Han Ki

    2013-06-01

    Repair of tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) has shown excellent outcomes. However it leaves varying degrees of residual hemodynamic impairment, with severe pulmonary stenosis (PS) and free pulmonary regurgitation (PR) at both ends of the spectrum. Since the 1980s, studies evaluating late outcomes after TOF repair revealed the adverse impacts of residual chronic PR on RV volume and function; thus, a turnaround of operational strategies has occurred from aggressive RV outflow tract (RVOT) reconstruction for complete relief of RVOT obstruction to conservative RVOT reconstruction for limiting PR. This transformation has raised the question of how much residual PS after conservative RVOT reconstruction is acceptable. Besides, as pulmonary valve replacement (PVR) increases in patients with RV deterioration from residual PR, there is concern regarding when it should be performed. Regarding residual PS, several studies revealed that PS in addition to PR was associated with less PR and a small RV volume. This suggests that PS combined with PR makes RV diastolic property to protect against dilatation through RV hypertrophy and supports conservative RVOT enlargement despite residual PS. Also, several studies have revealed the pre-PVR threshold of RV parameters for the normalization of RV volume and function after PVR, and based on these results, the indications for PVR have been revised. Although there is no established strategy, better understanding of RV mechanics, development of new surgical and interventional techniques, and evidence for the effect of PVR on RV reverse remodeling and its late outcome will aid us to optimize the management of TOF.

  15. Pulmonary stenosis and pulmonary regurgitation: both ends of the spectrum in residual hemodynamic impairment after tetralogy of Fallot repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byung Won Yoo

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Repair of tetralogy of Fallot (TOF has shown excellent outcomes. However it leaves varying degrees of residual hemodynamic impairment, with severe pulmonary stenosis (PS and free pulmonary regurgitation (PR at both ends of the spectrum. Since the 1980s, studies evaluating late outcomes after TOF repair revealed the adverse impacts of residual chronic PR on RV volume and function; thus, a turnaround of operational strategies has occurred from aggressive RV outflow tract (RVOT reconstruction for complete relief of RVOT obstruction to conservative RVOT reconstruction for limiting PR. This transformation has raised the question of how much residual PS after conservative RVOT reconstruction is acceptable. Besides, as pulmonary valve replacement (PVR increases in patients with RV deterioration from residual PR, there is concern regarding when it should be performed. Regarding residual PS, several studies revealed that PS in addition to PR was associated with less PR and a small RV volume. This suggests that PS combined with PR makes RV diastolic property to protect against dilatation through RV hypertrophy and supports conservative RVOT enlargement despite residual PS. Also, several studies have revealed the pre-PVR threshold of RV parameters for the normalization of RV volume and function after PVR, and based on these results, the indications for PVR have been revised. Although there is no established strategy, better understanding of RV mechanics, development of new surgical and interventional techniques, and evidence for the effect of PVR on RV reverse remodeling and its late outcome will aid us to optimize the management of TOF.

  16. Natural radioactivity in petroleum residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gazineu, M.H.P.; Gazineu, M.H.P.; Hazin, C.A.; Hazin, C.A.

    2006-01-01

    The oil extraction and production industry generates several types of solid and liquid wastes. Scales, sludge and water are typical residues that can be found in such facilities and that can be contaminated with Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material (N.O.R.M.). As a result of oil processing, the natural radionuclides can be concentrated in such residues, forming the so called Technologically Enhanced Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material, or T.E.N.O.R.M.. Most of the radionuclides that appear in oil and gas streams belong to the 238 U and 232 Th natural series, besides 40 K. The present work was developed to determine the radionuclide content of scales and sludge generated during oil extraction and production operations. Emphasis was given to the quantification of 226 Ra, 228 Ra and 40 K since these radionuclides,are responsible for most of the external exposure in such facilities. Samples were taken from the P.E.T.R.O.B.R.A.S. unity in the State of Sergipe, in Northeastern Brazil. They were collected directly from the inner surface of water pipes and storage tanks, or from barrels stored in the waste storage area of the E and P unit. The activity concentrations for 226 Ra, 228 Ra and 40 K were determined by using an HP Ge gamma spectrometric system. The results showed concentrations ranging from 42.7 to 2,110.0 kBq/kg for 226 Ra, 40.5 to 1,550.0 kBq/kg for 228 Ra, and 20.6 to 186.6 kBq/kg for 40 K. The results highlight the importance of determining the activity concentration of those radionuclides in oil residues before deciding whether they should be stored or discarded to the environment. (authors)

  17. Soil nitrogen dynamics and leaching under conservation tillage in the Atlantic Coastal Plain, Georgia, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conservation tillage (CsT) involves management that reduces soil erosion by maintaining crop residue cover on farm fields. Typically, both infiltration and soil organic matter increase over time with CsT practices. We compared the impact of a commonly used CsT practice, strip tillage (ST), to conven...

  18. Earthworm activity and soil structural changes under conservation agriculture in central Mexico

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castellanos Navarrete, A.; Rodriguez-Aragonés, C.; Goede, de R.G.M.; Kooistra, M.J.; Sayre, K.D.; Brussaard, L.; Pulleman, M.M.

    2012-01-01

    Crop residue mulching combined with zero tillage and crop rotation, known as conservation agriculture (CA), is being promoted as an alternative system to revert soil degradation in maize-based farming in the central highlands of Mexico. The goal of this paper was to determine the effects of CA vs.

  19. The role of a topologically conserved isoleucine in glutathione transferase structure, stability and function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Achilonu, Ikechukwu; Gildenhuys, Samantha; Fisher, Loren; Burke, Jonathan; Fanucchi, Sylvia; Sewell, B. Trevor; Fernandes, Manuel; Dirr, Heini W.

    2010-01-01

    The role of a topologically conserved isoleucine in the structure of glutathione transferase was investigated by replacing the Ile71 residue in human GSTA1-1 by alanine or valine. The common fold shared by members of the glutathione-transferase (GST) family has a topologically conserved isoleucine residue at the N-terminus of helix 3 which is involved in the packing of helix 3 against two β-strands in domain 1. The role of the isoleucine residue in the structure, function and stability of GST was investigated by replacing the Ile71 residue in human GSTA1-1 by alanine or valine. The X-ray structures of the I71A and I71V mutants resolved at 1.75 and 2.51 Å, respectively, revealed that the mutations do not alter the overall structure of the protein compared with the wild type. Urea-induced equilibrium unfolding studies using circular dichroism and tryptophan fluorescence suggest that the mutation of Ile71 to alanine or valine reduces the stability of the protein. A functional assay with 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene shows that the mutation does not significantly alter the function of the protein relative to the wild type. Overall, the results suggest that conservation of the topologically conserved Ile71 maintains the structural stability of the protein but does not play a significant role in catalysis and substrate binding

  20. Conservation through the economics lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farley, Joshua

    2010-01-01

    Although conservation is an inherently transdisciplinary issue, there is much to be gained from examining the problem through an economics lens. Three benefits of such an approach are laid out in this paper. First, many of the drivers of environmental degradation are economic in origin, and the better we understand them, the better we can conserve ecosystems by reducing degradation. Second, economics offers us a when-to-stop rule, which is equivalent to a when-to-conserve rule. All economic production is based on the transformation of raw materials provided by nature. As the economic system grows in physical size, it necessarily displaces and degrades ecosystems. The marginal benefits of economic growth are diminishing, and the marginal costs of ecological degradation are increasing. Conceptually, we should stop economic growth and focus on conservation when the two are equal. Third, economics can help us understand how to efficiently and justly allocate resources toward conservation, and this paper lays out some basic principles for doing so. Unfortunately, the field of economics is dominated by neoclassical economics, which builds an analytical framework based on questionable assumptions and takes an excessively disciplinary and formalistic approach. Conservation is a complex problem, and analysis from individual disciplinary lenses can make important contributions to conservation only when the resulting insights are synthesized into a coherent vision of the whole. Fortunately, there are a number of emerging transdisciplines, such as ecological economics and environmental management, that are dedicated to this task.

  1. Space, time and conservation laws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aronov, R.A.; Ugarov, V.A.

    1978-01-01

    The Neter theorem establishing correspondence between conservation laws and symmetry properties (space and time in particular) is considered. The theorem is based on one of the possible ways of finding equations of motion for a physical system. From a certain expression (action functional) equations of motion for a system can be obtained which do not contain new physical assertions in principal in comparison with the Newtonian laws. Neter suggested a way of deriving conservation laws by transforming space and time coordinates. Neter theorem consequences raise a number of problems: 1). Are conservation laws (energy, momentum) consequences of space and time symmetry properties. 2). Is it possible to obtain conservation laws in theory neglecting equations of motion. 3). What is of the primary importance: equations of motion, conservation laws or properties of space and time symmetry. It is shown that direct Neter theorem does not testify to stipulation of conservation laws by properties of space and time symmetry and symmetry properties of other non-space -time properties of material systems in objective reality. It says nothing of whether there is any subordination between symmetry properties and conservation laws

  2. Residual Liquefaction under Standing Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirca, V.S. Ozgur; Sumer, B. Mutlu; Fredsøe, Jørgen

    2012-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results of an experimental study which deals with the residual liquefaction of seabed under standing waves. It is shown that the seabed liquefaction under standing waves, although qualitatively similar, exhibits features different from that caused by progressive waves....... The experimental results show that the buildup of pore-water pressure and the resulting liquefaction first starts at the nodal section and spreads towards the antinodal section. The number of waves to cause liquefaction at the nodal section appears to be equal to that experienced in progressive waves for the same...

  3. Process to recycle shredder residue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jody, Bassam J.; Daniels, Edward J.; Bonsignore, Patrick V.

    2001-01-01

    A system and process for recycling shredder residue, in which separating any polyurethane foam materials are first separated. Then separate a fines fraction of less than about 1/4 inch leaving a plastics-rich fraction. Thereafter, the plastics rich fraction is sequentially contacted with a series of solvents beginning with one or more of hexane or an alcohol to remove automotive fluids; acetone to remove ABS; one or more of EDC, THF or a ketone having a boiling point of not greater than about 125.degree. C. to remove PVC; and one or more of xylene or toluene to remove polypropylene and polyethylene. The solvents are recovered and recycled.

  4. Mistaken identity: activating conservative political identities induces "conservative" financial decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Michael W; Carranza, Erica; Fox, Craig R

    2008-11-01

    Four studies investigated whether activating a social identity can lead group members to choose options that are labeled in words associated with that identity. When political identities were made salient, Republicans (but not Democrats) became more likely to choose the gamble or investment option labeled "conservative." This shift did not occur in a condition in which the same options were unlabeled. Thus, the mechanism underlying the effect appears to be not activated identity-related values prioritizing low risk, but rather activated identity-related language (the group label "conservative"). Indeed, when political identities were salient, Republicans favored options labeled "conservative" regardless of whether the options were low or high risk. Finally, requiring participants to explain the label "conservative" before making their choice did not diminish the effect, which suggests that it does not merely reflect inattention to content or construct accessibility. We discuss the implications of these results for the literatures on identity, priming, choice, politics, and marketing.

  5. Conservation Lands and Preserves, Private - Volusia County Conservation Corridor

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — The Volusia Conservation Corridor (VCC) is a mosaic of contiguous parcels of land, approximately 55,000 acres in size, which sits essentially in the middle of the...

  6. Geographies of Conservation I: De-extinction and Precision Conservation

    OpenAIRE

    Adams, William Mark

    2016-01-01

    Extinction has long been a central concern in biodiversity conservation. Today, de-extinction offers interesting possibilities of restoring charismatic species and ecosystem function, but also risks and costs. Most de-extinction depends on genetic engineering and synthetic biology. These technologies are also proposed for use in ‘gene tweaking’ in wild species to enhance their chance of survival. Within conservation, the resulting debates pit an optimistic world of high-tech ‘precision con...

  7. Climate, Carbon, Conservation and Communities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaugn, Kit; Brickell, Emily [WWF-UK (United Kingdom); Roe, Dilys; Reid, Hannah; Elliot, Jo

    2007-07-01

    The growing market for carbon offers great opportunities for linking greenhouse gas mitigation with conservation of forests and biodiversity, and the generation of local livelihoods. For these combined objectives to be achieved, strong governance is needed along with institutions that ensure poor people win, rather than lose out, from the new challenges posed by climate change. This briefing paper explores the opportunities from and limitations to carbon-based funds for conservation and development. It highlights mechanisms that may help secure benefits for climate, conservation and communities.

  8. The conservation of orbital symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Woodward, R B

    2013-01-01

    The Conservation of Orbital Symmetry examines the principle of conservation of orbital symmetry and its use. The central content of the principle was that reactions occur readily when there is congruence between orbital symmetry characteristics of reactants and products, and only with difficulty when that congruence does not obtain-or to put it more succinctly, orbital symmetry is conserved in concerted reaction. This principle is expected to endure, whatever the language in which it may be couched, or whatever greater precision may be developed in its application and extension. The book ope

  9. Local Responses to Participatory Conservation in Annapurna Conservation Area, Nepal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khadka, Damodar; Nepal, Sanjay K.

    2010-02-01

    Biodiversity conservation has undergone a profound change in philosophy, policies and management approaches over the last forty years. The traditional top-down approach to nature protection has been widely criticized for failing to include critical social elements in management practices, and is being gradually replaced by a slew of participatory strategies under the rubric of bottom-up conservation. The new approach recognizes local communities as key partners in wildlife management and seeks their participation in social development and biodiversity conservation. However, every social context is different in its structure and functions, and in the way social groups respond to calls for participation. In order to gain a better understanding of the approach and the barriers encountered in its implementation, a questionnaire survey of 188 households was employed in the communities of the Upper Mustang extension of Annapurna Conservation Area (ACA) in Nepal. The study provides a comparative analysis of community participation and its barriers between Non-Tourist (NT) and Tourist (TV) villages. The results revealed important differences between the two groups in terms of their participation in community programs, barriers to participation, and perception of benefits from participation. Owing to their distinct spatial, demographic and attitudinal differences, the two village groups have their own sets of needs, values and motivation factors which cannot be generalized and treated as such. The research clearly identifies the need for the conservation agency to be creative in devising strategies and initiatives appropriate to specific social groups so as to optimize their input in participatory conservation.

  10. Residual Stresses In 3013 Containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mickalonis, J.; Dunn, K.

    2009-01-01

    The DOE Complex is packaging plutonium-bearing materials for storage and eventual disposition or disposal. The materials are handled according to the DOE-STD-3013 which outlines general requirements for stabilization, packaging and long-term storage. The storage vessels for the plutonium-bearing materials are termed 3013 containers. Stress corrosion cracking has been identified as a potential container degradation mode and this work determined that the residual stresses in the containers are sufficient to support such cracking. Sections of the 3013 outer, inner, and convenience containers, in both the as-fabricated condition and the closure welded condition, were evaluated per ASTM standard G-36. The standard requires exposure to a boiling magnesium chloride solution, which is an aggressive testing solution. Tests in a less aggressive 40% calcium chloride solution were also conducted. These tests were used to reveal the relative stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of the as fabricated 3013 containers. Significant cracking was observed in all containers in areas near welds and transitions in the container diameter. Stress corrosion cracks developed in both the lid and the body of gas tungsten arc welded and laser closure welded containers. The development of stress corrosion cracks in the as-fabricated and in the closure welded container samples demonstrates that the residual stresses in the 3013 containers are sufficient to support stress corrosion cracking if the environmental conditions inside the containers do not preclude the cracking process.

  11. Residual Fragments after Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaan Özdedeli

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Clinically insignificant residual fragments (CIRFs are described as asymptomatic, noninfectious and nonobstructive stone fragments (≤4 mm remaining in the urinary system after the last session of any intervention (ESWL, URS or PCNL for urinary stones. Their insignificance is questionable since CIRFs could eventually become significant, as their presence may result in recurrent stone growth and they may cause pain and infection due to urinary obstruction. They may become the source of persistent infections and a significant portion of the patients will have a stone-related event, requiring auxilliary interventions. CT seems to be the ultimate choice of assessment. Although there is no concensus about the timing, recent data suggests that it may be performed one month after the procedure. However, imaging can be done in the immediate postoperative period, if there are no tubes blurring the assessment. There is some evidence indicating that selective medical therapy may have an impact on decreasing stone formation rates. Retrograde intrarenal surgery, with its minimally invasive nature, seems to be the best way to deal with residual fragments.

  12. Residual number processing in dyscalculia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappelletti, Marinella; Price, Cathy J

    2014-01-01

    Developmental dyscalculia - a congenital learning disability in understanding numerical concepts - is typically associated with parietal lobe abnormality. However, people with dyscalculia often retain some residual numerical abilities, reported in studies that otherwise focused on abnormalities in the dyscalculic brain. Here we took a different perspective by focusing on brain regions that support residual number processing in dyscalculia. All participants accurately performed semantic and categorical colour-decision tasks with numerical and non-numerical stimuli, with adults with dyscalculia performing slower than controls in the number semantic tasks only. Structural imaging showed less grey-matter volume in the right parietal cortex in people with dyscalculia relative to controls. Functional MRI showed that accurate number semantic judgements were maintained by parietal and inferior frontal activations that were common to adults with dyscalculia and controls, with higher activation for participants with dyscalculia than controls in the right superior frontal cortex and the left inferior frontal sulcus. Enhanced activation in these frontal areas was driven by people with dyscalculia who made faster rather than slower numerical decisions; however, activation could not be accounted for by response times per se, because it was greater for fast relative to slow dyscalculics but not greater for fast controls relative to slow dyscalculics. In conclusion, our results reveal two frontal brain regions that support efficient number processing in dyscalculia.

  13. Residual number processing in dyscalculia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinella Cappelletti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Developmental dyscalculia – a congenital learning disability in understanding numerical concepts – is typically associated with parietal lobe abnormality. However, people with dyscalculia often retain some residual numerical abilities, reported in studies that otherwise focused on abnormalities in the dyscalculic brain. Here we took a different perspective by focusing on brain regions that support residual number processing in dyscalculia. All participants accurately performed semantic and categorical colour-decision tasks with numerical and non-numerical stimuli, with adults with dyscalculia performing slower than controls in the number semantic tasks only. Structural imaging showed less grey-matter volume in the right parietal cortex in people with dyscalculia relative to controls. Functional MRI showed that accurate number semantic judgements were maintained by parietal and inferior frontal activations that were common to adults with dyscalculia and controls, with higher activation for participants with dyscalculia than controls in the right superior frontal cortex and the left inferior frontal sulcus. Enhanced activation in these frontal areas was driven by people with dyscalculia who made faster rather than slower numerical decisions; however, activation could not be accounted for by response times per se, because it was greater for fast relative to slow dyscalculics but not greater for fast controls relative to slow dyscalculics. In conclusion, our results reveal two frontal brain regions that support efficient number processing in dyscalculia.

  14. Residual number processing in dyscalculia☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappelletti, Marinella; Price, Cathy J.

    2013-01-01

    Developmental dyscalculia – a congenital learning disability in understanding numerical concepts – is typically associated with parietal lobe abnormality. However, people with dyscalculia often retain some residual numerical abilities, reported in studies that otherwise focused on abnormalities in the dyscalculic brain. Here we took a different perspective by focusing on brain regions that support residual number processing in dyscalculia. All participants accurately performed semantic and categorical colour-decision tasks with numerical and non-numerical stimuli, with adults with dyscalculia performing slower than controls in the number semantic tasks only. Structural imaging showed less grey-matter volume in the right parietal cortex in people with dyscalculia relative to controls. Functional MRI showed that accurate number semantic judgements were maintained by parietal and inferior frontal activations that were common to adults with dyscalculia and controls, with higher activation for participants with dyscalculia than controls in the right superior frontal cortex and the left inferior frontal sulcus. Enhanced activation in these frontal areas was driven by people with dyscalculia who made faster rather than slower numerical decisions; however, activation could not be accounted for by response times per se, because it was greater for fast relative to slow dyscalculics but not greater for fast controls relative to slow dyscalculics. In conclusion, our results reveal two frontal brain regions that support efficient number processing in dyscalculia. PMID:24266008

  15. High abundance of Serine/Threonine-rich regions predicted to be hyper-O-glycosylated in the secretory proteins coded by eight fungal genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    González Mario

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background O-glycosylation of secretory proteins has been found to be an important factor in fungal biology and virulence. It consists in the addition of short glycosidic chains to Ser or Thr residues in the protein backbone via O-glycosidic bonds. Secretory proteins in fungi frequently display Ser/Thr rich regions that could be sites of extensive O-glycosylation. We have analyzed in silico the complete sets of putatively secretory proteins coded by eight fungal genomes (Botrytis cinerea, Magnaporthe grisea, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, Ustilago maydis, Aspergillus nidulans, Neurospora crassa, Trichoderma reesei, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae in search of Ser/Thr-rich regions as well as regions predicted to be highly O-glycosylated by NetOGlyc (http://www.cbs.dtu.dk. Results By comparison with experimental data, NetOGlyc was found to overestimate the number of O-glycosylation sites in fungi by a factor of 1.5, but to be quite reliable in the prediction of highly O-glycosylated regions. About half of secretory proteins have at least one Ser/Thr-rich region, with a Ser/Thr content of at least 40% over an average length of 40 amino acids. Most secretory proteins in filamentous fungi were predicted to be O-glycosylated, sometimes in dozens or even hundreds of sites. Residues predicted to be O-glycosylated have a tendency to be grouped together forming hyper-O-glycosylated regions of varying length. Conclusions About one fourth of secretory fungal proteins were predicted to have at least one hyper-O-glycosylated region, which consists of 45 amino acids on average and displays at least one O-glycosylated Ser or Thr every four residues. These putative highly O-glycosylated regions can be found anywhere along the proteins but have a slight tendency to be at either one of the two ends.

  16. 118 CONSERVATION NARRATIVES AND CONTESTED ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2017-07-01

    Jul 1, 2017 ... conservation narratives and resource conflicts and degradation in Zambia‟s .... protection without being subject to human competition and exploitation. ..... guard was retrenched as part of the SAP process leaving the reserve ...

  17. Electric power conservation in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollanda, J.B. de

    1989-01-01

    The Brazilian Electric Power Conservation Program (PROCEL) is discussed. The main objective of this program is the optimization of electric power use, including consideration about prices, technology development and legislation. (M.V.M.)

  18. Experience in determining the residual life expectancy of conventional thermal power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolksdorf, E.

    1990-01-01

    A combination of computer analysis, degree of damage and approximate conversion to residual life expectancy gives acceptable results. There is considerable uncertainty in converting degree of damage to residual life expectancy, since structural component characteristics play a major role here. Structure damages play a major part in establishing the degree of damage. Damage categories are given, together with action if operations are to continue. Exhaustion calculations to TRD 508 are to be taken as conservative and as possible evidence of trends. 14 figs., 12 refs

  19. A Single Residue in Ebola Virus Receptor NPC1 Influences Cellular Host Range in Reptiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-07

    VH-2) is resistant to infection in an NPC1-36   dependent manner . We found that VH-2 cells are resistant to EBOV infection because the Rus-37...infection in a host species-dependent manner (24). Here, we demonstrate that an adjacent 89   residue, 503, highly conserved in the domain C of NPC1...Tyr sequence 194   change at residue 503 might influence EBOV GPCL–NPC1 binding in a bidirectional manner . 195   Accordingly, we expressed and

  20. Dictionary of applied energy conservation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kut, D

    1982-01-01

    The escalating cost of energy is drawing an ever increasing number of people into the planning and execution of energy conservation measures and programs and confronts them with the specialist terminology of the conservationist. The object of this illustrated dictionary is to list the generality of terms employed in energy conservation practice and to explain, with the aid of appropriate illustrations, the basic definitions and underlying techniques.

  1. Energy conservation. Ambitions and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    From results of monitoring it is shown that energy conservation in the Netherlands is behind the ambitions of the Dutch government. The Dutch Court of Audit examined the reasons why energy conservation targets are not met and what the consequences are for the national and European energy and climate goals for 2020. Also the Dutch Court of Audit looked at the possibilities to make energy saving policies more effective. [nl

  2. Evolutionary conservation of TORC1 components, TOR, Raptor, and LST8, between rice and yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maegawa, Kentaro; Takii, Rumi; Ushimaru, Takashi; Kozaki, Akiko

    2015-10-01

    Target of rapamycin (TOR) is a conserved eukaryotic serine/threonine kinase that functions as a central controller of cell growth. TOR protein is structurally defined by the presence several conserved domains such as the HEAT repeat, focal adhesion target (FAT), FKBP12/rapamycin binding (FRB), kinase, and FATC domains starting from the N-terminus. In most eukaryotes, TOR forms two distinct physical and functional complexes, which are termed as TOR complex 1 (TORC1) and TORC2. However, plants contain only TORC1 components, i.e., TOR, Raptor, and LST8. In this study, we analyzed the gene structure and functions of TORC components in rice to understand the properties of the TOR complex in plants. Comparison of the locations of introns in these genes among rice and other eukaryotes showed that they were well conserved among plants except for Chlamydomonas. Moreover, the intron positions in the coding sequence of human Raptor and LST8 were closer to those of plants than of fly or nematode. Complementation tests of rice TOR (OsTOR) components in yeast showed that although OsTOR did not complement yeast tor mutants, chimeric TOR, which consisted of the HEAT repeat and FAT domain from yeast and other regions from rice, rescued the tor mutants, indicating that the HEAT repeat and FAT domains are important for species-specific signaling. OsRaptor perfectly complemented a kog1 (yeast Raptor homolog) mutant, and OsLST8 partially complemented an lst8 mutant. Together, these data suggest the importance of the N-terminal region of the TOR, HEAT, and FAT domains for functional diversification of the TOR complex.

  3. Fertilizer-nitrogen residues: useful conservation and pollutant potential under maize

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filipovic, R.

    1980-01-01

    A study of the fate of labelled fertilizer nitrogen in cropped soil, with particular reference to leaching after harvest, is reported. The experiment was carried out in a chernozem soil with three replications and two treatments (I and II), with maize as the crop: I: NPK(120kgN.ha -1 ; 100kgP.ha -1 ; 126kgK.ha -1 . II: NPK+OM(120kgN.ha -1 ; 100kgP.ha -1 ; 126kgK.ha -1 plus 5000kg of organic matter (ground straw) per hectare). A 4-m 2 plot was fertilized with ( 15 NH 4 ) 2 SO 4 containing 10 atom 15 N% excess. Tensiometers and access tubes were installed for measuring water content and water pressure at depths of 30, 60, 100, 150 and 200cm. Harvested crop as well as soil cores taken after crop harvest were analysed for 15 N. The highest content of fertilizer-derived NO 3 - 15 N at 0-60cm depth was 1ppm, and at 120-180cm depth it was 0.3ppm. Climatological data were also obtained. There was evidence that, after harvest, mineral nitrogen had moved to a depth of 2m and some 10% was derived from the labelled fertilizer. Organic matter additions tended to reduce both leaching of nitrate and the percentage of leached Ndff. (author)

  4. The role of conserved inulosucrase residues in the reaction and product specificity of Lactobacillus reuteri inulosucrase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anwar, Munir A.; Leemhuis, Hans; Pijning, Tjaard; Kralj, Slavko; Dijkstra, Bauke W.; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert

    2012-01-01

    The probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus reuteri 121 produces two fructosyltransferase enzymes, a levansucrase and an inulosucrase. Although these two fructosyltransferase enzymes share high sequence similarity, they differ significantly in the type and size distribution of fructooligosaccharide

  5. Craniopharyngioma: treatment by conservative surgery and radiation therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagpal R

    1992-10-01

    Full Text Available Benign neoplasms are curable only when excised. This applies even to craniopharyngiomas. The proximity of craniopharyngiomas to the hypothalamus and neurovascular structures makes total excision difficult to achieve. Over the last 3-4 decades, it has become increasingly obvious that craniopharyngiomas respond to radiation therapy. Early, unhappy results with major excisions have prompted us to adopt a policy of conservative surgery and radiation therapy to the residual tumour. Preliminary results suggest a good outcome in 35 of the 63 patients so treated from 1981. Details of the study are presented.

  6. Energy conservation, efficiency and energy audit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, R.A.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper the author discusses the conservation, efficiency, audit, fundamentals, differences and methods, the objectives of energy conservation, definitions of energy audit, scope, short term, medium term and long term measures to be taken for conservation are discussed

  7. Conservation genetics of Iberian raptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martinez–Cruz, B.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper I provide an overview of conservation genetics and describe the management actions in the wild that can benefit from conservation genetic studies. I describe the genetic factors of risk for the survival of wild species, the consequences of loss of genetic diversity, inbreeding and outbreeding depression, and the use of genetic tools to delimitate units of conservation. Then I introduce the most common applications of conservation genetics in the management of wild populations. In a second part of the paper I review the conservation genetic studies carried on the Iberian raptors. I introduce several studies on the Spanish imperial eagle, the bearded vulture, the black vulture and the red kite that were carried out using autosomal microsatellite markers and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA sequencing. I describe studies on the lesser kestrel and Egyptian vulture that additionally applied major histocompatibility complex (MHC markers, with the purpose of incorporating the study of non–neutral variation. For every species I explain how these studies can be and/or are applied in the strategy of conservation in the wild.

  8. Productivity limits and potentials of the principles of conservation agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittelkow, Cameron M; Liang, Xinqiang; Linquist, Bruce A; van Groenigen, Kees Jan; Lee, Juhwan; Lundy, Mark E; van Gestel, Natasja; Six, Johan; Venterea, Rodney T; van Kessel, Chris

    2015-01-15

    One of the primary challenges of our time is to feed a growing and more demanding world population with reduced external inputs and minimal environmental impacts, all under more variable and extreme climate conditions in the future. Conservation agriculture represents a set of three crop management principles that has received strong international support to help address this challenge, with recent conservation agriculture efforts focusing on smallholder farming systems in sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia. However, conservation agriculture is highly debated, with respect to both its effects on crop yields and its applicability in different farming contexts. Here we conduct a global meta-analysis using 5,463 paired yield observations from 610 studies to compare no-till, the original and central concept of conservation agriculture, with conventional tillage practices across 48 crops and 63 countries. Overall, our results show that no-till reduces yields, yet this response is variable and under certain conditions no-till can produce equivalent or greater yields than conventional tillage. Importantly, when no-till is combined with the other two conservation agriculture principles of residue retention and crop rotation, its negative impacts are minimized. Moreover, no-till in combination with the other two principles significantly increases rainfed crop productivity in dry climates, suggesting that it may become an important climate-change adaptation strategy for ever-drier regions of the world. However, any expansion of conservation agriculture should be done with caution in these areas, as implementation of the other two principles is often challenging in resource-poor and vulnerable smallholder farming systems, thereby increasing the likelihood of yield losses rather than gains. Although farming systems are multifunctional, and environmental and socio-economic factors need to be considered, our analysis indicates that the potential contribution of no-till to the

  9. Exigência de treonina, com base no conceito de proteína ideal, de alevinos de tilápia-do-nilo Digestible threonine requirement of Nile tilapia fingerlings using ideal protein concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Antonio Delmondes Bomfim

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Avaliou-se o efeito dos níveis de treonina digestível, com base no conceito de proteína ideal, em rações com 1,35% de lisina digestível sobre o desempenho de alevinos de tilápia-do-nilo (Oreochromis niloticus. Utilizaram-se 432 alevinos revertidos de tilápia, linhagem tailandesa, com peso inicial de 1,64 ± 0,03 g, em delineamento inteiramente ao acaso, com seis tratamentos, cada um com seis repetições, e doze peixes por unidade experimental. Os tratamentos consistiram de cinco rações com diversas relações treonina:lisina digestível (69,0; 74,0; 79,0; 84,0 e 89,0% e relação metionina + cistina:lisina digestível de 70,0% e uma ração com relação treonina:lisina digestível de 84,0% e de metionina + cistina:lisina digestível de 75,0%, todas isoenergéticas e isoprotéicas. Os peixes foram mantidos em 36 aquários de 130 L, dotados de abastecimento de água, temperatura controlada e aeração individuais, e alimentados à vontade, seis vezes ao dia, durante 30 dias. Avaliaram-se o desempenho, a composição corporal, as deposições de proteína e gordura e a eficiência de retenção de nitrogênio dos peixes. O consumo de ração, o teor de proteína corporal e a deposição de proteína corporal aumentaram de forma linear de acordo com a relação treonina:lisina na ração, contudo, não foram influenciados pelo aumento da relação metionina + cistina:lisina da ração. Os níveis de treonina total ou digestível que proporcionaram os melhores resultados de desempenho em alevinos de tilápia-do-nilo foram de 1,11 e 0,99%, enquanto os níveis que promoveram melhor deposição de proteína corporal foram de 1,43 e 1,28%, que correspondem às relações treonina:lisina total de 71,0 e 69,0% e treonina:lisina digestível de 90,0 e 89,0%.The effects of digestible threonine levels, based on ideal protein concept in diets with 1.35% of digestible lysine on Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus fingerlings performance. Four hundred

  10. Energy conservation in pulp and paper industry: some thoughts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadawarte, N. S.; Prasad, A. K.; Khanolkar, V. D.; Shenoy, S. C.

    1980-03-15

    The pulp and paper industry is highly energy intensive. In view of the spiralling fuel prices and rising power costs, there is an urgent need to conserve energy through better management of various operations in the industry, from the optimal utilization of the forest residues to the shipment of the final product. The total energy concept, e.g., energy generation, distribution and utilization in Indian paper industry is discussed. The need for an energy audit is emphasized and the formats of energy reporting forms are included. Short and long term measures to be enforced to achieve energy savings in the pulp and paper mills are outlined. Some important energy conservation approaches are also discussed. Factors affecting energy efficiency in a pulp and paper mill are reviewed. Some areas where sustained R and D efforts should be focused to make the paper industry nearly self-sufficient in energy generation and utilization are also given. It is essential to have a National Energy Policy clearly defining achievable targets of energy conservation for industry. The Indian paper industry could advantageously form its own committee to review the operation of the various mills in the country and come out with concrete solutions for higher energy efficiency and more effective conservation of energy.

  11. Evaluating local benefits from conservation in Nepal's Annapurna Conservation Area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiteri, Arian; Nepal, Sanjay K

    2008-09-01

    Protected areas are integral to the global effort to conserve biodiversity, and, over the past two decades, protected area managers have begun to recognize that conservation objectives are next to impossible to achieve without considering the needs and concerns of local communities. Incentive-based programs (IBPs) have become a favored approach to protected area management, geared at fostering local stewardship by delivering benefits tied to conservation to local people. Effective IBPs require benefits to accrue to and be recognized by those experiencing the greatest consequences as a result of the protected area, and those likely to continue extractive activities if their livelihood needs are compromised. This research examines dispersal of IBP benefits, as perceived by local residents in Nepal's Annapurna Conservation Area. Results reported here are based on questionnaire interviews with 188 households conducted between September and December 2004. Results indicate that local residents primarily identify benefits from social development activities, provisions for resource extraction, and economic opportunities. Overall, benefits have been dispersed equally to households in villages on and off the main tourist route, and regardless of a household's participation in tourism. However, benefits are not effectively targeted to poorer residents, those highly dependent on natural resources, and those experiencing the most crop damage and livestock loss from protected wildlife. This article provides several suggestions for improving the delivery of conservation incentives.

  12. Constructing Conservation Impact: Understanding Monitoring and Evaluation in Conservation NGOs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Benson Wahlén

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A growing number of scholars critically examine large conservation organisations to explore organisational intentions, practices, and outcomes. In parallel, other scholars have problematised audit cultures, suggesting that these seemingly good practices of evaluation and measurement are not neutral and instead have consequences for governance and power. This article combines literature on conservation NGOs, organisational theory, and audit culture to study the inner workings of conservation and to understand the construction of effectiveness and impact. I draw on semi-structured interviews to examine how a large, international conservation organisation, which I term the World Conservation Organisation (WCO; a pseudonym, coordinates monitoring and evaluation (M&E processes among its international, national, and local offices. I find individual staff within WCO make varying assumptions about the M&E policies and place different values on M&E, which results in different institutional logics towards M&E and a broader organisational failure to measure progress and reflect upon outcomes. The findings also show difficulties in translating broad organisational goals into specific project activities, underscoring tensions in implementation and limitations in M&E practice. I also find that organisational and managerial pressure to report success is greater than donor pressure, a finding that expands understandings of NGO-donor dynamics.

  13. EFSA NDA Panel (EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies), 2014. Scientific Opinion on the substantiation of a health claim related to a combination of L-threonine, L-valine, L-leucine, L-isoleucine, L-lysine plus chromium picolinate and reduction of post-prandial glycaemic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    2014-01-01

    on the scientific substantiation of a health claim related to a combination of L-threonine, L-valine, L-leucine, L-isoleucine, L-lysine plus chromium picolinate and reduction of post-prandial glycaemic responses. The Panel considers that the food is sufficiently characterised. The target population proposed...... not been established between the consumption of the food, a combination of L-threonine, L-valine, L-leucine, L-isoleucine, L-lysine plus chromium picolinate, and a beneficial physiological effect for the target population....

  14. MORTAR WITH UNSERVICEABLE TIRE RESIDUES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Canova

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzes the effects of unserviceable tire residues on rendering mortar using lime and washed sand at a volumetric proportion of 1:6. The ripened composite was dried in an oven and combined with both cement at a volumetric proportion of 1:1.5:9 and rubber powder in proportional aggregate volumes of 6, 8, 10, and 12%. Water exudation was evaluated in the plastic state. Water absorption by capillarity, fresh shrinkage and mass loss, restrained shrinkage and mass loss, void content, flexural strength, and deformation energy under compression were evaluated in the hardened state. There was an improvement in the water exudation and water absorption by capillarity and drying shrinkage, as well as a reduction of the void content and flexural strength. The product studied significantly aided the water exudation from mortar and, capillary elevation in rendering.

  15. MORTAR WITH UNSERVICEABLE TIRE RESIDUES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Aparecido Canova

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzes the effects of unserviceable tire residues on rendering mortar using lime and washed sand at a volumetric proportion of 1:6. The ripened composite was dried in an oven and combined with both cement at a volumetric proportion of 1:1.5:9 and rubber powder in proportional aggregate volumes of 6, 8, 10, and 12%. Water exudation was evaluated in the plastic state. Water absorption by capillarity, fresh shrinkage and mass loss, restrained shrinkage and mass loss, void content, flexural strength, and deformation energy under compression were evaluated in the hardened state. There was an improvement in the water exudation and water absorption by capillarity and drying shrinkage, as well as a reduction of the void content and flexural strength. The product studied significantly aided the water exudation from mortar and, capillary elevation in rendering.

  16. Upgraded wood residue fuels 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinterbaeck, J.

    1995-01-01

    The Swedish market for upgraded residue fuels, i.e. briquettes, pellets and wood powder, has developed considerably during the nineties. The additional costs for the upgrading processes are regained and create a surplus in other parts of the system, e.g. in the form of higher combustion efficiencies, lower investment costs for burning equipment, lower operation costs and a diminished environmental impact. All these factors put together have resulted in a rapid growth of this part of the energy sector. In 1994 the production was 1.9 TWh, an increase of 37 % compared to the previous year. In the forthcoming heating season 1995/96 the production may reach 4 TWh. 57 refs, 11 figs, 6 tabs

  17. Forest residues in cattle feed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Elzeário Castelo Branco Iapichini

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The ruminants are capable of converting low-quality food, when they are complementes with high-energy source. Through the use of regional agricultural residues is possible to conduct more economical production systems, since energetic foods have high cost in animal production. There is very abundant availability of residues in agroforestry activities worldwide, so that if a small fraction of them were used with appropriate technical criteria they could largely meet the needs of existing herds in the world and thus meet the demands of consumption of protein of animal origin. The Southwest Region of São Paulo State has large area occupied by reforestation and wide availability of non-timber forest residues, which may represent more concentrated energetic food for ruminant production. This experiment aimed to evaluate the acceptability of ground pine (20, 30 and 40%, replacing part of the energetic food (corn, present in the composition of the concentrate and was performed at the Experimental Station of Itapetininga - Forest Institute / SMA, in the dry season of 2011. It were used four crossbred steers, mean 18 months old, average body weight of 250 kg, housed in a paddock provided with water ad libitum and covered troughs for supplementation with the experimental diet. The adjustment period of the animals was of 07 days and the measurement of the levels of consumption, physiological changes, acceptability and physiological parameters were observed during the following 25 days. The concentrate supplement was formulated based on corn (76.2%, Soybean Meal (20%, urea (2%, Ammonium sulfate (0.4%, calcite (1.4%, Mineral Core (1% and finely ground Pine Cone, replacing corn. In preparing food, the formulas were prepared to make them isoproteic/energetic, containing the following nutrient levels: 22% Crude Protein (CP and 79% of Total Nutrients (TDN. The animals received the supplement in three steps for each level of cone replaced, being offered in the

  18. Landfill Mining of Shredder Residues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jette Bjerre; Hyks, Jiri; Shabeer Ahmed, Nassera

    In Denmark, shredder residues (SR) are classified as hazardous waste and until January 2012 the all SR were landfilled. It is estimated that more than 1.8 million tons of SR have been landfilled in mono cells. This paper describes investigations conducted at two Danish landfills. SR were excavated...... from the landfills and size fractionated in order to recover potential resources such as metal and energy and to reduce the amounts of SR left for re-landfilling. Based on the results it is estimated that 60-70% of the SR excavated could be recovered in terms of materials or energy. Only a fraction...... with particle size less than 5 mm needs to be re-landfilled at least until suitable techniques are available for recovery of materials with small particle sizes....

  19. Evaluation of presenting conserved foods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asl Soleimani H

    1998-08-01

    Full Text Available Food, it's production and preserving has been one of the most important problems in human life. Limitation of production due to climatic, geographic and papulational situations and conservation due to providance and prosecting for solution of one of the most fundamental human needs, has been discussed much. Difference between the lands, temperature, humidity and rainfall on one hand and texture and accumulation of papulation on the other hand, not only has limited the amount and kind of food production but also has improved the preserving methods as much as possible. Extra production in fertile lands and confirmed need for receiving food in deserts and dry areas, makes the need of exchanging and transfer of food inevitable because of economic and ethical matters and sanitation of food. Avoidance of being contaminated and resistance against decay seems very important and vital. So process of preserving and conserving of eaw or cooked food became a fundamental problem. In previous 200 years, many advanced methods have been designed for preserving food in which the role of conserving and packing in vital often. Because of industrial production, conserved food have a great influence on sanitation of people nutrition, and herefor the rate of diseases from consumption of contaminated food has been reduced in industrial countries and the tensancy of people to use conventional food has been decreased gradually. Because of high cost of industrial conserved food production some people produce conserved foods in the way which is not hygienic. That may have a high risk when ingested. In this article we discuss about unwarranted conserved foods productions.

  20. Domain architecture conservation in orthologs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background As orthologous proteins are expected to retain function more often than other homologs, they are often used for functional annotation transfer between species. However, ortholog identification methods do not take into account changes in domain architecture, which are likely to modify a protein's function. By domain architecture we refer to the sequential arrangement of domains along a protein sequence. To assess the level of domain architecture conservation among orthologs, we carried out a large-scale study of such events between human and 40 other species spanning the entire evolutionary range. We designed a score to measure domain architecture similarity and used it to analyze differences in domain architecture conservation between orthologs and paralogs relative to the conservation of primary sequence. We also statistically characterized the extents of different types of domain swapping events across pairs of orthologs and paralogs. Results The analysis shows that orthologs exhibit greater domain architecture conservation than paralogous homologs, even when differences in average sequence divergence are compensated for, for homologs that have diverged beyond a certain threshold. We interpret this as an indication of a stronger selective pressure on orthologs than paralogs to retain the domain architecture required for the proteins to perform a specific function. In general, orthologs as well as the closest paralogous homologs have very similar domain architectures, even at large evolutionary separation. The most common domain architecture changes observed in both ortholog and paralog pairs involved insertion/deletion of new domains, while domain shuffling and segment duplication/deletion were very infrequent. Conclusions On the whole, our results support the hypothesis that function conservation between orthologs demands higher domain architecture conservation than other types of homologs, relative to primary sequence conservation. This supports the

  1. Residues and duality for projective algebraic varieties

    CERN Document Server

    Kunz, Ernst; Dickenstein, Alicia

    2008-01-01

    This book, which grew out of lectures by E. Kunz for students with a background in algebra and algebraic geometry, develops local and global duality theory in the special case of (possibly singular) algebraic varieties over algebraically closed base fields. It describes duality and residue theorems in terms of K�hler differential forms and their residues. The properties of residues are introduced via local cohomology. Special emphasis is given to the relation between residues to classical results of algebraic geometry and their generalizations. The contribution by A. Dickenstein gives applications of residues and duality to polynomial solutions of constant coefficient partial differential equations and to problems in interpolation and ideal membership. D. A. Cox explains toric residues and relates them to the earlier text. The book is intended as an introduction to more advanced treatments and further applications of the subject, to which numerous bibliographical hints are given.

  2. Using cotton plant residue to produce briquettes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coates, W. [University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Bioresources Research Facility

    2000-07-01

    In Arizona, cotton (Gossypium) plant residue left in the field following harvest must be buried to prevent it from serving as an overwintering site for insects such as the pink bollworm. Most tillage operations employed to incorporate the residue into the soil are energy intensive and often degrade soil structure. Trials showed that cotton plant residue could be incorporated with pecan shells to produce commercially acceptable briquettes. Pecan shell briquettes containing cotton residue rather than waste paper were slightly less durable, when made using equivalent weight mixtures and moisture contents. Proximate and ultimate analyses showed the only difference among briquette samples to be a higher ash content in those made using cotton plant residue. Briquettes made with paper demonstrated longer flame out time, and lower ash percentage, compared to those made with cotton plant residue. (author)

  3. Decentralizing conservation and diversifying livelihoods within Kanchenjunga Conservation Area, Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Pete; Thapa, Brijesh; Jacob, Aerin

    2015-12-01

    To alleviate poverty and enhance conservation in resource dependent communities, managers must identify existing livelihood strategies and the associated factors that impede household access to livelihood assets. Researchers increasingly advocate reallocating management power from exclusionary central institutions to a decentralized system of management based on local and inclusive participation. However, it is yet to be shown if decentralizing conservation leads to diversified livelihoods within a protected area. The purpose of this study was to identify and assess factors affecting household livelihood diversification within Nepal's Kanchenjunga Conservation Area Project, the first protected area in Asia to decentralize conservation. We randomly surveyed 25% of Kanchenjunga households to assess household socioeconomic and demographic characteristics and access to livelihood assets. We used a cluster analysis with the ten most common income generating activities (both on- and off-farm) to group the strategies households use to diversify livelihoods, and a multinomial logistic regression to identify predictors of livelihood diversification. We found four distinct groups of household livelihood strategies with a range of diversification that directly corresponded to household income. The predictors of livelihood diversification were more related to pre-existing socioeconomic and demographic factors (e.g., more landholdings and livestock, fewer dependents, receiving remittances) than activities sponsored by decentralizing conservation (e.g., microcredit, training, education, interaction with project staff). Taken together, our findings indicate that without direct policies to target marginalized groups, decentralized conservation in Kanchenjunga will continue to exclude marginalized groups, limiting a household's ability to diversify their livelihood and perpetuating their dependence on natural resources. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Conservation and non-conservation in general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bondi, H.

    1990-01-01

    The difficulties of conservation laws in general relativity are discussed, with special reference to the non-tangible nature of gravitational energy and its transformation into tangible forms of energy. Inductive transfer of energy is marked out as wholly distinct from wave transfer. Slow (adiabatic) changes are utilized to make clear, in the axi-symmetric case, that the mass of an isolated body is conserved irrespective of any local changes (e.g. of shape) and that in inductive transfer the movement of energy between two bodies can readily be traced by the changes in their masses. (author)

  5. Distribution of residues and primitive roots

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Replacing the function f by g, we get the required estimate for N(p, N). D. Proof of Theorem 1.1. When p = 7, we clearly see that (1, 2) is a consecutive pair of quadratic residue modulo 7. Assume that p ≥ 11. If 10 is a quadratic residue modulo p, then we have (9, 10) as a consecutive pair of quadratic residues modulo p, ...

  6. Residual analysis for spatial point processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baddeley, A.; Turner, R.; Møller, Jesper

    We define residuals for point process models fitted to spatial point pattern data, and propose diagnostic plots based on these residuals. The techniques apply to any Gibbs point process model, which may exhibit spatial heterogeneity, interpoint interaction and dependence on spatial covariates. Ou...... or covariate effects. Q-Q plots of the residuals are effective in diagnosing interpoint interaction. Some existing ad hoc statistics of point patterns (quadrat counts, scan statistic, kernel smoothed intensity, Berman's diagnostic) are recovered as special cases....

  7. Conserving and managing the subnivium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuckerberg, Benjamin; Pauli, Jonathan N

    2018-02-08

    In regions where snowfall historically has been a defining seasonal characteristic of the landscape, warming winters have reduced the depth, duration, and extent of snowpack. However, most management and conservation has focused on how aboveground wildlife will be affected by altered snow conditions, even though the majority of species that persist through the winter do so under the snowpack in a thermally stable refugium: the subnivium. Shortened winters, forest management practices, and winter recreation can alter subnivium conditions by increasing snow compaction and compromising thermal stability at the soil-snow interface. To help slow the loss of the subnivium in the face of rapidly changing winter conditions, we suggest managers adopt regional conservation plans for identifying threatened snow-covered environments; measure and predict the effects land cover and habitat management has on local subnivium conditions; and control the timing and distribution of activities that disturb and compact snow cover (e.g., silvicultural practices, snow recreation, and road and trail maintenance). As a case study, we developed a spatially explicit model of subnivium presence in a working landscape of the Chequamegon National Forest, Wisconsin. We identified landscapes where winter recreation and management practices could threaten potentially important areas for subnivium persistence. Similar modeling approaches could inform management decisions related to subnivium conservation. Current climate projections predict that snow seasons will change rapidly in many regions, and as result, we advocate for the immediate recognition, conservation, and management of the subnivium and its dependent species. © 2018 Society for Conservation Biology.

  8. CONSRANK: a server for the analysis, comparison and ranking of docking models based on inter-residue contacts

    KAUST Repository

    Chermak, Edrisse; Petta, A.; Serra, L.; Vangone, A.; Scarano, V.; Cavallo, Luigi; Oliva, R.

    2014-01-01

    Summary: Herein, we present CONSRANK, a web tool for analyzing, comparing and ranking protein–protein and protein–nucleic acid docking models, based on the conservation of inter-residue contacts and its visualization in 2D and 3D interactive contact maps.

  9. Newly identified essential amino acid residues affecting ^8-sphingolipid desaturase activity revealed by site-directed mutagenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    In order to identify amino acid residues crucial for the enzymatic activity of ^8-sphingolipid desaturases, a sequence comparison was performed among ^8-sphingolipid desaturases and ^6-fatty acid desaturase from various plants. In addition to the known conserved cytb5 (cytochrome b5) HPGG motif and...

  10. CONSRANK: a server for the analysis, comparison and ranking of docking models based on inter-residue contacts

    KAUST Repository

    Chermak, Edrisse

    2014-12-21

    Summary: Herein, we present CONSRANK, a web tool for analyzing, comparing and ranking protein–protein and protein–nucleic acid docking models, based on the conservation of inter-residue contacts and its visualization in 2D and 3D interactive contact maps.

  11. Carbaryl residues in maize and processed products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qureshi, M.J.; Sattar, A. Jr.; Naqvi, M.H.

    1981-01-01

    Carbaryl residues in two local maize varieties were determined using a colorimetric method. No significant differences were observed for residues of the two varieties which ranged between 12.0 to 13.75 mg/kg in the crude oil, and averaged 1.04 and 0.67 mg/kg in the flour and cake respectively. In whole maize plants, carbaryl residues declined to approximately 2 mg/kg 35 days after treatment. Cooking in aqueous, oil or aqueous-oil media led to 63-83% loss of carbaryl residues, after 30 minutes. (author)

  12. The effect of sludge water treatment plant residuals on the properties of compressed brick

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamsudin, Shamrul-Mar; Shahidan, S.; Azmi, M. A. M.; Ghaffar, S. A.; Ghani, M. B. Abdul; Saiful Bahari, N. A. A.; Zuki, S. S. M.

    2017-11-01

    The focus of this study is on the production of compressed bricks which contains sludge water treatment plant (SWTP) residuals obtained from SAJ. The main objective of this study is to utilise and incorporate discarded material (SWTP) in the form of residual solution to produce compressed bricks. This serves as one of the recycling efforts to conserve the environment. This study determined the optimum mix based on a mix ratio of 1:2:4 (cement: sand: soil) in the production of compressed bricks where 5 different mixes were investigated i. e. 0%, 5%, 10%, 20%, and 30% of water treatment plant residue solution. The production of the compressed bricks is in accordance with the Malaysian Standard MS 7.6: 1972 and British Standard BS 3921: 1985 - Compressive Strength & Water Absorption. After being moulded and air dried, the cured bricks were subjected to compression tests and water absorption tests. Based on the tests conducted, it was found that 20% of water treatment plant residue solution which is equivalent to 50% of soil content replacement with a mix composition of [10: cement] [20: sand] [20: soil] [20: water treatment plant residue solution] is the optimum mix. It was also observed that the bricks containing SWTP residuals were lighter in weight compared to the control specimens

  13. Laboratory experiment on the 3D tide-induced Lagrangian residual current using the PIV technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yang; Jiang, Wensheng; Chen, Xu; Wang, Tao; Bian, Changwei

    2017-12-01

    The 3D structure of the tide-induced Lagrangian residual current was studied using the particle image velocimetry (PIV) technique in a long shallow narrow tank in the laboratory. At the mouth of the tank, a wave generator was used to make periodic wave which represents the tide movement, and at the head of the tank, a laterally sloping topography with the length of one fifth of the water tank was installed, above which the tide-induced Lagrangian residual current was studied. Under the weakly nonlinear condition in the present experiment setup, the results show that the Lagrangian residual velocity (LRV) field has a three-layer structure. The residual current flows inwards (towards the head) in the bottom layer and flows outwards in the middle layer, while in the surface layer, it flows inwards along the shallow side of the sloping topography and outwards along the deep side. The depth-averaged and breadth-averaged LRV are also analyzed based on the 3D LRV observations. Our results are in good agreement with the previous experiment studies, the analytical solutions with similar conditions and the observational results in real bays. Moreover, the volume flux comparison between the Lagrangian and Eulerian residual currents shows that the Eulerian residual velocity violates the mass conservation law while the LRV truly represents the inter-tidal water transport. This work enriches the laboratory studies of the LRV and offers valuable references for the LRV studies in real bays.

  14. Comparing Residue Clusters from Thermophilic and Mesophilic Enzymes Reveals Adaptive Mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deanne W Sammond

    Full Text Available Understanding how proteins adapt to function at high temperatures is important for deciphering the energetics that dictate protein stability and folding. While multiple principles important for thermostability have been identified, we lack a unified understanding of how internal protein structural and chemical environment determine qualitative or quantitative impact of evolutionary mutations. In this work we compare equivalent clusters of spatially neighboring residues between paired thermophilic and mesophilic homologues to evaluate adaptations under the selective pressure of high temperature. We find the residue clusters in thermophilic enzymes generally display improved atomic packing compared to mesophilic enzymes, in agreement with previous research. Unlike residue clusters from mesophilic enzymes, however, thermophilic residue clusters do not have significant cavities. In addition, anchor residues found in many clusters are highly conserved with respect to atomic packing between both thermophilic and mesophilic enzymes. Thus the improvements in atomic packing observed in thermophilic homologues are not derived from these anchor residues but from neighboring positions, which may serve to expand optimized protein core regions.

  15. Comparing Residue Clusters from Thermophilic and Mesophilic Enzymes Reveals Adaptive Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammond, Deanne W; Kastelowitz, Noah; Himmel, Michael E; Yin, Hang; Crowley, Michael F; Bomble, Yannick J

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how proteins adapt to function at high temperatures is important for deciphering the energetics that dictate protein stability and folding. While multiple principles important for thermostability have been identified, we lack a unified understanding of how internal protein structural and chemical environment determine qualitative or quantitative impact of evolutionary mutations. In this work we compare equivalent clusters of spatially neighboring residues between paired thermophilic and mesophilic homologues to evaluate adaptations under the selective pressure of high temperature. We find the residue clusters in thermophilic enzymes generally display improved atomic packing compared to mesophilic enzymes, in agreement with previous research. Unlike residue clusters from mesophilic enzymes, however, thermophilic residue clusters do not have significant cavities. In addition, anchor residues found in many clusters are highly conserved with respect to atomic packing between both thermophilic and mesophilic enzymes. Thus the improvements in atomic packing observed in thermophilic homologues are not derived from these anchor residues but from neighboring positions, which may serve to expand optimized protein core regions.

  16. An Image Segmentation Based on a Genetic Algorithm for Determining Soil Coverage by Crop Residues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Angela; Ranz, Juan; Burgos-Artizzu, Xavier P.; Pajares, Gonzalo; Sanchez del Arco, Maria J.; Navarrete, Luis

    2011-01-01

    Determination of the soil coverage by crop residues after ploughing is a fundamental element of Conservation Agriculture. This paper presents the application of genetic algorithms employed during the fine tuning of the segmentation process of a digital image with the aim of automatically quantifying the residue coverage. In other words, the objective is to achieve a segmentation that would permit the discrimination of the texture of the residue so that the output of the segmentation process is a binary image in which residue zones are isolated from the rest. The RGB images used come from a sample of images in which sections of terrain were photographed with a conventional camera positioned in zenith orientation atop a tripod. The images were taken outdoors under uncontrolled lighting conditions. Up to 92% similarity was achieved between the images obtained by the segmentation process proposed in this paper and the templates made by an elaborate manual tracing process. In addition to the proposed segmentation procedure and the fine tuning procedure that was developed, a global quantification of the soil coverage by residues for the sampled area was achieved that differed by only 0.85% from the quantification obtained using template images. Moreover, the proposed method does not depend on the type of residue present in the image. The study was conducted at the experimental farm “El Encín” in Alcalá de Henares (Madrid, Spain). PMID:22163966

  17. Induction of monooxygenases and incorporation of radioactivity from 2-14C-lysine into hepatic microsomes of phenobarbital-treated rats fed a diet deficient in lysine, methionine, threonine and vitamines A, C, E

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nurmagambetov, T.Zh.; Amirov, B.B.; Kuanysheva, T.G.; Sharmanov, T.Sh.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of diet on induction of monooxygenases and distribution of radioactivity from 2- 14 C-lysine in fractions of liver homogenate, muscle homogenate and blood of male rats treated with phenobarbital was studied. 2- 14 C-lysin was injected intraperitoneally 24 h before the first injection of phenobarbital. It was demonstrated that monooxygenase induction, increase of relative liver weight and incorporation of radioactivity from 2- 14 C-lysine into fractions of liver homogenate in phenobarbital-treated rats fed diet deficient in lysine, methionine, threonine and vitamins A, C, E were more pronounced as compared with the similarly treated rats which were fed a balanced diet. The possibility of mobilization of deficient essencial components to liver from other organs and tissues for maintenance of monooxygenase induction iis discussed

  18. Crop residue management in arable cropping systems under a temperate climate. Part 2: Soil physical properties and crop production. A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiel, MP.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Residues of previous crops provide a valuable amount of organic matter that can be used either to restore soil fertility or for external use. A better understanding of the impact of crop residue management on the soil-water-plant system is needed in order to manage agricultural land sustainably. This review focuses on soil physical aspects related to crop residue management, and specifically on the link between soil structure and hydraulic properties and its impact on crop production. Literature. Conservation practices, including crop residue retention and non-conventional tillage, can enhance soil health by improving aggregate stability. In this case, water infiltration is facilitated, resulting in an increase in plant water availability. Conservation practices, however, do not systematically lead to higher water availability for the plant. The influence of crop residue management on crop production is still unclear; in some cases, crop production is enhanced by residue retention, but in others crop residues can reduce crop yield. Conclusions. In this review we discuss the diverse and contrasting effects of crop residue management on soil physical properties and crop production under a temperate climate. The review highlights the importance of environmental factors such as soil type and local climatic conditions, highlighting the need to perform field studies on crop residue management and relate them to specific pedo-climatic contexts.

  19. Additive versus multiplicative muon conservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemethy, P.

    1981-01-01

    Experimental elucidation of the question of muon conservation is reviewed. It is shown that neutral-current experiments have not yet yielded information about muonium-antimuonium conversion at the weak-interaction level and that all the charged-current experiments agree that there is no evidence for a multiplicative law. The best limits, from the muon-decay neutrino experiment at LAMPF and from the inverse muon-decay experiment in the CERN neutrino beam, definitely exclude multiplicative law schemes with a branching ratio R approximately 1/2. It is concluded that unless the dynamics conspire to make a multiplicative law with very small R it would appear that muon conservation obeys conserved additive lepton flavor law. (U.K.)

  20. Quality control in breast conservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, G.F.

    1992-01-01

    Over the past 15 years, breast conservation has become an accepted option for treatment of Stages I and II carcinoma of the breast; in this practice in 1991, more than 80% of these patients were treated in this manner. A surgical procedure to excise the primary lesion and to dissect the axilla is generally required to prepare patients for breast conservation, concurrently maximizing esthetic appearance of the breast, minimizing the risk of local recurrence and providing appropriate information for recommendations concerning adjuvant therapy. The volume of breast tissue to be removed, significance of findings at surgical margins, and extent of the axillary dissection are all somewhat controversial subjects. Based upon a personal series of almost 800 patients undergoing breast conservation, observations that reflect the findings from this experience may be shared. (author)