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Sample records for congolense highlights gene

  1. Transcriptional profiling of cattle infected with Trypanosoma congolense highlights gene expression signatures underlying trypanotolerance and trypanosusceptibility

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    Naessens Jan

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background African animal trypanosomiasis (AAT caused by tsetse fly-transmitted protozoa of the genus Trypanosoma is a major constraint on livestock and agricultural production in Africa and is among the top ten global cattle diseases impacting on the poor. Here we show that a functional genomics approach can be used to identify temporal changes in host peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC gene expression due to disease progression. We also show that major gene expression differences exist between cattle from trypanotolerant and trypanosusceptible breeds. Using bovine long oligonucleotide microarrays and real time quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR validation we analysed PBMC gene expression in naïve trypanotolerant and trypanosusceptible cattle experimentally challenged with Trypanosoma congolense across a 34-day infection time course. Results Trypanotolerant N'Dama cattle displayed a rapid and distinct transcriptional response to infection, with a ten-fold higher number of genes differentially expressed at day 14 post-infection compared to trypanosusceptible Boran cattle. These analyses identified coordinated temporal gene expression changes for both breeds in response to trypanosome infection. In addition, a panel of genes were identified that showed pronounced differences in gene expression between the two breeds, which may underlie the phenomena of trypanotolerance and trypanosusceptibility. Gene ontology (GO analysis demonstrate that the products of these genes may contribute to increased mitochondrial mRNA translational efficiency, a more pronounced B cell response, an elevated activation status and a heightened response to stress in trypanotolerant cattle. Conclusion This study has revealed an extensive and diverse range of cellular processes that are altered temporally in response to trypanosome infection in African cattle. Results indicate that the trypanotolerant N'Dama cattle respond more rapidly and with a

  2. Partial nucleotide sequence analysis of 18S ribosomal RNA gene of the four genotypes of Trypanosoma congolense

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osanya, A.; Majiwa, P.A.O.; Kinyanjui, P.W.

    2006-01-01

    Specific oligonucleotide primers based on conserved nucleotide sequences of 18s ribisomal RNA (18s rRNA) gene of Trypanosoma brucei, Leishmania donovani, Triponema aequale and Lagenidium gigantum have been designed and used in the ploymerase chain reaction (PCR) to amplify genomic DNA from four different clones each representing a different genotypic group of T. congolence. PCR products of approximately 1Kb were generated using as template DNA from each of the trypanosomes. The PCR products cross-hybridized with genomic DNA from T.brucei, T. simiae and the four genotypes of T.congolense implying significant sequence homology of 18S rRNA gene among trypanosomes. The nucleotide sequence of a segment of the PCR products were determined by direct sequencing to provide partial nucleotide sequence of the 18s rRNA gene in each T.congolense genotypic group. The sequences obtained together with those that have been published for T.brucei reveals that although most regions show inter and intra species nucleotide identity, there are several sites where deletions, insertions and base changes have occured in nucleotide sequence of of T.brucei and the four genotypes of T.congolense.(author)

  3. Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of PCR products amplified from 18S ribosomal RNA gene of Trypanosoma congolense

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osanyo, A.; Majiwa, P.W.

    2006-01-01

    Oligonucleotide primers were designed from the conserved nucleotide sequences of 18S ribosomal RNA (18S rRNA) gene of protozoans: Trypanosoma brucei, Leishmania donovani, Triponema aequale and Lagenidium gigantum. The primers were used in polymerace chain reaction (PCR) to generate PCR products of approximately 1 Kb using genomic DNA from T. brucei and the four genotypic groups of T. congolense as template. The five PCR products so produced were digested with several restriction enzymes and hybridized to a DNA probe made from T. brucei PCR product of the same 18S rRNA gene region. Most restriction enzyme digests revealed polymorphism with respect to the location of their recognition sites on the five PCR products. The restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) pattern observed indicate that the 18S rRNA gene sequences of trypanosomes: T. brucei and the four genotypes of T.congolence group are heterogeneous. The results further demonstrate that the region that was amplified can be used in specific identification of trypanosomes species and subspecies.(author)

  4. Role of sialic acids in the midguts of Trypanosoma congolense ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

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    total sialic acid concentration. The relevance of these findings to the role of sialic acids in the midgut of. T. congolense infected C.p. pipiense mosquitoes is discussed in this paper. Key words: Trypanosoma congolense, Culex pipiense pipiense, sialic acid, midgut. INTRODUCTION. The Culex pipiense pipiense mosquito is ...

  5. Complete in vitro life cycle of Trypanosoma congolense: development of genetic tools.

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    Virginie Coustou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Animal African trypanosomosis, a disease mainly caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma congolense, is a major constraint to livestock productivity and has a significant impact in the developing countries of Africa. RNA interference (RNAi has been used to study gene function and identify drug and vaccine targets in a variety of organisms including trypanosomes. However, trypanosome RNAi studies have mainly been conducted in T. brucei, as a model for human infection, largely ignoring livestock parasites of economical importance such as T. congolense, which displays different pathogenesis profiles. The whole T. congolense life cycle can be completed in vitro, but this attractive model displayed important limitations: (i genetic tools were currently limited to insect forms and production of modified infectious BSF through differentiation was never achieved, (ii in vitro differentiation techniques lasted several months, (iii absence of long-term bloodstream forms (BSF in vitro culture prevented genomic analyses. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We optimized culture conditions for each developmental stage and secured the differentiation steps. Specifically, we devised a medium adapted for the strenuous development of stable long-term BSF culture. Using Amaxa nucleofection technology, we greatly improved the transfection rate of the insect form and designed an inducible transgene expression system using the IL3000 reference strain. We tested it by expression of reporter genes and through RNAi. Subsequently, we achieved the complete in vitro life cycle with dramatically shortened time requirements for various wild type and transgenic strains. Finally, we established the use of modified strains for experimental infections and underlined a host adaptation phase requirement. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We devised an improved T. congolense model, which offers the opportunity to perform functional genomics analyses throughout the whole life

  6. Highlights of meiotic genes in Arabidopsis thaliana | Consiglio ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Meiosis is a fascinating and complex phenomenon and, despite its central role in sexual plant reproduction, little is known on the molecular mechanisms involved in this process. We review the progress made in recent years using Arabidopsis thaliana mutants for isolating meiotic genes. In particular, emphasis is given on ...

  7. Biochemical characterization of trans-sialidase TS1 variants from Trypanosoma congolense

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    Dietz Frank

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Animal African trypanosomiasis, sleeping sickness in humans and Nagana in cattle, is a resurgent disease in Africa caused by Trypanosoma parasites. Trans-sialidases expressed by trypanosomes play an important role in the infection cycle of insects and mammals. Whereas trans-sialidases of other trypanosomes like the American T. cruzi are well investigated, relatively little research has been done on these enzymes of T. congolense. Results Based on a partial sequence and an open reading frame in the WTSI database, DNA sequences encoding for eleven T. congolense trans-sialidase 1 variants with 96.3% overall amino acid identity were amplified. Trans-sialidase 1 variants were expressed as recombinant proteins, isolated and assayed for trans-sialylation activity. The purified proteins produced α2,3-sialyllactose from lactose by desialylating fetuin, clearly demonstrating their trans-sialidase activity. Using an HPLC-based assay, substrate specificities and kinetic parameters of two variants were characterized in detail indicating differences in substrate specificities for lactose, fetuin and synthetic substrates. Both enzymes were able to sialylate asialofetuin to an extent, which was sufficient to reconstitute binding sites for Siglec-4. A mass spectrometric analysis of the sialylation pattern of glycopeptides from fetuin revealed clear but generally similar changes in the sialylation pattern of the N-glycans on fetuin catalyzed by the trans-sialidases investigated. Conclusions The identification and characterization of a trans-sialidase gene family of the African parasite T. congolense has opened new perspectives for investigating the biological role of these enzymes in Nagana and sleeping sickness. Based on this study it will be interesting to address the expression pattern of these genes and their activities in the different stages of the parasite in its infection cycle. Furthermore, these trans-sialidases have the

  8. A gene pathway analysis highlights the role of cellular adhesion molecules in multiple sclerosis susceptibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damotte, V; Guillot-Noel, L; Patsopoulos, N A

    2014-01-01

    adhesion molecule (CAMs) biological pathway using Cytoscape software. This network is a strong candidate, as it is involved in the crossing of the blood-brain barrier by the T cells, an early event in MS pathophysiology, and is used as an efficient therapeutic target. We drew up a list of 76 genes...... in interaction with other genes as a group. Pathway analysis is an alternative way to highlight such group of genes. Using SNP association P-values from eight multiple sclerosis (MS) GWAS data sets, we performed a candidate pathway analysis for MS susceptibility by considering genes interacting in the cell...... belonging to the CAM network. We highlighted 64 networks enriched with CAM genes with low P-values. Filtering by a percentage of CAM genes up to 50% and rejecting enriched signals mainly driven by transcription factors, we highlighted five networks associated with MS susceptibility. One of them, constituted...

  9. Duplications and losses in gene families of rust pathogens highlight putative effectors

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    Amanda L. Pendleton

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Rust fungi are a group of fungal pathogens that cause some of the world’s most destructive diseases of trees and crops. A shared characteristic among rust fungi is obligate biotrophy, the inability to complete a lifecycle without a host. This dependence on a host species likely affects patterns of gene expansion, contraction, and innovation within rust pathogen genomes. The establishment of disease by biotrophic pathogens is reliant upon effector proteins that are encoded in the fungal genome and secreted from the pathogen into the host’s cell apoplast or within the cells. This study uses a comparative genomic approach to elucidate putative effectors and determine their evolutionary histories. We used OrthoMCL to identify nearly 20,000 gene families in proteomes of sixteen diverse fungal species, which include fifteen basidiomycetes and one ascomycete. We inferred patterns of duplication and loss for each gene family and identified families with distinctive patterns of expansion/contraction associated with the evolution of rust fungal genomes. To recognize potential contributors for the unique features of rust pathogens, we identified families harboring secreted proteins that: i arose or expanded in rust pathogens relative to other fungi, or ii contracted or were lost in rust fungal genomes. While the origin of rust fungi appears to be associated with considerable gene loss, there are many gene duplications associated with each sampled rust fungal genome. We also highlight two putative effector gene families that have expanded in Cqf that we hypothesize have roles in pathogenicity.

  10. Duplications and losses in gene families of rust pathogens highlight putative effectors.

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    Pendleton, Amanda L; Smith, Katherine E; Feau, Nicolas; Martin, Francis M; Grigoriev, Igor V; Hamelin, Richard; Nelson, C Dana; Burleigh, J Gordon; Davis, John M

    2014-01-01

    Rust fungi are a group of fungal pathogens that cause some of the world's most destructive diseases of trees and crops. A shared characteristic among rust fungi is obligate biotrophy, the inability to complete a lifecycle without a host. This dependence on a host species likely affects patterns of gene expansion, contraction, and innovation within rust pathogen genomes. The establishment of disease by biotrophic pathogens is reliant upon effector proteins that are encoded in the fungal genome and secreted from the pathogen into the host's cell apoplast or within the cells. This study uses a comparative genomic approach to elucidate putative effectors and determine their evolutionary histories. We used OrthoMCL to identify nearly 20,000 gene families in proteomes of 16 diverse fungal species, which include 15 basidiomycetes and one ascomycete. We inferred patterns of duplication and loss for each gene family and identified families with distinctive patterns of expansion/contraction associated with the evolution of rust fungal genomes. To recognize potential contributors for the unique features of rust pathogens, we identified families harboring secreted proteins that: (i) arose or expanded in rust pathogens relative to other fungi, or (ii) contracted or were lost in rust fungal genomes. While the origin of rust fungi appears to be associated with considerable gene loss, there are many gene duplications associated with each sampled rust fungal genome. We also highlight two putative effector gene families that have expanded in Cqf that we hypothesize have roles in pathogenicity.

  11. Evolution of Parallel Spindles Like genes in plants and highlight of unique domain architecture#

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    Consiglio Federica M

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polyploidy has long been recognized as playing an important role in plant evolution. In flowering plants, the major route of polyploidization is suggested to be sexual through gametes with somatic chromosome number (2n. Parallel Spindle1 gene in Arabidopsis thaliana (AtPS1 was recently demonstrated to control spindle orientation in the 2nd division of meiosis and, when mutated, to induce 2n pollen. Interestingly, AtPS1 encodes a protein with a FHA domain and PINc domain putatively involved in RNA decay (i.e. Nonsense Mediated mRNA Decay. In potato, 2n pollen depending on parallel spindles was described long time ago but the responsible gene has never been isolated. The knowledge derived from AtPS1 as well as the availability of genome sequences makes it possible to isolate potato PSLike (PSL and to highlight the evolution of PSL family in plants. Results Our work leading to the first characterization of PSLs in potato showed a greater PSL complexity in this species respect to Arabidopsis thaliana. Indeed, a genomic PSL locus and seven cDNAs affected by alternative splicing have been cloned. In addition, the occurrence of at least two other PSL loci in potato was suggested by the sequence comparison of alternatively spliced transcripts. Phylogenetic analysis on 20 Viridaeplantae showed the wide distribution of PSLs throughout the species and the occurrence of multiple copies only in potato and soybean. The analysis of PSLFHA and PSLPINc domains evidenced that, in terms of secondary structure, a major degree of variability occurred in PINc domain respect to FHA. In terms of specific active sites, both domains showed diversification among plant species that could be related to a functional diversification among PSL genes. In addition, some specific active sites were strongly conserved among plants as supported by sequence alignment and by evidence of negative selection evaluated as difference between non-synonymous and

  12. Expression QTL analysis of top loci from GWAS meta-analysis highlights additional schizophrenia candidate genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Jong, Simone; van Eijk, Kristel R; Zeegers, Dave W L H

    2012-01-01

    of the Psychiatric GWAS consortium (PGC) yielded five novel loci for schizophrenia. In this study, we aim to highlight additional schizophrenia susceptibility loci from the PGC study by combining the top association findings from the discovery stage (9394 schizophrenia cases and 12 462 controls) with expression QTLs...

  13. Mapping microbial ecosystems and spoilage-gene flow in breweries highlights patterns of contamination and resistance.

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    Bokulich, Nicholas A; Bergsveinson, Jordyn; Ziola, Barry; Mills, David A

    2015-03-10

    Distinct microbial ecosystems have evolved to meet the challenges of indoor environments, shaping the microbial communities that interact most with modern human activities. Microbial transmission in food-processing facilities has an enormous impact on the qualities and healthfulness of foods, beneficially or detrimentally interacting with food products. To explore modes of microbial transmission and spoilage-gene frequency in a commercial food-production scenario, we profiled hop-resistance gene frequencies and bacterial and fungal communities in a brewery. We employed a Bayesian approach for predicting routes of contamination, revealing critical control points for microbial management. Physically mapping microbial populations over time illustrates patterns of dispersal and identifies potential contaminant reservoirs within this environment. Habitual exposure to beer is associated with increased abundance of spoilage genes, predicting greater contamination risk. Elucidating the genetic landscapes of indoor environments poses important practical implications for food-production systems and these concepts are translatable to other built environments.

  14. A case of Trypanosoma congolense savannah type infection and its management in a dog

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    Peter Kimeli

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A case of Trypanosoma congolense savannah type infection in a 4-year old German shepherd dog weighing 26-kg was presented to the Small Animal Clinic, University of Nairobi, Kenya, with the history of anorexia and difficulty in breathing. The clinical manifestations were fever, pale mucous membrane, dyspnea and wasting. Blood examination revealed the existence of trypanosome parasites, and showed mild anemia. Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS based polymerase chain reaction confirmed the presence of Trypanosoma congolense savannah type. Along with supporting therapy, the case was successfully managed using diminazene aceturate injection (dosed at 3.5 mg/kg body weight through intramuscular route. Complete recovery of the case was observed on day 6 of post-treatment.

  15. Structural basis for the high specificity of a Trypanosoma congolense immunoassay targeting glycosomal aldolase.

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    Joar Pinto

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Animal African trypanosomosis (AAT is a neglected tropical disease which imposes a heavy burden on the livestock industry in Sub-Saharan Africa. Its causative agents are Trypanosoma parasites, with T. congolense and T. vivax being responsible for the majority of the cases. Recently, we identified a Nanobody (Nb474 that was employed to develop a homologous sandwich ELISA targeting T. congolense fructose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase (TcoALD. Despite the high sequence identity between trypanosomatid aldolases, the Nb474-based immunoassay is highly specific for T. congolense detection. The results presented in this paper yield insights into the molecular principles underlying the assay's high specificity.The structure of the Nb474-TcoALD complex was determined via X-ray crystallography. Together with analytical gel filtration, the structure reveals that a single TcoALD tetramer contains four binding sites for Nb474. Through a comparison with the crystal structures of two other trypanosomatid aldolases, TcoALD residues Ala77 and Leu106 were identified as hot spots for specificity. Via ELISA and surface plasmon resonance (SPR, we demonstrate that mutation of these residues does not abolish TcoALD recognition by Nb474, but does lead to a lack of detection in the Nb474-based homologous sandwich immunoassay.The results show that the high specificity of the Nb474-based immunoassay is not determined by the initial recognition event between Nb474 and TcoALD, but rather by its homologous sandwich design. This (i provides insights into the optimal set-up of the assay, (ii may be of great significance for field applications as it could explain the potential detection escape of certain T. congolense strains, and (iii may be of general interest to those developing similar assays.

  16. Deep comparative genomics among Chlamydia trachomatis lymphogranuloma venereum isolates highlights genes potentially involved in pathoadaptation.

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    Borges, Vítor; Gomes, João Paulo

    2015-06-01

    Lymphogranuloma venereum (LGV) is a human sexually transmitted disease caused by the obligate intracellular bacterium Chlamydia trachomatis (serovars L1-L3). LGV clinical manifestations range from severe ulcerative proctitis (anorectal syndrome), primarily caused by the epidemic L2b strains, to painful inguinal lymphadenopathy (the typical LGV bubonic form). Besides potential host-related factors, the differential disease severity and tissue tropism among LGV strains is likely a function of the genetic backbone of the strains. We aimed to characterize the genetic variability among LGV strains as strain- or serovar-specific mutations may underlie phenotypic signatures, and to investigate the mutational events that occurred throughout the pathoadaptation of the epidemic L2b lineage. By analyzing 20 previously published genomes from L1, L2, L2b and L3 strains and two new genomes from L2b strains, we detected 1497 variant sites and about 100 indels, affecting 453 genes and 144 intergenic regions, with 34 genes displaying a clear overrepresentation of nonsynonymous mutations. Effectors and/or type III secretion substrates (almost all of those described in the literature) and inclusion membrane proteins showed amino acid changes that were about fivefold more frequent than silent changes. More than 120 variant sites occurred in plasmid-regulated virulence genes, and 66% yielded amino acid changes. The identified serovar-specific variant sites revealed that the L2b-specific mutations are likely associated with higher fitness and pointed out potential targets for future highly discriminatory diagnostic/typing tests. By evaluating the evolutionary pathway beyond the L2b clonal radiation, we observed that 90.2% of the intra-L2b variant sites occurring in coding regions involve nonsynonymous mutations, where CT456/tarp has been the main target. Considering the progress on C. trachomatis genetic manipulation, this study may constitute an important contribution for prioritizing

  17. Validation of pre-coated ELISA tests to detect antibodies against T. congolense and T. vivax

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shumba, W.

    2000-01-01

    The anti-trypanosomal antibody detecting enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was first described in 1977 and was further developed for use in large scale surveys in Zimbabwe. More recently, the IAEA initiated a programme to improve the robustness and standardisation of the assay. The IAEA supplied plates pre-coated with either a crude T. congolense or T. vivax antigen and the reagents necessary for analysing samples. Parasitologically positive and negative sera were used to validate and determine the cut-off values of the two tests. The samples were tested and results analysed using a variety of cut-off values. The tests provided similar information although the T. congolense pre-coated plates gave significantly higher optical density values than the plates coated with T. vivax. Sensitivity and specificity values were calculated using the different cut-off points. Results indicate that the test using T. congolense antigen had the highest specificity and sensitivity for a given cut-off value. Although the test could distinguish positive from negative sera, it was quite difficult to provide a suitable cut-off value, but the value should be dictated by the use of the test. (author)

  18. Effects of experimental Trypanosoma congolense infection on sperm morphology in Yankasa rams

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    Oluyinka O. Okubanjo

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study was to determine the effect of T. congolense on the sperm morphology of Yankasa rams (YKR. Nine YKR aged 24-30 months-old were assigned into two groups of 6 infected and 3 uninfected control and were monitored for 7 weeks. The infected group of YKR was each inoculated with 1 x 106 T. congolense through the jugular vein, while the control group remained uninfected. The entire infected group developed trypanosomosis post infection (pi characterized by sperm morphological abnormalities in the semen. There were significant (P<0.001 increases in the mean percentage of acrosomal, head, middle piece and tail abnormalities. Proximal and distal droplets as well detached heads were also significantly (P<0.001 increased post infection (pi. Acrosomal abnormalities, distal droplet and tail abnormalities increased from week 1 pi till the end of the study, while head abnormalities and detached heads increased from week 2 pi. Middle piece abnormalities and proximal droplets increased from week 3 and 4 pi till the end of the study respectively. The high incidence of morphological defects caused by T. congolense is capable of causing infertility from the first week pi thereby making the rams unfit for breeding at the end of the study.

  19. An Anti-proteome Nanobody Library Approach Yields a Specific Immunoassay for Trypanosoma congolense Diagnosis Targeting Glycosomal Aldolase.

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    Steven Odongo

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Infectious diseases pose a severe worldwide threat to human and livestock health. While early diagnosis could enable prompt preventive interventions, the majority of diseases are found in rural settings where basic laboratory facilities are scarce. Under such field conditions, point-of-care immunoassays provide an appropriate solution for rapid and reliable diagnosis. The limiting steps in the development of the assay are the identification of a suitable target antigen and the selection of appropriate high affinity capture and detection antibodies. To meet these challenges, we describe the development of a Nanobody (Nb-based antigen detection assay generated from a Nb library directed against the soluble proteome of an infectious agent. In this study, Trypanosoma congolense was chosen as a model system.An alpaca was vaccinated with whole-parasite soluble proteome to generate a Nb library from which the most potent T. congolense specific Nb sandwich immunoassay (Nb474H-Nb474B was selected. First, the Nb474-homologous sandwich ELISA (Nb474-ELISA was shown to detect experimental infections with high Positive Predictive Value (98%, Sensitivity (87% and Specificity (94%. Second, it was demonstrated under experimental conditions that the assay serves as test-of-cure after Berenil treatment. Finally, this assay allowed target antigen identification. The latter was independently purified through immuno-capturing from (i T. congolense soluble proteome, (ii T. congolense secretome preparation and (iii sera of T. congolense infected mice. Subsequent mass spectrometry analysis identified the target as T. congolense glycosomal aldolase.The results show that glycosomal aldolase is a candidate biomarker for active T. congolense infections. In addition, and by proof-of-principle, the data demonstrate that the Nb strategy devised here offers a unique approach to both diagnostic development and target discovery that could be widely applied to other infectious

  20. CSF protein changes associated with hippocampal sclerosis risk gene variants highlight impact of GRN/PGRN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fardo, David W; Katsumata, Yuriko; Kauwe, John S K; Deming, Yuetiva; Harari, Oscar; Cruchaga, Carlos; Nelson, Peter T

    2017-04-01

    Hippocampal sclerosis of aging (HS-Aging) is a common cause of dementia in older adults. We tested the variability in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) proteins associated with previously identified HS-Aging risk single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative cohort (ADNI; n=237) data, combining both multiplexed proteomics CSF and genotype data, were used to assess the association between CSF analytes and risk SNPs in four genes (SNPs): GRN (rs5848), TMEM106B (rs1990622), ABCC9 (rs704180), and KCNMB2 (rs9637454). For controls, non-HS-Aging SNPs in APOE (rs429358/rs7412) and MAPT (rs8070723) were also analyzed against Aβ1-42 and total tau CSF analytes. The GRN risk SNP (rs5848) status correlated with variation in CSF proteins, with the risk allele (T) associated with increased levels of AXL Receptor Tyrosine Kinase (AXL), TNF-Related Apoptosis-Inducing Ligand Receptor 3 (TRAIL-R3), Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and clusterin (CLU) (all p<0.05 after Bonferroni correction). The TRAIL-R3 correlation was significant in meta-analysis with an additional dataset (p=5.05×10 -5 ). Further, the rs5848 SNP status was associated with increased CSF tau protein - a marker of neurodegeneration (p=0.015). These data are remarkable since this GRN SNP has been found to be a risk factor for multiple types of dementia-related brain pathologies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Genes of the major histocompatibility complex highlight interactions of the innate and adaptive immune system

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    Barbara Lukasch

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background A well-functioning immune defence is crucial for fitness, but our knowledge about the immune system and its complex interactions is still limited. Major histocompatibility complex (MHC molecules are involved in T-cell mediated adaptive immune responses, but MHC is also highly upregulated during the initial innate immune response. The aim of our study was therefore to determine to what extent the highly polymorphic MHC is involved in interactions of the innate and adaptive immune defence and if specific functional MHC alleles (FA or heterozygosity at the MHC are more important. Methods To do this we used captive house sparrows (Passer domesticus to survey MHC diversity and immune function controlling for several environmental factors. MHC class I alleles were identified using parallel amplicon sequencing and to mirror immune function, several immunological tests that correspond to the innate and adaptive immunity were conducted. Results Our results reveal that MHC was linked to all immune tests, highlighting its importance for the immune defence. While all innate responses were associated with one single FA, adaptive responses (cell-mediated and humoral were associated with several different alleles. Discussion We found that repeated injections of an antibody in nestlings and adults were linked to different FA and hence might affect different areas of the immune system. Also, individuals with a higher number of different FA produced a smaller secondary response, indicating a disadvantage of having numerous MHC alleles. These results demonstrate the complexity of the immune system in relation to the MHC and lay the foundation for other studies to further investigate this topic.

  2. Genes of the major histocompatibility complex highlight interactions of the innate and adaptive immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukasch, Barbara; Westerdahl, Helena; Strandh, Maria; Winkler, Hans; Moodley, Yoshan; Knauer, Felix; Hoi, Herbert

    2017-01-01

    A well-functioning immune defence is crucial for fitness, but our knowledge about the immune system and its complex interactions is still limited. Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules are involved in T-cell mediated adaptive immune responses, but MHC is also highly upregulated during the initial innate immune response. The aim of our study was therefore to determine to what extent the highly polymorphic MHC is involved in interactions of the innate and adaptive immune defence and if specific functional MHC alleles (FA) or heterozygosity at the MHC are more important. To do this we used captive house sparrows ( Passer domesticus ) to survey MHC diversity and immune function controlling for several environmental factors. MHC class I alleles were identified using parallel amplicon sequencing and to mirror immune function, several immunological tests that correspond to the innate and adaptive immunity were conducted. Our results reveal that MHC was linked to all immune tests, highlighting its importance for the immune defence. While all innate responses were associated with one single FA, adaptive responses (cell-mediated and humoral) were associated with several different alleles. We found that repeated injections of an antibody in nestlings and adults were linked to different FA and hence might affect different areas of the immune system. Also, individuals with a higher number of different FA produced a smaller secondary response, indicating a disadvantage of having numerous MHC alleles. These results demonstrate the complexity of the immune system in relation to the MHC and lay the foundation for other studies to further investigate this topic.

  3. Transcriptome analysis highlights defense and signaling pathways mediated by rice pi21 gene with partial resistance to Magnaporthe oryzae

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    Yu Zhang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Rice blast disease is one of the most destructive rice diseases worldwide. The pi21 gene confers partial and durable resistance to Magnaporthe oryzae. However, little is known regarding the molecular mechanisms of resistance mediated by the loss-of-function of Pi21. In this study, comparative transcriptome profiling of the Pi21-RNAi transgenic rice line and Nipponbare with M. oryzae infection at different time points (0, 12, 24, 48, and 72 hpi were investigated using RNA sequencing. The results generated 43,222 unique genes mapped to the rice genome. In total, 1,109 differentially expressed genes (DEGs were identified between the Pi21-RNAi line and Nipponbare with M. oryzae infection, with 103, 281, 209, 69, and 678 DEGs at 0, 12, 24, 48, and 72 hpi, respectively. Functional analysis showed that most of the DEGs were involved in metabolism, transport, signaling, and defense. Among the genes assigned to plant–pathogen interaction, we identified 43 receptor kinase genes associated with pathogen-associated molecular pattern recognition and calcium ion influx. The expression levels of brassinolide-insensitive 1, flagellin sensitive 2 and elongation factor Tu receptor, ethylene (ET biosynthesis and signaling genes, were higher in the Pi21-RNAi line than Nipponbare. This suggested that there was a more robust PTI response in Pi21-RNAi plants and that ET signaling was important to rice blast resistance. We also identified 53 transcription factor genes, including WRKY, NAC, DOF, and ERF families that show differential expression between the two genotypes. This study highlights possible candidate genes that may serve a function in the partial rice blast resistance mediated by the loss-of-function of Pi21 and increase our understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in partial resistance against M. oryzae.

  4. Isothermal microcalorimetry - A quantitative method to monitor Trypanosoma congolense growth and growth inhibition by trypanocidal drugs in real time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gysin, M; Braissant, O; Gillingwater, K; Brun, R; Mäser, P; Wenzler, T

    2018-03-16

    Trypanosoma congolense is a protozoan parasite that is transmitted by tsetse flies, causing African Animal Trypanosomiasis, also known as Nagana, in sub-Saharan Africa. Nagana is a fatal disease of livestock that causes severe economic losses. Two drugs are available, diminazene and isometamidium, yet successful treatment is jeopardized by drug resistant T. congolense. Isothermal microcalorimetry is a highly sensitive tool that can be used to study growth of the extracellular T. congolense parasites or to study parasite growth inhibition after the addition of antitrypanosomal drugs. Time of drug action and time to kill can be quantified in a simple way by real time heat flow measurements. We established a robust protocol for the microcalorimetric studies of T. congolense and developed mathematical computations in R to calculate different parameters related to growth and the kinetics of drug action. We demonstrate the feasibility and benefit of the method exemplary with the two standard drugs, diminazene aceturate and isometamidium chloride. The method and the mathematical approach can be translated to study other pathogenic or non-pathogenic cells if they are metabolically active and grow under axenic conditions. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  5. Diminazene aceturate (Berenil modulates the host cellular and inflammatory responses to Trypanosoma congolense infection.

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    Shiby Kuriakose

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Trypanosoma congolense are extracellular and intravascular blood parasites that cause debilitating acute or chronic disease in cattle and other domestic animals. Diminazene aceturate (Berenil has been widely used as a chemotherapeutic agent for trypanosomiasis in livestock since 1955. As in livestock, treatment of infected highly susceptible BALB/c mice with Berenil leads to rapid control of parasitemia and survival from an otherwise lethal infection. The molecular and biochemical mechanisms of action of Berenil are still not very well defined and its effect on the host immune system has remained relatively unstudied. Here, we investigated whether Berenil has, in addition to its trypanolytic effect, a modulatory effect on the host immune response to Trypanosoma congolense. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice were infected intraperitoneally with T. congolense, treated with Berenil and the expression of CD25 and FoxP3 on splenic cells was assessed directly ex vivo. In addition, serum levels and spontaneous and LPS-induced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines by splenic and hepatic CD11b⁺ cells were determined by ELISA. Berenil treatment significantly reduced the percentages of CD25⁺ cells, a concomitant reduction in the percentage of regulatory (CD4⁺Foxp3⁺ T cells and a striking reduction in serum levels of disease exacerbating pro-inflammatory cytokines including IL-6, IL-12, TNF and IFN-γ. Furthermore, Berenil treatment significantly suppressed spontaneous and LPS-induced production of inflammatory cytokines by splenic and liver macrophages and significantly ameliorated LPS-induced septic shock and the associated cytokine storm. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Collectively, these results provide evidence that in addition to its direct trypanolytic effect, Berenil also modulates the host immune response to the parasite in a manner that dampen excessive immune activation and production of pathology

  6. Fertility of the Small East African goat following pre-pubertal infection with Trypanosoma congolense

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Hara, H.B.; Gombe, S.

    1991-01-01

    Pre-pubertal male and female Small East African goats were infected with Trypanosoma congolense at 4-5 months of age. Changes in body weight and haemogram were monitored weekly. Progesterone and testosterone measurements were made three times weekly until the goats either reached puberty or 18 months of age. Onset of puberty was determined from observation of oestrus behaviour, mating or increase in libidio; this was confirmed by elevation in plasma progesterone or testosterone levels. Trypanosomiasis affected pre-pubertal goats by reducing body weight gain and delaying onset of puberty. Histological examination of the gonads showed pronounced pathological changes. These effects were reversed by treatment with isometamidium chloride (Samorin, May and Baker). It was concluded that early treatment of infected goats before serious gonadal damage could occur allowed full restoration of reproductive function. (author). 6 refs, 4 figs, 1 tab

  7. Chemosensitization of Trypanosoma congolense strains resistant to isometamidium chloride by tetracyclines and enrofloxacin.

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    Vincent Delespaux

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Because of the development of resistance in trypanosomes to trypanocidal drugs, the livelihood of millions of livestock keepers in sub-Saharan Africa is threatened now more than ever. The existing compounds have become virtually useless and pharmaceutical companies are not keen on investing in the development of new trypanocides. We may have found a breakthrough in the treatment of resistant trypanosomal infections, through the combination of the trypanocide isometamidium chloride (ISM with two affordable veterinary antibiotics. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In a first experiment, groups of mice were inoculated with Trypanosoma congolense strains resistant to ISM and either left untreated or treated with (i tetracycline, (ii ISM or (iii the combination of the antibiotic and the trypanocide. Survival analysis showed that there was a significant effect of treatment and resistance to treatment on the survival time. The groups treated with ISM (with or without antibiotic survived significantly longer than the groups that were not treated with ISM (P<0.01. The group treated with the combination trypanocide/antibiotic survived significantly longer than the group treated with ISM (P<0.01. In a second experiment, groups of cattle were inoculated with the same resistant trypanosome strain and treated with (i ISM, (ii ISM associated with oxytetracycline or (iii ISM associated with enrofloxacine. All animals treated with ISM became parasitaemic. In the groups treated with ISM-oxytetracycline and ISM-enrofloxacine, 50% of the animals were cured. Animals from the groups treated with a combination trypanocide/antibiotic presented a significantly longer prepatent period than animals treated with ISM (p<0.001. The impact of the disease on the haematocrit was low in all ISM treated groups. Yet, it was lower in the groups treated with the combination trypanocide/antibiotic (p<0.01. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: After optimization of the administration

  8. AEB highlights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    AEB HIGHLIGHTS is a half-yearly report reflecting the most important recent achievements of the various Research and Technical Divisions of the Atomic Energy Board. It appears alternately in English and Afrikaans [af

  9. BBG Highlights

    Data.gov (United States)

    Broadcasting Board of Governors — BBG Highlights is a monthly summary of the BBG's accomplishments and news and developments affecting the Agency's work. Now, for the first time, this monthly update...

  10. AEB highlights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    AEB HIGHLIGHTS is a half yearly report reflecting the most important recent achievements of the various Research and Technical Divisions of the Atomic Energy Board. It appears alternately in English and Afrikaans [af

  11. Comprehensive analysis of schizophrenia-associated loci highlights ion channel pathways and biologically plausible candidate causal genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pers, Tune H; Timshel, Pascal; Ripke, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Over 100 associated genetic loci have been robustly associated with schizophrenia. Gene prioritization and pathway analysis have focused on a priori hypotheses and thus may have been unduly influenced by prior assumptions and missed important causal genes and pathways. Using a data-driven approac...

  12. Gene-ontology enrichment analysis in two independent family-based samples highlights biologically plausible processes for autism spectrum disorders.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Anney, Richard J L

    2012-02-01

    Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have implicated a range of genes from discrete biological pathways in the aetiology of autism. However, despite the strong influence of genetic factors, association studies have yet to identify statistically robust, replicated major effect genes or SNPs. We apply the principle of the SNP ratio test methodology described by O\\'Dushlaine et al to over 2100 families from the Autism Genome Project (AGP). Using a two-stage design we examine association enrichment in 5955 unique gene-ontology classifications across four groupings based on two phenotypic and two ancestral classifications. Based on estimates from simulation we identify excess of association enrichment across all analyses. We observe enrichment in association for sets of genes involved in diverse biological processes, including pyruvate metabolism, transcription factor activation, cell-signalling and cell-cycle regulation. Both genes and processes that show enrichment have previously been examined in autistic disorders and offer biologically plausibility to these findings.

  13. Prevalence of mixed Trypanosoma congolense infections in livestock and tsetse in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Gillingwater

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma congolense causes the most economically important animal trypanosomosis in Africa. In South Africa, a rinderpest pandemic of the 1890s removed many host animals, resulting in the near-eradication of most tsetse species. Further suppression was achieved through spraying with dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT; however, residual populations of Glossina austeni and G. brevipalpis remained in isolated pockets. A total of 506 of these tsetse flies were captured in the Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park, the St Lucia Wetland Park and Boomerang commercial farm. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR was used to determine the infection rate and frequency of mixed infections of these flies. Additionally, 473 blood samples were collected from cattle at communal diptanks and a commercial farm in the area and each one examined by the haematocrit centrifugation technique (HCT. Furthermore, buffy coats from these blood samples were spotted onto FTA Elute cards and the DNA extracted from each one tested using 3 separate PCRs. The HCT revealed the presence of trypanosomes in only 6.6 % of the blood samples; by contrast, species-specific PCR detected trypanosome DNA in 50 % of the samples. The species-specific PCR detected trypanosome DNA in 17 % of the tsetse flies, compared with the nested PCR targeting rDNA which detected trypanosome DNA in only 14 % of the samples. Over time, the transmission of Savannah-type T. congolense and Kilifi-type T. congolense as mixed infections could have an impact on disease manifestation in different hosts in the area.

  14. Comparative RNA-seq analysis in the unsequenced axolotl: the oncogene burst highlights early gene expression in the blastema.

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    Ron Stewart

    Full Text Available The salamander has the remarkable ability to regenerate its limb after amputation. Cells at the site of amputation form a blastema and then proliferate and differentiate to regrow the limb. To better understand this process, we performed deep RNA sequencing of the blastema over a time course in the axolotl, a species whose genome has not been sequenced. Using a novel comparative approach to analyzing RNA-seq data, we characterized the transcriptional dynamics of the regenerating axolotl limb with respect to the human gene set. This approach involved de novo assembly of axolotl transcripts, RNA-seq transcript quantification without a reference genome, and transformation of abundances from axolotl contigs to human genes. We found a prominent burst in oncogene expression during the first day and blastemal/limb bud genes peaking at 7 to 14 days. In addition, we found that limb patterning genes, SALL genes, and genes involved in angiogenesis, wound healing, defense/immunity, and bone development are enriched during blastema formation and development. Finally, we identified a category of genes with no prior literature support for limb regeneration that are candidates for further evaluation based on their expression pattern during the regenerative process.

  15. Brookhaven highlights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowe, M.S.; Belford, M.; Cohen, A.; Greenberg, D.; Seubert, L.

    1993-01-01

    This report highlights the research activities of Brookhaven National Laboratory during the period dating from October 1, 1992 through September 30, 1993. There are contributions to the report from different programs and departments within the laboratory. These include technology transfer, RHIC, Alternating Gradient Synchrotron, physics, biology, national synchrotron light source, applied science, medical science, advanced technology, chemistry, reactor physics, safety and environmental protection, instrumentation, and computing and communications

  16. Sustainable syntrophic growth of Dehalococcoides ethenogenes strain 195 with Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough and Methanobacterium congolense: Global transcriptomic and proteomic analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Men, Y.; Feil, H.; VerBerkmoes, N.C.; Shah, M.B.; Johnson, D.R.; Lee, P.K.H; West, K.A.; Zinder, S.H.; Andersen, G.L.; Alvarez-Cohen, L.

    2011-03-01

    Dehalococcoides ethenogenes strain 195 (DE195) was grown in a sustainable syntrophic association with Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough (DVH) as a co-culture, as well as with DVH and the hydrogenotrophic methanogen Methanobacterium congolense (MC) as a tri-culture using lactate as the sole energy and carbon source. In the co- and tri-cultures, maximum dechlorination rates of DE195 were enhanced by approximately three times (11.0±0.01 lmol per day for the co-culture and 10.1±0.3 lmol per day for the tri-culture) compared with DE195 grown alone (3.8±0.1 lmol per day). Cell yield of DE195 was enhanced in the co-culture (9.0±0.5 x 107 cells per lmol Cl{sup -} released, compared with 6.8±0.9x 107 cells per lmol Cl{sup -} released for the pure culture), whereas no further enhancement was observed in the tri-culture (7.3±1.8x 107 cells per lmol Cl{sup -} released). The transcriptome of DE195 grown in the co-culture was analyzed using a whole-genome microarray targeting DE195, which detected 102 significantly up- or down-regulated genes compared with DE195 grown in isolation, whereas no significant transcriptomic difference was observed between co- and tri-cultures. Proteomic analysis showed that 120 proteins were differentially expressed in the co-culture compared with DE195 grown in isolation. Physiological, transcriptomic and proteomic results indicate that the robust growth of DE195 in co- and tri-cultures is because of the advantages associated with the capabilities of DVH to ferment lactate to provide H2 and acetate for growth, along with potential benefits from proton translocation, cobalamin-salvaging and amino acid biosynthesis, whereas MC in the tri-culture provided no significant additional benefits beyond those of DVH.

  17. Significant Microsynteny with New Evolutionary Highlights Is Detected through Comparative Genomic Sequence Analysis of Maize CCCH IX Gene Subfamily

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Jun Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available CCCH zinc finger proteins, which are characterized by the presence of three cysteine residues and one histidine residue, play important roles in RNA processing in plants. Subfamily IX CCCH proteins were recently shown to function in stress tolerances. In this study, we analyzed CCCH IX genes in Zea mays, Oryza sativa, and Sorghum bicolor. These genes, which are almost intronless, were divided into four groups based on phylogenetic analysis. Microsynteny analysis revealed microsynteny in regions of some gene pairs, indicating that segmental duplication has played an important role in the expansion of this gene family. In addition, we calculated the dates of duplication by Ks analysis, finding that all microsynteny blocks were formed after the monocot-eudicot divergence. We found that deletions, multiplications, and inversions were shown to have occurred over the course of evolution. Moreover, the Ka/Ks ratios indicated that the genes in these three grass species are under strong purifying selection. Finally, we investigated the evolutionary patterns of some gene pairs conferring tolerance to abiotic stress, laying the foundation for future functional studies of these transcription factors.

  18. Ataxin1L is a regulator of HSC function highlighting the utility of cross-tissue comparisons for gene discovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliette J Kahle

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs are rare quiescent cells that continuously replenish the cellular components of the peripheral blood. Observing that the ataxia-associated gene Ataxin-1-like (Atxn1L was highly expressed in HSCs, we examined its role in HSC function through in vitro and in vivo assays. Mice lacking Atxn1L had greater numbers of HSCs that regenerated the blood more quickly than their wild-type counterparts. Molecular analyses indicated Atxn1L null HSCs had gene expression changes that regulate a program consistent with their higher level of proliferation, suggesting that Atxn1L is a novel regulator of HSC quiescence. To determine if additional brain-associated genes were candidates for hematologic regulation, we examined genes encoding proteins from autism- and ataxia-associated protein-protein interaction networks for their representation in hematopoietic cell populations. The interactomes were found to be highly enriched for proteins encoded by genes specifically expressed in HSCs relative to their differentiated progeny. Our data suggest a heretofore unappreciated similarity between regulatory modules in the brain and HSCs, offering a new strategy for novel gene discovery in both systems.

  19. Integration of liver gene co-expression networks and eGWAs analyses highlighted candidate regulators implicated in lipid metabolism in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballester, Maria; Ramayo-Caldas, Yuliaxis; Revilla, Manuel; Corominas, Jordi; Castelló, Anna; Estellé, Jordi; Fernández, Ana I; Folch, Josep M

    2017-04-19

    In the present study, liver co-expression networks and expression Genome Wide Association Study (eGWAS) were performed to identify DNA variants and molecular pathways implicated in the functional regulatory mechanisms of meat quality traits in pigs. With this purpose, the liver mRNA expression of 44 candidates genes related with lipid metabolism was analysed in 111 Iberian x Landrace backcross animals. The eGWAS identified 92 eSNPs located in seven chromosomal regions and associated with eight genes: CROT, CYP2U1, DGAT1, EGF, FABP1, FABP5, PLA2G12A, and PPARA. Remarkably, cis-eSNPs associated with FABP1 gene expression which may be determining the C18:2(n-6)/C18:3(n-3) ratio in backfat through the multiple interaction of DNA variants and genes were identified. Furthermore, a hotspot on SSC8 associated with the gene expression of eight genes was identified and the TBCK gene was pointed out as candidate gene regulating it. Our results also suggested that the PI3K-Akt-mTOR pathway plays an important role in the control of the analysed genes highlighting nuclear receptors as the NR3C1 or PPARA. Finally, sex-dimorphism associated with hepatic lipid metabolism was identified with over-representation of female-biased genes. These results increase our knowledge of the genetic architecture underlying fat composition traits.

  20. Antitrypanosomal activity of Verbascum sinaiticum Benth. (Scrophulariaceae) against Trypanosoma congolense isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mergia, Ermias; Shibeshi, Workineh; Terefe, Getachew; Teklehaymanot, Tilahun

    2016-09-15

    African Trypanosomiasis is a neglected tropical disease with a large impact on the livelihood of the rural poor in Sub-Saharan Africa. The available drugs for managing this disease are old, expensive and are facing the problem of drug resistance. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate in vivo antitrypanosomal efficacy of aqueous and absolute methanol leaf extracts of Verbascum sinaiticum Benth. against Trypanosoma congolense field isolate. Verbascum sinaiticum (Local name 'qetetina') is a biennial plant, and 60-150 cm tall. It is traditionally used to treat wound, stomachache, viral infection, cancer, sunstroke, fever, abdominal colic, diarrhea, hemorrhage, anthrax, and hepatitis. The efficacy of aqueous and absolute methanol leaf extracts of V. sinaiticum was evaluated in a randomized experiment with Swiss albino mice infected with T. congolense field isolate. The extracts were administered at doses of 100, 200 and 400 mg/kg by intraperitoneal injection for seven days at 12 Days Post-Infection (DPI) when the peak parasitaemia level was approximately 10(8) trypanosomes/ml. Parasitaemia, Packed Cell Volume (PCV), mean survival time and change in body weight were used as indices for monitoring the efficacy of the extracts. Diminazene (28 mg/kg) was used as a positive control while 2 % Tween was used as the negative control. Phytochemicals screening were conducted following standard methods. The extracts showed no toxicity effect in Swiss albino mice and had LD50 above 2000 mg/kg. The phytochemicals screened in V. sinaiticum were alkaloids, flavonoids, glycoside, saponins, steroids, phenolic compounds, and tannins. The mice treated with absolute methanol leaf extract of V. sinaiticum at 400 mg/kg dose had significantly lower mean parasitaemia (7.20 ± 0.16) (p < 0.001) as compared to the negative control group (8.82 ± 0.12) on day 14 of treatment. Animals treated with the same dose had significant (p < 0.001) higher PCV value and body

  1. Whole genome expression array profiling highlights differences in mucosal defense genes in Barrett's esophagus and esophageal adenocarcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek J Nancarrow

    Full Text Available Esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC has become a major concern in Western countries due to rapid rises in incidence coupled with very poor survival rates. One of the key risk factors for the development of this cancer is the presence of Barrett's esophagus (BE, which is believed to form in response to repeated gastro-esophageal reflux. In this study we performed comparative, genome-wide expression profiling (using Illumina whole-genome Beadarrays on total RNA extracted from esophageal biopsy tissues from individuals with EAC, BE (in the absence of EAC and those with normal squamous epithelium. We combined these data with publically accessible raw data from three similar studies to investigate key gene and ontology differences between these three tissue states. The results support the deduction that BE is a tissue with enhanced glycoprotein synthesis machinery (DPP4, ATP2A3, AGR2 designed to provide strong mucosal defenses aimed at resisting gastro-esophageal reflux. EAC exhibits the enhanced extracellular matrix remodeling (collagens, IGFBP7, PLAU effects expected in an aggressive form of cancer, as well as evidence of reduced expression of genes associated with mucosal (MUC6, CA2, TFF1 and xenobiotic (AKR1C2, AKR1B10 defenses. When our results are compared to previous whole-genome expression profiling studies keratin, mucin, annexin and trefoil factor gene groups are the most frequently represented differentially expressed gene families. Eleven genes identified here are also represented in at least 3 other profiling studies. We used these genes to discriminate between squamous epithelium, BE and EAC within the two largest cohorts using a support vector machine leave one out cross validation (LOOCV analysis. While this method was satisfactory for discriminating squamous epithelium and BE, it demonstrates the need for more detailed investigations into profiling changes between BE and EAC.

  2. Symposium Highlights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owen-Whitred, K.

    2015-01-01

    Overview/Highlights: To begin, I'd like to take a moment to highlight some of the novel elements of this Symposium as compared to those that have been held in the past. For the first time ever, this Symposium was organized around five concurrent sessions, covering over 300 papers and presentations. These sessions were complemented by an active series of exhibits put on by vendors, universities, ESARDA, INMM, and Member State Support Programmes. We also had live demonstrations throughout the week on everything from software to destructive analysis to instrumentation, which provided the participants the opportunity to see recent developments that are ready for implementation. I'm sure you all had a chance to observe - and, more importantly, interact with - the electronic Poster, or ePoster format used this past week. This technology was used here for the first time ever by the IAEA, and I'm sure was a first for many of us as well. The ePoster format allowed participants to interact with the subject matter, and the subject matter experts, in a dynamic, engaging way. In addition to the novel technology used here, I have to say that having the posters strategically embedded in the sessions on the same topic, by having each poster author introduce his or her topic to the assembled group in order to lure us to the poster area during the breaks, was also a novel and highly effective technique. A final highlight I'd like to touch on in terms of the Symposium organization is the diversity of participation. This chart shows the breakdown by geographical distribution for the Symposium, in terms of participants. There are no labels, so don't try to read any, I simply wanted to demonstrate that we had great representation in terms of both the Symposium participants in general and the session chairs more specifically-and on that note, I would just mention here that 59 Member States participated in the Symposium. But what I find especially interesting and

  3. QTL replication and targeted association highlight the nerve growth factor gene for nonverbal communication deficits in autism spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, A T-H; Yoon, J; Geschwind, D H; Cantor, R M

    2013-02-01

    Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) has a heterogeneous etiology that is genetically complex. It is defined by deficits in communication and social skills and the presence of restricted and repetitive behaviors. Genetic analyses of heritable quantitative traits that correlate with ASD may reduce heterogeneity. With this in mind, deficits in nonverbal communication (NVC) were quantified based on items from the Autism Diagnostic Interview Revised. Our previous analysis of 228 families from the Autism Genetics Research Exchange (AGRE) repository reported 5 potential quantitative trait loci (QTL). Here we report an NVC QTL replication study in an independent sample of 213 AGRE families. One QTL was replicated (Panalysis of 476 haplotype blocks with 708 AGRE families using the Family Based Association Test (FBAT). Blocks in two QTL genes were associated with NVC with a P-value of 0.001. Three associated haplotype blocks were intronic to the Nerve Growth Factor (NGF) gene (P=0.001, 0.001, 0.002), and one was intronic to KCND3 (P=0.001). Individual haplotypes within the associated blocks drove the associations (0.003, 0.0004 and 0.0002) for NGF and 0.0001 for KCND3. Using the same methods, these genes were tested for association with NVC in an independent sample of 1517 families from an Autism Genome Project (AGP). NVC was associated with a haplotype in an adjacent NGF block (P=0.0005) and one 46 kb away from the associated block in KCND3 (0.008). These analyses illustrate the value of QTL and targeted association studies for genetically complex disorders such as ASD. NGF is a promising risk gene for NVC deficits.

  4. Leishmania naiffi and Leishmania guyanensis reference genomes highlight genome structure and gene evolution in the Viannia subgenus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlan, Simone; Taylor, Ali Shirley; Feane, Eoghan; Sanders, Mandy; Schonian, Gabriele; Cotton, James A; Downing, Tim

    2018-04-01

    The unicellular protozoan parasite Leishmania causes the neglected tropical disease leishmaniasis, affecting 12 million people in 98 countries. In South America, where the Viannia subgenus predominates, so far only L. ( Viannia ) braziliensis and L. ( V. ) panamensis have been sequenced, assembled and annotated as reference genomes. Addressing this deficit in molecular information can inform species typing, epidemiological monitoring and clinical treatment. Here, L. ( V. ) naiffi and L. ( V. ) guyanensis genomic DNA was sequenced to assemble these two genomes as draft references from short sequence reads. The methods used were tested using short sequence reads for L. braziliensis M2904 against its published reference as a comparison. This assembly and annotation pipeline identified 70 additional genes not annotated on the original M2904 reference. Phylogenetic and evolutionary comparisons of L. guyanensis and L. naiffi with 10 other Viannia genomes revealed four traits common to all Viannia : aneuploidy, 22 orthologous groups of genes absent in other Leishmania subgenera, elevated TATE transposon copies and a high NADH-dependent fumarate reductase gene copy number. Within the Viannia , there were limited structural changes in genome architecture specific to individual species: a 45 Kb amplification on chromosome 34 was present in all bar L. lainsoni , L. naiffi had a higher copy number of the virulence factor leishmanolysin, and laboratory isolate L. shawi M8408 had a possible minichromosome derived from the 3' end of chromosome 34 . This combination of genome assembly, phylogenetics and comparative analysis across an extended panel of diverse Viannia has uncovered new insights into the origin and evolution of this subgenus and can help improve diagnostics for leishmaniasis surveillance.

  5. In silico analysis highlights the frequency and diversity of type 1 lantibiotic gene clusters in genome sequenced bacteria

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Marsh, Alan J

    2010-11-30

    Abstract Background Lantibiotics are lanthionine-containing, post-translationally modified antimicrobial peptides. These peptides have significant, but largely untapped, potential as preservatives and chemotherapeutic agents. Type 1 lantibiotics are those in which lanthionine residues are introduced into the structural peptide (LanA) through the activity of separate lanthionine dehydratase (LanB) and lanthionine synthetase (LanC) enzymes. Here we take advantage of the conserved nature of LanC enzymes to devise an in silico approach to identify potential lantibiotic-encoding gene clusters in genome sequenced bacteria. Results In total 49 novel type 1 lantibiotic clusters were identified which unexpectedly were associated with species, genera and even phyla of bacteria which have not previously been associated with lantibiotic production. Conclusions Multiple type 1 lantibiotic gene clusters were identified at a frequency that suggests that these antimicrobials are much more widespread than previously thought. These clusters represent a rich repository which can yield a large number of valuable novel antimicrobials and biosynthetic enzymes.

  6. Effect of crude extracts of Moringa stenopetala and Artemisia absinthium on parasitaemia of mice infected with Trypanosoma congolense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kifleyohannes, Tsegabirhan; Terefe, Getachew; Tolossa, Yacob H; Giday, Mirutse; Kebede, Nigatu

    2014-06-24

    Treatment of trypanosomosis is currently facing a number of problems including toxicity of trypanocidal drugs and development of resistance by the parasites. These limitations have prompted the search for alternative active substances (such as of natural origin). The purpose of the study was to investigate the effect of extracts of Moringa stenopetala and Artemisia absinthium on Trypanosoma congolense in mice. Swiss white male mice aged 8-12 weeks were divided into six experimental groups of six animals. Water and methanol extracts of the two plants were prepared. T. congolense was isolated from cattle at Ghibe valley (Ethiopia). All experimental mice received approximately 1 x 10(5) trypanosomes in 0.2 ml of blood. Plant extracts were given orally to four groups (2 plant species and two extraction methods) at 400 mg/kg body weight for seven consecutive days. One group remained as distilled water treated control and the other as diminzene aceturate treated control. The effect of the extracts on levels of parasitaemia, body weight, packed cell volume (PCV) and mice survival was monitored for 25 days. All treatments have significantly reduced parasitaemia and helped improve body weight, PCV and survival of mice compared to the water-treated control (P < 0.01 in all cases). These effects were comparable to that with diminazene aceturate. No significant difference was observed in the reduction of parasitaemia between plant extract treatment groups. However, mice with extracts of A. absinthium had significantly higher body weight than those with extracts of M. stenopetala (P < 0.05). The two plants have antitrypanosomal potential against T. congolense by reducing the levels of parasitaemia, maintaining good PCV and body weight, and prolonging the lives of infected animals.

  7. Vector competence of Glossina austeni and Glossina brevipalpis for Trypanosoma congolense in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makhosazana Motloang

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Tsetse-transmitted trypanosomosis (nagana has been the cause of stock losses in the recent past and still presents a major problem to livestock owners in certain areas of KwaZulu- Natal, South Africa. Over 10 000 cattle mortalities were reported in the 1990 nagana outbreak. Although information on the distribution and abundance of the tsetse flies Glossina brevipalpis and Glossina austeni in KwaZulu-Natal exists, data on their vector competence are lacking. This study aimed to determine the rate of natural Trypanosoma congolense infection by field-collected as well as colony-reared flies of these species. A total of 442 field-collected G. brevipalpis and 40 G. austeni flies were dissected immediately after collection to determine their infection rates, whilst 699 G. brevipalpis and 49 G. austeni flies were fed on susceptible animals in 10 and four batches, respectively, for use in xenodiagnosis experiments. Teneral colony flies were fed on infected animals and dissected 21 days post infection to confirm their infectivity testing. Glossina austeni harboured 8% immature and mature infections. In G. brevipalpis, the infection with the immature stages was lower (1% and no mature infections were observed. Although all four batches of G. austeni transmitted T. congolense to four susceptible animals, no transmission resulted from 10 batches of G. brevipalpis fed on susceptible cattle. Colony-derived G. austeni (534 and G. brevipalpis (882 were fed on four bovines infected with different T. congolense isolates. Both G. austeni and G. brevipalpis acquired trypanosome infection from the bovines, with immature infection ranges of 20% – 33% and 1% – 4%, respectively. Parasites, however, only matured in G. austeni (average = 4%. Glossina austeni plays a larger role in the epidemiology of animal trypanosomosis in KwaZulu-Natal than G. brevipalpis and therefore more focus should be aimed at the former when control measures are implemented.

  8. Editor's Highlight: High-Throughput Functional Genomics Identifies Modulators of TCE Metabolite Genotoxicity and Candidate Susceptibility Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De La Rosa, Vanessa Y; Asfaha, Jonathan; Fasullo, Michael; Loguinov, Alex; Li, Peng; Moore, Lee E; Rothman, Nathaniel; Nakamura, Jun; Swenberg, James A; Scelo, Ghislaine; Zhang, Luoping; Smith, Martyn T; Vulpe, Chris D

    2017-11-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE), an industrial chemical and environmental contaminant, is a human carcinogen. Reactive metabolites are implicated in renal carcinogenesis associated with TCE exposure, yet the toxicity mechanisms of these metabolites and their contribution to cancer and other adverse effects remain unclear. We employed an integrated functional genomics approach that combined functional profiling studies in yeast and avian DT40 cell models to provide new insights into the specific mechanisms contributing to toxicity associated with TCE metabolites. Genome-wide profiling studies in yeast identified the error-prone translesion synthesis (TLS) pathway as an import mechanism in response to TCE metabolites. The role of TLS DNA repair was further confirmed by functional profiling in DT40 avian cell lines, but also revealed that TLS and homologous recombination DNA repair likely play competing roles in cellular susceptibility to TCE metabolites in higher eukaryotes. These DNA repair pathways are highly conserved between yeast, DT40, and humans. We propose that in humans, mutagenic TLS is favored over homologous recombination repair in response to TCE metabolites. The results of these studies contribute to the body of evidence supporting a mutagenic mode of action for TCE-induced renal carcinogenesis mediated by reactive metabolites in humans. Our approach illustrates the potential for high-throughput in vitro functional profiling in yeast to elucidate toxicity pathways (molecular initiating events, key events) and candidate susceptibility genes for focused study. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Highlighting of quorum sensing lux genes and their expression in the hydrothermal vent shrimp Rimicaris exoculata ectosymbiontic community. Possible use as biogeographic markers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Le Bloa

    Full Text Available Rimicaris exoculata is a caridean shrimp that dominates the fauna at several hydrothermal vent sites of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. It has two distinct and stable microbial communities. One of these epibiontic bacterial communities is located in the shrimp gut and has a distribution and role that are poorly understood. The second colonizes its enlarged gill chamber and is involved in host nutrition. It is eliminated after each molt, and has colonization processes reminiscent of those of a biofilm. The presence and expression of genes usually involved in quorum sensing (QS were then studied. At four sites, Rainbow, TAG, Snake Pit and Logatchev, two lux genes were identified in the R. exoculata epibiontic community at different shrimp molt stages and life stages. RT-PCR experiments highlighted lux gene expression activity at TAG, Snake Pit and Rainbow vent sites. Their potential QS activity and their possible roles in epibiont colonization processes are discussed. Moreover, phylogenetic analysis has shown the presence of three clades for luxS (Epsilonproteobacteria and four clades for luxR (Gammaproteobacteria genes, each clade being restricted to a single site. These genes are more divergent than the 16S rRNA one. They could therefore be used as biogeographical genetic markers.

  10. A manually annotated Actinidia chinensis var. chinensis (kiwifruit) genome highlights the challenges associated with draft genomes and gene prediction in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilkington, Sarah M; Crowhurst, Ross; Hilario, Elena; Nardozza, Simona; Fraser, Lena; Peng, Yongyan; Gunaseelan, Kularajathevan; Simpson, Robert; Tahir, Jibran; Deroles, Simon C; Templeton, Kerry; Luo, Zhiwei; Davy, Marcus; Cheng, Canhong; McNeilage, Mark; Scaglione, Davide; Liu, Yifei; Zhang, Qiong; Datson, Paul; De Silva, Nihal; Gardiner, Susan E; Bassett, Heather; Chagné, David; McCallum, John; Dzierzon, Helge; Deng, Cecilia; Wang, Yen-Yi; Barron, Lorna; Manako, Kelvina; Bowen, Judith; Foster, Toshi M; Erridge, Zoe A; Tiffin, Heather; Waite, Chethi N; Davies, Kevin M; Grierson, Ella P; Laing, William A; Kirk, Rebecca; Chen, Xiuyin; Wood, Marion; Montefiori, Mirco; Brummell, David A; Schwinn, Kathy E; Catanach, Andrew; Fullerton, Christina; Li, Dawei; Meiyalaghan, Sathiyamoorthy; Nieuwenhuizen, Niels; Read, Nicola; Prakash, Roneel; Hunter, Don; Zhang, Huaibi; McKenzie, Marian; Knäbel, Mareike; Harris, Alastair; Allan, Andrew C; Gleave, Andrew; Chen, Angela; Janssen, Bart J; Plunkett, Blue; Ampomah-Dwamena, Charles; Voogd, Charlotte; Leif, Davin; Lafferty, Declan; Souleyre, Edwige J F; Varkonyi-Gasic, Erika; Gambi, Francesco; Hanley, Jenny; Yao, Jia-Long; Cheung, Joey; David, Karine M; Warren, Ben; Marsh, Ken; Snowden, Kimberley C; Lin-Wang, Kui; Brian, Lara; Martinez-Sanchez, Marcela; Wang, Mindy; Ileperuma, Nadeesha; Macnee, Nikolai; Campin, Robert; McAtee, Peter; Drummond, Revel S M; Espley, Richard V; Ireland, Hilary S; Wu, Rongmei; Atkinson, Ross G; Karunairetnam, Sakuntala; Bulley, Sean; Chunkath, Shayhan; Hanley, Zac; Storey, Roy; Thrimawithana, Amali H; Thomson, Susan; David, Charles; Testolin, Raffaele; Huang, Hongwen; Hellens, Roger P; Schaffer, Robert J

    2018-04-16

    Most published genome sequences are drafts, and most are dominated by computational gene prediction. Draft genomes typically incorporate considerable sequence data that are not assigned to chromosomes, and predicted genes without quality confidence measures. The current Actinidia chinensis (kiwifruit) 'Hongyang' draft genome has 164 Mb of sequences unassigned to pseudo-chromosomes, and omissions have been identified in the gene models. A second genome of an A. chinensis (genotype Red5) was fully sequenced. This new sequence resulted in a 554.0 Mb assembly with all but 6 Mb assigned to pseudo-chromosomes. Pseudo-chromosomal comparisons showed a considerable number of translocation events have occurred following a whole genome duplication (WGD) event some consistent with centromeric Robertsonian-like translocations. RNA sequencing data from 12 tissues and ab initio analysis informed a genome-wide manual annotation, using the WebApollo tool. In total, 33,044 gene loci represented by 33,123 isoforms were identified, named and tagged for quality of evidential support. Of these 3114 (9.4%) were identical to a protein within 'Hongyang' The Kiwifruit Information Resource (KIR v2). Some proportion of the differences will be varietal polymorphisms. However, as most computationally predicted Red5 models required manual re-annotation this proportion is expected to be small. The quality of the new gene models was tested by fully sequencing 550 cloned 'Hort16A' cDNAs and comparing with the predicted protein models for Red5 and both the original 'Hongyang' assembly and the revised annotation from KIR v2. Only 48.9% and 63.5% of the cDNAs had a match with 90% identity or better to the original and revised 'Hongyang' annotation, respectively, compared with 90.9% to the Red5 models. Our study highlights the need to take a cautious approach to draft genomes and computationally predicted genes. Our use of the manual annotation tool WebApollo facilitated manual checking and

  11. Evaluation of the antibody-detection ELISA using plates precoated with denatured T. congolense and T. vivax antigens for monitoring tsetse and trypanosomosis control in Zambia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machila, N.; Sinyangwe, L.; Eisler, M.C.

    2000-01-01

    An evaluation of the indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the detection of anti-trypanosomal antibodies in bovine serum was conducted using ELISA plates pre-coated with denatured T. congolense and T. vivax antigen. The study was conducted on 280 samples from a parasitologically positive cattle population and 200 samples from a negative cattle population. The overwhelming majority of trypanosome infections in the parasitologically positive cattle were T. congolense. The Ab-ELISA was able to discriminate between the negative and positive cattle populations, at an optimum cut-off point of 40% positivity (T. congolense antigen), with 89% sensitivity and 86% specificity; and for the T. vivax antigen, the optimum cut-off point was at 30%, with 81% sensitivity and 70% specificity. However, the optical densities (OD) and percentage positivity (PP) values for sera from both the reference positive and negative cattle populations were unacceptably high particularly in the ELISA using T. congolense antigen. Furthermore the quality control sera used in the assay appear to have inappropriately low OD and PP values by comparison to typical sera from the reference positive and negative cattle populations. It is suggested that these ELISA's be re-titrated using more appropriate quality assurance sera. This should result in OD and PP values for sera from the reference populations failing within acceptable ranges. (author)

  12. Validation of an indirect ELISA for the detection of Trypanosoma congolense antibodies in Ethiopian cattle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tadesse, Y.; Kefyalew, H.; Kembata, G.; Nega, A.

    2000-01-01

    Control and eradication of African Animal Trypanosomosis can be achieved if the reliability of the methods to diagnose the disease could be improved. The techniques currently used in the diagnosis of trypanosomosis in Ethiopia are not sufficiently sensitive to detect all infected animals. In order to improve disease diagnosis the indirect antibody detection ELISA, developed by FAO/IAEA, was evaluated under field conditions. Accordingly, reference serum samples were collected from trypanosomosis free and endemic areas. Serum samples negative for trypanosomes were collected from the Central highlands of Ethiopia where there is no previous record of trypanosomosis. The samples were used to establish the threshold and the specificity of the test. Trypanosoma congolense positive sera (based on thin and thick smears and BCT) were collected from endemic areas in the Southwestern part of the country to estimate the sensitivity of the test. Out of 701 negative serum samples, 690 were identified as negative with the indirect antibody ELISA, whereas the remaining 11 were detected as positive. Moreover, of the 282 infected samples the ELISA detected 155 sera as positive, but the remaining 127 cases fell in the negative range. The positive/negative threshold established from negative reference sera was found to be 81.38%. Based on this threshold the specificity of the test was 98.43%, whilst the sensitivity was calculated as 54.96%. Thus, the complementary use of both the ELISA and parasitological methods is encouraged. Since the internal quality controls (IQC) did not fall in the ranges prescribed in the protocol provided by FAO/IAEA precision was achieved by comparing the plate to plate variation of the IQC based on the means plot. Accordingly the assay process indicated that there was no significant difference between individual mean of each plate regarding the strong positive (C++) and moderate positive (C+) controls. Nevertheless, considerable discrepancies were

  13. Dissecting a QTL into Candidate Genes Highlighted the Key Role of Pectinesterases in Regulating the Ascorbic Acid Content in Tomato Fruit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentino Ruggieri

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Tomato ( is a crucial component of the human diet because of its high nutritional value and the antioxidant content of its fruit. As a member of the Solanaceae family, it is considered a model species for genomic studies in this family, especially since its genome has been completely sequenced. Among genomic resources available, introgression lines represent a valuable tool to mine the genetic diversity present in wild species. One introgression line, IL12-4, was previously selected for high ascorbic acid (AsA content, and a transcriptomic analysis indicated the involvement of genes controlling pectin degradation in AsA accumulation. In this study the integration of data from different “omics” platforms has been exploited to identify candidate genes that increase AsA belonging to the wild region 12-4. Thirty-two genes potentially involved in pathways controlling AsA levels were analyzed with bioinformatic tools. Two hundred-fifty nonsynonymous polymorphisms were detected in their coding regions, and 11.6% revealed deleterious effects on predicted protein function. To reduce the number of genes that had to be functionally validated, introgression sublines of the region 12–4 were selected using species-specific polymorphic markers between the two species. Four sublines were obtained and we demonstrated that a subregion of around 1 Mbp includes 12 candidate genes potentially involved in AsA accumulation. Among these, only five exhibited structural deleterious variants, and one of the 12 was differentially expressed between the two species. We have highlighted the role of three polymorphic pectinesterases and inhibitors of pectinesterases that merit further investigation.

  14. Evaluation of an antibody-detection ELISA using pre-coated plates in the diagnosis of Trypanosoma congolense and T. vivax infections in cattle in Mali

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diall, O.; Bocoum, Z.; Sanogo, Y.

    2000-01-01

    Under the Coordinated Research Programme ''Use of immunoassay for improved diagnosis of trypanosomosis and monitoring trypanosomosis control programmes'', a new ELISA test has been validated. The test was designed for trypanosome specific antibody detection. The purpose of the work was to study the main parameters of the test (sensitivity and specificity) using reference sera provided by IAEA and field sera collected in Mali. The field sera were collected in different ecological zones and included sera from trypanosomosis endemic areas as well as sera from tsetse free areas. The test was performed according to the protocol proposed by IAEA. The results have shown a poor stability of the reference sera for both T. congolense and T. vivax. By using de-ionized water, we got better OD's for T. vivax C++ reference serum, while the T. congolense C++ had to be replaced by a locally produced reference serum. Under the above conditions, the T. congolense system gave quite encouraging results (sensitivity: 100%; specificity: 87.5-95%). This system was able to differentiate quite well animals from tsetse infected areas from those originating from tsetse free areas and could therefore be used in epidemiological surveys. The T. vivax system showed a good sensitivity (100%), but a poor specificity (37.5-57.5%). The T. vivax system could be improved by establishing a cut-off point based on local negative populations. (author)

  15. Genome-wide analysis of autophagy-related genes in banana highlights MaATG8s in cell death and autophagy in immune response to Fusarium wilt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yunxie; Liu, Wen; Hu, Wei; Liu, Guoyin; Wu, Chunjie; Liu, Wei; Zeng, Hongqiu; He, Chaozu; Shi, Haitao

    2017-08-01

    MaATG8s play important roles in hypersensitive-like cell death and immune response, and autophagy is essential for disease resistance against Foc in banana. Autophagy is responsible for the degradation of damaged cytoplasmic constituents in the lysosomes or vacuoles. Although the effects of autophagy have been extensively revealed in model plants, the possible roles of autophagy-related gene in banana remain unknown. In this study, 32 MaATGs were identified in the draft genome, and the profiles of several MaATGs in response to fungal pathogen Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense (Foc) were also revealled. We found that seven MaATG8s were commonly regulated by Foc. Through transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves, we highlight the novel roles of MaATG8s in conferring hypersensitive-like cell death, and MaATG8s-mediated hypersensitive response-like cell death is dependent on autophagy. Notablly, autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3-MA) treatment resulted in decreased disease resistance in response to Foc4, and the effect of 3-MA treatment could be rescued by exogenous salicylic acid, jasmonic acid and ethylene, indicating the involvement of autophagy-mediated plant hormones in banana resistance to Fusarium wilt. Taken together, this study may extend our understanding the putative role of MaATG8s in hypersensitive-like cell death and the essential role of autophagy in immune response against Foc in banana.

  16. Detection of Trypanosoma congolense type savannah in field samples of buffy coats of bovins using PCR-ELISA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sidibe, I.

    2007-01-01

    PCR-ELISA was set up to detect strain of Trypanosoma congolense type savannah in field samples of buffy coats. Results of PCR-ELISA and PCR were compared and the sensibility and specificity of both techniques were also compared with those of the method of Murray [1] for the detection of TCS in 257 samples. The PCR products were labelling with DIG-dUTP during amplification cycles of the repetitive satellite DNA. A DNA biotinyled capture probe was used to detect the amplicon by ELISA in streptavidine coated microplates. Both of PCR-ELISA and PCR were more sensible and more specific than the method of Murray. Indeed, for the 257 samples analysed by the three techniques, PCR-ELISA and PCR have detected TCS in 98 and 97 samples respectively, whereas the method of Murray has detected TCS in only 39 samples. In addition, PCRELISA and PCR had almost the same sensibility and specificity. So, PCR-ELISA and PCR have respectively detected TCS in 38.62% and 39.22% of all the 334 samples analysed by both techniques during this study. At the end of this study, the cost of analyse by PCR-ELISA of a sample of buffy coat, was evaluated at 1993 FCFA or Euro 3,04. (author) [fr

  17. Inspection of the grapevine BURP superfamily highlights an expansion of RD22 genes with distinctive expression features in berry development and ABA-mediated stress responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Tomás Matus

    Full Text Available The RESPONSIVE TO DEHYDRATION 22 (RD22 gene is a molecular link between abscisic acid (ABA signalling and abiotic stress responses. Its expression has been used as a reliable ABA early response marker. In Arabidopsis, the single copy RD22 gene possesses a BURP domain also located at the C-terminus of USP embryonic proteins and the beta subunit of polygalacturonases. In grapevine, a RD22 gene has been identified but putative paralogs are also found in the grape genome, possibly forming a large RD22 family in this species. In this work, we searched for annotations containing BURP domains in the Vitis vinifera genome. Nineteen proteins were defined by a comparative analysis between the two genome predictions and RNA-Seq data. These sequences were compared to other plant BURPs identified in previous genome surveys allowing us to reconceive group classifications based on phylogenetic relationships and protein motif occurrence. We observed a lineage-specific evolution of the RD22 family, with the biggest expansion in grapevine and poplar. In contrast, rice, sorghum and maize presented highly expanded monocot-specific groups. The Vitis RD22 group may have expanded from segmental duplications as most of its members are confined to a region in chromosome 4. The inspection of transcriptomic data revealed variable expression of BURP genes in vegetative and reproductive organs. Many genes were induced in specific tissues or by abiotic and biotic stresses. Three RD22 genes were further studied showing that they responded oppositely to ABA and to stress conditions. Our results show that the inclusion of RNA-Seq data is essential while describing gene families and improving gene annotations. Robust phylogenetic analyses including all BURP members from other sequenced species helped us redefine previous relationships that were erroneously established. This work provides additional evidence for RD22 genes serving as marker genes for different organs or stresses

  18. Inspection of the grapevine BURP superfamily highlights an expansion of RD22 genes with distinctive expression features in berry development and ABA-mediated stress responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matus, José Tomás; Aquea, Felipe; Espinoza, Carmen; Vega, Andrea; Cavallini, Erika; Dal Santo, Silvia; Cañón, Paola; Rodríguez-Hoces de la Guardia, Amparo; Serrano, Jennifer; Tornielli, Giovanni Battista; Arce-Johnson, Patricio

    2014-01-01

    The RESPONSIVE TO DEHYDRATION 22 (RD22) gene is a molecular link between abscisic acid (ABA) signalling and abiotic stress responses. Its expression has been used as a reliable ABA early response marker. In Arabidopsis, the single copy RD22 gene possesses a BURP domain also located at the C-terminus of USP embryonic proteins and the beta subunit of polygalacturonases. In grapevine, a RD22 gene has been identified but putative paralogs are also found in the grape genome, possibly forming a large RD22 family in this species. In this work, we searched for annotations containing BURP domains in the Vitis vinifera genome. Nineteen proteins were defined by a comparative analysis between the two genome predictions and RNA-Seq data. These sequences were compared to other plant BURPs identified in previous genome surveys allowing us to reconceive group classifications based on phylogenetic relationships and protein motif occurrence. We observed a lineage-specific evolution of the RD22 family, with the biggest expansion in grapevine and poplar. In contrast, rice, sorghum and maize presented highly expanded monocot-specific groups. The Vitis RD22 group may have expanded from segmental duplications as most of its members are confined to a region in chromosome 4. The inspection of transcriptomic data revealed variable expression of BURP genes in vegetative and reproductive organs. Many genes were induced in specific tissues or by abiotic and biotic stresses. Three RD22 genes were further studied showing that they responded oppositely to ABA and to stress conditions. Our results show that the inclusion of RNA-Seq data is essential while describing gene families and improving gene annotations. Robust phylogenetic analyses including all BURP members from other sequenced species helped us redefine previous relationships that were erroneously established. This work provides additional evidence for RD22 genes serving as marker genes for different organs or stresses in grapevine.

  19. Effect of experimental single Ancylostoma caninum and mixed infections of Trypanosoma brucei and Trypanosoma congolense on the humoural immune response to anti-rabies vaccination in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nwoha Rosemary Ijeoma Ogechi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the effect of Ancylostoma caninum (A. caninum and trypanosome parasites on the immune response to vaccination in dogs in endemic environments. Methods: Sixteen dogs for the experiment were grouped into 4 of 4 members each. Group I was the uninfected control one, and GPII was infected with A. caninum; GPIII was infected with A. caninum/Trypanosoma congolense (T. congolense, and GPIV was infected with Trypanosoma brucei (T. brucei/A. caninum. The dogs were first vaccinated with antirabies vaccine before infecting GPII, GPIII and GPIV with A. caninum which were done 4 weeks after vaccination. By 2-week post-vaccination, trypanosome parasites were superimposed on both GPIII and GPIV. A secondary vaccination was given to GPI, GPII, GPIII, and GPIV by Week 12 of the experiment (4 weeks post treatment. Results: The prepatent period was (3.00 ± 1.40 days, in the conjunct infection of T. brucei/ A. caninum. It was (9.00 ± 1.10 days, in conjunct T. congolense/A. caninum. The prepatent period of A. caninum was (14.0 ± 2.0 days in the single A. caninum group and (13.0 ± 1.0 days in the conjunct trypanosome/A. caninum. At the 1st week after vaccination, the antibody titer in all the vaccinated groups (GPI, GPII, GPIII, and GPIV significantly increased (P < 0.05 and peaked at the 3rd week after vaccination. Following infections, there were marked significant decreases (P < 0.05 in the antibody production against rabies in GPII, GPIII and GPIV. The significant decrease (P < 0.05 in antibody titer was highest in the conjunct groups (GPIII and GPIV compared to the single infection (GPII. Treatment with diminazene aceturate and mebendazole did not significantly improve antibody response in the dogs. A secondary vaccination administered at the 12th week after the primary vaccination significantly increased (P < 0.05 the antibody titer with a peak at the 3rd week after the secondary vaccination. Conclusions: It was therefore concluded

  20. RNA-Seq Analysis of Abdominal Fat in Genetically Fat and Lean Chickens Highlights a Divergence in Expression of Genes Controlling Adiposity, Hemostasis, and Lipid Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnyk, Christopher W.; Chen, Chuming; Huang, Hongzhan; Wu, Cathy H.; Simon, Jean; Le Bihan-Duval, Elisabeth; Duclos, Michel J.; Cogburn, Larry A.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic selection for enhanced growth rate in meat-type chickens (Gallus domesticus) is usually accompanied by excessive adiposity, which has negative impacts on both feed efficiency and carcass quality. Enhanced visceral fatness and several unique features of avian metabolism (i.e., fasting hyperglycemia and insulin insensitivity) mimic overt symptoms of obesity and related metabolic disorders in humans. Elucidation of the genetic and endocrine factors that contribute to excessive visceral fatness in chickens could also advance our understanding of human metabolic diseases. Here, RNA sequencing was used to examine differential gene expression in abdominal fat of genetically fat and lean chickens, which exhibit a 2.8-fold divergence in visceral fatness at 7 wk. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis revealed that many of 1687 differentially expressed genes are associated with hemostasis, endocrine function and metabolic syndrome in mammals. Among the highest expressed genes in abdominal fat, across both genotypes, were 25 differentially expressed genes associated with de novo synthesis and metabolism of lipids. Over-expression of numerous adipogenic and lipogenic genes in the FL chickens suggests that in situ lipogenesis in chickens could make a more substantial contribution to expansion of visceral fat mass than previously recognized. Distinguishing features of the abdominal fat transcriptome in lean chickens were high abundance of multiple hemostatic and vasoactive factors, transporters, and ectopic expression of several hormones/receptors, which could control local vasomotor tone and proteolytic processing of adipokines, hemostatic factors and novel endocrine factors. Over-expression of several thrombogenic genes in abdominal fat of lean chickens is quite opposite to the pro-thrombotic state found in obese humans. Clearly, divergent genetic selection for an extreme (2.5–2.8-fold) difference in visceral fatness provokes a number of novel regulatory responses that govern

  1. Gene expression analysis by cDNA-AFLP highlights a set of new signaling networks and translational control during seed dormancy breaking in Nicotiana plumbaginifolia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bove, Jérôme; Lucas, Philippe; Godin, Béatrice; Ogé, Laurent; Jullien, Marc; Grappin, Philippe

    2005-03-01

    Seed dormancy in Nicotiana plumbaginifolia is characterized by an abscisic acid accumulation linked to a pronounced germination delay. Dormancy can be released by 1 year after-ripening treatment. Using a cDNA-amplified fragment length polymorphism (cDNA-AFLP) approach we compared the gene expression patterns of dormant and after-ripened seeds, air-dry or during one day imbibition and analyzed 15,000 cDNA fragments. Among them 1020 were found to be differentially regulated by dormancy. Of 412 sequenced cDNA fragments, 83 were assigned to a known function by search similarities to public databases. The functional categories of the identified dormancy maintenance and breaking responsive genes, give evidence that after-ripening turns in the air-dry seed to a new developmental program that modulates, at the RNA level, components of translational control, signaling networks, transcriptional control and regulated proteolysis.

  2. Expression levels of the BAK1 and BCL2 genes highlight the role of apoptosis in age-related hearing impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Falah M

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Masoumeh Falah,1,2 Mohammad Najafi,2 Massoud Houshmand,3 Mohammad Farhadi1 1ENT and Head & Neck Research Center and Department, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; 2Cellular and Molecular Research Center, Biochemistry Department, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; 3Department of Medical Genetics, National Institute for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, Tehran, Iran Abstract: Age-related hearing impairment (ARHI is a progressive and a common sensory disorder in the elderly and will become an increasingly important clinical problem given the growing elderly population. Apoptosis of cochlear cells is an important factor in animal models of ARHI. As these cells cannot regenerate, their loss leads to irreversible hearing impairment. Identification of molecular mechanisms can facilitate disease prevention and effective treatment. In this study, we compared the expression of the genes BAK1 and BCL2 as two arms of the intrinsic apoptosis pathway between patients with ARHI and healthy subjects. ARHI and healthy subjects were selected after an ear nose throat examination, otoscopic investigation, and pure tone audiometry. RNA was extracted from peripheral blood samples, and relative gene expression levels were measured using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. BAK1 and the BAK1/BCL2 ratio were statistically significantly upregulated in the ARHI subjects. The BAK1/BCL2 ratio was positively correlated with the results of the audiometric tests. Our results indicate that BAK-mediated apoptosis may be a core mechanism in the progression of ARHI in humans, similar to finding in animal models. Moreover, the gene expression changes in peripheral blood samples could be used as a rapid and simple biomarker for early detection of ARHI. Keywords: age-related hearing impairment (ARHI, presbycusis, biomarker, treatment

  3. Global transcriptional analysis of psoriatic skin and blood confirms known disease-associated pathways and highlights novel genomic "hot spots" for differentially expressed genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coda, Alvin B; Icen, Murat; Smith, Jason R; Sinha, Animesh A

    2012-07-01

    There are major gaps in our knowledge regarding the exact mechanisms and genetic basis of psoriasis. To investigate the pathogenesis of psoriasis, gene expression in 10 skin (5 lesional, 5 nonlesional) and 11 blood (6 psoriatic, 5 nonpsoriatic) samples were examined using Affymetrix HG-U95A microarrays. We detected 535 (425 upregulated, 110 downregulated) DEGs in lesional skin at 1% false discovery rate (FDR). Combining nine microarray studies comparing lesional and nonlesional psoriatic skin, 34.5% of dysregulated genes were overlapped in multiple studies. We further identified 20 skin and 2 blood associated transcriptional "hot spots" at specified genomic locations. At 5% FDR, 11.8% skin and 10.4% blood DEGs in our study mapped to one of the 12 PSORS loci. DEGs that overlap with PSORS loci may offer prioritized targets for downstream genetic fine mapping studies. Novel DEG "hot spots" may provide new targets for defining susceptibility loci in future studies. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Computational analysis of a novel mutation in ETFDH gene highlights its long-range effects on the FAD-binding motif

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Jan-Gowth

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multiple acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase deficiency (MADD is an autosomal recessive disease caused by the defects in the mitochondrial electron transfer system and the metabolism of fatty acids. Recently, mutations in electron transfer flavoprotein dehydrogenase (ETFDH gene, encoding electron transfer flavoprotein:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (ETF:QO have been reported to be the major causes of riboflavin-responsive MADD. To date, no studies have been performed to explore the functional impact of these mutations or their mechanism of disrupting enzyme activity. Results High resolution melting (HRM analysis and sequencing of the entire ETFDH gene revealed a novel mutation (p.Phe128Ser and the hotspot mutation (p.Ala84Thr from a patient with MADD. According to the predicted 3D structure of ETF:QO, the two mutations are located within the flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD binding domain; however, the two residues do not have direct interactions with the FAD ligand. Using molecular dynamics (MD simulations and normal mode analysis (NMA, we found that the p.Ala84Thr and p.Phe128Ser mutations are most likely to alter the protein structure near the FAD binding site as well as disrupt the stability of the FAD binding required for the activation of ETF:QO. Intriguingly, NMA revealed that several reported disease-causing mutations in the ETF:QO protein show highly correlated motions with the FAD-binding site. Conclusions Based on the present findings, we conclude that the changes made to the amino acids in ETF:QO are likely to influence the FAD-binding stability.

  5. A genome wide association study for backfat thickness in Italian Large White pigs highlights new regions affecting fat deposition including neuronal genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fontanesi Luca

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Carcass fatness is an important trait in most pig breeding programs. Following market requests, breeding plans for fresh pork consumption are usually designed to reduce carcass fat content and increase lean meat deposition. However, the Italian pig industry is mainly devoted to the production of Protected Designation of Origin dry cured hams: pigs are slaughtered at around 160 kg of live weight and the breeding goal aims at maintaining fat coverage, measured as backfat thickness to avoid excessive desiccation of the hams. This objective has shaped the genetic pool of Italian heavy pig breeds for a few decades. In this study we applied a selective genotyping approach within a population of ~ 12,000 performance tested Italian Large White pigs. Within this population, we selectively genotyped 304 pigs with extreme and divergent backfat thickness estimated breeding value by the Illumina PorcineSNP60 BeadChip and performed a genome wide association study to identify loci associated to this trait. Results We identified 4 single nucleotide polymorphisms with P≤5.0E-07 and additional 119 ones with 5.0E-07 Conclusions Further investigations are needed to evaluate the effects of the identified single nucleotide polymorphisms associated with backfat thickness on other traits as a pre-requisite for practical applications in breeding programs. Reported results could improve our understanding of the biology of fat metabolism and deposition that could also be relevant for other mammalian species including humans, confirming the role of neuronal genes on obesity.

  6. ATLAS Outreach Highlights

    CERN Document Server

    Cheatham, Susan; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS outreach team is very active, promoting particle physics to a broad range of audiences including physicists, general public, policy makers, students and teachers, and media. A selection of current outreach activities and new projects will be presented. Recent highlights include the new ATLAS public website and ATLAS Open Data, the very recent public release of 1 fb-1 of ATLAS data.

  7. Studies Highlight Biodiesel's Benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    , Colo., July 6, 1998 — Two new studies highlight the benefits of biodiesel in reducing overall air Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) conducted both studies: An Overview of Biodiesel and Petroleum Diesel Life Cycles and Biodiesel Research Progress, 1992-1997. Biodiesel is a renewable diesel

  8. Clinical highlights from Amsterdam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jouke T. Annema

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This article contains highlights and a selection of the scientific advances from the Clinical Assembly that were presented at the 2015 European Respiratory Society International Congress in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. The most relevant topics for clinicians will be discussed, covering a wide range of areas including interventional pulmonology, rehabilitation and chronic care, thoracic imaging, diffuse and parenchymal lung diseases, and general practice and primary care. In this comprehensive review, exciting novel data will be discussed and put into perspective.

  9. FY 2016 Research Highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2017-03-23

    This fact sheet summarizes the research highlights for the Clean Energy Manufacturing Analysis Center (CEMAC) for Fiscal Year 2106. Topics covered include additive manufacturing for the wind industry, biomass-based chemicals substitutions, carbon fiber manufacturing facility siting, geothermal power plant turbines, hydrogen refueling stations, hydropower turbines, LEDs and lighting, light-duty automotive lithium-ion cells, magnetocaloric refrigeration, silicon carbide power electronics for variable frequency motor drives, solar photovoltaics, and wide bandgap semiconductor opportunities in power electronics.

  10. IGC highlights 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The major thrust of the research and development (R and D) activities of the Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research (IGCAR), Kalpakkam is oriented towards mastering fast breeder reactor (FBR) technology. Towards this end, its current R and D activities are carried out in a wide variety of disciplines. Highlights of its R and D activities during 1988 are summarised under the headings: Reactor Engineering and Design, Reactor Physics and Safety, Materials Science and Technology, Sodium Chemistry and Technology, Fuel Reprocessing and Electronics and Instrumentation. The text is illustrated with a number of figures, graphs and coloured pictures. (M.G.B.). figs., tabs

  11. BARC highlights '88

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    Highlights of research and development activities of the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), Bombay during 1988 are presented in chapters entitled: Physical Sciences, Chemical Sciences, Materials and Materials Sciences, Radioisotopes, Reactors, Fuel Cycle, Radiological Safety and Protection, Electronics and Instrumentation, Engineering Services, and Life Sciences. Main thrust of the R and D activities of BARC is on nuclear power reactor technology and all stages of nuclear fuel cycle. Some activities are also in the frontier areas such as high temperature superconductivity and inertial confinement fusion. (M.G.B.). figs., tabs., coloured ills

  12. Highlights from CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Autermann, Christian

    2018-01-01

    This article summarizes the latest highlights from the CMS experiment as presented at the Lepton Photon conference 2017 in Guangzhou, China. A selection of the latest physics results, the latest detector upgrades, and the current detector status are discussed. CMS has analyzed the full dataset of proton-proton collision data delivered by the LHC in 2016 at a center-of-mass energy of $13$\\,TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of $40$\\,fb$^{-1}$. The leap in center-of-mass energy and in luminosity with respect to the $7$ and $8$\\,TeV runs enabled interesting and relevant new physics results. A new silicon pixel tracking detector was installed during the LHC shutdown 2016/17 and has successfully started operation.

  13. PSI scientific highlights 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piwnicki, P.; Dury, T.

    2013-05-01

    This comprehensive report issued by the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) reviews research in various areas carried out by the institute in 2012. Also, the various facilities to be found at the institute are described. Research focus and highlights are discussed. These include work done using synchrotron light, neutrons and muons as well as work done in the particle physics, microtechnology and nanotechnology areas. Further areas of research include biomolecular research, radiopharmacy, radiochemistry and environmental chemistry. Other areas covered include general energy research and work done at the Competence Center for Energy and Mobility CCEM, work done on nuclear energy safety as well as systems analysis in the environmental and energy areas. The report is concluded with facts and figures on the PSI, its Advisory Board and its organisational structures

  14. PSI scientific highlights 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piwnicki, P.

    2012-04-01

    This comprehensive report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) presents the major highlights of the work done at the Paul Scherrer Institute, Switzerland, in 2011. According to the institute's director, work was concerned with the design and analysis of advanced materials with new functionalities, for application in fields as diverse as communications and energy technology, transportation, construction and medicine. Of particular topical interest are research projects on materials for application in the field of energy, for example for improving batteries for future electrically powered vehicles. Another example is in the field of catalysts. Environmentally harmful compounds, such as nitrogen oxide and sulphur dioxide produced in an engine, are transformed into nontoxic gases through catalytic conversion. Work progress on the SwissFEL installation is noted, including a breakthrough for SwissFEL main Linac C-band accelerating systems. Further topics in relation to the SwissFEL system are noted. Planning of the initial set of experimental stations at the SwissFEL is discussed and close collaboration with growing number of user communities is noted. Cross-Correlation Scattering, and a theoretical framework for this method is being developed and experimentally verified, using artificial nanostructures and synchrotron radiation. Highlights of further research work are discussed, including topics such as Synchrotron light, work done on neutrons and muons, particle physics, micro and nanotechnology as well as on biomolecular research and radiopharmacy. Large research facilities are discussed as is the PSI proton therapy installation. General energy topics are looked at, as are nuclear energy and safety aspects and environmental and energy systems analysis. Various further work includes factors causing glacier retreat and aerosols. User facilities are listed, including accelerators, the SLS light source, the SINQ neutron source, the UCN ultra-cold neutron source

  15. RESEARCH HIGHLIGHTS IN IAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marko Kreft

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available We are reviewing and commenting highlights of the research published in Image Analysis and Stereology journal (IAS, volume 35, where 16 original research papers on image analysis, computer vision, modelling, and other approaches were published. We have reported on the precision of curve length estimation in the plane. Further, a focus was on a robust estimation technique for 3D point cloud registration. Next contribution in computer vision was on the accuracy of stereo matching algorithm based on illumination control. An attempt was also made to automatically diagnose prenatal cleft lip with representative key points and identify the type of defect in three-dimensional ultrasonography. Similarly, a new report is presenting estimation of torsion of digital curves in 3D images and next, the nuchal translucency by ultrasound is being analyzed. Also in ophthalmology, image analysis may help physicians to establish a correct diagnosis, which is supported by a new approach to measure tortuosity of retinal vessel. Another report of medical significance analyzed correlation of the shape parameters for characterization of images of corneal endothelium cells. Shape analysis is also an important topic in material science, e.g. in analyzing fine aggregates in concrete. As in concrete, in fiber reinforced composites image analysis may aid in improved quality, where the direction of fibers have decisive impact on properties. Automatic defect detection using a computer vision system improves productivity quality in industrial production, hence we report of a new Haar wavelet-based approach.

  16. Molecular cytogenetic characterization of canine histiocytic sarcoma: A spontaneous model for human histiocytic cancer identifies deletion of tumor suppressor genes and highlights influence of genetic background on tumor behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abadie Jerome

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Histiocytic malignancies in both humans and dogs are rare and poorly understood. While canine histiocytic sarcoma (HS is uncommon in the general domestic dog population, there is a strikingly high incidence in a subset of breeds, suggesting heritable predisposition. Molecular cytogenetic profiling of canine HS in these breeds would serve to reveal recurrent DNA copy number aberrations (CNAs that are breed and/or tumor associated, as well as defining those shared with human HS. This process would identify evolutionarily conserved cytogenetic changes to highlight regions of particular importance to HS biology. Methods Using genome wide array comparative genomic hybridization we assessed CNAs in 104 spontaneously occurring HS from two breeds of dog exhibiting a particularly elevated incidence of this tumor, the Bernese Mountain Dog and Flat-Coated Retriever. Recurrent CNAs were evaluated further by multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization and loss of heterozygosity analyses. Statistical analyses were performed to identify CNAs associated with tumor location and breed. Results Almost all recurrent CNAs identified in this study were shared between the two breeds, suggesting that they are associated more with the cancer phenotype than with breed. A subset of recurrent genomic imbalances suggested involvement of known cancer associated genes in HS pathogenesis, including deletions of the tumor suppressor genes CDKN2A/B, RB1 and PTEN. A small number of aberrations were unique to each breed, implying that they may contribute to the major differences in tumor location evident in these two breeds. The most highly recurrent canine CNAs revealed in this study are evolutionarily conserved with those reported in human histiocytic proliferations, suggesting that human and dog HS share a conserved pathogenesis. Conclusions The breed associated clinical features and DNA copy number aberrations exhibited by canine HS offer a valuable model

  17. Molecular cytogenetic characterization of canine histiocytic sarcoma: A spontaneous model for human histiocytic cancer identifies deletion of tumor suppressor genes and highlights influence of genetic background on tumor behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedan, Benoit; Thomas, Rachael; Motsinger-Reif, Alison; Abadie, Jerome; Andre, Catherine; Cullen, John; Breen, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    Histiocytic malignancies in both humans and dogs are rare and poorly understood. While canine histiocytic sarcoma (HS) is uncommon in the general domestic dog population, there is a strikingly high incidence in a subset of breeds, suggesting heritable predisposition. Molecular cytogenetic profiling of canine HS in these breeds would serve to reveal recurrent DNA copy number aberrations (CNAs) that are breed and/or tumor associated, as well as defining those shared with human HS. This process would identify evolutionarily conserved cytogenetic changes to highlight regions of particular importance to HS biology. Using genome wide array comparative genomic hybridization we assessed CNAs in 104 spontaneously occurring HS from two breeds of dog exhibiting a particularly elevated incidence of this tumor, the Bernese Mountain Dog and Flat-Coated Retriever. Recurrent CNAs were evaluated further by multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization and loss of heterozygosity analyses. Statistical analyses were performed to identify CNAs associated with tumor location and breed. Almost all recurrent CNAs identified in this study were shared between the two breeds, suggesting that they are associated more with the cancer phenotype than with breed. A subset of recurrent genomic imbalances suggested involvement of known cancer associated genes in HS pathogenesis, including deletions of the tumor suppressor genes CDKN2A/B, RB1 and PTEN. A small number of aberrations were unique to each breed, implying that they may contribute to the major differences in tumor location evident in these two breeds. The most highly recurrent canine CNAs revealed in this study are evolutionarily conserved with those reported in human histiocytic proliferations, suggesting that human and dog HS share a conserved pathogenesis. The breed associated clinical features and DNA copy number aberrations exhibited by canine HS offer a valuable model for the human counterpart, providing additional evidence towards

  18. Atmospheric Research 2011 Technical Highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    The 2011 Technical Highlights describes the efforts of all members of Atmospheric Research. Their dedication to advancing Earth Science through conducting research, developing and running models, designing instruments, managing projects, running field campaigns, and numerous other activities, is highlighted in this report.

  19. Highlights of nuclear chemistry 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-07-01

    In this report 9 topics of the work of the Nuclear Chemistry Group in 1995 are highlighted. A list of publications and an overview of the international cooperation is given. (orig.). 19 refs., 19 figs., 2 tabs., 2 app

  20. Highlights of nuclear chemistry 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-07-01

    In this report 9 topics of the work of the Nuclear Chemistry Group in 1995 are highlighted. A list of publications and an overview of the international cooperation is given. (orig.). 19 refs., 19 figs., 2 tabs., 2 app.

  1. LAMA Preconference and Program Highlights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Library Administration & Management, 1988

    1988-01-01

    Highlights events of the Library Administration and Management Association 1988 conference, including presentation of awards and programs on: (1) transfer of training; (2) hiring; (3) mentoring; (4) acquisitions automation; (5) library building consultation; and (6) managing shared systems. (MES)

  2. Research and technology highlights, 1993

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    This report contains highlights of the major accomplishments and applications that have been made by Langley researchers and by our university and industry colleagues during the past year. The highlights illustrate both the broad range of the research and technology activities supported by NASA Langley Research Center and the contributions of this work toward maintaining United States leadership in aeronautics and space research. This report also describes some of the Center's most important research and testing facilities.

  3. Brookhaven highlights, 1986-1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowe, M.S.

    1988-01-01

    The highlights of research conducted between October 1985 and September 1987 at Brookhaven National Laboratory are reviewed in this publication. Also covered are the administrative and financial status of the laboratory and a brief mention of meetings held and honors received. (FI)

  4. Energy Policy. Highlights. 2013 Edition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-07-01

    Energy Policy Highlights showcases recent developments in energy policies among all 28 IEA member countries. Each contribution underscores the changing nature of both global and domestic energy challenges, as well as the commonality of energy concerns among member countries. The policies highlighted in this publication identify an urgent need to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions as a clear policy objective. Electricity, enhancing energy efficiency and increasing the share of renewables in the energy mix in a cost effective manner are likewise areas of common focus. On the end-user side, increasing public awareness of domestic energy policies through improved transparency and engagement is an important facet of policy support among IEA member countries. The successful implementation of policies and other initiatives benefitted from efforts to inform the public.

  5. Highlights of nuclear chemistry 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-12-01

    Highlights were: 1. Fission product release: benchmark calculations for severe nuclear accidents; 2. Thermochemical data for reactor materials and fission products; 3. thermochemical calculations on fuel of the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor; 4. Formation of organic tellurides during nuclear accidents?; 5. Reaction of tellurium with Zircaloy-4; 6. Transmutation of fission products; 7. The thermal conductivity of high-burnup UO 2 fuel; 8. Tritium retention in graphite. (orig./HP)

  6. Tourette syndrome research highlights 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Cheryl A.; Black, Kevin J.

    2016-01-01

    We present selected highlights from research that appeared during 2015 on Tourette syndrome and other tic disorders. Topics include phenomenology, comorbidities, developmental course, genetics, animal models, neuroimaging, electrophysiology, pharmacology, and treatment. We briefly summarize articles whose results we believe may lead to new treatments, additional research or modifications in current models of TS. PMID:27429744

  7. LHC Results Highlights (CLASHEP 2013)

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzalez, O.

    2015-05-22

    The good performance of the LHC provided enough data at 7 TeV and 8 TeV to allow the experiments to perform very competitive measurements and to expand the knowledge about the fundamental interaction far beyond that from previous colliders. This report summarizes the highlights of the results obtained with these data samples by the four large experiments, covering all the topics of the physics program and focusing on those exploiting the possibilities of the LHC.

  8. Atmospheric Research 2012 Technical Highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, William K -M.

    2013-01-01

    This annual report, as before, is intended for a broad audience. Our readers include colleagues within NASA, scientists outside the Agency, science graduate students, and members of the general public. Inside are descriptions of atmospheric research science highlights and summaries of our education and outreach accomplishments for calendar year 2012.The report covers research activities from the Mesoscale Atmospheric Processes Laboratory, the Climate and Radiation Laboratory, the Atmospheric Chemistry and Dynamics Laboratory, and the Wallops Field Support Office under the Office of Deputy Director for Atmospheres, Earth Sciences Division in the Sciences and Exploration Directorate of NASAs Goddard Space Flight Center. The overall mission of the office is advancing knowledge and understanding of the Earths atmosphere. Satellite missions, field campaigns, peer-reviewed publications, and successful proposals are essential to our continuing research.

  9. Highlights of DAMA/LIBRA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernabei R.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The DAMA project develops and uses new/improved low background scintillation detectors to investigate the Dark Matter (DM particle component(s in the galactic halo and rare processes deep underground at the Gran Sasso National Laboratory (LNGS of the I.N.F.N.. Here some highlights of DAMA/LIBRA (Large sodium Iodide Bulk for Rare processes as a unique apparatus in direct DM investigation for its full sensitive mass, target material, intrinsic radio-purity, methodological approach and all the controls performed on the experimental parameters are outlined. The DAMA/LIBRA–phase1 and the former DAMA/NaI data (cumulative exposure 1.33 ton × yr, corresponding to 14 annual cycles have reached a model-independent evidence at 9.3 σ C.L. for the presence of DM particles in the galactic halo exploiting the DM annual modulation signature with highly radio-pure NaI(Tl target. Some of the perspectives of the presently running DAMA/LIBRA–phase2 are summarised and the powerful tools offered by a model independent strategy of DM investigation are pointed out.

  10. ESO PR Highlights in 2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    At the beginning of the new millennium, ESO and its staff are facing the future with confidence. The four 8.2-m Unit Telescopes of the Very Large Telescope (VLT) are in great shape and the VLT Interferometer (VLTI) will soon have "first fringes". The intercontinental ALMA project is progressing well and concepts for extremely large optical/infrared telescopes are being studied. They can also look back at a fruitful and rewarding past year. Perhaps the most important, single development has been the rapid transition of the Very Large Telescope (VLT). From being a "high-tech project under construction" it has now become a highly proficient, world-class astronomical observatory. This trend is clearly reflected in ESO's Press Releases , as more and more front-line scientific results emerge from rich data obtained at this very efficient facility. There were also exciting news from several of the instruments at La Silla. At the same time, the ESO community may soon grow, as steps towards membership are being taken by various European countries. Throughout 2000, a total of 54 PR communications were made, with a large number of Press Photos and Video Clips, cf. the 2000 PR Index. Some of the ESO PR highlights may be accessed directly via the clickable image on the present page. ESO PR Photo 01/01 is also available in a larger (non-clickable) version [ JPEG: 566 x 566 pix - 112k]. It may be reproduced, if credit is given to the European Southern Observatory.

  11. Cassini's Grand Finale Science Highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spilker, Linda

    2017-10-01

    After 13 years in orbit, the Cassini-Huygens Mission to Saturn ended in a science-rich blaze of glory. Cassini returned its final bits of unique science data on September 15, 2017, as it plunged into Saturn's atmosphere satisfying planetary protection requirements. Cassini's Grand Finale covered a period of roughly five months and ended with the first time exploration of the region between the rings and planet.The final close flyby of Titan in late April 2017 propelled Cassini across Saturn’s main rings and into its Grand Finale orbits; 22 orbits that repeatedly dove between Saturn’s innermost rings and upper atmosphere making Cassini the first spacecraft to explore this region. The last orbit turned the spacecraft into the first Saturn upper atmospheric probe.The Grand Finale orbits provided highest resolution observations of both the rings and Saturn, and in-situ sampling of the ring particle composition, Saturn's atmosphere, plasma, and innermost radiation belts. The gravitational field was measured to unprecedented accuracy, providing information on the interior structure of the planet, winds in the deeper atmosphere, and mass of the rings. The magnetic field provided insight into the physical nature of the magnetic dynamo and structure of the internal magnetic field. The ion and neutral mass spectrometer sampled the upper atmosphere for molecules that escape the atmosphere in addition to molecules originating from the rings. The cosmic dust analyzer directly sampled the composition from different parts of the main rings for the first time. Fields and particles instruments directly measured the plasma environment between the rings and planet.Science highlights and new mysteries gleaned to date from the Grand Finale orbits will be discussed.The research described in this paper was carried out in part at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Copyright 2017

  12. Research highlights: microfluidics meets big data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Peter; Weaver, Westbrook M; Masaeli, Mahdokht; Owsley, Keegan; Di Carlo, Dino

    2014-03-07

    In this issue we highlight a collection of recent work in which microfluidic parallelization and automation have been employed to address the increasing need for large amounts of quantitative data concerning cellular function--from correlating microRNA levels to protein expression, increasing the throughput and reducing the noise when studying protein dynamics in single-cells, and understanding how signal dynamics encodes information. The painstaking dissection of cellular pathways one protein at a time appears to be coming to an end, leading to more rapid discoveries which will inevitably translate to better cellular control--in producing useful gene products and treating disease at the individual cell level. From these studies it is also clear that development of large scale mutant or fusion libraries, automation of microscopy, image analysis, and data extraction will be key components as microfluidics contributes its strengths to aid systems biology moving forward.

  13. Atmospheric Research 2014 Technical Highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platnick, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Earth Sciences Division in atmospheric science research. Figure 1.1 shows the 20-year record of peer-reviewed publications and proposals among the various Laboratories. This data shows that the scientific work being conducted in the Laboratories is competitive with the work being done elsewhere in universities and other government agencies. The office of Deputy Director for Atmospheric Research will strive to maintain this record by rigorously monitoring and promoting quality while emphasizing coordination and integration among atmospheric disciplines. Also, an appropriate balance will be maintained between the scientists' responsibility for large collaborative projects and missions and their need to carry out active science research as a principal investigator. This balance allows members of the Laboratories to improve their scientific credentials, and develop leadership potentials. Interdisciplinary research is carried out in collaboration with other laboratories and research groups within the Earth Sciences Division, across the Sciences and Exploration Directorate, and with partners in universities and other government agencies. Members of the Laboratories interact with the general public to support a wide range of interests in the atmospheric sciences. Among other activities, the Laboratories raise the public's awareness of atmospheric science by presenting public lectures and demonstrations, by making scientific data available to wide audiences, by teaching, and by mentoring students and teachers. The Atmosphere Laboratories make substantial efforts to attract and recruit new scientists to the various areas of atmospheric research. We strongly encourage the establishment of partnerships with Federal and state agencies that have operational responsibilities to promote the societal application of our science products. This report describes our role in NASA's mission, provides highlights of our research scope and activities, and summarizes our scientists' major

  14. ESO PR Highlights in 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Last year proved to be another exceptional year for the European organisation for ground-based astronomy. ESO should begin the New Year with two new member states: Spain (PR 05/06) and the Czech Republic (PR 52/06). ESO PR Highlights 2006 2006 was a year of renovation and revolution in the world of planets. A new Earth-like exoplanet has been discovered (PR 03/06) using a network of telescopes from all over the world (including the Danish 1.54-m one at ESO La Silla). It is not the only child of this fruitful year: thanks to the combined use of ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT) and La Silla instruments, a surprising system of twin giant exoplanets was found (PR 29/06), and a trio of Neptune-like planets hosted by a nearby star were identified (PR 18/06). These results open new perspectives on the search for habitable zones and on the understanding of the mechanism of planet formation. The VISIR instrument on the VLT has been providing unique information to answer this last question, by supplying a high resolution view of a planet-forming disc (PR 36/06). There are not only new members in the planets' register: during the General Assembly of the International Astronomical Union held in Prague (Czech Republic), it was decided that Pluto is not a planet anymore but a 'dwarf planet'. Whatever its status, Pluto still has a satellite, Charon, whose radius and density have been measured more accurately by observing a rare occultation from different sites, including Cerro Paranal (PR 02/06). The scientific community dedicated 2006 to the great physicist James Clerk Maxwell (it was the 175th anniversary of the birth): without his electromagnetic theory of light, none of the astonishing discoveries of modern physics could have been achieved. Nowadays we can look at distant galaxies in great detail: the GIRAFFE spectrograph on the VLT revealed that galaxies 6 billion years ago had the same amount of dark matter relative to stars than nowadays (PR 10/06), while SINFONI gave an

  15. Gene

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Gene integrates information from a wide range of species. A record may include nomenclature, Reference Sequences (RefSeqs), maps, pathways, variations, phenotypes,...

  16. Using an Electronic Highlighter to Eliminate the Negative Effects of Pre-Existing, Inappropriate Highlighting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gier, Vicki; Kreiner, David; Hudnell, Jason; Montoya, Jodi; Herring, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the present experiment was to determine whether using an active learning technique, electronic highlighting, can eliminate the negative effects of pre-existing, poor highlighting on reading comprehension. Participants read passages containing no highlighting, appropriate highlighting, or inappropriate highlighting. We hypothesized…

  17. Photon science 2012. Highlights and annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appel, Karen; Gehrke, Rainer; Gutt, Christian; Incoccia-Hermes, Lucia; Laarmann, Tim; Morgenroth, Wolfgang; Roehlsberger, Ralf; Schulte-Schrepping, Horst; Vainio, Ulla; Zimmermann, Martin von

    2012-12-01

    The synchrotron-radiation research at DESY is reviewed. The following topics are dealt with: Research highlights, research platforms and outstations, light sources, new technologies and developments. (HSI)

  18. Editorial highlighting and highly cited papers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonoyiannakis, Manolis

    Editorial highlighting-the process whereby journal editors select, at the time of publication, a small subset of papers that are ostensibly of higher quality, importance or interest-is by now a widespread practice among major scientific journal publishers. Depending on the venue, and the extent to which editorial resources are invested in the process, highlighted papers appear as News & Views, Research Highlights, Perspectives, Editors' Choice, IOP Select, Editors' Summary, Spotlight on Optics, Editors' Picks, Viewpoints, Synopses, Editors' Suggestions, etc. Here, we look at the relation between highlighted papers and highly influential papers, which we define at two levels: having received enough citations to be among the (i) top few percent of their journal, and (ii) top 1% of all physics papers. Using multiple linear regression and multilevel regression modeling we examine the parameters associated with highly influential papers. We briefly comment on cause and effect relationships between citedness and highlighting of papers.

  19. Using Highlighting to Train Attentional Expertise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roads, Brett; Mozer, Michael C; Busey, Thomas A

    2016-01-01

    Acquiring expertise in complex visual tasks is time consuming. To facilitate the efficient training of novices on where to look in these tasks, we propose an attentional highlighting paradigm. Highlighting involves dynamically modulating the saliency of a visual image to guide attention along the fixation path of a domain expert who had previously viewed the same image. In Experiment 1, we trained naive subjects via attentional highlighting on a fingerprint-matching task. Before and after training, we asked subjects to freely inspect images containing pairs of prints and determine whether the prints matched. Fixation sequences were automatically scored for the degree of expertise exhibited using a Bayesian discriminative model of novice and expert gaze behavior. Highlighted training causes gaze behavior to become more expert-like not only on the trained images but also on transfer images, indicating generalization of learning. In Experiment 2, to control for the possibility that the increase in expertise is due to mere exposure, we trained subjects via highlighting of fixation sequences from novices, not experts, and observed no transition toward expertise. In Experiment 3, to determine the specificity of the training effect, we trained subjects with expert fixation sequences from images other than the one being viewed, which preserves coarse-scale statistics of expert gaze but provides no information about fine-grain features. Observing at least a partial transition toward expertise, we obtain only weak evidence that the highlighting procedure facilitates the learning of critical local features. We discuss possible improvements to the highlighting procedure.

  20. AEB-highlights. January - June 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    AEB Highlights is a half-yearly report reflecting the most important recent achievements of the various Research and Technical divisions of the Atomic Energy Board. It appears alternatively in English and Afrikaans [af

  1. Using Highlighting to Train Attentional Expertise.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brett Roads

    Full Text Available Acquiring expertise in complex visual tasks is time consuming. To facilitate the efficient training of novices on where to look in these tasks, we propose an attentional highlighting paradigm. Highlighting involves dynamically modulating the saliency of a visual image to guide attention along the fixation path of a domain expert who had previously viewed the same image. In Experiment 1, we trained naive subjects via attentional highlighting on a fingerprint-matching task. Before and after training, we asked subjects to freely inspect images containing pairs of prints and determine whether the prints matched. Fixation sequences were automatically scored for the degree of expertise exhibited using a Bayesian discriminative model of novice and expert gaze behavior. Highlighted training causes gaze behavior to become more expert-like not only on the trained images but also on transfer images, indicating generalization of learning. In Experiment 2, to control for the possibility that the increase in expertise is due to mere exposure, we trained subjects via highlighting of fixation sequences from novices, not experts, and observed no transition toward expertise. In Experiment 3, to determine the specificity of the training effect, we trained subjects with expert fixation sequences from images other than the one being viewed, which preserves coarse-scale statistics of expert gaze but provides no information about fine-grain features. Observing at least a partial transition toward expertise, we obtain only weak evidence that the highlighting procedure facilitates the learning of critical local features. We discuss possible improvements to the highlighting procedure.

  2. Brookhaven highlights, October 1979-September 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-01-01

    Highlights are given for the research areas of the Brookhaven National Laboratory. These areas include high energy physics, physics and chemistry, life sciences, applied energy science (energy and environment, and nuclear energy), and support activities (including mathematics, instrumentation, reactors, and safety). (GHT)

  3. University of Maryland MRSEC - Research: Highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    -Engineering Program: Project Lead the Way Thinking Small: Nanoscale Informal Science Education (NISE Education Outreach Highlights NanoFabulous Greatest Show on Earth: Big Top Physics, USA Science and Perspective at UMD MRSEC Nanoscience Camp Annual Middle School Student Science Conference (SSC) Pre

  4. Palliativedrugs.com therapeutic highlights: gabapentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Twycross Robert

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This is the second in a series of highlights drawn from the www.palliativedrugs.com website. The website provides free access to the Palliative Care Formulary, a monthly newsletter and a bulletin board for advice to be given and received. With almost 10,000 professional members it is the largest palliative care resource of its kind.

  5. Brookhaven highlights, October 1979-September 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    Highlights are given for the research areas of the Brookhaven National Laboratory. These areas include high energy physics, physics and chemistry, life sciences, applied energy science (energy and environment, and nuclear energy), and support activities (including mathematics, instrumentation, reactors, and safety)

  6. Brookhaven highlights - Brookhaven National Laboratory 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-09-01

    This report highlights research conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory in the following areas: alternating gradient synchrotron; physics; biology; national synchrotron light source; department of applied science; medical; chemistry; department of advanced technology; reactor; safety and environmental protection; instrumentation; and computing and communications.

  7. A comparison of phenotypic traits related to trypanotolerance in five west african cattle breeds highlights the value of shorthorn taurine breeds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Berthier

    Full Text Available Animal African Trypanosomosis particularly affects cattle and dramatically impairs livestock development in sub-Saharan Africa. African Zebu (AFZ or European taurine breeds usually die of the disease in the absence of treatment, whereas West African taurine breeds (AFT, considered trypanotolerant, are able to control the pathogenic effects of trypanosomosis. Up to now, only one AFT breed, the longhorn N'Dama (NDA, has been largely studied and is considered as the reference trypanotolerant breed. Shorthorn taurine trypanotolerance has never been properly assessed and compared to NDA and AFZ breeds.This study compared the trypanotolerant/susceptible phenotype of five West African local breeds that differ in their demographic history. Thirty-six individuals belonging to the longhorn taurine NDA breed, two shorthorn taurine Lagune (LAG and Baoulé (BAO breeds, the Zebu Fulani (ZFU and the Borgou (BOR, an admixed breed between AFT and AFZ, were infected by Trypanosoma congolense IL1180. All the cattle were genetically characterized using dense SNP markers, and parameters linked to parasitaemia, anaemia and leukocytes were analysed using synthetic variables and mixed models. We showed that LAG, followed by NDA and BAO, displayed the best control of anaemia. ZFU showed the greatest anaemia and the BOR breed had an intermediate value, as expected from its admixed origin. Large differences in leukocyte counts were also observed, with higher leukocytosis for AFT. Nevertheless, no differences in parasitaemia were found, except a tendency to take longer to display detectable parasites in ZFU.We demonstrated that LAG and BAO are as trypanotolerant as NDA. This study highlights the value of shorthorn taurine breeds, which display strong local adaptation to trypanosomosis. Thanks to further analyses based on comparisons of the genome or transcriptome of the breeds, these results open up the way for better knowledge of host-pathogen interactions and

  8. Highlighting relatedness promotes prosocial motives and behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavey, Louisa; Greitemeyer, Tobias; Sparks, Paul

    2011-07-01

    According to self-determination theory, people have three basic psychological needs: relatedness, competence, and autonomy. Of these, the authors reasoned that relatedness need satisfaction is particularly important for promoting prosocial behavior because of the increased sense of connectedness to others that this engenders. In Experiment 1, the authors manipulated relatedness, autonomy, competence, or gave participants a neutral task, and found that highlighting relatedness led to higher interest in volunteering and intentions to volunteer relative to the other conditions. Experiment 2 found that writing about relatedness experiences promoted feelings of connectedness to others, which in turn predicted greater prosocial intentions. Experiment 3 found that relatedness manipulation participants donated significantly more money to charity than did participants given a neutral task. The results suggest that highlighting relatedness increases engagement in prosocial activities and are discussed in relation to the conflict and compatibility between individual and social outcomes. © 2011 by the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, Inc

  9. Trends and highlights of VCI 2004

    CERN Document Server

    Fabjan, Christian Wolfgang

    2004-01-01

    This report attempts to summarize the presentations given at this conference. Topics related to R&D of gaseous and solid state detectors clearly point to several trends in particle physics instrumentation. More established techniques are represented by reports on recent experiments and facilities which can be considered the highlights in this research field. The extension of these techniques to space, arctic ice and deep sea are opening new frontiers of particle physics.

  10. Highlights of LHC experiments – Part I

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00072301; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The superb performance of the LHC accelerator in 2016, in both live time and peak luminosity, has provided a large data sample of collisions at 13 TeV. Excellent performances of the ATLAS and LHCb detectors, together with highly performant offline and analysis systems, mean that a wealth of results are already available from 13 TeV data. Selected highlights are reported here.

  11. ENC 2010 European nuclear congress - Conference highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonin, B. [European Nuclear Society (ENS), Bern (Switzerland)

    2010-11-15

    This synthetical paper presents the main progress, trends or achievements that have appeared through the 450 communications of this conference. The highlights are reported according to 11 issues: 1) general nuclear situation and policy, 2) life extension, 3) standardisation, 4) safety, 5) fuel cycle, 6) dismantling techniques and waste management, 7) research reactors, 8) fusion, 9) nuclear applications in life sciences, 10) education and training, 11) networks and research structures

  12. Highlights and Perspectives from the CMS Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butler, Joel Nathan [Fermilab

    2017-09-09

    In 2016, the Large Hadron Collider provided proton-proton collisions at 13 TeV center-of-mass energy and achieved very high luminosity and reliability. The performance of the CMS Experiment in this running period and a selection of recent physics results are presented. These include precision measurements and searches for new particles. The status and prospects for data-taking in 2017 and a brief summary of the highlights of the High Luminosity (HL-LHC) upgrade of the CMS detector are also presented.

  13. Fermi GBM: Highlights from the First Year

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.

    2009-01-01

    The Fermi Gamma ray Burst Monitor is an all-sky instrument sensitive to photons from about 8 keV to 40 MeV. I will summarize highlights from the first year, including triggered observations of gamma ray bursts, soft gamma ray repeaters, and terrestrial gamma flashes, and observations in the continuous data of X-ray binaries and accreting X-ray pulsars. GBM provides complementary observations to Swift/BAT, observing many of the same sources, but over a wider energy range.

  14. Highlights of the SSC Site Development Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanford, J.R.

    1991-10-01

    This paper summarizes highlights of the Site Development Plan for the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory. The Plan, sometimes called a Master Plan, was prepared by the architectural and engineering firm for the Laboratory: Parsons Brinckerhoff/Morrison Knudsen (PB/MK) working in association with CRSS. Their task was to interpret the SSC project needs in the context of the Ellis County, Texas site. The team effort was under the direction of Lewis May from CRSS, guided by Robert Sims from the SSC Laboratory. Conceptual drawings are presented in this report

  15. Some physics highlights from the EUROBALL spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korten, W.

    2004-01-01

    The latest generation of large γ-ray spectrometers, such as EUROBALL, has boosted the explorations of nuclei under extreme conditions especially at the limits of angular momentum and at finite temperatures. But the coupling of this instrument to very selective ''ancillary'' devices allows for more and more refined investigations of the third important degree of freedom in contemporary nuclear-structure studies, the isospin. This contribution summarises some of the recent highlights from the physics at EUROBALL obtained in some of the different areas of nuclear-structure research

  16. Physics highlights at ILC and CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Lukić, Strahinja

    2015-01-01

    In this lecture, the physics potential for the e+e- linear collider experiments ILC and CLIC is reviewed. The experimental conditions are compared to those at hadron colliders and their intrinsic value for precision experiments, complementary to the hadron colliders, is discussed. The detector concepts for ILC and CLIC are outlined in their most important aspects related to the precision physics. Highlights from the physics program and from the benchmark studies are given. It is shown that linear colliders are a promising tool, complementing the LHC in essential ways to test the Standard Model and to search for new physics.

  17. Biotransformation and bioactivation reactions - 2015 literature highlights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baillie, Thomas A; Dalvie, Deepak; Rietjens, Ivonne M C M; Cyrus Khojasteh, S

    2016-05-01

    Since 1972, Drug Metabolism Reviews has been recognized as one of the principal resources for researchers in pharmacological, pharmaceutical and toxicological fields to keep abreast of advances in drug metabolism science in academia and the pharmaceutical industry. With a distinguished list of authors and editors, the journal covers topics ranging from relatively mature fields, such as cytochrome P450 enzymes, to a variety of emerging fields. We hope to continue this tradition with the current compendium of mini-reviews that highlight novel biotransformation processes that were published during the past year. Each review begins with a summary of the article followed by our comments on novel aspects of the research and their biological implications. This collection of highlights is not intended to be exhaustive, but rather to be illustrative of recent research that provides new insights or approaches that advance the field of drug metabolism. Abbreviations NAPQI N-acetyl-p-benzoquinoneimine ALDH aldehyde dehydrogenase AO aldehyde oxidase AKR aldo-keto reductase CES carboxylesterase CSB cystathionine β-synthase CSE cystathionine γ-lyase P450 cytochrome P450 DHPO 2,3-dihydropyridin-4-one ESI electrospray FMO flavin monooxygenase GSH glutathione GSSG glutathione disulfide ICPMS inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry i.p. intraperitoneal MDR multidrug-resistant NNAL 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanol NNK 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone oaTOF orthogonal acceleration time-of-flight PBK physiologically based kinetic PCP pentachlorophenol SDR short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase SULT sulfotransferase TB tuberculosis.

  18. Syndicate of renewable energies - Highlights 2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    This publication first proposes a presentation of the SER (Syndicat des Energies Renouvelables, Syndicate of Renewable Energies), a professional body: missions, scope of action, members. It outlines its commitment in the French policy for energy transition as a major actor of the sector of renewable energies. It addresses the legal and regulatory framework by indicating evolutions introduced by the French law for energy transition and for a green growth for the different renewable energies (hydroelectricity, wind energy, solar photovoltaic, geothermal, biofuels and bio-energies, biogas), by the new regimes of authorisations for onshore wind energy, methanization and hydroelectricity, and by the law for growth, activity and equality of economic opportunities. It proposes brief presentations of transverse actions (agreements, meetings, partnership in exhibitions, commitment in the COP21), and of actions regarding power grids, overseas territories, or the building sector. Some highlights related bio-energy sectors, geothermal energy, onshore wind energy, renewable marine energies and offshore wind energy, solar photovoltaic energy, hydroelectricity, or solar thermodynamic energy are mentioned. These highlights may concern legal, organisational, political or financial frameworks. Actions in the field of communication are indicated, and projects for 2016 are briefly indicated

  19. Astonishing the wild pigs highlights of technology

    CERN Document Server

    Trueb, Lucien F; Stuber, Fred A

    2015-01-01

    A hydraulic machine for astonishing wild pigs was one of the many technological highlights the author encountered in the course of his career as a research scientist and science writer. Writing a book about them, never taking more (or less) than two printed pages for each of 146 subjects was a very special challenge. The book covers fundamentally important achievements of technology that directly impacted mankind or even profoundly changed it. Many of those highlights are quite new, at least one of them (power generation by nuclear fusion) is not available yet. But particularly ingenious things dating way back were also included, as they are the base of our technical civilization Good examples are ceramics as well as copper, bronze and iron; whole periods of history have been named for the latter three. The analog computer of Antikythera used for stellar navigation was made some 2100 years ago, gunpowder was used in China as early as 1044 A.D., the astronomical clock in the Strasburg cathedral was built in th...

  20. Dissection of protein interactomics highlights microRNA synergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wenliang; Zhao, Yilei; Xu, Yingqi; Sun, Yong; Wang, Zhe; Yuan, Wei; Du, Zhimin

    2013-01-01

    Despite a large amount of microRNAs (miRNAs) have been validated to play crucial roles in human biology and disease, there is little systematic insight into the nature and scale of the potential synergistic interactions executed by miRNAs themselves. Here we established an integrated parameter synergy score to determine miRNA synergy, by combining the two mechanisms for miRNA-miRNA interactions, miRNA-mediated gene co-regulation and functional association between target gene products, into one single parameter. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis indicated that synergy score accurately identified the gene ontology-defined miRNA synergy (AUC = 0.9415, psynergy, implying poor expectancy of widespread synergy. However, targeting more key genes made two miRNAs more likely to act synergistically. Compared to other miRNAs, miR-21 was a highly exceptional case due to frequent appearance in the top synergistic miRNA pairs. This result highlighted its essential role in coordinating or strengthening physiological and pathological functions of other miRNAs. The synergistic effect of miR-21 and miR-1 were functionally validated for their significant influences on myocardial apoptosis, cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis. The novel approach established in this study enables easy and effective identification of condition-restricted potent miRNA synergy simply by concentrating the available protein interactomics and miRNA-target interaction data into a single parameter synergy score. Our results may be important for understanding synergistic gene regulation by miRNAs and may have significant implications for miRNA combination therapy of cardiovascular disease.

  1. FY 1996 Congressional budget request: Budget highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1995-02-01

    The FY 1996 budget presentation is organized by the Department`s major business lines. An accompanying chart displays the request for new budget authority. The report compares the budget request for FY 1996 with the appropriated FY 1995 funding levels displayed on a comparable basis. The FY 1996 budget represents the first year of a five year plan in which the Department will reduce its spending by $15.8 billion in budget authority and by $14.1 billion in outlays. FY 1996 is a transition year as the Department embarks on its multiyear effort to do more with less. The Budget Highlights are presented by business line; however, the fifth business line, Economic Productivity, which is described in the Policy Overview section, cuts across multiple organizational missions, funding levels and activities and is therefore included in the discussion of the other four business lines.

  2. Highlights from NuFact05

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Landua, Rolf

    2005-01-01

    The 7th International Workshop on Neutrino Factories and Superbeams was held in Frascati in June 2005 with nearly 200 participants. The most recent progress in the design of future neutrino facilities was described, including novel ideas in detectors, and many issues were raised. The International Scoping Study (ISS) for a future Neutrino Facility which would incorporate a Neutrino Factory and/or a high intensity Neutrino Superbeam was launched at that occasion. Built upon previous studies in the USA, Europe and Japan, it will aim to i) define the physics case and a baseline design for such a facility including the related neutrino detection systems, ii) identify the required research and development programme and iii) perform comparisons with other options such as beta beams. The highlights of the meeting and the upcoming studies will be presented.

  3. Research highlights: impacts of microplastics on plankton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Vivian S

    2016-02-01

    Each year, millions of metric tons of the plastic produced for food packaging, personal care products, fishing gear, and other human activities end up in lakes, rivers, and the ocean. The breakdown of these primary plastics in the environment results in microplastics, small fragments of plastic typically less than 1-5 mm in size. These synthetic particles have been detected in all of the world's oceans and also in many freshwater systems, accumulating in sediment, on shorelines, suspended in surface waters, and being ingested by plankton, fish, birds, and marine mammals. While the occurrence of plastics in surface waters has been surveyed in a number of studies, the impacts of microplastics on marine organisms are still being elucidated. This highlight features three recent publications that explore the interactions of microplastics with planktonic organisms to clarify the effects of these pollutants on some of the ocean's smallest and most important inhabitants.

  4. LHC INAUGURATION, LHC Fest highlights: exhibition time!

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    David Gross, one of the twenty-one Nobel Laureates who have participated in the project.Tuesday 21 October 2008 Accelerating Nobels Colliding Charm, Atomic Cuisine, The Good Anomaly, A Quark Somewhere on the White Paper, Wire Proliferation, A Tale of Two Liquids … these are just some of the titles given to artworks by Physics Nobel Laureates who agreed to make drawings of their prize-winning discoveries (more or less reluctantly) during a special photo session. Science photographer Volker Steger made portraits of Physics Nobel Laureates and before the photo sessions he asked them to make a drawing of their most important discovery. The result is "Accelerating Nobels", an exhibition that combines unusual portraits of and original drawings by twenty-one Nobel laureates in physics whose work is closely related to CERN and the LHC. This exhibition will be one of the highlights of the LHC celebrations on 21 October in the SM18 hall b...

  5. Transport Task Force workshop: basic experiments highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linford, R.K. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Luckhardt, S. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (USA)); Lyon, J.F. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Navratil, G.A. (Columbia Univ., New York, NY (USA)); Schoenberg, K.F. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA))

    1990-01-01

    Selected topics are summarized from the Basic Experiments session of the Transport Task Force Workshop held August 21-24, 1989, in San Diego, California. This session included presentations on paradigm experiments, stellarators, reversed-field pinches, and advanced tokamaks. Recent advances in all of these areas illustrate the importance of these experiments in advancing our understanding of toroidal transport. Progress has been made in measuring the details of particle diffusion, isolating specific modes, measuring fluctuation variations with field geometry and beta, and comparing all these with theoretical predictions. The development of experimental tools for determining which fluctuations dominate transport are also reported. Continued significant advances are anticipated in a number of areas highlighted. (author).

  6. Transport Task Force workshop: basic experiments highlights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linford, R.K.; Luckhardt, S.; Lyon, J.F.; Navratil, G.A.; Schoenberg, K.F.

    1990-01-01

    Selected topics are summarized from the Basic Experiments session of the Transport Task Force Workshop held August 21-24, 1989, in San Diego, California. This session included presentations on paradigm experiments, stellarators, reversed-field pinches, and advanced tokamaks. Recent advances in all of these areas illustrate the importance of these experiments in advancing our understanding of toroidal transport. Progress has been made in measuring the details of particle diffusion, isolating specific modes, measuring fluctuation variations with field geometry and beta, and comparing all these with theoretical predictions. The development of experimental tools for determining which fluctuations dominate transport are also reported. Continued significant advances are anticipated in a number of areas highlighted. (author)

  7. Symmetric configurations highlighted by collective quantum coherence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Obster, Dennis [Radboud University, Institute for Mathematics, Astrophysics and Particle Physics, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Kyoto University, Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kyoto (Japan); Sasakura, Naoki [Kyoto University, Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kyoto (Japan)

    2017-11-15

    Recent developments in quantum gravity have shown the Lorentzian treatment to be a fruitful approach towards the emergence of macroscopic space-times. In this paper, we discuss another related aspect of the Lorentzian treatment: we argue that collective quantum coherence may provide a simple mechanism for highlighting symmetric configurations over generic non-symmetric ones. After presenting the general framework of the mechanism, we show the phenomenon in some concrete simple examples in the randomly connected tensor network, which is tightly related to a certain model of quantum gravity, i.e., the canonical tensor model. We find large peaks at configurations invariant under Lie-group symmetries as well as a preference for charge quantization, even in the Abelian case. In future study, this simple mechanism may provide a way to analyze the emergence of macroscopic space-times with global symmetries as well as various other symmetries existing in nature, which are usually postulated. (orig.)

  8. Physical Sciences 2007 Science & Technology Highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hazi, A U

    2008-04-07

    The Physical Sciences Directorate applies frontier physics and technology to grand challenges in national security. Our highly integrated and multidisciplinary research program involves collaborations throughout Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the National Nuclear Security Administration, the Department of Energy, and with academic and industrial partners. The Directorate has a budget of approximately $150 million, and a staff of approximately 350 employees. Our scientists provide expertise in condensed matter and high-pressure physics, plasma physics, high-energy-density science, fusion energy science and technology, nuclear and particle physics, accelerator physics, radiation detection, optical science, biotechnology, and astrophysics. This document highlights the outstanding research and development activities in the Physical Sciences Directorate that made news in 2007. It also summarizes the awards and recognition received by members of the Directorate in 2007.

  9. Highlights from the 9th Cachexia Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebner, Nicole; von Haehling, Stephan

    2017-06-01

    This article highlights updates of pathways as well as pre-clinical and clinical studies into the field of wasting disorders that were presented at the 9th Cachexia Conference held in Berlin, Germany, December 2016. This year, some interesting results from clinical trials and different new therapeutic targets were shown. This article presents the biological and clinical significance of different markers and new diagnostic tools and cut-offs of detecting skeletal muscle wasting. Effective treatments of cachexia and wasting disorders are urgently needed in order to improve the patients' quality of life and their survival. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Cachexia, Sarcopenia and Muscle published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of the Society on Sarcopenia, Cachexia and Wasting Disorders.

  10. Syndicate of renewable energies - Highlights 2016

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-01-01

    This publication first proposes a presentation of the SER (Syndicat des Energies Renouvelables, Syndicate of Renewable Energies), a professional body: missions, scope of action, members. It outlines its commitment in the French policy for energy transition as a major actor of the sector of renewable energies. It addresses the legal and regulatory framework as well as the economic framework and markets. It proposes brief presentations of transverse actions regarding power grids, overseas territories, the building sector and the international export. Some highlights related to ground-based wind power, renewable marine energies and offshore wind energy, solar photovoltaic energy, bio-energies (wood-fueled power plants for collective, tertiary and industrial sectors, biogas, biofuels and municipal wastes), domestic wood space heating, geothermal energy and hydroelectricity are mentioned. Actions in the field of communication are summarized, and projects for 2017 are briefly indicated

  11. ATOMLLL: atoms with shading and highlights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Max, N.L.; y.

    1979-01-01

    The ATOMS program, written at Bell Telephone Laboratory, is capable of determining the visible portions of a scene consisting of interpenetrating spheres and cylinders, put together to represent space-filling or ball-and-stick molecular models. The Lawrence Livermore Laboratory version contains enhancements to add shading and highlights, and to render the spheres on film as ellipses, so they will appear round when projected in various wide-screen formats. The visible parts of each sphere or cylinder are shaded by a minicomputer controlling the film recorder, thus releasing the main computer from transferring the millions of intensity values for each frame. The minicomputer is microprogrammed with an efficient algorithm for the intensities, which uses the color look-up tables in the film recorder to store the reflectance as a function of angle of incidence. 8 references

  12. AGILE Data Center and AGILE science highlights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pittori, C.

    2013-01-01

    AGILE is a scientific mission of the Italian Space Agency (ASI) with INFN, INAF e CIFS participation, devoted to gamma-ray astrophysics. The satellite is in orbit since April 23rd, 2007. Gamma-ray astrophysics above 100 MeV is an exciting field of astronomical sciences that has received a strong impulse in recent years. Despite the small size and budget, AGILE produced several important scientific results, among which the unexpected discovery of strong and rapid gamma-ray flares from the Crab Nebula. This discovery won to the AGILE PI and the AGILE Team the prestigious Bruno Rossi Prize for 2012, an international recognition in the field of high energy astrophysics. We present here the AGILE data center main activities, and we give an overview of the AGILE scientific highlights after 5 years of operations

  13. 2006 highlights according to the IEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lafon, M.

    2007-01-01

    The 2007 natural gas market review of the International energy agency (IEA) is this year subtitled: 'security in a globalizing market to 2015'. The review thus stresses on the 2006 highlights but reinforces the idea already expressed in the 2006 issue that energy security is now an inevitable topic. It offers also a prospective analysis of the natural gas market up to 2015 and devotes a full chapter to LNG development. As a matter of fact, the IEA considers that, from now to 2015, two thirds of the additional gas supplies will be in the form of LNG. The review supplies also some complements about some national markets. The present article reviews the most important points of this analysis. (J.S.)

  14. Physical Sciences 2007 Science and Technology Highlights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazi, A.U.

    2008-01-01

    The Physical Sciences Directorate applies frontier physics and technology to grand challenges in national security. Our highly integrated and multidisciplinary research program involves collaborations throughout Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the National Nuclear Security Administration, the Department of Energy, and with academic and industrial partners. The Directorate has a budget of approximately $150 million, and a staff of approximately 350 employees. Our scientists provide expertise in condensed matter and high-pressure physics, plasma physics, high-energy-density science, fusion energy science and technology, nuclear and particle physics, accelerator physics, radiation detection, optical science, biotechnology, and astrophysics. This document highlights the outstanding research and development activities in the Physical Sciences Directorate that made news in 2007. It also summarizes the awards and recognition received by members of the Directorate in 2007

  15. Brookhaven highlights, October 1978-September 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    These highlights present an overview of the major research and development achievements at Brookhaven National Laboratory from October 1978 to September 1979. Specific areas covered include: accelerator and high energy physics programs; high energy physics research; the AGS and improvements to the AGS; neutral beam development; heavy ion fusion; superconducting power cables; ISABELLE storage rings; the BNL Tandem accelerator; heavy ion experiments at the Tandem; the High Flux Beam Reactor; medium energy physics; nuclear theory; atomic and applied physics; solid state physics; neutron scattering studies; x-ray scattering studies; solid state theory; defects and disorder in solids; surface physics; the National Synchrotron Light Source ; Chemistry Department; Biology Department; Medical Department; energy sciences; environmental sciences; energy technology programs; National Center for Analysis of Energy Systems; advanced reactor systems; nuclear safety; National Nuclear Data Center; nuclear materials safeguards; Applied Mathematics Department; and support activities

  16. Biotransformation and bioactivation reactions - 2016 literature highlights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khojasteh, S Cyrus; Rietjens, Ivonne M C M; Dalvie, Deepak; Miller, Grover

    2017-08-01

    We are pleased to present a second annual issue highlighting a previous year's literature on biotransformation and bioactivation. Each contributor to this issue worked independently to review the articles published in 2016 and proposed three to four articles, which he or she believed would be of interest to the broader research community. In each synopsis, the contributing author summarized the procedures, analyses and conclusions as described in the original manuscripts. In the commentary sections, our authors offer feedback and highlight aspects of the work that may not be apparent from an initial reading of the article. To be fair, one should still read the original article to gain a more complete understanding of the work conducted. Most of the articles included in this review were published in Drug Metabolism and Disposition or Chemical Research in Toxicology, but attempts were made to seek articles in 25 other journals. Importantly, these articles are not intended to represent a consensus of the best papers of the year, as we did not want to make any arbitrary standards for this purpose, but rather they were chosen by each author for their notable findings and descriptions of novel metabolic pathways or biotransformations. I am pleased that Drs. Rietjens and Dalvie have again contributed to this annual review. We would like to welcome Grover P Miller as an author for this year's issue, and we thank Tom Baillie for his contributions to last year's edition. We have intentionally maintained a balance of authors such that two come from an academic setting and two come from industry. Finally, please drop us a note if you find this review helpful. We would be pleased to hear your opinions of our commentary, and we extend an invitation to anyone who would like to contribute to a future edition of this review. This article is dedicated to Professor Thomas Baillie for his exceptional contributions to the field of drug metabolism.

  17. Gene doping: gene delivery for olympic victory

    OpenAIRE

    Gould, David

    2012-01-01

    With one recently recommended gene therapy in Europe and a number of other gene therapy treatments now proving effective in clinical trials it is feasible that the same technologies will soon be adopted in the world of sport by unscrupulous athletes and their trainers in so called ‘gene doping’. In this article an overview of the successful gene therapy clinical trials is provided and the potential targets for gene doping are highlighted. Depending on whether a doping gene product is secreted...

  18. AGILE Highlights after Six Years in Orbit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlotta Pittori

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available AGILE is an ASI space mission in collaboration with INAF, INFN and CIFS, dedicated to the observation of the gamma-ray Universe in the 30 MeV - 50 GeV energy range, with simultaneous X-ray imaging capability in the 18-60 keV band. The AGILE satellite was launched on April 23rd, 2007, and produced several important scientic results, among which the unexpected discovery of strong ares from the Crab Nebula. This discovery won to the AGILE PI and the AGILE Team the Bruno Rossi Prize for 2012 by the High Energy Astrophysics division of the American Astronomical Society. Thanks to its sky monitoring capability and fast ground segment alert system, AGILE detected many Galactic and extragalactic sources: among other results AGILE discovered gamma-ray emission from the microquasar Cygnus X-3, detected many bright blazars, discovered several new gamma-ray pulsars, and discovered emission up to 100 MeV from Terrestrial Gamma-Ray Flashes. We present an overview of the main AGILE Data Center activities and the AGILE scientic highlights after 6 years of operations.

  19. LHC Highlights, from dream to reality

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    The idea of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) was born in the early 1980s. Although LEP (CERN’s previous large accelerator) was still under construction at that time, scientists were already starting to think about re-using the 27-kilometre ring for an even more powerful machine. Turning this ambitious scientific plan into reality proved to be an immensely complex task. Civil engineering work, state-of-the-art technologies, a new approach to data storage and analysis: many people worked hard for many years to accomplish all this.   Here are some of the highlights: 1984. A symposium organized in Lausanne, Switzerland, is the official starting point for the LHC. LHC prototype of the two beam pipes (1992). 1989. The first embryonic collaborations begin. 1992. A meeting in Evian, France, marks the beginning of the LHC experiments. 1994. The CERN Council approves the construction of the LHC accelerator. 1995. Japan becomes an Observer of CERN and announces a financial contribution to ...

  20. Argonne National Laboratory Research Highlights 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1988-01-01

    The research and development highlights are summarized. The world's brightest source of X-rays could revolutionize materials research. Test of a prototype insertion device, a key in achieving brilliant X-ray beams, have given the first glimpse of the machine's power. Superconductivity research focuses on the new materials' structure, economics and applications. Other physical science programs advance knowledge of material structures and properties, nuclear physics, molecular structure, and the chemistry and structure of coal. New programming approaches make advanced computers more useful. Innovative approaches to fighting cancer are being developed. More experiments confirm the passive safety of Argonne's Integral Fast Reactor concept. Device simplifies nuclear-waste processing. Advanced fuel cell could provide better mileage, more power than internal combustion engine. New instruments find leaks in underground pipe, measure sodium impurities in molten liquids, detect flaws in ceramics. New antibody findings may explain ability to fight many diseases. Cadmium in cigarettes linked to bone loss in women. Programs fight deforestation in Nepal. New technology could reduce acid rain, mitigate greenhouse effect, enhance oil recovery. Innovative approaches transfer Argonne-developed technology to private industry. Each year Argonne educational programs reach some 1200 students

  1. Highlights from past and future physics

    CERN Multimedia

    Daisy Yuhas

    2009-01-01

    A two-day symposium was held at CERN on 3 and 4 December in celebration of the fiftieth anniversary of the Proton Synchrotron and the twentieth anniversary of LEP. The symposium, entitled “From the Proton Synchrotron to the Large Hadron Collider- 50 Years of Nobel Memories in High-Energy Physics”, included a series of seminars reflecting on the past fifty years in particle physics and an exhibition highlighting CERN’s research over this period.   Lyn Evans, LHC project leader, addressing the audience gathered in the Main Auditorium during the symposium that celebrated the 50 years of the PS and the 20 years of LEP.  The events were well attended on both days. Thursday’s reception, to which the Director-General invited everyone working at CERN, attracted over 1200 people. The seminars drew about 500 people to the Main Auditorium and the Council Chamber each day, with at least as many on-line attendees. The symposium speakers, including thirteen No...

  2. Highlights on the IAEA project QUATRO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milano, F.

    2012-01-01

    The success of radiotherapy in term of prob- ability of local control of the tumor and the limiting factor in treatments in term of probability of complications are strictly depending on the accuracy and precision of the pa- tient treatment. An overall Quality Assurance programme (QAP) has been recognized as an essential tool to assure that the goals of radiotherapy are achieved. As part of a comprehensive approach to QAP an independent external audit is considered a very effective method of checking that the quality of activities in an Institution permits to achieve the required objectives. Since many years the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has audited Member States for radiotherapy dosimetry, for educating and training radio- therapy professionals and for reviewing the radiotherapy process. Recently a new approach has been developed and named ''Quality Assurance Team for Radiation Oncology (QUATRO)''. The principal aim of QUATRO is to review all the radiotherapy process, including organization, infra- structure, clinical and medical physics aspects of the radio- therapy services. It also includes a review of the hospital's professional competence with a view to quality improve- ment. The aim of this paper is to introduce and to highlight the QUATRO methodology describing its effectiveness on improving either the quality of the radiotherapy treatments and in general the management of the patient.

  3. Engineering sciences research highlights. Fiscal year 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tucker, E.F.; Dobratz, B.

    1984-05-01

    The Laboratory's overall mission is sixfold. We are charged with developing nuclear warheads for defense, technology for arms control, and new concepts for defense against nuclear attack; with supporting programs for both nonnuclear defense and energy research and development; and with advancing our knowledge of science and technology so that we can respond to other national needs. Major programs in support of this mission involve nuclear weapons, energy, environmental science, and basic research. Specific areas of investigation include the design, development, and testing of nuclear weapons; nuclear safeguards and security; inertial and magnetic fusion and nuclear, solar, fossil, and geothermal energy; and basic research in physics, chemistry, mathematics, engineering, and the computer and life sciences. With the staff and facilities maintained for these and other programs, the Laboratory can respond to specific national needs in virtually all areas of the physical and life sciences. Within the Laboratory's organization, most technical research activities are carried out in three directorates: Engineering Sciences; Physics and Mathematics; and Chemistry, Earth and Life Sciences. The activities highlighted here are examples of unclassified work carried out in the seven divisions that made up the Engineering Sciences Directorate at the end of fiscal year 1983. Brief descriptions of these divisions' goals and capabilities and summaries of selected projects illustrate the diversity of talent, expertise, and facilities maintained within the Engineering Sciences Directorate

  4. Serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE in bovine trypanotolerance: preliminary results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Berthier

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In Africa, trypanosomosis is a tsetse-transmitted disease which represents the most important constraint to livestock production. Several indigenous West African taurine (Bos taurus breeds, such as the Longhorn (N'Dama cattle are well known to control trypanosome infections. This genetic ability named "trypanotolerance" results from various biological mechanisms under multigenic control. The methodologies used so far have not succeeded in identifying the complete pool of genes involved in trypanotolerance. New post genomic biotechnologies such as transcriptome analyses are efficient in characterising the pool of genes involved in the expression of specific biological functions. We used the serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE technique to construct, from Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells of an N'Dama cow, 2 total mRNA transcript libraries, at day 0 of a Trypanosoma congolense experimental infection and at day 10 post-infection, corresponding to the peak of parasitaemia. Bioinformatic comparisons in the bovine genomic databases allowed the identification of 187 up- and down- regulated genes, EST and unknown functional genes. Identification of the genes involved in trypanotolerance will allow to set up specific microarray sets for further metabolic and pharmacological studies and to design field marker-assisted selection by introgression programmes.

  5. ASCO 2016: highlights in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartsch, Rupert; Bergen, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    At the 2016 ASCO Annual Meeting, several pertinent studies in the field of breast cancer were presented. MA17.R was the first randomized phase III trial to evaluate the prolongation of adjuvant aromatase-inhibitor (AI) therapy from 5 to 10 years; while a significant reduction of disease-free survival events was observed in the extended treatment group, the absolute difference was relatively small and longer endocrine therapy resulted in a higher fracture rate. A combined analysis of three North American trials emphasized the superiority of anthracycline containing adjuvant chemotherapy regimens compared with docetaxel/cyclophosphamide (TC), while the PANTHER trial investigated dose-dense tailored adjuvant treatment. In metastatic breast cancer, the main interest was on cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 4/6 inhibitors. In PALOMA-2, the addition of palbociclib to letrozole prolonged progression-free survival (PFS) from 14.5 to 24.8 months resulting in the longest PFS data ever reported in the first-line setting. A subgroup analysis of premenopausal patients accrued to PALOMA-3 indicated that in this patient subset, ovarian function suppression plus fulvestrant and palbociclib yielded results comparable to the postmenopausal population. ESR1 mutations were another focus of interest as these activating mutations in the gene coding for the estrogen receptor alpha apparently evolve under the selection pressure of AI therapy.

  6. Highlights from Johannesburg, Gauteng Province, South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Although the extraction of mineral wealth has been the major influence in the history of Johannesburg and the surrounding Witwatersrand regions (with about 45% of all gold ever mined coming from there), the discovery of now-famous hominid fossils at the Sterkfontein Caves, and the convening of the world's largest-ever conference on environment and development, are setting a new stage for the future. The United Nations began the second Development and Environment Conference in Johannesburg on August 26, 2002. This meeting addresses the implementation of international goals to fight poverty and protect the global environment that were established at the first such conference held in Rio de Janeiro in 1992. The Johannesburg summit involves about forty thousand participants, and perhaps 100 world leaders. One of several official opening ceremonies for the conference was held at the Sterkfontein Caves to recognize the outstanding universal value of the paleo-anthropological fossils found there.These views from the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) highlight a number of the land use, vegetation, and geological features found within Gauteng Province (including the urban center of Johannesburg and the capital city Pretoria) and parts of the North West and Free State Provinces. The image on the right displays vegetation in red hues and is a false-color view utilizing data from MISR's near-infrared, red and blue bands. Both the natural-color view (left) and the false-color version were acquired by MISR's nadir camera on June 16, 2002. The urban areas appear as gray-colored pixels in the natural-color view, and exhibit colors corresponding with the relative abundance of vegetation found in the urban parts of this arid region.The mountains trending east-west near the center of the images extend from Pretoria in the east to Rustenberg in the west. These ranges, the Magaliesberg and Witwatersberg, separate the low-lying, hotter bushveld to the north from the cooler

  7. Electric transport in the Netherlands. Highlights 2012; Elektrisch vervoer in Nederland. Highlights 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-03-15

    Businesses, social and educational institutions and governmental institutes work together to accelerate electric transport and to discover and exploit economic opportunities. In 2012, many activities were carried out and results achieved, of which the highlights are presented in this brochure [Dutch] Bedrijfsleven, maatschappelijke- en kennisinstellingen en overheden werken samen aan versnelling van elektrisch vervoer en het ontdekken en benutten van economische kansen. In 2012 werden veel activiteiten uitgevoerd en resultaten geboekt, waarvan in deze brochure verslag wordt gedaan.

  8. Towards a Moon Village : Community Workshops Highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foing, Bernard H.

    2016-07-01

    . References: [1] http://sci.esa.int/ilewg/ and https://ildwg.wordpress.com/ [2] Foing B. Moon exploration highlights and Moon Village introduction. [3] Young Lunar Explorers Report ESTEC Moon village sessions with community and young professionals.

  9. Difference between highlight and object colors enhances glossiness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanada, Mitsuhiko

    2012-06-01

    The effect of highlight and object colors on perception of glossiness was examined. Ten participants rated glossiness of object images. The color coordinates of objects and highlights were varied while luminance of each pixel was unchanged. Four colors were used for objects and highlights. Objects were perceived as glossier when the highlight color was different from the object color than when they were the same. Objects with some unnatural combinations of highlight and object colors were perceived to be as glossy as those with natural color combinations. The results suggested that differences between highlight and object colors enhance perceived glossiness and that perceived glossiness does not depend on naturalness of color combination for highlights and objects.

  10. Brookhaven highlights, October 1, 1989--September 30, 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowe, M.S.; Cohen, A.; Greenberg, D.; Seubert, L.; Kuper, J.B.H. (eds.)

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses research being conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Highlights from all the department are illustrated. The main topics are on accelerator development and applications. (LSP)

  11. Genes and Gene Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... correctly, a child can have a genetic disorder. Gene therapy is an experimental technique that uses genes to ... or prevent disease. The most common form of gene therapy involves inserting a normal gene to replace an ...

  12. Automatic Online Lecture Highlighting Based on Multimedia Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, Xiaoyin; Yang, Haojin; Meinel, Christoph

    2018-01-01

    Textbook highlighting is widely considered to be beneficial for students. In this paper, we propose a comprehensive solution to highlight the online lecture videos in both sentence- and segment-level, just as is done with paper books. The solution is based on automatic analysis of multimedia lecture materials, such as speeches, transcripts, and…

  13. Small Drinking Water Systems Communication and Outreach Highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    As part of our small drinking water systems efforts, this poster highlights several communications and outreach highlights that EPA's Office of Research and Development and Office of Water have been undertaking in collaboration with states and the Association of State Drinking Wa...

  14. Is Domain Highlighting Actually Helpful in Identifying Phishing Web Pages?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Aiping; Proctor, Robert W; Yang, Weining; Li, Ninghui

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of domain highlighting in helping users identify whether Web pages are legitimate or spurious. As a component of the URL, a domain name can be overlooked. Consequently, browsers highlight the domain name to help users identify which Web site they are visiting. Nevertheless, few studies have assessed the effectiveness of domain highlighting, and the only formal study confounded highlighting with instructions to look at the address bar. We conducted two phishing detection experiments. Experiment 1 was run online: Participants judged the legitimacy of Web pages in two phases. In Phase 1, participants were to judge the legitimacy based on any information on the Web page, whereas in Phase 2, they were to focus on the address bar. Whether the domain was highlighted was also varied. Experiment 2 was conducted similarly but with participants in a laboratory setting, which allowed tracking of fixations. Participants differentiated the legitimate and fraudulent Web pages better than chance. There was some benefit of attending to the address bar, but domain highlighting did not provide effective protection against phishing attacks. Analysis of eye-gaze fixation measures was in agreement with the task performance, but heat-map results revealed that participants' visual attention was attracted by the highlighted domains. Failure to detect many fraudulent Web pages even when the domain was highlighted implies that users lacked knowledge of Web page security cues or how to use those cues. Potential applications include development of phishing prevention training incorporating domain highlighting with other methods to help users identify phishing Web pages.

  15. Highlighting material structure with transmission electron diffraction correlation coefficient maps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiss, Ákos K.; Rauch, Edgar F.; Lábár, János L.

    2016-01-01

    Correlation coefficient maps are constructed by computing the differences between neighboring diffraction patterns collected in a transmission electron microscope in scanning mode. The maps are shown to highlight material structural features like grain boundaries, second phase particles or dislocations. The inclination of the inner crystal interfaces are directly deduced from the resulting contrast. - Highlights: • We propose a novel technique to image the structure of polycrystalline TEM-samples. • Correlation coefficients maps highlights the evolution of the diffracting signal. • 3D views of grain boundaries are provided for nano-particles or polycrystals.

  16. Special journal issue highlights IDRC-supported findings on ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2018-03-08

    Mar 8, 2018 ... Special journal issue highlights IDRC-supported findings on women's paid work ... An important aspect of women's economic empowerment is their participation in the labour ... Maternal health research concerns men too.

  17. EMSL Quarterly Highlights Report: FY 2008, 3rd Quarter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Showalter, Mary Ann

    2008-09-16

    The EMSL Quarterly Highlights Report covers the science, staff and user recognition, and publication activities that occurred during the 1st quarter (October 2007 - December 2007) of Fiscal Year 2008.

  18. EMSL Quarterly Highlights Report: 1st Quarter, FY08

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Showalter, Mary Ann

    2008-01-28

    The EMSL Quarterly Highlights Report covers the science, staff and user recognition, and publication activities that occurred during the 1st quarter (October 2007 - December 2007) of Fiscal Year 2008.

  19. Highlight: IDRC at the World Congress on Public Health 2015 ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-04-14

    Apr 14, 2016 ... ... and communication tools such as radio jingles and internet messages. ... They highlighted best practices in Thailand, which has an effective ... for Health Sciences, Kunming Medical University, Yunnan Province, China.

  20. 2016 Highlights of Ferry Operations in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    This publication highlights data collected by the 2016 NCFO. The Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS) conducted the NCFO from April through November 2016, collecting the operational characteristics of the 2015 calendar year ferry operations.

  1. FY17 Transportation and Hydrogen Systems Center Journal Publication Highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2017-12-08

    NREL's Transportation and Hydrogen Systems Center published 39 journal articles in fiscal year 2017 highlighting recent research in advanced vehicle technology, alternative fuels, and hydrogen systems.

  2. Highlight: Youth (Un)Employment: Global problems meet local ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-07-07

    Jul 7, 2016 ... ... because there is a huge knowledge gap between what we consider formal ... economic development programming, especially for women and youth. ... Highlight: Ankara workshop puts minimum wage on the G-20 radar.

  3. EMSL Quarterly Highlights Report: 1st Quarter, Fiscal Year 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Showalter, Mary Ann; Kathmann, Loel E.; Manke, Kristin L.

    2009-02-02

    The EMSL Quarterly Highlights Report covers the science, staff and user recognition, and publication activities that occurred during the 1st quarter (October 2008 - December 2008) of Fiscal Year 2009.

  4. Physical and Life Sciences 2008 Science & Technology Highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Correll, D L; Hazi, A U

    2009-05-06

    This document highlights the outstanding research and development activities in the Physical and Life Sciences Directorate that made news in 2008. It also summarizes the awards and recognition received by members of the Directorate in 2008.

  5. Mapping microbial ecosystems and spoilage-gene flow in breweries highlights patterns of contamination and resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Bokulich, Nicholas A; Bergsveinson, Jordyn; Ziola, Barry; Mills, David A

    2015-01-01

    eLife digest Many microbes?including bacteria and fungi?can affect the food and drink we consume, for better and for worse. Some spoil food, making it less tasty or even harmful to health. However, microbes can also be important ingredients: for example, yeast ferments malted barley sugars to make the alcohol and flavor of beer. Nowadays, many beers are made under carefully controlled conditions, where the only microbes in the beer should be the strain of yeast added to the barley sugars. A m...

  6. Gene doping: gene delivery for olympic victory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, David

    2013-08-01

    With one recently recommended gene therapy in Europe and a number of other gene therapy treatments now proving effective in clinical trials it is feasible that the same technologies will soon be adopted in the world of sport by unscrupulous athletes and their trainers in so called 'gene doping'. In this article an overview of the successful gene therapy clinical trials is provided and the potential targets for gene doping are highlighted. Depending on whether a doping gene product is secreted from the engineered cells or is retained locally to, or inside engineered cells will, to some extent, determine the likelihood of detection. It is clear that effective gene delivery technologies now exist and it is important that detection and prevention plans are in place. © 2012 The Author. British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology © 2012 The British Pharmacological Society.

  7. Highlights in emergency medicine medical education research: 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Susan E; Coates, Wendy C; Khun, Gloria J; Fisher, Jonathan; Shayne, Philip; Lin, Michelle

    2009-12-01

    The purpose of this article is to highlight medical education research studies published in 2008 that were methodologically superior and whose outcomes were pertinent to teaching and education in emergency medicine. Through a PubMed search of the English language literature in 2008, 30 medical education research studies were independently identified as hypothesis-testing investigations and measurements of educational interventions. Six reviewers independently rated and scored all articles based on eight anchors, four of which related to methodologic criteria. Articles were ranked according to their total rating score. A ranking agreement among the reviewers of 83% was established a priori as a minimum for highlighting articles in this review. Five medical education research studies met the a priori criteria for inclusion and are reviewed and summarized here. Four of these employed experimental or quasi-experimental methodology. Although technology was not a component of the structured literature search employed to identify the candidate articles for this review, 14 of the articles identified, including four of the five highlighted articles, employed or studied technology as a focus of the educational research. Overall, 36% of the reviewed studies were supported by funding; three of the highlighted articles were funded studies. This review highlights quality medical education research studies published in 2008, with outcomes of relevance to teaching and education in emergency medicine. It focuses on research methodology, notes current trends in the use of technology for learning in emergency medicine, and suggests future avenues for continued rigorous study in education.

  8. Genes and Social Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Robinson, Gene E.; Fernald, Russell D.; Clayton, David F.

    2008-01-01

    What specific genes and regulatory sequences contribute to the organization and functioning of brain circuits that support social behavior? How does social experience interact with information in the genome to modulate these brain circuits? Here we address these questions by highlighting progress that has been made in identifying and understanding two key “vectors of influence” that link genes, brain, and social behavior: 1) social information alters gene readout in the brain to influence beh...

  9. Transcriptomic analysis highlights epigenetic and transcriptional regulation during zygotic embryo development of Pinus pinaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vega-Bartol, José J; Simões, Marta; Lorenz, W Walter; Rodrigues, Andreia S; Alba, Rob; Dean, Jeffrey F D; Miguel, Célia M

    2013-08-30

    It is during embryogenesis that the plant body plan is established and the meristems responsible for all post-embryonic growth are specified. The molecular mechanisms governing conifer embryogenesis are still largely unknown. Their elucidation may contribute valuable information to clarify if the distinct features of embryo development in angiosperms and gymnosperms result from differential gene regulation. To address this issue, we have performed the first transcriptomic analysis of zygotic embryo development in a conifer species (Pinus pinaster) focusing our study in particular on regulatory genes playing important roles during plant embryo development, namely epigenetic regulators and transcription factors. Microarray analysis of P. pinaster zygotic embryogenesis was performed at five periods of embryo development from early developing to mature embryos. Our results show that most changes in transcript levels occurred in the first and the last embryo stage-to-stage transitions, namely early to pre-cotyledonary embryo and cotyledonary to mature embryo. An analysis of functional categories for genes that were differentially expressed through embryogenesis highlighted several epigenetic regulation mechanisms. While putative orthologs of transcripts associated with mechanisms that target transposable elements and repetitive sequences were strongly expressed in early embryogenesis, PRC2-mediated repression of genes seemed more relevant during late embryogenesis. On the other hand, functions related to sRNA pathways appeared differentially regulated across all stages of embryo development with a prevalence of miRNA functions in mid to late embryogenesis. Identification of putative transcription factor genes differentially regulated between consecutive embryo stages was strongly suggestive of the relevance of auxin responses and regulation of auxin carriers during early embryogenesis. Such responses could be involved in establishing embryo patterning. Later in

  10. Mental Health Disorders. Adolescent Health Highlight. Publication #2013-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphey, David; Barry, Megan; Vaughn, Brigitte

    2013-01-01

    Mental disorders are diagnosable conditions characterized by changes in thinking, mood, or behavior (or some combination of these) that can cause a person to feel stressed out and impair his or her ability to function. These disorders are common in adolescence. This "Adolescent Health Highlight" presents the warning signs of mental disorders;…

  11. HIV and Cancer Interaction Highlights Need to Address Disease Stigma

    Science.gov (United States)

    The global landscape of disease highlights disparities that exist between nations. An estimated 36 million people worldwide live with HIV and AIDS, of which only 1 million are located within the United States. While the diagnosis of a life-threatening disease can be devastating, individuals with HIV and AIDS frequently bear an additional burden of stigma and discrimination.

  12. Highlights from the 7th European Meeting on Molecular Diagnostics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dr. A.J.C. van den Brule, van den; Drs A.J.M. Loonen; Dr. R. Schuurman

    2012-01-01

    This report presents the highlights of the 7th European Meeting on Molecular Diagnostics held in Scheveningen, The Hague, The Netherlands, 12-14 October 2011. The areas covered included molecular diagnostics applications in medical microbiology, virology, pathology, hemato-oncology,clinical genetics

  13. Fabricating graphene supercapacitors: highlighting the impact of surfactants and moieties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownson, Dale A C; Banks, Craig E

    2012-02-01

    We highlight the impact of surfactants, routinely used in the fabrication of graphene, which can significantly influence the performance of supercapacitors. Through the utilisation of various graphitic forms we offer insight into the design and fabrication of graphene based supercapacitors. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2012

  14. NCI intramural research highlighted at 2014 AACR meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    This year’s American Association for Cancer Research meeting featured plenary talks by two NCI scientists, Steven Rosenberg, M.D., and Louis Staudt, M.D., Ph.D., that highlighted the challenges in developing varied and potentially synergistic treatments f

  15. Spring Research Festival Highlighted on WHAG-TV | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    WHAG-TV (Hagerstown, Md.) visited Fort Detrick to highlight the 2015 Spring Research Festival (SRF), sponsored by the National Interagency Confederation for Biological Research (NICBR). Visit the WHAG-TV website to see the video broadcast, which aired May 6. The video was produced by WHAG Reporter Mallory Sofastaii. The video featured Linganore High School senior Rebecca

  16. Tobacco Use. Adolescent Health Highlight. Publication #2012-33

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphey, David; Barry, Megan; Vaughn, Brigitte; Terzian, Mary

    2012-01-01

    Cigarette smoking has steadily declined among adolescents during the last fifteen years, although use of some tobacco products, like cigars, has seen recent increases. However, large numbers of teens continue to use tobacco products. This "Adolescent Health Highlight" presents key research findings; describes prevalence and trends; illustrates…

  17. Highlights of the 8th International Veterinary Immunology Symposium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veterinary immunologists have expanded understanding of the immune systems for our companion animals and developed new vaccines and therapeutics. This manuscript summarizes the highlights of the 8th International Veterinary Immunology Symposium (8 th IVIS) held August 15th-19th, 2007, in Ouro Preto,...

  18. The Shortcomings of Medical Education Highlighted through Film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Pranav

    2012-01-01

    The aims of this report are to highlight the shortcomings in medical education. To use a student made short film as an example of how issues that cause medical student distress can be displayed. To show that the process of film-making is a useful tool in reflection. To display that film is an effective device in raising awareness. (Contains 3…

  19. Geothermal Today: 2003 Geothermal Technologies Program Highlights (Revised)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2004-05-01

    This outreach publication highlights milestones and accomplishments of the DOE Geothermal Technologies Program for 2003. Included in this publication are discussions of geothermal fundamentals, enhanced geothermal systems, direct-use applications, geothermal potential in Idaho, coating technology, energy conversion R&D, and the GeoPowering the West initiative.

  20. Highlights from the ATLAS experiment at CERN LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Tsukerman, Ilya; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    Highlights from the ATLAS Experiment at the LHC are presented. Results shown are mostly based on the analysis of 2015-2016 year dataset which corresponds to the luminosity 36 inverse fb. Mainly recent measurements of Higgs boson production and decay are discussed while only summary of summaries is given for the SM processes, top production, SUSY and Exotics.

  1. Medicaid Highlights: Mental-Behavioral Health Data: 2001 NHIS

    OpenAIRE

    Lied, Terry R.

    2004-01-01

    These data highlights are based on analysis of the 2001 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) public use data (http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nhis.htm). NHIS is a multi-purpose survey conducted by the National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. NHIS has been conducted continuously since 1957.

  2. Highlighting material structure with transmission electron diffraction correlation coefficient maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, Ákos K; Rauch, Edgar F; Lábár, János L

    2016-04-01

    Correlation coefficient maps are constructed by computing the differences between neighboring diffraction patterns collected in a transmission electron microscope in scanning mode. The maps are shown to highlight material structural features like grain boundaries, second phase particles or dislocations. The inclination of the inner crystal interfaces are directly deduced from the resulting contrast. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Highlights of the new U.S. Energy Policy Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rusche, B.C.

    1982-01-01

    This paper gives the highlights of the New U.S. Energy Policy Plan, a reformulation of policies affecting energy, as part of President Reagan's comprehensive Program for Economic Recovery. A survey is given of the different energy sources and their importances now and in the future along with a definition of the government's and the private sector's roles in energy production. (orig.)

  4. Advanced Education and Technology Business Plan, 2009-12. Highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberta Advanced Education and Technology, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Advanced Education and Technology provides strategic leadership for the development of the next generation economy in Alberta through the provision of accessible, affordable and quality learning opportunities for all Albertans and support for a dynamic and integrated innovation system. This paper provides the highlights of the business plan of the…

  5. Advanced Education and Technology Business Plan, 2010-13. Highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberta Advanced Education and Technology, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The Ministry of Advanced Education and Technology envisions Alberta's prosperity through innovation and lifelong learning. Advanced Education and Technology's mission is to lead the development of a knowledge-driven future through a dynamic and integrated advanced learning and innovation system. This paper presents the highlights of the business…

  6. Global gene expression analysis highlights microgravity sensitive key genes in soleus and EDL of 30 days space flown mice

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Microgravity exposure as well as chronic muscle disuse are two of the main causes of physiological adaptive skeletal muscle atrophy in humans and murine animals in...

  7. Gene doping in sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unal, Mehmet; Ozer Unal, Durisehvar

    2004-01-01

    Gene or cell doping is defined by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) as "the non-therapeutic use of genes, genetic elements and/or cells that have the capacity to enhance athletic performance". New research in genetics and genomics will be used not only to diagnose and treat disease, but also to attempt to enhance human performance. In recent years, gene therapy has shown progress and positive results that have highlighted the potential misuse of this technology and the debate of 'gene doping'. Gene therapies developed for the treatment of diseases such as anaemia (the gene for erythropoietin), muscular dystrophy (the gene for insulin-like growth factor-1) and peripheral vascular diseases (the gene for vascular endothelial growth factor) are potential doping methods. With progress in gene technology, many other genes with this potential will be discovered. For this reason, it is important to develop timely legal regulations and to research the field of gene doping in order to develop methods of detection. To protect the health of athletes and to ensure equal competitive conditions, the International Olympic Committee, WADA and International Sports Federations have accepted performance-enhancing substances and methods as being doping, and have forbidden them. Nevertheless, the desire to win causes athletes to misuse these drugs and methods. This paper reviews the current status of gene doping and candidate performance enhancement genes, and also the use of gene therapy in sports medicine and ethics of genetic enhancement. Copyright 2004 Adis Data Information BV

  8. Transcriptomic changes in the pre-implantation uterus highlight histotrophic nutrition of the developing marsupial embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittington, Camilla M; O'Meally, Denis; Laird, Melanie K; Belov, Katherine; Thompson, Michael B; McAllan, Bronwyn M

    2018-02-05

    Early pregnancy is a critical time for successful reproduction; up to half of human pregnancies fail before the development of the definitive chorioallantoic placenta. Unlike the situation in eutherian mammals, marsupial pregnancy is characterised by a long pre-implantation period prior to the development of the short-lived placenta, making them ideal models for study of the uterine environment promoting embryonic survival pre-implantation. Here we present a transcriptomic study of pre-implantation marsupial pregnancy, and identify differentially expressed genes in the Sminthopsis crassicaudata uterus involved in metabolism and biosynthesis, transport, immunity, tissue remodelling, and uterine receptivity. Interestingly, almost one quarter of the top 50 genes that are differentially upregulated in early pregnancy are putatively involved in histotrophy, highlighting the importance of nutrient transport to the conceptus prior to the development of the placenta. This work furthers our understanding of the mechanisms underlying survival of pre-implantation embryos in the earliest live bearing ancestors of mammals.

  9. Luminescence spectroscopy with synchrotron radiation: History, highlights, future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmerer, Georg

    2006-01-01

    Luminescence spectroscopy and the investigation of dynamical processes with synchrotron radiation (SR) started about 35 years ago in nearly all SR laboratories existing at that time. In the present paper, the pioneering experiments are particularly emphasized. The exciting development is illustrated presenting highlights for the whole period from the beginning to the present day. The highlights are taken from fields like exciton self-trapping, inelastic electron-electron scattering, optically stimulated desorption, cross luminescence, or probing of cluster properties with luminescence spectroscopic methods. More technological aspects play a role in present day's experiments, like quantum cutting in rare-earth-doped insulators. Promising two-photon excitation and light amplification experiments with SR will be included, as well as the first results obtained in a luminescence experiment with selective Vaccum ultraviolet-free electron laser excitation. Finally, a few ideas concerning the future development of luminescence spectroscopy with SR will be sketched

  10. Using Publication Metrics to Highlight Academic Productivity and Research Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Christopher R.; Cone, David C.; Sarli, Cathy C.

    2016-01-01

    This article provides a broad overview of widely available measures of academic productivity and impact using publication data and highlights uses of these metrics for various purposes. Metrics based on publication data include measures such as number of publications, number of citations, the journal impact factor score, and the h-index, as well as emerging metrics based on document-level metrics. Publication metrics can be used for a variety of purposes for tenure and promotion, grant applications and renewal reports, benchmarking, recruiting efforts, and administrative purposes for departmental or university performance reports. The authors also highlight practical applications of measuring and reporting academic productivity and impact to emphasize and promote individual investigators, grant applications, or department output. PMID:25308141

  11. Highlights of articles published in annals of nuclear medicine 2016

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jadvar, Hossein

    2017-01-01

    This article is the first installment of highlights of selected articles published during 2016 in the Annals of Nuclear Medicine, an official peer-reviewed journal of the Japanese Society of Nuclear Medicine. A companion article highlighting selected articles published during 2016 in the European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, which is the official peer-reviewed journal of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine, will also appear in the Annals Nuclear Medicine. This new initiative by the respective journals will continue as an annual endeavor and is anticipated to not only enhance the scientific collaboration between Europe and Japan but also facilitate global partnership in the field of nuclear medicine and molecular imaging. (orig.)

  12. Highlights of articles published in annals of nuclear medicine 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jadvar, Hossein [University of Southern California, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2017-10-15

    This article is the first installment of highlights of selected articles published during 2016 in the Annals of Nuclear Medicine, an official peer-reviewed journal of the Japanese Society of Nuclear Medicine. A companion article highlighting selected articles published during 2016 in the European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, which is the official peer-reviewed journal of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine, will also appear in the Annals Nuclear Medicine. This new initiative by the respective journals will continue as an annual endeavor and is anticipated to not only enhance the scientific collaboration between Europe and Japan but also facilitate global partnership in the field of nuclear medicine and molecular imaging. (orig.)

  13. OSART mission highlights related to on-the-job training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazour, T.; Hide, K.

    1996-01-01

    This paper summarizes the highlights, related to the topic of on-the-job training (OJT), for Agency OSART missions conducted since 1990 (a total of 27 missions). Recommendations and suggestions for improvements related to on-the-job training and qualification programmes are discussed, as well as Good Practices and Good Performances. For Good Practices and Good Performances, the plant is identified to aid in follow-up by meeting participants. For recommendations and suggestions, the number of plants that had recommendations/findings in this area are identified by a number in parentheses after the item. The paper takes a broad approach toward highlights that are related to OJT. For example, there have been a number of OSART recommendations and suggestions concerning responsibilities, authorities and interfaces for NPP activities. These recommendations and suggestions relate not only to responsibilities and interfaces for on-the-job training and qualification programmes, but also to other areas as well

  14. Highlighted requests of neutron nuclear data measurements for fission reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    Highlighted requests were selected from lists of requests for neutron nuclear Data measurements. This work was made by WRENDA Working Group of Japanese Nuclear Data Committee in response to an action of the NEANDC. This will be submitted to a NEA meeting on request lists. Compiled requests in this note correspond finally to the parts of the WRENDA 76/77 with some modifications and additional comments. (auth.)

  15. NRC safety research in support of regulation. Selected highlights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-05-01

    The report presents selected highlights of how research has contributed to the regulatory effort. It explains the research role of the NRC and nuclear safety research contributions in the areas of: pressure vessel integrity, piping, small- and large-break loss-of-coolant accidents, hydrogen and containment, source term analysis, seismic hazards and high-level waste management. The report also provides a summary of current and future research directions in support of regulation

  16. New highlights on stroma–epithelial interactions in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen; Medina, Daniel

    2005-01-01

    Although the stroma in which carcinomas arise has been previously regarded as a bystander to the clonal expansion and acquisition of malignant characteristics of tumor cells, it is now generally acknowledged that stromal changes are required for the establishment of cancer. In the present article, we discuss three recent publications that highlight the complex role the stroma has during the development of cancer and the potential for targeting the stroma by therapeutic approaches

  17. Tourette syndrome research highlights 2015 [version 1; referees: 3 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheryl A. Richards

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available We present selected highlights from research that appeared during 2015 on Tourette syndrome and other tic disorders. Topics include phenomenology, comorbidities, developmental course, genetics, animal models, neuroimaging, electrophysiology, pharmacology, and treatment. We briefly summarize articles whose results we believe may lead to new treatments, additional research or modifications in current models of TS.

  18. Nuclear fuel waste management - biosphere program highlights - 1978 to 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zach, R

    1997-07-01

    The biosphere program in support of the development of the disposal concept for Canadian nuclear fuel waste since 1978 is scheduled for close-out. AECL`s Environmental Science Branch (ESB) was mainly responsible for work in this program. In order to preserve as much information as possible, this report highlights many of the key achievements of the program, particularly those related to the development of the BIOTRAC biosphere model and its supporting research. This model was used for the assessment and review of the disposal concept in an environmental impact statement (EIS). The report also treats highlights related to alternative models, external scientific/technical reviews, EIS feedback, and the international BIOMOVS model validation program. Furthermore, it highlights basic aspects of future modelling and research needs in relation to siting a disposal facility. In this, feedback from the various reviews and the EIS is taken into account. Appendices of the report include listings of key ESB staff involved in the program, all the scientific/technical reports and papers produced under the program, contracts let to outside agencies, and issues raised by various participants or intervenors during the EIS review. Although the report is concerned with close-out of the biosphere program, it also provides valuable information for a continuing program concerned with siting a disposal facility. One of the conclusions of the report is that such a program is essential for successfully siting such a facility. (author) Refs.

  19. Nuclear fuel waste management - biosphere program highlights - 1978 to 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zach, R.

    1997-07-01

    The biosphere program in support of the development of the disposal concept for Canadian nuclear fuel waste since 1978 is scheduled for close-out. AECL's Environmental Science Branch (ESB) was mainly responsible for work in this program. In order to preserve as much information as possible, this report highlights many of the key achievements of the program, particularly those related to the development of the BIOTRAC biosphere model and its supporting research. This model was used for the assessment and review of the disposal concept in an environmental impact statement (EIS). The report also treats highlights related to alternative models, external scientific/technical reviews, EIS feedback, and the international BIOMOVS model validation program. Furthermore, it highlights basic aspects of future modelling and research needs in relation to siting a disposal facility. In this, feedback from the various reviews and the EIS is taken into account. Appendices of the report include listings of key ESB staff involved in the program, all the scientific/technical reports and papers produced under the program, contracts let to outside agencies, and issues raised by various participants or intervenors during the EIS review. Although the report is concerned with close-out of the biosphere program, it also provides valuable information for a continuing program concerned with siting a disposal facility. One of the conclusions of the report is that such a program is essential for successfully siting such a facility. (author)

  20. Comparative Analysis Highlights Variable Genome Content of Wheat Rusts and Divergence of the Mating Loci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina A. Cuomo

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Three members of the Puccinia genus, Puccinia triticina (Pt, P. striiformis f.sp. tritici (Pst, and P. graminis f.sp. tritici (Pgt, cause the most common and often most significant foliar diseases of wheat. While similar in biology and life cycle, each species is uniquely adapted and specialized. The genomes of Pt and Pst were sequenced and compared to that of Pgt to identify common and distinguishing gene content, to determine gene variation among wheat rust pathogens, other rust fungi, and basidiomycetes, and to identify genes of significance for infection. Pt had the largest genome of the three, estimated at 135 Mb with expansion due to mobile elements and repeats encompassing 50.9% of contig bases; in comparison, repeats occupy 31.5% for Pst and 36.5% for Pgt. We find all three genomes are highly heterozygous, with Pst [5.97 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs/kb] nearly twice the level detected in Pt (2.57 SNPs/kb and that previously reported for Pgt. Of 1358 predicted effectors in Pt, 784 were found expressed across diverse life cycle stages including the sexual stage. Comparison to related fungi highlighted the expansion of gene families involved in transcriptional regulation and nucleotide binding, protein modification, and carbohydrate degradation enzymes. Two allelic homeodomain pairs, HD1 and HD2, were identified in each dikaryotic Puccinia species along with three pheromone receptor (STE3 mating-type genes, two of which are likely representing allelic specificities. The HD proteins were active in a heterologous Ustilago maydis mating assay and host-induced gene silencing (HIGS of the HD and STE3 alleles reduced wheat host infection.

  1. Phylogenetic profiles of all membrane transport proteins of the malaria parasite highlight new drug targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    January Weiner 3rd

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In order to combat the on-going malaria epidemic, discovery of new drug targets remains vital. Proteins that are essential to survival and specific to malaria parasites are key candidates. To survive within host cells, the parasites need to acquire nutrients and dispose of waste products across multiple membranes. Additionally, like all eukaryotes, they must redistribute ions and organic molecules between their various internal membrane bound compartments. Membrane transport proteins mediate all of these processes and are considered important mediators of drug resistance as well as drug targets in their own right. Recently, using advanced experimental genetic approaches and streamlined life cycle profiling, we generated a large collection of Plasmodium berghei gene deletion mutants and assigned essential gene functions, highlighting potential targets for prophylactic, therapeutic, and transmission-blocking anti-malarial drugs. Here, we present a comprehensive orthology assignment of all Plasmodium falciparum putative membrane transport proteins and provide a detailed overview of the associated essential gene functions obtained through experimental genetics studies in human and murine model parasites. Furthermore, we discuss the phylogeny of selected potential drug targets identified in our functional screen. We extensively discuss the results in the context of the functional assignments obtained using gene targeting available to date.

  2. Optically Highlighting Basement Membrane Components in C. elegans

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2015-01-01

    Authors: Elliott Hagedorn & David Sherwood ### Abstract Green fluorescent protein (GFP) and other genetically encoded fluorescent proteins provide a means to study gene expression pattern and protein localization in living tissues. Recently discovered GFP-like fluorophores and engineered variants have further expanded the fluorescent protein toolkit for in vivo imaging. Here we describe a technique using transgenic C. elegans that contain laminin or type IV collagen fused to the green...

  3. Ranking Highlights in Personal Videos by Analyzing Edited Videos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Min; Farhadi, Ali; Chen, Tseng-Hung; Seitz, Steve

    2016-11-01

    We present a fully automatic system for ranking domain-specific highlights in unconstrained personal videos by analyzing online edited videos. A novel latent linear ranking model is proposed to handle noisy training data harvested online. Specifically, given a targeted domain such as "surfing," our system mines the YouTube database to find pairs of raw and their corresponding edited videos. Leveraging the assumption that an edited video is more likely to contain highlights than the trimmed parts of the raw video, we obtain pair-wise ranking constraints to train our model. The learning task is challenging due to the amount of noise and variation in the mined data. Hence, a latent loss function is incorporated to mitigate the issues caused by the noise. We efficiently learn the latent model on a large number of videos (about 870 min in total) using a novel EM-like procedure. Our latent ranking model outperforms its classification counterpart and is fairly competitive compared with a fully supervised ranking system that requires labels from Amazon Mechanical Turk. We further show that a state-of-the-art audio feature mel-frequency cepstral coefficients is inferior to a state-of-the-art visual feature. By combining both audio-visual features, we obtain the best performance in dog activity, surfing, skating, and viral video domains. Finally, we show that impressive highlights can be detected without additional human supervision for seven domains (i.e., skating, surfing, skiing, gymnastics, parkour, dog activity, and viral video) in unconstrained personal videos.

  4. Highlights from the early (and pre-) history of reliability engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saleh, J.H.; Marais, K.

    2006-01-01

    Reliability is a popular concept that has been celebrated for years as a commendable attribute of a person or an artifact. From its modest beginning in 1816-the word reliability was first coined by Samuel T. Coleridge-reliability grew into an omnipresent attribute with qualitative and quantitative connotations that pervades every aspect of our present day technologically intensive world. In this short communication, we highlight key events and the history of ideas that led to the birth of Reliability Engineering, and its development in the subsequent decades. We first argue that statistics and mass production were the enablers in the rise of this new discipline, and the catalyst that accelerated the coming of this new discipline was the (unreliability of the) vacuum tube. We highlight the foundational role of AGREE report in 1957 in the birth of reliability engineering, and discuss the consolidation of numerous efforts in the 1950s into a coherent new technical discipline. We show that an evolution took place in the discipline in the following two decades along two directions: first, there was an increased specialization in the discipline (increased sophistication of statistical techniques, and the rise of a new branch focused on the actual physics of failure of components, Reliability Physics); second, there occurred a shift in the emphasis of the discipline from a component-centric to an emphasis on system-level attributes (system reliability, availability, safety). Finally, in selecting the particular events and highlights in the history of ideas that led to the birth and subsequent development of reliability engineering, we acknowledge a subjective component in this work and make no claims to exhaustiveness

  5. Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials Program: Progress and Highlights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D. Ray Johnson; Sidney Diamond

    2000-01-01

    The Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials Program was begun in 1997 to support the enabling materials needs of the DOE Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies (OHVT). The technical agenda for the program grew out of the technology roadmap for the OHVT and includes efforts in materials for: fuel systems, exhaust aftertreatment, valve train, air handling, structural components, electrochemical propulsion, natural gas storage, and thermal management. A five-year program plan was written in early 2000, following a stakeholders workshop. The technical issues and planned and ongoing projects are discussed. Brief summaries of several technical highlights are given

  6. Highlights of the SM Physics at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Haijun; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    This talk shows the recent highlights of the SM physics from the ATLAS and CMS experiments at the LHC. It includes the precision measurements of diboson, triboson, vector boson scattering, and indirect search for new physics via anomalous triple/quartic gauge boson couplings etc. Some latest results from LHC Run2 @ 13 TeV will also be presented. The talk was invited to present at the 5th KIAS Workshop on Particle Physics and Cosmology in Seoul on November 9-13, 2015.

  7. Clinical highlights from the 2016 European Respiratory Society International Congress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Kahn

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This article contains highlights and a selection of the scientific advances from the European Respiratory Society (ERS Clinical Assembly (Assembly 1 and its six respective groups (Groups 1.1–1.6 that were presented at the 2016 ERS International Congress in London, UK. The most relevant topics for clinicians will be discussed, covering a wide range of areas including clinical problems, rehabilitation and chronic care, thoracic imaging, interventional pulmonology, diffuse and parenchymal lung diseases, and general practice and primary care. In this comprehensive review, the newest research and actual data will be discussed and put into perspective.

  8. Hot subluminous stars: Highlights from the MUCHFUSS and Kepler missions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geier S.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Research into hot subdwarf stars is progressing rapidly. We present recent important discoveries. First we review the knowledge about magnetic fields in hot subdwarfs and highlight the first detection of a highly-magnetic, helium-rich sdO star. We briefly summarize recent discoveries based on Kepler light curves and finally introduce the closest known sdB+WD binary discovered by the MUCHFUSS project and discuss its relevance as a progenitor of a double-detonation type Ia supernova.

  9. Realizing a Clean Energy Future: Highlights of NREL Analysis (Brochure)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2013-12-01

    Profound energy system transformation is underway. In Hawaiian mythology, Maui set out to lasso the sun in order to capture its energy. He succeeded. That may have been the most dramatic leap forward in clean energy systems that the world has known. Until now. Today, another profound transformation is underway. A combination of forces is taking us from a carbon-centric, inefficient energy system to one that draws from diverse energy sources - including the sun. NREL analysis is helping guide energy systems policy and investment decisions through this transformation. This brochure highlights NREL analysis accomplishments in the context of four thematic storylines.

  10. Status, performance and scientific highlights from the MAGIC telescope system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doert, Marlene [Technische Universitaet Dortmund (Germany); Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum (Germany); Collaboration: MAGIC-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    The MAGIC telescopes are a system of two 17 m Imaging Air Cherenkov Telescopes, which are located at 2200 m above sea level at the Roque de Los Muchachos Observatory on the Canary Island of La Palma. In this presentation, we report on recent scientific highlights gained from MAGIC observations in the galactic and the extragalactic regime. We also present the current status and performance of the MAGIC system after major hardware upgrades in the years 2011 to 2014 and give an overview of future plans.

  11. Two interesting cases highlighting an oblivious specialty of psychoneuroendocrinology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hari Kumar, K V S; Dhull, Pawan; Somasekharan, Manoj; Seshadri, K

    2012-01-01

    Psychoneuroendocrinology deals with the overlap disorders pertaining to three different specialties. Awareness about the somatic manifestations of psychiatric diseases and vice versa is a must for all the clinicians. The knowledge of this interlinked specialty is essential because of the obscure presentation of certain disorders. Our first case was treated as depressive disorder, whereas the diagnosis was hypogonadism with empty sella. Our second patient was managed as schizophrenia and the evaluation revealed bilateral basal ganglia calcification and a diagnosis of Fahr's disease. We report these cases for their unusual presentation and to highlight the importance of this emerging specialty.

  12. 50 years of Dutch immunology--founders, institutions, highlights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gmelig-Meyling, Frits H J; Meyaard, Linde; Mebius, Reina E

    2014-12-01

    At the occasion of the 50th anniversary of the Dutch Society for Immunology (DSI, de Nederlandse Vereniging voor Immunologie), this contribution deals with some highlights of 50 years of Immunology in the Netherlands. It narrates about the founders and first board members of the DSI, their institutes, progeny and patrimony, describes major centers of immunological activities, mentions key persons in the field, and touches upon some events dear to the Society and its members. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Highlights of SPring-8 BL23SU in 2001

    CERN Document Server

    Agui, A; Nakatani, T; Yokoya, A; Yoshigoe, A

    2002-01-01

    BL23SU in SPring-8 is a soft x-ray beamline for the material science project in JAERI. The insertion device, monochromator and other beamline equipments have been installed or developed. The beamline maintenance has also been continued. We report highlights of these activities for the BL23SU in 2001. Specially, it has proceeded with the countermeasure against the rise in the maximum radiant power, toward the low-energy operation realization. And, improvement in that precision proceeds through the COD correlation to the ID drive as well.

  14. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory for FY2003. Annual Highlights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, Carol A.; DeMeo, Anthony R.

    2004-01-01

    The Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory FY2003 Annual Highlights report provides a summary of the activities at the Laboratory for the fiscal year--1 October 2002 through 30 September 2003. The report includes the Laboratory's Mission and Vision Statements, a message ''From the Director,'' summaries of the research and engineering activities by project, and sections on Technology Transfer, the Graduate and Science Education Programs, Awards and Honors garnered by the Laboratory and the employees, and the Year in Pictures. There is also a listing of the Laboratory's publications for the year and a section of the abbreviations, acronyms, and symbols used throughout the report. In the PDF document, links have been created from the Table of Contents to each section. You can also return to the Table of Contents from the beginning page of each section. The PPPL Highlights for fiscal year 2003 is also available in hardcopy format. To obtain a copy e-mail Publications and Reports at: pub-reports at pppl.gov. Be sure to include your complete mailing address

  15. Coated Particle and Deep Burn Fuels Monthly Highlights December 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snead, Lance Lewis; Bell, Gary L.; Besmann, Theodore M.

    2011-01-01

    During FY 2011 the CP and DB Program will report Highlights on a monthly basis, but will no longer produce Quarterly Progress Reports. Technical details that were previously included in the quarterly reports will be included in the appropriate Milestone Reports that are submitted to FCRD Program Management. These reports will also be uploaded to the Deep Burn website. The Monthly Highlights report for November 2010, ORNL/TM-2010/323, was distributed to program participants on December 9, 2010. The final Quarterly for FY 2010, Deep Burn Program Quarterly Report for July - September 2010, ORNL/TM-2010/301, was announced to program participants and posted to the website on December 28, 2010. This report discusses the following: (1) Thermochemical Data and Model Development - (a) Thermochemical Modeling, (b) Core Design Optimization in the HTR (high temperature helium-cooled reactor) Pebble Bed Design (INL), (c) Radiation Damage and Properties; (2) TRISO (tri-structural isotropic) Development - (a) TRU (transuranic elements) Kernel Development, (b) Coating Development; (3) LWR Fully Ceramic Fuel - (a) FCM Fabrication Development, (b) FCM Irradiation Testing (ORNL); (4) Fuel Performance and Analytical Analysis - Fuel Performance Modeling (ORNL).

  16. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory FY2003 Annual Highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Editors: Carol A. Phillips; Anthony R. DeMeo

    2004-08-23

    The Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory FY2003 Annual Highlights report provides a summary of the activities at the Laboratory for the fiscal year--1 October 2002 through 30 September 2003. The report includes the Laboratory's Mission and Vision Statements, a message ''From the Director,'' summaries of the research and engineering activities by project, and sections on Technology Transfer, the Graduate and Science Education Programs, Awards and Honors garnered by the Laboratory and the employees, and the Year in Pictures. There is also a listing of the Laboratory's publications for the year and a section of the abbreviations, acronyms, and symbols used throughout the report. In the PDF document, links have been created from the Table of Contents to each section. You can also return to the Table of Contents from the beginning page of each section. The PPPL Highlights for fiscal year 2003 is also available in hardcopy format. To obtain a copy e-mail Publications and Reports at: pub-reports@pppl.gov. Be sure to include your complete mailing address

  17. CO2 Emissions From Fuel Combustion. Highlights. 2013 Edition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-07-01

    In the lead-up to the UN climate negotiations in Warsaw, the latest information on the level and growth of CO2 emissions, their source and geographic distribution will be essential to lay the foundation for a global agreement. To provide input to and support for the UN process, the IEA is making available for free download the ''Highlights'' version of CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion now for sale on IEA Bookshop. This annual publication contains, for more than 140 countries and regions: estimates of CO2 emissions from 1971 to 2011; selected indicators such as CO2/GDP, CO2/capita, CO2/TPES and CO2/kWh; a decomposition of CO2 emissions into driving factors; and CO2emissions from international marine and aviation bunkers, key sources, and other relevant information. The nineteenth session of the Conference of the Parties to the Climate Change Convention (COP-19), in conjunction with the ninth meeting of the Parties to the Kyoto Protocol (CMP 9), met in Warsaw, Poland from 11 to 22 November 2013. This volume of ''Highlights'', drawn from the full-scale study, was specially designed for delegations and observers of the meeting in Warsaw.

  18. Brugada Syndrome and Pregnancy: Highlights on Antenatal and Prenatal Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Giambanco

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Brugada syndrome is characterized by a disruption of heart’s normal rhythm. It is an autosomal dominant disease due to a mutation of SNC5A gene. Its prevalence is low all over the world, but it is a lethal disease. Sudden cardiac death is the result of phenotypic manifestation of Brugada syndrome. Among asymptomatic Brugada patients, arrhythmia could be provoked by physical activity, fever, or pregnancy. About obstetrical management, very few data or reports have been published since this syndrome has been diagnosed in late 1992. Case Presentation. A 20-year-old pregnant woman at 13 weeks of gestation was referred to our department because of her familial history of sudden cardiac deaths. Brothers and sisters of her mother died of Brugada syndrome in childhood or older and live components of this family were carrier of mutation in Brugada gene. The pregnancy was uneventful. The patient gave birth vaginally without any arrhythmia. Strictly cardiological monitoring was performed during labour, delivery, and 12 hours of the postpartum. Conclusion. Even though patient at low risk may never have arrhythmia, some conditions could represent a Brugada trigger. The management could be very easy and uneventful. Otherwise it could be very difficult with need of ECMO or antiarrhythmics drugs or intracardiac device. Obstetrical management of Brugada pregnant women should be very strict and multidisciplinary in cooperation with cardiologist and anaesthesiologist and should provide an informed consent to the couple.

  19. Highlights of top quark cross-section measurements at ATLAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berta Peter

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The highlights of the measurements of top quark production in proton-proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider with the ATLAS detector are presented. The inclusive measurements of the top-pair production cross section have reached high precision and are compared to the best available theoretical calculations. The differential cross section measurements, including results using boosted top quarks, probe our understanding of top-pair production in the TeV regime. The results are compared to Monte Carlo generators implementing LO and NLO matrix elements matched with parton showers. Measurements of the single top quark production cross section are presented in the t-channel and s-channel, and with associated production with a W boson. For the t-channel production, results on the ratio between top quark and antitop quark production cross sections and differential measurements are also included.

  20. Mobile learning and high-lighting language education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther, Jane

    Mobile learning and high-profiling language education. The number of students learning a second or foreign language and participating in instruction in languages other than English has been in decline for some time. There seems to be such a general tendency across nations albeit for a variety...... of reasons idiosyncratic to the particular national conditions. This paper gives an account of a diversified national project designed to infuse foreign language learning classes in upper secondary schools in Denmark with renewed enthusiasm through systematically experimenting with the new media by taking...... advantage of the social side in their application. The aim has been to make language classes attractive and relevant and to highlight the attractiveness and fun in learning through web 2.0 and mobile units. The overall project was supported by the Danish ministry of education as well as the individual...

  1. LHC highlights from ATLAS - FRAPWS2016 conference - Claudio Luci

    CERN Document Server

    Luci, Claudio; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    I am going to give a talk about highlight from ATLAS. The conference is FRAP2016, it is a conference of astrophysics. My talk is the third one oon the first day, after a general talk and one about dark matter search at colliders (given by someone does not working in atlas or cms). There is not a talk given by a colleague from cms, so mine is the only one about lhc. I have prepared my slides thinking about a "general" public and not for a specialized audience like the one we use to give talks. I have 30 minutes, maybe I have too many slides but I can easily keep the ones about dark matter if I am going to run late.

  2. Some highlights of research and development at AECL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langford, W.J.; Rae, H.K.

    1980-06-01

    The research and development programs of AECL have as their goal the strengthening of the knowledge and ability necessary to achieve national objectives in the field of nuclear energy. These objectives include a nuclear reactor system appropriate to Canada's industrial capabilities, now realized, and the extension of that system, through scientific and technological development, to serve the nation's needs for the forseeable future. The Company's programs are carefully integrated and focused to use the available funding to maximum advantage. The research facilities on which the program depends are among the best in the world, and support a full spectrum of research from fundamental nuclear physics to full-scale power reactor component irradiation and testing. In this report it has only been possible to high-light some important facets of the programs in each of the principal areas currently employing our energies. (auth)

  3. FY 1995 research highlights: PNL accomplishments in OER programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-10-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) conducts fundamental and applied research in support of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) core missions in science and technology, environmental quality, energy resources, and national security. Much of this research is funded by the program offices of DOE`s Office of Energy Research (DOE-ER), primarily the Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES) and the Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER), and by PNL`s Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program. This document is a collection of research highlights that describe PNL`s accomplishments in DOE-ER funded programs during Fiscal Year 1995. Included are accomplishments in research funded by OHER`s Analytical Technologies, Environmental Research, Health Effects, General Life Sciences, and Carbon Dioxide Research programs; BES`s Materials Science, Chemical Sciences, Engineering and Geoscience, and Applied Mathematical Sciences programs; and PNL`s LDRD Program. Summaries are given for 70 projects.

  4. CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion 2011: Highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    How much CO2 are countries emitting? Where is it coming from? In the lead-up to the UN climate negotiations in Durban, the latest information on the level and growth of CO2 emissions, their source and geographic distribution will be essential to lay the foundation for a global agreement. To provide input to and support for the UN process the IEA is making available for free download the 'Highlights' version of CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion. This annual publication contains: - estimates of CO2 emissions by country from 1971 to 2009; - selected indicators such as CO2/GDP, CO2/capita, CO2/TPES and CO2/kWh; - CO2 emissions from international marine and aviation bunkers, and other relevant information. These estimates have been calculated using the IEA energy databases and the default methods and emission factors from the Revised 1996 IPCC Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories.

  5. CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion - 2012 Highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-07-01

    How much CO2 are countries emitting? Where is it coming from? In the lead-up to the UN climate negotiations in Doha, the latest information on the level and growth of CO2 emissions, their source and geographic distribution will be essential to lay the foundation for a global agreement. To provide input to and support for the UN process the IEA is making available for free download the 'Highlights' version of CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion. This annual publication contains: estimates of CO2 emissions by country from 1971 to 2010; selected indicators such as CO2/GDP, CO2/capita, CO2/TPES and CO2/kWh; and CO2 emissions from international marine and aviation bunkers, and other relevant information.

  6. Technology meets research 60 years of CERN technology : selected highlights

    CERN Document Server

    Taylor, Thomas; Treille, Daniel; Wenninger, Horst

    2017-01-01

    "Big" science and advanced technology are known to cross-fertilize. This book emphasizes the interplay between particle physics and technology at CERN that has led to breakthroughs in both research and technology over the laboratory's first 60 years. The innovations, often the work of individuals or by small teams, are illustrated with highlights describing selected technologies from the domains of accelerators and detectors. The book also presents the framework and conditions prevailing at CERN that enabled spectacular advances in technology and contributed to propel the European organization into the league of leading research laboratories in the world. While the book is specifically aimed at providing information for the technically interested general public, more expert readers may also appreciate the broad variety of subjects presented. Ample references are given for those who wish to further explore a given topic.

  7. SUPPORTING LEARNING THROUGH EPISTEMIC SCAFFOLDS EMBEDDED IN A HIGHLIGHTER TOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Erik Dahl

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the use of epistemic scaffolds embedded in a digital highlighter tool that was used to support students’ readings and discussions of research articles. The use of annotation technologies in education is increasing, and annotations can play a wide variety of epistemic roles; e.g., they can facilitate a deeper level of engagement, support critical thinking, develop cognitive and metacognitive skills and introduce practices that can support knowledge building and independent learning. However, research has shown that the actual tool use often deviates from the underlying knowledge model in the tools. Hence, the situated and mediated nature of these tools is still poorly understood. Research also tends to study the tools as a passed on resource rather than being co-constructed between students and teachers. The researcher argues that approaching these resources as co-constructed can be more productive and can create new spaces for teacher–student dialogues, students’ agency and self-scaffolding.

  8. Highlights of contractor initiatives in quality enhancement and productivity improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    The NASA/Contractor Team efforts are presented as part of NASA's continuing effort to facilitate the sharing of quality and productivity improvement ideas among its contractors. This complilation is not meant to be a comprehensive review of contractor initiative nor does it necessarily express NASA's views. The submissions represent samples from a general survey, and were not edited by NASA. The efforts are examples of quality and productivity programs in private industry, and as such, highlight company efforts in individual areas. Topics range from modernization of equipment, hardware, and technology to management of human resources. Of particular interest are contractor initiatives which deal with measurement and evaluation data pertaining to quality and productivity performance.

  9. CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion 2011: Highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    How much CO2 are countries emitting? Where is it coming from? In the lead-up to the UN climate negotiations in Durban, the latest information on the level and growth of CO2 emissions, their source and geographic distribution will be essential to lay the foundation for a global agreement. To provide input to and support for the UN process the IEA is making available for free download the 'Highlights' version of CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion. This annual publication contains: - estimates of CO2 emissions by country from 1971 to 2009; - selected indicators such as CO2/GDP, CO2/capita, CO2/TPES and CO2/kWh; - CO2 emissions from international marine and aviation bunkers, and other relevant information. These estimates have been calculated using the IEA energy databases and the default methods and emission factors from the Revised 1996 IPCC Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories.

  10. CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion - 2012 Highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-07-01

    How much CO2 are countries emitting? Where is it coming from? In the lead-up to the UN climate negotiations in Doha, the latest information on the level and growth of CO2 emissions, their source and geographic distribution will be essential to lay the foundation for a global agreement. To provide input to and support for the UN process the IEA is making available for free download the 'Highlights' version of CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion. This annual publication contains: estimates of CO2 emissions by country from 1971 to 2010; selected indicators such as CO2/GDP, CO2/capita, CO2/TPES and CO2/kWh; and CO2 emissions from international marine and aviation bunkers, and other relevant information.

  11. Wildlife studies on the Hanford Site: 1993 Highlights report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadwell, L.L. [ed.

    1994-04-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) Wildlife Resources Monitoring Project was initiated by DOE to track the status of wildlife populations to determine whether Hanford operations affected them. The project continues to conduct a census of wildlife populations that are highly visible, economically or aesthetically important, and rare or otherwise considered sensitive. Examples of long-term data collected and maintained through the Wildlife Resources Monitoring Project include annual goose nesting surveys conducted on islands in the Hanford Reach, wintering bald eagle surveys, and fall Chinook salmon redd (nest) surveys. The report highlights activities related to salmon and mollusks on the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River; describes efforts to map vegetation on the Site and efforts to survey species of concern; provides descriptions of shrub-steppe bird surveys, including bald eagles, Canada geese, and hawks; outlines efforts to monitor mule deer and elk populations on the Site; and describes development of a biological database management system.

  12. The MeteoMet2 project—highlights and results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlone, A.; Sanna, F.; Beges, G.; Bell, S.; Beltramino, G.; Bojkovski, J.; Brunet, M.; del Campo, D.; Castrillo, A.; Chiodo, N.; Colli, M.; Coppa, G.; Cuccaro, R.; Dobre, M.; Drnovsek, J.; Ebert, V.; Fernicola, V.; Garcia-Benadí, A.; Garcia-Izquierdo, C.; Gardiner, T.; Georgin, E.; Gonzalez, A.; Groselj, D.; Heinonen, M.; Hernandez, S.; Högström, R.; Hudoklin, D.; Kalemci, M.; Kowal, A.; Lanza, L.; Miao, P.; Musacchio, C.; Nielsen, J.; Nogueras-Cervera, M.; Oguz Aytekin, S.; Pavlasek, P.; de Podesta, M.; Rasmussen, M. K.; del-Río-Fernández, J.; Rosso, L.; Sairanen, H.; Salminen, J.; Sestan, D.; Šindelářová, L.; Smorgon, D.; Sparasci, F.; Strnad, R.; Underwood, R.; Uytun, A.; Voldan, M.

    2018-02-01

    Launched in 2011 within the European Metrology Research Programme (EMRP) of EURAMET, the joint research project ‘MeteoMet’—Metrology for Meteorology—is the largest EMRP consortium; national metrology institutes, universities, meteorological and climate agencies, research institutes, collaborators and manufacturers are working together, developing new metrological techniques, as well as improving existing ones, for use in meteorological observations and climate records. The project focuses on humidity in the upper and surface atmosphere, air temperature, surface and deep-sea temperatures, soil moisture, salinity, permafrost temperature, precipitation, and the snow albedo effect on air temperature. All tasks are performed using a rigorous metrological approach and include the design and study of new sensors, new calibration facilities, the investigation of sensor characteristics, improved techniques for measurements of essential climate variables with uncertainty evaluation, traceability, laboratory proficiency and the inclusion of field influencing parameters, long-lasting measurements, and campaigns in remote and extreme areas. The vision for MeteoMet is to take a step further towards establishing full data comparability, coherency, consistency, and long-term continuity, through a comprehensive evaluation of the measurement uncertainties for the quantities involved in the global climate observing systems and the derived observations. The improvement in quality of essential climate variables records, through the inclusion of measurement uncertainty budgets, will also highlight possible strategies for the reduction of the uncertainty. This contribution presents selected highlights of the MeteoMet project and reviews the main ongoing activities, tasks and deliverables, with a view to its possible future evolution and extended impact.

  13. A preliminary molecular phylogeny of shield-bearer moths (Lepidoptera: Adeloidea: Heliozelidae) highlights rich undescribed diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milla, Liz; van Nieukerken, Erik J; Vijverberg, Ruben; Doorenweerd, Camiel; Wilcox, Stephen A; Halsey, Mike; Young, David A; Jones, Therésa M; Kallies, Axel; Hilton, Douglas J

    2018-03-01

    Heliozelidae are a widespread, evolutionarily early diverging family of small, day-flying monotrysian moths, for which a comprehensive phylogeny is lacking. We generated the first molecular phylogeny of the family using DNA sequences of two mitochondrial genes (COI and COII) and two nuclear genes (H3 and 28S) from 130 Heliozelidae specimens, including eight of the twelve known genera: Antispila, Antispilina, Coptodisca, Heliozela, Holocacista, Hoplophanes, Pseliastis, and Tyriozela. Our results provide strong support for five major Heliozelidae clades: (i) a large widespread clade containing the leaf-mining genera Antispilina, Coptodisca and Holocacista and some species of Antispila, (ii) a clade containing most of the described Antispila, (iii) a clade containing the leaf-mining genus Heliozela and the monotypic genus Tyriozela, (iv) an Australian clade containing Pseliastis and (v) an Australian clade containing Hoplophanes. Each clade includes several new species and potentially new genera. Collectively, our data uncover a rich and undescribed diversity that appears to be especially prevalent in Australia. Our work highlights the need for a major taxonomic revision of the family and for generating a robust molecular phylogeny using multi-gene approaches in order to resolve the relationships among clades. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Molecular data highlight hybridization in squirrel monkeys (Saimiri, Cebidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeferson Carneiro

    Full Text Available Abstract Hybridization has been reported increasingly frequently in recent years, fueling the debate on its role in the evolutionary history of species. Some studies have shown that hybridization is very common in captive New World primates, and hybrid offspring have phenotypes and physiological responses distinct from those of the "pure" parents, due to gene introgression. Here we used the TA15 Alu insertion to investigate hybridization in the genus Saimiri. Our results indicate the hybridization of Saimiri boliviensis peruviensis with S. sciureus macrodon, and S. b. boliviensis with S. ustus. Unexpectedly, some hybrids of both S. boliviensis peruviensis and S. b. boliviensis were homozygous for the absence of the insertion, which indicates that the hybrids were fertile.

  15. Genome sequencing highlights the dynamic early history of dogs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam H Freedman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To identify genetic changes underlying dog domestication and reconstruct their early evolutionary history, we generated high-quality genome sequences from three gray wolves, one from each of the three putative centers of dog domestication, two basal dog lineages (Basenji and Dingo and a golden jackal as an outgroup. Analysis of these sequences supports a demographic model in which dogs and wolves diverged through a dynamic process involving population bottlenecks in both lineages and post-divergence gene flow. In dogs, the domestication bottleneck involved at least a 16-fold reduction in population size, a much more severe bottleneck than estimated previously. A sharp bottleneck in wolves occurred soon after their divergence from dogs, implying that the pool of diversity from which dogs arose was substantially larger than represented by modern wolf populations. We narrow the plausible range for the date of initial dog domestication to an interval spanning 11-16 thousand years ago, predating the rise of agriculture. In light of this finding, we expand upon previous work regarding the increase in copy number of the amylase gene (AMY2B in dogs, which is believed to have aided digestion of starch in agricultural refuse. We find standing variation for amylase copy number variation in wolves and little or no copy number increase in the Dingo and Husky lineages. In conjunction with the estimated timing of dog origins, these results provide additional support to archaeological finds, suggesting the earliest dogs arose alongside hunter-gathers rather than agriculturists. Regarding the geographic origin of dogs, we find that, surprisingly, none of the extant wolf lineages from putative domestication centers is more closely related to dogs, and, instead, the sampled wolves form a sister monophyletic clade. This result, in combination with dog-wolf admixture during the process of domestication, suggests that a re-evaluation of past hypotheses regarding dog

  16. Highlighting landslides and other geomorphological features using sediment connectivity maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossi, Giulia; Crema, Stefano; Cavalli, Marco; Marcato, Gianluca; Pasuto, Alessandro

    2016-04-01

    Landslide identification is usually made through interpreting geomorphological features in the field or with remote sensing imagery. In recent years, airborne laser scanning (LiDAR) has enhanced the potentiality of geomorphological investigations by providing a detailed and diffuse representation of the land surface. The development of algorithms for geomorphological analysis based on LiDAR derived high-resolution Digital Terrain Models (DTMs) is increasing. Among them, the sediment connectivity index (IC) has been used to quantify sediment dynamics in alpine catchments. In this work, maps of the sediment connectivity index are used for detecting geomorphological features and processes not exclusively related to water-laden processes or debris flows. The test area is located in the upper Passer Valley in South Tyrol (Italy). Here a 4 km2 Deep-seated Gravitational Slope Deformation (DGSD) with several secondary phenomena has been studied for years. The connectivity index was applied to a well-known study area in order to evaluate its effectiveness as an interpretative layer to assist geomorphological analysis. Results were cross checked with evidence previously identified by means of in situ investigations, photointerpretation and monitoring data. IC was applied to a 2.5 m LiDAR derived DTM using two different scenarios in order to test their effectiveness: i) IC derived on the hydrologically correct DTM; ii) IC derived on the original DTM. In the resulting maps a cluster of low-connectivity areas appears as the deformation of the DGSD induce a convexity in the central part of the phenomenon. The double crests, product of the sagging of the landslide, are extremely evident since in those areas the flow directions diverge from the general drainage pattern, which is directed towards the valley river. In the crown area a rock-slab that shows clear evidence of incumbent detachment is clearly highlighted since the maps emphasize the presence of traction trenches and

  17. History highlights and future trends of infrared sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsi, Carlo

    2010-10-01

    Infrared (IR) technologies (materials, devices and systems) represent an area of excellence in science and technology and, even if they have been generally confined to a selected scientific community, they have achieved technological and scientific highlights constituting 'innovation drivers' for neighbouring disciplines, especially in the sensors field. The development of IR sensors, initially linked to astronomical observations, since World War II and for many years has been fostered essentially by defence applications, particularly thermo-vision and, later on, smart vision and detection, for surveillance and warning. Only in the last few decades, the impact of silicon technology has changed the development of IR detectors dramatically, with the advent of integrated signal read-outs and the opening of civilian markets (EO communications, biomedical, environmental, transport and energy applications). The history of infrared sensors contains examples of real breakthroughs, particularly true in the case of focal plane arrays that first appeared in the late 1970s, when the superiority of bi-dimensional arrays for most applications pushed the development of technologies providing the highest number of pixels. An impressive impulse was given to the development of FPA arrays by integration with charge coupled devices (CCD), with strong competition from different technologies (high-efficiency photon sensors, Schottky diodes, multi-quantum wells and, later on, room temperature microbolometers/cantilevers). This breakthrough allowed the development of high performance IR systems of small size, light weight and low cost - and therefore suitable for civil applications - thanks to the elimination of the mechanical scanning system and the progressive reduction of cooling requirements (up to the advent of microbolometers, capable of working at room temperature). In particular, the elimination of cryogenic cooling allowed the development and commercialisation of IR Smart Sensors

  18. Highlighting Entanglement of Cultures via Ranking of Multilingual Wikipedia Articles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Young-Ho; Shepelyansky, Dima L.

    2013-01-01

    How different cultures evaluate a person? Is an important person in one culture is also important in the other culture? We address these questions via ranking of multilingual Wikipedia articles. With three ranking algorithms based on network structure of Wikipedia, we assign ranking to all articles in 9 multilingual editions of Wikipedia and investigate general ranking structure of PageRank, CheiRank and 2DRank. In particular, we focus on articles related to persons, identify top 30 persons for each rank among different editions and analyze distinctions of their distributions over activity fields such as politics, art, science, religion, sport for each edition. We find that local heroes are dominant but also global heroes exist and create an effective network representing entanglement of cultures. The Google matrix analysis of network of cultures shows signs of the Zipf law distribution. This approach allows to examine diversity and shared characteristics of knowledge organization between cultures. The developed computational, data driven approach highlights cultural interconnections in a new perspective. Dated: June 26, 2013 PMID:24098338

  19. Wildlife studies on the Hanford site: 1994 Highlights report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadwell, L.L. [ed.

    1995-04-01

    The purposes of the project are to monitor and report trends in wildlife populations; conduct surveys to identify, record, and map populations of threatened, endangered, and sensitive plant and animal species; and cooperate with Washington State and federal and private agencies to help ensure the protection afforded by law to native species and their habitats. Census data and results of surveys and special study topics are shared freely among cooperating agencies. Special studies are also conducted as needed to provide additional information that may be required to assess, protect, or manage wildlife resources at Hanford. This report describes highlights of wildlife studies on the Site in 1994. Redd counts of fall chinook salmon in the Hanford Reach suggest that harvest restrictions directed at protecting Snake River salmon may have helped Columbia River stocks as well. The 1994 count (5619) was nearly double that of 1993 and about 63% of the 1989 high of approximately 9000. A habitat map showing major vegetation and land use cover types for the Hanford Site was completed in 1993. During 1994, stochastic simulation was used to estimate shrub characteristics (height, density, and canopy cover) across the previously mapped Hanford landscape. The information provided will be available for use in determining habitat quality for sensitive wildlife species. Mapping Site locations of plant species of concern continued during 1994. Additional sensitive plant species data from surveys conducted by TNC were archived. The 10 nesting pairs of ferruginous hawks that used the Hanford Site in 1993 represented approximately 25% of the Washington State population.

  20. AGILE DATA CENTER AT ASDC AND AGILE HIGHLIGHTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlotta Pittori

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We present an overview of the main AGILE Data Center activities and the AGILE scientific highlights during the first 5 years of operations. AGILE is an ASI space mission in joint collaboration with INAF, INFN and CIFS, dedicated to the observation of the gamma-ray Universe. The AGILE satellite was launched on April 23rd, 2007, and is devoted to gamma-ray astrophysics in the 30MeV ÷ 50 GeV energy range, with simultaneous X-ray imaging capability in the 18 ÷ 60 keV band. Despite the small size and budget, AGILE has produced several important scientific results, including the unexpected discovery of strong and rapid gamma-ray flares from the Crab Nebula over daily timescales. This discovery won AGILE PI and the AGILE Team the prestigious Bruno Rossi Prize for 2012, an international award in the field of high energy astrophysics. Thanks to its sky monitoring capability and fast ground segment alert system, AGILE is substantially improving our knowledge of the gamma-ray sky, also making a crucial contribution to the study of the terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs detected in the Earth atmosphere. The AGILE Data Center, part of the ASI Science Data Center (ASDC located in Frascati, Italy, is in charge of all the science oriented activities related to the analysis, archiving and distribution of AGILE data.

  1. Wildlife studies on the Hanford site: 1994 Highlights report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadwell, L.L.

    1995-04-01

    The purposes of the project are to monitor and report trends in wildlife populations; conduct surveys to identify, record, and map populations of threatened, endangered, and sensitive plant and animal species; and cooperate with Washington State and federal and private agencies to help ensure the protection afforded by law to native species and their habitats. Census data and results of surveys and special study topics are shared freely among cooperating agencies. Special studies are also conducted as needed to provide additional information that may be required to assess, protect, or manage wildlife resources at Hanford. This report describes highlights of wildlife studies on the Site in 1994. Redd counts of fall chinook salmon in the Hanford Reach suggest that harvest restrictions directed at protecting Snake River salmon may have helped Columbia River stocks as well. The 1994 count (5619) was nearly double that of 1993 and about 63% of the 1989 high of approximately 9000. A habitat map showing major vegetation and land use cover types for the Hanford Site was completed in 1993. During 1994, stochastic simulation was used to estimate shrub characteristics (height, density, and canopy cover) across the previously mapped Hanford landscape. The information provided will be available for use in determining habitat quality for sensitive wildlife species. Mapping Site locations of plant species of concern continued during 1994. Additional sensitive plant species data from surveys conducted by TNC were archived. The 10 nesting pairs of ferruginous hawks that used the Hanford Site in 1993 represented approximately 25% of the Washington State population

  2. Satellite tracking of manta rays highlights challenges to their conservation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel T Graham

    Full Text Available We describe the real-time movements of the last of the marine mega-vertebrate taxa to be satellite tracked - the giant manta ray (or devil fish, Manta birostris, the world's largest ray at over 6 m disc width. Almost nothing is known about manta ray movements and their environmental preferences, making them one of the least understood of the marine mega-vertebrates. Red listed by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature as 'Vulnerable' to extinction, manta rays are known to be subject to direct and incidental capture and some populations are declining. Satellite-tracked manta rays associated with seasonal upwelling events and thermal fronts off the Yucatan peninsula, Mexico, and made short-range shuttling movements, foraging along and between them. The majority of locations were received from waters shallower than 50 m deep, representing thermally dynamic and productive waters. Manta rays remained in the Mexican Exclusive Economic Zone for the duration of tracking but only 12% of tracking locations were received from within Marine Protected Areas (MPAs. Our results on the spatio-temporal distribution of these enigmatic rays highlight opportunities and challenges to management efforts.

  3. Satellite tracking of manta rays highlights challenges to their conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Rachel T; Witt, Matthew J; Castellanos, Dan W; Remolina, Francisco; Maxwell, Sara; Godley, Brendan J; Hawkes, Lucy A

    2012-01-01

    We describe the real-time movements of the last of the marine mega-vertebrate taxa to be satellite tracked - the giant manta ray (or devil fish, Manta birostris), the world's largest ray at over 6 m disc width. Almost nothing is known about manta ray movements and their environmental preferences, making them one of the least understood of the marine mega-vertebrates. Red listed by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature as 'Vulnerable' to extinction, manta rays are known to be subject to direct and incidental capture and some populations are declining. Satellite-tracked manta rays associated with seasonal upwelling events and thermal fronts off the Yucatan peninsula, Mexico, and made short-range shuttling movements, foraging along and between them. The majority of locations were received from waters shallower than 50 m deep, representing thermally dynamic and productive waters. Manta rays remained in the Mexican Exclusive Economic Zone for the duration of tracking but only 12% of tracking locations were received from within Marine Protected Areas (MPAs). Our results on the spatio-temporal distribution of these enigmatic rays highlight opportunities and challenges to management efforts.

  4. Highlighting entanglement of cultures via ranking of multilingual Wikipedia articles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Ho Eom

    Full Text Available How different cultures evaluate a person? Is an important person in one culture is also important in the other culture? We address these questions via ranking of multilingual Wikipedia articles. With three ranking algorithms based on network structure of Wikipedia, we assign ranking to all articles in 9 multilingual editions of Wikipedia and investigate general ranking structure of PageRank, CheiRank and 2DRank. In particular, we focus on articles related to persons, identify top 30 persons for each rank among different editions and analyze distinctions of their distributions over activity fields such as politics, art, science, religion, sport for each edition. We find that local heroes are dominant but also global heroes exist and create an effective network representing entanglement of cultures. The Google matrix analysis of network of cultures shows signs of the Zipf law distribution. This approach allows to examine diversity and shared characteristics of knowledge organization between cultures. The developed computational, data driven approach highlights cultural interconnections in a new perspective. Dated: June 26, 2013.

  5. Automatic summarization of soccer highlights using audio-visual descriptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raventós, A; Quijada, R; Torres, Luis; Tarrés, Francesc

    2015-01-01

    Automatic summarization generation of sports video content has been object of great interest for many years. Although semantic descriptions techniques have been proposed, many of the approaches still rely on low-level video descriptors that render quite limited results due to the complexity of the problem and to the low capability of the descriptors to represent semantic content. In this paper, a new approach for automatic highlights summarization generation of soccer videos using audio-visual descriptors is presented. The approach is based on the segmentation of the video sequence into shots that will be further analyzed to determine its relevance and interest. Of special interest in the approach is the use of the audio information that provides additional robustness to the overall performance of the summarization system. For every video shot a set of low and mid level audio-visual descriptors are computed and lately adequately combined in order to obtain different relevance measures based on empirical knowledge rules. The final summary is generated by selecting those shots with highest interest according to the specifications of the user and the results of relevance measures. A variety of results are presented with real soccer video sequences that prove the validity of the approach.

  6. Can Chimpanzee Biology Highlight Human Origin and Evolution?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itai Roffman

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The closest living relatives of humans are their chimpanzee/bonobo (Pan sister species, members of the same subfamily “Homininae”. This classification is supported by over 50 years of research in the fields of chimpanzee cultural diversity, language competency, genomics, anatomy, high cognition, psychology, society, self-consciousness and relation to others, tool use/production, as well as Homo level emotions, symbolic competency, memory recollection, complex multifaceted problem-solving capabilities, and interspecies communication. Language competence and symbolism can be continuously bridged from chimpanzee to man. Emotions, intercommunity aggression, body language, gestures, facial expressions, and vocalization of intonations seem to parallel between the sister taxa Homo and Pan. The shared suite of traits between Pan and Homo genus demonstrated in this article integrates old and new information on human–chimpanzee evolution, bilateral informational and cross-cultural exchange, promoting the urgent need for Pan cultures in the wild to be protected, as they are part of the cultural heritage of mankind. Also, we suggest that bonobos, Pan paniscus, based on shared traits with Australopithecus, need to be included in Australopithecine’s subgenus, and may even represent living-fossil Australopithecines. Unfolding bonobo and chimpanzee biology highlights our common genetic and cultural evolutionary origins.

  7. Highlighting Interleukin-36 Signalling in Plaque Psoriasis and Pustular Psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furue, Kazuhisa; Yamamura, Kazuhiko; Tsuji, Gaku; Mitoma, Chikage; Uchi, Hiroshi; Nakahara, Takeshi; Kido-Nakahara, Makiko; Kadono, Takafumi; Furue, Masutaka

    2018-01-12

    Plaque psoriasis and pustular psoriasis are overlapping, but distinct, disorders. The therapeutic response to biologics supports the pivotal role of the tumour necrosis alpha (TNF-?)/ interleukin (IL)-23/IL-17/IL-22 axis in the pathogenesis of these disorders. Recently, functional activation of the IL-36 receptor (IL-36R) was discovered to be another driving force in the pathogenesis of psoriasis. This was first highlighted by the discovery that a loss-of-function mutation of the IL-36R antagonist (IL-36Ra) causes pustular psoriasis. Although the TNF-?/IL-23/IL-17/IL-22 axis and the functional activation of IL-36R are fundamentally involved in plaque psoriasis and pustular psoriasis, respectively, the 2 pathways are closely related and mutually reinforced, resulting in full-blown clinical manifestations. This review summarizes current topics on how IL-36 agonists (IL-36?, IL-36?, IL-36?) signal IL-36R, the pathological expression of IL-36 agonists and IL-36Ra in plaque and pustular psoriatic lesions, and the cross-talk between the TNF-?/IL-23/IL-17/IL-22 axis and the functional activation of IL-36R in the epidermal milieu.

  8. Pre-accidental situations highlighted by RECUPERARE method and data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matahri, N. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), 92 - Fontenay-aux-Roses (France)

    2006-07-01

    RECUPERARE method has been developed for operating feedback analysis and built on the French Human Reliability Analysis (HRA) principles. It is used to study the causes of human errors or technical failures occurred in French PWRs and the recovery process of events. Based on an event classification (6 categories) model according to the nature of the link between failure and recovery, the identified and recorded data are: the causes of the defects (technical, human, organizational) and the context in which they appear; the factors of the recovery performance (depending on technical and organizational aspects); a chronological analysis, designed to collect delays between failures and their detection/recovery for each event. About 3600 events reported in French PWRs (1997-2003) had been reviewed through this model. Initially, the weight of factors and the most important factors, which influenced the detection and recovery delay, are defined. For this purpose, the regression Partial Least Square (PLS) is used. Then, to link RECUPERARE results with pre-accidental data, conditional probabilities of events linked between them by a cause and effect relationship are calculated. For this, the Bayesian method with the Bayesian network is built with the PLS obtained results and applied. This constitutes a first approach to take into account in HRA the human and organizational factors highlighted by operating feedback. (author)

  9. Alberta Energy and Utilities Board, regulatory highlights for 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    This new publication informs readers about what the Alberta Energy and Utilities Board (EUB) did in the past year, including important regulatory issues, trends and initiatives. The EUB is an agency of the provincial government, established to regulate Alberta's energy resource and utility sectors. It is part of the Alberta Ministry of Energy. The four main functions of the Board are regulatory initiatives, license applications, enforcement and information. This publication summarized the EUB's position regarding flaring (both solution gas flaring and well test flaring), and Board activities in the areas of animal health concerns, the gas over bitumen controversy, the deregulation of the electric industry and what it means to the EUB, improvements in data quality as a result of improved industry compliance in reporting, and a variety of issues related to the oil sands and the negotiated settlement process. Also, the Board has been proactive in the area of oilfield waste management guidelines, proliferation policies for gas processing facilities, sulphur recovery guidelines, and the expansion of the orphan well program to include facilities and pipelines. As a measure of the success of the EUB, a recent survey of 19 randomly selected focus groups praised EUB for its impartiality, fair and equitable enforcement and independence. It was also praised for its technically competent and experienced staff, its access to quality information and the clarity of its mandate, regulatory requirements and processes. The Board's efforts in the area of timely stakeholder consultation was highlighted. tabs., figs

  10. Alberta Energy and Utilities Board, regulatory highlights for 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-08-01

    This new publication informs readers about what the Alberta Energy and Utilities Board (EUB) did in the past year, including important regulatory issues, trends and initiatives. The EUB is an agency of the provincial government, established to regulate Alberta`s energy resource and utility sectors. It is part of the Alberta Ministry of Energy. The four main functions of the Board are regulatory initiatives, license applications, enforcement and information. This publication summarized the EUB`s position regarding flaring (both solution gas flaring and well test flaring), and Board activities in the areas of animal health concerns, the gas over bitumen controversy, the deregulation of the electric industry and what it means to the EUB, improvements in data quality as a result of improved industry compliance in reporting, and a variety of issues related to the oil sands and the negotiated settlement process. Also, the Board has been proactive in the area of oilfield waste management guidelines, proliferation policies for gas processing facilities, sulphur recovery guidelines, and the expansion of the orphan well program to include facilities and pipelines. As a measure of the success of the EUB, a recent survey of 19 randomly selected focus groups praised EUB for its impartiality, fair and equitable enforcement and independence. It was also praised for its technically competent and experienced staff, its access to quality information and the clarity of its mandate, regulatory requirements and processes. The Board`s efforts in the area of timely stakeholder consultation was highlighted. tabs., figs.

  11. Binary Paths to Type Ia Supernovae Explosions: the Highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrario, Lilia

    2013-01-01

    This symposium was focused on the hunt for the progenitors of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). Is there a main channel for the production of SNe Ia? If so, are these elusive progenitors single degenerate or double degenerate systems? Although most participants seemed to favor the single degenerate channel, there was no general agreement on the type of binary system at play. An observational puzzle that was highlighted was the apparent paucity of supersoft sources in our Galaxy and also in external galaxies. The single degenerate channel (and as it was pointed out, quite possibly also the double degenerate channel) requires the binary system to pass through a phase of steady nuclear burning. However, the observed number of supersoft sources falls short by a factor of up to 100 in explaining the estimated birth rates of SNe Ia. Thus, are these supersoft sources somehow hidden away and radiating at different wavelengths, or are we missing some important pieces of this puzzle that may lead to the elimination of a certain class of progenitor? Another unanswered question concerns the dependence of SNe Ia luminosities on the age of their host galaxy. Several hypotheses were put forward, but none was singled out as the most likely explanation. It is fair to say that at the end of the symposium the definitive answer to the vexed progenitor question remained well and truly wide open.

  12. Highlights from PHENIX transverse spin program at RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, M.

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, there has been exciting development in both experimental and theoretical studies of transverse spin phenomena in high energy polarized p+p and polarized DIS collisions. In the p+p frontier, the polarized p+p collider at RHIC provides a unique opportunity to investigate the novel physics that causes the large spin effects seen in the transversely polarized p+p collisions over the past 30 years, particularly in the forward rapidity. Since the beginning, PHENIX has been conducting a very active transverse spin physics program to study Sivers, Collins and other novel spin effects at RHIC, including measurements of transverse single spin asymmetry (TSSA) in light and heavy quark productions, leading neutron TSSA in the very forward rapidity, and di-hadron (and 'jet') spin correlations in a wide kinematics range, just to name a few. In 2012, PHENIX collected transversely polarized 200 GeV p+p data with a record high luminosity of 9.24 pb −1 , with an average beam polarization of 58%. In this talk, I highlight the recent results from the PHENIX experiment, and also briefly discuss the near-term prospects of new transverse spin measurements only possible with the latest (forward) silicon vertex detectors, (F)VTX, and the upcoming forward MPC-EX upgrade detectors.

  13. Pre-accidental situations highlighted by RECUPERARE method and data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matahri, N.

    2006-01-01

    RECUPERARE method has been developed for operating feedback analysis and built on the French Human Reliability Analysis (HRA) principles. It is used to study the causes of human errors or technical failures occurred in French PWRs and the recovery process of events. Based on an event classification (6 categories) model according to the nature of the link between failure and recovery, the identified and recorded data are: the causes of the defects (technical, human, organizational) and the context in which they appear; the factors of the recovery performance (depending on technical and organizational aspects); a chronological analysis, designed to collect delays between failures and their detection/recovery for each event. About 3600 events reported in French PWRs (1997-2003) had been reviewed through this model. Initially, the weight of factors and the most important factors, which influenced the detection and recovery delay, are defined. For this purpose, the regression Partial Least Square (PLS) is used. Then, to link RECUPERARE results with pre-accidental data, conditional probabilities of events linked between them by a cause and effect relationship are calculated. For this, the Bayesian method with the Bayesian network is built with the PLS obtained results and applied. This constitutes a first approach to take into account in HRA the human and organizational factors highlighted by operating feedback. (author)

  14. Radio Astronomy at TIFR, some highlights and reminiscences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swarup, G.

    Radio astronomy research was initiated at TIFR fifty years ago. In this historical article, I firstly trace my initiation in the field of radio astronomy during 1953-55 in the Radio Physics Laboratory of CSIRO in Australia and later during 1956-63 in USA. In September 1961, four radio astronomers working abroad wrote to a number of scientific organizations in India with their desire to start radio astronomy research in India. Soon thereafter Dr. Homi Bhabha, the founder Director of TIFR, approved the formation of a radio astronomy group therein. I joined TIFR in April 1963. During the last 50 years, TIFR has built two of the world's largest radio telescopes, namely the 530m long and 30 m wide parabolic cylinder equatorially mounted on a hill at Ooty in South India during 1960s and the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope near Pune, consisting of 30 nos. of fully steerable parabolic dishes of 45 m diameters during 1990s. Fifty years of radio astronomy research at TIFR is briefly highlighted here.

  15. Atomic Auger spectroscopy: Historical perspective and recent highlights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehlhorn, W.

    2000-01-01

    The non-radiating decay of an inner-shell ionized atom by the emission of an electron was discovered by Pierre Auger in cloud-chamber experiments in the years 1923 to 1926. The first spectroscopic investigation of Auger electrons was performed by Robinson and Cassie in 1926, marking the birth date of Auger spectroscopy. The following seven decades of Auger spectroscopy will be divided into three periods. In the first period (1926-1960) Auger spectroscopy was mainly connected with β-ray spectroscopy where inner-shell ionization of atoms in the solid state was caused either by γ-conversion or by electron capture. The second period (beginning in 1960) is characterized by the external excitation of gas-phase or free metallic atoms, opening Auger spectroscopy to electron energies in the range of few eV to few keV. The third period (beginning in 1977/78) is characterized by the use of synchrotron radiation with its outstanding properties of tunability, polarization and narrow-band high intensity for the excitation and ionization of inner-shell electrons. Finally, two recent highlights of Auger spectroscopy, the interference between photo- and Auger electron with equal energies and an 'almost' complete experiment for Auger decay, will be presented

  16. Students' reflections in a portfolio pilot: highlighting professional issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haffling, Ann-Christin; Beckman, Anders; Pahlmblad, Annika; Edgren, Gudrun

    2010-01-01

    Portfolios are highlighted as potential assessment tools for professional competence. Although students' self-reflections are considered to be central in the portfolio, the content of reflections in practice-based portfolios is seldom analysed. To investigate whether students' reflections include sufficient dimensions of professional competence, notwithstanding a standardized portfolio format, and to evaluate students' satisfaction with the portfolio. Thirty-five voluntary final-year medical students piloted a standardized portfolio in a general practice (GP) attachment at Lund University, Sweden. Students' portfolio reflections were based upon documentary evidence from practice, and aimed to demonstrate students' learning. The reflections were qualitatively analysed, using a framework approach. Students' evaluations of the portfolio were subjected to quantitative and qualitative analysis. Among professional issues, an integration of cognitive, affective and practical dimensions in clinical practice was provided by students' reflections. The findings suggested an emphasis on affective issues, particularly on self-awareness of feelings, attitudes and concerns. In addition, ethical problems, clinical reasoning strategies and future communication skills training were subjects of several reflective commentaries. Students' reflections on their consultation skills demonstrated their endeavour to achieve structure in the medical interview by negotiation of an agenda for the consultation, keeping the interview on track, and using internal summarizing. The importance of active listening and exploration of patient's perspective was also emphasized. In students' case summaries, illustrating characteristic attributes of GP, the dominating theme was 'patient-centred care', including the patient-doctor relationship, holistic modelling and longitudinal continuity. Students were satisfied with the portfolio, but improved instructions were needed. A standardized portfolio in a

  17. Highlights on searches for supersymmetry and exotic models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clerbaux, B.

    2015-01-01

    In this review, we present highlight results of the first three years of the LHC running on searches for new physics beyond the Standard Model (BSM). The excellent performance of the LHC machine and detectors has provided a large, high-quality dataset, mainly proton-proton interactions at a centre of mass energy of 7 TeV (collected in 2010 and 2011) and 8 TeV (collected in 2012). This allowed the experiments to test the Standard Model (SM) at the highest available energy and to search for new phenomena in a considerably enlarged phase space compared to previous colliders. The present review is organised as follows. Section 2 gives motivations to search for new physics beyond the SM, and a brief description of the main classes of BSM theory candidates is reported in Section 3. Section 4 summarises the characteristics of the 3-year LHC dataset, called in the following the Run 1 dataset. Precise tests of the SM are reported in Section 5. The following next sections are the core of the review and present a selection of results from the ATLAS and CMS experiments on BSM searches, gathered in four parts: the search for new physics in the scalar sector in Section 6, the search for supersymmetric particles in Section 7, the search for dark matter candidates in Section 8, and a non-exhaustive list of other exotics BSM (heavy resonances, excited fermions, leptoquarks and vector-like quarks) searches in Section 9. Future plans of the LHC running are reported in Section 10

  18. Highlights of IAEA activities in the field of radiation application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machi, S.

    1994-01-01

    In IAEA's major programme of Nuclear Applications, the activities performed are divided into four areas: food and agriculture, industry and earth science, human health, and physical and chemical sciences. These activities involve co-operation with FAO, WHO, UNIDO and UNEP, and have close link with the technical assistance programme. About 60% of the technical assistance projects are implemented in the field of nuclear applications. The purpose of the nuclear application programme is to develop technologies useful for environmental protection and sustainable development, to support R and D programmes of developing countries, to develop new applications of nuclear techniques. Major activities in food and agriculture are the application of radiation and isotopes, controling insects, preserving food, soil fertility and crop production, and improving animal production and the use of radiation with biotechnology for plant mutation breeding aiming at environmentally friendly and sustainable food production. In the human health programme emphasis is given to nuclear medicine, cancer therapy and nutrition. Today, only 35% of all developing countries have radiotherapy facilities. Activities, therefore, focus on strengthening clinical radiotherapy in such countries. In the field of industry and earth science, flue gas cleaning by electron beams, pollution monitoring using nuclear analytical techniques, nucleonic control systems for industries, and water resource exploration are major projects assisting developing countries. As of 1994 the IAEA will launch 12 new and promising Model Projects for developing Member States which will be of benefit to their economies and raising of their standard of living. In this paper the highlights of the above mentioned IAEA activities are presented. (author)

  19. Primetime for Learning Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keifer, Joyce

    2017-02-11

    Learning genes in mature neurons are uniquely suited to respond rapidly to specific environmental stimuli. Expression of individual learning genes, therefore, requires regulatory mechanisms that have the flexibility to respond with transcriptional activation or repression to select appropriate physiological and behavioral responses. Among the mechanisms that equip genes to respond adaptively are bivalent domains. These are specific histone modifications localized to gene promoters that are characteristic of both gene activation and repression, and have been studied primarily for developmental genes in embryonic stem cells. In this review, studies of the epigenetic regulation of learning genes in neurons, particularly the brain-derived neurotrophic factor gene ( BDNF ), by methylation/demethylation and chromatin modifications in the context of learning and memory will be highlighted. Because of the unique function of learning genes in the mature brain, it is proposed that bivalent domains are a characteristic feature of the chromatin landscape surrounding their promoters. This allows them to be "poised" for rapid response to activate or repress gene expression depending on environmental stimuli.

  20. Genetic association study of QT interval highlights role for calcium signaling pathways in myocardial repolarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arking, Dan E.; Pulit, Sara L.; Crotti, Lia; van der Harst, Pim; Munroe, Patricia B.; Koopmann, Tamara T.; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Rossin, Elizabeth J.; Morley, Michael; Wang, Xinchen; Johnson, Andrew D.; Lundby, Alicia; Gudbjartsson, Daníel F.; Noseworthy, Peter A.; Eijgelsheim, Mark; Bradford, Yuki; Tarasov, Kirill V.; Dörr, Marcus; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Lahtinen, Annukka M.; Nolte, Ilja M.; Smith, Albert Vernon; Bis, Joshua C.; Isaacs, Aaron; Newhouse, Stephen J.; Evans, Daniel S.; Post, Wendy S.; Waggott, Daryl; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Hicks, Andrew A.; Eisele, Lewin; Ellinghaus, David; Hayward, Caroline; Navarro, Pau; Ulivi, Sheila; Tanaka, Toshiko; Tester, David J.; Chatel, Stéphanie; Gustafsson, Stefan; Kumari, Meena; Morris, Richard W.; Naluai, Åsa T.; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Kluttig, Alexander; Strohmer, Bernhard; Panayiotou, Andrie G.; Torres, Maria; Knoflach, Michael; Hubacek, Jaroslav A.; Slowikowski, Kamil; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Kumar, Runjun D.; Harris, Tamara B.; Launer, Lenore J.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Alonso, Alvaro; Bader, Joel S.; Ehret, Georg; Huang, Hailiang; Kao, W.H. Linda; Strait, James B.; Macfarlane, Peter W.; Brown, Morris; Caulfield, Mark J.; Samani, Nilesh J.; Kronenberg, Florian; Willeit, Johann; Smith, J. Gustav; Greiser, Karin H.; zu Schwabedissen, Henriette Meyer; Werdan, Karl; Carella, Massimo; Zelante, Leopoldo; Heckbert, Susan R.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Kolcic, Ivana; Polašek, Ozren; Wright, Alan F.; Griffin, Maura; Daly, Mark J.; Arnar, David O.; Hólm, Hilma; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Denny, Joshua C.; Roden, Dan M.; Zuvich, Rebecca L.; Emilsson, Valur; Plump, Andrew S.; Larson, Martin G.; O'Donnell, Christopher J.; Yin, Xiaoyan; Bobbo, Marco; D'Adamo, Adamo P.; Iorio, Annamaria; Sinagra, Gianfranco; Carracedo, Angel; Cummings, Steven R.; Nalls, Michael A.; Jula, Antti; Kontula, Kimmo K.; Marjamaa, Annukka; Oikarinen, Lasse; Perola, Markus; Porthan, Kimmo; Erbel, Raimund; Hoffmann, Per; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Kälsch, Hagen; Nöthen, Markus M.; consortium, HRGEN; den Hoed, Marcel; Loos, Ruth J.F.; Thelle, Dag S.; Gieger, Christian; Meitinger, Thomas; Perz, Siegfried; Peters, Annette; Prucha, Hanna; Sinner, Moritz F.; Waldenberger, Melanie; de Boer, Rudolf A.; Franke, Lude; van der Vleuten, Pieter A.; Beckmann, Britt Maria; Martens, Eimo; Bardai, Abdennasser; Hofman, Nynke; Wilde, Arthur A.M.; Behr, Elijah R.; Dalageorgou, Chrysoula; Giudicessi, John R.; Medeiros-Domingo, Argelia; Barc, Julien; Kyndt, Florence; Probst, Vincent; Ghidoni, Alice; Insolia, Roberto; Hamilton, Robert M.; Scherer, Stephen W.; Brandimarto, Jeffrey; Margulies, Kenneth; Moravec, Christine E.; Fabiola Del, Greco M.; Fuchsberger, Christian; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Lee, Wai K.; Watt, Graham C.M.; Campbell, Harry; Wild, Sarah H.; El Mokhtari, Nour E.; Frey, Norbert; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Leach, Irene Mateo; Navis, Gerjan; van den Berg, Maarten P.; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Kellis, Manolis; Krijthe, Bouwe P.; Franco, Oscar H.; Hofman, Albert; Kors, Jan A.; Uitterlinden, André G.; Witteman, Jacqueline C.M.; Kedenko, Lyudmyla; Lamina, Claudia; Oostra, Ben A.; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Lakatta, Edward G.; Mulas, Antonella; Orrú, Marco; Schlessinger, David; Uda, Manuela; Markus, Marcello R.P.; Völker, Uwe; Snieder, Harold; Spector, Timothy D.; Ärnlöv, Johan; Lind, Lars; Sundström, Johan; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Kivimaki, Mika; Kähönen, Mika; Mononen, Nina; Raitakari, Olli T.; Viikari, Jorma S.; Adamkova, Vera; Kiechl, Stefan; Brion, Maria; Nicolaides, Andrew N.; Paulweber, Bernhard; Haerting, Johannes; Dominiczak, Anna F.; Nyberg, Fredrik; Whincup, Peter H.; Hingorani, Aroon; Schott, Jean-Jacques; Bezzina, Connie R.; Ingelsson, Erik; Ferrucci, Luigi; Gasparini, Paolo; Wilson, James F.; Rudan, Igor; Franke, Andre; Mühleisen, Thomas W.; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Lehtimäki, Terho J.; Paterson, Andrew D.; Parsa, Afshin; Liu, Yongmei; van Duijn, Cornelia; Siscovick, David S.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Jamshidi, Yalda; Salomaa, Veikko; Felix, Stephan B.; Sanna, Serena; Ritchie, Marylyn D.; Stricker, Bruno H.; Stefansson, Kari; Boyer, Laurie A.; Cappola, Thomas P.; Olsen, Jesper V.; Lage, Kasper; Schwartz, Peter J.; Kääb, Stefan; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Ackerman, Michael J.; Pfeufer, Arne; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Newton-Cheh, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    The QT interval, an electrocardiographic measure reflecting myocardial repolarization, is a heritable trait. QT prolongation is a risk factor for ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death (SCD) and could indicate the presence of the potentially lethal Mendelian Long QT Syndrome (LQTS). Using a genome-wide association and replication study in up to 100,000 individuals we identified 35 common variant QT interval loci, that collectively explain ∼8-10% of QT variation and highlight the importance of calcium regulation in myocardial repolarization. Rare variant analysis of 6 novel QT loci in 298 unrelated LQTS probands identified coding variants not found in controls but of uncertain causality and therefore requiring validation. Several newly identified loci encode for proteins that physically interact with other recognized repolarization proteins. Our integration of common variant association, expression and orthogonal protein-protein interaction screens provides new insights into cardiac electrophysiology and identifies novel candidate genes for ventricular arrhythmias, LQTS,and SCD. PMID:24952745

  1. Current Highlights on ESA's Planetary Technology Reference Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkner, P.

    The concept of Technology Reference Studies has been introduced already at EGU05, where the Venus Entry Probe (VEP), the Jupiter Minisat Explorer (JME), the Deimos Sample Return (DSR) and the Interstellar Heliopause Probe (IHP) have been presented in detail. At the EGU06 the new studies in reaction to the Cosmic Vision exercise have been introduced. The formulation of themes and mapping into potential future missions has been taken as basis in the planning of additional new and adaptation of existing TRS's to cover areas, which have not yet been addressed by any TRS. These new ongoing studies are progressing well and current highlights will be presented in the paper in further detail as well as an overview on supporting technology studies and Concurrent Design Facility (CDF) sessions. The Jupiter System Explorer (JSE) study investigates mission concepts with up to two Magnetospheric Orbiters placed in a highly elliptical Jovian orbit and the possibility to deploy a Jovian Entry Probe. The mission profile is based on a solar powered concept launched on a Soyuz-Fregat launcher. Mission analysis and the application of a new Jovian radiation model are supporting the study activities. The Near-Earth Asteroid Sample Return (NEA-SR) concept explores the possibilities of sample return or in-situ mission profiles with visits to up to two NEA targets. Due to the assumed low cost cap a trade between a sample return and remote/in-situ exploration concept has a high attention in the study. The Cross Scale TRS (CS-TRS) is intended to simultaneously investigate magnetospheric and plasma processes in three spatial scales with a formation flight of up to 12 spacecraft, orbiting on deep elliptical orbits around Earth. One of the major challenges is the launch of that number of spacecraft on a single launcher and the collisionless deployment of the formation at the target orbit. The scope if the GeoSail TRS is to demonstrate deployment, attitude control and navigation concepts for a

  2. Cassini-Huygens Science Highlights: Surprises in the Saturn System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spilker, Linda; Altobelli, Nicolas; Edgington, Scott

    2014-05-01

    The Cassini-Huygens mission has greatly enhanced our understanding of the Saturn system. Fundamental discoveries have altered our views of Saturn, its retinue of icy moons including Titan, the dynamic rings, and the system's complex magnetosphere. Launched in 1997, the Cassini-Huygens spacecraft spent seven years traveling to Saturn, arriving in July 2004, roughly two years after the northern winter solstice. Cassini has orbited Saturn for 9.5 years, delivering the Huygens probe to its Titan landing in 2005, crossing northern equinox in August 2009, and completing its Prime and Equinox Missions. It is now three years into its 7-year Solstice mission, returning science in a previously unobserved seasonal phase between equinox and solstice. As it watches the approach of northern summer, long-dark regions throughout the system become sunlit, allowing Cassini's science instruments to probe as-yet unsolved mysteries. Key Cassini-Huygens discoveries include icy jets of material streaming from tiny Enceladus' south pole, lakes of liquid hydrocarbons and methane rain on giant Titan, three-dimensional structures in Saturn's rings, and curtain-like aurorae flickering over Saturn's poles. The Huygens probe sent back amazing images of Titan's surface, and made detailed measurements of the atmospheric composition, structure and winds. Key Cassini-Huygens science highlights will be presented. The Solstice Mission continues to provide new science. First, the Cassini spacecraft observes seasonally and temporally dependent processes on Saturn, Titan, Enceladus and other icy satellites, and within the rings and magnetosphere. Second, it addresses new questions that have arisen during the mission thus far, for example providing qualitatively new measurements of Enceladus and Titan that could not be accommodated in the earlier mission phases. Third, it will conduct a close-in mission at Saturn yielding fundamental knowledge about the interior of Saturn. This grand finale of the

  3. Highlights of Odessa Branch of AN in 2017

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andronov, I. L.

    2017-12-01

    An annual report with a list of publications. Our group works on the variable star research within the international campaign "Inter-Longitude Astronomy" (ILA) based on temporarily working groups in collaboration with Poland, Slovakia, Korea, USA and other countries. A recent self-review on highlights was published in 2017. Our group continues the scientific school of Prof. Vladymir P. Tsesevich (1907 - 1983). Another project we participate is "AstroInformatics". The unprecedented photo-polarimetric monitoring of a group of AM Her - type magnetic cataclysmic variable stars was carried out since 1989 (photometry in our group - since 1978). A photometric monitoring of the intermediate polars (MU Cam, V1343 Her, V2306 Cyg et al.) was continued to study rotational evolution of magnetic white dwarfs. The super-low luminosity state was discovered in the outbursting intermediate polar = magnetic dwarf nova DO Dra. Previously typical low state was some times interrupted by outbursts, which are narrower than usual dwarf nova outbursts. Once there were detected TPO - "Transient Periodic Oscillations". The orbital and quasi-periodic variability was recently studied. Such super-low states are characteristic for nova-like variables (e.g. MV Lyr, TT Ari) or intermediate polars, but unusual for the dwarf novae. The electronic "Catalogue of Characteristics and Atlas of the Light Curves of Newly-Discovered Eclipsing Binary Stars" was compiled and is being prepared for publication. The software NAV ("New Algol Variable") with specially developed algorithms was used. It allows to determine the begin and end of the eclipses even in EB and EW - type stars, whereas the current classification (GCVS, VSX) claims that the begin and end of eclipses only in the EA - type objects. The further improvements of the NAV algorithm were comparatively studied. The "Wall-Supported Polynomial" (WSP) algoritms were implemented in the software MAVKA for statistically optimal modeling of flat eclipses

  4. Gene Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gene therapy Overview Gene therapy involves altering the genes inside your body's cells in an effort to treat or stop disease. Genes contain your ... that don't work properly can cause disease. Gene therapy replaces a faulty gene or adds a new ...

  5. Integrative network analysis highlights biological processes underlying GLP-1 stimulated insulin secretion: A DIRECT study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valborg Gudmundsdottir

    Full Text Available Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1 stimulated insulin secretion has a considerable heritable component as estimated from twin studies, yet few genetic variants influencing this phenotype have been identified. We performed the first genome-wide association study (GWAS of GLP-1 stimulated insulin secretion in non-diabetic individuals from the Netherlands Twin register (n = 126. This GWAS was enhanced using a tissue-specific protein-protein interaction network approach. We identified a beta-cell protein-protein interaction module that was significantly enriched for low gene scores based on the GWAS P-values and found support at the network level in an independent cohort from Tübingen, Germany (n = 100. Additionally, a polygenic risk score based on SNPs prioritized from the network was associated (P < 0.05 with glucose-stimulated insulin secretion phenotypes in up to 5,318 individuals in MAGIC cohorts. The network contains both known and novel genes in the context of insulin secretion and is enriched for members of the focal adhesion, extracellular-matrix receptor interaction, actin cytoskeleton regulation, Rap1 and PI3K-Akt signaling pathways. Adipose tissue is, like the beta-cell, one of the target tissues of GLP-1 and we thus hypothesized that similar networks might be functional in both tissues. In order to verify peripheral effects of GLP-1 stimulation, we compared the transcriptome profiling of ob/ob mice treated with liraglutide, a clinically used GLP-1 receptor agonist, versus baseline controls. Some of the upstream regulators of differentially expressed genes in the white adipose tissue of ob/ob mice were also detected in the human beta-cell network of genes associated with GLP-1 stimulated insulin secretion. The findings provide biological insight into the mechanisms through which the effects of GLP-1 may be modulated and highlight a potential role of the beta-cell expressed genes RYR2, GDI2, KIAA0232, COL4A1 and COL4A2 in GLP-1 stimulated

  6. History of gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, Thomas; Parker, Nigel; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo

    2013-08-10

    Two decades after the initial gene therapy trials and more than 1700 approved clinical trials worldwide we not only have gained much new information and knowledge regarding gene therapy in general, but also learned to understand the concern that has persisted in society. Despite the setbacks gene therapy has faced, success stories have increasingly emerged. Examples for these are the positive recommendation for a gene therapy product (Glybera) by the EMA for approval in the European Union and the positive trials for the treatment of ADA deficiency, SCID-X1 and adrenoleukodystrophy. Nevertheless, our knowledge continues to grow and during the course of time more safety data has become available that helps us to develop better gene therapy approaches. Also, with the increased understanding of molecular medicine, we have been able to develop more specific and efficient gene transfer vectors which are now producing clinical results. In this review, we will take a historical view and highlight some of the milestones that had an important impact on the development of gene therapy. We will also discuss briefly the safety and ethical aspects of gene therapy and address some concerns that have been connected with gene therapy as an important therapeutic modality. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. GEP analysis validates high risk MDS and acute myeloid leukemia post MDS mice models and highlights novel dysregulated pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerenne, Laura; Beurlet, Stéphanie; Said, Mohamed; Gorombei, Petra; Le Pogam, Carole; Guidez, Fabien; de la Grange, Pierre; Omidvar, Nader; Vanneaux, Valérie; Mills, Ken; Mufti, Ghulam J; Sarda-Mantel, Laure; Noguera, Maria Elena; Pla, Marika; Fenaux, Pierre; Padua, Rose Ann; Chomienne, Christine; Krief, Patricia

    2016-01-27

    In spite of the recent discovery of genetic mutations in most myelodysplasic (MDS) patients, the pathophysiology of these disorders still remains poorly understood, and only few in vivo models are available to help unravel the disease. We performed global specific gene expression profiling and functional pathway analysis in purified Sca1+ cells of two MDS transgenic mouse models that mimic human high-risk MDS (HR-MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) post MDS, with NRASD12 and BCL2 transgenes under the control of different promoters MRP8NRASD12/tethBCL-2 or MRP8[NRASD12/hBCL-2], respectively. Analysis of dysregulated genes that were unique to the diseased HR-MDS and AML post MDS mice and not their founder mice pointed first to pathways that had previously been reported in MDS patients, including DNA replication/damage/repair, cell cycle, apoptosis, immune responses, and canonical Wnt pathways, further validating these models at the gene expression level. Interestingly, pathways not previously reported in MDS were discovered. These included dysregulated genes of noncanonical Wnt pathways and energy and lipid metabolisms. These dysregulated genes were not only confirmed in a different independent set of BM and spleen Sca1+ cells from the MDS mice but also in MDS CD34+ BM patient samples. These two MDS models may thus provide useful preclinical models to target pathways previously identified in MDS patients and to unravel novel pathways highlighted by this study.

  8. GEP analysis validates high risk MDS and acute myeloid leukemia post MDS mice models and highlights novel dysregulated pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Guerenne

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In spite of the recent discovery of genetic mutations in most myelodysplasic (MDS patients, the pathophysiology of these disorders still remains poorly understood, and only few in vivo models are available to help unravel the disease. Methods We performed global specific gene expression profiling and functional pathway analysis in purified Sca1+ cells of two MDS transgenic mouse models that mimic human high-risk MDS (HR-MDS and acute myeloid leukemia (AML post MDS, with NRASD12 and BCL2 transgenes under the control of different promoters MRP8NRASD12/tethBCL-2 or MRP8[NRASD12/hBCL-2], respectively. Results Analysis of dysregulated genes that were unique to the diseased HR-MDS and AML post MDS mice and not their founder mice pointed first to pathways that had previously been reported in MDS patients, including DNA replication/damage/repair, cell cycle, apoptosis, immune responses, and canonical Wnt pathways, further validating these models at the gene expression level. Interestingly, pathways not previously reported in MDS were discovered. These included dysregulated genes of noncanonical Wnt pathways and energy and lipid metabolisms. These dysregulated genes were not only confirmed in a different independent set of BM and spleen Sca1+ cells from the MDS mice but also in MDS CD34+ BM patient samples. Conclusions These two MDS models may thus provide useful preclinical models to target pathways previously identified in MDS patients and to unravel novel pathways highlighted by this study.

  9. Genome, secretome and glucose transport highlight unique features of the protein production host Pichia pastoris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mattanovich Diethard

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pichia pastoris is widely used as a production platform for heterologous proteins and model organism for organelle proliferation. Without a published genome sequence available, strain and process development relied mainly on analogies to other, well studied yeasts like Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Results To investigate specific features of growth and protein secretion, we have sequenced the 9.4 Mb genome of the type strain DSMZ 70382 and analyzed the secretome and the sugar transporters. The computationally predicted secretome consists of 88 ORFs. When grown on glucose, only 20 proteins were actually secreted at detectable levels. These data highlight one major feature of P. pastoris, namely the low contamination of heterologous proteins with host cell protein, when applying glucose based expression systems. Putative sugar transporters were identified and compared to those of related yeast species. The genome comprises 2 homologs to S. cerevisiae low affinity transporters and 2 to high affinity transporters of other Crabtree negative yeasts. Contrary to other yeasts, P. pastoris possesses 4 H+/glycerol transporters. Conclusion This work highlights significant advantages of using the P. pastoris system with glucose based expression and fermentation strategies. As only few proteins and no proteases are actually secreted on glucose, it becomes evident that cell lysis is the relevant cause of proteolytic degradation of secreted proteins. The endowment with hexose transporters, dominantly of the high affinity type, limits glucose uptake rates and thus overflow metabolism as observed in S. cerevisiae. The presence of 4 genes for glycerol transporters explains the high specific growth rates on this substrate and underlines the suitability of a glycerol/glucose based fermentation strategy. Furthermore, we present an open access web based genome browser http://www.pichiagenome.org.

  10. Highlights 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-02-15

    This document summarizes a year of activities for the ESRF (European synchrotron radiation facilities), this facility serves 31 beamlines that represent 34 end stations that can be run independently. This document is organized into 9 parts. Part 1: 'high resolution and resonance scattering' deals with surface science and magnetism at high pressure, in particular results are presented for samarium and europium chalcogenides. A cross-section of a variety of applications are presented, they range from glass physics to the understanding of thermoelectric materials. Part 2: 'materials sciences' deals with material behaviour under extreme conditions (metallic sulfur above 100 GPa,...) general applications of X-ray diffraction : stress and strain studies, assessment of excess free volume in metallic glasses, or grain nucleation and growth kinetics during solidification. Part 3: 'soft condensed matter'. Part 4: 'structural biology'. Part 5: 'surface and interface science' (at ESRF surfaces and interfaces are studied at about 50% of all beamlines). A study shows the existence of ordered SiGe domains in the interior of the small Ge islands in Si, whereas bulk SiGe alloy is disordered. Other studies shed light on the surprisingly different magnetic behaviour of ultra-thin cobalt and nickel films on a platinum surface. Part 6 : 'X-ray absorption and magnetic scattering'. Many of the studies push the limits of methods using high pressure, high magnetic fields, high and low temperature with absorption and scattering techniques. There are also examples of measurements on the femtosecond time scale using the core-hole clock method and on femto-meter length scale in magnetostriction measurements. Part 7: 'X-ray imaging and optics'. Part 8: 'the X-ray source'. Part 9: 'facts and figures'. (A.C.)

  11. Brookhaven highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowe, M.S.; Cohen, A.; Greenberg, D.; Seubert, L. (eds.)

    1992-01-01

    This publication provides a broad overview of the research programs and efforts being conducted, built, designed, and planned at Brookhaven National Laboratory. This work covers a broad range of scientific disciplines. Major facilities include the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS), with its newly completed booster, the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR), and the RHIC, which is under construction. Departments within the laboratory include the AGS department, accelerator development, physics, chemistry, biology, NSLS, medical, nuclear energy, and interdepartmental research efforts. Research ranges from the pure sciences, in nuclear physics and high energy physics as one example, to environmental work in applied science to study climatic effects, from efforts in biology which are a component of the human genome project to the study, production, and characterization of new materials. The paper provides an overview of the laboratory operations during 1992, including staffing, research, honors, funding, and general laboratory plans for the future.

  12. 1982 Highlights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1983-01-01

    A short report of the activities of the Brazilian Energy and Mines Ministery - MME -, is presented, emphasizing the most important facts that happened in its several areas of actuation during 1982. Through a simple and objective communication, those facts are shown. (E.G.) [pt

  13. Brookhaven highlights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowe, M.S.; Cohen, A.; Greenberg, D.; Seubert, L.

    1992-01-01

    This publication provides a broad overview of the research programs and efforts being conducted, built, designed, and planned at Brookhaven National Laboratory. This work covers a broad range of scientific disciplines. Major facilities include the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS), with its newly completed booster, the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR), and the RHIC, which is under construction. Departments within the laboratory include the AGS department, accelerator development, physics, chemistry, biology, NSLS, medical, nuclear energy, and interdepartmental research efforts. Research ranges from the pure sciences, in nuclear physics and high energy physics as one example, to environmental work in applied science to study climatic effects, from efforts in biology which are a component of the human genome project to the study, production, and characterization of new materials. The paper provides an overview of the laboratory operations during 1992, including staffing, research, honors, funding, and general laboratory plans for the future

  14. Austrian highlights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, Simon

    2001-01-01

    An overview of recent development in the Austrian hydroelectric industry is presented, and details of the installed capacity, the Austrian government's power market reform package, and the promotion of small-scale hydroelectric power plants are given. The operation of Verbund - Austria's largest power generator and distributor - and the restructuring of the Verbund's main Austrian Hydro Power (AHP) generating group are discussed. The export of power, the joint venture of Verbund with CIR Energia in Italy to market power to commercial and industrial users, and the controversy surrounding the Freudenau run-of-the river plant which successfully tested a matrix turbine are reported

  15. 2013 Highlights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The annual report gives a summary overview of key research and development activities at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN in 2013. The report discusses progress and main achievements in the following areas: reactor safety, radioactive waste and decommissioing, radiation protection, the BR2 reactor, nuclear fuel research, raduioactivity and the environment and medical applications with emphasis on dosimetry.

  16. Highlights 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-02-01

    This document summarizes a year of activities for the ESRF (European synchrotron radiation facilities), this facility serves 31 beamlines that represent 34 end stations that can be run independently. This document is organized into 9 parts. Part 1: 'high resolution and resonance scattering' deals with surface science and magnetism at high pressure, in particular results are presented for samarium and europium chalcogenides. A cross-section of a variety of applications are presented, they range from glass physics to the understanding of thermoelectric materials. Part 2: 'materials sciences' deals with material behaviour under extreme conditions (metallic sulfur above 100 GPa,...) general applications of X-ray diffraction : stress and strain studies, assessment of excess free volume in metallic glasses, or grain nucleation and growth kinetics during solidification. Part 3: 'soft condensed matter'. Part 4: 'structural biology'. Part 5: 'surface and interface science' (at ESRF surfaces and interfaces are studied at about 50% of all beamlines). A study shows the existence of ordered SiGe domains in the interior of the small Ge islands in Si, whereas bulk SiGe alloy is disordered. Other studies shed light on the surprisingly different magnetic behaviour of ultra-thin cobalt and nickel films on a platinum surface. Part 6 : 'X-ray absorption and magnetic scattering'. Many of the studies push the limits of methods using high pressure, high magnetic fields, high and low temperature with absorption and scattering techniques. There are also examples of measurements on the femtosecond time scale using the core-hole clock method and on femto-meter length scale in magnetostriction measurements. Part 7: 'X-ray imaging and optics'. Part 8: 'the X-ray source'. Part 9: 'facts and figures'. (A.C.)

  17. Highlights 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-02-15

    This document summarizes a year of activities for the ESRF (European synchrotron radiation facilities), this facility serves 31 beamlines that represent 34 end stations that can be run independently. This document is organized into 9 parts. Part 1: 'high resolution and resonance scattering' deals with surface science and magnetism at high pressure, in particular results are presented for samarium and europium chalcogenides. A cross-section of a variety of applications are presented, they range from glass physics to the understanding of thermoelectric materials. Part 2: 'materials sciences' deals with material behaviour under extreme conditions (metallic sulfur above 100 GPa,...) general applications of X-ray diffraction : stress and strain studies, assessment of excess free volume in metallic glasses, or grain nucleation and growth kinetics during solidification. Part 3: 'soft condensed matter'. Part 4: 'structural biology'. Part 5: 'surface and interface science' (at ESRF surfaces and interfaces are studied at about 50% of all beamlines). A study shows the existence of ordered SiGe domains in the interior of the small Ge islands in Si, whereas bulk SiGe alloy is disordered. Other studies shed light on the surprisingly different magnetic behaviour of ultra-thin cobalt and nickel films on a platinum surface. Part 6 : 'X-ray absorption and magnetic scattering'. Many of the studies push the limits of methods using high pressure, high magnetic fields, high and low temperature with absorption and scattering techniques. There are also examples of measurements on the femtosecond time scale using the core-hole clock method and on femto-meter length scale in magnetostriction measurements. Part 7: 'X-ray imaging and optics'. Part 8: 'the X-ray source'. Part 9: 'facts and figures'. (A.C.)

  18. 2014 Highlights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    The annual report gives a summary overview of key research and development activities at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN in 2014. The report discusses progress and main achievements in the following areas: reactor safety, radioactive waste and decommissioning, radiation protection, the BR2 reactor, nuclear fuel research, radioactivity and the environment and medical applications with emphasis on dosimetry.

  19. HAWC highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jardin-Blicq, Armelle [Max Planck Institut fuer Kernphysik (Germany); Collaboration: HAWC-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Observatory was completed and began full operation on March 20, 2015. The detector consists of an array of 300 water tanks, each containing 200 tons of purified water and instrumented with 4 PMTs. Located at an elevation of 4100m a.s.l. near the Sierra Negra volcano in central Mexico, HAWC observes gamma rays in the 0.1-100 TeV range and has a sensitivity to TeV-scale gamma-ray sources an order of magnitude better than previous air-shower arrays. It has 2 sr field-of-view and >90% duty cycle make HAWC an ideal instrument for surveying the high-energy sky. We describe the HAWC detector and its performance characteristics and report initial results from the first months of operation.

  20. MAGIC highlights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    López-Coto Rubén

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The present generation of Imaging Air Cherenkov Telescopes (IACTs has greatly improved our knowledge on the Very High Energy (VHE side of our Universe. The MAGIC IACTs operate since 2004 with one telescope and since 2009 as a two telescope stereoscopic system. I will outline a few of our latest and most relevant results: the discovery of pulsed emission from the Crab pulsar at VHE, recently found to extend up to 400 GeV and along the “bridge” of the light curve, the measurement of the Crab nebula spectrum over three decades of energy, the discovery of VHE γ-ray emission from the PWN 3C 58, the very rapid emission of IC 310, in addition to dark matter studies. The results that will be described here and the planned deep observations in the next years will pave the path for the future generation of IACTs.

  1. New Gene Evolution: Little Did We Know

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Manyuan; VanKuren, Nicholas W.; Chen, Sidi; Vibranovski, Maria D.

    2014-01-01

    Genes are perpetually added to and deleted from genomes during evolution. Thus, it is important to understand how new genes are formed and evolve as critical components of the genetic systems determining the biological diversity of life. Two decades of effort have shed light on the process of new gene origination, and have contributed to an emerging comprehensive picture of how new genes are added to genomes, ranging from the mechanisms that generate new gene structures to the presence of new genes in different organisms to the rates and patterns of new gene origination and the roles of new genes in phenotypic evolution. We review each of these aspects of new gene evolution, summarizing the main evidence for the origination and importance of new genes in evolution. We highlight findings showing that new genes rapidly change existing genetic systems that govern various molecular, cellular and phenotypic functions. PMID:24050177

  2. Genomes of coral dinoflagellate symbionts highlight evolutionary adaptations conducive to a symbiotic lifestyle

    KAUST Repository

    Aranda, Manuel

    2016-12-22

    Despite half a century of research, the biology of dinoflagellates remains enigmatic: they defy many functional and genetic traits attributed to typical eukaryotic cells. Genomic approaches to study dinoflagellates are often stymied due to their large, multi-gigabase genomes. Members of the genus Symbiodinium are photosynthetic endosymbionts of stony corals that provide the foundation of coral reef ecosystems. Their smaller genome sizes provide an opportunity to interrogate evolution and functionality of dinoflagellate genomes and endosymbiosis. We sequenced the genome of the ancestral Symbiodinium microadriaticum and compared it to the genomes of the more derived Symbiodinium minutum and Symbiodinium kawagutii and eukaryote model systems as well as transcriptomes from other dinoflagellates. Comparative analyses of genome and transcriptome protein sets show that all dinoflagellates, not only Symbiodinium, possess significantly more transmembrane transporters involved in the exchange of amino acids, lipids, and glycerol than other eukaryotes. Importantly, we find that only Symbiodinium harbor an extensive transporter repertoire associated with the provisioning of carbon and nitrogen. Analyses of these transporters show species-specific expansions, which provides a genomic basis to explain differential compatibilities to an array of hosts and environments, and highlights the putative importance of gene duplications as an evolutionary mechanism in dinoflagellates and Symbiodinium.

  3. Genomes of coral dinoflagellate symbionts highlight evolutionary adaptations conducive to a symbiotic lifestyle

    KAUST Repository

    Aranda, Manuel; Li, Yangyang; Liew, Yi Jin; Baumgarten, Sebastian; Simakov, O.; Wilson, M. C.; Piel, J.; Ashoor, Haitham; Bougouffa, Salim; Bajic, Vladimir B.; Ryu, Tae Woo; Ravasi, Timothy; Bayer, Till; Micklem, G.; Kim, H.; Bhak, J.; LaJeunesse, T. C.; Voolstra, Christian R.

    2016-01-01

    Despite half a century of research, the biology of dinoflagellates remains enigmatic: they defy many functional and genetic traits attributed to typical eukaryotic cells. Genomic approaches to study dinoflagellates are often stymied due to their large, multi-gigabase genomes. Members of the genus Symbiodinium are photosynthetic endosymbionts of stony corals that provide the foundation of coral reef ecosystems. Their smaller genome sizes provide an opportunity to interrogate evolution and functionality of dinoflagellate genomes and endosymbiosis. We sequenced the genome of the ancestral Symbiodinium microadriaticum and compared it to the genomes of the more derived Symbiodinium minutum and Symbiodinium kawagutii and eukaryote model systems as well as transcriptomes from other dinoflagellates. Comparative analyses of genome and transcriptome protein sets show that all dinoflagellates, not only Symbiodinium, possess significantly more transmembrane transporters involved in the exchange of amino acids, lipids, and glycerol than other eukaryotes. Importantly, we find that only Symbiodinium harbor an extensive transporter repertoire associated with the provisioning of carbon and nitrogen. Analyses of these transporters show species-specific expansions, which provides a genomic basis to explain differential compatibilities to an array of hosts and environments, and highlights the putative importance of gene duplications as an evolutionary mechanism in dinoflagellates and Symbiodinium.

  4. Topological variation in single-gene phylogenetic trees

    OpenAIRE

    Castresana, Jose

    2007-01-01

    A recent large-scale phylogenomic study has shown the great degree of topological variation that can be found among eukaryotic phylogenetic trees constructed from single genes, highlighting the problems that can be associated with gene sampling in phylogenetic studies.

  5. Meta-analysis identifies five novel loci associated with endometriosis highlighting key genes involved in hormone metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sapkota, Yadav; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Morris, Andrew P.

    2017-01-01

    Endometriosis is a heritable hormone-dependent gynecological disorder, associated with severe pelvic pain and reduced fertility; however, its molecular mechanisms remain largely unknown. Here we perform a meta-analysis of 11 genome-wide association case-control data sets, totalling 17,045 endomet...

  6. Comparative genome analysis of PHB gene family reveals deep evolutionary origins and diverse gene function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di, Chao; Xu, Wenying; Su, Zhen; Yuan, Joshua S

    2010-10-07

    PHB (Prohibitin) gene family is involved in a variety of functions important for different biological processes. PHB genes are ubiquitously present in divergent species from prokaryotes to eukaryotes. Human PHB genes have been found to be associated with various diseases. Recent studies by our group and others have shown diverse function of PHB genes in plants for development, senescence, defence, and others. Despite the importance of the PHB gene family, no comprehensive gene family analysis has been carried to evaluate the relatedness of PHB genes across different species. In order to better guide the gene function analysis and understand the evolution of the PHB gene family, we therefore carried out the comparative genome analysis of the PHB genes across different kingdoms. The relatedness, motif distribution, and intron/exon distribution all indicated that PHB genes is a relatively conserved gene family. The PHB genes can be classified into 5 classes and each class have a very deep evolutionary origin. The PHB genes within the class maintained the same motif patterns during the evolution. With Arabidopsis as the model species, we found that PHB gene intron/exon structure and domains are also conserved during the evolution. Despite being a conserved gene family, various gene duplication events led to the expansion of the PHB genes. Both segmental and tandem gene duplication were involved in Arabidopsis PHB gene family expansion. However, segmental duplication is predominant in Arabidopsis. Moreover, most of the duplicated genes experienced neofunctionalization. The results highlighted that PHB genes might be involved in important functions so that the duplicated genes are under the evolutionary pressure to derive new function. PHB gene family is a conserved gene family and accounts for diverse but important biological functions based on the similar molecular mechanisms. The highly diverse biological function indicated that more research needs to be carried out

  7. Gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hildebrand, C.E.; Crawford, B.D.; Walters, R.A.; Enger, M.D.

    1983-01-01

    We prepared probes for isolating functional pieces of the metallothionein locus. The probes enabled a variety of experiments, eventually revealing two mechanisms for metallothionein gene expression, the order of the DNA coding units at the locus, and the location of the gene site in its chromosome. Once the switch regulating metallothionein synthesis was located, it could be joined by recombinant DNA methods to other, unrelated genes, then reintroduced into cells by gene-transfer techniques. The expression of these recombinant genes could then be induced by exposing the cells to Zn 2+ or Cd 2+ . We would thus take advantage of the clearly defined switching properties of the metallothionein gene to manipulate the expression of other, perhaps normally constitutive, genes. Already, despite an incomplete understanding of how the regulatory switch of the metallothionein locus operates, such experiments have been performed successfully

  8. Metagenomic Analysis of Subtidal Sediments from Polar and Subpolar Coastal Environments Highlights the Relevance of Anaerobic Hydrocarbon Degradation Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espinola, Fernando J.; Dionisi, Hebe M.; Borglin, Sharon; Brislawn, Colin J.; Jansson, Janet K.; Mac Cormack, Walter P.; Carroll, Jolynn; Sjoling, Sara; Lozada , Mariana

    2018-01-02

    In this work, we analyzed the community structure and metabolic potential of sediment microbial communities in high-latitude coastal environments subjected to low to moderate levels of chronic pollution. Subtidal sediments from four low-energy inlets located in polar and subpolar regions from both Hemispheres were analyzed using large-scale 16S rRNA gene and metagenomic sequencing. Communities showed high diversity (Shannon’s index 6.8 to 10.2), with distinct phylogenetic structures (<40% shared taxa at the Phylum level among regions) but similar metabolic potential in terms of sequences assigned to KOs. Environmental factors (mainly salinity, temperature, and in less extent organic pollution) were drivers of both phylogenetic and functional traits. Bacterial taxa correlating with hydrocarbon pollution included families of anaerobic or facultative anaerobic lifestyle, such as Desulfuromonadaceae, Geobacteraceae, and Rhodocyclaceae. In accordance, biomarker genes for anaerobic hydrocarbon degradation (bamA, ebdA, bcrA, and bssA) were prevalent, only outnumbered by alkB, and their sequences were taxonomically binned to the same bacterial groups. BssA-assigned metagenomic sequences showed an extremely wide diversity distributed all along the phylogeny known for this gene, including bssA sensu stricto, nmsA, assA, and other clusters from poorly or not yet described variants. This work increases our understanding of microbial community patterns in cold coastal sediments, and highlights the relevance of anaerobic hydrocarbon degradation processes in subtidal environments.

  9. Ethics of Gene Therapy Debated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borman, Stu

    1991-01-01

    Presented are the highlights of a press conference featuring biomedical ethicist LeRoy Walters of Georgetown University and attorney Andrew Kimbrell of the Foundation on Economic Trends. The opposing points of view of these two speakers serve to outline the pros and cons of the gene therapy issue. (CW)

  10. Modeling sports highlights using a time-series clustering framework and model interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishnan, Regunathan; Otsuka, Isao; Xiong, Ziyou; Divakaran, Ajay

    2005-01-01

    In our past work on sports highlights extraction, we have shown the utility of detecting audience reaction using an audio classification framework. The audio classes in the framework were chosen based on intuition. In this paper, we present a systematic way of identifying the key audio classes for sports highlights extraction using a time series clustering framework. We treat the low-level audio features as a time series and model the highlight segments as "unusual" events in a background of an "usual" process. The set of audio classes to characterize the sports domain is then identified by analyzing the consistent patterns in each of the clusters output from the time series clustering framework. The distribution of features from the training data so obtained for each of the key audio classes, is parameterized by a Minimum Description Length Gaussian Mixture Model (MDL-GMM). We also interpret the meaning of each of the mixture components of the MDL-GMM for the key audio class (the "highlight" class) that is correlated with highlight moments. Our results show that the "highlight" class is a mixture of audience cheering and commentator's excited speech. Furthermore, we show that the precision-recall performance for highlights extraction based on this "highlight" class is better than that of our previous approach which uses only audience cheering as the key highlight class.

  11. Highlighting the gap between critical outcomes requirements and built environment education in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ampofo-Anti, NL

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to highlight the discrepancies between current built environment education and Critical Outcomes requirements of the South African National Qualifications Framework (NQF)...

  12. Retroviruses Hijack Chromatin Loops to Drive Oncogene Expression and Highlight the Chromatin Architecture around Proto-Oncogenic Loci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattison, Jillian M.; Wright, Jason B.; Cole, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    The majority of the genome consists of intergenic and non-coding DNA sequences shown to play a major role in different gene regulatory networks. However, the specific potency of these distal elements as well as how these regions exert function across large genomic distances remains unclear. To address these unresolved issues, we closely examined the chromatin architecture around proto-oncogenic loci in the mouse and human genomes to demonstrate a functional role for chromatin looping in distal gene regulation. Using cell culture models, we show that tumorigenic retroviral integration sites within the mouse genome occur near existing large chromatin loops and that this chromatin architecture is maintained within the human genome as well. Significantly, as mutagenesis screens are not feasible in humans, we demonstrate a way to leverage existing screens in mice to identify disease relevant human enhancers and expose novel disease mechanisms. For instance, we characterize the epigenetic landscape upstream of the human Cyclin D1 locus to find multiple distal interactions that contribute to the complex cis-regulation of this cell cycle gene. Furthermore, we characterize a novel distal interaction upstream of the Cyclin D1 gene which provides mechanistic evidence for the abundant overexpression of Cyclin D1 occurring in multiple myeloma cells harboring a pathogenic translocation event. Through use of mapped retroviral integrations and translocation breakpoints, our studies highlight the importance of chromatin looping in oncogene expression, elucidate the epigenetic mechanisms crucial for distal cis-regulation, and in one particular instance, explain how a translocation event drives tumorigenesis through upregulation of a proto-oncogene. PMID:25799187

  13. Highlights Eurosites insights; highlights on image, implementation, interpretation and integration of Natura 2000 in European perspective; United Kingdom, Sweden, Spain, France and Hungary

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neven, M.G.G.; Kistenkas, F.H.

    2005-01-01

    Highlighting the main report Eurosites Insights this comparative study analyses Natura 2000 nature conservation (EU Birds- and Habitats Directives) alongside the key issues of image, implementation, interpretation and integration. Having quick scanned the EU25, five member states have been selected

  14. Deconstructing the pluripotency gene regulatory network

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Mo

    2018-04-04

    Pluripotent stem cells can be isolated from embryos or derived by reprogramming. Pluripotency is stabilized by an interconnected network of pluripotency genes that cooperatively regulate gene expression. Here we describe the molecular principles of pluripotency gene function and highlight post-transcriptional controls, particularly those induced by RNA-binding proteins and alternative splicing, as an important regulatory layer of pluripotency. We also discuss heterogeneity in pluripotency regulation, alternative pluripotency states and future directions of pluripotent stem cell research.

  15. Deconstructing the pluripotency gene regulatory network

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Mo; Belmonte, Juan Carlos Izpisua

    2018-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells can be isolated from embryos or derived by reprogramming. Pluripotency is stabilized by an interconnected network of pluripotency genes that cooperatively regulate gene expression. Here we describe the molecular principles of pluripotency gene function and highlight post-transcriptional controls, particularly those induced by RNA-binding proteins and alternative splicing, as an important regulatory layer of pluripotency. We also discuss heterogeneity in pluripotency regulation, alternative pluripotency states and future directions of pluripotent stem cell research.

  16. Moving beyond Text Highlights: Inferring Users' Interests to Improve the Relevance of Retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakrishnan, Vimala; Mehmood, Yasir; Nagappan, Yoganathan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Studies have indicated that users' text highlighting behaviour can be further manipulated to improve the relevance of retrieved results. This article reports on a study that examined users' text highlight frequency, length and users' copy-paste actions. Method: A binary voting mechanism was employed to determine the weights for the…

  17. North-American Conference Highlights the Treatment of Trauma Utilizing Guided Imagery and Music

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scott-Montcrieff, Suzannah; Beck, Bolette Daniels; Montgomery, Erin

    2015-01-01

    A report on the 2015 Association for Music and Imagery conference highlights papers that address clinical practice and research using Guided Imagery and Music for the treatment of trauma.......A report on the 2015 Association for Music and Imagery conference highlights papers that address clinical practice and research using Guided Imagery and Music for the treatment of trauma....

  18. Trichoderma genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foreman, Pamela [Los Altos, CA; Goedegebuur, Frits [Vlaardingen, NL; Van Solingen, Pieter [Naaldwijk, NL; Ward, Michael [San Francisco, CA

    2012-06-19

    Described herein are novel gene sequences isolated from Trichoderma reesei. Two genes encoding proteins comprising a cellulose binding domain, one encoding an arabionfuranosidase and one encoding an acetylxylanesterase are described. The sequences, CIP1 and CIP2, contain a cellulose binding domain. These proteins are especially useful in the textile and detergent industry and in pulp and paper industry.

  19. The 2014 Ebola virus outbreak in West Africa highlights no evidence of rapid evolution or adaptation to humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xingguang; Zai, Junjie; Liu, Haizhou; Feng, Yi; Li, Fan; Wei, Jing; Zou, Sen; Yuan, Zhiming; Shao, Yiming

    2016-10-21

    Following its immergence in December 2013, the recent Zaire Ebola virus (EBOV) outbreak in West Africa has spread and persisted for more than two years, making it the largest EBOV epidemic in both scale and geographical region to date. In this study, a total of 726 glycoprotein (GP) gene sequences of the EBOV full-length genome obtained from West Africa from the 2014 outbreak, combined with 30 from earlier outbreaks between 1976 and 2008 were used to investigate the genetic divergence, evolutionary history, population dynamics, and selection pressure of EBOV among distinct epidemic waves. Results from our dataset showed that no non-synonymous substitutions occurred on the GP gene coding sequences of EBOV that were likely to have affected protein structure or function in any way. Furthermore, the significantly different dN/dS ratios observed between the 2014 West African outbreak and earlier outbreaks were more likely due to the confounding presence of segregating polymorphisms. Our results highlight no robust evidence that the 2014 EBOV outbreak is fast-evolving and adapting to humans. Therefore, the unprecedented nature of the 2014 EBOV outbreak might be more likely related to non-virological elements, such as environmental and sociological factors.

  20. Functional genomics highlights differential induction of antiviral pathways in the lungs of SARS-CoV-infected macaques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna de Lang

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV is likely mediated by disproportional immune responses and the ability of the virus to circumvent innate immunity. Using functional genomics, we analyzed early host responses to SARS-CoV infection in the lungs of adolescent cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis that show lung pathology similar to that observed in human adults with SARS. Analysis of gene signatures revealed induction of a strong innate immune response characterized by the stimulation of various cytokine and chemokine genes, including interleukin (IL-6, IL-8, and IP-10, which corresponds to the host response seen in acute respiratory distress syndrome. As opposed to many in vitro experiments, SARS-CoV induced a wide range of type I interferons (IFNs and nuclear translocation of phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 in the lungs of macaques. Using immunohistochemistry, we revealed that these antiviral signaling pathways were differentially regulated in distinctive subsets of cells. Our studies emphasize that the induction of early IFN signaling may be critical to confer protection against SARS-CoV infection and highlight the strength of combining functional genomics with immunohistochemistry to further unravel the pathogenesis of SARS.

  1. Tourette syndrome research highlights from 2016 [version 2; referees: 4 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin J. Black

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This article presents highlights chosen from research that appeared during 2016 on Tourette syndrome and other tic disorders. Selected articles felt to represent meaningful advances in the field are briefly summarized.

  2. Tourette syndrome research highlights from 2016 [version 1; referees: 2 approved, 1 approved with reservations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin J. Black

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This article presents highlights chosen from research that appeared during 2016 on Tourette syndrome and other tic disorders. Selected articles felt to represent meaningful advances in the field are briefly summarized.

  3. January 1978 monthly highlights for Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research Programs at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mynatt, F.R.

    1978-01-01

    Highlights of technical progress during January 1978 are presented for sixteen separate program activities which comprise the ORNL research program for the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research's Division of Reactor Safety Research

  4. PNNL Highlights for the Office of Basic Energy Sciences (July 2013-July 2014)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Benjamin; Warren, Pamela M.; Manke, Kristin L.

    2014-08-13

    This report includes research highlights of work funded in part or whole by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences as well as selected leadership accomplishments.

  5. The Third International Congress on Child Abuse and Neglect: Conference Highlights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besharov, Douglas J.

    1981-01-01

    Presents highlights from the Third International Congress on Child Abuse and Neglect. The topic of child sexual abuse dominated the Congress; other topics included malnutrition, research problems, and concerns of Third World countries. Recommendations of the Congress are summarized.

  6. Symposium on Highlights from 14 years of LEAR Physics : "LEAR Performance" by M. Chanel

    CERN Multimedia

    1998-01-01

    Symposium on Highlights from 14 years of LEAR Physics hold at CERN, commemorating the closure of LEAR and giving a topical review of the impact of experiments with low energy antiprotons in their respective fields: M. Chanel "LEAR Performance"

  7. Symposium on Highlights from 14 years of LEAR Physics : "Atomic Physics" by E. Uggerhoj

    CERN Multimedia

    1998-01-01

    Symposium on Highlights from 14 years Physics hold at CERN, commemorating the closure of LEAR and giving a topical review of the impact of experiments with low energy antiprotons in their respective fields

  8. Symposium on Highlights from 14 years of LEAR Physics : "Antiproton Mass" by G. Gabrielse

    CERN Multimedia

    1998-01-01

    Symposium on Highlights from 14 years Physics hold at CERN, commemorating the closure of LEAR and giving a topical review of the impact of experiments with low energy antiprotons in their respective fields

  9. Symposium on Highlights from 14 years of LEAR Physics : "CP Violation" by P. Pavlopoulos

    CERN Multimedia

    1998-01-01

    Symposium on Highlights from 14 years Physics hold at CERN, commemorating the closure of LEAR and giving a topical review of the impact of experiments with low energy antiprotons in their respective fields

  10. Symposium on Highlights from 14 years of LEAR Physics : "AD Project" by S. Maury

    CERN Multimedia

    1998-01-01

    Symposium on Highlights from 14 years of LEAR Physics hold at CERN, commemorating the closure of LEAR and giving a topical review of the impact of experiments with low energy antiprotons in their respective fields: S. Maury "AD Project"

  11. Symposium on Highlights from 14 years of LEAR Physics: "Light Antiprotonic Atoms" by R. Hayano

    CERN Multimedia

    1998-01-01

    Symposium on Highlights from 14 years of LEAR Physics hold at CERN, commemorating the closure of LEAR and giving a topical review of the impact of experiments with low energy antiprotons in their respective fields

  12. Symposium on Highlights from 14 years of LEAR Physics : R. Landua (chairman)

    CERN Multimedia

    1998-01-01

    Symposium on Highlights from 14 years of LEAR Physics hold at CERN, commemorating the closure of LEAR and giving a topical review of the impact of experiments with low energy antiprotons in their respective fields

  13. Symposium on Highlights from 14 years of LEAR Physics : "Nuclear Physics" by T. von Egidy

    CERN Multimedia

    1998-01-01

    Symposium on Highlights from 145 years of LEAR Physics hold at CERN, commemorating the closure of LEAR and giving a topical review of the impact of experiments with low energy antiprotons in their respective fields

  14. Symposium on Highlights from 14 years of LEAR Physics : "Meson spectroscopy" by H. Koch

    CERN Multimedia

    1998-01-01

    Symposium on Highlights from 14 years of LEAR Physics hold at CERN, commemorating the closure of LEAR and giving a topical review of the impact of experiments with low energy antiprotons in their respective fields

  15. Symposium on Highlights from 14 years of LEAR Physics : "Annihilation at Rest" by U. Gastaldi

    CERN Multimedia

    1998-01-01

    Symposium on Highlights from 14 years of LEAR Physics hold at CERN, commemorating the closure of LEAR and giving a topical review of the impact of experiments with low energy antiprotons in their respective fields

  16. Symposium on Highlights from 14 years of LEAR Physics : "Annihilation in Flight" by D. Hertzog

    CERN Multimedia

    1998-01-01

    Symposium on Highlights from 14 years of LEAR Physics hold at CERN, commemorating the closure of LEAR and giving a topical review of the impact of experiments with low energy antiprotons in their respective fields

  17. Monthly highlights for Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research Programs at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, March 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fee, G.G.

    1977-01-01

    Highlights of technical progress during March 1977 are presented for thirteen separate program activities which comprise the ORNL research program for the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research's Division of Reactor Safety Research

  18. Highlight: Private sector could play a major role in feeding Africa ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2014-09-08

    Sep 8, 2014 ... Highlight: Private sector could play a major role in feeding Africa ... scale, we will need to involve the private sector," said IDRC President Jean Lebel. ... There is ample evidence that addressing gender inequalities and ...

  19. Ageing genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rattan, Suresh

    2018-01-01

    The idea of gerontogenes is in line with the evolutionary explanation of ageing as being an emergent phenomenon as a result of the imperfect maintenance and repair systems. Although evolutionary processes did not select for any specific ageing genes that restrict and determine the lifespan...... of an individual, the term ‘gerontogenes’ primarily refers to any genes that may seem to influence ageing and longevity, without being specifically selected for that role. Such genes can also be called ‘virtual gerontogenes’ by virtue of their indirect influence on the rate and process of ageing. More than 1000...... virtual gerontogenes have been associated with ageing and longevity in model organisms and humans. The ‘real’ genes, which do influence the essential lifespan of a species, and have been selected for in accordance with the evolutionary life history of the species, are known as the longevity assurance...

  20. Comparative Genomic Analysis of Soybean Flowering Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Chol-Hee; Wong, Chui E.; Singh, Mohan B.; Bhalla, Prem L.

    2012-01-01

    Flowering is an important agronomic trait that determines crop yield. Soybean is a major oilseed legume crop used for human and animal feed. Legumes have unique vegetative and floral complexities. Our understanding of the molecular basis of flower initiation and development in legumes is limited. Here, we address this by using a computational approach to examine flowering regulatory genes in the soybean genome in comparison to the most studied model plant, Arabidopsis. For this comparison, a genome-wide analysis of orthologue groups was performed, followed by an in silico gene expression analysis of the identified soybean flowering genes. Phylogenetic analyses of the gene families highlighted the evolutionary relationships among these candidates. Our study identified key flowering genes in soybean and indicates that the vernalisation and the ambient-temperature pathways seem to be the most variant in soybean. A comparison of the orthologue groups containing flowering genes indicated that, on average, each Arabidopsis flowering gene has 2-3 orthologous copies in soybean. Our analysis highlighted that the CDF3, VRN1, SVP, AP3 and PIF3 genes are paralogue-rich genes in soybean. Furthermore, the genome mapping of the soybean flowering genes showed that these genes are scattered randomly across the genome. A paralogue comparison indicated that the soybean genes comprising the largest orthologue group are clustered in a 1.4 Mb region on chromosome 16 of soybean. Furthermore, a comparison with the undomesticated soybean (Glycine soja) revealed that there are hundreds of SNPs that are associated with putative soybean flowering genes and that there are structural variants that may affect the genes of the light-signalling and ambient-temperature pathways in soybean. Our study provides a framework for the soybean flowering pathway and insights into the relationship and evolution of flowering genes between a short-day soybean and the long-day plant, Arabidopsis. PMID:22679494

  1. Highlight shapes and perception of gloss for real and photographed objects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Assen, Jan Jaap R; Wijntjes, Maarten W A; Pont, Sylvia C

    2016-01-01

    Gloss perception strongly depends on the three-dimensional shape and the illumination of the object under consideration. In this study we investigated the influence of the spatial structure of the illumination on gloss perception. A diffuse light box in combination with differently shaped masks was used to produce a set of six simple and complex highlight shapes. The geometry of the simple highlight shapes was inspired by conventional artistic practice (e.g., ring flash for photography, window shape for painting and disk or square for cartoons). In the box we placed spherical stimuli that were painted in six degrees of glossiness. This resulted in a stimulus set of six highlight shapes and six gloss levels, a total of 36 stimuli. We performed three experiments of which two took place using digital photographs on a computer monitor and one with the real spheres in the light box. The observers had to perform a comparison task in which they chose which of two stimuli was glossiest and a rating task in which they rated the glossiness. The results show that, perhaps surprisingly, more complex highlight shapes were perceived to produce a less glossy appearance than simple highlight shapes such as a disk or square. These findings were confirmed for both viewing conditions, on a computer display and in a real setting. The results show that variations in the spatial structure of "rather simple" illumination of the "extended source" type highlight influences perceived glossiness.

  2. Deriving Trading Rules Using Gene Expression Programming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian VISOIU

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents how buy and sell trading rules are generated using gene expression programming with special setup. Market concepts are presented and market analysis is discussed with emphasis on technical analysis and quantitative methods. The use of genetic algorithms in deriving trading rules is presented. Gene expression programming is applied in a form where multiple types of operators and operands are used. This gives birth to multiple gene contexts and references between genes in order to keep the linear structure of the gene expression programming chromosome. The setup of multiple gene contexts is presented. The case study shows how to use the proposed gene setup to derive trading rules encoded by Boolean expressions, using a dataset with the reference exchange rates between the Euro and the Romanian leu. The conclusions highlight the positive results obtained in deriving useful trading rules.

  3. Gene transfer therapy in vascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, M J; Gaballa, M A

    2001-01-01

    Somatic gene therapy of vascular diseases is a promising new field in modern medicine. Recent advancements in gene transfer technology have greatly evolved our understanding of the pathophysiologic role of candidate disease genes. With this knowledge, the expression of selective gene products provides the means to test the therapeutic use of gene therapy in a multitude of medical conditions. In addition, with the completion of genome sequencing programs, gene transfer can be used also to study the biologic function of novel genes in vivo. Novel genes are delivered to targeted tissue via several different vehicles. These vectors include adenoviruses, retroviruses, plasmids, plasmid/liposomes, and oligonucleotides. However, each one of these vectors has inherent limitations. Further investigations into developing delivery systems that not only allow for efficient, targeted gene transfer, but also are stable and nonimmunogenic, will optimize the clinical application of gene therapy in vascular diseases. This review further discusses the available mode of gene delivery and examines six major areas in vascular gene therapy, namely prevention of restenosis, thrombosis, hypertension, atherosclerosis, peripheral vascular disease in congestive heart failure, and ischemia. Although we highlight some of the recent advances in the use of gene therapy in treating vascular disease discovered primarily during the past two years, many excellent studies published during that period are not included in this review due to space limitations. The following is a selective review of practical uses of gene transfer therapy in vascular diseases. This review primarily covers work performed in the last 2 years. For earlier work, the reader may refer to several excellent review articles. For instance, Belalcazer et al. (6) reviewed general aspects of somatic gene therapy and the different vehicles used for the delivery of therapeutic genes. Gene therapy in restenosis and stimulation of

  4. With Reference to Reference Genes: A Systematic Review of Endogenous Controls in Gene Expression Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Joanne R; Waldenström, Jonas

    2015-01-01

    The choice of reference genes that are stably expressed amongst treatment groups is a crucial step in real-time quantitative PCR gene expression studies. Recent guidelines have specified that a minimum of two validated reference genes should be used for normalisation. However, a quantitative review of the literature showed that the average number of reference genes used across all studies was 1.2. Thus, the vast majority of studies continue to use a single gene, with β-actin (ACTB) and/or glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) being commonly selected in studies of vertebrate gene expression. Few studies (15%) tested a panel of potential reference genes for stability of expression before using them to normalise data. Amongst studies specifically testing reference gene stability, few found ACTB or GAPDH to be optimal, whereby these genes were significantly less likely to be chosen when larger panels of potential reference genes were screened. Fewer reference genes were tested for stability in non-model organisms, presumably owing to a dearth of available primers in less well characterised species. Furthermore, the experimental conditions under which real-time quantitative PCR analyses were conducted had a large influence on the choice of reference genes, whereby different studies of rat brain tissue showed different reference genes to be the most stable. These results highlight the importance of validating the choice of normalising reference genes before conducting gene expression studies.

  5. Chlorophyll b degradation by chlorophyll b reductase under high-light conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Rei; Ito, Hisashi; Tanaka, Ayumi

    2015-12-01

    The light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b binding protein complex of photosystem II (LHCII) is the main antenna complex of photosystem II (PSII). Plants change their LHCII content depending on the light environment. Under high-light conditions, the content of LHCII should decrease because over-excitation damages the photosystem. Chlorophyll b is indispensable for accumulating LHCII, and chlorophyll b degradation induces LHCII degradation. Chlorophyll b degradation is initiated by chlorophyll b reductase (CBR). In land plants, NON-YELLOW COLORING 1 (NYC1) and NYC1-Like (NOL) are isozymes of CBR. We analyzed these mutants to determine their functions under high-light conditions. During high-light treatment, the chlorophyll a/b ratio was stable in the wild-type (WT) and nol plants, and the LHCII content decreased in WT plants. The chlorophyll a/b ratio decreased in the nyc1 and nyc1/nol plants, and a substantial degree of LHCII was retained in nyc1/nol plants after the high-light treatment. These results demonstrate that NYC1 degrades the chlorophyll b on LHCII under high-light conditions, thus decreasing the LHCII content. After the high-light treatment, the maximum quantum efficiency of the PSII photochemistry was lower in nyc1 and nyc1/nol plants than in WT and nol plants. A larger light-harvesting system would damage PSII in nyc1 and nyc1/nol plants. The fluorescence spectroscopy of the leaves indicated that photosystem I was also damaged by the excess LHCII in nyc1/nol plants. These observations suggest that chlorophyll b degradation by NYC1 is the initial reaction for the optimization of the light-harvesting capacity under high-light conditions.

  6. Gene doping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haisma, H J; de Hon, O

    2006-04-01

    Together with the rapidly increasing knowledge on genetic therapies as a promising new branch of regular medicine, the issue has arisen whether these techniques might be abused in the field of sports. Previous experiences have shown that drugs that are still in the experimental phases of research may find their way into the athletic world. Both the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) and the International Olympic Committee (IOC) have expressed concerns about this possibility. As a result, the method of gene doping has been included in the list of prohibited classes of substances and prohibited methods. This review addresses the possible ways in which knowledge gained in the field of genetic therapies may be misused in elite sports. Many genes are readily available which may potentially have an effect on athletic performance. The sporting world will eventually be faced with the phenomena of gene doping to improve athletic performance. A combination of developing detection methods based on gene arrays or proteomics and a clear education program on the associated risks seems to be the most promising preventive method to counteract the possible application of gene doping.

  7. Institutional supporting research highlights in physics and mathematics, fiscal year 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vigil, J.C.

    1984-03-01

    Highlights of FY 1983 Institutional Supporting Research and Development activities within the six Physics and Mathematics divisions and the Center for Nonlinear Studies are presented. The highlights are but a fraction of the ISRD activities in the Directorate and are intended to be a representative sample of progress in the various research areas. FY 1983 ISRD activities within the Physics and Mathematics divisions included both basic and applied research and were divided into 11 research areas: mathematics and numerical methods, low-energy nuclear physics, medium- and high-energy nuclear physics, atomic and molecular physics, solid-state physics and materials science, fluid dynamics, plasma physics and intense particle beam theory, astrophysics and space physics, particle transport methods, accelerator and fusion technology, and biophysics. Highlights from each of these areas are presented

  8. Gene Locater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anwar, Muhammad Zohaib; Sehar, Anoosha; Rehman, Inayat-Ur

    2012-01-01

    software's for calculating recombination frequency is mostly limited to the range and flexibility of this type of analysis. GENE LOCATER is a fully customizable program for calculating recombination frequency, written in JAVA. Through an easy-to-use interface, GENE LOCATOR allows users a high degree...... of flexibility in calculating genetic linkage and displaying linkage group. Among other features, this software enables user to identify linkage groups with output visualized graphically. The program calculates interference and coefficient of coincidence with elevated accuracy in sample datasets. AVAILABILITY...

  9. Variants in the interleukin 8 gene and the response to inhaled bronchodilators in cystic fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa Lazzarini Furlan

    2017-11-01

    Conclusions: This study highlighted the importance of the rs4073 variant of the interleukin 8 gene, regarding response to inhaled bronchodilators, and of the assessment of mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene.

  10. Transcriptomic and anatomical complexity of primary, seminal, and crown roots highlight root type-specific functional diversity in maize (Zea mays L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Huanhuan; Lu, Xin; Opitz, Nina; Marcon, Caroline; Paschold, Anja; Lithio, Andrew; Nettleton, Dan; Hochholdinger, Frank

    2016-02-01

    Maize develops a complex root system composed of embryonic and post-embryonic roots. Spatio-temporal differences in the formation of these root types imply specific functions during maize development. A comparative transcriptomic study of embryonic primary and seminal, and post-embryonic crown roots of the maize inbred line B73 by RNA sequencing along with anatomical studies were conducted early in development. Seminal roots displayed unique anatomical features, whereas the organization of primary and crown roots was similar. For instance, seminal roots displayed fewer cortical cell files and their stele contained more meta-xylem vessels. Global expression profiling revealed diverse patterns of gene activity across all root types and highlighted the unique transcriptome of seminal roots. While functions in cell remodeling and cell wall formation were prominent in primary and crown roots, stress-related genes and transcriptional regulators were over-represented in seminal roots, suggesting functional specialization of the different root types. Dynamic expression of lignin biosynthesis genes and histochemical staining suggested diversification of cell wall lignification among the three root types. Our findings highlight a cost-efficient anatomical structure and a unique expression profile of seminal roots of the maize inbred line B73 different from primary and crown roots. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  11. Genome-wide scan in Hispanics highlights candidate loci for brain white matter hyperintensities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beecham, Ashley; Dong, Chuanhui; Wright, Clinton B; Dueker, Nicole; Brickman, Adam M; Wang, Liyong; DeCarli, Charles; Blanton, Susan H; Rundek, Tatjana; Mayeux, Richard; Sacco, Ralph L

    2017-10-01

    To investigate genetic variants influencing white matter hyperintensities (WMHs) in the understudied Hispanic population. Using 6.8 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), we conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) to identify SNPs associated with WMH volume (WMHV) in 922 Hispanics who underwent brain MRI as a cross-section of 2 community-based cohorts in the Northern Manhattan Study and the Washington Heights-Inwood Columbia Aging Project. Multiple linear modeling with PLINK was performed to examine the additive genetic effects on ln(WMHV) after controlling for age, sex, total intracranial volume, and principal components of ancestry. Gene-based tests of association were performed using VEGAS. Replication was performed in independent samples of Europeans, African Americans, and Asians. From the SNP analysis, a total of 17 independent SNPs in 7 genes had suggestive evidence of association with WMHV in Hispanics ( p < 1 × 10 -5 ) and 5 genes from the gene-based analysis with p < 1 × 10 -3 . One SNP (rs9957475 in GATA6 ) and 1 gene ( UBE2C ) demonstrated evidence of association ( p < 0.05) in the African American sample. Four SNPs with p < 1 × 10 -5 were shown to affect binding of SPI1 using RegulomeDB. This GWAS of 2 community-based Hispanic cohorts revealed several novel WMH-associated genetic variants. Further replication is needed in independent Hispanic samples to validate these suggestive associations, and fine mapping is needed to pinpoint causal variants.

  12. Highlighted scientific findings of the Interior Columbia Basin Ecosystem Management Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas M. Quigley; Heidi. Bigler Cole

    1997-01-01

    Decisions regarding 72 million acres of Forest Service- and Bureau of Land Management- administered lands will be based on scientific findings brought forth in the Interior Columbia Basin Ecosystem Management Project. Some highlights of the scientific findings are presented here. Project scientists drew three general conclusions: (1) Conditions and trends differ widely...

  13. Ethical Challenges in a Complex World: Highlights of the 2005 ACA Code of Ethics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocet, Michael M.

    2006-01-01

    Being an effective counselor includes having knowledge of and the ability to integrate a code of ethics into one's professional practice. This article addresses some of the highlights of the changes in the 2005 ACA [American Counseling Association] Code of Ethics such as end-of-life issues, boundaries and relationships, and multicultural and…

  14. Three decades of Cognition & Emotion : A brief review of past highlights and future prospects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rothermund, Klaus; Koole, Sander L.

    Over the past three decades, Cognition & Emotion has been one of the world’s leading outlets for emotion research. In this article, we review past highlights of and future prospects for the journal. Our tour of history covers three periods: The first period, from 1987 to 1999, was a pioneering era

  15. The Effects of Highlight Color on Immediate Recall on Subjects of Different Cognitive Styles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worley, Gary M.; Moore, David M.

    2001-01-01

    Discussion of the use of color for enhancing recognition memory focuses on a study of undergraduates that evaluated images as black and white, full color, or highlight color and the effect these characteristics had on recognition memory and recall for learners classified as field-dependent and field-independent in terms of cognitive style. (LRW)

  16. A deep learning approach for detecting and correcting highlights in endoscopic images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodriguez-Sanchez, Antonio; Chea, Daly; Azzopardi, George; Stabinger, Sebastian

    2017-01-01

    The image of an object changes dramatically depending on the lightning conditions surrounding that object. Shadows, reflections and highlights can make the object very difficult to be recognized for an automatic system. Additionally, images used in medical applications, such as endoscopic images and

  17. The Probability Evaluation Game: An Instrument to Highlight the Skill of Reflexive Listening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Clare

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the development of the Probability Evaluation Game (PEG): an innovative teaching instrument that emphasises the sophistication of listening and highlights listening as a key skill for accounting practitioners. Whilst in a roundtable format, playing PEG involves participants individually evaluating a series of probability terms…

  18. State Digital Learning Exemplars: Highlights from States Leading Change through Policies and Funding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acree, Lauren; Fox, Christine

    2015-01-01

    States are striving to support the expansion of technology tools and resources in K-12 education through state policies, programs, and funding in order to provide digital learning opportunities for all students. This paper highlights examples of states with policies in support of five key areas: (1) innovative funding streams and policy; (2)…

  19. Water Reuse Highlights: A Summary Volume of Wastewater Reclamation and Reuse Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Water Works Association, Denver, CO. Research Foundation.

    This document reports the efforts of the AWWA Research Foundation to gather, prepare, and distribute current technical information in the wastewater reclamation and reuse field. The information reported has been abstracted from other Foundation publications and only attempts here to highlight the field. Categories discussed include research,…

  20. The Water Quality in Rio Highlights the Global Public Health Concern Over Untreated Sewage Disposal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Water quality issues in Rio have been widely publicized because of the 2016 Olympics. Recent concerns about polluted waters that athletes may be exposed to highlights the conditions that more than a billion people globally are exposed to daily. Despite these unhealthy conditions,...

  1. Aeroacoustics research in Europe : the CEAS-ASC report on 1997 highlights

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rienstra, S.W.

    1998-01-01

    This paper is a report on the highlights of aeroacoustics research and development in Europe in 1997, compiled from information provided in the CEAS Aeroacoustics Specialists Committee (ASC). The Confederation of European Aerospace Societies (CEAS) comprises the national Aerospace Societies of

  2. Highlights of papers presented at the workshop on cold fusion phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-09-01

    This report contains highlights of formal oral papers presented at the Workshop on Cold Fusion Phenomena, hosted by Los Alamos National Laboratory and held May 23--25, 1989, in Santa Fe, New Mexico. General topics covered are: physics of fusion reactions; neutron and gamma-ray spectroscopy; colorimetry; and applicable condensed-matter physics, electrochemistry, and analytical chemistry

  3. The Contribution of Text-Highlighting to Comprehension: A Comparison of Print and Digital Reading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Yehudah, Gal; Eshet-Alkalai, Yoram

    2018-01-01

    The use of digital materials in educational settings is common, despite evidence indicating that comprehension of digital text is inferior to comprehension of printed text. A potential solution to this problem is to use learning strategies for deeper text processing. Text-highlighting is a strategy known to improve comprehension of printed text;…

  4. Highlighting the Transfer, Honors, and Excellence Workshop. CSCC Bulletin, Issue 7, 1983.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center for the Study of Community Colleges, Los Angeles, CA.

    Summaries are provided for the major presentations given at a workshop on honors, transfer, and excellence, held in Los Angeles in October 1982. Following a brief overview of the main topics covered, highlights are presented from the talks of: (1) Robert McCabe, president of Miami-Dade Community College (MDCC), who urged participants to set high…

  5. Frontiers: Research highlights 1946-1996 [50th Anniversary Edition. Argonne National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    This special edition of 'Frontiers' commemorates Argonne National Laboratory's 50th anniversary of service to science and society. America's first national laboratory, Argonne has been in the forefront of U.S. scientific and technological research from its beginning. Past accomplishments, current research, and future plans are highlighted.

  6. Highlighting the Need for Systems-level Experimental Characterization of Plant Metabolic Enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Karl Magnus Engqvist

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The biology of living organisms is determined by the action and interaction of a large number of individual gene products, each with specific functions. Discovering and annotating the function of gene products is key to our understanding of these organisms. Controlled experiments and bioinformatic predictions both contribute to functional gene annotation. For most species it is difficult to gain an overview of what portion of gene annotations are based on experiments and what portion represent predictions. Here, I survey the current state of experimental knowledge of enzymes and metabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana as well as eleven economically important crops and forestry trees – with a particular focus on reactions involving organic acids in central metabolism. I illustrate the limited availability of experimental data for functional annotation of enzymes in most of these species. Many enzymes involved in metabolism of citrate, malate, fumarate, lactate, and glycolate in crops and forestry trees have not been characterized. Furthermore, enzymes involved in key biosynthetic pathways which shape important traits in crops and forestry trees have not been characterized. I argue for the development of novel high-throughput platforms with which limited functional characterization of gene products can be performed quickly and relatively cheaply. I refer to this approach as systems-level experimental characterization. The data collected from such platforms would form a layer intermediate between bioinformatic gene function predictions and in-depth experimental studies of these functions. Such a data layer would greatly aid in the pursuit of understanding a multiplicity of biological processes in living organisms.

  7. RNA-Seq Highlights High Clonal Variation in Monoclonal Antibody Producing CHO Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orellana, Camila A.; Marcellin, Esteban; Palfreyman, Robin W.

    2018-01-01

    The development of next-generation sequencing technologies has opened new opportunities to better characterize complex eukaryotic cells. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells play a primary role in therapeutic protein production, with currently five of the top ten blockbuster drugs produced in CHO......-regulation of genes encoding secreted glycoproteins is found to be the most significant change. The large number of significant differences even between subclones challenges the notion of identifying and manipulating a few key genes to generate high production CHO cell lines....

  8. Gene-gene, gene-environment, gene-nutrient interactions and single nucleotide polymorphisms of inflammatory cytokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadeem, Amina; Mumtaz, Sadaf; Naveed, Abdul Khaliq; Aslam, Muhammad; Siddiqui, Arif; Lodhi, Ghulam Mustafa; Ahmad, Tausif

    2015-05-15

    Inflammation plays a significant role in the etiology of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The rise in the pro-inflammatory cytokines is the essential step in glucotoxicity and lipotoxicity induced mitochondrial injury, oxidative stress and beta cell apoptosis in T2DM. Among the recognized markers are interleukin (IL)-6, IL-1, IL-10, IL-18, tissue necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), C-reactive protein, resistin, adiponectin, tissue plasminogen activator, fibrinogen and heptoglobins. Diabetes mellitus has firm genetic and very strong environmental influence; exhibiting a polygenic mode of inheritance. Many single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in various genes including those of pro and anti-inflammatory cytokines have been reported as a risk for T2DM. Not all the SNPs have been confirmed by unifying results in different studies and wide variations have been reported in various ethnic groups. The inter-ethnic variations can be explained by the fact that gene expression may be regulated by gene-gene, gene-environment and gene-nutrient interactions. This review highlights the impact of these interactions on determining the role of single nucleotide polymorphism of IL-6, TNF-α, resistin and adiponectin in pathogenesis of T2DM.

  9. Genome-wide association studies of autoimmune vitiligo identify 23 new risk loci and highlight key pathways and regulatory variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Ying; Andersen, Genevieve; Yorgov, Daniel; Ferrara, Tracey M; Ben, Songtao; Brownson, Kelly M; Holland, Paulene J; Birlea, Stanca A; Siebert, Janet; Hartmann, Anke; Lienert, Anne; van Geel, Nanja; Lambert, Jo; Luiten, Rosalie M; Wolkerstorfer, Albert; Wietze van der Veen, J P; Bennett, Dorothy C; Taïeb, Alain; Ezzedine, Khaled; Kemp, E Helen; Gawkrodger, David J; Weetman, Anthony P; Kõks, Sulev; Prans, Ele; Kingo, Külli; Karelson, Maire; Wallace, Margaret R; McCormack, Wayne T; Overbeck, Andreas; Moretti, Silvia; Colucci, Roberta; Picardo, Mauro; Silverberg, Nanette B; Olsson, Mats; Valle, Yan; Korobko, Igor; Böhm, Markus; Lim, Henry W; Hamzavi, Iltefat; Zhou, Li; Mi, Qing-Sheng; Fain, Pamela R; Santorico, Stephanie A; Spritz, Richard A

    2016-11-01

    Vitiligo is an autoimmune disease in which depigmented skin results from the destruction of melanocytes, with epidemiological association with other autoimmune diseases. In previous linkage and genome-wide association studies (GWAS1 and GWAS2), we identified 27 vitiligo susceptibility loci in patients of European ancestry. We carried out a third GWAS (GWAS3) in European-ancestry subjects, with augmented GWAS1 and GWAS2 controls, genome-wide imputation, and meta-analysis of all three GWAS, followed by an independent replication. The combined analyses, with 4,680 cases and 39,586 controls, identified 23 new significantly associated loci and 7 suggestive loci. Most encode immune and apoptotic regulators, with some also associated with other autoimmune diseases, as well as several melanocyte regulators. Bioinformatic analyses indicate a predominance of causal regulatory variation, some of which corresponds to expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) at these loci. Together, the identified genes provide a framework for the genetic architecture and pathobiology of vitiligo, highlight relationships with other autoimmune diseases and melanoma, and offer potential targets for treatment.

  10. Highlights from the 2016 WIN Symposium, 27-29 June 2016, Paris: personalised therapy beyond next-generation sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilsky, Richard; Davies, Will

    2016-01-01

    The Worldwide Innovative Networking (WIN) consortium is an alliance of academic institutions, pharmaceutical partners, representatives from technology companies and charitable/health payer organisations from across the globe. For the last six years, the consortium's aims have been to foster communication and collaboration between members, encourage dialogue in an open forum, and deliver clinical trial results that improve the care and outcomes of patients with cancer using the latest advances in genomic-based medicine. The annual WIN Symposium, held over two days, is a chance for its members to come together and discuss ongoing research, recent announcements, and introduce new developments in personalised medicine. This year's conference, held in Paris, France 27-29 June, consisted of six dedicated sessions, including two debates, and posters from members and participating organisations, all focusing on the latest therapeutic advances and updates in genomic analysis. Special highlights from this year included discussion of the MINDACT clinical trial, which uses a gene expression test to identify patients with breast cancer who can safely forego adjuvant chemotherapy, and the reflections on the SHIVA trial. Of particular interest to many speakers was the utilisation of liquid biopsy samples to produce near real time snapshots of tumour mutational profiles and vulnerability.

  11. Genome-wide association studies of autoimmune vitiligo identify 23 new risk loci and highlight key pathways and regulatory variants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Ying; Andersen, Genevieve; Yorgov, Daniel; Ferrara, Tracey M; Ben, Songtao; Brownson, Kelly M; Holland, Paulene J; Birlea, Stanca A; Siebert, Janet; Hartmann, Anke; Lienert, Anne; van Geel, Nanja; Lambert, Jo; Luiten, Rosalie M; Wolkerstorfer, Albert; van der Veen, JP Wietze; Bennett, Dorothy C; Taïeb, Alain; Ezzedine, Khaled; Kemp, E Helen; Gawkrodger, David J; Weetman, Anthony P; Kõks, Sulev; Prans, Ele; Kingo, Külli; Karelson, Maire; Wallace, Margaret R; McCormack, Wayne T; Overbeck, Andreas; Moretti, Silvia; Colucci, Roberta; Picardo, Mauro; Silverberg, Nanette B; Olsson, Mats; Valle, Yan; Korobko, Igor; Böhm, Markus; Lim, Henry W.; Hamzavi, Iltefat; Zhou, Li; Mi, Qing-Sheng; Fain, Pamela R.; Santorico, Stephanie A; Spritz, Richard A

    2016-01-01

    Vitiligo is an autoimmune disease in which depigmented skin results from destruction of melanocytes1, with epidemiologic association with other autoimmune diseases2. In previous linkage and genome-wide association studies (GWAS1, GWAS2), we identified 27 vitiligo susceptibility loci in patients of European (EUR) ancestry. We carried out a third GWAS (GWAS3) in EUR subjects, with augmented GWAS1 and GWAS2 controls, genome-wide imputation, and meta-analysis of all three GWAS, followed by an independent replication. The combined analyses, with 4,680 cases and 39,586 controls, identified 23 new loci and 7 suggestive loci, most encoding immune and apoptotic regulators, some also associated with other autoimmune diseases, as well as several melanocyte regulators. Bioinformatic analyses indicate a predominance of causal regulatory variation, some corresponding to eQTL at these loci. Together, the identified genes provide a framework for vitiligo genetic architecture and pathobiology, highlight relationships to other autoimmune diseases and melanoma, and offer potential targets for treatment. PMID:27723757

  12. Analysis of behavioral and emotional problems in children highlights the role of genotype × environment interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molenaar, D.; Middeldorp, C.; van Beijsterveldt, T.; Boomsma, D.I.

    2015-01-01

    This study tested for Genotype × Environment (G × E) interaction on behavioral and emotional problems in children using new methods that do not require identification of candidate genes or environments, can distinguish between interaction with shared and unique environment, and are insensitive to

  13. Comparative "Omics" of the Fusarium fujikuroi Species Complex Highlights Differences in Genetic Potential and Metabolite Synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niehaus, E.-M.; Münsterkötter, M.; Proctor, R.H.; Brown, D.W.; Sharon, A.; Idan, Y.; Oren-Young, L.; Sieber, C.M.; Novák, O.; Pěnčík, A.; Tarkowská, D.; Hromadová, K.; Freeman, S.; Maymon, M.; Elazar, M.; Youssef, S.A.; El-Shabrawy, E.S.M.; Shalaby, A.B.A.; Houterman, P.; Brock, N.L.; Burkhardt, I.; Tsavkelova, E.A.; Dickschat, J.S.; Galuszka, P.; Güldener, U.; Tudzynski, B.

    2016-01-01

    Species of the Fusarium fujikuroi species complex (FFC) cause a wide spectrum of often devastating diseases on diverse agricultural crops, including coffee, fig, mango, maize, rice, and sugarcane. Although species within the FFC are difficult to distinguish by morphology, and their genes often share

  14. Analysis of Behavioral and Emotional Problems in Children Highlights the Role of Genotype 9 Environment Interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molenaar, D.; Middeldorp, C.M.; van Beijsterveldt, C.E.M.; Boomsma, D.I.

    2015-01-01

    This study tested for Genotype × Environment (G × E) interaction on behavioral and emotional problems in children using new methods that do not require identification of candidate genes or environments, can distinguish between interaction with shared and unique environment, and are insensitive to

  15. Gene Ontology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaston K. Mazandu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The wide coverage and biological relevance of the Gene Ontology (GO, confirmed through its successful use in protein function prediction, have led to the growth in its popularity. In order to exploit the extent of biological knowledge that GO offers in describing genes or groups of genes, there is a need for an efficient, scalable similarity measure for GO terms and GO-annotated proteins. While several GO similarity measures exist, none adequately addresses all issues surrounding the design and usage of the ontology. We introduce a new metric for measuring the distance between two GO terms using the intrinsic topology of the GO-DAG, thus enabling the measurement of functional similarities between proteins based on their GO annotations. We assess the performance of this metric using a ROC analysis on human protein-protein interaction datasets and correlation coefficient analysis on the selected set of protein pairs from the CESSM online tool. This metric achieves good performance compared to the existing annotation-based GO measures. We used this new metric to assess functional similarity between orthologues, and show that it is effective at determining whether orthologues are annotated with similar functions and identifying cases where annotation is inconsistent between orthologues.

  16. Genome-to-genome analysis highlights the impact of the human innate and adaptive immune systems on the hepatitis C virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ip, Camilla; Magri, Andrea; Von Delft, Annette; Bonsall, David; Chaturvedi, Nimisha; Bartha, Istvan; Smith, David; Nicholson, George; McVean, Gilean; Trebes, Amy; Piazza, Paolo; Fellay, Jacques; Cooke, Graham; Foster, Graham R; Hudson, Emma; McLauchlan, John; Simmonds, Peter; Bowden, Rory; Klenerman, Paul; Barnes, Eleanor; Spencer, Chris C. A.

    2018-01-01

    Outcomes of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and treatment depend on viral and host genetic factors. We use human genome-wide genotyping arrays and new whole-genome HCV viral sequencing technologies to perform a systematic genome-to-genome study of 542 individuals chronically infected with HCV, predominately genotype 3. We show that both HLA alleles and interferon lambda innate immune system genes drive viral genome polymorphism, and that IFNL4 genotypes determine HCV viral load through a mechanism that is dependent on a specific polymorphism in the HCV polyprotein. We highlight the interplay between innate immune responses and the viral genome in HCV control. PMID:28394351

  17. Genome-to-genome analysis highlights the effect of the human innate and adaptive immune systems on the hepatitis C virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, M Azim; Pedergnana, Vincent; L C Ip, Camilla; Magri, Andrea; Von Delft, Annette; Bonsall, David; Chaturvedi, Nimisha; Bartha, Istvan; Smith, David; Nicholson, George; McVean, Gilean; Trebes, Amy; Piazza, Paolo; Fellay, Jacques; Cooke, Graham; Foster, Graham R; Hudson, Emma; McLauchlan, John; Simmonds, Peter; Bowden, Rory; Klenerman, Paul; Barnes, Eleanor; Spencer, Chris C A

    2017-05-01

    Outcomes of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and treatment depend on viral and host genetic factors. Here we use human genome-wide genotyping arrays and new whole-genome HCV viral sequencing technologies to perform a systematic genome-to-genome study of 542 individuals who were chronically infected with HCV, predominantly genotype 3. We show that both alleles of genes encoding human leukocyte antigen molecules and genes encoding components of the interferon lambda innate immune system drive viral polymorphism. Additionally, we show that IFNL4 genotypes determine HCV viral load through a mechanism dependent on a specific amino acid residue in the HCV NS5A protein. These findings highlight the interplay between the innate immune system and the viral genome in HCV control.

  18. Macro Photography for Reflectance Transformation Imaging: A Practical Guide to the Highlights Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonino Cosentino

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Reflectance Transformation Imaging (RTI is increasingly being used for art documentation and analysis and it can be successful also for the examination of features on the order of hundreds of microns. This paper evaluates some macro scale photography methods specifically for RTI employing the Highlights method for documenting sub-millimeter details. This RTI technique consists in including one reflective sphere in the scene photographed so that the processing software can calculate for each photo the direction of the light source from its reflection on the sphere. RTI documentation can be performed also with an RTI dome, but the Highlights method is preferred because is more mobile and more affordable. This technique is demonstrated in the documentation of some prints ranging from the XV to the XX century from to the Ingels collection in Sweden. The images are here examined and discussed, showing the application of macro RTI for identifying features of prints.

  19. Highlights from the SOAP project survey. What Scientists Think about Open Access Publishing

    CERN Document Server

    Dallmeier-Tiessen, Suenje; Goerner, Bettina; Hyppoelae, Jenni; Igo-Kemenes, Peter; Kahn, Deborah; Lambert, Simon; Lengenfelder, Anja; Leonard, Chris; Mele, Salvatore; Nowicka, Malgorzata; Polydoratou, Panayiota; Ross, David; Ruiz-Perez, Sergio; Schimmer, Ralf; Swaisland, Mark; van der Stelt, Wim

    2011-01-01

    The SOAP (Study of Open Access Publishing) project has run a large-scale survey of the attitudes of researchers on, and the experiences with, open access publishing. Around forty thousands answers were collected across disciplines and around the world, showing an overwhelming support for the idea of open access, while highlighting funding and (perceived) quality as the main barriers to publishing in open access journals. This article serves as an introduction to the survey and presents this and other highlights from a preliminary analysis of the survey responses. To allow a maximal re-use of the information collected by this survey, the data are hereby released under a CC0 waiver, so to allow libraries, publishers, funding agencies and academics to further analyse risks and opportunities, drivers and barriers, in the transition to open access publishing.

  20. Monthly highlights for Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research Programs at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, August 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fee, G.G.

    1977-01-01

    Technical highlights are presented for the following safety-related studies: heavy section steel technology, fission product beta and gamma energy release, fission product release from LWR fuel, fission product transport tests, multirod burst tests, Nuclear Safety Information Center, PWR blowdown heat transfer-separate effects, zircaloy fuel cladding collapse studies, zirconium metal-water oxidation kinetics, aerosol release and transport from LMFBR fuel, HTGR safety analysis and research, design criteria for piping and nozzles, and noise diagnostics for safety assessment

  1. Women's expectations and experiences of maternity care in NSW--what women highlight as most important.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Mary G; Ford, Jane B; Morris, Jonathan M; Roberts, Christine L

    2014-09-01

    Although surveys have identified that women are generally highly satisfied with maternity care provision, those aspects of care that women highlight as most important for achieving satisfaction and a satisfactory maternity care experience have not been reported. The aim of this study was to investigate how women understand and experience their maternity care and to report which aspects of care women highlight as most important. This large qualitative study explored women's expectations and experiences of maternity care provision. In-depth semi-structured interviews were conducted with 53 women experiencing maternity care in a range of tertiary, regional, rural, remote hospitals and midwife-led practices in the state of New South Wales, Australia during 2011-2012. Included in the interview schedule was the question 'What 3 aspects would you see as most important for delivery of maternity care?' Descriptive analyses of entire transcripts and responses to the question on most important aspects of care were undertaken. Descriptive analyses of women's responses identified 5 important aspects of care: woman-focused care, staff qualities, systems and facilities, family-focused care and continuity of care/information. First-time mothers were more likely to identify woman-focused care, staff qualities and continuity of care/information as important aspects than multiparous mothers. Urban and regional mothers highlighted staff qualities as having greater importance for satisfaction with their care while rural and particularly remote women nominated systems and facilities as important. Our study showed that women from a range of settings are more concerned with staff and relational issues than facilities. Differences in perceptions among primiparous versus multiparous women, at different stages of pregnancy and among women from rural and remote compared to urban settings highlight the need to include women with a diversity of experience when trying to understand the aspects

  2. Brookhaven highlights for fiscal year 1991, October 1, 1990--September 30, 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowe, M.S.; Cohen, A.; Greenberg, D.; Seubert, L.; Kuper, J.B.H.

    1991-01-01

    This report highlights Brookhaven National Laboratory's activities for fiscal year 1991. Topics from the four research divisions: Computing and Communications, Instrumentation, Reactors, and Safety and Environmental Protection are presented. The research programs at Brookhaven are diverse, as is reflected by the nine different scientific departments: Accelerator Development, Alternating Gradient Synchrotron, Applied Science, Biology, Chemistry, Medical, National Synchrotron Light Source, Nuclear Energy, and Physics. Administrative and managerial information about Brookhaven are also disclosed

  3. Brookhaven highlights. Report on research, October 1, 1992--September 30, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowe, M.S.; Belford, M.; Cohen, A.; Greenberg, D.; Seubert, L. [eds.

    1993-12-31

    This report highlights the research activities of Brookhaven National Laboratory during the period dating from October 1, 1992 through September 30, 1993. There are contributions to the report from different programs and departments within the laboratory. These include technology transfer, RHIC, Alternating Gradient Synchrotron, physics, biology, national synchrotron light source, applied science, medical science, advanced technology, chemistry, reactor physics, safety and environmental protection, instrumentation, and computing and communications.

  4. Brookhaven highlights for fiscal year 1991, October 1, 1990--September 30, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowe, M.S.; Cohen, A.; Greenberg, D.; Seubert, L.; Kuper, J.B.H.

    1991-01-01

    This report highlights Brookhaven National Laboratory's activities for fiscal year 1991. Topics from the four research divisions: Computing and Communications, Instrumentation, Reactors, and Safety and Environmental Protection are presented. The research programs at Brookhaven are diverse, as is reflected by the nine different scientific departments: Accelerator Development, Alternating Gradient Synchrotron, Applied Science, Biology, Chemistry, Medical, National Synchrotron Light Source, Nuclear Energy, and Physics. Administrative and managerial information about Brookhaven are also disclosed. (GHH)

  5. Brookhaven highlights for fiscal year 1991, October 1, 1990--September 30, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowe, M.S.; Cohen, A.; Greenberg, D.; Seubert, L.; Kuper, J.B.H.

    1991-12-31

    This report highlights Brookhaven National Laboratory`s activities for fiscal year 1991. Topics from the four research divisions: Computing and Communications, Instrumentation, Reactors, and Safety and Environmental Protection are presented. The research programs at Brookhaven are diverse, as is reflected by the nine different scientific departments: Accelerator Development, Alternating Gradient Synchrotron, Applied Science, Biology, Chemistry, Medical, National Synchrotron Light Source, Nuclear Energy, and Physics. Administrative and managerial information about Brookhaven are also disclosed. (GHH)

  6. Monthly highlights for Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research Programs at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fee, G.G.

    1976-08-01

    Brief highlights are presented for the following programs: heavy section steel technology, fission product beta and gamma energy release, LOCA release from LWR fuel, multirod burst tests, Nuclear Safety Information Center, PWR blowdown heat transfer-separate effects, zircaloy fuel cladding collapse studies, zirconium metal-water oxidation kinetics, aerosol release and transport from LMFBR fuel, HTGR safety analysis, design criteria for piping and nozzles, and dose conversion factors for inhalation of radionuclides

  7. Highlighting Energy Policies and Strategies for the Residential Sector in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Bekhet, Hussain Ali; Ivy-Yap, Lee Lian

    2014-01-01

    Energy is an important catalyst for development. Malaysia is very fortunate to be endowed with oil reserves. However, these reserves are finite and not renewable. Being cognizant of this, the Malaysian government had implemented various energy policies and strategies to manage and safeguard its oil reserves for better energy security as well as to promote prudent use of energy. This paper aims to highlight the electricity sector in Malaysia and the various policies and strategies implemented ...

  8. Monthly highlights for Office of Nuclear Regulatory research programs at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fee, G.G.

    1975-04-01

    Summaries are given of the following programs: heavy section steel technology, fission product beta and gamma energy release, LOCA release from LWR fuel, multirod burst tests, Nuclear Safety Information Center, PWR blowdown heat transfer--separate effects, Zircaloy fuel cladding collapse studies, Zr metal--water oxidation kinetics, transient vaporization of LMFBR fuel, and HTGR safety analysis and research. Technical highlights and cost/budget reports are included. (U.S.)

  9. Monthly highlights for Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research Programs at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, August 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fee, G.G.

    1976-10-01

    Technical highlights are presented for the following activities: heavy section steel technology, fission product beta and gamma energy release, LOCA release from LWR fuel, Nuclear Safety Information Center, PWR blowdown heat transfer-separate effects, Zircaloy fuel cladding collapse studies, zirconium metal-water oxidation kinetics, aerosol release and transport from LMFBR fuel, HTGR safety analysis and research, design criteria for piping and nozzles, and dose conversion factors for inhalation of radionuclides

  10. Highlights of the 16th annual scientific sessions of the Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, John-Paul; Patel, Amit R; Fernandes, Juliano Lara

    2013-07-19

    The 16th Annual Scientific Sessions of the Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (SCMR) took place in San Francisco, USA at the end of January 2013. With a faculty of experts from across the world, this congress provided a wealth of insight into cutting-edge research and technological development. This review article intends to provide a highlight of what represented the most significant advances in the field of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) during this year's meeting.

  11. Monthly highlights for Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research Programs at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fee, G.G.

    1976-02-01

    Brief highlights are presented for the following activities: heavy section steel technology program, fission product β and γ energy release, LOCA release from LWR fuel, multirod burst tests, Nuclear Safety Information Center, PWR blowdown heat transfer-separate effects, zircaloy fuel cladding collapse studies, zirconium metal-water oxidation kinetics, aerosol release and transport from LMFBR fuel, HTGR safety analysis and research, and design criteria for piping and nozzles

  12. Adaptive highlights stencils for modeling of multi-axial BRDF anisotropy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Filip, Jiří; Havlíček, Michal; Vávra, Radomír

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 33, č. 1 (2017), s. 5-15 ISSN 0178-2789 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-02652S Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : anisotropic * Highlight * stencils * BRDF * model Subject RIV: BD - Theory of Information OBOR OECD: Applied mathematics Impact factor: 1.468, year: 2016 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2016/RO/filip-0452917.pdf

  13. A panel study on patients with dominant cerebellar ataxia highlights the frequency of channelopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutelier, Marie; Coarelli, Giulia; Monin, Marie-Lorraine; Konop, Juliette; Davoine, Claire-Sophie; Tesson, Christelle; Valter, Rémi; Anheim, Mathieu; Behin, Anthony; Castelnovo, Giovanni; Charles, Perrine; David, Albert; Ewenczyk, Claire; Fradin, Mélanie; Goizet, Cyril; Hannequin, Didier; Labauge, Pierre; Riant, Florence; Sarda, Pierre; Sznajer, Yves; Tison, François; Ullmann, Urielle; Van Maldergem, Lionel; Mochel, Fanny; Brice, Alexis; Stevanin, Giovanni; Durr, Alexandra

    2017-06-01

    Autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxias have a marked heterogeneous genetic background, with mutations in 34 genes identified so far. This large amount of implicated genes accounts for heterogeneous clinical presentations, making genotype-phenotype correlations a major challenge in the field. While polyglutamine ataxias, linked to CAG repeat expansions in genes such as ATXN1, ATXN2, ATXN3, ATXN7, CACNA1A and TBP, have been extensively characterized in large cohorts, there is a need for comprehensive assessment of frequency and phenotype of more 'conventional' ataxias. After exclusion of CAG/polyglutamine expansions in spinocerebellar ataxia genes in 412 index cases with dominantly inherited cerebellar ataxias, we aimed to establish the relative frequencies of mutations in other genes, with an approach combining panel sequencing and TaqMan® polymerase chain reaction assay. We found relevant genetic variants in 59 patients (14.3%). The most frequently mutated were channel genes [CACNA1A (n = 16), KCND3 (n = 4), KCNC3 (n = 2) and KCNA1 (n = 2)]. Deletions in ITPR1 (n = 11) were followed by biallelic variants in SPG7 (n = 9). Variants in AFG3L2 (n = 7) came next in frequency, and variants were rarely found in STBN2 (n = 2), ELOVL5, FGF14, STUB1 and TTBK2 (n = 1 each). Interestingly, possible risk factor variants were detected in SPG7 and POLG. Clinical comparisons showed that ataxias due to channelopathies had a significantly earlier age at onset with an average of 24.6 years, versus 40.9 years for polyglutamine expansion spinocerebellar ataxias and 37.8 years for SPG7-related forms (P = 0.001). In contrast, disease duration was significantly longer in the former (20.5 years versus 9.3 and 13.7, P=0.001), though for similar functional stages, indicating slower progression of the disease. Of interest, intellectual deficiency was more frequent in channel spinocerebellar ataxias, while cognitive impairment in adulthood was similar among the three groups. Similar

  14. Fifteen new risk loci for coronary artery disease highlight arterial wall-specific mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Howson, Joanna M.M.; Zhao, Wei; Barnes, Daniel R.; Ho, Weang-Kee; Young, Robin; Paul, Dirk S.; Waite, Lindsay L.; Freitag, Daniel F.; Fauman, Eric B.; Salfati, Elias L.; Sun, Benjamin B.; Eicher, John D.; Johnson, Andrew D.; Sheu, Wayne H.H.; Nielsen, Sune F.

    2017-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Although 58 genomic regions have been associated with CAD thus far, most of the heritability is unexplained, indicating that additional susceptibility loci await identification. An efficient discovery strategy may be larger-scale evaluation of promising associations suggested by genome-wide association studies (GWAS). Hence, we genotyped 56,309 participants using a targeted gene array derived from earlier G...

  15. Fifteen new risk loci for coronary artery disease highlight arterial-wall-specific mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Howson, Joanna McCammond; Zhao, W; Barnes, Daniel Robert; Ho, W-K; Young, R; Paul, Dirk Stefan; Waite, LL; Freitag, DF; Fauman, EB; Salfati, EL; Sun, Benjamin; Eicher, JD; Johnson, AD; Sheu, WHH; Nielsen, SF

    2017-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Although 58 genomic regions have been associated with CAD thus far, most of the heritability is unexplained, indicating that additional susceptibility loci await identification. An efficient discovery strategy may be larger-scale evaluation of promising associations suggested by genome-wide association studies (GWAS). Hence, we genotyped 56,309 participants using a targeted gene array derived from earlier G...

  16. Respiratory Highlights, 2016 - 2017 Influenza Season (2 October 2016 - 31 September 2017)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-21

    Medicine Public Health and Preventive Medicine Dept/PHR 2510 Fifth St., Bldg. 840 Wright-Patterson AFB, OH 45433-7913 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION...Surveillance Program Cleared, 88PA, Case # 2018-1051, 5 Mar 2018. 1 USAF School of Aerospace Medicine & Defense Health Agency...influenza from an infected child with a history of swine contact at an agricultural event in Texas. The HA gene from select influenza positives was

  17. Genes and Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ENTCareers Marketplace Find an ENT Doctor Near You Genes and Hearing Loss Genes and Hearing Loss Patient ... mutation may only have dystopia canthorum. How Do Genes Work? Genes are a road map for the ...

  18. Risoe DTU annual report 2009. Highlights from Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, DTU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedersen, Birgit; Bindslev, H. (eds.)

    2010-06-15

    Risoe DTU is the National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy at the Technical University of Denmark. The research focuses on development of energy technologies and systems with minimal effect on climate, and contributes to innovation, education and policy. Risoe has large experimental facilities and interdisciplinary research environments, and includes the national centre for nuclear technologies. The 2009 annual report gives highlights on Risoe's research in the following areas: wind energy, bioenergy, solar energy, fusion energy, fuel cells and hydrogen, energy systems and climate change, and nuclear technologies. It also includes information on Education and training, Innovation and business, Research facilities, and Management, Personnel and Operating statements. (LN)

  19. Selection, Appraisal, and Retention of Digital Scientific Data: Highlights of an ERPANET/CODATA Workshop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Esanu

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available CODATA and ERPANET collaborated to convene an international archiving workshop on the selection, appraisal, and retention of digital scientific data, which was held on 15-17 December 2003 at the Biblioteca Nacional in Lisbon, Portugal. The workshop brought together more than 65 researchers, data and information managers, archivists, and librarians from 13 countries to discuss the issues involved in making critical decisions regarding the long-term preservation of the scientific record. One of the major aims for this workshop was to provide an international forum to exchange information about data archiving policies and practices across different scientific, institutional, and national contexts. Highlights from the workshop discussions are presented.

  20. Environmental programs of the Department of Energy and Environment annual highlights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manowitz, B.

    1978-12-01

    Environmental Sciences is one of the four areas comprising the Department of Energy and Environment at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It carries out a wide range of activities in atmospheric sciences, environmental chemistry, oceanographic sciences, and land and freshwater environmental sciences. In general, these programs are concerned with identification and measurement of pollutants introduced into the environment by energy-related activities and the evaluation and prediction of the effects or potential effects of these pollutants on the environment. This highlights report for Environmental Programs covers the year 1978 and describes the objectives and funding levels of each of the programs, major accomplishments during the year, planned future activities, and current publications

  1. Highlights from the CERN/ESO/NordForsk ''Gender in Physics Day''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primas, F.; Guinot, G.; Strandberg, L.

    2017-03-01

    In their role as observers on the EU Gender Equality Network in the European Research Area (GENERA) project, funded under the Horizon 2020 framework, CERN, ESO and NordForsk joined forces and organised a Gender in Physics Day at the CERN Globe of Science and Innovation. The one-day conference aimed to examine innovative activities promoting gender equality, and to discuss gender-oriented policies and best practice in the European Research Area (with special emphasis on intergovernmental organisations), as well as the importance of building solid networks. The event was very well attended and was declared a success. The main highlights of the meeting are reported.

  2. Retroperitoneal Inflammatory Liposarcoma in a Patient with Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma: A Report Highlighting Diagnostic Pitfalls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cathy S. Lim

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Well differentiated liposarcoma (WDLS is the commonest subtype of liposarcoma. Recognised subtypes of WDLSs are lipoma-like, sclerosing, spindle cell and inflammatory. The inflammatory variant of WDLS also known as “lymphocyte-rich liposarcoma” is rare. We present a case of inflammatory WDLS occurring in the retroperitoneum, in a patient with a past history of non-Hodgkin lymphoma. We outline the histological features, discuss the differential diagnoses and highlight the diagnostic pitfalls in interpretation of this lesion on fine needle biopsy.

  3. Highlights of proposed changes to ANSI/ASME N509-80

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ornberg, S.C.

    1987-01-01

    The ASME Committee on Nuclear Air and Gas Treatment (CONAGT) are at the time of this writing considering performing maintenance revisions of ANSI N509 and N510 based on the results of a required 5-year review and comments received from users of the standards at workshops and through inquiries. This paper discusses the highlights of the significant revisions to ANSI/ASME N509 and explains the reasons for the changes. It should be emphasized that these revisions are not yet approved by ASME CONAGT, the board of Nuclear Codes and Standards, or ANSI

  4. Risoe DTU annual report 2008. Highlights from Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, DTU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedersen, Birgit; Bindslev, H.

    2009-08-01

    Risoe DTU is the National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy at the Technical University of Denmark. The research focuses on development of energy technologies and systems with minimal effect on climate, and contributes to innovation, education and policy. Risoe has large experimental facilities and interdisciplinary research environments, and includes the national centre for nuclear technologies. The 2008 annual report gives highlights on Risoe's research in the following areas: wind energy, bioenergy, solar energy, fusion energy, fuel cells and hydrogen, energy systems and climate change, and nuclear technologies. It also includes information on Education and training, Innovation and business, Research facilities, and Management, Personnel and Operating statements. (LN)

  5. Risoe DTU annual report 2008. Highlights from Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, DTU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedersen, Birgit; Bindslev, H. (eds.)

    2009-08-15

    Risoe DTU is the National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy at the Technical University of Denmark. The research focuses on development of energy technologies and systems with minimal effect on climate, and contributes to innovation, education and policy. Risoe has large experimental facilities and interdisciplinary research environments, and includes the national centre for nuclear technologies. The 2008 annual report gives highlights on Risoe's research in the following areas: wind energy, bioenergy, solar energy, fusion energy, fuel cells and hydrogen, energy systems and climate change, and nuclear technologies. It also includes information on Education and training, Innovation and business, Research facilities, and Management, Personnel and Operating statements. (LN)

  6. Highlighting micrographic structures of uranium-zirconium alloys with 6 per cent of weight of Zr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouleau, Maurice

    1961-01-01

    In order to study the transformation kinetics of U-Zr alloys with a Zr content of 6 per cent in weight, the authors searched for a slow enough electrolytic polishing bath, and for an attack and examination method to highlight martensite structures produced by austempering and water tempering, and ultra-fine decomposition structures obtained by austempering. The authors explain the choice of a perchloric-butyl glycol polishing bath, of an examination under polarized light or normal light after appropriate attacks. These studies are reported for annealed alloys, and for processed alloys with martensite or ultra-fine decomposition structures [fr

  7. Environmental programs of the Department of Energy and Environment annual highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manowitz, B

    1978-12-01

    Environmental Sciences is one of the four areas comprising the Department of Energy and Environment at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It carries out a wide range of activities in atmospheric sciences, environmental chemistry, oceanographic sciences, and land and freshwater environmental sciences. In general, these programs are concerned with identification and measurement of pollutants introduced into the environment by energy-related activities and the evaluation and prediction of the effects or potential effects of these pollutants on the environment. This highlights report for Environmental Programs covers the year 1978 and describes the objectives and funding levels of each of the programs, major accomplishments during the year, planned future activities, and current publications.

  8. The highlighting of an internal combustion engine piston ring radial oscillations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djallel ZEBBAR

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the definition of the lube-oil film thickness in the piston ring cylinder liner junction of an internal combustion engine. At first, a mathematical model for the estimation of the film thickness is established. It is used to point out the oscillating motion of the piston ring normal to the cylinder wall. For the first time, has been highlighted and analytically evaluated the oscillating behavior of the piston ring in its housing in the radial direction. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that the radial oscillations frequency is a function of piston ring stiffness, material and geometry.

  9. EMSL Quarterly Highlights Report Second Quarter, Fiscal Year 2010 (January 1, 2010 through March 31, 2010)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    West, Staci A.; Showalter, Mary Ann; Manke, Kristin L.; Carper, Ross R.; Wiley, Julie G.; Beckman, Mary T.

    2010-04-20

    The Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) national scientific user facility located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Richland, Washington. EMSL is operated by PNNL for the DOE-Office of Biological and Environmental Research. At one location, EMSL offers a comprehensive array of leading-edge resources and expertise. Access to the instrumentation and expertise is obtained on a peer-reviewed proposal basis. Staff members work with researchers to expedite access to these capabilities. The "EMSL Quarterly Highlights Report" documents current research and activities of EMSL staff and users.

  10. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory - 1995 Highlights. Fiscal Year 1995, 1 October 1994--30 September 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-01

    The purpose of this Highlights Report is to present a brief overview of the Laboratory`s significant research accomplishments during the fiscal year 1995. The activities covered in this report include advances on the large projects, such as the discovery of the Enhanced Reversed Shear mode on the TFTR and the engineering design developments in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor project, as well as the significant progress made in plasma theory, small-scale experiments, technology transfer, graduate education, and the Laboratory`s outreach program in science education.

  11. Highlighting micrographic structures of uranium alloys containing 0.5 to 10 per cent wt molybdenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laniesse, J.; Bouleau, M.

    1959-02-01

    The authors report a study which aimed at determining for different uranium molybdenum alloys and with respect to their molybdenum content a polishing method which allows a relatively simple grain examination in the as-cast condition, an as perfect as possible resolution of eutectic decompositions, and the appropriate conditions to highlight structures (beta-alpha and gamma-alpha martensite transformations, beta phase retention and decomposition, transient structures, eutectoid decomposition, and so on). Alloys differ by their molybdenum content: from 0.5 to 1 per cent wt, 1.5 to 3 per cent wt, 5 to 10 per cent wt

  12. Event displays highlighting the main properties of heavy flavour jets in the CMS Experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    Skovpen, Kirill

    2017-01-01

    A broad range of physics analyses at CMS rely on the efficient identification of heavy flavour jets. Identification of these objects is a challenging task, especially in the presence of a large number of multiple interactions per bunch crossing. The presented summary contains a set of graphical displays of reconstructed events in data collected by CMS in proton-proton collisions at 13 TeV in 2016. The displays highlight the main properties of heavy flavour jets in several event topologies, including QCD multijet, top quark pair, W+c and boosted H→bb.

  13. Risoe DTU annual report 2009. Highlights from Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, DTU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedersen, Birgit; Bindslev, H [eds.

    2010-06-15

    Risoe DTU is the National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy at the Technical University of Denmark. The research focuses on development of energy technologies and systems with minimal effect on climate, and contributes to innovation, education and policy. Risoe has large experimental facilities and interdisciplinary research environments, and includes the national centre for nuclear technologies. The 2009 annual report gives highlights on Risoe's research in the following areas: wind energy, bioenergy, solar energy, fusion energy, fuel cells and hydrogen, energy systems and climate change, and nuclear technologies. It also includes information on Education and training, Innovation and business, Research facilities, and Management, Personnel and Operating statements. (LN)

  14. Risoe DTU annual report 2009. Highlights from Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, DTU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedersen, Birgit; Bindslev, H.

    2010-06-01

    Risoe DTU is the National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy at the Technical University of Denmark. The research focuses on development of energy technologies and systems with minimal effect on climate, and contributes to innovation, education and policy. Risoe has large experimental facilities and interdisciplinary research environments, and includes the national centre for nuclear technologies. The 2009 annual report gives highlights on Risoe's research in the following areas: wind energy, bioenergy, solar energy, fusion energy, fuel cells and hydrogen, energy systems and climate change, and nuclear technologies. It also includes information on Education and training, Innovation and business, Research facilities, and Management, Personnel and Operating statements. (LN)

  15. Gene expression and gene therapy imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rome, Claire; Couillaud, Franck; Moonen, Chrit T.W.

    2007-01-01

    The fast growing field of molecular imaging has achieved major advances in imaging gene expression, an important element of gene therapy. Gene expression imaging is based on specific probes or contrast agents that allow either direct or indirect spatio-temporal evaluation of gene expression. Direct evaluation is possible with, for example, contrast agents that bind directly to a specific target (e.g., receptor). Indirect evaluation may be achieved by using specific substrate probes for a target enzyme. The use of marker genes, also called reporter genes, is an essential element of MI approaches for gene expression in gene therapy. The marker gene may not have a therapeutic role itself, but by coupling the marker gene to a therapeutic gene, expression of the marker gene reports on the expression of the therapeutic gene. Nuclear medicine and optical approaches are highly sensitive (detection of probes in the picomolar range), whereas MRI and ultrasound imaging are less sensitive and require amplification techniques and/or accumulation of contrast agents in enlarged contrast particles. Recently developed MI techniques are particularly relevant for gene therapy. Amongst these are the possibility to track gene therapy vectors such as stem cells, and the techniques that allow spatiotemporal control of gene expression by non-invasive heating (with MRI guided focused ultrasound) and the use of temperature sensitive promoters. (orig.)

  16. Multi-modal highlight generation for sports videos using an information-theoretic excitability measure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Taufiq; Bořil, Hynek; Sangwan, Abhijeet; L Hansen, John H.

    2013-12-01

    The ability to detect and organize `hot spots' representing areas of excitement within video streams is a challenging research problem when techniques rely exclusively on video content. A generic method for sports video highlight selection is presented in this study which leverages both video/image structure as well as audio/speech properties. Processing begins where the video is partitioned into small segments and several multi-modal features are extracted from each segment. Excitability is computed based on the likelihood of the segmental features residing in certain regions of their joint probability density function space which are considered both exciting and rare. The proposed measure is used to rank order the partitioned segments to compress the overall video sequence and produce a contiguous set of highlights. Experiments are performed on baseball videos based on signal processing advancements for excitement assessment in the commentators' speech, audio energy, slow motion replay, scene cut density, and motion activity as features. Detailed analysis on correlation between user excitability and various speech production parameters is conducted and an effective scheme is designed to estimate the excitement level of commentator's speech from the sports videos. Subjective evaluation of excitability and ranking of video segments demonstrate a higher correlation with the proposed measure compared to well-established techniques indicating the effectiveness of the overall approach.

  17. Highlights and Opportunities from Continuous Access to Gas Hydrates Sites at Ocean Networks Canada's NEPTUNE Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherwath, M.; Heesemann, M.; Riedel, M.; Thomsen, L.; Roemer, M.; Chatzievangelou, D.; Purser, A.

    2017-12-01

    Since 2009 Ocean Networks Canada provides permanent access and continuous data in near real-time from two prominent gas hydrates research sites at the Northern Cascadia Margin, Barkley Canyon and Clayoquot Slope off Vancouver Island, through power and communication cables directly from shore. We show data highlights from the seafloor crawler Wally, the world's first internet operated vehicle, in a field of hydrate mounds and outcropping gas hydrates, and its co-located sonars and state-of-the-ocean sensors and Barkley Canyon. For example, spectacular views from the benthic communities and their changes over time are captured by video. At Clayoquot Slope highly active gas seep fields are monitored with a rotating multibeam sonar and various other environmental sensors. In addition, newly installed geodetic sensors as well as an instrumented borehole in that area are now online and provide additional data on subduction-related deformation and potential links to gas discharge. These show-case examples highlight the benefits of co-located experiments that enable interdisciplinary research and also the ability for high-power and -bandwidth long-term monitoring at remote seafloor locations, that over time will provide baselines for environmental monitoring together with natural variability and potential long-term trends.

  18. Coated Particle Fuel and Deep Burn Program Monthly Highlights May 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snead, Lance Lewis; Bell, Gary L.; Besmann, Theodore M.

    2011-01-01

    During FY 2011 the CP and DB Program will report Highlights on a monthly basis, but will no longer produce Quarterly Progress Reports. Technical details that were previously included in the quarterly reports will be included in the appropriate Milestone Reports that are submitted to FCRD Program Management. These reports will also be uploaded to the Deep Burn website. The Monthly Highlights report for April 2011, ORNL/TM-2011/125, was distributed to program participants on May 10, 2011. As reported previously, the final Quarterly for FY 2010, Deep Burn Program Quarterly Report for July - September 2010, ORNL/TM-2010/301, was announced to program participants and posted to the website on December 28, 2010. This report discusses the following: (1) Fuel Performance Modeling - Fuel Performance Analysis; (2) Thermochemical Data and Model Development - (a) Thermochemical Modeling, (b) Thermomechanical Modeling, (c) Actinide and Fission Product Transport; (3) TRU (transuranic elements) TRISO (tri-structural isotropic) Development - (a) TRU Kernel Development, (b) Coating Development; and (4) LWR Fully Ceramic Fuel - (a) FCM Fabrication Development, (b) FCM Irradiation Testing.

  19. Coated Particle Fuel and Deep Burn Program Monthly Highlights June 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snead, Lance Lewis; Bell, Gary L.; Besmann, Theodore M.

    2011-01-01

    During FY 2011 the CP and DB Program will report Highlights on a monthly basis, but will no longer produce Quarterly Progress Reports. Technical details that were previously included in the quarterly reports will be included in the appropriate Milestone Reports that are submitted to FCRD Program Management. These reports will also be uploaded to the Deep Burn website. The Monthly Highlights report for May 2011, ORNL/TM-2011/126, was distributed to program participants on June 9, 2011. As reported previously, the final Quarterly for FY 2010, Deep Burn Program Quarterly Report for July - September 2010, ORNL/TM-2010/301, was announced to program participants and posted to the website on December 28, 2010. This report discusses the following: (1) Fuel Performance Modeling - Fuel Performance Analysis; (2) Thermochemical Data and Model Development - (a) Thermochemical Behavior, (b) Thermomechanical Modeling, (c) Actinide and Fission Product Transport; (3) TRU (transuranic elements) TRISO (tri-structural isotropic) Development - (a) TRU Kernel Development, (b) Coating Development; and (4) LWR Fully Ceramic Fuel - (a) FCM Fabrication Development, (b) FCM Irradiation Testing.

  20. Research Progress in Oncology. Highlighting and Exploiting the Roles of Several Strategic Proteins in Understanding Cancer Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odiba Arome S.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Although almost all biological processes are mediated by a variety of proteins, it is important to bring to spotlight recent experimental and clinical research advances that had their focus on highlighting and taking advantage of the roles of several strategic proteins in order to gain more understanding of cancer biology. Proteins have a major stake in the initiation, progression, sustenance and completion of cellular processes, and have also demonstrated their vital roles in cancer processes. The characteristic functions of proteins and modified proteins have been utilized in the understanding and treatment of cancer. Recent insights in such roles and applications include linker histone H1.2 in the compaction of chromatin and gene silencing via the recognition of H3K27me3; c-Jun with Fra-2/c-Fos in the promotion of aggressive tumour phenotypes in tongue cancer; the use of sodium channelinhibiting agents targeting the transmembrane protein in breast, colon and prostate cancer; SET-mediated activities; protein interaction networks in glioma; Gpnmb significance as a biomarker; β-carbolines inhibition on Wnt/β-catenin signaling; p53 mutants co-opt chromatin pathways; Bone morphogenetic protein 4 as regulator of the behaviors of cancer cell; Brain-Expressed X-linked (BEX proteins in human cancers; targeting CDK4/6 including protein kinases to make a reversal of multidrug resistance in sarcoma. In-depth knowledge of Proteomics will go a long way in helping us uncover a lot more strategies that will help us in the long fight against cancer.

  1. Imaging reporter gene for monitoring gene therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beco, V. de; Baillet, G.; Tamgac, F.; Tofighi, M.; Weinmann, P.; Vergote, J.; Moretti, J.L.; Tamgac, G.

    2002-01-01

    Scintigraphic images can be obtained to document gene function at cellular level. This approach is presented here and the use of a reporter gene to monitor gene therapy is described. Two main ways are presented: either the use of a reporter gene coding for an enzyme the action of which will be monitored by radiolabeled pro-drug, or a cellular receptor gene, the action of which is documented by a radio labeled cognate receptor ligand. (author)

  2. Topographic attributes as a guide for automated detection or highlighting of geological features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viseur, Sophie; Le Men, Thibaud; Guglielmi, Yves

    2015-04-01

    Photogrammetry or LIDAR technology combined with photography allow geoscientists to obtain 3D high-resolution numerical representations of outcrops, generally termed as Digital Outcrop Models (DOM). For over a decade, these 3D numerical outcrops serve as support for precise and accurate interpretations of geological features such as fracture traces or plans, strata, facies mapping, etc. These interpretations have the benefit to be directly georeferenced and embedded into the 3D space. They are then easily integrated into GIS or geomodeler softwares for modelling in 3D the subsurface geological structures. However, numerical outcrops generally represent huge data sets that are heavy to manipulate and hence to interpret. This may be particularly tedious as soon as several scales of geological features must be investigated or as geological features are very dense and imbricated. Automated tools for interpreting geological features from DOMs would be then a significant help to process these kinds of data. Such technologies are commonly used for interpreting seismic or medical data. However, it may be noticed that even if many efforts have been devoted to easily and accurately acquire 3D topographic point clouds and photos and to visualize accurate 3D textured DOMs, few attentions have been paid to the development of algorithms for automated detection of the geological structures from DOMs. The automatic detection of objects on numerical data generally assumes that signals or attributes computed from this data allows the recognition of the targeted object boundaries. The first step consists then in defining attributes that highlight the objects or their boundaries. For DOM interpretations, some authors proposed to use differential operators computed on the surface such as normal or curvatures. These methods generally extract polylines corresponding to fracture traces or bed limits. Other approaches rely on the PCA technology to segregate different topographic plans

  3. Construction of a global pain systems network highlights phospholipid signaling as a regulator of heat nociception.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Gregory Neely

    Full Text Available The ability to perceive noxious stimuli is critical for an animal's survival in the face of environmental danger, and thus pain perception is likely to be under stringent evolutionary pressure. Using a neuronal-specific RNAi knock-down strategy in adult Drosophila, we recently completed a genome-wide functional annotation of heat nociception that allowed us to identify α2δ3 as a novel pain gene. Here we report construction of an evolutionary-conserved, system-level, global molecular pain network map. Our systems map is markedly enriched for multiple genes associated with human pain and predicts a plethora of novel candidate pain pathways. One central node of this pain network is phospholipid signaling, which has been implicated before in pain processing. To further investigate the role of phospholipid signaling in mammalian heat pain perception, we analysed the phenotype of PIP5Kα and PI3Kγ mutant mice. Intriguingly, both of these mice exhibit pronounced hypersensitivity to noxious heat and capsaicin-induced pain, which directly mapped through PI3Kγ kinase-dead knock-in mice to PI3Kγ lipid kinase activity. Using single primary sensory neuron recording, PI3Kγ function was mechanistically linked to a negative regulation of TRPV1 channel transduction. Our data provide a systems map for heat nociception and reinforces the extraordinary conservation of molecular mechanisms of nociception across different species.

  4. Construction of a Global Pain Systems Network Highlights Phospholipid Signaling as a Regulator of Heat Nociception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mair, Norbert; Racz, Ildiko; Milinkeviciute, Giedre; Meixner, Arabella; Nayanala, Swetha; Griffin, Robert S.; Belfer, Inna; Dai, Feng; Smith, Shad; Diatchenko, Luda; Marengo, Stefano; Haubner, Bernhard J.; Novatchkova, Maria; Gibson, Dustin; Maixner, William; Pospisilik, J. Andrew; Hirsch, Emilio; Whishaw, Ian Q.; Zimmer, Andreas; Gupta, Vaijayanti; Sasaki, Junko; Kanaho, Yasunori; Sasaki, Takehiko; Kress, Michaela; Woolf, Clifford J.; Penninger, Josef M.

    2012-01-01

    The ability to perceive noxious stimuli is critical for an animal's survival in the face of environmental danger, and thus pain perception is likely to be under stringent evolutionary pressure. Using a neuronal-specific RNAi knock-down strategy in adult Drosophila, we recently completed a genome-wide functional annotation of heat nociception that allowed us to identify α2δ3 as a novel pain gene. Here we report construction of an evolutionary-conserved, system-level, global molecular pain network map. Our systems map is markedly enriched for multiple genes associated with human pain and predicts a plethora of novel candidate pain pathways. One central node of this pain network is phospholipid signaling, which has been implicated before in pain processing. To further investigate the role of phospholipid signaling in mammalian heat pain perception, we analysed the phenotype of PIP5Kα and PI3Kγ mutant mice. Intriguingly, both of these mice exhibit pronounced hypersensitivity to noxious heat and capsaicin-induced pain, which directly mapped through PI3Kγ kinase-dead knock-in mice to PI3Kγ lipid kinase activity. Using single primary sensory neuron recording, PI3Kγ function was mechanistically linked to a negative regulation of TRPV1 channel transduction. Our data provide a systems map for heat nociception and reinforces the extraordinary conservation of molecular mechanisms of nociception across different species. PMID:23236288

  5. Autism Spectrum Disorder and High Confidence Gene Factors

    OpenAIRE

    Mai, MOCHIZUKI

    2017-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a neurological developmental disorder whose mechanism isyet unclear. However, recent ASD studies, which employ exome- and genome-wide sequencing,have identified some high-confidence ASD genes. Those ASD studies have revealed that CHD8is likely associated with ASD. In this article, we highlight that CHD8 may regulate othercandidate ASD risk genes. Current research indicates that there exist some thousand autismsusceptibility candidate genes. Moreover, we sugge...

  6. ITALIAN LOCAL PUBLIC SERVICES: SOME GOVERNANCE HIGHLIGHTS FROM THE LARGER CITIES’ EXPERIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DE MATTEIS Fabio

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Entrusting most local public services to local government entities has led to proliferation of public groups and, consistently, to greater complexity of the governance dynamics of local authorities. Differently from Anglo-Saxon countries, the Italian local public services provision has been characterized by a hybrid externalization process where local entities are legally autonomous but owned by the local government. This leads to a peculiar governance complexity source represented by the dual role (stakeholder and customer assumed by the local authority. Considering these elements (hybrid externalization and governance structure, this work tries to investigate some governance issues of public groups, basing on the two most populous Italian municipalities. The empirical findings highlight a gap between the presence of the conditions for defining a group governance structure and the adoption of a group approach by the parent local government. The authors try to suggest how to bridge this gap.

  7. Highlights of the EANM Congress Barcelona 2009: increasing our impact in diagnostic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roca, Isabel

    2010-01-01

    The EANM Congress 2009 took place in Barcelona from 10 to 14 October under the chairmanship of Dr. Martin-Comin. As always, the meeting was successful with high-level scientific content and a great number of participants. In spite of the economic crisis, industry made an important contribution presenting new revolutionary equipment and tracers, and in particular the pharmaceutical industry has increased its involvement in our speciality. This article is a brief summary of the major scientific contributions presented at the annual congress 2009, highlighting the fields of nuclear medicine at a higher level of development, including those with an increased clinical impact (especially oncology, but also cardiology, neurology and other clinical sciences), new detectors and multimodality imaging, and those fields showing important progress, including radiochemistry and pharmacy (with the development of new tracers and increased collaboration of industry). (orig.)

  8. Highlights of the 12th International Conference on Nuclear Cardiology and Cardiac CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitsiou, Anastasia; Dorbala, Sharmila; Scholte, Arthur J H A

    2015-09-01

    The 12th International Conference on Nuclear Cardiology and Cardiac CT was held from 3 to 5 May 2015 in Madrid, Spain. In this article, the three Congress Program Committee Chairs summarize selected highlights of the presented abstracts. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com. This article is being published concurrently in the Journal of Nuclear Cardiology (10.1007/s12350-015-0260-y) and European Heart Journal – Cardiovascular Imaging (10.1093/ehjci/jev179). The articles are identical except for minor stylistic and spelling differences in keeping with each journal’s style. Either citation can be used when citing this article.

  9. Brookhaven highlights, October 1978-September 1979. [October 1978 to September 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-01-01

    These highlights present an overview of the major research and development achievements at Brookhaven National Laboratory from October 1978 to September 1979. Specific areas covered include: accelerator and high energy physics programs; high energy physics research; the AGS and improvements to the AGS; neutral beam development; heavy ion fusion; superconducting power cables; ISABELLE storage rings; the BNL Tandem accelerator; heavy ion experiments at the Tandem; the High Flux Beam Reactor; medium energy physics; nuclear theory; atomic and applied physics; solid state physics; neutron scattering studies; x-ray scattering studies; solid state theory; defects and disorder in solids; surface physics; the National Synchrotron Light Source ; Chemistry Department; Biology Department; Medical Department; energy sciences; environmental sciences; energy technology programs; National Center for Analysis of Energy Systems; advanced reactor systems; nuclear safety; National Nuclear Data Center; nuclear materials safeguards; Applied Mathematics Department; and support activities. (GHT)

  10. Diagnosis and Management of Rhinosinusitis: Highlights from the 2015 Practice Parameter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dass, Kathleen; Peters, Anju Tripathi

    2016-04-01

    Rhinosinusitis is a commonly diagnosed disease in the USA. Rhinosinusitis is classified as acute, recurrent, or chronic (with or without nasal polyps). While acute rhinosinusitis is diagnosed by history and physical examination, chronic rhinosinusitis and recurrent acute rhinosinusitis are diagnosed based on symptoms and the presence of disease on either a sinus CT scan and/or endoscopy. Management of uncomplicated acute rhinosinusitis includes analgesics, saline irrigation, and/or intranasal steroids. Antibiotics and intranasal steroids are recommended for acute bacterial rhinosinusitis. Intranasal and oral steroids with antibiotics are recommended to treat chronic rhinosinusitis although the evidence for antibiotics is weak. Biologics such as omalizumab and mepolizumab are being investigated for the treatment of chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps. Surgery may be indicated in management of refractory chronic rhinosinusitis and rarely for acute bacterial rhinosinusitis. This review discusses highlights of the updated 2014 practice parameter and up-to-date evidence from other literature sources.

  11. Translating psychological science: Highlighting the media's contribution to contagion in mass shootings: Comment on Kaslow (2015).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrin, Paul B

    2016-01-01

    In her presidential address, N. J. Kaslow (see record 2015-33530-002) argued that psychologists have a responsibility to translate psychological science to the public and identifies various platforms for doing so. In this comment on her article, I advocate that psychology as a field immediately heed her call in the area of psychological science highlighting the media's contribution to contagion in mass shootings. I point out the psychological science documenting media contagion for suicide and mass shootings, the World Health Organization's (2008) guidelines for media in reporting suicide deaths to prevent that contagion, and discuss ways-based on Dr. Kaslow's suggestions-that psychologists can disseminate psychological science to prevent similar tragedies in the future. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  12. Highlighting the History of Astronomy in the Asia-Pacific Region

    CERN Document Server

    Nakamura, Tsuko; Strom, Richard G; ICOA-6 Conference

    2011-01-01

    This book provides readers with the results of recent research from some of the world's leading historians of astronomy on aspects of Arabic, Australian, Chinese, Japanese, and North and South American astronomy and astrophysics. It contains peer-reviewed papers gathered from the International Conferences on Oriental Astronomy 6 (ICO-6) with the chosen theme of "Highlighting the History of Astronomy in the Asia-Pacific Region." Of particular note are the sections on Arabic astronomy, Asian applied astronomy and the history of Australian radio astronomy, and the chapter on Peruvian astronomy. This title is a valuable complement for those with research interests in applied historical astronomy; archaeoastronomy; calendars, manuscripts, and star charts; historical instruments and observatories, and the history of radio astronomy.

  13. Differential proteomic analysis highlights metabolic strategies associated with balhimycin production in Amycolatopsis balhimycina chemostat cultivations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gallo, Giuseppe; Alduina, Rosa; Renzone, Giovanni

    2010-01-01

    Background Proteomics was recently used to reveal enzymes whose expression is associated with the production of the glycopeptide antibiotic balhimycin in Amycolatopsis balhimycina batch cultivations. Combining chemostat fermentation technology, where cells proliferate with constant parameters...... in a highly reproducible steady-state, and differential proteomics, the relationships between physiological status and metabolic pathways during antibiotic producing and non-producing conditions could be highlighted. Results Two minimal defined media, one with low Pi (0.6 mM; LP) and proficient glucose (12 g....../l) concentrations and the other one with high Pi (1.8 mM) and limiting (6 g/l; LG) glucose concentrations, were developed to promote and repress antibiotic production, respectively, in A. balhimycina chemostat cultivations. Applying the same dilution rate (0.03 h-1), both LG and LP chemostat cultivations showed...

  14. Highlights of the SLD Physics Program at the SLAC Linear Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willocq, Stephane

    2001-01-01

    Starting in 1989, and continuing through the 1990s, high-energy physics witnessed a flowering of precision measurements in general and tests of the standard model in particular, led by e + e - collider experiments operating at the Z 0 resonance. Key contributions to this work came from the SLD collaboration at the SLAC Linear Collider. By exploiting the unique capabilities of this pioneering accelerator and the SLD detector, including a polarized electron beam, exceptionally small beam dimensions, and a CCD pixel vertex detector, SLD produced a broad array of electroweak, heavy-flavor, and QCD measurements. Many of these results are one of a kind or represent the world's standard in precision. This article reviews the highlights of the SLD physics program, with an eye toward associated advances in experimental technique, and the contribution of these measurements to our dramatically improved present understanding of the standard model and its possible extensions

  15. Natural Variation in Banana Varieties Highlights the Role of Melatonin in Postharvest Ripening and Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wei; Yang, Hai; Tie, Weiwei; Yan, Yan; Ding, Zehong; Liu, Yang; Wu, Chunlai; Wang, Jiashui; Reiter, Russel J; Tan, Dun-Xian; Shi, Haitao; Xu, Biyu; Jin, Zhiqiang

    2017-11-22

    This study aimed to investigate the role of melatonin in postharvest ripening and quality in various banana varieties with contrasting ripening periods. During the postharvest life, endogenous melatonin showed similar performance with ethylene in connection to ripening. In comparison to ethylene, melatonin was more correlated with postharvest banana ripening. Exogenous application of melatonin resulted in a delay of postharvest banana ripening. Moreover, this effect is concentration-dependent, with 200 and 500 μM treatments more effective than the 50 μM treatment. Exogenous melatonin also led to elevated endogenous melatonin content, reduced ethylene production through regulation of the expression of MaACO1 and MaACS1, and delayed sharp changes of quality indices. Taken together, this study highlights that melatonin is an indicator for banana fruit ripening in various varieties, and the repression of ethylene biosynthesis and postharvest ripening by melatonin can be used for biological control of postharvest fruit ripening and quality.

  16. Highlights of the SLD Physics Program at the SLAC Linear Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willocq, Stephane

    2001-09-07

    Starting in 1989, and continuing through the 1990s, high-energy physics witnessed a flowering of precision measurements in general and tests of the standard model in particular, led by e{sup +}e{sup -} collider experiments operating at the Z{sup 0} resonance. Key contributions to this work came from the SLD collaboration at the SLAC Linear Collider. By exploiting the unique capabilities of this pioneering accelerator and the SLD detector, including a polarized electron beam, exceptionally small beam dimensions, and a CCD pixel vertex detector, SLD produced a broad array of electroweak, heavy-flavor, and QCD measurements. Many of these results are one of a kind or represent the world's standard in precision. This article reviews the highlights of the SLD physics program, with an eye toward associated advances in experimental technique, and the contribution of these measurements to our dramatically improved present understanding of the standard model and its possible extensions.

  17. Highlights from panel discussion on key issues for future developments in microwave processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gac, F.D.; Iskander, M.F.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports on highlights from a panel discussion on Key Issues for Future Development in Microwave Processing. Although the panelists represented a mix of individuals from government, academia, and industry, only one aspect of industry was represented, namely microwave system manufacturers. For further panel discussions, it is recommended that the materials manufacturing (i.e., microwave user) sector also be represented. Three important points emerged from the panel discussion. The first deals with the credibility and usability of information, be it dielectric property measurements, experimental procedures, or microwave processing results. Second, a considerable communication and education gap continues to exist between the materials community and microwave engineers. Finally, a more realistic approach should be taken in identifying where microwave processing makes sense

  18. Thermal hydraulics of sodium-cooled fast reactors - key issues and highlights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ninokata, H.; Kamide, H.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper key issues and highlighted topics in thermal hydraulics are discussed in connection to the current Japan's sodium-cooled fast reactor development efforts. In particular, design study and related researches of the Japan Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (JSFR) are focused. Several innovative technologies, e.g., compact reactor vessel, two-loop system, fully natural circulation decay heat removal, and recriticality free core, have been investigated in order to reduce construction cost and to achieve higher level of reactor safety. Preliminary evaluations of innovative technologies to be applied to JSFR are on-going. Here, progress of design study is introduced. Then, research and development activities on the thermal hydraulics related to the innovative technologies are briefly reviewed. (author)

  19. Bioanalysis-related highlights from the 2011 AAPS National Biotechnology Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisino, Rebecca M; Dulanto, Beatriz

    2011-08-01

    The American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists is a dynamic international forum for the exchange of knowledge among scientists to enhance their contributions to drug development. The annual National Biotechnology Conference, conducted and organized by the American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists, is a forum dedicated to advancements in science and technology related to discovery, development and manufacture of medical biotechnology products. The 2011 National Biotechnology Conference meeting convened in San Francisco, CA, USA on 16-18 May. Over 300 abstracts were submitted and approximately 50 sessions examined topics pertaining to advances in drug development, emerging analytical technologies, bioanalysis-related issues, biosimilar therapies, updates on global regulatory documents and expectations, and other topics. The focus of this article is to highlight key developments relevant to immunogenicity and pharmacokinetic drug concentration bioanalysis.

  20. Conference report: Bioanalysis highlights from the 2012 American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists National Biotechnology Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisino, Rebecca M; Geist, Brian; Li, Jian

    2012-09-01

    The American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists (AAPS) is an international forum for the exchange of knowledge among scientists to enhance their contributions to drug development. The annual National Biotechnology Conference, organized by the AAPS on 21-23 May 2012 in San Diego, CA, USA, brings together experts from various disciplines representing private industry, academia and governing institutions dedicated toward advancing the scientific and technological progress related to discovery, development and manufacture of medical biotechnology products. Over 300 scientific poster presentations and approximately 50 oral presentation and discussion sessions examined a breadth of topics pertaining to biotechnology drug development, such as the advancement of vaccines and biosimilars, emerging and innovative technologies, nonclinical and clinical bioanalysis, and regulatory updates. This conference report highlights the existing challenges with ligand-binding assays, emerging challenges, innovative integration of various technology platforms and applicable regulatory considerations as they relate to immunogenicity and pharmacokinetic bioanalytical assessments.

  1. B-physics and quarkonium highlights and recent results from ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    Studies of heavy flavour quark-antiquark bound states provide unique insights into the picture of strong interactions near the boundary between the perturbative and non-perturbative regimes. Despite the 40-year history since the discovery of the J/psi, quarkonia still challenge both theory and experiment. Data collected in Run 1 has now produced a comprehensive suite of measurements for a range of energies, states and decay modes. The open beauty sector tests a variety of theoretical models and provides sensitivity to beyond-standard-model processes through precision measurements, such as studies of CP violation. Highlights and most recent measurements from the B-physics and quarkonium programmes of the ATLAS experiment will be presented.

  2. Visual content highlighting via automatic extraction of embedded captions on MPEG compressed video

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Boon-Lock; Liu, Bede

    1996-03-01

    Embedded captions in TV programs such as news broadcasts, documentaries and coverage of sports events provide important information on the underlying events. In digital video libraries, such captions represent a highly condensed form of key information on the contents of the video. In this paper we propose a scheme to automatically detect the presence of captions embedded in video frames. The proposed method operates on reduced image sequences which are efficiently reconstructed from compressed MPEG video and thus does not require full frame decompression. The detection, extraction and analysis of embedded captions help to capture the highlights of visual contents in video documents for better organization of video, to present succinctly the important messages embedded in the images, and to facilitate browsing, searching and retrieval of relevant clips.

  3. Highlights of X-Stack ExM Deliverable: MosaStore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ripeanu, Matei [Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    2016-07-20

    This brief report highlights the experience gained with MosaStore, an exploratory part of the X-Stack project “ExM: System support for extreme-scale, many-task applications”. The ExM project proposed to use concurrent workflows supported by the Swift language and runtime as an innovative programming model to exploit parallelism in exascale computers. MosaStore aims to support this endeavor by improving storage support for workflow-based applications, more precisely by exploring the gains that can be obtained from co-designing the storage system and the workflow runtime engine. MosaStore has been developed primarily at the University of British Columbia.

  4. Highlighting ethical decisions underlying the scoring of animal welfare in the Welfare Quality® scheme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veissier, I.; Jensen, Karsten Klint; Botreau, R.

    2011-01-01

    dimension of scoring and labelling does not mean that we should reject them, but it does mean that we need to make the normative and ethical background explicit. The Welfare Quality® scoring system is used as a case study in order to highlight the role of underlying value-based decisions. In this scoring......, but the rules governing the assignment of an animal unit to a category take into account what had been observed on European farms. The scientists behind Welfare Quality® are keen to make the value-based choices underlying assessments of animal welfare transparent. This is essential to allow stakeholder groups......All systems of scoring animal units (groups, farms, slaughter plants, etc.) according to the level of the animals’ welfare are based inevitably on normative decisions. Similarly, all methods of labelling, in terms of acceptability, are based on choices reflecting ethical values. The evaluative...

  5. Using qualitative problem-solving strategies to highlight the role of conceptual knowledge in solving problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, William J.; Dufresne, Robert J.; Mestre, Jose P.

    1996-12-01

    We report on the use of qualitative problem-solving strategies in teaching an introductory, calculus-based physics course as a means of highlighting the role played by conceptual knowledge in solving problems. We found that presenting strategies during lectures and in homework solutions provides an excellent opportunity to model for students the type of concept-based, qualitative reasoning that is valued in our profession, and that student-generated strategies serve a diagnostic function by providing instructors with insights on students' conceptual understanding and reasoning. Finally, we found strategies to be effective pedagogical tools for helping students both to identify principles that could be applied to solve specific problems, as well as to recall the major principles covered in the course months after it was over.

  6. Scale effect challenges in urban hydrology highlighted with a distributed hydrological model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichiba, Abdellah; Gires, Auguste; Tchiguirinskaia, Ioulia; Schertzer, Daniel; Bompard, Philippe; Ten Veldhuis, Marie-Claire

    2018-01-01

    Hydrological models are extensively used in urban water management, development and evaluation of future scenarios and research activities. There is a growing interest in the development of fully distributed and grid-based models. However, some complex questions related to scale effects are not yet fully understood and still remain open issues in urban hydrology. In this paper we propose a two-step investigation framework to illustrate the extent of scale effects in urban hydrology. First, fractal tools are used to highlight the scale dependence observed within distributed data input into urban hydrological models. Then an intensive multi-scale modelling work is carried out to understand scale effects on hydrological model performance. Investigations are conducted using a fully distributed and physically based model, Multi-Hydro, developed at Ecole des Ponts ParisTech. The model is implemented at 17 spatial resolutions ranging from 100 to 5 m. Results clearly exhibit scale effect challenges in urban hydrology modelling. The applicability of fractal concepts highlights the scale dependence observed within distributed data. Patterns of geophysical data change when the size of the observation pixel changes. The multi-scale modelling investigation confirms scale effects on hydrological model performance. Results are analysed over three ranges of scales identified in the fractal analysis and confirmed through modelling. This work also discusses some remaining issues in urban hydrology modelling related to the availability of high-quality data at high resolutions, and model numerical instabilities as well as the computation time requirements. The main findings of this paper enable a replacement of traditional methods of model calibration by innovative methods of model resolution alteration based on the spatial data variability and scaling of flows in urban hydrology.

  7. Nerve-Highlighting Fluorescent Contrast Agents for Image-Guided Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Summer L. Gibbs-Strauss

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Nerve damage is the major morbidity of many surgeries, resulting in chronic pain, loss of function, or both. The sparing of nerves during surgical procedures is a vexing problem because surrounding tissue often obscures them. To date, systemically administered nerve-highlighting contrast agents that can be used for nerve-sparing image-guided surgery have not been reported. In the current study, physicochemical and optical properties of 4,4‘-[(2-methoxy-1,4-phenylenedi-(1E-2,1-ethenediyl]bis-benzenamine (BMB and a newly synthesized, red-shifted derivative 4-[(1E-2-[4-[(1E-2-[4-aminophenyl]ethenyl]-3-methoxyphenyl]ethenyl]-benzonitrile (GE3082 were characterized in vitro and in vivo. Both agents crossed the blood-nerve barrier and blood-brain barrier and rendered myelinated nerves fluorescent after a single systemic injection. Although both BMB and GE3082 also exhibited significant uptake in white adipose tissue, GE3082 underwent a hypsochromic shift in adipose tissue that provided a means to eliminate the unwanted signal using hyperspectral deconvolution. Dose and kinetic studies were performed in mice to determine the optimal dose and drug-imaging interval. The results were confirmed in rat and pig, with the latter used to demonstrate, for the first time, simultaneous fluorescence imaging of blood vessels and nerves during surgery using the FLARE™ (Fluorescence-Assisted Resection and Exploration imaging system. These results lay the foundation for the development of ideal nerve-highlighting fluorophores for image-guided surgery.

  8. Text mining in cancer gene and pathway prioritization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yuan; Riedlinger, Gregory; Szolovits, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Prioritization of cancer implicated genes has received growing attention as an effective way to reduce wet lab cost by computational analysis that ranks candidate genes according to the likelihood that experimental verifications will succeed. A multitude of gene prioritization tools have been developed, each integrating different data sources covering gene sequences, differential expressions, function annotations, gene regulations, protein domains, protein interactions, and pathways. This review places existing gene prioritization tools against the backdrop of an integrative Omic hierarchy view toward cancer and focuses on the analysis of their text mining components. We explain the relatively slow progress of text mining in gene prioritization, identify several challenges to current text mining methods, and highlight a few directions where more effective text mining algorithms may improve the overall prioritization task and where prioritizing the pathways may be more desirable than prioritizing only genes.

  9. Nanoparticles for cancer gene therapy: Recent advances, challenges, and strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kui; Kievit, Forrest M; Zhang, Miqin

    2016-12-01

    Compared to conventional treatments, gene therapy offers a variety of advantages for cancer treatment including high potency and specificity, low off-target toxicity, and delivery of multiple genes that concurrently target cancer tumorigenesis, recurrence, and drug resistance. In the past decades, gene therapy has undergone remarkable progress, and is now poised to become a first line therapy for cancer. Among various gene delivery systems, nanoparticles have attracted much attention because of their desirable characteristics including low toxicity profiles, well-controlled and high gene delivery efficiency, and multi-functionalities. This review provides an overview on gene therapeutics and gene delivery technologies, and highlight recent advances, challenges and insights into the design and the utility of nanoparticles in gene therapy for cancer treatment. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Integrative network analysis highlights biological processes underlying GLP-1 stimulated insulin secretion: A DIRECT study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudmundsdottir, Valborg; Pedersen, Helle Krogh; Allebrandt, Karla Viviani

    2018-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) stimulated insulin secretion has a considerable heritable component as estimated from twin studies, yet few genetic variants influencing this phenotype have been identified. We performed the first genome-wide association study (GWAS) of GLP-1 stimulated insulin...... secretion in non-diabetic individuals from the Netherlands Twin register (n = 126). This GWAS was enhanced using a tissue-specific protein-protein interaction network approach. We identified a beta-cell protein-protein interaction module that was significantly enriched for low gene scores based on the GWAS...... P-values and found support at the network level in an independent cohort from Tübingen, Germany (n = 100). Additionally, a polygenic risk score based on SNPs prioritized from the network was associated (P

  11. Analysis of Behavioral and Emotional Problems in Children Highlights the Role of Genotype × Environment Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molenaar, Dylan; Middeldorp, Christel; van Beijsterveldt, Toos; Boomsma, Dorret I

    2015-01-01

    This study tested for Genotype × Environment (G × E) interaction on behavioral and emotional problems in children using new methods that do not require identification of candidate genes or environments, can distinguish between interaction with shared and unique environment, and are insensitive to scale effects. Parental ratings of problem behavior from 14,755 twin pairs (5.3 years, SD = 0.22) indicated G × E interaction on emotional liability, social isolation, aggression, attention problems, dependency, anxiety, and physical coordination. Environmental influences increased in children who were genetically more predisposed to problem behavior, with ~20% of the variance due to G × E interaction (8% for anxiety to 37% for attention problems). Ignoring G × E interaction does not greatly bias heritability estimates, but it does offer a comprehensive model of the etiology for childhood problems. © 2015 The Authors. Child Development © 2015 Society for Research in Child Development, Inc.

  12. Molecular Phylogeny and Biogeography of Adenocaulon Highlight the Biogeographic Links between New World and Old World

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Deng

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Adenocaulon (Asteraceae is a small genus with only five species but has a broad amphi-Pacific distribution pattern with three species distributed disjunctly in South America, Central America, and North America and two endemic species spanning from eastern Asia to the Himalayas. To trace the biogeographic pattern of the genus, we reconstructed its phylogenetic relationships and diversification history based on one nuclear and eight plastid gene regions. Our results showed that Adenocaulon is monophyletic and may have originated in Central America during the Miocene, dispersed into North America and finally reached the Himalayas via the Bering Land Bridge. The hypothesized trajectory implies that long-distance dispersal may have played an important role in the formation of the distribution of this group of species. This hypothesis seems to have gained support from the special morphological structure of fruits of the genus.

  13. Comparative Genomics Highlights Symbiotic Capacities and High Metabolic Flexibility of the Marine Genus Pseudovibrio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Versluis, Dennis; Nijsse, Bart; Naim, Mohd Azrul; Koehorst, Jasper J; Wiese, Jutta; Imhoff, Johannes F; Schaap, Peter J; van Passel, Mark W J; Smidt, Hauke; Sipkema, Detmer

    2018-01-01

    Pseudovibrio is a marine bacterial genus members of which are predominantly isolated from sessile marine animals, and particularly sponges. It has been hypothesized that Pseudovibrio spp. form mutualistic relationships with their hosts. Here, we studied Pseudovibrio phylogeny and genetic adaptations that may play a role in host colonization by comparative genomics of 31 Pseudovibrio strains, including 25 sponge isolates. All genomes were highly similar in terms of encoded core metabolic pathways, albeit with substantial differences in overall gene content. Based on gene composition, Pseudovibrio spp. clustered by geographic region, indicating geographic speciation. Furthermore, the fact that isolates from the Mediterranean Sea clustered by sponge species suggested host-specific adaptation or colonization. Genome analyses suggest that Pseudovibrio hongkongensis UST20140214-015BT is only distantly related to other Pseudovibrio spp., thereby challenging its status as typical Pseudovibrio member. All Pseudovibrio genomes were found to encode numerous proteins with SEL1 and tetratricopeptide repeats, which have been suggested to play a role in host colonization. For evasion of the host immune system, Pseudovibrio spp. may depend on type III, IV, and VI secretion systems that can inject effector molecules into eukaryotic cells. Furthermore, Pseudovibrio genomes carry on average seven secondary metabolite biosynthesis clusters, reinforcing the role of Pseudovibrio spp. as potential producers of novel bioactive compounds. Tropodithietic acid, bacteriocin, and terpene biosynthesis clusters were highly conserved within the genus, suggesting an essential role in survival, for example through growth inhibition of bacterial competitors. Taken together, these results support the hypothesis that Pseudovibrio spp. have mutualistic relations with sponges. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  14. Editor's Highlight: Hydroxyurea Exposure Activates the P53 Signaling Pathway in Murine Organogenesis-Stage Embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Husseini, Nazem; Schlisser, Ava E; Hales, Barbara F

    2016-08-01

    Hydroxyurea, an anticancer agent and potent teratogen, induces oxidative stress and activates a DNA damage response pathway in the gestation day (GD) 9 mouse embryo. To delineate the stress response pathways activated by this drug, we investigated the effect of hydroxyurea exposure on the transcriptome of GD 9 embryos. Timed pregnant CD-1 mice were treated with saline or hydroxyurea (400 mg/kg or 600 mg/kg) on GD 9; embryonic gene and protein expression were examined 3 h later. Microarray analysis revealed that the expression of 1346 probe sets changed significantly in embryos exposed to hydroxyurea compared with controls; the P53 signaling pathway was highly affected. In addition, P53 related family members, P63 and P73, were predicted to be activated and had common and unique downstream targets. Western blot analysis revealed that active phospho-P53 was significantly increased in drug-exposed embryos; confocal microscopy showed that the translocation of phospho-P53 to the nucleus was widespread in the embryo. Furthermore, qRT-PCR showed that the expression of P53-regulated genes (Cdkn1A, Fas, and Trp53inp1) was significantly upregulated in hydroxyurea-exposed embryos; the concentration of the redox sensitive P53INP1 protein was also increased in a hydroxyurea dose-dependent fashion. Thus, hydroxyurea elicits a significant effect on the transcriptome of the organogenesis stage murine embryo, activating several key developmental signaling pathways related to DNA damage and oxidative stress. We propose that the P53 pathway plays a central role in the embryonic stress response and the developmental outcome after teratogen exposure. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Institut de Physique Nucleaire d'Orsay. Highlights and achievements 2008-2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    Activities of the Institute through the 2008-2013 period, have been considerable and a detailed description of all of them would have resulted in a relatively large document. The choice was then made to only describe a selection of highlights from the activities of the different groups during the last 5 years. This concerns the five main scientific topics of the institute that are: 1- Nuclear Structure and Dynamics: The highlights described in this section concern the activities of two different research groups 'NESTER' and 'NIM'; 2 - Hadrons and Hadronic Matter: This section concerns the three teams involved in the CLASS collaboration at JLab, the HADES collaboration at GSI and the ALICE collaboration at LHC. All three are part of the group 'PHEN'; 3- Physics and Chemistry of Nuclear Energy: This section covers, on one hand, activities related to Nuclear Data and Simulations of novel option for nuclear energy production within the group 'PACS' and, on the other hand, all the activities that are performed within the 'RC (Radio-chemistry group)'; 4- Astrophysics: This section concerns nuclear astrophysics research activity at the group 'NESTER', the astro-chemistry activity at the 'NIM' group and the astro-particle activity within the 'AUGER' collaboration in the group 'PHEN'; 5 - Theory: This activity concerns mainly the 'Theory' group. Beside these five scientific topics a multidisciplinary activity based mainly on the use of accelerated nanoparticles with the TANDEM accelerator at ALTO is also described. Two additional sections are devoted in the document to summarize the activities related to: 1 -Accelerator physics and technology; 2 - Detector technology, instrumentation and data acquisition and processing. A separate paragraph gives a status report and highlights from the main facilities in the Institute such as ALTO, SUPRATECH and CACAO. The activities on 'Dosimetry' in one hand and on 'Safety and Radiation Protection' on the other hand as well as an overview

  16. Soil Contamination, Advanced integrated characterisation and time-lapse Monitoring, SoilCAM project highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, H. K.; Van Der Zee, S. E.; Wehrer, M.; Godio, A.; Pedersen, L. B.; Tsocano, G.

    2013-12-01

    measurements indicate where the remaining crude oil can be found. Water samples from multilevel samplers reveal crude oil present in emulsion in the zone of groundwater fluctuations, highlighting the importance of colloidal transport. Modelling of multiphase flow of the fluctuating groundwater level explains the lack of horizontal displacement of the plume in the area. Geochemistry of the groundwater clearly indicates degradation of hydrocarbons under iron- and sulphate reducing conditions, but changes were too slow to be mapped by time-lapse geophysical measurements during the project period. MODFLOW was used to simulate the regional groundwater flow and transport in the area. Highlights of the results from both test sites will be presented as an integrated overview. Snow removal at Oslo airport

  17. "Discoveries in Planetary Sciences": Slide Sets Highlighting New Advances for Astronomy Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brain, D. A.; Schneider, N. M.; Beyer, R. A.

    2010-12-01

    Planetary science is a field that evolves rapidly, motivated by spacecraft mission results. Exciting new mission results are generally communicated rather quickly to the public in the form of press releases and news stories, but it can take several years for new advances to work their way into college textbooks. Yet it is important for students to have exposure to these new advances for a number of reasons. In some cases, new work renders older textbook knowledge incorrect or incomplete. In some cases, new discoveries make it possible to emphasize older textbook knowledge in a new way. In all cases, new advances provide exciting and accessible examples of the scientific process in action. To bridge the gap between textbooks and new advances in planetary sciences we have developed content on new discoveries for use by undergraduate instructors. Called 'Discoveries in Planetary Sciences', each new discovery is summarized in a 3-slide PowerPoint presentation. The first slide describes the discovery, the second slide discusses the underlying planetary science concepts, and the third presents the big picture implications of the discovery. A fourth slide includes links to associated press releases, images, and primary sources. This effort is generously sponsored by the Division for Planetary Sciences of the American Astronomical Society, and the slide sets are available at http://dps.aas.org/education/dpsdisc/. Sixteen slide sets have been released so far covering topics spanning all sub-disciplines of planetary science. Results from the following spacecraft missions have been highlighted: MESSENGER, the Spirit and Opportunity rovers, Cassini, LCROSS, EPOXI, Chandrayan, Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, Mars Express, and Venus Express. Additionally, new results from Earth-orbiting and ground-based observing platforms and programs such as Hubble, Keck, IRTF, the Catalina Sky Survey, HARPS, MEarth, Spitzer, and amateur astronomers have been highlighted. 4-5 new slide sets are

  18. Three decades of Cognition & Emotion: A brief review of past highlights and future prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothermund, Klaus; Koole, Sander L

    2018-02-01

    Over the past three decades, Cognition & Emotion has been one of the world's leading outlets for emotion research. In this article, we review past highlights of and future prospects for the journal. Our tour of history covers three periods: The first period, from 1987 to 1999, was a pioneering era in which cognitive theories began to be applied to the scientific analysis of emotion. The second period, from 2000 to 2007, was characterised by a sharp increase in the number of empirical research papers, a lot of which were concerned with automatic processing biases and their implications for clinical psychology. During the third period, from 2008 to 2017, a new focus emerged on self-regulatory processes and their implications for emotion. We then turn to the present profile of Cognition & Emotion and introduce our new editorial team. Finally, we consider how the journal's future success can be continued and increased by a) providing authors with fast and high-quality feedback; b) offering attractive publication formats, including the newly introduced Registered Reports for pre-registered studies; and c) consolidating key methodological paradigms with reproducible findings.

  19. Ciguatera fish poisoning: a first epidemic in Germany highlights an increasing risk for European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattei, César; Vetter, Irina; Eisenblätter, Anneka; Krock, Bernd; Ebbecke, Martin; Desel, Herbert; Zimmermann, Katharina

    2014-12-01

    Toxin-producing microalgae are thriving worldwide due to coral reef destruction and global warming with major consequences on ecosystems, international trade and human health. Microalgae belonging to the family of flagellate protists, in particular dinoflagellates, secrete a variety of high-molecular-weight polyether toxins that accumulate through the marine food chain to cause disease in humans by acting as sodium channel activator toxins; ciguatera is the most frequent seafood-borne illness worldwide with 50,000 to 500,000 global incidences per annum and is usually limited to endemic areas located between 35° northern and 35° southern latitude. The rising global incidence frequency renders it a major human health problem, because no curative treatment is available yet and reliable detection assays are lacking. During the last decade ciguatera has increasingly become endemic in previously unaffected areas for two reasons: first global warming has contributed to the emergence of dinoflagellate species in subtropical and even temperate regions that previously had been constrained to tropical areas and second: in Europe globalization of fishing industry and tourism has led to a progressive increase in the number of ciguatera cases and a lack of awareness among medical personnel contributes to under-reporting. We review, through a recent ciguatera outbreak in Germany, the risk for ciguatera poisoning in Europe and highlight characteristic symptoms, current knowledge about disease pathomechanisms and treatment options.

  20. Research Integrity and Peer Review-past highlights and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boughton, Stephanie L; Kowalczuk, Maria K; Meerpohl, Joerg J; Wager, Elizabeth; Moylan, Elizabeth C

    2018-01-01

    In May 2016, we launched Research Integrity and Peer Review , an international, open access journal with fully open peer review (reviewers are identified on their reports and named reports are published alongside the article) to provide a home for research on research and publication ethics, research reporting, and research on peer review. As the journal enters its third year, we reflect on recent events and highlights for the journal and explore how the journal is faring in terms of gender and diversity in peer review. We also share the particular interests of our Editors-in-Chief regarding models of peer review, reporting quality, common research integrity issues that arise during the publishing process, and how people interact with the published literature. We continue to encourage further research into peer review, research and publication ethics and research reporting, as we believe that all new initiatives should be evidence-based. We also remain open to constructive discussions of the developments in the field that offer new solutions.

  1. Highlights from the Electricity Sector Council's powerline technician project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-05-15

    The Electricity Sector Council completed a situational analysis of the powerline technician trade in Canada in April 2008. The purpose of the study was to provide industry partners with the opportunity to provide input into the development of the powerline trade; to assess the current workforce; to examine training and working conditions based on in-depth focus group interviews; and to demonstrate regional and provincial differences in apprenticeship development. This report presented highlights from the Electricity Sector Council's powerline technician project. Specifically, the report discussed the number of powerline apprentices entering the trade; regional differences in the powerline trade; and emerging practices for recruitment, retention, and training. Recommendations were also offered in order to address the challenges faced by the powerline trade. It was concluded that the best ways to recruit candidates in the powerline technician trade are to invest in a word-of mouth campaign, such as a coaching program; encourage early introduction to the trades through job sampling; offer financial incentives; and invest in outreach programs. 4 figs.

  2. Genetic Evidence Highlights Potential Impacts of By-Catch to Cetaceans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, Martin; Rosenbaum, Howard C.; Wells, Randall S.; Stamper, Andrew; Bordino, Pablo

    2010-01-01

    Incidental entanglement in fishing gear is arguably the most serious threat to many populations of small cetaceans, judging by the alarming number of captured animals. However, other aspects of this threat, such as the potential capture of mother-offspring pairs or reproductive pairs, could be equally or even more significant but have rarely been evaluated. Using a combination of demographic and genetic data we provide evidence that i) Franciscana dolphin pairs that are potentially reproductive and mother-offspring pairs form temporal bonds, and ii) are entangled simultaneously. Our results highlight potential demographic and genetic impacts of by-catch to cetacean populations: the joint entanglement of mother-offspring or reproductive pairs, compared to random individuals, might exacerbate the demographic consequences of by-catch, and the loss of groups of relatives means that significant components of genetic diversity could be lost together. Given the social nature of many odontocetes (toothed cetaceans), we suggest that these potential impacts could be rather general to the group and therefore by-catch could be more detrimental than previously considered. PMID:21179542

  3. Emerging roles for microtubules in angiosperm pollen tube growth highlight new research cues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra eMoscatelli

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In plants, actin filaments have an important role in organelle movement and cytoplasmic streaming. Otherwise microtubules have a role in restricting organelles to specific areas of the cell and in maintaining organelle morphology. In somatic plant cells, microtubules also participate in cell division and morphogenesis, allowing cells to take their definitive shape in order to perform specific functions. In the latter case, microtubules influence assembly of the cell wall, controlling the delivery of enzymes involved in cellulose synthesis and of wall modulation material to the proper sites.In angiosperm pollen tubes, organelle movement is generally attributed to the acto-myosin system, the main role of which is in distributing organelles in the cytoplasm and in carrying secretory vesicles to the apex for polarized growth. Recent data on membrane trafficking suggests a role of microtubules in fine delivery and repositioning of vesicles to sustain pollen tube growth. This review examines the role of microtubules in secretion and endocytosis, highlighting new research cues regarding cell wall construction and pollen tube-pistil crosstalk, that help unravel the role of microtubules in polarized growth.

  4. A new dimensionless number highlighted from mechanical energy exchange during running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delattre, Nicolas; Moretto, Pierre

    2008-09-18

    This study aimed to highlight a new dimensionless number from mechanical energy transfer occurring at the centre of gravity (Cg) during running. We built two different-sized spring-mass models (SMM #1 and SMM #2). SMM #1 was built from the previously published data, and SMM #2 was built to be dynamically similar to SMM #1. The potential gravitational energy (E(P)), kinetic energy (E(K)), and potential elastic energy (E(E)) were taken into account to test our hypothesis. For both SMM #1 and SMM #2, N(Mo-Dela)=(E(P)+E(K))/E(E) reached the same mean value and was constant (4.1+/-0.7) between 30% and 70% of contact time. Values of N(Mo-Dela) obtained out of this time interval were due to the absence of E(E) at initial and final times of the simulation. This phenomenon does not occur during in vivo running because a leg muscle's pre-activation enables potential elastic energy storage prior to ground contact. Our findings also revealed that two different-sized spring-mass models bouncing with equal N(Mo-Dela) values moved in a dynamically similar fashion. N(Mo-Dela), which can be expressed by the combination of Strouhal and Froude numbers, could be of great interest in order to study animal and human locomotion under Earth's gravity or to induce dynamic similarity between different-sized individuals during bouncing gaits.

  5. On the Need for Rethinking Current Practice that Highlights Goal Achievement Risk in an Enterprise Context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aven, Eyvind; Aven, Terje

    2015-09-01

    This article addresses the issue of how performance and risk management can complement each other in order to enhance the management of an enterprise. Often, we see that risk management focuses on goal achievements and not the enterprise risk related to its activities in the value chain. The statement "no goal, no risk" is a common misconception. The main aim of the article is to present a normative model for describing the links between performance and risk, and to use this model to give recommendations on how to best structure and plan the management of an enterprise in situations involving risk and uncertainties. The model, which has several novel features, is based on the interaction between different types of risk management (enterprise risk management, task risk management, and personal risk management) and a structure where the enterprise risk management overrules both the task and personal risk management. To illustrate the model we use the metaphor of a ship, where the ship is loaded with cash-generating activities and has a direction over time determined by the overall strategic objectives. Compared to the current enterprise risk management practice, the model and related analysis are founded on a new perspective on risk, highlighting knowledge and uncertainties beyond probabilities. © 2015 Society for Risk Analysis.

  6. Emotional sensitization highlights the attentional bias in blood-injection-injury phobics: an ERP study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarlo, Michela; Buodo, Giulia; Devigili, Andrea; Munafò, Marianna; Palomba, Daniela

    2011-02-18

    The presence of an attentional bias towards disorder-related stimuli has not been consistently demonstrated in blood phobics. The present study was aimed at investigating whether or not an attentional bias, as measured by event-related potentials (ERPs), could be highlighted in blood phobics by inducing cognitive-emotional sensitization through the repetitive presentation of different disorder-related pictures. The mean amplitudes of the N100, P200, P300 and late positive potentials to picture onset were assessed along with subjective ratings of valence and arousal in 13 blood phobics and 12 healthy controls. Blood phobics, but not controls, showed a linear increase of subjective arousal over time, suggesting that cognitive-emotional sensitization did occur. The analysis of cortical responses showed larger N100 and smaller late positive potentials in phobics than in controls in response to mutilations. These findings suggest that cognitive-emotional sensitization induced an attentional bias in blood phobics during picture viewing, involving early selective encoding and late cognitive avoidance of disorder-related stimuli depicting mutilations. © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Highlighting continued uncertainty in global land cover maps for the user community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritz, Steffen; See, Linda; McCallum, Ian; Schill, Christian; Obersteiner, Michael; Van der Velde, Marijn; Boettcher, Hannes; Havlík, Petr; Achard, Frédéric

    2011-01-01

    In the last 10 years a number of new global datasets have been created and new, more sophisticated algorithms have been designed to classify land cover. GlobCover and MODIS v.5 are the most recent global land cover products available, where GlobCover (300 m) has the finest spatial resolution of other comparable products such as MODIS v.5 (500 m) and GLC-2000 (1 km). This letter shows that the thematic accuracy in the cropland domain has decreased when comparing these two latest products. This disagreement is also evident spatially when examining maps of cropland and forest disagreement between GLC-2000, MODIS and GlobCover. The analysis highlights the continued uncertainty surrounding these products, with a combined forest and cropland disagreement of 893 Mha (GlobCover versus MODIS v.5). This letter suggests that data sharing efforts and the provision of more in situ data for training, calibration and validation are very important conditions for improving future global land cover products.

  8. Algal Pretreatment Improves Biofuels Yield and Value; Highlights in Science, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2015-05-15

    One of the major challenges associated with algal biofuels production in a biorefinery-type setting is improving biomass utilization in its entirety, increasing the process energetic yields and providing economically viable and scalable co-product concepts. We demonstrate the effectiveness of a novel, integrated technology based on moderate temperatures and low pH to convert the carbohydrates in wet algal biomass to soluble sugars for fermentation, while making lipids more accessible for downstream extraction and leaving a protein-enriched fraction behind. This research has been highlighted in the Green Chemistry journal article mentioned above and a milestone report, and is based on the work the researchers are doing for the AOP projects Algal Biomass Conversion and Algal Biofuels Techno-economic Analysis. That work has demonstrated an advanced process for algal biofuel production that captures the value of both the algal lipids and carbohydrates for conversion to biofuels.  With this process, as much as 150 GGE/ton of biomass can be produced, 2-3X more than can be produced by terrestrial feedstocks.  This can also reduce the cost of biofuel production by as much as 40%. This also represents the first ever design case for the algal lipid upgrading pathway.

  9. Solidarity through shared disadvantage: Highlighting shared experiences of discrimination improves relations between stigmatized groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortland, Clarissa I; Craig, Maureen A; Shapiro, Jenessa R; Richeson, Jennifer A; Neel, Rebecca; Goldstein, Noah J

    2017-10-01

    Intergroup relations research has largely focused on relations between members of dominant groups and members of disadvantaged groups. The small body of work examining intraminority intergroup relations, or relations between members of different disadvantaged groups, reveals that salient experiences of ingroup discrimination promote positive relations between groups that share a dimension of identity (e.g., 2 different racial minority groups) and negative relations between groups that do not share a dimension of identity (e.g., a racial minority group and a sexual minority group). In the present work, we propose that shared experiences of discrimination between groups that do not share an identity dimension can be used as a lever to facilitate positive intraminority intergroup relations. Five experiments examining relations among 4 different disadvantaged groups supported this hypothesis. Both blatant (Experiments 1 and 3) and subtle (Experiments 2, 3, and 4) connections to shared experiences of discrimination, or inducing a similarity-seeking mindset in the context of discrimination faced by one's ingroup (Experiment 5), increased support for policies benefiting the outgroup (Experiments 1, 2, and 4) and reduced intergroup bias (Experiments 3, 4, and 5). Taken together, these experiments provide converging evidence that highlighting shared experiences of discrimination can improve intergroup outcomes between stigmatized groups across dimensions of social identity. Implications of these findings for intraminority intergroup relations are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  10. Professor Mansour Ali Haseeb: Highlights from a pioneer of biomedical research, physician and scientist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salih, Mustafa Abdalla M

    2013-01-01

    The article highlights the career of Professor Mansour Ali Haseeb (1910 - 1973; DKSM, Dip Bact, FRCPath, FRCP [Lond]), a pioneer worker in health, medical services, biomedical research and medical education in the Sudan. After his graduation from the Kitchener School of Medicine (renamed, Faculty of Medicine, University of Khartoum [U of K]) in 1934, he devoted his life for the development of laboratory medicine. He became the first Sudanese Director of Stack Medical Research Laboratories (1952 - 1962). He made valuable contributions by his services in the vaccine production and implementation programs, most notably in combating small pox, rabies and epidemic meningitis. In 1963 he became the first Sudanese Professor of Microbiology and Parasitology and served as the first Sudanese Dean of the Faculty of Medicine, U of K (1963-1969). He was an active loyal citizen in public life and served in various fields outside the medical profession. As Mayor of Omdurman, he was invited to visit Berlin in 1963 by Willy Brandt, Mayor of West Berlin (1957-1966) and Chancellor of the Federal Republic of Germany (1969 to 1974). Also as Mayor of Omdurman, he represented the City in welcoming Queen Elizabeth II during her visit to Sudan in February 1965. He also received State Medals from Egypt and Ethiopia. In 1973 he was appointed Chairman of the Sudan Medical Research Council, and was awarded the international Dr. Shousha Foundation Prize and Medal by the WHO for his contribution in the advancement of health, research and medical services.

  11. Personal reflections on the highlights and changes in radiation and radioisotope measurement applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardner, Robin P.; Lee, Kyoung O.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the recent changes that the authors have perceived in the use of radiation and radioisotope measurement applications. The first change is that due to the increased use of Monte Carlo simulation which has occurred from a normal evolutionary process. This is due in large part to the increased accuracy that is being obtained by the use of detector response functions (DRFs) and the simultaneous increased computational efficiency that has become available with these DRFs, the availability of a greatly improved weight windows variance reduction method, and the availability of inexpensive computer clusters. This first change is a happy one. The other change that is occurring is in response to recent terrorist activities. That change is the replacement or major change in the use of long-lived radioisotopes in radioisotope measurement and other radioisotope source applications. In general this can be done by improving the security of these radioisotope sources or by replacing them altogether by using machine sources of radiation. In either case one would like to preclude altogether or at least minimize the possibility of terrorists being able to obtain radioisotopes and use them for clandestine purposes. - Highlights: • Recent changes in radioisotope measurement applications. • Improvements in Monte Carlo simulation for treating radioisotope measurement applications. • Replacement of radioisotope sources with machine sources of radiation.

  12. A vaccine cold chain freezing study in PNG highlights technology needs for hot climate countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirkas, Theo; Toikilik, Steven; Miller, Nan; Morgan, Chris; Clements, C John

    2007-01-08

    Fourteen data loggers were packed with vaccine vials at the national vaccine store, Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea (PNG), and sent to peripheral locations in the health system. The temperatures that the data loggers recorded during their passage along the cold chain indicated that heat damage was unlikely, but that all vials were exposed to freezing temperatures at some time. The commonest place where freezing conditions existed was during transport. The freezing conditions were likely induced by packing the vials too close to the ice packs that were themselves too cold, and with insufficient insulation between them. This situation was rectified and a repeat dispatch of data loggers demonstrated that the system had indeed been rectified. Avoiding freeze damage becomes even more important as the price of freeze-sensitive vaccines increases with the introduction of more multiple-antigen vaccines. This low-cost high-tech method of evaluating the cold chain function is highly recommended for developing and industrialized nations and should be used on a regular basis to check the integrity of the vaccine cold chain. The study highlights the need for technological solutions to avoid vaccine freezing, particularly in hot climate countries.

  13. Liposome Delivery Systems for Inhalation: A Critical Review Highlighting Formulation Issues and Anticancer Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudokas, Mindaugas; Najlah, Mohammad; Alhnan, Mohamed Albed; Elhissi, Abdelbary

    2016-01-01

    This is a critical review on research conducted in the field of pulmonary delivery of liposomes. Issues relating to the mechanism of nebulisation and liposome composition were appraised and correlated with literature reports of liposome formulations used in clinical trials to understand the role of liposome size and composition on therapeutic outcome. A major highlight was liposome inhalation for the treatment of lung cancers. Many in vivo studies that explored the potential of liposomes as anticancer carrier systems were evaluated, including animal studies and clinical trials. Liposomes can entrap anticancer drugs and localise their action in the lung following pulmonary delivery. The safety of inhaled liposomes incorporating anticancer drugs depends on the anticancer agent used and the amount of drug delivered to the target cancer in the lung. The difficulty of efficient targeting of liposomal anticancer aerosols to the cancerous tissues within the lung may result in low doses reaching the target site. Overall, following the success of liposomes as inhalable carriers in the treatment of lung infections, it is expected that more focus from research and development will be given to designing inhalable liposome carriers for the treatment of other lung diseases, including pulmonary cancers. The successful development of anticancer liposomes for inhalation may depend on the future development of effective aerosolisation devices and better targeted liposomes to maximise the benefit of therapy and reduce the potential for local and systemic adverse effects. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Activity in the superior temporal sulcus highlights learning competence in an interaction game.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haruno, Masahiko; Kawato, Mitsuo

    2009-04-08

    During behavioral adaptation through interaction with human and nonhuman agents, marked individual differences are seen in both real-life situations and games. However, the underlying neural mechanism is not well understood. We conducted a neuroimaging experiment in which subjects maximized monetary rewards by learning in a prisoner's dilemma game with two computer agents: agent A, a tit-for-tat player who repeats the subject's previous action, and agent B, a simple stochastic cooperator oblivious to the subject's action. Approximately 1/3 of the subjects (group I) learned optimally in relation to both A and B, while another 1/3 (group II) did so only for B. Post-experiment interviews indicated that group I exploited the agent strategies more often than group II. Significant differences in learning-related brain activity between the two groups were only found in the superior temporal sulcus (STS) for both A and B. Furthermore, the learning performance of each group I subject was predictable based on this STS activity, but not in the group II subjects. This differential activity could not be attributed to a behavioral difference since it persisted in relation to agent B for which the two groups behaved similarly. In sharp contrast, the brain structures for reward processing were recruited similarly by both groups. These results suggest that STS provides knowledge of the other agent's strategies for association between action and reward and highlights learning competence during interactive reinforcement learning.

  15. Hanford Site Permanent Isolation Surface Barrier Development Program: Fiscal year 1992 and 1993 highlights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadwell, L.L.; Link, S.O.; Gee, G.W.

    1993-09-01

    The Hanford Site Permanent Isolation Surface Barrier Development Program was jointly developed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory and Westinghouse Hanford Company to design and test an earthen cover system that can be used to inhibit water infiltration; plant, animal, and human intrusion; and wind and water erosion. Kaiser Engineers Hanford Company provided engineering design support for the program. Work on barrier design has been under way at Hanford for nearly 10 years. The comprehensive development of a long-term barrier, formerly the Hanford Site Protective Barrier Development Program, was initiated in FY 1986, and a general field-tested design is expected to be completed by FY 1998. Highlights of efforts in FY 1992 and FY 1993 included the resumption of field testing, the completion of the prototype barrier design, and the convening of an external peer review panel, which met twice with the barrier development team. The review panel provided helpful guidance on current and future barrier development activities, while commending the program for its significant technical contributions to innovative barrier technology development

  16. Nanog Fluctuations in Embryonic Stem Cells Highlight the Problem of Measurement in Cell Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Rosanna C G; Stumpf, Patrick S; Ridden, Sonya J; Sim, Aaron; Filippi, Sarah; Harrington, Heather A; MacArthur, Ben D

    2017-06-20

    A number of important pluripotency regulators, including the transcription factor Nanog, are observed to fluctuate stochastically in individual embryonic stem cells. By transiently priming cells for commitment to different lineages, these fluctuations are thought to be important to the maintenance of, and exit from, pluripotency. However, because temporal changes in intracellular protein abundances cannot be measured directly in live cells, fluctuations are typically assessed using genetically engineered reporter cell lines that produce a fluorescent signal as a proxy for protein expression. Here, using a combination of mathematical modeling and experiment, we show that there are unforeseen ways in which widely used reporter strategies can systematically disturb the dynamics they are intended to monitor, sometimes giving profoundly misleading results. In the case of Nanog, we show how genetic reporters can compromise the behavior of important pluripotency-sustaining positive feedback loops, and induce a bifurcation in the underlying dynamics that gives rise to heterogeneous Nanog expression patterns in reporter cell lines that are not representative of the wild-type. These findings help explain the range of published observations of Nanog variability and highlight the problem of measurement in live cells. Copyright © 2017 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Hanford Site Long-term Surface Barrier Development Program: Fiscal year 1994 highlights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petersen, K.L.; Link, S.O.; Gee, G.W.

    1995-08-01

    The Hanford Site Surface Barrier Development Program was organized in 1985 to test the effectiveness of various barrier designs in minimizing the effects of water infiltration; plant, animal and human intrusion; and wind and water erosion on buried wastes, plus preventing or minimizing the emanation of noxious gases. A team of scientists from the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and engineers from Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) direct the barrier development effort. ICF Kaiser Hanford Company, in conjunction with WHC and PNL, developed design drawings and construction specifications for a 5-acre prototype barrier. The highlight of efforts in FY 1994 was the construction of the prototype barrier. The prototype barrier was constructed on the Hanford Site at the 200 BP-1 Operable Unit of the 200 East Area. Construction was completed in August 1994 and monitoring instruments are being installed so experiments on the prototype barrier can begin in FY 1995. The purpose of the prototype barrier is to provide insights and experience with issues regarding barrier design, construction, and performance that have not been possible with individual tests and experiments conducted to date. Additional knowledge and experience was gained in FY 1994 on erosion control, physical stability, water infiltration control, model testing, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) comparisons, biointrusion control, long-term performance, and technology transfer

  18. Highlights from the First Ever Demographic Study of Solar Physics, Space Physics, and Upper Atmospheric Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moldwin, M.; Morrow, C. A.; White, S. C.; Ivie, R.

    2014-12-01

    Members of the Education & Workforce Working Group and the American Institute of Physics (AIP) conducted the first ever National Demographic Survey of working professionals for the 2012 National Academy of Sciences Solar and Space Physics Decadal Survey to learn about the demographics of this sub-field of space science. The instrument contained questions for participants on: the type of workplace; basic demographic information regarding gender and minority status, educational pathways (discipline of undergrad degree, field of their PhD), how their undergraduate and graduate student researchers are funded, participation in NSF and NASA funded spaceflight missions and suborbital programs, and barriers to career advancement. Using contact data bases from AGU, the American Astronomical Society's Solar Physics Division (AAS-SPD), attendees of NOAA's Space Weather Week and proposal submissions to NSF's Atmospheric, Geospace Science Division, the AIP's Statistical Research Center cross correlated and culled these data bases resulting in 2776 unique email addresses of US based working professionals. The survey received 1305 responses (51%) and generated 125 pages of single space answers to a number of open-ended questions. This talk will summarize the highlights of this first-ever demographic survey including findings extracted from the open-ended responses regarding barriers to career advancement which showed significant gender differences.

  19. Educational Entrepreneurship (EE: Delineating and Highlighting Its Domain, Importance and Feasibility in Uganda’s Context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genza Musoke Gyaviira

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Although in many countries government financial support for education is dwindling, not many educational institutions have succeeded in devising internal mechanisms and practices to enable them to continuously deliver quality education in quantity. Might the application of certain entrepreneurial strategies in educational management perhaps help to make a difference? What is educational entrepreneurship (EE? How feasible is EE in a developing world education landscape like that of Uganda? Which challenges must EE surmount before it can envisage success? Using literature review methodology, this study attempted to find answers to such questions. Its aim was to delineate the EE domain and to highlight both its importance and feasibility in Uganda’s context. The study makes two important revelations; first, that indeed EE is clouded in conceptual mishmash, hence need for more scholarly attention on the subject; second, that however salvaging EE can be to struggling educational institutions, it is not without challenges – even apparent contradictions – hence preference for a “moderate risk” approach to entrepreneurship within educational institutions.    

  20. Where there's a will: can highlighting future youth-targeted marketing increase support for soda taxes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Sungjong; Schuldt, Jonathon P

    2014-12-01

    Amid concern about high rates of obesity and related diseases, the marketing of nutritionally poor foods to young people by the food industry has come under heavy criticism by public health advocates, who cite decades of youth-targeted marketing in arguing for reforms. In light of recent evidence that the same event evokes stronger emotional reactions when it occurs in the future versus the past, highlighting youth-targeted marketing that has yet to occur may evoke stronger reactions to such practices, and perhaps, greater support for related health policy initiatives. In a between-subjects experiment, Web participants (N = 285) read that a major soda company had already launched (past condition) or was planning to launch (future condition) an advertising campaign targeting children. Measures included support for a soda tax and affective responses to the company's actions. Greater support for the soda tax was observed in the future condition than in the past condition. Moreover, participants in the future condition reported heightened negative emotions about the company's actions, which mediated the observed effect on soda tax support. The same action undertaken by the food industry (here, marketing soda to children) may evoke stronger negative emotions and greater support for a health policy initiative when it is framed prospectively rather than retrospectively.

  1. HIVR4P 2016, Partnering for Prevention: Conference Summary and Highlights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shacklett, Barbara L; Derdeyn, Cynthia A; Folayan, Morenike Oluwatoyin; Landovitz, Raphael J; Anthony, Colin; Behrens, Anna-Janina; Hope, Thomas J; Landais, Elise; Leal, Lorna; Marrazzo, Jeanne M; Morris, Lynn; Mugo, Nelly; Ngure, Kenneth; Noseda, Veronica; Ranasinghe, Srinika; Tully, Damien C; Voronin, Yegor; Warren, Mitchell; Wibmer, Constantinos Kurt; Xie, Irene Y; Scarlatti, Gabriella; Thyagarajan, Bargavi

    2017-08-01

    HIV Research for Prevention: AIDS Vaccine, Microbicide, and ARV-based Prevention Science (HIVR4P) was built on a growing consensus that effective HIV prevention requires a combination of approaches and that understanding, analyzing, and debating the cross-cutting issues that impact prevention research are all essential to combat the global HIV/AIDS epidemic. To that end, the biennial HIVR4P conference is dedicated to all biomedical HIV prevention research approaches, including HIV vaccines, microbicides, pre-exposure prophylaxis, and treatment as prevention. The HIVR4P 2016 conference was held in Chicago, Illinois (USA), on October 17-21, and included more than 700 scientific presentations and 21 satellite sessions covering the latest and most promising advances across the HIV prevention research field. The theme "Partnering for Prevention" represented the conference's commitment to breaking down silos between research disciplines as well as between researchers, program developers, care providers, advocates, communities, and funders. Delegates spanning 42 countries attended the conference. One-third of those in attendance were early career investigators, which reflects a firm commitment to emerging researchers and ultimately to the goal of developing a sustainable scientific enterprise well into the future. This article presents a concise summary of highlights from the conference. For a more detailed account, one may find full abstracts, daily summaries, and webcasts on the conference website at hivr4p.org.

  2. Status of SINQ, the only MW spallation neutron source-highlighting target development and industrial applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, Werner; Dai, Yong; Glasbrenner, Heike; Grosse, Mirco; Lehmann, Eberhard

    2006-01-01

    SINQ is a continuous spallation neutron source, driven by PSI's 590 MeV proton accelerator. Receiving a stable proton current of 1.3 mA, SINQ is the presently most powerful accelerator-driven facility worldwide. Besides the primary designation of SINQ to serve as user facility for neutron scattering and neutron imaging, PSI seeks to play a leading role in the development of the facility, focusing on spallation targets and materials research for high-dose radiation environments. Accompanying these activities, SINQ has established several projects serving a more general, profound development towards high-power spallation targets: the most prominent ones being SINQ Target Irradiation Program (STIP) and megawatt pilot experiment for a liquid metal target (MEGAPIE), complemented by LiSoR and VIMOS. Within the user program, SINQ is aspiring to attract an appropriate contingent of industrial applications. The paper highlights the potential for industrial applications by means of selected examples from strain mapping and neutron imaging

  3. MALDI-TOF typing highlights geographical and fluconazole resistance clusters in Candida glabrata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhieb, C; Normand, A C; Al-Yasiri, M; Chaker, E; El Euch, D; Vranckx, K; Hendrickx, M; Sadfi, N; Piarroux, R; Ranque, S

    2015-06-01

    Utilizing matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectra for Candida glabrata typing would be a cost-effective and easy-to-use alternative to classical DNA-based typing methods. This study aimed to use MALDI-TOF for the typing of C. glabrata clinical isolates from various geographical origins and test its capacity to differentiate between fluconazole-sensitive and -resistant strains.Both microsatellite length polymorphism (MLP) and MALDI-TOF mass spectra of 58 C. glabrata isolates originating from Marseilles (France) and Tunis (Tunisia) as well as collection strains from diverse geographic origins were analyzed. The same analysis was conducted on a subset of C. glabrata isolates that were either susceptible (MIC ≤ 8 mg/l) or resistant (MIC ≥ 64 mg/l) to fluconazole.According to the seminal results, both MALDI-TOF and MLP classifications could highlight C. glabrata population structures associated with either geographical dispersal barriers (p typing to investigate C. glabrata infection outbreaks and predict the antifungal susceptibility profile of clinical laboratory isolates. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The International Society for Human and Animal Mycology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Brain Potentials Highlight Stronger Implicit Food Memory for Taste than Health and Context Associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoogeveen, Heleen R; Jolij, Jacob; Ter Horst, Gert J; Lorist, Monicque M

    2016-01-01

    Increasingly consumption of healthy foods is advised to improve population health. Reasons people give for choosing one food over another suggest that non-sensory features like health aspects are appreciated as of lower importance than taste. However, many food choices are made in the absence of the actual perception of a food's sensory properties, and therefore highly rely on previous experiences of similar consumptions stored in memory. In this study we assessed the differential strength of food associations implicitly stored in memory, using an associative priming paradigm. Participants (N = 30) were exposed to a forced-choice picture-categorization task, in which the food or non-food target images were primed with either non-sensory or sensory related words. We observed a smaller N400 amplitude at the parietal electrodes when categorizing food as compared to non-food images. While this effect was enhanced by the presentation of a food-related word prime during food trials, the primes had no effect in the non-food trials. More specifically, we found that sensory associations are stronger implicitly represented in memory as compared to non-sensory associations. Thus, this study highlights the neuronal mechanisms underlying previous observations that sensory associations are important features of food memory, and therefore a primary motive in food choice.

  5. OSART programme highlights 1993-1994. Operational safety practices in nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-04-01

    This report continues the practice of summarizing mission results so that all the aspects of OSART missions, Pre-OSART missions and good practices are to be found in one volume. For the first time it includes results of follow-up visits. Attempts have been made in this report to highlight the most significant findings whilst retaining as much of the vital background information as possible. This report is in four parts: Part I summarizes the most significant observations made during the missions and follow-up visits during 1993-1994; Part II, in chronological order, is an overview of the major strengths and opportunities for improvement identified during each OSART mission and summaries of follow-up visits performed during the period; Part III lists good practices that were identified during 1993 and 1994; and Part IV presents the recently developed OSART mission results (OSMIR) database. Each part of the report is intended for different levels in operating and regulatory organizations but not exclusively so. Part I is primarily to the executive management level; Part II to middle managers; and Parts III and IV to those involved in operational experience feedback. Because of widely different plant designs, operating and management styles, cultural practices, and other factors affecting plant operations, no OSART findings were applicable to all of the plants visited in 1993 and 1994. Individual findings varied considerably in scope and significance. However, the findings do reflect some common strengths and opportunities for improvement. 4 tabs.

  6. Silver linings on the horizon: highlights from the 10th Cachexia Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebner, Nicole; von Haehling, Stephan

    2018-02-01

    This article highlights the updates from preclinical and clinical studies into the field of wasting disorders that were presented at the 10th Cachexia Conference held in Rome, Italy, in December 2017. This year's conference saw some interesting results of larger-scale studies and clinical trials and new therapeutic targets. Herein, we summarize the biological and clinical significance of different markers and new diagnostic tools and cut-offs for the detection of skeletal muscle wasting, including micro RNAs, the ubiquitin-proteasome system, mTOR signalling, news in body composition analysis including the D3-creatine dilution method, and new biomarkers. Clinical studies investigated novel nutritional approaches, trials of elamipretide, enobosarm, and urolithin A. It remains a fact, however, that effective treatments of cachexia and wasting disorders are urgently needed in order to improve patients' quality of life and their survival. © 2018 The Authors. Journal of Cachexia, Sarcopenia and Muscle published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of the Society on Sarcopenia, Cachexia and Wasting Disorders.

  7. The Third International Genomic Medicine Conference (3rd IGMC, 2015: overall activities and outcome highlights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Abu-Elmagd

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Third International Genomic Medicine Conference (3rd IGMC was organised by the Centre of Excellence in Genomic Medicine Research (CEGMR at the King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA. This conference is a continuation of a series of meetings, which began with the first International Genomic Medicine Conference (1st IGMC, 2011 followed by the second International Genomic Medicine Conference (2nd IGMC, 2013. The 3rd IGMC meeting presented as a timely opportunity to bring scientists from across the world to gather, discuss, and exchange recent advances in the field of genomics and genetics in general as well as practical information on using these new technologies in different basic and clinical applications. The meeting undoubtedly inspired young male and female Saudi researchers, who attended the conference in large numbers, as evidenced by the oversubscribed oral and poster presentations. The conference also witnessed the launch of the first content for npj Genomic Medicine, a high quality new journal was established in partnership by CEGMR with Springer Nature and published as part of the Nature Partner Journal series. Here, we present a brief summary report of the 2-day meeting including highlights from the oral presentations, poster presentations, workshops, poster prize-winners and comments from the distinguished scientists.

  8. Quantitative Analysis of Signaling Networks across Differentially Embedded Tumors Highlights Interpatient Heterogeneity in Human Glioblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most aggressive malignant primary brain tumor, with a dismal mean survival even with the current standard of care. Although in vitro cell systems can provide mechanistic insight into the regulatory networks governing GBM cell proliferation and migration, clinical samples provide a more physiologically relevant view of oncogenic signaling networks. However, clinical samples are not widely available and may be embedded for histopathologic analysis. With the goal of accurately identifying activated signaling networks in GBM tumor samples, we investigated the impact of embedding in optimal cutting temperature (OCT) compound followed by flash freezing in LN2 vs immediate flash freezing (iFF) in LN2 on protein expression and phosphorylation-mediated signaling networks. Quantitative proteomic and phosphoproteomic analysis of 8 pairs of tumor specimens revealed minimal impact of the different sample processing strategies and highlighted the large interpatient heterogeneity present in these tumors. Correlation analyses of the differentially processed tumor sections identified activated signaling networks present in selected tumors and revealed the differential expression of transcription, translation, and degradation associated proteins. This study demonstrates the capability of quantitative mass spectrometry for identification of in vivo oncogenic signaling networks from human tumor specimens that were either OCT-embedded or immediately flash-frozen. PMID:24927040

  9. Local and regional smokefree and tobacco-free action in New Zealand: highlights and directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, George; Wilson, Nick

    2017-09-22

    In this viewpoint we highlight and discuss some recent local and regional level advances in tobacco control in Aotearoa/New Zealand. In this country a wide range of local actors are helping drive smokefree and tobacco-free policies, with an increasing presence of businesses in this field. There has been progress in the areas of smokefree dining, large outdoor worksites and ski fields, and parts of downtown areas such as squares and streets. In 2015 and 2016, three councils (Palmerston North, Napier and Hastings) have used pavement lease policies and bylaws to start introducing an element of requirement into smokefree outdoor dining. Elsewhere (eg, Rotorua, Ashburton, Westland and Christchurch) significant smokefree outdoor dining moves have been made by, or in conjunction with, local councils. Tobacco-free retailing continues to expand, particularly in Northland. In the absence of meaningful central government action on smokefree places in the last decade (despite the Smokefree 2025 goal), local activity is leading the way. It is particularly important in providing models for smokefree outdoor hospitality areas, where smoking normalisation and relapse are significant health risks. Nevertheless, there is a need for the local smokefree and tobacco-free activity to be nationally evaluated, particularly for assessing the prevalence of smoking in areas covered by 'smokefree' policies. Action by central government could help local actors by providing a more definite legislative basis for bylaws, by minimum outdoor smokefree laws and by the funding of effective tobacco control mass media.

  10. DNA and dispersal models highlight constrained connectivity in a migratory marine megavertebrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naro-Maciel, Eugenia; Hart, Kristen M.; Cruciata, Rossana; Putman, Nathan F.

    2016-01-01

    Population structure and spatial distribution are fundamentally important fields within ecology, evolution, and conservation biology. To investigate pan-Atlantic connectivity of globally endangered green turtles (Chelonia mydas) from two National Parks in Florida, USA, we applied a multidisciplinary approach comparing genetic analysis and ocean circulation modeling. The Everglades (EP) is a juvenile feeding ground, whereas the Dry Tortugas (DT) is used for courtship, breeding, and feeding by adults and juveniles. We sequenced two mitochondrial segments from 138 turtles sampled there from 2006-2015, and simulated oceanic transport to estimate their origins. Genetic and ocean connectivity data revealed northwestern Atlantic rookeries as the major natal sources, while southern and eastern Atlantic contributions were negligible. However, specific rookery estimates differed between genetic and ocean transport models. The combined analyses suggest that post-hatchling drift via ocean currents poorly explains the distribution of neritic juveniles and adults, but juvenile natal homing and population history likely play important roles. DT and EP were genetically similar to feeding grounds along the southern US coast, but highly differentiated from most other Atlantic groups. Despite expanded mitogenomic analysis and correspondingly increased ability to detect genetic variation, no significant differentiation between DT and EP, or among years, sexes or stages was observed. This first genetic analysis of a North Atlantic green turtle courtship area provides rare data supporting local movements and male philopatry. The study highlights the applications of multidisciplinary approaches for ecological research and conservation.

  11. Promoting positive youth development and highlighting reasons for living in Northwest Alaska through digital storytelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wexler, Lisa; Gubrium, Aline; Griffin, Megan; DiFulvio, Gloria

    2013-07-01

    Using a positive youth development framework, this article describes how a 3-year digital storytelling project and the 566 digital stories produced from it in Northwest Alaska promote protective factors in the lives of Alaska Native youth and serve as digital "hope kits," a suicide prevention approach that emphasizes young people's reasons for living. Digital stories are short, participant-produced videos that combine photos, music, and voice. We present process data that indicate the ways that digital stories serve as a platform for youth to reflect on and represent their lives, important relationships and achievements. In so doing, youth use the digital storytelling process to identify and highlight encouraging aspects of their lives, and develop more certain and positive identity formations. These processes are correlated with positive youth health outcomes. In addition, the digital stories themselves serve as reminders of the young people's personal assets--their reasons for living--after the workshop ends. Young people in this project often showed their digital stories to those who were featured positively within as a way to strengthen these interpersonal relationships. Evaluation data from the project show that digital storytelling workshops and outputs are a promising positive youth development approach. The project and the qualitative data demonstrate the need for further studies focusing on outcomes related to suicide prevention.

  12. Recent highlights of experimental research for inhibiting tumor growth by using Chinese medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xi-ran; Han, Shu-yan; Li, Ping-ping

    2015-10-01

    To give an overview of contemporary experimental research using Chinese medicine (CM) for the treatment of cancer. As an integral part of mainstream medicine in the People's Republic of China, CM emphasizes improvements in holistic physical condition instead of merely killing tumor cells, which is consistent with the current medical model that advocates patient-oriented treatment. Great progress has been made in experimental research, and the principle aspects include anti-tumor angiogenesis, inducing apoptosis and differentiation, reversing multidrug resistance, and improving immune function. As a current hot topic in cancer research, tumor microenvironment (TME) highlights the mutual and interdependent interaction between tumor cells and their surrounding tissues, and the CM treatment concept bears a striking resemblance to it. To date, primary points of TME include extracellular matrix remodeling, inflammation, hypoxia, and angiogenesis, but trials using CM with a focus on TME are rare. Despite considerable recent development, experimental research on CM for solving cancer issues appears insufficient. Greater efforts in this field are urgently needed.

  13. OSART programme highlights 1993-1994. Operational safety practices in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-04-01

    This report continues the practice of summarizing mission results so that all the aspects of OSART missions, Pre-OSART missions and good practices are to be found in one volume. For the first time it includes results of follow-up visits. Attempts have been made in this report to highlight the most significant findings whilst retaining as much of the vital background information as possible. This report is in four parts: Part I summarizes the most significant observations made during the missions and follow-up visits during 1993-1994; Part II, in chronological order, is an overview of the major strengths and opportunities for improvement identified during each OSART mission and summaries of follow-up visits performed during the period; Part III lists good practices that were identified during 1993 and 1994; and Part IV presents the recently developed OSART mission results (OSMIR) database. Each part of the report is intended for different levels in operating and regulatory organizations but not exclusively so. Part I is primarily to the executive management level; Part II to middle managers; and Parts III and IV to those involved in operational experience feedback. Because of widely different plant designs, operating and management styles, cultural practices, and other factors affecting plant operations, no OSART findings were applicable to all of the plants visited in 1993 and 1994. Individual findings varied considerably in scope and significance. However, the findings do reflect some common strengths and opportunities for improvement. 4 tabs

  14. Highlights of the UKAEA Underlying Research Programme: April 1988-March 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    Investment in fundamental research is essential to the success of any organisation whose business is the selling of research and development and the services relating to it. The resulting scientific and technical excellence is the hall-mark of a major contract research and development organisation and its main product. Fundamental research in the AEA is co-ordinated through the Underlying Research Programme. The Programme has to keep closely in touch with all the applied projects, in order to identify within these the problems that are hindering progress and might therefore benefit from further investigation. It also has the responsibility for developing new skills and techniques across the AEA. This brochure highlights some of the projects undertaken as part of the Underlying Research Programme. The Programme is organised into fifteen different areas of research, with the research projects not obviously fitting into any of these areas having a separate section to themselves. The text introduces each of these areas in turn, and then describes two or three examples of the sort of work undertaken within it. The areas are radiation effects, fracture studies, chemical effects at surfaces, surface physics and corrosion, fluid mechanics and heat transfer, nuclear studies, neutron beam studies, theoretical sciences, instrumentation, reactor physics and control, fabrication processes, laser isotope separation, nuclear fuel cycle studies, quantum electronics and radiological protection. (author)

  15. Highlighting the Structure-Function Relationship of the Brain with the Ising Model and Graph Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. K. Das

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available With the advent of neuroimaging techniques, it becomes feasible to explore the structure-function relationships in the brain. When the brain is not involved in any cognitive task or stimulated by any external output, it preserves important activities which follow well-defined spatial distribution patterns. Understanding the self-organization of the brain from its anatomical structure, it has been recently suggested to model the observed functional pattern from the structure of white matter fiber bundles. Different models which study synchronization (e.g., the Kuramoto model or global dynamics (e.g., the Ising model have shown success in capturing fundamental properties of the brain. In particular, these models can explain the competition between modularity and specialization and the need for integration in the brain. Graphing the functional and structural brain organization supports the model and can also highlight the strategy used to process and organize large amount of information traveling between the different modules. How the flow of information can be prevented or partially destroyed in pathological states, like in severe brain injured patients with disorders of consciousness or by pharmacological induction like in anaesthesia, will also help us to better understand how global or integrated behavior can emerge from local and modular interactions.

  16. Prophylactic platelets in dengue: survey responses highlight lack of an evidence base.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Whitehorn

    Full Text Available Dengue is the most important arboviral infection of humans. Thrombocytopenia is frequently observed in the course of infection and haemorrhage may occur in severe disease. The degree of thrombocytopenia correlates with the severity of infection, and may contribute to the risk of haemorrhage. As a result of this prophylactic platelet transfusions are sometimes advocated for the prevention of haemorrhage. There is currently no evidence to support this practice, and platelet transfusions are costly and sometimes harmful. We conducted a global survey to assess the different approaches to the use of platelets in dengue. Respondents were all physicians involved with the treatment of patients with dengue. Respondents were asked that their answers reflected what they would do if they were the treating physician. We received responses from 306 physicians from 20 different countries. The heterogeneity of the responses highlights the variation in clinical practice and lack of an evidence base in this area and underscores the importance of prospective clinical trials to address this key question in the clinical management of patients with dengue.

  17. Patient engagement: four case studies that highlight the potential for improved health outcomes and reduced costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurance, Jeremy; Henderson, Sarah; Howitt, Peter J; Matar, Mariam; Al Kuwari, Hanan; Edgman-Levitan, Susan; Darzi, Ara

    2014-09-01

    The energy of patients and members of the public worldwide who care about improving health is a huge, but still largely unrecognized and untapped, resource. The aim of patient engagement is to shift the clinical paradigm from determining "what is the matter?" to discovering "what matters to you?" This article presents four case studies from around the world that highlight the proven and potential abilities of increased patient engagement to improve health outcomes and reduce costs, while extending the reach of treatment and diagnostic programs into the community. The cases are an online mental health community in the United Kingdom, a genetic screening program in the United Arab Emirates, a World Health Organization checklist for new mothers, and a hospital-based patient engagement initiative in the United States. Evidence from these and similar endeavors suggests that closer collaboration on the part of patients, families, health care providers, health care systems, and policy makers at multiple levels could help diverse nations provide more effective and population-appropriate health care with fewer resources. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  18. Simple method for highlighting the temperature distribution into a liquid sample heated by microwave power field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surducan, V.; Surducan, E.; Dadarlat, D.

    2013-01-01

    Microwave induced heating is widely used in medical treatments, scientific and industrial applications. The temperature field inside a microwave heated sample is often inhomogenous, therefore multiple temperature sensors are required for an accurate result. Nowadays, non-contact (Infra Red thermography or microwave radiometry) or direct contact temperature measurement methods (expensive and sophisticated fiber optic temperature sensors transparent to microwave radiation) are mainly used. IR thermography gives only the surface temperature and can not be used for measuring temperature distributions in cross sections of a sample. In this paper we present a very simple experimental method for temperature distribution highlighting inside a cross section of a liquid sample, heated by a microwave radiation through a coaxial applicator. The method proposed is able to offer qualitative information about the heating distribution, using a temperature sensitive liquid crystal sheet. Inhomogeneities as smaller as 1°-2°C produced by the symmetry irregularities of the microwave applicator can be easily detected by visual inspection or by computer assisted color to temperature conversion. Therefore, the microwave applicator is tuned and verified with described method until the temperature inhomogeneities are solved

  19. Calcisponges have a ParaHox gene and dynamic expression of dispersed NK homeobox genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortunato, Sofia A V; Adamski, Marcin; Ramos, Olivia Mendivil; Leininger, Sven; Liu, Jing; Ferrier, David E K; Adamska, Maja

    2014-10-30

    Sponges are simple animals with few cell types, but their genomes paradoxically contain a wide variety of developmental transcription factors, including homeobox genes belonging to the Antennapedia (ANTP) class, which in bilaterians encompass Hox, ParaHox and NK genes. In the genome of the demosponge Amphimedon queenslandica, no Hox or ParaHox genes are present, but NK genes are linked in a tight cluster similar to the NK clusters of bilaterians. It has been proposed that Hox and ParaHox genes originated from NK cluster genes after divergence of sponges from the lineage leading to cnidarians and bilaterians. On the other hand, synteny analysis lends support to the notion that the absence of Hox and ParaHox genes in Amphimedon is a result of secondary loss (the ghost locus hypothesis). Here we analysed complete suites of ANTP-class homeoboxes in two calcareous sponges, Sycon ciliatum and Leucosolenia complicata. Our phylogenetic analyses demonstrate that these calcisponges possess orthologues of bilaterian NK genes (Hex, Hmx and Msx), a varying number of additional NK genes and one ParaHox gene, Cdx. Despite the generation of scaffolds spanning multiple genes, we find no evidence of clustering of Sycon NK genes. All Sycon ANTP-class genes are developmentally expressed, with patterns suggesting their involvement in cell type specification in embryos and adults, metamorphosis and body plan patterning. These results demonstrate that ParaHox genes predate the origin of sponges, thus confirming the ghost locus hypothesis, and highlight the need to analyse the genomes of multiple sponge lineages to obtain a complete picture of the ancestral composition of the first animal genome.

  20. Expression variation in connected recombinant populations of Arabidopsis thaliana highlights distinct transcriptome architectures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cubillos Francisco A

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Expression traits can vary quantitatively between individuals and have a complex inheritance. Identification of the genetics underlying transcript variation can help in the understanding of phenotypic variation due to genetic factors regulating transcript abundance and shed light into divergence patterns. So far, only a limited number of studies have addressed this subject in Arabidopsis, with contrasting results due to dissimilar statistical power. Here, we present the transcriptome architecture in leaf tissue of two RIL sets obtained from a connected-cross design involving 3 commonly used accessions. We also present the transcriptome architecture observed in developing seeds of a third independent cross. Results The utilisation of the novel R/eqtl package (which goal is to automatize and extend functions from the R/qtl package allowed us to map 4,290 and 6,534 eQTLs in the Cvi-0 × Col-0 and Bur-0 × Col-0 recombinant populations respectively. In agreement with previous studies, we observed a larger phenotypic variance explained by eQTLs in linkage with the controlled gene (potentially cis-acting, compared to distant loci (acting necessarily indirectly or in trans. Distant eQTLs hotspots were essentially not conserved between crosses, but instead, cross-specific. Accounting for confounding factors using a probabilistic approach (VBQTL increased the mapping resolution and the number of significant associations. Moreover, using local eQTLs obtained from this approach, we detected evidence for a directional allelic effect in genes with related function, where significantly more eQTLs than expected by chance were up-regulated from one of the accessions. Primary experimental data, analysis parameters, eQTL results and visualisation of LOD score curves presented here are stored and accessible through the QTLstore service database http://qtlstore.versailles.inra.fr/. Conclusions Our results demonstrate the extensive diversity and

  1. Highlights of X-Stack ExM Deliverable Swift/T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wozniak, Justin M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-03-31

    Swift/T is a key success from the ExM: System support for extreme-scale, many-task applications1 X-Stack project, which proposed to use concurrent dataflow as an innovative programming model to exploit extreme parallelism in exascale computers. The Swift/T component of the project reimplemented the Swift language from scratch to allow applications that compose scientific modules together to be build and run on available petascale computers (Blue Gene, Cray). Swift/T does this via a new compiler and runtime that generates and executes the application as an MPI program. We assume that mission-critical emerging exascale applications will be composed as scalable applications using existing software components, connected by data dependencies. Developers wrap native code fragments using a higherlevel language, then build composite applications to form a computational experiment. This exemplifies hierarchical concurrency: lower-level messaging libraries are used for fine-grained parallelism; highlevel control is used for inter-task coordination. These patterns are best expressed with dataflow, but static DAGs (i.e., other workflow languages) limit the applications that can be built; they do not provide the expressiveness of Swift, such as conditional execution, iteration, and recursive functions.

  2. How Tom Moon's research highlighted the question of glucose tolerance in carnivorous fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polakof, S; Panserat, S

    2016-09-01

    Fifteen years ago, Tom Moon wrote a review on this journal in order to propose some explanations to the exacerbated glycaemic response after a glucose load or a carbohydrate meal intake observed in fish, the so-called intolerance to glucose. Before, but in most of cases after this paper, several laboratories worldwide started to make important efforts in order to better understand this strange phenotype observed in fish and that so far seemed to belong to diabetic humans only. Tom had been worked on fish metabolism for at least 30years when he proposed that mini-review and the paths opened by him in 2001 were followed by tens of fish researchers, making this paper a breaking point on the field. Fifteen years later, we propose not only to have a look to the answers given to the questions rose in that paper, but also to summarize how his career over all these years impacted the domain of glucose metabolism in fish. In the review, we will show how Tom Moon analysed at different levels (from genes up to the whole organism), using distinct experimental tools (cells, hormone or glucose injection, pumps, drugs) the questions of glucose metabolism, tolerance and nutrition in fish species. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Aye-aye population genomic analyses highlight an important center of endemism in northern Madagascar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, George H; Louis, Edward E; Ratan, Aakrosh; Bedoya-Reina, Oscar C; Burhans, Richard C; Lei, Runhua; Johnson, Steig E; Schuster, Stephan C; Miller, Webb

    2013-04-09

    We performed a population genomics study of the aye-aye, a highly specialized nocturnal lemur from Madagascar. Aye-ayes have low population densities and extensive range requirements that could make this flagship species particularly susceptible to extinction. Therefore, knowledge of genetic diversity and differentiation among aye-aye populations is critical for conservation planning. Such information may also advance our general understanding of Malagasy biogeography, as aye-ayes have the largest species distribution of any lemur. We generated and analyzed whole-genome sequence data for 12 aye-ayes from three regions of Madagascar (North, West, and East). We found that the North population is genetically distinct, with strong differentiation from other aye-ayes over relatively short geographic distances. For comparison, the average FST value between the North and East aye-aye populations--separated by only 248 km--is over 2.1-times greater than that observed between human Africans and Europeans. This finding is consistent with prior watershed- and climate-based hypotheses of a center of endemism in northern Madagascar. Taken together, these results suggest a strong and long-term biogeographical barrier to gene flow. Thus, the specific attention that should be directed toward preserving large, contiguous aye-aye habitats in northern Madagascar may also benefit the conservation of other distinct taxonomic units. To help facilitate future ecological- and conservation-motivated population genomic analyses by noncomputational biologists, the analytical toolkit used in this study is available on the Galaxy Web site.

  4. Natural variation in Arabidopsis thaliana as a tool for highlighting differential drought responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oumaya Bouchabke

    Full Text Available To test whether natural variation in Arabidopsis could be used to dissect out the genetic basis of responses to drought stress, we characterised a number of accessions. Most of the accessions belong to a core collection that was shown to maximise the genetic diversity captured for a given number of individual accessions in Arabidopsis thaliana. We measured total leaf area (TLA, Electrolyte Leakage (EL, Relative Water Content (RWC, and Cut Rosette Water Loss (CRWL in control and mild water deficit conditions. A Principal Component Analysis revealed which traits explain most of the variation and showed that some accessions behave differently compared to the others in drought conditions, these included Ita-0, Cvi-0 and Shahdara. This study relied on genetic variation found naturally within the species, in which populations are assumed to be adapted to their environment. Overall, Arabidopsis thaliana showed interesting phenotypic variations in response to mild water deficit that can be exploited to identify genes and alleles important for this complex trait.

  5. Imaging gene expression in gene therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiebe, Leonard I.

    1997-01-01

    Full text. Gene therapy can be used to introduce new genes, or to supplement the function of indigenous genes. At the present time, however, there is non-invasive test to demonstrate efficacy of the gene transfer and expression processes. It has been postulated that scintigraphic imaging can offer unique information on both the site at which the transferred gene is expressed, and the degree of expression, both of which are critical issue for safety and clinical efficacy. Many current studies are based on 'suicide gene therapy' of cancer. Cells modified to express these genes commit metabolic suicide in the presence of an enzyme encoded by the transferred gene and a specifically-convertible pro drug. Pro drug metabolism can lead to selective metabolic trapping, required for scintigraphy. Herpes simplex virus type-1 thymidine kinase (H S V-1 t k + ) has been use for 'suicide' in vivo tumor gene therapy. It has been proposed that radiolabelled nucleosides can be used as radiopharmaceuticals to detect H S V-1 t k + gene expression where the H S V-1 t k + gene serves a reporter or therapeutic function. Animal gene therapy models have been studied using purine-([ 18 F]F H P G; [ 18 F]-A C V), and pyrimidine- ([ 123 / 131 I]I V R F U; [ 124 / 131I ]) antiviral nucleosides. Principles of gene therapy and gene therapy imaging will be reviewed and experimental data for [ 123 / 131I ]I V R F U imaging with the H S V-1 t k + reporter gene will be presented

  6. Imaging gene expression in gene therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiebe, Leonard I. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton (Canada). Noujaim Institute for Pharmaceutical Oncology Research

    1997-12-31

    Full text. Gene therapy can be used to introduce new genes, or to supplement the function of indigenous genes. At the present time, however, there is non-invasive test to demonstrate efficacy of the gene transfer and expression processes. It has been postulated that scintigraphic imaging can offer unique information on both the site at which the transferred gene is expressed, and the degree of expression, both of which are critical issue for safety and clinical efficacy. Many current studies are based on `suicide gene therapy` of cancer. Cells modified to express these genes commit metabolic suicide in the presence of an enzyme encoded by the transferred gene and a specifically-convertible pro drug. Pro drug metabolism can lead to selective metabolic trapping, required for scintigraphy. Herpes simplex virus type-1 thymidine kinase (H S V-1 t k{sup +}) has been use for `suicide` in vivo tumor gene therapy. It has been proposed that radiolabelled nucleosides can be used as radiopharmaceuticals to detect H S V-1 t k{sup +} gene expression where the H S V-1 t k{sup +} gene serves a reporter or therapeutic function. Animal gene therapy models have been studied using purine-([{sup 18} F]F H P G; [{sup 18} F]-A C V), and pyrimidine- ([{sup 123}/{sup 131} I]I V R F U; [{sup 124}/{sup 131I}]) antiviral nucleosides. Principles of gene therapy and gene therapy imaging will be reviewed and experimental data for [{sup 123}/{sup 131I}]I V R F U imaging with the H S V-1 t k{sup +} reporter gene will be presented

  7. Advances and highlights in allergen immunotherapy: On the way to sustained clinical and immunologic tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berings, Margot; Karaaslan, Cagatay; Altunbulakli, Can; Gevaert, Philippe; Akdis, Mübeccel; Bachert, Claus; Akdis, Cezmi A

    2017-11-01

    Allergen immunotherapy (AIT) is an effective treatment strategy for allergic diseases and has been used for more than 100 years. In recent years, however, the expectations on concepts, conduct, statistical evaluation, and reporting have developed significantly. Products have undergone dose-response and confirmative studies in adults and children to provide evidence for the optimal dosage, safety, and efficacy of AIT vaccines using subcutaneous and sublingual delivery pathways in large patient cohorts, ensuring solid conclusions to be drawn from them for the advantage of patients and societies alike. Those standards should be followed today, and products answering to them should be preferred over others lacking optimization and proof of efficacy and safety. Molecular and cellular mechanisms of AIT include early mast cell and basophil desensitization effects, regulation of T- and B-cell responses, regulation of IgE and IgG 4 production, and inhibition of responses from eosinophils, mast cells, and basophils in the affected tissues. There were many developments to improve vaccination strategies, demonstration of new molecules involved in molecular mechanisms, and demonstration of new biomarkers for AIT during the last few years. The combination of probiotics, vitamins, and biological agents with AIT is highlighting current advances. Development of allergoids and recombinant and hypoallergenic vaccines to skew the immune response from IgE to IgG 4 and regulation of dendritic cell, mast cell, basophil, innate lymphoid cell, T-cell, and B-cell responses to allergens are also discussed in detail. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Oxidation of metabolites highlights the microbial interactions and role of Acetobacter pasteurianus during cocoa bean fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moens, Frédéric; Lefeber, Timothy; De Vuyst, Luc

    2014-03-01

    Four cocoa-specific acetic acid bacterium (AAB) strains, namely, Acetobacter pasteurianus 386B, Acetobacter ghanensis LMG 23848(T), Acetobacter fabarum LMG 24244(T), and Acetobacter senegalensis 108B, were analyzed kinetically and metabolically during monoculture laboratory fermentations. A cocoa pulp simulation medium (CPSM) for AAB, containing ethanol, lactic acid, and mannitol, was used. All AAB strains differed in their ethanol and lactic acid oxidation kinetics, whereby only A. pasteurianus 386B performed a fast oxidation of ethanol and lactic acid into acetic acid and acetoin, respectively. Only A. pasteurianus 386B and A. ghanensis LMG 23848(T) oxidized mannitol into fructose. Coculture fermentations with A. pasteurianus 386B or A. ghanensis LMG 23848(T) and Lactobacillus fermentum 222 in CPSM for lactic acid bacteria (LAB) containing glucose, fructose, and citric acid revealed oxidation of lactic acid produced by the LAB strain into acetic acid and acetoin that was faster in the case of A. pasteurianus 386B. A triculture fermentation with Saccharomyces cerevisiae H5S5K23, L. fermentum 222, and A. pasteurianus 386B, using CPSM for LAB, showed oxidation of ethanol and lactic acid produced by the yeast and LAB strain, respectively, into acetic acid and acetoin. Hence, acetic acid and acetoin are the major end metabolites of cocoa bean fermentation. All data highlight that A. pasteurianus 386B displayed beneficial functional roles to be used as a starter culture, namely, a fast oxidation of ethanol and lactic acid, and that these metabolites play a key role as substrates for A. pasteurianus in its indispensable cross-feeding interactions with yeast and LAB during cocoa bean fermentation.

  9. Self-assessment of safety culture in nuclear installations. Highlights and good practices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-11-01

    This report summarizes the findings of two IAEA Technical Committee Meetings on Safety Culture Self-Assessment Highlights and Good Practices. The meetings took place on 3-5 June 1998 and 23-25 October 2000 in Vienna, and involved an international cross-section of representatives who participated both in plenary discussions and working groups. The purpose of the meetings was to discuss the practical implications of evolutionary changes in the development of safety culture, and to share international experience, particularly on the methods used for the assessment of safety culture and good practices for its enhancement in an organization. The working groups were allocated specific topics for discussion, which included the following: organizational factors influencing the implementation of actions to improve safety culture; how to measure, effectively, progress in implementing solutions to safety culture problems; the symptoms of a weakening safety culture; the suitability of different methods for assessing safety culture; the achievement of sustainable improvements in safety culture using the results of assessment; the potential threats to the continuation of a strong safety culture in an organization from the many challenges facing the nuclear industry. The working groups, when appropriate, considered issues from both the utility's and the regulator's perspectives. This report will be of interest to all organizations who wish to assess and achieve a strong and sustainable safety culture. This includes not only nuclear power plants, but also other sectors of the nuclear industry such as uranium mines and mills, nuclear fuel fabrication facilities, nuclear waste repositories, research reactors, accelerators, radiography facilities, etc. The report specifically supplements other IAEA publications on this subject

  10. Radiotelemetry and wildlife: Highlighting a gap in the knowledge on radiofrequency radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balmori, Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    Radio transmitters and associated devices may induce negative effects that can bias the results of ongoing research. The main documented effects of radio transmitters on animals include reduced survival, decreased productivity, changes in behaviour and movement patterns and a biased sex ratio. The only factors that have claimed responsibility for these possible damages are the weight of the radio transmitter and associated devices, and the attachment type. The electromagnetic radiation produced by radio transmitters has not been considered so far in research. There have been no studies evaluating the effects of non-ionising electromagnetic radiation (radiofrequency signals) necessary for tracking, although the problems found were significantly associated with the length of time that animals had been carrying their radio transmitters. Similar problems as those in radiotracked animals have been found in numerous studies with animals exposed to radiofrequency radiation for a sufficient amount of time. Laboratory scientists investigating the orientation of animals know they have to shield the place where experiments are performed to prevent interference from man-made radiation, as anthropogenic signals may distort the results. It is paradoxical that, at the same time, field scientists investigating the movements and other aspects of animal biology are providing animals with radio transmitters that emit the same type of radiation, since this may affect the results concerning their orientation and movement. This paper identifies gaps in the knowledge that should be investigated in-depth. The possibility that the radiofrequency radiation from radiotracking devices is responsible for the findings should be considered. Considering this factor may allow researchers to best understand the long-term effects found. - Highlights: • Radiotracking may induce negative effects that can bias the results. • Effects have been documented on survival, reproduction and behaviour.

  11. Comparative analysis of transposable elements highlights mobilome diversity and evolution in vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalopin, Domitille; Naville, Magali; Plard, Floriane; Galiana, Delphine; Volff, Jean-Nicolas

    2015-01-09

    Transposable elements (TEs) are major components of vertebrate genomes, with major roles in genome architecture and evolution. In order to characterize both common patterns and lineage-specific differences in TE content and TE evolution, we have compared the mobilomes of 23 vertebrate genomes, including 10 actinopterygian fish, 11 sarcopterygians, and 2 nonbony vertebrates. We found important variations in TE content (from 6% in the pufferfish tetraodon to 55% in zebrafish), with a more important relative contribution of TEs to genome size in fish than in mammals. Some TE superfamilies were found to be widespread in vertebrates, but most elements showed a more patchy distribution, indicative of multiple events of loss or gain. Interestingly, loss of major TE families was observed during the evolution of the sarcopterygian lineage, with a particularly strong reduction in TE diversity in birds and mammals. Phylogenetic trends in TE composition and activity were detected: Teleost fish genomes are dominated by DNA transposons and contain few ancient TE copies, while mammalian genomes have been predominantly shaped by nonlong terminal repeat retrotransposons, along with the persistence of older sequences. Differences were also found within lineages: The medaka fish genome underwent more recent TE amplification than the related platyfish, as observed for LINE retrotransposons in the mouse compared with the human genome. This study allows the identification of putative cases of horizontal transfer of TEs, and to tentatively infer the composition of the ancestral vertebrate mobilome. Taken together, the results obtained highlight the importance of TEs in the structure and evolution of vertebrate genomes, and demonstrate their major impact on genome diversity both between and within lineages. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  12. OSART programme highlights 1995-1996. Operational safety practices in nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-05-01

    The IAEA Operational Safety Review Team (OSART) programme provides advice and assistance to Member States in enhancing the operational safety of nuclear power plants. This report continues the practice of summarizing mission results so that all the aspects of OSART missions, Pre-OSART missions and good practices are to be found in one volume. It also includes results of follow-up visits. Attempts have been made in this report to highlight the most significant findings whilst retaining as much of the vital background information as possible. This report is in four parts: Part I summarizes the most significant observations made during the missions and follow-up visits during 1995-1996; Part II, in chronological order, is an overview of the major strengths and opportunities for improvement identified during each OSART mission and summaries of follow-up visits performed during the period; Part III lists good practices that were identified during 1995 and 1996; and Part IV presents the OSART mission results (OSMIR) database. Each part of the report is intended for different levels in operating and regulatory organizations but not exclusively so. Part I is primarily to the executive management level; Part II to middle managers; and Parts III and IV to those involved in operational experience feedback. Because of widely different plant designs, operating and management styles, cultural practices, and other factors affecting plant operations, no OSART findings were applicable to all of the plants visited in 1995 and 1996. Individual findings varied considerably in scope and significance. However, the findings do reflect some common strengths and opportunities for improvement

  13. Radiotelemetry and wildlife: Highlighting a gap in the knowledge on radiofrequency radiation effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balmori, Alfonso, E-mail: balmaral@jcyl.es

    2016-02-01

    Radio transmitters and associated devices may induce negative effects that can bias the results of ongoing research. The main documented effects of radio transmitters on animals include reduced survival, decreased productivity, changes in behaviour and movement patterns and a biased sex ratio. The only factors that have claimed responsibility for these possible damages are the weight of the radio transmitter and associated devices, and the attachment type. The electromagnetic radiation produced by radio transmitters has not been considered so far in research. There have been no studies evaluating the effects of non-ionising electromagnetic radiation (radiofrequency signals) necessary for tracking, although the problems found were significantly associated with the length of time that animals had been carrying their radio transmitters. Similar problems as those in radiotracked animals have been found in numerous studies with animals exposed to radiofrequency radiation for a sufficient amount of time. Laboratory scientists investigating the orientation of animals know they have to shield the place where experiments are performed to prevent interference from man-made radiation, as anthropogenic signals may distort the results. It is paradoxical that, at the same time, field scientists investigating the movements and other aspects of animal biology are providing animals with radio transmitters that emit the same type of radiation, since this may affect the results concerning their orientation and movement. This paper identifies gaps in the knowledge that should be investigated in-depth. The possibility that the radiofrequency radiation from radiotracking devices is responsible for the findings should be considered. Considering this factor may allow researchers to best understand the long-term effects found. - Highlights: • Radiotracking may induce negative effects that can bias the results. • Effects have been documented on survival, reproduction and behaviour.

  14. Karst system vadose zone hydrodynamics highlighted by an integrative geophysical and hydrogeological monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watlet, A.; Van Camp, M. J.; Francis, O.; Poulain, A.; Hallet, V.; Rochez, G.; Kaufmann, O.

    2015-12-01

    The vadose zone of karst systems plays an important role on the water dynamics. In particular, temporary perched aquifers can appear in the subsurface due to changes of climate conditions, diminished evapotranspiration and differences of porosity relative to deeper layers. It is therefore crucial, but challenging, to separate the hydrological signature of the vadose zone from the one of the saturated zone for understanding hydrological processes that occur in the vadose zone. Although many difficulties are usually encountered when studying karst environments due to their heterogeneities, cave systems offer an outstanding opportunity to investigate vadose zone from the inside with various techniques. We present results covering two years of hydrogeological and geophysical monitoring at the Rochefort Cave Laboratory (RCL), located in the Variscan fold-and-thrust belt (Belgium), a region that shows many karstic networks within Devonian limestone units. Hydrogeological data such as flows and levels monitoring or tracer tests performed in both vadose and saturated zones bring valuable information on the hydrological context of the studied area. Combining those results with geophysical measurements allows validating and imaging them with more integrative techniques. A microgravimetric monitoring involves a superconducting gravimeter continuously measuring at the surface of the RCL. Early in 2015, a second relative gravimeter was installed in the underlying cave system located 35 meters below the surface. This set up allows highlighting vadose gravity changes. These relative measurements are calibrated using an absolute gravimeter. 12 additional stations (7 at the surface, 5 in the cave) are monitored on a monthly basis by a spring gravimeter. To complete these gravimetric measurements, the site has been equipped with a permanent Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) monitoring system comprising an uncommon array of surface, borehole and cave electrodes. Although such

  15. Genetic analysis of complement C1s deficiency associated with systemic lupus erythematosus highlights alternative splicing of normal C1s gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amano, Mariane T; Ferriani, Virgínia P L; Florido, Marlene P C

    2008-01-01

    Deficiencies of complement proteins of the classical pathway are strongly associated with the development of autoimmune diseases. Deficiency of C1r has been observed to occur concomitantly with deficiency in C1s and 9 out of 15 reported cases presented systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Here, we...... describe a family in which all four children are deficient in C1s but only two of them developed SLE. Hemolytic activity mediated by the alternative and the lectin pathways were normal, but classical pathway activation was absent in all children's sera. C1s was undetectable, while in the parents' sera...

  16. Gene set analysis of GWAS data for human longevity highlights the relevance of the insulin/IGF-1 signaling and telomere maintenance pathways

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Deelen (Joris); H.-W. Uh; R. Monajemi (Ramin); D. van Heemst (Diana); P.E. Thijssen (Peter); S. Böhringer (Stefan); E.B. van den Akker (Erik); A.J.M. de Craen (Anton J.M.); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); R.G.J. Westendorp (Rudi); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); J.J. Goeman (Jelle); P.E. Slagboom (Eline); J.J. Houwing-Duistermaat (Jeanine); M. Beekman (Marian)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractIn genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of complex traits, single SNP analysis is still the most applied approach. However, the identified SNPs have small effects and provide limited biological insight. A more appropriate approach to interpret GWAS data of complex traits is to analyze

  17. Cross platform analysis of methylation, miRNA and stem cell gene expression data in germ cell tumors highlights characteristic differences by tumor histology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poynter, Jenny N.; Bestrashniy, Jessica R. B. M.; Silverstein, Kevin A. T.; Hooten, Anthony J.; Lees, Christopher; Ross, Julie A.; Tolar, Jakub

    2015-01-01

    Alterations in methylation patterns, miRNA expression, and stem cell protein expression occur in germ cell tumors (GCTs). Our goal is to integrate molecular data across platforms to identify molecular signatures in the three main histologic subtypes of Type I and Type II GCTs (yolk sac tumor (YST), germinoma, and teratoma). We included 39 GCTs and 7 paired adjacent tissue samples in the current analysis. Molecular data available for analysis include DNA methylation data (Illumina GoldenGate Cancer Methylation Panel I), miRNA expression (NanoString nCounter miRNA platform), and stem cell factor expression (SABiosciences Human Embryonic Stem Cell Array). We evaluated the cross platform correlations of the data features using the Maximum Information Coefficient (MIC). In analyses of individual datasets, differences were observed by tumor histology. Germinomas had higher expression of transcription factors maintaining stemness, while YSTs had higher expression of cytokines, endoderm and endothelial markers. We also observed differences in miRNA expression, with miR-371-5p, miR-122, miR-302a, miR-302d, and miR-373 showing elevated expression in one or more histologic subtypes. Using the MIC, we identified correlations across the data features, including six major hubs with higher expression in YST (LEFTY1, LEFTY2, miR302b, miR302a, miR 126, and miR 122) compared with other GCT. While prognosis for GCTs is overall favorable, many patients experience resistance to chemotherapy, relapse and/or long term adverse health effects following treatment. Targeted therapies, based on integrated analyses of molecular tumor data such as that presented here, may provide a way to secure high cure rates while reducing unintended health consequences

  18. An innovative way to highlight the power of each polymorphism on elite athletes phenotype expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Contrò

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine the probability of soccer players having the best genetic background that could increase performance, evaluating the polymorphism that are considered Performance Enhancing Polymorphism (PEPs distributed on five genes: PPARα, PPARGC1A, NRF2, ACE e CKMM. Particularly, we investigated how each polymorphism works directly or through another polymorphism to distinguish elite athletes from non-athletic population. Sixty professional soccer players (age 22.5 ± 2.2 and sixty healthy volunteers (age 21.2± 2.3 were enrolled. Samples of venous blood was used to prepare genomic DNA. The polymorphic sites were scanned using PCR-RFLP protocols with different enzyme. We used a multivariate logistic regression analysis to demonstrate an association between the five PEPs and elite phenotype. We found statistical significance in NRF2 (AG/GG genotype polymorphism/soccer players association (p<0.05 as well as a stronger association in ACE polymorphism (p=0.02. Particularly, we noticed that the ACE ID genotype and even more the II genotype are associated with soccer player phenotype. Although the other PEPs had no statistical significance, we proved that some of these may work indirectly, amplifying the effect of another polymorphism; for example, seems that PPARα could acts on NRF2 (GG enhancing the effect of the latter, notwithstanding it had not shown a statistical significance. In conclusion, to establish if a polymorphism can influence the performance, it is necessary to understand how they act and interact, directly and indirectly, on each other

  19. Molecular identification of GAPDHs in cassava highlights the antagonism of MeGAPCs and MeATG8s in plant disease resistance against cassava bacterial blight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Hongqiu; Xie, Yanwei; Liu, Guoyin; Lin, Daozhe; He, Chaozu; Shi, Haitao

    2018-06-01

    MeGAPCs were identified as negative regulators of plant disease resistance, and the interaction of MeGAPCs and MeATG8s was highlighted in plant defense response. As an important enzyme of glycolysis metabolic pathway, glyceraldehyde-3-P dehydrogenase (GAPDH) plays important roles in plant development, abiotic stress and immune responses. Cassava (Manihot esculenta) is most important tropical crop and one of the major food crops, however, no information is available about GAPDH gene family in cassava. In this study, 14 MeGAPDHs including 6 cytosol GAPDHs (MeGAPCs) were identified from cassava, and the transcripts of 14 MeGAPDHs in response to Xanthomonas axonopodis pv manihotis (Xam) indicated their possible involvement in immune responses. Further investigation showed that MeGAPCs are negative regulators of disease resistance against Xam. Through transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana, we found that overexpression of MeGAPCs led to decreased disease resistance against Xam. On the contrary, MeGAPCs-silenced cassava plants through virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) conferred improved disease resistance. Notably, MeGAPCs physically interacted with autophagy-related protein 8b (MeATG8b) and MeATG8e and inhibited autophagic activity. Moreover, MeATG8b and MeATG8e negatively regulated the activities of NAD-dependent MeGAPDHs, and are involved in MeGAPCs-mediated disease resistance. Taken together, this study highlights the involvement of MeGAPCs in plant disease resistance, through interacting with MeATG8b and MeATG8e.

  20. Gene Therapy with the Sleeping Beauty Transposon System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kebriaei, Partow; Izsvák, Zsuzsanna; Narayanavari, Suneel A; Singh, Harjeet; Ivics, Zoltán

    2017-11-01

    The widespread clinical implementation of gene therapy requires the ability to stably integrate genetic information through gene transfer vectors in a safe, effective, and economical manner. The latest generation of Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon vectors fulfills these requirements, and may overcome limitations associated with viral gene transfer vectors and transient nonviral gene delivery approaches that are prevalent in ongoing clinical trials. The SB system enables high-level stable gene transfer and sustained transgene expression in multiple primary human somatic cell types, thereby representing a highly attractive gene transfer strategy for clinical use. Here, we review the most important aspects of using SB for gene therapy, including vectorization as well as genomic integration features. We also illustrate the path to successful clinical implementation by highlighting the application of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-modified T cells in cancer immunotherapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.