WorldWideScience

Sample records for connecticut storrs connecticut

  1. Learning Communities: Animal Science at the University of Connecticut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinn, Anne T.; Foreman, Melissa D.; Masso, Lauren Griffin; Ouimette, David T.; Zinn, Steven A.

    2015-01-01

    The University of Connecticut (UConn) is a public Carnegie Foundation Research institution with 14 schools and colleges that enrolls more than 18,000 undergraduate students at the main campus in Storrs, CT. Beginning in 1999, First-Year Experience (FYE) seminars were offered to entering freshman students. Since that time, the size of the program…

  2. Connecticut Marketing Education Handbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West Haven Board of Education, CT.

    This revised marketing education handbook is intended to assist marketing education teachers and administrators in Connecticut in preparing students to enter meaningful careers in marketing, merchandising, and management positions. The 17 units of this reference guide cover the following topics: introduction; mission and scope of marketing…

  3. 33 CFR 117.205 - Connecticut River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Connecticut River. 117.205 Section 117.205 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Connecticut § 117.205 Connecticut River. (a) The...

  4. Residential Energy Efficiency Potential: Connecticut

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Eric J [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-11-16

    Energy used by Connecticut single-family homes that can be saved through cost-effective improvements. Prepared by Eric Wilson and Noel Merket, NREL, and Erin Boyd, U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Policy and Systems Analysis.

  5. Dynamics of Connecticut hemlock stands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffrey S. Ward; David M. Smith

    2000-01-01

    The stand dynamics and production of two one-acre plots of eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis L) in Connecticut have been followed for more than six decades. Data were recorded for all individual trees. One plot (Saltonstall) was established in 1924 after the removal of a hardwood overstory. This stand had a nearly pure, almost fully closed understory...

  6. NOAA coastal Connecticut infrared (IR) orthorectified mosaic image tiles, Connecticut, 2004 (NODC Accession 0086838)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Coastal Services Center purchased digital ADS40 imagery and digital elevation models of the Connecticut coastline in 2004. The Coastal Connecticut project...

  7. NOAA coastal Connecticut true color RGB orthorectified mosaic image tiles, Connecticut, 2004 (NODC Accession 0086893)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Coastal Services Center purchased digital ADS40 imagery and digital elevation models of the Connecticut coastline in 2004. The Coastal Connecticut project...

  8. Cable in Connecticut; a Citizen's Handbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleland, Margaret

    This handbook for Connecticut cable television consumers addresses a variety of topics, including: (1) a definition of cable television services; (2) the public stake in cable television; (3) program variety; (4) pay cable service; (5) public satellites; (6) government regulation; (7) proposed regulation; (8) role of the Connecticut Public…

  9. Connecticut church passes genetics resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culliton, B J

    1984-11-09

    The Connecticut Conference of the United Church of Christ, which represents the largest Protestant denomination in the state, has passed a resolution affirming an ethical duty to do research on human gene therapy and is planning to form local church groups to study the scientific and ethical issues involved. The resolution is intended to counter an earlier one proposed by Jeremy Rifkin to ban all efforts at engineering specific traits into the human germline. The Rifkin proposal had been endorsed by a large number of religious leaders, including the head of the U.S. United Church of Christ, but was subsequently characterized by many of the church leaders as overly restrictive.

  10. 2015 USACE NAE Topobathy Lidar DEM: Connecticut

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data were collected for the USACE New England District (NAE). The data set is made up of 13 small projects in Connecticut. These projects are: Bridgeport,...

  11. Applying transportation asset management in Connecticut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    The study consists primarily of a detailed review of those states that utilize transportation asset management (TAM) systems that may be applicable for Connecticuts consideration, and includes as well the identification of a comprehensive pavement...

  12. Agribusiness Management. The Connecticut Vocational Agriculture Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    EASTCONN Regional Educational Services Center, North Windham, CT.

    These materials in agribusiness management for the Connecticut Vocational Agriculture Curriculum were designed for use in the following areas: Animal Science; Plant Science; Agricultural Mechanics; and Natural Resources and Aquaculture. Each unit of this competency-based guide contains title of unit, unit length, grade level, objectives, teacher…

  13. Numerical modeling of eastern connecticut's visual resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel L. Civco

    1979-01-01

    A numerical model capable of accurately predicting the preference for landscape photographs of selected points in eastern Connecticut is presented. A function of the social attitudes expressed toward thirty-two salient visual landscape features serves as the independent variable in predicting preferences. A technique for objectively assigning adjectives to landscape...

  14. Evaluation of Connecticut's Interdistrict Magnet Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, Casey D.; Bifulco, Robert; Bell, Courtney

    2009-01-01

    As of October 2007, 54 interdistrict magnet schools enrolling 18,928 students were operating in Connecticut. The bulk of these schools are located in the Hartford and New Haven areas--21 in the Hartford area and 17 in the New Haven area. Interdistrict magnets also serve significant numbers of students in the Waterbury region. In keeping with the…

  15. School Finance Reform: The Challenge Facing Connecticut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, John F.

    1979-01-01

    Traces the presence of tax burden equity and educational funding equity interests in recent court rulings in order to place Connecticut's Horton vs Meskill in context. Also describes the California and New Jersey state legislatures' responses to similar state Supreme Court rulings on school finance. (Author/IRT)

  16. 76 FR 35978 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Connecticut River, Old Lyme, CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-21

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Connecticut River, Old Lyme, CT... of the Amtrak Railroad Bridge at mile 3.4, across the Connecticut River at Old Lyme, Connecticut. The... INFORMATION: The Amtrak Railroad Bridge, across the Connecticut River at mile 3.4, at Old Lyme, Connecticut...

  17. Babesia microti, human babesiosis, and Borrelia burgdorferi in Connecticut.

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, J F; Mintz, E D; Gadbaw, J J; Magnarelli, L A

    1991-01-01

    Babesia microti was isolated from a white-footed mouse (Peromyscus leucopus) that was captured in southeastern Connecticut in 1988, when the first human case of babesiosis acquired in Connecticut was recognized. To date, 13 cases of babesiosis have been reported in Connecticut, the largest number of human cases reported on the mainland United States. Two of nine patients quiried remembered a prior tick bite. Since Babesia parasites are known to be vectored only by ticks, we surmise that 12 of...

  18. Survey of Connecticut Nurse-Midwives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Margaret L; Holland, Eliza S

    2007-01-01

    Descriptive data on nurse-midwifery income, workload, job definitions, employment benefits, and clinical practices are limited. Information about nurse-midwifery practice today is important for the growth of the profession and for future policy initiatives. A survey of nurse-midwives in Connecticut was conducted in 2005. This article reports state-specific data about income, workload, job definitions, employment benefits, and clinical issues, such as vaginal birth after cesarean. Full-time midwives in Connecticut worked an average of 77 hours per week, had a mean salary of 79,554 dollars, and 87% had on-call responsibilities. A "typical" Connecticut midwife had an "average" full-time work week consisting of two 24-hour call days and three 7-hour office days, seeing 19 to 24 patients per office day. Most held Master of Science in Nursing degrees, worked in physician-owned practices, and attended births in hospitals or medical centers. Health insurance, paid sick time, and retirement plans were offered to most respondents. Almost all respondents provide gynecologic, antepartum, and postpartum care, but few offer newborn care. There is significant variation in restrictions on midwives offering vaginal birth after cesarean and on length of scheduled appointments. Data on expanded practices, such as first-assisting caesarean sections and endometrial biopsies, are reported for the first time.

  19. 77 FR 68798 - Connecticut; Emergency and Related Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-16

    ... determined that the emergency conditions in the State of Connecticut resulting from Hurricane Sandy beginning... State of Connecticut have been designated as adversely affected by this declared emergency: All counties... Assistance (DUA); 97.046, Fire Management Assistance Grant; 97.048, Disaster Housing Assistance to...

  20. 76 FR 61373 - Connecticut; Emergency and Related Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-04

    ... determined that the emergency conditions in the State of Connecticut resulting from Hurricane Irene beginning... designated as adversely affected by this declared emergency: All eight counties in the State of Connecticut... Management Assistance Grant; 97.048, Disaster Housing Assistance to Individuals and Households In...

  1. Gun Violence, mental health, and Connecticut physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodds, Peter R; Anderson, Caitlyn O; Dodds, Jon H

    2014-01-01

    While there is a public perception that gun violence is associated with mental illness we present evidence that it is a complex public health problem which defies simple characterizations and solutions. Only a small percentage of individuals with mental illness are at risk for extreme violence and they account for only a small percentage of gun-related homicides. Individuals who are at risk for gun violence are difficult to identify and successfully treat. The incidence, and perhaps the demographics, of gun violence vary substantially from state to state. We make a case for Connecticut physicians to study gun violence at the state level. We recommend that Connecticut physicians promote and expand upon the American Academy of Pediatrics' recommendation for creating a "safe home environment. "We suggest that guns be secured in all homes in which there are children. In addition we suggest that guns be voluntarily removed from homes in which there are individuals with a history of violence, threats of violence, depression, drug and/or alcohol abuse, and individuals with major mental illnesses who are not cooperating with therapy.

  2. Connecticut ITS/CVO business plan : final report

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-06-01

    This document describes: goals and objectives for Connecticut ITS/CVO deployment; current regulatory structure and activities; envisioned process changes enabled by ITS/CVO technologies; how motor carriers perceive the value of ITS/CVO services; bene...

  3. Connecticut Transit (CTTRANSIT) Fuel Cell Transit Bus Preliminary Evaluation Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-10-16

    This report describes operations at Connecticut Transit (CTTRANSIT) in Hartford for one prototype fuel cell bus and three new diesel buses operating from the same location. The report discusses the planned fuel cell bus demonstration and equipment us...

  4. Connecticut Statewide LiDAR 2016 - Blocks 1-7

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This metadata record describes the Classified Point Cloud (LAS) for the 2016 Connecticut LiDAR project covering approximately 5240 square miles in seven blocks. The...

  5. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of the Residential Provisions of the 2015 IECC for Connecticut

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendon, Vrushali V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhao, Mingjie [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Taylor, Zachary T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Poehlman, Eric A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-02-15

    The 2015 IECC provides cost-effective savings for residential buildings in Connecticut. Moving to the 2015 IECC from the 2009 IECC base code is cost-effective for residential buildings in all climate zones in Connecticut.

  6. Comparison of the use of notched wedge joints vs. traditional butt joints in Connecticut

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-11-07

    Performance of Hot Mix Asphalt (HMA) longitudinal joints have been an item of increasing scrutiny in : Connecticut. The traditional butt joint has typically been the method used in Connecticut. These joints : have been reportedly opening up, creating...

  7. Under Connecticut Skies: Exploring 100 Years of Astronomy at Van Vleck Observatory in Middletown, Connecticut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilgard, Roy E.; Williams, Amrys; Erickson, Paul; Herbst, William; Redfield, Seth

    2017-01-01

    Under Connecticut Skies examines the history of astronomy at Van Vleck Observatory, located on the campus of Wesleyan University in Middletown, Connecticut. Since its dedication in June of 1916, Van Vleck has been an important site of astronomical research, teaching, and public outreach. Over a thousand visitors pass through the observatory each year, and regular public observing nights happen year-round in cooperation with the Astronomical Society of Greater Hartford. Our project explores the place-based nature of astronomical research, the scientific instruments, labor, and individuals that have connected places around the world in networks of observation, and the broader history of how observational astronomy has linked local people, amateur observers, professional astronomers, and the tools and objects that have facilitated their work under Connecticut’s skies over the past 100 years. Our research team has produced a historical exhibition to help commemorate the observatory’s centennial that opened to the public in May of 2016. Our work included collecting, documenting, and interpretting this history through objects, archival documents, oral histories, photographs, and more. The result is both a museum and a working history "laboratory" for use by student and professional researchers. In addition to the exhibit itself, we have engaged in new interpretive programs to help bring the history of astronomy to life. Future work will include digitization of documents and teaching slides, further collection of oral histories, and expanding the collection to the web for use by off-site researches.

  8. The State of Connecticut: The Report of the Governor's Commission on Tax Reform. Summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Governor's Commission on Tax Reform, Hartford, CT.

    The Commission evaluated a wide variety of alternative tax sources and examined the existing structure in Connecticut. It specifically evaluated inequities resulting from Connecticut taxes as they affect various classes of citizens and examined the impact of the Connecticut tax structure on business with a view to encouraging economic expansion.…

  9. 77 FR 6465 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Connecticut River, Old Lyme, CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-08

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Connecticut River, Old Lyme, CT... of the Old Saybrook-Old Lyme RR Bridge, mile 3.4, across the Connecticut River at Old Lyme... INFORMATION: The Old Saybrook-Old Lyme RR Bridge at mile 3.4, across the Connecticut River at Old Lyme...

  10. Quaternary Geologic Map of Connecticut and Long Island Sound Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Janet Radway; Schafer, John P.; London, Elizabeth Haley; DiGiacomo-Cohen, Mary L.; Lewis, Ralph S.; Thompson, Woodrow B.

    2005-01-01

    The Quaternary geologic map (sheet 1) and explanatory figures and cross sections (sheet 2) portray the geologic features formed in Connecticut during the Quaternary Period, which includes the Pleistocene (glacial) and Holocene (postglacial) Epochs. The Quaternary Period has been a time of development of many details of the landscape and of all the surficial deposits. At least twice in the late Pleistocene, continental ice sheets swept across Connecticut. Their effects are of pervasive importance to the present occupants of the land. The Quaternary geologic map illustrates the geologic history and the distribution of depositional environments during the emplacement of glacial and postglacial surficial deposits and the landforms resulting from those events.

  11. Water resources inventory of Connecticut Part 7: upper Connecticut River basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryder, Robert B.; Thomas, Mendall P.; Weiss, Lawrence A.

    1981-01-01

    The 508 square miles of the upper Connecticut River basin in north-central Connecticut include the basins of four major tributaries: the Scantic, Park, and Hockanum Rivers, and the Farmington River downstream from Tariffville. Precipitation over this area averaged 44 inches per year during 1931-60. In this period, an additional 3,800 billion gallons of water per year entered the basin in the main stem of the Connecticut River at the Massachusetts state line, about 230 billion gallons per year in the Farmington River at Tariffville, and about 10 billion gallons per year in the Seantic River at the Massachusetts state line. Some water was also imported from outside the basin by water-supply systems. About half the precipitation, 22.2 inches, was lost from the basin by evapotranspiration; the remainder flowed out of the study area in the Connecticut River at Portland. Variations in streamflow at 41 long-term continuous-record gaging stations are summarized in standardized graphs and tables that can be used to estimate streamflow characteristics at other sites. For example, mean-flow and two low-flow characteristics: (1) the 7-day annual minimum flow for 2-year and (2) 10-year recurrence intervals, have been determined for many partial-record stations throughout the basin. Of the 30 principal lakes, ponds, and reservoirs, two have usable storage capacities of more than 1 billion gallons. The maximum safe draft rate (regulated flow) of the largest of these, Shenipsit Lake at Rockville, is 6.5 million gallons per day for the 2-year and 30-year recurrence intervals (median and lowest annual flow). Floods have occurred within each month of the year but in different years. The greatest known flood on the Connecticut River was in March 1936; it had a peak flow of 130,000 cubic feet per second at Hartford. Since then, major floods have been reduced by flood-control measures. The major aquifers underlying the basin are composed of unconsolidated materials (stratified drift and

  12. Digital Learning Compass: Distance Education State Almanac 2017. Connecticut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seaman, Julia E.; Seaman, Jeff

    2017-01-01

    This brief report uses data collected under the U.S. Department of Education's National Center for Educational Statistics (NCES) Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS) Fall Enrollment survey to highlight distance education data in the state of Connecticut. The sample for this analysis is comprised of all active, degree-granting…

  13. Connecticut School Integration: Moving Forward as the Northeast Retreats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orfield, Gary

    2015-01-01

    This report analyzes the data on changes in patterns of racial segregation and their education consequences over a quarter century, from l987 to 2012. It examines a major transition in the racial and ethnic composition of Connecticut and the changes in integration and segregation in the schools of the state and its urban communities and it…

  14. Connecticut Children's Medical Center multi-year branding campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botvin, J

    2000-01-01

    As the only children's hospital in the state, Connecticut Children's Medical Center was challenged by the inherent complacency of parents. It met the challenge through a multi-level marketing effort which included television and radio, community outreach and strong media relations. By emphasizing the unique nature of children, the campaign affirms the need for a specialized children's health center.

  15. Connecticut Public Higher Education: 2011 System Trends. Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connecticut Department of Higher Education (NJ1), 2011

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the public higher education system trends in Connecticut for 2011. This report contains the following sections: (1) Higher Education in a Statewide Context; (2) Expenditure Trends; (3) Comparative Funding Indicators; (4) Enrollment Trends; (5) Position Trends; (6) Tuition and Fees; (7) Student and State Share of Costs; and (8)…

  16. Connecticut Public Higher Education: 2009 System Trends. Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connecticut Department of Higher Education (NJ1), 2009

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the public higher education system trends in Connecticut for 2009. This report contains the following sections: (1) Higher Education in a Statewide Context; (2) Expenditure Trends; (3) Comparative Funding Indicators; (4) Enrollment Trends; (5) Degrees Conferred; (6) Position Trends; (7) Tuition and Fees; (8) Student and State…

  17. 27 CFR 9.122 - Western Connecticut Highlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Town of Barkhamstead (Litchfield-Hartford County line); (5) The boundary then goes south approximately 25 miles along the Litchfield-Hartford County line to the southeast corner of the Town of Plymouth... the Litchfield-New Haven County line to Connecticut Route #8 at Waterville in the Town of Waterbury...

  18. 77 FR 68800 - Connecticut; Major Disaster and Related Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-16

    ... resulting from Hurricane Sandy beginning on October 27, 2012, and continuing, is of sufficient severity and... section 310(a), Priority to Certain Applications for Public Facility and Public Housing Assistance, 42 U.S... Connecticut have been designated as adversely affected by this major disaster: Fairfield, Middlesex, New Haven...

  19. Babesia microti, human babesiosis, and Borrelia burgdorferi in Connecticut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, J F; Mintz, E D; Gadbaw, J J; Magnarelli, L A

    1991-12-01

    Babesia microti was isolated from a white-footed mouse (Peromyscus leucopus) that was captured in southeastern Connecticut in 1988, when the first human case of babesiosis acquired in Connecticut was recognized. To date, 13 cases of babesiosis have been reported in Connecticut, the largest number of human cases reported on the mainland United States. Two of nine patients quiried remembered a prior tick bite. Since Babesia parasites are known to be vectored only by ticks, we surmise that 12 of these infections were acquired via tick bites; 1 was obtained by blood transfusion (the patient was 46 years of age) from an endemically infected donor. The ages of the patients with tick-acquired babesiosis ranged from 61 to 95 years. Two patients died with active infections, and one patient died from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease soon after treatment with clindamycin and quinine. Indirect fluorescent-antibody titers of blood samples drawn at the time of hospitalization for 11 patients and at the time of active infection for 1 asymptomatic person ranged from 1:1,024 to 1:4,096. Five of eight patients with babesiosis also had significant immunoglobulin G or immunoglobulin M titers (1:640 to 1:5,120) to Borrelia burgdorferi. B. microti was isolated in Syrian hamsters inoculated with blood from 7 of 12 patients tested and was also isolated from mice captured in six towns. The peridomestic nature of the disease was demonstrated by isolating the parasite from white-footed mice captured in or near the yards of eight different patients. Of 59 mice tested, 27 were positive and 25 were coinfected with B. burgdorferi. The isolation of B. microti from a white-footed mouse captured in north-central Connecticut (West Hartford), away from the focus of human infections in southeastern Connecticut, suggests that this pathogen may spread into other areas where Ixodes dammini, the tick vector, becomes established.

  20. Confirmatory Survey Results for the Emergency Operations Facility (EOF) at the Connecticut Yankee Haddam Neck Plant, Haddam, Connecticut

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    W. C. Adams

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requested that the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) perform a confirmatory survey on the Emergency Operations Facility (EOF) at the Connecticut Yankee Haddam Neck Plant (HNP) in Haddam, Connecticut. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requested that the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) perform a confirmatory survey on the Emergency Operations Facility (EOF) at the Connecticut Yankee Haddam Neck Plant (HNP) in Haddam, Connecticut. The EOF building was used for emergency operations, a training center, and as an in-processing center for the HNP site. Whole body counters and the respirator fit test facility were also located in the EOF. Currently, the EOF is used as office space for the decommissioning project and recently, the Health Physics (HP) Count Room and Final Status Survey (FSS) instrumentation calibration activities were relocated to this facility. The EOF has always been located outside of the Radiological Control Area (RCA). The only known licensed radioactive materials used or stored in the facility were sealed calibration/check sources used for HP instruments and the Whole Body Counter and soil samples containing small amounts of radioactivity. During the free release surveys (FRS), Connecticut Yankee Atomic Power Company (CYAPCO) personnel identified several areas of elevated activity; most of the areas of identified elevated activity were deemed to be from naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) within clay tiles. One location of site-generated elevated activity was determined on the floor in the north hallway. At this location, a portion of the carpet was removed for further evaluation by gamma spectroscopy and the results indicated cesium-137 (Cs-137) and cobalt-60 (Co-60) contamination within the carpet. It was suspected that the contamination entered the facility by adhering to the bottom of a workers shoe and was transferred to the carpet. The

  1. Connecticut – Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity Law and Documentation of Discrimination

    OpenAIRE

    Sears, Brad

    2009-01-01

    A Connecticut statute bans employment discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation. No Connecticut statutes prohibit discrimination on the basis of gender identity or expression. In November 2000, the Connecticut Commission on Human Rights and Opportunities – the agency responsible for administering the anti-discrimination statutes and for processing discrimination complaints – ruled that statutes prohibiting sex discrimination also banned discrimination on the basis of gender identity. ...

  2. Costs of non-helmeted motorcycle riding in Connecticut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eltorai, Adam E M; Daniels, Alan H; Grauer, Jonathan N; Browner, Bruce D; Born, Christopher T

    2014-02-01

    Motorcycle-related head injuries and fatalities are a serious public health concern that can be reduced with helmet use. Caring for crash victims places additional economic stress on the healthcare system. The current Connecticut motorcycle helmet law does not require all motorcyclists to wear helmets. Universal motorcycle helmet laws increase helmet use. Efforts to increase helmet use through education and legislation should be considered for review, given the number of deaths and injuries that could be prevented.

  3. 40 CFR 81.184 - Northwestern Connecticut Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Northwestern Connecticut Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.184 Section 81.184 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.184 Northwestern Connecticut Intrastate Air Quality Control...

  4. 76 FR 16358 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Connecticut, Maine, New Hampshire...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-23

    ... enforceable emission limits on ozone precursors; any judgment about whether those emission limits discharge... attainment demonstration modeling efforts conducted by the Ozone Transport Commission. Connecticut, Maine... Implementation Plans; Connecticut, Maine, New Hampshire and Rhode Island; Infrastructure SIPs for the 1997 Ozone...

  5. 76 FR 752 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Connecticut: Prevention of Significant...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-06

    ... Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Connecticut: Prevention of Significant Deterioration; Greenhouse Gas... changes impacting Connecticut's New Source Review (NSR) Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD... Regional Office, Office of Ecosystem Protection, 5 Post Office Square-- Suite 100 (Mail code OEP05-2...

  6. 76 FR 26933 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Connecticut: Prevention of Significant...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-10

    ... Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Connecticut: Prevention of Significant Deterioration; Greenhouse Gas... Significant Deterioration (PSD) program. First, the revision provides Connecticut with authority to issue PSD... Regional Office, Office of Ecosystem Protection, Air Permits, Toxics, and Indoor Air Programs Unit, 5 Post...

  7. Can Interdistrict Choice Boost Student Achievement? The Case of Connecticut's Interdistrict Magnet School Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bifulco, Robert; Cobb, Casey D.; Bell, Courtney

    2009-01-01

    Connecticut's interdistrict magnet schools offer a model of choice-based desegregation that appears to satisfy current legal constraints. This study presents evidence that interdistrict magnet schools have provided students from Connecticut's central cities access to less racially and economically isolated educational environments and estimates…

  8. The Utilization of Inquiry-Based Science Instruction in Connecticut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozzuto, David M.

    The purpose of this study was to explore the perspectives of practitioners of inquiry-based instruction from 35 Connecticut school districts. The source of the participants, Connecticut State Science Assessment Advisory Committee members, and their involvement in science education acted to bound the research. Using a multiple case study design, data were gathered from 28 participants: teachers n = 21, curriculum leaders n = 4, professional development experts n = 2, and state education advisor/ teacher preparation expert n = 1 involved with Connecticut schools. Each participant was asked to complete an online demographic and inquiry utilization questionnaire. From the results of the questionnaires, a cadre of 11 participants was selected to participate in semi-structured interviews. A round of follow-up interviews of five key participants was conducted to further clarify the phenomenon. Two of the follow up interviewees were observed using the EQUIP rubric to assess inquiry implementation. Artifacts such as minutes, PowerPoint presentations, and a reflexive journal were collected throughout the study. An inductive approach to content analysis of data from the survey and interviews was used to explore constructs, themes, and patterns. After segmentation took place, the data were categorized to allow patterns and constructs to emerge. The data were reduced based on the emergent design and those reductions, or themes, were informed by ongoing data collection using constant comparison as different levels of codes emerge. Data collection further informed data analysis and future data collection. Initial coding of patterns was reduced until theoretical saturation occurred and the data allowed five thematic findings to emerge from the data. The five themes were: teach, process, impasse, develop, and support. The significance of each theme and its implication for practitioners and researchers were discussed and offered, respectively.

  9. Water resources of the Hartford-New Britain area, Connecticut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushman, Robert Vittum; Tanski, D.; Thomas, M.P.

    1964-01-01

    The Hartford-New Britain area includes the metropolitan areas of Hartford and New Britain and parts of several adjoining towns. Water used in the area is withdrawn from the principal streams and aquifers at an average rate of 463.5 mgd (million gallons per day). Sufficient water is available from these sources to meet present requirements and those for many years to come, although local shortages may develop in some areas as the result of problems of distribution and treatment. About 98 percent of all water used in 1957 was from surface sources. More than 425 mgd was required by industry, and about 23 mgd was for domestic water supply. The Farmington River upstream from Collinsville is the chief source of water for public supply in the Hartford-New Britain area, whereas the Connecticut River is the chief source of water for industry. An average of about 40 mgd is withdrawn from the upper Farmington River for public supply, and about 404 mgd is withdrawn by industry from the Connecticut River for nonconsumptive use and returned directly to the stream. The Connecticut River is the source of the largest quantity of water in the area. The flow of the stream at Thompsonville may be expected to equal or exceed about 2,000 mgd 95 percent of the time, and the flow should not be less than this amount for periods longer than 12 days. The flow below Thompsonville is increased by additions from the Scantic, Farmington, Park, and Hockanum Rivers and from numerous smaller tributary streams. The available streamflow data for the aforementioned rivers have been summarized graphically in the report. The chemical quality of water in the Connecticut River is good, except for short periods when the iron concentration is high. In addition to the removal of iron some other treatment may be necessary if water from the Connecticut River is used for special purposes. The chemical quality of the tributary streams is good, except the quality of the Park River, which is poor. Thus the

  10. Weighted likelihood copula modeling of extreme rainfall events in Connecticut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaojing; Gebremichael, Mekonnen; Yan, Jun

    2010-08-01

    SummaryCopulas have recently emerged as a practical method for multivariate modeling. To date, only limited amount of work has been done to apply copula-based modeling in the context of extreme rainfall analysis, and no work exists on modeling multiple characteristics of rainfall events from data at resolutions finer than hourly. In this study, trivariate copula-based modeling is applied to annual extreme rainfall events constructed from 15-min time series precipitation data at 12 stations within the state of Connecticut. Three characteristics (volume, duration, and peak intensity) are modeled by a multivariate distribution specified by three marginal distributions and a dependence structure via copula. A major issue in this application is that, because the 15-min precipitation data are only available fairly recently, the sample size at most stations is small, ranging from 10 to 33 years. For each station, we estimate the model parameters by maximizing a weighted likelihood, which assigns weight to data at stations nearby, borrowing strengths from them. The weights are assigned by a kernel function whose bandwidth is chosen by cross-validation in terms of predictive loglikelihood. The fitted model and sampling algorithms provide new knowledge on design storms and risk assessment in Connecticut.

  11. The joint EC/EPA mid-Connecticut test program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilgroe, J.D.; Brna, T.G.

    1991-01-01

    In early 1989, Environment Canada and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency sponsored a comprehensive test program on a refuse-derived fuel (RDF) unit of the Mid-Connecticut facility in Hartford. The program, conducted in cooperation with the Connecticut Resource Recovery Authority (CRRA), the facility's operator, included characterization and performance test phases. The results of the characterization tests were used in defining both the combustion and flue gas cleaning system operating conditions for the performance tests. The results of the performance tests are emphasized in this paper and are summarized in three parts. First, the combustion tests results will be addressed and related to good combustion practice for RDF combustors. Then, the performance of the lime spray dryer absorber/fabric filter system in controlling acid gas (hydrogen chloride, sulfur dioxide), trace organic [polychlorinated dibenzodioxin (PCDD) and polychlorinated dibenzofuran (PCDF)], trace metal [arsenic (as), cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), lead (Pb), mercury (Hg), nickel (Ni), and zinc (Zn)], and particulate matter (PM) emissions will be discussed. Finally, the results of ash/residue analyses will be presented

  12. Integration of fall prevention into state policy in Connecticut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Terrence E; Baker, Dorothy I; Leo-Summers, Linda S; Bianco, Luann; Gottschalk, Margaret; Acampora, Denise; King, Mary B

    2013-06-01

    To describe the ongoing efforts of the Connecticut Collaboration for Fall Prevention (CCFP) to move evidence regarding fall prevention into clinical practice and state policy. A university-based team developed methods of networking with existing statewide organizations to influence clinical practice and state policy. We describe steps taken that led to funding and legislation of fall prevention efforts in the state of Connecticut. We summarize CCFP's direct outreach by tabulating the educational sessions delivered and the numbers and types of clinical care providers that were trained. Community organizations that had sustained clinical practices incorporating evidence-based fall prevention were subsequently funded through mini-grants to develop innovative interventional activities. These mini-grants targeted specific subpopulations of older persons at high risk for falls. Building collaborative relationships with existing stakeholders and care providers throughout the state, CCFP continues to facilitate the integration of evidence-based fall prevention into clinical practice and state-funded policy using strategies that may be useful to others.

  13. Modeling Waves and Coastal Flooding along the Connecticut Coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cifuentes-Lorenzen, A.; Howard-Strobel, M. M.; Fake, T.; McCardell, G.; O'Donnell, J.; Asthita, M.

    2015-12-01

    We have used a hydrodynamic- wave coupled numerical model (FVCOM-SWAVE) to simulate flooding at the Connecticut coastline during severe storms. The model employed a one-way nesting scheme and an unstructured grid. The parent domain spanned most of the southern New England shelf and the fine resolution grid covered Long Island Sound (LIS) and extended across the Connecticut coast to the 10m elevation contour. The model results for sea level, current and wave statistics from the parent grid have been tested with data from several field campaigns at different locations spanning the western, central and eastern portions of LIS. Waves are fetch limited and improvements to the model-data comparison required modifications to spectral coefficients in the wave model. Finally, the nested results were validated with two field campaigns in shallow water environments (i.e. New Haven and Old Saybrook). To assess the spatial variability of storm wave characteristics the domain was forced with the hindcast winds obtained from meteorological models (NAM and WRF) for 13 severe weather events that affected LIS in the past 15 years. We have also forced the system with a simulation of Superstorm Sandy in a warmer climate to assess the impact a climate change on the character of flooding. The nested grid is currently being used to map flooding risks under severe weather events including the effects of precipitation on river flow and discharge.

  14. Green modes of transportation for Connecticut's mixed used developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-01

    Our multi-disciplinary team will not be single-minded. We will create a dynamic business and transportation model for the delivery of goods for : the existing and proposed commercial establishments located in Downtown Storrs. These models will demons...

  15. The 3D Elevation Program: summary for Connecticut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carswell, William J.

    2015-01-01

    Elevation data are essential to a broad range of applications, including forest resources management, wildlife and habitat management, national security, recreation, and many others. For the State of Connecticut, elevation data are critical for coastal zone management, flood risk management, natural resources conservation, agriculture and precision farming, sea level rise and subsidence, and other business uses. Today, high-density light detection and ranging (lidar) data are the primary sources for deriving elevation models and other datasets. Federal, State, Tribal, and local agencies work in partnership to (1) replace data that are older and of lower quality and (2) provide coverage where publicly accessible data do not exist. A joint goal of State and Federal partners is to acquire consistent, statewide coverage to support existing and emerging applications enabled by lidar data.

  16. Nuclear instrument upgrade at Connecticut Yankee Atomic Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brothers, M.H.; Flynn, B.J.; Shugars, H.G.

    1989-01-01

    After 20 years of commercial operation, the Connecticut Yankee Atomic Power Station decided to replace the original nuclear instrument system. The plant was motivated primarily by reliability and maintainability problems, the former attributed to equipment wearout and discrete component failure, and the latter to the unavailability of qualified spare parts, another effect of the equipment's age. In replacing the system, the plant also had to address current regulatory, design, and plant technical specification requirements, including physical separation, signal isolation, and changes in equipment qualification. This paper discusses the motivation for the system's replacement, the challenges to the plant engineers and equipment designers, the ways in which the new design met the challenges, the test results of the new system, and other potential benefits supported by the test results

  17. A Science Framework for Connecticut River Watershed Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rideout, Stephen; Nicolson, Craig; Russell-Robinson, Susan L.; Mecray, Ellen L.

    2005-01-01

    Introduction: This document outlines a research framework for water resource managers and land-use planners in the four-state Connecticut River Watershed (CRW). It specifically focuses on developing the decision-support tools and data needed by managers in the watershed. The purpose of the Science Framework is to identify critical research issues and information required to better equip managers to make decisions on desirable changes in the CRW. This Science Framework is the result of a cooperative project between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the University of Massachusetts at Amherst (UMass-Amherst), and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS). The cooperative project was guided by a Science Steering Committee (SC) and included several focus groups, a 70-person workshop in September 2004, and an open collaborative process by which the workshop outcomes were synthesized, written up, and then progressively refined through peer review. This document is the product of that collaborative process.

  18. Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, and New Jersey ESI: INVERT (Invertebrate Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for marine, estuarine, and terrestrial invertebrate species in coastal Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York,...

  19. Social Vulnerability Index (SoVI) for Connecticut based on 2000 Census Block Groups

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data depicts the social vulnerability of Connecticut census block groups to environmental hazards. Data were culled primarily from the 2000 Decennial Census.

  20. Weatherization Makes Headlines in Connecticut: Weatherization Assistance Close-Up Fact Sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D& R International

    2001-10-10

    Connecticut demonstrates its commitment to technology and efficiency through the Weatherization Program. Weatherization uses advanced technologies and techniques to reduce energy costs for low-income families by increasing the energy efficiency of their homes.

  1. Connecticut State Briefing Book for low-level radioactive-waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-06-01

    The Connecticut State Briefing Book is one of a series of state briefing books on low-level radioactive waste management practices. It has been prepared to assist state and federal agency officials in planning for safe low-level radioactive waste disposal. The report contains a profile of low-level radioactive waste generators in Connecticut. The profile is the result of a survey of Nuclear Regulatory Commission licensees in Connecticut. The briefing book also contains a comprehensive assessment of low-level radioactive waste management issues and concerns as defined by all major interested parties including industry, government, the media, and interest groups. The assessment was developed through personal communications with representatives of interested parties, and through a review of media sources. Lastly, the briefing book provides demographic and socioeconomic data and a discussion of relevant government agencies and activities, all of which may affect waste management practices in Connecticut

  2. 2016 Coastal Connecticut MLLW ADS80 4-Band 16 Bit Imagery

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Project: NOAA 2016 Multispectral Coastal Imagery Project - Connecticut Shoreline Orthoimagery Contract No. EA133C11CQ0010 Reference No. NCNP0000-16-01163 Woolpert...

  3. Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, and New Jersey ESI: FISHL (Fish Lines)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for anadromous fish species in coastal Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, and New Jersey. Vector arcs in...

  4. Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, and New Jersey ESI: M_MAMMAL (Marine Mammal Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for seals, whales, and dolphins in coastal Rhode Island, Connecticut, and the New York/New Jersey...

  5. History of Connecticut's short-term strain program for evaluation of steel bridges : July 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-07-01

    Non-destructive strain monitoring has been used for two decades on Connecticuts bridges to : supplement visual field inspections. These studies have addressed a wide range of problems, : including fatigue cracking in diaphragm connections, cracked...

  6. Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, and New Jersey ESI: M_MAMPT (Marine Mammal Points)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for seal haul-out sites in coastal Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, and New Jersey. Vector points in...

  7. Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, and New Jersey ESI: T_MAMMAL (Terrestrial Mammal Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for small mammal species in coastal Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, and New Jersey. Vector polygons in...

  8. Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, and New Jersey ESI: FISH (Fish Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for marine, estuarine, and anadromous fish species in coastal Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, and New...

  9. Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, and New Jersey ESI: INVERTPT (Invertebrate Points)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for rare terrestrial invertebrates in coastal Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, and New Jersey. Vector...

  10. Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, and New Jersey ESI: NESTS (Nest Points)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for nesting birds in coastal Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, and New Jersey. Vector points in this...

  11. NOAA Digital Orthophotography for the Coasts of Connecticut and Long Island, NY

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Project: NOAA Digital Orthophotography for the Coasts of Main/New Hampshire, Massachusetts/Rhode Island/Connecticut, and Hudson River/Long Island /NY/NJ Contract No....

  12. Connecticut State Briefing Book for low-level radioactive-waste management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1981-06-01

    The Connecticut State Briefing Book is one of a series of state briefing books on low-level radioactive waste management practices. It has been prepared to assist state and federal agency officials in planning for safe low-level radioactive waste disposal. The report contains a profile of low-level radioactive waste generators in Connecticut. The profile is the result of a survey of Nuclear Regulatory Commission licensees in Connecticut. The briefing book also contains a comprehensive assessment of low-level radioactive waste management issues and concerns as defined by all major interested parties including industry, government, the media, and interest groups. The assessment was developed through personal communications with representatives of interested parties, and through a review of media sources. Lastly, the briefing book provides demographic and socioeconomic data and a discussion of relevant government agencies and activities, all of which may affect waste management practices in Connecticut.

  13. Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, and New Jersey ESI: HABPT (Habitat and Plant Points)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for rare terrestrial plants in coastal Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, and New Jersey. Vector points...

  14. Connecticut State University System Initiative for Nanotechnology-Related Equipment, Faculty Development and Curriculum Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broadbridge, Christine C. [Southern Connecticut State University

    2013-03-28

    DOE grant used for partial fulfillment of necessary laboratory equipment for course enrichment and new graduate programs in nanotechnology at the four institutions of the Connecticut State University System (CSUS). Equipment in this initial phase included variable pressure scanning electron microscope with energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy elemental analysis capability [at Southern Connecticut State University]; power x-ray diffractometer [at Central Connecticut State University]; a spectrophotometer and spectrofluorimeter [at Eastern Connecticut State University; and a Raman Spectrometer [at Western Connecticut State University]. DOE's funding was allocated for purchase and installation of this scientific equipment and instrumentation. Subsequently, DOE funding was allocated to fund the curriculum, faculty development and travel necessary to continue development and implementation of the System's Graduate Certificate in Nanotechnology (GCNT) program and the ConnSCU Nanotechnology Center (ConnSCU-NC) at Southern Connecticut State University. All of the established outcomes have been successfully achieved. The courses and structure of the GCNT program have been determined and the program will be completely implemented in the fall of 2013. The instrumentation has been purchased, installed and has been utilized at each campus for the implementation of the nanotechnology courses, CSUS GCNT and the ConnSCU-NC. Additional outcomes for this grant include curriculum development for non-majors as well as faculty and student research.

  15. Public School Principals' Experiences with Interpreting and Implementing Connecticut's Anti-Bullying Law (Connecticut General Statute Section 10-222d): A Statewide Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaRocco, Diana J.; Nestler-Rusack, Donna; Freiberg, Jo Ann

    2007-01-01

    Background: In June 2002, the State of Connecticut General Assembly (CGA) passed Public Act 02-119, An Act Concerning Bullying Behavior in Schools and Concerning the Pledge of Allegiance. Section 1 mandated that each local and regional board of education (school district) develop a policy to address bullying in its schools. Conn. Gen. Statute…

  16. The Puerto Ricans: On the Island, On the Mainland, In Connecticut. The Peoples of Connecticut Multicultural Ethnic Heritage Series, Number Four.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdette, Barbara; Echevarria, Francisco

    This 11-unit curriculum guide on Puerto Rican culture is intended for both Puerto Rican and and non-Puerto Rican teachers and students living in Connecticut. Although the materials are written for use in grades six through nine, they can be adapted for older or younger students. Topics include Puerto Rican history, ethnology, geography, economy,…

  17. The Jews: Their Origins, in America, in Connecticut. A Curriculum Guide. The Peoples of Connecticut Multicultural Ethnic Heritage Series No. 3. Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klitz, Sally Innis

    This curriculum guide explores the Jewish ethnic and religious community in the United States generally, and specifically in Connecticut. Intended as a resource tool for studying the Jewish cultural heritage and traditions, the material may be used among Jews and non-Jews. The guide is divided into three parts. Part one is a detailed account of…

  18. An Examination of the Information Literacy Expectations and Practices of Librarians in Connecticut State Colleges and Universities and Connecticut Public High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schofield, Cindy K.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the perceptions of Connecticut librarians at the secondary and post-secondary education levels regarding Information Literacy (IL) resources and instruction at the two levels; the competencies of their high school seniors and university/college first-year students; their familiarity with their respective institutions' IL…

  19. Multiple Fentanyl Overdoses - New Haven, Connecticut, June 23, 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomassoni, Anthony J; Hawk, Kathryn F; Jubanyik, Karen; Nogee, Daniel P; Durant, Thomas; Lynch, Kara L; Patel, Rushaben; Dinh, David; Ulrich, Andrew; D'Onofrio, Gail

    2017-02-03

    On the evening of June 23, 2016, a white powder advertised as cocaine was purchased off the streets from multiple sources and used by an unknown number of persons in New Haven, Connecticut. During a period of less than 8 hours, 12 patients were brought to the emergency department (ED) at Yale New Haven Hospital, experiencing signs and symptoms consistent with opioid overdose. The route of intoxication was not known, but presumed to be insufflation ("snorting") in most cases. Some patients required doses of the opioid antidote naloxone exceeding 4 mg (usual initial dose = 0.1-0.2 mg intravenously), and several patients who were alert after receiving naloxone subsequently developed respiratory failure. Nine patients were admitted to the hospital, including four to the intensive care unit (ICU); three required endotracheal intubation, and one required continuous naloxone infusion. Three patients died. The white powder was determined to be fentanyl, a drug 50 times more potent than heroin, and it included trace amounts of cocaine. The episode triggered rapid notification of public health and law enforcement agencies, interviews of patients and their family members to trace and limit further use or distribution of the fentanyl, immediate naloxone resupply and augmentation for emergency medical services (EMS) crews, public health alerts, and plans to accelerate naloxone distribution to opioid users and their friends and families. Effective communication and timely, coordinated, collaborative actions of community partners reduced the harm caused by this event and prevented potential subsequent episodes.

  20. Breakup ice control structure for the Salmon River in Connecticut

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuthill, A.M.; White, K.D.

    1997-01-01

    The Salmon River ice jam problem was investigated and a conceptual design for a breakup ice control structure was developed. Historical ice jam events were reviewed and an ice observation program was conducted during the winter of 1994-95. The factors affecting ice jam frequency and severity were examined. The factors included daily temperature, rainfall quantity and intensity, Salmon River stage and discharge, and Connecticut River tide levels. First, a numerical model was developed to simulate a worst case scenario for ice jams, followed by a conceptual design for a concrete pier ice control structure under two ice breakup scenarios. The first scenario assumed that a semi-intact ice sheet would rest against the piers and retain a floating equilibrium jam upstream, allowing water discharge to pass beneath. The second scenario was based on the assumption that a grounded ice jam in direct contact with the piers would divert water flow around the structure via an armored channel in the overbank area. An ice retention structure consisting of a row of concrete piers, spaced across the main channel, 60 m upstream of an existing dam, was proposed. 11 refs., 6 figs

  1. Familism and Social Inclusion: Hispanics in New London, Connecticut

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Amparo Cruz-Saco

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the financial support and inclusiveness within Hispanic families in New London, Connecticut, and the causes of their social exclusion in the larger society. We designed and administered a survey of 114 items that was answered by 148 participants representing 1.3% of the non-Puerto Rican Hispanic population. Using factor analysis, we reduced a large number of items in two familism scores to four latent factors: "Financial Support for Family", "Obligation to Family", "Plan to Return", and "Filial Responsibility". We found that financial support for family and obligation to family are strongly endorsed by participants. Approximately one-half would return back to their home countries where they believe to be happier. One-fifth rejects this option. Three-quarters of participants remit money to family, parents in particular, who reside in countries of origin. In contrast to other studies, remitting money is not affected by any given personal characteristic such as gender, income or level of education. Similarly, participants remit irrespective of their degree of self-reported familism measured by scores on the latent factors. A large incidence of poverty among this population, lack of English proficiency, low skills, immigration status, and a lack of voice and political representation inhibit their social inclusion.

  2. Evidence of natural reproduction of Atlantic sturgeon in the Connecticut River from unlikely sources.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Savoy

    Full Text Available Atlantic Sturgeon is listed under the U.S. Endangered Species Act as five Distinct Population Segments (DPS. The "endangered" New York Bight (NYB DPS is thought to only harbor two populations; one in the Hudson River and a second smaller one in the Delaware River. Historically, the Connecticut River probably supported a spawning population of Atlantic Sturgeon that was believed extirpated many decades ago. In 2014, we successfully collected pre-migratory juvenile specimens from the lower Connecticut River which were subjected to mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA control region sequence and microsatellite analyses to determine their genetic relatedness to other populations coastwide. Haplotype and allelic frequencies differed significantly between the Connecticut River collection and all other populations coastwide. Sibship analyses of the microsatellite data indicated that the Connecticut River collection was comprised of a small number of families that were likely the offspring of a limited number of breeders. This was supported by analysis of effective population size (Ne and number of breeders (Nb. STRUCTURE analysis suggested that there were 11 genetic clusters among the coastwide collections and that from the Connecticut River was distinct from those in all other rivers. This was supported by UPGMA analyses of the microsatellite data. In AMOVA analyses, among region variation was maximized, and among population within regions variation minimized when the Connecticut River collection was separate from the other two populations in the NYB DPS indicating the dissimilarity between the Connecticut River collection and the other two populations in the NYB DPS. Use of mixed stock analysis indicated that the Connecticut River juvenile collection was comprised of specimens primarily of South Atlantic and Chesapeake Bay DPS origins. The most parsimonious explanation for these results is that the Connecticut River hosted successful natural reproduction in 2013

  3. Sex Education in Connecticut High Schools: Teachers' Reports of Content and Importance Ratings According to the SIECUS Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obloj, Wallace; Lynn, Donna

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine Connecticut teachers' reports of the sex education content taught to high school students as well as teachers' reports of the degree of importance for Connecticut high school students to understand according to the SIECUS Guidelines. The data revealed that participants (N=125) reported teaching 72% of the…

  4. State of Connecticut middle data collection program. Final report, August 1, 1979-May 31, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salamandra, J.; Wilson, R.

    1980-01-01

    The Connecticut Office of Policy and Management, Energy Division, conducted a heating oil monitoring program of Connecticut fuel oil suppliers and dealers. From August 1979, through May 1980, the Energy Division conducted a biweekly price and inventory survey for No. 2 fuel oil and kerosene. The purpose of the survey has been to provide data necessary for the US Department of Energy's Energy Information Administration to execute its role in monitoring cost and price movements within the US petroleum industry and in performing analyses and projections related to energy supplies, demands, and prices for No. 2 fuel oil. The survey has also provided the state of Connecticut with a current, consistent, and reliable set of figures on heating oil prices and inventories and provided a mechanism for handling consumer inquiries concerning price and supply conditions.

  5. Helmet use in Connecticut motorcycle crashes: a state without a universal helmet law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landman, Adam B; Phipps, Michael S; Jawin, Kimberly; Bolton, Lauri; Van Gelder, Carin M; Kamin, Richard; Teel, Bill; Vaca, Federico E

    2011-05-01

    Assess the association of helmet use with motorcycle crash mortality and identify characteristics of riders who do not wear helmets in Connecticut crashes. Police crash data for Connecticut motorcycle crashes 2001-2007 were analyzed. Bivariate analysis and multivariable logistic regressions were performed including age, gender, seating position, road type, season, time of day, and recklessness. Of the 9,214 crashes with helmet use data available, helmets were worn in 4072 (44.2%). Non-helmeted riders, age > or =18, riding interstate or state roads, in the evening or at night, and who were riding recklessly were associated with higher odds of fatality. Predictors of nonhelmet use included males, passengers, age helmets reduce fatal crashes in Connecticut. A set of factors help predict nonhelmeted riders to whom safety training could be targeted.

  6. Recurrent mass mortalities of the blueback herring, Alosa aestivalis, in the lower Connecticut River

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moss, S.A.; Leggett, W.C.; Boyd, W.A.

    1976-01-01

    The authors studied 5 mass mortalities of blueback herring, Alosa aestivalis between 1965 and 1971. The reach of the Connecticut River in which the mortalities were observed includes the region thermally influenced by cooling water effluents from the Connecticut Yankee Atomic Power Plant. This warm water effluent has not been related to catastrophic blueback herring mortalities to the present time. The mortalities observed in 1965, 1966, and 1967 occurred before the plant became operational. The years of no abnormal mortalities, 1968, 1969, and 1970 coincided with periods of near-maximum generating output by this power plant. Only in June, 1971, did power plant operation coincide with a mass mortality of herring. Nevertheless, the occurrence of herring mortalities in four years out of seven observed suggests that further deterioration of water quality in the Connecticut River may threaten the continued spawning success of this fish. 9 references, 4 figures, 4 tables

  7. Bibliography of Connecticut Advanced Nuclear Engineering Laboratory reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1965-12-01

    This report, published in two volumes, is a bibliography of the reports published at the Connecticut Advanced Nuclear Engineering Laboratory (CANEL). The reports cover the period 1952 through 1965 and include the Aircraft Nuclear Propulsion program, the Advanced Liquid Metal Cooled Reactor program, the Advanced Reactor Materials program and the SNAP-50 program. The bibliography contains the report number, title, author, date published, and classification. In some cases where the writing of a report was a group effort, and in some reports containing compilations of certain types of data, the author column is not applicable. This is indicated by a {open_quotes}n.a.{close_quotes} in the author column. The following types of reports are included: PWAC`s, TIM`s, CNLM`s, FXM`s and miscellaneous reports. PWAC and TIM reports conform to the requirements of AEC Manual Chapter 3202-041 and 3202-042, respectively. Most of the technical information of interest generated by this project is documented in these reports. CNLM and FXM reports were written primarily for internal distribution. However, these reports contain enough information of technical interest to warrant their inclusion. All CNLM`s and those FXM`s considered to be of interest are included in this bibliography. The MPR`s (Monthly Progress Reports) are the most important of the miscellaneous categories of reports. The other miscellaneous categories relate primarily to equipment and reactor specifications. The Division of Technical Information Extension (DTIE) at Oak Ridge, Tennessee has been designated as the primary recipient of the reports in the CANEL library. When more than one copy of a report was available, the additional copies were delivered to the Lawrence Radiation Laboratory, Livermore, California.

  8. Bibliography of Connecticut Advanced Nuclear Engineering Laboratory reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1965-12-01

    This report, published in two, volumes, is a bibliography of the reports published at the Connecticut Advanced Nuclear Engineering Laboratory (CANEL). The reports cover the period 1952 through 1965 and include the Aircraft Nuclear Propulsion program, the Advanced Liquid Metal Cooled Reactor program, the Advanced Reactor Materials program and the SNAP-50 program. The bibliography contains the report number, title, author, date published, and classification. In some cases where the writing of a report was a group effort, and in some reports containing compilations of certain types of data, the author column is not applicable. This is indicated by a {open_quotes}n.a.{close_quotes} in the author column. The following types of reports are included: PWAC`s, TIM`s, CNLM`s. FXM`s and miscellaneous reports. PWAC and TIM reports conform to the requirements of AEC Manual Chapter 3202-041 and 3202-042, respectively. Most of the technical information of interest generated by this project is documented in these reports, CNLM and FXM reports were written primarily for internal distribution. However, these reports contain enough information of technical interest to warrant their inclusion. All CNLM`s and those FXM`s considered to be of interest are included in this bibliography. The MPR`s (Monthly Progress Reports) are the most important of the miscellaneous categories of reports. The other miscellaneous categories relate primarily to equipment and reactor specifications. The Division of Technical Information Extension (DTIE) at Oak Ridge, Tennessee has been designated as the primary recipient of the reports in the CANEL library. When more than one copy of a report was available, the additional copies were delivered to the Lawrence Radiation Laboratory, Livermore, California.

  9. National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Albany Quadrangle, Massachusetts, New York, Connecticut, Vermont, and New Hampshire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Field, M.T.; Truesdell, D.B.

    1982-09-01

    The Albany 1 0 x 2 0 Quadrangle, Massachusetts, New York, Connecticut, Vermont, and New Hampshire, was evaluated to a depth of 1500 m for uranium favorability using National Uranium Resource Evaluation criteria. Areas of favorable geology and aeroradioactivity anomalies were examined and sampled. Most Triassic and Jurassic sediments in the Connecticut Basin, in the central part of the quadrangle, were found to be favorable for sandstone uranium deposits. Some Precambrian units in the southern Green Mountains of Vermont were found favorable for uranium deposits in veins in metamorphic rocks

  10. ASME XI stroke time testing of solenoid valves at Connecticut Yankee Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, C.W.

    1996-12-01

    Connecticut Yankee Atomic Power Company has developed the capability of measuring the stroke times of AC and DC solenoid valves. This allows the station to measure the stroke time of any solenoid valve in the plant, even those valves which do not have valve stem position indicators. Connecticut Yankee has adapted the ITI MOVATS Checkmate 3 system, using a signal input from a Bruel and Kjaer (B&K) Model 4382 acoustic accelerometer and the Schaumberg Campbell Associates (SCA) Model SCA-1148 dual sensor, which is a combined accelerometer and gaussmeter.

  11. ASME XI stroke time testing of solenoid valves at Connecticut Yankee Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, C.W.

    1996-01-01

    Connecticut Yankee Atomic Power Company has developed the capability of measuring the stroke times of AC and DC solenoid valves. This allows the station to measure the stroke time of any solenoid valve in the plant, even those valves which do not have valve stem position indicators. Connecticut Yankee has adapted the ITI MOVATS Checkmate 3 system, using a signal input from a Bruel and Kjaer (B ampersand K) Model 4382 acoustic accelerometer and the Schaumberg Campbell Associates (SCA) Model SCA-1148 dual sensor, which is a combined accelerometer and gaussmeter

  12. Insane acquittees and insane convicts: the rationalization of policy in nineteenth-century Connecticut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodheart, Lawrence B

    2017-12-01

    A current situation in Connecticut of whether a violent insane acquittee should be held in a state prison or psychiatric facility raises difficult issues in jurisprudence and medical ethics. Overlooked is that the present case of Francis Anderson reiterates much of the debate over rationalization of policy during the formative nineteenth century. Contrary to theories of social control and state absolutism, governance in Connecticut was largely episodic, indecisive and dilatory over much of the century. The extraordinary urban and industrial transformation at the end of the Gilded Age finally forced a coherent response in keeping with longstanding legal and medical perspectives.

  13. Sweeping out Home Economics: Curriculum Reform at Connecticut College for Women, 1952-1962

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marthers, Paul Philip

    2011-01-01

    At the moment of its founding in 1911, Connecticut College for Women exhibited a curricular tension between an emphasis on the liberal arts, which mirrored the elite men's and women's colleges of the day, and vocational aspects, which made it a different type of women's college, one designed to prepare women for the kind of lives they would lead…

  14. 76 FR 41530 - Connecticut Yankee Atomic Power Company, Haddam Neck Plant; Notice of Consideration of Approval...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-14

    ... Atomic Power Company, Haddam Neck Plant; Notice of Consideration of Approval of Application Regarding..., the public can gain entry into ADAMS, which provides text and image files of the NRC's public... No. DPR-61 for the Haddam Neck Plant, currently held by Connecticut Yankee Atomic Power Company...

  15. 77 FR 71140 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Connecticut; NOX

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-29

    ... Modification United States Groton. 1, 8201CC. Naval Submarine Base. 8230 Jacobs Vehicle Bloomfield. Systems.... Naugatuck. 8118 Modification South Norwalk Norwalk. Electrical Works. 8130 Modification Connecticut Newtown... ``Improving Air Quality With Economic Incentive Programs'' (EIP Guidance). (See EPA-452/R-01-001, January 2001...

  16. 77 FR 32898 - Safety & Security Zones; OPSAIL 2012 Connecticut, Thames River, New London, CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-04

    ... 1625-AA00; AA87 Safety & Security Zones; OPSAIL 2012 Connecticut, Thames River, New London, CT AGENCY... 20, 2012 the Coast Guard published a notice of proposed rulemaking entitled Safety & Security Zones... Homeland Security Delegation No. 0170.1, which collectively authorize the Coast Guard to define safety and...

  17. Fish Consumption in Connecticut, Florida, Minnesota, and North Dakota (Final Report)

    Science.gov (United States)

    In August 2013, EPA announced the availability of the final report,Fish Consumption in Connecticut, Florida, Minnesota, and North Dakota. Many state and local health agencies throughout the United States conduct area-specific surveys that monitor and evaluate contaminant ...

  18. 78 FR 6819 - Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Relinquishment From The Connecticut Hospital Association...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-31

    ... Organizations: Voluntary Relinquishment From The Connecticut Hospital Association Federal Patient Safety Organization AGENCY: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), HHS. ACTION: Notice of delisting..., 42 U.S.C. 299b-21--b-26, provides for the formation of Patient Safety Organizations (PSOs), which...

  19. 78 FR 54962 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Connecticut; NOX

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-09

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 [EPA-R01-OAR-2012-0198; A-1-FRL-9900-63-Region1] Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Connecticut; NOX Emission Trading Orders as Single Source SIP Revisions AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY...

  20. 78 FR 58467 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Connecticut; Redesignation of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-24

    ..., is not placed on the Internet and will be publicly available only in hard copy form. Publicly... (CT DEEP) submitted a request for EPA to redesignate the Connecticut portion of the New York-N. New... redesignation request, CT DEEP asked EPA to withdraw the SIP-approved 2009 motor vehicle emissions budgets...

  1. 78 FR 27161 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Connecticut; Ozone Attainment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-09

    ... and made available on the Internet. If you submit an electronic comment, EPA recommends that you... the Internet and will be publicly available only in hard copy form. Publicly available docket... Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection (CT DEEP) submitted a letter withdrawing this...

  2. 2008 update on addiction medicine/psychiatry in the State of Connecticut. Part II of II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Mark L

    2008-05-01

    No other health or social problem impacts our society so widely and profoundly as substance abuse. Investment in Connecticut's substance abuse service system is an investment in improved health and wellness its cities as well as its citizens. Since 2004 Connecticut's addiction treatment and recovery community have worked together to reduce the pain and suffering of those individuals with addiction disorders. The State of Connecticut is a national leader in addiction medicine scientific research and education, emergencyroom care, and public policy; and the Community of Addiction Recovery (CCAR) has emerged as a national leader for the recovery movement. As Chairperson ofthe CSMS's Committee on Alcohol and Other Drug Dependency Education, I am proud of the accomplishments of the Committee and the work of our statewide addiction medicine/psychiatryleaders and recovery community. I am equally proud and appreciative of the ongoing relationship of the CSMS, the addiction treatment and recovery community with DMHAS. Under the leadership of Commissioner Thomas Kirk, DMHAS has opened its arms to embrace the communities' providers. The work of these leaders is presented here to give readers an update on Addiction Medicine/Psychiatry in the State of Connecticut 2008.

  3. Evaluating Child and Youth Homelessness: The Example of New Haven, Connecticut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidd, Sean A.; Scrimenti, Kathryn

    2004-01-01

    Following a review of approaches taken to generate accurate estimates of the scale of child and youth homelessness in America, this article documents the methods and results of a multipronged count of homeless children and youth in New Haven, Connecticut. The survey used in this count accessed demographics and service needs, and was administered…

  4. Acts of Racism and Intolerance at Connecticut Colleges and Universities 1993.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connecticut State Dept. of Higher Education, Hartford.

    This report contains a summary of information submitted by public and independent colleges and universities in Connecticut concerning incidents of racism and intolerance that occurred on campuses during 1993. It reviews the number, type, and disposition of incidents that occurred and describes programs and activities undertaken to promote…

  5. Trace elements and radionuclides in the Connecticut River and Amazon River estuary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dion, E.P.

    1983-01-01

    The Connecticut River, its estuary, and the Amazon River estuary were studied to elucidate some of the processes which control river water chemistry and the flux of elements to the sea. The approach taken was to identify inputs to the Connecticut River and to investigate geochemical processes which modify the dissolved load. The form and quantity of nuclides which are in turn supplied to the estuary are altered by processes unique to that transition zone to the ocean. The Connecticut River estuary was sampled on a seasonal basis to investigate the role of the estuary in controlling the flux of elements to the sea. The knowledge gained from the Connecticut River study was applied to the quantitatively more significant Amazon River estuary. There a variety of samples were analyzed to understand the processes controlling the single greatest flux of elements to the Atlantic Ocean. The results indicate that estimates of the total flux of nuclides to the oceans can best be calculated based on groundwater inputs. Unless significant repositories for nuclides exist in the river-estuarine system, the groundwater flux of dissolved nuclides is that which will eventually be delivered to the ocean despite the reactions which were shown to occur in both rivers and estuaries. 153 references, 63 figures, 28 tables

  6. 77 FR 776 - Agenda and Notice of Public Meeting of the Connecticut Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-06

    .... Commission on Civil Rights (Commission), and the Federal Advisory Committee Act (FACA), that a planning... convene at 12:00 noon (EST) Friday, January 13, 2012. The purpose of the planning meeting is to work to... COMMISSION ON CIVIL RIGHTS Agenda and Notice of Public Meeting of the Connecticut Advisory...

  7. 76 FR 37780 - Agenda and Notice of Public Meeting of the Connecticut Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-28

    .... Commission on Civil Rights (Commission) and the Federal Advisory Committee Act (FACA), that an orientation... Wednesday, July 20, 2011, at the University of Connecticut, School of Law, Faculty Lounge, 55 Elizabeth Street, Hartford, CT 06105. The purpose of the orientation meeting is to review the rules of operation...

  8. Foreign Student Orientation Needs at the University of Connecticut: Results of a Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfau, Richard H.

    Views of 48 foreign students concerning orientation needs at the University of Connecticut were surveyed. The following orientation activities were identified as most important, and are listed in the approximate order of importance: (1) U.S. government regulations (about visas, immigration, social security, and taxes); (2) needs of the spouse…

  9. 78 FR 31459 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Connecticut; Reasonably Available...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-24

    ... equipment is required to control VOC emissions by one of the following methods: Use of an enclosed gun... keeping; air pollution control equipment requirements; surface preparation requirements; and spray gun... and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Connecticut; Reasonably Available Control...

  10. Connecticut's Evolving Interactive Distance Learning Network in the Cable and Telecommunications Industries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietras, Jesse John

    This paper describes the state of interactive distance learning in Connecticut, particularly the current and future provision of these services by the telecommunications and cable television industries. The overview examines questions of where obligation and responsibility lie (with schools, local exchange companies, cable franchises, etc.) in…

  11. Water resources inventory of Connecticut Part 8: Quinnipiac River basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzaferro, David L.; Handman, Elinor H.; Thomas, Mendall P.

    1978-01-01

    The Quinnipiac River basin area in southcentral Connecticut covers 363 square miles, and includes all drainage basins that enter Long Island Sound from the Branford to the Wepawaug Rivers. Its population in 1970 was estimated at 535,000. Precipitation averages 47 inches per year and provides an abundant supply of water. Twenty-one inches returns to the atmosphere as evapotranspiration; the remainder flows directly to streams or percolates to the water table and discharges to Long Island Sound. Small amounts of water are exported from the basin by the New Britain Water Department, and small amounts are imported to the basin by the New Haven Water Company. The amount of water that can be developed at a given place depends upon precipitation, variability of streamflow, hydraulic properties and areal extent of the aquifers, and hydraulic connection between the aquifers and major streams. The quality of the water is determined by the physical environment and the effects of man. Stratified drift is the only aquifer capable of large sustained yields of water to individual wells. Yields of 64 screened wells tapping stratified drift range from 17 to 2,000 gpm (gallons per minute); their median yield is 500 gpm. Till is widespread and generally provides only small amounts of water. Wells in till normally yield only a few hundred gallons of water daily and commonly are inadequate during dry periods. Till is generally used only as an emergency or secondary source of water. Bedrock aquifers underlie the entire report area and include sedimentary, igneous, and metamorphic rock types. These aquifers supply small but reliable quantities of water to wells throughout the basin and are the chief source for many nonurban homes and farms. About 90 percent of the wells tapping bedrock yield at least 2 pgm, and much larger yields are occasionally reported. Maximum well yields of 305 gpm for sedimentary, 75 gpm for igneous, and 200 gpm for metamorphic bedrock have been reported. Water

  12. Validating and assessing integrity of troubled bridges in Connecticut : monitoring cable tensions for the Arrigoni Bridge, Middletown, CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    This report provides information on a study of the Arrigoni Bridge in Middletown, Connecticut, : where vibration measurements are used to determine the tension among various suspender : cables in the structure. Actual vibration data on 134 cables und...

  13. 2010 U.S. Department of Agriculture- Natural Resources Conservation Service (USDA-NRCS) Topographic Lidar: Eastern Connecticut

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Earth Eye collected LiDAR data for approximately 4,589 square kilometers that partially cover the Connecticut counties of Hartford, Tolland, Windham, Middlesex and...

  14. Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, and New Jersey ESI: ESI (Environmental Sensitivity Index Shoreline Types - Polygons and Lines)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains vector lines and polygons representing the shoreline and coastal habitats of Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, and New Jersey, classified...

  15. 2011 U.S. Department of Agriculture- Natural Resources Conservation Service (USDA-NRCS) Topographic Lidar: North West Connecticut

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Earth Eye collected LiDAR data for approximately 1,703 square kilometers that partially cover the Connecticut counties of Litchfield and Fairfield. The nominal pulse...

  16. Safe Shores and Resilient Transit Corridors: Using Science, Design, and Stakeholder Partnerships to Address Connecticut's Coastal Vulnerabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, R. A.; Felson, A. J.; Kirmmse, E.; Hagemann, K.

    2015-12-01

    Connecticut's densely developed coastline is highly vulnerable to sea level rise and coastal storms. 95% of the state's entire population lives within 50 miles of the shore. Connecticut has more than $542 billion in insured assets in harms way, only Florida has a greater exposure. As part of the state of Connecticut Phase 1 application for the HUD National Disaster Resilience Competition, the Connecticut Institute for Resilience and Climate Adaptation (CIRCA) at the University of Connecticut undertook an assessment of coastal vulnerabilities, including the impacts of sea level rise on the frequency of flooding, socioeconomic factors, critical infrastructure, and housing using data collected from federal, state, and municipal sources. Connecticut's unique geology, characterized by a glaciated coastline with highly erodible former deltas and elevated ridgelines extending out to rocky headlands, became the basis of the climate adaptation approach. Together with a nine state agency workgroup, municipal and regional government, and non-profit and industry representatives, CIRCA and the Yale UED lab developed a long-term urban redevelopment solution of resilient access and egress corridors layered over ridgelines and resilient zones of transit oriented economic development linked to shoreline communities. This concept can be applied in both Connecticut's coastal cities like New Haven and its smaller towns. The process demonstrated the effective partnership between the universities and state agencies in bringing the science of flood modeling and mapping together with innovative design to create solutions for climate adaptation. However, it also revealed significant gaps in data availability to analyze the economic and social drivers for adopting different adaptation strategies. Furthermore, the accuracy of current flood mapping tools needs to be improved to predict future flooding at the municipal project scale. As Connecticut and other states move forward with resilience

  17. Assisted reproductive technology use, embryo transfer practices, and birth outcomes after infertility insurance mandates: New Jersey and Connecticut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Sara; Boulet, Sheree L; Jamieson, Denise J; Stone, Carol; Mullen, Jewel; Kissin, Dmitry M

    2016-02-01

    To explore whether recently enacted infertility mandates including coverage for assisted reproductive technology (ART) treatment in New Jersey (2001) and Connecticut (2005) increased ART use, improved embryo transfer practices, and decreased multiple birth rates. Retrospective cohort study using data from the National ART Surveillance System. We explored trends in ART use, embryo transfer practices and birth outcomes, and compared changes in practices and outcomes during a 2-year period before and after passing the mandate between mandate and non-mandate states. Not applicable. Cycles of ART performed in the United States between 1996 and 2013. Infertility insurance mandates including coverage for ART treatment passed in New Jersey (2001) and Connecticut (2005). Number of ART cycles performed, number of embryos transferred, multiple live birth rates. Both New Jersey and Connecticut experienced an increase in ART use greater than the non-mandate states. The mean number of embryos transferred decreased significantly in New Jersey and Connecticut; however, the magnitudes were not significantly different from non-mandate states. There was no significant change in ART birth outcomes in either mandate state except for an increase in live births in Connecticut; the magnitude was not different from non-mandate states. The infertility insurance mandates passed in New Jersey and Connecticut were associated with increased ART treatment use but not a decrease in the number of embryos transferred or the rate of multiples; however, applicability of the mandates was limited. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Legal obstacles and incentives to the development of small scale hydroelectric power in Connecticut

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None,

    1980-05-01

    The legal and institutional obstacles to the development of small-scale hydroelectric power in Connecticut are discussed. The Federal government also exercises extensive regulatory authority in the area and this dual system is examined from the standpoint of the appropriate legal doctrine, the law of pre-emption, application of the law to the case of hydroelectric development, and an inquiry into the practical use of the doctrine by the FERC. Connecticut follows the riparian theory of water law. Under this theory of the water law, private rights in rivers and streams are confined to the use of flowing water. A riparian proprietor does not own the water that flows by his estate. Licensing, permitting, and review procedures are discussed followed by discussion on public utilities regulation and indirect considerations.

  19. Clinical and epidemiological characterization of histoplasmosis cases in a nonendemic area, Connecticut, United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azar, Marwan M; Zhang, Xuchen; Assi, Roland; Hage, Chadi; Wheat, L Joseph; Malinis, Maricar F

    2017-12-08

    We performed a retrospective analysis of histoplasmosis cases diagnosed at our institution in New Haven, Connecticut, from 2005 to 2015. Among 12 cases of active histoplasmosis, seven were immunosuppressed and five had human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Eleven patients reported travel to potentially endemic areas at a median of 105 days prior to presentation; travel to the Caribbean was most common (n = 6). Median time to diagnosis from symptom onset and first Histoplasma antigen testing were 41 and 28 days, respectively. Consistent with reports from other non-endemic areas, our findings suggest that the epidemiology of histoplasmosis may differ in Connecticut, potentially contributing to delayed diagnoses. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The International Society for Human and Animal Mycology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Water resources inventory of Connecticut Part 9: Farmington River basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handman, Elinor H.; Haeni, F. Peter; Thomas, Mendall P.

    1986-01-01

    The Farmington River basin covers 435 square miles in north-central Connecticut upstream from Tariffville and downstream of the Massachusetts state line. Most water in the basin is derived from precipitation, which averages 48 inches (366 billion gallons) per year. An additional 67 billion gallons of water per year enters the basin from Massachusetts in the West Branch of the Farmington River, Hubbard River, Valley Brook and some smaller streams. Of the total 433 billion gallons, 174 billion gallons returns to the atmosphere through evaporation and transpiration. 239 billion gallons flows out of the study area in the Farmington River at Tariffville, and 20 billion gallons is diverted for Hartford water supply. Variations in streamflow at 23 continuous-record gaging stations are summarized in standardized graphs and tables that can be used to estimate streamflow characteristics at other sites. For example, mean flow and low-flow characteristics such as the 7-day annual minimum flow for 2-year and 10-year recurrence intervals, have been determined for many partial-record stations from the data for the 23 continuous-record stations. Of the 31 principal lakes, ponds, and reservoirs in the basin, eight have usable storage capacities of more than 1 billion gallons. Two of the largest, Colebrook River Lake and Barkhamsted Reservoir, have more than 30 billion gallons usable storage. Floods have occurred in the area in every month of the year. The greatest known flood on the Farmington River was in August 1955, which had a peak flow of 140,000 cubic feet per second at Collinsville. Since then, three major floodcontrol reservoirs have been constructed to reduce the hazards of high streamflow. The major aquifers underlying the basin are composed of unconsolidated materials (stratified drift and till) and bedrock (sedimentary, igneous, and metamorphic). Stratified drift overlies till and bedrock in valleys and lowlands; it averages about 90 feet in thickness, and is capable of

  1. New Haven, Connecticut: Targeting Low-Income Household Energy Savings (City Energy: From Data to Decisions)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strategic Priorities and Impact Analysis Team, Office of Strategic Programs

    2017-11-01

    This fact sheet "New Haven, Connecticut: Targeting Low-Income Household Energy Savings" explains how the City of New Haven used data from the U.S. Department of Energy's Cities Leading through Energy Analysis and Planning (Cities-LEAP) and the State and Local Energy Data (SLED) programs to inform its city energy planning. It is one of ten fact sheets in the "City Energy: From Data to Decisions" series.

  2. Too Big, Too Small, or Just Right? Cost-Efficiency of Environmental Inspection Services in Connecticut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Jeffrey P; Checko, Patricia J

    2017-12-01

    To assess optimal activity size/mix of Connecticut local public health jurisdictions, through estimating economies of scale/scope/specialization for environmental inspections/services. Connecticut's 74 local health jurisdictions (LHJs) must provide environmental health services, but their efficiency or reasons for wide cost variation are unknown. The public health system is decentralized, with variation in organizational structure/size. We develop/compile a longitudinal dataset covering all 74 LHJs, annually from 2005 to 2012. We estimate a public health services/inspections cost function, where inputs are translated into outputs. We consider separate estimates of economies of scale/scope/specialization for four mandated inspection types. We obtain data from Connecticut Department of Public Health databases, reports, and other publicly available sources. There has been no known previous utilization of this combined dataset. On average, regional districts, municipal departments, and part-time LHJs are performing fewer than the efficient number of inspections. The full-time municipal departments and regional districts are more efficient but still not at the minimum efficient scale. The regional districts' elasticities of scale are larger, implying they are more efficient than municipal health departments. Local health jurisdictions may enhance efficiency by increasing inspections and/or sharing some services. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  3. Arsenic and uranium in private wells in Connecticut, 2013-15

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, Sarah M.; Brown, Craig J.

    2017-05-03

    The occurrence of arsenic and uranium in groundwater at concentrations that exceed drinking-water standards is a concern because of the potential adverse effects on human health. Some early studies of arsenic occurrence in groundwater considered anthropogenic causes, but more recent studies have focused on sources of naturally occurring arsenic to groundwater, such as minerals within aquifer materials that are in contact with groundwater. Arsenic and uranium in groundwater in New England have been shown to have a strong association to the geologic setting and nearby streambed sediment concentrations. In New Hampshire and Massachusetts, arsenic and uranium concentrations greater than human-health benchmarks have shown distinct spatial patterns when related to the bedrock units mapped at the local scale.The Connecticut Department of Public Health (DPH) reported that there are about 322,600 private wells in Connecticut serving approximately 823,000 people, or 23 percent of the State’s population. The State does not require that existing private wells be routinely tested for arsenic, uranium, or other contaminants; consequently, private wells are only sampled at the well owner’s discretion or when they are newly constructed. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the DPH, completed an assessment in 2016 on the distribution of concentrations of arsenic and uranium in groundwater from bedrock in Connecticut. This report presents the major findings for arsenic and uranium concentrations from water samples collected from 2013 to 2015 from private wells.

  4. "You Say Tomato, I Say Solanum Lycopersicum Containing Beta-ionone and Phenylacetaldehyde": an Analysis of Connecticut's GMO Labeling Legislation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunziato, Travis

    2014-01-01

    "You Say Tomato, I Say Solanum Lycopersicum Containing Beta-ionone and Phenylacetaldehyde" discusses the importance of requiring labels on products that contain genetically modified organisms, focusing on Connecticut's GMO Labeling statutes, as it is they are the first of their kind in the nation. The article will compare Connecticut's law to the legislation found in Australia, highlighting the positive aspects of Connecticut's bill and identifying its key weaknesses, namely the "trigger clause" found in the statute. Part I will provide an overview of Genetic Modification and provide a brief history of Biotechnology. It will also provide a brief overview of the federal regulatory framework in biotechnology, as well as evaluate the United States Food and Drug Association's role of regulating genetic modification. Part I will conclude by discussing how the American public has shown that labeling GMOs is important, and something that should occur. Part II of this article will explore Connecticut's recent legislation requiring labels on products that contain GMOs. Part III will explore Australia's legislation requiring labels on products containing GMOs, comparing Australia's law to Connecticut's legislation.

  5. The Tab: How Connecticut Can Fix Its Dysfunctional Education Spending System to Reward Success, Incentivize Choice and Boost Student Achievement. A ConnCAN/Public Impact Research Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassel, Bryan C.; Doyle, Daniela

    2009-01-01

    Thirty years ago, the Connecticut Supreme Court forced our state to take stock of its system for funding schools. Our poorest towns had thousands of dollars less per child to spend. Today, our poorest districts spend roughly the same as our richest, but Connecticut's poor children still score far below their wealthy peers. Our school finance…

  6. Providing Flood Risk Science for Resilient Transportation Infrastructure Decisions in Connecticut

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, R.; Cifuentes-Lorenzen, A.; Kooris, D.; O'Donnell, J.

    2017-12-01

    The Connecticut Institute for Resilience and Climate Adaptation (CIRCA) provides actionable science to accelerate adaptation and resilience strategies for Connecticut's inland and coastal waterways communities. Connecticut's coastal area has some of the most valuable real estate in the United States due to the Metro North and Shoreline East commuter rail line that connects all 24 coastal municipalities through transit hubs to the New York City metropolitan region. On its way to NY, the rail runs through neighborhoods and coastal marshes and crosses local and state roads. During coastal storms and increasingly at high tides as the sea level rises, the rail line may act like a berm, but also cuts off coastal neighborhoods from the upland. When it crosses a road in a marsh setting, the clearance restriction also severely limits communities' options for moving or elevating the roadway. These flooded roadways and vulnerable transit hubs are already a challenge for municipalities and will continue to be in the future. However, given scarce resources, it is not sufficient to simply know that they are vulnerable using existing low resolution mapping tools. Communities need site-specific, exact estimates of frequency of flooding, incorporating future sea level rise, to make cost determinations and accurately project the useful life of their investment. To address this need CIRCA developed high-resolution dynamic coastal flood risk models and partnered with municipal staff, regional planning bodies and the state to apply them to infrastructure decision-making. We will present three case studies of this approach: 1) the implementation of the US HUD National Disaster Resilience Competition pilot project of road elevation and berm construction in partnership with the Department of Housing and the City of Bridgeport; 2) the City of New London's first rail and ferry transit hub vulnerability assessment for sea level rise and storms and 3) the flooding frequency of a state road

  7. The effect of helmets on motorcycle outcomes in a level I trauma center in Connecticut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiznia, Daniel H; Kim, Chang-Yeon; Dai, Feng; Goel, Alex; Leslie, Michael P

    2016-08-17

    The State of Connecticut has a partial motorcycle helmet law, which has been linked to one of the lowest helmet compliance rates in the Northeast. We examine the clinical and financial impact of low motorcycle helmet use in the State of Connecticut. A retrospective cohort study comparing the outcomes between helmeted and nonhelmeted motorcycle crash victims over a 12.5-year period, from July 2, 2002, to December 31, 2013. All patients who were admitted to the hospital after a motorcycle crash were included in the study. Patients were stratified into helmeted and nonhelmeted cohorts. Group differences were compared using t-test or Wilcoxon rank test for continuous variables and chi-square test for dichotomous outcomes. Regression models were created to evaluate predictors of helmet use, alcohol and drugs as confounding variables, and factors that influenced hospital costs. The registry included 986 eligible patients. Of this group, 335 (34%) were helmeted and 651 (66%) were nonhelmeted. Overall, nonhelmeted patients had a worse clinical presentation, with lower Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS; P helmeted patients incurred $14,970 (P =.18). ISS, GCS, and ICU length of stay were significantly correlated with increased hospital costs (P helmet was a significant predictor of mortality (P =.04) after adjusting for alcohol/drug use and age. Helmet use is associated with lower injury severity and increased survival after a motorcycle crash. These outcomes remained consistent even after controlling for age and alcohol and drug use. The medical and financial impact of Connecticut's partial helmet law should be carefully evaluated to petition for increased education and enforcement of helmet use.

  8. Trace elements and radionuclides in the Connecticut River and Amazon River estuary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dion, E.P.

    1983-01-01

    The Connecticut River, its estuary and the Amazon River plume were studied to elucidate processes which control the flux of nuclides to the sea. Major ions (Ca, Mg, Na, Cl, Bicarbonate) and selected trace elements (Ra, Ba, Cu, Si) are introduced to the Connecticut River in proportion to the total dissolved load of various groundwaters. Si, Ra, and Ba are subject to removal from solution by seasonal diatom productivity; whereas the other groundwater-derived elements are found in proportion to TDS both time and space. These nuclides are released in the estuary when a portion of the Ra, Ba, and Si in riverine biogenic detritus is trapped in salt marshes and coves bordering the estuary where it redissolves and is exported to the main river channel at ebb tide. In the Amazon River estuary, the Ra and Ba are released in mid-salinity waters. Ra and Ba together with Si are subsequently removed by diatom productivity as reflected in increased Ra and Ba in the suspended particles and depleted dissolved nuclide concentrations in samples from the high productivity zone. In both the Connecticut River system and the Amazon River plume, Cu behaves conservatively; whereas the fates of Fe and Al are linked to soil-derived humic acids. Trace elements in Amazon plume sediments are found simply in proportion to the percentage of fine-grained size materials, despite low Th-228/Ra-228 mean residence times in the plume and the presence of Cs-137 in the sediment column. Estimates of the total flux of nuclides to the oceans can best be calculated on a mass balance basis using groundwater inputs. Unless significant repositories for nuclides exist in the river-estuarine system, the groundwater flux of dissolved nuclides is net flux to the ocean despite the reactions which occur in both rivers and estuaries

  9. Determining training effectiveness: a model developed for use at Connecticut Yankee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulligna, R.R.

    1983-01-01

    The purpose (or intent) of training, in the Nuclear Power Industry, is to provide an operating/support organization capable of safely and efficiently operating a nuclear power plant throughout its operating lifetime. (ANSI/ANS-3.1 - 1981). It stands, then, that the extent of fulfillment of this purpose, the extent of accomplishment of this desired result, needs to be determined. (The question How well, also needs to be answered). Evolve, the Determining Training Effectiveness Program. This paper presents an Effective Training Model and discusses the construct of the Determining Training Effectiveness Program at Connecticut Yankee

  10. Geologic features of the Connecticut Valley, Massachusetts, as related to recent floods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahns, Richard Henry

    1947-01-01

    This report gives the results of a geologic study of certain features that bear upon the recent flood behavior of rivers flowing in the Massachusetts part of the Connecticut Valley. It is in part an outline of the physiographic history of the Connecticut River, a 'history that is treated in progressively greater detail as it concerns events occurring from Mesozoic time to the present, and in part a discussion of erosional and depositional processes associated with the extraordinary floods of March 1936 and September 1938. The Connecticut River flows southward through Massachusetts in a broad lowland area of more than 400 square miles and is joined in this area by four large tributaries, the Deerfield and Westfield Rivers from the west and the Millers and Chicopee Rivers from the east. The lowland area, or :Connecticut Valley province, is flanked on the west by the Berkshire Hills, a, deeply incised uplifted plateau, and on the east by the central upland, or Worcester .County plateau, a lower upland marked by rolling topography. Most of the broad, relatively flat valley floor is underlain by Triassic sedimentary rocks. Rising above it, however, are the prominent Holyoke-Mount Tom and Deerfield Ranges, which consist in large part of dark-colored igneous rocks, also of Triassic age. There is evidence of several cycles of erosion in central western Massachusetts, the last two of which are of Tertiary age and appear to have reached nature and very youthful stages of topographic development, respectively. Immediately prior to the glacial epoch, therefore, the Connecticut River flowed in a fairly narrow, deep gorge, which it had incised in the rather flat 5ottom of the valley that it had formed at an earlier stage. A Pleistocene crustal subsidence probably of several hundred feet, for which there has been only partial compensation in postglacial time, was responsible for the present position of much of this gorge below sea level. That an estuary does not now occupy the

  11. Life cycle costs for disposal and assured isolation of low-level radioactive waste in Connecticut

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chau, B.; Sutherland, A.A.; Baird, R.D.

    1998-03-01

    This document presents life cycle costs for a low-level radioactive disposal facility and a comparable assured isolation facility. Cost projections were based on general plans and assumptions, including volume projections and operating life, provided by the Connecticut Hazardous Waste Management Service, for a facility designed to meet the State's needs. Life cycle costs include the costs of pre-construction activities, construction, operations, closure, and post-closure institutional control. In order to provide a better basis for understanding the relative magnitude of near-term costs and future costs, the results of present value analysis of ut-year costs are provided

  12. National environmental/energy workforce assessment. Connecticut. Final report on phase 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-12-01

    This study is one of 70 volumes assessing the workforce needs (manpower needs) for pollution control and abatement in the United States for the five-year period of 1976 through 1981. Seven fields for pollution control -- air, noise, pesticides, potable water, radiation, solid waste, and wastewater -- are analyzed, together with energy-related programs currently accentuated by the national effort to solve energy supply problems. The report identifies existing workforce levels, training programs, career opportunities, and future staffing level projections (1976 to 1982) based on the information available for the state of Connecticut

  13. From cure to custodianship of the insane poor in nineteenth-century Connecticut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodheart, Lawrence B

    2010-01-01

    Connecticut was the exception among the Northeastern and Middle Atlantic states in not founding a public institution for the insane until after the Civil War when it opened the Hospital for the Insane at Middletown in 1868, a facility previously neglected by scholars. The state had relied on the expedient of subsidizing the impoverished at the private Hartford Retreat for the Insane that overtaxed that institution and left hundreds untreated. Despite abundant evidence to the contrary, well meaning officials oversold the idea that the Middletown site would promote cures and be cost effective. A number of unanticipated consequences occurred that mirrored fundamental changes in nineteenth-century psychiatry. The new hospital swelled by 1900 to over 2,000 patients, the largest in New England. Custodianship at the monolithic hospital became the norm. The hegemony of monopoly capitalism legitimated the ruling idea that bigger institutions were better and was midwife to the birth of eugenic responses. Class based psychiatry--the few rich at the Retreat and the many poor at Middletown--was standard as it was in other aspects of the Gilded Age. Public policy toward the insane poor in Connecticut represents an outstanding example of the transition from antebellum romanticism to fin de siècle fatalism.

  14. Connecticut's Value-Based Insurance Plan Increased The Use Of Targeted Services And Medication Adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirth, Richard A; Cliff, Elizabeth Q; Gibson, Teresa B; McKellar, M Richard; Fendrick, A Mark

    2016-04-01

    In 2011 Connecticut implemented the Health Enhancement Program for state employees. This voluntary program followed the principles of value-based insurance design (VBID) by lowering patient costs for certain high-value primary and chronic disease preventive services, coupled with requirements that enrollees receive these services. Nonparticipants in the program, including those removed for noncompliance with its requirements, were assessed a premium surcharge. The program was intended to curb cost growth and improve health through adherence to evidence-based preventive care. To evaluate its efficacy in doing so, we compared changes in service use and spending after implementation of the program to trends among employees of six other states. Compared to employees of other states, Connecticut employees were similar in age and sex but had a slightly higher percentage of enrollees with chronic conditions and substantially higher spending at baseline. During the program's first two years, the use of targeted services and adherence to medications for chronic conditions increased, while emergency department use decreased, relative to the situation in the comparison states. The program's impact on costs was inconclusive and requires a longer follow-up period. This novel combination of VBID principles and participation requirements may be a tool that can help plan sponsors increase the use of evidence-based preventive services. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  15. Impact of Connecticut Legislation Incentivizing Elimination of Unhealthy Competitive Foods on National School Lunch Program Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luedicke, Joerg; Dorsey, Marice; Fiore, Susan S.; Henderson, Kathryn E.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. We analyzed the impact of Connecticut legislation incentivizing voluntary school district–level elimination of unhealthy competitive foods on National School Lunch Program (NSLP) participation. Methods. We analyzed data on free, reduced, and paid participation in the NSLP from 904 schools within 154 Connecticut school districts from the 2004–2005 to the 2009–2010 school year, resulting in 5064 observations of annual school-level meal participation. We used multilevel regression modeling techniques to estimate the impact of the state competitive food legislation on the count of NSLP lunches served per student in each school. Results. Overall, the state statute was associated with an increase in school lunch participation. We observed increases between 7% and 23% for middle- and high-school meal programs, and a slight decrease of 2.5% for the elementary school free meal eligibility category, leading to an estimated revenue increase of roughly $30 000 for an average school district per school year. Conclusions. This study provides support for national implementation of proposed rigorous competitive food standards that can improve the health of students while supporting local school district finances. PMID:23678930

  16. Joint Regulation of Radionuclides at Connecticut Yankee Haddam Neck Plant - Finding Common Ground and Lessons Learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, J.; Glucksberg, N.; Fogg, A.; Couture, B.

    2006-01-01

    During the site closure of nuclear facilities where both radionuclides and chemicals are present in environmental media, state and federal regulatory agencies other than the Nuclear Regulatory Commission often have a stake in the regulation of the site closure process. At the Connecticut Yankee Atomic Power Company (CYAPCO) Haddam Neck Plant in Haddam, Connecticut, the site closure process includes both radiological and chemical cleanup which is regulated by two separate divisions within the state and two federal agencies. Each of the regulatory agencies has unique closure criteria which pertain to radionuclides and, consequently, there is overlapping and in some cases disparate regulation of radionuclides. Considerable effort has been expended by CYAPCO to find common ground in meeting the site closure requirements for radionuclides required by each of the agencies. This paper discusses the approaches that have been used by CYAPCO to address radionuclide site closure requirements. Significant lessons learned from these approaches include the demonstration that public health cleanup criteria for most radionuclides of concern at nuclear power generation facilities are protective for chemical toxicity concerns and are protective for ecological receptors and, consequently, performing a baseline ecological risk assessment for radionuclides at power generation facilities is not generally necessary. (authors)

  17. Combining Mineral Identification Techniques to Help Homeowners of Northeastern Connecticut Diagnose Pyrrhotite Laced Concrete Foundations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourley, J. R.; Geiss, C. E.

    2017-12-01

    Crumbling concrete linked to the mineral pyrrhotite is an emerging home owner crisis in northeastern Connecticut as new home foundations are failing within only several years. Potentially thousands of homes that have been built between the mid 1980's and 2016 are affected. Homes have been rendered worthless as basement concrete is crumbling and the cost of repair often exceeds the value of the home. In all of the failing concrete cases the presence of pyrrhotite from a local quarry is the common denominator. Testing for pyrrhotite, until now, has been costly and often invasive, with large core samples required. In working with a local advocacy group, The Connecticut Coalition Against Crumbling Basements (CCACB), we have developed a rapid analysis method that uses a combination of magnetic susceptibility and high resolution X-ray diffraction to identify both the mineral pyrrhotite and/or its expansive product mineral, ettringite. The goal of this method to give homeowners a reliable diagnosis that could help in mitigation decisions and/or the determination of the resale value of their homes. The partnership of Trinity College's Environmental Science Program with the CCACB has built a rewarding bridge between education and the community. Faculty, students and local advocates are collaborating to solve a problem that will help homeowners diagnose a potentially devastating non-natural "geo" hazard that can adversely affect home values where concrete is of an unknown provenance.

  18. Anterior Deep Bite Malocclusion Treated with Connecticut Intrusion Arch: Biomechanical Consideration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Abhishek; Sami, Laique; Tapashetti, Roopali; Gaikwad, Shashank

    2014-01-01

    Most Class II division 2 malocclusion manifest a severe deep bite, the orthodontic correction of deep overbite can be achieved with several mechanisms one such mechanics is true intrusion of anterior teeth. Deep overbite correction by intrusion of anterior teeth affords a number of advantages which includes simplifying control of the vertical dimension and allowing forward rotation of mandible to aid in Class II correction. It also aid in correction of a high gingival smile line. This case report presents the patient of a 14-year-old boy with Class II division 2 subdivision malocclusion treated with connecticut intrusion arch and also highlights the biomechanical aspect of this appliance. Intrusion of anterior teeth is difficult. An appropriate, effective and clinically manageable biomechanical system is required. The treatment approach shown in this case can treat the deep overbite precisely with incisor intrusion. The article shows the versatility of Connecticut Intrusion Arch and by applying the sound biomechanical principles we can execute the planned mechanics with minimal side effects. PMID:24995261

  19. Integrated Multibeam and LIDAR Bathymetry Data Offshore of New London and Niantic, Connecticut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppe, L.J.; Danforth, W.W.; McMullen, K.Y.; Parker, Castle E.; Lewit, P.G.; Doran, E.F.

    2010-01-01

    Nearshore areas within Long Island Sound are of great interest to the Connecticut and New York research and resource management communities because of their ecological, recreational, and commercial importance. Although advances in multibeam echosounder technology permit the construction of high-resolution representations of sea-floor topography in deeper waters, limitations inherent in collecting fixed-angle multibeam data make using this technology in shallower waters (less than 10 meters deep) difficult and expensive. These limitations have often resulted in data gaps between areas for which multibeam bathymetric datasets are available and the adjacent shoreline. To address this problem, the geospatial data sets released in this report seamlessly integrate complete-coverage multibeam bathymetric data acquired off New London and Niantic Bay, Connecticut, with hydrographic Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) data acquired along the nearshore. The result is a more continuous sea floor representation and a much smaller gap between the digital bathymetric data and the shoreline than previously available. These data sets are provided online and on CD-ROM in Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI) raster-grid and GeoTIFF formats in order to facilitate access, compatibility, and utility.

  20. Classifying the Health of Connecticut Streams Using Benthic Macroinvertebrates with Implications for Water Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellucci, Christopher J.; Becker, Mary E.; Beauchene, Mike; Dunbar, Lee

    2013-06-01

    Bioassessments have formed the foundation of many water quality monitoring programs throughout the United States. Like many state water quality programs, Connecticut has developed a relational database containing information about species richness, species composition, relative abundance, and feeding relationships among macroinvertebrates present in stream and river systems. Geographic Information Systems can provide estimates of landscape condition and watershed characteristics and when combined with measurements of stream biology, provide a useful visual display of information that is useful in a management context. The objective of our study was to estimate the stream health for all wadeable stream kilometers in Connecticut using a combination of macroinvertebrate metrics and landscape variables. We developed and evaluated models using an information theoretic approach to predict stream health as measured by macroinvertebrate multimetric index (MMI) and identified the best fitting model as a three variable model, including percent impervious land cover, a wetlands metric, and catchment slope that best fit the MMI scores (adj- R 2 = 0.56, SE = 11.73). We then provide examples of how modeling can augment existing programs to support water management policies under the Federal Clean Water Act such as stream assessments and anti-degradation.

  1. Classifying the health of Connecticut streams using benthic macroinvertebrates with implications for water management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellucci, Christopher J; Becker, Mary E; Beauchene, Mike; Dunbar, Lee

    2013-06-01

    Bioassessments have formed the foundation of many water quality monitoring programs throughout the United States. Like many state water quality programs, Connecticut has developed a relational database containing information about species richness, species composition, relative abundance, and feeding relationships among macroinvertebrates present in stream and river systems. Geographic Information Systems can provide estimates of landscape condition and watershed characteristics and when combined with measurements of stream biology, provide a useful visual display of information that is useful in a management context. The objective of our study was to estimate the stream health for all wadeable stream kilometers in Connecticut using a combination of macroinvertebrate metrics and landscape variables. We developed and evaluated models using an information theoretic approach to predict stream health as measured by macroinvertebrate multimetric index (MMI) and identified the best fitting model as a three variable model, including percent impervious land cover, a wetlands metric, and catchment slope that best fit the MMI scores (adj-R (2) = 0.56, SE = 11.73). We then provide examples of how modeling can augment existing programs to support water management policies under the Federal Clean Water Act such as stream assessments and anti-degradation.

  2. Predictors of Nutrition Quality in Early Child Education Settings in Connecticut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreyeva, Tatiana; Kenney, Erica L; O'Connell, Meghan; Sun, Xiaohan; Henderson, Kathryn E

    2018-02-23

    This study assessed the dietary quality of lunches and feeding practices (family-style service, teacher role modeling) in Connecticut child care centers and made comparisons by center participation in the federal Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP). Plate waste methods and visual observation of lunches served and consumed. A total of 97 randomly selected licensed Connecticut child care centers (53 CACFP and 44 non-CACFP). A total of 838 preschool-aged children. Total energy intake, macronutrient intake, and intake by CACFP meal component as well as use of family-style dining, management of additional helpings, and whether and what teachers consumed in view of children. Child dietary intake at lunch was compared with dietary and CACFP recommendations using a mixed linear regression model. The CACFP centers were more likely to offer family-style service and have staff eat the same foods as the children. Children in non-CACFP centers consumed more saturated fat (4.1 vs 2.7 g; P advantages in terms of provider behavior during meals, characteristics of food offerings, and child intake. Current feeding practices in child care settings require further exploration in the context of serving children at risk for food insecurity and in light of recent work on responsive feeding. Copyright © 2018 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Water-quality characteristics of selected public recreational lakes and ponds in Connecticut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, D.F.; Kulp, K.P.

    1995-01-01

    Reconnaissance limnological and lakebed-sediment surveys were conducted in Connecticut during 1989-91 by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Connecticut Department of Environmental Protec- tion, to evaluate water-quality characteristics of selected public recreational lakes and ponds in the State. Limnological surveys were conducted on 49 lakes and ponds selected from a list of 105 publicly owned waterbodies that qualified for water- quality assessments under Section 314 of the Federal Clean Water Act. Lakebed-sediment surveys were conducted in 9 river impoundments and 1 riverine lake below industrial areas and 2 headwater lakes in relatively pristine areas. The limnological surveys consisted of two sampling events--during spring turnover and during the summer stratifi- cation. Each sampling event included depth profiles of water temperature, specific conductance, hydrogen-ion activity, and dissolved oxygen concen- trations; measurements of Secchi disc transparency; and the collection of samples for the analyses of alkalinity, chlorophyll, phosphorus, and nitrogen concentrations. Areal extent and population density of the dominant aquatic macrophytes were qualita- tively noted during the summer sampling event. These water-quality data were used to determine the trophic classification and acidification status of the 49 lakes. The trophic classification yielded the following results: 2 oligotrophic, 8 early mesotrophic, 13 mesotrophic, 5 late mesotrophic, 10 eutrophic, and 11 highly eutrophic lakes. In terms of acidification status, 7 lakes were classified as acid threatened and 42 as not threatened. A Wilcoxon two-tailed signed rank test was used to compare data for 13 lakes and ponds from the present survey with data from the 1973-75 or 1978-79 surveys conducted by the Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station and Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection. The test showed no significant difference at the 90 percent confidence level for

  4. Nitrogen concentrations and loads for the Connecticut River at Middle Haddam, Connecticut, computed with the use of autosampling and continuous measurements of water quality for water years 2009 to 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullaney, John R.; Martin, Joseph W.; Morrison, Jonathan

    2018-03-20

    The daily and annual loads of nitrate plus nitrite and total nitrogen for the Connecticut River at Middle Haddam, Connecticut, were determined for water years 2009 to 2014. The analysis was done with a combination of methods, which included a predefined rating curve method for nitrate plus nitrite and total nitrogen for water years 2009 to 2011 and a custom rating curve method that included sensor measurements of nitrate plus nitrite nitrogen concentration and turbidity along with mean daily flow to determine total nitrogen loads for water years 2011 to 2014. Instantaneous concentrations of total nitrogen were estimated through the use of a regression model based on sensor measurements at 15-minute intervals of nitrate plus nitrite nitrogen and turbidity for water years 2011 to 2014.Annual total nitrogen loads at the Connecticut River at Middle Haddam ranged from 12,900 to 19,200 metric tons, of which about 42 to 49 percent was in the form of nitrate plus nitrite. The mean 95-percent prediction intervals on daily total nitrogen load estimates were smaller from the custom model, which used sensor data, than those calculated by the predefined model.Annual total nitrogen load estimates at the Connecticut River at Middle Haddam were compared with the upstream load estimates at the Connecticut River at Thompsonville, Conn. Annual gains in total nitrogen loads between the two stations ranged from 3,430 to 6,660 metric tons. These increases between the two stations were attributed to the effects of increased urbanization and to combined annual discharges of 1,540 to 2,090 metric tons of nitrogen from 24 wastewater treatment facilities in the drainage area between the two stations. The contribution of total nitrogen from wastewater discharge between the two stations had declined substantially before the beginning of this study and accounted for from 31 to 52 percent of the gain in nitrogen load between the Thompsonville and Middle Haddam sites.

  5. Motorcycle Helmets: The Economic Burden of an Incomplete Helmet Law to Medical Care in the State of Connecticut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiznia, Daniel H; Averbukh, Leon; Kim, Chang-Yeon; Goel, Alex; Leslie, Michael P

    2015-09-01

    The lack of a mandatory motorcycle helmet law leads to increased injury severity and increased health care costs. This study presents a financial model to estimate how the lack of a mandatory helmet law impacts the cost of health care in the state of Connecticut. The average cost to treat a helmeted rider and a nonhelmeted rider was $3,112 and $5,746 respectively (cost adjusted for year 2014). The total hospital treatment cost in the state of Connecticut from 2003 through 2012 was $73,106,197, with $51,508,804 attributed to nonhelmeted riders and $21,597,393 attributed to helmeted riders. The total Medicaid cost to the state of Connecticut for treating nonhelmeted patients was $18,277,317. This model demonstrates that the lack of a mandatory helmet law increases overall health care costs to the state of Connecticut, and provides a framework by which hospital costs can be reduced to contribute to the economic stability of health care economics in the state.

  6. Geologic evolution of the lower Connecticut River valley: Influence of bedrock geology, glacial deposits, and sea level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Janet R.; Lewis, Ralph S.

    2016-01-01

    This fieldtrip illustrates the character of the lower Connecticut River bedrock valley, in particular its depth, and the lithology and structure of bedrock units it crosses. It examines the character and distribution of the glaciodeltaic terraces that partially fill the valley and discusses the depth of postglacial incision into them.

  7. An Examination of Mental Health Content in Course Work and Field Experiences in Connecticut Educational Leadership Preparation Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papa, Dorothy P.

    2017-01-01

    This exploratory mixed method convergent parallel study examined Connecticut Educational leadership preparation programs for the existence of mental health content to learn the extent to which pre-service school leaders are prepared for addressing student mental health. Interviews were conducted with school mental health experts and Connecticut…

  8. The Forests of Southern New England, 2007: A report on the forest resources of Connecticut, Massachusetts, and Rhode Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brett J. Butler; Charles J. Barnett; Susan J. Crocker; Grant M. Domke; Dale Gormanson; William N. Hill; Cassandra M. Kurtz; Tonya Lister; Christopher Martin; Patrick D. Miles; Randall Morin; W. Keith Moser; Mark D. Nelson; Barbara O' Connell; Bruce Payton; Charles H. Perry; Ronald J. Piva; Rachel Riemann; Christopher W. Woodall

    2011-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of the fifth forest inventory of the forests of Southern New England, defined as Connecticut, Massachusetts, and Rhode Island, conducted by the U.S. Forest Service, Forest Inventory and analysis program. Information on forest attributes, ownership, land use change, carbon, timber products, forest health, and statistics and quality...

  9. 75 FR 14634 - Dominion Nuclear Connecticut, Inc.; Millstone Power Station, Unit Nos. 1, 2, and 3; Environmental...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-26

    ...-49, issued to Dominion Nuclear Connecticut, Inc. (DNC or the licensee) for operation of Millstone... with certain new requirements contained in 10 CFR 73.55 by the March 31, 2010, deadline. DNC has... beyond the date required by 10 [[Page 14635

  10. 75 FR 16517 - Dominion Nuclear Connecticut, Inc.; Millstone Power Station, Unit Nos 1, 2, and 3; Exemption

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Dominion Nuclear Connecticut, Inc. (DNC or the licensee) is the holder of Facility Operating License Nos... from two of these new requirements that DNC now seeks an exemption from the March 31, 2010... supplemented by letter dated January 12, 2010 (ADAMS Accession No. ML100131115), DNC requested an exemption in...

  11. Regional Regression Equations to Estimate Flow-Duration Statistics at Ungaged Stream Sites in Connecticut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahearn, Elizabeth A.

    2010-01-01

    Multiple linear regression equations for determining flow-duration statistics were developed to estimate select flow exceedances ranging from 25- to 99-percent for six 'bioperiods'-Salmonid Spawning (November), Overwinter (December-February), Habitat Forming (March-April), Clupeid Spawning (May), Resident Spawning (June), and Rearing and Growth (July-October)-in Connecticut. Regression equations also were developed to estimate the 25- and 99-percent flow exceedances without reference to a bioperiod. In total, 32 equations were developed. The predictive equations were based on regression analyses relating flow statistics from streamgages to GIS-determined basin and climatic characteristics for the drainage areas of those streamgages. Thirty-nine streamgages (and an additional 6 short-term streamgages and 28 partial-record sites for the non-bioperiod 99-percent exceedance) in Connecticut and adjacent areas of neighboring States were used in the regression analysis. Weighted least squares regression analysis was used to determine the predictive equations; weights were assigned based on record length. The basin characteristics-drainage area, percentage of area with coarse-grained stratified deposits, percentage of area with wetlands, mean monthly precipitation (November), mean seasonal precipitation (December, January, and February), and mean basin elevation-are used as explanatory variables in the equations. Standard errors of estimate of the 32 equations ranged from 10.7 to 156 percent with medians of 19.2 and 55.4 percent to predict the 25- and 99-percent exceedances, respectively. Regression equations to estimate high and median flows (25- to 75-percent exceedances) are better predictors (smaller variability of the residual values around the regression line) than the equations to estimate low flows (less than 75-percent exceedance). The Habitat Forming (March-April) bioperiod had the smallest standard errors of estimate, ranging from 10.7 to 20.9 percent. In

  12. Building Connecticut's clinical biodosimetry laboratory surge capacity to mitigate the health consequences of radiological and nuclear disasters: A collaborative approach between the state biodosimetry laboratory and Connecticut's medical infrastructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albanese, Joseph; Martens, Kelly; Arnold, Jeffrey L.; Kelley, Katherine; Kristie, Virginia; Forte, Elaine; Schneider, Mark; Dainiak, Nicholas

    2007-01-01

    Biodosimetry, based on the analysis of dicentric chromosomes in circulating mononuclear cells, is considered the 'gold standard' for estimating radiation dose and is used to make informed decisions regarding the medical management of irradiated persons. This paper describes the development of biodosimetry laboratory surge capacity for the health consequences of radiological and nuclear disasters in Connecticut, including: (1) establishment of the Biodosimetry Laboratory for the timely assessment of radiation dosage in biodosimetry specimens; (2) identification of clinical laboratories qualified and willing to process biodosimetry specimens from a large number of victims; (3) training of clinical laboratorians in initial biodosimetry specimen processing; and (4) conducting a functional drill that evaluated the effectiveness of these elements. Descriptive information was obtained from: (1) personal observations; (2) a needs assessment of clinical laboratories in Connecticut; (3) records from a training program of clinical laboratorians in biodosimetry specimen processing that was developed and provided by the Yale New Haven Center for Emergency Preparedness and Disaster Response; and (4) records from a statewide functional drill in biodosimetry specimen processing that was developed and conducted by the State of Connecticut Biodosimetry Laboratory. A needs assessment of clinical laboratories in Connecticut identified 30 of 32 clinical laboratories qualified and willing to perform initial biodosimetry specimen processing. Currently, 79 clinical laboratorians in 19 of these qualified clinical laboratories have been trained in biodosimetry specimen processing. A functional exercise was conducted involving 37 of these trained clinical laboratorians in 18 qualified laboratories as well as the Biodosimetry Laboratory. The average turnaround time for biodosimetry specimen processing in this drill was 199 min. Exercise participants provided feedback which will be used to

  13. How ``Natural'' are inland wetlands? an example from the trail wood audubon sanctuary in Connecticut, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorson, Robert M.; Harris, Sandra L.

    1991-09-01

    We examined the geology of a small inland wetland in Hampton, Connecticut to determine its postglacial history and to assess the severity of human impact at this remote wooded site. Using stratigraphic evidence, we dernonstrate that the present wetland was created when sediment pollution from a 19th-century railroad filled a preexisting artificial reservoir, and that the prehistoric wetland was a narrow drainage swale along Hampton Brook. This same, severely impacted wetland was interpreted by the Pulitzer Prize-winning naturalist Edwin Way Teale as a beautiful wilderness area of particular interest. These conflicting perceptions indicate that artificial wetlands can be naturally mitigated in less than a century of healing, even in the absence of deliberate management. We also point out that the “wilderness” value of the Teale wetland was in the eye of the beholder and that unseen human impacts may have improved the aesthetic experience.

  14. Correctional nursing competency development in the Connecticut Correctional Managed Health Care program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, Deborah; Weiskopf, Constance; Nicholson, Michael

    2010-10-01

    This article reports on a work group process that aimed to articulate the American Nurses Association (ANA) standards of correctional nursing practice in the Connecticut Department of Correction. When recruiting nurses for prison health care, few candidates possess enough experience in all of the related fields, and even experienced nurses are seldom prepared for the environment and its challenging population. A public-academic partnership provided a model for collaboration. Workforce development methods used in the United Kingdom for correctional nursing were combined with the ANA professional development model. An incremental implementation plan was designed. Orientation checklists and methods to assure entry-level baseline competencies, resource manuals, supervisor packets, and evaluation strategies were developed. The group process was as important as the products it developed. The pathway toward the future of the correctional nursing workforce begins with articulation of correctional nursing competencies.

  15. Ew, that's icky: Assessing children's attitudes towards the insects of Connecticut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, Faith Jean-Ellen

    This study investigated children's attitudes towards insects, focusing on how attitudes change from fascination to repulsion as the children age. This study involved 127 elementary students (grades 4-6) and 139 high school students (grades 9-12) from New Haven public schools. Students were administered Likert type surveys to evaluate their attitudes after viewing photos of 8 common insects of Connecticut; the butterfly, ladybug, dragonfly, ant, moth, cricket, beetle, and fly. Scores from elementary school students were compared with high school students to determine if attitudes towards insects became less favorable as the children age. The results were also analyzed to determine if attitudinal changes were consistent between girls and boys. It was found that elementary school students did not hold more negative attitudes than high school students, but girls did hold more negative attitudes towards insects than boys.

  16. Body mass index, weight change, and survival in non-Hodgkin lymphoma patients in Connecticut women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xuesong; Stevens, June; Bradshaw, Patrick T

    2013-01-01

    Evidence is emerging that obesiy and weight gain may affect the prognosis of several types of cancer. We investigated the impact of body mass index (BMI) as well as pre-and postdiagnosis weight changes on non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) prognosis. A cohort of 573 female incident NHL cases diagnosed during 1996-2000 in Connecticut was followed for a median of 7.8 yr. Self-reported height and weight at 3 time points before and after diagnosis were collected. Hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using proportional hazard models adjusting for factors believed to be associated with overall survival of NHL. Underweight (BMI treatment were found to have a poorer survival.

  17. Advanced Placement Scores for Black Male Students from Connecticut, Florida, Maryland, Massachetts, and Texas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanine L. Wilson

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Differences in student performance were analyzed for Black males in Connecticut, Florida, Maryland, Massachusetts, and Texas on the Advanced Placement English Language and Composition, Calculus AB, Biology, and United States History examinations from the 2001 through the 2012 exam years. All analyses included in the comparisons of overall examination scores and U.S. History examination scores were statistically significant. Of the 48 individual examination comparisons, 26 yielded evidence of a statistically significant difference among the Black male students from the selected states. Massachusetts was the state with the highest percentages of Black male students who achieved an AP score of 4 or 5. Conversely, Texas was the state with the highest percentages of Black male students who failed to achieve an AP score of 4 or 5. Implications for policy regarding advanced placement testing as an avenue for preparing students for college and recommendations for future research are discussed.

  18. Comparison of genetic diversity in the recently founded Connecticut River Atlantic salmon population to that of its primary donor stock, Maine's Penobscot River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spidle, A.P.; King, T.L.; Letcher, B.H.

    2004-01-01

    Anadromous Atlantic salmon returning to the Connecticut River (CR) from 1996 to 1999 were assayed for variability at nine microsatellite DNA loci. Heterozygosity and allele frequencies were compared to the anadromous Atlantic salmon returning to Maine's Penobscot River from 1998 to 2000. The Penobscot River was the primary source of the salmon used to found the previously extirpated population in the Connecticut River. While there were no significant differences in heterozygosity between the source population and the Connecticut River sea-run spawners, microsatellite allele frequencies were significantly different between the populations. Two techniques of estimating effective population size (Ne) suggested a healthy level of genetic variation in the Connecticut River population of anadromous Atlantic salmon. This is significant because the sea-run population is maintained almost entirely through hatchery production. Healthy ratios of Ne to N indicate that hatchery production has not resulted in excessive inbreeding to date. ?? 2003 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. NOAA Digital Oblique Imagery Collection for the Coasts of Main/New Hampshire, Massachusetts/Rhode Island/Connecticut, and Hudson River/Long Island /NY/NJ

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Project: NOAA Digital Orthophotography and Ancillary Oblique Imagery Collection for the Coasts of Main/New Hampshire, Massachusetts/Rhode Island/Connecticut, and...

  20. Phytophthora species recovered from the Connecticut River Valley in Massachusetts, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazee, Nicholas J; Wick, Robert L; Hulvey, Jonathan P

    2016-01-01

    Little is currently known about the assemblage of Phytophthora species in northeastern North America, representing a gap in our understanding of species incidence. Therefore, Phytophthora species were surveyed at 20 sites in Massachusetts, with 16 occurring in the Connecticut River Valley. Many of the sampled waterways were adjacent to active agricultural lands, yet were buffered by mature floodplain forests composed of Acer, Platanus, Populus and Ulmus. Isolates were recovered with three types of baits (rhododendron leaves, pear, green pepper) in 2013 and water filtration in 2014. Overall, 457 isolates of Phytophthora were recovered and based on morphological characters and rDNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS), β-tubulin (β-tub) and cytochrome oxidase c subunit I (cox1) sequences, 18 taxa were identified, including three new species: P. taxon intercalaris, P. taxon caryae and P. taxon pocumtuck. In addition, 49 isolates representing five species of Phytopythium also were identified. Water filtration captured a greater number of taxa (18) compared to leaf and fruit baits (12). Of the three bait types rhododendron leaves yielded the greatest number of isolates and taxa, followed by pear and green pepper, respectively. Despite the proximity to agricultural lands, none of the Phytophthora species baited are considered serious pathogens of vegetable crops in the region. However, many of the recovered species are known woody plant pathogens, including four species in the P. citricola s.l. complex that were identified: P. plurivora, P. citricola III, P. pini and a putative novel species, referred to here as P. taxon caryae. An additional novel species, P. taxon pocumtuck, is a close relative of P. borealis based on cox1 sequences. The results illustrate a high level of Phytophthora species richness in the Connecticut River Valley and that major rivers can serve as a source of inoculum for pathogenic Phytophthora species in the northeast. © 2016 by The Mycological

  1. Prevalence of agglutinating antibodies to Toxoplasma gondii in striped skunks (Mephitis mephitis), opossums (Didelphis virginiana), and raccoons (Procyon lotor) from Connecticut

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchell, S. M.; Richardson, D. J.; Lindsay, D. S.

    2006-01-01

    The prevalence of agglutinating antibodies to Toxoplasma gondii was examined in striped skunks (Mephitis mephitis), opossums (Didelphis virginiana), and raccoons (Procyon lotor) from 8 cities in Connecticut. Ten (42%) of the 24 striped skunks, 2 of 7 (29%) opossums, and 12 of 12 (100%) raccoons were positive at dilutions of 1:50 or greater. These results suggest that T. gondii is prevalent in the environment, or prey items, or both, of these omnivores in Connecticut.

  2. Prevalence of agglutinating antibodies to Toxoplasma gondii in striped skunks (Mephitis mephitis), opossums (Didelphis virginiana), and raccoons (Procyon lotor) from Connecticut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Sheila M; Richardson, Dennis J; Lindsay, David S

    2006-06-01

    The prevalence of agglutinating antibodies to Toxoplasma gondii was examined in striped skunks (Mephitis mephitis), opossums (Didelphis virginiana), and raccoons (Procyon lotor) from 8 cities in Connecticut. Ten (42%) of the 24 striped skunks, 2 of 7 (29%) opossums, and 12 of 12 (100%) raccoons were positive at dilutions of 1:50 or greater. These results suggest that T. gondii is prevalent in the environment, or prey items, or both, of these omnivores in Connecticut.

  3. National Program for Inspection of Non-Federal Dams. Goss Brook Dam (CT 00465), Thames River Basin, Ashford, Connecticut. Phase I Inspection Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-09-01

    A. J. MF, CCHI , A ENG iRS A. J / cc. State of Connecticut Water Resources Comission State Office Building Lzrtford, Connecticut B- 14 Ce !ater -’v’jr...appeared to be satisfactory. Very truly yours, A. J. CCHI /,ENGINEERS H 1~AH0tMAN, P. E. B/ , / / ,. iI B- 26 ,J. M A C C H I E N G I N E E R S D.R

  4. Confirmatory Survey Results For Portions Of The ABB Combustion Engineering Site In Windsor, Connecticut During The Fall Of 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, Wade C.

    2011-01-01

    From the mid-1950s until mid-2000, the Combustion Engineering, Inc. (CE) site in Windsor, Connecticut (Figure A-1) was involved in the research, development, engineering, production, and servicing of nuclear fuels, systems, and services. The site is currently undergoing decommissioning that will lead to license termination and unrestricted release in accordance with the requirements of the License Termination Rule in 10 CFR Part 20, Subpart E. Asea Brown Boveri Incorporated (ABB) has been decommissioning the CE site since 2001.

  5. The Impact of Medicaid Reform on Children?s Dental Care Utilization in Connecticut, Maryland, and Texas

    OpenAIRE

    Nasseh, Kamyar; Vujicic, Marko

    2014-01-01

    Objective To measure the impact of Medicaid reforms, in particular increases in Medicaid dental fees in Connecticut, Maryland, and Texas, on access to dental care among Medicaid-eligible children. Data 2007 and 2011?2012 National Survey of Children?s Health. Study Design Difference-in-differences and triple differences models were used to measure the impact of reforms. Principal Findings Relative to Medicaid-ineligible children and all children from a group of control states, preventive denta...

  6. CONFIRMATORY SURVEY RESULTS FOR PORTIONS OF THE ABB COMBUSTION ENGINEERING SITE IN WINDSOR, CONNECTICUT DURING THE FALL OF 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wade C. Adams

    2011-12-09

    From the mid-1950s until mid-2000, the Combustion Engineering, Inc. (CE) site in Windsor, Connecticut (Figure A-1) was involved in the research, development, engineering, production, and servicing of nuclear fuels, systems, and services. The site is currently undergoing decommissioning that will lead to license termination and unrestricted release in accordance with the requirements of the License Termination Rule in 10 CFR Part 20, Subpart E. Asea Brown Boveri Incorporated (ABB) has been decommissioning the CE site since 2001.

  7. Making It Work Without a Family Drug Court: Connecticut's Approach to Parental Substance Abuse in the Child Welfare System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungemack, Jane; Giovannucci, Marilou; Moy, Samuel; Ohrenberger, Karen; Dematteo, Thomas; Smith, Staceyann

    2015-01-01

    Parental substance abuse presents, complex challenges for the child welfare system and courts. This article describes the State of Connecticut's experience implementing the Recovery Specialist Voluntary Program (RSVP), a recovery support program designed to confront the problem of parental substance abuse within the child welfare system without, a family drug court. The state-level collaboration efforts, system changes, factors affecting development and implementation of RSVP, program participants, and preliminary outcomes are described.

  8. Northern range expansion of the Asian tiger mosquito (Aedes albopictus): Analysis of mosquito data from Connecticut, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Philip M; Andreadis, Theodore G; Shepard, John J; Thomas, Michael C

    2017-05-01

    The Asian tiger mosquito (Aedes albopictus) is an invasive species and important arbovirus vector that was introduced into the U.S. in the 1980's where it continues to expand its range. Winter temperature is an important constraint to its northward expansion, with potential range limits located between the 0° and -5°C mean cold month isotherm. Connecticut is located within this climatic zone and therefore, Ae. albopictus was monitored statewide to assess its northern range expansion and to delineate where populations can stably persist. Ae. albopictus females were monitored at fixed trapping sites throughout Connecticut from June-October over a 20-year period, 1997-2016. In addition, Ae. albopictus larvae and pupae were collected from tire habitats and tires were retrieved from the field in the spring and flooded to evaluate overwintering success of hatching larvae. Ae. albopictus was first detected during statewide surveillance when a single adult female was collected in 2006. This species was not collected again until 2010 and was subsequently detected each successive year with increasing abundance and distribution except following the unusually cold winters of 2014 and 2015. Ae. albopictus mosquitoes were most abundant in urban and suburban locations along the southwestern shoreline of Connecticut; however, single specimens were occasionally detected in central parts of the state. Field-collected females were also screened for arbovirus infection yielding two isolations of Cache Valley virus and one isolation of West Nile virus, highlighting the threat posed by this mosquito. Ae. albopictus overwintered in Connecticut under mild winter conditions as shown by recovery of hatched larvae from field collected tires in spring and by early season detection of larvae and pupae. This study documents the establishment and expansion of Ae. albopictus at the northern boundary of its range in the northeastern U.S. and provides a baseline for monitoring the future spread

  9. Northern range expansion of the Asian tiger mosquito (Aedes albopictus: Analysis of mosquito data from Connecticut, USA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip M Armstrong

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The Asian tiger mosquito (Aedes albopictus is an invasive species and important arbovirus vector that was introduced into the U.S. in the 1980's where it continues to expand its range. Winter temperature is an important constraint to its northward expansion, with potential range limits located between the 0° and -5°C mean cold month isotherm. Connecticut is located within this climatic zone and therefore, Ae. albopictus was monitored statewide to assess its northern range expansion and to delineate where populations can stably persist.Ae. albopictus females were monitored at fixed trapping sites throughout Connecticut from June-October over a 20-year period, 1997-2016. In addition, Ae. albopictus larvae and pupae were collected from tire habitats and tires were retrieved from the field in the spring and flooded to evaluate overwintering success of hatching larvae. Ae. albopictus was first detected during statewide surveillance when a single adult female was collected in 2006. This species was not collected again until 2010 and was subsequently detected each successive year with increasing abundance and distribution except following the unusually cold winters of 2014 and 2015. Ae. albopictus mosquitoes were most abundant in urban and suburban locations along the southwestern shoreline of Connecticut; however, single specimens were occasionally detected in central parts of the state. Field-collected females were also screened for arbovirus infection yielding two isolations of Cache Valley virus and one isolation of West Nile virus, highlighting the threat posed by this mosquito. Ae. albopictus overwintered in Connecticut under mild winter conditions as shown by recovery of hatched larvae from field collected tires in spring and by early season detection of larvae and pupae.This study documents the establishment and expansion of Ae. albopictus at the northern boundary of its range in the northeastern U.S. and provides a baseline for monitoring

  10. Effects of changes in permit-to-purchase handgun laws in Connecticut and Missouri on suicide rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crifasi, Cassandra K; Meyers, John Speed; Vernick, Jon S; Webster, Daniel W

    2015-10-01

    In 2013, more than 40,000 individuals died from suicide in the United States. Restricting access to lethal means has the potential to prevent suicide, as suicidal thoughts are often transient. Permit-to-purchase (PTP) laws for handguns could potentially reduce suicides by making it more difficult for persons at risk of suicide to purchase a handgun. We used a quasi-experimental research design with annual, state-level suicide data to evaluate changes to PTP laws in Connecticut and Missouri. Data were analyzed for 1981-2012. We used synthetic control modeling as the primary method to estimate policy effects. This methodology provided better prediction of pre-PTP-law-change trends in the two states with PTP law changes than econometric models and is thus likely to provide more accurate estimates of policy effects. The synthetic control model estimated a 15.4% reduction in firearm suicide rates associated with Connecticut's PTP law. Missouri's PTP law repeal was associated with a 16.1% increase in firearm suicide rates. Evidence that PTP laws were associated with non-firearm suicide rates was mixed in Connecticut and negative in Missouri. The findings are consistent with prior research linking firearm availability to increased risk of suicide and lower suicide risks associated with PTP handgun laws. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected, Leaf-on September 2004 0.5m resolution RGB orthoimagery that covers Connecticut's coastal communities. Data were collected by Earth Data, under contract to NOAA, using a Leica ADS40 sensor., Published in 2004, University of Connecticut.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected dataset current as of 2004. Leaf-on September 2004 0.5m resolution RGB orthoimagery that covers Connecticut's coastal...

  12. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected, Leaf-on September 2004 0.5m resolution CIR orthoimagery that covers Connecticut's coastal communities. Data were collected by Earth Data, under contract to NOAA, using a Leica ADS40 sensor., Published in 2004, University of Connecticut.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected dataset current as of 2004. Leaf-on September 2004 0.5m resolution CIR orthoimagery that covers Connecticut's coastal...

  13. Relationship of cancer incidence to terrestrial radiation and population density in Connecticut, 1935-1974

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walter, S.D.; Meigs, J.W.; Heston, J.F.

    1986-01-01

    The relationship of cancer incidence to terrestrial radiation and population density was investigated. Cancer incidence was obtained using 40 years of age-standardized data from the Connecticut Tumor Registry, and environmental radiation was estimated using data from an airborne gamma radiation survey of the entire state. These variables were examined ecologically, using the 169 towns of the state as the analytic units in a weighted regression analysis. The study design involves a large population base in a state having relatively high terrestrial radiation exposure levels overall and reasonable variation in exposure between towns. For all cancer combined, only one of the eight sex-specific analyses by decade yielded a significant radiation regression coefficient, and this was negative. In the sex- and site-specific analyses, almost all the coefficients for radiation were not significantly different from zero. In contrast, significant positive relationships of cancer incidence with population density were found for all cancer, for cancer of the lung for both sexes, for stomach, colonic, and prostatic cancer for males, and for lymphomas, thyroid, breast, and ovarian cancer for females. Both the radiation and population density relationships were adjusted for socioeconomic status. Socioeconomic status was significantly negatively associated with stomach and lung cancer in males and with cervical cancer in females; it was also positively associated with lymphomas and breast cancer in females. A power calculation revealed that, despite the relatively large size of this study, there was only a small probability of detecting a radiation effect of the strength anticipated from previous estimates

  14. E-cigarette Use Among High School and Middle School Adolescents in Connecticut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan-Sarin, Suchitra; Morean, Meghan E; Camenga, Deepa R; Cavallo, Dana A; Kong, Grace

    2015-07-01

    There is limited evidence on electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) use among U.S. adolescents. Cross-sectional, anonymous surveys conducted in 4 high schools (HS; n = 3,614) and 2 middle schools (MS; n = 1,166) in Connecticut in November 2013 examined e-cigarette awareness, use patterns, susceptibility to future use, preferences, product components used (battery type, nicotine content, flavors), and sources of marketing and access. High rates of awareness (MS: 84.3%; HS: 92.0%) and of lifetime (3.5% MS, 25.2 % HS) and current (1.5% MS, 12% HS) use of e-cigarettes was observed. Among those who had not tried e-cigarettes, 26.4% of MS and 31.7% of HS students reported being susceptible to future use. Males (OR = 1.70, p flavors were most popular. Smokers preferred e-cigarettes to cigarettes. Current cigarette smokers were more likely to initiate with nicotine-containing e-cigarettes, and ever and never cigarette smokers to initiate with e-cigarettes without nicotine. Primary sources for e-cigarette advertisements were televisions and gas stations and, for acquiring e-cigarettes, were peers. Longitudinal monitoring of e-cigarette use among adolescents and establishment of policies to limit access are imperatively needed. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Cost Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 for the State of Connecticut

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, Philip R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Athalye, Rahul A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Xie, YuLong [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhuge, Jing Wei [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Halverson, Mark A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Loper, Susan A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rosenberg, Michael I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Richman, Eric E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Moving to the ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 (ASHRAE 2013) edition from Standard 90.1-2010 (ASHRAE 2010) is cost-effective for the State of Connecticut. The table below shows the state-wide economic impact of upgrading to Standard 90.1-2013 in terms of the annual energy cost savings in dollars per square foot, additional construction cost per square foot required by the upgrade, and life-cycle cost (LCC) per square foot. These results are weighted averages for all building types in all climate zones in the state, based on weightings shown in Table 4. The methodology used for this analysis is consistent with the methodology used in the national cost-effectiveness analysis. Additional results and details on the methodology are presented in the following sections. The report provides analysis of two LCC scenarios: Scenario 1, representing publicly-owned buildings, considers initial costs, energy costs, maintenance costs, and replacement costs—without borrowing or taxes. Scenario 2, representing privately-owned buildings, adds borrowing costs and tax impacts.

  16. Effects of Road Salt on Connecticut's Groundwater: A Statewide Centennial Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassanelli, James P; Robbins, Gary A

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the extent to which development and road salting has affected Connecticut's groundwater. We gathered water quality data from different time periods between 1894 and the present and analyzed the data using maps generated with ESRI ArcGIS. Historical reports illustrate a statewide baseline trend of decreasing chloride concentration northward across the State (average, 2 ppm). Since then, statewide chloride concentrations in ground water have increased by more than an order of magnitude on average. Analysis indicates spatial correlation between chloride impacts and major roadways. Furthermore, increases in statewide chloride concentration parallel increases in road salt application. Projected trends suggest that statewide baseline concentrations will increase by an amount equal to five times background levels between the present and the year 2030. The analytical process outlined herein can be readily applied to any region to investigate salt impacts on large spatial and temporal scales. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  17. Bridging the Response to Mass Shootings and Urban Violence: Exposure to Violence in New Haven, Connecticut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santilli, Alycia; O'Connor Duffany, Kathleen; Carroll-Scott, Amy; Thomas, Jordan; Greene, Ann; Arora, Anita; Agnoli, Alicia; Gan, Geliang; Ickovics, Jeannette

    2017-03-01

    We have described self-reported exposure to gun violence in an urban community of color to inform the movement toward a public health approach to gun violence prevention. The Community Alliance for Research and Engagement at Yale School of Public Health conducted community health needs assessments to document chronic disease prevalence and risk, including exposure to gun violence. We conducted surveys with residents in six low-income neighborhoods in New Haven, Connecticut, using a neighborhood-stratified, population-based sample (n = 1189; weighted sample to represent the neighborhoods, n = 29 675). Exposure to violence is pervasive in these neighborhoods: 73% heard gunshots; many had family members or close friends hurt (29%) or killed (18%) by violent acts. Although all respondents live in low-income neighborhoods, exposure to violence differs by race/ethnicity and social class. Residents of color experienced significantly more violence than did White residents, with a particularly disparate increase among young Black men aged 18 to 34 years. While not ignoring societal costs of horrific mass shootings, we must be clear that a public health approach to gun violence prevention means focusing on the dual epidemic of mass shootings and urban violence.

  18. Community Energy Systems and the Law of Public Utilities. Volume Nine. Connecticut

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L

    1981-01-01

    A detailed description of the laws and programs of the State of Connecticut governing the regulation of public energy utilities, the siting of energy generating and transmission facilities, the municipal franchising of public energy utilities, and the prescription of rates to be charged by utilities including attendant problems of cost allocations, rate base and operating expense determinations, and rate of return allowances. These laws and programs are analyzed to identify impediments which they may present to the implementation of Integrated Community Energy Systems (ICES). This report is one of fifty-one separate volumes which describe such regulatory programs at the Federal level and in each state as background to the report entitled Community Energy Systems and the Law of Public Utilities - Volume One: An Overview. This report also contains a summary of a strategy described in Volume One - An Overview for overcoming these impediments by working within the existing regulatory framework and by making changes in the regulatory programs to enhance the likelihood of ICES implementation.

  19. Evaluation of Haddam Neck (Connecticut Yankee) Nuclear Power Plant, environmental impact prediction, based on monitoring programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gore, K.L.; Thomas, J.M.; Kannberg, L.D.; Mahaffey, J.A.; Waton, D.G.

    1976-12-01

    A study was undertaken by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to evaluate the nonradiological environmental data obtained from three nuclear power plants operating for a period of one year or longer. The document presented reports the second of three nuclear power plants to be evaluated in detail by Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories. Haddam Neck (Connecticut Yankee) Nuclear Power Plant nonradiological monitoring data were assessed to determine their effectiveness in the measurement of environmental impacts. Efforts were made to determine if: (1) monitoring programs, as designed, can detect environmental impacts, (2) appropriate statistical analyses were performed and if they were sensitive enough to detect impacts, (3) predicted impacts could be verified by monitoring programs, and (4) monitoring programs satisfied the requirements of the Environmental Technical Specifications. Both preoperational and operational monitoring data were examined to test the usefulness of baseline information in evaluating impacts. This included an examination of the methods used to measure ecological, chemical, and physical parameters, and an assessment of sampling periodicity and sensitivity where appropriate data sets were available. From this type of analysis, deficiencies in both preoperational and operational monitoring programs may be identified and provide a basis for suggested improvement.

  20. Evaluation of power outages in Connecticut during hypothetical future Hurricane Sandy scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanik, D. W.; Anagnostou, E. N.; Astitha, M.; Frediani, M. E.; Yang, J.

    2015-12-01

    Reliable electric power is a staple of our modern society.The purpose of this work was to evaluate the occurrence of power outages under more intense, future Hurricane Sandy simulations in Connecticut. In addition, we also evaluated how many crews would be necessary to restore power in 7 days, and how different vegetation scenarios might contribute to a decrease in outages. We trained five pairwise models on each current Sandy runs (2012) as training using the random forest model (each validated using 10-fold cross-validation), and used each future Sandy run as an independent test. We predict that a future Sandy would have 2.5x as many outages as current Sandy, which would require 3.23x as many crews as current Sandy to restore power in 7 days. We also found that increased vegetation management might decrease outages, which has implications for both fair-weather and storm days of all types (i.e. blizzards, thunderstorms, ice storms). Although we have only evaluated outages for electric distribution networks, there are many other types (water supply, wastewater, telecommunications) that would likely benefit from an analysis of this type. In addition, given that we have the weather simulations already processed within our 2-km weather simulation domain, we would like to expand our vulnerability analyses to surrounding utilities in New Jersey, New York, Rhode Island, Massachusetts and New Hampshire to facilitate regional coordination among electric distribution networks.

  1. A New England bonesetter dynasty: the Porters of Farmington, Connecticut--Part II of II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kugelman, Thomas P

    2006-01-01

    Daniel Porter (d. 1690), a bonesetter/ chirurgeon, one of the early settlers of the Connecticut Colony, was the first and only doctor serving the Farmington valley during much of the second half of the 17th century. More than forty of his descendants, spanning eight generations and almost three centuries, practiced medicine and surgery, moving with the migration of the expanding population to towns throughout New England, New York State, and ultimately the midwest and west coast. Their notable accomplishments, apart from their consistent reputation for exceptional skill and endurance, include the training and independent practice as bonesetters of two of their wives. In 1796, Samuel Lee, Jr., (1773-1814), a fifth-generation descendant, received the first U.S. patent for a medication, "Samuel Lee's Genuine Windham Bilious Pills." The last Porter doctor to be identified, Charles Allen Porter (1866-1931), a pioneer Professor of Surgery at Harvard Medical School, was among the first to recognize the carcinogenic effects of radiation. In the absence of a comprehensive published genealogy of the Daniel Porter family, this essay identifies the relationships among his many descendants.

  2. A New England bonesetter dynasty: the Porters of Farmington, Connecticut--Part I of II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kugelman, Thomas P

    2006-10-01

    Daniel Porter (d. 1690), a bonesetter/ chirurgeon, one of the early settlers of the Connecticut Colony, was the first and only doctor serving the Farmington valley during much of the second half of the 17th century. More than 40 of his descendants, spanning eight generations and almost three centuries, practiced medicine and surgery, moving with the migration of the expanding population to towns throughout New England, New York State, and ultimately the midwest and west coast. Their notable accomplishments, apart from their consistent reputation for exceptional skill and endurance, include the training and independent practice as bonesetters of two of their wives. In 1796, Samuel Lee, Jr., (1773-1814), a fifth-generation descendant, received the first U.S. patent for a medication, "Samuel Lee's Genuine Windham Bilious Pills." The last Porter doctor to be identified, Charles Allen Porter (1866-1931), a pioneer Professor of Surgery at Harvard Medical School, was among the first to recognize the carcinogenic effects of radiation. In the absence of a comprehensive published genealogy of the Daniel Porter family, this essay identifies the relationships among his many descendants.

  3. Industrial hygiene survey report of Millstone Nuclear Power Station No. 3 construction site, Waterford, Connecticut

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaebst, D.D.; Herrick, R.

    1985-11-01

    Personal and area air samples were analyzed for total dust, organic solvent vapors, and metals during spray, brush, and roller painting and paint removal operations at Millstone Nuclear Power Station Number 3 construction site, Waterford, Connecticut, March 1981. Solvent exposures were generally well below their relevant standards. Total dust exposures during paint removal ranged up to 1,000 milligrams per cubic meter (mg/m3) in the containment building. The OSHA standard for total dust is 15mg/m3. Exposures to lead dusts exceeded the OSHA standard of 0.05mg/m3 in the turbine, auxiliary, and containment buildings. Chromium exposures were generally below the OSHA standard of 1mg/m3, except for 2.4mg/m3 in a personal sample taken during paint removal in the containment building. Very few engineering controls other than 3M single use respirators were observed. The authors note that the chromium exposure data is difficult to interpret as the form of the chromium is not known. If the chromium existed as hexavalent chromium exposure was excessive. The authors conclude that in view of the measured exposures to total dust, lead, and chromium, engineering controls and respiratory protection are inadequate. Recommendations include implementing better controls and respiratory protection

  4. Impact of requiring influenza vaccination for children in licensed child care or preschool programs--Connecticut, 2012-13 influenza season.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadler, James L; Yousey-Hindes, Kimberly; Kudish, Kathy; Kennedy, Erin D; Sacco, Vincent; Cartter, Matthew L

    2014-03-07

    Preschool-aged children are at increased risk for severe influenza-related illness and complications. Congregate child care settings facilitate influenza transmission among susceptible children. To protect against influenza transmission in these settings, in September 2010, Connecticut became the second U.S. state (after New Jersey) to implement regulations requiring that all children aged 6-59 months receive at least 1 dose of influenza vaccine each year to attend a licensed child care program. To evaluate the impact of this regulation on vaccination levels and influenza-associated hospitalizations during the 2012-13 influenza season, vaccination data from U.S. and Connecticut surveys and the Emerging Infections Program (EIP) were analyzed. After the regulation took effect, vaccination rates among Connecticut children aged 6-59 months increased from 67.8% during the 2009-10 influenza season to 84.1% during the 2012-13 season. During the 2012-13 influenza season, among all 11 EIP surveillance sites, Connecticut had the greatest percentage decrease (12%) in the influenza-associated hospitalization rate from 2007-08 among children aged ≤4 years. Additionally, the ratio of the influenza-associated hospitalization rates among children aged ≤4 years to the overall population rate (0.53) was lower than for any other EIP site. Requiring vaccination for child care admission might have helped to increase vaccination rates in Connecticut and reduced serious morbidity from influenza.

  5. Measuring chronic liver disease mortality using an expanded cause of death definition and medical records in Connecticut, 2004.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ly, Kathleen N; Speers, Suzanne; Klevens, R Monina; Barry, Vaughn; Vogt, Tara M

    2014-10-16

    Chronic liver disease (CLD) is a leading cause of death and is defined based on a specific set of underlying cause-of-death codes on death certificates. This conventional approach to measuring CLD mortality underestimates the true mortality burden because it does not consider certain CLD conditions like viral hepatitis and hepatocellular carcinoma. We measured how much the conventional CLD mortality case definition will underestimate CLD mortality and described the distribution of CLD etiologies in Connecticut. We used 2004 Connecticut death certificates to estimate CLD mortality two ways. One way used the conventional definition and the other used an expanded definition that included more conditions suggestive of CLD. We compared the number of deaths identified using this expanded definition with the number identified using the conventional definition. Medical records were reviewed to confirm CLD deaths. Connecticut had 29 314 registered deaths in 2004. Of these, 282 (1.0%) were CLD deaths identified by the conventional CLD definition while 616 (2.1%) were CLD deaths defined by the expanded definition. Medical record review confirmed that most deaths identified by the expanded definition were CLD-related (550/616); this suggested a 15.8 deaths/100 000 population mortality rate. Among deaths for which hepatitis B, hepatitis C and alcoholic liver disease were identified during medical record review, only 8.6%, 45.4% and 36.5%, respectively, had that specific cause-of-death code cited on the death certificate. An expanded CLD mortality case definition that incorporates multiple causes of death and additional CLD-related conditions will better estimate CLD mortality. Published 2014. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  6. Geology and hydrocarbon potential of the Hartford-Deerfield Basin, Connecticut and Massachusetts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, James

    2016-01-01

    The Hartford-Deerfield basin, a Late Triassic to Early Jurassic rift basin located in central Connecticut and Massachusetts, is the northernmost basin of the onshore Mesozoic rift basins in the eastern United States. The presence of asphaltic petroleum in outcrops indicates that at least one active petroleum system has existed within the basin. However, to-date oil and gas wells have not been drilled in the basin to test any type of petroleum trap. There are good to excellent quality source rocks (up to 3.8% present day total organic carbon) within the Jurassic East Berlin and Portland formations. While these source rock intervals are fairly extensive and at peak oil to peak gas stages of maturity, individual source rock beds are relatively thin (typically less than 1 m) based solely on outcrop observations. Potential reservoir rocks within the Hartford-Deerfield basin are arkosic conglomerates, pebbly sandstones, and finer grained sandstones, shales, siltstones, and fractured igneous rocks of the Triassic New Haven and Jurassic East Berlin and Portland formations (and possibly other units). Sandstone porosity data from 75 samples range from less than 1% to 21%, with a mean of 5%. Permeability is equally low, except around joints, fractures, and faults. Seals are likely to be unfractured intra-formational shales and tight igneous bodies. Maturation, generation, and expulsion likely occurred during the late synrift period (Early Jurassic) accentuated by an increase in local geothermal gradient, igneous intrusions, and hydrothermal fluid circulation. Migration pathways were likely along syn- and postrift faults and fracture zones. Petroleum resources, if present, are probably unconventional (continuous) accumulations as conventionally accumulated petroleum is likely not present in significant volumes.

  7. The connecticut experiment: the role of ultrasound in the screening of women with dense breasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigert, Jean; Steenbergen, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the potential of screening breast ultrasound to improve breast cancer detection in women with mammographically normal, but dense breasts. Six Connecticut radiology practices with 12 total sites participated in a retrospective chart review. The total number of screening mammograms, screening ultrasounds broken down by BIRADS (Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System) codes, and the number of positive and negative biopsies were collected from November 2009 through November 2010. Demographic data on the patients with positive biopsies as well as cancer staging were also collected. Sensitivity, Specificity, Positive Predictive Value, and Negative Predictive Value were calculated. A total of 72,030 screening mammograms and 8,647 screening ultrasounds were performed at the research sites during the study period. Relevant research indicates that 41% of the female population has dense breasts. In this study, 12% (8,647/72,030) underwent follow-up breast ultrasound screening. A total of 86% (7,451/8,647) of the ultrasounds were BIRADS 1 or 2, 9% (767/8,647) were BIRADS 3, 5% (429/8,647) were BIRADS 4 or 5. Of those 429 recommended to undergo biopsy 418 were performed and 28 cancers were found. There was one false negative. Screening breast ultrasound in women with mammographically normal, but dense breasts has a Positive Predictive Value (PPV) of 6.7% (28/418), Negative Predictive Value (NPV) of 99.9% (7,450/7,451), sensitivity of 96.6% (28/29), and a specificity of 94.9% (7,450/7,851). Screening ultrasound had an additional yield of 3.25 per 1,000 cancers in women with dense breasts and normal mammograms and no additional risk factors. As with all screening tests, time, cost, and false positive risk must be considered. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Suicide, guns, and buyback programs: An epidemiologic analysis of firearm-related deaths in Connecticut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Laura; Clinton, Heather; Berntsson, Rob; Williams, Susan S; Rovella, James C; Shapiro, David; Thaker, Shefali; Borrup, Kevin; Lapidus, Garry; Campbell, Brendan T

    2017-12-01

    Gun buyback programs aim to remove unwanted firearms from the community with the goal of preventing firearm injury and death. Buyback programs are held in many communities, but evidence demonstrating their effectiveness is lacking. The purpose of this study is to compare firearms collected at buyback events to crime guns and firearms used in homicides and suicides. Detailed firearm and case data were obtained from the Hartford Police Department and the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner from January through December of 2015. Information was reviewed for guns collected at buyback events, crime guns confiscated by police, and for weapons associated with firearm fatalities. Detailed firearm data included type, manufacturer, model, and caliber (small, ≤ 0.32 caliber; medium, 0.357 caliber to 9 mm; large, ≥ 0.40 caliber). χ analyses were used for comparisons between groups. In 2015, 224 crime guns were seized by the Hartford Police, 169 guns were collected at four community buyback events, and there were 187 firearm-related deaths statewide (105 suicides, 81 homicides, 1 legal intervention). Comparisons between buyback, crime, and fatality-related firearms are shown in the table below. Medium caliber handguns account for the majority of crime guns and fatalities, and buyback programs collected smaller caliber handguns. The demographics of individuals who turn in guns at buyback events and commit suicide are similar: age (buyback, 63 ± 11; suicide, 52 ± 18; homicide, 34 ± 12 years), sex (buyback, 81%; suicide, 91%; homicide, 84% men), and race (buyback, 80%; suicide, 97%; homicide, 47% white). Handguns account for the majority of crime guns and firearm-related fatalities in Connecticut. Buyback programs are both an opportunity to remove unwanted handguns from the community and to remove firearms from the homes of individuals at increased risk of suicide. Epidemiologic/therapeutic study, level IV.

  9. Prevalence of agglutinating antibodies to Sarcocystis neurona in skunks (Mephitis Mephitis), raccoons (Procyon lotor), and opossums (Didelphis Virginiana) from Connecticut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Sheila M; Richardson, Dennis J; Cheadle, M Andy; Zajac, Anne M; Lindsay, David S

    2002-10-01

    Equine protozoal myeloencephalitis is the most important protozoan disease of horses in North America and is usually caused by Sarcocystis neurona. Natural cases of encephalitis caused by S. neurona have been reported in skunks (Mephitis mephitis) and raccoons (Procyon lotor). Opossums (Didelphis spp.) are the only known definitive host. Sera from 24 striped skunks, 12 raccoons, and 7 opossums (D. virginiana) from Connecticut were examined for agglutinating antibodies to S. neurona using the S. neurona agglutination test (SAT) employing formalin-fixed merozoites as antigen. The SAT was validated for skunk sera using pre- and postinfection serum samples from 2 experimentally infected skunks. Of the 24 (46%) skunks 11 were positive, and all 12 raccoons were positive for S. neurona antibodies. None of the 7 opossums was positive for antibodies to S. neurona. These results suggest that exposure to sporocysts of S. neurona by intermediate hosts is high in Connecticut. The absence of antibodies in opossums collected from the same areas is most likely because of the absence of systemic infection in the definitive host.

  10. E-cigarette Use Among High School and Middle School Adolescents in Connecticut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morean, Meghan E.; Camenga, Deepa R.; Cavallo, Dana A.; Kong, Grace

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: There is limited evidence on electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) use among U.S. adolescents. Methods: Cross-sectional, anonymous surveys conducted in 4 high schools (HS; n = 3,614) and 2 middle schools (MS; n = 1,166) in Connecticut in November 2013 examined e-cigarette awareness, use patterns, susceptibility to future use, preferences, product components used (battery type, nicotine content, flavors), and sources of marketing and access. Results: High rates of awareness (MS: 84.3%; HS: 92.0%) and of lifetime (3.5% MS, 25.2 % HS) and current (1.5% MS, 12% HS) use of e-cigarettes was observed. Among those who had not tried e-cigarettes, 26.4% of MS and 31.7% of HS students reported being susceptible to future use. Males (OR = 1.70, p < .01), older students (OR = 1.39, p < .05), Caucasians (OR = 2.01, p < .001), ever cigarette smokers (OR = 13.04, p < .001), and current cigarette smokers (OR = 65.11, p < .001) were more likely to be lifetime e-cigarette users and to report greater future susceptibility (males: OR = 1.30; Caucasians: OR = 1.14; ever cigarette smokers; OR = 3.85; current cigarette smokers; OR = 9.81; ps < .01–.001). Among MS students who were lifetime e-cigarette users, 51.2% reported that e-cigarette was the first tobacco product they had tried. E-cigarettes that were rechargeable and had sweet flavors were most popular. Smokers preferred e-cigarettes to cigarettes. Current cigarette smokers were more likely to initiate with nicotine-containing e-cigarettes, and ever and never cigarette smokers to initiate with e-cigarettes without nicotine. Primary sources for e-cigarette advertisements were televisions and gas stations and, for acquiring e-cigarettes, were peers. Conclusions: Longitudinal monitoring of e-cigarette use among adolescents and establishment of policies to limit access are imperatively needed. PMID:25385873

  11. Marine Geophysical Investigation of Selected Sites in Bridgeport Harbor, Connecticut, 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Carole D.; White, Eric A.

    2007-01-01

    A marine geophysical investigation was conducted in 2006 to help characterize the bottom and subbottom materials and extent of bedrock in selected areas of Bridgeport Harbor, Connecticut. The data will be used by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in the design of confined aquatic disposal (CAD) cells within the harbor to facilitate dredging of the harbor. Three water-based geophysical methods were used to evaluate the geometry and composition of subsurface materials: (1) continuous seismic profiling (CSP) methods provide the depth to water bottom, and when sufficient signal penetration can be achieved, delineate the depth to bedrock and subbottom materials; (2) continuous resistivity profiling (CRP) methods were used to define the electrical properties of the shallow subbottom, and to possibly determine the distribution of conductive materials, such as clay, and resistive materials, such as sand and bedrock; (3) and magnetometer data were used to identify conductive anomalies of anthropogenic sources, such as cables and metallic debris. All data points were located using global positioning systems (GPS), and the GPS data were used for real-time navigation. The results of the CRP, CSP, and magnetometer data are consistent with the conceptual site model of a bedrock channel incised beneath the present day harbor. The channel appears to follow a north-northwest to south-southeast trend and is parallel to the Pequannock River. The seismic record and boring data indicate that under the channel, the depth to bedrock is as much as 42.7 meters (m) below mean low-low water (MLLW) in the dredged part of the harbor. The bedrock channel becomes shallower towards the shore, where bedrock outcrops have been mapped at land surface. CSP and CRP data were able to provide a discontinuous, but reasonable, trace from the channel toward the west under the proposed southwestern CAD cell. The data indicate a high amount of relief on the bedrock surface, as well as along the water bottom

  12. New Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Singer Village - A Cold Climate Zero Energy Ready Home, Derby, Connecticut

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2015-03-01

    After progressively incorporating ENERGY STAR for Homes Versions 1, 2, and 3 into its standard practices over the years, builder Brookside Development was seeking to build an even more sustainable product that would further increase energy efficiency, while also addressing indoor air quality, water conservation, renewable-ready, and resiliency. These objectives align with the framework of the U.S. Department of Energy Zero Energy Ready Home program, which builds upon the comprehensive building science requirements of ENERGY STAR for Homes Version 3 and proven Building America innovations and best practices. To meet this goal, Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings partnered with Brookside Development to design and construct the first zero energy ready home in a development of seven new homes on the old Singer Estate in Derby, Connecticut.

  13. "I live by shooting hill"-a qualitative exploration of conflict and violence among urban youth in New Haven, Connecticut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuval, Kerem; Massey, Zohar; Caughy, Margaret O; Cavanaugh, Brenda; Pillsbury, Charles A; Groce, Nora

    2012-02-01

    To elucidate urban youths' perceptions of conflict and violence we conducted a qualitative study among minority urban youths in New Haven, Connecticut. We utilized the ecological framework to explore the multilevel nature of the findings, and triangulated results with a parallel quantitative study. We found risk factors for violence at multiple levels including lack of interpersonal anger management skills (individual level); parents not physically present in the household (relationship level); residence in crime and gang-ridden neighborhoods (community level); and socioeconomic inequalities between neighborhoods, as reflected by participants' perception of the inadequacy of neighborhood resources to provide safety (societal level). Neighborhood resources were perceived as sparse, and police were not regarded as a protective factor (sometimes rather as racially discriminatory). Participants' statements pertaining to feelings of isolation, racism, and violence without strong parental, neighborhood, and school support may impede prosocial attitudes and behaviors throughout adolescence and young adulthood.

  14. Integrated plant safety assessment: systematic evaluation program. Haddam Neck Plant, Connecticut Yankee Atomic Power Company. Docket No. 50-213

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-03-01

    The Systematic Evaluation Program was initiated in February 1977 by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission to review the designs of older operating nuclear reactor plants to confirm and document their safety. The review provides: (1) an assessment of how these plants compare with current licensing safety requirements relating to selected issues, (2) a basis for deciding on how these differences should be resolved in an integrated plant review, and (3) a documented evaluation of plant safety. This report documents the review of Haddam Neck Plant, operated by Connecticut Yankee Atomic Power Company. The Haddam Neck Plant is one of 10 plants reviewed under Phase II of this program. This report indicates how 137 topics selected for review under Phase I of the program were addressed. Equipment and procedural changes have been identified as a result of the review

  15. Water-quality assessment of the Connecticut, Housatonic, and Thames river basins study unit; analysis of available data on nutrients, suspended sediments, and pesticides, 1972-92

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Marc James; Grady, S.J.; Trench, E.C.; Flanagan, S.M.; Nielsen, M.G.

    1996-01-01

    This retrospective report examines available nutrient, suspended sediment, and pesticide data in surface and ground water in the Connecticut, Housatonic and Thames Rivers Study Unit of the National Water-Quality Assessment Program. The purpose of this study is to improve the under- standing of natural and anthropogenic factors affecting water quality in the study unit. Water-quality data were acquired from various sources, primarily, the U.S. Geological Survey and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The report examines data for water years 1972-92, focusing on 1980-92, although it also includes additional data from as early as 1905. The study unit lies within the New England Physiographic Province and altitudes range from sea level in coastal Connecticut to 6,288 feet above sea level at Mount Washington, New Hampshire. Two major aquifer types underlie the study unit--unconsolidated glacial deposits and fractured bedrock. The climate generally is temperate and humid, with four distinct seasons. Average annual precipitation ranges from 34 to 65 inches. The study unit has a population of about 4.5 million, which is most highly concentrated in southwestern Connecticut and along the south-central region of the Connecticut River Valley. Surface-water-quality data were screened to provide information about sites with adequate numbers of analyses (50) over sufficiently long periods (1980-90) to enable valid statistical analyses. In order to compare effects of different types of land use on surface-water quality, examination of data required application of several statistical and graphical techniques, including mapping, histograms, boxplots, concentration-discharge plots, trend analysis, and load estimation. Spatial and temporal analysis of surface-water-quality data indicated that, with a single exception, only/stations in the Connecticut water-quality network had sufficient data collected over adequately long time periods to use in detailed analyses. Ground

  16. Impact of fee increases on dental utilization rates for children living in Connecticut and enrolled in Medicaid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beazoglou, Tryfon; Douglass, Joanna; Myne-Joslin, Veronica; Baker, Patricia; Bailit, Howard

    2015-01-01

    In 2008, Connecticut's Medicaid program administration increased children's dental fees to match approximately the 70th percentile of what the market fees were for dental care in 2005. These Medicaid program changes occurred at the same time as a national economic recession, which took place from 2007 through 2009. The authors obtained Medicaid eligibility, claims, and provider data before and after the fee increase, in 2006 and 2009 through 2012, respectively. Their analysis examined changes in utilization rates, service mix, expenditures, and dentists' participation. The authors qualitatively assessed the general impact of the recession on utilization rate changes. The Medicaid fee increase, program improvements, and the recession resulted in a dramatic increase in utilization rates. For children continuously enrolled in Medicaid, utilization rates increased from 45.9% in 2006 to 71.6% in 2012. Rates increased across sex, race, ethnicity, and geographic areas. These increased utilization rates eliminated the disparities in access to dental services between children with private insurance and children receiving Medicaid benefits. Children enrolled in Medicaid now have utilization rates that are similar to or higher than privately insured children. Expenditures increased $62 million; this represents less than 1% of 2012 State Medicaid expenditures. Dentist participation increased by 72%. These results suggest that dentists will participate in the Medicaid program if adequately compensated, and low-income families will seek dental services. The Medicaid fee increase, program improvements, and the recession had a dramatic impact on reducing disparities in children's access to dental care in Connecticut. One solution to the substantial disparities in access to dental care is to increase Medicaid fees to competitive levels. Copyright © 2015 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Variation in patient–provider communication by patient’s race and ethnicity, provider type, and continuity in and site of care: An analysis of data from the Connecticut Health Care Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Robert H Aseltine; Alyse Sabina; Gillian Barclay; Garth Graham

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study is to examine the quality of patient-reported communication with their health care providers using data from a large, statewide survey of patients. We examine the relationship between patient?s race and ethnicity, type of health care provider, site of and continuity in care, and the quality of patient?provider communication. Methods: We analyze data from the Connecticut Health Care Survey, a representative telephone survey of 4608 Connecticut residents co...

  18. Effects of Economic Conditions and Organizational Structure on Local Health Jurisdiction Revenue Streams and Personnel Levels in Connecticut, 2005-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallas, Sarah Wood; Kertanis, Jennifer; O'Keefe, Elaine; Humphries, Debbie L

    2015-01-01

    We investigated whether or not changes in economic conditions during the 2008-2010 U.S. recession were associated with changes in Connecticut local health jurisdictions' (LHJs') revenue or personnel levels. We analyzed Connecticut Department of Public Health 2005-2012 annual report data from 91 Connecticut LHJs, as well as publicly available data on economic conditions. We used fixed- and random-effect regression models to test whether or not LHJ per capita revenues and full-time equivalent (FTE) personnel differed during and post-recession compared with pre-recession, or varied with recession intensity, as measured by unemployment rates and housing permits. On average, total revenue per capita was significantly lower during and post-recession compared with pre-recession, with two-thirds of LHJs experiencing per capita revenue reductions. FTE personnel per capita were significantly lower post-recession. Changes in LHJ-level unemployment rates and housing permits did not explain the variation in revenue or FTE personnel per capita. Revenue and personnel differed significantly by LHJ organizational structure across all time periods. Economic downturns can substantially reduce resources available for local public health. LHJ organizational structure influences revenue levels and sources, with implications for the scope, quality, and efficiency of services delivered.

  19. Telescoping metamorphic isograds: Evidence from 40Ar/39A dating in the Orange-Milford belt, southern Connecticut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunk, Michael J.; Walsh, Gregory J.; Growdon, Martha L.; Wintsch, Robert P.

    2013-01-01

    New 40Ar/39Ar ages for hornblende and muscovite from the Orange-Milford belt in southern Connecticut reflect cooling from Acadian amphibolite facies metamorphism between ∼380 to 360 Ma followed by retrograde recrystallization of fabric-forming muscovite and chlorite during lower greenschist facies Alleghanian transpression at ∼280 Ma. Reported field temperature and pressure gradients are improbably high for these rocks and a NW metamorphic field gradient climbing from chlorite-grade to staurolite-grade occurs over less than 5 km. Simple tilting cannot account for this compressed isograd spacing given the geothermal gradient of ∼20 °C/km present at the time of regional metamorphism. However, post-metamorphic transpression could effectively telescope the isograds by stretching the belt at an oblique angle to the isograd traces. Textures in the field and in thin section reveal several older prograde schistosities overprinted by lower greenschist facies fabrics. The late cleavages commonly occur at the scale of ∼100 μm and these samples contain multiple age populations of white mica. 40Ar/39Ar analysis of these poly-metamorphic samples with mixed muscovite populations yield climbing or U-shaped age spectra. The ages of the low temperature steps are late Paleozoic, while the ages of the older steps are late Devonian. These results support our petrologic interpretation that the younger cleavage developed under metamorphic conditions below the closure temperature for Ar diffusion in muscovite, that is, in the lower greenschist facies. The correlation of a younger regionally reproducible age population with a pervasive retrograde muscovite ± chlorite cleavage reveals an Alleghanian (∼280 Ma) overprint on the Acadian metamorphic gradient (∼380 Ma). Outcrop-scale structures including drag folds and imbricate boudins suggest that Alleghanian deformation and cleavage development occurred in response to dextral transpression along a northeast striking boundary

  20. Instructional practices among science departments with high, moderate, and low gains on the Connecticut Academic Performance Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachergis, Theodora R.

    The purpose of this study was to ascertain whether the instructional practices of performance-based, inquiry-based, and authentic-based learning strategies, and rubric use are related to improvement on the science portion of the Connecticut Academic Performance Test [CAPT], as indicated by CAPT gains from 1995--2001. Data were collected for this study by a survey/interview of 63 Connecticut high schools and their 118 certified biology teachers, who had participated in the science CAPT administration within that same school district during 1995--2001. Results from the analysis of the data indicate a significant relationship between strategy and rubric use and CAPT science score outputs. Those schools having the highest levels of strategy and rubric use also demonstrated high CAPT gains and increasing CAPT scores, over time. It was also determined that a strong relationship exists between the percentage of the ERG's goal for CAPT index and those ERGs, using strategies and/or rubrics proficiently. The major findings of the study reveal that teachers demonstrate a confusion of strategy/rubric meaning, as indicated by the low proficiency levels of their submitted strategy and rubric samples, despite high indicators of use for the three learning strategies and rubrics. In addition, rubrics are rated highly by the sample, but are not employed at the high levels of reported favorability. Further analysis determines that objective forms of assessment are used more frequently than strategy and rubric use, and may be implicated for the decreased use of rubrics. Although survey data indicate that 90% of the sample reported "Satisfactory" to "Excellent" levels of annual score updates within their respective districts, teachers requested a need for increased pre- and in-service professional development in the use of all three strategies and rubrics: particularly non-tenured teachers expressed a need for basic CAPT information and samples of strategy and rubric use, while

  1. Bayesian nonparametric areal wombling for small-scale maps with an application to urinary bladder cancer data from Connecticut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guhaniyogi, Rajarshi

    2017-11-10

    With increasingly abundant spatial data in the form of case counts or rates combined over areal regions (eg, ZIP codes, census tracts, or counties), interest turns to formal identification of difference "boundaries," or barriers on the map, in addition to the estimated statistical map itself. "Boundary" refers to a border that describes vastly disparate outcomes in the adjacent areal units, perhaps caused by latent risk factors. This article focuses on developing a model-based statistical tool, equipped to identify difference boundaries in maps with a small number of areal units, also referred to as small-scale maps. This article proposes a novel and robust nonparametric boundary detection rule based on nonparametric Dirichlet processes, later referred to as Dirichlet process wombling (DPW) rule, by employing Dirichlet process-based mixture models for small-scale maps. Unlike the recently proposed nonparametric boundary detection rules based on false discovery rates, the DPW rule is free of ad hoc parameters, computationally simple, and readily implementable in freely available software for public health practitioners such as JAGS and OpenBUGS and yet provides statistically interpretable boundary detection in small-scale wombling. We offer a detailed simulation study and an application of our proposed approach to a urinary bladder cancer incidence rates dataset between 1990 and 2012 in the 8 counties in Connecticut. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Examination of stainless steel-clad Connecticut Yankee fuel assembly S004 after storage in borated water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langstaff, D.C.; Bailey, W.J.; Johnson, A.B. Jr.; Landow, M.P.; Pasupathi, V.; Klingensmith, R.W.

    1982-09-01

    A Connecticut Yankee fuel assembly (S004) was tested nondestructively and destructively. It was concluded that no obvious degradation of the 304L stainless steel-clad spent fuel from assembly S004 occurred during 5 y of storage in borated water. Furthermore, no obvious degradation due to the pool environment occurred on 304 stainless steel-clad rods in assemblies H07 and G11, which were stored for shorter periods but contained operationally induced cladding defects. The seam welds in the cladding on fuel rods from assembly S004, H07, and G11 were similar in that they showed a wrought microstructure with grains noticeably smaller than those in the cladding base metal. The end cap welds showed a dendritically cored structure, typical of rapidly quenched austenitic weld metal. Some intergranular melting may have occurred in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) in the cladding adjacent to the end cap welds in rods from assemblies S004 and H07. However, the weld areas did not show evidence of corrosion-induced degradation

  3. Use of Dietary Vitamin Supplements and Risk of Thyroid Cancer: A Population-Based Case-Control Study in Connecticut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Christopher; Huang, Huang; Zhao, Nan; Lerro, Catherine C; Dai, Min; Chen, Yingtai; Li, Ni; Ma, Shuangge; Udelsman, Robert; Zhang, Yawei

    2017-04-24

    Certain dietary supplements have been reported to increase the risk of some cancers. Over half of the US population regularly uses dietary supplements. Thyroid cancer incidence has increased over the past several decades. However, few studies have investigated the association between dietary supplements and thyroid cancer. Thus, it is essential to clarify any association between dietary supplements and risk of thyroid cancer. A population-based case-control study in Connecticut was conducted during 2010-2011 among 462 histologically confi rmed incident thyroid cancer cases and 498 population-based controls. Dietary supplement intake was ascertained through in-person interviews and a food frequency questionnaire. Multivariate unconditional logistic regression models were used to estimate the risk of thyroid cancer and dietary supplement use. Overall, no statistically signifi cant associations were observed between dietary supplementation and thyroid cancer risk. Stratifi ed analyses revealed a suggestive protective effect on risk of papillary microcarcinoma among longterm (> 10 years) use of multivitamins (OR = 0.59, 95 % CI: 0.33, 1.04) and calcium supplementation (OR = 0.45, 95 % CI: 0.22, 0.93). An increased risk of large papillary thyroid cancers (tumor size > 1 cm) was observed among short-term (supplements (OR = 2.24, 95 % CI: 1.30, 3.88). No signifi cant associations were observed between supplementation and overall thyroid cancer risk. The different associations between calcium supplements and risk of papillary thyroid cancer by tumor size warrant further investigation.

  4. What role do local grocery stores play in urban food environments? A case study of Hartford-Connecticut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Katie S; Ghosh, Debarchana; Page, Martha; Wolff, Michele; McMinimee, Kate; Zhang, Mengyao

    2014-01-01

    Research on urban food environments emphasizes limited access to healthy food, with fewer large supermarkets and higher food prices. Many residents of Hartford, Connecticut, which is often considered a food desert, buy most of their food from small and medium-sized grocery stores. We examined the food environment in greater Hartford, comparing stores in Hartford to those in the surrounding suburbs, and by store size (small, medium, and large). We surveyed all small (over 1,000 ft2), medium, and large-sized supermarkets within a 2-mile radius of Hartford (36 total stores). We measured the distance to stores, availability, price and quality of a market basket of 25 items, and rated each store on internal and external appearance. Geographic Information System (GIS) was used for mapping distance to the stores and variation of food availability, quality, and appearance. Contrary to common literature, no significant differences were found in food availability and price between Hartford and suburban stores. However, produce quality, internal, and external store appearance were significantly lower in Hartford compared to suburban stores (all pfood deserts' may overlook the availability of healthy foods and low prices that exist within small and medium-sized groceries common in inner cities. Improving produce quality and store appearance can potentially impact the food purchasing decisions of low-income residents in Hartford.

  5. Predictors of middle school students' interest in participating in an incentive-based tobacco prevention and cessation program in connecticut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morean, Meghan E; Camenga, Deepa R; Kong, Grace; Cavallo, Dana A; Schepis, Ty S; Krishnan-Sarin, Suchitra

    2014-01-01

    Behavioral incentives have been used to encourage smoking cessation in older adolescents, but the acceptability of incentives to promote a smoke-free lifestyle in younger adolescents is unknown. To inform the development of novel, effective, school-based interventions for youth, we assessed middle school students' interest in participating in an incentive-based tobacco abstinence program. We surveyed 988 students (grades 6-8) attending three Connecticut middle schools to determine whether interest in program participation varied as a function of (1) intrapersonal factors (i.e., demographic characteristics (sex, age, race), smoking history, and trait impulsivity) and/or (2) aspects of program design (i.e., prize type, value, and reward frequency). Primary analyses were conducted using multiple regression. A majority of students (61.8%) reported interest in program participation. Interest did not vary by gender, smoking risk status, or offering cash prizes. However, younger students, non-Caucasian students, behaviorally impulsive students, and students with higher levels of self-regulation were more likely to report interest. Inexpensive awards (e.g., video games) offered monthly motivated program interest. In sum, middle school students reported high levels of interest in an incentive-based program to encourage a tobacco-free lifestyle. These formative data can inform the design of effective, incentive-based smoking cessation and prevention programs in middle schools.

  6. Predictors of Middle School Students’ Interest in Participating in an Incentive-Based Tobacco Prevention and Cessation Program in Connecticut

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meghan E. Morean

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Behavioral incentives have been used to encourage smoking cessation in older adolescents, but the acceptability of incentives to promote a smoke-free lifestyle in younger adolescents is unknown. To inform the development of novel, effective, school-based interventions for youth, we assessed middle school students’ interest in participating in an incentive-based tobacco abstinence program. We surveyed 988 students (grades 6–8 attending three Connecticut middle schools to determine whether interest in program participation varied as a function of (1 intrapersonal factors (i.e., demographic characteristics (sex, age, race, smoking history, and trait impulsivity and/or (2 aspects of program design (i.e., prize type, value, and reward frequency. Primary analyses were conducted using multiple regression. A majority of students (61.8% reported interest in program participation. Interest did not vary by gender, smoking risk status, or offering cash prizes. However, younger students, non-Caucasian students, behaviorally impulsive students, and students with higher levels of self-regulation were more likely to report interest. Inexpensive awards (e.g., video games offered monthly motivated program interest. In sum, middle school students reported high levels of interest in an incentive-based program to encourage a tobacco-free lifestyle. These formative data can inform the design of effective, incentive-based smoking cessation and prevention programs in middle schools.

  7. Modeling migratory energetics of Connecticut River American shad (Alosa sapidissima): implications for the conservation of an iteroparous anadromous fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Santos, Theodore; Letcher, Benjamin H.

    2010-01-01

    We present a simulation model in which individual adult migrant American shad (Alosa sapidissima) ascend the Connecticut River and spawn, and survivors return to the marine environment. Our approach synthesizes bioenergetics, reproductive biology, and behavior to estimate the effects of migratory distance and delays incurred at dams on spawning success and survival. We quantified both the magnitude of effects and the consequences of uncertainty in the estimates of input variables. Behavior, physiology, and energetics strongly affected both the distribution of spawning effort and survival to the marine environment. Delays to both upstream and downstream movements had dramatic effects on spawning success, determining total fecundity and spatial extent of spawning. Delays, combined with cues for migratory reversal, also determined the likelihood of survival. Spawning was concentrated in the immediate vicinity of dams and increased with greater migratory distance and delays to downstream migration. More research is needed on reproductive biology, behavior, energetics, and barrier effects to adequately understand the interplay of the various components of this model; it does provide a framework, however, that suggests that provision of upstream passage at dams in the absence of expeditious downstream passage may increase spawning success — but at the expense of reduced iteroparity. 

  8. Where in Connecticut Is the Best Location for a Split Tax? An Analysis of Land Assessment Equity in Several Cities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey P. Cohen

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The ability of local assessors to accurately estimate land values separately from structure values is important when considering a split tax. When the value of land is estimated with less variation, there is greater equity. We examine land ratios in New London, New Haven, and Hartford Connecticut and sub-groupings within these cities for 2006 to 2010. Overall, the land ratios coefficients of dispersion (COD, a measure of horizontal equity, are too large for an equitable split tax. We also look at land assessment equity among sub-groupings of properties near parks, highway exits, airports, Yale University (for New Haven, residential versus commercial properties, land with old versus new properties, and large versus small parcels and ‘expensive’ versus ‘less expensive’ properties (by examining price per square foot. Commercial properties near Hartford’s Brainard Airport are the best candidates for an equitable split tax. We also find that more frequent revaluations are necessary for an equitable split tax.

  9. Public health assessment for public health implications of radiation contamination at former clock factories located in Bristo (Hartford County), New Haven, (New Haven County), Thomaston (Litchfield County), and Waterbury (New Haven County), Connecticut, Region 1. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    This public health assessment was developed (1) to evaluate the radiation data collected by the Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection (CT DEP) at structures that once housed clock factories in four Connecticut municipalities, and (2) to determine whether a public health hazard exists at any of these sites from the contamination. Contamination was detected at levels that may pose a health risk to current occupants at the former Waterbury Clock Factory, the former Lux Clock Factory, and the former Benrus Clock Company buildings in Waterbury; the former Sessions Clock Company in Bristol; and the former Seth Thomas Clock Company in Thomaston. However, none of the radiation levels detected pose an immediate health problem. The Connecticut Department of Public Health recommends that individuals be disassociated from areas with radiation at levels exceeding 15 mRem/year

  10. A one-dimensional diffusion analogy model for estimation of tide heights in selected tidal marshes in Connecticut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjerklie, David M.; O’Brien, Kevin; Rozsa, Ron

    2013-01-01

    A one-dimensional diffusion analogy model for estimating tide heights in coastal marshes was developed and calibrated by using data from previous tidal-marsh studies. The method is simpler to use than other one- and two-dimensional hydrodynamic models because it does not require marsh depth and tidal prism information; however, the one-dimensional diffusion analogy model cannot be used to estimate tide heights, flow velocities, and tide arrival times for tide conditions other than the highest tide for which it is calibrated. Limited validation of the method indicates that it has an accuracy within 0.3 feet. The method can be applied with limited calibration information that is based entirely on remote sensing or geographic information system data layers. The method can be used to estimate high-tide heights in tidal wetlands drained by tide gates where tide levels cannot be observed directly by opening the gates without risk of flooding properties and structures. A geographic information system application of the method is demonstrated for Sybil Creek marsh in Branford, Connecticut. The tidal flux into this marsh is controlled by two tide gates that prevent full tidal inundation of the marsh. The method application shows reasonable tide heights for the gates-closed condition (the normal condition) and the one-gate-open condition on the basis of comparison with observed heights. The condition with all tide gates open (two gates) was simulated with the model; results indicate where several structures would be flooded if the gates were removed as part of restoration efforts or if the tide gates were to fail.

  11. Use of electromagnetic induction methods to monitor remediation at the University of Connecticut landfill: 2004–2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Carole D.; White, Eric A.; Joesten, Peter K.

    2012-01-01

    Time‐lapse geophysical surveys using frequency‐domain electromagnetics (FDEM) can indirectly measure time‐varying hydrologic parameters such as fluid saturation or solute concentration. Monitoring of these processes provides insight into aquifer properties and the effectiveness of constructed controls (such as leachate interceptor trenches), as well as aquifer responses to natural or induced stresses. At the University of Connecticut landfill, noninvasive, electromagnetic induction (EMI) methods were used to monitor changes in subsurface electrical conductivity that were related to the landfill‐closure activities. After the landfill was closed, EMI methods were used to monitor changes in water saturation and water quality. As part of a long‐term monitoring plan to observe changes associated with closure, redevelopment, and remediation of the former landfill, EMI data were collected to supplement information from groundwater samples collected in wells to the south and north of the landfill. In comparison to single‐point measurements that could have been collected by conventional installation of additional monitoring wells, the EMI methods provided increased spatial coverage, and were less invasive and therefore less destructive to the wetland north of the landfill. To monitor effects of closure activities on the subsurface conductivity, EMI measurements were collected from 2004 to 2011 along discrete transects north and south of the landfill prior to, during, and after the landfill closure. In general, the results indicated an overall decline in subsurface electrical conductivity with time and with distance from the former landfill. This decline in electrical conductivity indicated that the closure and remediation efforts reduced the amount of leachate that originated from the landfill and that entered the drainages to the north and south of the landfill.

  12. What role do local grocery stores play in urban food environments? A case study of Hartford-Connecticut.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie S Martin

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Research on urban food environments emphasizes limited access to healthy food, with fewer large supermarkets and higher food prices. Many residents of Hartford, Connecticut, which is often considered a food desert, buy most of their food from small and medium-sized grocery stores. We examined the food environment in greater Hartford, comparing stores in Hartford to those in the surrounding suburbs, and by store size (small, medium, and large. METHODS: We surveyed all small (over 1,000 ft2, medium, and large-sized supermarkets within a 2-mile radius of Hartford (36 total stores. We measured the distance to stores, availability, price and quality of a market basket of 25 items, and rated each store on internal and external appearance. Geographic Information System (GIS was used for mapping distance to the stores and variation of food availability, quality, and appearance. RESULTS: Contrary to common literature, no significant differences were found in food availability and price between Hartford and suburban stores. However, produce quality, internal, and external store appearance were significantly lower in Hartford compared to suburban stores (all p<0.05. Medium-sized stores had significantly lower prices than small or large supermarkets (p<0.05. Large stores had better scores for internal (p<0.05, external, and produce quality (p<0.01. Most Hartford residents live within 0.5 to 1 mile distance to a grocery store. DISCUSSION: Classifying urban areas with few large supermarkets as 'food deserts' may overlook the availability of healthy foods and low prices that exist within small and medium-sized groceries common in inner cities. Improving produce quality and store appearance can potentially impact the food purchasing decisions of low-income residents in Hartford.

  13. Public health assessment for US Naval Submarine Base, New London, Groton, New London County, Connecticut, Region 1. CERCLIS No. CTD980906515. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The New London Submarine Base was divided by the town boundaries of Groton to the south and Ledyard to the north in New London County, Connecticut. In 1983, the Navy identified 16 potential source areas of environmental contamination during their investigations. The submarine base was listed on the US Environmental Protection Agency's National Priorities List in August 1990 because of the potential for on-base groundwater contamination to migrate to off-base residential wells that are close to the New London Submarine Base

  14. Preliminary investigation of the effects of sea-level rise on groundwater levels in New Haven, Connecticut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjerklie, David M.; Mullaney, John R.; Stone, Janet R.; Skinner, Brian J.; Ramlow, Matthew A.

    2012-01-01

    Global sea level rose about 0.56 feet (ft) (170 millimeters (mm)) during the 20th century. Since the 1960s, sea level has risen at Bridgeport, Connecticut, about 0.38 ft (115 mm), at a rate of 0.008 ft (2.56 mm + or - 0.58 mm) per year. With regional subsidence, and with predicted global climate change, sea level is expected to continue to rise along the northeast coast of the United States through the 21st century. Increasing sea levels will cause groundwater levels in coastal areas to rise in order to adjust to the new conditions. Some regional climate models predict wetter climate in the northeastern United States under some scenarios. Scenarios for the resulting higher groundwater levels have the potential to inundate underground infrastructure in lowlying coastal cities. New Haven is a coastal city in Connecticut surrounded and bisected by tidally affected waters. Monitoring of water levels in wells in New Haven from August 2009 to July 2010 indicates the complex effects of urban influence on groundwater levels. The response of groundwater levels to recharge and season varied considerably from well to well. Groundwater temperatures varied seasonally, but were warmer than what was typical for Connecticut, and they seem to reflect the influence of the urban setting, including the effects of conduits for underground utilities. Specific conductance was elevated in many of the wells, indicating the influence of urban activities or seawater in Long Island Sound. A preliminary steady-state model of groundwater flow for part of New Haven was constructed using MODFLOW to simulate current groundwater levels (2009-2010) and future groundwater levels based on scenarios with a rise of 3 ft (0.91 meters (m)) in sea level, which is predicted for the end of the 21st century. An additional simulation was run assuming a 3-ft rise in sea level combined with a 12-percent increase in groundwater recharge. The model was constructed from existing hydrogeologic information for the

  15. Classification of the alterations of beaver dams to headwater streams in northeastern Connecticut, U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burchsted, Denise; Daniels, Melinda D.

    2014-01-01

    Of the many types of barriers to water flow, beaver dams are among the smallest, typically lasting less than a decade and rarely exceeding 1.5 m in height. They are also among the most frequent and common obstructions in rivers, with a density often exceeding ten dams per km, a frequency of construction within a given network on a time scale of years, and a historic extent covering most of North America. Past quantification of the geomorphologic impact of beaver dams has primarily been limited to local impacts within individual impoundments and is of limited geographic scope. To assess the impact of beaver dams at larger scales, this study examines channel shape and sediment distribution in thirty river reaches in northeastern Connecticut, U.S.A. The study reaches fall within the broader categories of impounded and free-flowing segments, leaving a third segment class of beaver meadows requiring additional study. Each of the study reaches were classified at the reach scale as free-flowing, valley-wide beaver pond, in-channel beaver pond, and downstream of beaver dam. The bankfull channel width to depth ratios and channel widths normalized by watershed area vary significantly across the study reach classes. Additionally, reaches modified by beaver dams have finer sediment distributions. This paper provides the first quantitative geomorphic descriptions of the in-channel beaver pond and reaches downstream of beaver dams. Given the different channel shapes and sediment distributions, we infer that geomorphic processes are longitudinally decoupled by these frequent barriers that control local base level. These barriers generate heterogeneity within a river network by greatly increasing the range of channel morphology and by generating patches controlled by different processes. Therefore, in spite of the small size of individual beaver dams, the cumulative effect of multiple dams has the potential to modify processes at larger spatial scales. To improve assessment of the

  16. National Program for Inspection of Non-Federal Dams. Mashhpaug Pond Spillway (CT 00640), Dike (CT 01699), Dam (CT 01700), Quinebaug River Basin, Union, Connecticut. Phase I Inspection Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-03-01

    INSPECTION REPORT SECTION I - PROJECT INFORMATION 6 1.1 General: a. Authort: Public Law 92-367, August 8, 1972, authorized the Secretary of the Army...ARMY ENGINEER DIV. NEW ENGLAND MASHAPAUG POND DIKE coops OF r.� NATIONAL PROGRAM OF UNION, CONNECTICUT WALRA .ABO C~ SI TSIN SPEC TIO N O F C T

  17. Assessing the vulnerability of public-supply wells to contamination--Glacial aquifer system in Woodbury, Connecticut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagucki, Martha L.; Brown, Craig J.; Starn, J. Jeffrey; Eberts, Sandra M.

    2010-01-01

    This fact sheet highlights findings from the vulnerability study of a public-supply well in Woodbury, Connecticut. The well typically produces water at the rate of 72 gallons per minute from the glacial aquifer system in the Pomperaug River Basin. Water samples were collected at the public-supply well and at monitoring wells installed in or near the simulated zone of contribution to the supply well. Samples of untreated water from the public-supply wellhead contained several types of undesirable constituents, including 11 volatile organic compounds (VOCs), nitrate, pesticides, uranium, and radon. Most of these constituents were detected at concentrations below drinking-water standards, where such standards exist. Only concentrations of the VOC trichlorethylene exceeded the Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) of 5 micrograms per liter (ug/L) established by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for drinking water. Radon concentrations exceeded a proposed-but not finalized-MCL of 300 picocuries per liter (pCi/L). Overall, the study findings point to four main factors that affect the movement and fate of contaminants and the vulnerability of the public-supply well in Woodbury: (1) groundwater age (how long ago water entered, or recharged, the aquifer); (2) the percentage of recharge received through urban areas; (3) the percentage of recharge received through dry wells and their proximity to the public-supply well; and (4) natural geochemical processes occurring within the aquifer system; that is, processes that affect the amounts and distribution of chemical substances in aquifer sediments and groundwater. A computer-model simulation of groundwater flow to the public-supply well was used to estimate the age of water particles entering the well along the length of the well screen. About 90 percent of the simulated flow to the well consists of water that entered the aquifer 9 or fewer years ago. Such young water is vulnerable to contaminants resulting from human activities

  18. State Geodatabase for Connecticut

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Census Bureau, Department of Commerce — The 2015 TIGER Geodatabases are extracts of selected nation based and state based geographic and cartographic information from the U.S. Census Bureau's Master...

  19. Extending the Instrumental Record of Sea-Level Change: A 1300-Year Sea-Level Record From Eastern Connecticut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, J. P.; Cleary, P.

    2002-12-01

    The instrumental record of sea-level change in the northeastern United States extends back to the early 20th century and at New York City (NYC) extends back to 1856. These tide gauge records indicate that sea level has risen at a rate of 2.5 to 4 mm/year over the last 100-150 years. Geologic evidence of sea-level change in the region over the last 2,000 years indicates rates of sea-level rise of about 1 mm/year or less. The discordance between the instrumental and geologic records is frequently cited as potentially providing evidence that anthropogenic warming of the climate system has resulted in an increase in the rate of sea-level rise. In order to begin to test the hypothesis that acceleration in the rate of sea-level rise has occurred in the last 150 years due to anthropogenic climate warming, accurate and precise information on the timing of the apparent acceleration in sea-level rise are needed. Here we construct a high-resolution relative sea-level record for the past 1350 years by dating basal salt marsh peat samples above a glacial erratic in a western Connecticut salt marsh. Preservation of marsh vegetation remains in the sediment record that has a narrow vertical habitat range at the upper end of the tidal range provides information on past sea levels. { \\it Spartina patens} (marsh hay) and { \\it Juncus gerardi} (black rush) dominate both the modern marsh and their remains are the major constituent of the marsh sediments and occur in the modern marsh between mean high water (MHW) and mean highest high water. We use the elevation distribution of modern plant communities to estimate the relationship of sediment samples to paleo-mean high water. The chronology is based on 15 radiocarbon ages, supplemented by age estimates derived from the horizons of industrial Pb pollution and pollen indicative of European land clearance. Thirteen of the radiocarbon ages and the Pb and pollen data come from samples taken along a contact between marsh peat and a glacial

  20. Delineation and Analysis of Uncertainty of Contributing Areas to Wells at the Southbury Training School, Southbury, Connecticut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starn, J. Jeffrey; Stone, Janet Radway; Mullaney, John R.

    2000-01-01

    Contributing areas to public-supply wells at the Southbury Training School in Southbury, Connecticut, were mapped by simulating ground-water flow in stratified glacial deposits in the lower Transylvania Brook watershed. The simulation used nonlinear regression methods and informational statistics to estimate parameters of a ground-water flow model using drawdown data from an aquifer test. The goodness of fit of the model and the uncertainty associated with model predictions were statistically measured. A watershed-scale model, depicting large-scale ground-water flow in the Transylvania Brook watershed, was used to estimate the distribution of groundwater recharge. Estimates of recharge from 10 small basins in the watershed differed on the basis of the drainage characteristics of each basin. Small basins having well-defined stream channels contributed less ground-water recharge than basins having no defined channels because potential ground-water recharge was carried away in the stream channel. Estimates of ground-water recharge were used in an aquifer-scale parameter-estimation model. Seven variations of the ground-water-flow system were posed, each representing the ground-water-flow system in slightly different but realistic ways. The model that most closely reproduced measured hydraulic heads and flows with realistic parameter values was selected as the most representative of the ground-water-flow system and was used to delineate boundaries of the contributing areas. The model fit revealed no systematic model error, which indicates that the model is likely to represent the major characteristics of the actual system. Parameter values estimated during the simulation are as follows: horizontal hydraulic conductivity of coarse-grained deposits, 154 feet per day; vertical hydraulic conductivity of coarse-grained deposits, 0.83 feet per day; horizontal hydraulic conductivity of fine-grained deposits, 29 feet per day; specific yield, 0.007; specific storage, 1.6E-05

  1. “I Live by Shooting Hill” – A Qualitative Exploration of Conflict and Violence among Urban Youth in New Haven, Connecticut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuval, Kerem; Massey, Zohar; O Caughy, Margaret; Cavanaugh, Brenda; Pillsbury, Charles A; Groce, Nora

    2013-01-01

    To elucidate urban youths’ perceptions of conflict and violence we conducted a qualitative study among minority urban youths in New Haven, Connecticut. We utilized the ecological framework to explore the multilevel nature of the findings, and triangulated results with a parallel quantitative study. We found risk factors for violence at multiple levels including lack of interpersonal anger management skills (individual level); parents not physically present in the household (relationship level); residence in crime and gang-ridden neighborhoods (community level); and socioeconomic inequalities between neighborhoods, as reflected by participants’ perception of the inadequacy of neighborhood resources to provide safety (societal level). Neighborhood resources were perceived as sparse, and police were not regarded as a protective factor (sometimes rather as racially discriminatory). Participants’ statements pertaining to feelings of isolation, racism, and violence without strong parental, neighborhood, and school support may impede prosocial attitudes and behaviors throughout adolescence and young adulthood. PMID:22643467

  2. Operation of the Millstone Nuclear Power Station, Unit No. 3 (NRC Docket No. 50-423) Northeast Nuclear Energy Company et. al., Waterford, New London County, Connecticut

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-07-01

    A draft version of the environmental impact statement (EPA No. 840331D) concerns the proposal to issue an operating license for Unit 3 of the Millstone Nuclear Power Station on Connecticut. The plant would use a four-loop pressurized water reactor to produce up to 3579 MW of thermal energy and a calculated maximum electric output of 1209 MW of electric power. A new line would require clearing about 350 acres. Positive impacts include the addition of new capacity, which would benefit the area economically and employment opportunities. Negative impacts include the loss of some winter flounder, which would be minimized by a fish return system, and some increases in the concentration of chemical constituents that would enter Long Island Sound. Policies relating to coastal areas, water pollution, and reactor regulation provide a legal mandate for the impact statement

  3. Integrated Plant Safety Assessment: Systematic Evaluation Program. Haddam Neck Plant, Connecticut Yankee Atomic Power Company, Docket No. 50-213. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    The Systematic Evaluation Progam was initiated in February 1977 by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission review the designs of older operating nuclear reactor plants to confirm and document their safety. The review provides: (1) an assessment of how these plants compare with curent licensing safety requirements relating to selected issues, (2) a basis for deciding on how these differences should be resolved in an integrated plant review, and (3) a documented evaluation of plant safety. This report documents the review of Haddam Neck Plant, operated by Connecticut Yankee Atomic Power Company. The Haddam Neck Plant is one of 10 plants reviewed under Phase II of this program. This report indicates how 137 topics selected for review under Phase I of the program were addressed. Equipment and procedural changes have been identified as a result of the review

  4. Geohydrology and conceptual model of a ground-water-flow system near a Superfund site in Cheshire, Connecticut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, J.R.; Barlow, P.M.; Starn, J.J.

    1996-01-01

    Degradation of ground-water quality has been identified in an area of the north-central part of the town of Cheshire, Connecticut. An investigation by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, was done during 1994-95 to characterize the unconsolidated glacial deposits and the sedimentary bedrock, integrate the local geohydrologic conditions with the regional geohydrologic system, and develop a conceptual understanding of ground-water flow in the study area. A regional ground-water-flow model developed for the region near the study area indicates that perennial streams, including Judd Brook and the Tenmile River, form hydrologic divides that separate the larger region into hydraulically independent flow systems. In the local study area, synoptic water-level measurements made in June 1995 indicate that ground water near the water table flows west and southwestward from the low hill on the eastern side of the area toward the pond and wetlands along Judd Brook. Water-level data indicate that there is good hydraulic connection between the unconsolidated materials and underlying fractured bedrock. Unconsolidated materials in the study area consist principally of glacial stratified deposits that are fine sand, silt, and clay of glaci- olacustrine origin; locally these overlie thin glacial till. The glacial sediments range in thickness from a few feet to about 25 ft in the eastern part of the study area and are as much as 100 ft thick in the western and southern part of the study area beneath the Judd Brook and Tenmile River valleys. Fluvial redbeds of the New Haven Arkose underlie the glacial deposits in the region; in the study area, the redbeds consist of (1) channel sandstone units, which are coarse sandstone to fine conglomerate, generally in 6- to 15-ft- thick sequences; and (2) overbank mudstone units, which are siltstone and silty sandstone with some fine sandstone, generally in 6- to 50-ft-thick sequences. Thin

  5. Comparison of sequences of hypervariable region (HVR subunit S-1 gene of field isolate I-37 infectious bronchitis virus with Connecticut serotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.L.P Indi Dharmayanti

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Infectious Bronchitis is a contagious and acute respiratory disease in chickens caused by infectious bronchitis virus (IBV.Antigenic differences in IBV are associated with changes in the sequence of the spike glycoprotein (S. The subunit S1 which demonstrates more sequence variability than S-2 have been identified as hypervariable region (HVR-1 and 2. There were several IB virus field isolates included I-37 have been identified in Indonesia by serum neutralization method. However, gene sequence variation in HVR subunit S-1 had not yet been identified. Isolate I-37 was close to the serotype Connecticut 46 (Conn 46. The aim of this study is to identify sequence variation of HVR subunit S-1 gene of isolate I-37 produced by Reverse Transcriptase-Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR and sequencing. Several procedures were carried out in the study including virus titration, propagation and was concentrated from the allantoic fluid infected with IBV. Then, RNA was extracted for RTPCR. urther the product was sequnced and its homology with IBV references from GenBank was compared by GenMac version 8.0. Result showed that isolate I-37 produced 515 bp of amplification product. Isolate I-37 and Conn 46 are same serotype, yet their HVR subunit S-1 nucleotides and amino acids (protein differ by 6.9% and 15.6% respectively. It might be concluded that isolate I-37 was variant of Conn 46.

  6. The development of professional identity and the formation of teams in the Veterans Affairs Connecticut Healthcare System's Center of Excellence in Primary Care Education Program (CoEPCE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Emily M; Zapatka, Susan; Brienza, Rebecca S

    2015-06-01

    The United States Department of Veterans Affairs Connecticut Healthcare System (VACHS) is one of five Centers of Excellence in Primary Care Education (CoEPCE) pilot sites. The overall goal of the CoEPCE program, which is funded by the Office of Academic Affiliations, is to develop and implement innovative approaches for training future health care providers in postgraduate education programs to function effectively in teams to provide exceptional patient care. This longitudinal study employs theoretically grounded qualitative methods to understand the effect of a combined nursing and medical training model on professional identity and team development at the VACHS CoEPCE site. The authors used qualitative approaches to understand trainees' experiences, expectations, and impressions of the program. From September 2011 to August 2012, they conducted 28 interviews of 18 trainees (internal medicine [IM] residents and nurse practitioners [NPs]) and subjected data to three stages of open, iterative coding. Major themes illuminate both the evolution of individual professional identity within both types of trainees and the dynamic process of group identity development. Results suggest that initially IM residents struggled to understand NPs' roles and responsibilities, whereas NP trainees doubted their ability to work alongside physicians. At the end of one academic year, these uncertainties disappeared, and what was originally artificial had transformed into an organic interprofessional team of health providers who shared a strong sense of understanding and trust. This study provides early evidence of successful interprofessional collaboration among NPs and IM residents in a primary care training program.

  7. Chloride concentrations, loads, and yields in four watersheds along Interstate 95, southeastern Connecticut, 2008-11: factors that affect peak chloride concentrations during winter storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Craig J.; Mullaney, John R.; Morrison, Jonathan; Martin, Joseph W.; Trombley, Thomas J.

    2015-07-01

    Chloride (Cl-) concentrations and loads and other water chemistry characteristics were assessed to evaluate potential effects of road-deicer applications on streamwater quality in four watersheds along Interstate 95 (I–95) in southeastern Connecticut from November 1, 2008, through September 30, 2011. Streamflow and water quality were studied in the Four Mile River, Oil Mill Brook, Stony Brook, and Jordan Brook watersheds, where developed land ranged from 9 to 32 percent. Water-quality samples were collected and specific conductance was measured continuously at paired water-quality monitoring sites, upstream and downstream from I–95. Specific conductance values were related to Cl- concentrations to assist in determining the effects of road-deicing operations on the levels of Cl-in the streams. Streamflow and water-quality data were compared with weather data and with the timing, amount, and composition of deicers applied to State highways. Grab samples were collected during winter stormwater-runoff events, such as winter storms or periods of rain or warm temperatures in which melting takes place. Grab samples were also collected periodically during the spring and summer and during base-flow conditions.

  8. Flood-inundation Maps for the Deerfield River, Franklin County, Massachusetts, from the Confluence with the Cold River Tributary to the Connecticut River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombard, Pamela J.; Bent, Gardner C.

    2015-09-02

    The U.S. Geological Survey developed flood elevations in cooperation with the Federal Emergency Management Agency for a 30-mile reach of the Deerfield River from the confluence of the Cold River tributary to the Connecticut River in the towns of Charlemont, Buckland, Shelburne, Conway, Deerfield, and Greenfield in Franklin County, Massachusetts to assist land owners, and emergency management workers prepare for and recover from floods. Peak flows with 50-, 20-, 10-, 4-, 2-, 1-, 0.5-, and 0.2-percent annual exceedance probabilities were computed for the reach from updated flood-frequency analyses. These peak flows were routed through a one-dimensional step-backwater hydraulic model to obtain the corresponding peak water-surface elevations and to place the tropical storm Irene flood of August 28, 2011 into historical context. The hydraulic model was calibrated by using current [2015] stage-discharge relations at two U.S. Geological Survey streamgages in the study reach—Deerfield River at Charlemont, MA (01168500) and Deerfield River near West Deerfield, MA (01170000)—and from documented high-water marks from the tropical storm Irene flood, which had between a 1- and 0.2-percent AEP.

  9. Can providing a morning healthy snack help to reduce hunger during school time? Experimental evidence from an elementary school in Connecticut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellari, Elena; Berning, Joshua P

    2016-11-01

    While children may be naturally inclined to regulate their hunger, they are also guided by adults and influenced by environmental constraints regarding when and how much to eat. As such, the timing and availability of meals could alter a child's natural eating habits. This could impact the nutritional quality of what they eat as well. We conducted a field experiment with three fourth grade classes at a public elementary school in Eastern Connecticut to analyze if providing a nutritious snack one hour prior to lunch effects a child's level of hunger and consequently their lunch-time consumption. We found students shift their caloric and nutrient intake from lunch to snack time. In addition, we found a significant reduction in student hunger. Our results highlight the importance in considering the timing and quality of meals provided during school time. In our sample, current snack and lunch schedule may not be optimal and changing it can have an impact on the wellbeing of students. Providing healthful options for snack could be an effective way to improve student diets while preserving their ability to make their own choices. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Samuel Holden Parsons Lee (1772-1863): American physician, entrepreneur and selfless fighter of the 1798 Yellow Fever epidemic of New London, Connecticut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattie, James K; Desai, Sukumar P

    2015-02-01

    Samuel Holden Parsons Lee practised medicine at a time when the germ theory of disease had not yet been proposed and antibiotics remained undiscovered. In 1798 he served selflessly as the only physician in town who was willing to battle the Yellow Fever outbreak of New London, Connecticut. Because he practised at the dawn of the age of patent medicine, unfortunately his name also came to be associated with medical quackery. We argue that his contributions have been grossly underestimated. He compounded and vended medications - including bilious pills and bitters - that were gold standards of the day. Moreover, one preparation for treatment of kidney stones led to his sub-specialization in this field and was met with such success that its sale continued for nearly 100 years after his death. While a talented medical man, Lee also had a knack for business, finding success in trading, whaling and real estate. © The Author(s) 2013 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  11. Nutrient concentrations and loads and Escherichia coli densities in tributaries of the Niantic River estuary, southeastern Connecticut, 2005 and 2008–2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullaney, John R.

    2013-01-01

    Nutrient concentrations and loads and Escherichia coli (E. coli) densities were studied in 2005 and from 2008 through 2011 in water-quality samples from tributaries of the Niantic River Estuary in southeastern Connecticut. Data from a water-quality survey of the base flow of subbasins in the watershed in June 2005 were used to determine the range of total nitrogen concentrations (0.09 to 2.4 milligrams per liter), instantaneous loads (less than 1 to 62 pounds per day) and the yields of total nitrogen ranging from 0.02 to 11.2 pounds per square mile per day (less than 1 to 7.2 kilograms per hectare per year) from basin segments. Nitrogen yields were positively correlated with the amount of developed land in each subbasin. Stable isotope measurements of nitrate (δ15N) and oxygen (δ18O) ranged from 3.9 to 9.4 per mil and 0.7 to 4.1 per mil, respectively, indicating that likely sources of nitrate in base flow are soil nitrate and ammonium fertilizers, sewage or animal waste, or a mixture of these sources. Continuous streamflow and monthly water-quality sampling, with additional storm event sampling, were conducted at the three major tributaries (Latimer Brook, Oil Mill Brook, and Stony Brook) of the Niantic River from October 2008 through September 2011. Samples were analyzed for nitrogen and phosphorus constituents and E. coli densities. Total freshwater discharge from these tributaries, which is reduced by upstream withdrawals, ranged from 25.9 to 37.8 million gallons per day. Total nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations generally were low, with the mean values below the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency recommended nutrient concentration values of 0.71 milligram per liter and 0.031 milligram per liter, respectively. Total nitrogen was predominantly in the form of total ammonia plus organic nitrogen at the Oil Mill Brook and Stony Brook sites and in the form of nitrate at Latimer Brook. Annual total nitrogen loads that flowed into the Niantic River estuary from

  12. Key plants preserve elements of culture: a study over distance and time of fresh crops in Puerto Rican markets in Hartford, Connecticut, "A moveable feast".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, David W; Anderson, Gregory J

    2014-04-01

    People retain culinary customs when they migrate. We tested this commitment via the study of Puerto Rican fresh produce markets in the continental United States over time, 18 yr, and space, by comparisons with source markets in Puerto Rico (PR). A survey of Puerto Rican markets in Hartford (HT), Connecticut in 1993-1994 was repeated in 2009-2010. A comparative study was made at open-air markets in PR in 2009. Surveys recorded fresh crops, and interviews with vendors and Hartford Puerto Rican residents provided context. We recorded 84 plant crops (64 species; 32 families) for seven categories. The largest category was viandas (fresh, starchy "root" crops and immature fruits), followed by saborizantes (flavorings). In the second HT survey, 80% of the crops were still present. And ∼90% of the HT 1993-1994 crops and ∼75% of the HT 2009-2010 crops were shared with markets in PR. On the basis of our results, we suggest two new concepts. The persistence of these largely tropical foods in a temperate market far removed from tropical PR shows the importance of basic foods as an element of cultural identification. We recognize this stability as an example of "culinary cultural conservation". Second, analysis of these fresh produce markets leads to the conclusion that viandas are the most prominent in diversity, persistence over time and distance, volume, and in terms of consumers' "willingness to pay". Accordingly, we consider the viandas a good example of a "cultural keystone food group", a food group that is emblematic of a community's culinary conservation.

  13. Variation in patient-provider communication by patient's race and ethnicity, provider type, and continuity in and site of care: An analysis of data from the Connecticut Health Care Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aseltine, Robert H; Sabina, Alyse; Barclay, Gillian; Graham, Garth

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the quality of patient-reported communication with their health care providers using data from a large, statewide survey of patients. We examine the relationship between patient's race and ethnicity, type of health care provider, site of and continuity in care, and the quality of patient-provider communication. We analyze data from the Connecticut Health Care Survey, a representative telephone survey of 4608 Connecticut residents conducted between June 2012 and February 2013. Eight measures of patient-provider communication were analyzed using weighted general linear and logistic regression models. Patients' assessments of the quality of communication with their health care providers were generally positive. Hispanic patients, those who received care in a clinic or hospital setting, and those who did not consistently see the same provider reported significantly poorer communication with their providers. Our data suggest that improving patient-provider communication for Hispanic patients may be a critical step in achieving health equity. However, increased access to health care delivered outside of physician offices where there may not be consistency in providers across encounters may pose challenges to effective health communication.

  14. Variation in patient–provider communication by patient’s race and ethnicity, provider type, and continuity in and site of care: An analysis of data from the Connecticut Health Care Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert H Aseltine

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The purpose of this study is to examine the quality of patient-reported communication with their health care providers using data from a large, statewide survey of patients. We examine the relationship between patient’s race and ethnicity, type of health care provider, site of and continuity in care, and the quality of patient–provider communication. Methods: We analyze data from the Connecticut Health Care Survey, a representative telephone survey of 4608 Connecticut residents conducted between June 2012 and February 2013. Eight measures of patient–provider communication were analyzed using weighted general linear and logistic regression models. Results: Patients’ assessments of the quality of communication with their health care providers were generally positive. Hispanic patients, those who received care in a clinic or hospital setting, and those who did not consistently see the same provider reported significantly poorer communication with their providers. Conclusion: Our data suggest that improving patient–provider communication for Hispanic patients may be a critical step in achieving health equity. However, increased access to health care delivered outside of physician offices where there may not be consistency in providers across encounters may pose challenges to effective health communication.

  15. Preliminary assessment of chloride concentrations, loads, and yields in selected watersheds along the Interstate 95 corridor, southeastern Connecticut, 2008-09

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Craig J.; Mullaney, John R.; Morrison, Jonathan; Mondazzi, Remo

    2011-01-01

    Water-quality conditions were assessed to evaluate potential effects of road-deicer applications on stream-water quality in four watersheds along Interstate 95 (I-95) in southeastern Connecticut from November 1, 2008, through September 30, 2009. This preliminary study is part of a four-year cooperative study by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), and the Connecticut Department of Transportation (ConnDOT). Streamflow and water quality were studied at four watersheds?Four Mile River, Oil Mill Brook, Stony Brook, and Jordan Brook. Water-quality samples were collected and specific conductance was measured continuously at paired water-quality monitoring sites upstream and downstream from I-95. Specific conductance values were related to chloride (Cl) concentrations to assist in determining the effects of road-deicing operations on the levels of Cl in the streams. Streamflow and water-quality data were compared with weather data and with the timing, amount, and composition of deicers applied to state highways. Grab samples were collected during winter stormwater-runoff events, such as winter storms or periods of rain or warm temperatures in which melting takes place, and periodically during the spring and summer. Cl concentrations at the eight water-quality monitoring sites were well below the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) recommended chronic and acute Cl toxicity criteria of 230 and 860 milligrams per liter (mg/L), respectively. Specific conductance and estimated Cl concentrations in streams, particularly at sites downstream from I-95, peaked during discharge events in the winter and early spring as a result of deicers applied to roads and washed off by stormwater or meltwater. During winter storms, deicing activities, or subsequent periods of melting, specific conductance and estimated Cl concentrations peaked as high as 703 microsiemens per centimeter (?S/cm) and 160 mg/L at the downstream sites. During most of

  16. 2004 Connecticut Coastline Lidar Mapping

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — LIDAR data is remotely sensed high-resolution elevation data collected by an airborne collection platform. Using a combination of laser rangefinding, GPS positioning...

  17. Level III Ecoregions of Connecticut

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by state were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and...

  18. County business patterns, 1997 : Connecticut

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-09-01

    County Business Patterns is an annual series that provides : subnational economic data by industry. The series is : useful for studying the economic activity of small areas; : analyzing economic changes over time; and as a benchmark : for statistical...

  19. Level IV Ecoregions of Connecticut

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by state were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and...

  20. Current and future carbon export by the Connecticut River: using streamflow data archives and rating curves to model annual and seasonal constituent loads under future discharge scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petsch, S.; Armfield, J. R.

    2013-12-01

    Rivers deliver play an important role in global carbon and nutrient cycling through delivery of organic matter to the oceans. However, connections between carbon export and the processes that control river discharge and landscape erosion are poorly understood in modern river systems, hampering efforts to make predictions about watershed carbon export in the face of future land-use and climate changes. The impacts of future changes can be estimated by exploring relationships between river discharge and constituent loads using long-term archives of streamflow and water quality. Here, we use data from USGS streamgage 01184000 to examine the relationships between discharge and constituent loads in the Connecticut River, northeast USA. 85 years of daily discharge data were used to establish probability distributions for annual and seasonal river discharge. Constituent loads (TSS, POC, DOC) and characteristics (POC C/N ratios, % OC in suspended sediments) were used with discharge to determine the form and significance of constituent rating curves. TSS and POC loads follow distinct positive power-law relationships with discharge. Discharge is negatively correlated with weight % OC in suspended sediments and positively correlated with POC C/N ratios. DOC concentrations do not vary with discharge. POC and TSS rating curves vary by season, but the significance of these differences is low (r20.10). Annual mean POC concentrations are 0.5 mg/L, with mean spring POC concentrations (0.7 mg/L) being twice those of summer. Annual mean DOC concentrations are approx. 4 mg/L. Mean annual POC C/N ratios are 8.1, with higher ratios in winter and spring, and lower ratios in summer and fall. The mean annual % OC in suspended sediments is nearly 6%; mean % OC in summer and fall suspended sediments is over 7% while mean % OC in spring suspended sediments is 2.9%. Mean daily spring discharge is twice the annual mean discharge and nearly four times the mean daily summer discharge. As a result

  1. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in Connecticut. Preliminary background report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feurer, D.A.; Weaver, C.L.; Gallagher, K.C.; Hejna, D.; Rielley, K.J.

    1980-01-01

    The Connecticut statutes expressly provide for the regulation of public utilities. As of January 1, 1979, responsibility for the regulation of utilities is vested in the Public Utilities Control Authority (PUCA). Formerly such authority was exercised by the Public Utilities Commission which has been abolished and replaced by the PUCA. The Public Utilities Act provides that the PUCA is to consist of five members appointed by the governor with the advice and consent of both houses of the general assembly. It should be noted that statutory references to the Public Utilities Commission are deemed to mean the Public Utilities Control Authority. The statute gives only a minor role to local government in regulating public utilities. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  2. Demographic, health-related, and work-related factors associated with body mass index and body fat percentage among workers at six Connecticut manufacturing companies across different age groups: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garza, Jennifer L; Dugan, Alicia G; Faghri, Pouran D; Gorin, Amy A; Huedo-Medina, Tania B; Kenny, Anne M; Cherniack, Martin G; Cavallari, Jennifer M

    2015-01-01

    Effective workplace interventions that consider the multifactorial nature of obesity are needed to reduce and prevent obesity among adults. Furthermore, the factors associated with obesity may differ for workers across age groups. Therefore, the objective of this study was to identify demographic, health-related, and work-related factors associated with baseline and changes in body mass index (BMI) and body fat percentage (BFP) and among Connecticut manufacturing workers acrossage groups. BMI and BFPof 758 workers from six Connecticut manufacturing companies were objectively measuredat two time points approximately 36 months apart. Demographic, health-related, and work-related factors wereassessed via questionnaire. All variables were included in linear regression models to identify factors associated with baseline and changes in BMI and BFP for workers in 3 age groups: 55 years (28 %). There were differences in baseline and changes in BMI and BFP among manufacturing workers across age groups. Being interested in changing weight was significantly (p age categories. Other factors associated with higher baseline BMI and BFP differed by age group and included: male gender (BMI p = 0.04), female gender (BFP p age category, male gender (BMI p = 0.02), female gender (BFP p age category, and female gender (BFP p 55 year age category. Few factors were associated with change in BMI or BFP across any age category. Among manufacturing workers, we identified associations between individual, health-related, and work-related factors and baseline BMIand BFP that differed by age. Such results support the use of strategies tailored to the challenges faced by workers in specific age groups rather than adopting a one size fits all approach. Effective interventions should consider a full range of individual, health-related, and work-related factors. More work must be done to identify factors or strategies associated with changes in obesity over time.

  3. Aquifer Chemistry and Transport Processes in the Zone of Contribution to a Public-Supply Well in Woodbury, Connecticut, 2002-06

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Craig J.; Starn, J. Jeffrey; Stollenwerk, Kenneth G.; Mondazzi, Remo A.; Trombley, Thomas J.

    2009-01-01

    A glacial aquifer system in Woodbury, Connecticut, was studied to identify factors that affect the groundwater quality in the zone of contribution to a community public-supply well. Water samples were collected during 2002-06 from the public-supply well and from 35 monitoring wells in glacial stratified deposits, glacial till, and fractured bedrock. The glacial aquifer is vulnerable to contamination from a variety of sources due to the short groundwater residence times and the urban land use in the contributing recharge area to the public-supply well. The distribution and concentrations of pH, major and trace elements, stable isotope ratios, recharge temperatures, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), and volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and the oxidation-reduction (redox) conditions, were used to identify recharge source areas, aquifer source material, anthropogenic sources, chemical processes, and groundwater-flow paths from recharge areas to the public-supply well, PSW-1. The major chemical sources to groundwater and the tracers or conditions used to identify them and their processes throughout the aquifer system include (1) bedrock and glacial stratified deposits and till, characterized by high pH and concentrations of sulfate (SO42-), bicarbonate, uranium (U), radon-222, and arsenic (As) relative to those of other wells, reducing redox conditions, enriched delta sulfur-34 (d34S) and delta carbon-13 (d13C) values, depleted delta oxygen-18 (d18O) and delta deuterium (dD) values, calcite near saturation, low recharge temperatures, and groundwater ages of more than about 9 years; (2) natural organic matter, either in sediments or in an upgradient riparian zone, characterized by high concentrations of DOC or manganese (Mn), low concentrations of dissolved oxygen (DO) and nitrate (NO3-), enriched d34S values, and depleted d18O and dD values; (3) road salt (halite), characterized by high concentrations of sodium (Na), chloride (Cl-), and calcium (Ca), and indicative

  4. Acculturation, socioeconomic status, obesity and lifestyle factors among low-income Puerto Rican women in Connecticut, U.S., 1998-1999 Aculturación, clase social, obesidad y factores relacionados con el estilo de vida en mujeres puertorriqueñas de bajos ingresos residentes del estado de Connecticut, Estados Unidos, 1998-1999

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurgül Fitzgerald

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To examine the associations of socioeconomic status and acculturation with obesity and lifestyle characteristics that may be risk factors for diabetes and cardiovascular disease among low-income Puerto Rican women. METHODS: This cross-sectional study was conducted between 1998 and 1999 by interviewing a convenience sample of 200 low-income Puerto Rican female caretakers of young children in Hartford, Connecticut, United States of America. Various recruitment methods were used to ensure adequate representation of the target community. The associations of obesity (body mass index > 30.0 and lifestyle factors (physical activity, cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption, food intake with socioeconomic status (education, employment, car ownership, acculturation, age, and marital status were examined with Spearman rho, chi-squared, and Mann-Whitney U tests and logistic regression analyses. RESULTS: Mean age was 29 years. Obesity (40%, physical inactivity (47%, and cigarette smoking (32% were common. Less acculturated participants were 57% less likely to smoke and 54% less likely to be obese than their more acculturated counterparts. Lower socioeconomic status (not finishing high school or not owning a car was associated with a higher likelihood of obesity, but unemployed (vs. employed women were less likely to be obese (P OBJETIVOS: Examinar las asociaciones entre el estado socioeconómico y la aculturación con las características del estilo de vida que podrían constituir factores de riesgo de diabetes y de enfermedades cardiovasculares en mujeres puertorriqueñas de bajos ingresos. MÉTODOS: Este estudio transversal se llevó a cabo entre 1998 y 1999 mediante entrevistas a una muestra de conveniencia compuesta de 200 mujeres puertorriqueñas de bajos ingresos que cuidaban a niños pequeños en Hartford, Connecticut, Estados Unidos de América. Se usaron diversas formas de reclutamiento para conseguir que hubiera una buena representaci

  5. Building America Case Study: Retrofitting a 1960s Split-Level, Cold-Climate Home, Westport, Connecticut; Whole-House Solutions for Existing Homes, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2015-08-01

    ??National programs such as Home Performance with ENERGY STAR(R) and numerous other utility air sealing programs have brought awareness to homeowners of the benefits of energy efficiency retrofits. Yet, these programs tend to focus on the low-hanging fruit: air-sealing the thermal envelope and ductwork where accessible, switch to efficient lighting, and low-flow fixtures. At the other end of the spectrum, deep-energy retrofit programs are also being encouraged by various utilities across the country. While deep energy retrofits typically seek 50% energy savings, they are often quite costly and most applicable to gut-rehab projects. A significant potential for lowering energy usage in existing homes lies between the low hanging fruit and deep energy retrofit approaches - retrofits that save approximately 30% in energy over the existing conditions. A key is to be non-intrusive with the efficiency measures so the retrofit projects can be accomplished in occupied homes. This cold climate retrofit project involved the design and optimization of a home in Connecticut that sought to improve energy savings by at least 30% (excluding solar PV) over the existing home's performance. This report documents the successful implementation of a cost-effective solution package that achieved performance greater than 30% over the pre-retrofit - what worked, what did not, and what improvements could be made. Confirmation of successfully achieving 30% source energy savings over the pre-existing conditions was confirmed through energy modeling and comparison of the utility bills pre- and post- retrofit.

  6. Connecticut Environmental Chapter Awarded EPA Education Grant

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Audubon Society has been awarded a $91,000 Environmental Education Grant by the US Environmental Protection Agency to support its work in addressing a range of topics in classrooms to support schoolyard habitats.

  7. 2014 NOAA NGS Topobathy Lidar: Connecticut

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data were collected by the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration National Geodetic Survey Remote Sensing Division using a Riegl VQ820G system. The data...

  8. December 2012 Connecticut School Shooting Position Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of School Violence, 2013

    2013-01-01

    In response to the killing of 20 children and 6 adults at Sandy Hook Elementary School on December 17, 2012, this position statement argues that research supports a thoughtful approach to safer schools, guided by four key elements--balance, communication, connectedness, and support--along with strengthened attention to mental health needs in the…

  9. 40 CFR 81.307 - Connecticut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Town, New Britain city, Plainville Town, and Southington Town Litchfield County (part) 1/2/96 Attainment Plymouth Town Middlesex County (part) 1/2/96 Attainment Cromwell Town, Durham Town, E. Hampton Town, Haddam Town, Middlefield Town, Middletown City, Portland Town, E. Haddam Town Tolland County...

  10. Environmental Compliance Assessment System (ECAS). Connecticut Supplement

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Schweinitz’s sedge T Dalibardia repens Dew drop E Desmodium hwntfusum Trailing tick-trefoil E Carex viridula Little green sedge E Dicentra canadensis...Squirrel corn T Dichantheliwn scabriusculum Panic grass E Castilleja coccinea Indian paintbrush E Floerkea proserpinacoides Stiff mermaid -weed E

  11. Journal of Chemical Sciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Author Affiliations. Challa V Kumar1 Apinya Buranaprapuk2 Jyotsna Thota1. Department of Chemistry, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269-3060, USA; Department of Chemistry, Srinakharinwirot University, Sukhumvit 23, Bangkok 10110, Thailand ...

  12. Characterization of Soil Processes in Bottomland Hardwood Wetland- Nonwetland Transition Zones in the Lower Mississippi River Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-02-01

    Plant Tissues," Phytochemistry , Vol 7, pp 1973-1988. Anderson, P. H. 1977. "Delineation of Deciduous Wetland Forests in Northeastern Connecticut," M.S... thesis , University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT. Anderson, W. B., and Kemper, W. D. 1965. "Corn Growth as Affected by Aggregate Stability, Soil

  13. Connecticut 2007 Lidar Coverage, USACE National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) has performed a coastal survey along the Atlantic Coastline, in the summer of 2007. The...

  14. 33 CFR 110.55 - Connecticut River, Conn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... principally for use by yachts and other recreational craft. Temporary floats or buoys for marking anchors will... paragraphs (d) and (e) of this section are principally for use by yachts and other recreational craft. Fore... Harbor Master. Area 2 will not be used during the shad fishing season. (e-1) Area No. 1 at Chester...

  15. Water resources inventory of Connecticut Part 2: Shetucket River Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Mendall P.; Bednar, Gene A.; Thomas, Chester E.; Wilson, William E.

    1967-01-01

    The Shetucket River basin has a relatively abundant supply of water of generally good quality which is derived from precipitation that has fallen on the basin. Annual precipitation has ranged from about 30 inches to 75 inches and has averaged about 45 inches over a 35-year period. Approximately 20 inches of water are returned to the atmosphere each year by evaporation and transpiration; the remainder of the annual precipitation either flows overland to streams or percolates downward to the water table and ultimately flows out of the basin in the Shetucket River or as underflow through the deposits beneath. During the autumn and winter months precipitation normally is sufficient to cause a substantial increase in the amount of water stored underground and in surface reservoirs within the basins whereas in the summer most of the precipitation is lost through evaporation and transpiration, resulting in sharply reduced streamflow and lowered groundwater levels. The mean monthly storage of water in the basin on an average is 3.5 inches higher in November than it is in June.

  16. 77 FR 71665 - Connecticut Disaster Number CT-00028

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-03

    ...), dated 10/ 30/2012. Incident: Hurricane Sandy. Incident Period: 10/27/2012 through 11/08/2012. Effective..., Processing and Disbursement Center, 14925 Kingsport Road, Fort Worth, TX 76155. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION...., Suite 6050, Washington, DC 20416. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The notice of the President's major...

  17. 78 FR 7848 - Connecticut Disaster Number CT-00028

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-04

    ...), dated 10/ 30/2012. Incident: Hurricane Sandy. Incident Period: 10/27/2012 through 11/08/2012. Effective..., Processing and Disbursement Center, 14925 Kingsport Road, Fort Worth, TX 76155. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION...., Suite 6050, Washington, DC 20416. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The notice of the President's major...

  18. Connecticut nutmeg fuel cell bus project : first analysis report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-01

    This report summarizes the experience and early results from a fuel cell bus demonstration funded by the Federal Transit Administra-tion (FTA) under the National Fuel Cell Bus Program (NFCBP). A team led by the Northeast Advanced Vehicle Consortium a...

  19. Media Services in a Connecticut Vocational-Technical School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Donald V.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses services offered by a vocational high school media center to meet the needs of students in the areas of general education as well as trade and technical education. Topics covered include the library collections and services; the audiovisual production facility; and the use of microcomputers in graphics production and in the library's…

  20. TERRAIN, CITY OF ANSONIA, NEW HAVEN COUNTY, CONNECTICUT - Levee PMR

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  1. Connecticut's New Comprehensive and Universal Early Childhood Health Assessment Form

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, Angela A.; Whitney, Grace-Ann C.

    2005-01-01

    Health assessments are required for entrance into child care, Head Start, and preschool programs. However, state and federal screening and documentation mandates vary, and programs create their own forms for keeping required data on file. Inconsistent recording formats present challenges for primary care providers who must document each child's…

  2. Dietary Diversity and Food Waste in a Rural Connecticut Daycare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, Margaret E.

    The relationship between diversity in the contents of preschool children's lunchboxes, food waste, and other variables was investigated among 32 children in a rural day care center located in a university community. Lunchbox contents and food waste were observed on five occasions for each child. Data were gathered on 10 variables (such as age of…

  3. 40 CFR 52.385 - EPA-approved Connecticut regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., manufacture of vegetable oil, pneumatic rubber tire categories. Other VOC rules. 10/10/80 6/7/82 47 FR 24452...) Program. 11/1/82 6/28/83 48 FR 29689 (c) 28 Simkins Industries—approved under the State Energy Trade... 5104 (c) 37 VOC RACT for King Industries. 8/8/87 12/17/87 52 FR 47925 (c) 39 VOC RACT for Belding...

  4. Meningitis in a College Student in Connecticut, 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosa, Lynn E.; Gupta, Shaili; Juthani-Mehta, Manisha; Hadler, James L.

    2009-01-01

    The authors describe a case of aseptic meningitis in a college student that was ultimately attributed to infection with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). The authors also provide a review of LCMV infection, epidemiology, and public health implications. Providers should be aware of LCMV as a cause of meningitis in college students,…

  5. John Ellis, Jens Vigen and Mick Storr on handmade knits made for CERN by high-school teachers Inga Hanne Dokka (Kongsberg videregående skole) and Jolanta Nylund (Akademiet Drammen)

    CERN Multimedia

    Pantelia, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Mick Storr wearing a pull-over made by high-school teacher Jolanta Nylund, Akademiet, Drammen. John Ellis and Jens Vigen in jumpers knitted by high-school teacher Inga Hanne Dokka Kongsberg videregående skole.

  6. Legacy of Wilbur O. Atwater: Human Nutrition Research Expansion at the USDA-Interagency Development of Food Composition Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The systematic chemical analysis of foods for human consumption in the United States had its origin with Wilbur O. Atwater. This activity began in the 1860s while Atwater was a student at Yale University and continued through his tenures at Wesleyan University and the Storrs (Connecticut) Experiment...

  7. National Program for Inspection of Non-Federal Dams. Crystal Lake Dam (CT 00138), Lower Connecticut River Basin, Middletown, Connecticut. Phase I Inspection Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    enclosing for your information three reports by Professor nadrickson: .- ..* (a) Deport dated April 26, 1963, based upon review of the basic plans and...than 2’ from the foundation, and each :. pie ." is keyed to its neighbor will reduce the piping liability along the rock contact. *"A11 parts of the... plano and ecifications for the proposed dam at Crystal Lake. Hr. Uelti has just returned from Switterland where he has spent a year study- Lng the

  8. National Program for Inspection of Non-Federal Dams. Burnt Hill Reservoir Dam (CT 00488), Connecticut River Basin, West Hartford, Connecticut. Phase I Inspection Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-05-01

    places (Photos C-l, C-2). 2. Upstream Face: The upstream face consists of a grassed earth slope at 3H:lV. There are two areas of low brush (Photos C-2, C-6...observed Structural Items on Slopes Trespassing on Slopes Yes. Numerous wheel ruts. Vegetation on Slopes Grass. Two low brush areas. Sloughing or...3419 itatng fIA"Mat tons 2 . VI tom saim I4~SPUIM 201 1൥ pe*3~o in time £ja~d from 6.0 teet . 1. a.. 6o.0 - 3/2/63 Simi bm 3ma tWp I’Msmote tree 6.0

  9. Obstructive sleep apnea, polysomnography, and split-night studies: consensus statement of the Connecticut Thoracic Society and the Connecticut Neurological Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-08-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea is a state-dependent syndrome. It is characterized by repeated collapse of the upper airway as the result of the loss of waking neuromuscular drive as the brain changes from wakefulness to sleep. This produces a state-dependent decrease in muscle tone, which, together with other predisposing factors such as obesity and anatomical narrowing of the upper airway, results in the spectrum of sleep disordered breathing. Sleep-disordered breathing describes the continuum from simple snoring (pharyngeal vibration), to flow limitation (hypopnea), to complete cessation of breathing (apnea). Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is the common description of what is now appreciated as the sleep apnea/hypopnea syndrome. The cardinal symptoms are snoring, observed apneas, and excessive daytime sleepiness. The immediate physical consequences are hypoxia, repeated sympathetic discharges, increased cardiac load, and repeated brain arousals. The repetitive arousals are required to restore airway patency, resulting in severely fragmented sleep and consequent sleep deprivation. The syndrome, untreated, produces significant cognitive and cardiorespiratory morbidity, and potential mortality. Compared to matched controls, patients with undiagnosed sleep apnea use twice the health resources and spend double the health-care dollars in the 10 years prior to diagnosis. Both trends are reversed by successful treatment. It is by definition a sleep-related illness and can be observed and evaluated only when the patient is asleep. Polysomnography is the laboratory procedure to study sleep and its protean dysfunctions. Multiple physiologic parameters are required to document the various types of sleep disorders as well as to establish the origin of pathologic sleep fragmentation. Complete polysomnography includes (but is not limited to) electroencephalogram (EEG), electrooculogram ((EOG), electromyogram (EMG), electrocardiogram (ECG), respiratory effort, air flow, and oxygen saturation. Treatment options for obstructive sleep apnea include continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), oral appliances, uvulopalatal and/or maxillomandibular surgery, positional control, and weight loss. The efficacy of each depends on the individual anatomy and the severity of the sleep-disordered breathing. CPAP is accepted as the most reliable treatment regardless of anatomy and severity. It is currently the only treatment modality which can be titrated during sleep and requires simultaneous polysomnography.

  10. 78 FR 28149 - Cranberries Grown in States of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey, Wisconsin...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-14

    ... small business guide on complying with fruit, vegetable, and specialty crop marketing agreements and... New York; Revising Determination of Sales History AGENCY: Agricultural Marketing Service, USDA. ACTION... history provisions currently prescribed under the cranberry marketing order (order). The order regulates...

  11. 78 FR 51043 - Cranberries Grown in States of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey, Wisconsin...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-20

    ... Order and Agreement Division, Fruit and Vegetable Program, AMS, USDA; Telephone: (863) 324-3375, Fax... Order and Agreement Division, Fruit and Vegetable Program, AMS, USDA, 1400 Independence Avenue SW., STOP... New York; Revising Determination of Sales History AGENCY: Agricultural Marketing Service, USDA. ACTION...

  12. Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, and New Jersey ESI: BIRDS (Bird Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for wading birds, shorebirds, waterfowl, raptors, diving birds, pelagic birds, passerine birds, gulls and...

  13. Feature-based Detection and Discrimination at DuPont's Lake Success Business Park, Connecticut

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Keiswetter, Dean A

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this demonstration was to determine if laser-positioned, high-density EM61 data acquired in a moving survey mode could support feature-based discrimination decisions for a canopied...

  14. 75 FR 57221 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Connecticut, Massachusetts, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-20

    ... NOx, as these compounds react in the presence of heat and sunlight to form ozone. 1. Point Source... from plants, trees, grasses and crops. EPA developed a computer model, referred to as the Biogenic... occurred in the state since then. Last, but by no means of least importance, Rhode Island is currently in...

  15. 77 FR 15981 - Special Local Regulations; OPSAIL 2012 Connecticut, Niantic Bay, Long Island Sound, Thames River...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-19

    ... would like to know that they reached the Facility, please enclose a stamped, self-addressed postcard or... and would like to know that they reached the Facility, please enclose a stamped, self-addressed... transit Area 1 at no wake speed or at speeds not to exceed 6 knots, whichever is less to maintain steerage...

  16. 78 FR 26401 - Connecticut Yankee Atomic Power Company, Haddam Neck Plant, Environmental Assessment and Finding...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-06

    ... Atomic Power Company, Haddam Neck Plant, Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact... Neck Plant (HNP) Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI). CYAPCO stated that the exemption...-rm/adams.html . From this site, you can access the NRC's ADAMS, which provides text and image files...

  17. Revising and Updating the Plant Science Components of the Connecticut Vocational Agriculture Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connecticut Univ., Storrs. Dept. of Educational Leadership.

    This curriculum guide provides the plant science components of the vocational agriculture curriculum for Regional Vocational Agriculture Centers. The curriculum is divided into exploratory units for students in the 9th and 10th grades and specialized units for students in grades 11 and 12. The five exploratory units are: agricultural pest control;…

  18. F00191: NOS Hydrographic Survey , Hydrographic and Wire Drag Investigations, Connecticut, 1963-04-26

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has the statutory mandate to collect hydrographic data in support of nautical chart compilation for safe...

  19. The use of polymer modified asphalt binder for high friction thin lift overlays in Connecticut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Controlling the frictional characteristics of a roadway is of paramount importance when considering highway safety. Several state highway agencies specify a friction wearing course to be used in high profile or high accident prone areas. The Connecti...

  20. 75 FR 18394 - Cranberries Grown in the States of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-12

    ... Kenneth G. Johnson, Regional Manager, DC Marketing Field Office, Marketing Order Administration Branch... Agricultural Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 929 Cranberries Grown in the States of Massachusetts, Rhode Island... New York; Revised Nomination and Balloting Procedures AGENCY: Agricultural Marketing Service, USDA...

  1. 75 FR 5900 - Cranberries Grown in the States of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-05

    ..., Marketing Specialist or Kenneth G. Johnson, Regional Manager, DC Marketing Field Office, Marketing Order... Agricultural Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 929 Cranberries Grown in the States of Massachusetts, Rhode Island... New York; Revised Nomination and Balloting Procedures AGENCY: Agricultural Marketing Service, USDA...

  2. Proceedings of Microwaves and Thermoregulation Held at New Haven, Connecticut on 26-27 October 1981

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    respiratory excretion of water was 1.7 times greater than that seen in the non-hydrated dog simi- larly exposed. Exposure of various species of animals to...Baldwin, B.A. (1968). Behavioural thermoregulation in mice. Physiol. Behav. 3: 401. Baldwin, B.A. (1975). The effects of intra- ruminal loading with cold...exposure, for the deter- mination of serum electrolytes, glucose, urea nitrogen , and carbon dioxide. At 13 wk of exposure, 2 cc blood samples were

  3. Water resources inventory of Connecticut Part 3: lower Thames and southeastern coastal river basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Chester E.; Cervione, Michael A.; Grossman, I.G.

    1968-01-01

    The lower Thames and southeastern coastal river basins have a relatively abundant supply of water of generally good quality which is derived from streams entering the area and precipitation that has fallen on the area. Annual precipitation has ranged from about 32 inches to 65 inches and has averaged about 48 inches over a 30-year period. Approximately 22 inches of water are returned to the atmosphere each year by evaporation and transpiration; the remainder of the annual precipitation either flows overland to streams or percolates downward to the water table and ultimately flows out of the report area through estuaries and coastal streams or as underflow through the deposits beneath. During the autumn and winter months precipitation normally is sufficient to cause a substantial increase in the amount of water stored underground and in surface reservoirs within the report area, whereas in the summer most of the precipitation is lost through evaporation and transpiration, resulting in sharply reduced stream-flow and lowered ground-water levels. The mean monthly storage of water on an average is about 3.8 inches higher in November than it is in June. The amount of water that flows through and out of the report area represents the total amount of water potentially available for use by man. For the 30-year period 1931 through 1960, the annual runoff from the report area has averaged nearly 26 inches (200 billion gallons), from the entire Thames River basin above Norwich about 24 inches (530 billion gallons), and from the Pawcatuck River basin about 26 inches (130 billion gallons). A total average annual runoff of 860 billion gallons is therefore available. Although runoff indicates the total amount of water potentially available, it is usually not economically feasible for man to use all of it. On the other hand, with increased development, it is possible that some water will be reused several times. The water available may be tapped as it flows through the area or is temporarily stored in streams, lakes, and aquifers. The amounts that can be developed vary from place to place and time to time, depending on the amount of precipitation, on the size of drainage area, on the thickness, permeability, and areal extent of aquifers, and on the variations in chemical and physical quality of the water. Differences in streamflow from point to point are due primarily to differences in the proportion of stratified drift in the drainage basin above each point, which affect the timing of streamflow, and to differences in precipitation, which affect the amount of streamflow. Ground water can be obtained from wells almost anywhere in the area, but the amount obtainable at any particular point depends upon the type and water-bearing properties of the aquifers. For practical purposes, the earth materials in the report area comprise three aquifers--stratified drift, bedrock, and till. Stratified drift is the only aquifer generally capable of yielding more than 100 gpm (gallons per minute) to individual wells. It covers about 20 percent of the area and occurs chiefly in lowlands where it overlies till and bedrock. The coefficient of permeability of the coarse-grained unit of stratified drift averages about 1,500 gbd (gallons per day) per sq ft. Drilled, screened wells tapping this unit are known to yield from 4 to 88o gpm and average 146 gpm. Dug wells in coarse-grained stratified drift supply about 2 gpm per foot of drawdown over a period of a few hours. Fine-grained stratified drift has an average coefficient of permeability of about 300 gpd per sq ft and can usually yield supplies sufficient for household use to dug wells. Bedrock and till are widespread in extent but generally provide only small water supplies. Bedrock is tapped chiefly by drilled wells, about 90 percent of which will supply at least 3 gpm. Very few, however, will supply more than 50 gpm. Till is tapped in a few places by dug wells which can yield small supplies of only a few hundred gpd throughout all or most of the year. The coefficient of permeability of till ranges from about 0.2 gpd per sq ft to 120 gpd per sq ft. The amount of ground water potentially available in the report area depends upon the amount of ground-water outflow, the amount of ground water in storage, and the quantity of water available by induced infiltration from streams and lakes. From data on permeability, saturated thickness, recharge, yield from aquifer storage, well performance, and streamflow, preliminary estimates of ground-water availability can be made for any point in the report area. Long-term yields estimated for 18 areas of stratified drift especially favorable for development of large ground-water supplies ranged from 1.3 to 66 mgd. Detailed site studies to determine optimum yields, drawdowns, and spacing of individual wells are needed before major ground-water development is undertaken in these or other areas. The chemical quality of water in the report area is generally good to excellent. Samples of naturally occurring surface water collected at 24 sites contained less than 151 ppm (parts per million) of dissolved solids and less than 63 ppm of hardness. Water from wells is more highly mineralized than naturally occurring water from streams. Even so only 12 percent of the wells sampled yielded water with more than 200 ppm of dissolved solids and only 8 percent yielded water with more than 120 ppm of hardness. Even in major streams, which are used to transport industrial waste, hardness rarely exceeds 60 ppm and the dissolved mineral content is generally less than 200 ppm. At a few places in the town of Montville however, waters may contain dissolved mineral concentrations of 2,000 to 4,000 ppm. Iron and manganese in both ground water and surface water are the only constituents whose concentrations commonly exceed recommended limits for domestic and industrial use. Most wells in the report area yield clear water with little or no iron or manganese, but distributed among them are wells yielding ground water that contains enough of these dissolved constituents to be troublesome for most uses. Iron concentrations in naturally occurring stream water exceed 0.3 ppm under low-flow conditions at 33 percent of the sites sampled. Large concentrations of iron in stream water result from discharge of iron-bearing water from aquifers or from swamps where it is released largely from decaying vegetation. Ground water more than 30 feet below the land surface has a relatively constant temperature, usually between 48°F and 52°F. Water temperature in very shallow wells may fluctuate from about 38°F in February or March to about 55°F in late summer. Water temperature in the larger streams fluctuates much more widely, ranging from 32°F at least for brief periods in winter, to about 85°F occasionally during summer. The quality of suspended sediment transported by streams in the area is negligible. Turbidity in streams is generally not a problem although amounts large enough to be troublesome may occur locally at times. The total amount of water used in the report area for all purposes during 1964 was about 118,260 million gallons, of which 105,600 million gallons was estuarine water used for cooling by industry. The average per capita water use, excluding estuarine, temporary summer residence, and institutional water was equivalent to 186 gpd. Public water systems supplied the domestic needs of nearly tw0-thirds the population of the report area. All of the 19 systems, which were sampled, provided water of better quality than the U.S. Public Health Service suggests for drinking water standards.

  4. Water resources inventory of Connecticut Part 6: Upper Housatonic River basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervione, Michael A.; Mazzaferro, David L.; Melvin, Robert T.

    1972-01-01

    The upper Housatonic River basin report area has an abundant supply of water of generally good quality, which is derived from precipitation on the area and streams entering the area. Annual precipitation has averaged about 46 inches over a 30-year period. Of this, approximately 22 inches of water is returned to the atmosphere each year by evaporation and transpiration; the remainder flows overland to streams or percolates downward to the water table and ultimately flows out of the report area in the Housatonic River or in smaller streams tributary to the Hudson River. During the autumn and winter precipitation normally is sufficient to cause a substantial increase in the amount of water stored in surface reservoirs and in aquifers, whereas in the summer, losses through evaporation and transpiration result in sharply reduced streamflow and lowered ground-water levels. Mean monthly storage of water in November is 2.8 inches more than it is in June. The amount of water that flows into, through, and out of the report area represents the total amount potentially available for use ignoring reuse. For the 30-year period 1931 through 1960, the annual runoff from precipitation has averaged 24 inches (294 billion gallons). During the same period, inflows from Massachusetts and New York have averaged 220 and 64 billion gallons per year, respectively. A total average annual runoff of 578 billion gallons is therefore available. Although runoff indicates the total amount of water potentially available, it is rarely feasible to use all of it. On the other hand, with increased development, some water may be reused several times. The water availability may be tapped as it flows through the area or is temporarily stored in streams, lakes, and aquifers. The amounts that can be developed differ from place to place and time to time, depending on the amount of precipitation, on the size of drainage area, on the thickness, transmissivity, and areal extent of aquifers, and on the variations in chemical and physical quality of water. Differences in precipitation cause differences in the amount of streamflow whereas differences in the proportion of stratified drift affect its timing. Water can be obtained from wells almost anywhere in the area, but the amount obtainable at any particular point depends on the type and water-bearing properties of the aquifers tapped. Stratified-drift aquifers are the only ones generally capable of yielding more than 100 gpm (gallons per minute) to individual wells. Drilled, screened wells tapping this unit yield from 17 to 1,400 gpm, with a median yield of 200 gpm. Till and bedrock are widespread but generally provide only small supplies of water. Till is tapped in a few places by dug wells, which can yield small supplies of only a few hundred gallons per day throughout all or most of the year. Bedrock is the chief aquifer for privately owned domestic and rural supplies; it is tapped by drilled wells, about 90 percent of which will supply at least 2 gpm. Only 1 of 10 bedrock wells, however, will supply more than 30 gpm. The amount of ground water potentially available in the report area depends upon the thickness and hydraulic properties of aquifers, the amount of salvageable natural discharge of ground water, and the quantity of water available by induced infiltration from streams and lakes. From data on transmissivity, thickness, recharge, well performance, and streamflow, preliminary estimates of ground-water availability can be made for most stratified-drift aquifers in the report area. Long-term yields estimated for eight areas of stratified drift especially favorable for development of large ground-water supplies ranged from 0.6 to 5 mgd (million gallons per day). Detailed site studies are needed to verity these estimates and to determine optimum yields, drawdowns, and spacing of individual wells before major ground-water development is undertaken in these or other areas. The chemical quality of water in the report area is generally good; carbonate-bedrock units exert considerable local influence on water quality. Samples of naturally occurring surface water collected at 24 sites during low flow averaged 90 mg/l (milligrams per liter) dissolved solids and 60 mg/l hardness. Water from wells is generally more highly mineralized than naturally occurring water from streams. About 37 percent of the wells sampled yielded water with more than 200 mg/l dissolved solids and 50 percent yielded water with more than 120 mg/l hardness. These concentrations reflect the high degree of mineralization of ground water in carbonate bedrock and unconsolidated deposits derived from this bedrock. The larger streams, which transport varying amounts of industrial and domestic effluents, averaged about 150 mg/l dissolved solids and 90 mg/l hardness. Iron and manganese concentrations in both ground water and surface water at some places exceed recommended limits for domestic and industrial use. Most wells in the report area yield water with little or no iron or manganese. In certain localities however, the probability is high of encountering water with excessive concentrations of these constituents. Schists, especially the unit in the northwestern corner of the basin, are the likely sources of water with excessive iron and manganese. Iron concentrations in naturally occurring stream water exceed 0.3 mg/l under low-flow conditions at 29 percent of the sites sampled. These excessive concentrations result from discharge of iron-bearing water from aquifers or from swamps where iron is released from decaying vegetation. Water temperature in the larger streams ranges from 0°C (degrees Celsius) to about 28°C. Ground water between 30 feet and 200 feet below the land surface has a relatively constant temperature, usually between 8°C and 11°C. The quantity of suspended sediment transported by streams under natural conditions is negligible. Even in streams affected by man, turbidity is rarely a problem. The total amount of water used in the report area for all purposes during 1967 was about 6,360 million gallons, or 140 gpd per person. Public supplies furnished the domestic needs of nearly half the population of the area. All of the 14 public supplies sampled provided water that meets the drinking water standards of the U.S. Public Health Service.

  5. Clostridium difficile Infection in Outpatients, Maryland and Connecticut, USA, 2002–2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Angela D.; Limbago, Brandi; McDonald, L. Clifford; Bonkosky, Michelle; Heimer, Robert; Meek, James; Mai, Volker; Braden, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    Clostridium difficile, the most commonly recognized diarrheagenic pathogen among hospitalized persons, can cause outpatient diarrhea. Of 1,091 outpatients with diarrhea, we found 43 (3.9%) who were positive for C. difficile toxin. Only 7 had no recognized risk factors, and 3 had neither risk factors nor co-infection with another enteric pathogen. PMID:22000379

  6. Advancing the use of streaming media and digital media technologies at the Connecticut Department of Transportation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-27

    This final research report culminates a decade-long initiative to demonstrate and implement streaming media technologies at CONNDOT. This effort began in 2001 during an earlier related-study (SPR-2231) that concluded in 2006. This study (SPR-2254) re...

  7. H11250: NOS Hydrographic Survey , Long Island Sound, Connecticut and New York, 2003-11-01

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has the statutory mandate to collect hydrographic data in support of nautical chart compilation for safe...

  8. 78 FR 21846 - Approval and Promulgation of State Plans for Designated Facilities and Pollutants: Connecticut...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-12

    ... to hydrochloric acid has been reported to cause gastritis, chronic bronchitis, dermatitis, and... respiratory tract, and lungs. Exposure to dioxin and furan can cause skin disorders, cancer, and reproductive...

  9. 77 FR 50533 - Dominion Nuclear Connecticut, Inc.; Millstone Power Station, Unit 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-21

    ....; Millstone Power Station, Unit 3 AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Environmental assessment and... search, select ``ADAMS Public Documents'' and then select ``Begin Web- based ADAMS Search.'' For problems... Optimized ZIRLO\\TM\\ fuel rod cladding in future core reload applications for Millstone Power Station, Unit 3...

  10. F00187: NOS Hydrographic Survey , Hydrographic and Wire Drag Investigations, Connecticut, 1963-04-25

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has the statutory mandate to collect hydrographic data in support of nautical chart compilation for safe...

  11. NOAA Office for Coastal Management Coastal Inundation Digital Elevation Model: Connecticut

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data were created as part of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Office for Coastal Management's efforts to create an online mapping viewer...

  12. Evaluating the enforceability of texting laws: strategies tested in Connecticut and Massachusetts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this research was to explore alternative strategies for increasing seat belt use. Researchers examined behavior : change strategies proven effective in education, healthcare, advertising, and marketing, and they considered how these : ...

  13. Integrated Multi-Team Decision Making Processes and Effectiveness and the Connecticut Center for Advanced Technology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mathieu, John

    2004-01-01

    .... This program established a three part implementation path: First, the Advanced Technology Center will focus on key issues in propulsion and advanced power systems as well as take a leadership role in Next Generation Manufacturing technology...

  14. 78 FR 38587 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Connecticut; Reasonably Available...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-27

    ... Newtown, Sumitomo Bakelite North America, Incorporated, located in Manchester, and Cyro Industries in... United States. EPA will submit a report containing this action and other required information to the U.S. Senate, the U.S. House of Representatives, and the Comptroller General of the United States prior to...

  15. F00521: NOS Hydrographic Survey , New London, Connecticut, 2006-06-30

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has the statutory mandate to collect hydrographic data in support of nautical chart compilation for safe...

  16. Development of a central hardwood stand following whole-tree clearcutting in Connecticut

    Science.gov (United States)

    C. Wayne Martin

    1995-01-01

    Little information is available concerning the initial stages of forest regeneration following intensive harvesting of central hardwood stands in the northeastern part of the range. Establishment of commercial species, density, and rate of biomass accumulation of the regeneration are of major concern to both foresters and landowners contemplating a harvest. To help...

  17. 77 FR 50595 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Connecticut, Massachusetts, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-22

    ... budgets and contingency measures associated with the RFP plans. EPA also is approving three rules adopted... being taken in accordance with the Clean Air Act. DATES: Effective Date: This rule is effective on... normal business hours, by appointment at the respective State Air Agency: Bureau of Air Management...

  18. 76 FR 58291 - Connecticut; Amendment No. 4 to Notice of a Major Disaster Declaration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-20

    ... Disaster Loans; 97.031, Cora Brown Fund; 97.032, Crisis Counseling; 97.033, Disaster Legal Services; 97.034, Disaster Unemployment Assistance (DUA); 97.046, Fire Management Assistance Grant; 97.048, Disaster Housing... Declared Disaster Assistance--Disaster Housing Operations for Individuals and Households; 97.050...

  19. 77 FR 71811 - Connecticut; Amendment No. 1 to Notice of an Emergency Declaration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-04

    ... Disaster Loans; 97.031, Cora Brown Fund; 97.032, Crisis Counseling; 97.033, Disaster Legal Services; 97.034, Disaster Unemployment Assistance (DUA); 97.046, Fire Management Assistance Grant; 97.048, Disaster Housing... Declared Disaster Assistance--Disaster Housing Operations for Individuals and Households; 97.050...

  20. 78 FR 14316 - Connecticut; Amendment No. 1 to Notice of an Emergency Declaration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-05

    ...; 97.031, Cora Brown Fund; 97.032, Crisis Counseling; 97.033, Disaster Legal Services; 97.034, Disaster Unemployment Assistance (DUA); 97.046, Fire Management Assistance Grant; 97.048, Disaster Housing Assistance to... Assistance--Disaster Housing Operations for Individuals and Households; 97.050, Presidentially Declared...

  1. 76 FR 58289 - Connecticut; Amendment No. 3 to Notice of an Emergency Declaration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-20

    ... Disaster Loans; 97.031, Cora Brown Fund; 97.032, Crisis Counseling; 97.033, Disaster Legal Services; 97.034, Disaster Unemployment Assistance (DUA); 97.046, Fire Management Assistance Grant; 97.048, Disaster Housing... Declared Disaster Assistance--Disaster Housing Operations for Individuals and Households; 97.050...

  2. 77 FR 71813 - Connecticut; Amendment No. 3 to Notice of a Major Disaster Declaration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-04

    ... Disaster Loans; 97.031, Cora Brown Fund; 97.032, Crisis Counseling; 97.033, Disaster Legal Services; 97.034, Disaster Unemployment Assistance (DUA); 97.046, Fire Management Assistance Grant; 97.048, Disaster Housing... Declared Disaster Assistance--Disaster Housing Operations for Individuals and Households; 97.050...

  3. 78 FR 15052 - Naugatuck Valley Surgical Center, Department of Saint Mary's Hospital, Waterbury, Connecticut...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-08

    ... Department of Labor issued an Affirmative Determination Regarding Application for Reconsideration applicable... Officer, a mis- interpretation of facts or of the law justified reconsideration of the decision. The...

  4. Bedrock Geologic Map of the Old Lyme Quadrangle, New London and Middlesex Counties, Connecticut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Gregory J.; Scott, Robert B.; Aleinikoff, John N.; Armstrong, Thomas R.

    2009-01-01

    The bedrock geology of the Old Lyme quadrangle consists of Neoproterozoic and Permian gneisses and granites of the Gander and Avalon terranes, Silurian metasedimentary rocks of the Merrimack terrane, and Silurian to Devonian metasedimentary rocks of uncertain origin. The Avalon terrane rocks crop out within the Selden Neck block, and the Gander terrane rocks crop out within the Lyme dome. The Silurian to Devonian rocks crop out between these two massifs. Previous mapping in the Old Lyme quadrangle includes the work by Lawrence Lundgren, Jr. Lundgren's work provides an excellent resource for rock descriptions and detailed modal analyses of rock units that will not be duplicated in this current report. New research that was not covered in detail by Lundgren is the focus of this report and includes (1) evaluation of the rocks in the core of the Lyme dome in an effort to subdivide units in this area; (2) structural analysis of foliations and folds in and around the Lyme dome; (3) geochronology of selected units within the Lyme dome; and (4) analysis of joints and the fracture properties of the rocks.

  5. The State of Mathematics Achievement in Connecticut: The Trial State Assessment at Grade Eight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Assessment of Educational Progress, Princeton, NJ.

    In 1990, the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) included a Trial State Assessment (TSA); for the first time in the NAEP's history, voluntary state-by-state assessments (37 states, the District of Columbia, Guam, and the Virgin Islands) were made. The sample was designed to represent the 8th grade public school population in a state…

  6. NAEP 1992 Mathematics State Report for Connecticut. The Trial State Assessment Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Assessment of Educational Progress, Princeton, NJ.

    In 1990, the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) included a Trial State Assessment which, for the first time in the NAEP's history, made voluntary state-by-state assessments. This 1992 mathematics report marks the first attempt of the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) to shift to standards-based reporting of National…

  7. Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, and New Jersey ESI: REPTILES (Reptile and Amphibian Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for threatened/endangered sea turtles, diamondback terrapins, and rare reptiles/amphibians in coastal Rhode...

  8. 78 FR 4800 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Connecticut; Reasonably Available...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-23

    ... negative declarations for the following CTG sectors: 1. Automobile coating. 2. Large petroleum dry cleaners... 81743). The state's submittal documents a substantial downward trend in NO X and [[Page 4803

  9. Providence 10 x 20 NTMS area, Connecticut, Massachusetts, and Rhode Island: data report (abbreviated)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, J.R.

    1980-11-01

    Results of ground water and stream sediment reconnaissance in the National Topographic Map Series (NTMS) Providence 1 0 x 2 0 quadrangle are presented. Surface sediment samples were collected at 318 sites. Ground water samples were collected at 180 sites. Neutron activation analysis (NAA) results are given for uranium and 16 other elements in sediments, and for uranium and 8 other elements in ground water. Field measurements and observations are reported for each site. Analytical data and field measurements are presented in tables and maps. Data from ground water sites include: water chemistry measurements (pH, conductivity, and alkalinity), physical measurements where applicable (water temperature, well description, etc.), and elemental analyses (U, Al, Br, Cl, Dy, F, Mn, Na, and V). Data from sediment sites include: stream water chemistry measurements (pH, conductivity, and alkalinity), and elemental analyses for sediment samples (U, Th, Hf, Al, Ce, Dy, Eu, Fe, La, Lu, Mn, Sc, Sm, Na, Ti, V, and Yb). Sample site descriptors (stream characteristics, vegetation, etc.) are also tabulated. Areal distribution maps, histograms, and cumulative frequency plots for most elements and for U/Th and U/Hf ratios are included on the microfiche. Key data from stream water sites include: water quality measurements (pH, conductivity, and alkalinity), and elemental analyses (U, Al, Br, Ci, Dy, F, Mg, Mn, Na, and V). Uranium concentrations in the sediments ranged from 1.2 to 61.7 ppM with an average of 4.5 ppM. A group of high uranium concentrations was found in Barnstable County, Massachusetts. These sites also had high concentrations of thorium and rare-earth elements that indicate the presence of a sand with a high proportion of heavy minerals

  10. Fear and Trembling in Connecticut: (Or "How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Open Source")

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terlaga, Amy

    2010-01-01

    In March 2007, SirsiDynix notified its Horizon and classic Dynix customers that it would not be releasing Horizon 8.0 in favor of developing its Unicorn software. As vice president/president-elect of SirsiDynix's Horizon/Dynix user group, the author was one of the first ones to be notified of this abrupt change in company strategy. The news sent…

  11. Recommendations: HIV/HBV infected health care workers. Connecticut Department of Health Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-04-01

    These recommendations have been developed in response to a congressional mandate and to public concern about transmission of HIV from health care workers to patients. Hepatitis B is also addressed in the recommendations. Both viruses are transmitted through blood-to-blood contact. The likelihood of transmission of HBV is very low, for HIV extraordinarily remote. The following are action steps to reduce this risk further: 1. The commissioner charges the professional associations and institutions to develop plans to educate their members, nonmembers, and employees on universal precautions, procedural modifications, and hepatitis B vaccination. They accept the charge. 2. The associations and institutions are charged with monitoring and assuring the compliance of their members, nonmembers and employees with the precautions. The Department of Health Services health facility licensing programs will incorporate review of infection control precautions into site reviews. Complaints of an institution's or individual practitioner's failure to follow the precautions will be investigated by the Department of Health Services Division of Hospital and Medical Care or Division of Medical Quality Assurance, respectively. 3. The professional associations will submit training plans and progress-to-date to the Commissioner of the Department of Health Services by 30 June 1992 and reports of training and assurance activities on 1 January 1993 and annually thereafter. 4. The department will not list specific hazardous procedures but will judge each case on an individual basis. 5. The department will not require health care workers to undergo HIV or HBV testing. It is recommended that workers who are at risk for HIV or HBV infection because of occupational exposure or personal behaviors be tested voluntarily. 6. The department recommends that infected workers seek advice from a state appointed and authorized review panel. The panel will review the practices of the worker, advise on infection control practices and monitor to assure compliance. Infected workers will be advised regarding notification of patients on a case-by-case basis. Institutional or professional association-based panels can also be consulted.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. DIGITAL FLOOD INSURANCE RATE MAP DATABASE, NEW HAVEN COUNTY, CONNECTICUT (ALL JURISDICTIONS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map (DFIRM) Database depicts flood risk information and supporting data used to develop the risk data. The primary risk...

  13. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Shore Road Project - Old Greenwich, Connecticut

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2014-11-01

    This case study describes a DOE Zero Energy Ready Home in Old Greenwich, CT, that scored HERS 40 without PV and HERS 27 with PV. This 4,100 ft2 custom home has 13-inch ICF basement walls and 11-inch ICF above-grade walls with a closed-cell spray foam-insulated roof deck, and a continuously running ERV. The house has a dual-fuel heat pump, an instantaneous condensing water heater, and 4.5-kW solar shingles.

  14. 77 FR 62539 - Dominion Nuclear Connecticut, Inc.; Millstone Power Station, Unit 2, Revocation of Exemption

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-15

    ... that the revocation of this exemption will not have a significant effect on the quality of the human..., this 3rd day of October 2012. For the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Michele G. Evans, Director...

  15. 77 FR 12885 - Millstone Power Station, Units 1, 2 and 3, Dominion Nuclear Connecticut, Inc.; Exemption

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-02

    ... significant effect on the quality of the human environment as published in the Federal Register on August 31.... Dated at Rockville, Maryland, this 24th day of February 2012. Michele G. Evans, Director, Division of...

  16. 77 FR 52765 - Dominion Nuclear Connecticut, Inc. Millstone Power Station, Unit 3; Exemption

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-30

    ... determined that the granting of this exemption will not have a significant effect on the quality of the human... day of August 2012. For the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Michele G. Evans, Director, Division of...

  17. H11224: NOS Hydrographic Survey , Eastern Long Island Sound, Connecticut, 2004-03-05

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has the statutory mandate to collect hydrographic data in support of nautical chart compilation for safe...

  18. Gesell: The First School Psychologist Part I. The Road to Connecticut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagan, Thomas K.

    1987-01-01

    Arnold Gesell's (1880-1960) qualifications, career, experiences, and the events which led to his official appointment as the first school psychologist in the United States are discussed. Gesell was influenced by Hall's thinking, and his graduate studies were a combination of experimental, developmental, and clinical psychology. (JAZ)

  19. 76 FR 401 - MetLife Insurance Company of Connecticut, et al.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-04

    ... Funds' adviser, profit distributions from the adviser. These profits from investment advisory fees may...''). ACTION: Notice of application for an order pursuant to Section 26(c) of the Investment Company Act of... CPPVUL 1''), MetLife Investors Insurance Company (``MetLife Investors''), MetLife Investors Variable...

  20. 75 FR 16205 - MetLife Insurance Company of Connecticut, et al.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-31

    ... Funds' adviser, profit distributions from the adviser. These profits from investment advisory fees may...''). ACTION: Notice of application for an order pursuant to Section 26(c) of the Investment Company Act of...''), MetLife of CT Fund UL for Variable Life Insurance (``Fund UL''), MetLife Investors Insurance Company...

  1. 77 FR 16198 - Safety & Security Zones; OPSAIL 2012 Connecticut, Thames River, New London, CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-20

    ... will begin arriving in the New London, CT area on July 3, 2012. Upon arrival each vessel will transit... adjacent to New London City Pier. The gathering of naval vessels is a significant event and creates a... be located on the Thames [[Page 16200

  2. H11225: NOS Hydrographic Survey , Eastern Long Island Sound, Connecticut, 2004-03-05

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has the statutory mandate to collect hydrographic data in support of nautical chart compilation for safe...

  3. Otter Brook Lake, New Hampshire Connecticut River Basin, Flood Control Project, Solid Waste Management Plan

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1996-01-01

    .... This plan provides guidance to establish policies, and responsibilities, procedures, and instructions for proper handling, storage, disposal and recycling of solid waste generated at the flood control project...

  4. 2006 Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Topographic LiDAR: Connecticut Coastline Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — LIDAR data is remotely sensed high-resolution elevation data collected by an airborne collection platform. By positioning laser range finding with the use of 1...

  5. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: BPC Green Builders, New Fairfield, Connecticut

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2013-09-01

    This LEED Platinum home was built on the site of a 60-year-old bungalow that was demolished. It boasts views of Candlewood Lake, a great deal of daylight, and projected annual energy savings of almost $3,000. This home was awarded a 2013 Housing Innovation Award in the custom builder category.

  6. Response of roseate tern to a shoreline protection project on Falkner Island, Connecticut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, C.J.; Spendelow, J.A.; Guilfoyle, Michael P.; Fischer, Richard A.; Pashley, David N.; Lott, Casey A.

    2007-01-01

    Construction was initiated following the 2000 tern breeding season for Phase 1 of a planned two-phase ?Shoreline Protection and Erosion Control Project? at the Falkner Island Unit of the USFWS Stewart B. McKinney National Wildlife Refuge located in Long Island Sound off the coast of Guilford, CT. When the Common Tern (Sterna hirundo) and federally endangered Roseate Tern (S. dougallii) arrived in spring 2001, they encountered several major habitat changes from what had existed in previous years. These changes included: a rock revetment covering most of the former nesting habitat on the beach from the northwestern section around the northern tip and covering about 60% of the eastern side; an elevated 60- ? 4-m shelf covering the beach and lower bank of the southwestern section; and about 2,000 sq m of devegetated areas on top of the island on the northeast side above the revetment, and about one-third of the southern half of the island. The southwest shelf was created by bulldozing and compacting extra construction fill and in situ materials. This shelf differed in internal structure from the main revetment on the north and eastern sections of the island because it lacked the deep internal crevices of the revetment. The deep internal crevices were created from the large stones and boulders (up to 2 tons) used in the construction of the main revetment. Small rock and gravel was used to fill the crevices to within 3 feet (0.9 m) of the surface of the revetment. Because half-buried tires and nest boxes for the six Roseate Tern (Sterna dougallii) sub-colony areas were deployed in similar patterns on the remaining beach, and nest boxes were placed on the newly elevated shelf areas several meters above previous locations on the now-covered beach areas, the distribution of Roseate Tern nests did not change much from 2000 to 2001. However, the movements of Roseate Tern chicks ? in many cases led by their parents towards traditional hiding places ? into the labyrinth of subterranean channels, especially in the main revetment area, made it difficult to measure chick growth and productivity as had been done for more than 12 years prior to construction. Also, observations of color-banded adults that were unable to locate and feed their young inside the main revetment, and of adults returning to courtship behavior and renesting after having hatched chicks from their initial clutches, indicated that a minimum of 20% of the chicks (mostly first hatched A-chicks, which usually have high rates of survival to fledging) that entered the main revetment died after doing so in 2001. The mortality rate of Roseate Tern chicks that entered the secondary revetment on the southwest shelf, however, was not unusually high in 2001. In an attempt to reduce the likelihood of nesting and chick losses in these sub-colonies, a research team led by the USGS in 2002-2003 did not put nest boxes on the northeast and east shelf areas where previous losses had been high. However, losses of tern eggs and young chicks to predatory Black-crowned Night Herons (Nycticorax nycticorax) were so great in 2002?2003 that few Roseate Tern chicks survived long enough to move into the main revetment area and little comparative survival data were collected. The USFWS continues to remove predatory night herons, to monitor the location and success of nesting Roseate Terns and to fill in some of problem areas near the tern nests in the main revetment. The extensive chick-searching fieldwork and observational procedures used by the USGS-led research team to determine the growth and survival of the Roseate Tern chicks at Falkner Island were not used in 2004?2005. The number of chicks lost in the revetment during these years is not known. Without additional fill, loss of chicks of this endangered species in the main revetment may rise again even though the night heron predation problem has been reduced.

  7. 2004 Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Bare Earth Topographic LiDAR: Connecticut River

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — LiDAR data is remotely sensed high-resolution elevation data collected by an airborne collection platform. The LiDAR files were converted from .PTS format to LAS...

  8. 77 FR 39746 - Dominion Nuclear Connecticut, Inc. Millstone Power Station, Unit 2; Environmental Assessment and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-05

    ... and members of the public. No changes will be made to plant structures or the site property. Therefore... requirements of 10 CFR part 50, appendix R, Section III.G.2. The NRC requires plants which credit manual... III.G.2 to ensure a train of equipment used for hot shutdown is available when redundant trains are in...

  9. From Policy to Practice: Implementation of Water Policies in Child Care Centers in Connecticut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, Ann E.; Henderson, Kathryn E.; Schwartz, Marlene B.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Child care policies may contribute to healthy beverage consumption patterns. This study documented availability and accessibility of water and correspondence with state and federal policy and accreditation standards in child care centers. Design: One-day observations were conducted in a random sample of 40 Child and Adult Care Food…

  10. 78 FR 43096 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Connecticut; Redesignation of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-19

    ... otherwise protected. The www.regulations.gov Web site is an ``anonymous access'' systems, which means EPA... you agree or disagree; suggest alternatives and substitute language for your requested changes. 4... Environmental Protection (CT DEEP) [[Page 43098

  11. 78 FR 49701 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Connecticut; Control of Visible Emissions...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-15

    ... otherwise protected. The www.regulations.gov Web site is an ``anonymous access'' systems, which means EPA... Emissions Increases Attributable to CT DEEP's Revised Regulation B. Emissions Inventories and Ambient Air... alternatives and substitute language for your requested changes. 4. Describe any assumptions and provide any...

  12. Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, and New Jersey ESI: HABITATS (Habitat and Plant Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for eelgrass, macroalgae, submerged aquatic vegetation, and rare terrestrial plants in coastal Rhode...

  13. 75 FR 33653 - Connecticut Yankee Atomic Power Company; Notice of Consideration of Issuance of Amendment to...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-14

    ... Company; Notice of Consideration of Issuance of Amendment to Facility Operating License, Proposed No Significant Hazards; Consideration Determination, and Opportunity for a Hearing The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory... the amendment request involves no significant hazards consideration. Under the Commission's...

  14. F00190: NOS Hydrographic Survey , Hydrographic and Wire Drag Investigations, Connecticut, 1963-05-13

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has the statutory mandate to collect hydrographic data in support of nautical chart compilation for safe...

  15. 77 FR 17367 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Connecticut; Regional Haze

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-26

    ... in use at the source; (4) the remaining useful life of the source; and (5) the degree of improvement... Retrofit Technology 1. Identification of All BART Eligible Sources 2. Identification All BART Source... is visibility impairment that is produced by a multitude of sources and activities which are located...

  16. Moving Meriden: In Connecticut, A Road Map for Union-District Relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubin, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    The author describes the early relationship between the Meriden Public schools' local teacher union and the Meriden Federation of Teachers (MFT) as "frosty with a lack of trust." However, in the last five years, she states, the union and the district have built a strong labor-management partnership whose focus on supporting teachers has…

  17. 77 FR 26601 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in Connecticut

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-04

    ... 1536], Marine Mammal Protection Act [16 U.S.C. 1361], Fish and Wildlife Coordination Act [16 U.S.C. 661...; E.O. 13175 Consultation and Coordination with Indian Tribal Governments; E.O. 11514 Protection and.... to 4:15 p.m. (eastern time). You may also contact Mr. Glenn Elliott, Environmental Protection...

  18. F00396: NOS Hydrographic Survey , Western Long Island Sound, Connecticut, 1994-06-09

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has the statutory mandate to collect hydrographic data in support of nautical chart compilation for safe...

  19. F00565: NOS Hydrographic Survey , Eastern Long Island Sound, Connecticut, 2009-04-27

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has the statutory mandate to collect hydrographic data in support of nautical chart compilation for safe...

  20. Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, and New Jersey ESI: SOCECON (Socioeconomic Resource Points and Lines)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains human-use resource data for bridges, state borders, airports, aquaculture sites, beaches, boat ramps, commercial fishing sites, Coast Guard,...

  1. Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, and New Jersey ESI: MGT (Management Area Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains management area data for National Estuarine Research Reserves, wildlife refuges, wildlife management areas, state/regional parks, state...

  2. 2011 Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Topographic LiDAR: Quinnipiac River Watershed, Connecticut

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Quinnipiac AOI consists of one 443 square mile area. Ground Control is collected throughout the AOI for use in the processing of LiDAR data to ensure data...

  3. Housing and Education Partnerships: A Case Study of New Haven, Connecticut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leopold, Josh; Simington, Jasmine

    2015-01-01

    The housing and education sectors are being asked to do more with fewer resources. School districts often struggle to meet the needs of low-income students who deal with challenges outside of school and to connect them to resources that can strengthen their academic competencies. Public housing authorities and other assisted-housing providers…

  4. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected, Black and white 0.82 feet pixel resolution leaf-off ortho imagery that covers the state of Connecticut., Published in 2004, University of Connecticut.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected dataset current as of 2004. Black and white 0.82 feet pixel resolution leaf-off ortho imagery that covers the state...

  5. The American Dream in the Great Depression. By Charles R. Hearn. Connecticut and London: Greenwood Press, 1977. The American Dream in the Great Depression. By Charles R. Hearn. Connecticut and London: Greenwood Press, 1977.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randall Huff

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Mr. Hearn examines 1 inspirational articles on success; 2 magazine biographies and other articles relating to the myth of success; 3 popular magazine (formula fiction; and 4 the "serious" fiction of the 1920s and 30s to determine the ways in which the depression changed the American myth of the self-made man's social mobility as portrayed in literature. The inspirational success articles in the 1920s presented America as a prosperous utopia with unfettered economic growth within everyone's reach. Many articles of this type continued to be published during the depression, but articles on the cult of personality (as opposed to character and success in non-commercial areas became more numerous. The new genre of how-to-succeed guidebooks provided evidence of a new "outer-directed" personality rather than the inner-directedness of the powerful business magnate. Mr. Hearn examines 1 inspirational articles on success; 2 magazine biographies and other articles relating to the myth of success; 3 popular magazine (formula fiction; and 4 the "serious" fiction of the 1920s and 30s to determine the ways in which the depression changed the American myth of the self-made man's social mobility as portrayed in literature. The inspirational success articles in the 1920s presented America as a prosperous utopia with unfettered economic growth within everyone's reach. Many articles of this type continued to be published during the depression, but articles on the cult of personality (as opposed to character and success in non-commercial areas became more numerous. The new genre of how-to-succeed guidebooks provided evidence of a new "outer-directed" personality rather than the inner-directedness of the powerful business magnate.

  6. DEVELOPING SITE-SPECIFIC DERIVED CONCENTRATION GUIDELINE LEVELS FOR MULTIPLE MEDIA AT THE CONNECTICUT YANKEE HADDAM NECK PLANT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, S.W.; Smith, L.C.; Carr, R.K.; Carson, A.; Darois, E.

    2003-01-01

    As part of the license termination process, site-specific Derived Concentration Guideline Levels for the Haddam Neck Plant site are developed for soil, groundwater, concrete left standing, and concrete demolished that satisfy the radiological criteria for unrestricted use as defined in 10 CFR 20.1402. Background information on the license termination process and characteristics of the Haddam Neck Plant site are presented. The dose models and associated resident farmer and building occupancy scenarios, applicable pathways, and critical groups developed to establish the Derived Concentration Guideline Levels are described. A parameter assignment process is introduced wherein general population values are used to establish behavioral and metabolic parameters representative of an average member of the critical group, while the uncertainty associated with important physical parameters is considered. A key element of the parameter assignment process is the use of sensitivity analysis to identify the dose sensitive physical parameters and to ensure that such parameters are assigned conservative values. Structuring the parameter assignment process, completing the formal sensitivity analyses, and assigning conservative values to the sensitive physical parameters in a consistent way establishes a calculation framework that lead to Derived Concentration Guideline Levels with a uniform level of conservatism across all media and all radionuclides

  7. Challenges Encountered by Connecticut Partner School Districts when Implementing Legislatively Required District Improvement Plans: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Meghan G.

    2010-01-01

    This research developed a survey that measures the degree to which challenges are experienced by school and district leaders, and teachers, when attempting to implement legislatively required District Improvement Plans (DIPs). The data indicate that there are certainly challenges when implementing DIPs and that teachers report experiencing a…

  8. H10354: NOS Hydrographic Survey , Western Long Island Sound, New York and Connecticut, 1990-09-07

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has the statutory mandate to collect hydrographic data in support of nautical chart compilation for safe...

  9. Russian, with Love. Learning a Supposedly Passe Language Can Have its Benefits, as Students in Connecticut Are Finding Out

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, Aaron

    2005-01-01

    Almost since the moment the Berlin Wall crumbled, American schools' interest in teaching Russian did likewise. But precisely because the numbers of Russian learners fell off sharply, Glastonbury and the few other schools that have stuck with the language are finding their students very much in demand. In this article, the author reports how…

  10. H10349: NOS Hydrographic Survey , Western Long Island Sound, New York and Connecticut, 1990-08-03

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has the statutory mandate to collect hydrographic data in support of nautical chart compilation for safe...

  11. Unofficial policy: access to housing, housing information and social services among homeless drug users in Hartford, Connecticut

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corbett A Michelle

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Much research has shown that the homeless have higher rates of substance abuse problems than housed populations and that substance abuse increases individuals' vulnerability to homelessness. However, the effects of housing policies on drug users' access to housing have been understudied to date. This paper will look at the "unofficial" housing policies that affect drug users' access to housing. Methods Qualitative interviews were conducted with 65 active users of heroin and cocaine at baseline, 3 and 6 months. Participants were purposively sampled to reflect a variety of housing statuses including homeless on the streets, in shelters, "doubled-up" with family or friends, or permanently housed in subsidized, unsubsidized or supportive housing. Key informant interviews and two focus group interviews were conducted with 15 housing caseworkers. Data were analyzed to explore the processes by which drug users receive information about different housing subsidies and welfare benefits, and their experiences in applying for these. Results A number of unofficial policy mechanisms limit drug users' access to housing, information and services, including limited outreach to non-shelter using homeless regarding housing programs, service provider priorities, and service provider discretion in processing applications and providing services. Conclusion Unofficial policy, i.e. the mechanisms used by caseworkers to ration scarce housing resources, is as important as official housing policies in limiting drug users' access to housing. Drug users' descriptions of their experiences working with caseworkers to obtain permanent, affordable housing, provide insights as to how access to supportive and subsidized housing can be improved for this population.

  12. H11441: NOS Hydrographic Survey , Eastern Long Island Sound, Connecticut and New York, 2005-05-22

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has the statutory mandate to collect hydrographic data in support of nautical chart compilation for safe...

  13. Albany 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ NTMS area Connecticut, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New York, and Vermont: data report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koller, G.R.

    1979-08-01

    Stream sediment and stream water samples were collected from small streams at 1328 sites. Ground water samples were collected at 664 sites. Neutron activation analysis (NAA) results are given for uranium and 16 other elements in sediments, and for uranium and 8 other elements in ground water and surface water.

  14. F00303: NOS Hydrographic Survey , Southern New England Coast, Connecticut and New York, 1988-08-21

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has the statutory mandate to collect hydrographic data in support of nautical chart compilation for safe...

  15. 77 FR 39997 - University of Connecticut, et al.; Notice of Consolidated Decision on Applications for Duty-Free...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-06

    ... Importation Act of 1966 (Pub. L. 89-651, as amended by Pub. L. 106-36; 80 Stat. 897; 15 CFR part 301). Related... of each instrument. Dated: June 29, 2012. Gregory W. Campbell, Director, Subsidies Enforcement Office...

  16. "CONFIRMATORY SURVEY RESULTS FOR THE ABB COMBUSTION ENGINEERING SITE WINDSOR, CONNECTICUT DCN 5158-SR-02-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ADAMS, WADE C

    2013-03-25

    The objectives of the confirmatory activities were to provide independent contractor field data reviews and to generate independent radiological data for use by the NRC in evaluating the adequacy and accuracy of the contractor's procedures and FSS results. ORAU reviewed ABB CE's decommissioning plan, final status survey plan, and the applicable soil DCGLs, which were developed based on an NRC-approved radiation dose assessment. The surveys include gamma surface scans, gamma direct measurements, and soil sampling.

  17. F00268: NOS Hydrographic Survey , Southern New England Coast, Connecticut and New York, 1984-10-23

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has the statutory mandate to collect hydrographic data in support of nautical chart compilation for safe...

  18. F00340: NOS Hydrographic Survey , Southern New England Coast, Connecticut and New York, 1989-11-15

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has the statutory mandate to collect hydrographic data in support of nautical chart compilation for safe...

  19. H10351: NOS Hydrographic Survey , Western Long Island Sound, New York and Connecticut, 1990-09-05

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has the statutory mandate to collect hydrographic data in support of nautical chart compilation for safe...

  20. H11361: NOS Hydrographic Survey , Eastern Long Island Sound, Connecticut and New York, 2004-11-15

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has the statutory mandate to collect hydrographic data in support of nautical chart compilation for safe...

  1. F00365: NOS Hydrographic Survey , Southern New England Coast, Connecticut and New York, 1991-09-24

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has the statutory mandate to collect hydrographic data in support of nautical chart compilation for safe...

  2. F00293: NOS Hydrographic Survey , Southern New England Coast, Connecticut and New York, 1986-12-10

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has the statutory mandate to collect hydrographic data in support of nautical chart compilation for safe...

  3. F00316: NOS Hydrographic Survey , Southern New England Coast, Connecticut and New York, 1988-08-08

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has the statutory mandate to collect hydrographic data in support of nautical chart compilation for safe...

  4. School-Wide Positive Behavior Support (SWPBS) in the Classroom: Assessing Perceived Challenges to Consistent Implementation in Connecticut Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallon, Lindsay M.; McCarthy, Scott R.; Sanetti, Lisa M. Hagermoser

    2014-01-01

    The number of schools implementing school-wide positive behavior support (SWPBS) practices nationwide is increasing, but still little is known about the fidelity with which teachers implement SWPBS practices in the classroom. Specifically, data are needed that reflect the consistency with which classroom-based SWPBS practices are implemented, as…

  5. F00360: NOS Hydrographic Survey , Southern New England Coast, Connecticut and New York, 1991-11-12

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has the statutory mandate to collect hydrographic data in support of nautical chart compilation for safe...

  6. F00320: NOS Hydrographic Survey , Southern New England Coast, Connecticut and New York, 1988-11-18

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has the statutory mandate to collect hydrographic data in support of nautical chart compilation for safe...

  7. Four High-Visibility Enforcement Demonstration Waves in Connecticut and New York Reduce Hand-Held Phone Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    The National Highway Traffic : Safety Administration initiated : distracted driving demonstration : programs in two communities : to test whether a high-visibility : enforcement (HVE) model could : reduce two specific instances : of distracted drivin...

  8. F00378: NOS Hydrographic Survey , Southern New England Coast, Connecticut and New York, 1992-11-02

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has the statutory mandate to collect hydrographic data in support of nautical chart compilation for safe...

  9. H10458: NOS Hydrographic Survey , Southern New England Coast, Connecticut and New York, 1993-08-30

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has the statutory mandate to collect hydrographic data in support of nautical chart compilation for safe...

  10. F00376: NOS Hydrographic Survey , Southern New England Coast, Connecticut and New York, 1992-09-15

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has the statutory mandate to collect hydrographic data in support of nautical chart compilation for safe...

  11. The Symbols Are in the Music: An Investigation of Eighth Graders' Mathematics Connecticut Mastery Test Achievement and Musical Involvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapp, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    Mathematical achievement is a student's success or failure on an examination of performance in the area of mathematics (Jensen, 1993). In order for students to be successful in the area of mathematics, they benefit substantially from participating in high-interest activities (Trautwein, Ludtke, & Marsh, 2006). Music is one high-interest…

  12. H10348: NOS Hydrographic Survey , Western Long Island Sound, New York and Connecticut, 1990-08-02

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has the statutory mandate to collect hydrographic data in support of nautical chart compilation for safe...

  13. F00254: NOS Hydrographic Survey , Southern New England Coast, Connecticut and New York, 1983-08-23

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has the statutory mandate to collect hydrographic data in support of nautical chart compilation for safe...

  14. F00257: NOS Hydrographic Survey , Southern New England Coast, Connecticut and New York, 1983-10-29

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has the statutory mandate to collect hydrographic data in support of nautical chart compilation for safe...

  15. F00319: NOS Hydrographic Survey , Southern New England Coast, Connecticut and New York, 1988-10-19

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has the statutory mandate to collect hydrographic data in support of nautical chart compilation for safe...

  16. H10378: NOS Hydrographic Survey , Southern New England Coast, Connecticut and New York, 1991-11-19

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has the statutory mandate to collect hydrographic data in support of nautical chart compilation for safe...

  17. F00373: NOS Hydrographic Survey , Southern New England Coast, Connecticut and New York, 1992-06-24

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has the statutory mandate to collect hydrographic data in support of nautical chart compilation for safe...

  18. F00318: NOS Hydrographic Survey , Southern New England Coast, Connecticut and New York, 1988-09-20

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has the statutory mandate to collect hydrographic data in support of nautical chart compilation for safe...

  19. F00321: NOS Hydrographic Survey , Southern New England Coast, Connecticut and New York, 1988-11-18

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has the statutory mandate to collect hydrographic data in support of nautical chart compilation for safe...

  20. F00363: NOS Hydrographic Survey , Southern New England Coast, Connecticut and New York, 1991-08-06

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has the statutory mandate to collect hydrographic data in support of nautical chart compilation for safe...

  1. F00262: NOS Hydrographic Survey , Southern New England Coast, Connecticut and New York, 1984-10-26

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has the statutory mandate to collect hydrographic data in support of nautical chart compilation for safe...

  2. F00322: NOS Hydrographic Survey , Southern New England Coast, Connecticut and New York, 1984-06-14

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has the statutory mandate to collect hydrographic data in support of nautical chart compilation for safe...

  3. F00323: NOS Hydrographic Survey , Southern New England Coast, Connecticut and New York, 1989-03-22

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has the statutory mandate to collect hydrographic data in support of nautical chart compilation for safe...

  4. F00364: NOS Hydrographic Survey , Southern New England Coast, Connecticut and New York, 1991-09-18

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has the statutory mandate to collect hydrographic data in support of nautical chart compilation for safe...

  5. F00367: NOS Hydrographic Survey , Southern New England Coast, Connecticut and New York, 1991-11-05

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has the statutory mandate to collect hydrographic data in support of nautical chart compilation for safe...

  6. H10422: NOS Hydrographic Survey , Southern New England Coast, Connecticut and New York, 1992-05-01

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has the statutory mandate to collect hydrographic data in support of nautical chart compilation for safe...

  7. F00317: NOS Hydrographic Survey , Southern New England Coast, Connecticut and New York, 1988-09-14

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has the statutory mandate to collect hydrographic data in support of nautical chart compilation for safe...

  8. 2016 Cartographic Boundary File, 2010 Urban Areas (UA) within 2010 County and Equivalent for Connecticut, 1:500,000

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Census Bureau, Department of Commerce — The 2016 cartographic boundary KMLs are simplified representations of selected geographic areas from the U.S. Census Bureau's Master Address File / Topologically...

  9. 76 FR 81914 - Export Trade Certificate of Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-29

    ... read ``LD Commodities Rice Merchandising LLC, Wilton, Connecticut, and LD Commodities Interior Rice Merchandising LLC, Kansas City, Missouri (subsidiaries of Louis Dreyfus Commodities LLC, Wilton, Connecticut...

  10. National Program for Inspection of Non-Federal Dams. Indian Lake Dam (CT 00189), Lower Conn River Basin, Clinton, Connecticut. Phase I Inspection Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-03-01

    7. 3. Karp Acimovic, L.D.E.I. 8. 4 Gonzao Castro, G.E.I. 9. 5. 10. PROJECT FEATURE INSPECTED BY REMARKS I. 2. 3. 4. S 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. S A-1... Gerald J. Vece, the Clinton Director of Civil Pre- paredness, and advised him of the dangerous situation at the dam. He told me that he had been informed

  11. The Thames Science Plan: Suggested Hydrologic Investigations to Support Nutrient-Related Water-Quality Improvements in the Thames River Basin, Connecticut

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Todd Trench, Elaine C

    2005-01-01

    ... (CTDEP). The Science Plan outlines water-quality investigations that could provide information necessary for the CTDEP to develop water-quality management and restoration strategies for nutrient-related...

  12. Order, 19 May 1982, in the matter of the American Medical Association, the Connecticut State Medical Society, the New Haven County Medical Association, Inc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-08-27

    The text of a Federal Trade Commission cease-and-desist order against the American Medical Association (AMA) is reprinted. The order prohibits the AMA from restricting or declaring unethical the advertising of physician services or the participation of physicians in health maintenance organizations.

  13. Surficial geologic map of the Heath-Northfield-Southwick-Hampden 24-quadrangle area in the Connecticut Valley region, west-central Massachusetts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Janet R.; DiGiacomo-Cohen, Mary L.

    2010-01-01

    The surficial geologic map layer shows the distribution of nonlithified earth materials at land surface in an area of 24 7.5-minute quadrangles (1,238 mi2 total) in west-central Massachusetts. Across Massachusetts, these materials range from a few feet to more than 500 ft in thickness. They overlie bedrock, which crops out in upland hills and as resistant ledges in valley areas. The geologic map differentiates surficial materials of Quaternary age on the basis of their lithologic characteristics (such as grain size and sedimentary structures), constructional geomorphic features, stratigraphic relationships, and age. Surficial materials also are known in engineering classifications as unconsolidated soils, which include coarse-grained soils, fine-grained soils, and organic fine-grained soils. Surficial materials underlie and are the parent materials of modern pedogenic soils, which have developed in them at the land surface. Surficial earth materials significantly affect human use of the land, and an accurate description of their distribution is particularly important for assessing water resources, construction aggregate resources, and earth-surface hazards, and for making land-use decisions. This work is part of a comprehensive study to produce a statewide digital map of the surficial geology at a 1:24,000-scale level of accuracy. This report includes explanatory text, quadrangle maps at 1:24,000 scale (PDF files), GIS data layers (ArcGIS shapefiles), metadata for the GIS layers, scanned topographic base maps (TIF), and a readme.txt file.

  14. National Program for Inspection of Non-Federal Dams. Plymouth Reservoir Dam (CT 00286), Naugatuck River Basin, Plymouth, Connecticut. Phase I Inspection Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-05-01

    walls. 6. Downstream Channel: Ston-filled mat ( gabions ) at 1,,an- of spillway. Flows into 4f;-inch culvert tlhat discharqes to natural stream. 7...consisted of placing gabions inside the concrete spillway walls in order to install downstream d-ainaqe blankets and toe drains, and to flatten the...water. There wa s ro not i cibe flow of .water from this area. Some seepage was observed in the gutter of the road near the left end of the iam, Photo 5

  15. An Assessment for the Presence of Powassan Virus in Ixodes scapularis Nymphs from Locations in Virginia, Maryland, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, New York, and Connecticut

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-21

    post employs over 56,000 military and civilian employees that provide information, intelligence , and cyber services to DOD and other federal...amphibians, reptiles , birds, and mammals. The American journal of tropical medicine and hygiene 17:645-50 84. Wikipedia. 2013. Aberdeen Proving Ground

  16. National Program for Inspection of Non-Federal Dams. Ellis Dam (CT 00478), Thames River Basin, Stafford, Connecticut. Phase I Inspection Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-12-01

    program is: Natilonal Program for Inspection of Non-Federal Dams; use cover date for date of report. I9. i(EY wORDS (Continue an’ reverse oido of noeoeery...00 UL 0S ww (no) oddJ cr1 wS z *+ PLT - IOF SEEPAGE DRAIN 2 ~ GPERFORATED PIPE I GO NON -PERFORATED PIPE EL ŗ ZINVERT ELBA 675.0 zme * 4#0" 21 SMALL

  17. National Program for Inspection of Non-Federal Dams. Murphy Dam (NH 00185), Connecticut River Basin, Pittsburg, New Hampshire. Phase I Inspection Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-08-01

    or Cavitation None noted. Interior surface of con- duit was covered with rust tubercles and slime Alignment of Joints No deficiencies noted Butterfly...recomend that they :e if the reservoir is being held do.-n, and -ater wasted, for fear of losing flashboards or if it is decided to keco the outlet vnlves...for fear of losing flashboards, or if it is decided to keep .e outlet valve closed during floods. 2. Should the Outlet Valves be Closed During Floods

  18. National Program for Inspection of Non-Federal Dams. Whiting River Dam (CT 00483), Housatonic River Basin, North Canaan, Connecticut. Phase I Inspection Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-02-01

    U.S.DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DRAWING NO. SOIL CONSERVATION SERVICE CS.V-4. S-EETL OFIDATE Za/l, /e B-21 i %A 0- o-o�c 0 0 0 0 0 , ’A 0100 I -- - -- . -I...presence of the bedrock more predictable as e_. vde in holes 3. 4 and 51’ If the-condiit-is relocated, somebedrock excavtion-pay-..be .reure o roach the

  19. Estimation of uranium and cobalt-60 distribution coefficients and uranium-235 enrichment at the Combustion Engineering Company site in Windsor, Connecticut

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Y.; Orlandini, K.A.; Yu, C.

    1996-05-01

    Site-specific distribution coefficients for uranium isotopes and cobalt-60 (Co-60) and the fraction of uranium-235 (U-235) enrichment by mass were estimated for environmental samples collected from the Combustion Engineering Company site in Windsor, CT. This site has been identified for remedial action under the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. The authority of DOE at the Combustion Engineering site is limited to (1) Building 3; (2) other activities or areas associated exclusively with Building 3 (such as sewer lines); or (3) contamination that is exclusively highly enriched uranium. In this study, 16 samples were collected from the Combustion Engineering site, including 8 soil, 4 sediment, 3 water, and 1 water plus sludge sample. These samples were analyzed for isotopic uranium by alpha spectrometry and for Co-60 by gamma spectrometry. The site-specific distribution coefficient for each isotope was estimated as the ratio of extractable radionuclide activity in the solid phase to the activity in the contact solution following a 19-day equilibration. The uranium activity measurements indicate that uranium-234 (U-234) and uranium-238 (U-238) were in secular equilibrium in two soil samples and that soil and sediment samples collected from other sampling locations had higher U-234 activity than U-238 activity in both the solid and solution phases. The site-specific distribution coefficient (Kd) ranged from 82 to 44,600 mL/g for U-238 and from 102 to 65,900 mL/g for U-234. Calculation of U-235 enrichment by mass indicated that four soil samples had values greater than 0.20; these values were 0.37, 0.38, 0.46, and 0.68. Cobalt-60 activity was detected in only three sediment samples. The measured Co-60 activity in the solid phase ranged from 0.15 to 0.45 pCi/g and that in the water phase of all three samples combined was 4 pCi/L. The Kd value for Co-60 in the site brook sediment was calculated to be 70 mL/g

  20. Historical and chemical assessment of the sources of PAHs in soils at a former coal-burning power plant, New Haven, Connecticut

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stout, S.A.; Wasielewski, T.N. [NewFields Environmental Forensics Practice, Rockland, MA (US)

    2004-12-01

    Soils from the manmade island in the Mill River (New Haven, CT) where a former power plant (English Station) operated for nearly 100 years had been previously shown to contain polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) at concentrations that exceed the state's Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) Remediation Standard Regulations (RSRs) numerical cleanup criteria for industrial/commercial properties. Understanding the source(s) of these PAHs was important for property development and environmental management decisions. This study was designed to assess the industrial use history of the study area and conduct detailed chemical and organic petrographic characterization of the organic matter in the site's soils, particularly the PAHs, in order to determine their likely source or sources.

  1. School Finance Reform: The Equity and Efficiency Implications of Capitalization and Tax-Price Changes in Connecticut. Real Estate Report: No. 22.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEachern, William A.

    The author argues that the effect of tax capitalization on the value of property has been neglected in the judicial and legislative discussion of school finance reform, even though this phenomena may weigh heavily on an equitable solution to the current funding dilemma. He examines theoretical and empirical support for the thesis that if, because…

  2. Evaluating the Impact of Conflict Resolution on Urban Children's Violence-Related Attitudes and Behaviors in New Haven, Connecticut, through a Community-Academic Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuval, Kerem; Pillsbury, Charles A.; Cavanaugh, Brenda; McGruder, La'rie; McKinney, Christy M.; Massey, Zohar; Groce, Nora E.

    2010-01-01

    Numerous schools are implementing youth violence prevention interventions aimed at enhancing conflict resolution skills without evaluating their effectiveness. Consequently, we formed a community-academic partnership between a New Haven community-based organization and Yale's School of Public Health and Prevention Research Center to examine the…

  3. Evaluating the impact of conflict resolution on urban children's violence-related attitudes and behaviors in New Haven, Connecticut, through a community–academic partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuval, Kerem; Pillsbury, Charles A.; Cavanaugh, Brenda; McGruder, La'Rie; McKinney, Christy M.; Massey, Zohar; Groce, Nora E.

    2010-01-01

    Numerous schools are implementing youth violence prevention interventions aimed at enhancing conflict resolution skills without evaluating their effectiveness. Consequently, we formed a community–academic partnership between a New Haven community-based organization and Yale's School of Public Health and Prevention Research Center to examine the impact of an ongoing conflict resolution curriculum in New Haven elementary schools, which had yet to be evaluated. Throughout the 2007–08 school year, 191 children in three schools participated in a universal conflict resolution intervention. We used a quasi-experimental design to examine the impact of the intervention on participants' likelihood of violence, conflict self-efficacy, hopelessness and hostility. Univariate and multivariable analyses were utilized to evaluate the intervention. The evaluation indicates that the intervention had little positive impact on participants' violence-related attitudes and behavior. The intervention reduced hostility scores significantly in School 1 (P School 3 (P = 0.05, Cohen's d = 0.52); however, the intervention decreased the conflict self-efficacy score in School 2 (P = 0.04; Cohen's d = 0.23) and was unable to significantly change many outcome measures. The intervention's inability to significantly change many outcome measures might be remedied by increasing the duration of the intervention, adding additional facets to the intervention and targeting high-risk children. PMID:20444803

  4. Industrial hygiene survey report of Millstone Nuclear Power Station No. 3 construction site (Northeast Utilities Service Co./Stone and Webster Engineering Corp.) Waterford, Connecticut

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaebst, D.D.; Herrick, R.H.

    1985-11-01

    The purpose of the study was to conduct an in-depth industrial hygiene survey to determine exposures of painters to coating components during the construction of a nuclear power plant. The survey was conducted as part of the Industrywide Studies Branch survey of Health Hazards in the Painting Trades

  5. Proceedings of Tripartite Conference on Submarine Medicine and IEP B-52 - France, United Kingdom, United States (6th) Held in Groton, Connecticut on 1-4 June 1987

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-10-03

    be recoveredl alt the aft hatch of the MOSUB for replnit ihl(et and tran;er of r-escuet if decomr-ssion is nut ,trdicatd aind For replenshm,(.i alone...midsphere hatch exists ; r t1it S *it~ii-nll pressure jr, nut excossive. The aft sph(ea can bei.ollo"d ai the Iid and forward sphere (qual. ied at which...pyrocatechol, resorcinol, hydroquinol) in synthetic chemistry and especially in the making of plastics ; its derivatives are also used as desinfectant

  6. National Program for Inspection of Non-Federal Dams. Shepaug Reservoir Dam (CT 00665), Housatonic River Basin, Litchfield and Warren, Connecticut. Phase I Inspection Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-05-01

    ENGINEERS D-WALTHAM, MASS. 02154 r-is dct" imrnf has beer .) po d MAY 1979 i ’ un1-i to dL N- -.- . . . -’ 0~i . . . . " . . . ..4...transmits * ~water to a tunnel aqueduct which then flows about 3. 6 miles under- * ground to Morris Reservoir. d 1-3 4~ ~~~ .., 4 4 -. A .(2) There are...observed but there were no observable flows. o It would not have been possible to identify any seeps that may occur in the deepest part of the valley because

  7. National Program for Inspection of Non-Federal Dams. Kent Pond Dam (VT 00071) Connecticut River Basin, Sherburne, Vermont. Phase I Inspection Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-06-01

    statistical confidence to determine probable peak discharge. DETERMINATION OF PEAK DESIGN . DISCHARGE: Recognizing there is some pondage In watershed, i.e...slightly for pondage and use 550 cfs/sq.mi. j Therefore, Peak Design Discharge is estimated to be: - 550 cfs x 3.64 cfs/sq.mi. = 2000 cfs GENERAL

  8. National Program for Inspection of Non-Federal Dams. Gardner Lake Dam (CT 00512), Thames River Basin, Bozrah, Connecticut. Phae I Inspection Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-11-01

    miles and a maximum width of about 3.98 miles. The basin consists of both open fields and forested areas, with sparse population , and the terrain is...selec ted to accers, 0With the triterts P resetd ts the wSmed GuilIn for Jets, -- ecqo of am. Suit. thin dam in6 clso- tied as latemediate is also with a

  9. DOE hearing on the draft area recommendation report for the Crystalline Repository Project, Hilton Hotel, Hartford, Connecticut, April 14, 1986: Transcript of proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    This document contains a transcript of the comments of 22 witnesses. These meetings were held to hear public comments regarding the selection of a site for a second high-level nuclear waste repository

  10. National Program for Inspection of Non-Federal Dams. Shenipsit Dam (CT 00482), Thames River Basin, Stafford, Connecticut. Phase I Inspection Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-09-01

    calculatec by the Soil Loss Formula (0.1 ton/ac/yr. y±cld). The dosianed heiGht of the structures vill provide st rage for a 50 year sediment...As shown in the above listing the design meet, the c:rr,1 ,ia established in all instances. L B-13 rage -,- n We have discussed with the S. C.S...WALTHAM,* MASS rMdlRie INSPECTION OF Stafford, CT CANIN ENGINEERS INC. WALLINGFORD, CON.NF. DAS CE# 27 785 KC EWNGINEER NO-FD AS DATE Set𔃺 PAGE C-4 S S U

  11. Evaluating the impact of conflict resolution on urban children's violence-related attitudes and behaviors in New Haven, Connecticut, through a community–academic partnership

    OpenAIRE

    Shuval, Kerem; Pillsbury, Charles A.; Cavanaugh, Brenda; McGruder, La'Rie; McKinney, Christy M.; Massey, Zohar; Groce, Nora E.

    2010-01-01

    Numerous schools are implementing youth violence prevention interventions aimed at enhancing conflict resolution skills without evaluating their effectiveness. Consequently, we formed a community–academic partnership between a New Haven community-based organization and Yale's School of Public Health and Prevention Research Center to examine the impact of an ongoing conflict resolution curriculum in New Haven elementary schools, which had yet to be evaluated. Throughout the 2007–08 school year...

  12. National Program for Inspection of Non-Federal Dams, Thames River Basin, Norwich, Connecticut, Spaulding Pond Dam (CT 00202), Spaulding Pond Dike (CT 01685). Phase I Inspection Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-08-01

    slopes is not mowed, but any brush or saplings which take root are cut down. Maintenance to the roadway, guard rail and chain link fence on the crest of...fraction predominated to refusal. Artesian conditiogs were detected at the approximate bedrock level. Water rose to . a lie ht .f 1.2 teet in the...ow: per toot. Refusal wir at 27.8 feet whereupon at well rractured poise was pentrated. Hole 304 was located about 90 teet below the eutterliue at

  13. National Program for Inspection of Non-Federal Dams. Parks Pond Dam (CT 00071), Housatonic River Basin, Danbury, Connecticut. Phase I Inspection Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-07-01

    dam is classified as small (height less than 40 teet and storage less than 1,000 acre-feet). d. Hazard Classification - Parks Pond Dam is classified as...with a 2:1 slope. It is well vegetated with grass, brush and trees (Photos 1, 2 and 3). Along the toe of the dam, there are trees and brush which...natural channel (Photo 4). Just below the spillway, brush and debris has accumulated (Photo 3). d. Reservoir Area - The area immediately adjacent to the

  14. NATIONAL INCINERATOR TESTING AND EVALUATION PROGRAM: THE ENVIRONMENTAL CHARACTERIZATION OF REFUSE-DERIVED FUEL (RDF) COMBUSTION TECHNOLOGY - MID-CONNECTICUT FACILITY,

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report gives results of an environmental characterization of refuse-derived, semi-suspension burning technology at a facility in Hartford, CT, that represents state-of-the-art technology, including a spray dryer/fabric filter flue gas cleaning (FGC) system for each unit. The ...

  15. How much choice is there in housing choice vouchers? Neighborhood risk and free market rental housing accessibility for active drug users in Hartford, Connecticut

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Convey Mark

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since the mid-1970s, the dominant model for U.S. federal housing policy has shifted from unit-based programs to tenant based vouchers and certificates, intended to allow recipients a choice in their housing and neighborhoods. Surprisingly little research has examined the question of where those with Section 8 housing vouchers are able to live, but some research suggests that voucher holders are more likely to reside in distressed neighborhoods than unsubsidized renter households. Further, federal housing policy has limited drug users' access to housing subsidies. In turn, neighborhood disorder has been associated with higher levels of injection drug risk behaviors, and higher drug-related mortality. This paper explores rental accessibility and neighborhood characteristics of advertised rental housing in Hartford CT. Methods Brief telephone interviews were conducted with landlords or management companies with units to rent in Hartford to explore housing accessibility measured as initial move in costs, credit and criminal background checks, and whether rental subsidies were accepted. These data were supplemented with in-depth interviews with landlords, shelter staff and active users of heroin, crack or cocaine. Apartments for rent were geocoded and mapped using ArcGIS. We used location quotients to identify areas where low-income rental housing is concentrated. Finally, we mapped apartments in relation to drug and violent arrest rates in each neighborhood. Results High security deposits, criminal background and credit checks limit housing accessibility even for drug users receiving vouchers. While most landlords or management companies accepted housing subsidies, several did not. Voucher units are concentrated in neighborhoods with high poverty neighborhoods. Landlords reported little incentive to accept rental subsidies in neighborhoods with low crime rates, but appreciated the guarantee provided by Section 8 in high crime neighborhoods that were less likely to attract applicants with good jobs and credit. Conclusion Housing vouchers in themselves do not greatly improve recipients' choice of neighborhood and voucher units are concentrated in the most distressed neighborhoods. Policy changes are needed to increase landlords' incentives to accept housing subsidies. Interventions to improve neighborhood conditions are needed to improve the probability of success for those recovering from drug addictions.

  16. National Program for Inspection of Non-Federal Dams. Otis Reservoir Dam MA 00308, Connecticut River Basin, Otis, Massachusetts. Phase I Inspection Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-08-01

    Appendix C, Photograph 11). Approximately 100 feet downstream of the fish frap structure, the channel falls over an almost vertical drop. (See App -n...explain] Rcommcnd r- movil from insr.cction list_______ B2-16 - W a W 0 0 0 0 0 a 0 a a -- 9 L-69rESCRIPTION OF DAM 707- DISTRICT ONET Submnitt~d by_ R D

  17. National Program for Inspection of Non-Federal Dams. Goodwin Dam (CT 00541), Farmington River Basin, Hartland, Connecticut. Phase I Inspection Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-09-01

    virtually every structural element of this dam. Dr. K. Terzaghi considered various ~LIL sections for this design including a concrete core wall. In I...settlement at Indications of Movement of Structural gae house Items on Slopes gatehouse Trespassing on Slopes None permitted -- - Sloughing or Erosion of

  18. Language exposure facilitates talker learning prior to language comprehension, even in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orena, Adriel John; Theodore, Rachel M; Polka, Linda

    2015-10-01

    Adults show a native language advantage for talker identification, which has been interpreted as evidence that phonological knowledge mediates talker learning. However, infants also show a native language benefit for talker discrimination, suggesting that sensitivity to linguistic structure due to systematic language exposure promotes talker learning, even in the absence of functional phonological knowledge or language comprehension. We tested this hypothesis by comparing two groups of English-monolingual adults on their ability to learn English and French voices. One group resided in Montréal with regular exposure to spoken French; the other resided in Storrs, Connecticut and did not have French exposure. Montréal residents showed faster learning and better retention for the French voices compared to their Storrs-residing peers. These findings demonstrate that systematic exposure to a foreign language bolsters talker learning in that language, expanding the gradient effect of language experience on talker learning to perceptual learning that precedes sentence comprehension. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Permeable Asphalt: A New Tool to Reduce Road Salt Contamination of Groundwater in Urban Areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietz, Michael E; Angel, Derek R; Robbins, Gary A; McNaboe, Lukas A

    2017-03-01

    Chloride contamination of groundwater in urban areas due to deicing is a well-documented phenomenon in northern climates. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of permeable pavement on degraded urban groundwater. Although low impact development practices have been shown to improve stormwater quality, no infiltration practice has been found to prevent road salt chlorides from entering groundwater. The few studies that have investigated chlorides in permeable asphalt have involved sampling directly beneath the asphalt; no research has looked more broadly at surrounding groundwater conditions. Monitoring wells were installed upgradient and downgradient of an 860 m 2 permeable asphalt parking lot at the University of Connecticut (Storrs, Connecticut). Water level and specific conductance were measured continuously, and biweekly samples were analyzed for chloride. Samples were also analyzed for sodium (Na), calcium (Ca), and magnesium (Mg). Analysis of variance analysis indicated a significantly (p monitoring revealed lower Cl concentrations downgradient than upgradient for the majority of the year. These results suggest that the use of permeable asphalt in impacted urban environments with high ambient chloride concentrations can be beneficial to shallow groundwater quality, although these results may not be generalizable to areas with low ambient chloride concentrations. © 2016, National Ground Water Association.

  20. 75 FR 5595 - Notice of Agreements Filed

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-03

    ..., Esq.; Hoppel, Mayer & Coleman; 1050 Connecticut Ave., NW., 10th Floor; Washington, DC 20036. Synopsis... Distribution, Inc. Filing Party: Paul D. Coleman, Esq.; Hoppel, Mayer & Coleman; 1050 Connecticut Ave. NW...

  1. Pike International, LLC et al. Information Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pike International LLC, et al. (the Company) is located in New Haven, Connecticut. The Complaint involves the lease of, and renovation activities conducted at, property constructed prior to 1978, located in New Haven, Connecticut.

  2. Sjogren's Syndrome: A Place to Begin

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Alabama >> Arizona >> Arkansas >> California >> Colorado >> Connecticut >> Florida >> Georgia >> Hawaii >> Idaho >> Illinois >> Indiana >> Iowa >> Kansas >> Louisiana >> Maryland >> Massachusetts >> ...

  3. 75 FR 60123 - Notice of Agreements Filed

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-29

    .... Coleman, Esq.; Hoppel, Mayer & Coleman; 1000 Connecticut Avenue, NW.; Washington, DC 20036. [[Page 60124...: Paul D. Coleman, Esq.; Hoppel, Mayer & Coleman; 1050 Connecticut Avenue, NW.; Tenth Floor; Washington....; Hoppel, Mayer & Coleman; 1000 Connecticut Avenue, NW.; Washington, DC 20036. Synopsis: The amendment...

  4. 75 FR 18496 - Notice of Complaint Filing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-12

    ..., PSEG Power Connecticut LLC, NRG Power marketing LLC, Connecticut Jet Power LLC, Devon Power LLC, Middletown Power LLC, Montville Power LLC, Norwalk Power LLC, Somerset Power LLC, Joint Complainants v. ISO..., NRG Power marketing LLC, Connecticut Jet Power LLC, Devon Power LLC, Middletown Power LLC, Montville...

  5. National Program for Inspection of Non-Federal Dams. Winsor Dam (MA 00588), Quabbin Spillway (MA 00589), Goodnough Dike (MA 00590), Connecticut River Basin, Ware, Massachusetts. Phase I Inspection Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-09-01

    prepared under the National Programa for Inspection of Non-Federal Dams. This report is .p4resented for your use and is based upon a visual, inspection, a...in the July 1935 BSCE Journal. Vol. XXI , No. 3, indicates that a runoff of 12 inches in 24 hours would result in a spillway discharge of 9, 000 cfs

  6. North Atlantic Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) Massachusetts (2001), Delaware Bay (1996), New Hampshire (2004), Hudson River (2006), and Rhode Island, Connecticut, NY/NJ Metro Area (2001) maps and geographic information systems data (NODC Accession 0020555)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These ESI data were collected, mapped, and digitized to provide environmental data for oil spill planning and response. The Clean Water Act with amendments by the...

  7. Final Report-Confirmatory Survey Results for the ABB Combustion Engineering Site, Windsor, Connecticut; Revision 1 (DCN 5158-SR-02-1) (Docket No. 030-03754; RFTA No. 12-003)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ADAMS, WADE C

    2013-01-28

    The objectives of the confirmatory activities were to provide independent contractor field data reviews and to generate independent radiological data for use by the NRC in evaluating the adequacy and accuracy of the contractor's procedures and FSS results. ORAU reviewed ABB CE's decommissioning plan, final status survey plan, and the applicable soil DCGLs, which were developed based on an NRC-approved radiation dose assessment. The surveys included gamma surface scans, gamma direct measurements, and soil sampling.

  8. National Program for Inspection of Non-Federal Dams. Upper Bemis Pond Dam (MA 00069), Lower Bemis Pond Dam (MA 00531), Connecticut River Basin, Chicopee, Massachusetts. Phase I Inspection Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-10-01

    were Ferformed or. , , Copies of the inspection checklists are inclunez n Appendix A. Previous inspections were conducted t"y t.. Iampden County Cori...and a maximum- storage cap~acity cf E’ acre-feet at-- There is r.o& low, level outlet at thsdam7 ex~e-, fc. which has solgs aha ca b s dse c 1c-.:e r

  9. National Program for Inspection of Non-Federal Dams. Pine Island Lake Dam and Dike - Dam (MA 00595) Dike (MA 00596) Connecticut River Basin, Westhampton, Massachusetts. Phase I Inspection Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-08-01

    should institute a program of annual tecnnical inspection. S. The Owner should develop a formal warning system for downstream areas in case of emergency ...ArEA EVLI /TEf CONDIT ION OIUTLET W4ORKS CONTROL TOWER L a. Concrete and Structural None at this project. General Condi tion Condition of Joints p Spal 1...eti:e- cc wale soJiway apnears to be the same as tinvert. of emergency sci a of in 1Sz1and Lake Damu, M7umbe r v.3.5lon opp-os ite end of Lake. -A , zq

  10. Absence of QTc-interval-prolonging or hemodynamic effects of a single dose of bitter-orange extract in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Bokyung; Cios, Deborah; Kluger, Jeffrey; White, C Michael

    2005-12-01

    To evaluate the hemodynamic and electrocardiographic effects of a single dose of commercially available bitter-orange dried-fruit extract, which is increasingly being used in dietary supplements. Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study. University of Connecticut, Storrs Campus. Eighteen healthy volunteers aged 18 years or older. Subjects were given either placebo or bitter-orange dried-fruit extract (450 mg standardized to 27 mg of m- or p-synephrine) in phase 1. The opposite treatment was given during phase 2 after a washout period of at least 7 days. The rate-corrected QT (QTc) interval and blood pressure were measured before dosing and at 1, 3, 5, and 8 hours after dosing. Mean+/-SD values of the maximum postdose values were compared between groups. Subjects receiving bitter-orange extract versus those receiving placebo had similar postdose QTc intervals (402+/-29 vs 403+/-24 msec, p=0.653), systolic blood pressure (114+/-10 vs 115+/-8 mm Hg, p=0.686) and diastolic blood pressure (68+/-9 vs 68+/-8, p=0.879). Bitter-orange dried-fruit extract standardized to m- or p-synephrine 27 mg did not significantly alter the QTc interval or blood pressure after a single dose was administered. Future studies are necessary to ensure the safety of this herbal product with multiple doses.

  11. A pilot program at the worksite to reduce adverse self-medication behaviors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia J Neafsey

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Patricia J Neafsey1,2, Gregory Lutkus2, Jessica Newcomb2, Elizabeth Anderson1,21Center for Health Intervention and Prevention (CHIP; 2School of Nursing, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, USAAbstract: A Next Generation Personal Education Program (PEP-NG that captures self-reported medication behaviors and delivers a tailored educational intervention on a touchscreen interface was piloted with 11 adults with hypertension, aged 45–60 years, in a worksite setting. A time series design with multiple institution of treatment (four visits over three months was employed. Blood pressure (BP, self-medication behaviors, self-efficacy, and knowledge for avoiding adverse self-medication behaviors were assessed at each of four visits. Satisfaction was assessed once at visit 4. Measures pre-PEP (visit 1 to visit 4 were compared with paired t-tests. The adverse self-medication behavior risk score decreased significantly from visit 1 to visit 4 (p < 0.05 with a medium effect size. Both knowledge and self-efficacy for avoiding adverse self-medication behaviors increased significantly (p < 0.05 with large effect sizes. All six participants not at BP goal (<140/90 mmHg on visit 1 were at goal by visit 4. User satisfaction was high as assessed by both quantitative measures and qualitative interviews. These positive results suggest the PEP could play a central role in worksite wellness programs aimed at workers with hypertension.Keywords: hypertension, worksite, information technology, tailored intervention

  12. Patient considerations in the management of type 2 diabetes – critical appraisal of dapagliflozin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvo MC

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Marissa C Salvo,1 Amie D Brooks,2 Stacey M Thacker3 1Department of Pharmacy Practice, University of Connecticut School of Pharmacy, Storrs, CT, 2Department of Pharmacy Practice, St Louis College of Pharmacy, St Louis, MO, 3Department of Pharmacy Practice, Southern Illinois University Edwardsville, Edwardsville, IL, USA Abstract: Type 2 diabetes affects more than 350 million people worldwide, and its prevalence is increasing. Many patients with diabetes do not achieve and/or maintain glycemic targets, despite therapy implementation and escalation. Multiple therapeutic classes of agents are available for the treatment of type 2 diabetes, and the armamentarium has expanded significantly in the past decade. Selective sodium glucose co-transporter 2 inhibitors, including dapagliflozin, represent the latest development in pharmacologic treatment options for type 2 diabetes. This class has a unique mechanism of action, working by increasing glucose excretion in the urine. The insulin-independent mechanism results in decreased serum glucose, without hypoglycemia or weight gain. Dapagliflozin is a once-daily oral therapy. Expanding therapy options for a complex patient population is critical, and dapagliflozin has a distinct niche that can be a viable option for select patients with diabetes. Keywords: SGLT2 inhibitor, selective sodium glucose co-transporter 2 inhibitors, pharmacological treatment

  13. 76 FR 76813 - Requested Administrative Waiver of the Coastwise Trade Laws: Vessel PRIORITIES; Invitation for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-08

    ...: ``Puerto Rico, Florida, New York, Connecticut, Rhode Island, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Maine.'' The...., Monday through Friday, except Federal holidays. An electronic version of this document and all documents...

  14. 78 FR 107 - Center for Scientific Review; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-02

    ... grant applications. Place: Renaissance Mayflower Hotel, 1127 Connecticut Avenue NW., Washington, DC... Committee: Center for Scientific Review Special Emphasis Panel Member Conflict: Cardiovascular Sciences...

  15. 77 FR 77080 - Center for Scientific Review; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-31

    ... grant applications. Place: Renaissance Mayflower Hotel, 1127 Connecticut Avenue NW., Washington, DC... Committee: Center for Scientific Review Special Emphasis Panel; Member Conflict: Cardiovascular Sciences...

  16. 78 FR 24224 - Center for Scientific Review; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-24

    ..., 301-435-1033, [email protected] . Name of Committee: Bioengineering Sciences & Technologies.... Agenda: To review and evaluate grant applications. Place: Renaissance Mayflower Hotel, 1127 Connecticut...

  17. Stormwater Infrastructure and other features - Linear Features

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — This data was collected and compiled for various towns in watersheds (currently including the Missisquoi Basin, Winooski Basin, Connecticut River Basin, Lamoille...

  18. 78 FR 40778 - Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-08

    ... information. ADDRESSES: Mayflower Renaissance Hotel Washington, 1127 Connecticut Ave. NW., Washington DC 20036..., 2013. Diane Janosek, Chief Legal Officer, Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board. [FR Doc. 2013...

  19. Stormwater Infrastructure and other features - Point Features

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — This data was collected and compiled for various towns in watersheds (currently including the Missisquoi Basin, Winooski Basin, Connecticut River Basin, Lamoille...

  20. Functionalized Graphitic Supports for Improved Fuel Cell Catalyst Stability, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI) together with the University of Connecticut (UCONN) proposes to demonstrate the improved fuel cell catalyst support durability offered...

  1. Stormwater Infrastructure and other features - Area Features

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — This data was collected and compiled for various towns in watersheds (currently including the Missisquoi Basin, Winooski Basin, Connecticut River Basin, Lamoille...

  2. New and Improved Lithium-Ion Battery, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This project is a partnership effort between American Energy Technologies Company (Illinois), Yardney Technical Products (Connecticut) and A.J. Drexel Nanotechnology...

  3. GenBank blastn search result: AK289245 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK289245 J100077H08 AY525350.1 AY525350 Castanea ozarkensis voucher CC R-etaT3, G. Miller (Connecticut Agric...ultural Experiment Station, New Haven, Connecticut) Ycf9 (ycf9) gene, partial cds;

  4. 77 FR 25472 - Amended Notice of Intent To Modify the Scope of the Environmental Impact Statement for the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-30

    ... consisting of a bipole (two cables) that would have extended into Connecticut (the Connecticut Circuit). This... Environmental Compatibility and Public Need from Champlain Hudson Power Express, Inc. in a series of documents... railroad property, pass under Interstate 890 then turn south, running approximately parallel with the CSX...

  5. 18 CFR Appendix A to Part 11 - Fee Schedule for FY 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Connecticut Tolland $115.52 Connecticut Windham $231.02 Delaware Kent $69.31 Delaware New Castle $115.52... Georgia Ben Hill $34.66 Georgia Berrien $34.66 Georgia Bibb $46.21 Georgia Bleckley $34.66 Georgia... $115.52 Maryland Kent $69.31 Maryland Montgomery $115.52 Maryland Prince George's $231.02 Maryland...

  6. 78 FR 31402 - Safety Zones and Special Local Regulations; Recurring Marine Events in Captain of the Port Long...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-24

    ... waters of the Thames River at New London, Connecticut, between the Penn Central Draw Bridge 41[deg]21'46... not cause waves which result in damage to submarines or other vessels in the floating dry- docks. 1.2...: All water of the Connecticut River, Hartford, CT, between the Putnum Bridge 41[deg]42.87' N 072[deg]38...

  7. Teen Pregnancy Prevention: A Rural Model Using School and Community Collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Nancy D.; Harrod, Susan E.

    1993-01-01

    Focuses on efforts in Connecticut to combat teenage pregnancy. Describes a model program that emphasizes a collaborative venture between a state-funded community-based pregnancy prevention program and a regional vocational-technical high school located in a rural setting. Describes Northeast Connecticut Teen Pregnancy Prevention Program and the…

  8. 78 FR 17763 - Housatonic Railroad Company, Inc., Maybrook Railroad Company, and Housatonic Transportation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-22

    ... Transportation (CDOT), and HRRC, respectively.\\1\\ Applicants state that MRC is a ``non-operating'' rail carrier that owns rail lines in Connecticut. Applicants indicate that MRC, HTC, CTC, and HRRC are under common... Class III rail carrier, operates rail lines in Connecticut and Massachusetts, including the Berkshire...

  9. 77 FR 11160 - Notice of a Change in Status of the Payable Periods in the Emergency Unemployment Compensation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-24

    ... Unemployment Compensation 2008 (EUC08) Program for Connecticut and Missouri AGENCY: Employment and Training... in the Emergency Unemployment Compensation 2008 (EUC08) program for Connecticut and Missouri. Public... high unemployment states. The Department of Labor produces a trigger notice indicating which states...

  10. Stratifying FIA Ground Plots Using A 3-Year Old MRLC Forest Cover Map and Current TM Derived Variables Selected By "Decision Tree" Classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael Hoppus; Stan Arner; Andrew Lister

    2001-01-01

    A reduction in variance for estimates of forest area and volume in the state of Connecticut was accomplished by stratifying FIA ground plots using raw, transformed and classified Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) imagery. A US Geological Survey (USGS) Multi-Resolution Landscape Characterization (MRLC) vegetation cover map for Connecticut was used to produce a forest/non-...

  11. Fishery Co-Management: A Practical Handbook

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Acknowledgements are made to the University of Connecticut and Connecticut Sea Grant Program, especially Ed Monahan and Emilio Pagoulatos. Robert S. Pomeroy ..... This has often led to misunderstandings among the co-management partners and vague adoption of the concept as a fisheries management strategy.

  12. Artists in the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Stephen R., Ed.; Place, Richard, Ed.

    Since 1970, the Connecticut Commission on the Arts has sponsored educational programs in which artists participate actively in the classroom with students and teachers. This book contains eight case studies showing the effects of visiting artists in eight Connecticut schools. Topics of these studies are song writing, dance movement in suburbia,…

  13. A Balanced Force Strategy for the New Security Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-05-03

    Powerlift – Getting to Desert Storm: Strategic Transportation and Strategy in the New World Order (Westport, Connecticut: Praeger, 1993), 157. 3...Menarchik, Powerlift – Getting to Desert Storm: Strategic Transportation and Strategy in the New World Order (Westport, Connecticut: Praeger, 1993), 157. 5...Praeger, 2003. Menarchik, Douglas. Powerlift – Getting to Desert Storm: Strategic Transportation and Strategy in the New World Order. Westport

  14. The Benefits of Recycling Silver - A Precious Metal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-09-01

    Silver Recovery Costs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 IV. DOD Total Savings - Yardney Industries ... 39 V. Total PMRP Silver Recovery Savings...locations -- New Jersey, New York, and Connecticut. Yardney Electric stores only silver at its Connecticut facilities. These companies have storage...GFM are Yardney , and Engelhard and Engelhard Industries (20:11885). The contracts and GFM management are administered by the Defense Contracts

  15. Review of "Spend Smart: Fix Our Broken School Funding System"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Bruce

    2011-01-01

    ConnCAN's Spend Smart: "Fix Our Broken School Funding System" was released concurrently with a bill introduced in the Connecticut legislature, based on the principles outlined in the report. However, the report is of negligible value to the policy debate over Connecticut school finance because it provides little or no support for any of…

  16. Insulin degludec as an ultralong-acting basal insulin once a day: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang F

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Fei Wang,1 Justine Surh,1 Manmeet Kaur21University of Connecticut School of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmacy Practice, Storrs, 2Joslin Diabetes Center Affiliate, Hospital of Central Connecticut, New Britain, CT, USABackground: Insulin degludec (IDeg is a neutral, ultralong-acting new generation basal insulin analog developed by NovoNordisk currently in Phase III clinical development. IDeg offers a duration of action of more than 42 hours in adults, much longer than current basal insulin formulations.Objective: The aim of this review is to assess the efficacy and safety data of IDeg in the treatment of type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus.Methods: Relevant English language articles from 2010 to 2012 were identified through MEDLINE, PubMed, EMBASE, Scopus, BIOSIS, and Google Scholar. Online conference proceedings of the 71st ADA Scientific Sessions and the 47th EASD Annual Meeting were reviewed. Studies were compared in terms of their study designs, primary and secondary efficacy parameters, and tolerability data.Results: There are a total of nine published trials investigating the clinical efficacy and safety of IDeg in over 3000 subjects with type 1 and 2 diabetes. Only three trials were published in full. All were open-label, randomized multicenter trials with durations of 16 to 52 weeks. IDeg and coformulations of IDeg with insulin aspart (IAsp were compared to insulin glargine (IGlar, detemir, and biphasic IAsp 30 (BIAsp 30.Conclusion: Based upon the available evidence, there appear to be no reported differences between IDeg and IGlar, detemir, or BIAsp 30 in the reduction of the primary efficacy end-points of HbA1c and mean fasting plasma glucose (FPG concentrations. Only flexible dosing of IDeg provided a significant reduction in FPG compared to IGlar. IDeg demonstrated a significant reduction in nocturnal hypoglycemia in type 1 diabetes. In type 2 diabetes, IDeg reduced the incidence of hypoglycemia by 18% and 58% compared to IGlar and

  17. A 5° medial wedge reduces frontal but not saggital plane motion during jump landing in highly trained women athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael F Joseph

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Michael F Joseph1, Craig R Denegar1, Elaine Horn1, Bradley MacDougall1, Michael Rahl1, Jessica Sheehan1, Thomas Trojian2, Jeffery M Anderson1, James E Clark1, William J Kraemer11Department of Kinesiology, 2Department of Sports Medicine, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, USAAbstract: Lower extremity mechanics during landing have been linked to traumatic and nontraumatic knee injuries, particularly in women’s athletics. The effects of efforts to mitigate these risks have not been fully elucidated. We previously reported that a 5° medial wedge reduced ankle eversion and knee valgus. In the present report we further investigated the effect of a 5° medial wedge inserted in the shoes of female athletes on frontal plane hip motion, as well as ankle, knee, hip, and trunk saggital plane motion during a jump landing task. Kinematic data were obtained from 10 intercollegiate female athletes during jump landings from a 31 cm platform with and without a 5° medial wedge. Hip adduction was reduced 1.98° (95% CI 0.97–2.99° by the medial wedge but saggital plane motions were unaffected. A 5° medial wedge reduces frontal plane motion and takes the knee away from a position associated with anterior cruciate ligament injury and patellofemoral pain syndrome. Although frontal plane motion was not captured it is unlikely to have increased in a bilateral landing task. Thus, it is likely that greater muscle forces were generated in these highly trained athletes to dissipate ground reaction forces when a medial wedge was in place. Additional investigation in younger and lesser trained athletes is warranted to assess the impact of orthotic devices on knee joint mechanics.Keywords: jump landing, foot orthotic, lower extremity kinematics, knee biomechanics, knee injury

  18. A Major Out of Sequence Fault in Central Range and Its Implication to Mountain Building Process of Taiwan Orogenic Belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Y. H.

    2015-12-01

    A Major Out of Sequence Fault in Central Range and Its Implication to Mountain Building Process of Taiwan Orogenic Belt Yuan-Hsi Lee1, Wei Lo2, Wei-Hau Wang1, Tim-Byrne 3, Ruey-Juen Rau 41. Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan, R.O.C. 2. Department of Materials and Mineral Resources Engineering, Taipei, National Taipei University of Technology, Taiwan, R.O.C. 3. Center for Integrative Geosciences, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, USA 4. Department of Earth Science, National Chen-Kung University, Taiwan, R.O.C. Taiwan mountain belt results from collision between Eurasia continental crust and Philippine Sea plate that result in exposing the metamorphic complex with high exhumation rate in eastern Central Range of Taiwan orogenic belt. In this study we combine with field survey, zircon fission track (ZFT), metamorphic grade, and tomography data to identify there exists a major out of sequence fault (MOSF) in eastern Central Range of Taiwan orogenic belt. This MOSF extends from north to south of eastern central Range with several segments and the total length is more than 250 km. The ZFT shows total annealing age of ca.1-3 Ma on the hanging wall and partial annealing ages on the foot wall. The seismicity data indicates the MOSF is still active from central to southern central Range. We consider that the MOSF is related with crustal channel flow in depth. To the western side of crustal flow it shows thrusting mechanism associated with MOSF and the normal faults (or normal shearing zone) develop in eastern side of the crustal channel flow. This crustal channel flow is also related with exposing the metamorphic complex in Central Range that is important mechanism for the mountain building process of Taiwan orogenic belt.

  19. Currents, backscatter, attenuation, conductivity, temperature, sigma-theta, and pressure data from moorings deployed from the SAMANTHA MILLER and the RV CONNECTICUT on the Hudson Shelf Valley, North Atlantic Ocean from the from April 5, 2006 to June 21, 2006 (NODC Accession 0066107)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Field experiments have been carried out to understand the transport of sediments and associated contaminants in the Hudson Shelf Valley, offshore of New York. The...

  20. Assessing ConnDOT's portland cement concrete testing methods phase II : field trials and implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-01

    This paper presents a description of efforts to disseminate findings from the Phase I study (SPR-2244), provides examples of applied maturity testing and temperature monitoring in Connecticut, reviews several State Highway Agency protocols for using ...

  1. The Effect of Circumferential Tube Wall Heat Conduction upon Laminar Filmwise Condensation on the Outside of Condenser Tubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-12-01

    California 93940 7. Professor G. Cantin , Code 69 Department of Mechanical Engineering Naval Postgraduate School Monterey, California 93940 8. LT H. M. Holland, USN 139 Pelican Drive Groton, Connecticut 06340 55 I IA ~LL~

  2. 77 FR 50703 - Center for Scientific Review; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-22

    ... . Name of Committee: Bioengineering Sciences & Technologies Integrated Review Group; Nanotechnology Study... applications. Place: Renaissance Mayflower Hotel, 1127 Connecticut Avenue NW., Washington, DC 20036. Contact..., [email protected] . Name of Committee: Population Sciences and Epidemiology Integrated Review Group...

  3. Integrated photovoltaics in nickel cadmium battery electric vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    This research report presents Connecticut Department of Transportations (ConnDOTs) : evaluation of preproduction prototype nickel-cadmium (NiCd) battery-powered electric : vehicles (BEVs) as an alternative-fuel (alt-fuel) option for local trips...

  4. Welcome to Garbage Museum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliot, Ian

    1996-01-01

    Introduces the Children's Garbage Museum in southwestern Connecticut and provides pictures as well as descriptions of exhibits. Suggests two activities to heighten students' awareness of recycling and composting and recommends reading materials. (MOK)

  5. 76 FR 8724 - First Light Hydro Generating Company; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing, Soliciting...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-15

    ... Pumped Storage Project. f. Location: East side of the Connecticut River, Towns of Erving and Northfield... Contact: Mr. John Howard, Plant Manager, Northfield Mountain Station, 99 Millers Falls Road, Northfield...

  6. Pop : Kogumikud. Vana kool. Funk / Siim Nestor

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Nestor, Siim, 1974-

    2004-01-01

    Heliplaatidest: Erinevad "The Third Unheard: Connecticut Hip Hop 1979-1983". Erinevad "Funk Drops 3: Breaks, Nuqqets and Rarities", George Duke "The Essential George Duke", The Jacksons "The Very Best of The Jacksons"

  7. 75 FR 71792 - Federal Interagency Committee on Emergency Medical Services Meeting Notice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-24

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION National Highway Traffic Safety Administration [NHTSA Docket No...: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), DOT. ACTION: Meeting Notice--Federal Interagency... Shoreham Hotel, 2500 Calvert Street, NW. (at Connecticut Avenue), Washington, DC 20008. FOR FURTHER...

  8. 78 FR 64037 - Notice of Hearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-25

    ... information. ADDRESSES: Mayflower Renaissance Hotel Washington, 1127 Connecticut Ave. NW., Washington DC 20036..., Chief Legal Officer, Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board. [FR Doc. 2013-25103 Filed 10-24-13; 8...

  9. Self-consolidating concrete : a synthesis of research findings and best practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-01

    The Connecticut Department of Transportation (ConnDOT) currently permits the : use of self-consolidating concrete (SCC) technology on a limited basis for : precast drainage structures, barriers and retaining walls. These include but : are not limited...

  10. 77 FR 38738 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Northeast Multispecies Fishery; Exempted Fishery for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-29

    ... Connecticut and Massachusetts. The company buys skate bait from 12-15 vessels throughout the year. The lobster... exemption while on a DAS should they feel it is to their benefit. Economic Impacts of Alternatives to the...

  11. NOAA Digital Orthophotography for the Coasts of New York and New Jersey

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Project: NOAA Digital Orthophotography for the Coasts of Main/New Hampshire, Massachusetts/Rhode Island/Connecticut, and Hudson River/Long Island /NY/NJ Contract No....

  12. Superfund National Priority List (NPL) Site Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — A set of site boundaries for each site in EPA Region 1 (Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Vermont) on EPA's Superfund National...

  13. A Recycled Giraffe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diorio, Lucille

    1976-01-01

    Chicken wire, cardboard tubes, newspaper, scrap lumber and discontinued fabric samples were among the discarded materials used in the art classes at the Webster Hill Elementary School, West Hartford, Connecticut, to create an eight-foot giraffe. (Author/RK)

  14. 33 CFR 100.101 - Harvard-Yale Regatta, Thames River, New London, CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., Connecticut, from the Penn Central Draw Bridge to Bartlett Cove. (b) Effective period. This section is in... not cause waves which result in damage to submarines or other vessels in the floating drydocks. (11...

  15. 78 FR 66030 - Center for Scientific Review; Amended Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-04

    ...., Washington Hilton, 1919 Connecticut Avenue NW., Washington, DC 20009, which was published in the Federal Register on September 09, 2013, 78 FR 174 Pgs. 55086- 55087. The meeting will be held at the Ritz-Carlton...

  16. 78 FR 66027 - Center for Scientific Review; Amended Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-04

    ... will be held at the Ritz-Carlton Hotel, 1150 22nd Street NW., Washington, DC 20037. The meeting will..., 2013, 11:00 a.m., Washington Hilton, 1919 Connecticut Avenue, Washington, DC 20009, which was published...

  17. Natural and Anthropogenic Methane Sources, New England, USA, 1990-1994

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains an inventory of natural and anthropogenic methane emissions for all counties in the six New England states of Connecticut, Rhode Island,...

  18. 75 FR 51104 - National Register of Historic Places; Notification of Pending Nominations and Related Actions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-18

    ..., 10000573 Lee, John Black, House I, (Mid-Twentieth-Century Modern Residences in Connecticut 1930-1979, MPS...; Mt. Church Rd; Brownsville Pass Rd; Townsend Rd, Burkittsville, 10000576 Turner's and Fox's Gaps...

  19. Good-bye Garage, Hello CCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augur, Eleanor

    1977-01-01

    The idea of having a religious education center in a four car garage may sound ridiculous to some but to the parishioners of Saint George's Church in Guilford, Connecticut, it was heaven-sent. (Author/RK)

  20. Benthic Mapping in Long Island Sound

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — QTCView is used with an incorporated depthfinder to create a sonar map of the bottom to the west of the Charles Island, in Long Island Sound in Connecticut waters....

  1. 78 FR 8533 - Notice of Agreements Filed

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-06

    ... Charter. Parties: EUKOR Car Carriers, Inc. and FESCO Ocean Management Limited Filing Parties: Neal M Mayer, Esq.; Hoppel, Mayer & Coleman; 1050 Connecticut Avenue NW, 10th Floor; Washington, DC 20036 Synopsis...

  2. 75 FR 44965 - Petition of Hainan P O Shipping Co., Ltd. For an Exemption From the First Sentence of Section 9(C...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-30

    ...-0001, and be served on Petitioner's counsel, Neal M. Mayer, Esq., and Paul D. Coleman, Esq., Hoppel, Mayer & Coleman, 10th Floor, 1050 Connecticut Avenue, NW., Washington, DC 20036. One copy of the reply...

  3. 75 FR 20849 - Notice of Agreements Filed

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-21

    ... Shipping & Construction Co., Ltd. and United Abaco Shipping Company Limited. Filing Parties: Neal M. Mayer, Esq.; Hoppel, Mayer & Coleman; 1050 Connecticut Avenue NW., 10th Floor; Washington, DC 20036. Synopsis...

  4. Analyzing the economic impacts of transportation projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    The main goal of the study is to explore methods, approaches and : analytical software tools for analyzing economic activity that results from largescale : transportation investments in Connecticut. The primary conclusion is that the : transportation...

  5. 75 FR 60145 - PNT Advisory Board; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-29

    ... Federal Advisory Committee Act, Public Law 92-463, as amended, the National Aeronautics and Space....m. ADDRESSES: Omni Shoreham Hotel, 2500 Calvert Street, NW. (at Connecticut Ave.), Hampton Ballroom...

  6. Training: The No. 1 Manpower Management Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippert, Frederick G.

    1977-01-01

    Reports results of a University of Connecticut study in which business administration graduate students in a manpower management course ranked six major functions of a competent personnel department according to perceived importance. A description of the course is included. (TA)

  7. 75 FR 991 - Notice of Meeting; National Commission on Children and Disasters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-07

    ... Hotel, 1127 Connecticut Avenue, NW., Washington, DC 20036. To attend in person, please register by 5 p.m... Disaster Recovery Workshop to explore challenges and solutions that impact the unique needs of children...

  8. Role of Shellfish Aquaculture in the Reduction of Eutrophication in an Urban Estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Land-based management has reduced nutrient discharges; however, many coastal waterbodies remain impaired. Oyster “bioextraction” of nutrients and how oyster aquaculture might complement existing management measures in urban estuaries was examined in Long Island Sound, Connecticut...

  9. Alternative Fuel News: Official Publication of the Clean Cities Network and the Alternative Fuels Data Center, Vol. 6, No. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2002-07-01

    Quarterly magazine with articles on auctions of used alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs), Royalty Enterprises of Ohio, and introducing AFVs in neglected urban areas. Plus Ford's new CNG school bus and electric buses in Connecticut.

  10. Environmental Factors Affecting Brook Trout Occurrence in Headwater Stream Segments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoichiro Kanno; Benjamin H. Letcher; Ana L. Rosner; Kyle P. O' Neil; Keith H. Nislow

    2015-01-01

    We analyzed the associations of catchment-scale and riparian-scale environmental factors with occurrence of Brook Trout Salvelinus fontinalis in Connecticut headwater stream segments with catchment areas of 15 Brook...

  11. University Data Partnership Peer Exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    In March 2012, the Connecticut (CTDOT) and New Mexico (NMDOT) Departments of Transportation met in Baton Rouge, Louisiana for a two-day peer session dedicated to exploring the intricate 12-year safety data partnership between the Louisiana Department...

  12. Chemotherapy and Your Mouth

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... San Francisco San Francisco, CA Joel Epstein, DMD, MSD, FRCD(C), FDSRCSE University of Illinois at Chicago ... of Connecticut Farmington, CT Mark M. Schubert, DDS, MSD University of Washington Seattle, WA John R. Wingard, ...

  13. Experimental demonstration of Xypex additive in concrete to improve durability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    In 2012 the Maine Department of Transportation reconstructed the Stockton Springs Underpass Bridge : #5760 on Church Street over US Route 1. The primary Contractor for this project was the Lane : Construction Corporation of Cheshire, Connecticut. : T...

  14. Development of the digital design environment ProjectWise(TM) - phase 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-28

    The goal of this research was to develop a project document management system capable of managing : Connecticut Department of Transportation (CTDOT) Capital Road and Bridge Program. Primary targets of : research and development included the system, c...

  15. 78 FR 66030 - Center for Scientific Review; Amended Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-04

    ... Hotel, 1127 Connecticut Avenue NW., Washington, DC 20036, which was published in the Federal Register on... end December 6, 2013 at 5:00 p.m. The meeting location remains the same. The meeting is closed to the...

  16. Airborne Gravity: NGS' Gravity Data for EN10 (2013)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Airborne gravity data for New York, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Connecticut and the Atlantic Ocean collected in 2013 over 1 survey. This data set is part of the...

  17. Airborne Gravity: NGS' Gravity Data for EN09 (2016)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Airborne gravity data for Massachusetts, Connecticut, Rhode Island, New Hampshire, New York, and the Atlantic Ocean collected in 2012 over 1 survey. This data set is...

  18. Installation and evaluation of weigh-in-motion utilizing quartz-piezo sensor technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-28

    The objective of the research study was: to install a quartz-piezo based WIM system, and to : determine sensor survivability, accuracy and reliability under actual traffic conditions in : Connecticuts environment. If the systems prove dependable a...

  19. 76 FR 45303 - ING Asia Pacific High Dividend Equity Income Fund, et al.; Notice of Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-28

    ... IM, a Connecticut corporation, acts as a sub-adviser to certain of the Current Funds. DSL, a Delaware... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Investment Company Act Release No. 29735; File No. 812-13909... Investment Company [[Page 45304

  20. Impacts of CTfastrak on Real Estate and Urban Economic Development : Phase 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-30

    CTfastrak, a bus rapid transit service connecting four municipalities (Hartford, West Hartford, Newington, and New Britain) in Central Connecticut (CT), received final funding approval in 2011 and opened for service in March 2015. This new service ma...