WorldWideScience

Sample records for conical hypersonic vehicle

  1. Design of Modular, Shape-transitioning Inlets for a Conical Hypersonic Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gollan, Rowan J.; Smart, Michael K.

    2010-01-01

    For a hypersonic vehicle, propelled by scramjet engines, integration of the engines and airframe is highly desirable. Thus, the forward capture shape of the engine inlet should conform to the vehicle body shape. Furthermore, the use of modular engines places a constraint on the shape of the inlet sidewalls. Finally, one may desire a combustor cross- section shape that is different from that of the inlet. These shape constraints for the inlet can be accommodated by employing a streamline-tracing and lofting technique. This design technique was developed by Smart for inlets with a rectangular-to-elliptical shape transition. In this paper, we generalise that technique to produce inlets that conform to arbitrary shape requirements. As an example, we show the design of a body-integrated hypersonic inlet on a winged-cone vehicle, typical of what might be used in a three-stage orbital launch system. The special challenge of inlet design for this conical vehicle at an angle-of-attack is also discussed. That challenge is that the bow shock sits relatively close to the vehicle body.

  2. Experimental results of a Mach 10 conical-flow derived waverider to 14-X hypersonic aerospace vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago Cavalcanti Rolim

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a research in the development of the 14-X hypersonic airspace vehicle at Institute for Advanced Studies (IEAv from Department of Science and Aerospace Technology (DCTA of the Brazilian Air Force (FAB. The 14-X project objective is to develop a higher efficient satellite launch alternative, using a Supersonic Combustion Ramjet (SCRAMJET engine and waverider aerodynamics. For this development, the waverider technology is under investigation in Prof. Henry T. Nagamatsu Aerothermodynamics and Hypersonics Laboratory (LHTN, in IEAv/DCTA. The investigation has been conducted through ground test campaigns in Hypersonic Shock Tunnel T3. The 14-X Waverider Vehicle characteristic was verified in shock tunnel T3 where surface static pressures and pitot pressure for Mach number 10 were measured and, using Schlieren photographs Diagnostic Method, it was possible to identify a leading-edge attached shock wave in 14-X lower surface.

  3. Optimization of Conical Wings in Hypersonic Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triantafillou, S. A.; Schwendeman, D. W.; Cole, J. D.

    A method of calculation is presented to determine conical wing shapes that minimize the coefficient of (wave) drag, CD, for a fixed coefficient of lift, CL, in steady, hypersonic flow. An optimization problem is considered for the compressive flow underneath wings at a small angle of attack δ and at a high free-stream Mach number M∞ so that hypersonic small-disturbance (HSD) theory applies. A figure of merit, F=CD/CL3/2, is computed for each wing using a finite volume discretization of the HSD equations. A set of design variables that determine the shape of the wing is defined and adjusted iteratively to find a shape that minimizes F for a given value of the hypersonic similarity parameter, H= (M∞δ)-2, and planform area. Wings with both attached and detached bow shocks are considered. Optimal wings are found for flat delta wings and for a family of caret wings. In the flat-wing case, the optima have detached bow shocks while in the caret-wing case, the optimum has an attached bow shock. An improved drag-to-lift performance is found using the optimization procedure for curved wing shapes. Several optimal designs are found, all with attached bow shocks. Numerical experiments are performed and suggest that these optima are unique.

  4. X-43 Hypersonic Vehicle Technology Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voland, Randall T.; Huebner, Lawrence D.; McClinton, Charles R.

    2005-01-01

    NASA recently completed two major programs in Hypersonics: Hyper-X, with the record-breaking flights of the X-43A, and the Next Generation Launch Technology (NGLT) Program. The X-43A flights, the culmination of the Hyper-X Program, were the first-ever examples of a scramjet engine propelling a hypersonic vehicle and provided unique, convincing, detailed flight data required to validate the design tools needed for design and development of future operational hypersonic airbreathing vehicles. Concurrent with Hyper-X, NASA's NGLT Program focused on technologies needed for future revolutionary launch vehicles. The NGLT was "competed" by NASA in response to the President s redirection of the agency to space exploration, after making significant progress towards maturing technologies required to enable airbreathing hypersonic launch vehicles. NGLT quantified the benefits, identified technology needs, developed airframe and propulsion technology, chartered a broad University base, and developed detailed plans to mature and validate hypersonic airbreathing technology for space access. NASA is currently in the process of defining plans for a new Hypersonic Technology Program. Details of that plan are not currently available. This paper highlights results from the successful Mach 7 and 10 flights of the X-43A, and the current state of hypersonic technology.

  5. X-43A Hypersonic vehicle technology development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voland, Randall T.; Huebner, Lawrence D.; McClinton, Charles R.

    2006-07-01

    NASA recently completed two major programs in hypersonics: Hyper-X, with the record-breaking flights of the X-43A, and the next generation launch technology (NGLT) program. The X-43A flights, the culmination of the Hyper-X program, were the first-ever examples of a scramjet engine propelling a hypersonic vehicle and provided unique, convincing, detailed flight data required to validate the design tools needed for design and development of future operational hypersonic airbreathing vehicles. Concurrent with Hyper-X, NASA's NGLT program focused on technologies needed for future revolutionary launch vehicles. The NGLT was "competed" by NASA in response to the President's redirection of the agency to space exploration, after making significant progress towards maturing technologies required to enable airbreathing hypersonic launch vehicles. NGLT quantified the benefits, identified technology needs, developed airframe and propulsion technology, chartered a broad University base, and developed detailed plans to mature and validate hypersonic airbreathing technology for space access. NASA is currently in the process of defining plans for a new hypersonic technology program. Details of that plan are not currently available. This paper highlights results from the successful Mach 7 and 10 flights of the X-43A, and the current state of hypersonic technology.

  6. Development of the hypersonic flight experimental vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, Hiroki; Kobayasi, Minoru; Yamazaki, Isao; Shirouzu, Masao; Yamamoto, Masataka

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes the development of the Hypersonic Flight Experimental Vehicle, Hyflex, the first Japanese hypersonic lifting vehicle as the precursor engineering demonstrator of the H-II Orbiting Plane (HOPE). The flight experiment was successfully conducted on February 12 1996 by the brand-new NASDA small launcher, the J-I Launch Vehicle. The project purpose, progress, experiment flight plan / result and the vehicle system feature are summarized. Onboard measurement such as pressure, temperature and other sensor is described with typical flight results. Some detailed development progress of Aerodynamics, Aerothermodynamics, Thermal Protection and Flight Control are also discussed.

  7. Airbreathing Hypersonic Technology Vision Vehicles and Development Dreams

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClinton, C. R.; Hunt, J. L.; Ricketts, R. H.; Reukauf, P.; Peddie, C. L.

    1999-01-01

    Significant advancements in hypersonic airbreathing vehicle technology have been made in the country's research centers and industry over the past 40 years. Some of that technology is being validated with the X-43 flight tests. This paper presents an overview of hypersonic airbreathing technology status within the US, and a hypersonic technology development plan. This plan builds on the nation's large investment in hypersonics. This affordable, incremental plan focuses technology development on hypersonic systems, which could be operating by the 2020's.

  8. Uncertainty Propagation in Hypersonic Vehicle Aerothermoelastic Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamorte, Nicolas Etienne

    Hypersonic vehicles face a challenging flight environment. The aerothermoelastic analysis of its components requires numerous simplifying approximations. Identifying and quantifying the effect of uncertainties pushes the limits of the existing deterministic models, and is pursued in this work. An uncertainty quantification framework is used to propagate the effects of identified uncertainties on the stability margins and performance of the different systems considered. First, the aeroelastic stability of a typical section representative of a control surface on a hypersonic vehicle is examined. Variability in the uncoupled natural frequencies of the system is modeled to mimic the effect of aerodynamic heating. Next, the stability of an aerodynamically heated panel representing a component of the skin of a generic hypersonic vehicle is considered. Uncertainty in the location of transition from laminar to turbulent flow and the heat flux prediction is quantified using CFD. In both cases significant reductions of the stability margins are observed. A loosely coupled airframe--integrated scramjet engine is considered next. The elongated body and cowl of the engine flow path are subject to harsh aerothermodynamic loading which causes it to deform. Uncertainty associated with deformation prediction is propagated to the engine performance analysis. The cowl deformation is the main contributor to the sensitivity of the propulsion system performance. Finally, a framework for aerothermoelastic stability boundary calculation for hypersonic vehicles using CFD is developed. The usage of CFD enables one to consider different turbulence conditions, laminar or turbulent, and different models of the air mixture, in particular real gas model which accounts for dissociation of molecules at high temperature. The system is found to be sensitive to turbulence modeling as well as the location of the transition from laminar to turbulent flow. Real gas effects play a minor role in the

  9. Analysis of Hypersonic Vehicle Wakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-17

    research . The data is being included for the sake of completion. Figure 93 and Figure 94 depict the concentration of Diatomic Oxygen on the surface...reactions occurring in the wake region will enable an advancement of tracking hypersonic bodies. This research examined the wake region behind a...Acknowledgments I would like to express my sincere appreciation to my research advisor, Dr. Robert Greendyke, for his guidance and support throughout

  10. Hypersonic drone vehicle design: A multidisciplinary experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    UCLA's Advanced Aeronautic Design group focussed their efforts on design problems of an unmanned hypersonic vehicle. It is felt that a scaled hypersonic drone is necesary to bridge the gap between present theory on hypersonics and the future reality of the National Aerospace Plane (NASP) for two reasons: (1) to fulfill a need for experimental data in the hypersonic regime, and (2) to provide a testbed for the scramjet engine which is to be the primary mode of propulsion for the NASP. The group concentrated on three areas of great concern to NASP design: propulsion, thermal management, and flight systems. Problem solving in these areas was directed toward design of the drone with the idea that the same design techniques could be applied to the NASP. A 70 deg swept double-delta wing configuration, developed in the 70's at the NASA Langley, was chosen as the aerodynamic and geometric model for the drone. This vehicle would be air launched from a B-1 at Mach 0.8 and 48,000 feet, rocket boosted by two internal engines to Mach 10 and 100,000 feet, and allowed to cruise under power of the scramjet engine until burnout. It would then return to base for an unpowered landing. Preliminary energy calculations based on flight requirements give the drone a gross launch weight of 134,000 pounds and an overall length of 85 feet.

  11. Hypersonic Vehicle Propulsion System Control Model Development Roadmap and Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stueber, Thomas J.; Le, Dzu K.; Vrnak, Daniel R.

    2009-01-01

    The NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program Hypersonic project is directed towards fundamental research for two classes of hypersonic vehicles: highly reliable reusable launch systems (HRRLS) and high-mass Mars entry systems (HMMES). The objective of the hypersonic guidance, navigation, and control (GN&C) discipline team is to develop advanced guidance and control algorithms to enable efficient and effective operation of these challenging vehicles. The ongoing work at the NASA Glenn Research Center supports the hypersonic GN&C effort in developing tools to aid the design of advanced control algorithms that specifically address the propulsion system of the HRRLSclass vehicles. These tools are being developed in conjunction with complementary research and development activities in hypersonic propulsion at Glenn and elsewhere. This report is focused on obtaining control-relevant dynamic models of an HRRLS-type hypersonic vehicle propulsion system.

  12. Hypersonic Vehicle Propulsion System Simplified Model Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stueber, Thomas J.; Raitano, Paul; Le, Dzu K.; Ouzts, Peter

    2007-01-01

    This document addresses the modeling task plan for the hypersonic GN&C GRC team members. The overall propulsion system modeling task plan is a multi-step process and the task plan identified in this document addresses the first steps (short term modeling goals). The procedures and tools produced from this effort will be useful for creating simplified dynamic models applicable to a hypersonic vehicle propulsion system. The document continues with the GRC short term modeling goal. Next, a general description of the desired simplified model is presented along with simulations that are available to varying degrees. The simulations may be available in electronic form (FORTRAN, CFD, MatLab,...) or in paper form in published documents. Finally, roadmaps outlining possible avenues towards realizing simplified model are presented.

  13. Current Hypersonic and Space Vehicle Flight Test and Instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-22

    System AFRL and DARPA have teamed up to manage two different hypersonic propulsion technology development programs; Tactical Boost Glide (TBG) and...412TW-PA-15264 CURRENT HYPERSONIC AND SPACE VEHICLE FLIGHT TEST AND INSTRUMENTATION John J. Spravka* and Timothy R. Jorris† AIR FORCE TEST...DATES COVERED (From - To) 22 – 26 July 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Current Hypersonic and Space Vehicle Flight Test and Instrumentation

  14. Conceptual Study on Hypersonic Turbojet Experimental Vehicle (HYTEX)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguchi, Hideyuki; Murakami, Akira; Sato, Tetsuya; Tsuchiya, Takeshi

    Pre-cooled turbojet engines have been investigated aiming at realization of reusable space transportation systems and hypersonic airplanes. Evaluation methods of these engine performances have been established based on ground tests. There are some plans on the demonstration of hypersonic propulsion systems. JAXA focused on hypersonic propulsion systems as a key technology of hypersonic transport airplane. Demonstrations of Mach 5 class hypersonic technologies are stated as a development target at 2025 in the long term vision. In this study, systems analyses of hypersonic turbojet experiment (HYTEX) with Mach 5 flight capability is performed. Aerodynamic coefficients are obtained by CFD analyses and wind tunnel tests. Small Pre-cooled turbojet is fabricated and tested using liquid hydrogen as fuel. As a result, characteristics of the baseline vehicle shape is clarified, . and effects of pre-cooling are confirmed at the firing test.

  15. Flight testing vehicles for verification and validation of hypersonics technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacher, Peter W.

    1995-03-01

    Hypersonics technology has obtained renewed interest since various concepts for future completely reusable Space Transportation Systems (STS) using airbreathing propulsion for the parts of atmospheric flight have been proposed in different countries (e.g. US, CIS, Japan, France, Germany, and UK). To cover major developments in those countries, AGARD FDP has formed the Working Group 18 on 'Hypersonic Experimental and Computational Capabilities - Improvement and Validation'. Of major importance for the proof of feasibility for all these concepts is the definition of an overall convincing philosophy for a 'hypersonics technology development and verification concept' using ground simulation facilities (both experimental and numerical) and flight testing vehicles. Flying at hypersonic Mach numbers using airbreathing propulsion requires highly sophisticated design tools to provide reliable prediction of thrust minus aerodynamic drag to accelerate the vehicle during ascent. Using these design tools, existing uncertainties have to be minimized by a carefully performed code validation process. To a large degree the database required for this validation cannot be obtained on ground. In addition thermal loads due to hypersonic flow have to be predicted accurately by aerothermodynamic flow codes to provide the inputs needed to decide on materials and structures. Heat management for hypersonic flight vehicles is one of the key-issues for any kind of successful flight demonstration. This paper identifies and discusses the role of flight testing during the verification and validation process of advanced hypersonic technology needed for flight in the atmosphere with hypersonic Mach numbers using airbreathing propulsion systems both for weapons and space transportation systems.

  16. Seal Technology for Hypersonic Vehicle and Propulsion: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinetz, Bruce M.

    2008-01-01

    Hypersonic vehicles and propulsion systems pose an extraordinary challenge for structures and materials. Airframes and engines require lightweight, high-temperature materials and structural configurations that can withstand the extreme environment of hypersonic flight. Some of the challenges posed include very high temperatures, heating of the whole vehicle, steady-state and transient localized heating from shock waves, high aerodynamic loads, high fluctuating pressure loads, potential for severe flutter, vibration, and acoustic loads and erosion. Correspondingly high temperature seals are required to meet these aggressive requirements. This presentation reviews relevant seal technology for both heritage (e.g. Space Shuttle, X-15, and X-38) vehicles and presents several seal case studies aimed at providing lessons learned for future hypersonic vehicle seal development. This presentation also reviews seal technology developed for the National Aerospace Plane propulsion systems and presents several seal case studies aimed at providing lessons learned for future hypersonic propulsion seal development.

  17. Advanced Control System Design for Hypersonic Vehicles Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Guidance and control system design for hypersonic vehicles is more challenging than their subsonic and supersonic counterparts. Some of these challenges are (i)...

  18. A review of design issues specific to hypersonic flight vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sziroczak, D.; Smith, H.

    2016-07-01

    This paper provides an overview of the current technical issues and challenges associated with the design of hypersonic vehicles. Two distinct classes of vehicles are reviewed; Hypersonic Transports and Space Launchers, their common features and differences are examined. After a brief historical overview, the paper takes a multi-disciplinary approach to these vehicles, discusses various design aspects, and technical challenges. Operational issues are explored, including mission profiles, current and predicted markets, in addition to environmental effects and human factors. Technological issues are also reviewed, focusing on the three major challenge areas associated with these vehicles: aerothermodynamics, propulsion, and structures. In addition, matters of reliability and maintainability are also presented. The paper also reviews the certification and flight testing of these vehicles from a global perspective. Finally the current stakeholders in the field of hypersonic flight are presented, summarizing the active programs and promising concepts.

  19. Hyper-X: Foundation for future hypersonic launch vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClinton, Charles R.; Rausch, Vincent L.; Shaw, Robert J.; Metha, Unmeel; Naftel, Chris

    2005-07-01

    The successful Mach-7 flight test of the Hyper-X/X-43A research vehicle has provided a major, essential demonstration of the capability of the airframe-integrated scramjet engine and hypersonic airbreathing vehicle design tools and vision vehicles. This flight was a crucial step toward establishing air-breathing hypersonic propulsion for application to space-launch vehicles and other hypersonic systems. This paper examines the significance of the flight test in advancing the state-of-the science and provides a strategic vision for achieving the dream for safe, efficient and reliable space access with air-breathing propulsion in the near future, through use of more near term approaches.

  20. Robust Switching Control for Hypersonic Vehicles Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Flight in the hypersonic regime is critical to NASA's goals because access to earth orbit and re-entry from orbit to earth or to other planets with atmospheres...

  1. Computational Sensitivity Analysis for the Aerodynamic Design of Supersonic and Hypersonic Air Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-18

    surfaces. These features differentiate the GHV from previous coarse hypersonic vehicle models where the integration of the propulsion system and...A TRIDENT SCHOLAR PROJECT REPORT NO. 442 Computational Sensitivity Analysis for the Aerodynamic Design of Supersonic and Hypersonic Air...Scholar project report; no. 442 (2015) Computational Sensitivity Analysis for the Aerodynamic Design of Supersonic and Hypersonic Air Vehicles by

  2. Conceptual Design and Numerical Simulations of Hypersonic Waverider Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, D. Y.; Zhang, J. B.; Lee, C. H.

    A modularized airframe/propulsion integrated model is established by oblique shock wave theory, engineering method and method of characteristics(MOC). Based on this method, a new design methodology for hypersonic waverider vehicle which integrated scramjets with waverider airframe derived from cone-wedge flow field is presented. Integrated aero-propulsion performance of the waverider vehicle under on-design and off-design conditions is predicted using Euler equations discretized by Harten-Yee non-MUSCL TVD scheme and the combustor flow field is approximated by a quasi-ID cycle analysis, skin friction of vehicle is calculated by reference temperature method.

  3. The Integrated Computational Environment for Airbreathing Hypersonic Flight Vehicle Modeling and Design Evaluation Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — An integrated computational environment for multidisciplinary, physics-based simulation and analyses of airbreathing hypersonic flight vehicles will be developed....

  4. Aerodynamics of Hypersonic Lifting Vehicles: Fluid Dynamics Panel AGARD Symposium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdonoff, S. M.; Hornung, H.; Whitehead, R. E.

    1988-04-01

    This report reviews and evaluates the Fluid Dynamics Panel AGARD Symposium entitled, Aerodynamics of Hypersonic Lifting Vehicles, held 6 to 9 June 1987 in Bristol, UK. The purpose of the Symposium was to assess the technology status in the field of hypersonics after a comparative lull in the past decade. The author addresses each of the papers separately and makes general comments on the 5 major topic sessions. The limitations of test facilities for experimental studies at high Mach numbers were clearly evident. New developments in computational fluid dynamics provide possibilities that did not exist in the past. The reviewer stressed the areas that need special emphasis in the future. The papers presented at the Symposium are published in AGARD Conference Proceedings CP-429 and are listed in an Appendix to this report.

  5. Heat loads in hypersonic vehicle design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirschel, E.H. [Daimler-Benz Aerospace AG, Muenchen (Germany)

    1999-12-01

    Heat loads are the major issue in high-speed vehicle design. Heat loads prediction capabilities need to be improved with regard to the materials and structure concept, and the aerodynamic and propulsion performance. Surface radiation cooling is the basic means to reduce heat loads on high-speed vehicles. Strong couplings can exist with the aerodynamic performance of vehicles, the structure and materials design, and flow-physics and thermochemical phenomena. Qualitative knowledge is available to interpret (computation) results and flight data, and to give the designer insight into related disciplinary and interdisciplinary vehicle design problems. Flow-physics and thermo-chemical models in prediction tools are inadequate. Heat loads and the related surface-temperature effects pose very important and challenging research and development problems. (orig.)

  6. Airframe Research and Technology for Hypersonic Airbreathing Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, David E.; Merski, N. Ronald; Glass, Christopher E.

    2002-01-01

    The Hypersonics Investment Area (HIA) within NASA's Advanced Space Transportation Program (ASTP) has the responsibility to develop hypersonic airbreathing vehicles for access to space. The Airframe Research and Technology (AR and T) Project, as one of six projects in the HIA, will push the state-of-the-art in airframe and vehicle systems for low-cost, reliable, and safe space transportation. The individual technologies within the project are focused on advanced, breakthrough technologies in airframe and vehicle systems and cross-cutting activities that are the basis for improvements in these disciplines. Both low and medium technology readiness level (TRL) activities are being pursued. The key technical areas that will be addressed by the project include analysis and design tools, integrated vehicle health management (IVHM), composite (polymer, metal, and ceramic matrix) materials development, thermal/structural wall concepts, thermal protection systems, seals, leading edges, aerothermodynamics, and airframe/propulsion flowpath technology. Each of the technical areas or sub-projects within the Airframe R and T Project is described in this paper.

  7. Flight Dynamics and Control of Elastic Hypersonic Vehicles Uncertainty Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavez, Frank R.; Schmidt, David K.

    1994-01-01

    It has been shown previously that hypersonic air-breathing aircraft exhibit strong aeroelastic/aeropropulsive dynamic interactions. To investigate these, especially from the perspective of the vehicle dynamics and control, analytical expressions for key stability derivatives were derived, and an analysis of the dynamics was performed. In this paper, the important issue of model uncertainty, and the appropriate forms for representing this uncertainty, is addressed. It is shown that the methods suggested in the literature for analyzing the robustness of multivariable feedback systems, which as a prerequisite to their application assume particular forms of model uncertainty, can be difficult to apply on real atmospheric flight vehicles. Also, the extent to which available methods are conservative is demonstrated for this class of vehicle dynamics.

  8. Modeling and Analysis of an Air-Breathing Flexible Hypersonic Vehicle

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Xi-bin; Zong, Qun

    2014-01-01

    By using light-weighted material in hypersonic vehicle, the vehicle body can be easily deformed. The mutual couplings in aerodynamics, flexible structure, and propulsion system will bring great challenges for vehicle modeling. In this work, engineering estimated method is used to calculate the aerodynamic forces, moments, and flexible modes to get the physics-based model of an air-breathing flexible hypersonic vehicle. The model, which contains flexible effects and viscous effects, can captur...

  9. Employment of hypersonic glide vehicles: Proposed criteria for use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olguin, Abel [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Hypersonic Glide Vehicles (HGVs) are a type of reentry vehicle that couples the high speed of ballistic missiles with the maneuverability of aircraft. The HGV has been in development since the 1970s, and its technology falls under the category of Conventional Prompt Global Strike (CPGS) weapons. As noted by James M. Acton, a senior associate in the Nuclear Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment, CPGS is a “missile in search of a mission.” With the introduction of any significant new military capability, a doctrine for use—including specifics regarding how, when and where it would be used, as well as tactics, training and procedures—must be clearly defined and understood by policy makers, military commanders, and planners. In this paper, benefits and limitations of the HGV are presented. Proposed criteria and four scenarios illustrate a possible method for assessing when to use an HGV.

  10. Airframe-integrated propulsion system for hypersonic cruise vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, R. A.; Huber, P. W.

    1978-01-01

    The paper describes a new hydrogen-burning airframe-integrated scramjet concept which offers good potential for efficient hypersonic cruise vehicles. The characteristics of the engine which assure good performance are extensive engine-airframe integration, fixed geometry, low cooling, and control of heat release in the supersonic combustor by mixed modes of fuel injection from the combustor entrance. The present paper describes the concept and presents results from inlet tests, direct-connect combustor tests, and tests of two subscale boiler-plate research engines currently underway under conditions which simulate flight at Mach 4 and 7. It is concluded that this engine concept has the potential for high thrust and efficiency, low drag and weight, low cooling requirement, and application to a wide range of vehicle sizes.

  11. Design tradeoffs on engine-integrated hypersonic vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Mary Kae L.; Lewis, Mark J.

    1992-01-01

    Two classes of airbreathing hypersonic vehicle concepts, one for primarily cruise missions and the other for accelerator type missions, are presented. Both are designed with waverider airframes and hydrogen-fueled scramjet engine modules. Cruise configurations are optimized for the product of I(sp) and L/D while matching lift to weight and thrust to drag at some equivalence ratio. Accelerator configurations are optimized for effective specific impulse while matching lift to weight at an equivalence ratio of one. The method and computer code developed to optimize the configurations are discussed. The features and design tradeoffs for each class of vehicles are described. Recently available weight estimates for all-body waveriders have had a significant impact on the integrated configurations. Mach 8 vehicles at 40 km altitude optimized with the cruise objective function have L/Ds of 2.55 to 2.92 and I(sp)s of 2850 to 2940 sec. A Mach 14 vehicle at 40-km altitude optimized with the accelerator objective function has an I(sp) sub eff of 189 sec, and a Mach 10 vehicle an I(sp) sub eff of 880 sec.

  12. Experimental Investigation of Brazilian 14-X B Hypersonic Scramjet Aerospace Vehicle

    OpenAIRE

    de Araujo Martos, João Felipe; da Silveira Rêgo, Israel; Pachon Laiton, Sergio Nicholas; Lima, Bruno Coelho; Costa, Felipe Jean; de Paula Toro, Paulo Gilberto

    2017-01-01

    The Brazilian hypersonic scramjet aerospace vehicle 14-X B is a technological demonstrator of a hypersonic airbreathing propulsion system based on the supersonic combustion (scramjet) to be tested in flight into the Earth’s atmosphere at an altitude of 30 km and Mach number 7. The 14-X B has been designed at the Prof. Henry T. Nagamatsu Laboratory of Aerothermodynamics and Hypersonics, Institute for Advanced Studies (IEAv), Brazil. The IEAv T3 Hypersonic Shock Tunnel is a ground-test facility...

  13. Heat Transfer Analysis of Thermal Protection Structures for Hypersonic Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chen; Wang, Zhijin; Hou, Tianjiao

    2017-11-01

    This research aims to develop an analytical approach to study the heat transfer problem of thermal protection systems (TPS) for hypersonic vehicles. Laplace transform and integral method are used to describe the temperature distribution through the TPS subject to aerodynamic heating during flight. Time-dependent incident heat flux is also taken into account. Two different cases with heat flux and radiation boundary conditions are studied and discussed. The results are compared with those obtained by finite element analyses and show a good agreement. Although temperature profiles of such problems can be readily accessed via numerical simulations, analytical solutions give a greater insight into the physical essence of the heat transfer problem. Furthermore, with the analytical approach, rapid thermal analyses and even thermal optimization can be achieved during the preliminary TPS design.

  14. SINS/CNS Nonlinear Integrated Navigation Algorithm for Hypersonic Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-jun Yu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Celestial Navigation System (CNS has characteristics of accurate orientation and strong autonomy and has been widely used in Hypersonic Vehicle. Since the CNS location and orientation mainly depend upon the inertial reference that contains errors caused by gyro drifts and other error factors, traditional Strap-down Inertial Navigation System (SINS/CNS positioning algorithm setting the position error between SINS and CNS as measurement is not effective. The model of altitude azimuth, platform error angles, and horizontal position is designed, and the SINS/CNS tightly integrated algorithm is designed, in which CNS altitude azimuth is set as measurement information. GPF (Gaussian particle filter is introduced to solve the problem of nonlinear filtering. The results of simulation show that the precision of SINS/CNS algorithm which reaches 130 m using three stars is improved effectively.

  15. Dynamic interactions between hypersonic vehicle aerodynamics and propulsion system performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flandro, G. A.; Roach, R. L.; Buschek, H.

    1992-01-01

    Described here is the development of a flexible simulation model for scramjet hypersonic propulsion systems. The primary goal is determination of sensitivity of the thrust vector and other system parameters to angle of attack changes of the vehicle. Such information is crucial in design and analysis of control system performance for hypersonic vehicles. The code is also intended to be a key element in carrying out dynamic interaction studies involving the influence of vehicle vibrations on propulsion system/control system coupling and flight stability. Simple models are employed to represent the various processes comprising the propulsion system. A method of characteristics (MOC) approach is used to solve the forebody and external nozzle flow fields. This results in a very fast computational algorithm capable of carrying out the vast number of simulation computations needed in guidance, stability, and control studies. The three-dimensional fore- and aft body (nozzle) geometry is characterized by the centerline profiles as represented by a series of coordinate points and body cross-section curvature. The engine module geometry is represented by an adjustable vertical grid to accommodate variations of the field parameters throughout the inlet and combustor. The scramjet inlet is modeled as a two-dimensional supersonic flow containing adjustable sidewall wedges and multiple fuel injection struts. The inlet geometry including the sidewall wedge angles, the number of injection struts, their sweepback relative to the vehicle reference line, and strut cross-section are user selectable. Combustion is currently represented by a Rayleigh line calculation including corrections for variable gas properties; improved models are being developed for this important element of the propulsion flow field. The program generates (1) variation of thrust magnitude and direction with angle of attack, (2) pitching moment and line of action of the thrust vector, (3) pressure and temperature

  16. Modified shuffled frog leaping algorithm optimized control for air-breathing hypersonic flight vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingbing Liang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This article addresses the flight control problem of air-breathing hypersonic vehicles and proposes a novel intelligent algorithm optimized control method. To achieve the climbing, cruising and descending flight control of the air-breathing hypersonic vehicle, an engineering-oriented flight control system based on a Proportional Integral Derivative (PID method is designed for the hypersonic vehicle, which including the height loop, the pitch angle loop and the velocity loop. Moreover, as a variant of nature-inspired algorithm, modified shuffled frog leaping algorithm is presented to optimize the flight control parameters and is characterized by better exploration and exploitation than the standard shuffled frog leaping algorithm. A nonlinear model of air-breathing hypersonic vehicle is used to verify the dynamic characteristics achieved by the intelligent flight control system. Simulation results demonstrate that the proposed swarm intelligence optimized PID controllers are effective in achieving better flight trajectory and velocity control performance than the traditional controllers.

  17. A hypersonic research vehicle to develop scramjet engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregorek, G. M.; Reuss, R. L.

    1990-01-01

    Four student design teams produced conceptual designs for a research vehicle to develop the supersonic combustion ramjet (scramjet) engines necessary for efficient hypersonic flight. This research aircraft would provide flight test data for prototype scramjets that is not available in groundbased test facilities. The design specifications call for a research aircraft to be launched from a carrier aircraft at 40,000 feet and a Mach number of 0.8. The aircraft must accelerate to Mach 6 while climbing to a 100,000 foot altitude and then ignite the experimental scramjet engines for acceleration to Mach 10. The research vehicle must then be recovered for another flight. The students responded with four different designs, two piloted waverider configurations, and two unmanned vehicles, one with a blended body-wing configuration, the other with a delta wing shape. All aircraft made use of an engine database provided by the General Electric Aircraft Engine Group; both turbofan ramjet and scramjet engine performance using liquid hydrogen fuel was available. Explained here are the students' conceptual designs and the aerodynamic and propulsion concepts that made their designs feasible.

  18. Exergy Methods for the Generic Analysis and Optimization of Hypersonic Vehicle Concepts

    OpenAIRE

    Markell, Kyle Charles

    2005-01-01

    This thesis work presents detailed results of the application of exergy-based methods to highly dynamic, integrated aerospace systems such as hypersonic vehicle concepts. In particular, an exergy-based methodology is compared to a more traditional based measure by applying both to the synthesis/design and operational optimization of a hypersonic vehicle configuration comprised of an airframe sub-system and a propulsion sub-system consisting of inlet, combustor, and nozzle components. A numbe...

  19. Exergy Methods for the Mission-Level Analysis and Optimization of Generic Hypersonic Vehicles

    OpenAIRE

    Brewer, Keith Merritt

    2006-01-01

    Though the field of hypersonic vehicle design is thriving again, few studies to date demonstrate the technology through a mission in which multiple flight conditions and constraints are encountered. This is likely due to the highly integrated and sensitive nature of hypersonic vehicle components. Consequently, a formal Mach 6 through Mach 10 flight envelope is explored which includes cruise, acceleration/climb, deceleration/descend and turn mission segments. An exergy approach to the vehic...

  20. Survey of Aerothermodynamics Facilities Useful for the Design of Hypersonic Vehicles Using Air-Breathing Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, James O.; Deiwert, George S.

    1997-01-01

    This paper surveys the use of aerothermodynamic facilities which have been useful in the study of external flows and propulsion aspects of hypersonic, air-breathing vehicles. While the paper is not a survey of all facilities, it covers the utility of shock tunnels and conventional hypersonic blow-down facilities which have been used for hypersonic air-breather studies. The problems confronting researchers in the field of aerothermodynamics are outlined. Results from the T5 GALCIT tunnel for the shock-on lip problem are outlined. Experiments on combustors and short expansion nozzles using the semi-free jet method have been conducted in large shock tunnels. An example which employed the NASA Ames 16-Inch shock tunnel is outlined, and the philosophy of the test technique is described. Conventional blow-down hypersonic wind tunnels are quite useful in hypersonic air-breathing studies. Results from an expansion ramp experiment, simulating the nozzle on a hypersonic air-breather from the NASA Ames 3.5 Foot Hypersonic wind tunnel are summarized. Similar work on expansion nozzles conducted in the NASA Langley hypersonic wind tunnel complex is cited. Free-jet air-frame propulsion integration and configuration stability experiments conducted at Langley in the hypersonic wind tunnel complex on a small generic model are also summarized.

  1. Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) Thermal Protection Systems (TPS) and Hot Structures for Hypersonic Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, David E.

    2008-01-01

    Thermal protection systems (TPS) and hot structures are required for a range of hypersonic vehicles ranging from ballistic reentry to hypersonic cruise vehicles, both within Earth's atmosphere and non-Earth atmospheres. The focus of this paper is on air breathing hypersonic vehicles in the Earth's atmosphere. This includes single-stage to orbit (SSTO), two-stage to orbit (TSTO) accelerators, access to space vehicles, and hypersonic cruise vehicles. This paper will start out with a brief discussion of aerodynamic heating and thermal management techniques to address the high heating, followed by an overview of TPS for rocket-launched and air-breathing vehicles. The argument is presented that as we move from rocket-based vehicles to air-breathing vehicles, we need to move away from the insulated airplane approach used on the Space Shuttle Orbiter to a wide range of TPS and hot structure approaches. The primary portion of the paper will discuss issues and design options for CMC TPS and hot structure components, including leading edges, acreage TPS, and control surfaces. The current state-of-the-art will be briefly discussed for some of the components. The two primary technical challenges impacting the use of CMC TPS and hot structures for hypersonic vehicles are environmental durability and fabrication, and will be discussed briefly.

  2. Modeling and Analysis of an Air-Breathing Flexible Hypersonic Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi-bin Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available By using light-weighted material in hypersonic vehicle, the vehicle body can be easily deformed. The mutual couplings in aerodynamics, flexible structure, and propulsion system will bring great challenges for vehicle modeling. In this work, engineering estimated method is used to calculate the aerodynamic forces, moments, and flexible modes to get the physics-based model of an air-breathing flexible hypersonic vehicle. The model, which contains flexible effects and viscous effects, can capture the physical characteristics of high-speed flight. To overcome the analytical intractability of the model, a simplified control-oriented model of the hypersonic vehicle is presented with curve fitting approximations. The control-oriented model can not only reduce the complexity of the model, but also retain aero-flexible structure-propulsion interactions of the physics-based model and can be applied for nonlinear control.

  3. Experimental Investigation of Brazilian 14-X B Hypersonic Scramjet Aerospace Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Felipe de Araujo Martos

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The Brazilian hypersonic scramjet aerospace vehicle 14-X B is a technological demonstrator of a hypersonic airbreathing propulsion system based on the supersonic combustion (scramjet to be tested in flight into the Earth’s atmosphere at an altitude of 30 km and Mach number 7. The 14-X B has been designed at the Prof. Henry T. Nagamatsu Laboratory of Aerothermodynamics and Hypersonics, Institute for Advanced Studies (IEAv, Brazil. The IEAv T3 Hypersonic Shock Tunnel is a ground-test facility able to produce high Mach number and high enthalpy flows in the test section close to those encountered during the flight of the 14-X B into the Earth’s atmosphere at hypersonic flight speeds. A 1 m long stainless steel 14-X B model was experimentally investigated at T3 Hypersonic Shock Tunnel, for freestream Mach numbers ranging from 7 to 8. Static pressure measurements along the lower surface of the 14-X B, as well as high-speed Schlieren photographs taken from the 5.5° leading edge and the 14.5° deflection compression ramp, provided experimental data. Experimental data was compared to the analytical theoretical solutions and the computational fluid dynamics (CFD simulations, showing good qualitative agreement and in consequence demonstrating the importance of these methods in the project of the 14-X B hypersonic scramjet aerospace vehicle.

  4. DNS Studies of Transitional Hypersonic Reacting Flows Over 3-D Hypersonic Vehicles

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhong, Xiaolin

    2003-01-01

    The objectives of this research project are to develop CFD techniques and to conduct DNS studies of fundamental flow physics leading to boundary-layer instability and transition in hypersonic flows...

  5. Flight Path Angle Dynamics of Air-Breathing Hypersonic Vehicles

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bolender, Michael A; Doman, David B

    2005-01-01

    .... This is not the case, however, with air-breathing hypersonic aircraft. This class of aircraft is characterized by unstable longitudinal dynamics, strong loop interactions, and the presence of non-minimum phase transmission zeros...

  6. Multifunctional Aerogel Thermal Protection Systems for Hypersonic Vehicles Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The push to hypersonic flight regimes requires novel materials that are lightweight as well as thermally and structurally efficient for airframes and thermal...

  7. The Multiobjective Trajectory Optimization for Hypersonic Glide Vehicle Based on Normal Boundary Intersection Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengnan Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To solve the multiobjective optimization problem on hypersonic glider vehicle trajectory design subjected to complex constraints, this paper proposes a multiobjective trajectory optimization method that combines the boundary intersection method and pseudospectral method. The multiobjective trajectory optimization problem (MTOP is established based on the analysis of the feature of hypersonic glider vehicle trajectory. The MTOP is translated into a set of general optimization subproblems by using the boundary intersection method and pseudospectral method. The subproblems are solved by nonlinear programming algorithm. In this method, the solution that has been solved is employed as the initial guess for the next subproblem so that the time consumption of the entire multiobjective trajectory optimization problem shortens. The maximal range and minimal peak heat problem is solved by the proposed method. The numerical results demonstrate that the proposed method can obtain the Pareto front of the optimal trajectory, which can provide the reference for the trajectory design of hypersonic glider vehicle.

  8. Design of hypersonic flight vehicles: some lessons from the past and future challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschel, E. H.; Weiland, C.

    2011-09-01

    Design challenges of four basic hypersonic flight vehicle classes are discussed: non-winged (capsules) and winged re-entry vehicles, airbreathing cruise/acceleration and ascent/re-entry vehicles. Basically flight in the Earth atmosphere is considered, no systematic review is given, propulsion systems are not considered. Three topics are treated in detail: (1) The concept of the thermal state of the vehicle surface, which encompasses both thermal surface effects and thermal loads. Thermal surface effects are important especially for hypersonic airbreathing flight vehicles. (2) The aerodynamic performance ( L/ D) of non-winged and winged re-entry vehicles as important mission parameter. It is sketched, how the shapes of the vehicles evolved and how L/ D increases were accomplished. (3) Air-vehicle engineering issues of large airbreathing hypersonic vehicles. High design sensitivities and small payload fractions of such vehicles make necessary new development and test approaches, with numerical multidisciplinary simulation and optimization as well as experimental vehicles playing a deciding role.

  9. The Role of Guidance, Navigation, and Control in Hypersonic Vehicle Multidisciplinary Design and Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouzts, Peter J.; Soloway, Donald I.; Moerder, Daniel D.; Wolpert, David H.; Benavides, Jose Victor

    2009-01-01

    Airbreathing hypersonic systems offer distinct performance advantages over rocket-based systems for space access vehicles. However, these performance advantages are dependent upon advances in current state-of-the-art technologies in many areas such as ram/scramjet propulsion integration, high temperature materials, aero-elastic structures, thermal protection systems, transition to hypersonics and hypersonic control elements within the framework of complex physics and new design methods. The complex interactions between elements of an airbreathing hypersonic vehicle represent a new paradigm in vehicle design to achieve the optimal performance necessary to meet space access mission objectives. In the past, guidance, navigation, and control (GNC) analysis often follows completion of the vehicle conceptual design process. Individual component groups design subsystems which are then integrated into a vehicle configuration. GNC is presented the task of developing control approaches to meet vehicle performance objectives given that configuration. This approach may be sufficient for vehicles where significant performance margins exist. However, for higher performance vehicles engaging the GNC discipline too late in the design cycle has been costly. For example, the X-29 experimental flight vehicle was built as a technology demonstrator. One of the many technologies to be demonstrated was the use of light-weight material composites for structural components. The use of light-weight materials increased the flexibility of the X- 29 beyond that of conventional metal alloy constructed aircraft. This effect was not considered when the vehicle control system was designed and built. The impact of this is that the control system did not have enough control authority to compensate for the effects of the first fundamental structural mode of the vehicle. As a result, the resulting pitch rate response of the vehicle was below specification and no post-design changes could recover the

  10. Heat pipe and surface mass transfer cooling of hypersonic vehicle structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colwell, Gene T.; Modlin, James M.

    1992-01-01

    The problem of determining the feasibility of cooling hypersonic vehicle leading-edge structures exposed to severe aerodynamic surface heating using heat pipe and mass transfer cooling techniques is addressed. A description is presented of a numerical finite-difference-based hypersonic leading-edge cooling model incorporating poststartup liquid metal heat pipe cooling with surface transpiration and film cooling to predict the transient structural temperature distributions and maximum surface temperatures of hypersonic vehicle leading edge. An application of this model to the transient cooling of a typical aerospace plane wing leading-edge section. The results of this application indicated that liquid metal heat pipe cooling alone is insufficient to maintain surface temperatures below an assumed maximum level of 1800 K for about one-third of a typical aerospace plane ascent trajectory through the earth's atmosphere.

  11. Detailed modeling of electron emission for transpiration cooling of hypersonic vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanquist, Kyle M.; Hara, Kentaro; Boyd, Iain D.

    2017-02-01

    Electron transpiration cooling (ETC) is a recently proposed approach to manage the high heating loads experienced at the sharp leading edges of hypersonic vehicles. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) can be used to investigate the feasibility of ETC in a hypersonic environment. A modeling approach is presented for ETC, which includes developing the boundary conditions for electron emission from the surface, accounting for the space-charge limit effects of the near-wall plasma sheath. The space-charge limit models are assessed using 1D direct-kinetic plasma sheath simulations, taking into account the thermionically emitted electrons from the surface. The simulations agree well with the space-charge limit theory proposed by Takamura et al. for emitted electrons with a finite temperature, especially at low values of wall bias, which validates the use of the theoretical model for the hypersonic CFD code. The CFD code with the analytical sheath models is then used for a test case typical of a leading edge radius in a hypersonic flight environment. The CFD results show that ETC can lower the surface temperature of sharp leading edges of hypersonic vehicles, especially at higher velocities, due to the increase in ionized species enabling higher electron heat extraction from the surface. The CFD results also show that space-charge limit effects can limit the ETC reduction of surface temperatures, in comparison to thermionic emission assuming no effects of the electric field within the sheath.

  12. Impact of aeroelasticity on propulsion and longitudinal flight dynamics of an air-breathing hypersonic vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raney, David L.; Mcminn, John D.; Pototzky, Anthony S.; Wooley, Christine L.

    1993-01-01

    Many air-breathing hypersonic aerospacecraft design concepts incorporate an elongated fuselage forebody acting as the aerodynamic compression surface for a hypersonic combustion module, or scram jet. This highly integrated design approach creates the potential for an unprecedented form of aero-propulsive-elastic interaction in which deflections of the vehicle fuselage give rise to propulsion transients, producing force and moment variations that may adversely impact the rigid body flight dynamics and/or further excite the fuselage bending modes. To investigate the potential for such interactions, a math model was developed which included the longitudinal flight dynamics, propulsion system, and first seven elastic modes of a hypersonic air-breathing vehicle. Perturbation time histories from a simulation incorporating this math model are presented that quantify the propulsive force and moment variations resulting from aeroelastic vehicle deflections. Root locus plots are presented to illustrate the effect of feeding the propulsive perturbations back into the aeroelastic model. A concluding section summarizes the implications of the observed effects for highly integrated hypersonic air-breathing vehicle concepts.

  13. Effects of thermochemistry, nonequilibrium, and surface catalysis on the design of hypersonic vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Carl D.

    1989-01-01

    An account is given of the function of physical aspects of a gas on the characteristics of the flow and of the heating associated with hypersonic flight. At the high temperatures encountered, the thermal and chemical characteristics of the air in a hypersonic vehicle's shock layer are altered in ways which depend on the atomic and molecular structure of N and O and their ions; similar effects exist in scramjet propulsion systems. These properties in turn influence the character of shock waves and expansions, and hence the pressure, temperature, and velocity distributions. Transport properties affecting the boundary-layer structure will also affect heat flux and shear stress.

  14. Development and validation of purged thermal protection systems for liquid hydrogen fuel tanks of hypersonic vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helenbrook, R. D.; Colt, J. Z.

    1977-01-01

    An economical, lightweight, safe, efficient, reliable, and reusable insulation system was developed for hypersonic cruise vehicle hydrogen fuel tanks. Results indicate that, a nitrogen purged, layered insulation system with nonpermeable closed-cell insulation next to the cryogenic tank and a high service temperature fibrous insulation surrounding it, is potentially an attractive solution to the insulation problem. For the postulated hypersonic flight the average unit weight of the purged insulation system (including insulation, condensate and fuel boil off) is 6.31 kg/sq m (1.29 psf). Limited cyclic tests of large specimens of closed cell polymethacrylimide foam indicate it will withstand the expected thermal cycle.

  15. Geometry Modeling and Adaptive Control of Air-Breathing Hypersonic Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vick, Tyler Joseph

    Air-breathing hypersonic vehicles have the potential to provide global reach and affordable access to space. Recent technological advancements have made scramjet-powered flight achievable, as evidenced by the successes of the X-43A and X-51A flight test programs over the last decade. Air-breathing hypersonic vehicles present unique modeling and control challenges in large part due to the fact that scramjet propulsion systems are highly integrated into the airframe, resulting in strongly coupled and often unstable dynamics. Additionally, the extreme flight conditions and inability to test fully integrated vehicle systems larger than X-51 before flight leads to inherent uncertainty in hypersonic flight. This thesis presents a means to design vehicle geometries, simulate vehicle dynamics, and develop and analyze control systems for hypersonic vehicles. First, a software tool for generating three-dimensional watertight vehicle surface meshes from simple design parameters is developed. These surface meshes are compatible with existing vehicle analysis tools, with which databases of aerodynamic and propulsive forces and moments can be constructed. A six-degree-of-freedom nonlinear dynamics simulation model which incorporates this data is presented. Inner-loop longitudinal and lateral control systems are designed and analyzed utilizing the simulation model. The first is an output feedback proportional-integral linear controller designed using linear quadratic regulator techniques. The second is a model reference adaptive controller (MRAC) which augments this baseline linear controller with an adaptive element. The performance and robustness of each controller are analyzed through simulated time responses to angle-of-attack and bank angle commands, while various uncertainties are introduced. The MRAC architecture enables the controller to adapt in a nonlinear fashion to deviations from the desired response, allowing for improved tracking performance, stability, and

  16. Flight Experiments for Hypersonic Vehicle Development (Experimentations envol pour le developpement d'un vehicule hypersonique) (CD-ROM)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2007-01-01

    ...: 1 CD-ROM; 4 3/4 in.; 124 MB. ABSTRACT: This RTO-AVT/VKI Lecture Series brought together specialists from Europe, USA, and Russia to discuss flight experiments that pertain to the development of hypersonic vehicles...

  17. Characteristic Model-Based Robust Model Predictive Control for Hypersonic Vehicles with Constraints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Zhang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Designing robust control for hypersonic vehicles in reentry is difficult, due to the features of the vehicles including strong coupling, non-linearity, and multiple constraints. This paper proposed a characteristic model-based robust model predictive control (MPC for hypersonic vehicles with reentry constraints. First, the hypersonic vehicle is modeled by a characteristic model composed of a linear time-varying system and a lumped disturbance. Then, the identification data are regenerated by the accumulative sum idea in the gray theory, which weakens effects of the random noises and strengthens regularity of the identification data. Based on the regenerated data, the time-varying parameters and the disturbance are online estimated according to the gray identification. At last, the mixed H2/H∞ robust predictive control law is proposed based on linear matrix inequalities (LMIs and receding horizon optimization techniques. Using active tackling system constraints of MPC, the input and state constraints are satisfied in the closed-loop control system. The validity of the proposed control is verified theoretically according to Lyapunov theory and illustrated by simulation results.

  18. A fast ascent trajectory optimization method for hypersonic air-breathing vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murillo, Oscar J., Jr.

    The objective of this dissertation is to investigate a fast and reliable method to generate three-dimensional optimal ascent trajectories for hypersonic air-breathing vehicles. The problem is notoriously difficult because of the strong nonlinear coupling amongst aerodynamics, propulsion, vehicle attitude and trajectory state. As such an algorithm matures, the ultimate goal is to realize optimal closed-loop ascent guidance for hypersonic air-breathing vehicles. The problem is formulated as a fuel-optimal control problem. The corresponding necessary conditions are given. It is shown how the original problem of search for the optimal control commands can be reduced to a univariate root-finding problem at each point along the trajectory. A finite difference scheme is used to numerically solve the associated two-point-boundary-value problem. Evaluation of the approach is done through open-loop solutions and closed-loop simulations. The results show promising potential of the proposed approach as a rapid trajectory optimization tool for the class of hypersonic air-breathing vehicles.

  19. Robust intelligent flight control for hypersonic vehicles. Ph.D. Thesis - Massachusetts Inst. of Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamitoff, Gregory Errol

    1992-01-01

    Intelligent optimization methods are applied to the problem of real-time flight control for a class of airbreathing hypersonic vehicles (AHSV). The extreme flight conditions that will be encountered by single-stage-to-orbit vehicles, such as the National Aerospace Plane, present a tremendous challenge to the entire spectrum of aerospace technologies. Flight control for these vehicles is particularly difficult due to the combination of nonlinear dynamics, complex constraints, and parametric uncertainty. An approach that utilizes all available a priori and in-flight information to perform robust, real time, short-term trajectory planning is presented.

  20. Propulsion integration of hypersonic air-breathing vehicles utilizing a top-down design methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkpatrick, Brad Kenneth

    In recent years, a focus of aerospace engineering design has been the development of advanced design methodologies and frameworks to account for increasingly complex and integrated vehicles. Techniques such as parametric modeling, global vehicle analyses, and interdisciplinary data sharing have been employed in an attempt to improve the design process. The purpose of this study is to introduce a new approach to integrated vehicle design known as the top-down design methodology. In the top-down design methodology, the main idea is to relate design changes on the vehicle system and sub-system level to a set of over-arching performance and customer requirements. Rather than focusing on the performance of an individual system, the system is analyzed in terms of the net effect it has on the overall vehicle and other vehicle systems. This detailed level of analysis can only be accomplished through the use of high fidelity computational tools such as Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) or Finite Element Analysis (FEA). The utility of the top-down design methodology is investigated through its application to the conceptual and preliminary design of a long-range hypersonic air-breathing vehicle for a hypothetical next generation hypersonic vehicle (NHRV) program. System-level design is demonstrated through the development of the nozzle section of the propulsion system. From this demonstration of the methodology, conclusions are made about the benefits, drawbacks, and cost of using the methodology.

  1. Nonlinear Constrained Adaptive Backstepping Tracking Control for a Hypersonic Vehicle with Uncertainty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Zou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The control problem of a flexible hypersonic vehicle is presented, where input saturation and aerodynamic uncertainty are considered. A control-oriented model including aerodynamic uncertainty is derived for simple controller design due to the nonlinearity and complexity of hypersonic vehicle model. Then it is separated into velocity subsystem and altitude subsystem. On the basis of the integration of robust adaptive control and backstepping technique, respective controller is designed for each subsystem, where an auxiliary signal provided by an additional dynamic system is used to compensate for the control saturation effect. Then to deal with the “explosion of terms” problem inherent in backstepping control, a novel first-order filter is proposed. Simulation results are included to demonstrate the effectiveness of the adaptive backstepping control scheme.

  2. Near Space Hypersonic Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Dynamic Surface Backstepping Control Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinyong YU

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Compared with traditional aircraft, the near space hypersonic unmanned aerial vehicle control system design must deal with the extra prominent dynamics characters, which are differ from the traditional aircrafts control system design. A new robust adaptive control design method is proposed for one hypersonic unmanned aerial vehicle (HSUAV uncertain MIMO nonaffine block control system by using multilayer neural networks, feedback linearization technology, and dynamic surface backstepping. Multilayer neural networks are used to compensate the influence from the uncertain, which designs the robust terms to solve the problem from approach error. Adaptive backstepping is adopted designed to ensure control law, the dynamic surface control strategy to eliminate “the explosion of terms” by introducing a series of first order filters to obtain the differentiation of the virtual control inputs. Finally, nonlinear six-degree-of-freedom (6-DOF numerical simulation results for a HSUAV model are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  3. Observer-based linear parameter varying H∞ tracking control for hypersonic vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiqing Huang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to develop observer-based linear parameter varying output feedback H∞ tracking controller for hypersonic vehicles. Due to the complexity of an original nonlinear model of the hypersonic vehicle dynamics, a slow–fast loop linear parameter varying polytopic model is introduced for system stability analysis and controller design. Then, a state observer is developed by linear parameter varying technique in order to estimate the unmeasured attitude angular for slow loop system. Also, based on the designed linear parameter varying state observer, a kind of attitude tracking controller is presented to reduce tracking errors for all bounded reference attitude angular inputs. The closed-loop linear parameter varying system is proved to be quadratically stable by Lypapunov function technique. Finally, simulation results show that the developed linear parameter varying H∞ controller has good tracking capability for reference commands.

  4. Active disturbance rejection attitude control for a hypersonic reentry vehicle with actuator saturation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongjiu Yang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In this article, nonlinear uncertainty has been investigated for a hypersonic reentry vehicle subject to actuator saturation via active disturbance rejection control technology. A nonlinear extended state observer is designed to estimate “total disturbances,” which is compensated with a linear controller. Both convergence of the nonlinear extended state observer and stabilization of the closed-loop system are studied in this article. Some simulation results are given to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  5. Hypersonic Vehicles: State-of-the-Art and Potential Game Changers for Future Warfare

    OpenAIRE

    Besser, Hans-Ludwig; Huggins, Michael; Zimper, Dirk; Göge, Dennis

    2016-01-01

    Hypersonic flight is lacking a scientific definition, but is typically understood as flight within the atmosphere at speed around and beyond Mach 5. In this regime, dissociation of air starts to get significant and kinetic heating results in increasingly severe problems for a vehicle with increasing flight Mach number. Temperatures to be dealt with are about doubled between Mach 4 and 6 and quadrupled between Mach 4 and 9. Drag forces get huge and limit longer flight to altitudes within th...

  6. Dynamics of hypersonic flight vehicles exhibiting significant aeroelastic and aeropropulsive interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavez, Frank R.; Schmidt, David K.

    1993-01-01

    With analytic expressions previously developed for the forces and moments acting on a generic hypersonic vehicle, it is of interest to investigate the relative importance of the aerodynamic and propulsive effects on the vehicle dynamics. It is shown that the vehicle's aerodynamics and propulsive forces are both very significant in the evaluation of key stability derivatives which dictate the vehicle's dynamic characteristics. It is also shown that the vehicle model selected is unstable in pitch and exhibits strong airframe/engine/elastic coupling. With the use of literal expressions for both the systems poles and zeros, as well as the stability derivatives, key vehicle dynamic characteristics are investigated. For small errors, or uncertainties, in either the aerodynamic or propulsive forces, significant errors in the frequency and damping of the dominant modes and zero locations will arise.

  7. A reduced order aerothermodynamic modeling framework for hypersonic vehicles based on surrogate and POD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Xin

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Aerothermoelasticity is one of the key technologies for hypersonic vehicles. Accurate and efficient computation of the aerothermodynamics is one of the primary challenges for hypersonic aerothermoelastic analysis. Aimed at solving the shortcomings of engineering calculation, computation fluid dynamics (CFD and experimental investigation, a reduced order modeling (ROM framework for aerothermodynamics based on CFD predictions using an enhanced algorithm of fast maximin Latin hypercube design is developed. Both proper orthogonal decomposition (POD and surrogate are considered and compared to construct ROMs. Two surrogate approaches named Kriging and optimized radial basis function (ORBF are utilized to construct ROMs. Furthermore, an enhanced algorithm of fast maximin Latin hypercube design is proposed, which proves to be helpful to improve the precisions of ROMs. Test results for the three-dimensional aerothermodynamic over a hypersonic surface indicate that: the ROMs precision based on Kriging is better than that by ORBF, ROMs based on Kriging are marginally more accurate than ROMs based on POD-Kriging. In a word, the ROM framework for hypersonic aerothermodynamics has good precision and efficiency.

  8. Analysis of a hypersonic waverider research vehicle with a hydrocarbon scramjet engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molvik, Gregory A.; Bowles, Jeffrey V.; Huynh, Loc C.

    1993-01-01

    The results of a feasibility study of a hypersonic waverider research vehicle with a hydrocarbon scramjet engine are presented. The integrated waverider/scramjet geometry is first optimized with a vehicle synthesis code to produce a maximum product of the lift-to-drag ratio and the cycle specific impulse, hence cruise range. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is then employed to provide a nose-to-tail analysis of the system at the on-design conditions. Some differences are noted between the results of the two analysis techniques. A comparison of experimental, engineering analysis and CFD results on a waverider forebody are also included for validation.

  9. Aerodynamic characteristics of hypersonic flight experiment (HYFLEX) vehicle; Goku choonsoku hiko jikkenki (HYFLEX) no kuriki tokusei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-01

    Hypersonic Flight Experiment (HYFLEX) vehicle successfully performed a hypersonic lifting flight. The vehicle was developed to establish the basic technologies necessary for an unmanned shuttle vehicle. In this report, the primary aerodynamic characteristics derived from analysis of the flight data are presented. They are aerodynamic force coefficients, longitudinal trim characteristics, stability and control derivatives, elevon hinge moment coefficient, and surface pressure distribution. The flight results are compared with the preflight predictions based on wind tunnel tests and CFD calculations. The purpose of the comparison is to evaluate the validity of the prediction methods including the development of aerodynamic uncertainties in the vehicle design process. The flight results agreed well with the predictions. This shows that the prediction methods are generally valid for the design of a lifting reentry vehicle with a high angle of attack. On the other hand, some differences between the flight results and the predictions were found in axial force coefficient, elevon trim deflection, and RCS gas-jet interaction. 36 refs., 33 figs., 9 tabs.

  10. A QMU approach for characterizing the operability limits of air-breathing hypersonic vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iaccarino, Gianluca, E-mail: giaccarino@gmail.com [Mechanical Engineering Department, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-3035 (United States); Pecnik, Rene [Mechanical Engineering Department, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-3035 (United States); Glimm, James [Applied Mathematics and Statistics Department, SUNY Stony Brook, NY 11794-3600 (United States); Sharp, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87544 (United States)

    2011-09-15

    The operability limits of a supersonic combustion engine for an air-breathing hypersonic vehicle are characterized using numerical simulations and an uncertainty quantification methodology. The time-dependent compressible flow equations with heat release are solved in a simplified configuration. Verification, calibration and validation are carried out to assess the ability of the model to reproduce the flow/thermal interactions that occur when the engine unstarts due to thermal choking. quantification of margins and uncertainty (QMU) is used to determine the safe operation region for a range of fuel flow rates and combustor geometries. - Highlights: > In this work we introduce a method to study the operability limits of hypersonic scramjet engines. > The method is based on a calibrated heat release model. > It accounts explicitly for uncertainties due to flight conditions and model correlations. > We examine changes due to the combustor geometry and fuel injection.

  11. Aerodynamic Performance Analysis of the Hypersonic Airbreathing Vehicle JAPHAR

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dueveau, P

    1999-01-01

    ...) combining both subsonic and supersonic combustion regimes. The other objective is to define a methodology to establish the thrust-minus-drag balance of the DMR on an experimental vehicle to be flown between Mach number 4 and 8...

  12. Control Relevant Modeling and Design of Scramjet-Powered Hypersonic Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickeson, Jeffrey James

    This report provides an overview of scramjet-powered hypersonic vehicle modeling and control challenges. Such vehicles are characterized by unstable non-minimum phase dynamics with significant coupling and low thrust margins. Recent trends in hypersonic vehicle research are summarized. To illustrate control relevant design issues and tradeoffs, a generic nonlinear 3DOF longitudinal dynamics model capturing aero-elastic-propulsive interactions for wedge-shaped vehicle is used. Limitations of the model are discussed and numerous modifications have been made to address control relevant needs. Two different baseline configurations are examined over a two-stage to orbit ascent trajectory. The report highlights how vehicle level-flight static (trim) and dynamic properties change over the trajectory. Thermal choking constraints are imposed on control system design as a direct consequence of having a finite FER margin. The implication of this state-dependent nonlinear FER margin constraint, the right half plane (RHP) zero, and lightly damped flexible modes, on control system bandwidth (BW) and FPA tracking has been discussed. A control methodology has been proposed that addresses the above dynamics while providing some robustness to modeling uncertainty. Vehicle closure (the ability to fly a trajectory segment subject to constraints) is provided through a proposed vehicle design methodology. The design method attempts to use open loop metrics whenever possible to design the vehicle. The design method is applied to a vehicle/control law closed loop nonlinear simulation for validation. The 3DOF longitudinal modeling results are validated against a newly released NASA 6DOF code.

  13. Hypersonic Waverider Configurations for Trans-Atmospheric Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    WAVERIDER CONFIGURATIONS FOR TRANS-ATMOSPHERIC VEHICLES A THESIS APPROVED FOR THE SCHOOL OF AEROSPACE AND MECHANICAL ENGINEERING Ti~f A;. - L).I...NiEck :10.0 toy 0.101#07 Gaia 1.40 1 0.400 + 1.964 T𔃼 + -2.600 1*4 4 1.077 146 Mfay 0.001938 UL 0,042999 CD :0.009261 SU/Sp 2,217167 1*(2/3)/Sp

  14. System controls challenges of hypersonic combined-cycle engine powered vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Russell H.; Ianculescu, George D.

    1992-01-01

    Hypersonic aircraft with air-breathing engines have been described as the most complex and challenging air/space vehicle designs ever attempted. This is particularly true for aircraft designed to accelerate to orbital velocities. The propulsion system for the National Aerospace Plane will be an active factor in maintaining the aircraft on course. Typically addressed are the difficulties with the aerodynamic vehicle design and development, materials limitations and propulsion performance. The propulsion control system requires equal materials limitations and propulsion performance. The propulsion control system requires equal concern. Far more important than merely a subset of propulsion performance, the propulsion control system resides at the crossroads of trajectory optimization, engine static performance, and vehicle-engine configuration optimization. To date, solutions at these crossroads are multidisciplinary and generally lag behind the broader performance issues. Just how daunting these demands will be is suggested. A somewhat simplified treatment of the behavioral characteristics of hypersonic aircraft and the issues associated with their air-breathing propulsion control system design are presented.

  15. Interactions between Flight Dynamics and Propulsion Systems of Air-Breathing Hypersonic Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalle, Derek J.

    The development and application of a first-principles-derived reduced-order model called MASIV (Michigan/AFRL Scramjet In Vehicle) for an air-breathing hypersonic vehicle is discussed. Several significant and previously unreported aspects of hypersonic flight are investigated. A fortunate coupling between increasing Mach number and decreasing angle of attack is shown to extend the range of operating conditions for a class of supersonic inlets. Detailed maps of isolator unstart and ram-to-scram transition are shown on the flight corridor map for the first time. In scram mode the airflow remains supersonic throughout the engine, while in ram mode there is a region of subsonic flow. Accurately predicting the transition between these two modes requires models for complex shock interactions, finite-rate chemistry, fuel-air mixing, pre-combustion shock trains, and thermal choking, which are incorporated into a unified framework here. Isolator unstart occurs when the pre-combustion shock train is longer than the isolator, which blocks airflow from entering the engine. Finally, cooptimization of the vehicle design and trajectory is discussed. An optimal control technique is introduced that greatly reduces the number of computations required to optimize the simulated trajectory.

  16. A Novel SHLNN Based Robust Control and Tracking Method for Hypersonic Vehicle under Parameter Uncertainty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuanfeng Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypersonic vehicle is a typical parameter uncertain system with significant characteristics of strong coupling, nonlinearity, and external disturbance. In this paper, a combined system modeling approach is proposed to approximate the actual vehicle system. The state feedback control strategy is adopted based on the robust guaranteed cost control (RGCC theory, where the Lyapunov function is applied to get control law for nonlinear system and the problem is transformed into a feasible solution by linear matrix inequalities (LMI method. In addition, a nonfragile guaranteed cost controller solved by LMI optimization approach is employed to the linear error system, where a single hidden layer neural network (SHLNN is employed as an additive gain compensator to reduce excessive performance caused by perturbations and uncertainties. Simulation results show the stability and well tracking performance for the proposed strategy in controlling the vehicle system.

  17. Control-Relevant Modeling, Analysis, and Design for Scramjet-Powered Hypersonic Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Armando A.; Dickeson, Jeffrey J.; Sridharan, Srikanth; Benavides, Jose; Soloway, Don; Kelkar, Atul; Vogel, Jerald M.

    2009-01-01

    Within this paper, control-relevant vehicle design concepts are examined using a widely used 3 DOF (plus flexibility) nonlinear model for the longitudinal dynamics of a generic carrot-shaped scramjet powered hypersonic vehicle. Trade studies associated with vehicle/engine parameters are examined. The impact of parameters on control-relevant static properties (e.g. level-flight trimmable region, trim controls, AOA, thrust margin) and dynamic properties (e.g. instability and right half plane zero associated with flight path angle) are examined. Specific parameters considered include: inlet height, diffuser area ratio, lower forebody compression ramp inclination angle, engine location, center of gravity, and mass. Vehicle optimizations is also examined. Both static and dynamic considerations are addressed. The gap-metric optimized vehicle is obtained to illustrate how this control-centric concept can be used to "reduce" scheduling requirements for the final control system. A classic inner-outer loop control architecture and methodology is used to shed light on how specific vehicle/engine design parameter selections impact control system design. In short, the work represents an important first step toward revealing fundamental tradeoffs and systematically treating control-relevant vehicle design.

  18. Analysis of the Effects of Vitiates on Surface Heat Flux in Ground Tests of Hypersonic Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuda, Vincent; Gaffney, Richard L

    2008-01-01

    To achieve the high enthalpy conditions associated with hypersonic flight, many ground test facilities burn fuel in the air upstream of the test chamber. Unfortunately, the products of combustion contaminate the test gas and alter gas properties and the heat fluxes associated with aerodynamic heating. The difference in the heating rates between clean air and a vitiated test medium needs to be understood so that the thermal management system for hypersonic vehicles can be properly designed. This is particularly important for advanced hypersonic vehicle concepts powered by air-breathing propulsion systems that couple cooling requirements, fuel flow rates, and combustor performance by flowing fuel through sub-surface cooling passages to cool engine components and preheat the fuel prior to combustion. An analytical investigation was performed comparing clean air to a gas vitiated with methane/oxygen combustion products to determine if variations in gas properties contributed to changes in predicted heat flux. This investigation started with simple relationships, evolved into writing an engineering-level code, and ended with running a series of CFD cases. It was noted that it is not possible to simultaneously match all of the gas properties between clean and vitiated test gases. A study was then conducted selecting various combinations of freestream properties for a vitiated test gas that matched clean air values to determine which combination of parameters affected the computed heat transfer the least. The best combination of properties to match was the free-stream total sensible enthalpy, dynamic pressure, and either the velocity or Mach number. This combination yielded only a 2% difference in heating. Other combinations showed departures of up to 10% in the heat flux estimate.

  19. Tracking error constrained robust adaptive neural prescribed performance control for flexible hypersonic flight vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhonghua Wu

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available A robust adaptive neural control scheme based on a back-stepping technique is developed for the longitudinal dynamics of a flexible hypersonic flight vehicle, which is able to ensure the state tracking error being confined in the prescribed bounds, in spite of the existing model uncertainties and actuator constraints. Minimal learning parameter technique–based neural networks are used to estimate the model uncertainties; thus, the amount of online updated parameters is largely lessened, and the prior information of the aerodynamic parameters is dispensable. With the utilization of an assistant compensation system, the problem of actuator constraint is overcome. By combining the prescribed performance function and sliding mode differentiator into the neural back-stepping control design procedure, a composite state tracking error constrained adaptive neural control approach is presented, and a new type of adaptive law is constructed. As compared with other adaptive neural control designs for hypersonic flight vehicle, the proposed composite control scheme exhibits not only low-computation property but also strong robustness. Finally, two comparative simulations are performed to demonstrate the robustness of this neural prescribed performance controller.

  20. Dynamic surface tracking controller design for a constrained hypersonic vehicle based on disturbance observer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Wang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The tracking control problem of a flexible air-breathing hypersonic vehicle subjects to aerodynamic parameter uncertainty and input constraint is investigated by combining nonlinear disturbance observer and dynamic surface control. To design controller simply, a control-oriented model is firstly derived and divided into two subsystems, velocity subsystem and altitude subsystem based on the engineering backgrounds of flexible air-breathing hypersonic vehicle. In every subsystem, compounded disturbances are included to consider aerodynamic uncertainty and the effect of the flexible modes. Then, disturbance observer is not only used to handle the compounded disturbance but also to handle the input constraint, where the estimation error converges to a random small region through appropriately choosing the observer parameters. To sequel, the disturbance observer–based robust control scheme and the disturbance observer-based dynamic surface control scheme are developed for the velocity subsystem and altitude subsystem, respectively. Besides, novel filters are designed to alleviate the problem of “explosion of terms” induced by backstepping method. On the basis of Lyapunov stability theory, the presented control scheme can assure that tracking error converges to an arbitrarily small neighborhood around zero by rigorous theoretical analysis. At last, simulation result shows the effectiveness of the presented control method.

  1. Improved MPSP Method-based Cooperative Re-entry Guidance for Hypersonic Gliding Vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chu Haiyan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A computationally sufficient technique is used to solve the 3-D cooperative re-entry guidance problem for hypersonic gliding vehicles. Due to the poor surrounding adaptive ability of the traditional cooperative guidance methods, a novel methodology, named as model predictive static programming (MPSP, is used to solve a class of finite-horizon optimal control problems with hard terminal constraints. The main feature of this guidance law is that it is capable of hitting the target with high accuracy for each one of the cooperative vehicles at the same time. In addition, it accurately satisfies variable constraints. Performance of the proposed MPSP-based guidance is demonstrated in 3-D nonlinear dynamics scenario. The numerical simulation results show that the proposed cooperative re-entry guidance methodology has the advantage of computational efficiency and better robustness against the perturbations.

  2. Differential Evolution Based Ascent Phase Trajectory Optimization for a Hypersonic Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giri, Ritwik; Ghose, D.

    In this paper, a new method for the numerical computation of optimal, or nearly optimal, solutions to aerospace trajectory problems is presented. Differential Evolution (DE), a powerful stochastic real-parameter optimization algorithm is used to optimize the ascent phase of a hypersonic vehicle. The vehicle has to undergo large changes in altitude and associated aerodynamic conditions. As a result, its aerodynamic characteristics, as well as its propulsion parameters, undergo drastic changes. Such trajectory optimization problems can be solved by converting it to a non-linear programming (NLP) problem. One of the issues in the NLP method is that it requires a fairly large number of grid points to arrive at an optimal solution. Differential Evolution based algorithm, proposed in this paper, is shown to perform equally well with lesser number of grid points. This is supported by extensive simulation results.

  3. Methods for estimating pressure and thermal loads induced by elevon deflections on hypersonic-vehicle surfaces with turbulent boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, L. G., II; Johnson, C. B.

    1981-09-01

    Empirical anaytic methods are presented for calculating thermal and pressure distributions in three-dimensional, shock-wave turbulent-boundary-layer, interaction-flow regions on the surface of controllable hypersonic aircraft and missiles. The methods, based on several experimental investigations, are useful and reliable for estimating both the extent and magnitude of the increased thermal and pressure loads on the vehicle surfaces.

  4. Disturbance observer-based L1 robust tracking control for hypersonic vehicles with T-S disturbance modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Yi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This article concerns a disturbance observer-based L1 robust anti-disturbance tracking algorithm for the longitudinal models of hypersonic flight vehicles with different kinds of unknown disturbances. On one hand, by applying T-S fuzzy models to represent those modeled disturbances, a disturbance observer relying on T-S disturbance models can be constructed to track the dynamics of exogenous disturbances. On the other hand, L1 index is introduced to analyze the attenuation performance of disturbance for those unmodeled disturbances. By utilizing the existing convex optimization algorithm, a disturbance observer-based proportional-integral-controlled input is proposed such that the stability of hypersonic flight vehicles can be ensured and the tracking error for velocity and altitude in hypersonic flight vehicle models can converge to equilibrium point. Furthermore, the satisfactory disturbance rejection and attenuation with L1 index can be obtained simultaneously. Simulation results on hypersonic flight vehicle models can reflect the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed control algorithm.

  5. Electron acoustic wave propagation in a two-electron-temperature plasma layer applied to the problem of hypersonic vehicle communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotnikov, Vladimir; Rose, David

    2008-11-01

    Problem of electromagnetic wave propagation through a plasma sheath surrounding reentry vehicles and vehicles traveling at hypersonic velocities at high altitudes attracts the attention of many researchers. High plasma density inside a plasma sheath around a hypersonic vehicle prevents propagation of electromagnetic waves with the frequencies below the local plasma frequency. This results in RF frequency communication problems. One possibility to mitigate this problem is to induce a two-temperature electron distribution inside the plasma sheath. This allows electron acoustic waves (EAWs) with frequencies well below the local plasma frequency (fp ˜ 9 GHz) to propagate through a plasma layer, enabling communication. A small hot electron population is produced in the sheath by injection of an energetic electron beam in the sheath from the vehicle. Excitation, propagation, and attenuation of EAWs inside a plasma sheath in the presence of an electron beam has been investigated as well as efficiency of transformation of EAWs into electromagnetic waves on the sheath boundary.

  6. Design of a Flush Airdata System (FADS) for the Hypersonic Air Launched Option (HALO) Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmore, Stephen A.; Moes, Timothy R.; Deets, Dwain A. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents a design study for a pressure based Flush airdata system (FADS) on the Hypersonic Air Launched Option (HALO) Vehicle. The analysis will demonstrate the feasibility of using a pressure based airdata system for the HALO and provide measurement uncertainty estimates along a candidate trajectory. The HALO is a conceived as a man-rated vehicle to be air launched from an SR-71 platform and is proposed as a testbed for an airbreathing hydrogen scramjet. A feasibility study has been performed and indicates that the proposed trajectory is possible with minimal modifications to the existing SR71 vehicle. The mission consists of launching the HALO off the top of an SR-71 at Mach 3 and 80,000 ft. A rocket motor is then used to accelerate the vehicle to the test condition. After the scramjet test is completed the vehicle will glide to a lakebed runway landing. This option provides reusability of the vehicle and scramjet engine. The HALO design will also allow for various scramjet engine and flowpath designs to be flight tested. For the HALO flights, measurements of freestream airdata are considered to be a mission critical to perform gain scheduling and trajectory optimization. One approach taken to obtaining airdata involves measurement of certain parameters such as external atmospheric winds, temperature, etc to estimate the airdata quantities. This study takes an alternate approach. Here the feasibility of obtaining airdata using a pressure-based flush airdata system (FADS) methods is assessed. The analysis, although it is performed using the HALO configuration and trajectory, is generally applicable to other hypersonic vehicles. The method to be presented offers the distinct advantage of inferring total pressure, Mach number, and flow incidence angles, without stagnating the freestream flow. This approach allows for airdata measurements to be made using blunt surfaces and significantly diminishes the heating load at the sensor. In the FADS concept a

  7. Australian Air Breathing Propulsion Research for Hypersonic, Beamed Energy-Propelled Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froning, David

    2010-05-01

    A three year laser-propelled vehicle analysis and design investigation has been begun in June, 2009 by Faculty and graduate students at the University of Adelaide under a Grant/Cooperative Agreement Award to the University of Adelaide by the Asian Office of Aerospace Research and Development (AOARD). The major objectives of thsis investigation are: (a) development of hypersonic, air breathing "lightcraft" with innovative air inlets that enable acceptable airflow capture and combustion, and acceptable cowl-lip heating rates during hot, high-speed, high angle-of-attack hypersonic flight; (b) yest of the most promising lightcraft and inlet design in the high power laser beam that is part of the shock tunnel facility at CTO Instituto in Brazil; and (c) plan a series of laser guided and propelled flights that achieve supersonic or higher speed at the Woomera Test Facility (WTF) in South Australia—using the existing WTF launching and tracking facilities and sponsor-provided laser pointing and tracking and illumination systems.

  8. Hypersonic Aerodynamic Characteristics of a Proposed Single-Stage-To-Orbit Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weilmuenster, K. James; Gnoffo, P. A.; Greene, F. A.; Riley, C. J.; Hamilton, H. H., II; Alter, S. J.

    1995-01-01

    The hypersonic aerodynamic characteristics of a winged body concept representing a candidate single- stage-to-orbit vehicle which features wing tip fin controllers and elevon/body flap control surfa'Fs are predicted at points along a nominal trajectory for Mach numbers from 5 to 27 and angles of attack from 19 to 32 degrees. Predictions are derived from surface properties based on flow solvers for inviscid and viscous, laminar flows acting as a perfect gas, as a gas in chemical equilibrium and as a gas in chemical non- equilibrium. At a Mach number of 22, the lateral aerodynamic characteristics of the vehicle are determined based on an inviscid analysis at side slip angles of 2 and 4 degrees and 32 degrees angle of attack; a viscous analysis was carried out to determine the effect of gas chemistry model on surface pressure and to determine the incremental aerodynamics for control surface deflections. The results show that the longitudinal pitch characteristics of the baseline configuration, i.e., zero control surface deflections, are significantly altered by real gas chemistry at angles of attack greater than 30 degrees and Mach numbers greater than 9; and, that aerodynamics derived from inviscid solutions are of sufficient accuracy for preliminary analysis. Also, it is shown that a Mach number of 22, the choice of gas chemistry model has a large impact on surface pressure levels at highly localized regions on the vehicle and that the vehicle can be trimmed at control surface deflections less than 11 degrees.

  9. Nonlinear Adaptive Control and Guidance for Unstart Recovery for a Generic Hypersonic Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunbatar, Yakup

    This work presents the development of an integrated flight controller for a generic model of a hypersonic air-breathing vehicle. The flight control architecture comprises a guidance and trajectory planning module and a nonlinear inner-loop adaptive controller. The emphasis of the controller design is on achieving stable tracking of suitable reference trajectories in the presence of a specific engine fault (inlet unstart), in which sudden and drastic changes in the vehicle aerodynamics and engine performance occur. First, the equations of motion of the vehicle for a rigid body model, taking the rotation of the Earth into account, is provided. Aerodynamic forces and moments and engine data are provided in lookup-table format. This comprehensive model is used for simulations and verification of the control strategies. Then, a simplified control-oriented model is developed for the purpose of control design and stability analysis. The design of the guidance and nonlinear adaptive control algorithms is first carried out on a longitudinal version of the vehicle dynamics. The design is verified in a simulation study aiming at testing the robustness of the inner-loop controller under significant model uncertainty and engine failures. At the same time, the guidance system provides reference trajectories to maximize the vehicle's endurance, which is cast as an optimal control problem. The design is then extended to tackle the significantly more challenging case of the 6-degree-of-freedom (6-DOF) vehicle dynamics. For the full 6-DOF case, the adaptive nonlinear flight controller is tested on more challenging maneuvers, where values of the flight path and bank angles exceed the nominal range defined for the vehicle. Simulation studies show stable operation of the closed-loop system in nominal operating conditions, unstart conditions, and during transition from sustained scramjet propulsion to engine failure mode.

  10. Modeling of aerodynamic heat flux and thermoelastic behavior of nose caps of hypersonic vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persova, Marina G.; Soloveichik, Yury G.; Belov, Vasiliy K.; Kiselev, Dmitry S.; Vagin, Denis V.; Domnikov, Petr A.; Patrushev, Ilya I.; Kurskiy, Denis N.

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, the problem of numerical modeling of thermoelastic behavior of nose caps of hypersonic vehicles at different angles of attack is considered. 3D finite element modeling is performed by solving the coupled heat and elastic problems taking into account thermal and mechanical properties variations with temperature. A special method for calculating the aerodynamic heat flux entering the nose cap from its surface is proposed. This method is characterized by very low computational costs and allows calculating the aerodynamic heat flux at different values of the Mach number and angles of attack which may vary during the aerodynamic heating. The numerical results obtained by the proposed approach are compared with the numerical results and experimental data obtained by other authors. The developed approach has been used for studying the impact of the angle of attack on the thermoelastic behavior of nose caps main components.

  11. Adaptive Neural Back-Stepping Control with Constrains for a Flexible Air-Breathing Hypersonic Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengfei Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The design of an adaptive neural back-stepping control for a flexible air-breathing hypersonic vehicle (AHV in the presence of input constraint and aerodynamic uncertainty is discussed. Based on functional decomposition, the dynamics can be decomposed into the velocity subsystem and the altitude subsystem. To guarantee the exploited controller’s robustness with respect to parametric uncertainties, neural network (NN is applied to approximate the lumped uncertainty of each subsystem of AHV model. The exceptional contribution is that novel auxiliary systems are introduced to compensate both the tracking errors and desired control laws, based on which the explored controller can still provide effective tracking of velocity and altitude commands when the actuators are saturated. Finally, simulation studies are made to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed control approach in spite of the flexible effects, system uncertainties, and varying disturbances.

  12. Continuous high order sliding mode controller design for a flexible air-breathing hypersonic vehicle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jie; Zong, Qun; Su, Rui; Tian, Bailing

    2014-05-01

    This paper investigates the problem of tracking control with uncertainties for a flexible air-breathing hypersonic vehicle (FAHV). In order to overcome the analytical intractability of this model, an Input-Output linearization model is constructed for the purpose of feedback control design. Then, the continuous finite time convergence high order sliding mode controller is designed for the Input-Output linearization model without uncertainties. In addition, a nonlinear disturbance observer is applied to estimate the uncertainties in order to compensate the controller and disturbance suppression, where disturbance observer and controller synthesis design is obtained. Finally, the synthesis of controller and disturbance observer is used to achieve the tracking for the velocity and altitude of the FAHV and simulations are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the control strategies. Copyright © 2014 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Structural analysis and sizing of stiffened, metal matrix composite panels for hypersonic vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, Craig S.

    1992-12-01

    The present method for strength and stability analyses of stiffened, fiber-reinforced composite panels to be used in hypersonic vehicle structures is of great generality, and can be linked with planar finite-element analysis (FEA). Nonlinear temperature and load-dependent material data for each laminate are used to 'build-up' the stiffened panel's membrane, bending, and membrane-bending coupling stiffness terms, as well as thermal coefficients. The resulting, FEA-solved thermomechanical forces and moments are used to calculate strain at any location in the panel; this allows an effective ply-by-ply orthotropic strength analysis to be conducted, together with orthotropic instability checks for each laminated segment of the cross-section.

  14. Sliding mode disturbance observer-enhanced adaptive control for the air-breathing hypersonic flight vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Hao; Wang, Changhong; Fidan, Baris

    2017-10-01

    This paper presents a backstepping procedure to design an adaptive controller for the air-breathing hypersonic flight vehicle (AHFV) subject to external disturbances and actuator saturations. In each step, a sliding mode exact disturbance observer (SMEDO) is exploited to exactly estimate the lumped disturbance in finite time. Specific dynamics are introduced to handle the possible actuator saturations. Based on SMEDO and introduced dynamics, an adaptive control law is designed, along with the consideration on ;explosion of complexity; in backstepping design. The developed controller is equipped with fast disturbance rejection and great capability to accommodate the saturated actuators, which also lead to a wider application scope. A simulation study is provided to show the effectiveness and superiority of the proposed controller.

  15. Concise Neural Nonaffine Control of Air-Breathing Hypersonic Vehicles Subject to Parametric Uncertainties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangwei Bu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a novel simplified neural control strategy is proposed for the longitudinal dynamics of an air-breathing hypersonic vehicle (AHV directly using nonaffine models instead of affine ones. For the velocity dynamics, an adaptive neural controller is devised based on a minimal-learning parameter (MLP technique for the sake of decreasing computational loads. The altitude dynamics is rewritten as a pure feedback nonaffine formulation, for which a novel concise neural control approach is achieved without backstepping. The special contributions are that the control architecture is concise and the computational cost is low. Moreover, the exploited controller possesses good practicability since there is no need for affine models. The semiglobally uniformly ultimate boundedness of all the closed-loop system signals is guaranteed via Lyapunov stability theory. Finally, simulation results are presented to validate the effectiveness of the investigated control methodology in the presence of parametric uncertainties.

  16. Multiple-step fault estimation for interval type-II T-S fuzzy system of hypersonic vehicle with time-varying elevator faults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Wang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This article proposes a multiple-step fault estimation algorithm for hypersonic flight vehicles that uses an interval type-II Takagi–Sugeno fuzzy model. An interval type-II Takagi–Sugeno fuzzy model is developed to approximate the nonlinear dynamic system and handle the parameter uncertainties of hypersonic firstly. Then, a multiple-step time-varying additive fault estimation algorithm is designed to estimate time-varying additive elevator fault of hypersonic flight vehicles. Finally, the simulation is conducted in both aspects of modeling and fault estimation; the validity and availability of such method are verified by a series of the comparison of numerical simulation results.

  17. Designing Backstepping Control System for Hypersonic Vehicle Based on Feedback Linearization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianli Wei

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A hypersonic vehicle uses the airbreathing scramjet engine and the airframe and engine integrated design. Therefore, there is a strong cross-coupling effect among its aerodynamic force, thrust, structure, and control. The nonlinearity and uncertainty of the model cause difficulties in control system design. Considering the nonlinearity, coupling characteristics, and aerodynamic parametric uncertainty of its longitudinal dynamic model, we design the control law for its altitude system and velocity system based on the adaptive backstepping control method. Because of the feedback linearization method, we introduce the constraints of the flight vehicle’s actuator into the design, obtaining the robust adaptive control system constrained by the actuator of the flight vehicle. To avoid the high-order derivation problem of the feedback linearization method and the derivation of the virtual control volume in adaptive backstepping control method, we use the arbitrary-order robust exact differentiator to solve the high-order derivatives in feedback linearization and utilize the command filter to obtain the virtual control volume and its derivatives. The simulation results show that the robust adaptive control system we designed can achieve the error-free tracking of altitude and velocity command. It can well overcome the influence of structural parameters, aerodynamic parametric uncertainty, and disturbances; meanwhile, the control command can satisfy the constraints of the actuator.

  18. SiC Matrix Composites for High Temperature Hypersonic Vehicle Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Durable high temperature materials are required for hypersonic engine and structural thermal protection systems. In particular, 2700:F or greater capable structural...

  19. SiC Matrix Composites for High Temperature Hypersonic Vehicle Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Durable high temperature materials are required for reusable hypersonic structural thermal protection systems. In particular, temperatures exceeding 2700:F, and...

  20. Material Characterization for Hypersonic Vehicles by the Fast Mutipole Boundary Element Method Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Hypersonic aircraft are subjected to extreme conditions with respect to mechanical thermal and acoustic loads. Materials with complex microstructure, such as...

  1. Adaptive fuzzy tracking control for a constrained flexible air-breathing hypersonic vehicle based on actuator compensation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Fei Wang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The design of an adaptive fuzzy tracking control for a flexible air-breathing hypersonic vehicle with actuator constraints is discussed. Based on functional decomposition methodology, velocity and altitude controllers are designed. Fuzzy logic systems are applied to approximate the lumped uncertainty of each subsystem of air-breathing hypersonic vehicle model. Every controllers contain only one adaptive parameter that needs to be updated online with a minimal-learning-parameter scheme. The back-stepping design is not demanded by converting the altitude subsystem into the normal output-feedback formulation, which predigests the design of a controller. The special contribution is that novel auxiliary systems are developed to compensate both the tracking errors and desired control laws, based on which the explored controller can still provide effective tracking of velocity and altitude commands when the inputs are saturated. Finally, reference trajectory tracking simulation shows the effectiveness of the proposed method in its application to air-breathing hypersonic vehicle control.

  2. Nonlinear fractional order proportion-integral-derivative active disturbance rejection control method design for hypersonic vehicle attitude control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jia; Wang, Lun; Cai, Guobiao; Qi, Xiaoqiang

    2015-06-01

    Near space hypersonic vehicle model is nonlinear, multivariable and couples in the reentry process, which are challenging for the controller design. In this paper, a nonlinear fractional order proportion integral derivative (NFOPIλDμ) active disturbance rejection control (ADRC) strategy based on a natural selection particle swarm (NSPSO) algorithm is proposed for the hypersonic vehicle flight control. The NFOPIλDμ ADRC method consists of a tracking-differentiator (TD), an NFOPIλDμ controller and an extended state observer (ESO). The NFOPIλDμ controller designed by combining an FOPIλDμ method and a nonlinear states error feedback control law (NLSEF) is to overcome concussion caused by the NLSEF and conversely compensate the insufficiency for relatively simple and rough signal processing caused by the FOPIλDμ method. The TD is applied to coordinate the contradiction between rapidity and overshoot. By attributing all uncertain factors to unknown disturbances, the ESO can achieve dynamic feedback compensation for these disturbances and thus reduce their effects. Simulation results show that the NFOPIλDμ ADRC method can make the hypersonic vehicle six-degree-of-freedom nonlinear model track desired nominal signals accurately and fast, has good stability, dynamic properties and strong robustness against external environmental disturbances.

  3. A Cost-Effective Tracking Algorithm for Hypersonic Glide Vehicle Maneuver Based on Modified Aerodynamic Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Fan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to defend the hypersonic glide vehicle (HGV, a cost-effective single-model tracking algorithm using Cubature Kalman filter (CKF is proposed in this paper based on modified aerodynamic model (MAM as process equation and radar measurement model as measurement equation. In the existing aerodynamic model, the two control variables attack angle and bank angle cannot be measured by the existing radar equipment and their control laws cannot be known by defenders. To establish the process equation, the MAM for HGV tracking is proposed by using additive white noise to model the rates of change of the two control variables. For the ease of comparison several multiple model algorithms based on CKF are presented, including interacting multiple model (IMM algorithm, adaptive grid interacting multiple model (AGIMM algorithm and hybrid grid multiple model (HGMM algorithm. The performances of these algorithms are compared and analyzed according to the simulation results. The simulation results indicate that the proposed tracking algorithm based on modified aerodynamic model has the best tracking performance with the best accuracy and least computational cost among all tracking algorithms in this paper. The proposed algorithm is cost-effective for HGV tracking.

  4. Active disturbance rejection based trajectory linearization control for hypersonic reentry vehicle with bounded uncertainties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Xingling; Wang, Honglun

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates a novel compound control scheme combined with the advantages of trajectory linearization control (TLC) and alternative active disturbance rejection control (ADRC) for hypersonic reentry vehicle (HRV) attitude tracking system with bounded uncertainties. Firstly, in order to overcome actuator saturation problem, nonlinear tracking differentiator (TD) is applied in the attitude loop to achieve fewer control consumption. Then, linear extended state observers (LESO) are constructed to estimate the uncertainties acting on the LTV system in the attitude and angular rate loop. In addition, feedback linearization (FL) based controllers are designed using estimates of uncertainties generated by LESO in each loop, which enable the tracking error for closed-loop system in the presence of large uncertainties to converge to the residual set of the origin asymptotically. Finally, the compound controllers are derived by integrating with the nominal controller for open-loop nonlinear system and FL based controller. Also, comparisons and simulation results are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the control strategy. Copyright © 2014 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Active disturbance rejection control based robust output feedback autopilot design for airbreathing hypersonic vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jiayi; Zhang, Shifeng; Zhang, Yinhui; Li, Tong

    2018-01-16

    Since motion control plant (y(n)=f(⋅)+d) was repeatedly used to exemplify how active disturbance rejection control (ADRC) works when it was proposed, the integral chain system subject to matched disturbances is always regarded as a canonical form and even misconstrued as the only form that ADRC is applicable to. In this paper, a systematic approach is first presented to apply ADRC to a generic nonlinear uncertain system with mismatched disturbances and a robust output feedback autopilot for an airbreathing hypersonic vehicle (AHV) is devised based on that. The key idea is to employ the feedback linearization (FL) and equivalent input disturbance (EID) technique to decouple nonlinear uncertain system into several subsystems in canonical form, thus it would be much easy to directly design classical/improved linear/nonlinear ADRC controller for each subsystem. It is noticed that all disturbances are taken into account when implementing FL rather than just omitting that in previous research, which greatly enhances controllers' robustness against external disturbances. For autopilot design, ADRC strategy enables precise tracking for velocity and altitude reference command in the presence of severe parametric perturbations and atmospheric disturbances only using measurable output information. Bounded-input-bounded-output (BIBO) stable is analyzed for closed-loop system. To illustrate the feasibility and superiority of this novel design, a series of comparative simulations with some prominent and representative methods are carried out on a benchmark longitudinal AHV model. Copyright © 2018 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Control-oriented modeling and adaptive backstepping control for a nonminimum phase hypersonic vehicle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Linqi; Zong, Qun; Tian, Bailing; Zhang, Xiuyun; Wang, Fang

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, the nonminimum phase problem of a flexible hypersonic vehicle is investigated. The main challenge of nonminimum phase is the prevention of dynamic inversion methods to nonlinear control design. To solve this problem, we make research on the relationship between nonminimum phase and backstepping control, finding that a stable nonlinear controller can be obtained by changing the control loop on the basis of backstepping control. By extending the control loop to cover the internal dynamics in it, the internal states are directly controlled by the inputs and simultaneously serve as virtual control for the external states, making it possible to guarantee output tracking as well as internal stability. Then, based on the extended control loop, a simplified control-oriented model is developed to enable the applicability of adaptive backstepping method. It simplifies the design process and releases some limitations caused by direct use of the no simplified control-oriented model. Next, under proper assumptions, asymptotic stability is proved for constant commands, while bounded stability is proved for varying commands. The proposed method is compared with approximate backstepping control and dynamic surface control and is shown to have superior tracking accuracy as well as robustness from the simulation results. This paper may also provide a beneficial guidance for control design of other complex systems. Copyright © 2017 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Fault-tolerant control with mixed aerodynamic surfaces and RCS jets for hypersonic reentry vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjing He

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a fault-tolerant strategy for hypersonic reentry vehicles with mixed aerodynamic surfaces and reaction control systems (RCS under external disturbances and subject to actuator faults. Aerodynamic surfaces are treated as the primary actuator in normal situations, and they are driven by a continuous quadratic programming (QP allocator to generate torque commanded by a nonlinear adaptive feedback control law. When aerodynamic surfaces encounter faults, they may not be able to provide sufficient torque as commanded, and RCS jets are activated to augment the aerodynamic surfaces to compensate for insufficient torque. Partial loss of effectiveness and stuck faults are considered in this paper, and observers are designed to detect and identify the faults. Based on the fault identification results, an RCS control allocator using integer linear programming (ILP techniques is designed to determine the optimal combination of activated RCS jets. By treating the RCS control allocator as a quantization element, closed-loop stability with both continuous and quantized inputs is analyzed. Simulation results verify the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  8. Continuous Recursive Sliding Mode Control for Hypersonic Flight Vehicle with Extended Disturbance Observer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunjie Wu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A continuous recursive sliding mode controller (CRSMC with extended disturbance observer (EDO is proposed for the longitudinal dynamics of a generic hypersonic flight vehicle (HFV in the presence of multiple uncertainties under control constraints. Firstly, sliding mode tracking controller based on a set of novel recursive sliding mode manifolds is presented, in which the chattering problem is reduced. The CRSMC possesses the merits of both nonsingular terminal sliding mode controller (NTSMC and high-order sliding mode controller (HOSMC. Then antiwindup controller is designed according to the input constraints, which adds a dynamic compensation factor in the CRSMC. For the external disturbance of system, an improved disturbance observer based on extended disturbance observer (EDO is designed. The external disturbance is estimated by the disturbance observer and the estimated value is regarded as compensation in CRSMC for disturbance. The stability of the proposed scheme is analyzed by Lyapunov function theory. Finally, numerical simulation is conducted for cruise flight dynamics of HFV, where altitude is 110000 ft, velocity is 15060 ft/s, and Mach is 15. Simulation results show the validity of the proposed approach.

  9. Global strike hypersonic weapons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Mark J.

    2017-11-01

    Beginning in the 1940's, the United States has pursued the development of hypersonic technologies, enabling atmospheric flight in excess of five times the speed of sound. Hypersonic flight has application to a range of military and civilian applications, including commercial transport, space access, and various weapons and sensing platforms. A number of flight tests of hypersonic vehicles have been conducted by countries around the world, including the United States, Russia, and China, that could lead the way to future hypersonic global strike weapon systems. These weapons would be especially effective at penetrating conventional defenses, and could pose a significant risk to national security.

  10. Evaluation of on-board hydrogen storage methods for hypersonic vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akyurtlu, Ates; Akyurtlu, J. F.; Adeyiga, A. A.; Perdue, Samara; Northam, G. B.

    1989-01-01

    Hydrogen is the foremost candidate as a fuel for use in high speed transport. Since any aircraft moving at hypersonic speeds must have a very slender body, means of decreasing the storage volume requirements below that for liquid hydrogen are needed. The total performance of the hypersonic plane needs to be considered for the evaluation of candidate fuel and storage systems. To accomplish this, a simple model for the performance of a hypersonic plane is presented. To allow for the use of different engines and fuels during different phases of flight, the total trajectory is divided into three phases: subsonic-supersonic, hypersonic and rocket propulsion phase. The fuel fraction for the first phase is found be a simple energy balance using an average thrust to drag ratio for this phase. The hypersonic flight phase is investigated in more detail by taking small altitude increments. This approach allowed the use of flight profiles other than the constant dynamic pressure flight. The effect of fuel volume on drag, structural mass and tankage mass was introduced through simplified equations involving the characteristic dimension of the plane. The propellant requirement for the last phase is found by employing the basic rocket equations. The candidate fuel systems such as the cryogenic fuel combinations and solid and liquid endothermic hydrogen generators are first screened thermodynamically with respect to their energy densities and cooling capacities and then evaluated using the above model.

  11. Robust adaptive multivariable higher-order sliding mode flight control for air-breathing hypersonic vehicle with actuator failures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Li

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This article proposes an adaptive multivariable higher-order sliding mode control for the longitudinal model of an air-breathing vehicle under system uncertainties and actuator failures. Firstly, a fast finite-time control law is designed for a chain of integrators. Secondly, based on the input/output feedback linearization technique, the system uncertainty and external disturbances are modeled as additive certainty and the actuator failures are modeled as multiplicative uncertainty. By using the proposed fast finite-time control law, a robust multivariable higher-order sliding mode control is designed for the air-breathing hypersonic vehicle with actuator failures. Finally, adaptive laws are proposed for the adaptation of the parameters in the robust multivariable higher-order sliding mode control. Thus, the bounds of the uncertainties are not needed in the control system design. Simulation results show the effectiveness of the proposed robust adaptive multivariable higher-order sliding mode control.

  12. Global neural dynamic surface tracking control of strict-feedback systems with application to hypersonic flight vehicle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Bin; Yang, Chenguang; Pan, Yongping

    2015-10-01

    This paper studies both indirect and direct global neural control of strict-feedback systems in the presence of unknown dynamics, using the dynamic surface control (DSC) technique in a novel manner. A new switching mechanism is designed to combine an adaptive neural controller in the neural approximation domain, together with the robust controller that pulls the transient states back into the neural approximation domain from the outside. In comparison with the conventional control techniques, which could only achieve semiglobally uniformly ultimately bounded stability, the proposed control scheme guarantees all the signals in the closed-loop system are globally uniformly ultimately bounded, such that the conventional constraints on initial conditions of the neural control system can be relaxed. The simulation studies of hypersonic flight vehicle (HFV) are performed to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed global neural DSC design.

  13. Hypersonic Materials and Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, David E.

    2016-01-01

    Thermal protection systems (TPS) and hot structures are required for a range of hypersonic vehicles ranging from ballistic reentry to hypersonic cruise vehicles, both within Earth's atmosphere and non-Earth atmospheres. The focus of this presentation is on air breathing hypersonic vehicles in the Earth's atmosphere. This includes single-stage to orbit (SSTO), two-stage to orbit (TSTO) accelerators, access to space vehicles, and hypersonic cruise vehicles. This paper will start out with a brief discussion of aerodynamic heating and thermal management techniques to address the high heating, followed by an overview of TPS for rocket-launched and air-breathing vehicles. The argument is presented that as we move from rocket-based vehicles to air-breathing vehicles, we need to move away from the insulated airplane approach used on the Space Shuttle Orbiter to a wide range of TPS and hot structure approaches. The primary portion of the paper will discuss issues and design options for CMC TPS and hot structure components, including leading edges, acreage TPS, and control surfaces. The current state-of-the-art will be briefly discussed for some of the components.

  14. Hypersonic Control Modeling and Simulation Tool for Lifting Towed Ballutes Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Global Aerospace Corporation proposes to develop a hypersonic control modeling and simulation tool for hypersonic aeroassist vehicles. Our control and simulation...

  15. Evaluation of some significant issues affecting trajectory and control management for air-breathing hypersonic vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattis, Philip D.; Malchow, Harvey L.

    1992-01-01

    Horizontal takeoff airbreathing-propulsion launch vehicles require near-optimal guidance and control which takes into account performance sensitivities to atmospheric characteristics while satisfying physically-derived operational constraints. A generic trajectory/control analysis tool that deepens insight into these considerations has been applied to two versions of a winged-cone vehicle model. Information that is critical to the design and trajectory of these vehicles is derived, and several unusual characteristics of the airbreathing propulsion model are shown to have potentially substantial effects on vehicle dynamics.

  16. Simulating flow around scaled model of a hypersonic vehicle in wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markova, T. V.; Aksenov, A. A.; Zhluktov, S. V.; Savitsky, D. V.; Gavrilov, A. D.; Son, E. E.; Prokhorov, A. N.

    2016-11-01

    A prospective hypersonic HEXAFLY aircraft is considered in the given paper. In order to obtain the aerodynamic characteristics of a new construction design of the aircraft, experiments with a scaled model have been carried out in a wind tunnel under different conditions. The runs have been performed at different angles of attack with and without hydrogen combustion in the scaled propulsion engine. However, the measured physical quantities do not provide all the information about the flowfield. Numerical simulation can complete the experimental data as well as to reduce the number of wind tunnel experiments. Besides that, reliable CFD software can be used for calculations of the aerodynamic characteristics for any possible design of the full-scale aircraft under different operation conditions. The reliability of the numerical predictions must be confirmed in verification study of the software. The given work is aimed at numerical investigation of the flowfield around and inside the scaled model of the HEXAFLY-CIAM module under wind tunnel conditions. A cold run (without combustion) was selected for this study. The calculations are performed in the FlowVision CFD software. The flow characteristics are compared against the available experimental data. The carried out verification study confirms the capability of the FlowVision CFD software to calculate the flows discussed.

  17. Tracking control of air-breathing hypersonic vehicles with non-affine dynamics via improved neural back-stepping design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bu, Xiangwei; He, Guangjun; Wang, Ke

    2018-02-16

    This study considers the design of a new back-stepping control approach for air-breathing hypersonic vehicle (AHV) non-affine models via neural approximation. The AHV's non-affine dynamics is decomposed into velocity subsystem and altitude subsystem to be controlled separately, and robust adaptive tracking control laws are developed using improved back-stepping designs. Neural networks are applied to estimate the unknown non-affine dynamics, which guarantees the addressed controllers with satisfactory robustness against uncertainties. In comparison with the existing control methodologies, the special contributions are that the non-affine issue is handled by constructing two low-pass filters based on model transformations, and virtual controllers are treated as intermediate variables such that they aren't needed for back-stepping designs any more. Lyapunov techniques are employed to show the uniformly ultimately boundedness of all closed-loop signals. Finally, simulation results are presented to verify the tracking performance and superiorities of the investigated control strategy. Copyright © 2018 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Iodine Tagging Velocimetry and Mechanism in the Hypersonic Near Wake of a MultiPurpose Crew Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balla, R. Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    This study demonstrates a new molecular tagging velocimetry (MTV) method for velocity measurements of high speed flow. It demonstrates offbody Iodine Tagging Velocimetry (ITV) in the hypersonic near wake of a MultiPurpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) model. Experiments are performed in the NASA-Langley 31-inch Mach 10 air wind tunnel. A 0.5% I2 / N2 mixture is seeded on the leeward backshell of the model using a pressure tap. I2 laser-induced fluorescence is excited along a 5.5 mm line using an ArF excimer laser near 193 nm. Results indicate I2 absorbs at least 2 photons to produce iodine ions and electrons. These recombine as the tagged region is displaced downstream to produce I (2P3/2) whose emission is monitored at 206 nm. Results at P0 = 2.41 MPa (350 psi), T0 = 990K, and 10 micro-sec transit times produce velocities from 630-820 m/sec across the I2 seeded jet at a distance of 38.2 mm (25.5 jet diameters) downstream from the jet orifice. Maximum wake jet velocities near the shear layer are 59% of freestream velocity.

  19. Electromagnetic-Thermal Integrated Design Optimization for Hypersonic Vehicle Short-Time Duty PM Brushless DC Motor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quanwu Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available High reliability is required for the permanent magnet brushless DC motor (PM-BLDCM in an electrical pump of hypersonic vehicle. The PM-BLDCM is a short-time duty motor with high-power-density. Since thermal equilibrium is not reached for the PM-BLDCM, the temperature distribution is not uniform and there is a risk of local overheating. The winding is a main heat source and its insulation is thermally sensitive, so reducing the winding temperature rise is the key to the improvement of the reliability. In order to reduce the winding temperature rise, an electromagnetic-thermal integrated design optimization method is proposed. The method is based on electromagnetic analysis and thermal transient analysis. The requirements and constraints of electromagnetic and thermal design are considered in this method. The split ratio and the maximum flux density in stator lamination, which are highly relevant to the windings temperature rise, are optimized analytically. The analytical results are verified by finite element analysis (FEA and experiments. The maximum error between the analytical and the FEA results is 4%. The errors between the analytical and measured windings temperature rise are less than 8%. It can be proved that the method can obtain the optimal design accurately to reduce the winding temperature rise.

  20. Quantifying Confidence in Model Predictions for Hypersonic Aircraft Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    and Driscoll, J.F. (2011). “Uncertainty propagation in integrated airframe- propulsion system analysis for hypersonic vehicles.” Proc., 17th AIAA Intl...AFRL-RQ-WP-TR-2015-0069 QUANTIFYING CONFIDENCE IN MODEL PREDICTIONS FOR HYPERSONIC AIRCRAFT STRUCTURES Benjamin P. Smarslok Hypersonic ...Signature// BENJAMIN P. SMARSLOK MEI-LING LIBER, Branch Chief Program Manager Hypersonic Sciences Branch Hypersonic Sciences Branch

  1. Non-equilibrium stagnation region aerodynamic heating of hypersonic glide vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosner, D. E.; Cibrian, R.

    1974-01-01

    A simple method of predicting aerodynamic heating and corresponding radiation equilibrium surface temperature-time histories for critical locations on space shuttle orbiter-type vehicles is presented. The method is based on a generalization of correlation equations developed earlier by Rosner for predicting the energy transfer and radiation equilibrium temperatures of surfaces with arbitrary catalytic activity and total hemispheric emittance. Recently obtained experimental data for O and N atom recombination probabilities on candidate material surfaces above 1000 K are used to assess nonequilibrium effects for a range of nose radii and a specific space shuttle re-entry trajectory. It is concluded that low catalytic activity will be especially important in locations of large effective nose radii by both increasing oxidation-resistant coating lifetime and reducing energy transfer into the vehicle.

  2. Wireless Subsurface Sensors for Health Monitoring of Thermal Protection Systems on Hypersonic Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milos, Frank S.; Arnold, Jim (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Health diagnostics is an area where major improvements have been identified for potential implementation into the design of new reusable launch vehicles (RLVs) in order to reduce life cycle costs, to increase safety margins, and to improve mission reliability. NASA Ames is leading the effort to develop inspection and health management technologies for thermal protection systems. This paper summarizes a joint project between NASA Ames and industry partners to develop "wireless" devices that can be embedded in the thermal protection system to monitor temperature or other quantities of interest. These devices are sensors integrated with radio-frequency identification (RFID) microchips to enable non-contact communication of sensor data to an external reader that may be a hand-held scanner or a large portal. Both passive and active prototype devices have been developed. The passive device uses a thermal fuse to indicate the occurrence of excessive temperature. This device has a diameter under 0.13 cm. (suitable for placement in gaps between ceramic TPS tiles on an RLV) and can withstand 370 C for 15 minutes. The active device contains a small battery to provide power to a thermocouple for recording a temperature history during flight. The bulk of the device must be placed beneath the TPS for protection from high temperature, but the thermocouple can be placed in a hot location such as near the external surface.

  3. Novel methodology for wide-ranged multistage morphing waverider based on conical theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhen; Liu, Jun; Ding, Feng; Xia, Zhixun

    2017-11-01

    This study proposes the wide-ranged multistage morphing waverider design method. The flow field structure and aerodynamic characteristics of multistage waveriders are also analyzed. In this method, the multistage waverider is generated in the same conical flowfield, which contains a free-stream surface and different compression-stream surfaces. The obtained results show that the introduction of the multistage waverider design method can solve the problem of aerodynamic performance deterioration in the off-design state and allow the vehicle to always maintain the optimal flight state. The multistage waverider design method, combined with transfiguration flight strategy, can lead to greater design flexibility and the optimization of hypersonic wide-ranged waverider vehicles.

  4. International Conference on Hypersonic Flight in the 21st Century, 1st, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, Sept. 20-23, 1988, Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higbea, M.E.; Vedda, J.A.

    1988-01-01

    The present conference on the development status of configurational concepts and component technologies for hypersonic-cruise and transatmospheric vehicles discusses topics relating to the U.S. National Aerospace Plane program, ESA-planned aerospace vehicles, Japanese spaceplane concepts, the integration of hypersonic aircraft into existing infrastructures, hypersonic airframe designs, hypersonic avionics and cockpit AI systems, hypersonic-regime CFD techniques, the economics of hypersonic vehicles, and possible legal implications of hypersonic flight. Also discussed are Soviet spaceplane concepts, propulsion systems involving laser power sources and hypervelocity launch technologies, and the management of support systems operations for hypersonic vehicles.

  5. A Collaborative Analysis Tool for Integrated Hypersonic Aerodynamics, Thermal Protection Systems, and RBCC Engine Performance for Single Stage to Orbit Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Thomas Troy; Alexander, Reginald; Landrum, Brian

    2000-01-01

    Presented is a computer-based tool that connects several disciplines that are needed in the complex and integrated design of high performance reusable single stage to orbit (SSTO) vehicles. Every system is linked to every other system, as is the case of SSTO vehicles with air breathing propulsion, which is currently being studied by NASA. An RBCC propulsion system integrates airbreathing and rocket propulsion into a single engine assembly enclosed within a cowl or duct. A typical RBCC propulsion system operates as a ducted rocket up to approximately Mach 3. Then there is a transition to a ramjet mode for supersonic-to-hypersonic acceleration. Around Mach 8 the engine transitions to a scramjet mode. During the ramjet and scramjet modes, the integral rockets operate as fuel injectors. Around Mach 10-12 (the actual value depends on vehicle and mission requirements), the inlet is physically closed and the engine transitions to an integral rocket mode for orbit insertion. A common feature of RBCC propelled vehicles is the high degree of integration between the propulsion system and airframe. At high speeds the vehicle forebody is fundamentally part of the engine inlet, providing a compression surface for air flowing into the engine. The compressed air is mixed with fuel and burned. The combusted mixture must be expanded to an area larger than the incoming stream to provide thrust. Since a conventional nozzle would be too large, the entire lower after body of the vehicle is used as an expansion surface. Because of the high external temperatures seen during atmospheric flight, the design of an airbreathing SSTO vehicle requires delicate tradeoffs between engine design, vehicle shape, and thermal protection system (TPS) sizing in order to produce an optimum system in terms of weight (and cost) and maximum performance. To adequately determine the performance of the engine/vehicle, the Hypersonic Flight Inlet Model (HYFIM) module was designed to interface with the RBCC

  6. A Collaborative Analysis Tool for Integrating Hypersonic Aerodynamics, Thermal Protection Systems, and RBCC Engine Performance for Single Stage to Orbit Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Thomas Troy; Alexander, Reginald

    1999-01-01

    Presented is a computer-based tool that connects several disciplines that are needed in the complex and integrated design of high performance reusable single stage to orbit (SSTO) vehicles. Every system is linked to every other system, as is the case of SSTO vehicles with air breathing propulsion, which is currently being studied by NASA. The deficiencies in the scramjet powered concept led to a revival of interest in Rocket-Based Combined-Cycle (RBCC) propulsion systems. An RBCC propulsion system integrates airbreathing and rocket propulsion into a single engine assembly enclosed within a cowl or duct. A typical RBCC propulsion system operates as a ducted rocket up to approximately Mach 3. At this point the transitions to a ramjet mode for supersonic-to-hypersonic acceleration. Around Mach 8 the engine transitions to a scram4jet mode. During the ramjet and scramjet modes, the integral rockets operate as fuel injectors. Around Mach 10-12 (the actual value depends on vehicle and mission requirements), the inlet is physically closed and the engine transitions to an integral rocket mode for orbit insertion. A common feature of RBCC propelled vehicles is the high degree of integration between the propulsion system and airframe. At high speeds the vehicle forebody is fundamentally part of the engine inlet, providing a compression surface for air flowing into the engine. The compressed air is mixed with fuel and burned. The combusted mixture must be expanded to an area larger than the incoming stream to provide thrust. Since a conventional nozzle would be too large, the entire lower after body of the vehicle is used as an expansion surface. Because of the high external temperatures seen during atmospheric flight, the design of an airbreathing SSTO vehicle requires delicate tradeoffs between engine design, vehicle shape, and thermal protection system (TPS) sizing in order to produce an optimum system in terms of weight (and cost) and maximum performance.

  7. Geometry of conics

    CERN Document Server

    Akopyan, A V

    2007-01-01

    The book is devoted to the properties of conics (plane curves of second degree) that can be formulated and proved using only elementary geometry. Starting with the well-known optical properties of conics, the authors move to less trivial results, both classical and contemporary. In particular, the chapter on projective properties of conics contains a detailed analysis of the polar correspondence, pencils of conics, and the Poncelet theorem. In the chapter on metric properties of conics the authors discuss, in particular, inscribed conics, normals to conics, and the Poncelet theorem for confoca

  8. Modeling, Analysis, and Control of a Hypersonic Vehicle with Significant Aero-Thermo-Elastic-Propulsion Interactions: Elastic, Thermal and Mass Uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatri, Jaidev

    This thesis examines themodeling, analysis, and control system design issues for scramjet powered hypersonic vehicles. A nonlinear three degrees of freedom longitudinal model which includes aero-propulsion-elasticity effects was used for all analyses. This model is based upon classical compressible flow and Euler-Bernouli structural concepts. Higher fidelity computational fluid dynamics and finite element methods are needed for more precise intermediate and final evaluations. The methods presented within this thesis were shown to be useful for guiding initial control relevant design. The model was used to examine the vehicle's static and dynamic characteristics over the vehicle's trimmable region. The vehicle has significant longitudinal coupling between the fuel equivalency ratio (FER) and the flight path angle (FPA). For control system design, a two-input two-output plant (FER - elevator to speed-FPA) with 11 states (including 3 flexible modes) was used. Velocity, FPA, and pitch were assumed to be available for feedback. Aerodynamic heat modeling and design for the assumed TPS was incorporated to original Bolender's model to study the change in static and dynamic properties. De-centralized control stability, feasibility and limitations issues were dealt with the change in TPS elasticity, mass and physical dimension. The impact of elasticity due to TPS mass, TPS physical dimension as well as prolonged heating was also analyzed to understand performance limitations of de-centralized control designed for nominal model.

  9. Hypersonic Air Flow with Finite Rate Chemistry

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Boyd, Ian

    1997-01-01

    ... describe the effects of non-equilibrium flow chemistry, shock interaction, and turbulent mixing and combustion on the performance of vehicles and air breathing engines designed to fly in the hypersonic flow...

  10. Experiment with Conical Pendulum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tongaonkar, S. S.; Khadse, V. R.

    2011-01-01

    Conical pendulum is similar to simple pendulum with the difference that the bob, instead of moving back and forth, swings around in a horizontal circle. Thus, in a conical pendulum the bob moves at a constant speed in a circle with the string tracing out a cone. This paper describes an experiment with conical pendulum, with determination of g from…

  11. Hypersonic propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, SIN-I.

    1989-01-01

    The paper reviews the whys and hows of the concept of supersonic combustion for hypersonic propulsion. Attention is given to the problem areas, the current research and development efforts, and their implications. The operating boundary of the SCRAMJET is reasonably well defined. The paper also explores some air-breathing alternatives that may go beyond SCRAMJETS.

  12. Hypersonic propulsion - Breaking the thermal barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidner, J. P.

    1993-01-01

    The challenges of hypersonic propulsion impose unique features on the hypersonic vehicle - from large volume requirements to contain cryogenic fuel to airframe-integrated propulsion required to process sufficient quantities of air. Additional challenges exist in the design of the propulsion module that must be capable of efficiently processing air at very high enthalpies, adding and mixing fuel at supersonic speeds and expanding the exhaust products to generate thrust greater than drag. The paper explores the unique challenges of the integrated hypersonic propulsion system, addresses propulsion cycle selection to cope with the severe thermal environment and reviews the direction of propulsion research at hypervelocity speeds.

  13. Integration of uniform design and quantum-behaved particle swarm optimization to the robust design for a railway vehicle suspension system under different wheel conicities and wheel rolling radii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yung-Chang; Lee, Cheng-Kang

    2017-10-01

    This paper proposes a systematic method, integrating the uniform design (UD) of experiments and quantum-behaved particle swarm optimization (QPSO), to solve the problem of a robust design for a railway vehicle suspension system. Based on the new nonlinear creep model derived from combining Hertz contact theory, Kalker's linear theory and a heuristic nonlinear creep model, the modeling and dynamic analysis of a 24 degree-of-freedom railway vehicle system were investigated. The Lyapunov indirect method was used to examine the effects of suspension parameters, wheel conicities and wheel rolling radii on critical hunting speeds. Generally, the critical hunting speeds of a vehicle system resulting from worn wheels with different wheel rolling radii are lower than those of a vehicle system having original wheels without different wheel rolling radii. Because of worn wheels, the critical hunting speed of a running railway vehicle substantially declines over the long term. For safety reasons, it is necessary to design the suspension system parameters to increase the robustness of the system and decrease the sensitive of wheel noises. By applying UD and QPSO, the nominal-the-best signal-to-noise ratio of the system was increased from -48.17 to -34.05 dB. The rate of improvement was 29.31%. This study has demonstrated that the integration of UD and QPSO can successfully reveal the optimal solution of suspension parameters for solving the robust design problem of a railway vehicle suspension system.

  14. TBCC Discipline Overview. Hypersonics Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Scott R.

    2011-01-01

    The "National Aeronautics Research and Development Policy" document, issued by the National Science and Technology Council in December 2006, stated that one (among several) of the guiding objectives of the federal aeronautics research and development endeavors shall be stable and long-term foundational research efforts. Nearly concurrently, the National Academies issued a more technically focused aeronautics blueprint, entitled: the "Decadal Survey of Civil Aeronautics - Foundations for the Future." Taken together these documents outline the principles of an aeronautics maturation plan. Thus, in response to these overarching inputs (and others), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) organized the Fundamental Aeronautics Program (FAP), a program within the NASA Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD). The FAP initiated foundational research and technology development tasks to enable the capability of future vehicles that operate across a broad range of Mach numbers, inclusive of the subsonic, supersonic, and hypersonic flight regimes. The FAP Hypersonics Project concentrates on two hypersonic missions: (1) Air-breathing Access to Space (AAS) and (2) the (Planetary Atmospheric) Entry, Decent, and Landing (EDL). The AAS mission focuses on Two-Stage-To-Orbit (TSTO) systems using air-breathing combined-cycle-engine propulsion; whereas, the EDL mission focuses on the challenges associated with delivering large payloads to (and from) Mars. So, the FAP Hypersonic Project investments are aligned to achieve mastery and intellectual stewardship of the core competencies in the hypersonic-flight regime, which ultimately will be required for practical systems with highly integrated aerodynamic/vehicle and propulsion/engine technologies. Within the FAP Hypersonics, the technology management is further divided into disciplines including one targeting Turbine-Based Combine-Cycle (TBCC) propulsion. Additionally, to obtain expertise and support from outside

  15. Effect of Sidewall Configurations on Hypersonic Intake Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seihwan; Park, Ji Hyun; Jeung, In-Seuck; Lee, Hyoung Jin

    For reusable space launchers and hypersonic flight vehicles, use of an air-breathing propulsion system with supersonic combustion is the most promising option in terms of cost effectiveness. At this point, only the scramjet propulsion system provides a real alternative to expensive rocket driven systems, which currently are the only way to reach a hypersonics speeds.

  16. High-Temperature Properties of Ceramic Fibers and Insulations for Thermal Protection of Atmospheric Entry and Hypersonic Cruise Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kourtides, Demetrius A.; Pitts, William C.; Araujo, Myrian; Zimmerman, R. S.

    1988-01-01

    Multilayer insulations which will operate in the 500C to 1000C temperature range are being considered for possible applications on aerospace vehicles subject to convective and radiative heating during atmospheric entry. The insulations described in this paper consist of ceramic fabrics, insulations, and metal foils quilted together using ceramic thread. As these types of insulations have highly anisotropic properties, the total heat transfer characteristics of these insulations must be determined. Data are presented on the thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity of four types of multilayer insulations and are compared to the baseline Advanced Flexible Reusable Surface Insulation

  17. The Syracuse University Center for Training and Research in Hypersonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaGraff, John; Blankson, Isaiah (Technical Monitor); Robinson, Stephen K. (Technical Monitor); Walsh, Michael J. (Technical Monitor); Anderson, Griffin Y. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    In Fall 1993, NASA Headquarters established Centers for Hypersonics at the University of Maryland, the University of Texas-Arlington, and Syracuse University. These centers are dedicated to research and education in hypersonic technologies and have the objective of educating the next generation of engineers in this critical field. At the Syracuse University Center for Hypersonics this goal is being realized by focusing resources to: Provide an environment in which promising undergraduate students can learn the fundamental engineering principles of hypersonics so that they may make a seamless transition to graduate study and research in this field; Provide graduate students with advanced training in hypersonics and an opportunity to interact with leading authorities in the field in both research and instructional capacities; and Perform fundamental research in areas that will impact hypersonic vehicle design and development.

  18. The Conic Benchmark Format

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friberg, Henrik A.

    This document constitutes the technical reference manual of the Conic Benchmark Format with le extension: .cbf or .CBF. It unies linear, second-order cone (also known as conic quadratic) and semidenite optimization with mixed-integer variables. The format has been designed with benchmark libraries...... in mind, and therefore focuses on compact and easily parsable representations. The problem structure is separated from the problem data, and the format moreover facilitate benchmarking of hotstart capability through sequences of changes....

  19. High temperature properties of ceramic fibers and insulations for thermal protection of atmospheric entry and hypersonic cruise vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kourtides, Demetrius A.; Pitts, William C.; Araujo, Myrian; Zimmerman, R. S.

    1988-01-01

    Multilayer insulations (MIs) which will operate in the 500 to 1000 C temperature range are being considered for possible applications on aerospace vehicles subject to convective and radiative heating during atmospheric entry. The insulations described consist of ceramic fibers, insulations, and metal foils quilted together with ceramic thread. As these types of insulations have highly anisotropic properties, the total heat transfer characteristics must be determined. Data are presented on the thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity of four types of MIs and are compared to the baseline Advanced Flexible Reusable Surface Insulation currently used on the Space Shuttle Orbiter. In addition, the high temperature properties of the fibers used in these MIs are discussed. The fibers investigated included silica and three types of aluminoborosilicate (ABS). Static tension tests were performed at temperatures up to 1200 C and the ultimate strain, tensile strength, and tensile modulus of single fibers were determined.

  20. Emerging hypersonic propulsion technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, E. T.; Beach, H. L., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Currently there is a renewal of interest in the utilization of air breathing engines for hypersonic flight. The use of such engines in accelerative missions is discussed, and the nature of the trade-off between engine thrust-to-weight ratio and specific impulse is highlighted. It is also pointed out that the use of a cryogenic fuel such as liquid hydrogen offers the opportunity to develop both precooled derivatives of turboaccelerator engines and new cryogenic engine cycles, where the heat exchange process plays a significant role in the engine concept. The continuing challenges of developing high speed supersonic combustion ramjet engines are discussed. The paper concludes with a brief review of the difficult discipline of vehicle integration, and the challenges of both ground and flight testing.

  1. NASA's Hypersonic Investment Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hueter, Uwe; Hutt, John; McClinton, Charles

    2002-01-01

    NASA has established long term goals for access to space. The third generation launch systems are to be fully reusable and operational around 2025. The goal for third-generation launch systems represents significant reduction in cost and improved safety over the current first generation system. The Advanced Space Transportation Office (ASTP) at NASA s Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has the agency lead to develop space transportation technologies. Within ASTP, under the Hypersonic Investment Area (HIA), third generation technologies are being pursued in the areas of propulsion, airframe, integrated vehicle health management (IVHM), avionics, power, operations and system analysis. These technologies are being matured through research and both ground and flight-testing. This paper provides an overview of the HIA program plans and recent accomplishments.

  2. Nose-to-tail analysis of an airbreathing hypersonic vehicle using an in-house simplified tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piscitelli, Filomena; Cutrone, Luigi; Pezzella, Giuseppe; Roncioni, Pietro; Marini, Marco

    2017-07-01

    SPREAD (Scramjet PREliminary Aerothermodynamic Design) is a simplified, in-house method developed by CIRA (Italian Aerospace Research Centre), able to provide a preliminary estimation of the performance of engine/aeroshape for airbreathing configurations. It is especially useful for scramjet engines, for which the strong coupling between the aerothermodynamic (external) and propulsive (internal) flow fields requires real-time screening of several engine/aeroshape configurations and the identification of the most promising one/s with respect to user-defined constraints and requirements. The outcome of this tool defines the base-line configuration for further design analyses with more accurate tools, e.g., CFD simulations and wind tunnel testing. SPREAD tool has been used to perform the nose-to-tail analysis of the LAPCAT-II Mach 8 MR2.4 vehicle configuration. The numerical results demonstrate SPREAD capability to quickly predict reliable values of aero-propulsive balance (i.e., net-thrust) and aerodynamic efficiency in a pre-design phase.

  3. Hypersonic propulsion: Status and challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guy, R. Wayne

    1990-01-01

    Scientists in the U.S. are again focusing on the challenge of hypersonic flight with the proposed National Aerospace Plane (NASP). This renewed interest has led to an expansion of research related to high speed airbreathing propulsion, in particular, the supersonic combustion ramjet, or scramjet. The history is briefly traced of scramjet research in the U.S., with emphasis on NASA sponsored efforts, from the Hypersonic Research Engine (HRE) to the current status of today's airframe integrated scramjets. The challenges of scramjet technology development from takeover to orbital speeds are outlined. Existing scramjet test facilities such as NASA Langley's Scramjet Test Complex as well as new high Mach number pulse facilities are discussed. The important partnership role of experimental methods and computational fluid dynamics is emphasized for the successful design of single stage to orbit vehicles.

  4. Hypersonic Propulsion at Pratt and Whitney: Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazmar, Richard R.

    2002-01-01

    Pratt & Whitney (P&W) is developing the technology for hypersonic components and engines. A supersonic combustion ramjet (scramjet) database was developed during the National Aero Space Plane (NASP) program using hydrogen fueled propulsion systems for space access vehicles and serves as a point of departure for the current emphasis on hydrocarbon scramjets. The Air Force Hypersonic Technology (HyTech) Office has put programs in place to develop the technologies necessary to demonstrate the operability, performance and structural durability of a liquid hydrocarbon fueled scramjet system that operates from Mach 4 to 8. Fuel-cooled superalloys and lightweight structures are being developed to improve thermal protection and durability and to reduce propulsion system weight. The application of scramjet engine technology as part of combined cycle propulsion systems is also being pursued under NASA and U.S. Air Force sponsorship. The combination of scramjet power and solid rocket booster acceleration is applicable to hypersonic cruise missiles. Scramjets that use gas turbines for low speed acceleration and scramjets using rocket power for low speed acceleration are being studied for application to reusable launch systems and hypersonic cruise vehicles. P&W's recent activities and future plans for hypersonic propulsion will be described.

  5. Hypersonic cruise aircraft propulsion integration study, volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, R. E.; Brewer, G. D.

    1979-01-01

    Conceptual vehicle configuration and propulsion approach for a Mach 6 transport aircraft capable of carring 200 passengers 9260 km was investigated. Wind tunnel test data for various hypersonic transport configurations were examined. Canidates for baseline reference vehicles were selected. An explanation of technical methods which were used and configuration details which were significant in the final vehicle concept are given.

  6. NASA hypersonic flight demonstrators—overview, status, and future plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    L. Moses, Paul; L. Rausch, Vincent; T. Nguyen, Luat; R. Hill, Jeryl

    2004-08-01

    NASA's Next Generation Launch Technology (NGLT) program is developing and maturing advanced propulsion and vehicle systems technologies and flight vehicle concepts to enable future development of safer and more economical launch systems. Within NGLT, NASA is developing advanced air breathing propulsion systems and demonstrating these systems in hypersonic flight vehicles. The flight demonstrations are necessary to fully validate these technologies for application to future space launch vehicles and other flight systems. NASA's Hyper-X Program (X-43A) began the effort to flight demonstrate hypersonic air breathing propulsion systems to provide technologies that will enable development of safer and more economic space access vehicles in the future. Following X-43A, NASA, in collaboration with the United States (US) Department of Defense (DoD), is developing additional, progressively more complex hypersonic X-vehicles that will demonstrate new air breathing propulsion systems, propulsion-airframe integration, and other vehicle systems technologies required for high speed flight up to Mach 15. These technologies will contribute to safer, more reliable and more economic future launch systems and hypersonic aircraft/missiles. This paper describes NASA's current hypersonic flight demonstration projects, status of the efforts, and plans for future vehicles.

  7. Aerodynamic prediction techniques for hypersonic configuration design

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    An investigation of approximate theoretical techniques for predicting aerodynamic characteristics and surface pressures for relatively slender vehicles at moderate hypersonic speeds was performed. Emphasis was placed on approaches that would be responsive to preliminary configuration design level of effort. Potential theory was examined in detail to meet this objective. Numerical pilot codes were developed for relatively simple three dimensional geometries to evaluate the capability of the approximate equations of motion considered. Results from the computations indicate good agreement with higher order solutions and experimental results for a variety of wing, body, and wing-body shapes for values of the hypersonic similarity parameter M delta approaching one.

  8. Lightweight Ultrahigh Temperature CMC-Encased C/C Structure for Reentry and Hypersonic Applications, Phase II Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Future reentry and hypersonic vehicles require advanced lightweight leading edge thermal protection systems that can provide the dual functionality of...

  9. Hypersonic drone design: A multidisciplinary experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    Efforts were focused on design problems of an unmanned hypersonic vehicle. It is felt that a scaled hypersonic drone is necessary to bridge the gap between present theory on hypersonics and the future reality of the National Aerospace Plane (NASP) for two reasons: to fulfill a need for experimental data in the hypersonic regime, and to provide a testbed for the scramjet engine which is to be the primary mode of propulsion for the NASP. Three areas of great concern to NASP design were examined: propulsion, thermal management, and flight systems. Problem solving in these areas was directed towards design of the drone with the idea that the same design techniques could be applied to the NASP. A seventy degree swept double delta wing configuration, developed in the 70's at NASA Langley, was chosen as the aerodynamic and geometric model for the drone. This vehicle would be air-launched from a B-1 at Mach 0.8 and 48,000 feet, rocket boosted by two internal engines to Mach 10 and 100,000 feet, and allowed to cruise under power of the scramjet engine until burnout. It would then return to base for an unpowered landing. Preliminary energy calculations based upon the flight requirements give the drone a gross launch weight of 134,000 lb. and an overall length of 85 feet.

  10. NASA's Hypersonic Program: A Status Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hueter, Uwe; Hutt, John; McClinton, Charles; Cook, Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    NASA's has established long term goals for access-to-space. NASA's third generation launch systems are to be fully reusable and operational in approximately 25 years. The goals for third generation launch systems are to reduce cost by a factor of 100 and improve safety by a factor of 10,000 over current conditions. The Advanced Space Transportation Program Office (ASTP) at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, AL has the agency lead to develop third generation space transportation technologies. The Hypersonics Investment Area, part of ASTP, is developing third generation launch vehicle technologies in two main areas, propulsion and airframes. The current program's major investment is in hypersonic airbreathing propulsion since it offers the greatest potential for meeting the third generation launch vehicles goals thus enabling the opening of new space markets. The program will methodically improve the technologies in three key propulsion areas, scramjets, rocket-based combined cycle and turbine-based combination cycle. Ground and flight propulsion tests are planned. A airframe technologies will be matured through ground testing. The invited paper describes NASA's activities in hypersonic. Current programs, future plans and technologies that are being pursued by the Hypersonics Investment Area under the Advanced Space Transportation Program Office will be discussed.

  11. NASA's Advanced Space Transportation Hypersonic Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hueter, Uwe; McClinton, Charles; Cook, Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    NASA's has established long term goals for access-to-space. NASA's third generation launch systems are to be fully reusable and operational in approximately 25 years. The goals for third generation launch systems are to reduce cost by a factor of 100 and improve safety by a factor of 10,000 over current conditions. The Advanced Space Transportation Program Office (ASTP) at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, AL has the agency lead to develop third generation space transportation technologies. The Hypersonics Investment Area, part of ASTP, is developing the third generation launch vehicle technologies in two main areas, propulsion and airframes. The program's major investment is in hypersonic airbreathing propulsion since it offers the greatest potential for meeting the third generation launch vehicles. The program will mature the technologies in three key propulsion areas, scramjets, rocket-based combined cycle and turbine-based combination cycle. Ground and flight propulsion tests are being planned for the propulsion technologies. Airframe technologies will be matured primarily through ground testing. This paper describes NASA's activities in hypersonics. Current programs, accomplishments, future plans and technologies that are being pursued by the Hypersonics Investment Area under the Advanced Space Transportation Program Office will be discussed.

  12. Filling a Conical Cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nye, Kyle; Eslam-Panah, Azar

    2016-11-01

    Root canal treatment involves the removal of infected tissue inside the tooth's canal system and filling the space with a dense sealing agent to prevent further infection. A good root canal treatment happens when the canals are filled homogeneously and tightly down to the root apex. Such a tooth is able to provide valuable service for an entire lifetime. However, there are some examples of poorly performed root canals where the anterior and posterior routes are not filled completely. Small packets of air can be trapped in narrow access cavities when restoring with resin composites. Such teeth can cause trouble even after many years and lead the conditions like acute bone infection or abscesses. In this study, the filling of dead-end conical cavities with various liquids is reported. The first case studies included conical cavity models with different angles and lengths to visualize the filling process. In this investigation, the rate and completeness at which a variety of liquids fill the cavity were observed to find ideal conditions for the process. Then, a 3D printed model of the scaled representation of a molar with prepared post spaces was used to simulate the root canal treatment. The results of this study can be used to gain a better understanding of the restoration for endodontically treated teeth.

  13. Hypersonic Tunnel Facility (HTF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Hypersonic Tunnel Facility (HTF) is a blow-down, non-vitiated (clean air) free-jet wind tunnel capable of testing large-scale, propulsion systems at Mach 5, 6,...

  14. Conical O-ring seal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalfant, Jr., Gordon G.

    1984-01-01

    A shipping container for radioactive or other hazardous materials which has a conical-shaped closure containing grooves in the conical surface thereof and an O-ring seal incorporated in each of such grooves. The closure and seal provide a much stronger, tighter and compact containment than with a conventional flanged joint.

  15. Hypersonic Global Strike Feasibility and Options

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-15

    with Inconel X; a nickel alloy capable of withstanding 1,200F, Inconel was also used on the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo space capsules and a standard...Rods-from- God ” concept. 98 Air Force Factsheet, “X-37B Orbital Test Vehicle,” http://www.af.mil...from- God ,” employed by a hypersonic aircraft, or shot from space by an X- 37B against HDBTs.121 Finally, sensors are a real challenge, and further

  16. Results of tests to determine the aerodynamic characteristics of two potential aeromaneuvering orbit-to-orbit shuttle (AMOOS) vehicle configurations in the NASA-Ames 3.5 foot hypersonic wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketter, F. C., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    An aerodynamic wind tunnel investigation was conducted in the NASA-Ames Research Center (ARC) 3.5-foot hypersonic facility to provide data for use in obtaining experimental force and static stability characteristics of two potential aeromaneuvering orbit-to-orbit shuttle (AMOOS) vehicle configurations. The experimental data were compared with the aerodynamic characteristics estimated using Newtonian theory, thus establishing the usefulness of these predictions. The candidate AMOOS configurations selected for the wind tunnel tests were the AMOOS 5B and HB configurations. Two flap configurations were tested for each candidate - a forward or compression surface flap and an aft or expansion flap. Photographs and sketches of the two configurations with different control surfaces are shown. It was determined that Newtonian theory generally predicted the aerodynamics of the 5B configuration with acceptable accuracy for all expansion flap deflections and for compression flap deflections less than or equal to 10 degrees. Flow separation upstream of large compression flap deflections was detected from the experimental data.

  17. Technologies for propelled hypersonic flight: Technologies des vols hypersoniques propulsés

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2006-01-01

    These reports document the results of the Applied Vehicle Technology Panel Working Group 10, Subgroups 1, 2, and 3, who aimed to address selected critical issues related to propelled hypersonic flight...

  18. Thermodynamics of Asymptotically Conical Geometries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cvetič, Mirjam; Gibbons, Gary W; Saleem, Zain H

    2015-06-12

    We study the thermodynamical properties of a class of asymptotically conical geometries known as "subtracted geometries." We derive the mass and angular momentum from the regulated Komar integral and the Hawking-Horowitz prescription and show that they are equivalent. By deriving the asymptotic charges, we show that the Smarr formula and the first law of thermodynamics hold. We also propose an analog of Christodulou-Ruffini inequality. The analysis can be generalized to other asymptotically conical geometries.

  19. Hypersonic characteristics of an advanced aerospace plane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mccandless, R. S.; Cruz, C. I.

    1985-01-01

    A series of hypersonic wind-tunnel tests have been conducted in the NASA Langley Hypersonic Facilities Complex to obtain the static longitudinal and lateral-directional aerodynamic characteristics of an advanced aerospace plane. Data were obtained at 0 to 20 deg angles of attack and -3 to 3 deg angles of sideslip at Mach numbers of 6 and 10 in air and 20 in helium. Results show that stable trim capability exists at angles of attack near maximum lift-drag ratio (L/D). Both performance and stability exhibited some Mach number dependency. The vehicle was longitudinally unstable at low angles of attack but stable at angles of attack near and above maximum L/D. It was directionally unstable with positive dihedral effect. The rudder showed an inability to provide lateral-directional control, and removing the vertical tail resulted in increased directional instability. Analytical predictions of the static longitudinal aerodynamic coefficients gave relatively good comparisons with the experimental data.

  20. A numerical study of hypersonic propulsion/airframe integration problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, J. R.; Kumar, A.

    1989-01-01

    A numerical analysis procedure useful in the propulsion-airframe integration problem has been established. Flow around a generic hypersonic vehicle forebody is solved using Parabolized Navier-Stokes equations and Thin Layer Navier-Stokes equations. Forebody cross sectional geometry corresponds to a two-ellipse configuration. Effect of forebody geometry on the flow structure, especially at the engine inlet location, is analyzed.

  1. Initiation of Gaseous Detonation by Conical Projectiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verreault, Jimmy

    Initiation and stabilization of detonation by hypersonic conical projectiles launched into combustible gas mixtures is investigated. This phenomenon must be understood for the design and optimization of specific hypersonic propulsion devices, such as the oblique detonation wave engine and the ram accelerator. The criteria for detonation initiation by a projectile is also related to fundamental aspects of detonation research, such as the requirement for direct initiation of a detonation by a blast wave. Experimental results of this problem also offer useful references for validation of numerical and theoretical modeling. Projectiles with cone half angles varying from 15° to 60° were launched into stoichiometric mixtures of hydrogen/oxygen with 70% argon dilution at initial pressures between 10 and 200 kPa. The projectiles were launched from a combustion-driven gas gun at velocities up to 2.2 km/s (corresponding to 133% of the Chapman Jouguet velocity). Pictures of the flowfields generated by the projectiles were taken via Schlieren photography. Five combustion regimes were observed about the projectile ranging from prompt and delayed oblique detonation wave formation, combustion instabilities, a wave splitting, and an inert shock wave. Two types of transition from the prompt oblique detonation wave regime to the inert shock regime were observed. The first (the delayed oblique detonation wave regime) showed an inert shock attached to the tip of the projectile followed by a sharp kink at the onset of an oblique detonation wave; this regime occurred by decreasing the cone angle at high mixture pressures. The second (the combustion instabilities regime) exhibited large density gradients due to combustion ignition and quenching phenomena; this regime occurred by decreasing the mixture pressure at large cone angles. A number of theoretical models were considered to predict critical conditions for the initiation of oblique detonations. The Lee-Vasiljev model agreed

  2. Research in Hypersonic Airbreathing Propulsion at the NASA Langley Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ajay; Drummond, J. Philip; McClinton, Charles R.; Hunt, James L.

    2001-01-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center has been conducting research for over four decades to develop technology for an airbreathing-propelled vehicle. Several other organizations within the United States have also been involved in this endeavor. Even though significant progress has been made over this period, a hypersonic airbreathing vehicle has not yet been realized due to low technology maturity. One of the major reasons for the slow progress in technology development has been the low level and cyclic nature of funding. The paper provides a brief historical overview of research in hypersonic airbreathing technology and then discusses current efforts at NASA Langley to develop various analytical, computational, and experimental design tools and their application in the development of future hypersonic airbreathing vehicles. The main focus of this paper is on the hypersonic airbreathing propulsion technology.

  3. Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (HIAD) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (HIAD) project will focus on the development and demonstration of hypersonic inflatable aeroshell technologies...

  4. Characterizing conical refraction optical tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, C; McDougall, C; Rafailov, E; McGloin, D

    2014-12-01

    Conical refraction occurs when a beam of light travels through an appropriately cut biaxial crystal. By focusing the conically refracted beam through a high numerical aperture microscope objective, conical refraction optical tweezers can be created, allowing for particle manipulation in both Raman spots, and in the Lloyd/Poggendorff rings. We present a thorough quantification of the trapping properties of such a beam, focusing on the trap stiffness, and how this varies with trap power and trapped particle location. We show that the lower Raman spot can be thought of as a single-beam optical gradient force trap, while radiation pressure dominates in the upper Raman spot, leading to optical levitation rather than trapping. Particles in the Lloyd/Poggendorff rings experience a lower trap stiffness than particles in the lower Raman spot, but benefit from rotational control.

  5. Ground tests confirm the promise of hypersonic propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Griffin Y.; Bencze, Daniel P.; Sanders, Bobby W.

    1987-01-01

    The feasibility of developing a hypersonic hydrogen-fueled airbreathing vehicle capable of Mach 8 is examined. A modular dual-mode scramjet concept integrated with the airframe has been proposed. The research involved in the formation of this design is discussed. Particular attention is given to studies concerned with airframe integration; the evaluation of hypersonic inlets; and the analysis of viscous phenomena. The injector and combustor configurations of the modular engine, which is designed to operate as a ramjet and scramjet, are analyzed. The engine thrust performance of subscale engine modules was tested, and positive results were obtained. Simulation testing of a full-size model is being planned.

  6. Initiation structure of oblique detonation waves behind conical shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Pengfei; Ng, Hoi Dick; Teng, Honghui; Jiang, Zonglin

    2017-08-01

    The understanding of oblique detonation dynamics has both inherent basic research value for high-speed compressible reacting flow and propulsion application in hypersonic aerospace systems. In this study, the oblique detonation structures formed by semi-infinite cones are investigated numerically by solving the unsteady, two-dimensional axisymmetric Euler equations with a one-step irreversible Arrhenius reaction model. The present simulation results show that a novel wave structure, featured by two distinct points where there is close-coupling between the shock and combustion front, is depicted when either the cone angle or incident Mach number is reduced. This structure is analyzed by examining the variation of the reaction length scale and comparing the flow field with that of planar, wedge-induced oblique detonations. Further simulations are performed to study the effects of chemical length scale and activation energy, which are both found to influence the formation of this novel structure. The initiation mechanism behind the conical shock is discussed to investigate the interplay between the effect of the Taylor-Maccoll flow, front curvature, and energy releases from the chemical reaction in conical oblique detonations. The observed flow fields are interpreted by means of the energetic limit as in the critical regime for initiation of detonation.

  7. NASA Glenn Research Center's Hypersonic Propulsion Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palac, Donald T.

    1999-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC), as NASA's lead center for aeropropulsion, is responding to the challenge of reducing the cost of space transportation through the integration of air-breathing propulsion into launch vehicles. Air- breathing launch vehicle (ABLV) propulsion requires a marked departure from traditional propulsion applications. and stretches the technology of both rocket and air-breathing propulsion. In addition, the demands of the space launch mission require an unprecedented level of integration of propulsion and vehicle systems. GRC is responding with a program with rocket-based combined cycle (RBCC) propulsion technology as its main focus. RBCC offers the potential for simplicity, robustness, and performance that may enable low-cost single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO) transportation. Other technologies, notably turbine-based combined cycle (TBCC) propulsion, offer benefits such as increased robustness and greater mission flexibility, and are being advanced, at a slower pace, as part of GRC's program in hypersonics.

  8. CFD for hypersonic propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povinelli, Louis A.

    1991-01-01

    An overview is given of research activity on the application of computational fluid dynamics (CDF) for hypersonic propulsion systems. After the initial consideration of the highly integrated nature of air-breathing hypersonic engines and airframe, attention is directed toward computations carried out for the components of the engine. A generic inlet configuration is considered in order to demonstrate the highly three dimensional viscous flow behavior occurring within rectangular inlets. Reacting flow computations for simple jet injection as well as for more complex combustion chambers are then discussed in order to show the capability of viscous finite rate chemical reaction computer simulations. Finally, the nozzle flow fields are demonstrated, showing the existence of complex shear layers and shock structure in the exhaust plume. The general issues associated with code validation as well as the specific issue associated with the use of CFD for design are discussed. A prognosis for the success of CFD in the design of future propulsion systems is offered.

  9. Hypersonic propulsion research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northam, G. Burton

    1990-01-01

    The development of technology for the modular airframe integrated scramjet has been the focus of hypersonic propulsion research for several years. An part of this research, a variety of inlet concepts have been explored and characterized. The emphasis of the inlet program has been the development of the short (light weight), fixed geometry, side wall compression inlets that operate efficiently over a wide Mach number range. As hypersonic combustion tunnels were developed, programs to study the parameters controlling fuel mixing and combustion with single and multiple strut models were conducted using direct connect test techniques. These various tests supported the design of subscale engine test hardware that integrated inlet and combustor technology and allowed the study of the effect of heat release on thrust and combustor/inlet interaction. A number of subscale engine tests have shown predicted performance levels at Mach 4 and 7 simulated flight conditions. A few of the highlights from this research program are summarized.

  10. Hypersonic Research Vehicle (HRV) real-time flight test support feasibility and requirements study. Part 2: Remote computation support for flight systems functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rediess, Herman A.; Hewett, M. D.

    1991-01-01

    The requirements are assessed for the use of remote computation to support HRV flight testing. First, remote computational requirements were developed to support functions that will eventually be performed onboard operational vehicles of this type. These functions which either cannot be performed onboard in the time frame of initial HRV flight test programs because the technology of airborne computers will not be sufficiently advanced to support the computational loads required, or it is not desirable to perform the functions onboard in the flight test program for other reasons. Second, remote computational support either required or highly desirable to conduct flight testing itself was addressed. The use is proposed of an Automated Flight Management System which is described in conceptual detail. Third, autonomous operations is discussed and finally, unmanned operations.

  11. Understanding the Conics through Augmented Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas, Patricia; Pulido, Ricardo

    2017-01-01

    This paper discusses the production of a digital environment to foster the learning of conics through augmented reality. The name conic refers to curves obtained by the intersection of a plane with a right circular conical surface. The environment gives students the opportunity to interact with the cone and the plane as virtual objects in real…

  12. Fifty years of hypersonics: where we've been, where we're going

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertin, J.J.; Cummings, R.M. [United States Air Force Academy, CO (United States). Department of Aeronautics

    2003-10-01

    Hypersonic flight has been with us since 22 September 1963, when Robert M. White flew the North American X-15 at 4520 mph at an altitude of 354,200 ft - a Mach number of 6.7. This remarkable achievement was accomplished over six decades due to intensive research and development by a large number of scientists and engineers. In spite of that momentous achievement, designers have found the hypersonic environment to be harsh and non-forgiving. New programs since the 1960s have often uncovered the unknown unknowns, usually the hard way - early flights of new systems have often revealed problems of which the designers are unaware. Such problems include: the ineffectiveness of the body flap for the Space Shuttle Orbiter, the viscous/inviscid interactions produced by the umbilical fairings that damaged the conical section tile protection system of the Gemini Capsule, and the shock/shock interaction that damaged the X-15A-2 when it carried the hypersonic ramjet experiment. In order to continue to make advances in hypersonic flight a sustained and visionary effort is essential to generate required knowledge and technology. In order to better prepare for future developments in hypersonic flight, this article reviews the advances made within the past 50 years and then looks into the future, not just for new technological developments, but for new ways of thinking about the unknown challenges that lie ahead. (author)

  13. Preliminary Sizing of an Hypersonic Airbreathing Airliner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingenito, Antonella; Gulli, Stefano; Bruno, Claudio

    The purpose of this paper is to identify, for given technology levels (TRL) and mission requirements, those parameters that are critical for preliminary sizing of a hypersonic airbreathing airliner. Mission requirements will dictate a solution space of possible vehicle architecture capable of meeting cruise conditions as well as of taking-off (TO) and landing. In practice, once defined a range of cruise vehicle architectures, constraints are imposed (as to all passenger airliners), such as: 1. take off (=TO) and landing distance (so-called field length, FL): FL no longer than for the B-747-400, or 10000 ft; 2. completing TO with one engine off; 3. max acceleration at TO and climb-out (CO) = 0.4 g; 4. Hydrogen fuel (Meeting NOx emission limits (EINOx) is a further constraint not discussed in this paper). These constraints enable focusing on a realistic design out of the broad range of vehicles capable of performing the given mission. Thus a realistic vehicle must not only integrate aerodynamics and propulsion system; in fact, it is the result of many iterations in the design space, until performance and constraints are successfully achieved and met. The Gross Weight at Take Off (TOGW) was deliberately discarded as a constraint, based on Previous studies by Czysz. Typically, limiting from the beginning the TOGW leads to a vicious spiral where weight and propulsion system requirements keep growing, eventually denying convergence. In designing passenger airliners, in fact, it is the payload that is assumed fixed from the start, not the total weight. A parametric analysis of the hypersonic vehicle architecture is presented: in particular, optimal size, weight and geometrical shape are defined for different mission requirements. This analysis has shown that, it is possible to define a range of possible successful solutions for the European LAPCAT II project.

  14. Correlation functions on conical defects

    CERN Document Server

    Smolkin, Michael

    2015-01-01

    We explore the new technique developed recently in \\cite{Rosenhaus:2014woa} and suggest a correspondence between the $N$-point correlation functions on spacetime with conical defects and the $(N+1)$-point correlation functions in regular Minkowski spacetime. This correspondence suggests a new systematic way to evaluate the correlation functions on spacetimes with conical defects. We check the correspondence for the expectation value of a scalar operator and of the energy momentum tensor in a conformal field theory and obtain the exact agreement with the earlier derivations for cosmic string spacetime. We then use this correspondence and do the computations for a generic scalar operator and a conserved vector current. For generic unitary field theory we compute the expectation value of the energy momentum tensor using the known spectral representation of the $2$-point correlators of stress-energy tensor in Minkowski spacetime.

  15. Surface pressure measurements for CFD code validation in hypersonic flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oberkampf, W.L.; Aeschliman, D.P.; Henfling, J.F.; Larson, D.E.

    1995-07-01

    Extensive surface pressure measurements were obtained on a hypersonic vehicle configuration at Mach 8. All of the experimental results were obtained in the Sandia National Laboratories Mach 8 hypersonic wind tunnel for laminar boundary layer conditions. The basic vehicle configuration is a spherically blunted 10{degrees} half-angle cone with a slice parallel with the axis of the vehicle. The bluntness ratio of the geometry is 10% and the slice begins at 70% of the length of the vehicle. Surface pressure measurements were obtained for angles of attack from {minus}10 to + 18{degrees}, for various roll angles, at 96 locations on the body surface. A new and innovative uncertainty analysis was devised to estimate the contributors to surface pressure measurement uncertainty. Quantitative estimates were computed for the uncertainty contributions due to the complete instrumentation system, nonuniformity of flow in the test section of the wind tunnel, and variations in the wind tunnel model. This extensive set of high-quality surface pressure measurements is recommended for use in the calibration and validation of computational fluid dynamics codes for hypersonic flow conditions.

  16. Hypersonic Propulsion Requirements for Sustained Hypersonic Flight for Air Transportation

    OpenAIRE

    Rate, J; Pesiridis, A

    2017-01-01

    n this paper the propulsion requirements required to achieve sustained hypersonic flight for commercial air transportation are evaluated. In addition, a design methodology is developed and used to determine the propulsive capabilities of both ramjet and scramjet engines. Twelve configurations are proposed for hypersonic flight using varying combinations of turbojet, turbofan, ramjet and scramjet engines. The optimal configuration was determined based on how well each of the configurations met...

  17. Research on hypersonic aircraft using pre-cooled turbojet engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguchi, Hideyuki; Kobayashi, Hiroaki; Kojima, Takayuki; Ueno, Atsushi; Imamura, Shunsuke; Hongoh, Motoyuki; Harada, Kenya

    2012-04-01

    Systems analysis of a Mach 5 class hypersonic aircraft is performed. The aircraft can fly across the Pacific Ocean in 2 h. A multidisciplinary optimization program for aerodynamics, structure, propulsion, and trajectory is used in the analysis. The result of each element model is improved using higher accuracy analysis tools. The aerodynamic performance of the hypersonic aircraft is examined through hypersonic wind tunnel tests. A thermal management system based on the data of the wind tunnel tests is proposed. A pre-cooled turbojet engine is adopted as the propulsion system for the hypersonic aircraft. The engine can be operated continuously from take-off to Mach 5. This engine uses a pre-cooling cycle using cryogenic liquid hydrogen. The high temperature inlet air of hypersonic flight would be cooled by the same liquid hydrogen used as fuel. The engine is tested under sea level static conditions. The engine is installed on a flight test vehicle. Both liquid hydrogen fuel and gaseous hydrogen fuel are supplied to the engine from a tank and cylinders installed within the vehicle. The designed operation of major components of the engine is confirmed. A large amount of liquid hydrogen is supplied to the pre-cooler in order to make its performance sufficient for Mach 5 flight. Thus, fuel rich combustion is adopted at the afterburner. The experiments are carried out under the conditions that the engine is mounted upon an experimental airframe with both set up either horizontally or vertically. As a result, the operating procedure of the pre-cooled turbojet engine is demonstrated.

  18. Hypersonic propulsion. Past and present

    OpenAIRE

    Sánchez Tarifa, Carlos

    1990-01-01

    The change of the concept of hypersonic speed with time is in the first place briefly discussed. The evolution of the hypersonic propulsion is restricted to the history of the ramjets. Considering the abundance of excellent literature on the subject only the most remarkable achievements are commented. Less divulged historical events, such as the propulsion of helicopters by ramjets are discussed with more detail, and special attention is given to the contributions of Spain to supersonic combu...

  19. Hypersonic Wind Tunnel Test of a Flare-type Membrane Aeroshell for Atmospheric Entry Capsules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Kazuhiko; Koyama, Masashi; Kimura, Yusuke; Suzuki, Kojiro; Abe, Takashi; Koichi Hayashi, A.

    A flexible aeroshell for atmospheric entry vehicles has attracted attention as an innovative space transportation system. In this study, hypersonic wind tunnel tests were carried out to investigate the behavior, aerodynamic characteristics and aerodynamic heating environment in hypersonic flow for a previously developed capsule-type vehicle with a flare-type membrane aeroshell made of ZYLON textile sustained by a rigid torus frame. Two different models with different flare angles (45º and 60º) were tested to experimentally clarify the effect of flare angle. Results indicate that flare angle of aeroshell has significant and complicate effect on flow field and aerodynamic heating in hypersonic flow at Mach 9.45 and the flare angle is very important parameter for vehicle design with the flare-type membrane aeroshell.

  20. Experimental Study of Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (HIAD) Aeroshell with Axisymmetric Surface Deflection Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollis, Brian R.; Hollingsworth, Kevin E.

    2017-01-01

    A wind tunnel test program was conducted to obtain aeroheating environment data on Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator aeroshells with flexible thermal protection systems. Data were obtained on a set of rigid wind tunnel models with surface deflection patterns of various heights that simulated a range of potential in-flight aeroshell deformations. Wind tunnel testing was conducted at Mach 6 at unit Reynolds numbers from 2.1 × 10(exp 6)/ft to 8.3 × 10(exp 6)/ft and angles of attack from 0 deg to 18 deg. Boundary-layer transition onset and global surface heating distribution measurements were performed using phosphor thermography and flow field images were obtained through schlieren photography. Surface deflections were found to both promote early transition of the boundary layer and to augment heating levels for both laminar and turbulent flows. A complimentary computational flow field study was also performed to provide heating predictions for comparison with the measurements as well as boundary layer flow field properties for use in correlating the data. Correlations of the wind tunnel data were developed to predict deflection effects on boundary layer transition and surface heating and were applied to both the wind tunnel test conditions and to the trajectory of NASA's successful IRVE-3 flight test. In general, the correlations produced at least qualitative agreement with the wind tunnel data, although the heating levels were underpredicted for some of the larger surface deflections. For the flight conditions, the correlations suggested that peak heating levels on the leeward side conical flank of the IRVE-3 vehicle may have exceeded those at nose for times late in the trajectory after the peak heating time point. However, the flight estimates were based on a conservative assumption of surface deflection magnitude (i.e., larger) than likely was produced in flight.

  1. Special Course on Aerothermodynamics of Hypersonic Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-06-01

    Roquefort , T.: ’Ecoulement Tridimensionnel Hypersonique aur une Combinaison D’Ellipsoldes’. CET, Poitiers, Rapport No. 4R0MF86, 1967. [166] Riedelbauch, S...J.L. Transition de bord d’attaque en 6coulement hyper- AYMER de la CHEVALIERE D. sonique. ALZIARY de ROQUEFORT T. 244me Colloque d’Arothermodynamique

  2. Transition on Hypersonic Vehicles with Crossflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-01

    t=520 seconds, the rest of the payload was turbulent. Mach number varied slightly throughout the test window from M=7.7 to M=7.9. During the same...and the transitional heat transfer. Heat transfer near the shoulder of the model at φ=45° also showed a periodic transition progression. Figure 2...wind tunnel experiments showed that the shoulder area transition was more closely correlated with yaw. Figure 2-16 shows that transition occurred

  3. On Challenges for Hypersonic Turbulent Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yee, H C; Sjogreen, B

    2009-01-14

    This short note discusses some of the challenges for design of suitable spatial numerical schemes for hypersonic turbulent flows, including combustion, and thermal and chemical nonequilibrium flows. Often, hypersonic turbulent flows in re-entry space vehicles and space physics involve mixed steady strong shocks and turbulence with unsteady shocklets. Material mixing in combustion poses additional computational challenges. Proper control of numerical dissipation in numerical methods beyond the standard shock-capturing dissipation at discontinuities is an essential element for accurate and stable simulations of the subject physics. On one hand, the physics of strong steady shocks and unsteady turbulence/shocklet interactions under the nonequilibrium environment is not well understood. On the other hand, standard and newly developed high order accurate (fourth-order or higher) schemes were developed for homogeneous hyperbolic conservation laws and mixed hyperbolic and parabolic partial differential equations (PDEs) (without source terms). The majority of finite rate chemistry and thermal nonequilibrium simulations employ methods for homogeneous time-dependent PDEs with a pointwise evaluation of the source terms. The pointwise evaluation of the source term might not be the best choice for stability, accuracy and minimization of spurious numerics for the overall scheme.

  4. Developing Conceptual Hypersonic Airbreathing Engines Using Design of Experiments Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferlemann, Shelly M.; Robinson, Jeffrey S.; Martin, John G.; Leonard, Charles P.; Taylor, Lawrence W.; Kamhawi, Hilmi

    2000-01-01

    Designing a hypersonic vehicle is a complicated process due to the multi-disciplinary synergy that is required. The greatest challenge involves propulsion-airframe integration. In the past, a two-dimensional flowpath was generated based on the engine performance required for a proposed mission. A three-dimensional CAD geometry was produced from the two-dimensional flowpath for aerodynamic analysis, structural design, and packaging. The aerodynamics, engine performance, and mass properties arc inputs to the vehicle performance tool to determine if the mission goals were met. If the mission goals were not met, then a flowpath and vehicle redesign would begin. This design process might have to be performed several times to produce a "closed" vehicle. This paper will describe an attempt to design a hypersonic cruise vehicle propulsion flowpath using a Design of' Experiments method to reduce the resources necessary to produce a conceptual design with fewer iterations of the design cycle. These methods also allow for more flexible mission analysis and incorporation of additional design constraints at any point. A design system was developed using an object-based software package that would quickly generate each flowpath in the study given the values of the geometric independent variables. These flowpath geometries were put into a hypersonic propulsion code and the engine performance was generated. The propulsion results were loaded into statistical software to produce regression equations that were combined with an aerodynamic database to optimize the flowpath at the vehicle performance level. For this example, the design process was executed twice. The first pass was a cursory look at the independent variables selected to determine which variables are the most important and to test all of the inputs to the optimization process. The second cycle is a more in-depth study with more cases and higher order equations representing the design space.

  5. Sierpinski-Based Conical Monopole Antenna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Vsetula

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Planar Sierpinski monopole exhibits a multi-band behavior, but its parameters in operation frequency bands are not optimal. By mapping the Sierpinski monopole on a conical surface, a symmetrical three-dimensional (3-D structure is obtained. In this way, a larger bandwidth and a better radiation pattern is achieved. The symmetrical 3D Sierpinski-based monopole is an original contribution of this paper. In the paper, different versions of the conical Sierpinski-based monopole are designed, and results of simulations performed in CST Microwave Studio are mutually compared. Then, the simulated versions of the conical monopole are optimized according to specified criteria. The optimized conical Sierpinski-based monopole is manufactured and its properties are experimentally verified. Results of measuring the Sierpinski-based conical monopole antenna are published here for the first time.

  6. Comparison of hypersonic experiments and PNS predictions. I - Aerothermodynamics. II - Aerodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhutta, Bilal A.; Lewis, Clark H.

    1991-01-01

    A 3D parabolized Navier-Stokes (PNS) technique is examined in terms of applications to equilibrium-air and perfect-gas hypersonic flows at different Mach numbers and angles of attack. The method renders sublayer approximation unnecessary, and treats axis-normal coupling effects first followed by a shock solution and a corrector step. Predictions of hypersonic flowfields over several blunt conical configurations are found to agree with established wind-tunnel and flight data, although those for the Dhawan-Narasimha (1958) transition model vary from the experimental data. The PNS technique is also applied to predictions of wall-pressure distributions and force and moment data, and the results agree with experimental values. The PNS method allows the calculation of a wide variety of configurations with only a slight increase over traditional computing times.

  7. Conical refraction and higher microlocalization

    CERN Document Server

    Liess, Otto

    1993-01-01

    The main topic of the book is higher analytic microlocalization and its application to problems of propagation of singularities. The part on higher microlocalization could serve as an introduction to the subject. The results on propagation refer to solutions of linear partial differentialoperators with characteristics of variable multiplicity and are of conical refraction type. The relation and interplay between these results and results or constructions from geometrical optics in crystal theory is discussed with many details. The notes are written foremost for researchers working in microlocal analysis, but it is hoped that they can also be of interest for mathematicians and physicists who work in propagation phenomena from a more classical point of view.

  8. Formulation of aerodynamic prediction techniques for hypersonic configuration design

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    An investigation of approximate theoretical techniques for predicting aerodynamic characteristics and surface pressures for relatively slender vehicles at moderate hypersonic speeds was performed. Emphasis was placed on approaches that would be responsive to preliminary configuration design level of effort. Supersonic second order potential theory was examined in detail to meet this objective. Shock layer integral techniques were considered as an alternative means of predicting gross aerodynamic characteristics. Several numerical pilot codes were developed for simple three dimensional geometries to evaluate the capability of the approximate equations of motion considered. Results from the second order computations indicated good agreement with higher order solutions and experimental results for a variety of wing like shapes and values of the hypersonic similarity parameter M delta approaching one.

  9. Nonlinear potential analysis techniques for supersonic-hypersonic configuration design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clever, W. C.; Shankar, V.

    1983-01-01

    Approximate nonlinear inviscid theoretical techniques for predicting aerodynamic characteristics and surface pressures for relatively slender vehicles at moderate hypersonic speeds were developed. Emphasis was placed on approaches that would be responsive to preliminary configuration design level of effort. Second order small disturbance and full potential theory was utilized to meet this objective. Numerical pilot codes were developed for relatively general three dimensional geometries to evaluate the capability of the approximate equations of motion considered. Results from the computations indicate good agreement with higher order solutions and experimental results for a variety of wing, body and wing-body shapes for values of the hypersonic similarity parameter M delta approaching one. Case computational times of a minute were achieved for practical aircraft arrangements.

  10. Hypersonic Inlet for a Laser Powered Propulsion System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrland, Alan; Doolan, Con; Wheatley, Vincent; Froning, Dave

    2011-11-01

    Propulsion within the lightcraft concept is produced via laser induced detonation of an incoming hypersonic air stream. This process requires suitable engine configurations that offer good performance over all flight speeds and angles of attack to ensure the required thrust is maintained. Stream traced hypersonic inlets have demonstrated the required performance in conventional hydrocarbon fuelled scramjet engines, and has been applied to the laser powered lightcraft vehicle. This paper will outline the current methodology employed in the inlet design, with a particular focus on the performance of the lightcraft inlet at angles of attack. Fully three-dimensional turbulent computational fluid dynamics simulations have been performed on a variety of inlet configurations. The performance of the lightcraft inlets have been evaluated at differing angles of attack. An idealized laser detonation simulation has also been performed to validate that the lightcraft inlet does not unstart during the laser powered propulsion cycle.

  11. Heat removing under hypersonic conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semenov Mikhail E.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we consider the heat transfer properties of the axially symmetric body with parabolic shape at hypersonic speeds (with a Mach number M > 5. We use the numerical methods based on the implicit difference scheme (Fedorenko method with direct method based on LU-decomposition and iterative method based on the Gauss-Seigel method. Our numerical results show that the heat removing process should be performed in accordance with the nonlinear law of heat distribution over the surface taking into account the hypersonic conditions of motion.

  12. Hypersonic Missile Propulsion System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kazmar, Richard

    1998-01-01

    .... A supersonic combustion ramjet (scramjet) database was developed using hydrogen fueled propulsion systems for space access vehicles and serves as a point of departure for the current development of hydrocarbon scramjets...

  13. Handbook on semidefinite, conic and polynomial optimization

    CERN Document Server

    Anjos, Miguel F

    2012-01-01

    This book offers the reader a snapshot of the state-of-the-art in the growing and mutually enriching areas of semidefinite optimization, conic optimization and polynomial optimization. It covers theory, algorithms, software and applications.

  14. Effects of Shock-Tube Cleanliness on Hypersonic Boundary Layer Transition at High Enthalpy

    OpenAIRE

    Jewell, Joseph S.; Parziale, Nicholaus J.; Leyva, Ivett A.; Shepherd, Joseph E.

    2017-01-01

    The prediction of a high-speed boundary-layer transition (BLT) location is critical to hypersonic vehicle design; this is because the increased skin friction and surface heating rate after transition result in increased weight of the thermal protection system. Experimental studies using hypervelocity wind tunnels are one component of BLT research.

  15. Covered by lines and Conic connected varieties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Massarenti

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available We study some properties of an embedded variety covered by lines and give a numerical criterion ensuring the existence of a singular conic through two of its general points. We show that our criterion is sharp. Conic-connected, covered by lines, QEL, LQEL, prime Fano, defective, and dual defective varieties are closely related. We study some relations between the above mentioned classes of objects using basic results by Ein and Zak.

  16. HYPERSONIC BOUNDARY LAYER TRANSITION EXPERIMENTS- HYPERSONIC INTERNATIONAL FLIGHT RESEARCH EXPERIMENTATION 5 (HIFIRE-5) AND CIRCULAR CONE

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    AFRL-RQ-WP-TR-2017-0098 HYPERSONIC BOUNDARY LAYER TRANSITION EXPERIMENTS - HYPERSONIC INTERNATIONAL FLIGHT RESEARCH EXPERIMENTATION 5 (HiFIRE-5...DATES COVERED (From - To) October 2016 Interim 01 April 2015 – 13 June 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE HYPERSONIC BOUNDARY LAYER TRANSITION EXPERIMENTS...during fiscal year 2016. The objective of this task is to better understand boundary layer transition in hypersonic flowfields with spanwise

  17. An Overview of the Role of Systems Analysis in NASA's Hypersonics Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Jeffrey S.; Martin John G.; Bowles, Jeffrey V> Mehta, Unmeel B.; Snyder, CHristopher A.

    2006-01-01

    NASA's Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate recently restructured its Vehicle Systems Program, refocusing it towards understanding the fundamental physics that govern flight in all speed regimes. Now called the Fundamental Aeronautics Program, it is comprised of four new projects, Subsonic Fixed Wing, Subsonic Rotary Wing, Supersonics, and Hypersonics. The Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate has charged the Hypersonics Project with having a basic understanding of all systems that travel at hypersonic speeds within the Earth's and other planets atmospheres. This includes both powered and unpowered systems, such as re-entry vehicles and vehicles powered by rocket or airbreathing propulsion that cruise in and accelerate through the atmosphere. The primary objective of the Hypersonics Project is to develop physics-based predictive tools that enable the design, analysis and optimization of such systems. The Hypersonics Project charges the systems analysis discipline team with providing it the decision-making information it needs to properly guide research and technology development. Credible, rapid, and robust multi-disciplinary system analysis processes and design tools are required in order to generate this information. To this end, the principal challenges for the systems analysis team are the introduction of high fidelity physics into the analysis process and integration into a design environment, quantification of design uncertainty through the use of probabilistic methods, reduction in design cycle time, and the development and implementation of robust processes and tools enabling a wide design space and associated technology assessment capability. This paper will discuss the roles and responsibilities of the systems analysis discipline team within the Hypersonics Project as well as the tools, methods, processes, and approach that the team will undertake in order to perform its project designated functions.

  18. Status of Turbulence Modeling for Hypersonic Propulsion Flowpaths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiadis, Nicholas J.; Yoder, Dennis A.; Vyas, Manan A.; Engblom, William A.

    2012-01-01

    This report provides an assessment of current turbulent flow calculation methods for hypersonic propulsion flowpaths, particularly the scramjet engine. Emphasis is placed on Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) methods, but some discussion of newer meth- ods such as Large Eddy Simulation (LES) is also provided. The report is organized by considering technical issues throughout the scramjet-powered vehicle flowpath including laminar-to-turbulent boundary layer transition, shock wave / turbulent boundary layer interactions, scalar transport modeling (specifically the significance of turbulent Prandtl and Schmidt numbers) and compressible mixing. Unit problems are primarily used to conduct the assessment. In the combustor, results from calculations of a direct connect supersonic combustion experiment are also used to address the effects of turbulence model selection and in particular settings for the turbulent Prandtl and Schmidt numbers. It is concluded that RANS turbulence modeling shortfalls are still a major limitation to the accuracy of hypersonic propulsion simulations, whether considering individual components or an overall system. Newer methods such as LES-based techniques may be promising, but are not yet at a maturity to be used routinely by the hypersonic propulsion community. The need for fundamental experiments to provide data for turbulence model development and validation is discussed.

  19. Status of turbulence modeling for hypersonic propulsion flowpaths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiadis, Nicholas J.; Yoder, Dennis A.; Vyas, Manan A.; Engblom, William A.

    2014-06-01

    This report provides an assessment of current turbulent flow calculation methods for hypersonic propulsion flowpaths, particularly the scramjet engine. Emphasis is placed on Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) methods, but some discussion of newer methods such as large eddy simulation (LES) is also provided. The report is organized by considering technical issues throughout the scramjet-powered vehicle flowpath, including laminar-to-turbulent boundary layer transition, shock wave/turbulent boundary layer interactions, scalar transport modeling (specifically the significance of turbulent Prandtl and Schmidt numbers), and compressible mixing. Unit problems are primarily used to conduct the assessment. In the combustor, results from calculations of a direct connect supersonic combustion experiment are also used to address the effects of turbulence model selection and in particular settings for the turbulent Prandtl and Schmidt numbers. It is concluded that RANS turbulence modeling shortfalls are still a major limitation to the accuracy of hypersonic propulsion simulations, whether considering individual components or an overall system. Newer methods such as LES-based techniques may be promising, but are not yet at a maturity to be used routinely by the hypersonic propulsion community. The need for fundamental experiments to provide data for turbulence model development and validation is discussed.

  20. Control integration concept for hypersonic cruise-turn maneuvers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raney, David L.; Lallman, Frederick J.

    1992-01-01

    Piloting difficulties associated with conducting aircraft maneuvers in hypersonic flight are caused in part by the nonintuitive nature of the aircraft response and the stringent constraints anticipated on allowable angle of attack and dynamic pressure variations. An approach is documented that provides precise, coordinated maneuver control during excursions from a hypersonic cruise flight path and the necessary flight condition constraints. The approach is to achieve specified guidance commands by resolving altitude and cross range errors into a load factor and bank angle command by using a coordinate transformation that acts as an interface between outer and inner loop flight controls. This interface, referred to as a 'resolver', applies constraints on angle of attack and dynamic pressure perturbations while prioritizing altitude regulation over cross range. An unpiloted test simulation, in which the resolver was used to drive inner loop flight controls, produced time histories of responses to guidance commands and atmospheric disturbances at Mach numbers of 6, 10, 15, and 20. Angle of attack and throttle perturbation constraints, combined with high speed flight effects and the desire to maintain constant dynamic pressure, significantly impact the maneuver envelope for a hypersonic vehicle.

  1. Simultaneous Global Pressure and Temperature Measurement Technique for Hypersonic Wind Tunnels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Gregory M.

    2000-01-01

    High-temperature luminescent coatings are being developed and applied for simultaneous pressure and temperature mapping in conventional-type hypersonic wind tunnels, providing global pressure as well as Global aeroheating measurements. Together, with advanced model fabrication and analysis methods, these techniques will provide a more rapid and complete experimental aerodynamic and aerothermodynamic database for future aerospace vehicles. The current status in development of simultaneous pressure- and temperature-sensitive coatings and measurement techniques for hypersonic wind tunnels at Langley Research Center is described. and initial results from a feasibility study in the Langley 31-Inch Mach 10 Tunnel are presented.

  2. Applications of an implicit HLLC-based Godunov solver for steady state hypersonic problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Link, R.A.; Sharman, B. [Martec Limited, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada)]. E-mail: rickl@martec.com

    2005-07-01

    Over the past few years, there has been considerable activity developing research vehicles for studying hypersonic propulsion. Successful launches of the Australian Hyshot and the US Hyper-X vehicles have added a significant amount of flight test data to a field that had previously been limited to numerical simulation. A number of approaches have been proposed for hypersonics propulsion, including attached detonation wave, supersonics combustion, and shock induced combustion. Due to the high cost of developing flight hardware, CFD simulations will continue to be a key tool for investigating the feasibility of these concepts. Capturing the interactions of the vehicle body with the boundary layer and chemical reactions pushes the limits of available modelling tools and computer hardware. Explicit formulations are extremely slow in converging to a steady state; therefore, the use of implicit methods are warranted. An implicit LLC-based Godunov solver has been developed at Martec in collaboration with DRDC Valcartier to solve hypersonic problems with a minimum of CPU time and RAM storage. The solver, Chinook Implicit, is based upon the implicit formulation adopted by Batten et. al. The solver is based on a point implicit Gauss-Seidel method for unstructured grids, and includes fully implicit boundary conditions. Preliminary results for small and large scale inviscid hypersonics problems will be presented. (author)

  3. Trajectory Approaches for Launching Hypersonic Flight Tests (Preprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    can be very difficult and expensive to test on the ground, it is sometimes a better value to pursue a flight test effort. Most of these hypersonic...at the end of the program using the lessons learned. This vehicle design was sized based on 4 SpaceX Merlin engines16 an capable of putting a 5,000...trajectories. An observations from the results is that as the dynamic pressure constraint is increased in value , the trajectory as seen in Figure 16

  4. Study of hypersonic propulsion/airframe integration technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartill, W. R.; Goebel, T. P.; Vancamp, V. V.

    1978-01-01

    An assessment is done of current and potential ground facilities, and analysis and flight test techniques for establishing a hypersonic propulsion/airframe integration technology base. A mach 6 cruise prototype aircraft incorporating integrated Scramjet engines was considered the baseline configuration, and the assessment focused on the aerodynamic and configuration aspects of the integration technology. The study describes the key technology milestones that must be met to permit a decision on development of a prototype vehicle, and defines risk levels for these milestones. Capabilities and limitations of analysis techniques, current and potential ground test facilities, and flight test techniques are described in terms of the milestones and risk levels.

  5. Instrumentation Development for Large Scale Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Gregory T.; Cassell, Alan M.

    2011-01-01

    Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (HIAD) technology is currently being considered for multiple atmospheric entry applications as the limitations of traditional entry vehicles have been reached. The Inflatable Re-entry Vehicle Experiment (IRVE) has successfully demonstrated this technology as a viable candidate with a 3.0 m diameter vehicle sub-orbital flight. To further this technology, large scale HIADs (6.0 8.5 m) must be developed and tested. To characterize the performance of large scale HIAD technology new instrumentation concepts must be developed to accommodate the flexible nature inflatable aeroshell. Many of the concepts that are under consideration for the HIAD FY12 subsonic wind tunnel test series are discussed below.

  6. Hypersonic modes in nanophononic semiconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepplestone, S P; Srivastava, G P

    2008-09-05

    Frequency gaps and negative group velocities of hypersonic phonon modes in periodically arranged composite semiconductors are presented. Trends and criteria for phononic gaps are discussed using a variety of atomic-level theoretical approaches. From our calculations, the possibility of achieving semiconductor-based one-dimensional phononic structures is established. We present results of the location and size of gaps, as well as negative group velocities of phonon modes in such structures. In addition to reproducing the results of recent measurements of the locations of the band gaps in the nanosized Si/Si{0.4}Ge{0.6} superlattice, we show that such a system is a true one-dimensional hypersonic phononic crystal.

  7. Ion cumulation by conical cathode electrolysis.

    CERN Document Server

    Grishin, V G

    2002-01-01

    Results of solid-state sodium stearate electrolysis with conical and cylindrical cathodes is presented here. Both electric measurement and conical samples destruction can be explained if a stress developing inside the conical sample is much bigger than in the cylindrical case and there is its unlimited amplification along cone slopes. OTHER KEYWORDS: ion, current, solid, symmetry, cumulation, polarization, depolarization, ionic conductor,superionic conductor, ice, crystal, strain, V-center, V-centre, doped crystal, interstitial impurity, intrinsic color center, high pressure technology, Bridgman, anvil, experiment, crowdion, dielectric, proton, layer, defect, lattice, dynamics, electromigration, mobility, muon catalysis, concentration, doping, dopant, conductivity, pycnonuclear reaction, permittivity, dielectric constant, point defects, interstitials, polarizability, imperfection, defect centers, glass, epitaxy, sodium hydroxide, metallic substrate, crystallization, point, tip, susceptibility, ferroelectric, ...

  8. Black hole thermodynamics with conical defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appels, Michael; Gregory, Ruth; Kubizňák, David

    2017-05-01

    Recently we have shown [1] how to formulate a thermodynamic first law for a single (charged) accelerated black hole in AdS space by fixing the conical deficit angles present in the spacetime. Here we show how to generalise this result, formulating thermodynamics for black holes with varying conical deficits. We derive a new potential for the varying tension defects: the thermodynamic length, both for accelerating and static black holes. We discuss possible physical processes in which the tension of a string ending on a black hole might vary, and also map out the thermodynamic phase space of accelerating black holes and explore their critical phenomena.

  9. Gravitational Fields of Conical Mass Distributions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chifu Ebenezer Ndikilar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The gravitational field of conical mass distributions is formulated using the general theory of relativity. The gravitational metric tensor is constructed and applied to the motion of test particles and photons in this gravitational field. The expression for gravitational time dilation is found to have the same form as that in spherical, oblate spheroidal, and prolate spheroidal gravitational fields and hence confirms an earlier assertion that this gravitational phenomena is invariant in form with various mass distributions. It is shown using the pure radial equation of motion that as a test particle moves closer to the conical mass distribution along the radial direction, its radial speed decreases.

  10. Parametric Study of Cantilever Plates Exposed to Supersonic and Hypersonic Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sri Harsha, A.; Rizwan, M.; Kuldeep, S.; Giridhara Prasad, A.; Akhil, J.; Nagaraja, S. R.

    2017-08-01

    Analysis of hypersonic flows associated with re-entry vehicles has gained a lot of significance due to the advancements in Aerospace Engineering. An area that is studied extensively by researchers is the simultaneous reduction aerodynamic drag and aero heating in re-entry vehicles. Out of the many strategies being studied, the use of aerospikes at the stagnation point of the vehicle is found to give favourable results. The structural stability of the aerospike becomes important as it is exposed to very high pressures and temperatures. Keeping this in view, the deflection and vibration of an inclined cantilever plate in hypersonic flow is carried out using ANSYS. Steady state pressure distribution obtained from Fluent is applied as load to the transient structural module for analysis. After due validation of the methods, the effects of parameters like flow Mach number, plate inclination and plate thickness on the deflection and vibration are studied.

  11. Wall catalytic recombination and boundary conditions in nonequilibrium hypersonic flows - With applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Carl D.

    1992-01-01

    The meaning of catalysis and its relation to aerodynamic heating in nonequilibrium hypersonic flows are discussed. The species equations are described and boundary conditions for them are derived for a multicomponent gas and for a binary gas. Slip effects are included for application of continuum methods to low-density flows. Measurement techniques for determining catalytic wall recombination rates are discussed. Among them are experiments carried out in arc jets as well as flow reactors. Diagnostic methods for determining the atom or molecule concentrations in the flow are included. Results are given for a number of materials of interest to the aerospace community, including glassy coatings such as the RCG coating of the Space Shuttle and for high temperature refractory metals such as coated niobium. Methods of calculating the heat flux to space vehicles in nonequilibrium flows are described. These methods are applied to the Space Shuttle, the planned Aeroassist Flight Experiment, and a hypersonic slender vehicle such as a transatmospheric vehicle.

  12. Subscale Test Program for the Orion Conical Ribbon Drogue Parachute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Anita; Stuart, Phil; Machin, Ricardo; Bourland, Gary; Schwing, Allen; Longmire, Ellen; Henning, Elsa; Sinclair, Rob

    2011-01-01

    A subscale wind tunnel test program for Orion's conical ribbon drogue parachute is under development. The desired goals of the program are to quantify aerodynamic performance of the parachute in the wake of the entry vehicle, including understanding of the coupling of the parachute and command module dynamics, and an improved understanding of the load distribution within the textile elements of the parachute. The test program is ten percent of full scale conducted in a 3x2.1 m (10x7 ft) closed loop subsonic wind tunnel. The subscale test program is uniquely suited to probing the aerodynamic and structural environment in both a quantitative and qualitative manner. Non-intrusive diagnostics, including Particle Image Velocimetry for wake velocity surveys, high speed pressure transducers for canopy pressure distribution, and a high speed photogrammetric reconstruction, will be used to quantify the parachute's performance.

  13. Thermal design of AOTV heatshields for a conical drag brake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitts, W. C.; Murbach, M. S.

    1985-01-01

    Results are presented from an on-going study of the thermal performance of thermal protection systems for a conical drag brake type AOTV. Three types of heatshield are considered: rigid ceramic insulation, flexible ceramic blankets, and ceramic cloths. The results for the rigid insulation apply to other types of AOTV as well. Charts are presented in parametric form so that they may be applied to a variety of missions and vehicle configurations. The parameters considered include: braking maneuver heat flux and total heat load, heatshield material and thickness, heatshield thermal mass and conductivity, absorptivity and emissivity of surfaces, thermal mass of support structure, and radiation transmission through thin heatshields. Results of temperature calculations presented show trends with and sensitivities to these parameters. The emphasis is on providing information that will be useful in estimating the minimum required mass of these heatshield materials.

  14. Thermal design of AOTV heatshields for a conical drag brake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitts, W. C.; Murbach, M. S.

    1985-06-01

    Results are presented from an on-going study of the thermal performance of thermal protection systems for a conical drag brake type AOTV. Three types of heatshield are considered: rigid ceramic insulation, flexible ceramic blankets, and ceramic cloths. The results for the rigid insulation apply to other types of AOTV as well. Charts are presented in parametric form so that they may be applied to a variety of missions and vehicle configurations. The parameters considered include: braking maneuver heat flux and total heat load, heatshield material and thickness, heatshield thermal mass and conductivity, absorptivity and emissivity of surfaces, thermal mass of support structure, and radiation transmission through thin heatshields. Results of temperature calculations presented show trends with and sensitivities to these parameters. The emphasis is on providing information that will be useful in estimating the minimum required mass of these heatshield materials.

  15. Design, Analysis and Qualification of Elevon for Reusable Launch Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, S. B.; Suresh, R.; Krishnadasan, C. K.

    2017-12-01

    Reusable launch vehicle technology demonstrator is configured as a winged body vehicle, designed to fly in hypersonic, supersonic and subsonic regimes. The vehicle will be boosted to hypersonic speeds after which the winged body separates and descends using aerodynamic control. The aerodynamic control is achieved using the control surfaces mainly the rudder and the elevon. Elevons are deflected for pitch and roll control of the vehicle at various flight conditions. Elevons are subjected to aerodynamic, thermal and inertial loads during the flight. This paper gives details about the configuration, design, qualification and flight validation of elevon for Reusable Launch Vehicle.

  16. Design, Analysis and Qualification of Elevon for Reusable Launch Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, S. B.; Suresh, R.; Krishnadasan, C. K.

    2017-11-01

    Reusable launch vehicle technology demonstrator is configured as a winged body vehicle, designed to fly in hypersonic, supersonic and subsonic regimes. The vehicle will be boosted to hypersonic speeds after which the winged body separates and descends using aerodynamic control. The aerodynamic control is achieved using the control surfaces mainly the rudder and the elevon. Elevons are deflected for pitch and roll control of the vehicle at various flight conditions. Elevons are subjected to aerodynamic, thermal and inertial loads during the flight. This paper gives details about the configuration, design, qualification and flight validation of elevon for Reusable Launch Vehicle.

  17. High Test Peroxide High Sealing Conical Seal Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — High Test Peroxide (HTP) Highly Compatible High Sealing Conical Seals are necessary for ground test operations and space based applications. Current conical seals...

  18. Conical polyurethane implants: an uplifting augmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgeu, Garrick A; Frame, James D; Frame, James D

    2013-11-01

    Polyurethane-coated conical implants were introduced by Silimed (US distributor: Sientra, Santa Barbara, California) in 2008 and offer an alternative to round or anatomically shaped implants. By their design and volume distribution, they naturally create central volume and give a reasonable fullness to the upper pole while lifting some ptotic breasts, thus avoiding the need for classical mastopexy. The authors discuss the advantages of conical implants as an alternative to conventional silicone implants for women with breast ptosis. In the 2-year period between December 2010 and December 2012, a consecutive series of 302 women underwent implant-based breast surgery procedures (236 primary augmentations, 59 revisions, and 7 mastopexy-augmentations) with conical polyurethane devices. Implant volumes ranged from 225 to 560 cc, with low- to medium-profile devices predominating. No extra-high-profile implants were used. Only 1 patient had a drain inserted on completion of a revision augmentation. There were no infections (0%) and no wound dehiscence (0%). Four cases required reoperation (1.3%). Patient satisfaction scores were universally high (average, 9.94/10). There have been no capsular contractures to date, but follow-up is short. The modern conical, polyurethane implant has many advantages over the conventional round or anatomically shaped implants and offers patients an ideal compromise between volume, natural upper pole fullness, and a lift without mastopexy scars.

  19. Mechanical Forces Alter Conical Intersections Topology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivero, Daniel; Valentini, Alessio; Fernández-González, Miguel Ángel; Zapata, Felipe; García-Iriepa, Cristina; Sampedro, Diego; Palmeiro, Raúl; Frutos, Luis Manuel

    2015-08-11

    Photoreactivity can be influenced by mechanical forces acting over a reacting chromophore. Nevertheless, the specific effect of the external forces in the photoreaction mechanism remains essentially unknown. Conical intersections are key structures in photochemistry, as they constitute the funnels connecting excited and ground states. These crossing points are well known to provide valuable information on molecular photoreactivity, including crucial aspects as potential photoproducts which may be predicted by just inspection of the branching plane vectors. Here, we outline a general framework for understanding the effect of mechanical forces on conical intersections and their implications on photoreactivity. Benzene S1/S0 conical intersection topology can be dramatically altered by applying less than 1 nN force, making the peaked pattern of the intersection become a sloped one, also provoking the transition state in the excited state to disappear. Both effects can be related to an increase in the photostability as the conical intersection becomes more accessible, and its topology in this case favors the recovery of the initial reactant. The results indicate that the presence of external forces acting over a chromophore have to be considered as a potential method for photochemical reactivity control.

  20. Vortex breakdown in a truncated conical bioreactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balci, Adnan; Brøns, Morten; Herrada, Miguel A.

    2015-01-01

    This numerical study explains the eddy formation and disappearance in a slow steady axisymmetric air–water flow in a vertical truncated conical container, driven by the rotating top disk. Numerous topological metamorphoses occur as the water height, Hw, and the bottom-sidewall angle, α, vary. It ...

  1. Low-threshold conical microcavity dye lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grossmann, Tobias; Schleede, Simone; Hauser, Mario

    2010-01-01

    We report on lasing in rhodamine 6G-doped, conical polymeric microcavities with high quality factors fabricated on a silicon substrate. Threshold pump energies as low as 3 nJ are achieved by free-space excitation in the quasistationary pumping regime with lasing wavelengths around 600 nm. Finite...

  2. Hypersonic Composites Resist Extreme Heat and Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Through research contracts with NASA, Materials and Electrochemical Research Corporation (MER), of Tucson, Arizona, contributed a number of technologies to record-breaking hypersonic flights. Through this research, MER developed a coating that successfully passed testing to simulate Mach 10 conditions, as well as provide several additional carbon-carbon (C-C) composite components for the flights. MER created all of the leading edges for the X-43A test vehicles at Dryden-considered the most critical parts of this experimental craft. In addition to being very heat resistant, the coating had to be very lightweight and thin, as the aircraft was designed to very precise specifications and could not afford to have a bulky coating. MER patented its carbon-carbon (C-C) composite process and then formed a spinoff company, Frontier Materials Corporation (FMC), also based in Tucson. FMC is using the patent in conjunction with low-cost PAN (polyacrylonitrile)-based fibers to introduce these materials to the commercial markets. The C-C composites are very lightweight and exceptionally strong and stiff, even at very high temperatures. The composites have been used in industrial heating applications, the automotive and aerospace industries, as well as in glass manufacturing and on semiconductors. Applications also include transfer components for glass manufacturing and structural members for carrier support in semiconductor processing.

  3. Study of heat sink thermal protection systems for hypersonic research aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahl, W. A.; Edwards, C. L. W.

    1978-01-01

    The feasibility of using a single metallic heat sink thermal protection system (TPS) over a projected flight test program for a hypersonic research vehicle was studied using transient thermal analyses and mission performance calculations. Four materials, aluminum, titanium, Lockalloy, and beryllium, as well as several combinations, were evaluated. Influence of trajectory parameters were considered on TPS and mission performance for both the clean vehicle configuration as well as with an experimental scramjet mounted. From this study it was concluded that a metallic heat sink TPS can be effectively employed for a hypersonic research airplane flight envelope which includes dash missions in excess of Mach 8 and 60 seconds of cruise at Mach numbers greater than 6. For best heat sink TPS match over the flight envelope, Lockalloy and titanium appear to be the most promising candidates

  4. Hypersonic wave drag reduction performance of cylinders with repetitive laser energy depositions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, J; Hong, Y J; Li, Q; Huang, H, E-mail: fangjuan314@163.com [Academy of Equipment Command and Technology, Post Box 3380-86, Huairou Dis. Beijing 101416 (China)

    2011-02-01

    It has been widely research that wave drag reduction on hypersonic vehicle by laser energy depositions. Using laser energy to reduce wave drag can improve vehicle performance. A second order accurate scheme based on finite-difference method and domain decomposition of structural grid is used to compute the drag performance of cylinders in a hypersonic flow of Mach number 2 at altitude of 15km with repetitive energy depositions. The effects of frequency on drag reduction are studied. The calculated results show: the recirculation zone is generated due to the interaction between bow shock over the cylinder and blast wave produced by energy deposition, and a virtual spike which is supported by an axis-symmetric recirculation, is formed in front of the cylinder. By increasing the repetitive frequency, the drag is reduced and the oscillation of the drag is decreased; however, the energy efficiency decreases by increasing the frequency.

  5. Propulsion Airframe Integration Test Techniques for Hypersonic Airbreathing Configurations at NASA Langley Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witte, David W.; Huebner, Lawrence D.; Trexler, Carl A.; Cabell, Karen F.; Andrews, Earl H., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    The scope and significance of propulsion airframe integration (PAI) for hypersonic airbreathing vehicles is presented through a discussion of the PAI test techniques utilized at NASA Langley Research Center. Four primary types of PAI model tests utilized at NASA Langley for hypersonic airbreathing vehicles are discussed. The four types of PAI test models examined are the forebody/inlet test model, the partial-width/truncated propulsion flowpath test model, the powered exhaust simulation test model, and the full-length/width propulsion flowpath test model. The test technique for each of these four types of PAI test models is described, and the relevant PAI issues addressed by each test technique are illustrated through the presentation of recent PAI test data.

  6. IMPACT CONICAL ROD ON HARD LIMITER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulitin G.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The problem is considered of longitudinal impact conical rod in article. A recommendation on the use of the approximate method of calculation is based on an analysis of the influence of design parameters on the value of the main oscillation frequency. There was obtained an equation of the displacement and stress of the rod. Engineering dependence has been proposed to determine the maximum force in the impact section.

  7. Conical Reflection in Direct Simulation Monte Carlo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampson, Andrew; Payne, Adam; Somers, William; Spencer, Ross

    2006-10-01

    Fenix is a particle-in-cell simulation, using a Direct Simulation Monte Carlo method, and is aimed to improve the accuracy of Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS). It currently focuses on the ICP-MS first expansion region through a supersonic nozzle in cylindrical symmetry. Due to increased complexity in Fenix, it has become necessary to solve the general conical surface reflection problem. The previous method, the new solution, and results from the enhanced simulation will be presented.

  8. Electroosmotic flow rectification in conical nanopores

    OpenAIRE

    Laohakunakorn, Nadanai; Keyser, Ulrich F.

    2015-01-01

    Recent experimental work has suggested that electroosmotic flows (EOF) through conical nanopores exhibit rectification in the opposite sense to the well-studied effect of ionic current rectification. A positive bias voltage generates large EOF and small current, while negative voltages generate small EOF and large current. Here we systematically investigate this effect using finite-element simulations. We find that inside the pore, the electric field and salt concentration are inversely corre...

  9. Electron Kinetics in Hypersonic Plasmas Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The goal of this SBIR project is to advance the state-of-the-art in computations of hypersonic plasmas by adding high-fidelity kinetic models for electrons. Electron...

  10. Air-breathing hypersonic cruise - Prospects for Mach 4-7 waverider aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blankson, Isaiah M.

    1992-06-01

    In the Mach 4-7 range, waverider aircraft are considered as candidates for both short- and long-range cruise missions, as hypersonic missiles, and as high L/D highly maneuverable craft. The potential for near- and far-term application of airbreathing engines to the waverider vehicle missions and concepts is presented. Attention is focused on the cruise mission and attempts are made to compare and contrast it with the accelerator mission.

  11. HIFiRE-5 Flight Vehicle Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimmel, Roger L.; Adamczak, David; Berger, Karen; Choudhari, Meelan

    2010-01-01

    The Hypersonic International Flight Research Experimentation (HIFiRE) program is a hypersonic flight test program executed by the Air Force Research Laboratories (AFRL) and Australian Defence Science and Technology Organization (DSTO). HIFiRE flight 5 is devoted to measuring transition on a three-dimensional body. This paper summarizes payload configuration, trajectory, vehicle stability limits and roughness tolerances. Results show that the proposed configuration is suitable for testing transition on a three-dimensional body. Transition is predicted to occur within the test window, and a design has been developed that will allow the vehicle to be manufactured within prescribed roughness tolerances

  12. Hypersonic sliding target tracking in near space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang-yu Zhang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available To improve the tracking accuracy of hypersonic sliding target in near space, the influence of target hypersonic movement on radar detection and tracking is analyzed, and an IMM tracking algorithm is proposed based on radial velocity compensating and cancellation processing of high dynamic biases under the earth centered earth fixed (ECEF coordinate. Based on the analysis of effect of target hypersonic movement, a measurement model is constructed to reduce the filter divergence which is caused by the model mismatch. The high dynamic biases due to the target hypersonic movement are approximately compensated through radial velocity estimation to achieve the hypersonic target tracking at low systematic biases in near space. The high dynamic biases are further eliminated by the cancellation processing of different radars, in which the track association problem can be solved when the dynamic biases are low. An IMM algorithm based on constant acceleration (CA, constant turning (CT and Singer models is used to achieve the hypersonic sliding target tracking in near space. Simulation results show that the target tracking in near space can be achieved more effectively by using the proposed algorithm.

  13. Experimental Analysis of a 2-D Lightcraft in Static and Hypersonic Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvador, Israel I.; Myrabo, Leik N.; Minucci, Marco A. S.; de Oliveira, Antonio C.; Rego, Israel S.; Toro, Paulo G. P.; Channes, José B.

    2010-05-01

    Aiming at the hypersonic phase of the Earth-to-Orbit trajectory for a laser propelled vehicle, a 2-D Lightcraft model was designed to be tested at the T3 Hypersonic Shock Tunnel at the Henry T. Nagamatsu Laboratory for Aerodynamics and Hypersonics. A high energy laser pulse was supplied by a Lumonics TEA 620 laser system operating in unstable resonator cavity mode. The experiments were performed at quiescent (no flow) conditions and at a nominal Mach number of 9.2. A Schlieren visualization apparatus was used in order to access both the cold hypersonic flowfield structure (without laser deposition) and the time dependent flowfield structure, taking place after the laser induced breakdown inside the absorption chamber. The model was fitted with piezoelectric pressure transducers and surface junction thermocouples in an attempt to measure pressure and heat transfer time dependent distributions at the internal surfaces of the model's absorption chamber. The 2-D model followed a modular design for flexibility on the analysis of geometrical features contribution on the expansion of the laser induced blast wave. Finally, future evolution of the experiments being currently pursued is addressed.

  14. Hypersonic MHD Propulsion System Integration for the Mercury Lightcraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myrabo, L. N.; Rosa, R. J.

    2004-03-01

    Introduced herein are the design, systems integration, and performance analysis of an exotic magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) slipstream accelerator engine for a single-occupant ``Mercury'' lightcraft. This ultra-energetic, laser-boosted vehicle is designed to ride a `tractor beam' into space, transmitted from a future orbital network of satellite solar power stations. The lightcraft's airbreathing combined-cycle engine employs a rotary pulsed detonation thruster mode for lift-off & landing, and an MHD slipstream accelerator mode at hypersonic speeds. The latter engine transforms the transatmospheric acceleration path into a virtual electromagnetic `mass-driver' channel; the hypersonic momentum exchange process (with the atmosphere) enables engine specific impulses in the range of 6000 to 16,000 seconds, and propellant mass fractions as low as 10%. The single-stage-to-orbit, highly reusable lightcraft can accelerate at 3 Gs into low Earth orbit with its throttle just barely beyond `idle' power, or virtually `disappear' at 30 G's and beyond. The objective of this advanced lightcraft design is to lay the technological foundations for a safe, very low cost (e.g., 1000X below chemical rockets) air and space transportation for human life in the mid-21st Century - a system that will be completely `green' and independent of Earth's limited fossil fuel reserves.

  15. Nonadiabatic Eigenfunctions Can Have Amplitude, Signed Conical Nodes, or Signed Higher Order Nodes at a Conical Intersection with Circular Symmetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Peter W; Jonas, David M

    2017-10-05

    Numerically exact nonadiabatic eigenfunctions are computed for a two-dimensional conical intersection with circular symmetry, for which a pseudorotation quantum number is conserved and all eigenstates are doubly degenerate. In the calculations reported here, the conical intersection is submerged, with energy below the zero point level. The complete real-valued vibrational-electronic eigenfunctions are visualized using Hunter's exact factorization for the total vibrational amplitude factor and color for the electronic factor. The zero-point levels have nonzero amplitude at the conical intersection. Nodes in the degenerate nonadiabatic eigenfunctions are classified as accidental if they can be moved or removed by a change in degenerate basis and as essential if they cannot. An integer electronic index defines the order of the nodes for nonadiabatic eigenfunctions by simple closed counterclockwise line integrals. Higher eigenstates can have accidental conical nodes around the conical intersection and essential nodes of varying circular orders at the conical intersection. The signs of the essential nodes are all opposite the sign of the conical intersection and the signed node orders obey sum rules. Even for submerged conical intersections, the appearance of the exact eigenstates motivates use of signed, half-odd-integral, pseudorotation quantum numbers j. Essential nodes of absolute order (|j| - 1/2) are located on the conical intersection for |j| greater than or equal to 3/2. The eigenfunctions around essential first order nodes are right circular cones with their vertex at the conical intersection.

  16. Morphological record of oxygenic photosynthesis in conical stromatolites

    OpenAIRE

    Bosak, Tanja; Liang, Biqing; Sim, Min Sub; Petroff, Alexander P.

    2009-01-01

    Conical stromatolites are thought to be robust indicators of the presence of photosynthetic and phototactic microbes in aquatic environments as early as 3.5 billion years ago. However, phototaxis alone cannot explain the ubiquity of disrupted, curled, and contorted laminae in the crests of many Mesoproterozoic, Paleoproterozoic, and some Archean conical stromatolites. Here, we demonstrate that cyanobacterial production of oxygen in the tips of modern conical aggregates creates contorted lamin...

  17. Decomposition in conic optimization with partially separable structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Yifan; Andersen, Martin Skovgaard; Vandenberghe, Lieven

    2014-01-01

    Decomposition techniques for linear programming are difficult to extend to conic optimization problems with general nonpolyhedral convex cones because the conic inequalities introduce an additional nonlinear coupling between the variables. However in many applications the convex cones have...... semidefinite and positive-semidefinite-completable matrices with chordal sparsity patterns. The paper describes a decomposition method that exploits partial separability in conic linear optimization. The method is based on Spingarn's method for equality constrained convex optimization, combined with a fast...

  18. Nonlinear Aerodynamics of Conical Delta Wings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sritharan, Sivaguru Sornalingam

    Steady, inviscid, supersonic flow past conical wings is studied within the context of irrotational, nonlinear theory. An efficient numerical method is developed to calculate cones of arbitrary section at incidence. The method is fully conservative and implements a body conforming mesh generator. The conical potential is assumed to have its best linear variation inside each cell; a secondary interlocking cell system is used to establish the flux balance required to conserve mass. In regions of supersonic cross flow, the discretization scheme is desymmetrized by adding the appropriate artificial viscosity in conservation form. The algorithm is nearly an order of magnitude faster than present Euler methods. It predicts known results as long as the flow Mach numbers normal to the shock waves are near 1; qualitative features, such as nodal point lift -off, are also predicted correctly. Results for circular and thin elliptic cones are shown to compare very well with calculations using Euler equations. This algorithm is then implemented in the design of conical wings to be free from shock waves terminating embedded supersonic zones adjacent to the body. This is accomplished by generating a smooth cross-flow sonic surface by using a fictitious gas law that makes the governing equation elliptic inside the cross-flow sonic surface. The shape of the wing required to provide this shock-free flow, if such a flow is consistent with the sonic surface data, is found by solving the Cauchy problem inside the sonic surface using the data on this surface and, of course, the correct gas law. This design procedure is then demonstrated using the simple case of a circular cone at angle of attack.

  19. Wave-vector and polarization dependence of conical refraction

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Turpin, A; Loiko, Yu V; Kalkandjiev, T K; Tomizawa, H; Mompart, J

    2013-01-01

    We experimentally address the wave-vector and polarization dependence of the internal conical refraction phenomenon by demonstrating that an input light beam of elliptical transverse profile refracts...

  20. Nonadiabatic eigenfunctions can have conical nodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Peter W.; Peters, William K.; Jonas, David M.

    2017-09-01

    It has been argued the total vibrational probability amplitude for a molecular nonadiabatic eigenfunction should not have nodes unless required by symmetry. For a model with two nonadiabatically coupled electronic states, exact factorization of nonadiabatic eigenfunctions into a total vibrational probability amplitude and a normalized electronic factor reveals zero-dimensional nodes in nonadiabatic eigenfunctions over a two-dimensional vibrational space. These conical nodes have the shape of a right elliptical cone with the node at the vertex. Low dimensionality nodes are likely when the number of nonadiabatically coupled electronic states is less than or equal to the dimensionality of the vibrational space.

  1. Conical and bi-conical high-Q optical nanofiber microcoil resonator

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Fei; Horak, Peter; Brambilla, Gilberto

    2006-01-01

    The Q-factor of the optical nanowire microcoil resonator is calculated and compared for different geometries. The results suggest that the Q-factor is very sensitive to the coupling conditions and high-Q resonators can be obtained more easily when the geometry of the nanowire microcoil resonator or its coupling contour has a bi-conical profile.

  2. Numerical study on aerodynamic heat of hypersonic flight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Haiming

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate prediction of the shock wave has a significant effect on the development of space transportation vehicle or exploration missions. Taking Lobb sphere as the example, the aerodynamic heat of hypersonic flight in different Mach numbers is simulated by the finite volume method. Chemical reactions and non-equilibrium heat are taken into account in this paper, where convective flux of the space term adopts the Roe format, and discretization of the time term is achieved by backward Euler algorithm. The numerical results reveal that thick mesh can lead to accurate prediction, and the thickness of the shock wave decreases as grid number increases. Furthermore, most of kinetic energy converts into internal energy crossing the shock wave.

  3. Hypersonic waverider configurations from the 1950's to the 1990's

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggers, A. J., Jr.; Ashley, Holt; Springer, George S.; Bowles, Jeffrey V.; Ardema, Mark D.

    1990-01-01

    The conceptual evolution of waverider configurations and their applications to hypersonic air vehicles are examined in the context of evolving mission requirements and technological advances. The fundamental objective of employing configurations which tend to maximize the payload fraction is emphasized, and the achievement of this objective over the time period of interest is reviewed, starting with high drag ballistic vehicles through low lift-drag ratio lifting bodies to the revived interest in high lift-drag ratio configurations. Practical applications of research in the area of lifting waveriders are discussed with particular reference to the B-70 Valkyrie and the Space Shuttle.

  4. Achievements Obtained for Sustained Hypersonic Flight within the LAPCAT-II Project

    OpenAIRE

    Steelant, Johan; Varvill, Richard; Defoort, Sebastien; Hannemann, Klaus; Marini, Marco

    2015-01-01

    The design of hypersonic airbreathing vehicles is a challenging objective due to the intrinsic complexity of propulsion-airframe integration in combination with an engine cycle design able to operate over a wide Mach number range. This is one of the objectives of EC co-funded project LAPCAT-II aiming to reduce antipodal flights to less than 2 to 4 hours. Among the several studied vehicles in the preceding project LAPCAT-I, only aircraft designs for Mach 5 and 8 flights were retained in the pr...

  5. Multiscale Computational Analysis of Nitrogen and Oxygen Gas-Phase Thermochemistry in Hypersonic Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Jason D.

    Understanding hypersonic aerodynamics is important for the design of next-generation aerospace vehicles for space exploration, national security, and other applications. Ground-level experimental studies of hypersonic flows are difficult and expensive; thus, computational science plays a crucial role in this field. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of extremely high-speed flows require models of chemical and thermal nonequilibrium processes, such as dissociation of diatomic molecules and vibrational energy relaxation. Current models are outdated and inadequate for advanced applications. We describe a multiscale computational study of gas-phase thermochemical processes in hypersonic flows, starting at the atomic scale and building systematically up to the continuum scale. The project was part of a larger effort centered on collaborations between aerospace scientists and computational chemists. We discuss the construction of potential energy surfaces for the N4, N2O2, and O4 systems, focusing especially on the multi-dimensional fitting problem. A new local fitting method named L-IMLS-G2 is presented and compared with a global fitting method. Then, we describe the theory of the quasiclassical trajectory (QCT) approach for modeling molecular collisions. We explain how we implemented the approach in a new parallel code for high-performance computing platforms. Results from billions of QCT simulations of high-energy N2 + N2, N2 + N, and N2 + O2 collisions are reported and analyzed. Reaction rate constants are calculated and sets of reactive trajectories are characterized at both thermal equilibrium and nonequilibrium conditions. The data shed light on fundamental mechanisms of dissociation and exchange reactions -- and their coupling to internal energy transfer processes -- in thermal environments typical of hypersonic flows. We discuss how the outcomes of this investigation and other related studies lay a rigorous foundation for new macroscopic models for

  6. Focal Conic Flower Textures at Curved Interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel A. Beller

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Focal conic domains (FCDs in smectic-A liquid crystals have drawn much attention, both for their exquisitely structured internal form and for their ability to direct the assembly of micromaterials and nanomaterials in a variety of patterns. A key to directing FCD assembly is control over the eccentricity of the domain. Here, we demonstrate a new paradigm for creating spatially varying FCD eccentricity by confining a hybrid-aligned smectic with curved interfaces. In particular, we manipulate interface behavior with colloidal particles in order to experimentally produce two examples of what has recently been dubbed the flower texture [C. Meyer et al., Focal Conic Stacking in Smectic A Liquid Crystals: Smectic Flower and Apollonius Tiling, Materials 2, 499, 2009MATEG91996-194410.3390/ma2020499], where the focal hyperbolæ diverge radially outward from the center of the texture, rather than inward as in the canonical éventail or fan texture. We explain how this unconventional assembly can arise from appropriately curved interfaces. Finally, we present a model for this system that applies the law of corresponding cones, showing how FCDs may be embedded smoothly within a “background texture” of large FCDs and concentric spherical layers, in a manner consistent with the qualitative features of the smectic flower. Such understanding could potentially lead to disruptive liquid-crystal technologies beyond displays, including patterning, smart surfaces, microlens arrays, sensors, and nanomanufacturing.

  7. Dynamic analysis of conical shells conveying fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senthil Kumar, D.; Ganesan, N.

    2008-02-01

    A formulation, based on the semi-analytical finite element method, is proposed for elastic conical shells conveying fluids. The structural equations are based on the shell element proposed by Ramasamy and Ganesan [Finite element analysis of fluid-filled isotropic cylindrical shells with constrained viscoelastic damping, Computers & Structures 70 (1998) 363-376] while the fluid model is based on velocity potential formulation used by Jayaraj et al. [A semi-analytical coupled finite element formulation for composite shells conveying fluids, Journal of Sound and Vibration 258(2) (2002) 287-307]. Dynamic pressure acting on the walls is derived from Bernoulli's equation. By imposing the requirement that the normal component of velocity of the solid and fluid are equal leads to fluid-structure coupling. The computer code developed has been validated using results available in the literature for cylindrical shells conveying fluid. The study has been carried out for conical shells of different cone angles and for boundary condition like clamped-clamped, simply supported and clamped free. In general, instability occurs at a critical fluid velocity corresponding to the shell circumferential mode with the lowest natural frequency. Critical fluid velocities are lower than that of equivalent cylindrical shells. This result holds good for all boundary conditions.

  8. Space Shuttle and Hypersonic Entry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Charles H.; Gerstenmaier, William H.

    2014-01-01

    Fifty years of human spaceflight have been characterized by the aerospace operations of the Soyuz, of the Space Shuttle and, more recently, of the Shenzhou. The lessons learned of this past half decade are important and very significant. Particularly interesting is the scenario that is downstream from the retiring of the Space Shuttle. A number of initiatives are, in fact, emerging from in the aftermath of the decision to terminate the Shuttle program. What is more and more evident is that a new era is approaching: the era of the commercial usage and of the commercial exploitation of space. It is probably fair to say, that this is the likely one of the new frontiers of expansion of the world economy. To make a comparison, in the last 30 years our economies have been characterized by the digital technologies, with examples ranging from computers, to cellular phones, to the satellites themselves. Similarly, the next 30 years are likely to be characterized by an exponential increase of usage of extra atmospheric resources, as a result of more economic and efficient way to access space, with aerospace transportation becoming accessible to commercial investments. We are witnessing the first steps of the transportation of future generation that will drastically decrease travel time on our Planet, and significantly enlarge travel envelope including at least the low Earth orbits. The Steve Jobs or the Bill Gates of the past few decades are being replaced by the aggressive and enthusiastic energy of new entrepreneurs. It is also interesting to note that we are now focusing on the aerospace band, that lies on top of the aeronautical shell, and below the low Earth orbits. It would be a mistake to consider this as a known envelope based on the evidences of the flights of Soyuz, Shuttle and Shenzhou. Actually, our comprehension of the possible hypersonic flight regimes is bounded within really limited envelopes. The achievement of a full understanding of the hypersonic flight

  9. Role of Genome in the Formation of Conical Retroviral Shells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erdemci-Tandogan, Gonca; Wagner, Jef; Schoot, Paul van der; Zandi, Roya

    2016-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) capsid proteins spontaneously assemble around the genome into a protective protein shell called the capsid, which can take on a variety of shapes broadly classified as conical, cylindrical and irregular. The majority of capsids seen in in vivo studies are conical

  10. NASA's hypersonic propulsion program: History and direction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wander, Steve

    1992-01-01

    Research into hypersonic propulsion; i.e., supersonic combustion, was seriously initiated at the Langley Research Center in the 1960's with the Hypersonic Research Engine (HRE) project. This project was designed to demonstrate supersonic combustion within the context of an engine module consisting of an inlet, combustor, and nozzle. In addition, the HRE utilized both subsonic and supersonic combustion (dual-mode) to demonstrate smooth operation over a Mach 4 to 7 speed range. The propulsion program thus concentrated on fundamental supersonic combustion studies and free jet propulsion tests for the three dimensional fixed geometry engine design to demonstrate inlet and combustor integration and installed performance potential. The developmental history of the program is presented. Additionally, the HRE program's effect on the current state of hypersonic propulsion is discussed.

  11. Study on Aerothermal Effects of Viscous Shock Interaction in Hypersonic Inlets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henckels, A.; Gruhn, P.

    2005-02-01

    The objective of this study is to gain insight into the complex flow phenomena governing the aerodynamics of inlets for airbreathing space vehicles. A fully established flow field to simulate external and internal compression processes of different inlet models with three ramps is ensured by the hypersonic blow down tunnel H2K with its long test duration. Comprehensive information about thermal loads on the wall is gained by IR-thermography, i.e. thermal mapping of the PTFE model surfaces. Complementary information is obtained by flow visualizations and pressure measurements. The influence of model parts like side walls is demonstrated and separation regions are determined with respect to the boundary layer state. Altogether, the experimental results provide a substantial insight into the aerodynamics of hypersonic propulsion components.

  12. Morphological record of oxygenic photosynthesis in conical stromatolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosak, Tanja; Liang, Biqing; Sim, Min Sub; Petroff, Alexander P

    2009-07-07

    Conical stromatolites are thought to be robust indicators of the presence of photosynthetic and phototactic microbes in aquatic environments as early as 3.5 billion years ago. However, phototaxis alone cannot explain the ubiquity of disrupted, curled, and contorted laminae in the crests of many Mesoproterozoic, Paleoproterozoic, and some Archean conical stromatolites. Here, we demonstrate that cyanobacterial production of oxygen in the tips of modern conical aggregates creates contorted laminae and submillimeter-to-millimeter-scale enmeshed bubbles. Similarly sized fossil bubbles and contorted laminae may be present only in the crestal zones of some conical stromatolites 2.7 billion years old or younger. This implies not only that cyanobacteria built Proterozoic conical stromatolites but also that fossil bubbles may constrain the timing of the evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis.

  13. The NASA hypersonic research engine program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubert, Kennedy F.; Lopez, Henry J.

    1992-01-01

    An overview is provided of the NASA Hypersonic Research Engine Program. The engine concept is described which was evolved, and the accomplishments of the program are summarized. The program was undertaken as an in-depth program of hypersonic airbreathing propulsion research to provide essential inputs to future prototype engine development and decision making. An airbreathing liquid hydrogen fueled research oriented scramjet was to be developed to certain performance goals. The work was many faceted, required aerodynamic design evaluation, structures development, and development of flight systems such as the fuel and control system, but the main objective was the study of the internal aerothermodynamics of the propulsion system.

  14. Five meter diameter conical furlable antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortenberry, J. W.; Freeland, R. E.; Moore, D. M.

    1976-01-01

    An investigation was made to demonstrate that a 5-meter-diameter, furlable, conical reflector antenna utilizing a line source feed can be fabricated utilizing composite materials and to prove that the antenna can function mechanically and electrically as prototype flight hardware. The design, analysis, and testing of the antenna are described. An RF efficiency of 55% at 8.5 GHz and a surface error of 0.64 mm rms were chosen as basic design requirements. Actual test measurements yielded an efficiency of 53% (49.77 dB gain) and a surface error of 0.61 mm rms. Atmospherically induced corrosion of the reflector mesh resulted in the RF performance degradation. An assessment of the antenna as compared to the current state of the art technology was made. This assessment included cost, surface accuracy and RF performance, structural and mechanical characteristics, and possible applications.

  15. Conically scanning lidar error in complex terrain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferhat Bingöl

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Conically scanning lidars assume the flow to be homogeneous in order to deduce the horizontal wind speed. However, in mountainous or complex terrain this assumption is not valid implying a risk that the lidar will derive an erroneous wind speed. The magnitude of this error is measured by collocating a meteorological mast and a lidar at two Greek sites, one hilly and one mountainous. The maximum error for the sites investigated is of the order of 10 %. In order to predict the error for various wind directions the flows at both sites are simulated with the linearized flow model, WAsP Engineering 2.0. The measurement data are compared with the model predictions with good results for the hilly site, but with less success at the mountainous site. This is a deficiency of the flow model, but the methods presented in this paper can be used with any flow model.

  16. Aero-Assisted Spacecraft Missions Using Hypersonic Waverider Aeroshells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knittel, Jeremy

    This work examines the use of high-lift, low drag vehicles which perform orbital transfers within a planet's atmosphere to reduce propulsive requirements. For the foreseeable future, spacecraft mission design will include the objective of limiting the mass of fuel required. One means of accomplishing this is using aerodynamics as a supplemental force, with what is termed an aero-assist maneuver. Further, the use of a lifting body enables a mission designer to explore candidate trajectory types wholly unavailable to non-lifting analogs. Examples include missions to outer planets by way of an aero-gravity assist, aero-assisted plane change, aero-capture, and steady atmospheric periapsis probing missions. Engineering level models are created in order to simulate both atmospheric and extra-atmospheric space flight. Each mission is parameterized using discrete variables which control multiple areas of design. This work combines the areas of hypersonic aerodynamics, re-entry aerothermodynamics, spacecraft orbital mechanics, and vehicle shape optimization. In particular, emphasis is given to the parametric design of vehicles known as "waveriders" which are inversely designed from known shock flowfields. An entirely novel means of generating a class of waveriders known as "starbodies" is presented. A complete analysis is performed of asymmetric starbody forms and compared to a better understood parameterization, "osculating cone" waveriders. This analysis includes characterization of stability behavior, a critical discipline within hypersonic flight. It is shown that asymmetric starbodies have significant stability improvement with only a 10% reduction in the lift-to-drag ratio. By combining the optimization of both the shape of the vehicle and the trajectory it flies, much is learned about the benefit that can be expected from lifting aero-assist missions. While previous studies have conceptually proven the viability, this work provides thorough quantification of the

  17. Investigation of air-breathing, hypersonic missile configurations within external box constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starkey, Ryan Peter

    2000-12-01

    Aspects relating to the aerodynamic, geometric, and propulsive design and analysis of missile-class, waverider-based hypersonic vehicles are explored. A quasi-one-dimensional engine model, including the effects of fuel injection, mixing, chemical production rates, heat transfer, and viscous losses is developed and utilized to assess the effects of finite rate hydrocarbon chemistry on optimized missile configurations. Resultant optimized single and double engine missile designs are shown for changes in fuel mixing length, fuel mixing efficiency, fuel injector location, and assumed fuel mass fraction. The effects of these different design conditions on the cruise range are explored, as well as perturbations around these design points for optimized vehicles. Aerodynamics are evaluated using a newly developed modified shock-expansion method. Missiles are optimized for steady-state trim conditions at the beginning of cruise using parallelized genetic algorithm optimization software developed for this study. All missile designs are assumed to reach cruising altitude and velocity through the use of an external rocket booster. The missile is geometrically constrained to fit within the 0.61 m x 0.61 m x 4.27 m [2 foot x 2 foot x 14 foot] box limits for a Naval vertical launch tube and has a desired cruise range of 750 km [400 nm] at Mach 6. Investigations are also shown for the effects of various modeling assumptions: (1) shock-expansion method versus a new modified shock-expansion aerodynamic method, (2) boundary layer assumptions, (3) assumed combustor temperature profile versus finite rate chemistry computations, and (4) ratio of specific heats assumptions. An overall analysis and optimization toolkit is developed for quick calculation of hypersonic aerodynamics and propulsion with added insight into externally constrained vehicles. Results show that the optimized combustor designs were extremely sensitive to small changes in flow conditions and that high

  18. Center of Excellence for Hypersonics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-25

    American astronauts on the moon . These observations motivated the need for a Center of Excellence in the area of hypersonic flows to advance the state of...as well as argon-xenon and argon- helium mixtures. The data produced by such first-principles MD simulations is then used to improve DSMC collision

  19. Hypersonic - Model Analysis as a Service

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Acretoaie, Vlad; Störrle, Harald

    2014-01-01

    Hypersonic is a Cloud-based tool that proposes a new approach to the deployment of model analysis facilities. It is implemented as a RESTful Web service API o_ering analysis features such as model clone detection. This approach allows the migration of resource intensive analysis algorithms from m...

  20. Design of a Broadband Inverted Conical Quadrifilar Helix Antenna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingyan Mo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces the design of a broadband inverted conical circularly polarized quadrifilar helix antenna (QHA. The antenna has many good characteristics, including wide beam and broad bandwidth, which are achieved by utilizing inverted conical geometry and adjusting the dimensions of the inverted conical support. The antenna is fed by a wideband network to provide 90° phase difference between the four arms with constant amplitude. The antenna impedance and axial ratio bandwidth values are more than 39% and 31.5%, respectively. The measured results coincide well with the simulated ones, which verified the effectiveness of the proposed design.

  1. Hypersonic Technology for Military Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-04-14

    TechnologyL . for Military Application Air Force Studies Board Commission on Engineering and Technical Systems National Research Council .iA -iorn For NTIS CNA...because coinp:’ters can simulate fraction of the vehicle, simultaneously twe hypQ rsonic flighi parameters of velccit;, free stream 7) The laige fuel

  2. An Approach to Establishing System Benefits for Technology in NASA's Hypersonics Investment Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hueter, Uwe; Pannell, Bill; Cook, Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    NASA's has established long term goals for access-to-space. The third generation launch systems are to be fully reusable and operational around 2025. The goals for the third generation launch system are to significantly reduce cost and improve safety over current systems. The Advanced Space Transportation Program (ASTP) Office at the NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, AL has the agency lead to develop space transportation technologies. Within ASTP, under the Hypersonics Investment Area, third generation technologies are being pursued. The Hypersonics Investment Area's primary objective is to mature vehicle technologies to enable substantial increases in the design and operating margins of third generation RLVs (current Space Shuttle is considered the first generation RLV) by incorporating advanced propulsion systems, materials, structures, thermal protection systems, power, and avionics technologies. The paper describes the system process, tools and concepts used to determine the technology benefits. Preliminary results will be presented along with the current technology investments that are being made by ASTP's Hypersonics Investment Area.

  3. Wind Tunnel to Flight: Numerical Simulations of Hypersonic Propulsion Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iaccarino, Gianluca

    2009-11-01

    Uncertainties in the flight conditions and limitations of ground based facilities create inherent difficulties in assessing the performance of hypersonic propulsion systems. We use numerical simulations to investigate the correlation of wind-tunnel measurements (Steelant et al., 2006) and flight data (Hass et al., 2005) for the HyShot vehicle; the objective is to identify potential engine unstart events occurring under different combustion regimes. As a first step we perform simulations corresponding to both reacting and non-reacting conditions in the ground-based facility to validate the numerical tools. Next, we focus on reproducing the flight conditions; a fundamental difficulty is the lack of precise information about the vehicle trajectory. A Bayesian inversion strategy is used to infer the altitude, angle of attack and Mach number from the noisy pressure measurements collected during the flight. The estimated conditions, together with the scatter due to the measurement uncertainty, are then used to study the flow and thermal fields in the combustor. The details of the methods used to characterize the uncertainty in the flow simulations and to perform the Bayesian inversion will also be discussed.

  4. Development of a computer code for calculating the steady super/hypersonic inviscid flow around real configurations. Volume 1: Computational technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marconi, F.; Salas, M.; Yaeger, L.

    1976-01-01

    A numerical procedure has been developed to compute the inviscid super/hypersonic flow field about complex vehicle geometries accurately and efficiently. A second order accurate finite difference scheme is used to integrate the three dimensional Euler equations in regions of continuous flow, while all shock waves are computed as discontinuities via the Rankine Hugoniot jump conditions. Conformal mappings are used to develop a computational grid. The effects of blunt nose entropy layers are computed in detail. Real gas effects for equilibrium air are included using curve fits of Mollier charts. Typical calculated results for shuttle orbiter, hypersonic transport, and supersonic aircraft configurations are included to demonstrate the usefulness of this tool.

  5. A Conic Section Approach to the Relativistic Reflection Law

    CERN Document Server

    Maesumi, Mohsen

    2016-01-01

    We consider the reflection of light, from a stationary source, off of a uniformly moving flat mirror, and derive the relativistic reflection law using well-known properties of conic sections. The effective surface of reflection (ESR) is defined as the loci of intersection of all beams, emanating from the source at a given time, with the moving mirror. Fermat principle of least time is then applied to ESR and it is shown that, assuming the independence of speed of light, the result is identical with the relativistic reflection law. For a uniformly moving mirror ESR is a conic and the reflection law becomes a case of bi-angular equation of the conic, with the incident and reflected beams coinciding with the focal rays of the conic. A short calculus-based proof for accelerating mirrors is also given.

  6. Vortex breakdown in a truncated conical bioreactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balci, Adnan; Brøns, Morten [DTU Compute, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Herrada, Miguel A [E.S.I, Universidad de Sevilla, Camino de los Descubrimientos s/n, E-41092 (Spain); Shtern, Vladimir N, E-mail: mobr@dtu.dk [Shtern Research and Consulting, Houston, TX 77096 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    This numerical study explains the eddy formation and disappearance in a slow steady axisymmetric air–water flow in a vertical truncated conical container, driven by the rotating top disk. Numerous topological metamorphoses occur as the water height, H{sub w}, and the bottom-sidewall angle, α, vary. It is found that the sidewall convergence (divergence) from the top to the bottom stimulates (suppresses) the development of vortex breakdown (VB) in both water and air. At α = 60°, the flow topology changes eighteen times as H{sub w} varies. The changes are due to (a) competing effects of AMF (the air meridional flow) and swirl, which drive meridional motions of opposite directions in water, and (b) feedback of water flow on AMF. For small H{sub w}, the AMF effect dominates. As H{sub w} increases, the swirl effect dominates and causes VB. The water flow feedback produces and modifies air eddies. The results are of fundamental interest and can be relevant for aerial bioreactors. (paper)

  7. Biophysical basis for the geometry of conical stromatolites

    OpenAIRE

    Petroff, Alexander P.; Sim, Min Sub; Maslov, Andrey; Krupenin, Mikhail; Rothman, Daniel H.; Bosak, Tanja

    2010-01-01

    Stromatolites may be Earth’s oldest macroscopic fossils; however, it remains controversial what, if any, biological processes are recorded in their morphology. Although the biological interpretation of many stromatolite morphologies is confounded by the influence of sedimentation, conical stromatolites form in the absence of sedimentation and are, therefore, considered to be the most robust records of biophysical processes. A qualitative similarity between conical stromatolites and some moder...

  8. Environmental Assessment for Hypersonic Technology Vehicle 2 Flight Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-01

    Turtles Green Sea Turtle Chelonia mydas T, RS Loggerhead Sea Turtle Caretta caretta T, RS Olive Ridley Sea Turtle Lapidochelys olivacea T, RS...Lapidochelys olivacea T, RS Leatherback Sea Turtle Dermochelys coriacea E, RS Hawksbill Sea Turtle Eretmochelys imbricata E, RS Fish Napoleon

  9. Final Environmental Assessment for Hypersonic Technology Vehicle 2 Flight Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-28

    Turtles Green Sea Turtle Chelonia mydas T, RS Loggerhead Sea Turtle Caretta caretta T, RS Olive Ridley Sea Turtle Lapidochelys olivacea T, RS...Dermochelys imbricata), loggerhead sea turtles (Caretta caretta), and olive ridley sea turtles (Lepidochelys olivacea ), as well as blue whales...Recovery Plan for U.S. Pacific Populations of the Olive Ridley Turtle (Lepidochelys olivacea ). National Marine Fisheries Service, Silver Spring, MD

  10. Hypersonic flow computations around re-entry vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peraire, J.; Peiro, J.; Morgan, K.; Vahdati, M.; Molina, R. C.

    1993-01-01

    The development of an algorithm for the solution of the compressible Euler equations at high Mach numbers on unstructured tetrahedral meshes is described. The basic algorithm is constructed in the form of a central difference scheme plus an explicit added artificial viscosity based upon fourth order differences of the solution. The stability of the solution in the vicinity of strong gradients is preserved by the incorporation of an additional artificial viscosity based upon a second order difference. Higher order accuracy is regained by using the ideas of flux corrected transport to limit the amount of added viscosity. The solution is advanced to steady state by means of an explicit multi-stage time-stepping method. The computational efficiency of the complete process is improved by incorporating an unstructured multigrid acceleration procedure. A number of flows of practical interest are analyzed to demonstrate the numerical performance of the proposed approach.

  11. Low Density Real Gas Flows About Hypersonic Vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-11-01

    in the adjacent cell to the boundary cell, as: Vbc = Vdj -(3-29) Solid Wall (No-slip). Although the exact form of the solid wall (no-slip) boundary...Wall. In the nonequilibrium flow over a body, the solid surface may act as a catalyst for the recombination of atoms and ions: hence, the heat transfer...catalycity is represented in terms of species catalytic efficiencies, defined as the ratio of the number of species recombining at the wall to the

  12. Reduced-Order Aerothermoelastic Analysis of Hypersonic Vehicle Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    server issues, I would like to thank Dave McLean for always being more than generous with his time in helping resolve whatever problems I have...rigid r = incident radiant heat flow, restrained degrees of freedom Suth = Sutherland reference quantity sky = atmospheric condition solar = solar... Sutherland reference temperature, µSuth is the known viscosity at TSuth, and S is Sutherland’s constant for the species of interest. With the reference

  13. Ultra high temperature ceramics for hypersonic vehicle applications.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tandon, Rajan; Dumm, Hans Peter; Corral, Erica L.; Loehman, Ronald E.; Kotula, Paul Gabriel

    2006-01-01

    HfB{sub 2} and ZrB{sub 2} are of interest for thermal protection materials because of favorable thermal stability, mechanical properties, and oxidation resistance. We have made dense diboride ceramics with 2 to 20 % SiC by hot pressing at 2000 C and 5000 psi. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) shows very thin grain boundary phases that suggest liquid phase sintering. Fracture toughness measurements give RT values of 4 to 6 MPam{sup 1/2}. Four-pt flexure strengths measured in air up to 1450 C were as high as 450-500 MPa. Thermal diffusivities were measured to 2000 C for ZrB{sub 2} and HfB{sub 2} ceramics with SiC contents from 2 to 20%. Thermal conductivities were calculated from thermal diffusivities and measured heat capacities. Thermal diffusivities were modeled using different two-phase composite models. These materials exhibit excellent high temperature properties and are attractive for further development for thermal protection systems.

  14. Ultraviolet Emissions Occurring About Hypersonic Vehicles in Rarefied Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-04-01

    producing NO;. This "efficiency" is in units of cmŗ and has built into it the residence time of O- atomo on the surface. Note here that this intensity must...noticeable scatter in the data. Presumably the scatter is in part relatable to the NO equilibration time but recall also that the time resolution of the

  15. Communication with Hypersonic Vehicles via Nonlinear Plasma Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-02-01

    0 =0.0. Our goal is to calculate the scattered field HS with frequency ws = wp- w. In this case, the boundary conditions are Z= -LI, alHs + irSH =0...21) az z R, alHs = 0. (22) 𔄃z The profiles of the magnetic fields HS for two different pumping frequencies are shown in Figures 7 and 8. We note that

  16. Multifunctional Aerogel Thermal Protection Systems for Hypersonic Vehicles Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The overall objective of the Phase II project is to develop lightweight reinforced aerogel materials for use as the core structural insulation material in...

  17. Flight Path Angle Dynamics of Air-Breathing Hypersonic Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-12-01

    Journal of Guidance, Control, and Dynamics, Vol. 22, No. 1, Jan./Feb. 1999, pp. 181–183. [7] Roskam , J., Airplane Flight Dynamics and Automatic Flight...Control , Vol. I, Roskam Aviation and Engineering Corp., Lawrence, KS, 1982, pp. 607–615. [8] Heffley, R. and Jewell, W., “Aircraft Handling Qualities

  18. Structural and Acoustic Responses of a Submerged Stiffened Conical Shell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meixia Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the vibrational behavior and far-field sound radiation of a submerged stiffened conical shell at low frequencies. The solution for the dynamic response of the conical shell is presented in the form of a power series. A smeared approach is used to model the ring stiffeners. Fluid loading is taken into account by dividing the conical shell into narrow strips which are considered to be local cylindrical shells. The far-field sound pressure is solved by the Element Radiation Superposition Method. Excitations in two directions are considered to simulate the loading on the surface of the conical shell. These excitations are applied along the generator and normal to the surface of the conical shell. The contributions from the individual circumferential modes on the structural responses of the conical shell are studied. The effects of the external fluid loading and stiffeners are discussed. The results from the analytical models are validated by numerical results from a fully coupled finite element/boundary element model.

  19. Numerical simulation as an important tool in developing novel hypersonic technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocharov, A. N.; Balakirev, B. A.; Bityurin, V. A.; Gryaznov, V. K.; Golovin, N. N.; Iosilevskiy, I. L.; Evstigneev, N. M.; Medin, S. A.; Naumov, N. D.; Petrovskiy, V. P.; Ryabkov, O. I.; Solomonov, Yu S.; Tatarinov, A. V.; Teplyakov, I. O.; Tikhonov, A. A.; Fortov, V. E.

    2015-11-01

    Development of novel hypersonic technologies necessarily requires the development of methods for analyzing a motion of hypervelocity vehicles. This paper could be considered as the initial stage in developing of complex computational model for studying flows around hypervelocity vehicles of arbitrary shape. Essential part of the model is a solution to three-dimensional transport equations for mass, momentum and energy for the medium in the state of both LTE (local thermodynamic equilibrium) and non-LTE. One of the primary requirements to the developed model is the realization on the modern heterogeneous computer systems including both CPU and GPU. The paper presents the first results on numerical simulation of hypersonic flow. The first problem considered is three-dimensional flow around curved body under angle of attack. The performance of heterogeneous 4-GPU computer system is tested. The second problem highlights the capabilities of the developed model to study heat and mass transfer problems. Namely, interior heat problem is considered which takes into account ablation of thermal protection system and variation of the surface shape of the vehicle.

  20. Diagnostics for Hypersonic Engine Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    this end, our academic partners worked with us to develop a FORTRAN code that would make virtual absorption measurements along any specified line of...measurements were studied for a particular time in the vehicle ascent with companion CFD work. The measured velocity and the virtual velocity agree to within...Kastengren, "Investigation of Near-Field Structures of Aerated-Liquid Jets Using X-Ray Radiography ," ILASS-Americas Paper 2012-027, 24th Annual

  1. Methods to Determine the Deformation of the IRVE Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, William R.

    2011-01-01

    Small resonant targets used in conjunction with a microwave reflectometer to determine the deformation of the Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (HIAD) during reentry are investigated. The reflectometer measures the distance to the targets and from this the HIAD deformation is determined. The HIAD is used by the Inflatable Reentry Vehicle Experiment (IRVE) which investigates the use of inflatable heat shields for atmospheric reentry. After several different microwave reflectometer systems were analyzed and compared it was determined that the most desirable for this application is the Frequency Doubling Target method.

  2. Three-dimensional hypersonic rarefied flow calculations using direct simulation Monte Carlo method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celenligil, M. Cevdet; Moss, James N.

    1993-01-01

    A summary of three-dimensional simulations on the hypersonic rarefied flows in an effort to understand the highly nonequilibrium flows about space vehicles entering the Earth's atmosphere for a realistic estimation of the aerothermal loads is presented. Calculations are performed using the direct simulation Monte Carlo method with a five-species reacting gas model, which accounts for rotational and vibrational internal energies. Results are obtained for the external flows about various bodies in the transitional flow regime. For the cases considered, convective heating, flowfield structure and overall aerodynamic coefficients are presented and comparisons are made with the available experimental data. The agreement between the calculated and measured results are very good.

  3. Review of NASA's Hypersonic Research Engine Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Earl H.; Mackley, Ernest A.

    1993-01-01

    The goals of the NASA Hypersonic Research Engine (HRE) Project, which began in 1964, were to design, develop, and construct a hypersonic research ramjet/scramjet engine for high performance and to flight-test the developed concept over the speed range from Mach 3 to 8. The project was planned to be accomplished in three phases: project definition, research engine development, and flight test using the X-15A-2 research aircraft, which was modified to carry hydrogen fuel for the research engine. The project goal of an engine flight test was eliminated when the X-15 program was canceled in 1968. Ground tests of engine models then became the focus of the project. Two axisymmetric full-scale engine models having 18-inch-diameter cowls were fabricated and tested: a structural model and a combustion/propulsion model. A brief historical review of the project with salient features, typical data results, and lessons learned is presented.

  4. Hypersonic propulsion. [supersonic combustion ramjet engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beach, H. L., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Research on hydrogen fueled scramjet engines for hypersonic flight is reviewed. Component developments, computational methods, and preliminary ground tests of subscale scramjet engine modules at Mach 4 and 7 are emphasized. Airframe integration, structures, and flow diagnostics are also discussed. It is shown that mixed-mode perpendicular and parallel fuel injection controls heat release over a wide Mach range and the fixed geometry inlet gives good performance over a wide range of Mach numbers.

  5. Thrust modeling for hypersonic engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riggins, D. W.; Mcclinton, C. R.

    1995-01-01

    Expressions for the thrust losses of a scramjet engine are developed in terms of irreversible entropy increases and the degree of incomplete combustion. A method is developed which allows the calculation of the lost vehicle thrust due to different loss mechanisms within a given flow-field. This analysis demonstrates clearly the trade-off between mixing enhancement and resultant increased flow losses in scramjet combustors. An engine effectiveness parameter is defined in terms of thrust loss. Exergy and the thrust-potential method are related and compared.

  6. Aerodynamic design of a space vehicle using the numerical simulation technique

    OpenAIRE

    Yamamoto, Yukimitsu; Wada, Yasuhiro; Takanashi, Susumu; Ishiguro, Mitsuo; 山本 行光; 和田 安弘; 高梨 進; 石黒 満津夫

    1994-01-01

    Optimization or the aerodynamic configuration or a space vehicle 'HOPE' (H-2 Orbiting Plane) is conducted by using several numerical simulation codes in the transonic and hypersonic speed ranges. Design requirements are set on the longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics in the transonic speed and the aerodynamic heat characteristics in the hypersonic speed. This paper describes the procedure or the optimization or aerodynamic configurations by using the numerical simulation technique as an e...

  7. Multi-Disciplinary Analysis and Optimization of Hypersonic Transport Aircrafts

    OpenAIRE

    Dittrich, R.; Longo, J.M.A.; Carrier, G.; Duveau, P.; Salah El Din, I.; Thepot, R.

    2008-01-01

    The development and first applications to a Mach 6 hypersonic transport configuration of a new multidisciplinary optimization (MDO) process is presented. The coupled treatment of several physical disciplines with focus on aerodynamic performance, flight mechanic aspects, propulsion integration and structure behaviour taking into account hypersonic relevant requirements is shown as well as the integration of multiple mission points.

  8. Biophysical basis for the geometry of conical stromatolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petroff, Alexander P; Sim, Min Sub; Maslov, Andrey; Krupenin, Mikhail; Rothman, Daniel H; Bosak, Tanja

    2010-06-01

    Stromatolites may be Earth's oldest macroscopic fossils; however, it remains controversial what, if any, biological processes are recorded in their morphology. Although the biological interpretation of many stromatolite morphologies is confounded by the influence of sedimentation, conical stromatolites form in the absence of sedimentation and are, therefore, considered to be the most robust records of biophysical processes. A qualitative similarity between conical stromatolites and some modern microbial mats suggests a photosynthetic origin for ancient stromatolites. To better understand and interpret ancient fossils, we seek a quantitative relationship between the geometry of conical stromatolites and the biophysical processes that control their growth. We note that all modern conical stromatolites and many that formed in the last 2.8 billion years display a characteristic centimeter-scale spacing between neighboring structures. To understand this prominent-but hitherto uninterpreted-organization, we consider the role of diffusion in mediating competition between stromatolites. Having confirmed this model through laboratory experiments and field observation, we find that organization of a field of stromatolites is set by a diffusive time scale over which individual structures compete for nutrients, thus linking form to physiology. The centimeter-scale spacing between modern and ancient stromatolites corresponds to a rhythmically fluctuating metabolism with a period of approximately 20 hr. The correspondence between the observed spacing and the day length provides quantitative support for the photosynthetic origin of conical stromatolites throughout geologic time.

  9. Features of the Upgraded Imaging for Hypersonic Experimental Aeroheating Testing (IHEAT) Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Michelle L.; Rufer, Shann J.

    2016-01-01

    The Imaging for Hypersonic Experimental Aeroheating Testing (IHEAT) software is used at the NASA Langley Research Center to analyze global aeroheating data on wind tunnel models tested in the Langley Aerothermodynamics Laboratory. One-dimensional, semi-infinite heating data derived from IHEAT are used in the design of thermal protection systems for hypersonic vehicles that are exposed to severe aeroheating loads, such as reentry vehicles during descent and landing procedures. This software program originally was written in the PV-WAVE(Registered Trademark) programming language to analyze phosphor thermography data from the two-color, relative-intensity system developed at Langley. To increase the efficiency, functionality, and reliability of IHEAT, the program was migrated to MATLAB(Registered Trademark) syntax and compiled as a stand-alone executable file labeled version 4.0. New features of IHEAT 4.0 include the options to perform diagnostic checks of the accuracy of the acquired data during a wind tunnel test, to extract data along a specified multi-segment line following a feature such as a leading edge or a streamline, and to batch process all of the temporal frame data from a wind tunnel run. Results from IHEAT 4.0 were compared on a pixel level to the output images from the legacy software to validate the program. The absolute differences between the heat transfer data output from the two programs were on the order of 10(exp -5) to 10(exp -7). IHEAT 4.0 replaces the PV-WAVE(Registered Trademark) version as the production software for aeroheating experiments conducted in the hypersonic facilities at NASA Langley.

  10. Unstart coupling mechanism analysis of multiple-modules hypersonic inlet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jichao; Chang, Juntao; Wang, Lei; Cao, Shibin; Bao, Wen

    2013-01-01

    The combination of multiplemodules in parallel manner is an important way to achieve the much higher thrust of scramjet engine. For the multiple-modules scramjet engine, when inlet unstarted oscillatory flow appears in a single-module engine due to high backpressure, how to interact with each module by massflow spillage, and whether inlet unstart occurs in other modules are important issues. The unstarted flowfield and coupling characteristic for a three-module hypersonic inlet caused by center module II and side module III were, conducted respectively. The results indicate that the other two hypersonic inlets are forced into unstarted flow when unstarted phenomenon appears on a single-module hypersonic inlet due to high backpressure, and the reversed flow in the isolator dominates the formation, expansion, shrinkage, and disappearance of the vortexes, and thus, it is the major factor of unstart coupling of multiple-modules hypersonic inlet. The coupling effect among multiple modules makes hypersonic inlet be more likely unstarted.

  11. Image-based force and moment measurement in hypersonic facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurence, Stuart J.; Hornung, H.G. [California Institute of Technology, Graduate Aeronautical Laboratories, Pasadena, CA (United States)

    2009-02-15

    This article addresses the problem of force and moment measurement in short-duration hypersonic facilities. An image-based technique is described in which the motion of a free-flying model is tracked over a sequence of high-speed digital images. Force components are derived from the calculated trajectory by assuming constant acceleration during the test time. A linear version of the technique, appropriate for simple model geometries, is first outlined and the technique's precision is estimated. A nonlinear version, suitable for more generalised body shapes, is then described in the context of a series of experiments to determine the aerodynamic characteristics of the NASA Orion vehicle in the T5 hypervelocity shock tunnel. The accuracy of these measurements was adversely affected by both the choice of light source and test-gas luminosity, but these experiments nevertheless show image-based measurements to be, at the very least, a promising supplement to standard accelerometer-based techniques. (orig.)

  12. Thermodynamic Cycle Analysis of Magnetohydrodynamic-Bypass Hypersonic Airbreathing Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litchford, R. J.; Cole, J. W.; Bityurin, V. A.; Lineberry, J. T.

    2000-01-01

    The prospects for realizing a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) bypass hypersonic airbreathing engine are examined from the standpoint of fundamental thermodynamic feasibility. The MHD-bypass engine, first proposed as part of the Russian AJAX vehicle concept, is based on the idea of redistributing energy between various stages of the propulsion system flow train. The system uses an MHD generator to extract a portion of the aerodynamic heating energy from the inlet and an MHD accelerator to reintroduce this power as kinetic energy in the exhaust stream. In this way, the combustor entrance Mach number can be limited to a specified value even as the flight Mach number increases. Thus, the fuel and air can be efficiently mixed and burned within a practical combustor length, and the flight Mach number operating envelope can be extended. In this paper, we quantitatively assess the performance potential and scientific feasibility of MHD-bypass engines using a simplified thermodynamic analysis. This cycle analysis, based on a thermally and calorically perfect gas, incorporates a coupled MHD generator-accelerator system and accounts for aerodynamic losses and thermodynamic process efficiencies in the various engin components. It is found that the flight Mach number range can be significantly extended; however, overall performance is hampered by non-isentropic losses in the MHD devices.

  13. A Mandrel Feeding Strategy in Conical Ring Rolling Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Meng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A mathematical model for radial conical ring rolling with a closed die structure on the top and bottom of driven roll, simplified as RCRRCDS, was established. The plastic penetration and biting-in conditions in RCRRCDS process were determined. A mandrel feeding strategy for RCRRCDS process was proposed. The mandrel feed rate and its reasonable value range were deduced. The coupled thermal-mechanical FE model of RCRRCDS process was established. The reasonable value range of the mandrel feed rate was verified by using numerical simulation method. The results indicate that the reasonable value range of the mandrel feed rate is feasible, the proposed mandrel feeding strategy can realize a steady RCRRCDS process, and the forming quality of conical ring rolled by using the proposed feeding strategy is better than that of conical ring rolled by using a constant mandrel feed rate.

  14. Wave-vector and polarization dependence of conical refraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turpin, A; Loiko, Yu V; Kalkandjiev, T K; Tomizawa, H; Mompart, J

    2013-02-25

    We experimentally address the wave-vector and polarization dependence of the internal conical refraction phenomenon by demonstrating that an input light beam of elliptical transverse profile refracts into two beams after passing along one of the optic axes of a biaxial crystal, i.e. it exhibits double refraction instead of refracting conically. Such double refraction is investigated by the independent rotation of a linear polarizer and a cylindrical lens. Expressions to describe the position and the intensity pattern of the refracted beams are presented and applied to predict the intensity pattern for an axicon beam propagating along the optic axis of a biaxial crystal.

  15. Recipes for Building the Dual of Conic Optimization Problem

    OpenAIRE

    Chaerani, Diah

    2010-01-01

    Building the dual of the primal problem of Conic Optimization (CO) isa very important step to make the ¯nding optimal solution. In many cases a givenproblem does not have the simple structure of CO problem (i.e., minimizing a linearfunction over an intersection between a±ne space and convex cones) but there areseveral conic constraints and sometimes also equality constraints. In this paper wedeal with the question how to form the dual problem in such cases. We discuss theanswer by considering...

  16. Control of ionic transport through gated single conical nanopores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalman, Eric B; Sudre, Olivier; Vlassiouk, Ivan; Siwy, Zuzanna S

    2009-05-01

    Control of ionic transport through nanoporous systems is a topic of scientific interest for the ability to create new devices that are applicable for ions and molecules in water solutions. We show the preparation of an ionic transistor based on single conical nanopores in polymer films with an insulated gold thin film "gate." By changing the electric potential applied to the "gate," the current through the device can be changed from the rectifying behavior of a typical conical nanopore to the almost linear behavior seen in cylindrical nanopores. The mechanism for this change in transport behavior is thought to be the enhancement of concentration polarization induced by the gate.

  17. Arc-heated gas flow experiments for hypersonic propulsion applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roseberry, Christopher Matthew

    Although hydrogen is an attractive fuel for a hypersonic air-breathing vehicle in terms of reaction rate, flame temperature, and energy content per unit mass, the substantial tank volume required to store hydrogen imposes a drag penalty to performance that tends to offset these advantages. An alternative approach is to carry a hydrocarbon fuel and convert it on-board into a hydrogen-rich gas mixture to be injected into the engine combustors. To investigate this approach, the UTA Arc-Heated Wind Tunnel facility was modified to run on methane rather than the normally used nitrogen. Previously, this facility was extensively developed for the purpose of eventually performing experiments simulating scramjet engine flow along a single expansion ramp nozzle (SERN) in addition to more generalized applications. This formidable development process, which involved modifications to every existing subsystem along with the incorporation of new subsystems, is described in detail. Fortunately, only a minor plumbing reconfiguration was required to prepare the facility for the fuel reformation research. After a failure of the arc heater power supply, a 5.6 kW plasma-cutting torch was modified in order to continue the arc pyrolysis experiments. The outlet gas flow from the plasma torch was sampled and subsequently analyzed using gas chromatography. The experimental apparatus converted the methane feedstock almost completely into carbon, hydrogen and acetylene. A high yield of hydrogen, consisting of a product mole fraction of roughly 0.7, was consistently obtained. Unfortunately, the energy consumption of the apparatus was too excessive to be feasible for a flight vehicle. However, other researchers have pyrolyzed hydrocarbons using electric arcs with much less power input per unit mass.

  18. Hypersonic characteristics of an advanced aerospace plane at Mach 20.3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mccandless, R. S.

    1985-01-01

    Wind-tunnel studies have been performed in the Langley Hypersonic Helium Tunnel Facility to obtain static longitudinal and lateral-directional aerodynamic characteristics of an advanced aerospace plane concept. The nominal test conditions are a Mach number of 20.3 and a Reynolds number of 6.8 x 10 to the 6th power per foot at angles of attack from 0 to 25 deg and angles of sideslip of -3 and 0 deg. Stability and control characteristics are obtained for several deflections of the elevators, elevons, and rudder. In addition, a modified canopy is examined. The results indicate that this vehicle is longitudinally stable at angles of attack near the maximum lift-drag ratio. Also, the vehicle is shown to be directionally unstable with positive dihedral effect.

  19. Nonlinear robust control of hypersonic aircrafts with interactions between flight dynamics and propulsion systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhaoying; Zhou, Wenjie; Liu, Hao

    2016-09-01

    This paper addresses the nonlinear robust tracking controller design problem for hypersonic vehicles. This problem is challenging due to strong coupling between the aerodynamics and the propulsion system, and the uncertainties involved in the vehicle dynamics including parametric uncertainties, unmodeled model uncertainties, and external disturbances. By utilizing the feedback linearization technique, a linear tracking error system is established with prescribed references. For the linear model, a robust controller is proposed based on the signal compensation theory to guarantee that the tracking error dynamics is robustly stable. Numerical simulation results are given to show the advantages of the proposed nonlinear robust control method, compared to the robust loop-shaping control approach. Copyright © 2016 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Numerical Study on Thrust Performance Evaluation of Laser Propulsion during Supersonic/Hypersonic Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sukyum; Jeung, In-Seuck; Choi, Jeong-Yeol

    2005-04-01

    Recently, several laser propulsion vehicles have been launched successfully. However, previous studies of laser propulsion have been limited on very low subsonic flight condition, because present laser facilities are not sufficient enough to produce extremely tremendous laser power. But, for space launching or aircraft flight, high speed flight condition is eventually traversing flight regime to complete mission. So, thrust characteristics on high speed flight condition becomes an important issue. In this study, numerical simulation was performed to understand the supersonic laser propulsion vehicle. From the result of numerical simulation for various flight Mach number, it has been understood that momentum coupling coefficient of supersonic/hypersonic laser propulsion is inversely proportional to the flight Mach number, and that, a large energy input causes thermal choking and projectile unstarts at the relatively low supersonic flight Mach number.

  1. Smooth leading edge transition in hypersonic flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaillard, L.; Benard, E.; Alziary de Roquefort, T. [CEAT, Poitiers (France). Lab. d`Etudes Aerodynamiques

    1999-01-01

    The boundary layer transition along the attachment line of a smooth swept circular cylinder in hypersonic flow is investigated in a blowdown wind tunnel. A wide range of spanwise Mach numbers Me (3.28 to 6.78) is covered with the help of different models at several sweep angles (60 {<=}{Lambda}{<=}80 ). The transition is indirectly detected by means of heat flux measurements. The influence of the wall to stagnation temperature ratio is investigated by cooling the model with liquid nitrogen. (orig.) With 9 figs., 2 tabs., 30 refs.

  2. Advanced Computational Techniques for Hypersonic Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povinelli, Louis A.

    1996-01-01

    CFD has played a major role in the resurgence of hypersonic flight, on the premise that numerical methods will allow us to perform simulations at conditions for which no ground test capability exists. Validation of CFD methods is being established using the experimental data base available, which is below Mach 8. It is important, however, to realize the limitations involved in the extrapolation process as well as the deficiencies that exist in numerical methods at the present time. Current features of CFD codes are examined for application to propulsion system components. The shortcomings in simulation and modeling are identified and discussed.

  3. GPM GROUND VALIDATION CONICAL SCANNING MILLIMETER-WAVE IMAGING RADIOMETER (COSMIR) GCPEX V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GPM Ground Validation Conical Scanning Millimeter-wave Imaging Radiometer (COSMIR) GCPEx dataset used the Conical Scanning Millimeter-wave Imaging Radiometer...

  4. Dimensionality reduction in conic section function neural network

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This paper details how dimensionality can be reduced in conic section function neural networks (CSFNN). This is particularly important for hardware implementation of networks. One of the main problems to be solved when considering the hardware design is the high connectivity requirement. If the effect that each of the ...

  5. Detecting aircrafts from satellite images using saliency and conical ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Parts from the salient regions are further processed using clustering and morphological processing to get the probable regions of isolated aircraft targets. Finally, a novel conical pyramid based framework for template representation of the target samples is proposed for matching. Experimental results shown on a few satellite ...

  6. RECIPES FOR BUILDING THE DUAL OF CONIC OPTIMIZATION PROBLEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diah Chaerani

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Building the dual of the primal problem of Conic Optimization (CO isa very important step to make the ¯nding optimal solution. In many cases a givenproblem does not have the simple structure of CO problem (i.e., minimizing a linearfunction over an intersection between a±ne space and convex cones but there areseveral conic constraints and sometimes also equality constraints. In this paper wedeal with the question how to form the dual problem in such cases. We discuss theanswer by considering several conic constraints with or without equality constraints.The recipes for building the dual of such cases is formed in standard matrix forms,such that it can be used easily on the numerical experiment. Special attention isgiven to dual development of special classes of CO problems, i.e., conic quadraticand semide¯nite problems. In this paper, we also brie°y present some preliminariestheory on CO as an introduction to the main topic

  7. Kinematical Diagrams for Conical Relativistic Jets Gopal-Krishna ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2007-02-28

    Feb 28, 2007 ... Kinematical Diagrams for Conical Relativistic Jets. Gopal-Krishna. 1. , Pronoy Sircar. 2. & Samir Dhurde. 3. 1National Centre for Radio Astrophysics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Pune. University Campus, Post Bag No. 3, Pune 411 007, India. e-mail: krishna@ncra.tifr.res.in. 2Department of ...

  8. Variable volume combustor with a conical liner support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Thomas Edward; McConnaughhay, Johnie Franklin; Keener, Chrisophter Paul; Ostebee, Heath Michael

    2017-06-27

    The present application provides a variable volume combustor for use with a gas turbine engine. The variable volume combustor may include a liner, a number of micro-mixer fuel nozzles positioned within the liner, and a conical liner support supporting the liner.

  9. NASA's Hypersonic Research Engine Project: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Earl H.; Mackley, Ernest A.

    1994-01-01

    The goals of the NASA Hypersonic Research Engine (HRE) Project, which began in 1964, were to design, develop, and construct a high-performance hypersonic research ramjet/scramjet engine for flight tests of the developed concept over the speed range of Mach 4 to 8. The project was planned to be accomplished in three phases: project definition, research engine development, and flight test using the X-15A-2 research airplane, which was modified to carry hydrogen fuel for the research engine. The project goal of an engine flight test was eliminated when the X-15 program was canceled in 1968. Ground tests of full-scale engine models then became the focus of the project. Two axisymmetric full-scale engine models, having 18-inch-diameter cowls, were fabricated and tested: a structural model and combustion/propulsion model. A brief historical review of the project, with salient features, typical data results, and lessons learned, is presented. An extensive number of documents were generated during the HRE Project and are listed.

  10. Towards the real-time application of indirect methods for hypersonic missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparapany, Michael J.

    Conceptual hypersonic mission design has typically been performed in a computationally intensive, iterative manner using direct optimization methods. The introduction of modern computing has resulted in the widespread adoption of direct methods, and useful information associated with optimal solutions has been lost. Optimization through indirect methods leverages this information, yielding high quality trajectories while reducing the dimensionality of the overall problem. The amount of content that can fit on a single chip is approaching physical limitations, resulting in state-of-the-art systems to use more chips. Due to this, present day computational systems are transitioning towards massively parallel frameworks thus creating a need for parallel algorithms to make effective use of available resources. The Multiple Shooting Method provides an effective means of constructing indirect solutions for hypersonic systems using parallel computational architectures. For systems with complex dynamics, it is expected that the chips will become fully saturated with computations, providing performance increases over the serial counterpart. One restriction to performing optimization using indirect methods is the requirement of high quality initial guesses that must be sufficiently close to a solution for convergence. Sophisticated nonlinear prediction models are used to overcome this limitation. Dimension reductions are performed using Noether's First Theorem with a generalization to Hamiltonian systems. A surrogate model is used to test and validate the outputs of the nonlinear prediction model are high-quality, thus increasing confidence in the constructed initial guess. The combination of parallel processing with generated high-quality initial guesses is shown to reduce the time to obtain a solution as well as increase the confidence that convergence to a solution will be obtained. Both these criteria must be known to perform real-time hypersonic optimization on-board a

  11. X-43A hypersonic research aircraft mated to its modified Pegasus booster rocket.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    The first of three X-43A hypersonic research aircraft was mated to its modified Pegasus booster rocket in late January at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif. FIRST X-43A MATED TO BOOSTER -- The first of three X-43A hypersonic research aircraft was mated to its modified Pegasus booster rocket in late January at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif. Mating of the X-43A and its specially-designed adapter to the first stage of the booster rocket marks a major milestone in the Hyper-X hypersonic research program. The 12-foot, unpiloted research vehicle was developed and built by MicroCraft Inc., Tullahoma, Tenn., for NASA. The booster, built by Orbital Sciences Corp., Dulles, Va., will accelerate the X-43A after the X-43A booster 'stack' is air-launched from NASA's venerable NB-52 mothership. The X-43A will separate from the rocket at a predetermined altitude and speed and fly a pre-programmed trajectory, conducting aerodynamic and propulsion experiments until it impacts into the Pacific Ocean. Three research flights are planned, two at Mach 7 and one at Mach 10 (seven and 10 times the speed of sound respectively) with the first tentatively scheduled for early summer of 2001. The X-43A is powered by a revolutionary supersonic-combustion ramjet ('scramjet') engine, and will use the underbody of the aircraft to form critical elements of the engine. The forebody shape helps compress the intake airflow, while the aft section acts as a nozzle to direct thrust. The X-43A flights will be the first actual flight tests of an aircraft powered by an air-breathing scramjet engine.

  12. A MEMS Floating Element Shear Stress Sensor for Hypersonic Flows

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sheplak, Mark

    2004-01-01

    ... for the measurement of unsteady hypersonic flow phenomena. The work focused on three parts: (1) modeling, optimization, and fabrication of a piezoresistive-based micromachined, floating element shear stress sensor, (2...

  13. High-Speed-/-Hypersonic-Weapon-Development-Tool Integration

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Duchow, Erin M; Munson, Michael J; Alonge, Jr, Frank A

    2006-01-01

    Multiple tools exist to aid in the design and evaluation of high-speed weapons. This paper documents efforts to integrate several existing tools, including the Integrated Hypersonic Aeromechanics Tool (IHAT)1-7...

  14. Advanced Metal Rubber Sensors for Hypersonic Decelerator Entry Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NanoSonic proposes to design and develop light-weight, low-modulus, and durable Metal Rubber™ sensors for aeroelastic analysis of Hypersonic Decelerator Entry...

  15. Planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) investigation of hypersonic flowfields in a Mach 10 wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danehy, Paul M.; Wilkes, Jennifer A.; Aderfer, David W.; Jones, Stephen B.; Robbins, Anthony W.; Pantry, Danny P.; Schwartz, Richard J.

    2006-01-01

    Planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) of nitric oxide (NO) was used to visualize four different hypersonic flowfields in the NASA Langley Research Center 31-Inch Mach 10 Air wind tunnel. The four configurations were: (1) the wake flowfield of a fuselage-only X-33 lifting body, (2) flow over a flat plate containing a rectangular cavity, (3) flow over a 70deg blunted cone with a cylindrical afterbody, formerly studied by an AGARD working group, and (4) an Apollo-geometry entry capsule - relevant to the Crew Exploration Vehicle currently being developed by NASA. In all cases, NO was seeded into the flowfield through tubes inside or attached to the model sting and strut. PLIF was used to visualize the NO in the flowfield. In some cases pure NO was seeded into the flow while in other cases a 5% NO, 95% N2 mix was injected. Several parameters were varied including seeding method and location, seeding mass flow rate, model angle of attack and tunnel stagnation pressure, which varies the unit Reynolds number. The location of the laser sheet was as also varied to provide three dimensional flow information. Virtual Diagnostics Interface (ViDI) technology developed at NASA Langley was used to visualize the data sets in post processing. The measurements demonstrate some of the capabilities of the PLIF method for studying hypersonic flows.

  16. Hypersonic Engine Leading Edge Experiments in a High Heat Flux, Supersonic Flow Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladden, Herbert J.; Melis, Matthew E.

    1994-01-01

    A major concern in advancing the state-of-the-art technologies for hypersonic vehicles is the development of an aeropropulsion system capable of withstanding the sustained high thermal loads expected during hypersonic flight. Three aerothermal load related concerns are the boundary layer transition from laminar to turbulent flow, articulating panel seals in high temperature environments, and strut (or cowl) leading edges with shock-on-shock interactions. A multidisciplinary approach is required to address these technical concerns. A hydrogen/oxygen rocket engine heat source has been developed at the NASA Lewis Research Center as one element in a series of facilities at national laboratories designed to experimentally evaluate the heat transfer and structural response of the strut (or cowl) leading edge. A recent experimental program conducted in this facility is discussed and related to cooling technology capability. The specific objective of the experiment discussed is to evaluate the erosion and oxidation characteristics of a coating on a cowl leading edge (or strut leading edge) in a supersonic, high heat flux environment. Heat transfer analyses of a similar leading edge concept cooled with gaseous hydrogen is included to demonstrate the complexity of the problem resulting from plastic deformation of the structures. Macro-photographic data from a coated leading edge model show progressive degradation over several thermal cycles at aerothermal conditions representative of high Mach number flight.

  17. The X-43A hypersonic research aircraft and its modified Pegasus booster rocket recently underwent c

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    The first of three X-43A hypersonic research aircraft and its modified Pegasus booster rocket recently underwent combined systems testing while mounted to NASA's NB-52B carrier aircraft at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif. The combined systems test was one of the last major milestones in the Hyper-X research program before the first X-43A flight. The X-43A flights will be the first actual flight tests of an aircraft powered by a revolutionary supersonic-combustion ramjet ('scramjet') engine capable of operating at hypersonic speeds (above Mach 5, or five times the speed of sound). The 12-foot, unpiloted research vehicle was developed and built by MicroCraft Inc., Tullahoma, Tenn., under NASA contract. The booster was built by Orbital Sciences Corp., Dulles, Va.,After being air-launched from NASA's venerable NB-52 mothership, the booster will accelerate the X-43A to test speed and altitude. The X-43A will then separate from the rocket and fly a pre-programmed trajectory, conducting aerodynamic and propulsion experiments until it descends into the Pacific Ocean. Three research flights are planned, two at Mach 7 and one at Mach 10.

  18. Further Investigations of Hypersonic Engine Seals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlap, Patrick H., Jr.; Steinetz, Bruce M.; DeMange, Jeffrey J.

    2004-01-01

    Durable, flexible sliding seals are required in advanced hypersonic engines to seal the perimeters of movable engine ramps for efficient, safe operation in high heat flux environments at temperatures of 2000 to 2500 F. Current seal designs do not meet the demanding requirements for future engines, so NASA's Glenn Research Center is developing advanced seals and preloading devices to overcome these shortfalls. An advanced ceramic wafer seal design and two silicon nitride compression spring designs were evaluated in a series of compression, scrub, and flow tests. Silicon nitride wafer seals survived 2000 in. (50.8 m) of scrubbing at 2000 F against a silicon carbide rub surface with no chips or signs of damage. Flow rates measured for the wafers before and after scrubbing were almost identical and were up to 32 times lower than those recorded for the best braided rope seal flow blockers. Silicon nitride compression springs showed promise conceptually as potential seal preload devices to help maintain seal resiliency.

  19. Photogrammetry of a Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushner, Laura Kathryn; Littell, Justin D.; Cassell, Alan M.

    2013-01-01

    In 2012, two large-scale models of a Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic decelerator were tested in the National Full-Scale Aerodynamic Complex at NASA Ames Research Center. One of the objectives of this test was to measure model deflections under aerodynamic loading that approximated expected flight conditions. The measurements were acquired using stereo photogrammetry. Four pairs of stereo cameras were mounted inside the NFAC test section, each imaging a particular section of the HIAD. The views were then stitched together post-test to create a surface deformation profile. The data from the photogram- metry system will largely be used for comparisons to and refinement of Fluid Structure Interaction models. This paper describes how a commercial photogrammetry system was adapted to make the measurements and presents some preliminary results.

  20. Development of numerical techniques for simulation of magnetogasdynamics and hypersonic chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damevin, Henri-Marie

    Magnetogasdynamics, the science concerned with the mutual interaction between electromagnetic field and flow of electrically conducting gas, offers promising advances in flow control and propulsion of future hypersonic vehicles. Numerical simulations are essential for understanding phenomena, and for research and development. The current dissertation is devoted to the development and validation of numerical algorithms for the solution of multidimensional magnetogasdynamic equations and the simulation of hypersonic high-temperature effects. Governing equations are derived, based on classical magnetogasdynamic assumptions. Two sets of equations are considered, namely the full equations and equations in the low magnetic Reynolds number approximation. Equations are expressed in a suitable formulation for discretization by finite differences in a computational space. For the full equations, Gauss law for magnetism is enforced using Powell's methodology. The time integration method is a four-stage modified Runge-Kutta scheme, amended with a Total Variation Diminishing model in a postprocessing stage. The eigensystem, required for the Total Variation Diminishing scheme, is derived in generalized three-dimensional coordinate system. For the simulation of hypersonic high-temperature effects, two chemical models are utilized, namely a nonequilibrium model and an equilibrium model. A loosely coupled approach is implemented to communicate between the magnetogasdynamic equations and the chemical models. The nonequilibrium model is a one-temperature, five-species, seventeen-reaction model solved by an implicit flux-vector splitting scheme. The chemical equilibrium model computes thermodynamics properties using curve fit procedures. Selected results are provided, which explore the different features of the numerical algorithms. The shock-capturing properties are validated for shock-tube simulations using numerical solutions reported in the literature. The computations of

  1. Optimization of the Conical Angle Design in Conical Implant-Abutment Connections: A Pilot Study Based on the Finite Element Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Kuang-Ta; Chen, Chen-Sheng; Cheng, Cheng-Kung; Fang, Hsu-Wei; Huang, Chang-Hung; Kao, Hung-Chan; Hsu, Ming-Lun

    2018-02-01

    Conical implant-abutment connections are popular for their excellent connection stability, which is attributable to frictional resistance in the connection. However, conical angles, the inherent design parameter of conical connections, exert opposing effects on 2 influencing factors of the connection stability: frictional resistance and abutment rigidity. This pilot study employed an optimization approach through the finite element method to obtain an optimal conical angle for the highest connection stability in an Ankylos-based conical connection system. A nonlinear 3-dimensional finite element parametric model was developed according to the geometry of the Ankylos system (conical half angle = 5.7°) by using the ANSYS 11.0 software. Optimization algorithms were conducted to obtain the optimal conical half angle and achieve the minimal value of maximum von Mises stress in the abutment, which represents the highest connection stability. The optimal conical half angle obtained was 10.1°. Compared with the original design (5.7°), the optimal design demonstrated an increased rigidity of abutment (36.4%) and implant (25.5%), a decreased microgap at the implant-abutment interface (62.3%), a decreased contact pressure (37.9%) with a more uniform stress distribution in the connection, and a decreased stress in the cortical bone (4.5%). In conclusion, the methodology of design optimization to determine the optimal conical angle of the Ankylos-based system is feasible. Because of the heterogeneity of different systems, more studies should be conducted to define the optimal conical angle in various conical connection designs.

  2. Biconical antennas and conical horns with elliptic cross section

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blume, Siegfried; Grafmueller, Bernhard

    1988-08-01

    The mode-matching technique is applied to the problem of radiation from a conical antenna with elliptic cross section including the degeneration to a sector antenna. In the `guiding region' of the antenna the transverse electromagnetic wave is considered as well as higher-order waves which are described by products of Lamefunctions which satisfy the boundary conditions. In the exterior region, the field is expanded into products of Lamepolynomials. Antenna input impedances and far-field patterns are shown as results. In addition to computing the far-field patterns of a conical horn with elliptic cross section by the aperture field method, the authors analyze the radiation field by a multiple expansion analogous to the authors analyze method described above.

  3. Direct determination of the resonance properties of metallic conical nanoantennas

    KAUST Repository

    Tuccio, Salvatore

    2014-01-01

    We present a simple method that is able to predict the resonant frequencies of a metallic conical nanoantenna. The alculation is based on an integral relation that takes into account the dependence of the effective refractive index of the plasmonic mode on the cone radius. Numerical simulations retrieving the near field properties of nanocones with different lengths are also performed for comparison. The fine agreement between the two approaches demonstrates the validity of our method. © 2014 Optical Society of America.

  4. Load fatigue performance of conical implant-abutment connections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seetoh, Y L; Tan, Keson B; Chua, E K; Quek, H C; Nicholls, Jack I

    2011-01-01

    Conical implant-abutment connections for platform switching have been recently introduced in implant systems. This study investigated the load fatigue performance of three conical abutment systems and their corresponding titanium and zirconia abutments. Regular-diameter implants of the Ankylos (AK), PrimaConnex (PC), and Straumann (ST) systems were tested with their corresponding titanium (Ti) and zirconia (Zr) abutments tightened to the recommended torque (n = 5 implant-abutment assemblies per group). A rotational load fatigue machine applied a sinusoidally varying tensile-compressive 21 N load to specimens at a 45-degree angle, producing an effective bending moment of 35 Ncm at a frequency of 10 Hz. The number of cycles to failure was recorded, with the upper limit set at 5 million cycles. Results were evaluated through analyses of variance. Except for the ST Zr group, which showed no failures in four samples and one failure just below the screw head, and the AK Ti group, in which one sample was preserved without fracture, all groups experienced failure of at least one of the components, whether the abutment screw only, the abutment, and/or the implant neck. There were significant differences between systems. There was no difference between systems for the Ti abutments, and the ST group was significantly different from the AK and PC groups for the Zr abutments. Ti conical abutments appear to have poorer load fatigue performance compared with earlier studies of external-hexagon connections. The load fatigue performance of Zr conical abutments varied and seemed to be highly system dependent. Many of the fractures in both the Ti and Zr abutment groups occurred within the implant, and retrieval would pose a significant clinical challenge. The clinician should weigh the mechanical, biologic, and esthetic considerations before selection of any implant system, connection type, or abutment material.

  5. The Conical Methodology: A Framework for Simulation Model Development

    OpenAIRE

    Richard E. Nance

    1987-01-01

    The Conical Methodology, intended for large discrete event simulation modeling, is reviewed from two perspectives. The designer perspectivebegins with the question: What is a methodology? From an answer to that question is framed an inquiry based on an objective/principles/attributes linkage that has proved useful in evaluating software development methodologies. The user perspective addresses the role of a methodology vis a vis the software utilities (the tools) that comprise the environme...

  6. Hartree-Fock symmetry breaking around conical intersections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jake, Lena C; Henderson, Thomas M; Scuseria, Gustavo E

    2018-01-14

    We study the behavior of Hartree-Fock (HF) solutions in the vicinity of conical intersections. These are here understood as regions of a molecular potential energy surface characterized by degenerate or nearly degenerate eigenfunctions with identical quantum numbers (point group, spin, and electron numbers). Accidental degeneracies between states with different quantum numbers are known to induce symmetry breaking in HF. The most common closed-shell restricted HF instability is related to singlet-triplet spin degeneracies that lead to collinear unrestricted HF solutions. Adding geometric frustration to the mix usually results in noncollinear generalized HF (GHF) solutions, identified by orbitals that are linear combinations of up and down spins. Near conical intersections, we observe the appearance of coplanar GHF solutions that break all symmetries, including complex conjugation and time-reversal, which do not carry good quantum numbers. We discuss several prototypical examples taken from the conical intersection literature. Additionally, we utilize a recently introduced magnetization diagnostic to characterize these solutions, as well as a solution of a Jahn-Teller active geometry of H8+2.

  7. Role of Genome in the Formation of Conical Retroviral Shells

    CERN Document Server

    Erdemci-Tandogan, Gonca; van der Schoot, Paul; Zandi, Roya

    2016-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) capsid proteins spontaneously assemble around the genome into a protective protein shell called the capsid, which can take on a variety of shapes broadly classified as conical, cylindrical and irregular. The majority of capsids seen in in vivo studies are conical in shape, while in vitro experiments have shown a preference for cylindrical capsids. The factors involved in the selection of the unique shape of HIV capsids are not well understood, and in particular the impact of RNA on the formation of the capsid is not known. In this work, we study the role of the genome and its interaction with the capsid protein by modeling the genomic RNA through a mean-field theory. Our results show that the confinement free energy for a homopolymeric model genome confined in a conical capsid is lower than that in a cylindrical capsid, at least when the genome does not interact with the capsid, which seems to be the case in in vivo experiments. Conversely, the confinement free energy for th...

  8. Explosively driven air blast in a conical shock tube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, Joel B., E-mail: joel.b.stewart2.civ@mail.mil; Pecora, Collin, E-mail: collin.r.pecora.civ@mail.mil [U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland 21005 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Explosively driven shock tubes present challenges in terms of safety concerns and expensive upkeep of test facilities but provide more realistic approximations to the air blast resulting from free-field detonations than those provided by gas-driven shock tubes. Likewise, the geometry of conical shock tubes can naturally approximate a sector cut from a spherically symmetric blast, leading to a better agreement with the blast profiles of free-field detonations when compared to those provided by shock tubes employing constant cross sections. The work presented in this article documents the design, fabrication, and testing of an explosively driven conical shock tube whose goal was to closely replicate the blast profile seen from a larger, free-field detonation. By constraining the blast through a finite area, large blasts (which can add significant damage and safety constraints) can be simulated using smaller explosive charges. The experimental data presented herein show that a close approximation to the free-field air blast profile due to a 1.5 lb charge of C4 at 76 in. can be achieved by using a 0.032 lb charge in a 76-in.-long conical shock tube (which translates to an amplification factor of nearly 50). Modeling and simulation tools were used extensively in designing this shock tube to minimize expensive fabrication costs.

  9. Calcium-induced voltage gating in single conical nanopores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siwy, Zuzanna S; Powell, Matthew R; Petrov, Alexander; Kalman, Eric; Trautmann, Christina; Eisenberg, Robert S

    2006-08-01

    We examine time signals of ion current through single conically shaped nanopores in the presence of sub-millimolar concentrations of calcium ions. We show that calcium induces voltage-dependent ion current fluctuations in time in addition to the previously reported negative incremental resistance (Nano Lett. 2006, 6, 473-477). These current fluctuations occur on the millisecond time scale at voltages at which the effect of negative incremental resistance was observed. We explain the fluctuations as results of transient binding of calcium ions to carboxyl groups on the pore walls that cause transient changes in electric potential inside a conical nanopore. We support this explanation by recordings of ion current in the presence of manganese ions that bind to carboxyl groups 3 orders of magnitude more tightly than calcium ions. The system of a single conical nanopore with calcium ions is compared to a semiconductor device of a unijunction transistor in electronic circuits. A unijunction transistor also exhibits negative incremental resistance and current instabilities.

  10. Explosively driven air blast in a conical shock tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Joel B.; Pecora, Collin

    2015-03-01

    Explosively driven shock tubes present challenges in terms of safety concerns and expensive upkeep of test facilities but provide more realistic approximations to the air blast resulting from free-field detonations than those provided by gas-driven shock tubes. Likewise, the geometry of conical shock tubes can naturally approximate a sector cut from a spherically symmetric blast, leading to a better agreement with the blast profiles of free-field detonations when compared to those provided by shock tubes employing constant cross sections. The work presented in this article documents the design, fabrication, and testing of an explosively driven conical shock tube whose goal was to closely replicate the blast profile seen from a larger, free-field detonation. By constraining the blast through a finite area, large blasts (which can add significant damage and safety constraints) can be simulated using smaller explosive charges. The experimental data presented herein show that a close approximation to the free-field air blast profile due to a 1.5 lb charge of C4 at 76 in. can be achieved by using a 0.032 lb charge in a 76-in.-long conical shock tube (which translates to an amplification factor of nearly 50). Modeling and simulation tools were used extensively in designing this shock tube to minimize expensive fabrication costs.

  11. Steeper Iris Conicity Is Related to a Shallower Anterior Chamber: The Gutenberg Health Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander K. Schuster

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To report the distribution of iris conicity (steepness of the iris cone, investigate associated factors, and test whether pseudophakia allows the iris to sink back. Methods. A population-based cross-sectional study was carried out. Ophthalmological examination including objective refraction, biometry, noncontact tonometry, and Scheimpflug imaging (Pentacam®, Oculus was performed including automated measurement of iris conicity. 3708 phakic subjects, 144 subjects with bilateral and 39 subjects with unilateral pseudophakia were included. Multivariable analyses were carried out to determine independently associated systemic and ocular factors for iris conicity in phakic eyes. Results. Mean iris conicity was 8.28° ± 3.29° (right eyes. Statistical analysis revealed associations between steeper iris conicity and shallower anterior chamber depth, thicker human lens and higher corneal power in multivariable analysis, while older age was related to a flatter iris conicity. Refraction, axial length, central corneal thickness, pupil diameter, and intraocular pressure were not associated with iris conicity. Pseudophakia resulted in a 5.82° flatter iris conicity than in the fellow phakic eyes. Conclusions. Associations indicate a correlation between iris conicity with risk factors for angle-closure, namely, shallower anterior chamber depth and thicker human lens. In pseudophakic eyes, iris conicity is significantly lower, indicating that cataract surgery flattens the iris.

  12. Steeper Iris Conicity Is Related to a Shallower Anterior Chamber: The Gutenberg Health Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, Norbert; Nickels, Stefan; Schulz, Andreas; Wild, Philipp S.; Blettner, Maria; Lackner, Karl; Beutel, Manfred E.; Münzel, Thomas; Vossmerbaeumer, Urs

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To report the distribution of iris conicity (steepness of the iris cone), investigate associated factors, and test whether pseudophakia allows the iris to sink back. Methods A population-based cross-sectional study was carried out. Ophthalmological examination including objective refraction, biometry, noncontact tonometry, and Scheimpflug imaging (Pentacam®, Oculus) was performed including automated measurement of iris conicity. 3708 phakic subjects, 144 subjects with bilateral and 39 subjects with unilateral pseudophakia were included. Multivariable analyses were carried out to determine independently associated systemic and ocular factors for iris conicity in phakic eyes. Results Mean iris conicity was 8.28° ± 3.29° (right eyes). Statistical analysis revealed associations between steeper iris conicity and shallower anterior chamber depth, thicker human lens and higher corneal power in multivariable analysis, while older age was related to a flatter iris conicity. Refraction, axial length, central corneal thickness, pupil diameter, and intraocular pressure were not associated with iris conicity. Pseudophakia resulted in a 5.82° flatter iris conicity than in the fellow phakic eyes. Conclusions Associations indicate a correlation between iris conicity with risk factors for angle-closure, namely, shallower anterior chamber depth and thicker human lens. In pseudophakic eyes, iris conicity is significantly lower, indicating that cataract surgery flattens the iris. PMID:29085672

  13. Design of a wing shape for study of hypersonic crossflow transition in flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godil, A.; Bertelrud, A.

    1992-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics methods were used in the design of a wing shape for study of hypersonic crossflow transition in flight. The flight experiment is to be performed on the delta wing of the first stage of a Pegasus launch vehicle as a piggy-back experiment to support boundary-layer stability code development and validation. The design goal is to obtain crossflow-induced transition at 20-40 percent of the chord for a flight Mach number of approximately six. The present paper describes the design and analysis process utilized to obtain desired glove shape. A variety of schemes were used in the design, ranging from simple empirical crossflow correlations to three-dimensional Navier-Stokes codes in conjunction with linear stability/N-factor computations. The sensitivity to various parameters, such as trajectory variations, allowable wing thickness, leading-edge radius and surface temperature, is also discussed.

  14. Numerical simulation of aerothermal loads in hypersonic engine inlets due to shock impingement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, R.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of shock impingement on an axial corner simulating the inlet of a hypersonic vehicle engine is modeled using a finite-difference procedure. A three-dimensional dynamic grid adaptation procedure is utilized to move the grids to regions with strong flow gradients. The adaptation procedure uses a grid relocation stencil that is valid at both the interior and boundary points of the finite-difference grid. A linear combination of spatial derivatives of specific flow variables, calculated with finite-element interpolation functions, are used as adaptation measures. This computational procedure is used to study laminar and turbulent Mach 6 flows in the axial corner. The description of flow physics and qualitative measures of heat transfer distributions on cowl and strut surfaces obtained from the analysis are compared with experimental observations. Conclusions are drawn regarding the capability of the numerical scheme for enhanced modeling of high-speed compressible flows.

  15. Thermal stress analysis of the NASA Dryden hypersonic wing test structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Glenn

    1990-01-01

    Present interest in hypersonic vehicles has resulted in a renewed interest in thermal stress analysis of airframe structures. While there are numerous texts and papers on thermal stress analysis, practical examples and experience on light gage aircraft structures are fairly limited. A research program has been undertaken at General Dynamics to demonstrate the present state of the art, verify methods of analysis, gain experience in their use, and develop engineering judgement in thermal stress analysis. The approach for this project has been to conduct a series of analyses of this sample problem and compare analysis results with test data. This comparison will give an idea of how to use our present methods of thermal stress analysis, and how accurate we can expect them to be.

  16. Unstart Coupling Mechanism Analysis of Multiple-Modules Hypersonic Inlet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jichao Hu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The combination of multiplemodules in parallel manner is an important way to achieve the much higher thrust of scramjet engine. For the multiple-modules scramjet engine, when inlet unstarted oscillatory flow appears in a single-module engine due to high backpressure, how to interact with each module by massflow spillage, and whether inlet unstart occurs in other modules are important issues. The unstarted flowfield and coupling characteristic for a three-module hypersonic inlet caused by center module II and side module III were, conducted respectively. The results indicate that the other two hypersonic inlets are forced into unstarted flow when unstarted phenomenon appears on a single-module hypersonic inlet due to high backpressure, and the reversed flow in the isolator dominates the formation, expansion, shrinkage, and disappearance of the vortexes, and thus, it is the major factor of unstart coupling of multiple-modules hypersonic inlet. The coupling effect among multiple modules makes hypersonic inlet be more likely unstarted.

  17. Optimal Control of Hypersonic Planning Maneuvers Based on Pontryagin’s Maximum Principle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Yu. Melnikov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The work objective is the synthesis of simple analytical formula of the optimal roll angle of hypersonic gliding vehicles for conditions of quasi-horizontal motion, allowing its practical implementation in onboard control algorithms.The introduction justifies relevance, formulates basic control tasks, and describes a history of scientific research and achievements in the field concerned. The author reveals a common disadvantage of the other authors’ methods, i.e. the problem of practical implementation in onboard control algorithms.The similar tasks of hypersonic maneuvers are systemized according to the type of maneuver, control parameters and limitations.In the statement of the problem the glider launched horizontally with a suborbital speed glides passive in the static Atmosphere on a spherical surface of constant radius in the Central field of gravitation.The work specifies a system of equations of motion in the inertial spherical coordinate system, sets the limits on the roll angle and optimization criteria at the end of the flight: high speed or azimuth and the minimum distances to the specified geocentric points.The solution.1 A system of equations of motion is transformed by replacing the time argument with another independent argument – the normal equilibrium overload. The Hamiltonian and the equations of mated parameters are obtained using the Pontryagin’s maximum principle. The number of equations of motion and mated vector is reduced.2 The mated parameters were expressed by formulas using current movement parameters. The formulas are proved through differentiation and substitution in the equations of motion.3 The Formula of optimal roll-position control by condition of maximum is obtained. After substitution of mated parameters, the insertion of constants, and trigonometric transformations the Formula of the optimal roll angle is obtained as functions of the current parameters of motion.The roll angle is expressed as the ratio

  18. Dynamic Testing of the NASA Hypersonic Project Combined Cycle Engine Testbed for Mode Transition Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    NASA is interested in developing technology that leads to more routine, safe, and affordable access to space. Access to space using airbreathing propulsion systems has potential to meet these objectives based on Airbreathing Access to Space (AAS) system studies. To this end, the NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program (FAP) Hypersonic Project is conducting fundamental research on a Turbine Based Combined Cycle (TBCC) propulsion system. The TBCC being studied considers a dual flow-path inlet system. One flow-path includes variable geometry to regulate airflow to a turbine engine cycle. The turbine cycle provides propulsion from take-off to supersonic flight. The second flow-path supports a dual-mode scramjet (DMSJ) cycle which would be initiated at supersonic speed to further accelerate the vehicle to hypersonic speed. For a TBCC propulsion system to accelerate a vehicle from supersonic to hypersonic speed, a critical enabling technology is the ability to safely and effectively transition from the turbine to the DMSJ-referred to as mode transition. To experimentally test methods of mode transition, a Combined Cycle Engine (CCE) Large-scale Inlet testbed was designed with two flow paths-a low speed flow-path sized for a turbine cycle and a high speed flow-path designed for a DMSJ. This testbed system is identified as the CCE Large-Scale Inlet for Mode Transition studies (CCE-LIMX). The test plan for the CCE-LIMX in the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) 10- by 10-ft Supersonic Wind Tunnel (10x10 SWT) is segmented into multiple phases. The first phase is a matrix of inlet characterization (IC) tests to evaluate the inlet performance and establish the mode transition schedule. The second phase is a matrix of dynamic system identification (SysID) experiments designed to support closed-loop control development at mode transition schedule operating points for the CCE-LIMX. The third phase includes a direct demonstration of controlled mode transition using a closed loop control

  19. CBLIB 2014: a benchmark library for conic mixed-integer and continuous optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friberg, Henrik Alsing

    2016-01-01

    The Conic Benchmark Library is an ongoing community-driven project aiming to challenge commercial and open source solvers on mainstream cone support. In this paper, 121 mixed-integer and continuous second-order cone problem instances have been selected from 11 categories as representative...... for the instances available online. Since current file formats were found incapable, we embrace the new Conic Benchmark Format as standard for conic optimization. Tools are provided to aid integration of this format with other software packages....

  20. Design of adaptive switching control for hypersonic aircraft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Jiao

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This article proposes a novel adaptive switching control of hypersonic aircraft based on type-2 Takagi–Sugeno–Kang fuzzy sliding mode control and focuses on the problem of stability and smoothness in the switching process. This method uses full-state feedback to linearize the nonlinear model of hypersonic aircraft. Combining the interval type-2 Takagi–Sugeno–Kang fuzzy approach with sliding mode control keeps the adaptive switching process stable and smooth. For rapid stabilization of the system, the adaptive laws use a direct constructive Lyapunov analysis together with an established type-2 Takagi–Sugeno–Kang fuzzy logic system. Simulation results indicate that the proposed control scheme can maintain the stability and smoothness of switching process for the hypersonic aircraft.

  1. NATO Advanced Study Institute on Molecular Physics and Hypersonic Flows

    CERN Document Server

    1996-01-01

    Molecular Physics and Hypersonic Flows bridges the gap between the fluid dynamics and molecular physics communities, emphasizing the role played by elementary processes in hypersonic flows. In particular, the work is primarily dedicated to filling the gap between microscopic and macroscopic treatments of the source terms to be inserted in the fluid dynamics codes. The first part of the book describes the molecular dynamics of elementary processes both in the gas phase and in the interaction with surfaces by using quantum mechanical and phenomenological approaches. A second group of contributions describes thermodynamics and transport properties of air components, with special attention to the transport of internal energy. A series of papers is devoted to the experimental and theoretical study of the flow of partially ionized gases. Subsequent contributions treat modern computational techniques for 3-D hypersonic flow. Non-equilibrium vibrational kinetics are then described, together with the coupling of vibra...

  2. Lateral control strategy for a hypersonic cruise missile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonghua Fan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Hypersonic cruise missile always adopts the configuration of waverider body with the restraint of scramjet. As a result, the lateral motion exhibits serious coupling, and the controller design of the lateral lateral system cannot be conducted separately for yaw channel and roll channel. A multiple input and multiple output optimal control method with integrators is presented to design the lateral combined control system for hypersonic cruise missile. A hypersonic cruise missile lateral model is linearized as a multiple input and multiple output plant, which is coupled by kinematics and fin deflection between yaw and roll. In lateral combined controller, the integrators are augmented, respectively, into the loop of roll angle and lateral overload to ensure that the commands are tracked with zero steady-state error. Through simulation, the proposed controller demonstrates good performance in tracking the command of roll angle and lateral overload.

  3. The Molecular Geometric Phase and Light-Induced Conical Intersections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zak, Emil J.

    2017-06-01

    Potential energy surfaces for electronic states of molecules in strong electromagnetic fields can be described in the dressed-state formalism, which introduces light-induced potentials. A light-induced conical intersection (LICI) [1] appears when two electronic states intersect due to the presence of an external electric field and when the dipole coupling between the field and the molecule vanishes. There are several aspects of quantum dynamics near LICIs, which still require a thorough investigation. How do non-adiabatic effects manifest themselves in polyatomic molecules in strong electromagnetic fields? Are the natural conical-intersections (NCI) and the light-induced conical intersections identical in nature? Do topological effects (Berry phase) [2] influence the nuclear dynamics around NCIs and LICIs? To answer these questions, a computer code for time-propagation of the ro-vibronic wavefunction on multiple coupled potential energy surfaces has been developed. The time-independent zero-order basis is taken from the DUO suite [3], which solves the full ro-vibronic Schrödinger equation for diatomic molecules. Non-adiabatic nuclear dynamics near LICIs will be presented on the examples of NaH and CaF molecules, with a perspective for extension to polyatomics. G. J. Halász, A Vibók, M. Sindelka, N. Moiseyev, L. S. Cederbaum, 2011 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 44 175102 C. Wittig, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2012, 14, 6409-6432 S. N. Yurchenko, L. Lodi, J. Tennyson, A. V. Stolyarov, Comput. Phys. Commun., 202, 262, 2016

  4. Wear Assessment of Conical Pick used in Coal Cutting Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewangan, Saurabh; Chattopadhyaya, Somnath; Hloch, Sergej

    2015-09-01

    Conical pick is a widely used tool for cutting coal in mines. It has a cemented carbide tip inserted in a steel body. Cemented carbide has been in use for many years for coal/rock cutting because it has the optimum combination of hardness, toughness and resistance against abrasive wear. As coal/rock is a heterogeneous substance, the cutting tool has to undergo various obstructions at the time of excavation that cause the tool to wear out. The cracks and fractures developing in the cemented carbide limit the life of the tool. For a long time, different wear mechanisms have been studied to develop improved grades of cemented carbide with high wear resistance properties. The research is still continuing. Moreover, due to the highly unpredictable nature of coal/rock, it is not easy to understand the wear mechanisms. In the present work, an attempt has been made to understand the wear mechanisms in four conical picks, which were used in a continuous miner machine for underground mining of coal. The wearing pattern of the conical pick indicates damage in its cemented carbide tip as well as the steel body. The worn out parts of the tools have been critically examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) point analysis. Mainly four types of wear mechanisms, namely, coal/rock intermixing, plastic deformation, rock channel formation and crushing and cracking, have been detected. The presence of coal/rock material and their respective concentrations in the selected area of worn out surface were observed using the spectra generated by EDX analysis.

  5. Micro-Ramps for Hypersonic Flow Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos Kontis

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Shock/boundary layer interaction (SBLI is an undesirable phenomenon, occurring in high-speed propulsion systems. The conventional method to manipulate and control SBLI is using a bleed system that involves the removal of a certain amount of mass of the inlet flow to control boundary layer separation. However, the system requires a larger nacelle to compensate the mass loss, larger nacelles contribute to additional weight and drag and reduce the overall performance. This study investigates a novel type of flow control device called micro-ramps, a part of the micro vortex generators (VGs family that intends to replace the bleed technique. Micro-ramps produce pairs of counter-rotating streamwise vortices, which help to suppress SBLI and reduce the chances of flow separation. Experiments were done at Mach 5 with two micro-ramp models of different sizes. Schlieren photography, surface flow visualization and infrared thermography were used in this investigation. The results revealed the detailed flow characteristics of the micro-ramp, such as the primary and secondary vortices. This helps us to understand the overall flow physics of micro-ramps in hypersonic flow and their application for SBLI control.

  6. Optimal Growth in Hypersonic Boundary Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paredes, Pedro; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Li, Fei; Chang, Chau-Lyan

    2016-01-01

    The linear form of the parabolized linear stability equations is used in a variational approach to extend the previous body of results for the optimal, nonmodal disturbance growth in boundary-layer flows. This paper investigates the optimal growth characteristics in the hypersonic Mach number regime without any high-enthalpy effects. The influence of wall cooling is studied, with particular emphasis on the role of the initial disturbance location and the value of the spanwise wave number that leads to the maximum energy growth up to a specified location. Unlike previous predictions that used a basic state obtained from a self-similar solution to the boundary-layer equations, mean flow solutions based on the full Navier-Stokes equations are used in select cases to help account for the viscous- inviscid interaction near the leading edge of the plate and for the weak shock wave emanating from that region. Using the full Navier-Stokes mean flow is shown to result in further reduction with Mach number in the magnitude of optimal growth relative to the predictions based on the self-similar approximation to the base flow.

  7. Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator Ground Test Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Corso, Jospeh A.; Hughes, Stephen; Cheatwood, Neil; Johnson, Keith; Calomino, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (HIAD) technology readiness levels have been incrementally matured by NASA over the last thirteen years, with most recent support from NASA's Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD) Game Changing Development Program (GCDP). Recently STMD GCDP has authorized funding and support through fiscal year 2015 (FY15) for continued HIAD ground developments which support a Mars Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) study. The Mars study will assess the viability of various EDL architectures to enable a Mars human architecture pathfinder mission planned for mid-2020. At its conclusion in November 2014, NASA's first HIAD ground development effort had demonstrated success with fabricating a 50 W/cm2 modular thermal protection system, a 400 C capable inflatable structure, a 10-meter scale aeroshell manufacturing capability, together with calibrated thermal and structural models. Despite the unquestionable success of the first HIAD ground development effort, it was recognized that additional investment was needed in order to realize the full potential of the HIAD technology capability to enable future flight opportunities. The second HIAD ground development effort will focus on extending performance capability in key technology areas that include thermal protection system, lifting-body structures, inflation systems, flight control, stage transitions, and 15-meter aeroshell scalability. This paper presents an overview of the accomplishments under the baseline HIAD development effort and current plans for a follow-on development effort focused on extending those critical technologies needed to enable a Mars Pathfinder mission.

  8. Elaboration of the technology of forming a conical product of sheet metal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Matysiak

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The work presents a general knowledge about spinning draw pieces of sheets, one of multi-operational processes of spinning a sheet metal conical product without machining. The objective of the work was to elaborate both the technology of forming conical products of sheet metal and execution of technological tests as well as to determine the technological parameters for the process of spinning a conical insert. As a result of the investigations, the products with improved mechanical properties, stricter execution tolerance and low roughness have been obtained. The series of 200 prototype conical inserts for the shipbuilding industry have been made.

  9. Development of a computer code for calculating the steady super/hypersonic inviscid flow around real configurations. Volume 2: Code description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marconi, F.; Yaeger, L.

    1976-01-01

    A numerical procedure was developed to compute the inviscid super/hypersonic flow field about complex vehicle geometries accurately and efficiently. A second-order accurate finite difference scheme is used to integrate the three-dimensional Euler equations in regions of continuous flow, while all shock waves are computed as discontinuities via the Rankine-Hugoniot jump conditions. Conformal mappings are used to develop a computational grid. The effects of blunt nose entropy layers are computed in detail. Real gas effects for equilibrium air are included using curve fits of Mollier charts. Typical calculated results for shuttle orbiter, hypersonic transport, and supersonic aircraft configurations are included to demonstrate the usefulness of this tool.

  10. Conical refraction healing after partially blocking the input beam

    CERN Document Server

    Turpin, Alex; Kalkandjiev, Todor K; Corbalán, Ramón; Mompart, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    In conical refraction, when a focused Gaussian beam passes along one of the optic axes of a biaxial crystal it is transformed into a pair of concentric bright rings at the focal plane. We demonstrate both theoretically and experimentally that this transformation is hardly affected by partially blocking the Gaussian input beam with an obstacle. We analyze the influence of the size of the obstruction both on the transverse intensity pattern of the beam and on its state of polarization, which is shown to be very robust.

  11. Scaling in light scattering by sharp conical metal tips

    CERN Document Server

    Pors, Anders; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I

    2016-01-01

    Using the electrostatic approximation, we analyze electromagnetic fields scattered by sharp conical metal tips, which are illuminated with light polarized along the tip axis. We establish scaling relations for the scattered field amplitude and phase, whose validity is verified with numerical simulations. Analytic expressions for the wavelength, at which the scattered field near the tip changes its direction, and field decay near the tip extremity are obtained, relating these characteristics to the cone angle and metal permittivity. The results obtained have important implications to various tip-enhanced phenomena, ranging from Raman and scattering near-field imaging to photoemission spectroscopy and nano-optical trapping.

  12. A New Conic Approach to Semisupervised Support Vector Machines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye Tian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a completely positive programming reformulation of the 2-norm soft margin S3VM model. Then, we construct a sequence of computable cones of nonnegative quadratic forms over a union of second-order cones to approximate the underlying completely positive cone. An ϵ-optimal solution can be found in finite iterations using semidefinite programming techniques by our method. Moreover, in order to obtain a good lower bound efficiently, an adaptive scheme is adopted in our approximation algorithm. The numerical results show that the proposed algorithm can achieve more accurate classifications than other well-known conic relaxations of semisupervised support vector machine models in the literature.

  13. Spin-weighted Green's functions in a conical space

    OpenAIRE

    Linet, B.

    1996-01-01

    We give an analysis of the spin-weighted Green's functions well-defined in a conical space. We apply these results in the case of a straight cosmic string and in the Rindler space in order to determine generally the Euclidean Green's functions for the massless spin 1/2 field and for the electromagnetic field. We give also the corresponding Green's functions at zero temperature. However, except for the scalar field, it seems that these Euclidean Green's functions do not correspond to the therm...

  14. Calculation of Thermal Strains and Stresses in Composite Conical Fairing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. S. Sarbaev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fairings in the form of thin-walled circular conical shells made from composite materials are a commonly used structural element of the cutting-edge rocketry. In the course of operation they are subjected to intense thermal and force loading. To calculate them the unnecessarily time consuming (laborious methods using complicated finite element software systems are often applied. The article proposes an analytical method to calculate thermal strains and stresses in composite conically shaped fairing under uneven heating. The proposed method of calculation can be useful at the preliminary stage of design process. The article describes a design model. For its construction the theory of thin orthotropic conical shells under axisymmetric loading, based on the Kirchhoff-Love hypotheses, is used. The article considers uneven heating of the fairing, when the temperature varies nonlinearly along the slant height and across the thickness. The fairing is made from composite material with woven filler. Duhamel-Neumann relations describe thermo-elastic properties of the material. Boundary conditions are formulated. The system of resolving ordinary nonhomogeneous differential equations of the second order with respect to the rotation angle of the normal in the meridian direction and shearing forces is obtained. The system of equations is transformed to the Bessel equation via auxiliary complex function. Its order is determined by the ratio of the elasticity modulus along the weft to the modulus of elasticity along the warp. For the practically important case when this ratio is equal approximately to 0.5, the analytical solution of the homogeneous system of equations is obtained. This solution is expressed by elementary functions. The variant of a particular solution for the nonhomogeneous system of differential equations is proposed. For the "long" conical shell a simplified solution is given. Using the obtained relations for the displacements and internal

  15. Multi-Exciter Vibroacoustic Simulation of Hypersonic Flight Vibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GREGORY,DANNY LYNN; CAP,JEROME S.; TOGAMI,THOMAS C.; NUSSER,MICHAEL A.; HOLLINGSHEAD,JAMES RONALD

    1999-11-11

    Many aerospace structures must survive severe high frequency, hypersonic, random vibration during their flights. The random vibrations are generated by the turbulent boundary layer developed along the exterior of the structures during flight. These environments have not been simulated very well in the past using a fixed-based, single exciter input with an upper frequency range of 2 kHz. This study investigates the possibility of using acoustic ardor independently controlled multiple exciters to more accurately simulate hypersonic flight vibration. The test configuration, equipment, and methodology are described. Comparisons with actual flight measurements and previous single exciter simulations are also presented.

  16. Integrated numerical methods for hypersonic aircraft cooling systems analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petley, Dennis H.; Jones, Stuart C.; Dziedzic, William M.

    1992-01-01

    Numerical methods have been developed for the analysis of hypersonic aircraft cooling systems. A general purpose finite difference thermal analysis code is used to determine areas which must be cooled. Complex cooling networks of series and parallel flow can be analyzed using a finite difference computer program. Both internal fluid flow and heat transfer are analyzed, because increased heat flow causes a decrease in the flow of the coolant. The steady state solution is a successive point iterative method. The transient analysis uses implicit forward-backward differencing. Several examples of the use of the program in studies of hypersonic aircraft and rockets are provided.

  17. Hypersonic boundary layer stabilization by using a wavy surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirilovskiy, S. V.; Poplavskaya, T. V.

    2017-10-01

    Numerical simulation of hypersonic (M∞=6) flow and evolution of disturbances on a smooth plate and a shallow grooved plate was performed by solving two-dimensional Navier– Stokes equations. Computational soft-ware verification was conducted by comparison with existing data of pressure pulsations on plates surface. It was showed that wavy surface significantly decrease pressure pulsations on plate surface and does not increase the value of mean heat fluxes. Data about effect of wavy surfaces with different form on the disturbances intensity in hypersonic boundary layer was obtained.

  18. Hypersonic cruise aircraft propulsion integration study, volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, R. E.; Brewer, G. D.

    1979-01-01

    A hypersonic cruise transport conceptual design is described. The integration of the subsonic, supersonic, and hypersonic propulsion systems with the aerodynamic design of the airframe is emphasized. An evaluation of various configurations of aircraft and propulsion integration concepts, and selection and refinement of a final design are given. This configuration was used as a baseline to compare two propulsion concepts - one using a fixed geometry dual combustion mode scramjet and the other a variable geometry ramjet engine. Both concepts used turbojet engines for takeoff, landing and acceleration to supersonic speed.

  19. Fatigue induced changes in conical implant-abutment connections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Kai; Wiest, Wolfram; Fella, Christian; Balles, Andreas; Dittmann, Jonas; Rack, Alexander; Maier, Dominik; Thomann, Ralf; Spies, Benedikt Christopher; Kohal, Ralf Joachim; Zabler, Simon; Nelson, Katja

    2015-11-01

    Based on the current lack of data and understanding of the wear behavior of dental two-piece implants, this study aims for evaluating the microgap formation and wear pattern of different implants in the course of cyclic loading. Several implant systems with different conical implant-abutment interfaces were purchased. The implants were first evaluated using synchrotron X-ray high-resolution radiography (SRX) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The implant-abutment assemblies were then subjected to cyclic loading at 98N and their microgap was evaluated after 100,000, 200,000 and 1 million cycles using SRX, synchrotron micro-tomography (μCT). Wear mechanisms of the implant-abutment connection (IAC) after 200,000 cycles and 1 million cycles were further characterized using SEM. All implants exhibit a microgap between the implant and abutment prior to loading. The gap size increased with cyclic loading with its changes being significantly higher within the first 200,000 cycles. Wear was seen in all implants regardless of their interface design. The wear pattern comprised adhesive wear and fretting. Wear behavior changed when a different mounting medium was used (brass vs. polymer). A micromotion of the abutment during cyclic loading can induce wear and wear particles in conical dental implant systems. This feature accompanied with the formation of a microgap at the IAC is highly relevant for the longevity of the implants. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Conical dispersion of Lamb waves in elastic plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stobbe, David M.; Murray, Todd W.

    2017-10-01

    Guided elastic waves in homogeneous isotropic plates exhibit conical dispersion at zero wave number for discrete values of Poisson's ratio where accidental degeneracy between longitudinal and transverse thickness resonances occur. Waves excited at the coincidence frequency have the infinite phase velocity associated with thickness mode resonances, but the group velocity remains finite. This leads to propagating waves that oscillate in time but are spatially uniform over the plate surface. Here, accidental degeneracy is induced in an aluminum plate by cooling the plate to tune the Poisson's ratio through the degenerate point. We measure linear dispersion in the transition from forward to backward propagating waves near zero wave number. In addition, we demonstrate that waves generated near the coincidence frequency exhibit spatially uniform phase over the plate surface, and show angle independent mode conversion upon encountering the free edge of the plate. We propose that elastic plates offer a simple system to explore the physics of conical dispersion at zero wave number, and that this phenomenon may find application in acoustic devices and nondestructive testing.

  1. Universal symbolic expression for radial distance of conic motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharaf M.A.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, a universal symbolic expression for radial distance of conic motion in recursive power series form is developed. The importance of this analytical power series representation is that it is invariant under many operations because the result of addition, multiplication, exponentiation, integration, differentiation, etc. of a power series is also a power series. This is the fact that provides excellent flexibility in dealing with analytical, as well as computational developments of problems related to radial distance. For computational developments, a full recursive algorithm is developed for the series coefficients. An efficient method using the continued fraction theory is provided for series evolution, and two devices are proposed to secure the convergence when the time interval (t − t0 is large. In addition, the algorithm does not need the solution of Kepler’s equation and its variants for parabolic and hyperbolic orbits. Numerical applications of the algorithm are given for three orbits of different eccentricities; the results showed that it is accurate for any conic motion.

  2. Conical intersection seams in polyenes derived from their chemical composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nenov, Artur; de Vivie-Riedle, Regina

    2012-08-01

    The knowledge of conical intersection seams is important to predict and explain the outcome of ultrafast reactions in photochemistry and photobiology. They define the energetic low-lying reachable regions that allow for the ultrafast non-radiative transitions. In complex molecules it is not straightforward to locate them. We present a systematic approach to predict conical intersection seams in multifunctionalized polyenes and their sensitivity to substituent effects. Included are seams that facilitate the photoreaction of interest as well as seams that open competing loss channels. The method is based on the extended two-electron two-orbital method [A. Nenov and R. de Vivie-Riedle, J. Chem. Phys. 135, 034304 (2011)], 10.1063/1.3608924. It allows to extract the low-lying regions for non-radiative transitions, which are then divided into small linear segments. Rules of thumb are introduced to find the support points for these segments, which are then used in a linear interpolation scheme for a first estimation of the intersection seams. Quantum chemical optimization of the linear interpolated structures yields the final energetic position. We demonstrate our method for the example of the electrocyclic isomerization of trifluoromethyl-pyrrolylfulgide.

  3. Atomistic Simulation of Non-Equilibrium Phenomena in Hypersonic Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Paul Erik

    The goal of this work is to model the heterogeneous recombination of atomic oxygen on silica surfaces, which is of interest for accurately predicting the heating on vehicles traveling at hypersonic speeds. This is accomplished by creating a finite rate catalytic model, which describes recombination with a set of elementary gas-surface reactions. Fundamental to a description of surface catalytic reactions are the in situ chemical structures on the surface where recombination can occur. Using molecular dynamics simulations with the Reax GSISiO potential, we find that the chemical sites active in direct gas-phase reactions on silica surfaces consist of a small number of specific structures (or defects). The existence of these defects on real silica surfaces is supported by experimental results and the structure and energetics of these defects have been verified with quantum chemical calculations. The reactions in the finite rate catalytic model are based on the interaction of molecular and atomic oxygen with these defects. Trajectory calculations are used to find the parameters in the forward rate equations, while a combination of detailed balance and transition state theory are used to find the parameters in the reverse rate equations. The rate model predicts that the oxygen recombination coefficient is relatively constant at T (300-1000 K), in agreement with experimental results. At T > 1000 K the rate model predicts a drop off in the oxygen recombination coefficient, in disagreement with experimental results, which predict that the oxygen recombination coefficient increases with temperature. A discussion of the possible reasons for this disagreement, including non-adiabatic collision dynamics, variable surface site concentrations, and additional recombination mechanisms is presented. This thesis also describes atomistic simulations with Classical Trajectory Calculation Direction Simulation Monte Carlo (CTC-DSMC), a particle based method for modeling non

  4. Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (HIAD) Technology Development Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Stephen J.; Cheatwood, F. McNeil; Calomino, Anthony M.; Wright, Henry S.

    2013-01-01

    The successful flight of the Inflatable Reentry Vehicle Experiment (IRVE)-3 has further demonstrated the potential value of Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (HIAD) technology. This technology development effort is funded by NASA's Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD) Game Changing Development Program (GCDP). This paper provides an overview of a multi-year HIAD technology development effort, detailing the projects completed to date and the additional testing planned for the future. The effort was divided into three areas: Flexible Systems Development (FSD), Mission Advanced Entry Concepts (AEC), and Flight Validation. FSD consists of a Flexible Thermal Protection Systems (FTPS) element, which is investigating high temperature materials, coatings, and additives for use in the bladder, insulator, and heat shield layers; and an Inflatable Structures (IS) element which includes manufacture and testing (laboratory and wind tunnel) of inflatable structures and their associated structural elements. AEC consists of the Mission Applications element developing concepts (including payload interfaces) for missions at multiple destinations for the purpose of demonstrating the benefits and need for the HIAD technology as well as the Next Generation Subsystems element. Ground test development has been pursued in parallel with the Flight Validation IRVE-3 flight test. A larger scale (6m diameter) HIAD inflatable structure was constructed and aerodynamically tested in the National Full-scale Aerodynamics Complex (NFAC) 40ft by 80ft test section along with a duplicate of the IRVE-3 3m article. Both the 6m and 3m articles were tested with instrumented aerodynamic covers which incorporated an array of pressure taps to capture surface pressure distribution to validate Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model predictions of surface pressure distribution. The 3m article also had a duplicate IRVE-3 Thermal Protection System (TPS) to test in addition to testing with the

  5. NASA Hypersonic Propulsion: Overview of Progress from 1995 to 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cikanek, Harry A., III; Bartolotta, Paul A.; Klem, Mark D.; Rausch, Vince L.

    2007-01-01

    Hypersonic propulsion work supported by the United States National Aeronautics and Space Administration had a primary focus on Space Transportation during the period from 1995 to 2005. The framework for these advances was established by policy and pursued with substantial funding. Many noteworthy advances were made, highlighted by the pinnacle flights of the X-43. This paper reviews and summarizes the programs and accomplishments of this era. The accomplishments are compared to the goals and objectives to lend an overarching perspective to what was achieved. At least dating back to the early days of the Space Shuttle program, NASA has had the objective of reducing the cost of access to space and concurrently improving safety and reliability. National Space Transportation Policy in 1994 coupled with a base of prior programs such as the National Aerospace Plane and the need to look beyond the Space Shuttle program set the stage for NASA to pursue Space Transportation Advances. Programs defined to pursue the advances represented a broad approach addressing classical rocket propulsion as well as airbreathing propulsion in various combinations and forms. The resulting portfolio of activities included systems analysis and design studies, discipline research and technology, component technology development, propulsion system ground test demonstration and flight demonstration. The types of propulsion systems that were pursued by these programs included classical rocket engines, "aerospike" rocket engines, high performance rocket engines, scram jets, rocket based combined cycles, and turbine based combined cycles. Vehicle architectures included single and two stage vehicles. Either single types of propulsion systems or combinations of the basic propulsion types were applied to both single and two stage vehicle design concepts. Some of the propulsion system design concepts were built and tested at full scale, large scale and small scale. Many flight demonstrators were

  6. In-stream measurements of combustion during Mach 5 to 7 tests of the Hypersonic Research Engine (HRE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lezberg, Erwin A.; Metzler, Allen J.; Pack, William D.

    1993-01-01

    Results of in-stream combustion measurements taken during Mach 5 to 7 true simulation testing of the Hypersonic Research Engine/Aerothermodynamic Integration Model (HRE/AIM) are presented. These results, the instrumentation techniques, and configuration changes to the engine installation that were required to test this model are described. In test runs at facility Mach numbers of 5 to 7, an exhaust instrumentation ring which formed an extension of the engine exhaust nozzle shroud provided diagnostic measurements at 10 circumferential locations in the HRE combustor exit plane. The measurements included static and pitot pressures using conventional conical probes, combustion gas temperatures from cooled-gas pyrometer probes, and species concentration from analysis of combustion gas samples. Results showed considerable circumferential variation, indicating that efficiency losses were due to nonuniform fuel distribution or incomplete mixing. Results using the Mach 7 facility nozzle but with Mach 6 temperature simulation, 1590 to 1670 K, showed indications of incomplete combustion. Nitric oxide measurements at the combustor exit peaked at 2000 ppmv for stoichiometric combustion at Mach 6.

  7. Energy methods for hypersonic trajectory optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Han-Chang

    A family of near-optimal guidance laws for the ascent and descent trajectories between earth surface and earth orbit of fully reusable single-stage-to-orbit launch vehicles is derived. Of interest are both the optimal operation of the propulsion system and the optimal flight path. The method is based on selecting propulsion system modes and flight-path parameters that maximize a certain performance function. This function is derived from consideration of the energy-state model of the aircraft equations of motion. For ascent trajectories of vehicles employing hydrogen fuel, because the density of liquid hydrogen is relatively low, the sensitivity to perturbations in volume needs to be taken into consideration as well as weight sensitivity. The cost functional is then a weighted sum of fuel mass and volume; the weighting factor is chosen to minimize vehicle empty weight for a given payload mass and volume in orbit. Both airbreathing/rocket and all rocket propulsion systems are considered. For airbreathing/rocket vehicles, the optimal propulsion switching Mach numbers are determined and the use of liquid oxygen augmentation is investigated. For the vehicles with all rocket power, the desirability of tripropellant systems is investigated. In addition, time and heat load is minimized as well. For descent trajectories, the trade-off between minimizing heat load into the vehicle and maximizing cross range distance is investigated, as well as minimum time and minimum temperature paths. The results show that the optimization methodology can be used to derive a wide variety of near-optimal launch vehicle trajectories.

  8. The Influence of the Wheel Conicity and the Creep Force Coefficients to the Hunting Motion Stability of a Bogie with Independently Rotating Wheelsets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Baldovin

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The hunting motion of railway vehicles is a coupled lateral and yaw self-oscillatory motion which is largely determined by wheel–rail contact geometry. The stability of this motion is an important dynamic problem, depends of the railway vehicles speed and determines the maximum operating speed of the vehicles. To improve the stability performances, without increasing the rail-wheel interaction forces above safety limits, elastic joints and dissipative devices are used to connect the wheelset to the bogie frame. In this paper is studied the influence of the wheel conicity and the creep force coefficients to the hunting motion stability of a dynamical system with 10 DOF representing a bogie with independently rotating wheelsets

  9. Existence of standard models of conic fibrations over non-algebraically-closed fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avilov, A A [National Research University " Higher School of Economics" , Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-12-31

    We prove an analogue of Sarkisov's theorem on the existence of a standard model of a conic fibration over an algebraically closed field of characteristic different from two for three-dimensional conic fibrations over an arbitrary field of characteristic zero with an action of a finite group. Bibliography: 16 titles.

  10. Sizing of scramjet vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingenito, A.; Gulli, S.; Bruno, C.

    2011-10-01

    The current European project LAPCAT II has the ambitious goal to define a conceptual vehicle capable of achieving the antipodal range Brussels-Sydney (~18,000 km) in about 2 h at Mach number Ma = 8. At this high speed, the requirement of high lift to drag (L/D) ratio is critical to high performance, because of high skin friction and wave drag: in fact, as the Mach number increases, the L/D ratio decreases. The design of the vehicle architecture (shape and propulsion system) is, as a consequence, crucial to achieve a reasonably high L/D. In this work, critical parameters for the preliminary sizing of a hypersonic airbreathing airliner have been identified. In particular, for a given Technology Readiness Level (TRL) and mission requirements, a solution space of possible vehicle architectures at cruise have been obtained. In this work, the Gross Weight at Take-Off (TOGW) was deliberately discarded as a constraint, based on previous studies by Czysz and Vanderkerkhove [1]. Typically, limiting from the beginning, the TOGW leads to a vicious spiral where weight and propulsion system requirements keep growing, eventually denying convergence. In designing passenger airliners, in fact, it is the payload that is assumed fixed from the start, not the total weight. In order to screen the solutions found, requirements for taking-off (TO) and landing as well as the trajectory have been accounted for. A consistent solution has finally been obtained by imposing typical airliner constraints: emergency take-off and landing. These constraints enable singling out a realistic design from the broad family of vehicles capable of performing the given mission. This vehicle has been obtained by integrating not only aerodynamics, trajectory, and airliner constraints, but also by integrating the propulsion system, the trimming devices and by doing some adjustments to the conceptual vehicle shape (i. e., spatular nose). Thus, the final vehicle is the result of many iterations in the design

  11. THE HYPERBOLOID OF REVOLUTION OF ONE NAPPE – A RULED SURFACE GENERATING CONICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    OPREA Gabriel

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper intends to underline the property of the hyperboloid of revolution of one nappe to generate on its surface, when it is cut by a plane, the three known conics (ellipse, hyperbola and parabola.Cutting this surface by a plane, we find the equation of the section to be the general equation of a conic. Depending on the parameters of this equation, we can establish the nature of the conic. The paper intends to emphasize the property of similarity between the ruled hyperboloidal surfaces of revolution and the conic ones, regarding their capacity to “house” conics on their surfaces; it also points out the existence of an alternative for the Dandelin′s theorem in the case of the hyperboloid.

  12. Experimental Detection of Branching at a Conical Intersection in a Highly Fluorescent Molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazard, Johanna; Bizimana, Laurie A; Gellen, Tobias; Carbery, William P; Turner, Daniel B

    2016-01-07

    Conical intersections are molecular configurations at which adiabatic potential-energy surfaces touch. They are predicted to be ubiquitous, yet condensed-phase experiments have focused on the few systems with clear spectroscopic signatures of negligible fluorescence, high photoactivity, or femtosecond electronic kinetics. Although rare, these signatures have become diagnostic for conical intersections. Here we detect a coherent surface-crossing event nearly two picoseconds after optical excitation in a highly fluorescent molecule that has no photoactivity and nanosecond electronic kinetics. Time-frequency analysis of high-sensitivity measurements acquired using sub-8 fs pulses reveals phase shifts of the signal due to branching of the wavepacket through a conical intersection. The time-frequency analysis methodology demonstrated here on a model compound will enable studies of conical intersections in molecules that do not exhibit their diagnostic signatures. Improving the ability to detect conical intersections will enrich the understanding of their mechanistic role in molecular photochemistry.

  13. Effect of static shape deformation on aerodynamics and aerothermodynamics of hypersonic inflatable aerodynamic decelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jinghui; Lin, Guiping; Bu, Xueqin; Fu, Shiming; Chao, Yanmeng

    2017-07-01

    The inflatable aerodynamic decelerator (IAD), which allows heavier and larger payloads and offers flexibility in landing site selection at higher altitudes, possesses potential superiority in next generation space transport system. However, due to the flexibilities of material and structure assembly, IAD inevitably experiences surface deformation during atmospheric entry, which in turn alters the flowfield around the vehicle and leads to the variations of aerodynamics and aerothermodynamics. In the current study, the effect of the static shape deformation on the hypersonic aerodynamics and aerothermodynamics of a stacked tori Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (HIAD) is demonstrated and analyzed in detail by solving compressible Navier-Stokes equations with Menter's shear stress transport (SST) turbulence model. The deformed shape is obtained by structural modeling in the presence of maximum aerodynamic pressure during entry. The numerical results show that the undulating shape deformation makes significant difference to flow structure. In particular, the more curved outboard forebody surface results in local flow separations and reattachments in valleys, which consequently yields remarkable fluctuations of surface conditions with pressure rising in valleys yet dropping on crests while shear stress and heat flux falling in valleys yet rising on crests. Accordingly, compared with the initial (undeformed) shape, the corresponding differences of surface conditions get more striking outboard, with maximum augmentations of 379 pa, 2224 pa, and 19.0 W/cm2, i.e., 9.8%, 305.9%, and 101.6% for the pressure, shear stress and heat flux respectively. Moreover, it is found that, with the increase of angle of attack, the aerodynamic characters and surface heating vary and the aeroheating disparities are evident between the deformed and initial shape. For the deformable HIAD model investigated in this study, the more intense surface conditions and changed flight

  14. Hypersonic engine component experiments in high heat flux, supersonic flow environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladden, Herbert J.; Melis, Matthew E.

    1993-01-01

    A major concern in advancing the state-of-the-art technologies for hypersonic vehicles is the development of an aeropropulsion system capable of withstanding the sustained high thermal loads expected during hypersonic flight. Even though progress has been made in the computational understanding of fluid dynamics and the physics/chemistry of high speed flight, there is also a need for experimental facilities capable of providing a high heat flux environment for testing component concepts and verifying/calibrating these analyses. A hydrogen/oxygen rocket engine heat source was developed at the NASA Lewis Research Center as one element in a series of facilities at national laboratories designed to fulfill this need. This 'Hot Gas Facility' is capable of providing heat fluxes up to 450 w/sq cm on flat surfaces and up to 5,000 w/sq cm at the leading edge stagnation point of a strut in a supersonic flow stream. Gas temperatures up to 3050 K can also be attained. Two recent experimental programs conducted in this facility are discussed. The objective of the first experiment is to evaluate the erosion and oxidation characteristics of a coating on a cowl leading edge (or strut leading edge) in a supersonic, high heat flux environment. Macrophotographic data from a coated leading edge model show progressive degradation over several thermal cycles at aerothermal conditions representative of high Mach number flight. The objective of the second experiment is to assess the capability of cooling a porous surface exposed to a high temperature, high velocity flow environment and to provide a heat transfer data base for a design procedure. Experimental results from transpiration cooled surfaces in a supersonic flow environment are presented.

  15. Three-dimensional flow simulation about the AFE vehicle in the transitional regime. [Aeroassist Flight Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celenligil, M. Cevdet; Moss, James N.; Blanchard, Robert C.

    1989-01-01

    The direct-simulation Monte Carlo technique is used to analyze the hypersonic rarefied flow about the three-dimensional NASA Aeroassist Flight Experiment vehicle. Results are given for typical transitional flows encountered during the vehicle's atmospheric entry from altitudes of 200-100 km with an entry velocity of 9.9 km/s. It is found that dissociation is important at altitudes of 110 km and below, and that transitional effects are significant even at an altitude of 200 km.

  16. Head-on view showing the X-43A hypersonic research aircraft after it was mated to its modified Pegas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    This head-on view shows the first of three X-43A hypersonic research aircraft (foreground) after it was mated to its modified Pegasus booster rocket (rear) in late January at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif. FIRST X-43A MATED TO BOOSTER -- This head-on view shows the first of three X-43A hypersonic research aircraft (foreground) after it was mated to its modified Pegasus booster rocket (rear) in late January at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif. Mating of the X-43A and its specially-designed adapter to the first stage of the booster rocket marks a major milestone in the Hyper-X hypersonic research program. The 12-foot, unpiloted research vehicle was developed and built by MicroCraft Inc., Tullahoma, Tenn., for NASA. The booster, built by Orbital Sciences Corp., Dulles, Va.,will accelerate the X-43A after the X-43A booster 'stack' is air-launched from NASA's venerable NB-52 mothership. The X-43A will separate from the rocket at a predetermined altitude and speed and fly a pre-programmed trajectory, conducting aerodynamic and propulsion experiments until it impacts into the Pacific Ocean. Three research flights are planned, two at Mach 7 and one at Mach 10 (seven and 10 times the speed of sound respectively) with the first tentatively scheduled for early summer, 2001. The X-43A is powered by a revolutionary supersonic-combustion ramjet ('scramjet') engine, and will use the underbody of the aircraft to form critical elements of the engine. The forebody shape helps compress the intake airflow, while the aft section acts as a nozzle to direct thrust. The X-43A flights will be the first actual flight tests of an aircraft powered by an air-breathing scramjet engine.

  17. Optical information transfer based on helico-conical laser beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihailescu, M.; Kusko, C.; Preda, L.

    2014-09-01

    We generated holographic masks starting with the interference between the reference beam and the signal beam, which is diffracted by the object. We investigate additive and multiplicative combinations between conical and helical phase distributions as compound objects to be inserted in the signal beam. We explored experimentally the dynamics of the diffracted intensity patterns, in two and three dimensions, after these holographic masks are addressed onto a programmable spatial light modulator. The diffracted intensity spatial arrangement contain information about constructive parameters used for holographic masks generation and exhibit asymmetric shapes and peaks along the optical axis in all analyzed compound objects. We introduce a reading mask in the optical path and, by analyzing changes of the spatial distribution in the final diffracted intensity arrangement, is possible to read the values of the constructive parameters. The generation of these reading masks in each case is discussed.

  18. Thermodynamical description of stationary, asymptotically flat solutions with conical singularities

    CERN Document Server

    Herdeiro, Carlos; Rebelo, Carmen

    2010-01-01

    We examine the thermodynamical properties of a number of asymptotically flat, stationary (but not static) solutions having conical singularities, with both connected and non-connected event horizons, using the thermodynamical description recently proposed in arXiv:0912.3386 [gr-qc]. The examples considered are the double-Kerr solution, the black ring rotating in either S^2 or S^1 and the black Saturn, where the balance condition is not imposed for the latter two solutions. We show that not only the Bekenstein-Hawking area law is recovered from the thermodynamical description but also the thermodynamical angular momentum is the ADM angular momentum. We also analyse the thermodynamical stability and show that, for all these solutions, either the isothermal moment of inertia or the specific heat at constant angular momentum is negative, at any point in parameter space. Therefore, all these solutions are thermodynamically unstable in the grand canonical ensemble.

  19. Virtual display design using waveguide hologram in conical mounting configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zhanjun; Li, Wenqiang; Zhou, Yongjun; Kang, Mingwu; Zheng, Zhenrong

    2011-09-01

    An improved virtual display is proposed by using a waveguide holographic configuration with two total internal reflection holographic gratings in conical mounting and two volume hologram in classical mounting recorded on a single transparent planar waveguide. Using this compact configuration, efficiency can be dramatically improved and assembly is easy to be realized. The main principle and the method of intensity uniformity control are present in the paper. The analysis and simulation results are also explained. The virtual display system design shows good optical performance with 25 deg. field of view, a large pupil about 43 mm, little distortion less than 1%, and low aberration. The configuration can be used to a portable or wearable display.

  20. Investigation of fusion gain in fast ignition with conical targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MJ Tabatabaei

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Fast ignition is a new scheme for inertial confinement fusion (ICF. In this scheme, at first the interaction of ultraintense laser beam with the hohlraum wall surrounding a capsule containing deuterium-tritium (D-T fuel causes implosion and compression of fuel to high density and then laser produced protons penetrate in the compressed fuel and deposit their energy in it as the ignition hot spot is created. In this paper, following the energy gain of spherical target and considering relationship of the burn fraction to burn duration, we have obtained the energy gain of conical targets characterized by the angle β, and found a hemispherical capsule (β=π/2 has a gain as high as 96% of that of the whole spherical capsule. The results obtained in this study are qualitatively consistent with Atzeni et al.'s studies of simulations.

  1. Stability characteristics of a conical aerospace plane concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahne, David E.; Luckring, James M.; Covell, Peter F.; Phillips, W. Pelham; Gatlin, Gregory M.

    1989-01-01

    Data on stability characteristics of a conical aerospace plane concept were collected for a number of model geometry variations and test conditions, using several NASA-Langley wind tunnels spanning Mach range 0.1-6. The baseline configuration of this plane concept incorporated a 5-deg cone forebody, a 75.96-deg delta wing, a 16-deg leading-edge sweep deployable canard, and a centerline vertical tail. The key results pertinent to stability considerations about all three axes of the model are presented together with data on the effect of the canard on pitch stability, the effect of vertical tail on lateral-directional stability, and the effect of forebody geometry on yaw asymmetries. The experimental stability data are compared with the results from an engineering predictive code.

  2. Performance of cylindrical-conical cyclones with different geometrical configurations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.D.A.M. Santana

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available The present work is a continuation of a study of the influence of geometric characteristics on the performance of reverse-flow cylindrical-conical cyclones. After studying the behavior of the pressure drop in previous work (Arnosti et al., 1998, here performance in terms of collection efficiency in the removal of particulate material is addressed. The independent variables considered in this study were inlet gas velocity (three velocities and the following dimensions of the cyclone: the cylindrical section (three heights and internal height of the gas exit duct (three heights. The tests were performed using an 3³ experimental design. Analysis of the results for overall efficiency was carried out using response surfaces and the statistical parameters were estimated from linear regression.

  3. On the biomechanical stability of cementless straight conical hip stems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viceconti, M; Pancanti, A; Varini, E; Traina, F; Cristofolini, L

    2006-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigation in vitro the effect of deficient bone-implant contact on the primary stability of a straight conical stem. Various possible deficient contact patterns were derived from surgical simulations. The effect of stair climbing loads on the bone-implant micromotion was firstly investigated using a finite element model and then an in vitro test aimed at assessing primary stability. It was found that if the surface features are prevented from biting dense bone in a few small but critical regions, stem primary stability is completely lost. These results suggest that the surface features used in the axisymmetric stem under investigation can be too sensitive to deficient contact conditions, and thus should be augmented with additional antirotational fins. Preliminary tests showed that a stem with the addition of such fins presents good primary stability in all tested conditions.

  4. Photodissociation of methyl formate: Conical intersections, roaming and triple fragmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, King-Chuen; Tsai, Po-Yu [Department of Chemistry, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Institute of Atomic and Molecular Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Chao, Meng-Hsuan [Department of Chemistry, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Kasai, Toshio [Department of Chemistry, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Graduate School of Science, Department of Chemistry, Osaka University, Toyonaka, 560-0043 Osaka (Japan); Lombardi, Andrea [Dipartimento di Chimica, Università di Perugia, 06123 Perugia (Italy); Palazzetti, Federico [Scuola Normale Superiore, 56126 Pisa (Italy); Aquilanti, Vincenzo [Dipartimento di Chimica, Università di Perugia, 06123 Perugia (Italy); Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Istituto di Struttura della Materia, 00016 Roma (Italy)

    2015-12-31

    The photodissociation channels of methyl formate have been extensively investigated by two different advanced experimental techniques, ion imaging and Fourier-Transform-Infrared emission spectroscopy, combined with quantum chemical calculations and molecular dynamics simulations. Our aim is to characterize the role of alternative routes to the conventional transition-state mediated pathway: the roaming and the triple fragmentation processes. The photolysis experiments, carried out at a range of laser wavelengths in the vicinity of the triple fragmentation threshold, beside the simulation of large bunches of classical trajectories with different initial conditions, have shown that both mechanisms share a common path that involves a conical intersection during the relaxation process from the electronic excited state S{sub 1} to the ground state S{sub 0}.

  5. Discovery of large conical stromatolites in Lake Untersee, Antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, D T; Sumner, D Y; Hawes, I; Webster-Brown, J; McKay, C P

    2011-05-01

    Lake Untersee is one of the largest (11.4 km(2)) and deepest (>160 m) freshwater lakes in East Antarctica. Located at 71°S the lake has a perennial ice cover, a water column that, with the exception of a small anoxic basin in the southwest of the lake, is well mixed, supersaturated with dissolved oxygen, alkaline (pH 10.4) and exceedingly clear. The floor of the lake is covered with photosynthetic microbial mats to depths of at least 100 m. These mats are primarily composed of filamentous cyanophytes and form two distinct macroscopic structures, one of which--cm-scale cuspate pinnacles dominated by Leptolyngbya spp.--is common in Antarctica, but the second--laminated, conical stromatolites that rise up to 0.5 m above the lake floor, dominated by Phormidium spp.--has not previously been reported in any modern environment. The laminae that form the conical stromatolites are 0.2-0.8 mm in thickness consisting of fine clays and organic material; carbon dating implies that laminations may occur on near decadal timescales. The uniformly steep sides (59.6 ± 2.5°) and the regular laminar structure of the cones suggest that they may provide a modern analog for growth of some of the oldest well-described Archean stromatolites. Mechanisms underlying the formation of these stromatolites are as yet unclear, but their growth is distinct from that of the cuspate pinnacles. The sympatric occurrence of pinnacles and cones related to microbial communities with distinct cyanobacterial compositions suggest that specific microbial behaviors underpin the morphological differences in the structures. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Early structure of LPG partially premixed conically stabilized flames

    KAUST Repository

    Elbaz, Ayman M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents experimental investigation of LPG partially premixed turbulent flames stabilized within a conical nozzle burner under constant degree of partial premixing. The stability limits and mean flame structure are presented based on the mean gas temperature and the concentration of CO, O 2, NO, and HC at the flame early region of reaction. The investigation covered the influence of the nozzle cone angle, the jet exit velocity and the jet equivalence ratio. The stability results show that the flames with cone are more stable than those without cone. For conical stabilized flames, the stability results exhibit three different sensitivity regions between the jet velocity and equivalence ratio. The inflame measurements prove that the flame stability could be attributed to the triple flame structure at the flame leading edge. The data show that the triple flame structure is influenced by cone angle, the jet velocity and the equivalence ratio. The flame is believed to be controlled by the recirculation flow inside the cone. Increasing the cone angle induced higher air entrainment to the reaction zone as depicted by a higher O 2 concentration within the flame leading edge. Increasing the jet velocity to a certain limit enhances the intensity of combustion at the flame leading edge, while excessive increase in jet velocity reduces this intensity. At a fixed jet velocity the higher the equivalence ratio, the higher the amount of fuel diffused and engulfed to the reaction zone, the more delay of the combustion completion and the higher the emission concentrations of the flame. © 2012 Elsevier Inc.

  7. NASA's Integrated Space Transportation Plan — 3 rd generation reusable launch vehicle technology update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Stephen; Hueter, Uwe

    2003-08-01

    NASA's Integrated Space Transportation Plan (ISTP) calls for investments in Space Shuttle safety upgrades, second generation Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) advanced development and third generation RLV and in-space research and technology. NASA's third generation launch systems are to be fully reusable and operation by 2025. The goals for third generation launch systems are to reduce cost by a factor of 100 and improve safety by a factor of 10,000 over current systems. The Advanced Space Transportation Program Office (ASTP) at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, AL has the agency lead to develop third generation space transportation technologies. The Hypersonics Investment Area, part of ASTP, is developing the third generation launch vehicle technologies in two main areas, propulsion and airframes. The program's major investment is in hypersonic airbreathing propulsion since it offers the greatest potential for meeting the third generation launch vehicles. The program will mature the technologies in three key propulsion areas, scramjets, rocket-based combined cycle and turbine-based combination cycle. Ground and flight propulsion tests are being planned for the propulsion technologies. Airframe technologies will be matured primarily through ground testing. This paper describes NASA's activities in hypersonics. Current programs, accomplishments, future plans and technologies that are being pursued by the Hypersonics Investment Area under the Advanced Space Transportation Program Office will be discussed.

  8. Local and System Level Considerations for Plasma-Based Techniques in Hypersonic Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suchomel, Charles; Gaitonde, Datta

    2007-01-01

    The harsh environment encountered due to hypersonic flight, particularly when air-breathing propulsion devices are utilized, poses daunting challenges to successful maturation of suitable technologies. This has spurred the quest for revolutionary solutions, particularly those exploiting the fact that air under these conditions can become electrically conducting either naturally or through artificial enhancement. Optimized development of such concepts must emphasize not only the detailed physics by which the fluid interacts with the imposed electromagnetic fields, but must also simultaneously identify system level issues integration and efficiencies that provide the greatest leverage. This paper presents some recent advances at both levels. At the system level, an analysis is summarized that incorporates the interdependencies occurring between weight, power and flow field performance improvements. Cruise performance comparisons highlight how one drag reduction device interacts with the vehicle to improve range. Quantified parameter interactions allow specification of system requirements and energy consuming technologies that affect overall flight vehicle performance. Results based on on the fundamental physics are presented by distilling numerous computational studies into a few guiding principles. These highlight the complex non-intuitive relationships between the various fluid and electromagnetic fields, together with thermodynamic considerations. Generally, energy extraction is an efficient process, while the reverse is accompanied by significant dissipative heating and inefficiency. Velocity distortions can be detrimental to plasma operation, but can be exploited to tailor flows through innovative electromagnetic configurations.

  9. Anisotropic power spectrum of refractive-index fluctuation in hypersonic turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiangting; Yang, Shaofei; Guo, Lixin; Cheng, Mingjian

    2016-11-10

    An anisotropic power spectrum of the refractive-index fluctuation in hypersonic turbulence was obtained by processing the experimental image of the hypersonic plasma sheath and transforming the generalized anisotropic von Kármán spectrum. The power spectrum suggested here can provide as good a fit to measured spectrum data for hypersonic turbulence as that recorded from the nano-planar laser scattering image. Based on the newfound anisotropic hypersonic turbulence power spectrum, Rytov approximation was employed to establish the wave structure function and the spatial coherence radius model of electromagnetic beam propagation in hypersonic turbulence. Enhancing the anisotropy characteristics of the hypersonic turbulence led to a significant improvement in the propagation performance of electromagnetic beams in hypersonic plasma sheath. The influence of hypersonic turbulence on electromagnetic beams increases with the increase of variance of the refractive-index fluctuation and the decrease of turbulence outer scale and anisotropy parameters. The spatial coherence radius was much smaller than that in atmospheric turbulence. These results are fundamental to understanding electromagnetic wave propagation in hypersonic turbulence.

  10. High-Fidelity Kinetics and Radiation Transport for NLTE Hypersonic Flows Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The modeling of NLTE hypersonic flows combines several disciplines: chemistry, kinetics, radiation transport, fluid mechanics, and surface science. No single code or...

  11. Testing of the NASA Hypersonics Project Combined Cycle Engine Large Scale Inlet Mode Transition Experiment (CCE LlMX)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, J. D.; Stueber, T. J.; Thomas, S. R.; Suder, K. L.; Weir, L. J.; Sanders, B. W.

    2012-01-01

    Status on an effort to develop Turbine Based Combined Cycle (TBCC) propulsion is described. This propulsion technology can enable reliable and reusable space launch systems. TBCC propulsion offers improved performance and safety over rocket propulsion. The potential to realize aircraft-like operations and reduced maintenance are additional benefits. Among most the critical TBCC enabling technologies are: 1) mode transition from turbine to scramjet propulsion, 2) high Mach turbine engines and 3) TBCC integration. To address these TBCC challenges, the effort is centered on a propulsion mode transition experiment and includes analytical research. The test program, the Combined-Cycle Engine Large Scale Inlet Mode Transition Experiment (CCE LIMX), was conceived to integrate TBCC propulsion with proposed hypersonic vehicles. The goals address: (1) dual inlet operability and performance, (2) mode-transition sequences enabling a switch between turbine and scramjet flow paths, and (3) turbine engine transients during transition. Four test phases are planned from which a database can be used to both validate design and analysis codes and characterize operability and integration issues for TBCC propulsion. In this paper we discuss the research objectives, features of the CCE hardware and test plans, and status of the parametric inlet characterization testing which began in 2011. This effort is sponsored by the NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Hypersonics project

  12. The X-43A hypersonic research aircraft and its modified Pegasus booster rocket nestled under the wi

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    The X-43A hypersonic research aircraft and its modified Pegasus booster rocket are nestled under the wing of NASA's NB-52B carrier aircraft during pre-flight systems testing at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif. The combined systems test was one of the last major milestones in the Hyper-X research program before the first X-43A flight. The X-43A flights will be the first actual flight tests of an aircraft powered by a revolutionary supersonic-combustion ramjet ('scramjet') engine capable of operating at hypersonic speeds (above Mach 5, or five times the speed of sound). The 12-foot, unpiloted research vehicle was developed and built by MicroCraft Inc., Tullahoma, Tenn., under NASA contract. The booster was built by Orbital Sciences Corp., Dulles, Va. After being air-launched from NASA's venerable NB-52 mothership, the booster will accelerate the X-43A to test speed and altitude. The X-43A will then separate from the rocket and fly a pre-programmed trajectory, conducting aerodynamic and propulsion experiments until it descends into the Pacific Ocean. Three research flights are planned, two at Mach 7 and one at Mach 10.

  13. NASA's NB-52B carrier aircraft rolls down a taxiway with the X-43A hypersonic research aircraft and

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    As part of a combined systems test conducted by NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, NASA's NB-52B carrier aircraft rolls down a taxiway at Edwards Air Force Base with the X-43A hypersonic research aircraft and its modified Pegasus booster rocket attached to a pylon under its right wing. The taxi test was one of the last major milestones in the Hyper-X research program before the first X-43A flight. The X-43A flights will be the first actual flight tests of an aircraft powered by a revolutionary supersonic-combustion ramjet ('scramjet') engine capable of operating at hypersonic speeds (above Mach 5, or five times the speed of sound). The 12-foot, unpiloted research vehicle was developed and built by MicroCraft Inc., Tullahoma, Tenn., under NASA contract. The booster was built by Orbital Sciences Corp., Dulles, Va. After being air-launched from NASA's venerable NB-52 mothership, the booster will accelerate the X-43A to test speed and altitude. The X-43A will then separate from the rocket and fly a pre-programmed trajectory, conducting aerodynamic and propulsion experiments until it descends into the Pacific Ocean. Three research flights are planned, two at Mach 7 and one at Mach 10.

  14. An Overview of Brazilian Developments in Beamed Energy Aerospace Propulsion and Vehicle Performance Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minucci, M. A. S.

    2008-04-01

    Beamed energy propulsion and beamed energy vehicle performance control concepts are equally promising and challenging. In Brazil, the two concepts are being currently investigated at the Prof Henry T Nagamatsu Laboratory of Aerothermodynamics and Hypersonics, of the Institute for Advanced Studies—IEAv, in collaboration with the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute—RPI, Troy, NY, and the United States Air force Research Laboratory-AFRL. Until recently, only laser energy addition for hypersonic flow control was being investigated at the Laboratory using a 0.3 m nozzle exit diameter hypersonic shock tunnel, T2, and two 7 joule CO2 TEA lasers. Flow visualization, model pressure and heat flux measurements of the laser energy addition perturbed flow around a model were produced as a result of this joint IEAv-RPI investigation. Presently, with the participation of AFRL and the newly commissioned 0.6 m. nozzle exit diameter hypersonic shock tunnel, T3, a more ambitious project is underway. Two 400 Joule Lumonics 620 CO2 TEA lasers will deliver a 20 cm X 25 cm propulsive laser beam to a complete laser propelled air breather/rocket hypersonic engine, located inside T3 test section. Schlieren photographs of the flow inside de engine as well as surface and heat flux measurements will be performed for free stream Mach numbers ranging from 6 to 25. The present paper discusses past, present and future Brazilian activities on beamed energy propulsion and related technologies.

  15. A preliminary assessment of the impact of 2-D exhaust-nozzle geometry on the cruise range of a hypersonic aircraft with top-mounted ramjet propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahl, W. A.; Weidner, J. P.

    1980-01-01

    A theoretical study of full length and shortened, two dimensional, isentropic, exhaust nozzles integrated with top mounted ramjet propulsion nacelles were conducted. Both symmetric and asymmetric contoured nozzles with a range of angular orientations were considered. Performance comparisons to determine optimum installations for a representative hypersonic vehicle at Mach 5 cruise conditions are presented on the basis of cruise range, propulsive specific impulse, inlet area requirements, and overall lift drag ratio. The effect of approximating the nozzle internal contours with planar surfaces and the determination of viscous and frozen flow effects are also presented.

  16. Experiment on Conical Pick Cutting Rock Material Assisted with Front and Rear Water Jet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohui Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Conical picks are one kind of cutting tools widely used in engineering machinery. In the process of rock breaking, the conical pick bears great cutting force and wear. To solve the problem, a new method, conical pick assisted with high pressure water jet, could break rock effectively, and four different configuration modes of water jet were presented. In this paper, based on the analysis of the different water jet configuration’s advantages and disadvantages, experiments on front water jet, new typed rear water jet, and the combination of those two water jet configuration modes were conducted to study the assisting cutting performance and obtain the quantitative results.

  17. Classification of conics and Cassini curves in Minkowski space-time plane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emad N. Shonoda

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we use the Apollonius definition of conics to generate algebraic curves in the Minkowski space-time plane M2, which turn out to be different from classical conic sections. We extend and classify this sort of “M-conics”. We discuss the cases of the singularity points of these M-conics, coming from the transition from timelike world to spacelike world through the lightlike one. Finally, we translate the classical concept of Cassini curves with two foci and that of (multifocal Cassini curves to Minkowski planes M2.

  18. Vehicle to Vehicle Services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brønsted, Jeppe Rørbæk

    2008-01-01

    As computing devices, sensors, and actuators pervade our surroundings, new applications emerge with accompanying research challenges. In the transportation domain vehicles are being linked by wireless communication and equipped with an array of sensors and actuators that make is possible to provide...... location aware infotainment, increase safety, and lessen environmental strain. This dissertation is about service oriented architecture for pervasive computing with an emphasis on vehicle to vehicle applications. If devices are exposed as services, applications can be created by composing a set of services...... and governing the flow of data among them. In pervasive computing, composing services is, however, not the whole story. To fully realize their potential, applications must also deal with challenges such as device heterogeneity, context awareness, openendedness, and resilience to dynamism in network connectivity...

  19. Analysis of spatial dispersion characteristics of improved conical sprays; Kairyo kasajo funmu no kukan bunsansei no kento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, W.; Murakami, A.; Hama, J. [Mechanical Engineering Lab., Tokyo (Japan); Obokata, T. [Gunma University, Gunma (Japan)

    1997-10-01

    The macro-characteristics of conical and improved conical sprays were analyzed using laser sheet and high speed camera. The injection pressure was 14.7, 24.5 or 34.3 MPa and the chamber pressure was 0.098, 0.98 or 1.96 MPa, where the amount of injected fuel was 28.5 mg per cycle, and the injection frequency was 8.3 Hz. As a result, at atmospheric pressure, both of the conical spray and improved conical spray have a conical pattern, but at high chamber pressure, the sprays become three dimensional. The penetration of the improved conical spray was about 25% stronger than that of the conical spray. 10 refs., 11 figs.

  20. Conical Intersections Between Vibrationally Adiabatic Surfaces in Methanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawadi, Mahesh B.; Perry, David S.

    2014-06-01

    The discovery of a set of seven conical intersections (CI's) between vibrationally adiabatic surfaces in methanol is reported. The intersecting surfaces represent the energies of the two asymmetric CH stretch vibrations, νb{2} and νb{9}, regarded as adiabatic functions of the torsional angle, γ, and COH bend angle, ρ. One conical intersection, required by symmetry, is located at the C3v geometry where the COH group is linear (ρ = 0°); the other six are in eclipsed conformations with ρ = 62° and 94°. The three CI's at ρ = 62° are close to the equilibrium geometry (ρ = 71.4°), within the zero-point amplitude of the COH bending vibration. CI's between electronic surfaces have long been recognized as crucial conduits for ultrafast relaxation, and recently Hamm, and Stock have shown that vibrational CI's may also provide a mechanism for ultrafast vibrational relaxation. The ab initio data reported here are well described by an extended Zwanziger and Grant model for E ⊗ e Jahn-Teller systems in which Renner-Teller coupling is also active. However, in the present case, the distortion ρ from C3v symmetry is much larger than is typical in the Jahn-Teller coupling of electronic surfaces and accordingly higher-order terms in ρ are required. The present results are also consistent with the two-state model of Xu et al. The cusp-like features, which they found along the internal-rotation path, are explained in the context of the present work in terms of proximity to the CI's. The presence of multiple CI's near the torsional minimum energy path impacts the role of geometric phase in this three-fold internal-rotor system. When the dimensionality of the low-frequency space is extended to include the CO bond length as well as γ and ρ, the individual CI's become seams of CI's. It is shown that the CI's at ρ = 62° and 94° lie along the same seam of CI's in this higher dimensional space. P. Hamm and G. Stock, Phys. Rev. Lett., 109, 173201, (2012) P. Hamm, and G

  1. Molecular-Based Optical Diagnostics for Hypersonic Nonequilibrium Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danehy, Paul; Bathel, Brett; Johansen, Craig; Winter, Michael; O'Byrne, Sean; Cutler, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    This presentation package consists of seven different talks rolled up into one. These talks are all invited orals presentations in a special session at the Aviation 2015 conference and represent contributions that were made to a recent AIAA book that will be published entitled 'Hypersonic Nonequilibrium Flows: Fundamentals and Recent Advances'. Slide 5 lists the individual presentations that will be given during the special session.

  2. Unstart Coupling Mechanism Analysis of Multiple-Modules Hypersonic Inlet

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Jichao; Chang, Juntao; Wang, Lei; Cao, Shibin; Bao, Wen

    2013-01-01

    The combination of multiplemodules in parallel manner is an important way to achieve the much higher thrust of scramjet engine. For the multiple-modules scramjet engine, when inlet unstarted oscillatory flow appears in a single-module engine due to high backpressure, how to interact with each module by massflow spillage, and whether inlet unstart occurs in other modules are important issues. The unstarted flowfield and coupling characteristic for a three-module hypersonic inlet caused by cent...

  3. Probability of Failure in Hypersonic Engines Using Large Deviations

    OpenAIRE

    Papanicolaou, George; West, Nicholas; Yang, Tzu-Wei

    2012-01-01

    We consider a reduced order model of an air-breathing hypersonic engine with a time-dependent stochastic inflow that may cause the failure of the engine. The probability of failure is analyzed by the Freidlin-Wentzell theory, the large deviation principle for finite dimensional stochastic differential equations. We compute the asymptotic failure probability by numerically solving the constrained optimization related to the large deviation problem. A large-deviation-based importance sampling s...

  4. Thermal analysis of a hypersonic wing test structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandlin, Doral R.; Swanson, Neil J., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    The three-dimensional finite element modeling techniques developed for the thermal analysis of a hypersonic wing test structure (HWTS) are described. The computed results are compared to measured test data. In addition, the results of a NASA two-dimensional parameter finite difference local thermal model and the results of a contractor two-dimensional lumped parameter finite difference local thermal model will be presented.

  5. Performance analysis of a new hypersonic vitrector system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanga, Paulo Eduardo; Zambrano, Isaac; Carlin, Paul; McLeod, David

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate porcine vitreous flow and water flow rates in a new prototype hypersonic vitrectomy system compared to currently available pneumatic guillotine vitrectors (GVs) systems. Methods Two vitrectors were tested, a prototype, ultrasound-powered, hypersonic vitrector (HV) and a GV. Porcine vitreous was obtained within 12 to 24 h of sacrifice and kept at 4°C. A vial of vitreous or water was placed on a precision balance and its weight measured before and after the use of each vitrector. Test parameters included changes in aspiration levels, vitrector gauge, cut rates for GVs, % ultrasound (US) power for HVs, and port size for HVs. Data was analysed using linear regression and t-tests. Results There was no difference in the total average mean water flow between the 25-gauge GV and the 25-gauge HV (t-test: P = 0.363); however, 25-gauge GV was superior (t-test: P Port 0.0055) (t-test: P < 0.001). For HV, wall thickness and gauge had no effect on flow rates. Water and vitreous flows showed a direct correlation with increasing aspiration levels and % US power (p<0.05). Conclusions The HV produced consistent water and vitreous flow rates across the range of US power and aspiration levels tested. Hypersonic vitrectomy may be a promising new alternative to the currently available guillotine-based technologies. PMID:28586375

  6. Experiments on hypersonic ramjet propulsion cycles using a ram accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, G.; Knowlen, C.; Burnham, E. A.; Hertzberg, A.; Bruckner, A. P.

    1991-01-01

    Work on hypersonic propulsion research using a ram accelerator is presented. Several different ram accelerator propulsive cycles have been experimentally demonstrated over the Mach number range of 3 to 8.5. The subsonic, thermally choked combustion mode has accelerated projectiles to near the Chapman-Jouguet (C-J) detonation velocity within many different propellant mixtures. In the transdetonative velocity regime (85 to 115 percent of C-J speed), projectiles have established a propulsive cycle which allows them to transition smoothly from subdetonative to superdetonative velocities. Luminosity data indicate that the combustion process moves forward onto the projectile body as it approaches the C-J speed. In the superdetonative velocity range, the projectiles accelerate while always traveling faster than the C-J velocity. Ram accelerator projectiles operating continuously through these velocity regimes generate distinctive hypersonic phenomena which can be studied very effectively in the laboratory. These results would be very useful for validating sophisticated CFD computer codes and in collecting engineering data for potential airbreathing hypersonic propulsive systems.

  7. GPM GROUND VALIDATION CONICAL SCANNING MILLIMETER-WAVE IMAGING RADIOMETER (COSMIR) GCPEX V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Conical Scanning Millimeter-wave Imaging Radiometer (CoSMIR) dataset for the GPM Cold-season Precipitation Experiment (GCPEx) plays the role as an airborne...

  8. GPM GROUND VALIDATION CONICAL SCANNING MILLIMETER-WAVE IMAGING RADIOMETER (COSMIR) MC3E V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Conical Scanning Millimeter-wave Imaging Radiometer (CoSMIR) dataset for the Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) plays the role as an...

  9. GPM GROUND VALIDATION CONICAL SCANNING MILLIMETER-WAVE IMAGING RADIOMETER (COSMIR) IPHEx V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GPM Ground Validation Conical Scanning Millimeter-wave Imaging Radiometer (CoSMIR) IPHEx dataset includes data gathered during the Integrated Precipitation and...

  10. Change of Pressing Chamber Conicalness at Briquetting Process in Briquetting Machine Pressing Chamber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Križan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we will present the impact of the conical shape of a pressing chamber, an important structural parameter. Besides the known impact of the technological parameters of pressing chambers, it is also very important to pay attention to their structural parameters. In the introduction, we present a theoretical analysis of pressing chamber conicalness. An experiment aimed at detecting this impact was performed at our institute, and it showed that increasing the conicalness of a pressing chamber improves the quality of the final briquettes. The conicalness of the pressing chamber has a significanteffect on the final briquette quality and on the construction of briquetting machines. The experimental findings presented here show the importance of this parameter in the briquetting process.

  11. CAMEX-4 CONICALLY-SCANNING TWO-LOOK AIRBORNE RADIOMETER (C-STAR) V1a

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Conically-Scanning Two-look Airborne Radiometer (C-STAR) was deployed during the Fourth Convection and Moisture Experiment (CAMEX-4). C-STAR data were collected...

  12. GPM Ground Validation Conical Scanning Millimeter-wave Imaging Radiometer (CoSMIR) OLYMPEX V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GPM Ground Validation Conical Scanning Millimeter-wave Imaging Radiometer (CoSMIR) OLYMPEX dataset consists of brightness temperatures from 9 channels as...

  13. Conical Fourier shell correlation applied to electron tomograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diebolder, C A; Faas, F G A; Koster, A J; Koning, R I

    2015-05-01

    The resolution of electron tomograms is anisotropic due to geometrical constraints during data collection, such as the limited tilt range and single axis tilt series acquisition. Acquisition of dual axis tilt series can decrease these effects. However, in cryo-electron tomography, to limit the electron radiation damage that occurs during imaging, the total dose should not increase and must be fractionated over the two tilt series. Here we set out to determine whether it is beneficial fractionate electron dose for recording dual axis cryo electron tilt series or whether it is better to perform single axis acquisition. To assess the quality of tomographic reconstructions in different directions here we introduce conical Fourier shell correlation (cFSCe/o). Employing cFSCe/o, we compared the resolution isotropy of single-axis and dual-axis (cryo-)electron tomograms using even/odd split data sets. We show that the resolution of dual-axis simulated and cryo-electron tomograms in the plane orthogonal to the electron beam becomes more isotropic compared to single-axis tomograms and high resolution peaks along the tilt axis disappear. cFSCe/o also allowed us to compare different methods for the alignment of dual-axis tomograms. We show that different tomographic reconstruction programs produce different anisotropic resolution in dual axis tomograms. We anticipate that cFSCe/o can also be useful for comparisons of acquisition and reconstruction parameters, and different hardware implementations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The Effects of Forming Parameters on Conical Ring Rolling Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Meng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The plastic penetration condition and biting-in condition of a radial conical ring rolling process with a closed die structure on the top and bottom of driven roll, simplified as RCRRCDS, were established. The reasonable value range of mandrel feed rate in rolling process was deduced. A coupled thermomechanical 3D FE model of RCRRCDS process was established. The changing laws of equivalent plastic strain (PEEQ and temperature distributions with rolling time were investigated. The effects of ring’s outer radius growth rate and rolls sizes on the uniformities of PEEQ and temperature distributions, average rolling force, and average rolling moment were studied. The results indicate that the PEEQ at the inner layer and outer layer of rolled ring are larger than that at the middle layer of ring; the temperatures at the “obtuse angle zone” of ring’s cross-section are higher than those at “acute angle zone”; the temperature at the central part of ring is higher than that at the middle part of ring’s outer surfaces. As the ring’s outer radius growth rate increases at its reasonable value ranges, the uniformities of PEEQ and temperature distributions increase. Finally, the optimal values of the ring’s outer radius growth rate and rolls sizes were obtained.

  15. The effects of forming parameters on conical ring rolling process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Wen; Zhao, Guoqun; Guan, Yanjin

    2014-01-01

    The plastic penetration condition and biting-in condition of a radial conical ring rolling process with a closed die structure on the top and bottom of driven roll, simplified as RCRRCDS, were established. The reasonable value range of mandrel feed rate in rolling process was deduced. A coupled thermomechanical 3D FE model of RCRRCDS process was established. The changing laws of equivalent plastic strain (PEEQ) and temperature distributions with rolling time were investigated. The effects of ring's outer radius growth rate and rolls sizes on the uniformities of PEEQ and temperature distributions, average rolling force, and average rolling moment were studied. The results indicate that the PEEQ at the inner layer and outer layer of rolled ring are larger than that at the middle layer of ring; the temperatures at the "obtuse angle zone" of ring's cross-section are higher than those at "acute angle zone"; the temperature at the central part of ring is higher than that at the middle part of ring's outer surfaces. As the ring's outer radius growth rate increases at its reasonable value ranges, the uniformities of PEEQ and temperature distributions increase. Finally, the optimal values of the ring's outer radius growth rate and rolls sizes were obtained.

  16. Numerical Study of motion of Falling Conical Graupel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chueh, Chih-Che; Wang, Pao K.; Hashino, Tempei

    2017-11-01

    Each year, large hailstones falling from a thunderstorm cause massive loss of crops and properties, pose a serious threat to aviation, and, on occasion, some deaths in the world. Graupel particles often serve as hailstone embryos, and are frequently observed forms of convective precipitation almost everywhere. And it is sufficiently evident that the major factor that determines collision efficiency for ice accretion is the flow field. In the present study, the attitudes of freely-falling conical graupel particles with a realistic range of densities are investigated numerically by solving the transient Navier-Stokes equations and the body dynamics equations representing the 6-degrees-of-freedom motion, allowing us to determine the position and orientation of the graupel in response to the coupling of the hydrodynamic force and torque of the flow fields, gravitational force, as well as Magnus force due to self-rotation. The results show significant horizontal movements (on the order of 1 km in one hour) and also show that when Reynolds number is small, a typical damped oscillation occurs, whereas when Reynolds number is high, amplifying oscillation may occur which leads to more complicated and unpredictable flying attitudes such as tumbling. This study is partially supported by the US NSF Grant AGS-1633921 and research fund provided by the Academia Sinica, Taiwan.

  17. Separability of diagonal symmetric states: a quadratic conic optimization problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordi Tura

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the separability problem in mixtures of Dicke states i.e., the separability of the so-called Diagonal Symmetric (DS states. First, we show that separability in the case of DS in $C^d\\otimes C^d$ (symmetric qudits can be reformulated as a quadratic conic optimization problem. This connection allows us to exchange concepts and ideas between quantum information and this field of mathematics. For instance, copositive matrices can be understood as indecomposable entanglement witnesses for DS states. As a consequence, we show that positivity of the partial transposition (PPT is sufficient and necessary for separability of DS states for $d \\leq 4$. Furthermore, for $d \\geq 5$, we provide analytic examples of PPT-entangled states. Second, we develop new sufficient separability conditions beyond the PPT criterion for bipartite DS states. Finally, we focus on $N$-partite DS qubits, where PPT is known to be necessary and sufficient for separability. In this case, we present a family of almost DS states that are PPT with respect to each partition but nevertheless entangled.

  18. STABILITY OF TRUNCATED CIRCULAR CONICAL SHELL EXPOSED TO AXIAL COMPRESSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Litvinov Vladimir Vital'evich

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The problem of stability of a freely supported truncated circular conical shell, compressed by the upper base of a uniformly distributed load per unit length t, referred to the median shell surface and directed along the generatrix of the cone, was solved by the Ritz-Timoshenko energy method. The orthogonal system of curvilinear coordinates of the points of the middle surface of the shell was adopted to solve the problem. Possible displacements were selected in the form of double series approximation functions. The physical principle of inextensible generatrix of the cone exposed to buckling at the moment of instability was employed. In addition, the fundamental principle of continuum mechanics, or the principle of minimal total potential energy of the system, was taken as the basis. According to the linear elasticity theory, energy methods make it possible to replace the solution of complex differential equations by the solution of simple linear algebraic equations. As a result, the problem is reduced to the problem of identifying the eigenvalues in the algebraic theory of matrices. The numerical value of the critical load was derived through the employment of the software.

  19. Thrust Stand Measurements of a Conical Pulsed Inductive Plasma Thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallock, Ashley K.; Polzin, Kurt A.; Emsellem, Gregory D.

    2012-01-01

    Pulsed inductive plasma thrusters [1-3] are spacecraft propulsion devices in which electrical energy is capacitively stored and then discharged through an inductive coil. The thruster is electrodeless, with a time-varying current in the coil interacting with a plasma covering the face of the coil to induce a plasma current. Propellant is accelerated and expelled at a high exhaust velocity (O(10-100 km/s)) by the Lorentz body force arising from the interaction of the magnetic field and the induced plasma current. While this class of thruster mitigates the life-limiting issues associated with electrode erosion, pulsed inductive plasma thrusters can su er from both high pulse energy requirements imposed by the voltage demands of inductive propellant ionization, and low propellant utilization efficiencies. The Microwave Assisted Discharge Inductive Plasma Accelerator (MAD-IPA)[4], shown in Fig. 1 is a pulsed inductive plasma thruster that is able to operate at lower pulse energies by partially ionizing propellant with an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) discharge inside a conical inductive coil whose geometry serves to potentially increase propellant and plasma plume containment relative to at coil geometries. The ECR plasma is created with the use of permanent mag- nets arranged to produce a thin resonance region along the inner surface of the coil, restricting plasma formation and, in turn, current sheet formation to areas of high magnetic coupling to the driving coil.

  20. Conical singularities and the Vainshtein screening in full GLPV theories

    CERN Document Server

    Kase, Ryotaro; De Felice, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    In Gleyzes-Langlois-Piazza-Vernizzi (GLPV) theories, it is known that the conical singularity arises at the center of a spherically symmetric body ($r=0$) in the case where the parameter $\\alpha_{{\\rm H}4}$ characterizing the deviation from the Horndeski Lagrangian $L_4$ approaches a non-zero constant as $r \\to 0$. We derive spherically symmetric solutions around the center in full GLPV theories and show that the GLPV Lagrangian $L_5$ does not modify the divergent property of the Ricci scalar $R$ induced by the non-zero $\\alpha_{{\\rm H}4}$. Provided that $\\alpha_{{\\rm H}4}=0$, curvature scalar quantities can remain finite at $r=0$ even in the presence of $L_5$ beyond the Horndeski domain. For the theories in which the scalar field $\\phi$ is directly coupled to $R$, we also obtain spherically symmetric solutions inside/outside the body to study whether the fifth force mediated by $\\phi$ can be screened by non-linear field self-interactions. We find that there is one specific model of GLPV theories in which the...

  1. Automatic Determination of the Conic Coronal Mass Ejection Model Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulkkinen, A.; Oates, T.; Taktakishvili, A.

    2009-01-01

    Characterization of the three-dimensional structure of solar transients using incomplete plane of sky data is a difficult problem whose solutions have potential for societal benefit in terms of space weather applications. In this paper transients are characterized in three dimensions by means of conic coronal mass ejection (CME) approximation. A novel method for the automatic determination of cone model parameters from observed halo CMEs is introduced. The method uses both standard image processing techniques to extract the CME mass from white-light coronagraph images and a novel inversion routine providing the final cone parameters. A bootstrap technique is used to provide model parameter distributions. When combined with heliospheric modeling, the cone model parameter distributions will provide direct means for ensemble predictions of transient propagation in the heliosphere. An initial validation of the automatic method is carried by comparison to manually determined cone model parameters. It is shown using 14 halo CME events that there is reasonable agreement, especially between the heliocentric locations of the cones derived with the two methods. It is argued that both the heliocentric locations and the opening half-angles of the automatically determined cones may be more realistic than those obtained from the manual analysis

  2. The fastest drop climbing on a wet conical fibre

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Erqiang

    2013-05-21

    We use high-speed video imaging to study the capillary-driven motion of a micro-droplet along the outside of a pre-wetted conical fiber. The cones are fabricated on a glass-puller with tip diameters as small as 1 μm, an order of magnitude smaller than in previous studies. The liquid is fed through the hollow fiber accumulating at the fiber tip to form droplets. The droplets are initially attached to the opening as they grow in size before detaching and traveling up the cone. This detachment can produce a transient oscillation of high frequency. The spatial variation of the capillary pressure drives the droplets towards the wider side of the cone. Various liquids were used to change the surface tension by a factor of 3.5 and viscosity by a factor of 1500. Within each droplet size and viscous-dissipation regime, the data for climbing speeds collapse on a single curve. Droplets traveling with and against gravity allow us to pinpoint the absolute strength of the driving capillary pressure and viscous stresses and thereby determine the prefactors in the dimensionless relationships. The motions are consistent with earlier results obtained from much larger cones. Translation velocities up to 270 mm/s were observed and overall the velocities follow capillary-viscous scaling, whereas the speed of the fastest droplets is limited by inertia following their emergence at the cone tip.

  3. Video summarization using line segments, angles and conic parts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehin, Md Musfequs; Paul, Manoranjan; Kabir, Muhammad Ashad

    2017-01-01

    Video summarization is a process to extract objects and their activities from a video and represent them in a condensed form. Existing methods for video summarization fail to detect moving (dynamic) objects in the low color contrast area of a video frame due to the pixel intensities of objects and non-objects are almost similar. However, edges of objects are prominent in the low contrast regions. Moreover, to represent objects, geometric primitives (such as lines, arcs) are distinguishable and high level shape descriptors than edges. In this paper, a novel method is proposed for video summarization using geometric primitives such as conic parts, line segments and angles. Using these features, objects are extracted from each video frame. A cost function is applied to measure the dissimilarity of locations of geometric primitives to detect the movement of objects between consecutive frames. The total distance of object movement is calculated and each video frame is assigned a probability score. Finally, a set of key frames is selected based on the probability scores as per user provided skimming ratio or system default skimming ratio. The proposed approach is evaluated using three benchmark datasets-BL-7F, Office, and Lobby. The experimental results show that our approach outperforms the state-of-the-art method in terms of accuracy.

  4. The conical stent in coronary artery improves hemodynamics compared with the traditional cylindrical stent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yi; Zhou, Yujie; Ma, Qian; Jia, Shuo; Wu, Sijing; Sun, Yan; Liu, Xiaoli; Zhao, Yingxin; Liu, Yuyang; Shi, Dongmei

    2017-01-15

    This study sought to explore the efficacy of the conical stent implantation in the coronary artery by comparing the effects of cylindrical and conical stents on wall shear stress (WSS) and velocity of flow and fractional flow reserve (FFR). The traditional cylindrical stent currently used in the percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) has a consistent diameter, which does not match the physiological change of the coronary artery. On the contrary, as a new patent, the conical stent with tapering lumen is consistent with the physiological change of vascular diameter. However, the effect of the conical stent implantation on the coronary hemodynamics remains unclear. The coronary artery, artery stenosis and two stent models were established by Solidworks software. All models were imported into the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software ANSYS ICEM-CFD to establish the fluid model. After the boundary conditions were set, CFD analysis was proceeded to compare the effects of two stent implantation on the change of WSS, velocity of flow and FFR. Hemodynamic indexes including FFR, blood flow velocity distribution (BVD) and WSS were improved by either the cylindrical or the conical stent implantation. However, after the conical stent implantation, the change of FFR seemed to be slower and more homogenous; the blood flow velocity was more appropriate without any obvious blood stagnation and direction changes; the WSS after the conical stent implantation was uniform from the proximal to distal side of the stent. Compared with the cylindrical stent, the conical stent implantation in the coronary artery can make the changes of vascular hemodynamic more closer to the physiological condition, which can reduce the incidence of intra-stent restenosis and thrombosis, thus making it more suitable for PCI therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A homogeneous interior-point algorithm for nonsymmetric convex conic optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skajaa, Anders; Ye, Yinyu

    2014-01-01

    A homogeneous interior-point algorithm for solving nonsymmetric convex conic optimization problems is presented. Starting each iteration from the vicinity of the central path, the method steps in the approximate tangent direction and then applies a correction phase to locate the next well...... are presented for the TeX -cone problem, the facility location problem, entropy maximization problems and geometric programs; all formulated as nonsymmetric convex conic optimization problems....

  6. On the Design of Conical Antennas for Broadband Impedance Matching Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Francisco Estêvão Simão Pereira; Maurício Henrique Costa Dias

    2017-01-01

    In the scope of broadband radiators, the biconical antenna, or its monopole conical counterpart, is long known to be a proper choice. One common form of such radiator, the spherically capped conical antenna (SCCA), has closed-form solution to its input impedance, from which the broadband performance potential is easily verified. Nonetheless, from the design perspective, apart from a few clues inferred from existing solutions, little is found to accurately guide the choice of the main geometri...

  7. The Intermediate Jacobian of a Three-Dimensional Conic Bundle is a Prym Variety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Èndryushka, S. Yu

    1985-02-01

    The paper contains the computation of the intermediate Jacobian of the general conic bundle. This computation is performed in three steps: a) computation of the Betti number (§2), b) computation of the Jacobian to within isogeny (§4), and c) computation of the polarization (§4).The author's results conclude the study of the intermediate Jacobian of conic bundles and give an efficient general answer.Bibliography: 6 titles.

  8. Hypersonic Flight and the Re-Entry Problem: The Twenty-First Wright Brothers Lecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, H. Julian

    1958-01-01

    Up to this point the discussion of the problems of rocket vehicles has been confined to the effects of phenomena which have in the past been important ones for lower speed aircraft and will continue to be important for aircraft of all speeds. Now with considerable extension of both speed and altitude, other phenomena also become important. The nature of some problems will be altered, as a result, and new problems, of course, will be encountered. First, it is well to note that our interest in bluff bodies for ballistic vehicles in particular, and in rounded-nosed bodies generally, has changed our emphasis in aerodynamics. The detached bow waves which occur with such bodies at high supersonic speeds complicate the calculations of the flow-field characteristics. In the present period, much attention is being given to such studies. In addition, at the very high altitudes attained by most of the rocket-craft, the mean free path of air molecules can be of the same order, or long, compared to the dimensions of the vehicles. Thus, slip-flow and free-molecule-flow studies are of interest, particularly for satellite vehicles." The aerodynatnicist must deal with air having unfamiliar states and properties. Second, at hypersonic speeds where, for example, air is greatly decelerated, it may undergo considerable change in composition, the degree of change depending upon many factors. Dissociation of oxygen and nitrogen molecules can occur and, in addition, thermal ionization of many of the constituents. It is naturally to be expected that the convective heat transfer will, as a result, be altered from what it was for the "perfect" gas, and this has been the subject of much recent research effort. Moreover, the decelerated gas becomes capable of radiating energy and the radiative heat transfer must generally be considered for hypersonic vehicles, particularly for long-range ballistic rockets. It is not only the aerodynamic heating problems that are affected. The fact that at very

  9. Separation control in a hypersonic shock wave / turbulent boundary-layer interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreyer, Anne-Marie; Bermejo-Moreno, Ivan; Kim, Jeonglae; Urzay, Javier

    2016-11-01

    Hypersonic vehicles play a key role for affordable access to space. The associated flow fields are strongly affected by shock wave/turbulent boundary-layer interactions, and the inherent separation causes flow distortion and low-frequency unsteadiness. Microramp sub-boundary layer vortex generators are a promising means to control separation and diminish associated detrimental effects. We investigate the effect of a microramp on the low-frequency unsteadiness in a fully separated interaction. A large eddy simulation of a 33 ∘ -compression-ramp interaction was performed for an inflow Mach number of 7.2 and a Reynolds number based on momentum thickness of Reθ = 3500 , matching the experiment of Schreyer et al. (2011). For the control case, we introduced a counter-rotating vortex pair, as induced by a single microramp, into the boundary layer through the inflow conditions. We applied a dynamic mode decomposition (DMD) on both cases to identify coherent structures that are responsible for the dynamic behavior. Based on the DMD, we discuss the reduction of the separation zone and the stabilization of the shock motion achieved by the microramp, and contribute to the description of the governing mechanisms. Pursued during the 2016 CTR Summer Program at Stanford University.

  10. Aerodynamic performance investigation on waverider with variable blunt radius in hypersonic flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shibin; Wang, Zhenguo; Huang, Wei; Xu, Shenren; Yan, Li

    2017-08-01

    Waverider is an important candidate for the design of hypersonic vehicles. However, the ideal waverider cannot be manufactured because of its sharp leading edge, so the leading edge should be blunted. In the paper, the HMB solver and laminar flow model have been utilized to obtain the flow field properties around the blunt waverider with the freestream Mach number being 8.0, and several novel strategies have been suggested to improve the aerodynamic performance of blunt waverider. The numerical method has been validated against experimental data, and the Stanton number(St) of the predicted result has been analyzed. The obtained results show good agreement with the experimental data. Stmax decreases by 58% and L/D decreases by 8.2% when the blunt radius increases from 0.0002 m to 0.001 m. ;Variable blunt waverider; is a good compromise for aerodynamic performance and thermal insulation. The aero-heating characteristics are very sensitive to Rmax. The position of the smallest blunt radius has a great effect on the aerodynamic performance. In addition, the type of blunt leading edge has a great effect on the aero-heating characteristics when Rmax is fixed. Therefore, out of several designs, Type 4is the best way to achieve the good overall performance. The ;Variable blunt waverider; not only improves the aerodynamic performance, but also makes the aero-heating become evenly-distributed, leading to better aero-heating characteristics.

  11. Mission and Design Sensitivities for Human Mars Landers Using Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polsgrove, Tara P.; Thomas, Herbert D.; Collins, Tim; Dwyer Cianciolo, Alicia; Samareh, Jamshid

    2017-01-01

    Landing humans on Mars is one of NASA's long term goals. The Evolvable Mars Campaign (EMC) is focused on evaluating architectural trade options to define the capabilities and elements needed for a sustainable human presence on the surface of Mars. The EMC study teams have considered a variety of in-space propulsion options and surface mission options. As we seek to better understand how these choices affect the performance of the lander, this work informs and influences requirements for transportation systems to deliver the landers to Mars and enable these missions. This paper presents the effects of mission and vehicle design options on lander mass and performance. Beginning with Earth launch, options include fairing size assumptions, co-manifesting other elements with the lander, and Earth-Moon vicinity operations. Capturing into Mars orbit using either aerocapture or propulsive capture is assessed. For entry, descent, and landing both storable as well as oxygen and methane propellant combinations are considered, engine thrust level is assessed, and sensitivity to landed payload mass is presented. This paper focuses on lander designs using the Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerators (HIAD), one of several entry system technologies currently considered for human missions.

  12. Numerical simulation of hypersonic non-equilibrium wake flow using a higher-resolution method; Goku choonsoku netsu kagaku hiheiko wo koryoshita donto buttai koryu no kokaizodo suchi kaiseki

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagatomo, H.; Yamamoto, S.; Daiguji, H. [Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1996-08-25

    An object which flies hypersonic speed, such as an aeroassisted orbital transfer vehicle, is affected greatly by not only the bow shock but also the expansion around the shoulder and the recompression of separated flow. Though the experiments to analyze this flow have been performed by some groups recently, there are some difficulties in measuring the flow because of limitations of instrumentation. Both experimental and numerical approaches are necessary to analyze the phenomena. The efficient numerical code which has been developed by the authors for hypersonic thermochemical non-equilibrium flow is applied to simulate the problem. The calculated results of different accuracies in space, the perfect gas and the experimental data are compared. 12 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Randomized intubation with polyurethane or conical cuffs to prevent pneumonia in ventilated patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippart, François; Gaudry, Stéphane; Quinquis, Laurent; Lau, Nicolas; Ouanes, Islem; Touati, Samia; Nguyen, Jean Claude; Branger, Catherine; Faibis, Frédéric; Mastouri, Maha; Forceville, Xavier; Abroug, Fekri; Ricard, Jean Damien; Grabar, Sophie; Misset, Benoît

    2015-03-15

    The occurrence of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is linked to the aspiration of contaminated pharyngeal secretions around the endotracheal tube. Tubes with cuffs made of polyurethane rather than polyvinyl chloride or with a conical rather than a cylindrical shape increase tracheal sealing. To test whether using polyurethane and/or conical cuffs reduces tracheal colonization and VAP in patients with acute respiratory failure. We conducted a multicenter, prospective, open-label, randomized study in four parallel groups in four intensive care units between 2010 and 2012. A cohort of 621 patients with expected ventilation longer than 2 days was included at intubation with a cuff composed of cylindrical polyvinyl chloride (n = 148), cylindrical polyurethane (n = 143), conical polyvinyl chloride (n = 150), or conical polyurethane (n = 162). We used Kaplan-Meier estimates and log-rank tests to compare times to events. After excluding 17 patients who secondarily refused participation or had met an exclusion criterion, 604 were included in the intention-to-treat analysis. Cumulative tracheal colonization greater than 10(3) cfu/ml at Day 2 was as follows (median [interquartile range]): cylindrical polyvinyl chloride, 0.66 (0.58-0.74); cylindrical polyurethane, 0.61 (0.53-0.70); conical polyvinyl chloride, 0.67 (0.60-0.76); and conical polyurethane, 0.62 (0.55-0.70) (P = 0.55). VAP developed in 77 patients (14.4%), and postextubational stridor developed in 28 patients (6.4%) (P = 0.20 and 0.28 between groups, respectively). Among patients requiring mechanical ventilation, polyurethane and/or conically shaped cuffs were not superior to conventional cuffs in preventing tracheal colonization and VAP. Clinical trial registered with clinicaltrials.gov (NCT01114022).

  14. Treatment planning of a skin-sparing conical breast brachytherapy applicator using conventional brachytherapy software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Yun; Melhus, Christopher S.; Sioshansi, Shirin; Rivard, Mark J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02111 (United States)

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: AccuBoost is a noninvasive image-guided technique for the delivery of partial breast irradiation to the tumor bed and currently serves as an alternate to conventional electron beam boost. To irradiate the target volume while providing dose sparing to the skin, the round applicator design was augmented through the addition of an internally truncated conical shield and the reduction of the source to skin distance. Methods: Brachytherapy dose distributions for two types of conical applicators were simulated and estimated using Monte Carlo (MC) methods for radiation transport and a conventional treatment planning system (TPS). MC-derived and TPS-generated dose volume histograms (DVHs) and dose distribution data were compared for both the conical and round applicators for benchmarking purposes. Results: Agreement using the gamma-index test was {>=}99.95% for distance to agreement and dose accuracy criteria of 2 mm and 2%, respectively. After observing good agreement, TPS DVHs and dose distributions for the conical and round applicators were obtained and compared. Brachytherapy dose distributions generated using Pinnacle{sup 3} for ten CT data sets showed that the parallel-opposed beams of the conical applicators provided similar PTV coverage to the round applicators and reduced the maximum dose to skin, chest wall, and lung by up to 27%, 42%, and 43%, respectively. Conclusions: Brachytherapy dose distributions for the conical applicators have been generated using MC methods and entered into the Pinnacle{sup 3} TPS via the Tufts technique. Treatment planning metrics for the conical AccuBoost applicators were significantly improved in comparison to those for conventional electron beam breast boost.

  15. Treatment planning of a skin-sparing conical breast brachytherapy applicator using conventional brachytherapy software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yun; Melhus, Christopher S; Sioshansi, Shirin; Rivard, Mark J

    2011-03-01

    AccuBoost is a noninvasive image-guided technique for the delivery of partial breast irradiation to the tumor bed and currently serves as an alternate to conventional electron beam boost. To irradiate the target volume while providing dose sparing to the skin, the round applicator design was augmented through the addition of an internally truncated conical shield and the reduction of the source to skin distance. Brachytherapy dose distributions for two types of conical applicators were simulated and estimated using Monte Carlo (MC) methods for radiation transport and a conventional treatment planning system (TPS). MC-derived and TPS-generated dose volume histograms (DVHs) and dose distribution data were compared for both the conical and round applicators for benchmarking purposes. Agreement using the gamma-index test was > or = 99.95% for distance to agreement and dose accuracy criteria of 2 mm and 2%, respectively. After observing good agreement, TPS DVHs and dose distributions for the conical and round applicators were obtained and compared. Brachytherapy dose distributions generated using Pinnacle for ten CT data sets showed that the parallel-opposed beams of the conical applicators provided similar PTV coverage to the round applicators and reduced the maximum dose to skin, chest wall, and lung by up to 27%, 42%, and 43%, respectively. Brachytherapy dose distributions for the conical applicators have been generated using MC methods and entered into the Pinnacle TPS via the Tufts technique. Treatment planning metrics for the conical AccuBoost applicators were significantly improved in comparison to those for conventional electron beam breast boost.

  16. Underwater Vehicle

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dick, James L

    2007-01-01

    There is thus provided an underwater vehicle having facility for maneuvering alongside a retrieving vehicle, as by manipulation of bow and stern planes, for engaging a hull surface of the retrieving...

  17. Ultrasonically Absorptive Coatings for Hypersonic Laminar Flow Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-12-01

    integrated into TPS. This, in turn, provides basis for design of UAC-TPS test articles that could be flight tested within the framework of the HIFiRE...articles could be flight tested within the framework of the HIFiRE (Hypersonic International Flight Research and Experimentation) project [ 15]. The...waves Sp’= poc Aexp[iwt - ikRx sinO][exp(ikokycosO) + Rexp(-ik.ky cosO )], (3.20) where R - complex reflection coefficient, A = const, K z 1 - 0.5i[bi

  18. Heat sink structural design concepts for a hypersonic research airplane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, A. H.; Jackson, L. R.

    1977-01-01

    Hypersonic research aircraft design requires careful consideration of thermal stresses. This paper relates some of the problems in a heat sink structural design that can be avoided by appropriate selection of design options including material selection, design concepts, and load paths. Data on several thermal loading conditions are presented on various conventional designs including bulkheads, longerons, fittings, and frames. Results indicate that conventional designs are inadequate and that acceptable designs are possible by incorporating innovative design practices. These include nonintegral pressure compartments, ball-jointed links to distribute applied loads without restraining the thermal expansion, and material selections based on thermal compatibility.

  19. "Conical Hut": A Basic Form of House Types in Timor Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y. R.; Lim, Y. L.; Wang, M. H.; Chen, C. Y.

    2015-08-01

    Timor Island situates in the southeast end of Southeast Asia. The island accommodates many ethnic groups, which produce many diverse house types. As visiting East Timor in 2012 and Timor Island in 2014, we found the "Pair- House Type" widely spread over Timor Island. Uma Lulik (holy house), accommodating the ancestry soul, fireplace and elder's bed, and Uma Tidor (house for sleep), containing living, sleeping and working space, compose the pair-house. The research team visited 14 ethnic groups and their houses, some of which were measured and drawn into 3D models as back to Taiwan. Uma Tidors of each ethnic group are quite similar with rectangular volume and hip roof, however, one of the fourteen ethnic groups can build cylinder houses for Uma Tidor. Uma Luliks of different ethnic groups are diversified and special. One group of the Uma Luliks shows a rectangular or square volume sheltered by a hip roof. The other group of Uma Luliks presents a non-specific volume under a conical roof, that we called the "conical hut". Seven ethnic groups, Atoni, Weimua, Makassae, Mambai, Bunaq, Kemak and Bekais, have built "conical huts" for the use of Uma Lulik. People of the seven ethnic groups can construct a reasonable structural system to support the conical roof, and take good advantage of the space under the conical roof to meet their sacred needs and everyday life. "Conical Hut" may be regarded as the basic form of the house types adopted by the seven ethnic groups. It contains the basic spatial limits and the formal properties that the construction systems have to follow. Based on the concise rules of the basic form, people of each ethnic group use their talents, skills and building materials to generate variations of "conical hut", which are different in house scale, spatial layout, construction system and form. The "conical huts" contain the consistency that all the huts come from the basic form, meanwhile, they also present the diversification that each conical hut has

  20. "Conical Hut": A Basic Form of House Types in Timor Island

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. R. Chen

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Timor Island situates in the southeast end of Southeast Asia. The island accommodates many ethnic groups, which produce many diverse house types. As visiting East Timor in 2012 and Timor Island in 2014, we found the “Pair- House Type” widely spread over Timor Island. Uma Lulik (holy house, accommodating the ancestry soul, fireplace and elder’s bed, and Uma Tidor (house for sleep, containing living, sleeping and working space, compose the pair-house. The research team visited 14 ethnic groups and their houses, some of which were measured and drawn into 3D models as back to Taiwan. Uma Tidors of each ethnic group are quite similar with rectangular volume and hip roof, however, one of the fourteen ethnic groups can build cylinder houses for Uma Tidor. Uma Luliks of different ethnic groups are diversified and special. One group of the Uma Luliks shows a rectangular or square volume sheltered by a hip roof. The other group of Uma Luliks presents a non-specific volume under a conical roof, that we called the “conical hut”. Seven ethnic groups, Atoni, Weimua, Makassae, Mambai, Bunaq, Kemak and Bekais, have built “conical huts” for the use of Uma Lulik. People of the seven ethnic groups can construct a reasonable structural system to support the conical roof, and take good advantage of the space under the conical roof to meet their sacred needs and everyday life. “Conical Hut” may be regarded as the basic form of the house types adopted by the seven ethnic groups. It contains the basic spatial limits and the formal properties that the construction systems have to follow. Based on the concise rules of the basic form, people of each ethnic group use their talents, skills and building materials to generate variations of “conical hut”, which are different in house scale, spatial layout, construction system and form. The “conical huts” contain the consistency that all the huts come from the basic form, meanwhile, they also present

  1. Frequencies of inaudible high-frequency sounds differentially affect brain activity: positive and negative hypersonic effects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariko Fukushima

    Full Text Available The hypersonic effect is a phenomenon in which sounds containing significant quantities of non-stationary high-frequency components (HFCs above the human audible range (max. 20 kHz activate the midbrain and diencephalon and evoke various physiological, psychological and behavioral responses. Yet important issues remain unverified, especially the relationship existing between the frequency of HFCs and the emergence of the hypersonic effect. In this study, to investigate the relationship between the hypersonic effect and HFC frequencies, we divided an HFC (above 16 kHz of recorded gamelan music into 12 band components and applied them to subjects along with an audible component (below 16 kHz to observe changes in the alpha2 frequency component (10-13 Hz of spontaneous EEGs measured from centro-parieto-occipital regions (Alpha-2 EEG, which we previously reported as an index of the hypersonic effect. Our results showed reciprocal directional changes in Alpha-2 EEGs depending on the frequency of the HFCs presented with audible low-frequency component (LFC. When an HFC above approximately 32 kHz was applied, Alpha-2 EEG increased significantly compared to when only audible sound was applied (positive hypersonic effect, while, when an HFC below approximately 32 kHz was applied, the Alpha-2 EEG decreased (negative hypersonic effect. These findings suggest that the emergence of the hypersonic effect depends on the frequencies of inaudible HFC.

  2. Geometric Phase Effects in Nonadiabatic Dynamics near Conical Intersections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryabinkin, Ilya G; Joubert-Doriol, Loïc; Izmaylov, Artur F

    2017-07-18

    Dynamical consideration that goes beyond the common Born-Oppenheimer approximation (BOA) becomes necessary when energy differences between electronic potential energy surfaces become small or vanish. One of the typical scenarios of the BOA breakdown in molecules beyond diatomics is a conical intersection (CI) of electronic potential energy surfaces. CIs provide an efficient mechanism for radiationless electronic transitions: acting as "funnels" for the nuclear wave function, they enable rapid conversion of the excessive electronic energy into the nuclear motion. In addition, CIs introduce nontrivial geometric phases (GPs) for both electronic and nuclear wave functions. These phases manifest themselves in change of the wave function signs if one considers an evolution of the system around the CI. This sign change is independent of the shape of the encircling contour and thus has a topological character. How these extra phases affect nonadiabatic dynamics is the main question that is addressed in this Account. We start by considering the simplest model providing the CI topology: two-dimensional two-state linear vibronic coupling model. Selecting this model instead of a real molecule has the advantage that various dynamical regimes can be easily modeled in the model by varying parameters, whereas any fixed molecule provides the system specific behavior that may not be very illustrative. After demonstrating when GP effects are important and how they modify the dynamics for two sets of initial conditions (starting from the ground and excited electronic states), we give examples of molecular systems where the described GP effects are crucial for adequate description of nonadiabatic dynamics. Interestingly, although the GP has a topological character, the extent to which accounting for GPs affect nuclear dynamics profoundly depends on topography of potential energy surfaces. Understanding an extent of changes introduced by the GP in chemical dynamics poses a problem of

  3. Conical Perspective Image of an Architectural Object Close to Human Perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzwierzynska, Jolanta

    2017-10-01

    The aim of the study is to develop a method of computer aided constructing conical perspective of an architectural object, which is close to human perception. The conical perspective considered in the paper is a central projection onto a projection surface being a conical rotary surface or a fragment of it. Whereas, the centre of projection is a stationary point or a point moving on a circular path. The graphical mapping results of the perspective representation is realized directly on an unrolled flat projection surface. The projective relation between a range of points on a line and the perspective image of the same range of points received on a cylindrical projection surface permitted to derive formulas for drawing perspective. Next, the analytical algorithms for drawing perspective image of a straight line passing through any two points were formulated. It enabled drawing a perspective wireframe image of a given 3D object. The use of the moving view point as well as the application of the changeable base elements of perspective as the variables in the algorithms enable drawing conical perspective from different viewing positions. Due to this fact, the perspective drawing method is universal. The algorithms are formulated and tested in Mathcad Professional software, but can be implemented in AutoCAD and majority of computer graphical packages, which makes drawing a perspective image more efficient and easier. The presented conical perspective representation, and the convenient method of its mapping directly on the flat unrolled surface can find application for numerous advertisement and art presentations.

  4. Runup of granular landslide-generated tsunamis on planar coasts and conical islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFall, Brian C.; Fritz, Hermann M.

    2017-08-01

    Large-scale physical model experiments of tsunamis generated by granular landslides and volcanic flank collapses are conducted to study the wave runup on both the hill slope laterally adjacent to the landslide and an opposing hill slope. A pneumatic landslide tsunami generator was deployed on planar and convex conical hill slopes to simulate deformable landslides with various geometries and kinematics. On the landslide hill slope, maximum runup and rundown were observed in the landslide impact region followed by adjacent second maxima after the lateral waves were fully formed. The runup and rundown decayed asymptotically from the second maxima. In the conical island scenario, a localized runup amplification was measured on the lee side of the island. Outside the landslide impact region, the effects of the landslide granulometry on the lateral wave runup are minimal. The lateral wave runup on the planar hill slope was generally larger than on the convex conical hill slope outside the landslide impact region. The convex conical hill slope traps less lateral wave energy. The zeroth mode of the edge wave dispersion relation matched the first and second lateral waves on the planar hill slope and the first wave on the convex conical hill slope. Predictive equations for the laterally propagating wave characteristics are derived and a method to predict the runup on an opposing hill slope is presented. The predictive wave and runup equations are benchmarked against the 2007 landslide-generated tsunami in Chehalis Lake, British Columbia, Canada.

  5. Conic Sector Analysis of Hybrid Control Systems. Ph.D. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, P. M.

    1982-01-01

    A hybrid control system contains an analog plant and a hybrid (or sampled-data) compensator. In this thesis a new conic sector is determined which is constructive and can be used to: (1) determine closed loop stability, (2) analyze robustness with respect to modelling uncertainties, (3) analyze steady state response to commands, and (4) select the sample rate. The use of conic sectors allows the designer to treat hybrid control systems as though they were analog control systems. The center of the conic sector can be used as a rigorous linear time invariant approximation of the hybrid control system, and the radius places a bound on the errors of this approximation. The hybrid feedback system can be multivariable, and the sampler is assumed to be synchronous. Algorithms to compute the conic sector are presented. Several examples demonstrate how the conic sector analysis techniques are applied. Extensions to single loop multirate hybrid feedback systems are presented. Further extensions are proposed for multiloop multirate hybrid feedback system and for single rate systems with asynchronous sampling.

  6. Rotor's Suspension for Vernier-gimballing magnetically suspended flywheel with conical magnetic bearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jiqiang; Xiang, Biao; Wang, Chun'e

    2015-09-01

    A novel Vernier-gimballing magnetically suspended flywheel with conical magnetic bearing (conical MB) can generate great gyroscopic moment by tilting the high-speed rotor. To output the gyroscopic moment, the high-speed rotor must be suspended stably and can be tilted. But when the rotor tilts, the gap between the stator and rotor of conical MB changes nonlinearly, what will cause the magnetic force and current stiffness of this conical MB to be serious nonlinear. To solve these problems, one kind of adaptive controller based on Lyapunov stability theory is designed by regarding the current stiffness of this conical MB as uncertain parameter. The validity of this adaptive control method is verified on a Vernier-gimballing MSFW with 68 Nms angular momentum and 1.7° maximum tilting angle. All experimental results indicated that this adaptive control has better performances on controlling rotor's stable suspension than existing PID control when the rotor translates or tilts. Copyright © 2015 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Geometerial description for a proposed aeroassist flight experiment vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheatwood, F. M.; Dejarnette, F. J.; Hamilton, H. H., II

    1986-01-01

    One geometry currently under consideration for the Aeroassist Flight Experiment (AFE) vehicle is composed of several segments of simple general conics: an ellipsoidal nose tangent to an elliptical cone and a base skirt with the base plane raked relative to the body axis. An analytic representation for the body coordinates and first and second partial derivatives of this configuration has been developed. Equations are given which define the body radius and partial derivatives for a prescribed axial and circumferential position on the vehicle. The results for a sample case are tabulated and presented graphically.

  8. A Simple Space Station Rescue Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petro, Andrew

    1995-01-01

    Early in the development of the Space Station it was determined that there is a need to have a vehicle which could be used in the event that the Space Station crew need to quickly depart and return to Earth when the Space Shuttle is not available. Unplanned return missions might occur because of a medical emergency, a major Space Station failure, or if there is a long-term interruption in the delivery of logistics to the Station. The rescue vehicle ms envisioned as a simple capsule-type spacecraft which would be maintained in a dormant state at the Station for several years and be quickly activated by the crew when needed. During the assembly phase for the International Space Station, unplanned return missions will be performed by the Russian Soyuz vehicle, which can return up to three people. When the Station assembly is complete there will be a need for rescue capability for up to six people. This need might be met by an additional Soyuz vehicle or by a new vehicle which might come from a variety of sources. This paper describes one candidate concept for a Space Station rescue vehicle. The proposed rescue vehicle design has the blunt-cone shape of the Apollo command module but with a larger diameter. The rescue vehicle would be delivered to the Station in the payload bay of the Space Shuttle. The spacecraft design can accommodate six to eight people for a one-day return mission. All of the systems for the mission including deorbit propulsion are contained within the conical spacecraft and so there is no separate service module. The use of the proven Apollo re-entry shape would greatly reduce the time and cost for development and testing. Other aspects of the design are also intended to minimize development cost and simplify operations. This paper will summarize the evolution of rescue vehicle concepts, the functional requirements for a rescue vehicle, and describe the proposed design.

  9. [Immediate implant-support and overdenture retained by conical crowns: three cases report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jian-sheng; Zhu, Xiao-bin

    2009-08-01

    Completed denture or immediate completed dentures were manufactured before operation to three patients with edentulous mandible and maxillary or severe chronic periodontitis. The remnant teeth of patients were extracted. Four Ankylos implants were implanted in mandible, and six implants were implanted in maxillary. SynCone conical bases were placed into implants, prefabricated conical crowns were inserted into conical bases, and temporary dentures were completed. After 3-12 months, temporary dentures were replaced by overdenture with casting frame. Except that one implant had been lost and was replaced by a new implant after 1 month of treatment, the rest implants had no obvious frontal resorption in 12-24 months of follow-up.

  10. Geometric phase for collinear conical intersections. I. Geometric phase angle and vector potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuan; Brue, Daniel A; Kendrick, Brian K; Blandon, Juan D; Parker, Gregory A

    2011-02-14

    We present a method for properly treating collinear conical intersections in triatomic systems. The general vector potential (gauge theory) approach for including the geometric phase effects associated with collinear conical intersections in hyperspherical coordinates is presented. The current study develops an introductory method in the treatment of collinear conical intersections by using the phase angle method. The geometric phase angle, η, in terms of purely internal coordinates is derived using the example of a spin-aligned quartet lithium triatomic system. A numerical fit and thus an analytical form for the associated vector potentials are explicitly derived for this triatomic A(3) system. The application of this methodology to AB(2) and ABC systems is also discussed.

  11. The X-43A hypersonic research aircraft and its modified Pegasus booster rocket mounted to NASA's NB

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    The first of three X-43A hypersonic research aircraft and its modified Pegasus booster rocket recently underwent combined systems testing while mounted to NASA's NB-52B carrier aircraft at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The combined systems test was one of the last major milestones in the Hyper-X research program before the first X-43A flight. One of the major goals of the Hyper-X program is flight validation of airframe-integrated, air-breathing propulsion system, which so far have only been tested in ground facilities, such as wind tunnels. The X-43A flights will be the first actual flight tests of an aircraft powered by a revolutionary supersonic-combustion ramjet ('scramjet') engine capable of operating at hypersonic speeds above Mach 5 (five times the speed of sound). The X-43A design uses the underbody of the aircraft to form critical elements of the engine. The forebody shape helps compress the intake airflow, while the aft section acts as a nozzle to direct thrust. The 12-foot, unpiloted research vehicle was developed and built by MicroCraft Inc., Tullahoma, Tenn., under NASA contract. The booster, built by Orbital Sciences Corp., Dulles, Va., will accelerate the X-43A after the X-43A/booster 'stack' is air-launched from NASA's venerable NB-52 mothership. The X-43A will separate from the rocket at a predetermined altitude and speed and fly a pre-programmed trajectory, conducting aerodynamic and propulsion experiments until it descends into the Pacific Ocean. Three research flights are planned, two at Mach 7 and one at Mach 10.

  12. Parasitological stool sample exam by spontaneous sedimentation method using conical tubes: effectiveness, practice, and biosafety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steveen Rios Ribeiro

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Spontaneous sedimentation is an important procedure for stool examination. A modification of this technique using conical tubes was performed and evaluated. METHODS: Fifty fecal samples were processed in sedimentation glass and in polypropylene conical tubes. Another 50 samples were used for quantitative evaluation of protozoan cysts. RESULTS: Although no significant differences occurred in the frequency of protozoa and helminths detected, significant differences in protozoan cyst counts did occur. CONCLUSIONS: The use of tube predicts a shorter path in the sedimentation of the sample, increases concentration of parasites for microscopy analysis, minimizes the risks of contamination, reduces the odor, and optimizes the workspace.

  13. Selective discrimination of small hydrophobic biomolecules based on ion-current rectification in conically shaped nanochannel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhijun; Wang, Jiahai; Wang, Erkang

    2012-01-30

    In this study, based on ion-current rectification in the conically shaped nanochannel embedded in polyethylene terephthalate (PET) membrane, we have selectively discriminated three small biomolecules. Because three positive biomolecules (Hoechst 33342, Propidium and Bupivacaine) have different hydrophobicities, their interactions with inside wall of the conical nanochannel are different and their binding affinities can be derived from Langmuir absorption model. Therefore, we can successfully discriminate these small biomolecules. The highest binding constant was obtained for the small molecule with highest hydrophobicity. Another interesting result is that the detection limit for the small molecule with the highest binding constant shifts to submicromole. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Generation of electron conical distributions by upper hybrid waves in the earth's polar region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, H. K.; Menietti, J. D.; Lin, C. S.; Burch, J. L.

    1988-01-01

    The heating of electron populations through resonant wave-particle interaction with upper hybrid turbulence is examined. It is first demonstrated that upper hybrid waves are easily excited by a population of warm electrons with a loss cone type distribution in a background of cold electron plasma. Quasi-linear theory is then used to show that the upper hybrid turbulence can preferentially heat the warm electrons in the perpendicular direction. In analogy to ion conic formation, this perpendicular heating process is a viable mechanism of generating electron conical distributions observed in the Earth's midaltitude polar regions.

  15. Warmstarting the homogeneous and self-dual interior point method for linear and conic quadratic problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skajaa, Anders; Andersen, Erling D.; Ye, Yinyu

    2013-01-01

    We present two strategies for warmstarting primal-dual interior point methods for the homogeneous self-dual model when applied to mixed linear and quadratic conic optimization problems. Common to both strategies is their use of only the final (optimal) iterate of the initial problem and their neg......We present two strategies for warmstarting primal-dual interior point methods for the homogeneous self-dual model when applied to mixed linear and quadratic conic optimization problems. Common to both strategies is their use of only the final (optimal) iterate of the initial problem...

  16. Ultrafast photochemistry with two product channels: Wavepacket motion through two distinct conical intersections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedle, Eberhard; Roos, Matthias K.; Thallmair, Sebastian; Sailer, Christian F.; Krebs, Nils; Fingerhut, Benjamin P.; de Vivie-Riedle, Regina

    2017-09-01

    Light induced bond cleavage is an ubiquitous process in large molecules, yet its quantum nature is not fully understood. We present a comprehensive description of the ultrafast light induced Csbnd Cl bond cleavage in diarylmethyl chlorides combining femtosecond transient absorption measurements with ab initio calculations. We observe a delayed appearance of radicals (80 fs) and cations (125 fs). The excited state wavepacket moves initially toward two conical intersections and the passing through these intersections determines the partitioning into the differing product channels. Different locations of the conical intersections explain the observed delay times.

  17. Practical conic sections the geometric properties of ellipses, parabolas and hyperbolas

    CERN Document Server

    Downs, J W

    2010-01-01

    Illustrated with interesting examples from everyday life, this text shows how to create ellipses, parabolas, and hyperbolas and presents fascinating historical background on their ancient origins. The text starts with a discussion of techniques for generating the conic curves, showing how to create accurate depictions of large or small conic curves and describing their reflective properties, from light in telescopes to sound in microphones and amplifiers. It further defines the role of curves in the construction of auditoriums, antennas, lamps, and numerous other design applications. Only a ba

  18. Understanding of cluster size deviation by measuring the dimensions of cluster jet from conical nozzles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guanglong Chen

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This work aims to understand the cluster size deviation from the prediction by an existing scaling law for conical nozzles. The dimensions of cluster jet at different heights above a nozzle along the direction of gas flow are measured. This study indicates that the dimension of cluster jet is underestimated in the existing scaling law and this under-estimation leads to the over-estimation of the equivalent diameter of conical nozzle. Thus the underestimation of the dimension of cluster jet may be one of possible factors responsible for the cluster size deviation (the degree of the deviation depends on details of cluster jet.

  19. Optimization of the Manufacturing Process of Conical Shell Structures Using Prepreg Laminatees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khakimova, Regina; Zimmermann, Rolf; Burau, Florian; Siebert, Marc; Arbelo, Mariano; Castro, Saullo; Degenhardt, Richard

    2014-06-01

    The design and manufacture of an unstiffened composite conical structure which is a scaled-down version of the Ariane 5 Midlife Evolution Equipment Bay Structure is presented. For such benchmarking structures the fiber orientation error is critical and then the manufacturing process becomes a big challenge. The paper therefore is focused on the implementation of a tailoring study and on the manufacturing process. The conical structure will be tested to validate a new design approach.This study contributes to the European Union (EU) project DESICOS, whose aim is to develop less conservative design guidelines for imperfection sensitive thin-walled structures.

  20. Investigation of turbulence measurements with a continuous wave, conically scanning LiDAR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Rozenn; Mikkelsen, Torben; Courtney, Michael

    of a continuous wave, conically scanning Zephir lidar. First, the wind speed standard deviation measured by such a lidar gives on average 80% of the standard deviation measured by a cup anemometer. This difference is due to the spatial averaging inherently made by a cw conically scanning lidar. The spatial...... suggest a volumetric filtering of the turbulence to represent the effect of the spatial averaging operated by a lidar when measuring the wind speed. We then evaluate this model by comparing the theoretical results to experimental data obtained with several Zephir systems, for both turbulence quantities....

  1. Structural Sizing of a 25,000-lb Payload, Air-breathing Launch Vehicle for Single-stage-to-orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, Joseph M.; Kosareo, Daniel N.

    2001-01-01

    In support of NASA's Air-Breathing Launch Vehicle (ABLV) study, a 25,000-lb payload version of the GTX (formerly Trailblazer) reference vehicle concept was developed. The GTX is a vertical lift-off, reusable, single-stage-to-orbit launch vehicle concept that uses hypersonic air-breathing propulsion in a rocket-based combined-cycle (RBCC) propulsion system to reduce the required propellant fraction. To achieve this goal the vehicle and propulsion system must be well integrated both aerodynamically and structurally to reduce weight. This study demonstrates the volumetric and structural efficiency of a vertical takeoff, horizontal landing, hypersonic vehicle with a circular cross section. A departure from the lifting body concepts, this design philosophy is even extended to the engines, which have semicircular nacelles symmetrically mounted on the vehicle. Material candidates with a potential for lightweight and simplicity have been selected from a set of near term technologies (five to ten years). To achieve the mission trajectory, preliminary weight estimates show the vehicle's gross lift-off weight is 1.26 x 10(exp 6) lb. The structural configuration of the GTX vehicle and its propulsion system are described. The vehicle design benefits are presented, and key technical issues are highlighted.

  2. Experimental observation of multi-spatial-mode quantum correlations in four-wave mixing with a conical pump and a conical probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Jinjian; Cao, Leiming; Zhang, Kai; Jing, Jietai

    2017-06-01

    Extensive attention has been drawn in generating multimode quantum states in recent years. Many efforts have been made during the last decade to produce such states. In this paper, we have experimentally demonstrated a scheme for generating a multi-spatial-mode quantum light source by a non-degenerated four-wave mixing process with a conical pump and a conical probe in a hot atomic vapor cell. The degree of the intensity-difference squeezing between the generated twin beams is about -4.1 dB. Due to the similar conical shape of the concentric quantum correlated beams, both the amplified probe and the generated conjugate beams can be decomposed into many angular modes. We have also experimentally verified the multi-spatial-mode nature of the generated quantum correlation by comparing the noise levels' variation tendencies of global attenuation and local cutting attenuations. In addition, we have also found the optimal values of each parameter in this scheme for further applications. Due to our scheme's advantages such as compactness, phase-insensitivity, and easy scalability, we have already shown a promising candidate for generating multi-spatial-mode quantum states, which may find potential applications in quantum metrology and quantum imaging, such as quantum-enhanced superresolution and the generation of multiple quantum correlated images.

  3. Gas-Kinetic Computational Algorithms for Hypersonic Flows in Continuum and Transitional Regimes Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase I project explores two gas-kinetic computational algorithms for simulation of hypersonic flows in both continuum and transitional regimes. One is the...

  4. Experimental Studies of Shock Interaction Phenomena Associated with Hypersonic Airbreathing Propulsion

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Holden, Michael

    2001-01-01

    ... and double cone configurations in hypersonic flow. In the best Navier-Stokes solutions the structure and density of the flowfield was captured exactly over both the hollow cylinder/flare and double cone models...

  5. Mathematical simulation of hydrocarbon fuel conversion in heat-protection elements of hypersonic aircrafts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuranov, A. L.; Korabel'nikov, A. V.; Mikhailov, A. M.

    2017-01-01

    We consider a mathematical model of hydrocarbon fuel conversion in a thermochemical reactor as an element of heat protection of a hypersonic aircraft. The application of this model has made it possible to enrich information obtained in experimental studies.

  6. Computational Tool for Coupled Simulation of Nonequilibrium Hypersonic Flows with Ablation Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The goal of this SBIR project is to develop a predictive computational tool for the aerothermal environment around ablation-cooled hypersonic atmospheric entry...

  7. Evaluation and Selection of Technology Concepts for a Hypersonic High Speed Standoff Missile

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Roth, Bryce

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes the application of a method for technology concept selection to the design of a hypersonic high-speed standoff missile capable of achieving pin-point strike of long-range targets...

  8. Experimental investigation of hypersonic buzz on a high cross-range shuttle configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, R. L.; Obremski, H. J.

    1972-01-01

    A wind tunnel investigation has been conducted to determine the nature of an unsteady hypersonic flow phenomenon, often referred to as hypersonic buzz, on a 1:100 scale model representative of a high cross-range shuttle configuration. The tests, conducted in helium at a nominal Mach number of 17.5, were specifically directed at obtaining a better understanding of the character of the hypersonic flow field in the vicinity of a deflected control surface. Power spectral densities and root mean squared values of surface pressure fluctuations are presented along with observations made from high speed motion pictures, schlieren and oil flow photographs. Flap deflections of 0, 20, 30, 35, 40 and 60 deg were tested at various angles of attack from 0 deg to 37 deg. It is quite clear from these tests that, under certain conditions, extremely unstable hypersonic flow patterns are formed.

  9. Comparison of measured and calculated temperatures for a Mach 8 hypersonic wing test structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, R. D.; Fields, R. A.

    1986-01-01

    Structural temperatures were measured on a hypersonic wing test structure during a heating test that simulated a Mach 8 thermal environment. Measured data are compared to design calculations and temperature predictions obtained from a finite-difference thermal analysis.

  10. Hypersonic Free-Flight Measurement of Aeroshell Forces and Flowfields Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A Hypersonic Gun Tunnel and laser based high speed imaging systems will be used to generate a unique, free flight, aerodynamic data base of potential Mars aeroshell...

  11. Lightweight Ultrahigh Temperature CMC-Encased C/C Structure for Reentry and Hypersonic Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The reentry spacecraft and hypersonic cruisers of the future will require advanced lightweight thermal protection systems that can provide the dual functionality of...

  12. Terahertz Quantum Cascade Laser-Based Sensors for Hypersonic Flows (7274-050) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Ground test facilities are used by NASA to simulate the conditions present during flight at hypersonic velocities, to test thermal protection materials for existing...

  13. Mode Transition Variable Geometry for High Speed Inlets for Hypersonic Aircraft Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Hypersonic propulsion research has been a focus of the NASA aeronautics program for years. Previous high-speed cruise and space access programs have examined the...

  14. A Laser-Based Diagnostic Suite for Hypersonic Test Facilities Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this SBIR effort, Los Gatos Research (LGR) proposes to develop a suite of laser-based diagnostics for the study of reactive and non-reactive hypersonic flows....

  15. Foreign Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-04-01

    3 4.19 Broadband Electromagnetic Interference ...... ........ 3 4.20 Gun Control Systems for Vehicle-Mounted Weapons...accordance with TOP 2-2-61333. 4.20 Gun Control Systems for Vehicle-Mounted Weapons. Characterize the angular-displacement type control handle used in tank...Main Weapon Firing Tests. Determine the ability of the test vehicle’s main armament and fire/ gun control system to hit its target. a. Artillery

  16. Theory and Design of Flight-Vehicle Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhdanov, V. T. (Editor); Kurziner, R. I. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    Papers are presented on such topics as the testing of aircraft engines, errors in the experimental determination of the parameters of scramjet engines, the effect of the nonuniformity of supersonic flow with shocks on friction and heat transfer in the channel of a hypersonic ramjet engine, and the selection of the basic parameters of cooled GTE turbines. Consideration is also given to the choice of optimal total wedge angle for the acceleration of aerospace vehicles, the theory of an electromagnetic-resonator engine, the dynamic characteristics of the pumps and turbines of liquid propellant rocket engines in transition regimes, and a hierarchy of mathematical models for spacecraft control engines.

  17. Aerodynamic and Propulsion Assisted Maneuvering for Waverider Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolley, Patrick

    2006-10-01

    Waveriders have long been sought after as the ideal space vehicle for space based aero assist maneuvers. Theoretically, waveriders can significantly increase gravity assist missions by performing an aero assist maneuver. These maneuvers are possible due to their high lift over drag ratio. However, implementing the theory is more difficult when considering the actual flight aerodynamics and heating problems that will be encountered. An aerodynamic database was generated using hypersonic incidence angle analysis tools with a viscous skin-drag correction. A performance analysis is performed and analyzes stagnation point heating, handling qualities, and controllability, etc. Finally, a simulation is being built to analyze various trajectories and possible mission scenarios.

  18. Modeling and simulation of radiation from hypersonic flows with Monte Carlo methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Ilyoup

    During extreme-Mach number reentry into Earth's atmosphere, spacecraft experience hypersonic non-equilibrium flow conditions that dissociate molecules and ionize atoms. Such situations occur behind a shock wave leading to high temperatures, which have an adverse effect on the thermal protection system and radar communications. Since the electronic energy levels of gaseous species are strongly excited for high Mach number conditions, the radiative contribution to the total heat load can be significant. In addition, radiative heat source within the shock layer may affect the internal energy distribution of dissociated and weakly ionized gas species and the number density of ablative species released from the surface of vehicles. Due to the radiation total heat load to the heat shield surface of the vehicle may be altered beyond mission tolerances. Therefore, in the design process of spacecrafts the effect of radiation must be considered and radiation analyses coupled with flow solvers have to be implemented to improve the reliability during the vehicle design stage. To perform the first stage for radiation analyses coupled with gas-dynamics, efficient databasing schemes for emission and absorption coefficients were developed to model radiation from hypersonic, non-equilibrium flows. For bound-bound transitions, spectral information including the line-center wavelength and assembled parameters for efficient calculations of emission and absorption coefficients are stored for typical air plasma species. Since the flow is non-equilibrium, a rate equation approach including both collisional and radiatively induced transitions was used to calculate the electronic state populations, assuming quasi-steady-state (QSS). The Voigt line shape function was assumed for modeling the line broadening effect. The accuracy and efficiency of the databasing scheme was examined by comparing results of the databasing scheme with those of NEQAIR for the Stardust flowfield. An accuracy of

  19. Hypersonic Transition Experiments in 3D Cone Flow with New Measurement Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    Schematic view of Hypersonic Ludwieg Tube Braunschweig ( HLB ).................... 9 Figure 2: First cone model...Hypersonic Ludwieg Tube Braunschweig ( HLB ). The facility is described in detail in Estorf et al. (2004). A schematic of the facility is given in Fig...1. The HLB is a wind tunnel that runs at a nominal Mach number M∞ = 6, in a unit Reynolds number range of [3 − 20] × 106 m-1 for about 80 ms at

  20. Assessment of CFD Modeling Capability for Hypersonic Shock Wave Boundary Layer Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-30

    RUTGERS UNIVERSITY Final Technical Report ONR Grant N00014-14-1-0827 Assessment of CFD Modeling Capability for Hypersonic Shock Wave Boundary...Layer Interactions 30 November 2015 Doyle Knight Dept Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey 98 Brett...30 September 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Assessment of CFD Modeling Capability for Hypersonic Shock Wave Boundary Layer Interactions 5a. CONTRACT

  1. Pegasus(Registered trademark) Wing-Glove Experiment to Document Hypersonic Crossflow Transition: Measurement System and Selected Flight Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertelrud, Arild; delaTova, Geva; Hamory, Philip J.; Young, Ronald; Noffz, Gregory K.; Dodson, Michael; Graves, Sharon S.; Diamond, John K.; Bartlett, James E.; Noack, Robert; hide

    2000-01-01

    In a recent flight experiment to study hypersonic crossflow transition, boundary layer characteristics were documented. A smooth steel glove was mounted on the first stage delta wing of Orbital Sciences Corporation's Pegasus (R) launch vehicle and was flown at speeds of up to Mach 8 and altitudes of up to 250,000 ft. The wing-glove experiment was flown as a secondary payload off the coast of Florida in October 1998. This paper describes the measurement system developed. Samples of the results obtained for different parts of the trajectory are included to show the characteristics and quality of the data. Thermocouples and pressure sensors (including Preston tubes, Stanton tubes, and a "probeless" pressure rake showing boundary layer profiles) measured the time-averaged flow. Surface hot-films and high-frequency pressure transducers measured flow dynamics. Because the vehicle was not recoverable, it was necessary to design a system for real-time onboard processing and transmission. Onboard processing included spectral averaging. The quality and consistency of data obtained was good and met the experiment requirements.

  2. Design and Fabrication of the ISTAR Direct-Connect Combustor Experiment at the NASA Hypersonic Tunnel Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin-Ho; Krivanek, Thomas M.

    2005-01-01

    The Integrated Systems Test of an Airbreathing Rocket (ISTAR) project was a flight demonstration project initiated to advance the state of the art in Rocket Based Combined Cycle (RBCC) propulsion development. The primary objective of the ISTAR project was to develop a reusable air breathing vehicle and enabling technologies. This concept incorporated a RBCC propulsion system to enable the vehicle to be air dropped at Mach 0.7 and accelerated up to Mach 7 flight culminating in a demonstration of hydrocarbon scramjet operation. A series of component experiments was planned to reduce the level of risk and to advance the technology base. This paper summarizes the status of a full scale direct connect combustor experiment with heated endothermic hydrocarbon fuels. This is the first use of the NASA GRC Hypersonic Tunnel facility to support a direct-connect test. The technical and mechanical challenges involved with adapting this facility, previously used only in the free-jet configuration, for use in direct connect mode will be also described.

  3. Influences of InGaP Conical Frustum Nanostructures on the Characteristics of GaAs Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen Dinh Lam

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Conical frustums with quasihexagonal nanostructures are fabricated on an InGaP window layer of single junction GaAs solar cells using a polystyrene nanosphere lithography technique followed by anisotropic etching processes. The optical and photovoltaic characteristics of the conical frustum nanostructured solar cells are investigated. Reflectance of the conical frustum nanostructured solar cells is significantly reduced in a wide range of wavelengths compared to that of the planar sample. The measured reflectance reduction is attributed to the gradual change in the refractive index of the InGaP conical frustum window layer. An increase of 15.2% in the power conversion efficiency has been achieved in the fabricated cell with an optimized conical frustum nanostructure compared to that of the planar cell.

  4. Roles of Engineering Correlations in Hypersonic Entry Boundary Layer Transition Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Charles H.; King, Rudolph A.; Kergerise, Michael A.; Berry, Scott A.; Horvath, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    Efforts to design and operate hypersonic entry vehicles are constrained by many considerations that involve all aspects of an entry vehicle system. One of the more significant physical phenomenon that affect entry trajectory and thermal protection system design is the occurrence of boundary layer transition from a laminar to turbulent state. During the Space Shuttle Return To Flight activity following the loss of Columbia and her crew of seven, NASA's entry aerothermodynamics community implemented an engineering correlation based framework for the prediction of boundary layer transition on the Orbiter. The methodology for this implementation relies upon the framework of correlation techniques that have been in use for several decades. What makes the Orbiter boundary layer transition correlation implementation unique is that a statistically significant data set was acquired in multiple ground test facilities, flight data exists to assist in establishing a better correlation and the framework was founded upon state of the art chemical nonequilibrium Navier Stokes flow field simulations. The basic tenets that guided the formulation and implementation of the Orbiter Return To Flight boundary layer transition prediction capability will be reviewed as a recommended format for future empirical correlation efforts. The validity of this approach has since been demonstrated by very favorable comparison of recent entry flight testing performed with the Orbiter Discovery, which will be graphically summarized. These flight data can provide a means to validate discrete protuberance engineering correlation approaches as well as high fidelity prediction methods to higher confidence. The results of these Orbiter engineering and flight test activities only serve to reinforce the essential role that engineering correlations currently exercise in the design and operation of entry vehicles. The framework of information-related to the Orbiter empirical boundary layer transition

  5. Computational study of performance characteristics for truncated conical aerospike nozzles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Prasanth P.; Suryan, Abhilash; Kim, Heuy Dong

    2017-12-01

    Aerospike nozzles are advanced rocket nozzles that can maintain its aerodynamic efficiency over a wide range of altitudes. It belongs to class of altitude compensating nozzles. A vehicle with an aerospike nozzle uses less fuel at low altitudes due to its altitude adaptability, where most missions have the greatest need for thrust. Aerospike nozzles are better suited to Single Stage to Orbit (SSTO) missions compared to conventional nozzles. In the current study, the flow through 20% and 40% aerospike nozzle is analyzed in detail using computational fluid dynamics technique. Steady state analysis with implicit formulation is carried out. Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations are solved with the Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model. The results are compared with experimental results from previous work. The transition from open wake to closed wake happens in lower Nozzle Pressure Ratio for 20% as compared to 40% aerospike nozzle.

  6. Application of Wrinkling Criterion for Prediction of Side-Wall Wrinkles in Deepdrawing of Conical Cups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wisselink, H.H.; Nagy, G.T.; Meinders, Vincent T.; Tewari, A.; Narasimhan, K.; Date, P.P.

    2012-01-01

    A wrinkling indicator is used to predict the development of wrinkles in a conical cup of relatively thin packaging steel. The results of FEM simulations using a wrinkling indicator are validated with a set of experiments with varying blankholder force and lubrication.

  7. Bifurcations of a creeping air–water flow in a conical container

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balci, Adnan; Brøns, Morten; Herrada, Miguel A.

    2016-01-01

    This numerical study describes the eddy emergence and transformations in a slow steady axisymmetric air–water flow, driven by a rotating top disk in a vertical conical container. As water height (Formula presented.) and cone half-angle (Formula presented.) vary, numerous flow metamorphoses occur....

  8. Experimental and Mathematical Modeling of High-Velocity Collision of a Conical Striker with Various Barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishchenko, A. N.; Afanas'eva, S. A.; Belov, N. N.; Burkin, V. V.; Rogaev, K. S.; Khabibullin, M. V.; Chupashev, A. V.; Yugov, N. T.

    2017-07-01

    A procedure for predicting the consequences of collisions of a metallic conical striker with various barriers has been developed. The calculation is carried out within the framework of an elastoviscous model of a continuous medium with account for the destruction of materials in axisymmetric and full spatial formulations. The interaction of colliding bodies of different composition and geometry is investigated.

  9. Conic Sections and the Discovery of a Novel Curve Using Differential Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Alwis, Amal

    2013-01-01

    We began by observing a variety of properties related to the tangent and normal lines of three conic sections: a parabola, an ellipse, and a hyperbola. Some of these properties include specific relationships between the x- and y-intercepts of the tangent and normal lines. Using these properties, we were able to form several differential equations.…

  10. Geometric phase effects in dynamics near conical intersections: symmetry breaking and spatial localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryabinkin, Ilya G; Izmaylov, Artur F

    2013-11-27

    We show that finite systems with conical intersections can exhibit spontaneous symmetry breaking which manifests itself in spatial localization of eigenstates. This localization has a geometric phase origin and is robust against variation of model parameters. The transition between localized and delocalized eigenstate regimes resembles a continuous phase transition. The localization slows down the low-energy quantum nuclear dynamics at low temperatures.

  11. Feasibility of Conical Biodegradable Polyurethane Foam for Closure of Oroantral Communications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visscher, Susan H.; van Minnen, Baucke; Bos, Rudolf R. M.

    Purpose: To assess the feasibility of a conically shaped biodegradable polyurethane (PU) foam for closure of oroantral communications (OACs). Patients and Methods: In 10 consecutive patients, fresh OACs (present for Results: No complications were observed in 7 of the 10 patients. Of the other 3

  12. On the Design of Conical Antennas for Broadband Impedance Matching Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Estêvão Simão Pereira

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the scope of broadband radiators, the biconical antenna, or its monopole conical counterpart, is long known to be a proper choice. One common form of such radiator, the spherically capped conical antenna (SCCA, has closed-form solution to its input impedance, from which the broadband performance potential is easily verified. Nonetheless, from the design perspective, apart from a few clues inferred from existing solutions, little is found to accurately guide the choice of the main geometrical parameters of the antenna that will enable it to comply with a set of imposed bandwidth requirements. This paper proposes a simple 10-step sequence to derive conical or biconical antenna design charts. These charts provide straightforward information on the geometrical limits within which the required antenna impedance matching broadband performance is achieved. The method is assessed for the SCCA and the open conical antenna (OCA using theoretical and simulated estimates of the input impedance. A discussion on the impact of the cap and the feed gap is included.

  13. Biconical antenna and V-conical antenna with elliptic cross section

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Naichang; Ruan, Chengli; Li, Weigan

    1993-01-01

    The methods of coordinates transformation and conformal mapping are applied to the problem of radiation from a biconical antenna and V-conical antenna with elliptic cross section. The infinite elliptic cone geometry can be transformed into two dimensions plane under the assumption of pure TEM spherical wave. The Closed-form solutions for the fields, currents, and characteristic parameters are obtained.

  14. A numerical study on the time-varying attitudes and aerodynamics of freely falling conical graupel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chueh, Chih-Che; Wang, Pao K.

    2016-04-01

    The flow fields and dynamic motions of conical graupel of diameters 0.5-5mm falling in air of 800 hPa and -20°C are studied by solving the transient Navier-Stokes equations numerically for flow past the conical graupel and the body dynamics equations representing the 6-degrees-of-freedom motion that determines the position and orientation of the graupel in response to the hydrodynamic force of the flow fields. The shape of conical graupel made through a simple but practical existing mathematical equation allows us to have an uneven mass distribution, which is generally believed to have great influence on ice particles' orientations while falling when inertial force becomes increasingly dominant over other effects. The simulated motions include vertical fall, lateral translation, sailing, rotation and pendulum swing. The computed flow fields are characterized in terms of streamtrace patterns as well as the vorticity magnitude fields, and the corresponding motion of the conical graupel is physically featured by looking upon the graupel surface distributions of pressure coefficient, torques contributed by both pressure as well as viscous effects. Tumbling occurs when an initial orientation of the graupel is 160° about Y axis, and the torque contributed by the pressure effect is dominant over that contributed by the viscous effect.

  15. In situ templating synthesis of conic Ba0⋅5 perovskite at elevated ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    preferentially formed during calcination at low temperature. BSCF perovskite was then produced by the in situ templating of BSC with iron diffusing into the BSC lattice during calcination at high temperature. Well- crystallized BSCF particles in conic shape were obtained by the calcination of the nitric acid treated precur-.

  16. Intramedullary fixation with screwed, conical stems--unsolicited results from animal experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.J.M. van Loon (Piet); H.H. Weinans (Harrie); R. Huiskes (Rik)

    1992-01-01

    textabstractFor the purpose of studying bone remodeling around prostheses, a segmental replacement for the goat tibia was designed, using a conical, screw-threaded, hydroxyapatite-coated stem for fixation. Eight goats were provided with the implant, seven of which loosened within 10 days

  17. Force characteristic of a magnetic actuator for separable electric connector based on conical airgap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Li

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a magnetic actuator for use in a separable electric connector based on conical airgap. The magnetic flux lines in conical airgap are almost vertical to the edge face of the yoke and armature, showing that the actual flux length in conical airgap is smaller than the axial stroke, which reduces magnetic reluctance over large stroke. Parameter improvement is analyzed based on modeling, and optimal results of the magnetic actuator are adopted to improve the rate of force to volume. The experimental results show that there is friction force of 10–12 N existing in the moving armature of the prototype, and the nominal value is in accordance with the simulation one. The results show that the design of conical airgap in the magnetic actuator is available to improve the initial force and reliability of the separating process and has the advantages of compact structure, short transmission, high reliability, large force with 50 N at the initial displacement of 2.5 mm, and fast response with 16.5 ms over the traditional actuator.

  18. Interaction Between Aerothermally Compliant Structures and Boundary-Layer Transition in Hypersonic Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Zachary Bryce

    The use of thin-gauge, light-weight structures in combination with the severe aero-thermodynamic loading makes reusable hypersonic cruise vehicles prone to fluid-thermal-structural interactions. These interactions result in surface perturbations in the form of temperature changes and deformations that alter the stability and eventual transition of the boundary layer. The state of the boundary layer has a significant effect on the aerothermodynamic loads acting on a hypersonic vehicle. The inherent relationship between boundary-layer stability, aerothermodynamic loading, and surface conditions make the interaction between the structural response and boundary-layer transition an important area of study in high-speed flows. The goal of this dissertation is to examine the interaction between boundary layer transition and the response of aerothermally compliant structures. This is carried out by first examining the uncoupled problems of: (1) structural deformation and temperature changes altering boundary-layer stability and (2) the boundary layer state affecting structural response. For the former, the stability of boundary layers developing over geometries that typify the response of surface panels subject to combined aerodynamic and thermal loading is numerically assessed using linear stability theory and the linear parabolized stability equations. Numerous parameters are examined including: deformation direction, deformation location, multiple deformations in series, structural boundary condition, surface temperature, the combined effect of Mach number and altitude, and deformation mode shape. The deformation-induced pressure gradient alters the boundary-layer thickness, which changes the frequency of the most-unstable disturbance. In regions of small boundary-layer growth, the disturbance frequency modulation resulting from a single or multiple panels deformed into the flowfield is found to improve boundary-layer stability and potentially delay transition. For the

  19. Prediction and Validation of Mars Pathfinder Hypersonic Aerodynamic Data Base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnoffo, Peter A.; Braun, Robert D.; Weilmuenster, K. James; Mitcheltree, Robert A.; Engelund, Walter C.; Powell, Richard W.

    1998-01-01

    Postflight analysis of the Mars Pathfinder hypersonic, continuum aerodynamic data base is presented. Measured data include accelerations along the body axis and axis normal directions. Comparisons of preflight simulation and measurements show good agreement. The prediction of two static instabilities associated with movement of the sonic line from the shoulder to the nose and back was confirmed by measured normal accelerations. Reconstruction of atmospheric density during entry has an uncertainty directly proportional to the uncertainty in the predicted axial coefficient. The sensitivity of the moment coefficient to freestream density, kinetic models and center-of-gravity location are examined to provide additional consistency checks of the simulation with flight data. The atmospheric density as derived from axial coefficient and measured axial accelerations falls within the range required for sonic line shift and static stability transition as independently determined from normal accelerations.

  20. Strong MHD-intraction in hypersonic flows near bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fomichev, Vladislav; Yadrenkin, Mikhail

    2017-10-01

    The results of experimental studies of local MHD interaction near bodies of various configurations are presented in the case when the work of the volumetric electromagnetic force leads to the deceleration of the hypersonic air flow, to the fixation of the ionization region in the flow, to the change of pressure in the interaction zone and to the appearance of a bow shock wave in front of the interaction zone. Shown, that at strong MHD-interaction the shape of the model slightly influences the final result of the change in the flow pattern, since the size of the interaction region becomes comparable, and in some cases larger than the size of the streamlined body.