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Sample records for congenital muscle dystrophy

  1. Muscle-Eye-Brain Disease; a Rare Form of Syndromic Congenital Muscular Dystrophy

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    Gosal Gurinder S

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Congenital muscular dystrophy (CMD is a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by muscular hypotonia since birth and the histologic features of muscular dystrophy. Syndromic congenital muscular dystrophies are clinically similar autosomal recessive disorders characterized by congenital muscular dystrophy, lissencephaly, and eye anomalies. We present a case of a rare form of syndromic congenital muscular dystrophy in an eight year old girl, born of first- degree consanguinity. She had: global developmental delay; a seizure disorder; hypotonia; progressive muscle contractures including bilateral symmetrical flexion contractures of hips, knees, equinus contracture and thoracolumbar scoliosis; diminished deep tendon reflexes: bilateral premature cataract; pseudophakia; and nystagmus. The patient was also highly myopic. Based on clinical features, muscle biopsy and MRI of the brain, a diagnosis of muscle- eye- brain disease was made. Identification of these patients may help to prevent this crippling disorder in the future siblings of probands by utilizing genetic counselling and mutation analysis.

  2. Congenital muscle dystrophy and diet consistency affect mouse skull shape differently.

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    Spassov, Alexander; Toro-Ibacache, Viviana; Krautwald, Mirjam; Brinkmeier, Heinrich; Kupczik, Kornelius

    2017-11-01

    The bones of the mammalian skull respond plastically to changes in masticatory function. However, the extent to which muscle function affects the growth and development of the skull, whose regions have different maturity patterns, remains unclear. Using muscle dissection and 3D landmark-based geometric morphometrics we investigated the effect of changes in muscle function established either before or after weaning, on skull shape and muscle mass in adult mice. We compared temporalis and masseter mass and skull shape in mice with a congenital muscle dystrophy (mdx) and wild type (wt) mice fed on either a hard or a soft diet. We found that dystrophy and diet have distinct effects on the morphology of the skull and the masticatory muscles. Mdx mice show a flattened neurocranium with a more dorsally displaced foramen magnum and an anteriorly placed mandibular condyle compared with wt mice. Compared with hard diet mice, soft diet mice had lower masseter mass and a face with more gracile features as well as labially inclined incisors, suggesting reduced bite strength. Thus, while the early-maturing neurocranium and the posterior portion of the mandible are affected by the congenital dystrophy, the late-maturing face including the anterior part of the mandible responds to dietary differences irrespective of the mdx mutation. Our study confirms a hierarchical, tripartite organisation of the skull (comprising neurocranium, face and mandible) with a modular division based on development and function. Moreover, we provide further experimental evidence that masticatory loading is one of the main environmental stimuli that generate craniofacial variation. © 2017 Anatomical Society.

  3. Genetics Home Reference: Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy

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    ... with mental retardation Muscular dystrophy, congenital, Fukuyama type Muscular dystrophy, congenital, with central nervous system involvement Polymicrogyria with muscular dystrophy Related Information How ...

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound and real-time ultrasound elastography of the thigh muscles in congenital muscle dystrophy

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    Drakonaki, Eleni E. [University of Crete, Radiology Department, Heraklion (Greece); Allen, Gina M. [Green Templeton College, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2010-04-15

    Congenital muscle dystrophy includes a range of genetic disorders characterized by muscle weakness and contractures. We report the magnetic resonance (MR), ultrasound (US) and real-time sonoelastography (RTE) imaging findings of the thigh muscles of a 15-year-old boy with Bethlem myopathy diagnosed with clinical, electromyographic and histopathological criteria. Ultrasound and MR showed hyperechoic appearance and high signal intensity on T1- and T2-weighted sequences respectively at the periphery of the vastus lateralis and the long head of the biceps femoris muscles, and at a central area within the rectus femoris muscles. RTE was employed to examine the elastic properties of the muscle. The elastograms were presented as colour-coded maps superimposed on the B-mode images and revealed that the elastographic pattern correlated with the MR and US pattern of involvement. The abnormal muscle areas were stiffer (blue) than the normal-appearing areas (green), a finding that probably correlates with the presence of dystrophic collagen at the affected areas. This report suggests that RTE could be used as an additional imaging tool to evaluate the pattern of muscle changes in congenital myopathy. Further studies are needed to investigate the specificity and clinical value of RTE in the diagnosis and monitoring of neuromuscular disease. (orig.)

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound and real-time ultrasound elastography of the thigh muscles in congenital muscle dystrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drakonaki, Eleni E.; Allen, Gina M.

    2010-01-01

    Congenital muscle dystrophy includes a range of genetic disorders characterized by muscle weakness and contractures. We report the magnetic resonance (MR), ultrasound (US) and real-time sonoelastography (RTE) imaging findings of the thigh muscles of a 15-year-old boy with Bethlem myopathy diagnosed with clinical, electromyographic and histopathological criteria. Ultrasound and MR showed hyperechoic appearance and high signal intensity on T1- and T2-weighted sequences respectively at the periphery of the vastus lateralis and the long head of the biceps femoris muscles, and at a central area within the rectus femoris muscles. RTE was employed to examine the elastic properties of the muscle. The elastograms were presented as colour-coded maps superimposed on the B-mode images and revealed that the elastographic pattern correlated with the MR and US pattern of involvement. The abnormal muscle areas were stiffer (blue) than the normal-appearing areas (green), a finding that probably correlates with the presence of dystrophic collagen at the affected areas. This report suggests that RTE could be used as an additional imaging tool to evaluate the pattern of muscle changes in congenital myopathy. Further studies are needed to investigate the specificity and clinical value of RTE in the diagnosis and monitoring of neuromuscular disease. (orig.)

  6. Distinct Fiber Type Signature in Mouse Muscles Expressing a Mutant Lamin A Responsible for Congenital Muscular Dystrophy in a Patient

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    Alice Barateau

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Specific mutations in LMNA, which encodes nuclear intermediate filament proteins lamins A/C, affect skeletal muscle tissues. Early-onset LMNA myopathies reveal different alterations of muscle fibers, including fiber type disproportion or prominent dystrophic and/or inflammatory changes. Recently, we identified the p.R388P LMNA mutation as responsible for congenital muscular dystrophy (L-CMD and lipodystrophy. Here, we asked whether viral-mediated expression of mutant lamin A in murine skeletal muscles would be a pertinent model to reveal specific muscle alterations. We found that the total amount and size of muscle fibers as well as the extent of either inflammation or muscle regeneration were similar to wildtype or mutant lamin A. In contrast, the amount of fast oxidative muscle fibers containing myosin heavy chain IIA was lower upon expression of mutant lamin A, in correlation with lower expression of genes encoding transcription factors MEF2C and MyoD. These data validate this in vivo model for highlighting distinct muscle phenotypes associated with different lamin contexts. Additionally, the data suggest that alteration of muscle fiber type identity may contribute to the mechanisms underlying physiopathology of L-CMD related to R388P mutant lamin A.

  7. Aberrant Myokine Signaling in Congenital Myotonic Dystrophy

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    Masayuki Nakamori

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Myotonic dystrophy types 1 (DM1 and 2 (DM2 are dominantly inherited neuromuscular disorders caused by a toxic gain of function of expanded CUG and CCUG repeats, respectively. Although both disorders are clinically similar, congenital myotonic dystrophy (CDM, a severe DM form, is found only in DM1. CDM is also characterized by muscle fiber immaturity not observed in adult DM, suggesting specific pathological mechanisms. Here, we revealed upregulation of the interleukin-6 (IL-6 myokine signaling pathway in CDM muscles. We also found a correlation between muscle immaturity and not only IL-6 expression but also expanded CTG repeat length and CpG methylation status upstream of the repeats. Aberrant CpG methylation was associated with transcriptional dysregulation at the repeat locus, increasing the toxic RNA burden that upregulates IL-6. Because the IL-6 pathway is involved in myocyte maturation and muscle atrophy, our results indicate that enhanced RNA toxicity contributes to severe CDM phenotypes through aberrant IL-6 signaling. : Congenital myotonic dystrophy (CDM manifests characteristic genetic (very large CTG repeat expansions, epigenetic (CpG hypermethylation upstream of the repeat, and phenotypic (muscle immaturity features not seen in adult DM. Nakamori et al. find phenotype-genotype and epigenotype correlation in CDM muscle and reveal involvement of the IL-6 myokine signaling pathway in the disease process. Keywords: CTCF, ER stress, IL-6, muscular dystrophy, NF-κB, trinucleotide, cytokine, splicing

  8. A neonate with congenital myotonic dystrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itani, Yasufumi; Anbo, Kazutoshi; Kashiwagi, Sigeru; Yokoya, Susumu; Kato, Kazuo

    1984-01-01

    A boy's neonate with congenital myotonic dystrophy who had difficulty in breathing immediately after birth was reported. A long-term management for artificial breathing was required because of a marked decrease of muscular tone, equinus and the difficulty in sucking milk. Myogenic pattern was seen on EMG and atrophied type I fibers and increased number of type 2 C fibers suggesting the prolongation of differentiation of muscle fibers were seen by muscle biopsy. Cranial CT revealed a marked atrophy of the cerebral cortex and low density area in the white matter, although the latter disappeared 4 months later. (Namekawa, K.)

  9. CONGENITAL MYOTONIC DYSTROPHY – CASE REPORT

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    David Neubauer

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Background. Myotonic dystrophy is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. It is characterized by myotonia, myopathy of voluntary and involuntary muscles, frontal baldness in men, cardiac conduction abnormalities, catharacts, intellectual deterioration and endocrinopathy. Men with this disorder have often gonadal atrophy and infertility. On the other hand women are generally fertile. During pregnancy their myopathy worsens, often causing severe obstetrical complications. Their children may develop congenital form of the disease with signs of myopathy in utero and have great difficulties in maintaining life functions after birth, together with other characteristical signs of this form: bilateral facial weakness, severe hypotonia, feeding difficulties, talipes equinovarus and mental retardation. The authors present a female newborn with such congenital form of myotonic dystrophy.Conclusions. The authors have emphasized the importance of medical history, regular updating of all the cases of neuromuscular diseases in the region and clinical characteristics for the recognition of congenital form of myotonic dystrophy because of possible prenatal diagnostics and better antenatal and postantal care.

  10. Laminin-111 protein therapy reduces muscle pathology and improves viability of a mouse model of merosin-deficient congenital muscular dystrophy.

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    Rooney, Jachinta E; Knapp, Jolie R; Hodges, Bradley L; Wuebbles, Ryan D; Burkin, Dean J

    2012-04-01

    Merosin-deficient congenital muscular dystrophy type 1A (MDC1A) is a lethal muscle-wasting disease that is caused by mutations in the LAMA2 gene, resulting in the loss of laminin-α2 protein. MDC1A patients exhibit severe muscle weakness from birth, are confined to a wheelchair, require ventilator assistance, and have reduced life expectancy. There are currently no effective treatments or cures for MDC1A. Laminin-α2 is required for the formation of heterotrimeric laminin-211 (ie, α2, β1, and γ1) and laminin-221 (ie, α2, β2, and γ1), which are major constituents of skeletal muscle basal lamina. Laminin-111 (ie, α1, β1, and γ1) is the predominant laminin isoform in embryonic skeletal muscle and supports normal skeletal muscle development in laminin-α2-deficient muscle but is absent from adult skeletal muscle. In this study, we determined whether treatment with Engelbreth-Holm-Swarm-derived mouse laminin-111 protein could rescue MDC1A in the dy(W-/-) mouse model. We demonstrate that laminin-111 protein systemically delivered to the muscles of laminin-α2-deficient mice prevents muscle pathology, improves muscle strength, and dramatically increases life expectancy. Laminin-111 also prevented apoptosis in laminin-α2-deficient mouse muscle and primary human MDC1A myogenic cells, which indicates a conserved mechanism of action and cross-reactivity between species. Our results demonstrate that laminin-111 can serve as an effective protein substitution therapy for the treatment of muscular dystrophy in the dy(W-/-) mouse model and establish the potential for its use in the treatment of MDC1A. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Study on the findings of muscle CT in patients with Fukuyama type congenital muscular dystrophy (FCMD)

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    Sumida, Sawako; Osawa, Makiko; Okada, Noriko and others

    1988-11-01

    This study was carried out to investigate the process of muscle involvement according to age in patients with FCMD (Brain Dev 1981 ; 3:1 - 29) by CT scans. Fourteen patients with FCMD I (age: 5 months-12 years) and two patients with FCMD III or IV (age: 3, 4 years) were studied. The midcalf, midthigh, L3 and shoulder girdle level were the sites chosen. Two types of change were found in FCMD I. One of them was the attenuation of the density in muscle and the other one was decreased area of muscle as a result of low density which started from periphery of the muscle. The latter was found in m. psoas major after age 9, whilst the former was found in other muscles to some degree. The severity of the changes was related to age. In the case which was examined twice, the changes extended even better motor function had been attained. The changes in midcalf preceded those in midthigh, L3, shoulder girdle. The attenuation of density was found early and severely in m. triceps surae, m. adductor magnus, paravertebral muscles and m. subscapularis, whilst those in m. tibialis anterior and posterior, m. gracilis, m. sartorius, m. quadratus lumborum appeared later and relatively mild. The relationship between the process of extension of low density in muscle and joint contractures were also discussed. The changes in CT scan in FCMD III or IV were milder than those of FCMD I and there was no tendency that the change in midcalf preceded those of other scanned level.

  12. Congenital muscular dystrophies--problems of classification.

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    Lenard, H G

    1991-04-01

    The classification of congenital muscular dystrophies (CMD), based on perceived clinical and morphological similarities or differences, is controversial. CMD without cerebral involvement has sometimes been divided into a mild and a severe form. This distinction is, however, arbitrary and not uncontested. Whether Ullrich's disease, formerly called atonic-sclerotic dystrophy, is a disease entity and if so, whether it is a primary muscle disorder, is uncertain. CMD without cerebral involvement is inherited in an autosomal recessive fashion in the great majority of cases. CMDs with cerebral involvement are usually classified into at least three forms: the Fukuyama type of CMD, occurring almost exclusively in Japanese patients; CMD with hypomyelination, sometimes also called the occidental type of cerebromuscular dystrophy; and Walker-Warburg syndrome. Muscle-eye-brain disease, described in a number of Finnish patients, may or may not belong in this last category. In CMD with cerebral involvement inheritance is also autosomal recessive. It is possible that single sporadic cases are phenocopies due to infectious or other exogenous causes. Reports of clinical and morphological findings from an increasing number of patients show a high degree of variability within and, on the other hand, certain similarities between the forms of CMD with cerebral involvement. In addition, neuroradiological changes are also found with increasing frequency in CMD patients without clinical neuropsychological abnormalities. It is not unreasonable to speculate that molecular genetic techniques will reveal in the near future a variable defect in one gene locus or defects in a few gene loci as the cause of the various clinical forms of CMDs.

  13. Myotonic Muscular Dystrophy

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    ... Marie-Tooth Disease (CMT) Congenital Muscular Dystrophy (CMD) Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) Emery-Dreifuss Muscular Dystrophy Endocrine Myopathies Metabolic Diseases of Muscle Mitochondrial Myopathies (MM) Myotonic Dystrophy (DM) Spinal-Bulbar ...

  14. Secondary reduction of alpha7B integrin in laminin alpha2 deficient congenital muscular dystrophy supports an additional transmembrane link in skeletal muscle.

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    Cohn, R D; Mayer, U; Saher, G; Herrmann, R; van der Flier, A; Sonnenberg, A; Sorokin, L; Voit, T

    1999-03-01

    The integrins are a large family of heterodimeric transmembrane cellular receptors which mediate the association between the extracellular matrix (ECM) and cytoskeletal proteins. The alpha7beta1 integrin is a major laminin binding integrin in skeletal and cardiac muscle and is thought to be involved in myogenic differentiation and migration processes. The main binding partners of the alpha7 integrin are laminin-1 (alpha1-beta1-gamma1), laminin-2 (alpha2-beta1-gamma1) and laminin-4 (alpha2-beta2-gamma1). Targeted deletion of the gene for the alpha7 integrin subunit (ITGA7) in mice leads to a novel form of muscular dystrophy. In the present study we have investigated the expression of two alternative splice variants, the alpha7B and beta1D integrin subunits, in normal human skeletal muscle, as well as in various forms of muscular dystrophy. In normal human skeletal muscle the expression of the alpha7 integrin subunit appeared to be developmentally regulated: it was first detected at 2 years of age. In contrast, the beta1D integrin could be detected in immature and mature muscle in the sarcolemma of normal fetal skeletal muscle at 18 weeks gestation. The expression of alpha7B integrin was significantly reduced at the sarcolemma in six patients with laminin alpha2 chain deficient congenital muscular dystrophy (CMD) (age >2 years). However, this reduction was not correlated with the amount of laminin alpha2 chain expressed. In contrast, the expression of the laminin alpha2 chain was not altered in the skeletal muscle of the alpha7 knock-out mice. These data argue in favor that there is not a tight correlation between the expression of the alpha7 integrin subunit and that of the laminin alpha2 chain in either human or murine dystrophic muscle. Interestingly, in dystrophinopathies (Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy; DMD/BMD) expression of alpha7B was upregulated irrespective of the level of dystrophin expression as shown by a strong sarcolemmal staining pattern even

  15. Impaired fetal muscle development and JAK-STAT activation mark disease onset and progression in a mouse model for merosin-deficient congenital muscular dystrophy.

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    Nunes, Andreia M; Wuebbles, Ryan D; Sarathy, Apurva; Fontelonga, Tatiana M; Deries, Marianne; Burkin, Dean J; Thorsteinsdóttir, Sólveig

    2017-06-01

    Merosin-deficient congenital muscular dystrophy type 1A (MDC1A) is a dramatic neuromuscular disease in which crippling muscle weakness is evident from birth. Here, we use the dyW mouse model for human MDC1A to trace the onset of the disease during development in utero. We find that myotomal and primary myogenesis proceed normally in homozygous dyW-/- embryos. Fetal dyW-/- muscles display the same number of myofibers as wildtype (WT) muscles, but by E18.5 dyW-/- muscles are significantly smaller and muscle size is not recovered post-natally. These results suggest that fetal dyW-/- myofibers fail to grow at the same rate as WT myofibers. Consistent with this hypothesis between E17.5 and E18.5 dyW-/- muscles display a dramatic drop in the number of Pax7- and myogenin-positive cells relative to WT muscles, suggesting that dyW-/- muscles fail to generate enough muscle cells to sustain fetal myofiber growth. Gene expression analysis of dyW-/- E17.5 muscles identified a significant increase in the expression of the JAK-STAT target gene Pim1 and muscles from 2-day and 3-week old dyW-/- mice demonstrate a dramatic increase in pSTAT3 relative to WT muscles. Interestingly, myotubes lacking integrin α7β1, a laminin-receptor, also show a significant increase in pSTAT3 levels compared with WT myotubes, indicating that α7β1 can act as a negative regulator of STAT3 activity. Our data reveal for the first time that dyW-/- mice exhibit a myogenesis defect already in utero. We propose that overactivation of JAK-STAT signaling is part of the mechanism underlying disease onset and progression in dyW-/- mice. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy (LGMD)

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    ... Marie-Tooth Disease (CMT) Congenital Muscular Dystrophy (CMD) Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) Emery-Dreifuss Muscular Dystrophy Endocrine Myopathies Metabolic Diseases of Muscle Mitochondrial Myopathies (MM) Myotonic Dystrophy (DM) Spinal-Bulbar ...

  17. A study on the findings of muscle CT in patients with Fukuyama type congenital muscular dystrophy (FCMD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumida, Sawako; Osawa, Makiko; Okada, Noriko

    1988-01-01

    This study was carried out to investigate the process of muscle involvement according to age in patients with FCMD (Brain Dev 1981 ; 3:1 - 29) by CT scans. Fourteen patients with FCMD I (age: 5 months-12 years) and two patients with FCMD III or IV (age: 3, 4 years) were studied. The midcalf, midthigh, L3 and shoulder girdle level were the sites chosen. Two types of change were found in FCMD I. One of them was the attenuation of the density in muscle and the other one was decreased area of muscle as a result of low density which started from periphery of the muscle. The latter was found in m. psoas major after age 9, whilst the former was found in other muscles to some degree. The severity of the changes was related to age. In the case which was examined twice, the changes extended even better motor function had been attained. The changes in midcalf preceded those in midthigh, L3, shoulder girdle. The attenuation of density was found early and severely in m. triceps surae, m. adductor magnus, paravertebral muscles and m. subscapularis, whilst those in m. tibialis anterior and posterior, m. gracilis, m. sartorius, m. quadratus lumborum appeared later and relatively mild. The relationship between the process of extension of low density in muscle and joint contractures were also discussed. The changes in CT scan in FCMD III or IV were milder than those of FCMD I and there was no tendency that the change in midcalf preceded those of other scanned level. (author)

  18. Merosin-deficient congenital muscular dystrophy. Partial genetic correction in two mouse models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuang, W; Xu, H; Vachon, P H

    1998-01-01

    Humans and mice with deficiency of the alpha2 subunit of the basement membrane protein laminin-2/merosin suffer from merosin-deficient congenital muscular dystrophy (MCMD). We have expressed a human laminin alpha2 chain transgene under the regulation of a muscle-specific creatine kinase promoter...

  19. Nonmuscular involvement in merosin-negative congenital muscular dystrophy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gilhuis, H.J.; Donkelaar, H.J. ten; Tanke, R.B.; Vingerhoets, D.M.; Zwarts, M.J.; Verrips, A.; Gabreëls, F.J.M.

    2002-01-01

    The spectrum of nonmuscular involvement in six children with merosin-negative congenital muscular dystrophy is described. In all children, biochemical, neuroradiologic, cardiac, and neurophysiologic studies were performed. Cerebral structures that were myelinated at gestation, including internal

  20. Non-Coding RNAs in Muscle Dystrophies

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    Alessandra Ferlini

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available ncRNAs are the most recently identified class of regulatory RNAs with vital functions in gene expression regulation and cell development. Among the variety of roles they play, their involvement in human diseases has opened new avenues of research towards the discovery and development of novel therapeutic approaches. Important data come from the field of hereditary muscle dystrophies, like Duchenne muscle dystrophy and Myotonic dystrophies, rare diseases affecting 1 in 7000–15,000 newborns and is characterized by severe to mild muscle weakness associated with cardiac involvement. Novel therapeutic approaches are now ongoing for these diseases, also based on splicing modulation. In this review we provide an overview about ncRNAs and their behavior in muscular dystrophy and explore their links with diagnosis, prognosis and treatments, highlighting the role of regulatory RNAs in these pathologies.

  1. MR imaging of fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy; a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Jeong Hyun; Kim, Yoo Kyung; Koo, Hae Soo; Park, Ki Deuk

    2000-01-01

    Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy is a genetic disease and common in Japan. The typical clinical features are hypotonia with an early infantile onset and severe developmental delay. The diagnosis is based on pathologic evidence of muscular dystrophy revealed by biopsy or an increased serum creatine kinase levels. Involvement of the brain is characterized by abnormal cerebral cortical dysplasia, cerebellar dysplasia, and white matter changes. We encountered a case of Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy in which brain MRI findings were typical, and present this case together with a review of the literature

  2. Respiratory muscle training in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    OpenAIRE

    Rodillo, E; Noble-Jamieson, C M; Aber, V; Heckmatt, J Z; Muntoni, F; Dubowitz, V

    1989-01-01

    Twenty two boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy were entered into a randomised double blind crossover trial to compare respiratory muscle training with a Triflow II inspirometer and 'placebo' training with a mini peak flow meter. Supine posture was associated with significantly impaired lung function, but respiratory muscle training showed no benefit.

  3. [Central Nervous Involvement in Patients with Fukuyama Congenital Muscular Dystrophy].

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    Ishigaki, Keiko

    2016-02-01

    Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy (FCMD), the second most common muscular dystrophy in the Japanese population, is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the fukutin (FKTN) gene. The main features of FCMD are a combination of infantile-onset hypotonia, generalized muscle weakness, eye abnormalities and central nervous system involvement with mental retardation and seizures associated with cortical migration defects. The FKTN gene product is thought to be necessary for maintaining migrating neurons in an immature state during migration, and for supporting migration via α-dystroglycan in the central nervous system. Typical magnetic resonance imaging findings in FCMD patients are cobblestone lissencephaly and cerebellar cystic lesions. White matter abnormalities with hyperintensity on T(2)-weighted images are seen especially in younger patients and those with severe phenotypes. Most FCMD patients are mentally retarded and the level is moderate to severe, with IQs ranging from 30 to 50. In our recent study, 62% of patients developed seizures. Among them, 71% had only febrile seizures, 6% had afebrile seizures from the onset, and 22% developed afebrile seizures following febrile seizures. Most patients had seizures that were controllable with just 1 type of antiepileptic drug, but 18% had intractable seizures that must be treated with 3 medications.

  4. Importance of Skin Changes in the Differential Diagnosis of Congenital Muscular Dystrophies

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    Uluç Yis

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Megaconial congenital muscular dystrophy (OMIM 602541 is characterized with early-onset hypotonia, muscle wasting, proximal weakness, cardiomyopathy, mildly elevated serum creatine kinase (CK levels, and mild-to-moderate intellectual disability. We report two siblings in a consanguineous family admitted for psychomotor delay. Physical examination revealed proximal muscle weakness, contractures in the knee of elder sibling, diffuse mild generalized muscle atrophy, and dry skin with ichthyosis together with multiple nummular eczema in both siblings. Serum CK values were elevated up to 500 U/L. For genetic work-up, we performed whole exome sequencing (WES after Nimblegen enrichment on the Illumina platform. The WES revealed a novel homozygous missense mutation in the Choline Kinase-Beta (CHKB gene c.1031G>A (p.R344Q in exon 9. Ichthyosis-like skin changes with intense pruritus and nummular eczema may lead to clinical diagnosis in cases with megaconial congenital muscular dystrophy.

  5. Fukuyama type congenital muscular dystrophy with unusual features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Hideo; Oguni, Hirokazu; Osawa, Makiko; Suzuki, Haruko; Fukuyama, Yukio

    1980-01-01

    The Fukuyama type congenital muscular dystrophy (F-CMD) has been generally recognized as a well delineated subgroup of progressive muscular dystrophy (PMD) with uniform clinical, pathological, and genetic features. However, there are still debate to be solved as to the etiology of the condition, because several neuropathological findings found in F-CMD brain allowed some investigators to hypothesize the intrauterine infection to be a primary causation. The authors reported here two families with two affected siblings in each. In the pedigree A, consanguineous parents produced two sisters, Case 1 (3-year-old) and Case 2 (14-month-old). Two patients in the pedigree B, the products of non-consanguineous parents, Case 3 (4-month-old male) and his elder sister already decreased, were affected with F-CMD and infantile spasms. In all cases, generalized weakness and hypotonia had been remarkable since their early infancy, and muscle atrophy, myopathic facies multiple joint contractures and mental dullness became evident gradually. The above-mentioned clinical features as well as laboratory findings including elevated serum CPK and myogenic EMG were compatible with those of typical F-CMD. However, they were characterized by the following three unusual features. 1. Muscle biopsy: In addition to an overwhelming myogenic change, there was a distinct inflammatory cell infiltration in all cases, and scattered small groups of atrophic fibers were present in Case 2. 2. Brain CT scanning: A symmetrical and extensive low density area was observed in the cerebral white matter in all cases. 3. A favorable response to prednisolone therapy was noted in all cases. (author)

  6. Muscle MRI findings in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy

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    Gerevini, Simonetta; Caliendo, Giandomenico; Falini, Andrea [IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Neuroradiology Unit, Head and Neck Department, Milan (Italy); Scarlato, Marina; Previtali, Stefano Carlo [IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Department of Neurology, INSPE and Division of Neuroscience, Milan (Italy); Maggi, Lorenzo; Pasanisi, Barbara; Morandi, Lucia [Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Neurologico ' ' Carlo Besta' ' , Neuromuscular Diseases and Neuroimmunology Unit, Milan (Italy); Cava, Mariangela [IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Department of Radiology and Center for Experimental Imaging, Milan (Italy)

    2016-03-15

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is characterized by extremely variable degrees of facial, scapular and lower limb muscle involvement. Clinical and genetic determination can be difficult, as molecular analysis is not always definitive, and other similar muscle disorders may have overlapping clinical manifestations. Whole-body muscle MRI examination for fat infiltration, atrophy and oedema was performed to identify specific patterns of muscle involvement in FSHD patients (30 subjects), and compared to a group of control patients (23) affected by other myopathies (NFSHD). In FSHD patients, we detected a specific pattern of muscle fatty replacement and atrophy, particularly in upper girdle muscles. The most frequently affected muscles, including paucisymptomatic and severely affected FSHD patients, were trapezius, teres major and serratus anterior. Moreover, asymmetric muscle involvement was significantly higher in FSHD as compared to NFSHD patients. In conclusion, muscle MRI is very sensitive for identifying a specific pattern of involvement in FSHD patients and in detecting selective muscle involvement of non-clinically testable muscles. Muscle MRI constitutes a reliable tool for differentiating FSHD from other muscular dystrophies to direct diagnostic molecular analysis, as well as to investigate FSHD natural history and follow-up of the disease. (orig.)

  7. Cardiac Complications of Fukuyama-Type Congenital Muscular Dystrophy

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    J Gordon Millichap

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available The course of left ventricular function was evaluated using M-mode and Doppler echocardiography in 34 patients with Fukuyama-type congenital muscular dystrophy (FCMD, in a study at the Tokyo Women’s Medical University, Tokyo, Japan.

  8. Neuroimaging study of Fukuyama type congenital muscular dystrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murasugi, Hiroko

    1992-01-01

    Fukuyama type congenital muscular dystrophy (FCMD) has been attracting attention in recent years because of its brain malformation and progressive muscular dystrophy. The intravitam recognition of brain malformation has been remarkably enhanced by the advent of noninvasive neuroimaging techniques such as CT and MRI. In this study, 87 cranial CT scans and 22 MRIs of the brain, carried out on 60 patients with FCMD, were systematically surveyed, and the correlation between neuroradiological findings and clinical disabilities, and, in two autopsy cases, neuropathological findings was evaluated. Four cases of lissencephalic, 29 of pachygyric, and one of polymicrogyric (suspected) brain surface, and 2 normal brain surfaces were recognized. The patients with lissencephalic brain surface were compared using Dobyns' criteria. Grading of pachygyria was judged as bilateral II in 52% of cases and bilateral I in 48%. The surface of the occipital lobe could not be confirmed with either CT or MRI. Polymicrogyria was suspected using MRI but could not confirmed with CT. Five caces of lissencephaly had never learned any meaningful words and all but one were bedridden because of poor head control. The abilities of patients were better when the grading of pachygyria was milder. Mental disability and peak motor function correlate more closely with the degree and extent of brain malformation than with muscle degeneration. The decrease in radiodensity in the white matter was remarkable in 12 out of 19 cases (63%), and was usually bilaterally symmetrical. An increase in radiodensity in the white matter with age was observed in 3 patients. The rate of myelination was slower than normal in 3 out of the 6 cases. (author)

  9. Neuroimaging study of Fukuyama type congenital muscular dystrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murasugi, Hiroko (Tokyo Women' s Medical Coll. (Japan))

    1992-11-01

    Fukuyama type congenital muscular dystrophy (FCMD) has been attracting attention in recent years because of its brain malformation and progressive muscular dystrophy. The intravitam recognition of brain malformation has been remarkably enhanced by the advent of noninvasive neuroimaging techniques such as CT and MRI. In this study, 87 cranial CT scans and 22 MRIs of the brain, carried out on 60 patients with FCMD, were systematically surveyed, and the correlation between neuroradiological findings and clinical disabilities, and, in two autopsy cases, neuropathological findings was evaluated. Four cases of lissencephalic, 29 of pachygyric, and one of polymicrogyric (suspected) brain surface, and 2 normal brain surfaces were recognized. The patients with lissencephalic brain surface were compared using Dobyns' criteria. Grading of pachygyria was judged as bilateral II in 52% of cases and bilateral I in 48%. The surface of the occipital lobe could not be confirmed with either CT or MRI. Polymicrogyria was suspected using MRI but could not confirmed with CT. Five caces of lissencephaly had never learned any meaningful words and all but one were bedridden because of poor head control. The abilities of patients were better when the grading of pachygyria was milder. Mental disability and peak motor function correlate more closely with the degree and extent of brain malformation than with muscle degeneration. The decrease in radiodensity in the white matter was remarkable in 12 out of 19 cases (63%), and was usually bilaterally symmetrical. An increase in radiodensity in the white matter with age was observed in 3 patients. The rate of myelination was slower than normal in 3 out of the 6 cases. (author).

  10. Molecular mechanisms of muscle atrophy in myotonic dystrophies

    OpenAIRE

    Timchenko, Lubov

    2013-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) and myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2) are multisystemic diseases that primarily affect skeletal muscle, causing myotonia, muscle atrophy, and muscle weakness. DM1 and DM2 pathologies are caused by expansion of CTG and CCTG repeats in non-coding regions of the genes encoding myotonic dystrophy protein kinase (DMPK) and Zinc finger protein 9 (ZNF9) respectively. These expansions cause DM pathologies through accumulation of mutant RNAs that alter RNA metabolism in p...

  11. Congenital Muscle Disease Study of Patient and Family Reported Medical Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-05

    Congenital Muscular Dystrophy (Including Unspecified/Undiagnosed); Dystroglycanopathy; Congenital Fiber Type Disproportion; Rigid Spine Muscular Dystrophy; Congenital Myopathy (Including Unspecified/Undiagnosed); Collagen VI CMD (Ullrich CMD, Intermediate, Bethlem Myopathy); Laminin Alpha 2 Related Congenital Muscular Dystrophy; LAMA2-CMD/Merosin Deficient/MDC1A; Walker-Warburg Syndrome; Muscle-Eye-Brain Disease; Fukuyama/Fukutin Related Muscular Dystrophy; Integrin Alpha 7 Deficiency; Integrin Alpha 9 Deficiency; LMNA-CMD/Lamin A/C/Laminopathy; SEPN1-Related Myopathy; Bethlem Myopathy; Actin Aggregation Myopathy; Cap Disease; Central Core Disease; Centronuclear Myopathy; Core Rod Myopathy; Hyaline Body Myopathy; Multiminicore Myopathy; Myotubular Myopathy; Nemaline Myopathy; Tubular Aggregate Myopathy; Zebra Body Myopathy; Reducing Body Myopathy; Spheroid Body Myopathy; LGMD1B (LMNA); LGMD1E (DES); LGMD2G (TCAP); LGMD2H (TRIM32); LGMD2I (FKRP); LGMD2J (TTN); LGMD2K (POMT1); LGMD2M (FKTN); LGMD2N (POMT2); LGMD2O (POMGnT1); LGMD2P (DAG1); LGMD2Q (PLEC1); LGMD2R (DES); LGMD2S (TRAPPC11); LGMD2T (GMPPB); LGMD2U (ISPD); LGMD2V (GAA); Ullrich Congenital Muscular Dystrophy; Titinopathy; Choline Kinase B Receptor; Emery-Dreifuss Muscular Dystrophy; RYR1 Related Myopathy; SYNE1/Nesprin Related Muscular Dystrophy; Telethonin Related Muscular Dystrophy (TCAP/Titin-Cap); Congenital Myasthenic Syndrome; Escobar Syndrome; Myofibrillar Myopathy; Malignant Hyperthermia; Alpha-Dystroglycan Related Muscular Dystrophy (DAG1, DPM1, DPM2, DPM3, FKRP, FKTN); Alpha-Dystroglycan Related Muscular Dystrophy (GAA, ISPD, LARGE, POMT1, POMT2, POMGnT1); Alpha-Dystroglycan Related Muscular Dystrophy (Unspecified/Undiagnosed/Other)

  12. Changes of laminin beta 2 chain expression in congenital muscular dystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cohn, R D; Herrmann, R; Wewer, U M

    1997-01-01

    We studied the distribution of laminin beta 2 chain in the skeletal muscle basement membrane of 16 patients with congenital muscular dystrophy (CMD) by immunohistochemistry. A dramatic reduction in the laminin beta 2 staining was observed in four patients with classical merosin-negative CMD....... A moderate reduction of laminin beta 2 labelling was observed in four patients with partial merosin deficiency and two patients with merosin-positive CMD. Two patients with merosin-positive CMD had no apparent changes in the expression of laminin beta 2. In three patients and one fetus diagnosed as Walker...

  13. Muscle regeneration and inflammation in patients with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauerslev, S; Ørngreen, M C; Hertz, J M

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether inflammation and regeneration are prominent in mildly affected muscles of patients with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy type 1A (FSHD1A). Inflammation in muscle has been suggested by MRI studies in patients with FSHD1A.......The aim of this study was to investigate whether inflammation and regeneration are prominent in mildly affected muscles of patients with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy type 1A (FSHD1A). Inflammation in muscle has been suggested by MRI studies in patients with FSHD1A....

  14. Rhabdomyolysis associated with human parvovirus B19 infection in a patient with Fukuyama-type congenital muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Aki; Yoto, Yuko; Ohya, Kazuhiro; Tsugawa, Takeshi; Tsutsumi, Hiroyuki

    2014-07-01

    Patients with Fukuyama-type congenital muscular dystrophy sometimes experience transient exacerbations of muscle weakness. We took care of a 9-year-old boy with Fukuyama-type congenital muscular dystrophy who presented with acute respiratory failure and decreased exercise ability with marked elevation of serum creatine kinase indicating rhabdomyolysis. At that time, his younger sister suffered from erythema infectiosum. Although he had no particular symptoms, he was tested and proven to have acute human parvovirus B19 infection based on detection of anti-B19 IgM and parvovirus B19 DNA in his serum. His acute rhabdomyolysis was possibly triggered by human parvovirus B19 infection. © The Author(s) 2013.

  15. Respiratory muscle decline in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khirani, Sonia; Ramirez, Adriana; Aubertin, Guillaume; Boulé, Michèle; Chemouny, Chrystelle; Forin, Véronique; Fauroux, Brigitte

    2014-05-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) causes progressive respiratory muscle weakness. The aim of the study was to analyze the trend of a large number of respiratory parameters to gain further information on the course of the disease. Retrospective study. 48 boys with DMD, age range between 6 and 19 year old, who were followed in our multidisciplinary neuromuscular clinic between 2001 and 2011. Lung function, blood gases, respiratory mechanics, and muscle strength were measured during routine follow-up over a 10-year period. Only data from patients with at least two measurements were retained. The data of 28 patients were considered for analysis. Four parameters showed an important decline with age. Gastric pressure during cough (Pgas cough) was below normal in all patients with a mean decline of 5.7 ± 3.8 cmH2 O/year. Sniff nasal inspiratory pressure (SNIP) tended to increase first followed by a rapid decline (mean decrease 4.8 ± 4.9 cmH2 O; 5.2 ± 4.4% predicted/year). Absolute forced vital capacity (FVC) values peaked around the age of 13-14 years and remained mainly over 1 L but predicted values showed a mean 4.1 ± 4.4% decline/year. Diaphragmatic tension-time index (TTdi) increased above normal values after the age of 14 years with a mean increase of 0.04 ± 0.04 point/year. This study confirms the previous findings that FVC and SNIP are among the most important parameters to monitor the evolution of DMD. Expiratory muscle strength, assessed by Pgas cough, and the endurance index, TTdi, which are reported for the first time in a large cohort, appeared to be informative too, even though measured through an invasive method. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Congenital muscular dystrophy and severe central nervous system atrophy in two siblings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leyten, Q. H.; Barth, P. G.; Gabreëls, F. J.; Renkawek, K.; Renier, W. O.; Gabreëls-Festen, A. A.; ter Laak, H. J.; Smits, M. G.

    1995-01-01

    Severe degenerative features of the nervous system of a hitherto unknown kind, associated with a neuromuscular disorder with histopathological features of congenital muscular dystrophy, are reported in two female siblings. The clinical profile was characterized by generalized hypotonia followed by

  17. Glycomic analyses of mouse models of congenital muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stalnaker, Stephanie H; Aoki, Kazuhiro; Lim, Jae-Min; Porterfield, Mindy; Liu, Mian; Satz, Jakob S; Buskirk, Sean; Xiong, Yufang; Zhang, Peng; Campbell, Kevin P; Hu, Huaiyu; Live, David; Tiemeyer, Michael; Wells, Lance

    2011-06-17

    Dystroglycanopathies are a subset of congenital muscular dystrophies wherein α-dystroglycan (α-DG) is hypoglycosylated. α-DG is an extensively O-glycosylated extracellular matrix-binding protein and a key component of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex. Previous studies have shown α-DG to be post-translationally modified by both O-GalNAc- and O-mannose-initiated glycan structures. Mutations in defined or putative glycosyltransferase genes involved in O-mannosylation are associated with a loss of ligand-binding activity of α-DG and are causal for various forms of congenital muscular dystrophy. In this study, we sought to perform glycomic analysis on brain O-linked glycan structures released from proteins of three different knock-out mouse models associated with O-mannosylation (POMGnT1, LARGE (Myd), and DAG1(-/-)). Using mass spectrometry approaches, we were able to identify nine O-mannose-initiated and 25 O-GalNAc-initiated glycan structures in wild-type littermate control mouse brains. Through our analysis, we were able to confirm that POMGnT1 is essential for the extension of all observed O-mannose glycan structures with β1,2-linked GlcNAc. Loss of LARGE expression in the Myd mouse had no observable effect on the O-mannose-initiated glycan structures characterized here. Interestingly, we also determined that similar amounts of O-mannose-initiated glycan structures are present on brain proteins from α-DG-lacking mice (DAG1) compared with wild-type mice, indicating that there must be additional proteins that are O-mannosylated in the mammalian brain. Our findings illustrate that classical β1,2-elongation and β1,6-GlcNAc branching of O-mannose glycan structures are dependent upon the POMGnT1 enzyme and that O-mannosylation is not limited solely to α-DG in the brain.

  18. Three-Dimensional Human iPSC-Derived Artificial Skeletal Muscles Model Muscular Dystrophies and Enable Multilineage Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Martina Maffioletti

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Generating human skeletal muscle models is instrumental for investigating muscle pathology and therapy. Here, we report the generation of three-dimensional (3D artificial skeletal muscle tissue from human pluripotent stem cells, including induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs from patients with Duchenne, limb-girdle, and congenital muscular dystrophies. 3D skeletal myogenic differentiation of pluripotent cells was induced within hydrogels under tension to provide myofiber alignment. Artificial muscles recapitulated characteristics of human skeletal muscle tissue and could be implanted into immunodeficient mice. Pathological cellular hallmarks of incurable forms of severe muscular dystrophy could be modeled with high fidelity using this 3D platform. Finally, we show generation of fully human iPSC-derived, complex, multilineage muscle models containing key isogenic cellular constituents of skeletal muscle, including vascular endothelial cells, pericytes, and motor neurons. These results lay the foundation for a human skeletal muscle organoid-like platform for disease modeling, regenerative medicine, and therapy development. : Maffioletti et al. generate human 3D artificial skeletal muscles from healthy donors and patient-specific pluripotent stem cells. These human artificial muscles accurately model severe genetic muscle diseases. They can be engineered to include other cell types present in skeletal muscle, such as vascular cells and motor neurons. Keywords: skeletal muscle, pluripotent stem cells, iPS cells, myogenic differentiation, tissue engineering, disease modeling, muscular dystrophy, organoids

  19. [Congenital myotonic dystrophy in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit: case series].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingues, Sara; Alves Pereira, Clara; Machado, Angela; Pereira, Sandra; Machado, Leonilde; Fraga, Carla; Oliveira, Abílio; Vale, Isabel; Quelhas, Ilídio

    2014-02-01

    Steinert myotonic dystrophy is a multisystemic disease, autosomal dominant, with a wide spectrum of severity and clinical manifestations. The most severe form is one that manifests in the neonatal period, called congenital myotonic dystrophy. This condition is distinguished by overall hypotonia at birth and respiratory function compromise. Complications are frequent, mainly psychomotor development delay, growth failure, food difficulties and constipation. It is associated with a poor prognosis, with an overall mortality of up to 50% of severely affected children. We present five patients with congenital myotonic dystrophy in order to describe clinical manifestations, diagnosis, treatment and prognosis. Existing data in the literature on psychomotor development, complications and prognosis of survivors with congenital myotonic dystrophy are scarce. In our case studies, we have found significant chronic psychomotor limitations.

  20. Muscle phenotype in patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Anne Grete Kielgast; Orngreen, Mette C; Preisler, Nicolai Rasmus

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The pathogenesis of muscle involvement in patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is not well understood. In this study, we characterized the muscle phenotype in patients with confirmed DM1. Methods: In 38 patients, muscle strength was tested by hand-held dynamometry. Myotonia...... was evaluated by a handgrip test and by analyzing the decrement of the compound muscle action potential. Muscle biopsies were assessed for morphological changes and Na(+) -K(+) pump content. Results: Muscle strength correlated with a decline in Na(+) -K(+) pump content (r = 0.60, P

  1. Protein-carbohydrate supplements improve muscle protein balance in muscular dystrophy patients after endurance exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Grete; Ørngreen, Mette C; Preisler, Nicolai

    2015-01-01

    In healthy individuals, postexercise protein supplementation increases muscle protein anabolism. In patients with muscular dystrophies, aerobic exercise improves muscle function, but the effect of exercise on muscle protein balance is unknown. Therefore, we investigated 1) muscle protein balance...

  2. Skeletal muscle CT of lower extremities in myotonic dystrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Ryosuke; Imai, Terukuni; Sadashima, Hiromichi; Matsumoto, Sadayuki; Yamamoto, Toru; Kusaka, Hirofumi; Yamasaki, Masahiro; Maya, Kiyomi; Tanabe, Masaya

    1988-01-01

    We evaluated the leg and thigh muscles of 4 control subjects and 10 patients with myotonic dystrophy using computed tomography. Taking previous reports about the skeletal muscle CT of myotonic dystrophy into account, we concluded that the following 5 features are characteristic of myotonic dystrophy: 1. The main change is the appearance of low-density areas in muscles; these areas reflect fat tissue. In addition, the muscle mass decreases in size. 2. The leg is more severely affected than the thigh. 3. In the thigh, although the m. quadriceps femoris, especially the vastus muscles, tends to be affected, the m. adductor longus and magnus tend to be preserved. 4. In the leg, although the m. tibialis anterior and m. triceps surae tend to be affected, the m. peroneus longus, brevis, and m. tibialis posterior tend to be preserved. 5. Compensatory hypertrophy is often observed in the m. rectus femoris, m. adductor longus, m. adductor magnus, m. peroneus longus, and m. peroneus brevis, accompanied by the involvement of their agonist muscles. (author)

  3. Altered cross-bridge properties in skeletal muscle dystrophies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aziz eGuellich

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Force and motion generated by skeletal muscle ultimately depends on the cyclical interaction of actin with myosin. This mechanical process is regulated by intracellular Ca2+ through the thin filament-associated regulatory proteins i.e.; troponins and tropomyosin. Muscular dystrophies are a group of heterogeneous genetic affections characterized by progressive degeneration and weakness of the skeletal muscle as a consequence of loss of muscle tissue which directly reduces the number of potential myosin cross-bridges involved in force production. Mutations in genes responsible for skeletal muscle dystrophies have been shown to modify the function of contractile proteins and cross-bridge interactions. Altered gene expression or RNA splicing or post-translational modifications of contractile proteins such as those related to oxidative stress, may affect cross-bridge function by modifying key proteins of the excitation-contraction coupling. Micro-architectural change in myofilament is another mechanism of altered cross-bridge performance. In this review, we provide an overview about changes in cross-bridge performance in skeletal muscle dystrophies and discuss their ultimate impacts on striated muscle function.

  4. Cyclosporine A in Ullrich Congenital Muscular Dystrophy: Long-Term Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Merlini

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Six individuals with Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD and mutations in the genes-encoding collagen VI, aging 5–9, received 3–5 mg/kg of cyclosporine A (CsA daily for 1 to 3.2 years. The primary outcome measure was the muscle strength evaluated with a myometer and expressed as megalimbs. The megalimbs score showed significant improvement (P=0.01 in 5 of the 6 patients. Motor function did not change. Respiratory function deteriorated in all. CsA treatment corrected mitochondrial dysfunction, increased muscle regeneration, and decreased the number of apoptotic nuclei. Results from this study demonstrate that long-term treatment with CsA ameliorates performance in the limbs, but not in the respiratory muscles of UCMD patients, and that it is well tolerated. These results suggest considering a trial of CsA or nonimmunosuppressive cyclosporins, that retains the PTP-desensitizing properties of CsA, as early as possible in UCMD patients when diaphragm is less compromised.

  5. Heme oxygenase and carbon monoxide protect from muscle dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Mun Chun; Ziegler, Olivia; Liu, Laura; Rowe, Glenn C; Das, Saumya; Otterbein, Leo E; Arany, Zoltan

    2016-11-28

    Duchenne muscle dystrophy (DMD) is one of the most common lethal genetic diseases of children worldwide and is 100% fatal. Steroids, the only therapy currently available, are marred by poor efficacy and a high side-effect profile. New therapeutic approaches are urgently needed. Here, we leverage PGC-1α, a powerful transcriptional coactivator known to protect against dystrophy in the mdx murine model of DMD, to search for novel mechanisms of protection against dystrophy. We identify heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) as a potential novel target for the treatment of DMD. Expression of HO-1 is blunted in the muscles from the mdx murine model of DMD, and further reduction of HO-1 by genetic haploinsufficiency worsens muscle damage in mdx mice. Conversely, induction of HO-1 pharmacologically protects against muscle damage. Mechanistically, HO-1 degrades heme into biliverdin, releasing in the process ferrous iron and carbon monoxide (CO). We show that exposure to a safe low dose of CO protects against muscle damage in mdx mice, as does pharmacological treatment with CO-releasing molecules. These data identify HO-1 and CO as novel therapeutic agents for the treatment of DMD. Safety profiles and clinical testing of inhaled CO already exist, underscoring the translational potential of these observations.

  6. Computed tomography in congenital muscular dystrophy (Fukuyama type)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshioka, Mieko; Okuno, Takehiko; Nakano, Yoshihisa; Honda, Yoshihito

    1980-01-01

    Central-nervous system involvement in 26 patients with congenital muscular dystrophy (CMD) was studied using computed tomography (CT). CT was carried out using the EMI-1000 or 1010. The most characteristic finding in the CT was a low-density area in the white matter, seen in 15 out of the 26 (58%). Ventricular dilatation was also noted in 21 out of the 26 (80%), and cortical atrophy in 16 (65%). In one case, asymmetry of the lateral ventricle was observed. Half of the patients had a low-density area in the white matter in addition to cerebral atrophy, while only three (12%) showed normal CT findings. From the relation between the CT findings and IQ in patients with CMD, those with a low-density area in addition to cerebral atrophy and those with cerebral atrophy alone had extremely low IQs compared with those with a low-density area and with normal CT findings. From the relation between the CT findings and the EEG in patients with CMD, seizure discharges, such as a spike or a sharp wave complex and a spike, were most frequently seen in those with a low-density area in the white matter in addition to cerebral atrophy, and among those patients epileptic seizures occurred in three. From the relation between the CT findings and the stage of disability in patients with CMD, those with a low-density area in addition to cerebral atrophy showed severe motor disability. From the relation between CT findings and age in patients with CMD, severe CT findings were seen in the younger group. On ophthalmological examination, one of the most important findings was the evident bulateral optic nerve atrophy noted in several cases. (J.P.N.)

  7. Congenital hereditary endothelial dystrophy with progressive sensorineural deafness (Harboyan syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abramowicz Marc

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Harboyan syndrome is a degenerative corneal disorder defined as congenital hereditary endothelial dystrophy (CHED accompanied by progressive, postlingual sensorineural hearing loss. To date, 24 cases from 11 families of various origin (Asian Indian, South American Indian, Sephardi Jewish, Brazilian Portuguese, Dutch, Gypsy, Moroccan, Dominican have been reported. More than 50% of the reported cases have been associated with parental consanguinity. The ocular manifestations in Harboyan syndrome include diffuse bilateral corneal edema occurring with severe corneal clouding, blurred vision, visual loss and nystagmus. They are apparent at birth or within the neonatal period and are indistinguishable from those characteristic of the autosomal recessive CHED (CHED2. Hearing deficit in Harboyan is slowly progressive and typically found in patients 10–25 years old. There are no reported cases with prelinglual deafness, however, a significant hearing loss in children as young as 4 years old has been detected by audiometry, suggesting that hearing may be affected earlier, even at birth. Harboyan syndrome is caused by mutations in the SLC4A11 gene located at the CHED2 locus on chromosome 20p13-p12, indicating that CHED2 and Harboyan syndrome are allelic disorders. A total of 62 different SLC4A11 mutations have been reported in 98 families (92 CHED2 and 6 Harboyan. All reported cases have been consistent with autosomal recessive transmission. Diagnosis is based on clinical criteria, detailed ophthalmological assessment and audiometry. A molecular confirmation of the clinical diagnosis is feasible. A variety of genetic, metabolic, developmental and acquired diseases presenting with clouding of the cornea should be considered in the differential diagnosis (Peters anomaly, sclerocornea, limbal dermoids, congenital glaucoma. Audiometry must be performed to differentiate Harboyan syndrome from CHED2. Autosomal recessive types of CHED (CHED2 and

  8. Epigenetic Regulators Modulate Muscle Damage in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajanca, Fernanda; Vandel, Laurence

    2017-12-21

    Histone acetyl transferases (HATs) and histone deacetylases (HDAC) control transcription during myogenesis. HDACs promote chromatin condensation, inhibiting gene transcription in muscle progenitor cells until myoblast differentiation is triggered and HDACs are released. HATs, namely CBP/p300, activate myogenic regulatory and elongation factors promoting myogenesis. HDAC inhibitors are known to improve regeneration in dystrophic muscles through follistatin upregulation. However, the potential of directly modulating HATs remains unexplored. We tested this possibility in a well-known zebrafish model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Interestingly, CBP/p300 transcripts were found downregulated in the absence of Dystrophin. While investigating CBP rescuing potential we observed that dystrophin-null embryos overexpressing CBP actually never show significant muscle damage, even before a first regeneration cycle could occur. We found that the pan-HDAC inhibitor trichostatin A (TSA) also prevents early muscle damage, however the single HAT CBP is as efficient even in low doses. The HAT domain of CBP is required for its full rescuing ability. Importantly, both CBP and TSA prevent early muscle damage without restoring endogenous CBP/p300 neither increasing follistatin transcripts. This suggests a new mechanism of action of epigenetic regulators protecting dystrophin-null muscle fibres from detaching, independent from the known improvement of regeneration upon damage of HDACs inhibitors. This study builds supporting evidence that epigenetic modulators may play a role in determining the severity of muscle dystrophy, controlling the ability to resist muscle damage. Determining the mode of action leading to muscle protection can potentially lead to new treatment options for muscular dystrophies in the future.

  9. Functional muscle ischemia in Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, Gail D.

    2013-01-01

    Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy (DMD/BMD) comprise a spectrum of devastating X-linked muscle wasting disease for which there is no treatment. DMD/BMD is caused by mutations in the gene encoding dystrophin, a cytoskeletal protein that stabilizes the muscle membrane and also targets other proteins to the sarcolemma. Among these is the muscle-specific isoform of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOSµ) which binds spectrin-like repeats within dystrophin’s rod domain and the adaptor pro...

  10. Nutritional status evaluation in patients affected by bethlem myopathy and ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toni, Silvia; Morandi, Riccardo; Busacchi, Marcello; Tardini, Lucia; Merlini, Luciano; Battistini, Nino Carlo; Pellegrini, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Collagen VI mutations lead to disabling myopathies like Bethlem myopathy (BM) and Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD). We have investigated the nutritional and metabolic status of one UCMD and seven BM patients (five female, three male, mean age 31 ± 9 years) in order to find a potential metabolic target for nutritional intervention. For this study, we used standard anthropometric tools, such as BMI evaluation and body circumference measurements. All results were compared to dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), considered the "gold standard" method. Energy intake of each patient was evaluated through longitudinal methods (7-day food diary) while resting energy expenditure (REE) was predicted using specific equations and measured by indirect calorimetry. Clinical evaluation included general and nutritional blood and urine laboratory analyses and quantitative muscle strength measurement by hand-held dynamometry. BM and UCMD patients showed an altered body composition, characterized by low free fat mass (FFM) and high fat mass (FM), allowing us to classify them as sarcopenic, and all but one as sarcopenic-obese. Another main result was the negative correlation between REE/FFM ratio (basal energy expenditure per kilograms of fat-free mass) and the severity of the disease, as defined by the muscle megascore (correlation coefficient -0.955, P-value nutritional intervention in these patients.

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging in classification of congenital muscular dystrophies with brain abnormalities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    vanderKnaap, MS; Smit, LME; Barth, PG; CatsmanBerrevoets, CE; Brouwer, OF; Begeer, JH; deCoo, IFM; Valk, J.

    A survey was performed of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in 21 patients with congenital muscular dystrophy (QID) with cerebral abnormalities to evaluate the contribution of MRI to the classification of CMD patients. In 5 patients with Walker-Warburg syndrome (WWS), MRI showed

  12. Tadalafil alleviates muscle ischemia in patients with Becker muscular dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Elizabeth A.; Barresi, Rita; Byrne, Barry J.; Tsimerinov, Evgeny I.; Scott, Bryan L.; Walker, Ashley E.; Gurudevan, Swaminatha V.; Anene, Francine; Elashoff, Robert M.; Thomas, Gail D.; Victor, Ronald G.

    2013-01-01

    Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) is a progressive X-linked muscle wasting disease for which there is no treatment. Like Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), BMD is caused by mutations in the gene encoding dystrophin, a structural cytoskeletal protein that also targets other proteins to the muscle sarcolemma. Among these is neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOSμ), which requires certain spectrin-like repeats in dystrophin’s rod domain and the adaptor protein α-syntrophin to be targeted to the sarcolemma. When healthy skeletal muscle is subjected to exercise, sarcolemmal nNOSμ-derived nitric oxide (NO) attenuates local α-adrenergic vasoconstriction thereby optimizing perfusion of muscle. We found previously that this protective mechanism is defective—causing functional muscle ischemia—in dystrophin-deficient muscles of the mdx mouse (a model of DMD) and of children with DMD, in whom nNOSμ is mislocalized to the cytosol instead of the sarcolemma. Here, we report that this protective mechanism also is defective in men with BMD in whom the most common dystrophin mutations disrupt sarcolemmal targeting of nNOSμ. In these men, the vasoconstrictor response, measured as a decrease in muscle oxygenation, to reflex sympathetic activation is not appropriately attenuated during exercise of the dystrophic muscles. In a randomized placebo-controlled cross-over trial, we show that functional muscle ischemia is alleviated and normal blood flow regulation fully restored in the muscles of men with BMD by boosting NO-cGMP signaling with a single dose of the drug tadalafil, a phosphodiesterase (PDE5A) inhibitor. These results further support an essential role for sarcolemmal nNOSμ in the normal modulation of sympathetic vasoconstriction in exercising human skeletal muscle and implicate the NO-cGMP pathway as a putative new target for treating BMD. PMID:23197572

  13. Tadalafil alleviates muscle ischemia in patients with Becker muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Elizabeth A; Barresi, Rita; Byrne, Barry J; Tsimerinov, Evgeny I; Scott, Bryan L; Walker, Ashley E; Gurudevan, Swaminatha V; Anene, Francine; Elashoff, Robert M; Thomas, Gail D; Victor, Ronald G

    2012-11-28

    Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) is a progressive X-linked muscle wasting disease for which there is no treatment. Like Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), BMD is caused by mutations in the gene encoding dystrophin, a structural cytoskeletal protein that also targets other proteins to the muscle sarcolemma. Among these is neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOSμ), which requires certain spectrin-like repeats in dystrophin's rod domain and the adaptor protein α-syntrophin to be targeted to the sarcolemma. When healthy skeletal muscle is subjected to exercise, sarcolemmal nNOSμ-derived NO attenuates local α-adrenergic vasoconstriction, thereby optimizing perfusion of muscle. We found previously that this protective mechanism is defective-causing functional muscle ischemia-in dystrophin-deficient muscles of the mdx mouse (a model of DMD) and of children with DMD, in whom nNOSμ is mislocalized to the cytosol instead of the sarcolemma. We report that this protective mechanism also is defective in men with BMD in whom the most common dystrophin mutations disrupt sarcolemmal targeting of nNOSμ. In these men, the vasoconstrictor response, measured as a decrease in muscle oxygenation, to reflex sympathetic activation is not appropriately attenuated during exercise of the dystrophic muscles. In a randomized placebo-controlled crossover trial, we show that functional muscle ischemia is alleviated and normal blood flow regulation is fully restored in the muscles of men with BMD by boosting NO-cGMP (guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate) signaling with a single dose of the drug tadalafil, a phosphodiesterase 5A inhibitor. These results further support an essential role for sarcolemmal nNOSμ in the normal modulation of sympathetic vasoconstriction in exercising human skeletal muscle and implicate the NO-cGMP pathway as a putative new target for treating BMD.

  14. Muscle MRI and functional outcome measures in Becker muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barp, Andrea; Bello, Luca; Caumo, Luca; Campadello, Paola; Semplicini, Claudio; Lazzarotto, Annalisa; Sorarù, Gianni; Calore, Chiara; Rampado, Alessandro; Motta, Raffaella; Stramare, Roberto; Pegoraro, Elena

    2017-11-22

    Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) is a neuromuscular disorder allelic to Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), caused by in-frame mutations in the dystrophin gene, and characterized by a clinical progression that is both milder and more heterogeneous than DMD. Muscle magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been proposed as biomarker of disease progression in dystrophinopathies. Correlation with clinically meaningful outcome measures such as North Star Ambulatory Assessment (NSAA) and 6 minute walk test (6MWT) is paramount for biomarker qualification. In this study, 51 molecularly confirmed BMD patients (aged 7-69 years) underwent muscle MRI and were evaluated with functional measures (NSAA and 6MWT) at the time of the MRI, and subsequently after one year. We confirmed a pattern of fatty substitution involving mainly the hip extensors and most thigh muscles. Severity of muscle fatty substitution was significantly correlated with specific DMD mutations: in particular, patients with an isolated deletion of exon 48, or deletions bordering exon 51, showed milder involvement. Fat infiltration scores correlated with baseline functional measures, and predicted changes after 1 year. We conclude that in BMD, skeletal muscle MRI not only strongly correlates with motor function, but also helps in predicting functional deterioration within a 12-month time frame.

  15. Vascular adrenergic receptor responses in skeletal muscle in myotonic dystrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mechler, F.; Mastaglia, F.L.

    1981-01-01

    The pharmacological responses of vascular adrenergic receptors to intravenously administered epinephrine, phentolamine, and propranolol were assessed by measuring muscle blood flow (MBF) changes in the tibialis anterior muscle using the xenon 133 clearance technique and were compared in 8 normal subjects and 11 patients with myotonic dystrophy. In cases with advanced involvement of the muscle, the resting MBF was reduced and was not significantly altered by epinephrine before or after alpha- or beta-receptor blockade. In patients in whom the tibialis anterior muscle was normal or only minimally affected clinically, a paradoxical reduction in the epinephrine-induced increase in MBF was found after alpha blockade by phentolamine, and the epinephrine-induced MBF increase was not completely blocked by propranolol as in the normal subjects. These findings point to functional alteration in the properties of vascular adrenergic receptors in muscle in myotonic dystrophy. While this may be another manifestation of a widespread cell membrane defect in the disease, the possibility that the changes are secondary to the myotonic state cannot be excluded

  16. Melanocytes from patients affected by Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy and Bethlem myopathy have dysfunctional mitochondria that can be rescued with cyclophilin inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra eZulian

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy and Bethlem myopathy are caused by mutations in collagen VI genes, which encode an extracellular matrix protein; yet mitochondria play a major role in disease pathogenesis through a short circuit caused by inappropriate opening of the permeability transition pore, a high conductance channel which causes a shortage in ATP production. We find that melanocytes do not produce collagen VI yet they bind it at the cell surface, suggesting that this protein may play a trophic role and that its absence may cause lesions similar to those seen in skeletal muscle. We show that mitochondria in melanocytes of Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy and Bethlem myooathy patients display increased size, reduced matrix density and disrupted cristae, findings that suggest a functional impairment. In keeping with this hypothesis, mitochondria (i underwent anomalous depolarization after inhibition of the F-ATP synthase with oligomycin, and (ii displayed decreased respiratory reserve capacity. The non-immunosuppressive cyclophilin inhibitor NIM811 prevented mitochondrial depolarization in response to oligomycin in melanocytes from both Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy and Bethlem myopathy patients, and partially restored the respiratory reserve of melanocytes from one Bethlem myopathy patient. These results match our recent findings on melanocytes from patients affected by Duchenne muscular dystrophy (Pellegrini et al., 2013 Melanocytes--a novel tool to study mitochondrial dysfunction in Duchenne muscular dystrophy. J Cell Physiol 228, 1323-1331, and suggest that skin biopsies may represent a minimally invasive tool to investigate mitochondrial dysfunction and to evaluate drug efficacy in collagen VI-related myopathies and possibly in other muscle wasting conditions like aging sarcopenia.

  17. Orthognathic Surgery in Patients With Congenital Myopathies and Congenital Muscular Dystrophies: Case Series and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezak, Brett J; Arce, Kevin A; Jacob, Adam; Van Ess, James

    2016-03-01

    This case series examined preoperative findings and the surgical, anesthetic, and postoperative management of 6 patients with congenital myopathies (CMs) and congenital muscular dystrophies (CMDs) treated at a tertiary medical institution with orthognathic surgery over 15 years to describe pertinent considerations for performing orthognathic surgery in these complex patients. According to the institutional review board-approved protocol, chart records were reviewed for all orthognathic surgical patients with a clinical, genetic, or muscle biopsy-proved diagnosis of CM or CMD. Six patients (5 male, 1 female) qualified, and they were treated by 4 surgeons in the division of oral and maxillofacial surgery from 1992 through 2007. Average age was 19.5 years at the time of orthognathic surgery. Five patients had Class III malocclusions and 1 patient had Class II malocclusion. All 6 patients had apertognathia with lip incompetence. Nasoendotracheal intubation with a difficulty of 0/3 (0=easiest, 3=most difficult) was performed in all cases. Routine induction and maintenance anesthetics, including halogenated agents and nondepolarizing muscle relaxants, were administered without malignant hyperthermia. All 6 patients underwent Le Fort level osteotomies; 4 also had mandibular setback surgery with or without balancing mandibular inferior border osteotomies. Five patients required planned intensive care unit care postoperatively (average, 18.4 days; range, 4 to 65 days). Postoperative respiratory complications resulting in major blood oxygen desaturations occurred in 5 patients; 4 of these patients required reintubation during emergency code response. Five patients required extended postoperative intubation (average, 4.2 days; range, 3 to 6 days) and ventilatory support. Average hospital length of stay was 21.8 days (range, 6 to 75 days). Average postoperative follow-up interval was 29.8 weeks (range, 6 to 128 weeks). Patients with CMs or CMDs often have characteristic

  18. Three-dimensional brain-surface MR images of brain anomalies in Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy and its differentiation from Duchenne muscular dystrophy with severe mental retardation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toda, Tatsushi; Watanabe, Toshiaki; Shimizu, Teruo; Iwata, Makoto; Kanazawa, Ichiro (Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine); Matsumura, Kiichiro

    1993-12-01

    Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy (FCMD) is the second most common form of muscular dystrophy in Japan and is peculiarly associated with brain anomalies such as micropolygyria. Since these anomalies are preferentially observed on the brain surface, it is difficult to identify them by either X-ray CT or conventional MRI. In addition, FCMD has an atypical (mild) form in which the patients are capable of walking. In such cases, clinical differential diagnosis from Duchenne muscular dystrophy with severe mental retardation (DMD-MR) is not necessarily easy. We analyzed the brain-surface structures of 4 typical FCMD cases. 1 atypical FCMD case, 4 DMD-MR cases, and 1 undiagnosed case using a method of 3-dimensional (3-D) brain-surface MR imaging; we then compared the results with dystrophin immuno-stainings of the biopsied skeletal muscles. In both typical and atypical FCMD cases, micropolygyria could be clearly demonstrated, with individual variations. The 3-D images were verified by neuropathology. Of the 4 DMD-MR cases, 3 cases showed no gyral abnormality. However, in 1 DMD-MR case the diagnosis was corrected to atypical FCMD because of micropolygyria found on 3-D MRI. The one undiangosed case was diagnosed as DMD-MR on the basis of 3-D MRI. There was a good correspondence between the results of the 3-D imaging and the dystrophin test. Recently, some FCMD cases with a complete deficiency of dystrophin have been reported. Therefore, the detection of brain anomalies is important for the precise diagnosis of FCMD; the present method is considered effective for this purpose. (author).

  19. Three-dimensional brain-surface MR images of brain anomalies in Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy and its differentiation from Duchenne muscular dystrophy with severe mental retardation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toda, Tatsushi; Watanabe, Toshiaki; Shimizu, Teruo; Iwata, Makoto; Kanazawa, Ichiro; Matsumura, Kiichiro.

    1993-01-01

    Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy (FCMD) is the second most common form of muscular dystrophy in Japan and is peculiarly associated with brain anomalies such as micropolygyria. Since these anomalies are preferentially observed on the brain surface, it is difficult to identify them by either X-ray CT or conventional MRI. In addition, FCMD has an atypical (mild) form in which the patients are capable of walking. In such cases, clinical differential diagnosis from Duchenne muscular dystrophy with severe mental retardation (DMD-MR) is not necessarily easy. We analyzed the brain-surface structures of 4 typical FCMD cases. 1 atypical FCMD case, 4 DMD-MR cases, and 1 undiagnosed case using a method of 3-dimensional (3-D) brain-surface MR imaging; we then compared the results with dystrophin immuno-stainings of the biopsied skeletal muscles. In both typical and atypical FCMD cases, micropolygyria could be clearly demonstrated, with individual variations. The 3-D images were verified by neuropathology. Of the 4 DMD-MR cases, 3 cases showed no gyral abnormality. However, in 1 DMD-MR case the diagnosis was corrected to atypical FCMD because of micropolygyria found on 3-D MRI. The one undiangosed case was diagnosed as DMD-MR on the basis of 3-D MRI. There was a good correspondence between the results of the 3-D imaging and the dystrophin test. Recently, some FCMD cases with a complete deficiency of dystrophin have been reported. Therefore, the detection of brain anomalies is important for the precise diagnosis of FCMD; the present method is considered effective for this purpose. (author)

  20. Modulation of Stem Cells Differentiation and Myostatin as an approach to Counteract fibrosis in Muscle Dystrophy and Regeneration after Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), hampers cell therapy in the muscle , and is a feasible therapeutic target. Myostatin (Mst), a...17 Figure 18 Figure 19 Figure 20 Figure 21 • Muscle lipofibrotic degeneration characterizes Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), hampers cell therapy...SUBJECT TERMS Myostatin, muscle dystrophy , stem cells, myogenesis, Oct-4; Duchenne 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: U 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT

  1. Three-Dimensional Human iPSC-Derived Artificial Skeletal Muscles Model Muscular Dystrophies and Enable Multilineage Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maffioletti, Sara Martina; Sarcar, Shilpita; Henderson, Alexander B H; Mannhardt, Ingra; Pinton, Luca; Moyle, Louise Anne; Steele-Stallard, Heather; Cappellari, Ornella; Wells, Kim E; Ferrari, Giulia; Mitchell, Jamie S; Tyzack, Giulia E; Kotiadis, Vassilios N; Khedr, Moustafa; Ragazzi, Martina; Wang, Weixin; Duchen, Michael R; Patani, Rickie; Zammit, Peter S; Wells, Dominic J; Eschenhagen, Thomas; Tedesco, Francesco Saverio

    2018-04-17

    Generating human skeletal muscle models is instrumental for investigating muscle pathology and therapy. Here, we report the generation of three-dimensional (3D) artificial skeletal muscle tissue from human pluripotent stem cells, including induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from patients with Duchenne, limb-girdle, and congenital muscular dystrophies. 3D skeletal myogenic differentiation of pluripotent cells was induced within hydrogels under tension to provide myofiber alignment. Artificial muscles recapitulated characteristics of human skeletal muscle tissue and could be implanted into immunodeficient mice. Pathological cellular hallmarks of incurable forms of severe muscular dystrophy could be modeled with high fidelity using this 3D platform. Finally, we show generation of fully human iPSC-derived, complex, multilineage muscle models containing key isogenic cellular constituents of skeletal muscle, including vascular endothelial cells, pericytes, and motor neurons. These results lay the foundation for a human skeletal muscle organoid-like platform for disease modeling, regenerative medicine, and therapy development. Copyright © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. B4GALNT2 (GALGT2) Gene Therapy Reduces Skeletal Muscle Pathology in the FKRP P448L Mouse Model of Limb Girdle Muscular Dystrophy 2I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Paul J; Xu, Rui; Martin, Paul T

    2016-09-01

    Overexpression of B4GALNT2 (previously GALGT2) inhibits the development of muscle pathology in mouse models of Duchenne muscular dystrophy, congenital muscular dystrophy 1A, and limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2D. In these models, muscle GALGT2 overexpression induces the glycosylation of α dystroglycan with the cytotoxic T cell glycan and increases the overexpression of dystrophin and laminin α2 surrogates known to inhibit disease. Here, we show that GALGT2 gene therapy significantly reduces muscle pathology in FKRP P448Lneo(-) mice, a model for limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2I. rAAVrh74.MCK.GALGT2-treated FKRP P448Lneo(-) muscles showed reduced levels of centrally nucleated myofibers, reduced variance, increased size of myofiber diameters, reduced myofiber immunoglobulin G uptake, and reduced muscle wasting at 3 and 6 months after treatment. GALGT2 overexpression in FKRP P448Lneo(-) muscles did not cause substantial glycosylation of α dystroglycan with the cytotoxic T cell glycan or increased expression of dystrophin and laminin α2 surrogates in mature skeletal myofibers, but it increased the number of embryonic myosin-positive regenerating myofibers. These data demonstrate that GALGT2 overexpression can reduce the extent of muscle pathology in FKRP mutant muscles, but that it may do so via a mechanism that differs from its ability to induce surrogate gene expression. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The Intriguing Regulators of Muscle Mass in Sarcopenia and Muscular Dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Sakuma, Kunihiro; Aoi, Wataru; Yamaguchi, Akihiko

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in our understanding of the biology of muscle have led to new interest in the pharmacological treatment of muscle wasting. Loss of muscle mass and increased intramuscular fibrosis occur in both sarcopenia and muscular dystrophy. Several regulators (mammalian target of rapamycin, serum response factor, atrogin-1, myostatin, etc.) seem to modulate protein synthesis and degradation or transcription of muscle-specific genes during both sarcopenia and muscular dystrophy. This revie...

  4. Muscle Activation during Gait in Children with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ropars, Juliette; Lempereur, Mathieu; Vuillerot, Carole; Tiffreau, Vincent; Peudenier, Sylviane; Cuisset, Jean-Marie; Pereon, Yann; Leboeuf, Fabien; Delporte, Ludovic; Delpierre, Yannick; Gross, Raphaël; Brochard, Sylvain

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to investigate changes in muscle activity during gait in children with Duchenne muscular Dystrophy (DMD). Dynamic surface electromyography recordings (EMGs) of 16 children with DMD and pathological gait were compared with those of 15 control children. The activity of the rectus femoris (RF), vastus lateralis (VL), medial hamstrings (HS), tibialis anterior (TA) and gastrocnemius soleus (GAS) muscles was recorded and analysed quantitatively and qualitatively. The overall muscle activity in the children with DMD was significantly different from that of the control group. Percentage activation amplitudes of RF, HS and TA were greater throughout the gait cycle in the children with DMD and the timing of GAS activity differed from the control children. Significantly greater muscle coactivation was found in the children with DMD. There were no significant differences between sides. Since the motor command is normal in DMD, the hyper-activity and co-contractions likely compensate for gait instability and muscle weakness, however may have negative consequences on the muscles and may increase the energy cost of gait. Simple rehabilitative strategies such as targeted physical therapies may improve stability and thus the pattern of muscle activity.

  5. Muscle Activation during Gait in Children with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliette Ropars

    Full Text Available The aim of this prospective study was to investigate changes in muscle activity during gait in children with Duchenne muscular Dystrophy (DMD. Dynamic surface electromyography recordings (EMGs of 16 children with DMD and pathological gait were compared with those of 15 control children. The activity of the rectus femoris (RF, vastus lateralis (VL, medial hamstrings (HS, tibialis anterior (TA and gastrocnemius soleus (GAS muscles was recorded and analysed quantitatively and qualitatively. The overall muscle activity in the children with DMD was significantly different from that of the control group. Percentage activation amplitudes of RF, HS and TA were greater throughout the gait cycle in the children with DMD and the timing of GAS activity differed from the control children. Significantly greater muscle coactivation was found in the children with DMD. There were no significant differences between sides. Since the motor command is normal in DMD, the hyper-activity and co-contractions likely compensate for gait instability and muscle weakness, however may have negative consequences on the muscles and may increase the energy cost of gait. Simple rehabilitative strategies such as targeted physical therapies may improve stability and thus the pattern of muscle activity.

  6. Balance outcomes following a tap dance program for a child with congenital myotonic muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biricocchi, Charlanne; Drake, JaimeLynn; Svien, Lana

    2014-01-01

    This case report describes the effects of a 6-week progressive tap dance program on static and dynamic balance for a child with type 1 congenital myotonic muscular dystrophy (congenital MMD1). A 6-year-old girl with congenital MMD1 participated in a 1-hour progressive tap dance program. Classes were held once a week for 6 consecutive weeks and included 3 children with adaptive needs and 1 peer with typical development. The Bruininks-Oseretsky Test of Motor Proficiency, second edition (BOT-2) balance subsection and the Pediatric Balance Scale were completed at the beginning of the first class and the sixth class. The participant's BOT-2 score improved from 3 to 14. Her Pediatric Balance Scale score did not change. Participation in a progressive tap dance class by a child with congenital MMD1 may facilitate improvements in static and dynamic balance.

  7. Transcriptome Analysis of Ullrich Congenital Muscular Dystrophy Fibroblasts Reveals a Disease Extracellular Matrix Signature and Key Molecular Regulators.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Paco

    Full Text Available Collagen VI related myopathies encompass a range of phenotypes with involvement of skeletal muscle, skin and other connective tissues. They represent a severe and relatively common form of congenital disease for which there is no treatment. Collagen VI in skeletal muscle and skin is produced by fibroblasts.In order to gain insight into the consequences of collagen VI mutations and identify key disease pathways we performed global gene expression analysis of dermal fibroblasts from patients with Ullrich Congenital Muscular Dystrophy with and without vitamin C treatment. The expression data were integrated using a range of systems biology tools. Results were validated by real-time PCR, western blotting and functional assays.We found significant changes in the expression levels of almost 600 genes between collagen VI deficient and control fibroblasts. Highly regulated genes included extracellular matrix components and surface receptors, including integrins, indicating a shift in the interaction between the cell and its environment. This was accompanied by a significant increase in fibroblasts adhesion to laminin. The observed changes in gene expression profiling may be under the control of two miRNAs, miR-30c and miR-181a, which we found elevated in tissue and serum from patients and which could represent novel biomarkers for muscular dystrophy. Finally, the response to vitamin C of collagen VI mutated fibroblasts significantly differed from healthy fibroblasts. Vitamin C treatment was able to revert the expression of some key genes to levels found in control cells raising the possibility of a beneficial effect of vitamin C as a modulator of some of the pathological aspects of collagen VI related diseases.

  8. Amelioration of Muscle and Nerve Pathology in LAMA2 Muscular Dystrophy by AAV9-Mini-Agrin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunping Qiao

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available LAMA2-related muscular dystrophy (LAMA2 MD is the most common and fatal form of early-onset congenital muscular dystrophies. Due to the large size of the laminin α2 cDNA and heterotrimeric structure of the protein, it is challenging to develop a gene-replacement therapy. Our group has developed a novel adeno-associated viral (AAV vector carrying the mini-agrin, which is a non-homologous functional substitute for the mutated laminin α2. A significant therapeutic effect in skeletal muscle was observed in our previous study using AAV serotype 1 (AAV1. In this investigation, we examined AAV9 vector, which has more widespread transduction than AAV1, to determine if the therapeutic effects could be further improved. As expected, AAV9-mini-agrin treatment offered enhanced therapeutic effects over the previously used AAV1-mini-agrin in extending mouse lifespan and improvement of muscle pathology. Additionally, overexpression of mini-agrin in peripheral nerves of dyw/dyw mice partially amended nerve pathology as evidenced by improved motor function and sensorimotor processing, partial restoration of myelination, partial restoration of basement membrane via EM examination, as well as decreased regeneration of Schwann cells. In conclusion, our studies indicate that overexpression of mini-agrin into dyw/dyw mice offers profound therapeutic effects in both skeletal muscle and nervous system. Keywords: LAMA2, mini-agrin, muscular dystrophy, CMD, AAV, gene therapy

  9. Naturally Protected Muscle Phenotypes: Development of Novel Treatment Strategies for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Dowling, Paul; Doran, Philip; Lohan, James; Culligan, Kevin; Ohlendieck, Kay

    2004-01-01

    Primary abnormalities in the dystrophin gene underlie x-linked muscular dystrophy. However, the absence of the dystrophin isoform Dp427 does not necessarily result in a severe dystrophic phenotype in all muscle groups. Distal mdx muscles, namely extraocular and toe fibres, appear to represent a protected phenotype in muscular dystrophy. Thus, a comparative analysis of affected versus naturally protected muscle cells should lead to a greater knowledge of the molecular pathogenes...

  10. Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Gene Expression in Normal and Diseased Human Muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oronzi Scott, M.; Sylvester, J. E.; Heiman-Patterson, T.; Shi, Y.-J.; Fieles, W.; Stedman, H.; Burghes, A.; Ray, P.; Worton, R.; Fischbeck, K. H.

    1988-03-01

    A probe for the 5' end of the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) gene was used to study expression of the gene in normal human muscle, myogenic cell cultures, and muscle from patients with DMD. Expression was found in RNA from normal fetal muscle, adult cardiac and skeletal muscle, and cultured muscle after myoblast fusion. In DMD muscle, expression of this portion of the gene was also revealed by in situ RNA hybridization, particularly in regenerating muscle fibers.

  11. Congenital Fibrosis of the Extraocular Muscles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leyla Niyaz

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Congenital fibrosis of the extraocular muscles (CFEOM is a rare disorder characterized by hereditary non-progressive restrictive strabismus and blepharoptosis. Although most of the cases are bilateral and isolated, some patients may have systemic findings. CFEOM is divided into three groups as CFEOM 1, 2, and 3 according to the phenotype. Primary responsible genes are KIF21A for CFEOM type 1 and 3 and PHOX2A/ARIX gene for CFEOM type 2. Studies suggest that abnormal innervation of the extraocular muscles is the cause of muscle fibrosis. Early treatment is important because of the risk of amblyopia. Surgery is the primary treatment option for strabismus and blepharoptosis. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2014; 44: 312-5

  12. Effect of sildenafil on skeletal and cardiac muscle in Becker muscular dystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Witting, Nanna; Kruuse, Christina; Nyhuus, Bo

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Patients with Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) and Duchenne muscular dystrophy lack neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS). nNOS mediates physiological sympatholysis, thus ensuring adequate blood supply to working muscle. In mice lacking dystrophin, restoration of nNOS effects...

  13. Modulation of Stem Cell Differentiation and Myostatin as an Approach to Counteract Fibrosis in Muscle Dystrophy and Regeneration after Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). To examine whether counteracting myostatin, a negative regulator of muscle mass and a pro-lipofibrotic factor...extracellular matrix, and fat, characterizes muscle dystrophy , and in particular Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) (1,2), as seen also in its animal model...stem cells (MDSC) into myogenic as opposed to lipofibrogenic lineages is a promising therapeutic strategy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). To

  14. Platelet-Derived Growth Factor BB Influences Muscle Regeneration in Duchenne Muscle Dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piñol-Jurado, Patricia; Gallardo, Eduard; de Luna, Noemi; Suárez-Calvet, Xavier; Sánchez-Riera, Carles; Fernández-Simón, Esther; Gomis, Clara; Illa, Isabel; Díaz-Manera, Jordi

    2017-08-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is characterized by a progressive loss of muscle fibers, and their substitution by fibrotic and adipose tissue. Many factors contribute to this process, but the molecular pathways related to regeneration and degeneration of muscle are not completely known. Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB belongs to a family of growth factors that regulate proliferation, migration, and differentiation of mesenchymal cells. The role of PDGF-BB in muscle regeneration in humans has not been studied. We analyzed the expression of PDGF-BB in muscle biopsy samples from controls and patients with DMD. We performed in vitro experiments to understand the effects of PDGF-BB on myoblasts involved in the pathophysiology of muscular dystrophies and confirmed our results in vivo by treating the mdx murine model of DMD with repeated i.m. injections of PDGF-BB. We observed that regenerating and necrotic muscle fibers in muscle biopsy samples from DMD patients expressed PDGF-BB. In vitro, PDGF-BB attracted myoblasts and activated their proliferation. Analysis of muscles from the animals treated with PDGF-BB showed an increased population of satellite cells and an increase in the number of regenerative fibers, with a reduction in inflammatory infiltrates, compared with those in vehicle-treated mice. Based on our results, PDGF-BB may play a protective role in muscular dystrophies by enhancing muscle regeneration through activation of satellite cell proliferation and migration. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Temporalis muscle hypertrophy and reduced skull eccentricity in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straathof, C S M; Doorenweerd, N; Wokke, B H A; Dumas, E M; van den Bergen, J C; van Buchem, M A; Hendriksen, J G M; Verschuuren, J J G M; Kan, H E

    2014-10-01

    Muscle hypertrophy and muscle weakness are well known in Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Decreased muscle force can have secondary effects on skeletal growth and development such as facial and dental morphology changes. In this study, we quantified temporal muscle thickness, circumference, and eccentricity of the skull and the head on T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of the head of 15 Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients and 15 controls. Average temporal muscle thickness was significantly increased in patients (12.9 ± 5.2 mm) compared to controls (6.8 ± 1.4 mm) (P muscle thickness and skull eccentricity were significantly negatively correlated in patients, and positively in controls. Hypertrophy of the temporal muscles and changes in skull eccentricity appear to occur early in the course of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Further studies in younger patients are needed to confirm a causal relationship. © The Author(s) 2014.

  16. A case of Fukuyama type congenital muscular dystrophy with progressive changes of brain CT scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Kenzi; Saijo, Takahiko; Hamaguchi, Hiroshi; Tayama, Masanobu; Kawano, Noboru; Hashimoto, Toshiaki; Miyao, Masuhide

    1988-01-01

    The Fukuyama type congenital muscular dystrophy (F-CMD) has been generally recognized as a well delineated subgroup of progressive muscular dystrophy with uniform clinical and pathological features. But the pathogenesis is not yet clear. Two theories have been proposed ; autosomal recessive inheritance and intrauterine infection. We experienced a female case of F-CMD, and tried serial brain CT scanning from the birth to one year of age. Low density changes of white matter were not found at the first day of her life. But marked brain atrophy and low density changes of white matter were found after three months. We propose that CT examination should be repeated from early stage to clarify the pathogenesis of F-CMD. (AUTHOR)

  17. Translating golden retriever muscular dystrophy microarray findings to novel biomarkers for cardiac/skeletal muscle function in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galindo, Cristi L; Soslow, Jonathan H; Brinkmeyer-Langford, Candice L; Gupte, Manisha; Smith, Holly M; Sengsayadeth, Seng; Sawyer, Douglas B; Benson, D Woodrow; Kornegay, Joe N; Markham, Larry W

    2016-04-01

    In Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), abnormal cardiac function is typically preceded by a decade of skeletal muscle disease. Molecular reasons for differences in onset and progression of these muscle groups are unknown. Human biomarkers are lacking. We analyzed cardiac and skeletal muscle microarrays from normal and golden retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD) dogs (ages 6, 12, or 47+ mo) to gain insight into muscle dysfunction and to identify putative DMD biomarkers. These biomarkers were then measured using human DMD blood samples. We identified GRMD candidate genes that might contribute to the disparity between cardiac and skeletal muscle disease, focusing on brain-derived neurotropic factor (BDNF) and osteopontin (OPN/SPP1, hereafter indicated as SPP1). BDNF was elevated in cardiac muscle of younger GRMD but was unaltered in skeletal muscle, while SPP1 was increased only in GRMD skeletal muscle. In human DMD, circulating levels of BDNF were inversely correlated with ventricular function and fibrosis, while SPP1 levels correlated with skeletal muscle function. These results highlight gene expression patterns that could account for differences in cardiac and skeletal disease in GRMD. Most notably, animal model-derived data were translated to DMD and support use of BDNF and SPP1 as biomarkers for cardiac and skeletal muscle involvement, respectively.

  18. Possible influences on the expression of X chromosome-linked dystrophin abnormalities by heterozygosity for autosomal recessive Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beggs, A.H.; Neumann, P.E.; Anderson, M.S.; Kunkel, L.M. (Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)); Arahata, Kiichi; Arikawa, Eri; Nonaka, Ikuya (National Inst. of Neuroscience, Tokyo (Japan))

    1992-01-15

    Abnormalities of dystrophin, a cytoskeletal protein of muscle and nerve, are generally considered specific for Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy. However, several patients have recently been identified with dystrophin deficiency who, before dystrophin testing, were considered to have Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy (FCMD) on the basis of clinical findings. Epidemiologic data suggest that only 1/3,500 males with autosomal recessive FCMD should have abnormal dystrophin. To explain the observation of 3/23 FCMD males with abnormal dystrophin, the authors propose that dystrophin and the FCMD gene product interact and that the earlier onset and greater severity of these patients' phenotype (relative to Duchenne muscular dystrophy) are due to their being heterozygous for the FCMD mutation in addition to being hemizygous for Duchenne muscular dystrophy, a genotype that is predicted to occur in 1/175,000 Japanese males. This model may help explain the genetic basis for some of the clinical and pathological variability seen among patients with FCMD, and it has potential implications for understanding the inheritance of other autosomal recessive disorders in general. For example, sex ratios for rare autosomal recessive disorders caused by mutations in proteins that interact with X chromosome-linked gene products may display predictable deviation from 1:1.

  19. Rare Muscular Dystrophies: Congenital, Distal, Emery-Dreifuss and Oculopharyngeal Muscular Dystrophies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... at least some cases of CMD. Merosin normally anchors muscle cells to a structure that encases them ( ... and sometimes frozen joints at the elbows, hips, ankles or knees. This protein is believed to play ...

  20. Muscle dysfunction in a zebrafish model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widrick, Jeffrey J; Alexander, Matthew S; Sanchez, Benjamin; Gibbs, Devin E; Kawahara, Genri; Beggs, Alan H; Kunkel, Louis M

    2016-11-01

    Sapje zebrafish lack the protein dystrophin and are the smallest vertebrate model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Their small size makes them ideal for large-scale drug discovery screens. However, the extent that sapje mimic the muscle dysfunction of higher vertebrate models of DMD is unclear. We used an optical birefringence assay to differentiate affected dystrophic sapje larvae from their unaffected siblings and then studied trunk muscle contractility at 4-7 days postfertilization. Preparation cross-sectional area (CSA) was similar for affected and unaffected larvae, yet tetanic forces of affected preparations were only 30-60% of normal. ANCOVA indicated that the linear relationship observed between tetanic force and CSA for unaffected preparations was absent in the affected population. Consequently, the average force/CSA of affected larvae was depressed 30-70%. Disproportionate reductions in twitch vs. tetanic force, and a slowing of twitch tension development and relaxation, indicated that the myofibrillar disorganization evident in the birefringence assay could not explain the entire force loss. Single eccentric contractions, in which activated preparations were lengthened 5-10%, resulted in tetanic force deficits in both groups of larvae. However, deficits of affected preparations were three- to fivefold greater at all strains and ages, even after accounting for any recovery. Based on these functional assessments, we conclude that the sapje mutant zebrafish is a phenotypically severe model of DMD. The severe contractile deficits of sapje larvae represent novel physiological endpoints for therapeutic drug screening. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  1. Becker muscular dystrophy with widespread muscle hypertrophy and a non-sense mutation of exon 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Witting, Nanna; Duno, M; Vissing, J

    2013-01-01

    Becker muscular dystrophy features progressive proximal weakness, wasting and often focal hypertrophy. We present a patient with pain and cramps from adolescence. Widespread muscle hypertrophy, preserved muscle strength and a 10-20-fold raised CPK were noted. Muscle biopsy was dystrophic......, and Western blot showed a 95% reduction of dystrophin levels. Genetic analyses revealed a non-sense mutation in exon 2 of the dystrophin gene. This mutation is predicted to result in a Duchenne phenotype, but resulted in a mild Becker muscular dystrophy with widespread muscle hypertrophy. We suggest...

  2. Allele-specific Gene Silencing of Mutant mRNA Restores Cellular Function in Ullrich Congenital Muscular Dystrophy Fibroblasts

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    Satoru Noguchi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD is an inherited muscle disorder characterized clinically by muscle weakness, distal joint hyperlaxity, and proximal joint contractures. Sporadic and recessive mutations in the three collagen VI genes, COL6A1, COL6A2, and COL6A3, are reported to be causative. In the sporadic forms, a heterozygous point mutation causing glycine substitution in the triple helical domain has been identified in higher rate. In this study, we examined the efficacy of siRNAs, which target point mutation site, on specific knockdown toward transcripts from mutant allele and evaluated consequent cellular phenotype of UCMD fibroblasts. We evaluated the effect of siRNAs targeted to silence-specific COL6A1 alleles in UCMD fibroblasts, where simultaneous expression of both wild-type and mutant collagen VI resulted in defective collagen localization. Addition of mutant-specific siRNAs allowed normal extracellular localization of collagen VI surrounding fibroblasts, suggesting selective inhibition of mutant collagen VI. Targeting the single-nucleotide COL6A1 c.850G>A (p.G284R mutation responsible a sporadic autosomal dominant form of UCMD can potently and selectively block expression of mutant collagen VI. These results suggest that allele-specific knockdown of the mutant mRNA can potentially be considered as a therapeutic procedure in UCMD due to COL6A1 point mutations.

  3. Congenital hypertrophy of multiple intrinsic muscles of the foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraishi, Tomohiro; Park, Susam; Niu, Atushi; Hasegawa, Hiromi

    2014-12-01

    Congenital hypertrophy of a single intrinsic muscle of the foot is rare, and as far as we know, only six cases have been reported. We describe a case of congenital anomaly that showed hypertrophy of multiple intrinsic muscles of the foot; the affected muscles were all the intrinsic muscles of the foot except the extensor digitorum brevis or extensor hallucis. Other tissues such as adipose tissue, nervous tissue, or osseous tissue showed no abnormalities. To reduce the volume of the foot we removed parts of the enlarged muscles.

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Is Sensitive to Pathological Amelioration in a Model for Laminin-Deficient Congenital Muscular Dystrophy (MDC1A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravneet Vohra

    Full Text Available To elucidate the reliability of MRI as a non-invasive tool for assessing in vivo muscle health and pathological amelioration in response to Losartan (Angiotensin II Type 1 receptor blocker in DyW mice (mouse model for Laminin-deficient Congenital Muscular Dystrophy Type 1A.Multiparametric MR quantifications along with histological/biochemical analyses were utilized to measure muscle volume and composition in untreated and Losartan-treated 7-week old DyW mice.MRI shows that DyW mice have significantly less hind limb muscle volume and areas of hyperintensity that are absent in WT muscle. DyW mice also have significantly elevated muscle levels (suggestive of inflammation and edema. Muscle T2 returned to WT levels in response to Losartan treatment. When considering only muscle pixels without T2 elevation, DyW T2 levels are significantly lower than WT (suggestive of fibrosis whereas Losartan-treated animals do not demonstrate this decrease in muscle T2. MRI measurements suggestive of elevated inflammation and fibrosis corroborate with increased Mac-1 positive cells as well as increased Picrosirius red staining/COL1a gene expression that is returned to WT levels in response to Losartan.MRI is sensitive to and tightly corresponds with pathological changes in DyW mice and thus is a viable and effective non-invasive tool for assessing pathological changes.

  5. Autonomic Dysfunction in Muscular Dystrophy: A Theoretical Framework for Muscle Reflex Involvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Alan Smith

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Muscular dystrophies are a heterogeneous group of genetically inherited disorders whose most prominent clinical feature is progressive degeneration of skeletal muscle. In several forms of the disease, the function of cardiac muscle is likewise affected. The primary defect in this group of diseases is caused by mutations in myocyte proteins important to cellular structure and/or performance. That being stated, a growing body of evidence suggests that the development of autonomic dysfunction may secondarily contribute to the generation of skeletal and cardio-myopathy in muscular dystrophy. Indeed, abnormalities in the regulation of both sympathetic and parasympathetic nerve activity have been reported in a number of muscular dystrophy variants. However, the mechanisms mediating this autonomic dysfunction remain relatively unknown. An autonomic reflex originating in skeletal muscle, the exercise pressor reflex, is known to contribute significantly to the control of sympathetic and parasympathetic activity when stimulated. Given the skeletal myopathy that develops with muscular dystrophy, it is logical to suggest that the function of this reflex might also be abnormal with the pathogenesis of disease. As such, it may contribute to or exacerbate the autonomic dysfunction that manifests. This possibility along with a basic description of exercise pressor reflex function in health and disease are reviewed. A better understanding of the mechanisms that possibly underlie autonomic dysfunction in muscular dystrophy may not only facilitate further research but could also lead to the identification of new therapeutic targets for the treatment of muscular dystrophy.

  6. Structure and function of masticatory muscles in a case of muscular dystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bakke, M; Kirkeby, S; Jensen, B L

    1990-01-01

    Histologic examination of muscle biopsies and functional examination comprising electromyography and force measurements in a 19-yr-old boy with muscular dystrophy showed different wasting patterns of mandibular elevator and depressor muscles. Pronounced histopathologic changes were present...... depressor strength corresponded more to reference values. This difference of muscular wasting might be caused by protective enzymes in the digastric muscle and/or functionally induced damage of the masseter. As affection from muscular dystrophy may vary greatly between the masticatory muscles, structural...... in the masseter muscle, whereas pathologic findings in the anterior digastric muscle were limited to increased number of cells in slightly enlarged interfiber connective tissue. The masticatory pattern was distorted, and strength of mandibular elevator muscles was less than one third of the norm, whereas...

  7. An herbal medicine, Go-sha-jinki-gan (GJG, increases muscle weight in severe muscle dystrophy model mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusei Takemoto

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Go-sha-jinki-gan (GJG, a traditional Japanese herbal medicine has a clinical implication to alleviate age-related symptoms, especially in some motor disorders. However, the scientific evidence is limited, and there is a possibility to expand the medical application range of GJG. Using senescence-accelerated mice, our group showed that GJG exerted an effect to prevent sarcopenia, the aged-related loss of skeletal muscle. Because muscular dystrophy is characterized by a progressive loss of skeletal muscle, we examined the effects of GJG on a mouse model of muscular dystrophy. Using a newly established mouse model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD, DBA/2-mdx, we showed that GJG significantly increased the body and skeletal muscle weights in comparison to the control DBA/2-mdx mice, regardless of gender. The increased skeletal muscle mass resulted from an increment in the myofiber size, but not from the myofiber number. Both the skeletal muscle regenerative ability and the accumulation of fibrosis (the dystrophic pathology in GJG-fed DBA/2-mdx mice were comparable to those in control DBA/2-mdx mice, suggesting that the cellular target of GJG is myofibers, with no contribution from the muscle satellite cells neither in an direct nor in an indirect manner. Taken together, GJG increased the skeletal muscle mass in a mouse model of muscular dystrophy, in addition to our previously tested sarcopenia mouse model.

  8. X-rays computed tomographic scans of lower limb and trunk muscles in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horikawa, Hirosei; Mano, Yukio; Takayanagi, Tetsuya [Nara Medical Univ., Kashihara (Japan); Takahashi, Keiichi; Nishio, Hisahide

    1992-10-01

    X-rays computed tomographic (CT) scans of muscles of the lower limbs and the trunk in 14 patients with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSH) were studied. The CT scans showed that the affected muscles were decreased in density and size. The laterality of muscular involvement was sometimes observed. The muscular lesions in the lower limbs showed proximal distribution. In the thigh, the hamstrings were affected first, the adductor muscles second, and then the muscular involvement progressed to the quadriceps femoris muscle. In the lower leg, the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles were relatively spared as compared with the tibialis anterior muscle. In the lumbar girdle, the abdominal muscles were involved first, the gluteal muscles second, the back muscles third, and the psoas major muscle were relatively spared. The muscular weakness of this distribution exacerbated lumbar lordosis. The neck muscles were less affected than those of the lumbar girdle. The CT scans in FSH demonstrated the characteristic pattern of muscular involvement, which differed from the inherited muscular diseases such as Duchenne muscular dystrophy, myotonic dystrophy, and others. (author).

  9. X-rays computed tomographic scans of lower limb and trunk muscles in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horikawa, Hirosei; Mano, Yukio; Takayanagi, Tetsuya; Takahashi, Keiichi; Nishio, Hisahide.

    1992-01-01

    X-rays computed tomographic (CT) scans of muscles of the lower limbs and the trunk in 14 patients with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSH) were studied. The CT scans showed that the affected muscles were decreased in density and size. The laterality of muscular involvement was sometimes observed. The muscular lesions in the lower limbs showed proximal distribution. In the thigh, the hamstrings were affected first, the adductor muscles second, and then the muscular involvement progressed to the quadriceps femoris muscle. In the lower leg, the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles were relatively spared as compared with the tibialis anterior muscle. In the lumbar girdle, the abdominal muscles were involved first, the gluteal muscles second, the back muscles third, and the psoas major muscle were relatively spared. The muscular weakness of this distribution exacerbated lumbar lordosis. The neck muscles were less affected than those of the lumbar girdle. The CT scans in FSH demonstrated the characteristic pattern of muscular involvement, which differed from the inherited muscular diseases such as Duchenne muscular dystrophy, myotonic dystrophy, and others. (author)

  10. Altered expression of cyclin A 1 in muscle of patients with facioscapulohumeral muscle dystrophy (FSHD-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Pakula

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Cyclin A1 regulates cell cycle activity and proliferation in somatic and germ-line cells. Its expression increases in G1/S phase and reaches a maximum in G2 and M phases. Altered cyclin A1 expression might contribute to clinical symptoms in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD. METHODS: Muscle biopsies were taken from the Vastus lateralis muscle for cDNA microarray, RT-PCR, immunohistochemistry and Western blot analyses to assess RNA and protein expression of cyclin A1 in human muscle cell lines and muscle tissue. Muscle fibers diameter was calculated on cryosections to test for hypertrophy. RESULTS: cDNA microarray data showed specifically elevated cyclin A1 levels in FSHD vs. other muscular disorders such as caveolinopathy, dysferlinopathy, four and a half LIM domains protein 1 deficiency and healthy controls. Data could be confirmed with RT-PCR and Western blot analysis showing up-regulated cyclin A1 levels also at protein level. We found also clear signs of hypertrophy within the Vastus lateralis muscle in FSHD-1 patients. CONCLUSIONS: In most somatic human cell lines, cyclin A1 levels are low. Overexpression of cyclin A1 in FSHD indicates cell cycle dysregulation in FSHD and might contribute to clinical symptoms of this disease.

  11. Omigapil treatment decreases fibrosis and improves respiratory rate in dy(2J mouse model of congenital muscular dystrophy.

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    Qing Yu

    Full Text Available Congenital muscular dystrophy is a distinct group of diseases presenting with weakness in infancy or childhood and no current therapy. One form, MDC1A, is the result of laminin alpha-2 deficiency and results in significant weakness, respiratory insufficiency and early death. Modification of apoptosis is one potential pathway for therapy in these patients.dy(2J mice were treated with vehicle, 0.1 mg/kg or 1 mg/kg of omigapil daily via oral gavage over 17.5 weeks. Untreated age matched BL6 mice were used as controls. Functional, behavioral and histological measurements were collected.dy(2J mice treated with omigapil showed improved respiratory rates compared to vehicle treated dy(2J mice (396 to 402 vs. 371 breaths per minute, p<0.03 and similar to control mice. There were no statistical differences in normalized forelimb grip strength between dy(2J and controls at baseline or after 17.5 weeks and no significant differences seen among the dy(2J treatment groups. At 30-33 weeks of age, dy(2J mice treated with 0.1 mg/kg omigapil showed significantly more movement time and less rest time compared to vehicle treated. dy(2J mice showed normal cardiac systolic function throughout the trial. dy(2J mice had significantly lower hindlimb maximal (p<0.001 and specific force (p<0.002 compared to the control group at the end of the trial. There were no statistically significant differences in maximal or specific force among treatments. dy(2J mice treated with 0.1 mg/kg/day omigapil showed decreased percent fibrosis in both gastrocnemius (p<0.03 and diaphragm (p<0.001 compared to vehicle, and in diaphragm (p<0.013 when compared to 1 mg/kg/day omigapil treated mice. Omigapil treated dy(2J mice demonstrated decreased apoptosis.Omigapil therapy (0.1 mg/kg improved respiratory rate and decreased skeletal and respiratory muscle fibrosis in dy(2J mice. These results support a putative role for the use of omigapil in laminin deficient congenital muscular dystrophy

  12. Congenital muscular dystrophy with merosin deficiency: MRI findings in five patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farina, L.; Milanesi, I.; Ciceri, E.; Savoiardo, M. [Dept. of Neuroradiology, Ist. Nazionale Neurologico C. Besta, Milan (Italy); Morandi, L.; Mora, M. [Dept. of Neuromuscular Disorders, Ist. Nazionale Neurologico C. Besta, Milan (Italy); Moroni, I.; Pantaleoni, C. [Dept. of Child Neurology, Ist. Nazionale Neurologico C. Besta, Milan (Italy)

    1998-12-01

    We present the MRI findings in five patients with congenital muscular dystrophy (CMD) and merosin (laminin {alpha} 2) deficiency, which was total in one and partial in four. In one patient with partial merosin deficiency, MRI was normal. The other four patients had supratentorial white matter abnormalities. In three, T2-weighted images revealed subcortical, deep lobar and periventricular high signal in white matter, while in the other there were only small peritrigonal areas of increased signal. On T1-weighted images, there was slightly low signal. Cortical abnormalities were absent. None of these changes were accompanied by symptoms or signs of central nervous system involvement. White matter abnormalities in a patient with CMD should prompt investigation of merosin. (orig.) With 4 figs., 11 refs.

  13. Muscular dystrophy in a family of Labrador Retrievers with no muscle dystrophin and a mild phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Natassia M; Guo, Ling T; Estrela, Elicia; Kunkel, Louis M; Zatz, Mayana; Shelton, G Diane

    2015-05-01

    Animal models of dystrophin deficient muscular dystrophy, most notably canine X-linked muscular dystrophy, play an important role in developing new therapies for human Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Although the canine disease is a model of the human disease, the variable severity of clinical presentations in the canine may be problematic for pre-clinical trials, but also informative. Here we describe a family of Labrador Retrievers with three generations of male dogs having markedly increased serum creatine kinase activity, absence of membrane dystrophin, but with undetectable clinical signs of muscle weakness. Clinically normal young male Labrador Retriever puppies were evaluated prior to surgical neuter by screening laboratory blood work, including serum creatine kinase activity. Serum creatine kinase activities were markedly increased in the absence of clinical signs of muscle weakness. Evaluation of muscle biopsies confirmed a dystrophic phenotype with both degeneration and regeneration. Further evaluations by immunofluorescence and western blot analysis confirmed the absence of muscle dystrophin. Although dystrophin was not identified in the muscles, we did not find any detectable deletions or duplications in the dystrophin gene. Sequencing is now ongoing to search for point mutations. Our findings in this family of Labrador Retriever dogs lend support to the hypothesis that, in exceptional situations, muscle with no dystrophin may be functional. Unlocking the secrets that protect these dogs from a severe clinical myopathy is a great challenge which may have important implications for future treatment of human muscular dystrophies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Systemic Inflammation in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy: Association with Muscle Function and Nutritional Status

    OpenAIRE

    Oriana del Rocío Cruz-Guzmán; Maricela Rodríguez-Cruz; Rosa Elena Escobar Cedillo

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation described in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) may be related to loss of muscle function or to obesity. It is unknown if circulating proinflammatory cytokines (IL-6, IL-1, and TNF-α) levels are associated with muscle function. The purpose was to evaluate whether an association exists between systemic inflammation with muscle function and nutritional status in DMD patients. In 66 DMD patients without corticosteroid treatment, the following were evaluated in serum: cy...

  15. Regulatory T cells suppress muscle inflammation and injury in muscular dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalta, S. Armando; Rosenthal, Wendy; Martinez, Leonel; Kaur, Amanjot; Sparwasser, Tim; Tidball, James G.; Margeta, Marta; Spencer, Melissa J.; Bluestone, Jeffrey A.

    2016-01-01

    We examined the hypothesis that regulatory T cells (Tregs) modulate muscle injury and inflammation in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Although Tregs were largely absent in the muscle of wildtype mice and normal human muscle, they were present in necrotic lesions, displayed an activated phenotype and showed increased expression of interleukin (IL)-10 in dystrophic muscle from mdx mice. Depletion of Tregs exacerbated muscle injury and the severity of muscle inflammation, which was characterized by an enhanced interferon-gamma (IFNγ) response and activation of M1 macrophages. To test the therapeutic value of targeting Tregs in muscular dystrophy, we treated mdx mice with IL-2/anti-IL-2 complexes (IL-2c), and found that Tregs and IL-10 concentrations were increased in muscle, resulting in reduced expression of cyclooygenase-2 and decreased myofiber injury. These findings suggest that Tregs modulate the progression of muscular dystrophy by suppressing type 1 inflammation in muscle associated with muscle fiber injury, and highlight the potential of Treg-modulating agents as therapeutics for DMD. PMID:25320234

  16. The Ras antagonist, farnesylthiosalicylic acid (FTS, decreases fibrosis and improves muscle strength in dy/dy mouse model of muscular dystrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoram Nevo

    Full Text Available The Ras superfamily of guanosine-triphosphate (GTP-binding proteins regulates a diverse spectrum of intracellular processes involved in inflammation and fibrosis. Farnesythiosalicylic acid (FTS is a unique and potent Ras inhibitor which decreased inflammation and fibrosis in experimentally induced liver cirrhosis and ameliorated inflammatory processes in systemic lupus erythematosus, neuritis and nephritis animal models. FTS effect on Ras expression and activity, muscle strength and fibrosis was evaluated in the dy(2J/dy(2J mouse model of merosin deficient congenital muscular dystrophy. The dy(2J/dy(2J mice had significantly increased RAS expression and activity compared with the wild type mice. FTS treatment significantly decreased RAS expression and activity. In addition, phosphorylation of ERK, a Ras downstream protein, was significantly decreased following FTS treatment in the dy(2J/dy(2J mice. Clinically, FTS treated mice showed significant improvement in hind limb muscle strength measured by electronic grip strength meter. Significant reduction of fibrosis was demonstrated in the treated group by quantitative Sirius Red staining and lower muscle collagen content. FTS effect was associated with significantly inhibition of both MMP-2 and MMP-9 activities. We conclude that active RAS inhibition by FTS was associated with attenuated fibrosis and improved muscle strength in the dy(2J/dy(2J mouse model of congenital muscular dystrophy.

  17. Overexpression of Latent TGFβ Binding Protein 4 in Muscle Ameliorates Muscular Dystrophy through Myostatin and TGFβ.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kay-Marie Lamar

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Latent TGFβ binding proteins (LTBPs regulate the extracellular availability of latent TGFβ. LTBP4 was identified as a genetic modifier of muscular dystrophy in mice and humans. An in-frame insertion polymorphism in the murine Ltbp4 gene associates with partial protection against muscular dystrophy. In humans, nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms in LTBP4 associate with prolonged ambulation in Duchenne muscular dystrophy. To better understand LTBP4 and its role in modifying muscular dystrophy, we created transgenic mice overexpressing the protective murine allele of LTBP4 specifically in mature myofibers using the human skeletal actin promoter. Overexpression of LTBP4 protein was associated with increased muscle mass and proportionally increased strength compared to age-matched controls. In order to assess the effects of LTBP4 in muscular dystrophy, LTBP4 overexpressing mice were bred to mdx mice, a model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. In this model, increased LTBP4 led to greater muscle mass with proportionally increased strength, and decreased fibrosis. The increase in muscle mass and reduction in fibrosis were similar to what occurs when myostatin, a related TGFβ family member and negative regulator of muscle mass, was deleted in mdx mice. Supporting this, we found that myostatin forms a complex with LTBP4 and that overexpression of LTBP4 led to a decrease in myostatin levels. LTBP4 also interacted with TGFβ and GDF11, a protein highly related to myostatin. These data identify LTBP4 as a multi-TGFβ family ligand binding protein with the capacity to modify muscle disease through overexpression.

  18. Muscle pathology in myotonic dystrophy: light and electron microscopic investigation in eighteen patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadaj-Pakleza, A; Lusakowska, A; Sułek-Piątkowska, A; Krysa, W; Rajkiewicz, M; Kwieciński, H; Kamińska, A

    2011-05-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM) is the most common muscular dystrophy in adults. Two known genetic subtypes include DM1 (myotonic dystrophy type 1) and DM2 (myotonic dystrophy type 2). Genetic testing is considered as the only reliable diagnostic criterion in myotonic dystrophies. Relatively little is known about DM1 and DM2 myopathology. Thus, the aim of our study was to characterise light and electron microscopic features of DM1 and DM2 in patients with genetically proven types of the disease. We studied 3 DM1 cases and 15 DM2 cases from which muscle biopsies were taken for diagnostic purposes during the period from 1973 to 2006, before genetic testing became available at our hospital. The DM1 group included 3 males (age at biopsy 15-19). The DM2 group included 15 patients (5 men and 10 women, age at biopsy 26-60). The preferential type 1 fibre atrophy was seen in all three DM1 cases in light microscopy, and substantial central nucleation was present in two biopsies. Electron microscopy revealed central nuclei in all three examined muscle biopsies. No other structural or degenerative changes were detected, probably due to the young age of our patients. Central nucleation, prevalence of type 2 muscle fibres, and the presence of pyknotic nuclear clumps were observed in DM2 patients in light microscopy. Among the ultrastructural abnormalities observed in our DM2 group, the presence of internal nuclei, severely atrophied muscle fibres, and lipofuscin accumulation were consistent findings. In addition, a variety of ultrastructural abnormalities were identified by us in DM2. It appears that no single ultrastructural abnormality is characteristic for the DM2 muscle pathology. It seems, however, that certain constellations of morphological changes might be indicative of certain types of myotonic dystrophy.

  19. Overexpression of Latent TGFβ Binding Protein 4 in Muscle Ameliorates Muscular Dystrophy through Myostatin and TGFβ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamar, Kay-Marie; Bogdanovich, Sasha; Gardner, Brandon B; Gao, Quan Q; Miller, Tamari; Earley, Judy U; Hadhazy, Michele; Vo, Andy H; Wren, Lisa; Molkentin, Jeffery D; McNally, Elizabeth M

    2016-05-01

    Latent TGFβ binding proteins (LTBPs) regulate the extracellular availability of latent TGFβ. LTBP4 was identified as a genetic modifier of muscular dystrophy in mice and humans. An in-frame insertion polymorphism in the murine Ltbp4 gene associates with partial protection against muscular dystrophy. In humans, nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms in LTBP4 associate with prolonged ambulation in Duchenne muscular dystrophy. To better understand LTBP4 and its role in modifying muscular dystrophy, we created transgenic mice overexpressing the protective murine allele of LTBP4 specifically in mature myofibers using the human skeletal actin promoter. Overexpression of LTBP4 protein was associated with increased muscle mass and proportionally increased strength compared to age-matched controls. In order to assess the effects of LTBP4 in muscular dystrophy, LTBP4 overexpressing mice were bred to mdx mice, a model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. In this model, increased LTBP4 led to greater muscle mass with proportionally increased strength, and decreased fibrosis. The increase in muscle mass and reduction in fibrosis were similar to what occurs when myostatin, a related TGFβ family member and negative regulator of muscle mass, was deleted in mdx mice. Supporting this, we found that myostatin forms a complex with LTBP4 and that overexpression of LTBP4 led to a decrease in myostatin levels. LTBP4 also interacted with TGFβ and GDF11, a protein highly related to myostatin. These data identify LTBP4 as a multi-TGFβ family ligand binding protein with the capacity to modify muscle disease through overexpression.

  20. Serum Osteopontin as a Novel Biomarker for Muscle Regeneration in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuraoka, Mutsuki; Kimura, En; Nagata, Tetsuya; Okada, Takashi; Aoki, Yoshitsugu; Tachimori, Hisateru; Yonemoto, Naohiro; Imamura, Michihiro; Takeda, Shin'ichi

    2016-05-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a lethal X-linked muscle disorder. We have already reported that osteopontin (OPN), an inflammatory cytokine and myogenic factor, is expressed in the early dystrophic phase in canine X-linked muscular dystrophy in Japan, a dystrophic dog model. To further explore the possibility of OPN as a new biomarker for disease activity in Duchenne muscular dystrophy, we monitored serum OPN levels in dystrophic and wild-type dogs at different ages and compared the levels to other serum markers, such as serum creatine kinase, matrix metalloproteinase-9, and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1. Serum OPN levels in the dystrophic dogs were significantly elevated compared with those in wild-type dogs before and 1 hour after a cesarean section birth and at the age of 3 months. The serum OPN level was significantly correlated with the phenotypic severity of dystrophic dogs at the period corresponding to the onset of muscle weakness, whereas other serum markers including creatine kinase were not. Immunohistologically, OPN was up-regulated in infiltrating macrophages and developmental myosin heavy chain-positive regenerating muscle fibers in the dystrophic dogs, whereas serum OPN was highly elevated. OPN expression was also observed during the synergic muscle regeneration process induced by cardiotoxin injection. In conclusion, OPN is a promising biomarker for muscle regeneration in dystrophic dogs and can be applicable to boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Zebrafish models flex their muscles to shed light on muscular dystrophies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Joachim; Currie, Peter D

    2012-11-01

    Muscular dystrophies are a group of genetic disorders that specifically affect skeletal muscle and are characterized by progressive muscle degeneration and weakening. To develop therapies and treatments for these diseases, a better understanding of the molecular basis of muscular dystrophies is required. Thus, identification of causative genes mutated in specific disorders and the study of relevant animal models are imperative. Zebrafish genetic models of human muscle disorders often closely resemble disease pathogenesis, and the optical clarity of zebrafish embryos and larvae enables visualization of dynamic molecular processes in vivo. As an adjunct tool, morpholino studies provide insight into the molecular function of genes and allow rapid assessment of candidate genes for human muscular dystrophies. This unique set of attributes makes the zebrafish model system particularly valuable for the study of muscle diseases. This review discusses how recent research using zebrafish has shed light on the pathological basis of muscular dystrophies, with particular focus on the muscle cell membrane and the linkage between the myofibre cytoskeleton and the extracellular matrix.

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging of skeletal muscle in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagao, Hideo; Morimoto, Takehiko; Sano, Nozomi; Takahashi, Mitsugi; Nagai, Hironao; Tawa, Ritsuko; Yoshimatsu, Makoto; Woo Young-Jong; Matsuda, Hiroshi.

    1991-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging of skeletal muscles in thirteen patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy was performed to estimate pathological changes. Serial axial and sagittal sections of the right lower extremity were recorded. In the early stage, the T 1 values of gastrocnemius and soleus muscles were slightly lower than the control values, and in the late stage, the values were much lower in all muscles examined. In sagittal sections, the gastrocnemius muscle in the early stage showed a high density area at the distal region adjacent to soleus muscle, and the soleus muscle showed a high density area adjacent to the gestrocnemius muscle. In serial axial sections, high density areas of the anterior and posterior tibialis muscles appeared first at their proximal and peripheral regions. It was concluded that the sequence of appearance of pathological changes was different not only among individual muscles but also among various regions of each muscle; the high density changes appeared first at myotendon junctions. (author)

  3. A decline in PABPN1 induces progressive muscle weakness in oculopharyngeal muscle dystrophy and in muscle aging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anvar, Seyed Yahya; Raz, Yotam; Verway, Nisha

    2013-01-01

    Oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD) is caused by trinucleotide repeat expansion mutations in Poly(A) binding protein 1 (PABPN1). PABPN1 is a regulator of mRNA stability and is ubiquitously expressed. Here we investigated how symptoms in OPMD initiate only at midlife and why a subset...... of skeletal muscles is predominantly affected. Genome-wide RNA expression profiles from Vastus lateralis muscles human carriers of expanded-PABPN1 at pre-symptomatic and symptomatic stages were compared with healthy controls. Major expression changes were found to be associated with age rather than...... with expression of expanded-PABPN1, instead transcriptomes of OPMD and elderly muscles were significantly similar (P...

  4. Cranial x-ray CT and MRI in congenital muscular dystrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horikawa, Hirosei; Konishi, Toshihiko; Konagaya, Masaaki; Mano, Yukio; Takayanagi, Tetsuya

    1988-01-01

    The involvements of central nervous system in those cases of congenital muscular dystrophy (CMD), especially in Fukuyama type CMD, have been observed both radiologically and pathologically. The recent development of MRI made it easier to detect fine structural changes in brain matter than the X-ray CT. Then, we tried to evaluate the central nervous system abnormalities of six cases of CMD by both X-ray CT and MRI. In one case, X-ray CT revealed diffuse hypodensity of cerebral white matter, and MRI showed high intensity on long spin-echo image and low intensity on inversion-recovery image. In another case, X-ray CT showed no abnormal findings, but long spin-echo image revealed two high intensity spots in cerebral white matter. In other four cases, brain atrophy was demonstrated by X-ray CT and/or MRI, one case of these patients had bilateral congenital arachnoid cysts in the middle cranial fossa and hypogenesis of temporal lobes. Although we could not demonstrate polymicrogyria and agyria in all cases by MRI, white matter changes and structural changes were revealed more clearly than X-ray CT. The combination of X-ray CT and MRI seems to make a noteworthy contribution to estimate the central nervous system abnormalities in CMD. (author)

  5. Expression of Pannexin 1 and Pannexin 3 during skeletal muscle development, regeneration, and Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Tammy L; St-Pierre, Marie-Eve; Ravel-Chapuis, Aymeric; Parks, Tara E C; Langlois, Stéphanie; Penuela, Silvia; Jasmin, Bernard J; Cowan, Kyle N

    2018-05-10

    Pannexin 1 (Panx1) and Pannexin 3 (Panx3) are single membrane channels recently implicated in myogenic commitment, as well as myoblast proliferation and differentiation in vitro. However, their expression patterns during skeletal muscle development and regeneration had yet to be investigated. Here, we show that Panx1 levels increase during skeletal muscle development becoming highly expressed together with Panx3 in adult skeletal muscle. In adult mice, Panx1 and Panx3 were differentially expressed in fast- and slow-twitch muscles. We also report that Panx1/PANX1 and Panx3/PANX3 are co-expressed in mouse and human satellite cells, which play crucial roles in skeletal muscle regeneration. Interestingly, Panx1 and Panx3 levels were modulated in muscle degeneration/regeneration, similar to the pattern seen during skeletal muscle development. As Duchenne muscular dystrophy is characterized by skeletal muscle degeneration and impaired regeneration, we next used mild and severe mouse models of this disease and found a significant dysregulation of Panx1 and Panx3 levels in dystrophic skeletal muscles. Together, our results are the first demonstration that Panx1 and Panx3 are differentially expressed amongst skeletal muscle types with their levels being highly modulated during skeletal muscle development, regeneration, and dystrophy. These findings suggest that Panx1 and Panx3 channels may play important and distinct roles in healthy and diseased skeletal muscles. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Secreted Protein Acidic and Rich in Cysteine (SPARC) in Human Skeletal Muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Louise H; Petersson, Stine J; Sellathurai, Jeeva

    2009-01-01

    indicated a function of SPARC in skeletal muscle. We therefore found it of interest to study SPARC expression in human skeletal muscle during development and in biopsies from Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy and congenital muscular dystrophy, congenital myopathy, inclusion body myositis...

  7. Skeletal Muscle Metabolism in Duchenne and Becker Muscular Dystrophy-Implications for Therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heydemann, Ahlke

    2018-06-20

    The interactions between nutrition and metabolism and skeletal muscle have long been known. Muscle is the major metabolic organ—it consumes more calories than other organs—and therefore, there is a clear need to discuss these interactions and provide some direction for future research areas regarding muscle pathologies. In addition, new experiments and manuscripts continually reveal additional highly intricate, reciprocal interactions between metabolism and muscle. These reciprocal interactions include exercise, age, sex, diet, and pathologies including atrophy, hypoxia, obesity, diabetes, and muscle myopathies. Central to this review are the metabolic changes that occur in the skeletal muscle cells of muscular dystrophy patients and mouse models. Many of these metabolic changes are pathogenic (inappropriate body mass changes, mitochondrial dysfunction, reduced adenosine triphosphate (ATP) levels, and increased Ca 2+ ) and others are compensatory (increased phosphorylated AMP activated protein kinase (pAMPK), increased slow fiber numbers, and increased utrophin). Therefore, reversing or enhancing these changes with therapies will aid the patients. The multiple therapeutic targets to reverse or enhance the metabolic pathways will be discussed. Among the therapeutic targets are increasing pAMPK, utrophin, mitochondrial number and slow fiber characteristics, and inhibiting reactive oxygen species. Because new data reveals many additional intricate levels of interactions, new questions are rapidly arising. How does muscular dystrophy alter metabolism, and are the changes compensatory or pathogenic? How does metabolism affect muscular dystrophy? Of course, the most profound question is whether clinicians can therapeutically target nutrition and metabolism for muscular dystrophy patient benefit? Obtaining the answers to these questions will greatly aid patients with muscular dystrophy.

  8. MRI for the demonstration of subclinical muscle involvement in muscular dystrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sookhoo, S.; MacKinnon, I.; Bushby, K.; Chinnery, P.F.; Birchall, D.

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To compare magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with clinical examination for the detection of muscle abnormality in patients with muscular dystrophy. Methods: Muscle power in 20 patients with a variety of forms of muscular dystrophy was examined clinically using the Medical Research Council (MRC) grading scale, and patients were subsequently imaged with MRI. MRI and clinical examination for the detection of muscle normality and abnormality were compared using a McNemar chi-squared test to examine differences between the two methods. Results: MRI demonstrated radiological evidence of muscle abnormality more often than clinical examination; 50% of movements assessed as normal on clinical examination were associated with muscle abnormalities on MRI, including a significant proportion where there was severe radiological abnormality, indicating that focally advanced disease may be undetectable clinically. Conclusion: The combination of clinical examination and MRI could improve the accuracy of phenotypic characterization of patients with muscular dystrophy, and this in turn could allow a more focussed molecular analysis through muscle biopsy or genetic investigation. This may also be very helpful in the assessment of the degree of muscle compromise not only in the early phases of the disease but especially during follow-up and can be used in therapeutic trials

  9. Quantitative computed tomography for objectifying disseminated skeletal muscles alterations in female conductors of progressive muscular dystrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huppert, P.

    1987-01-01

    The detection of early morphologic changes, such as circumscribed infiltrations of adipose connective tissue into the muscles of female conductors of progressive muscular dystrophy requires quantitative planimetric methods. For a reliable interpretation of the results the dependence of the fat content of the musculature on age and physical constitution of the patient must be taken into consideration in each individual case. (author)

  10. Becker muscular dystrophy with widespread muscle hypertrophy and a non-sense mutation of exon 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witting, N; Duno, M; Vissing, J

    2013-01-01

    Becker muscular dystrophy features progressive proximal weakness, wasting and often focal hypertrophy. We present a patient with pain and cramps from adolescence. Widespread muscle hypertrophy, preserved muscle strength and a 10-20-fold raised CPK were noted. Muscle biopsy was dystrophic, and Western blot showed a 95% reduction of dystrophin levels. Genetic analyses revealed a non-sense mutation in exon 2 of the dystrophin gene. This mutation is predicted to result in a Duchenne phenotype, but resulted in a mild Becker muscular dystrophy with widespread muscle hypertrophy. We suggest that this unusual phenotype is caused by translation re-initiation downstream from the mutation site. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Metabogenic and Nutriceutical Approaches to Address Energy Dysregulation and Skeletal Muscle Wasting in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Rybalka

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD is a fatal genetic muscle wasting disease with no current cure. A prominent, yet poorly treated feature of dystrophic muscle is the dysregulation of energy homeostasis which may be associated with intrinsic defects in key energy systems and promote muscle wasting. As such, supplementative nutriceuticals that target and augment the bioenergetical expansion of the metabolic pathways involved in cellular energy production have been widely investigated for their therapeutic efficacy in the treatment of DMD. We describe the metabolic nuances of dystrophin-deficient skeletal muscle and review the potential of various metabogenic and nutriceutical compounds to ameliorate the pathological and clinical progression of the disease.

  12. Muscular dystrophy in a dog resembling human becker muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baroncelli, A B; Abellonio, F; Pagano, T B; Esposito, I; Peirone, B; Papparella, S; Paciello, O

    2014-05-01

    A 3-year-old, male Labrador retriever dog was presented with clinical signs of progressive exercise intolerance, bilateral elbow extension, rigidity of the forelimbs, hindlimb flexion and kyphosis. Microscopical examination of muscle tissue showed marked variability in myofibre size, replacement of muscle with mature adipose tissue and degeneration/regeneration of muscle fibres, consistent with muscular dystrophy. Immunohistochemical examination for dystrophin showed markedly reduced labelling with monoclonal antibodies specific for the rod domain and the carboxy-terminal of dystrophin, while expression of β-sarcoglycan, γ-sarcoglycan and β-dystroglycan was normal. Immunoblotting revealed a truncated dystrophin protein of approximately 135 kDa. These findings supported a diagnosis of congenital canine muscular dystrophy resembling Becker muscular dystrophy in man. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Non-invasive assessment of muscle stiffness in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacourpaille, Lilian; Hug, François; Guével, Arnaud; Péréon, Yann; Magot, Armelle; Hogrel, Jean-Yves; Nordez, Antoine

    2015-02-01

    Assessment of muscle mechanical properties may provide clinically valuable information for follow-up of patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) through the course of their disease. In this study we aimed to assess the effect of DMD on stiffness of relaxed muscles using elastography (supersonic shear imaging). Fourteen DMD patients and 13 control subjects were studied. Six muscles were measured at 2 muscle lengths (shortened and stretched): gastrocnemius medialis (GM); tibialis anterior (TA); vastus lateralis (VL); biceps brachii (BB); triceps brachii (TB); and abductor digiti minimi (ADM). Stiffness was significantly higher in DMD patients compared with controls for all the muscles (main effect for population, P muscle lengths) to large (d = 0.86 for BB/stretched). Supersonic shear imaging is a sensitive non-invasive technique to assess the increase in muscle stiffness associated with DMD. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. CD133+ cells derived from skeletal muscles of Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients have a compromised myogenic and muscle regenerative capability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Jinhong; Muntoni, Francesco; Morgan, Jennifer

    2018-05-12

    Cell-mediated gene therapy is a possible means to treat muscular dystrophies like Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Autologous patient stem cells can be genetically-corrected and transplanted back into the patient, without causing immunorejection problems. Regenerated muscle fibres derived from these cells will express the missing dystrophin protein, thus improving muscle function. CD133+ cells derived from normal human skeletal muscle contribute to regenerated muscle fibres and form muscle stem cells after their intra-muscular transplantation into an immunodeficient mouse model. But it is not known whether CD133+ cells derived from DMD patient muscles have compromised muscle regenerative function. To test this, we compared CD133+ cells derived from DMD and normal human muscles. DMD CD133+ cells had a reduced capacity to undergo myogenic differentiation in vitro compared with CD133+ cells derived from normal muscle. In contrast to CD133+ cells derived from normal human muscle, those derived from DMD muscle formed no satellite cells and gave rise to significantly fewer muscle fibres of donor origin, after their intra-muscular transplantation into an immunodeficient, non-dystrophic, mouse muscle. DMD CD133+ cells gave rise to more clones of smaller size and more clones that were less myogenic than did CD133+ cells derived from normal muscle. The heterogeneity of the progeny of CD133+ cells, combined with the reduced proliferation and myogenicity of DMD compared to normal CD133+ cells, may explain the reduced regenerative capacity of DMD CD133+ cells. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Merosin-deficient congenital muscular dystrophy (CMD): a study of 25 Brazilian patients using MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leite, Claudia C.; Lucato, Leandro T.; Martin, Maria G.M.; Ferreira, Lucio G.; Resende, Maria B.D.; Carvalho, Mary S.; Marie, Suely K.N.; Reed, Umbertina C.; Jinkins, J.Randy

    2005-01-01

    Merosin-deficient congenital muscular dystrophy (CMD) is characterized clinically by hypotonia and muscular weakness and, on imaging studies, by white matter (WM) abnormality. To evaluate MRI findings in Brazilian patients with merosin-deficient CMD. Twenty-five patients were evaluated using MRI. Three patients presented with partial merosin deficiency and 22 with total merosin deficiency. Follow-up examinations were done in 7 cases. T1- and T2-weighted images were performed in all examinations, and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) was performed in 15. Enhanced images were done in 11 cases. The WM involvement was classified according to location and severity. From 1991 to 2004, 32 MRI examinations were performed. Severe involvement was found in 23 patients in the frontal and temporal lobes, in 18 patients in the parietal lobes, and in 7 patients in the occipital lobes. The brain stem (n=5), cerebellum (n=6), internal capsules (n=1), and external capsules (n=5) were also affected. One patient had occipital pachygyria, and one had cerebellar vermian hypoplasia. No gadolinium enhancement was noted. Follow-up MRI showed no interval change (n=4), progression (n=1), or improvement of the findings (n=2). (orig.)

  16. Role of Decorin Core Protein in Collagen Organisation in Congenital Stromal Corneal Dystrophy (CSCD.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina S Kamma-Lorger

    Full Text Available The role of Decorin in organising the extracellular matrix was examined in normal human corneas and in corneas from patients with Congenital Stromal Corneal Dystrophy (CSCD. In CSCD, corneal clouding occurs due to a truncating mutation (c.967delT in the decorin (DCN gene. Normal human Decorin protein and the truncated one were reconstructed in silico using homology modelling techniques to explore structural changes in the diseased protein. Corneal CSCD specimens were also examined using 3-D electron tomography and Small Angle X-ray diffraction (SAXS, to image the collagen-proteoglycan arrangement and to quantify fibrillar diameters, respectively. Homology modelling showed that truncated Decorin had a different spatial geometry to the normal one, with the truncation removing a major part of the site that interacts with collagen, compromising its ability to bind effectively. Electron tomography showed regions of abnormal stroma, where collagen fibrils came together to form thicker fibrillar structures, showing that Decorin plays a key role in the maintenance of the order in the normal corneal extracellular matrix. Average diameter of individual fibrils throughout the thickness of the cornea however remained normal.

  17. Contribution of oxidative stress to pathology in diaphragm and limb muscles with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong-Hee; Kwak, Hyo-Bum; Thompson, LaDora V; Lawler, John M

    2013-02-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a degenerative skeletal muscle disease that makes walking and breathing difficult. DMD is caused by an X-linked (Xp21) mutation in the dystrophin gene. Dystrophin is a scaffolding protein located in the sarcolemmal cytoskeleton, important in maintaining structural integrity and regulating muscle cell (muscle fiber) growth and repair. Dystrophin deficiency in mouse models (e.g., mdx mouse) destabilizes the interface between muscle fibers and the extracellular matrix, resulting in profound damage, inflammation, and weakness in diaphragm and limb muscles. While the link between dystrophin deficiency with inflammation and pathology is multi-factorial, elevated oxidative stress has been proposed as a central mediator. Unfortunately, the use of non-specific antioxidant scavengers in mouse and human studies has led to inconsistent results, obscuring our understanding of the importance of redox signaling in pathology of muscular dystrophy. However, recent studies with more mechanistic approaches in mdx mice suggest that NAD(P)H oxidase and nuclear factor-kappaB are important in amplifying dystrophin-deficient muscle pathology. Therefore, more targeted antioxidant therapeutics may ameliorate damage and weakness in human population, thus promoting better muscle function and quality of life. This review will focus upon the pathobiology of dystrophin deficiency in diaphragm and limb muscle primarily in mouse models, with a rationale for development of targeted therapeutic antioxidants in DMD patients.

  18. Muscle ERRγ mitigates Duchenne muscular dystrophy via metabolic and angiogenic reprogramming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsakas, Antonios; Yadav, Vikas; Lorca, Sabina; Narkar, Vihang

    2013-10-01

    Treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) by replacing mutant dystrophin or restoring dystrophin-associated glycoprotein complex (DAG) has been clinically challenging. Instead, identifying and targeting muscle pathways deregulated in DMD will provide new therapeutic avenues. We report that the expression of nuclear receptor estrogen-related receptor-γ (ERRγ), and its metabolic and angiogenic targets are down-regulated (50-85%) in skeletal muscles of mdx mice (DMD model) vs. wild-type mice. Corelatively, oxidative myofibers, muscle vasculature, and exercise tolerance (33%) are decreased in mdx vs. wild-type mice. Overexpressing ERRγ selectively in the dystrophic muscles of the mdx mice restored metabolic and angiogenic gene expression compared with control mdx mice. Further, ERRγ enhanced muscle oxidative myofibers, vasculature, and blood flow (by 33-66%) and improved exercise tolerance (by 75%) in the dystrophic mice. Restoring muscle ERRγ pathway ameliorated muscle damage and also prevented DMD hallmarks of postexercise muscle damage, hypoxia, and fatigue in mdx mice. Notably, ERRγ did not restore sarcolemmal DAG complex, which is thus dispensable for antidystrophic effects of ERRγ. In summary, ERRγ-dependent metabolic and angiogenic gene program is defective in DMD, and we demonstrate that its restoration is a potential strategy for treating muscular dystrophy.

  19. Progression and variation of fatty infiltration of the thigh muscles in Duchenne muscular dystrophy, a muscle magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenzhu; Zheng, Yiming; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Zhaoxia; Xiao, Jiangxi; Yuan, Yun

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the progression and variation of fatty infiltration of the thigh muscles of Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients. Muscle magnetic resonance imaging was used to measure the degree of fatty infiltration of the thigh muscles of 171 boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (mean age, 6.09 ± 2.30 years). Fatty infiltration was assigned using a modified Mercuri's scale 0-5 (normal-severe). The gluteus maximus and adductor magnus were affected in patients less than two years old, followed by the biceps femoris. Quadriceps and semimembranosus were first affected at the age of five to six years; the sartorius, gracilis and adductor longus remained apparently unaffected until seven years of age. Fatty infiltration of all the thigh muscles developed rapidly after seven years of age. The standard deviation of the fatty infiltration scores ranged from 2.41 to 4.87 before five years old, and from 6.84 to 11.66 between six and ten years old. This study provides evidence of highly variable degrees of fatty infiltration in children of different ages with Duchenne muscular dystrophy, and indicates that fatty infiltration progresses more quickly after seven years of age. These findings may be beneficial for the selection of therapeutic regimens and the analysis of future clinical trials. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. A Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Model of Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy-Affected Skeletal Muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caron, Leslie; Kher, Devaki; Lee, Kian Leong; McKernan, Robert; Dumevska, Biljana; Hidalgo, Alejandro; Li, Jia; Yang, Henry; Main, Heather; Ferri, Giulia; Petek, Lisa M; Poellinger, Lorenz; Miller, Daniel G; Gabellini, Davide; Schmidt, Uli

    2016-09-01

    : Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) represents a major unmet clinical need arising from the progressive weakness and atrophy of skeletal muscles. The dearth of adequate experimental models has severely hampered our understanding of the disease. To date, no treatment is available for FSHD. Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) potentially represent a renewable source of skeletal muscle cells (SkMCs) and provide an alternative to invasive patient biopsies. We developed a scalable monolayer system to differentiate hESCs into mature SkMCs within 26 days, without cell sorting or genetic manipulation. Here we show that SkMCs derived from FSHD1-affected hESC lines exclusively express the FSHD pathogenic marker double homeobox 4 and exhibit some of the defects reported in FSHD. FSHD1 myotubes are thinner when compared with unaffected and Becker muscular dystrophy myotubes, and differentially regulate genes involved in cell cycle control, oxidative stress response, and cell adhesion. This cellular model will be a powerful tool for studying FSHD and will ultimately assist in the development of effective treatments for muscular dystrophies. This work describes an efficient and highly scalable monolayer system to differentiate human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) into skeletal muscle cells (SkMCs) and demonstrates disease-specific phenotypes in SkMCs derived from both embryonic and induced hPSCs affected with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy. This study represents the first human stem cell-based cellular model for a muscular dystrophy that is suitable for high-throughput screening and drug development. ©AlphaMed Press.

  1. Fnip1 regulates skeletal muscle fiber type specification, fatigue resistance, and susceptibility to muscular dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Nicholas L.; Banks, Glen B.; Tsang, Mark; Margineantu, Daciana; Gu, Haiwei; Djukovic, Danijel; Chan, Jacky; Torres, Michelle; Liggitt, H. Denny; Hirenallur-S, Dinesh K.; Hockenbery, David M.; Raftery, Daniel; Iritani, Brian M.

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian skeletal muscle is broadly characterized by the presence of two distinct categories of muscle fibers called type I “red” slow twitch and type II “white” fast twitch, which display marked differences in contraction strength, metabolic strategies, and susceptibility to fatigue. The relative representation of each fiber type can have major influences on susceptibility to obesity, diabetes, and muscular dystrophies. However, the molecular factors controlling fiber type specification remain incompletely defined. In this study, we describe the control of fiber type specification and susceptibility to metabolic disease by folliculin interacting protein-1 (Fnip1). Using Fnip1 null mice, we found that loss of Fnip1 increased the representation of type I fibers characterized by increased myoglobin, slow twitch markers [myosin heavy chain 7 (MyH7), succinate dehydrogenase, troponin I 1, troponin C1, troponin T1], capillary density, and mitochondria number. Cultured Fnip1-null muscle fibers had higher oxidative capacity, and isolated Fnip1-null skeletal muscles were more resistant to postcontraction fatigue relative to WT skeletal muscles. Biochemical analyses revealed increased activation of the metabolic sensor AMP kinase (AMPK), and increased expression of the AMPK-target and transcriptional coactivator PGC1α in Fnip1 null skeletal muscle. Genetic disruption of PGC1α rescued normal levels of type I fiber markers MyH7 and myoglobin in Fnip1-null mice. Remarkably, loss of Fnip1 profoundly mitigated muscle damage in a murine model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. These results indicate that Fnip1 controls skeletal muscle fiber type specification and warrant further study to determine whether inhibition of Fnip1 has therapeutic potential in muscular dystrophy diseases. PMID:25548157

  2. Relationship between muscle strength and motor function in Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milene F. Nunes

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Measuring muscle strength and motor function is part of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD assessment. However, the relationship between these variables is controversial. Objective To investigate the relationship between muscle strength and motor function and between these variables and age. Method Muscle strength was measured by Medical Research Council (MRC scale and motor function, by Motor Function Measure (MFM, in 40 non-ambulatory patients. Spearman tests investigated the relationships between muscle strength, motor function and age. Results Total MRC and MFM scores were strongly related to each other (r = 0.94; p 0.05. Strong and moderate relationships between partial muscle strength and motor function scores were found. Higher correlation coefficients were found between total scores and Dimensions 2 (axial/ proximal control and 3 (distal control of MFM. Conclusion Muscle strength and motor function are strongly correlated and seem to decrease proportionally in DMD.

  3. Intramuscular degeneration process in Duchenne muscular dystrophy; Investigation by longitudinal MR imaging of the skeletal muscles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasegawa, Takeshi; Matsumra, Kiichiro (Shimoshizu National Hospital, Yotsukaido, Chiba (Japan)); Hashimoto, Takahiro; Ikehira, Hiroo; Fukuda, Hiroshi; Tateno, Yukio

    1992-03-01

    Intramuscular degeneration process of Duchenne dystrophy skeletal muscles was investigated by longitudinal skeletal muscle imaging with high-field-strength NMR-CT of 1.5 Tesla. Thigh muscles in 10 cases ranging in age from 4 to 19 years were examined by T{sub 1}-weighted longitudinal images (TR=215{approx}505 ms, TE=19{approx}20 ms). The following results were obtained. Skeletal muscle degeneration was depicted as high signal intensity area reflecting its high fat contents. These high signal intensity areas had a longitudinally streaky appearance in parallel direction with myofibers. These findings were more prominent toward myotendon junction than muscle bellies. Skeletal muscle degeneration progressed rapidly between 7 to 10 years of age, and reached a plateau after that. (author).

  4. Quantitative muscle ultrasound in Duchenne muscular dystrophy: a comparison of techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shklyar, Irina; Geisbush, Tom R; Mijialovic, Aleksandar S; Pasternak, Amy; Darras, Basil T; Wu, Jim S; Rutkove, Seward B; Zaidman, Craig M

    2015-02-01

    Muscle pathology in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) can be quantified using ultrasound by measuring either the amplitudes of sound-waves scattered back from the tissue [quantitative backscatter analysis (QBA)] or by measuring these backscattered amplitudes after compression into grayscale levels (GSL) obtained from the images. We measured and compared QBA and GSL from 6 muscles of 25 boys with DMD and 25 healthy subjects, aged 2-14 years, with age and, in DMD, with function (North Star Ambulatory Assessment). Both QBA and GSL were measured reliably (intraclass correlation ≥ 0.87) and were higher in DMD than controls (P muscle increased (rho ≥ 0.47, P muscle did not. QBA and GSL measured from superficial regions of muscle can similarly quantify muscle pathology in DMD. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Hsp72 preserves muscle function and slows progression of severe muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrig, Stefan M; van der Poel, Chris; Sayer, Timothy A; Schertzer, Jonathan D; Henstridge, Darren C; Church, Jarrod E; Lamon, Severine; Russell, Aaron P; Davies, Kay E; Febbraio, Mark A; Lynch, Gordon S

    2012-04-04

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a severe and progressive muscle wasting disorder caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene that result in the absence of the membrane-stabilizing protein dystrophin. Dystrophin-deficient muscle fibres are fragile and susceptible to an influx of Ca(2+), which activates inflammatory and muscle degenerative pathways. At present there is no cure for DMD, and existing therapies are ineffective. Here we show that increasing the expression of intramuscular heat shock protein 72 (Hsp72) preserves muscle strength and ameliorates the dystrophic pathology in two mouse models of muscular dystrophy. Treatment with BGP-15 (a pharmacological inducer of Hsp72 currently in clinical trials for diabetes) improved muscle architecture, strength and contractile function in severely affected diaphragm muscles in mdx dystrophic mice. In dko mice, a phenocopy of DMD that results in severe spinal curvature (kyphosis), muscle weakness and premature death, BGP-15 decreased kyphosis, improved the dystrophic pathophysiology in limb and diaphragm muscles and extended lifespan. We found that the sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA, the main protein responsible for the removal of intracellular Ca(2+)) is dysfunctional in severely affected muscles of mdx and dko mice, and that Hsp72 interacts with SERCA to preserve its function under conditions of stress, ultimately contributing to the decreased muscle degeneration seen with Hsp72 upregulation. Treatment with BGP-15 similarly increased SERCA activity in dystrophic skeletal muscles. Our results provide evidence that increasing the expression of Hsp72 in muscle (through the administration of BGP-15) has significant therapeutic potential for DMD and related conditions, either as a self-contained therapy or as an adjuvant with other potential treatments, including gene, cell and pharmacological therapies.

  6. Expression of the Murine Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Gene in Muscle and Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, Jeffrey S.; Pearlman, Joel A.; Muzny, Donna M.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Ranier, Joel E.; Reeves, Alice A.; Caskey, C. Thomas

    1988-03-01

    Complementary DNA clones were isolated that represent the 5' terminal 2.5 kilobases of the murine Duchenne muscular dystrophy (Dmd) messenger RNA (mRNA). Mouse Dmd mRNA was detectable in skeletal and cardiac muscle and at a level approximately 90 percent lower in brain. Dmd mRNA is also present, but at much lower than normal levels, in both the muscle and brain of three different strains of dystrophic mdx mice. The identification of Dmd mRNA in brain raises the possibility of a relation between human Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) gene expression and the mental retardation found in some DMD males. These results also provide evidence that the mdx mutations are allelic variants of mouse Dmd gene mutations.

  7. Sildenafil reduces respiratory muscle weakness and fibrosis in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Percival, Justin M; Whitehead, Nicholas P; Adams, Marvin E; Adamo, Candace M; Beavo, Joseph A; Froehner, Stanley C

    2012-09-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most common form of muscular dystrophy caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene. Loss of dystrophin initiates a progressive decline in skeletal muscle integrity and contractile capacity which weakens respiratory muscles including the diaphragm, culminating in respiratory failure, the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in DMD patients. At present, corticosteroid treatment is the primary pharmacological intervention in DMD, but has limited efficacy and adverse side effects. Thus, there is an urgent need for new safe, cost-effective, and rapidly implementable treatments that slow disease progression. One promising new approach is the amplification of nitric oxide-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (NO-cGMP) signalling pathways with phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) inhibitors. PDE5 inhibitors serve to amplify NO signalling that is attenuated in many neuromuscular diseases including DMD. We report here that a 14-week treatment of the mdx mouse model of DMD with the PDE5 inhibitor sildenafil (Viagra(®), Revatio(®)) significantly reduced mdx diaphragm muscle weakness without impacting fatigue resistance. In addition to enhancing respiratory muscle contractility, sildenafil also promoted normal extracellular matrix organization. PDE5 inhibition slowed the establishment of mdx diaphragm fibrosis and reduced matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP-13) expression. Sildenafil also normalized the expression of the pro-fibrotic (and pro-inflammatory) cytokine tumour necrosis factor α (TNFα). Sildenafil-treated mdx diaphragms accumulated significantly less Evans Blue tracer dye than untreated controls, which is also indicative of improved diaphragm muscle health. We conclude that sildenafil-mediated PDE5 inhibition significantly reduces diaphragm respiratory muscle dysfunction and pathology in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. This study provides new insights into the therapeutic utility of targeting defects in NO

  8. Immortalized human myotonic dystrophy muscle cell lines to assess therapeutic compounds

    OpenAIRE

    Arandel, Ludovic; Polay Espinoza, Micaela; Matloka, Magdalena; Bazinet, Audrey; De Dea Diniz, Damily; Naouar, Na?ra; Rau, Fr?d?rique; Jollet, Arnaud; Edom-Vovard, Fr?d?rique; Mamchaoui, Kamel; Tarnopolsky, Mark; Puymirat, Jack; Battail, Christophe; Boland, Anne; Deleuze, Jean-Francois

    2017-01-01

    International audience; Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) and type 2 (DM2) are autosomal dominant neuromuscular diseases caused by microsatellite expansions and belong to the family of RNA-dominant disorders. Availability of cellular models in which the DM mutation is expressed within its natural context is essential to facilitate efforts to identify new therapeutic compounds. Here, we generated immortalized DM1 and DM2 human muscle cell lines that display nuclear RNA aggregates of expanded rep...

  9. Quantitative MRI and strength measurements in the assessment of muscle quality in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wokke, B H; van den Bergen, J C; Versluis, M J; Niks, E H; Milles, J; Webb, A G; van Zwet, E W; Aartsma-Rus, A; Verschuuren, J J; Kan, H E

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess leg muscle quality and give a detailed description of leg muscle involvement in a series of Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients using quantitative MRI and strength measurements. Fatty infiltration, as well as total and contractile (not fatty infiltrated) cross sectional areas of various leg muscles were determined in 16 Duchenne patients and 11 controls (aged 8-15). To determine specific muscle strength, four leg muscle groups (quadriceps femoris, hamstrings, anterior tibialis and triceps surae) were measured and related to the amount of contractile tissue. In patients, the quadriceps femoris showed decreased total and contractile cross sectional area, attributable to muscle atrophy. The total, but not the contractile, cross sectional area of the triceps surae was increased in patients, corresponding to hypertrophy. Specific strength decreased in all four muscle groups of Duchenne patients, indicating reduced muscle quality. This suggests that muscle hypertrophy and fatty infiltration are two distinct pathological processes, differing between muscle groups. Additionally, the quality of remaining muscle fibers is severely reduced in the legs of Duchenne patients. The combination of quantitative MRI and quantitative muscle testing could be a valuable outcome parameter in longitudinal studies and in the follow-up of therapeutic effects. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Muscle MRI findings in patients with limb girdle muscular dystrophy with calpain 3 deficiency (LGMD2A) and early contractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercuri, Eugenio; Bushby, Kate; Ricci, Enzo; Birchall, Daniel; Pane, Marika; Kinali, Maria; Allsop, Joanna; Nigro, Vincenzo; Sáenz, Amets; Nascimbeni, Annachiara; Fulizio, Luigi; Angelini, Corrado; Muntoni, Francesco

    2005-02-01

    Limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2A is a common variant secondary to mutations in the calpain 3 gene. A proportion of patients has early and severe contractures, which can cause diagnostic difficulties with other conditions. We report clinical and muscle magnetic resonance imaging findings in seven limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2A patients (four sporadic and three familial) who had prominent and early contractures. All patients showed a striking involvement of the posterior thigh muscles. The involvement of the other thigh muscles was variable and was related to clinical severity. Young patients with minimal functional motor impairment showed a predominant involvement of the adductors and semimembranosus muscles while patients with restricted ambulation had a more diffuse involvement of the posterolateral muscles of the thigh and of the vastus intermedius with relative sparing of the vastus lateralis, sartorius and gracilis. At calf level all patients showed involvement of the soleus muscle and of the medial head of the gastrocnemius with relative sparing of the lateral head. MRI findings were correlated to those found in two patients with the phenotype of limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2A without early contractures and the pattern observed was quite similar. However, the pattern observed in limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2A is different from that reported in other muscle diseases such as Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy and Bethlem myopathy which have a significant clinical overlap with limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2A once early contractures are present. Our results suggest that muscle MRI may help in recognising patients with limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2A even when the clinical presentation overlaps with other conditions, and may therefore, be used as an additional investigation to target the appropriate biochemical and genetic tests.

  11. Morphological and ultrastructural evaluation of the golden retriever muscular dystrophy trachea, lungs, and diaphragm muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lessa, Thais Borges; de Abreu, Dilayla Kelly; Rodrigues, Márcio Nogueira; Brólio, Marina Pandolphi; Miglino, Maria Angélica; Ambrósio, Carlos Eduardo

    2014-11-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a genetic disease, characterized by atrophy and muscle weakness. The respiratory failure is a common cause of early death in patients with DMD. Golden retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD) is a canine model which has been extensively used for many advances in therapeutics applications. As the patients with DMD, the GRMD frequently died from cardiac and respiratory failure. Observing the respiratory failure in DMD is one of the major causes of mortality we aimed to describe the morphological and ultrastructural data of trachea, lungs (conductive and respiratory portion of the system), and diaphragm muscle using histological and ultrastructural analysis. The diaphragm muscle showed discontinuous fibers architecture, with different diameter; a robust perimysium inflammatory infiltrate and some muscle cells displayed central nuclei. GRMD trachea and lungs presented collagen fibers and in addition, the GRMD lungs showed higher of levels collagen fibers that could limit the alveolar ducts and alveoli distension. Therefore, the most features observed were the collagen areas and fibrosis. We suggested in this study that the collagen remodeling in the trachea, lungs, and diaphragm muscle may increase fibrosis and affect the trachea, lungs, and diaphragm muscle function that can be a major cause of respiratory failure that occur in patients with DMD. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Glucocorticoids enhance muscle endurance and ameliorate Duchenne muscular dystrophy through a defined metabolic program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morrison-Nozik, Alexander; Anand, Priti; Zhu, Han

    2015-01-01

    in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), a genetic muscle-wasting disease. A defined molecular basis underlying these performance-enhancing properties of GCs in skeletal muscle remains obscure. Here, we demonstrate that ergogenic effects of GCs are mediated by direct induction of the metabolic transcription......Classic physiology studies dating to the 1930s demonstrate that moderate or transient glucocorticoid (GC) exposure improves muscle performance. The ergogenic properties of GCs are further evidenced by their surreptitious use as doping agents by endurance athletes and poorly understood efficacy...... factor KLF15, defining a downstream pathway distinct from that resulting in GC-related muscle atrophy. Furthermore, we establish that KLF15 deficiency exacerbates dystrophic severity and muscle GC-KLF15 signaling mediates salutary therapeutic effects in the mdx mouse model of DMD. Thus, although...

  13. Musculoskeletal simulation can help explain selective muscle degeneration in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiao; Blemker, Silvia S

    2015-08-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a genetic disease that occurs due to the deficiency of the dystrophin protein. Although dystrophin is deficient in all muscles, it is unclear why degeneration progresses differently across muscles in DMD. We hypothesized that each muscle undergoes a different degree of eccentric contraction during gait, which could contribute to the selective degeneration in lower limb muscle, as indicated by various amounts of fatty infiltration. By comparing eccentric contractions quantified from a previous multibody dynamic musculoskeletal gait simulation and fat fractions quantified in a recent imaging study, our preliminary analyses show a strong correlation between eccentric contractions during gait and lower limb muscle fat fractions, supporting our hypothesis. This knowledge is critical for developing safe exercise regimens for the DMD population. This study also provides supportive evidence for using multiscale modeling and simulation of the musculoskeletal system in future DMD research. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Muscle function recovery in golden retriever muscular dystrophy after AAV1-U7 exon skipping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vulin, Adeline; Barthélémy, Inès; Goyenvalle, Aurélie; Thibaud, Jean-Laurent; Beley, Cyriaque; Griffith, Graziella; Benchaouir, Rachid; le Hir, Maëva; Unterfinger, Yves; Lorain, Stéphanie; Dreyfus, Patrick; Voit, Thomas; Carlier, Pierre; Blot, Stéphane; Garcia, Luis

    2012-11-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked recessive disorder resulting from lesions of the gene encoding dystrophin. These usually consist of large genomic deletions, the extents of which are not correlated with the severity of the phenotype. Out-of-frame deletions give rise to dystrophin deficiency and severe DMD phenotypes, while internal deletions that produce in-frame mRNAs encoding truncated proteins can lead to a milder myopathy known as Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD). Widespread restoration of dystrophin expression via adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated exon skipping has been successfully demonstrated in the mdx mouse model and in cardiac muscle after percutaneous transendocardial delivery in the golden retriever muscular dystrophy dog (GRMD) model. Here, a set of optimized U7snRNAs carrying antisense sequences designed to rescue dystrophin were delivered into GRMD skeletal muscles by AAV1 gene transfer using intramuscular injection or forelimb perfusion. We show sustained correction of the dystrophic phenotype in extended muscle areas and partial recovery of muscle strength. Muscle architecture was improved and fibers displayed the hallmarks of mature and functional units. A 5-year follow-up ruled out immune rejection drawbacks but showed a progressive decline in the number of corrected muscle fibers, likely due to the persistence of a mild dystrophic process such as occurs in BMD phenotypes. Although AAV-mediated exon skipping was shown safe and efficient to rescue a truncated dystrophin, it appears that recurrent treatments would be required to maintain therapeutic benefit ahead of the progression of the disease.

  15. Correlation of Utrophin Levels with the Dystrophin Protein Complex and Muscle Fibre Regeneration in Duchenne and Becker Muscular Dystrophy Muscle Biopsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janghra, Narinder; Morgan, Jennifer E; Sewry, Caroline A; Wilson, Francis X; Davies, Kay E; Muntoni, Francesco; Tinsley, Jonathon

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a severe and currently incurable progressive neuromuscular condition, caused by mutations in the DMD gene that result in the inability to produce dystrophin. Lack of dystrophin leads to loss of muscle fibres and a reduction in muscle mass and function. There is evidence from dystrophin-deficient mouse models that increasing levels of utrophin at the muscle fibre sarcolemma by genetic or pharmacological means significantly reduces the muscular dystrophy pathology. In order to determine the efficacy of utrophin modulators in clinical trials, it is necessary to accurately measure utrophin levels and other biomarkers on a fibre by fibre basis within a biopsy section. Our aim was to develop robust and reproducible staining and imaging protocols to quantify sarcolemmal utrophin levels, sarcolemmal dystrophin complex members and numbers of regenerating fibres within a biopsy section. We quantified sarcolemmal utrophin in mature and regenerating fibres and the percentage of regenerating muscle fibres, in muscle biopsies from Duchenne, the milder Becker muscular dystrophy and controls. Fluorescent immunostaining followed by image analysis was performed to quantify utrophin intensity and β-dystrogylcan and ɣ -sarcoglycan intensity at the sarcolemma. Antibodies to fetal and developmental myosins were used to identify regenerating muscle fibres allowing the accurate calculation of percentage regeneration fibres in the biopsy. Our results indicate that muscle biopsies from Becker muscular dystrophy patients have fewer numbers of regenerating fibres and reduced utrophin intensity compared to muscle biopsies from Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients. Of particular interest, we show for the first time that the percentage of regenerating muscle fibres within the muscle biopsy correlate with the clinical severity of Becker and Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients from whom the biopsy was taken. The ongoing development of these tools to quantify

  16. Correlation of Utrophin Levels with the Dystrophin Protein Complex and Muscle Fibre Regeneration in Duchenne and Becker Muscular Dystrophy Muscle Biopsies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narinder Janghra

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a severe and currently incurable progressive neuromuscular condition, caused by mutations in the DMD gene that result in the inability to produce dystrophin. Lack of dystrophin leads to loss of muscle fibres and a reduction in muscle mass and function. There is evidence from dystrophin-deficient mouse models that increasing levels of utrophin at the muscle fibre sarcolemma by genetic or pharmacological means significantly reduces the muscular dystrophy pathology. In order to determine the efficacy of utrophin modulators in clinical trials, it is necessary to accurately measure utrophin levels and other biomarkers on a fibre by fibre basis within a biopsy section. Our aim was to develop robust and reproducible staining and imaging protocols to quantify sarcolemmal utrophin levels, sarcolemmal dystrophin complex members and numbers of regenerating fibres within a biopsy section. We quantified sarcolemmal utrophin in mature and regenerating fibres and the percentage of regenerating muscle fibres, in muscle biopsies from Duchenne, the milder Becker muscular dystrophy and controls. Fluorescent immunostaining followed by image analysis was performed to quantify utrophin intensity and β-dystrogylcan and ɣ -sarcoglycan intensity at the sarcolemma. Antibodies to fetal and developmental myosins were used to identify regenerating muscle fibres allowing the accurate calculation of percentage regeneration fibres in the biopsy. Our results indicate that muscle biopsies from Becker muscular dystrophy patients have fewer numbers of regenerating fibres and reduced utrophin intensity compared to muscle biopsies from Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients. Of particular interest, we show for the first time that the percentage of regenerating muscle fibres within the muscle biopsy correlate with the clinical severity of Becker and Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients from whom the biopsy was taken. The ongoing development of these

  17. Muscle ultrasound elastography and MRI in preschool children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichiecchio, Anna; Alessandrino, Francesco; Bortolotto, Chandra; Cerica, Alessandra; Rosti, Cristina; Raciti, Maria Vittoria; Rossi, Marta; Berardinelli, Angela; Baranello, Giovanni; Bastianello, Stefano; Calliada, Fabrizio

    2018-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine muscle tissue elasticity, measured with shear-wave elastography, in selected lower limb muscles of patients affected by Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and to correlate the values obtained with those recorded in healthy children and with muscle magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data from the same DMD children, specifically the pattern on T1-weighted (w) and short-tau inversion recovery (STIR) sequences. Five preschool DMD children and five age-matched healthy children were studied with shear-wave elastography. In the DMD children, muscle stiffness was moderately higher compared with the muscle stiffness in HC, in the rectus femoris, vastus lateralis, adductor magnus and gluteus maximus muscles. On muscle MRI T1-w images showed fatty replacement in 3/5 patients at the level of the GM, while thigh and leg muscles were affected in 2/5; hyperintensity on STIR images was identified in 4/5 patients. No significant correlation was observed between stiffness values and MRI scoring. Our study demonstrated that lower limb muscles of preschool DMD patients show fatty replacement and patchy edema on muscle MRI and increased stiffness on shear-wave elastography. In conclusion, although further studies in larger cohorts are needed, shear-wave elastography could be considered a useful non-invasive tool to easily monitor muscle changes in early stages of the disease. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Characteristic of muscle involvement evaluated by CT scans in early stages of progressive muscular dystrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arai, Yumi

    1993-01-01

    Muscle CT scans were performed in order to compare the characteristic distribution of progressive muscle involvement in the early stages of Duchenne type (DMD) and Fukuyama type muscular dystrophy (FCMD). Muscle images at the levels of the 3rd lumbar vertebra, thigh and calf were assessed by visual inspection, and mean CT numbers calculated for individual muscles were statistically analysed. On visual inspection, intramuscular low density areas and muscular atrophy were observed in the muscles of older patients with either disease. These changes were, however, more extensive at thigh level in DMD, and at calf level in FCMD. Nevertheless, the mean CT numbers of muscles in which only slight changes were grossly visible on CT scans displayed progressive decreases with increasing age. Moreover, a significant negative relationship was recognizable between age and mean CT number in almost all muscles examined. Comparison of the slopes of the regression lines revealed that the so-called selective pattern of muscle involvement characteristic of the symptomatic stage had already partially manifested in the preclinical or early stages of both diseases. In FCMD, the rates of decrease in CT numbers were extremely rapid for calf muscles as compared with those in DMD, indicating that this is one reason for FCMD patients never becoming ambulatory. However, for almost all of the other muscles, the CT numbers in FCMD decreased in parallel with the corresponding CT numbers in DMD; thus, these diseases displayed a similarity in the pattern of muscle involvement, despite their different pathogenetic mechanisms and inheritance patterns. (author)

  19. Skeletal, cardiac, and respiratory muscle function and histopathology in the P448Lneo- mouse model of FKRP-deficient muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qing; Morales, Melissa; Li, Ning; Fritz, Alexander G; Ruobing, Ren; Blaeser, Anthony; Francois, Ershia; Lu, Qi-Long; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina; Spurney, Christopher F

    2018-04-06

    Fukutin-related protein (FKRP) mutations are the most common cause of dystroglycanopathies known to cause both limb girdle and congenital muscular dystrophy. The P448Lneo- mouse model has a knock-in mutation in the FKRP gene and develops skeletal, respiratory, and cardiac muscle disease. We studied the natural history of the P448Lneo- mouse model over 9 months and the effects of twice weekly treadmill running. Forelimb and hindlimb grip strength (Columbus Instruments) and overall activity (Omnitech Electronics) assessed skeletal muscle function. Echocardiography was performed using VisualSonics Vevo 770 (FujiFilm VisualSonics). Plethysmography was performed using whole body system (ADInstruments). Histological evaluations included quantification of inflammation, fibrosis, central nucleation, and fiber size variation. P448Lneo- mice had significantly increased normalized tissue weights compared to controls at 9 months of age for the heart, gastrocnemius, soleus, tibialis anterior, quadriceps, and triceps. There were no significant differences seen in forelimb or hindlimb grip strength or activity monitoring in P448Lneo- mice with or without exercise compared to controls. Skeletal muscles demonstrated increased inflammation, fibrosis, central nucleation, and variation in fiber size compared to controls (p muscular dystrophies.

  20. Distribution of skeletal muscle involvement in autosomal recessive distal muscular dystrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizusawa, Hidehiro; Nakanishi, Takao; Kobayashi, Fumie.

    1987-01-01

    Distribution of skeletal muscle involvement in 5 cases with autosomal recessive distal muscular dystrophy was studied clinically and by computed tomography (CT). Manual muscle test showed muscle involvement with a predilection for flexors in the lower leg and adductors in the thigh. Flexion and extension of the thigh and the lower leg was impaired to similar degree. In progressed cases, neck flexors and trunk muscles were also affected mildly. CT disclosed more clearly the preferential involvement of flexors in the lower leg, and involvement of both hamstrings · adductors group and extensors group of the thigh to similar degree. However, m. popliteus was curiously well preserved. In addition, there was a stage showing high density and hypertrophy of m. sartorius, m. gracilis, m. adductor, m. biceps femoris, m. semimenbranosus, m. semitendinosus or m. rectus femoris, which in thought to be compensatory hypertrophy. M. gluteus minimus in the pelvic girdle and m. dorsi proprii in the trunk were also liable to be affected. The CT findings are regarded as characteristic features noted clearly before muscle weakness and atrophy become apparent clinically. CT is very useful for distinguishing distal muscular dystrophy from rimmed vacuolar distal myopathy in which m. quadriceps femoris and flexors of the lower leg are usually well preserved without compensatory hypertrophy on CT. (author)

  1. Targeting DMPK with Antisense Oligonucleotide Improves Muscle Strength in Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1 Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominic Jauvin

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1, a dominant hereditary muscular dystrophy, is caused by an abnormal expansion of a (CTGn trinucleotide repeat in the 3′ UTR of the human dystrophia myotonica protein kinase (DMPK gene. As a consequence, mutant transcripts containing expanded CUG repeats are retained in nuclear foci and alter the function of splicing regulatory factors members of the MBNL and CELF families, resulting in alternative splicing misregulation of specific transcripts in affected DM1 tissues. In the present study, we treated DMSXL mice systemically with a 2′-4′-constrained, ethyl-modified (ISIS 486178 antisense oligonucleotide (ASO targeted to the 3′ UTR of the DMPK gene, which led to a 70% reduction in CUGexp RNA abundance and foci in different skeletal muscles and a 30% reduction in the heart. Furthermore, treatment with ISIS 486178 ASO improved body weight, muscle strength, and muscle histology, whereas no overt toxicity was detected. This is evidence that the reduction of CUGexp RNA improves muscle strength in DM1, suggesting that muscle weakness in DM1 patients may be improved following elimination of toxic RNAs.

  2. Targeting DMPK with Antisense Oligonucleotide Improves Muscle Strength in Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1 Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauvin, Dominic; Chrétien, Jessina; Pandey, Sanjay K; Martineau, Laurie; Revillod, Lucille; Bassez, Guillaume; Lachon, Aline; MacLeod, A Robert; Gourdon, Geneviève; Wheeler, Thurman M; Thornton, Charles A; Bennett, C Frank; Puymirat, Jack

    2017-06-16

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1), a dominant hereditary muscular dystrophy, is caused by an abnormal expansion of a (CTG) n trinucleotide repeat in the 3' UTR of the human dystrophia myotonica protein kinase (DMPK) gene. As a consequence, mutant transcripts containing expanded CUG repeats are retained in nuclear foci and alter the function of splicing regulatory factors members of the MBNL and CELF families, resulting in alternative splicing misregulation of specific transcripts in affected DM1 tissues. In the present study, we treated DMSXL mice systemically with a 2'-4'-constrained, ethyl-modified (ISIS 486178) antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) targeted to the 3' UTR of the DMPK gene, which led to a 70% reduction in CUG exp RNA abundance and foci in different skeletal muscles and a 30% reduction in the heart. Furthermore, treatment with ISIS 486178 ASO improved body weight, muscle strength, and muscle histology, whereas no overt toxicity was detected. This is evidence that the reduction of CUG exp RNA improves muscle strength in DM1, suggesting that muscle weakness in DM1 patients may be improved following elimination of toxic RNAs. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Skeletal muscle magnetic resonance biomarkers correlate with function and sentinel events in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard, Alison M; Willcocks, Rebecca J; Finanger, Erika L; Daniels, Michael J; Triplett, William T; Rooney, William D; Lott, Donovan J; Forbes, Sean C; Wang, Dah-Jyuu; Senesac, Claudia R; Harrington, Ann T; Finkel, Richard S; Russman, Barry S; Byrne, Barry J; Tennekoon, Gihan I; Walter, Glenn A; Sweeney, H Lee; Vandenborne, Krista

    2018-01-01

    To provide evidence for quantitative magnetic resonance (qMR) biomarkers in Duchenne muscular dystrophy by investigating the relationship between qMR measures of lower extremity muscle pathology and functional endpoints in a large ambulatory cohort using a multicenter study design. MR spectroscopy and quantitative imaging were implemented to measure intramuscular fat fraction and the transverse magnetization relaxation time constant (T2) in lower extremity muscles of 136 participants with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Measures were collected at 554 visits over 48 months at one of three imaging sites. Fat fraction was measured in the soleus and vastus lateralis using MR spectroscopy, while T2 was assessed using MRI in eight lower extremity muscles. Ambulatory function was measured using the 10m walk/run, climb four stairs, supine to stand, and six minute walk tests. Significant correlations were found between all qMR and functional measures. Vastus lateralis qMR measures correlated most strongly to functional endpoints (|ρ| = 0.68-0.78), although measures in other rapidly progressing muscles including the biceps femoris (|ρ| = 0.63-0.73) and peroneals (|ρ| = 0.59-0.72) also showed strong correlations. Quantitative MR biomarkers were excellent indicators of loss of functional ability and correlated with qualitative measures of function. A VL FF of 0.40 was an approximate lower threshold of muscle pathology associated with loss of ambulation. Lower extremity qMR biomarkers have a robust relationship to clinically meaningful measures of ambulatory function in Duchenne muscular dystrophy. These results provide strong supporting evidence for qMR biomarkers and set the stage for their potential use as surrogate outcomes in clinical trials.

  4. Immortalized human myotonic dystrophy muscle cell lines to assess therapeutic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arandel, Ludovic; Polay Espinoza, Micaela; Matloka, Magdalena; Bazinet, Audrey; De Dea Diniz, Damily; Naouar, Naïra; Rau, Frédérique; Jollet, Arnaud; Edom-Vovard, Frédérique; Mamchaoui, Kamel; Tarnopolsky, Mark; Puymirat, Jack; Battail, Christophe; Boland, Anne; Deleuze, Jean-Francois; Mouly, Vincent; Klein, Arnaud F.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) and type 2 (DM2) are autosomal dominant neuromuscular diseases caused by microsatellite expansions and belong to the family of RNA-dominant disorders. Availability of cellular models in which the DM mutation is expressed within its natural context is essential to facilitate efforts to identify new therapeutic compounds. Here, we generated immortalized DM1 and DM2 human muscle cell lines that display nuclear RNA aggregates of expanded repeats, a hallmark of myotonic dystrophy. Selected clones of DM1 and DM2 immortalized myoblasts behave as parental primary myoblasts with a reduced fusion capacity of immortalized DM1 myoblasts when compared with control and DM2 cells. Alternative splicing defects were observed in differentiated DM1 muscle cell lines, but not in DM2 lines. Splicing alterations did not result from differentiation delay because similar changes were found in immortalized DM1 transdifferentiated fibroblasts in which myogenic differentiation has been forced by overexpression of MYOD1. As a proof-of-concept, we show that antisense approaches alleviate disease-associated defects, and an RNA-seq analysis confirmed that the vast majority of mis-spliced events in immortalized DM1 muscle cells were affected by antisense treatment, with half of them significantly rescued in treated DM1 cells. Immortalized DM1 muscle cell lines displaying characteristic disease-associated molecular features such as nuclear RNA aggregates and splicing defects can be used as robust readouts for the screening of therapeutic compounds. Therefore, immortalized DM1 and DM2 muscle cell lines represent new models and tools to investigate molecular pathophysiological mechanisms and evaluate the in vitro effects of compounds on RNA toxicity associated with myotonic dystrophy mutations. PMID:28188264

  5. Immortalized human myotonic dystrophy muscle cell lines to assess therapeutic compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludovic Arandel

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1 and type 2 (DM2 are autosomal dominant neuromuscular diseases caused by microsatellite expansions and belong to the family of RNA-dominant disorders. Availability of cellular models in which the DM mutation is expressed within its natural context is essential to facilitate efforts to identify new therapeutic compounds. Here, we generated immortalized DM1 and DM2 human muscle cell lines that display nuclear RNA aggregates of expanded repeats, a hallmark of myotonic dystrophy. Selected clones of DM1 and DM2 immortalized myoblasts behave as parental primary myoblasts with a reduced fusion capacity of immortalized DM1 myoblasts when compared with control and DM2 cells. Alternative splicing defects were observed in differentiated DM1 muscle cell lines, but not in DM2 lines. Splicing alterations did not result from differentiation delay because similar changes were found in immortalized DM1 transdifferentiated fibroblasts in which myogenic differentiation has been forced by overexpression of MYOD1. As a proof-of-concept, we show that antisense approaches alleviate disease-associated defects, and an RNA-seq analysis confirmed that the vast majority of mis-spliced events in immortalized DM1 muscle cells were affected by antisense treatment, with half of them significantly rescued in treated DM1 cells. Immortalized DM1 muscle cell lines displaying characteristic disease-associated molecular features such as nuclear RNA aggregates and splicing defects can be used as robust readouts for the screening of therapeutic compounds. Therefore, immortalized DM1 and DM2 muscle cell lines represent new models and tools to investigate molecular pathophysiological mechanisms and evaluate the in vitro effects of compounds on RNA toxicity associated with myotonic dystrophy mutations.

  6. Immortalized human myotonic dystrophy muscle cell lines to assess therapeutic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arandel, Ludovic; Polay Espinoza, Micaela; Matloka, Magdalena; Bazinet, Audrey; De Dea Diniz, Damily; Naouar, Naïra; Rau, Frédérique; Jollet, Arnaud; Edom-Vovard, Frédérique; Mamchaoui, Kamel; Tarnopolsky, Mark; Puymirat, Jack; Battail, Christophe; Boland, Anne; Deleuze, Jean-Francois; Mouly, Vincent; Klein, Arnaud F; Furling, Denis

    2017-04-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) and type 2 (DM2) are autosomal dominant neuromuscular diseases caused by microsatellite expansions and belong to the family of RNA-dominant disorders. Availability of cellular models in which the DM mutation is expressed within its natural context is essential to facilitate efforts to identify new therapeutic compounds. Here, we generated immortalized DM1 and DM2 human muscle cell lines that display nuclear RNA aggregates of expanded repeats, a hallmark of myotonic dystrophy. Selected clones of DM1 and DM2 immortalized myoblasts behave as parental primary myoblasts with a reduced fusion capacity of immortalized DM1 myoblasts when compared with control and DM2 cells. Alternative splicing defects were observed in differentiated DM1 muscle cell lines, but not in DM2 lines. Splicing alterations did not result from differentiation delay because similar changes were found in immortalized DM1 transdifferentiated fibroblasts in which myogenic differentiation has been forced by overexpression of MYOD1. As a proof-of-concept, we show that antisense approaches alleviate disease-associated defects, and an RNA-seq analysis confirmed that the vast majority of mis-spliced events in immortalized DM1 muscle cells were affected by antisense treatment, with half of them significantly rescued in treated DM1 cells. Immortalized DM1 muscle cell lines displaying characteristic disease-associated molecular features such as nuclear RNA aggregates and splicing defects can be used as robust readouts for the screening of therapeutic compounds. Therefore, immortalized DM1 and DM2 muscle cell lines represent new models and tools to investigate molecular pathophysiological mechanisms and evaluate the in vitro effects of compounds on RNA toxicity associated with myotonic dystrophy mutations. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  7. Carrier detection of duchenne and becker muscular dystrophy using muscle dystrophin immunohistochemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Acary S. Bulle Oliveira

    1992-12-01

    Full Text Available To ascertain whether dystrophin immunohistochemistry could improve DMD/ BMD carrier detection, we analyzed 14 muscle biopsies from 13 DMD and one BMD probable and possible carriers. All women were also evaluated using conventional methods, including genetic analysis, clinical and neurological evaluation, serum CK levels, KMG, and muscle biopsy. In 6 cases, there was a mosaic of dystrophin-positive and dystrophin-deficient fibers that allowed to make the diagnosis of a carrier state. Comparing dystrophin immunohistochemistry to the traditional methods, it was noted that this method is less sensitive than serum CK measuremens, but is more sensitive than EMG and muscle biopsy. The use of dystrophin immunohistochemistry in addition to CK, EMG and muscle biopsy improved the accuracy of carrier detection. This method is also helpful to distinguish manifesting DMD carriers from patients with other neuromuscular diseases like limb-girdle muscular dystrophy and spinal muscular atrophy.

  8. Positive effects of bisphosphonates on bone and muscle in a mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Sung-Hee; Sugamori, Kim S; Grynpas, Marc D; Mitchell, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy are at increased risk of decreased bone mineral density and bone fracture as a result of inactivity. To determine if antiresorptive bisphosphonates could improve bone quality and their effects on muscle we studied the Mdx mouse, treated with pamidronate during peak bone growth at 5 and 6 weeks of age, and examined the outcome at 13 weeks of age. Pamidronate increased cortical bone architecture and strength in femurs with increased resistance to fracture. While overall long bone growth was not affected by pamidronate, there was significant inhibition of remodeling in metaphyseal trabecular bone with evidence of residual calcified cartilage. Pamidronate treatment had positive effects on skeletal muscle in the Mdx mice with decreased serum and muscle creatine kinase and evidence of improved muscle histology and grip strength. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Sparing of extraocular muscle in aging and muscular dystrophies: A myogenic precursor cell hypothesis

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    Kallestad, Kristen M.; Hebert, Sadie L.; McDonald, Abby A.; Daniel, Mark L.; Cu, Sharon R.; McLoon, Linda K., E-mail: mcloo001@tc.umn.edu

    2011-04-01

    The extraocular muscles (EOM) are spared from pathology in aging and many forms of muscular dystrophy. Despite many studies, this sparing remains an enigma. The EOM have a distinct embryonic lineage compared to somite-derived muscles, and we have shown that they continuously remodel throughout life, maintaining a population of activated satellite cells even in aging. These data suggested the hypothesis that there is a population of myogenic precursor cells (mpcs) in EOM that is different from those in limb, with either elevated numbers of stem cells and/or mpcs with superior proliferative capacity compared to mpcs in limb. Using flow cytometry, EOM and limb muscle mononuclear cells were compared, and a number of differences were seen. Using two different cell isolation methods, EOM have significantly more mpcs per mg muscle than limb skeletal muscle. One specific subpopulation significantly increased in EOM compared to limb was positive for CD34 and negative for Sca-1, M-cadherin, CD31, and CD45. We named these the EOMCD34 cells. Similar percentages of EOMCD34 cells were present in both newborn EOM and limb muscle. They were retained in aged EOM, whereas the population decreased significantly in adult limb muscle and were extremely scarce in aged limb muscle. Most importantly, the percentage of EOMCD34 cells was elevated in the EOM from both the mdx and the mdx/utrophin{sup -/-} (DKO) mouse models of DMD and extremely scarce in the limb muscles of these mice. In vitro, the EOMCD34 cells had myogenic potential, forming myotubes in differentiation media. After determining a media better able to induce proliferation in these cells, a fusion index was calculated. The cells isolated from EOM had a 40% higher fusion index compared to the same cells isolated from limb muscle. The EOMCD34 cells were resistant to both oxidative stress and mechanical injury. These data support our hypothesis that the EOM may be spared in aging and in muscular dystrophies due to a

  10. Sparing of extraocular muscle in aging and muscular dystrophies: A myogenic precursor cell hypothesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kallestad, Kristen M.; Hebert, Sadie L.; McDonald, Abby A.; Daniel, Mark L.; Cu, Sharon R.; McLoon, Linda K.

    2011-01-01

    The extraocular muscles (EOM) are spared from pathology in aging and many forms of muscular dystrophy. Despite many studies, this sparing remains an enigma. The EOM have a distinct embryonic lineage compared to somite-derived muscles, and we have shown that they continuously remodel throughout life, maintaining a population of activated satellite cells even in aging. These data suggested the hypothesis that there is a population of myogenic precursor cells (mpcs) in EOM that is different from those in limb, with either elevated numbers of stem cells and/or mpcs with superior proliferative capacity compared to mpcs in limb. Using flow cytometry, EOM and limb muscle mononuclear cells were compared, and a number of differences were seen. Using two different cell isolation methods, EOM have significantly more mpcs per mg muscle than limb skeletal muscle. One specific subpopulation significantly increased in EOM compared to limb was positive for CD34 and negative for Sca-1, M-cadherin, CD31, and CD45. We named these the EOMCD34 cells. Similar percentages of EOMCD34 cells were present in both newborn EOM and limb muscle. They were retained in aged EOM, whereas the population decreased significantly in adult limb muscle and were extremely scarce in aged limb muscle. Most importantly, the percentage of EOMCD34 cells was elevated in the EOM from both the mdx and the mdx/utrophin -/- (DKO) mouse models of DMD and extremely scarce in the limb muscles of these mice. In vitro, the EOMCD34 cells had myogenic potential, forming myotubes in differentiation media. After determining a media better able to induce proliferation in these cells, a fusion index was calculated. The cells isolated from EOM had a 40% higher fusion index compared to the same cells isolated from limb muscle. The EOMCD34 cells were resistant to both oxidative stress and mechanical injury. These data support our hypothesis that the EOM may be spared in aging and in muscular dystrophies due to a subpopulation of

  11. Anti-fibrotic effect of pirfenidone in muscle derived-fibroblasts from Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanotti, Simona; Bragato, Cinzia; Zucchella, Andrea; Maggi, Lorenzo; Mantegazza, Renato; Morandi, Lucia; Mora, Marina

    2016-01-15

    Tissue fibrosis, characterized by excessive deposition of extracellular matrix proteins, is the end point of diseases affecting the kidney, bladder, liver, lung, gut, skin, heart and muscle. In Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), connective fibrotic tissue progressively substitutes muscle fibers. So far no specific pharmacological treatment is available for muscle fibrosis. Among promising anti-fibrotic molecules, pirfenidone has shown anti-fibrotic and anti-inflammatory activity in animal and cell models, and has already been employed in clinical trials. Therefore we tested pirfenidone anti-fibrotic properties in an in vitro model of muscle fibrosis. We evaluated effect of pirfenidone on fibroblasts isolated from DMD muscle biopsies. These cells have been previously characterized as having a pro-fibrotic phenotype. We tested cell proliferation and migration, secretion of soluble collagens, intracellular levels of collagen type I and fibronectin, and diameter of 3D fibrotic nodules. We found that pirfenidone significantly reduced proliferation and cell migration of control and DMD muscle-derived fibroblasts, decreased extracellular secretion of soluble collagens by control and DMD fibroblasts, as well as levels of collagen type I and fibronectin, and, in DMD fibroblasts only, reduced synthesis and deposition of intracellular collagen. Furthermore, pirfenidone was able to reduce the diameter of fibrotic-nodules in our 3D model of in vitro fibrosis. These pre-clinical results indicate that pirfenidone has potential anti-fibrotic effects also in skeletal muscle fibrosis, urging further studies in in vivo animal models of muscular dystrophy in order to translate the drug into the treatment of muscle fibrosis in DMD patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Immunohistochemical alterations of dystrophin in congenital muscular dystrophy Alterações imuno-hístoquímicas da distrofina na distrofia muscular congênita

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    Lineu Cesar Werneck

    1995-09-01

    Full Text Available The dystrophin distribution in the plasma muscle membrane using immunohystochemistry was studied in 22 children with congenital muscular dystrophy. The dystrophin was detected by immunofluorescence in muscle biopsy through a polyclonal antibody. All the cases had patchy interruptions of the fluorescence in the plasma membrane. A large patchy interruption of the sarcolemma was found in 17 cases, small interruption in 12, and a combination of large and small patchy discontinuity in 7. Small gaps around the fiber like a rosary were found in 15 cases. The frequency of these abnormalities ranged cases from: all fibers in 5 cases, frequent in 8, occasional in 5, and rare in 4. Five cases had total absence of immunofluorescence. These results suggest that the dystrophin expression is abnormal in this group of children and that this type of abnormalities can not be differentiated from early Becker muscular dystrophy nor childhood autosomal recessive muscular dystrophy through immunohystochemistry alone.Foi estudada a distribuição da distrofina na membrana plasmática das fibras musculares em 22 crianças com distrofia muscular congênita, através de técnicas de imuno-histoquímica. A distrofina foi identificada nas biópsias musculares processadas a fresco, por técnicas de imunofluorescência utilizando anticorpos policlonais. Todos os casos tinham interrupções da imunofluorescência na membrana plasmática. Em 17 elas eram grandes, em 12 eram pequenas e em 7 eram de ambos os tipos. Fibras com interrupções pequenas e constantes, como um rosário, foram vistas em 15 casos. Essas anormalidades estavam presentes em todas as fibras em 5 casos, eram frequentes em 8, ocasionais em 5 e raras em 4. Cinco casos mostraram fibras sem distrofina. Esses dados sugerem que a expressão da distrofina é anormal nesse grupo de crianças. Essas anormalidades podem também ser encontradas em casos precoces de distrofia muscular de Becker e distrofia autoss

  13. Non-uniform muscle fat replacement along the proximodistal axis in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooijmans, M T; Niks, E H; Burakiewicz, J; Anastasopoulos, C; van den Berg, S I; van Zwet, E; Webb, A G; Verschuuren, J J G M; Kan, H E

    2017-05-01

    The progressive replacement of muscle tissue by fat in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) has been studied using quantitative MRI between, but not within, individual muscles. We studied fat replacement along the proximodistal muscle axis using the Dixon technique on a 3T MR scanner in 22 DMD patients and 12 healthy controls. Mean fat fractions per muscle per slice for seven lower and upper leg muscles were compared between and within groups assuming a parabolic distribution. Average fat fraction for a small central slice stack and a large coverage slice stack were compared to the value when the stack was shifted one slice (15 mm) up or down. Higher fat fractions were observed in distal and proximal muscle segments compared to the muscle belly in all muscles of the DMD subjects (p muscle end regions are exposed to higher mechanical strain, which points towards mechanical disruption of the sarcolemma as one of the key factors in the pathophysiology. Overall, this non-uniformity in fat replacement needs to be taken into account to prevent sample bias when applying quantitative MRI as biomarker in clinical trials for DMD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Functions of fukutin, a gene responsible for Fukuyama type congenital muscular dystrophy, in neuromuscular system and other somatic organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Tomoko; Shibata, Noriyuki; Saito, Yoshiaki; Osawa, Makiko; Kobayashi, Makio

    2010-06-01

    Fukuyama type congenital muscular dystrophy (FCMD) is an autosomal recessive disease, exhibiting muscular dystrophy, and central nervous system (CNS) and ocular malformations. It is included in alpha-dystroglycanopathy, a group of muscular dystrophy showing reduced glycosylation of alpha-dystroglycan. alpha-Dystroglycan is one of the components of dystrophin-glycoprotein complex linking extracellular and intracellular proteins. The sugar chains of alpha-dystroglycan are receptors for extracellular matrix proteins such as laminin. Fukutin, a gene responsible for FCMD, is presumably related to the glycosylation of alpha-dystroglycan like other causative genes of alpha-dystroglycanopathy. The CNS lesion of FCMD is characterized by cobblestone lissencephaly, associated with decreased glycosylation of alpha-dystroglycan in the glia limitans where the basement membrane is formed. Astrocytes whose endfeet form the glia limitans seem to be greatly involved in the genesis of the CNS lesion. Fukutin is probably necessary for astrocytic function. Other components of the CNS may also need fukutin, such as migration and synaptic function in neurons. However, roles of fukutin in oligodendroglia, microglia, leptomeninges and capillaries are unknown at present. Fukutin is expressed in various somatic organs as well, and appears to work differently between epithelial cells and astrocytes. In the molecular level, since the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex is linked to cell signaling pathways involving c-src and c-jun, fukutin may be able to affect cell proliferation/survival. Fukutin was localized in the nucleus on cancer cell lines. With the consideration that mutations of fukutin give rise to wide spectrum of the clinical phenotype, more unknown functions of fukutin besides the glycosylation of alpha-dystroglycan can be suggested. Trials for novel treatments including gene therapy are in progress in muscular dystrophies. Toward effective therapies with minimal side effects, precise

  15. Modulation of Stem Cell Differentiation and Myostatin as an Approach to Counteract Fibrosis in Muscle Dystrophy and Regeneration After Injury. Addendum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    ged mdx mouse a n ovel therapeutic approach for Duchenne’s muscular dystrophy (DMD) based on the implantation of muscle -derived stem cells (MDSC), and...with limb ischemia. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Myostatin, muscle dystrophy , stem cells, myogenesis, Oct-4; Duchenne ; fibrosis 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION...derived stem cells (MDSC) into myogenic, as opposed to lipofibrogenic lineages, is a promising therapeutic strategy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD

  16. Calpain 3 is important for muscle regeneration: Evidence from patients with limb girdle muscular dystrophies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hauerslev Simon

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Limb girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD type 2A is caused by mutations in the CAPN3 gene and complete lack of functional calpain 3 leads to the most severe muscle wasting. Calpain 3 is suggested to be involved in maturation of contractile elements after muscle degeneration. The aim of this study was to investigate how mutations in the four functional domains of calpain 3 affect muscle regeneration. Methods We studied muscle regeneration in 22 patients with LGMD2A with calpain 3 deficiency, in five patients with LGMD2I, with a secondary reduction in calpain 3, and in five patients with Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD with normal calpain 3 levels. Regeneration was assessed by using the developmental markers neonatal myosin heavy chain (nMHC, vimentin, MyoD and myogenin and counting internally nucleated fibers. Results We found that the recent regeneration as determined by the number of nMHC/vimentin-positive fibers was greatly diminished in severely affected LGMD2A patients compared to similarly affected patients with LGMD2I and BMD. Whorled fibers, a sign of aberrant regeneration, was highly elevated in patients with a complete lack of calpain 3 compared to patients with residual calpain 3. Regeneration is not affected by location of the mutation in the CAPN3 gene. Conclusions Our findings suggest that calpain 3 is needed for the regenerative process probably during sarcomere remodeling as the complete lack of functional calpain 3 leads to the most severe phenotypes.

  17. Muscle-Derived Proteins as Serum Biomarkers for Monitoring Disease Progression in Three Forms of Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burch, Peter M.; Pogoryelova, Oksana; Goldstein, Richard; Bennett, Donald; Guglieri, Michela; Straub, Volker; Bushby, Kate; Lochmüller, Hanns; Morris, Carl

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Identifying translatable, non-invasive biomarkers of muscular dystrophy that better reflect the disease pathology than those currently available would aid the development of new therapies, the monitoring of disease progression and the response to therapy. Objective: The goal of this study was to evaluate a panel of serum protein biomarkers with the potential to specifically detect skeletal muscle injury. Method: Serum concentrations of skeletal troponin I (sTnI), myosin light chain 3 (Myl3), fatty acid binding protein 3 (FABP3) and muscle-type creatine kinase (CKM) proteins were measured in 74 Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), 38 Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) and 49 Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2B (LGMD2B) patients and 32 healthy controls. Results: All four proteins were significantly elevated in the serum of these three muscular dystrophy patient populations when compared to healthy controls, but, interestingly, displayed different profiles depending on the type of muscular dystrophy. Additionally, the effects of patient age, ambulatory status, cardiac function and treatment status on the serum concentrations of the proteins were investigated. Statistical analysis revealed correlations between the serum concentrations and certain clinical endpoints including forced vital capacity in DMD patients and the time to walk ten meters in LGMD2B patients. Serum concentrations of these proteins were also elevated in two preclinical models of muscular dystrophy, the mdx mouse and the golden-retriever muscular dystrophy dog. Conclusions: These proteins, therefore, are potential muscular dystrophy biomarkers for monitoring disease progression and therapeutic response in both preclinical and clinical studies. PMID:26870665

  18. Muscle MRI in Duchenne muscular dystrophy: Evidence of a distinctive pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polavarapu, Kiran; Manjunath, Mahadevappa; Preethish-Kumar, Veeramani; Sekar, Deepha; Vengalil, Seena; Thomas, PriyaTreesa; Sathyaprabha, Talakad N; Bharath, Rose Dawn; Nalini, Atchayaram

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the pattern of muscle involvement using MRI findings and correlate with functional as well as muscle strength measurements. Fifty genetically confirmed DMD children with a mean age of 7.6 ± 2.8 (4-15 years) underwent muscle MRI and qualitative assessment was done for muscle changes using Mercuri staging for fibro-fatty replacement on T1 sequence and Borsato score for myoedema on STIR sequence. Detailed phenotypic characterisation was done with Manual muscle testing (modified MRC grading) and Muscular Dystrophy Functional Rating Scale (MDFRS). Mercuri scoring showed severe fibro-fatty changes in Gluteus medius, minimus and Adductor magnus followed by moderate to severe changes in Gluteus maximus and Quadriceps muscles. Total sparing of Gracilis, Sartorius and Semimembranosus muscles was observed. Superficial posterior and lateral leg muscles were preferentially involved with sparing of deep posterior and anterior leg muscles. Myoedema showed significant inverse correlation with fatty infiltration in thigh muscles. Similarly, significant inverse correlation was observed between Mercuri scores and MRC grading as well as MDFRS scores. A direct linear correlation was observed between duration of illness and fibro-fatty changes in piriformis, quadriceps and superficial posterior leg muscles. There was no correlation between MRI findings and genotypic characteristics. However, this specific pattern of muscle involvement in MRI could aid in proceeding for genetic testing when clinical suspicion is high, thus reducing the need for muscle biopsy. Fibro fatty infiltration as measured by Mercuri scoring can be a useful marker for assessing the disease severity and progression. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Porcine Zygote Injection with Cas9/sgRNA Results in DMD-Modified Pig with Muscle Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Hao Yu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Dystrophinopathy, including Duchenne muscle dystrophy (DMD and Becker muscle dystrophy (BMD is an incurable X-linked hereditary muscle dystrophy caused by a mutation in the DMD gene in coding dystrophin. Advances in further understanding DMD/BMD for therapy are expected. Studies on mdx mice and dogs with muscle dystrophy provide limited insight into DMD disease mechanisms and therapeutic testing because of the different pathological manifestations. Miniature pigs share similar physiology and anatomy with humans and are thus an excellent animal model of human disease. Here, we successfully achieved precise DMD targeting in Chinese Diannan miniature pigs by co-injecting zygotes with Cas9 mRNA and sgRNA targeting DMD. Two piglets were obtained after embryo transfer, one of piglets was identified as DMD-modified individual via traditional cloning, sequencing and T7EN1 cleavage assay. An examination of targeting rates in the DMD-modified piglet revealed that sgRNA:Cas9-mediated on-target mosaic mutations were 70% and 60% of dystrophin alleles in skeletal and smooth muscle, respectively. Meanwhile, no detectable off-target mutations were found, highlighting the high specificity of genetic modification using CRISPR/Cas9. The DMD-modified piglet exhibited degenerative and disordered phenotypes in skeletal and cardiac muscle, and declining thickness of smooth muscle in the stomach and intestine. In conclusion, we successfully generated myopathy animal model by modifying the DMD via CRISPR/Cas9 system in a miniature pig.

  20. Targeting deregulated AMPK/mTORC1 pathways improves muscle function in myotonic dystrophy type I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockhoff, Marielle; Rion, Nathalie; Chojnowska, Kathrin; Wiktorowicz, Tatiana; Eickhorst, Christopher; Erne, Beat; Frank, Stephan; Angelini, Corrado; Furling, Denis; Rüegg, Markus A; Sinnreich, Michael; Castets, Perrine

    2017-02-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type I (DM1) is a disabling multisystemic disease that predominantly affects skeletal muscle. It is caused by expanded CTG repeats in the 3'-UTR of the dystrophia myotonica protein kinase (DMPK) gene. RNA hairpins formed by elongated DMPK transcripts sequester RNA-binding proteins, leading to mis-splicing of numerous pre-mRNAs. Here, we have investigated whether DM1-associated muscle pathology is related to deregulation of central metabolic pathways, which may identify potential therapeutic targets for the disease. In a well-characterized mouse model for DM1 (HSALR mice), activation of AMPK signaling in muscle was impaired under starved conditions, while mTORC1 signaling remained active. In parallel, autophagic flux was perturbed in HSALR muscle and in cultured human DM1 myotubes. Pharmacological approaches targeting AMPK/mTORC1 signaling greatly ameliorated muscle function in HSALR mice. AICAR, an AMPK activator, led to a strong reduction of myotonia, which was accompanied by partial correction of misregulated alternative splicing. Rapamycin, an mTORC1 inhibitor, improved muscle relaxation and increased muscle force in HSALR mice without affecting splicing. These findings highlight the involvement of AMPK/mTORC1 deregulation in DM1 muscle pathophysiology and may open potential avenues for the treatment of this disease.

  1. Muscle MRS detects elevated PDE/ATP ratios prior to fatty infiltration in Becker muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wokke, B H; Hooijmans, M T; van den Bergen, J C; Webb, A G; Verschuuren, J J; Kan, H E

    2014-11-01

    Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) is characterized by progressive muscle weakness. Muscles show structural changes (fatty infiltration, fibrosis) and metabolic changes, both of which can be assessed using MRI and MRS. It is unknown at what stage of the disease process metabolic changes arise and how this might vary for different metabolites. In this study we assessed metabolic changes in skeletal muscles of Becker patients, both with and without fatty infiltration, quantified via Dixon MRI and (31) P MRS. MRI and (31) P MRS scans were obtained from 25 Becker patients and 14 healthy controls using a 7 T MR scanner. Five lower-leg muscles were individually assessed for fat and muscle metabolite levels. In the peroneus, soleus and anterior tibialis muscles with non-increased fat levels, PDE/ATP ratios were higher (P < 0.02) compared with controls, whereas in all muscles with increased fat levels PDE/ATP ratios were higher compared with healthy controls (P ≤ 0.05). The Pi /ATP ratio in the peroneus muscles was higher in muscles with increased fat fractions (P = 0.005), and the PCr/ATP ratio was lower in the anterior tibialis muscles with increased fat fractions (P = 0.005). There were no other significant changes in metabolites, but an increase in tissue pH was found in all muscles of the total group of BMD patients in comparison with healthy controls (P < 0.05). These findings suggest that (31) P MRS can be used to detect early changes in individual muscles of BMD patients, which are present before the onset of fatty infiltration. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Muscular dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are no known cures for the various muscular dystrophies. The goal of treatment is to control symptoms. Physical therapy may help maintain muscle strength and function. Leg braces and a wheelchair ...

  3. Dystrophic changes in masticatory muscles related chewing problems and malocclusions in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Engel-Hoek, L; de Groot, I J M; Sie, L T; van Bruggen, H W; de Groot, S A F; Erasmus, C E; van Alfen, N

    2016-06-01

    Dysphagia in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) worsens with age, with increasingly effortful mastication. The aims of this study were to describe mastication problems in consecutive stages in a group of patients with DMD and to determine related pathophysiological aspects of masticatory muscle structure, tongue thickness, bite force and dental characteristics. Data from 72 patients with DMD (4.3 to 28.0 years), divided into four clinical stages, were collected in a cross sectional study. Problems with mastication and the need for food adaptations, in combination with increased echogenicity of the masseter muscle, were already found in the early stages of the disease. A high percentage of open bites and cross bites were found, especially in the later stages. Tongue hypertrophy also increased over time. Increased dysfunction, reflected by increasingly abnormal echogenicity, of the masseter muscle and reduced occlusal contacts (anterior and posterior open bites) were mainly responsible for the hampered chewing. In all, this study shows the increasing involvement of various elements of the masticatory system in progressive Duchenne muscular dystrophy. To prevent choking and also nutritional deficiency, early detection of chewing problems by asking about feeding and mastication problems, as well as asking about food adaptations made, is essential and can lead to timely intervention. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. NAD+ repletion improves muscle function in muscular dystrophy and counters global PARylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Dongryeol; Zhang, Hongbo; Ropelle, Eduardo R; Sorrentino, Vincenzo; Mázala, Davi A G; Mouchiroud, Laurent; Marshall, Philip L; Campbell, Matthew D; Ali, Amir Safi; Knowels, Gary M; Bellemin, Stéphanie; Iyer, Shama R; Wang, Xu; Gariani, Karim; Sauve, Anthony A; Cantó, Carles; Conley, Kevin E; Walter, Ludivine; Lovering, Richard M; Chin, Eva R; Jasmin, Bernard J; Marcinek, David J; Menzies, Keir J; Auwerx, Johan

    2016-10-19

    Neuromuscular diseases are often caused by inherited mutations that lead to progressive skeletal muscle weakness and degeneration. In diverse populations of normal healthy mice, we observed correlations between the abundance of mRNA transcripts related to mitochondrial biogenesis, the dystrophin-sarcoglycan complex, and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD + ) synthesis, consistent with a potential role for the essential cofactor NAD + in protecting muscle from metabolic and structural degeneration. Furthermore, the skeletal muscle transcriptomes of patients with Duchene's muscular dystrophy (DMD) and other muscle diseases were enriched for various poly[adenosine 5'-diphosphate (ADP)-ribose] polymerases (PARPs) and for nicotinamide N-methyltransferase (NNMT), enzymes that are major consumers of NAD + and are involved in pleiotropic events, including inflammation. In the mdx mouse model of DMD, we observed significant reductions in muscle NAD + levels, concurrent increases in PARP activity, and reduced expression of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT), the rate-limiting enzyme for NAD + biosynthesis. Replenishing NAD + stores with dietary nicotinamide riboside supplementation improved muscle function and heart pathology in mdx and mdx/Utr -/- mice and reversed pathology in Caenorhabditis elegans models of DMD. The effects of NAD + repletion in mdx mice relied on the improvement in mitochondrial function and structural protein expression (α-dystrobrevin and δ-sarcoglycan) and on the reductions in general poly(ADP)-ribosylation, inflammation, and fibrosis. In combination, these studies suggest that the replenishment of NAD + may benefit patients with muscular dystrophies or other neuromuscular degenerative conditions characterized by the PARP/NNMT gene expression signatures. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  5. Increased autophagy and apoptosis contribute to muscle atrophy in a myotonic dystrophy type 1 Drosophila model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariadna Bargiela

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Muscle mass wasting is one of the most debilitating symptoms of myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1 disease, ultimately leading to immobility, respiratory defects, dysarthria, dysphagia and death in advanced stages of the disease. In order to study the molecular mechanisms leading to the degenerative loss of adult muscle tissue in DM1, we generated an inducible Drosophila model of expanded CTG trinucleotide repeat toxicity that resembles an adult-onset form of the disease. Heat-shock induced expression of 480 CUG repeats in adult flies resulted in a reduction in the area of the indirect flight muscles. In these model flies, reduction of muscle area was concomitant with increased apoptosis and autophagy. Inhibition of apoptosis or autophagy mediated by the overexpression of DIAP1, mTOR (also known as Tor or muscleblind, or by RNA interference (RNAi-mediated silencing of autophagy regulatory genes, achieved a rescue of the muscle-loss phenotype. In fact, mTOR overexpression rescued muscle size to a size comparable to that in control flies. These results were validated in skeletal muscle biopsies from DM1 patients in which we found downregulated autophagy and apoptosis repressor genes, and also in DM1 myoblasts where we found increased autophagy. These findings provide new insights into the signaling pathways involved in DM1 disease pathogenesis.

  6. Compositional analysis of muscle in boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy using MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marden, Franklin A.; Siegel, Marilyn J.; Rubin, David A. [Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology at Washington University Medical Center, St. Louis (United States); Barnes-Jewish Hospital, Department of Radiology, St. Louis (United States); Connolly, Anne M. [St. Louis Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, St. Louis (United States); Barnes-Jewish Hospital, Washington University School of Medicine, Department of Neurology, 660 S. Euclid, Box 8111, St. Louis (United States)

    2005-03-01

    Boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) present by age 5 years with weakness and, untreated, stop walking unaided by age 10 or 11 years. We used magnetic resonance (MR) imaging to study age-related changes in the composition and distribution of diseased muscles. Eleven boys (mean 7.1{+-}1.6 years) with DMD underwent clinical and MR examinations. Quantitative muscle strength and timed functional testing was performed. Thigh muscles were scanned at three levels (hip, mid-thigh, and knee) using T1-weighted spin echo and short-tau inversion recovery (STIR) sequences. Outcome measures included intramuscular fatty infiltration, intermuscle fat deposition, edema, and muscle size. Ten boys completed the study. Older boys demonstrated more prominent fatty infiltration of muscles. Fatty infiltration occurred in a characteristic pattern with the gluteus and adductor magnus muscles most commonly involved and the gracilis most commonly spared. Similarly, patchy increases in free water content suggested a pattern of intramuscular edema or inflammation. Atrophy occurred in muscles heavily infiltrated with fat, and true hypertrophy selectively occurred in those that were spared. While fibrofatty changes have been described in DMD, this study further defines differential involvement and additionally suggests widespread edema or inflammation. Improved imaging techniques to quantify the degree and distribution of these changes may provide a basis for exploring mechanisms of action of medications and perhaps another means for selecting treatment regimens and monitoring their effects. (orig.)

  7. Compositional analysis of muscle in boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy using MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marden, Franklin A.; Siegel, Marilyn J.; Rubin, David A.; Connolly, Anne M.

    2005-01-01

    Boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) present by age 5 years with weakness and, untreated, stop walking unaided by age 10 or 11 years. We used magnetic resonance (MR) imaging to study age-related changes in the composition and distribution of diseased muscles. Eleven boys (mean 7.1±1.6 years) with DMD underwent clinical and MR examinations. Quantitative muscle strength and timed functional testing was performed. Thigh muscles were scanned at three levels (hip, mid-thigh, and knee) using T1-weighted spin echo and short-tau inversion recovery (STIR) sequences. Outcome measures included intramuscular fatty infiltration, intermuscle fat deposition, edema, and muscle size. Ten boys completed the study. Older boys demonstrated more prominent fatty infiltration of muscles. Fatty infiltration occurred in a characteristic pattern with the gluteus and adductor magnus muscles most commonly involved and the gracilis most commonly spared. Similarly, patchy increases in free water content suggested a pattern of intramuscular edema or inflammation. Atrophy occurred in muscles heavily infiltrated with fat, and true hypertrophy selectively occurred in those that were spared. While fibrofatty changes have been described in DMD, this study further defines differential involvement and additionally suggests widespread edema or inflammation. Improved imaging techniques to quantify the degree and distribution of these changes may provide a basis for exploring mechanisms of action of medications and perhaps another means for selecting treatment regimens and monitoring their effects. (orig.)

  8. Anti-inflammatory drugs for Duchenne muscular dystrophy: focus on skeletal muscle-releasing factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyatake, Shouta; Shimizu-Motohashi, Yuko; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Aoki, Yoshitsugu

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), an incurable and a progressive muscle wasting disease, is caused by the absence of dystrophin protein, leading to recurrent muscle fiber damage during contraction. The inflammatory response to fiber damage is a compelling candidate mechanism for disease exacerbation. The only established pharmacological treatment for DMD is corticosteroids to suppress muscle inflammation, however this treatment is limited by its insufficient therapeutic efficacy and considerable side effects. Recent reports show the therapeutic potential of inhibiting or enhancing pro- or anti-inflammatory factors released from DMD skeletal muscles, resulting in significant recovery from muscle atrophy and dysfunction. We discuss and review the recent findings of DMD inflammation and opportunities for drug development targeting specific releasing factors from skeletal muscles. It has been speculated that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs targeting specific inflammatory factors are more effective and have less side effects for DMD compared with steroidal drugs. For example, calcium channels, reactive oxygen species, and nuclear factor-κB signaling factors are the most promising targets as master regulators of inflammatory response in DMD skeletal muscles. If they are combined with an oligonucleotide-based exon skipping therapy to restore dystrophin expression, the anti-inflammatory drug therapies may address the present therapeutic limitation of low efficiency for DMD.

  9. CT evaluation of the damaged upper limb muscle in patients with Duchenne type progressive muscular dystrophy (DMD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Hiroshi; Matsuke, Yutaka.

    1992-01-01

    In order to evaluate the changes of CT numbers and cross sectional areas of the muscles, we determined CT scores of the muscle. In twelve patients with Duchenne type progressive muscular dystrophy (DMD), we assessed the difference of CT scores of the muscle and the correlation between CT score of the muscle and 9-stage classification of upper extremities. CT scores of the subscapularis muscle and infraspinatus muscle were significantly lower than deltoideus muscle at the level of the shoulder, and flexor muscles showed also significantly lower than extensor muscles at the level of the upper extremity. Good correlations between CT score of the muscle and 9-stage classification of upper extremities were observed in the muscles of shoulder and upper arm. (author)

  10. CT evaluation of the damaged upper limb muscle in patients with Duchenne type progressive muscular dystrophy (DMD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, Hiroshi (Anan Central Hospital, Tokushima (Japan)); Matsuke, Yutaka

    1992-04-01

    In order to evaluate the changes of CT numbers and cross sectional areas of the muscles, we determined CT scores of the muscle. In twelve patients with Duchenne type progressive muscular dystrophy (DMD), we assessed the difference of CT scores of the muscle and the correlation between CT score of the muscle and 9-stage classification of upper extremities. CT scores of the subscapularis muscle and infraspinatus muscle were significantly lower than deltoideus muscle at the level of the shoulder, and flexor muscles showed also significantly lower than extensor muscles at the level of the upper extremity. Good correlations between CT score of the muscle and 9-stage classification of upper extremities were observed in the muscles of shoulder and upper arm. (author).

  11. Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sets of muscles and cause different degrees of muscle weakness. Duchenne muscular dystrophy is the most common and the most severe ... can walk independently. Prednisone If a child has Duchenne muscular ... to help slow the rate of muscle deterioration. By doing so, the child may be ...

  12. An MRI volumetric study for leg muscles in congenital clubfoot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ippolito, Ernesto; Dragoni, Massimiliano; Antonicoli, Marco; Farsetti, Pasquale; Simonetti, Giovanni; Masala, Salvatore

    2012-10-01

    To investigate both volume and length of the three muscle compartments of the normal and the affected leg in unilateral congenital clubfoot. Volumetric magnetic resonance imaging (VMRI) of the anterior, lateral and postero-medial muscular compartments of both the normal and the clubfoot leg was obtained in three groups of seven patients each, whose mean age was, respectively, 4.8 months, 11.1 months and 4.7 years. At diagnosis, all the unilateral congenital clubfeet had a Pirani score ranging from 4.5 to 5.5 points, and all of them had been treated according to a strict Ponseti protocol. All the feet had percutaneous lengthening of the Achilles tendon. A mean difference in both volume and length was found between the three muscular compartments of the leg, with the muscles of the clubfoot side being thinner and shorter than those of the normal side. The distal tendon of the tibialis anterior, peroneus longus and triceps surae (Achilles tendon) were longer than normal on the clubfoot side. Our study shows that the three muscle compartments of the clubfoot leg are thinner and shorter than normal in the patients of the three groups. The difference in the musculature volume of the postero-medial compartment between the normal and the affected side increased nine-fold from age group 2 to 3, while the difference in length increased by 20 %, thus, showing that the muscles of the postero-medial compartment tend to grow in both thickness and length much less than the muscles of the other leg compartments.

  13. Identification of muscle necrosis in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy using three-dimensional optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klyen, Blake R.; Shavlakadze, Thea; Radley-Crabb, Hannah G.; Grounds, Miranda D.; Sampson, David D.

    2011-07-01

    Three-dimensional optical coherence tomography (3D-OCT) was used to image the structure and pathology of skeletal muscle tissue from the treadmill-exercised mdx mouse model of human Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) images of excised muscle samples were compared with co-registered hematoxylin and eosin-stained and Evans blue dye fluorescence histology. We show, for the first time, structural 3D-OCT images of skeletal muscle dystropathology well correlated with co-located histology. OCT could identify morphological features of interest and necrotic lesions within the muscle tissue samples based on intrinsic optical contrast. These findings demonstrate the utility of 3D-OCT for the evaluation of small-animal skeletal muscle morphology and pathology, particularly for studies of mouse models of muscular dystrophy.

  14. Longitudinal 2-point dixon muscle magnetic resonance imaging in becker muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonati, Ulrike; Schmid, Maurice; Hafner, Patricia; Haas, Tanja; Bieri, Oliver; Gloor, Monika; Fischmann, Arne; Fischer, Dirk

    2015-06-01

    Quantitative MRI techniques detect disease progression in myopathies more sensitively than muscle function measures or conventional MRI. To date, only conventional MRI data using visual rating scales are available for measurement of disease progression in Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD). In 3 patients with BMD (mean age 36.8 years), the mean fat fraction (MFF) of the thigh muscles was assessed by MRI at baseline and at 1-year follow-up using a 2-point Dixon approach (2PD). The motor function measurement scale (MFM) was used for clinical assessment. The mean MFF of all muscles at baseline was 61.6% (SD 7.6). It increased by 3.7% to 65.3% (SD 4.7) at follow-up. The severity of muscle involvement varied between various muscle groups. As in other myopathies, 2PD can quantify fatty muscle degeneration in BMD and can detect disease progression in a small sample size and at relatively short imaging intervals. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Glucocorticoids enhance muscle endurance and ameliorate Duchenne muscular dystrophy through a defined metabolic program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison-Nozik, Alexander; Anand, Priti; Zhu, Han; Duan, Qiming; Sabeh, Mohamad; Prosdocimo, Domenick A; Lemieux, Madeleine E; Nordsborg, Nikolai; Russell, Aaron P; MacRae, Calum A; Gerber, Anthony N; Jain, Mukesh K; Haldar, Saptarsi M

    2015-12-08

    Classic physiology studies dating to the 1930s demonstrate that moderate or transient glucocorticoid (GC) exposure improves muscle performance. The ergogenic properties of GCs are further evidenced by their surreptitious use as doping agents by endurance athletes and poorly understood efficacy in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), a genetic muscle-wasting disease. A defined molecular basis underlying these performance-enhancing properties of GCs in skeletal muscle remains obscure. Here, we demonstrate that ergogenic effects of GCs are mediated by direct induction of the metabolic transcription factor KLF15, defining a downstream pathway distinct from that resulting in GC-related muscle atrophy. Furthermore, we establish that KLF15 deficiency exacerbates dystrophic severity and muscle GC-KLF15 signaling mediates salutary therapeutic effects in the mdx mouse model of DMD. Thus, although glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-mediated transactivation is often associated with muscle atrophy and other adverse effects of pharmacologic GC administration, our data define a distinct GR-induced gene regulatory pathway that contributes to therapeutic effects of GCs in DMD through proergogenic metabolic programming.

  16. Electromechanical delay components during skeletal muscle contraction and relaxation in patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Fabio; Cè, Emiliano; Rampichini, Susanna; Limonta, Eloisa; Venturelli, Massimo; Monti, Elena; Bet, Luciano; Fossati, Barbara; Meola, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    The electromechanical delay during muscle contraction and relaxation can be partitioned into mainly electrochemical and mainly mechanical components by an EMG, mechanomyographic, and force combined approach. Component duration and measurement reliability were investigated during contraction and relaxation in a group of patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1, n = 13) and in healthy controls (n = 13). EMG, mechanomyogram, and force were recorded in DM1 and in age- and body-matched controls from tibialis anterior (distal muscle) and vastus lateralis (proximal muscle) muscles during maximum voluntary and electrically-evoked isometric contractions. The electrochemical and mechanical components of the electromechanical delay during muscle contraction and relaxation were calculated off-line. Maximum strength was significantly lower in DM1 than in controls under both experimental conditions. All electrochemical and mechanical components were significantly longer in DM1 in both muscles. Measurement reliability was very high in both DM1 and controls. The high reliability of the measurements and the differences between DM1 patients and controls suggest that the EMG, mechanomyographic, and force combined approach could be utilized as a valid tool to assess the level of neuromuscular dysfunction in this pathology, and to follow the efficacy of pharmacological or non-pharmacological interventions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging of skeletal muscle in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy; Serial axial and sagittal section studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagao, Hideo (Ehime Univ., Matsuyama (Japan). Faculty of Education); Morimoto, Takehiko; Sano, Nozomi; Takahashi, Mitsugi; Nagai, Hironao; Tawa, Ritsuko; Yoshimatsu, Makoto; Woo Young-Jong; Matsuda, Hiroshi

    1991-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging of skeletal muscles in thirteen patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy was performed to estimate pathological changes. Serial axial and sagittal sections of the right lower extremity were recorded. In the early stage, the T{sub 1} values of gastrocnemius and soleus muscles were slightly lower than the control values, and in the late stage, the values were much lower in all muscles examined. In sagittal sections, the gastrocnemius muscle in the early stage showed a high density area at the distal region adjacent to soleus muscle, and the soleus muscle showed a high density area adjacent to the gestrocnemius muscle. In serial axial sections, high density areas of the anterior and posterior tibialis muscles appeared first at their proximal and peripheral regions. It was concluded that the sequence of appearance of pathological changes was different not only among individual muscles but also among various regions of each muscle; the high density changes appeared first at myotendon junctions. (author).

  18. Arginine metabolism by macrophages promotes cardiac and muscle fibrosis in mdx muscular dystrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Wehling-Henricks

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is the most common, lethal disease of childhood. One of 3500 new-born males suffers from this universally-lethal disease. Other than the use of corticosteroids, little is available to affect the relentless progress of the disease, leading many families to use dietary supplements in hopes of reducing the progression or severity of muscle wasting. Arginine is commonly used as a dietary supplement and its use has been reported to have beneficial effects following short-term administration to mdx mice, a genetic model of DMD. However, the long-term effects of arginine supplementation are unknown. This lack of knowledge about the long-term effects of increased arginine metabolism is important because elevated arginine metabolism can increase tissue fibrosis, and increased fibrosis of skeletal muscles and the heart is an important and potentially life-threatening feature of DMD.We use both genetic and nutritional manipulations to test whether changes in arginase metabolism promote fibrosis and increase pathology in mdx mice. Our findings show that fibrotic lesions in mdx muscle are enriched with arginase-2-expressing macrophages and that muscle macrophages stimulated with cytokines that activate the M2 phenotype show elevated arginase activity and expression. We generated a line of arginase-2-null mutant mdx mice and found that the mutation reduced fibrosis in muscles of 18-month-old mdx mice, and reduced kyphosis that is attributable to muscle fibrosis. We also observed that dietary supplementation with arginine for 17-months increased mdx muscle fibrosis. In contrast, arginine-2 mutation did not reduce cardiac fibrosis or affect cardiac function assessed by echocardiography, although 17-months of dietary supplementation with arginine increased cardiac fibrosis. Long-term arginine treatments did not decrease matrix metalloproteinase-2 or -9 or increase the expression of utrophin, which have been reported as beneficial

  19. Protein synthesis in muscle cultures from patients with duchenne muscular dystrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionasescu, V.; Zellweger, H.; Ionasescu, R.; Lara-Braud, C.; Cancilla, P.A.

    1976-01-01

    Muscle samples for cultures were obtained from the quadriceps by open biopsy under local anesthesia in five patients with early stage of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and 10 controls. Primary cultures were grown in Eagle's Minimum Essential Medium (MEM) with 20 per cent fetal calf serum. After 4 weeks, cells were trypsinized, counted, subcultured for 5 days in MEM with 5 per cent horse serum and finally incubated for 4 h with ( 3 H) leucine. Total protein synthesis showed a significant decrease (ALF OF CONTROL VALUES) only in muscle cultures from patients with DMD. Addition of calcium chloride alone or with A23187 ionophore normalized this defect in protein synthesis. By contrast, myosin heavy chain synthesis was measured and found normal in all patients. (author)

  20. The Correlation of Skeletal and Cardiac Muscle Dysfunction in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posner, Andrew D; Soslow, Jonathan H; Burnette, W Bryan; Bian, Aihua; Shintani, Ayumi; Sawyer, Douglas B; Markham, Larry W

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is characterized by progressive skeletal muscle and cardiac dysfunction. While skeletal muscle dysfunction precedes cardiomyopathy, the relationship between the progressive decline in skeletal and cardiac muscle function is unclear. This relationship is especially important given that the myocardial effects of many developing DMD therapies are largely unknown. Our objective was to assess the relationship between progression of skeletal muscle weakness and onset of cardiac dysfunction in DMD. A total of 77 DMD subjects treated at a single referral center were included. Demographic information, quantitative muscle testing (QMT), subjective muscle strength, cardiac function, and current and retrospective medications were collected. A Spearman rank correlation was used to evaluate for an association between subjective strength and fractional shortening. The effects of total QMT and arm QMT on fractional shortening were examined in generalized least square with and without adjustments for age, ambulatory status, and duration of corticosteroids and cardiac specific medications. We found a significant correlation between maintained subjective skeletal muscle arm and leg strength and maintained cardiac function as defined by fractional shortening (rho=0.47, p=0.004 and rho=0.48, p=0.003, respectively). We also found a significant association between QMT and fractional shortening among non-ambulatory DMD subjects (p=0.03), while this association was not significant in ambulatory subjects. Our findings allow us to conclude that in this population, there exists a significant relationship between skeletal muscle and cardiac function in non-ambulatory DMD patients. While this does not imply a causal relationship, a possible association between skeletal and cardiac muscle function suggests that researchers should carefully monitor cardiac function, even when the primary outcome measures are not cardiac in nature.

  1. Pharmacological Inhibition of PKCθ Counteracts Muscle Disease in a Mouse Model of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrocco, V; Fiore, P; Benedetti, A; Pisu, S; Rizzuto, E; Musarò, A; Madaro, L; Lozanoska-Ochser, B; Bouché, M

    2017-02-01

    Inflammation plays a considerable role in the progression of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD), a severe muscle disease caused by a mutation in the dystrophin gene. We previously showed that genetic ablation of Protein Kinase C θ (PKCθ) in mdx, the mouse model of DMD, improves muscle healing and regeneration, preventing massive inflammation. To establish whether pharmacological targeting of PKCθ in DMD can be proposed as a therapeutic option, in this study we treated young mdx mice with the PKCθ inhibitor Compound 20 (C20). We show that C20 treatment led to a significant reduction in muscle damage associated with reduced immune cells infiltration, reduced inflammatory pathways activation, and maintained muscle regeneration. Importantly, C20 treatment is efficient in recovering muscle performance in mdx mice, by preserving muscle integrity. Together, these results provide proof of principle that pharmacological inhibition of PKCθ in DMD can be considered an attractive strategy to modulate immune response and prevent the progression of the disease. Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a severe muscle disease affecting 1:3500 male births. DMD is caused by a mutation in dystrophin gene, coding for a protein required for skeletal and cardiac muscle integrity. Lack of a functional dystrophin is primarily responsible for the muscle eccentric contraction-induced muscle damage, observed in dystrophic muscle. However, inflammation plays a considerable role in the progression of DMD. Glucocorticoids, which have anti-inflammatory properties, are being used to treat DMD with some success; however, long term treatment with these drugs induces muscle atrophy and wasting, outweighing their benefit. The identification of specific targets for anti-inflammatory therapies is one of the ongoing therapeutic options. Although blunting inflammation would not be a "cure" for the disease, the emerging clue is that multiple strategies, addressing different aspects of the pathology

  2. Abnormal splicing switch of DMD's penultimate exon compromises muscle fibre maintenance in myotonic dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rau, Frédérique; Lainé, Jeanne; Ramanoudjame, Laetitita; Ferry, Arnaud; Arandel, Ludovic; Delalande, Olivier; Jollet, Arnaud; Dingli, Florent; Lee, Kuang-Yung; Peccate, Cécile; Lorain, Stéphanie; Kabashi, Edor; Athanasopoulos, Takis; Koo, Taeyoung; Loew, Damarys; Swanson, Maurice S; Le Rumeur, Elisabeth; Dickson, George; Allamand, Valérie; Marie, Joëlle; Furling, Denis

    2015-05-28

    Myotonic Dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is a dominant neuromuscular disease caused by nuclear-retained RNAs containing expanded CUG repeats. These toxic RNAs alter the activities of RNA splicing factors resulting in alternative splicing misregulation and muscular dysfunction. Here we show that the abnormal splicing of DMD exon 78 found in dystrophic muscles of DM1 patients is due to the functional loss of MBNL1 and leads to the re-expression of an embryonic dystrophin in place of the adult isoform. Forced expression of embryonic dystrophin in zebrafish using an exon-skipping approach severely impairs the mobility and muscle architecture. Moreover, reproducing Dmd exon 78 missplicing switch in mice induces muscle fibre remodelling and ultrastructural abnormalities including ringed fibres, sarcoplasmic masses or Z-band disorganization, which are characteristic features of dystrophic DM1 skeletal muscles. Thus, we propose that splicing misregulation of DMD exon 78 compromises muscle fibre maintenance and contributes to the progressive dystrophic process in DM1.

  3. PDE5 inhibition alleviates functional muscle ischemia in boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Michael D; Rader, Florian; Tang, Xiu; Tavyev, Jane; Nelson, Stanley F; Miceli, M Carrie; Elashoff, Robert M; Sweeney, H Lee; Victor, Ronald G

    2014-06-10

    To determine whether phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) inhibition can alleviate exercise-induced skeletal muscle ischemia in boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). In 10 boys with DMD and 10 healthy age-matched male controls, we assessed exercise-induced attenuation of reflex sympathetic vasoconstriction, i.e., functional sympatholysis, a protective mechanism that matches oxygen delivery to metabolic demand. Reflex vasoconstriction was induced by simulated orthostatic stress, measured as the decrease in forearm muscle oxygenation with near-infrared spectroscopy, and performed when the forearm muscles were rested or lightly exercised with rhythmic handgrip exercise. Then, the patients underwent an open-label, dose-escalation, crossover trial with single oral doses of tadalafil or sildenafil. The major new findings are 2-fold: first, sympatholysis is impaired in boys with DMD-producing functional muscle ischemia-despite contemporary background therapy with corticosteroids alone or in combination with cardioprotective medication. Second, PDE5 inhibition with standard clinical doses of either tadalafil or sildenafil alleviates this ischemia in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, PDE5 inhibition also normalizes the exercise-induced increase in skeletal muscle blood flow (measured by Doppler ultrasound), which is markedly blunted in boys with DMD. These data provide in-human proof of concept for PDE5 inhibition as a putative new therapeutic strategy for DMD. This study provides Class IV evidence that in patients with DMD, PDE5 inhibition restores functional sympatholysis. © 2014 American Academy of Neurology.

  4. Muscle ultrasound quantifies disease progression over time in infants and young boys with duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidman, Craig M; Malkus, Elizabeth C; Connolly, Anne M

    2015-09-01

    Quantitative muscle ultrasound (QUS) in boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) shows increased echointensity as muscle is replaced with fat and fibrosis. Studies of quantitative ultrasound in infants/young boys with DMD over time have not been reported. We used calibrated muscle backscatter (cMB), a reproducible measure of ultrasound echointensity, to quantify muscle pathology in 5 young boys with DMD (ages 0.5-2.8 years) over 17-29 months. We compared the results with repeated assessments of function (n = 4) and with muscle ultrasound images from a cross-section of 6 male controls (0.6-3.1 years). cMB in boys with DMD increased (worsened) over time (P < 0.001), whereas function improved. After age 2 years, cMB in most (4 of 5) boys with DMD was higher than in any control. QUS measures disease progression in young boys with DMD despite functional improvements. QUS could be employed as an outcome measure for serial assessment of young boys with DMD. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. A human in vitro model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy muscle formation and contractility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesmith, Alexander P; Wagner, Matthew A; Pasqualini, Francesco S; O'Connor, Blakely B; Pincus, Mark J; August, Paul R; Parker, Kevin Kit

    2016-10-10

    Tongue weakness, like all weakness in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), occurs as a result of contraction-induced muscle damage and deficient muscular repair. Although membrane fragility is known to potentiate injury in DMD, whether muscle stem cells are implicated in deficient muscular repair remains unclear. We hypothesized that DMD myoblasts are less sensitive to cues in the extracellular matrix designed to potentiate structure-function relationships of healthy muscle. To test this hypothesis, we drew inspiration from the tongue and engineered contractile human muscle tissues on thin films. On this platform, DMD myoblasts formed fewer and smaller myotubes and exhibited impaired polarization of the cell nucleus and contractile cytoskeleton when compared with healthy cells. These structural aberrations were reflected in their functional behavior, as engineered tongues from DMD myoblasts failed to achieve the same contractile strength as healthy tongue structures. These data suggest that dystrophic muscle may fail to organize with respect to extracellular cues necessary to potentiate adaptive growth and remodeling. © 2016 Nesmith et al.

  6. Evaluation of skeletal muscle DTI in patients with duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooijmans, M T; Damon, B M; Froeling, M; Versluis, M J; Burakiewicz, J; Verschuuren, J J G M; Niks, E H; Webb, A G; Kan, H E

    2015-11-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is a popular method to assess differences in fiber organization in diseased and healthy muscle tissue. Previous work has shown that muscle DTI measurements depend on signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), %fat, and tissue T2. The goal of this study was to evaluate the potential biasing effects of these factors on skeletal muscle DTI data in patients with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD). MR images were obtained of the right lower leg of 21 DMD patients and 12 healthy controls on a Philips 3T system. DTI measurements were combined with quantitative in-vivo measures of mean water T2, %fat and SNR to evaluate their effect on DTI parameter estimation. All outcome measures were determined within ROIs drawn for six lower leg muscles. Between group analysis, using all ROIs, revealed a significantly elevated FA in the GCL, SOL and PER muscles (pDTI parameter estimation. These findings suggest that measuring mean water T2, %fat and SNR is essential to ascribe changes in DTI measures to intrinsic diffusion changes or to confounding influences. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Determination of muscle fatigue index for strength training in patients with Duchenne dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Rodrigues Oliveira

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Muscle weakness is the most prominent impairment in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD and often involves the loss of functional ability as well as other limitations related to daily living. Thus, there is a need to maintain muscle strength in large muscle groups, such as the femoral quadriceps, which is responsible for diverse functional abilities. However, the load and duration of training for such rehabilitation has proven to be a great unknown, mainly due to the undesired appearance of muscle fatigue, which is a severe factor for the injury of muscle fibers. OBJECTIVES: The aim of the present study was to determine a fatigue index by means of surface electromyography (EMG for the parameterization of muscle strengthening physiotherapy training. METHODS: A cross-sectional study (case series was carried out involving four patients with DMD. Three pairs of surface electrodes were placed on the motor point of the Rectus femoris, Vastus lateralis and Vastus medialis of the dominant limb, maintaining the knee at 60º of flexion. The participants were instructed to perform the extension movement of this joint at four strength levels (100%, 80%, 60% and 40% of maximal voluntary isometric contraction. RESULTS: The slope of the linear regression line was used for the determination of the fatigue index, performed by Pearson's test on the median frequency of each strength level. CONCLUSION: Electromyographic measurements of the strength index for muscle training proved to be a simple accessible assessment method, as well as an extremely valuable tool, allowing the design of a muscle strength training program with an individualized load threshold.

  8. Distrofia muscular congênita e deficiência de merosina Congenital muscular dystrophy and merosin deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lineu Cesar Werneck

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Uma proporção variável de pacientes com distrofia muscular congênita (DMC da forma clássica ou ocidental apresenta deficiência da cadeia α2 da merosina, uma proteína da matriz extracelular. Foi realizado estudo das características clínicas, laboratoriais e histopatológicas de 18 pacientes com DMC, relacionadas com o padrão de merosina encontrado na biópsia muscular. Estudo imuno-histoquímico demonstrou que 11 pacientes eram merosina-deficiente (MD e sete pacientes eram merosina-positiva (MP. Nenhum dos nove pacientes MD com idade suficiente para serem avaliados alcançaram a capacidade de deambulação, enquanto quatro dos sete pacientes MP atingiram deambulação sem auxílio. Os níveis de creatinoquinase estavam mais aumentados nos pacientes MD, mas a diferença entre os dois grupos não foi estatisticamente significativa. Estudo da condução nervosa motora foi realizado em 12 pacientes. Todos os quatro pacientes MP apresentaram exames normais, enquanto dois de oito pacientes MD apresentaram diminuição da velocidade de condução nervosa motora. Entre 69 parâmetros de biópsia muscular avaliados, não foi encontrada diferença estatisticamente significativa entre os grupos MP e MD. Esses resultados sugerem que a diferenciação entre os casos MP e MD serve para fins de prognóstico, pois os pacientes MP chegam a deambular. Além disso, este estudo indica que não existe relação entre a ausência de merosina e as alterações histológicas encontradas na biópsia muscular.Merosin α2 chain, an extracellular matrix protein, is deficient in a proportion of patients with classical congenital muscular dystrophy (CMD. A study of clinical, laboratory and histopathological features of 18 patients with CMD was performed in relation to the merosin expression in muscle biopsy. Immunohistochemistry study showed that merosin was deficient in 11 patients and present in 7. None of the 9 merosin-deficient patient: evaluated achieved

  9. Evidence-based guideline summary: evaluation, diagnosis, and management of congenital muscular dystrophy: Report of the Guideline Development Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology and the Practice Issues Review Panel of the American Association of Neuromuscular & Electrodiagnostic Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Peter B; Morrison, Leslie; Iannaccone, Susan T; Graham, Robert J; Bönnemann, Carsten G; Rutkowski, Anne; Hornyak, Joseph; Wang, Ching H; North, Kathryn; Oskoui, Maryam; Getchius, Thomas S D; Cox, Julie A; Hagen, Erin E; Gronseth, Gary; Griggs, Robert C

    2015-03-31

    To delineate optimal diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to congenital muscular dystrophy (CMD) through a systematic review and analysis of the currently available literature. Relevant, peer-reviewed research articles were identified using a literature search of the MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Scopus databases. Diagnostic and therapeutic data from these articles were extracted and analyzed in accordance with the American Academy of Neurology classification of evidence schemes for diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic studies. Recommendations were linked to the strength of the evidence, other related literature, and general principles of care. The geographic and ethnic backgrounds, clinical features, brain imaging studies, muscle imaging studies, and muscle biopsies of children with suspected CMD help predict subtype-specific diagnoses. Genetic testing can confirm some subtype-specific diagnoses, but not all causative genes for CMD have been described. Seizures and respiratory complications occur in specific subtypes. There is insufficient evidence to determine the efficacy of various treatment interventions to optimize respiratory, orthopedic, and nutritional outcomes, and more data are needed regarding complications. Multidisciplinary care by experienced teams is important for diagnosing and promoting the health of children with CMD. Accurate assessment of clinical presentations and genetic data will help in identifying the correct subtype-specific diagnosis in many cases. Multiorgan system complications occur frequently; surveillance and prompt interventions are likely to be beneficial for affected children. More research is needed to fill gaps in knowledge regarding this category of muscular dystrophies. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  10. Alterations in Notch signalling in skeletal muscles from mdx and dko dystrophic mice and patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, Jarrod E; Trieu, Jennifer; Chee, Annabel; Naim, Timur; Gehrig, Stefan M; Lamon, Séverine; Angelini, Corrado; Russell, Aaron P; Lynch, Gordon S

    2014-04-01

    New Findings What is the central question of this study? The Notch signalling pathway plays an important role in muscle regeneration, and activation of the pathway has been shown to enhance muscle regeneration in aged mice. It is unknown whether Notch activation will have a similarly beneficial effect on muscle regeneration in the context of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). What is the main finding and its importance? Although expression of Notch signalling components is altered in both mouse models of DMD and in human DMD patients, activation of the Notch signalling pathway does not confer any functional benefit on muscles from dystrophic mice, suggesting that other signalling pathways may be more fruitful targets for manipulation in treating DMD. Abstract In Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), muscle damage and impaired regeneration lead to progressive muscle wasting, weakness and premature death. The Notch signalling pathway represents a central regulator of gene expression and is critical for cellular proliferation, differentiation and apoptotic signalling during all stages of embryonic muscle development. Notch activation improves muscle regeneration in aged mice, but its potential to restore regeneration and function in muscular dystrophy is unknown. We performed a comprehensive examination of several genes involved in Notch signalling in muscles from dystrophin-deficient mdx and dko (utrophin- and dystrophin-null) mice and DMD patients. A reduction of Notch1 and Hes1 mRNA in tibialis anterior muscles of dko mice and quadriceps muscles of DMD patients and a reduction of Hes1 mRNA in the diaphragm of the mdx mice were observed, with other targets being inconsistent across species. Activation and inhibition of Notch signalling, followed by measures of muscle regeneration and function, were performed in the mouse models of DMD. Notch activation had no effect on functional regeneration in C57BL/10, mdx or dko mice. Notch inhibition significantly depressed the

  11. Anti-inflammatory drugs for Duchenne muscular dystrophy: focus on skeletal muscle-releasing factors

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    Miyatake S

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Shouta Miyatake,1 Yuko Shimizu-Motohashi,2 Shin’ichi Takeda,1 Yoshitsugu Aoki1 1Department of Molecular Therapy, National Institute of Neuroscience, National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, Kodaira, Tokyo, Japan; 2Department of Child Neurology, National Center Hospital, National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, Kodaira, Tokyo, Japan Abstract: Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD, an incurable and a progressive muscle wasting disease, is caused by the absence of dystrophin protein, leading to recurrent muscle fiber damage during contraction. The inflammatory response to fiber damage is a compelling candidate mechanism for disease exacerbation. The only established pharmacological treatment for DMD is corticosteroids to suppress muscle inflammation, however this treatment is limited by its insufficient therapeutic efficacy and considerable side effects. Recent reports show the therapeutic potential of inhibiting or enhancing pro- or anti-inflammatory factors released from DMD skeletal muscles, resulting in significant recovery from muscle atrophy and dysfunction. We discuss and review the recent findings of DMD inflammation and opportunities for drug development targeting specific releasing factors from skeletal muscles. It has been speculated that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs targeting specific inflammatory factors are more effective and have less side effects for DMD compared with steroidal drugs. For example, calcium channels, reactive oxygen species, and nuclear factor-κB signaling factors are the most promising targets as master regulators of inflammatory response in DMD skeletal muscles. If they are combined with an oligonucleotide-based exon skipping therapy to restore dystrophin expression, the anti-inflammatory drug therapies may address the present therapeutic limitation of low efficiency for DMD. Keywords: calcium channels, ryanodine receptor 1, exon skipping, NF-κB, myokine, ROS

  12. Calf muscle involvement in Becker muscular dystrophy: when size does not matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monforte, Mauro; Mercuri, Eugenio; Laschena, Francesco; Ricci, Enzo; Tasca, Giorgio

    2014-12-15

    Calf hypertrophy is a common feature in Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD), and it is still debated to which extent fatty degeneration or true muscle hypertrophy account for it. We wanted to investigate the relative contribution of these two components using a simple image analysis approach and their possible correlation with disease severity. Twenty-nine BMD patients' MRI scans were analyzed. A semiquantitative visual score assessing fatty replacement of calf muscles (calf MRI score, CMS) was calculated and correlated with the cross sectional area (CSA) of lower leg posterior compartment muscles, digitally measured on acquired images. The correlation between CSA and CMS was not significant. CMS in contrast correlated with disease severity (p<0.001) while CSA did not (p=0.969). In BMD, a major contribution to calf hypertrophy is provided by real muscle hypertrophy rather than by fatty degeneration. CMS appears to be a potential surrogate marker of disease severity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Oral muscles are progressively affected in Duchenne muscular dystrophy: implications for dysphagia treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Engel-Hoek, Lenie; Erasmus, Corrie E; Hendriks, Jan C M; Geurts, Alexander C H; Klein, Willemijn M; Pillen, Sigrid; Sie, Lilian T; de Swart, Bert J M; de Groot, Imelda J M

    2013-05-01

    Dysphagia is reported in advanced stages of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). The population of DMD is changing due to an increasing survival. We aimed to describe the dysphagia in consecutive stages and to assess the underlying mechanisms of dysphagia in DMD, in order to develop mechanism based recommendations for safe swallowing. In this cross-sectional study, participants were divided into: early and late ambulatory stage (AS, n = 6), early non-ambulatory stage (ENAS, n = 7), and late non-ambulatory stage (LNAS, n = 11). Quantitative oral muscle ultrasound was performed to quantify echo intensity. Swallowing was assessed with a video fluoroscopic swallow study, surface electromyography (sEMG) of the submental muscle group and tongue pressure. Differences in outcome parameters among the three DMD stages were tested with analysis of variance. Oral muscles related to swallowing were progressively affected, starting in the AS with the geniohyoid muscle. Tongue (pseudo) hypertrophy was found in 70 % of patients in the ENAS and LNAS. Oral phase problems and post-swallow residue were observed, mostly in the LNAS with solid food. sEMG and tongue pressure data of swallowing solid food revealed the lowest sEMG amplitude, the longest duration and lowest tongue pressure in the LNAS. In case of swallowing problems in DMD, based on the disturbed mechanisms of swallowing, it is suggested to (1) adjust meals in terms of less solid food, and (2) drink water after meals to clear the oropharyngeal area.

  14. Exoskeletal meal assistance system (EMAS II) for progressive muscle dystrophy patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Yasuhisa; Oura, Saori

    2011-01-01

    This paper introduces a 4-DOFs exoskeletal meal assistance system (EMAS II) for progressive muscle dystrophy patient. It is generally better for the patient to use his/her hands by himself in daily life because active works maintain level of residual functions, health and initiative of him/her. The EMAS II that has a new joystick-type user interface device and three-DOFs on a shoulder part is enhanced for an easier operation and more comfortable support on eating, as the succeeding model of the previous system that has two-DOFs on a shoulder. In order to control the 4-DOFs system by the simple user interface device, the EMAS II simulates upper limb motion patterns of a healthy person. The motion patterns are modeled by extracting correlations between the height of a user's wrist joint and that of the user's elbow joint at the table. Moreover, the EMAS II automatically brings user's hand up to his/her mouth or back to a table when he/she pushes a preset switch on the interface device. Therefore a user has only to control a position of his/her wrist to pick or scoop foods and then flip the switch to start automatic mode, while a height of the elbow joint is automatically controlled by the EMAS II itself. The results of experiments, where a healthy subject regarded as a muscle dystrophy patient eats a meal with EMAS II, show that the subject finished her meal in a natural way in 18 minutes 40 seconds which was within a recommended time of 30 minutes. © 2011 IEEE

  15. Skeletal muscle water T2 as a biomarker of disease status and exercise effects in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mankodi, Ami; Azzabou, Noura; Bulea, Thomas; Reyngoudt, Harmen; Shimellis, Hirity; Ren, Yupeng; Kim, Eunhee; Fischbeck, Kenneth H; Carlier, Pierre G

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine exercise effects on muscle water T 2 in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). In 12 DMD subjects and 19 controls, lower leg muscle fat (%) was measured by Dixon and muscle water T 2 and R 2 (1/T 2 ) by the tri-exponential model. Muscle water R 2 was measured again at 3 hours after an ankle dorsiflexion exercise. The muscle fat fraction was higher in DMD participants than in controls (p muscle. Muscle water T 2 was measured independent of the degree of fatty degeneration in DMD muscle. At baseline, muscle water T 2 was higher in all but the extensor digitorum longus muscles of DMD participants than controls (p muscle torque (p muscle water R 2 decreased (T 2 increased) after exercise from baseline in DMD subjects and controls with greater changes in the target muscles of the exercise than in ankle plantarflexor muscles. Skeletal muscle water T 2 is a sensitive biomarker of the disease status in DMD and of the exercise response in DMD patients and controls. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Clinical and muscle biopsy findings in Norwegian paediatric patients with limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Magnhild; Scheie, David; Breivik, Noralv; Mork, Marit; Lindal, Sigurd

    2014-05-01

    To describe patients diagnosed with limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2I (LGMD2I) in our paediatric departments between 2004 and 2012. The hospital charts of 17 patients presenting for evaluation at a mean age of 7.8 years (range 1-13 years) were retrospectively reviewed. With one exception, all patients were homozygous for the common mutation c.826C>A in the FKRP gene. Three patients experienced transient pronounced weakness as toddlers. Fatigue and muscle pain were most prominent, weakness less so, in children presenting at an older age. The degree of severity varied substantially. In certain cases, increased creatine kinase was an incidental finding. All walked independently by 18 months. When last evaluated at a mean age of 14.3 years (range 3.5-18 years), five patients were part-time wheelchair users. One patient was then treated for a cardiomyopathy. Creatine kinase was consistently increased, except presymptomatic in one patient. Muscle biopsies showed focal acute and chronic myopathic changes and pathological expression of α-dystroglycan. No consistent relationship between clinical function and the degree of morphological pathology was found. LGMD2I is a relevant differential diagnosis when creatine kinase is increased in children presenting with fatigue, muscle pain and sometimes weakness. ©2014 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. [Features of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy in oral and maxillofacial region and MRI analysis of facial muscles].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y H; Ma, Y X; Hu, J; Gao, G D; Wu, Y K; Zhang, Z Y

    2016-12-09

    Objective: To investigate the manifestation of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) in oral and maxillofacial region. Methods: A total of 12 patients diagnosed as FSHD and 20 healthy volunteers were included in the study. Their medical history was collected from these patients. The decayed missing filled teeth (DMFT), calculus index-simplified (CI-S), occlusal relationship, maximal opening of mouth and maximum bite force were recorded. The impressions were taken to measure the maximal hight of palate and the width of palate. The lateral cephalometric radiographs were also taken to measure the mandibular plane-frankfurt horizontal plane angle (MP-FH). They finally received oral and maxillofacial region MRI examination to observe the masseter muscle, medial pterygoid muscle and lateral pterygoid muscle. The data were analyzed by t -test or Wilcoxon signed ranks test. Results: There was no significant gender difference in FSHD group. The average age of treatment was (27.5 ± 8.1) years and the average age of onset was (15.7±7.5) years. Nine patients liked to eat soft foods, 4 patients had difficulties of closing eyes, 8 patients had difficulties of cheek-bulging, 10 patients showed pouty lips and 9 patients had mesio-malocclusion. DMFT (4.0±2.3), CI-S (5.8±2.1), male maximal hight of palate (20.5±2.1) mm , female maximal hight of palate (17.9±1.6) mm, MP-FH (31.8°±2.2°) of FSHD group were greater than those of the control group. Male width of palate (34.8±1.4) mm, female width of palate (33.7±1.5) mm, male maximum bite force (451.7 ± 39.0) N, female maximum bite force (326.7 ± 21.6) N, maximal opening of mouth (3.5 ± 0.4) cm of FSHD group were less than those of the control group ( P muscle asymmetr in 11 cases of masseter and 6 cases of medial pterygoid muscle, 5 cases of lateral pterygoid, and these muscle showed mild fatty infiltration mainly concentrating in the grade 0, grade 1 and grade 2. Conclusions: The FSHD patients have poor oral

  18. Bortezomib partially improves laminin α2 chain-deficient muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Körner, Zandra; Fontes-Oliveira, Cibely C; Holmberg, Johan; Carmignac, Virginie; Durbeej, Madeleine

    2014-05-01

    Congenital muscular dystrophy, caused by mutations in LAMA2 (the gene encoding laminin α2 chain), is a severe and incapacitating disease for which no therapy is yet available. We have recently demonstrated that proteasome activity is increased in laminin α2 chain-deficient muscle and that treatment with the nonpharmaceutical proteasome inhibitor MG-132 reduces muscle pathology in laminin α2 chain-deficient dy(3K)/dy(3K) mice. Here, we explore the use of the selective and therapeutic proteasome inhibitor bortezomib (currently used for treatment of relapsed multiple myeloma and mantle cell lymphoma) in dy(3K)/dy(3K) mice and in congenital muscular dystrophy type 1A muscle cells. Outcome measures included quantitative muscle morphology, gene and miRNA expression analyses, proteasome activity, motor activity, and survival. Bortezomib improved several histological hallmarks of disease, partially normalized miRNA expression (miR-1 and miR-133a), and enhanced body weight, locomotion, and survival of dy(3K)/dy(3K) mice. In addition, bortezomib reduced proteasome activity in congenital muscular dystrophy type 1A myoblasts and myotubes. These findings provide evidence that the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib partially reduces laminin α2 chain-deficient muscular dystrophy. Investigation of the clinical efficacy of bortezomib administration in congenital muscular dystrophy type 1A clinical trials may be warranted. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Congenital heart disease in adolescents with gluteal muscle contracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Tian; Zhang, Xin-tao; Zha, Zhen-gang; Zhang, Wen-tao

    2015-02-01

    Gluteal muscle contracture (GMC), presented with hip abduction and external rotation when crouching, is common in several ethnicities, particularly in Chinese. It remains unclear that the reasons why these children are weak and have no choice to accept repeated intramuscular injection. Here, we found some unique cases which may be useful to explain this question. We describe a series of special GMC patients, who are accompanied with congenital heart disease (CHD). These cases were first observed in preoperative examinations of a patient with atrial septal defect (ASD), which was proved by chest X-ray and cardiac ultrasound. From then on, we gradually identified additional 3 GMC patients with CHD. The original patient with ASD was sent to cardiosurgery department to repair atrial septal first and received arthroscopic surgery later. While the other 3 were cured postoperative of ventricular septal defect (VSD), tetralogy of fallot (TOF), patent ductus arteriosus (PDA), respectively, and had surgery directly. The study gives us 3 proposals: (1) as to CHD children, it is essential to decrease the use of intramuscular injection, (2) paying more attention to cardiac examination especially cardiac ultrasound in perioperative period, and (3) taking 3D-CT to reconstruct gluteal muscles for observing contracture bands clearly in preoperation. However, more larger series of patients are called for to confirm these findings.

  20. Efficacy of muscle exercise in patients with muscular dystrophy: a systematic review showing a missed opportunity to improve outcomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Gianola

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although muscular dystrophy causes muscle weakness and muscle loss, the role of exercise in the management of this disease remains controversial. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this systematic review is to evaluate the role of exercise interventions on muscle strength in patients with muscular dystrophy. METHODS: We performed systematic electronic searches in Medline, Embase, Web of Science, Scopus and Pedro as well as a list of reference literature. We included trials assessing muscle exercise in patients with muscular dystrophy. Two reviewers independently abstracted data and appraised risk of bias. RESULTS: We identified five small (two controlled and three randomized clinical trials comprising 242 patients and two ongoing randomized controlled trials. We were able to perform two meta-analyses. We found an absence of evidence for a difference in muscle strength (MD 4.18, 95% CIs - 2.03 to 10.39; p = 0.91 and in endurance (MD -0.53, 95% CIs -1.11 to 0.05; p = 0.26. In both, the direction of effects favored muscle exercise. CONCLUSIONS: The first included trial about the efficacy of muscular exercise was published in 1978. Even though some benefits of muscle exercise were consistently reported across studies, the benefits might be due to the small size of studies and other biases. Detrimental effects are still possible. After several decades of research, doctors cannot give advice and patients are, thus, denied basic information. A multi-center randomized trial investigating the strength of muscles, fatigue, and functional limitations is needed.

  1. Lower leg muscle involvement in Duchenne muscular dystrophy: an MR imaging and spectroscopy study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torriani, Martin; Townsend, Elise; Thomas, Bijoy J.; Bredella, Miriam A.; Ghomi, Reza H.; Tseng, Brian S.

    2012-01-01

    To describe the involvement of lower leg muscles in boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) by using MR imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy (MRS) correlated to indices of functional status. Nine boys with DMD (mean age, 11 years) and eight healthy age- and BMI-matched boys (mean age, 13 years) prospectively underwent lower leg MRI, 1H-MRS of tibialis anterior (TA) and soleus (SOL) for lipid fraction measures, and 31P-MRS for pH and high-energy phosphate measures. DMD subjects were evaluated using the Vignos lower extremity functional rating, and tests including 6 min walk test (6MWT) and 10 m walk. DMD subjects had highest fatty infiltration scores in peroneal muscles, followed by medial gastrocnemius and soleus. Compared to controls, DMD boys showed higher intramuscular fat (P = 0.04), lipid fractions of TA and SOL (P = 0.02 and 0.003, respectively), pH of anterior compartment (P = 0.0003), and lower phosphocreatine/inorganic phosphorus ratio of posterior compartment (P = 0.02). The Vignos rating correlated with TA (r = 0.79, P = 0.01) and SOL (r = 0.71, P = 0.03) lipid fractions. The 6MWT correlated with fatty infiltration scores of SOL (r = -0.76, P = 0.046), medial (r = -0.80, P = 0.03) and lateral (r = -0.84, P = 0.02) gastrocnemius, intramuscular fat (r = -0.80, P = 0.03), and SOL lipid fraction (r = -0.89, P = 0.007). Time to walk 10 m correlated with anterior compartment pH (r = 0.78, P = 0.04). Lower leg muscles of boys with DMD show a distinct involvement pattern and increased adiposity that correlates with functional status. Lower leg MRI and 1H-MRS studies may help to noninvasively demonstrate the severity of muscle involvement. (orig.)

  2. Lower leg muscle involvement in Duchenne muscular dystrophy: an MR imaging and spectroscopy study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torriani, Martin [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Division of Musculoskeletal Imaging and Intervention, Boston, MA (United States); Massachusetts General Hospital, Musculoskeletal Imaging and Intervention, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Townsend, Elise [MGH Institute of Health Professions and Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Thomas, Bijoy J.; Bredella, Miriam A.; Ghomi, Reza H. [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Division of Musculoskeletal Imaging and Intervention, Boston, MA (United States); Tseng, Brian S. [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Pediatric Neuromuscular Clinic, Boston, MA (United States); Novartis Institute of Biomedical Research, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2012-04-15

    To describe the involvement of lower leg muscles in boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) by using MR imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy (MRS) correlated to indices of functional status. Nine boys with DMD (mean age, 11 years) and eight healthy age- and BMI-matched boys (mean age, 13 years) prospectively underwent lower leg MRI, 1H-MRS of tibialis anterior (TA) and soleus (SOL) for lipid fraction measures, and 31P-MRS for pH and high-energy phosphate measures. DMD subjects were evaluated using the Vignos lower extremity functional rating, and tests including 6 min walk test (6MWT) and 10 m walk. DMD subjects had highest fatty infiltration scores in peroneal muscles, followed by medial gastrocnemius and soleus. Compared to controls, DMD boys showed higher intramuscular fat (P = 0.04), lipid fractions of TA and SOL (P = 0.02 and 0.003, respectively), pH of anterior compartment (P = 0.0003), and lower phosphocreatine/inorganic phosphorus ratio of posterior compartment (P = 0.02). The Vignos rating correlated with TA (r = 0.79, P = 0.01) and SOL (r = 0.71, P = 0.03) lipid fractions. The 6MWT correlated with fatty infiltration scores of SOL (r = -0.76, P = 0.046), medial (r = -0.80, P = 0.03) and lateral (r = -0.84, P = 0.02) gastrocnemius, intramuscular fat (r = -0.80, P = 0.03), and SOL lipid fraction (r = -0.89, P = 0.007). Time to walk 10 m correlated with anterior compartment pH (r = 0.78, P = 0.04). Lower leg muscles of boys with DMD show a distinct involvement pattern and increased adiposity that correlates with functional status. Lower leg MRI and 1H-MRS studies may help to noninvasively demonstrate the severity of muscle involvement. (orig.)

  3. Muscleblind, BSF and TBPH are mislocalized in the muscle sarcomere of a Drosophila myotonic dystrophy model

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    Beatriz Llamusi

    2013-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1 is a genetic disease caused by the pathological expansion of a CTG trinucleotide repeat in the 3′ UTR of the DMPK gene. In the DMPK transcripts, the CUG expansions sequester RNA-binding proteins into nuclear foci, including transcription factors and alternative splicing regulators such as MBNL1. MBNL1 sequestration has been associated with key features of DM1. However, the basis behind a number of molecular and histological alterations in DM1 remain unclear. To help identify new pathogenic components of the disease, we carried out a genetic screen using a Drosophila model of DM1 that expresses 480 interrupted CTG repeats, i(CTG480, and a collection of 1215 transgenic RNA interference (RNAi fly lines. Of the 34 modifiers identified, two RNA-binding proteins, TBPH (homolog of human TAR DNA-binding protein 43 or TDP-43 and BSF (Bicoid stability factor; homolog of human LRPPRC, were of particular interest. These factors modified i(CTG480 phenotypes in the fly eye and wing, and TBPH silencing also suppressed CTG-induced defects in the flight muscles. In Drosophila flight muscle, TBPH, BSF and the fly ortholog of MBNL1, Muscleblind (Mbl, were detected in sarcomeric bands. Expression of i(CTG480 resulted in changes in the sarcomeric patterns of these proteins, which could be restored by coexpression with human MBNL1. Epistasis studies showed that Mbl silencing was sufficient to induce a subcellular redistribution of TBPH and BSF proteins in the muscle, which mimicked the effect of i(CTG480 expression. These results provide the first description of TBPH and BSF as targets of Mbl-mediated CTG toxicity, and they suggest an important role of these proteins in DM1 muscle pathology.

  4. AMP-activated protein kinase at the nexus of therapeutic skeletal muscle plasticity in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ljubicic, Vladimir; Jasmin, Bernard J

    2013-10-01

    Recent studies have highlighted the potential of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) to act as a central therapeutic target in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Here, we review the role of AMPK as an important integrator of cell signaling pathways that mediate phenotypic plasticity within the context of dystrophic skeletal muscle. Pharmacological AMPK activation remodels skeletal muscle towards a slower, more oxidative phenotype, which is more pathologically resistant to the lack of dystrophin. Moreover, recent studies suggest that AMPK-activated autophagy may be beneficial for myofiber structure and function in mice with muscular dystrophy. Thus, AMPK may represent an ideal target for intervention because clinically approved pharmacological agonists exist, and because benefits can be derived via two independent yet, complementary biological pathways. The availability of several AMPK activators could therefore lead to the rapid development and implementation of novel and highly effective therapeutics aimed at altering the relentless progression of DMD. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Air stacking: effects on pulmonary function in patients with spinal muscular atrophy and in patients with congenital muscular dystrophy,

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    Tanyse Bahia Carvalho Marques

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Respiratory complications are the main causes of morbidity and mortality in patients with neuromuscular disease (NMD. The objectives of this study were to determine the effects that routine daily home air-stacking maneuvers have on pulmonary function in patients with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA and in patients with congenital muscular dystrophy (CMD, as well as to identify associations between spinal deformities and the effects of the maneuvers. METHODS: Eighteen NMD patients (ten with CMD and eight with SMA were submitted to routine daily air-stacking maneuvers at home with manual resuscitators for four to six months, undergoing pulmonary function tests before and after that period. The pulmonary function tests included measurements of FVC; PEF; maximum insufflation capacity (MIC; and assisted and unassisted peak cough flow (APCF and UPCF, respectively with insufflations. RESULTS: After the use of home air-stacking maneuvers, there were improvements in the APCF and UPCF. In the patients without scoliosis, there was also a significant increase in FVC. When comparing patients with and without scoliosis, the increases in APCF and UPCF were more pronounced in those without scoliosis. CONCLUSIONS: Routine daily air-stacking maneuvers with a manual resuscitator appear to increase UPCF and APCF in patients with NMD, especially in those without scoliosis.

  6. Immortalized Muscle Cell Model to Test the Exon Skipping Efficacy for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

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    Quynh Nguyen

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is a lethal genetic disorder that most commonly results from mutations disrupting the reading frame of the dystrophin (DMD gene. Among the therapeutic approaches employed, exon skipping using antisense oligonucleotides (AOs is one of the most promising strategies. This strategy aims to restore the reading frame, thus producing a truncated, yet functioning dystrophin protein. In 2016, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA conditionally approved the first AO-based drug, eteplirsen (Exondys 51, developed for DMD exon 51 skipping. An accurate and reproducible method to quantify exon skipping efficacy is essential for evaluating the therapeutic potential of different AOs sequences. However, previous in vitro screening studies have been hampered by the limited proliferative capacity and insufficient amounts of dystrophin expressed by primary muscle cell lines that have been the main system used to evaluate AOs sequences. In this paper, we illustrate the challenges associated with primary muscle cell lines and describe a novel approach that utilizes immortalized cell lines to quantitatively evaluate the exon skipping efficacy in in vitro studies.

  7. Role of myotonic dystrophy protein kinase (DMPK in glucose homeostasis and muscle insulin action.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Llagostera

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Myotonic dystrophy 1 (DM1 is caused by a CTG expansion in the 3'-unstranslated region of the DMPK gene, which encodes a serine/threonine protein kinase. One of the common clinical features of DM1 patients is insulin resistance, which has been associated with a pathogenic effect of the repeat expansions. Here we show that DMPK itself is a positive modulator of insulin action. DMPK-deficient (dmpk-/- mice exhibit impaired insulin signaling in muscle tissues but not in adipocytes and liver, tissues in which DMPK is not expressed. Dmpk-/- mice display metabolic derangements such as abnormal glucose tolerance, reduced glucose uptake and impaired insulin-dependent GLUT4 trafficking in muscle. Using DMPK mutants, we show that DMPK is required for a correct intracellular trafficking of insulin and IGF-1 receptors, providing a mechanism to explain the molecular and metabolic phenotype of dmpk-/- mice. Taken together, these findings indicate that reduced DMPK expression may directly influence the onset of insulin-resistance in DM1 patients and point to dmpk as a new candidate gene for susceptibility to type 2-diabetes.

  8. Anterior uveitis and congenital fibrosis of the extraocular muscles in a patient with Noonan syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elgohary Mostafa

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a patient with Noonan syndrome who presented with Human Leukocyte Antigen B27-associated recurrent acute anterior uveitis and manifestations of congenital fibrosis of the extraocular muscles, which has not been reported before.

  9. Overexpression of microRNA-206 in the skeletal muscle from myotonic dystrophy type 1 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelini Corrado

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MicroRNAs are highly conserved, noncoding RNAs involved in post-transcriptional gene silencing. They have been shown to participate in a wide range of biological processes, including myogenesis and muscle regeneration. The goal of this study is to test the hypothesis that myo-miRs (myo = muscle + miR = miRNA expression is altered in muscle from patients affected by myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1, the most frequently inherited neuromuscular disease in adults. In order to gain better insights about the role of miRNAs in the DM1 pathogenesis, we have also analyzed the muscular expression of miR-103 and miR-107, which have been identified in silico as attractive candidates for binding to the DMPK mRNA. Methods To this aim, we have profiled the expression of miR-133 (miR-133a, miR-133b, miR-1, miR-181 (miR-181a, miR-181b, miR-181c and miR-206, that are specifically induced during myogenesis in cardiac and skeletal muscle tissues. miR-103 and miR-107, highly expressed in brain, heart and muscle have also been included in this study. QRT-PCR experiments have been performed on RNA from vastus lateralis biopsies of DM1 patients (n = 7 and control subjects (n = 4. Results of miRNAs expression have been confirmed by Northern blot, whereas in situ hybridization technique have been performed to localize misexpressed miRNAs on muscle sections from DM1 and control individuals. Results Only miR-206 showed an over-expression in 5 of 7 DM1 patients (threshold = 2, fold change between 1.20 and 13.22, average = 5.37 compared to the control group. This result has been further confirmed by Northern blot analysis (3.37-fold overexpression, R2 = 0.89. In situ hybridization localized miR-206 to nuclear site both in normal and DM1 tissues. Cellular distribution in DM1 tissues includes also the nuclear regions of centralized nuclei, with a strong signal corresponding to nuclear clumps. Conclusions This work provides, for the first time, evidences about

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging of the erector spinae muscles in Duchenne muscular dystrophy: implication for scoliotic deformities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoabli, Gnahoua; Mathieu, Pierre A; Aubin, Carl-Eric

    2008-12-29

    In Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), the muscular degeneration often leads to the development of scoliosis. Our objective was to investigate how anatomical changes in back muscles can lead to scoliosis. Muscular volume and the level of fat infiltration in those muscles were thus evaluated, in non-scoliotic, pre-scoliotic and scoliotic patients. The overlying skin thickness over the apex level of scoliotic deformations was also measured to facilitate the interpretation of electromyographic signals when recorded on the skin surface. In 8 DMD patients and two healthy controls with no known muscular deficiencies, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to measure continuously at 3 mm intervals the distribution of the erector spinae (ES) muscle in the T8-L4 region as well as fat infiltration in the muscle and overlying skin thickness: four patients were non-scoliotic (NS), two were pre-scoliotic (PS, Cobb angle /= 15 degrees ). For each subject, 63 images 3 mm thick of the ES muscle were obtained in the T8-L4 region on both sides of the spine. The pixel dimension was 0.39 x 0.39 mm. With a commercial software, on each 12 bits image, the ES contour on the left and on the right sides of the spine were manually determined as well as those of its constituents i.e., the iliocostalis (IL), the longissimus (LO) and the spinalis (SP) muscles. Following this segmentation, the surfaces within the contours were determined, the muscles volume were obtained, the amount of fat infiltration inside each muscle was evaluated and the overlying skin thickness measured. The volume of the ES muscle of our S and PS patients was found smaller on the convex side relative to the concave one by 5.3 +/- 0.7% and 2.8 +/- 0.2% respectively. For the 4 NS patients, the volume difference of this muscle between right and left sides was 2.1 +/- 1.5% and for the 2 controls, it was 1.4 +/- 1.2%. Fat infiltration for the S and the PS patients was larger on the convex side than on the concave one (4

  11. Andrographolide attenuates skeletal muscle dystrophy in mdx mice and increases efficiency of cell therapy by reducing fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, Daniel; Gutiérrez, Jaime; Cabello-Verrugio, Claudio; Morales, Maria Gabriela; Mezzano, Sergio; Fadic, Ricardo; Casar, Juan Carlos; Hancke, Juan L; Brandan, Enrique

    2014-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is characterized by the absence of the cytoskeletal protein dystrophin, muscle wasting, increased transforming growth factor type beta (TGF-β) signaling, and fibrosis. At the present time, the only clinically validated treatments for DMD are glucocorticoids. These drugs prolong muscle strength and ambulation of patients for a short term only and have severe adverse effects. Andrographolide, a bicyclic diterpenoid lactone, has traditionally been used for the treatment of colds, fever, laryngitis, and other infections with no or minimal side effects. We determined whether andrographolide treatment of mdx mice, an animal model for DMD, affects muscle damage, physiology, fibrosis, and efficiency of cell therapy. mdx mice were treated with andrographolide for three months and skeletal muscle histology, creatine kinase activity, and permeability of muscle fibers were evaluated. Fibrosis and TGF-β signaling were evaluated by indirect immunofluorescence and Western blot analyses. Muscle strength was determined in isolated skeletal muscles and by a running test. Efficiency of cell therapy was determined by grafting isolated skeletal muscle satellite cells onto the tibialis anterior of mdx mice. mdx mice treated with andrographolide exhibited less severe muscular dystrophy than untreated dystrophic mice. They performed better in an exercise endurance test and had improved muscle strength in isolated muscles, reduced skeletal muscle impairment, diminished fibrosis and a significant reduction in TGF-β signaling. Moreover, andrographolide treatment of mdx mice improved grafting efficiency upon intramuscular injection of dystrophin-positive satellite cells. These results suggest that andrographolide could be used to improve quality of life in individuals with DMD.

  12. Duchenne muscular dystrophy carriers. Proton spin-lattice relaxation times of skeletal muscles on magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumura, K.; Nakano, I. (Shimoshizu National Hospital, Chiba (Japan). Dept. of Neurology); Fukuda, N.; Ikehira, H.; Tateno, Y. (National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan). Div. of Clinical Research); Aoki, Y. (National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan))

    1989-11-01

    By means of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the proton spin-lattice relaxation times (T1 values) of the skeletal muscles were measured in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) carriers and normal controls. The bound water fraction (BWF) was calculated from the T1 values obtained, according to the fast proton diffusion model. In the DMD carriers, T1 values of the gluteus maximus and quadriceps femoris muscles were significantly higher, and BWFs of these muscles were significantly lower than in normal control. Degenerative muscular changes accompanied by interstitial edema were presumed responsible for this abnormality. No correlation was observed between the muscle T1 and serum creatine kinase values. The present study showed that MRI could be a useful method for studying the dynamic state of water in both normal and pathological skeletal muscles. Its possible utility for DMD carrier detection was discussed briefly. (orig.).

  13. Increased plasma lipid levels exacerbate muscle pathology in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milad, Nadia; White, Zoe; Tehrani, Arash Y; Sellers, Stephanie; Rossi, Fabio M V; Bernatchez, Pascal

    2017-09-12

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is caused by loss of dystrophin expression and leads to severe ambulatory and cardiac function decline. However, the dystrophin-deficient mdx murine model of DMD only develops a very mild form of the disease. Our group and others have shown vascular abnormalities in animal models of MD, a likely consequence of the fact that blood vessels express the same dystrophin-associated glycoprotein complex (DGC) proteins as skeletal muscles. To test the blood vessel contribution to muscle damage in DMD, mdx 4cv mice were given elevated lipid levels via apolipoprotein E (ApoE) gene knockout combined with normal chow or lipid-rich Western diets. Ambulatory function and heart function (via echocardiogram) were assessed at 4 and 7 months of age. After sacrifice, muscle histology and aortic staining were used to assess muscle pathology and atherosclerosis development, respectively. Plasma levels of total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL), triglycerides, and creatine kinase (CK) were also measured. Although there was an increase in left ventricular heart volume in mdx-ApoE mice compared to that in mdx mice, parameters of heart function were not affected. Compared with wild-type and ApoE-null, only mdx-ApoE KO mice showed significant ambulatory dysfunction. Despite no significant difference in plasma CK, histological analyses revealed that elevated plasma lipids in chow- and Western diet-fed mdx-ApoE mice was associated with severe exacerbation of muscle pathology compared to mdx mice: significant increase in myofiber damage and fibrofatty replacement in the gastrocnemius and triceps brachii muscles, more reminiscent of human DMD pathology. Finally, although both ApoE and mdx-ApoE groups displayed increased plasma lipids, mdx-ApoE exhibited atherosclerotic plaque deposition equal to or less than that of ApoE mice. Since others have shown that lipid abnormalities correlate with DMD severity, our data suggest that plasma lipids could be

  14. Skeletal muscle secretome in Duchenne muscular dystrophy: a pivotal anti-inflammatory role of adiponectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecompte, S; Abou-Samra, M; Boursereau, R; Noel, L; Brichard, S M

    2017-07-01

    Persistent inflammation exacerbates the progression of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). The hormone, adiponectin (ApN), which is decreased in the metabolic syndrome, exhibits anti-inflammatory properties on skeletal muscle and alleviates the dystrophic phenotype of mdx mice. Here, we investigate whether ApN retains its anti-inflammatory action in myotubes obtained from DMD patients. We unravel the underlying mechanisms by studying the secretome and the early events of ApN. Primary cultures of myotubes from DMD and control patients were treated or not by ApN after an inflammatory challenge. Myokines secreted in medium were identified by cytokine antibody-arrays and ELISAs. The early events of ApN signaling were assessed by abrogating selected genes. ApN retained its anti-inflammatory properties in both dystrophic and control myotubes. Profiling of secretory products revealed that ApN downregulated the secretion of two pro-inflammatory factors (TNFα and IL-17A), one soluble receptor (sTNFRII), and one chemokine (CCL28) in DMD myotubes, while upregulating IL-6 that exerts some anti-inflammatory effects. These changes were explained by pretranslational mechanisms. Earlier events of the ApN cascade involved AdipoR1, the main receptor for muscle, and the AMPK-SIRT1-PGC-1α axis leading, besides alteration of the myokine profile, to the upregulation of utrophin A (a dystrophin analog). ApN retains its beneficial properties in dystrophic muscles by activating the AdipoR1-AMPK-SIRT1-PGC-1α pathway, thereby inducing a shift in the secretion of downstream myokines toward a less inflammatory profile while upregulating utrophin. ApN, the early events of the cascade and downstream myokines may be therapeutic targets for the management of DMD.

  15. Safe and bodywide muscle transduction in young adult Duchenne muscular dystrophy dogs with adeno-associated virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Yongping; Pan, Xiufang; Hakim, Chady H; Kodippili, Kasun; Zhang, Keqing; Shin, Jin-Hong; Yang, Hsiao T; McDonald, Thomas; Duan, Dongsheng

    2015-10-15

    The ultimate goal of muscular dystrophy gene therapy is to treat all muscles in the body. Global gene delivery was demonstrated in dystrophic mice more than a decade ago using adeno-associated virus (AAV). However, translation to affected large mammals has been challenging. The only reported attempt was performed in newborn Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) dogs. Unfortunately, AAV injection resulted in growth delay, muscle atrophy and contracture. Here we report safe and bodywide AAV delivery in juvenile DMD dogs. Three ∼2-m-old affected dogs received intravenous injection of a tyrosine-engineered AAV-9 reporter or micro-dystrophin (μDys) vector at the doses of 1.92-6.24 × 10(14) viral genome particles/kg under transient or sustained immune suppression. DMD dogs tolerated injection well and their growth was not altered. Hematology and blood biochemistry were unremarkable. No adverse reactions were observed. Widespread muscle transduction was seen in skeletal muscle, the diaphragm and heart for at least 4 months (the end of the study). Nominal expression was detected in internal organs. Improvement in muscle histology was observed in μDys-treated dogs. In summary, systemic AAV gene transfer is safe and efficient in young adult dystrophic large mammals. This may translate to bodywide gene therapy in pediatric patients in the future. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Distribution of skeletal muscle involvement in autosomal recessive distal muscular dystrophy. A clinical and computed tomographic study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizusawa, Hidehiro; Nakanishi, Takao; Kobayashi, Fumie

    1987-02-01

    Distribution of skeletal muscle involvement in 5 cases with autosomal recessive distal muscular dystrophy was studied clinically and by computed tomography (CT). Manual muscle test showed muscle involvement with a predilection for flexors in the lower leg and adductors in the thigh. Flexion and extension of the thigh and the lower leg was impaired to similar degree. In progressed cases, neck flexors and trunk muscles were also affected mildly. CT disclosed more clearly the preferential involvement of flexors in the lower leg, and involvement of both hamstrings center dot adductors group and extensors group of the thigh to similar degree. However, m. popliteus was curiously well preserved. In addition, there was a stage showing high density and hypertrophy of m. sartorius, m. gracilis, m. adductor, m. biceps femoris, m. semimenbranosus, m. semitendinosus or m. rectus femoris, which in thought to be compensatory hypertrophy. M. gluteus minimus in the pelvic girdle and m. dorsi proprii in the trunk were also liable to be affected. The CT findings are regarded as characteristic features noted clearly before muscle weakness and atrophy become apparent clinically. CT is very useful for distinguishing distal muscular dystrophy from rimmed vacuolar distal myopathy in which m. quadriceps femoris and flexors of the lower leg are usually well preserved without compensatory hypertrophy on CT.

  17. Creatine monohydrate supplementation does not increase muscle strength, lean body mass, or muscle phosphocreatine in patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarnopolsky, Mark; Mahoney, Douglas; Thompson, Terry; Naylor, Heather; Doherty, Timothy J

    2004-01-01

    Creatine monohydrate (CrM) supplementation may increase strength in some types of muscular dystrophy. A recent study in myotonic muscular dystrophy type 1 (DM1) did not find a significant treatment effect, but measurements of muscle phosphocreatine (PCr) were not performed. We completed a randomized, double-blind, cross-over trial using 34 genetically confirmed adult DM1 patients without significant cognitive impairment. Participants received CrM (5 g, approximately 0.074 g/kg daily) and a placebo for each 4-month phase with a 6-week wash-out. Spirometry, manual muscle testing, quantitative isometric strength testing of handgrip, foot dorsiflexion, and knee extension, handgrip and foot dorsiflexion endurance, functional tasks, activity of daily living scales, body composition (total, bone, and fat-free mass), serum creatine kinase activity, serum creatinine concentration and clearance, and liver function tests were completed before and after each intervention, and muscle PCr/beta-adenosine triphosphate (ATP) ratios of the forearm flexor muscles were completed at the end of each phase. CrM supplementation did not increase any of the outcome measurements except for plasma creatinine concentration (but not creatinine clearance). Thus, CrM supplementation at 5 g daily does not have any effects on muscle strength, body composition, or activities of daily living in patients with DM1, perhaps because of a failure of the supplementation to increase muscle PCr/beta-ATP content.

  18. Mitochondrial alterations and oxidative stress in an acute transient mouse model of muscle degeneration: implications for muscular dystrophy and related muscle pathologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadasan-Nair, Renjini; Gayathri, Narayanappa; Mishra, Sudha; Sunitha, Balaraju; Mythri, Rajeswara Babu; Nalini, Atchayaram; Subbannayya, Yashwanth; Harsha, Hindalahalli Chandregowda; Kolthur-Seetharam, Ullas; Srinivas Bharath, Muchukunte Mukunda

    2014-01-03

    Muscular dystrophies (MDs) and inflammatory myopathies (IMs) are debilitating skeletal muscle disorders characterized by common pathological events including myodegeneration and inflammation. However, an experimental model representing both muscle pathologies and displaying most of the distinctive markers has not been characterized. We investigated the cardiotoxin (CTX)-mediated transient acute mouse model of muscle degeneration and compared the cardinal features with human MDs and IMs. The CTX model displayed degeneration, apoptosis, inflammation, loss of sarcolemmal complexes, sarcolemmal disruption, and ultrastructural changes characteristic of human MDs and IMs. Cell death caused by CTX involved calcium influx and mitochondrial damage both in murine C2C12 muscle cells and in mice. Mitochondrial proteomic analysis at the initial phase of degeneration in the model detected lowered expression of 80 mitochondrial proteins including subunits of respiratory complexes, ATP machinery, fatty acid metabolism, and Krebs cycle, which further decreased in expression during the peak degenerative phase. The mass spectrometry (MS) data were supported by enzyme assays, Western blot, and histochemistry. The CTX model also displayed markers of oxidative stress and a lowered glutathione reduced/oxidized ratio (GSH/GSSG) similar to MDs, human myopathies, and neurogenic atrophies. MS analysis identified 6 unique oxidized proteins from Duchenne muscular dystrophy samples (n = 6) (versus controls; n = 6), including two mitochondrial proteins. Interestingly, these mitochondrial proteins were down-regulated in the CTX model thereby linking oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. We conclude that mitochondrial alterations and oxidative damage significantly contribute to CTX-mediated muscle pathology with implications for human muscle diseases.

  19. Histological evaluation of levator palpebralis superior muscle in patients with congenital blepharoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevda Söker

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to examine levator palpebralis superior muscle histologically in patients with congenital blepharoptosis and to investigate the relationship between these findings and age, sex and degree of blefaroptosis in this patient group.Materials and methods: Levator muscle of 13 patients with congenital ptosis, who had applied to Dicle University Medical Faculty Ophthalmology Clinic and had undergone levator palpebralis superior muscle resection between january 2009-january 2010, has been examined histopathologically in Histology and Embriology Deparment. During preoperative period, ptosis amount, levator function (LF, tear functions, Bell’s phenomenon and jaw-winking phenomenon were evaluated. All patients underwent resection of levator palpebralis superior muscle. Received postoperative levator muscle was examined by light microscopy.Results: The average age of 9 (69.2% male and 4 (30.8% female cases were 10.61 ± 4.77 (4- 19 years. In histological examination, the quality and quantity of the levator muscle fibrils have been assessed. There was no relationship detected between histological features of levator palpebralis superior muscle and patient’s age and gender (p>0.05. Patients with weak levator palpebralis superior muscle were detected to have fatty degeneration histologically. The higher the levator palpebralis superior muscle function revealed decreased fatty degeneration and increased skeletal muscle fibrils.Conclusion: More ultrastructural studies in larger populations are needed to support the relationship between structure and function of levator palpebralis superior muscle in patients with congenital blepharoptosis.

  20. Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... There is no known cure for facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy. Treatments are given to control symptoms and improve quality of life. Activity is encouraged. Inactivity such as bedrest can make the muscle disease worse. Physical therapy may help maintain muscle ...

  1. Ret function in muscle stem cells points to tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy for facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyle, Louise A; Blanc, Eric; Jaka, Oihane; Prueller, Johanna; Banerji, Christopher Rs; Tedesco, Francesco Saverio; Harridge, Stephen Dr; Knight, Robert D; Zammit, Peter S

    2016-11-14

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) involves sporadic expression of DUX4, which inhibits myogenesis and is pro-apoptotic. To identify target genes, we over-expressed DUX4 in myoblasts and found that the receptor tyrosine kinase Ret was significantly up-regulated, suggesting a role in FSHD. RET is dynamically expressed during myogenic progression in mouse and human myoblasts. Constitutive expression of either RET9 or RET51 increased myoblast proliferation, whereas siRNA-mediated knockdown of Ret induced myogenic differentiation. Suppressing RET activity using Sunitinib, a clinically-approved tyrosine kinase inhibitor, rescued differentiation in both DUX4-expressing murine myoblasts and in FSHD patient-derived myoblasts. Importantly, Sunitinib also increased engraftment and differentiation of FSHD myoblasts in regenerating mouse muscle. Thus, DUX4-mediated activation of Ret prevents myogenic differentiation and could contribute to FSHD pathology by preventing satellite cell-mediated repair. Rescue of DUX4-induced pathology by Sunitinib highlights the therapeutic potential of tyrosine kinase inhibitors for treatment of FSHD.

  2. NINDS Common Data Elements for Congenital Muscular Dystrophy Clinical Research: A National Institute for Neurological Disorders and Stroke Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawlor, Michael W; Iannaccone, Susan T; Mathews, Katherine; Muntoni, Francesco; Alai-Hansen, Sherita; Odenkirchen, Joanne C; S Feldman, Robin

    2018-01-01

    A Congenital Muscular Dystrophy (CMD) Working Group (WG) consisting of international experts reviewed common data elements (CDEs) previously developed for other neuromuscular diseases (NMDs) and made recommendations for all types of studies on CMD. To develop a comprehensive set of CDEs, data definitions, case report forms and guidelines for use in CMD clinical research to facilitate interoperability of data collection, as part of the CDE project at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS). One working group composed of ten experts reviewed existing NINDS CDEs and outcome measures, evaluated the need for new elements, and provided recommendations for CMD clinical research. The recommendations were compiled, internally reviewed by the CMD working group, and posted online for external public comment. The CMD working group and the NIH CDE team reviewed the final version before release. The NINDS CMD CDEs and supporting documents are publicly available on the NINDS CDE website (https://www.commondataelements.ninds.nih.gov/CMD.aspx#tab=Data_Standards). Content areas include demographics, social status, health history, physical examination, diagnostic tests, and guidelines for a variety of specific outcomes and endpoints. The CMD CDE WG selected these documents from existing versions that were generated by other disease area working groups. Some documents were tailored to maximize their suitability for the CMD field. Widespread use of CDEs can facilitate CMD clinical research and trial design, data sharing and retrospective analyses. The CDEs that are most relevant to CMD research are like those generated for other NMDs, and CDE documents tailored to CMD are now available to the public. The existence of a single source for these documents facilitates their use in research studies and offers a clear mechanism for the discussion and update of the information as knowledge is gained.

  3. Laminin beta 2 chain and adhalin deficiency in the skeletal muscle of Walker-Warburg syndrome (cerebro-ocular dysplasia-muscular dystrophy)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wewer, U M; Durkin, M E; Zhang, X

    1995-01-01

    Muscular dystrophy may be caused by disturbances in a number of muscle proteins that appear to be part of a chain of interacting molecules that includes cytoskeletal, cell membrane, and basement membrane components. We found that the skeletal muscle cells in two cases of Walker-Warburg syndrome w...

  4. Mechanism to induce scoliosis in Duchenne muscular dystrophy; A study of paraspinal muscle by X-ray computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ando, Noriaki; Fujimoto, Yasuyo (National Nishinara Hosital, Nara (Japan)); Takayanagi, Tetsuya; Mano, Yukio

    1992-09-01

    We studied the mechanism to induce scoliosis in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) by use of X-ray computed tomography (CT) of paraspinal muscles. CT examination of paraspinal muscles was performed on 15 DMD patients at the following six levels: (1) Th3 vertebrae (upper thoracic spine level); (2) Th6 vertebrae (middle thoracic spine level); (3) Th10 vertebrae (lower thoracic spine level); (4) L1 vertebrae (upper lumbar spine level); (5) L3 vertebrae (middle lumbar spine level); (6) L5 vertebrae (lower lumbar spine level). We evaluated the degeneration of paraspinal muscle by a decrese in ratio-density of the muscle which indicates infiltration of fatty tissue. The degeneration of the lateral portion of paraspinal muscle was more marked than that of the medial portion. The muscle was most severely affected at the middle lumbar spine level, showing a tendency to increase degeneration at the lower level of the spine. In cases showing laterality of the degeneration of paraspinal muscle, the less affected muscle on CT was located at the convex site of scoliosis. We speculate that the scoliosis occurs when DMD patients have asymmetrical paraspinal muscle degeneration, leading them to take compensatory posture. (author).

  5. Multi-slice MRI reveals heterogeneity in disease distribution along the length of muscle in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrzanowski, Stephen M; Baligand, Celine; Willcocks, Rebecca J; Deol, Jasjit; Schmalfuss, Ilona; Lott, Donovan J; Daniels, Michael J; Senesac, Claudia; Walter, Glenn A; Vandenborne, Krista

    2017-09-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) causes progressive pathologic changes to muscle secondary to a cascade of inflammation, lipid deposition, and fibrosis. Clinically, this manifests as progressive weakness, functional loss, and premature mortality. Though insult to whole muscle groups is well established, less is known about the relationship between intramuscular pathology and function. Differences of intramuscular heterogeneity across muscle length were assessed using an ordinal MRI grading scale in lower leg muscles of boys with DMD and correlated to patient's functional status. Cross sectional T 1 weighted MRI images with fat suppression were obtained from ambulatory boys with DMD. Six muscles (tibialis anterior, extensor digitorum longus, peroneus, soleus, medial and lateral gastrocnemii) were graded using an ordinal grading scale over 5 slice sections along the lower leg length. The scores from each slice were combined and results were compared to global motor function and age. Statistically greater differences of involvement were observed at the proximal ends of muscle compared to the midbellies. Multi-slice assessment correlated significantly to age and the Vignos functional scale, whereas single-slice assessment correlated to the Vignos functional scale only. Lastly, differential disease involvement of whole muscle groups and intramuscular heterogeneity were observed amongst similar age subjects. A multi-slice ordinal MRI grading scale revealed that muscles are not uniformly affected, with more advanced disease visible near the tendons in a primarily ambulatory population with DMD. A geographically comprehensive evaluation of the heterogeneously affected muscle in boys with DMD may more accurately assess disease involvement.

  6. Quantifying disease activity in fatty-infiltrated skeletal muscle by IDEAL-CPMG in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mankodi, Ami; Bishop, Courtney A; Auh, Sungyoung; Newbould, Rexford D; Fischbeck, Kenneth H; Janiczek, Robert L

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the use of iterative decomposition of water and fat with echo asymmetry and least-squares estimation Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (IDEAL-CPMG) to simultaneously measure skeletal muscle apparent fat fraction and water T 2 (T 2,w ) in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). In twenty healthy volunteer boys and thirteen subjects with DMD, thigh muscle apparent fat fraction was measured by Dixon and IDEAL-CPMG, with the IDEAL-CPMG also providing T 2,w as a measure of muscle inflammatory activity. A subset of subjects with DMD was followed up during a 48-week clinical study. The study was in compliance with the Patient Privacy Act and approved by the Institutional Review Board. Apparent fat fraction in the thigh muscles of subjects with DMD was significantly increased compared to healthy volunteer boys (p Muscle T 2,w measured by IDEAL-CPMG was independent of changes in apparent fat fraction. Muscle T 2,w was higher in the biceps femoris and vastus lateralis muscles of subjects with DMD (p muscles and six-minute walk distance (6MWD) in subjects with DMD. IDEAL-CPMG allowed independent and simultaneous quantification of skeletal muscle fatty degeneration and disease activity in DMD. IDEAL-CPMG apparent fat fraction and T 2,w may be useful as biomarkers in clinical trials of DMD as the technique disentangles two competing biological processes. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Nanopatterned muscle cell patches for enhanced myogenesis and dystrophin expression in a mouse model of muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hee Seok; Ieronimakis, Nicholas; Tsui, Jonathan H; Kim, Hong Nam; Suh, Kahp-Yang; Reyes, Morayma; Kim, Deok-Ho

    2014-02-01

    Skeletal muscle is a highly organized tissue in which the extracellular matrix (ECM) is composed of highly-aligned cables of collagen with nanoscale feature sizes, and provides structural and functional support to muscle fibers. As such, the transplantation of disorganized tissues or the direct injection of cells into muscles for regenerative therapy often results in suboptimal functional improvement due to a failure to integrate with native tissue properly. Here, we present a simple method in which biodegradable, biomimetic substrates with precisely controlled nanotopography were fabricated using solvent-assisted capillary force lithography (CFL) and were able to induce the proper development and differentiation of primary mononucleated cells to form mature muscle patches. Cells cultured on these nanopatterned substrates were highly-aligned and elongated, and formed more mature myotubes as evidenced by up-regulated expression of the myogenic regulatory factors Myf5, MyoD and myogenin (MyoG). When transplanted into mdx mice models for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), the proposed muscle patches led to the formation of a significantly greater number of dystrophin-positive muscle fibers, indicating that dystrophin replacement and myogenesis is achievable in vivo with this approach. These results demonstrate the feasibility of utilizing biomimetic substrates not only as platforms for studying the influences of the ECM on skeletal muscle function and maturation, but also to create transplantable muscle cell patches for the treatment of chronic and acute muscle diseases or injuries. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Distal mdx muscle groups exhibiting up-regulation of utrophin and rescue of dystrophin-associated glycoproteins exemplify a protected phenotype in muscular dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowling, Paul; Culligan, Kevin; Ohlendieck, Kay

    2002-02-01

    Unique unaffected skeletal muscle fibres, unlike necrotic torso and limb muscles, may pave the way for a more detailed understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of inherited neuromuscular disorders and help to develop new treatment strategies for muscular dystrophies. The sparing of extraocular muscle in Duchenne muscular dystrophy is mostly attributed to the special protective properties of extremely fast-twitching small-diameter fibres, but here we show that distal muscles also represent a particular phenotype that is more resistant to necrosis. Immunoblot analysis of membranes isolated from the well established dystrophic animal model mdx shows that, in contrast to dystrophic limb muscles, the toe musculature exhibits an up-regulation of the autosomal dystrophin homologue utrophin and a concomitant rescue of dystrophin-associated glycoproteins. Thus distal mdx muscle groups provide a cellular system that naturally avoids myofibre degeneration which might be useful in the search for naturally occurring compensatory mechanisms in inherited skeletal muscle diseases.

  9. Agrin mutations lead to a congenital myasthenic syndrome with distal muscle weakness and atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicole, Sophie; Chaouch, Amina; Torbergsen, Torberg; Bauché, Stéphanie; de Bruyckere, Elodie; Fontenille, Marie-Joséphine; Horn, Morten A; van Ghelue, Marijke; Løseth, Sissel; Issop, Yasmin; Cox, Daniel; Müller, Juliane S; Evangelista, Teresinha; Stålberg, Erik; Ioos, Christine; Barois, Annie; Brochier, Guy; Sternberg, Damien; Fournier, Emmanuel; Hantaï, Daniel; Abicht, Angela; Dusl, Marina; Laval, Steven H; Griffin, Helen; Eymard, Bruno; Lochmüller, Hanns

    2014-09-01

    Congenital myasthenic syndromes are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of rare diseases resulting from impaired neuromuscular transmission. Their clinical hallmark is fatigable muscle weakness associated with a decremental muscle response to repetitive nerve stimulation and frequently related to postsynaptic defects. Distal myopathies form another clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of primary muscle disorders where weakness and atrophy are restricted to distal muscles, at least initially. In both congenital myasthenic syndromes and distal myopathies, a significant number of patients remain genetically undiagnosed. Here, we report five patients from three unrelated families with a strikingly homogenous clinical entity combining congenital myasthenia with distal muscle weakness and atrophy reminiscent of a distal myopathy. MRI and neurophysiological studies were compatible with mild myopathy restricted to distal limb muscles, but decrement (up to 72%) in response to 3 Hz repetitive nerve stimulation pointed towards a neuromuscular transmission defect. Post-exercise increment (up to 285%) was observed in the distal limb muscles in all cases suggesting presynaptic congenital myasthenic syndrome. Immunofluorescence and ultrastructural analyses of muscle end-plate regions showed synaptic remodelling with denervation-reinnervation events. We performed whole-exome sequencing in two kinships and Sanger sequencing in one isolated case and identified five new recessive mutations in the gene encoding agrin. This synaptic proteoglycan with critical function at the neuromuscular junction was previously found mutated in more typical forms of congenital myasthenic syndrome. In our patients, we found two missense mutations residing in the N-terminal agrin domain, which reduced acetylcholine receptors clustering activity of agrin in vitro. Our findings expand the spectrum of congenital myasthenic syndromes due to agrin mutations and show an unexpected

  10. Increasing taurine intake and taurine synthesis improves skeletal muscle function in the mdx mouse model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrill, Jessica R; Pinniger, Gavin J; Graves, Jamie A; Grounds, Miranda D; Arthur, Peter G

    2016-06-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a fatal muscle wasting disease associated with increased inflammation, oxidative stress and myofibre necrosis. Cysteine precursor antioxidants such as N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) and l-2-oxothiazolidine-4-carboxylate (OTC) reduce dystropathology in the mdx mouse model for DMD, and we propose this is via increased synthesis of the amino acid taurine. We compared the capacity of OTC and taurine treatment to increase taurine content of mdx muscle, as well as effects on in vivo and ex vivo muscle function, inflammation and oxidative stress. Both treatments increased taurine in muscles, and improved many aspects of muscle function and reduced inflammation. Taurine treatment also reduced protein thiol oxidation and was overall more effective, as OTC treatment reduced body and muscle weight, suggesting some adverse effects of this drug. These data suggest that increasing dietary taurine is a better candidate for a therapeutic intervention for DMD. Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a fatal muscle wasting disease for which there is no widely available cure. Whilst the mechanism of loss of muscle function in DMD and the mdx mouse model are not fully understood, disruptions in intracellular calcium homeostasis, inflammation and oxidative stress are implicated. We have shown that protein thiol oxidation is increased in mdx muscle, and that the indirect thiol antioxidant l-2-oxothiazolidine-4-carboxylate (OTC), which increases cysteine availability, decreases pathology and increases in vivo strength. We propose that the protective effects of OTC are a consequence of conversion of cysteine to taurine, which has itself been shown to be beneficial to mdx pathology. This study compares the efficacy of taurine with OTC in decreasing dystropathology in mdx mice by measuring in vivo and ex vivo contractile function and measurements of inflammation and protein thiol oxidation. Increasing the taurine content of mdx muscle improved both in vivo and ex

  11. Glu20Ter Variant in PLEC 1f Isoform Causes Limb-Girdle Muscle Dystrophy with Lung Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman V. Deev

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Plectinopathies are orphan diseases caused by PLEC gene mutations. PLEC is encoding the protein plectin, playing a role in linking cytoskeleton components in various tissues. In this study, we describe the clinical case of a 26-year-old patient with an early onset plectinopathy variant “limb-girdle muscle dystrophy type 2Q,” report histopathological and ultrastructural findings in m. vastus lateralis biopsy and a novel homozygous likely pathogenic variant (NM_201378.3:c.58G>T, NP_958780.1:p.Glu20Ter in isoform 1f of the gene PLEC. The patient had an early childhood onset with retarded physical development, moderate weakness in pelvic girdle muscles, progressive weakening of limb-girdle muscles after the age of 21, pronounced atrophy of axial muscles, and hypertrophy of the gastrocnemius, deltoid, and triceps muscles, intermittent dyspnea, and no skin involvement. Findings included: non-infectious bronchiolitis and atelectasis signs, biopsy revealed myodystrophal pattern without macrophage infiltration, muscle fiber cytoskeleton disorganization resulted from the plectin loss, incomplete reparative rhabdomyogenesis, and moderate endomysial fibrosis. We have determined a novel likely pathogenic variant in PLEC 1f isoform that causes limb-girdle muscle dystrophy type 2Q and described the third case concerning an isolated myodystrophic phenotype of LGMD2Q with the likely pathogenic variant in PLEC 1f isoform. In addition, we have demonstrated the presence of severe lung injury in a patient and his siblings with the same myodystrophic phenotype and discussed the possible role of plectin deficiency in its pathogenesis.

  12. Severe insulin-resistant diabetes mellitus in patients with congenital muscle fiber type disproportion myopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, H; Klein, H H; Hansen, T

    1995-01-01

    Congenital muscle fiber type disproportion myopathy (CFTDM) is a chronic, nonprogressive muscle disorder characterized by universal muscle hypotrophy and growth retardation. Histomorphometric examination of muscle shows a preponderance of smaller than normal type 1 fibers and overall fiber size....... Insulin receptor function and glycogen synthase (GS) activity and expression were examined in biopsies of vastus lateralis muscle. Despite a 45-90-fold increase in both fasting and postprandial serum insulin levels, both CFTDM patients had diabetes mellitus. Clamp studies revealed that the oldest boy had...

  13. Divergent impact of Toll-like receptor 2 deficiency on repair mechanisms in healthy muscle versus Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mojumdar, Kamalika; Giordano, Christian; Lemaire, Christian; Liang, Feng; Divangahi, Maziar; Qureshi, Salman T; Petrof, Basil J

    2016-05-01

    Injury to skeletal muscle, whether acute or chronic, triggers macrophage-mediated innate immunity in a manner which can be either beneficial or harmful for subsequent repair. Endogenous ligands for Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) are released by damaged tissues and might play an important role in activating the innate immune system following muscle injury. To test this hypothesis, we compared macrophage behaviour and muscle repair mechanisms in mice lacking TLR2 under conditions of either acute (cardiotoxin-induced) or chronic (mdx mouse genetic model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy; DMD) muscle damage. In previously healthy muscle subjected to acute damage, TLR2 deficiency reduced macrophage numbers in the muscle post-injury but did not alter the expression pattern of the prototypical macrophage polarization markers iNOS and CD206. In addition, there was abnormal persistence of necrotic fibres and impaired regeneration in TLR2-/- muscles after acute injury. In contrast, TLR2 ablation in chronically diseased muscles of mdx mice not only resulted in significantly reduced macrophage numbers but additionally modified their phenotype by shifting from inflammatory (iNOS(pos) CD206(neg) ) to more anti-inflammatory (iNOS(neg) CD206(pos) ) characteristics. This decrease in macrophage-mediated inflammation was associated with ameliorated muscle histopathology and improved force-generating capacity of the dystrophic muscle. Our results suggest that the role of TLR2 in macrophage function and skeletal muscle repair depends greatly upon the muscle injury context, and raise the possibility that inhibition of TLR2 could serve as a useful therapeutic measure in DMD. Copyright © 2016 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Ion channels in a skeletal muscle cell line from a Duchenne muscular dystrophy patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caviedes, R; Caviedes, P; Liberona, J L; Jaimovich, E

    1994-09-01

    A cell line (RCDMD), derived from a muscle biopsy taken from a 7-year-old patient with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), was established in vitro using conditioned media from the UCHT1 thyroid cell line as described elsewhere (Biochim Biophys Acta 1992; 1134:247-255). Unlike other cell lines established by the same procedure, RCDMD cells were highly refractory to transformation and the resulting cell line grew slowly with a doubling time of approximately 72 h. Further, cells continue to grow after more than 20 doublings and 15 passages. Some of the characteristics of the cell line include lack of reaction with antidystrophin antibodies and the presence of receptors for the dihydropyridine PN200-110 (Kd) = 0.3 +/- 0.05 nmol/L and Bmax = 1.06 +/- 0.03 pmol/mg protein) and for alpha-bungarotoxin (Kd = 1.02 +/- 0.17 nmol/L and Bmax = 4.2 +/- 0.37 pmol/mg protein). Patch clamped cells in the voltage clamp configuration lack ion currents when growing in complete medium with high serum, but they can be induced to differentiate by serum deprivation and addition of hormones and trace elements. After 5 days in differentiating medium, noninactivating, delayed rectifier potassium currents are seen. At day 12, A-type, inactivating potassium currents as well as transient inward currents are seen. In conditions in which sodium and potassium currents are absent, a very fast activating and fast inactivating calcium current was evident. The cell line offers the possibility of studying cellular mechanisms in the pathophysiology of DMD.

  15. Amitriptyline is efficacious in ameliorating muscle inflammation and depressive symptoms in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Jennifer; Kulbida, Rebecca; Rai, Prerana; Jensen, Lindsay; Bouma, Judith; Singh, Sanjay P; O'Malley, Dervla; Yilmazer-Hanke, Deniz

    2014-10-01

    Mutations in the structural protein dystrophin underlie muscular dystrophies characterized by progressive deterioration of muscle function. Dystrophin-deficient mdx mice are considered a model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Individuals with DMD are also susceptible to mood disorders, such as depression and anxiety. Therefore, the study objectives were to investigate the effects of the tricyclic antidepressant amitriptyline on mood, learning, central cytokine expression and skeletal muscle inflammation in mdx mice. Amitriptyline-induced effects (10 mg kg(-1) daily s.c. injections, 25 days) on the behaviour of mdx mice were investigated using the open field arena and tail suspension tests. The effects of chronic amitriptyline treatment on inflammatory markers were studied in the muscle and plasma of mdx mice, and mood-associated monoamine and cytokine concentrations were measured in the amygdala, hippocampus, prefrontal cortex, striatum, hypothalamus and midbrain. The mdx mice exhibited increased levels of anxiety and depressive-like behaviour compared with wild-type mice. Amitriptyline treatment had anxiolytic and antidepressant effects in mdx mice associated with elevations in serotonin levels in the amygdala and hippocampus. Inflammation in mdx skeletal muscle tissue was also reduced following amitriptyline treatment as indicated by decreased immune cell infiltration of muscle and lower levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines tumour necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 in the forelimb flexors. Interleukin-6 mRNA expression was remarkably reduced in the amygdala of mdx mice by chronic amitriptyline treatment. Positive effects of amitriptyline on mood, in addition to its anti-inflammatory effects in skeletal muscle, may make it an attractive therapeutic option for individuals with DMD. © 2014 The Authors. Experimental Physiology © 2014 The Physiological Society.

  16. Differential requirement for utrophin in the induced pluripotent stem cell correction of muscle versus fat in muscular dystrophy mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda J Beck

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is an incurable degenerative muscle disorder. We injected WT mouse induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs into mdx and mdx∶utrophin mutant blastocysts, which are predisposed to develop DMD with an increasing degree of severity (mdx <<< mdx∶utrophin. In mdx chimeras, iPSC-dystrophin was supplied to the muscle sarcolemma to effect corrections at morphological and functional levels. Dystrobrevin was observed in dystrophin-positive and, at a lesser extent, utrophin-positive areas. In the mdx∶utrophin mutant chimeras, although iPSC-dystrophin was also supplied to the muscle sarcolemma, mice still displayed poor skeletal muscle histopathology, and negligible levels of dystrobrevin in dystrophin- and utrophin-negative areas. Not only dystrophin-expressing tissues are affected by iPSCs. Mdx and mdx∶utrophin mice have reduced fat/body weight ratio, but iPSC injection normalized this parameter in both mdx and mdx∶utrophin chimeras, despite the fact that utrophin was compromised in the mdx∶utrophin chimeric fat. The results suggest that the presence of utrophin is required for the iPSC-corrections in skeletal muscle. Furthermore, the results highlight a potential (utrophin-independent non-cell autonomous role for iPSC-dystrophin in the corrections of non-muscle tissue like fat, which is intimately related to the muscle.

  17. Molecular and Genetic Studies of Congenital Myopathies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-21

    Central Core Disease; Centronuclear Myopathy; Congenital Fiber Type Disproportion; Multiminicore Disease; Myotubular Myopathy; Nemaline Myopathy; Rigid Spine Muscular Dystrophy; Undefined Congenital Myopathy

  18. Comparative proteomic profiling of soleus, extensor digitorum longus, flexor digitorum brevis and interosseus muscles from the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carberry, Steven; Brinkmeier, Heinrich; Zhang, Yaxin; Winkler, Claudia K; Ohlendieck, Kay

    2013-09-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is due to genetic abnormalities in the dystrophin gene and represents one of the most frequent genetic childhood diseases. In the X-linked muscular dystrophy (mdx) mouse model of dystrophinopathy, different subtypes of skeletal muscles are affected to a varying degree albeit the same single base substitution within exon 23 of the dystrophin gene. Thus, to determine potential muscle subtype-specific differences in secondary alterations due to a deficiency in dystrophin, in this study, we carried out a comparative histological and proteomic survey of mdx muscles. We intentionally included the skeletal muscles that are often used for studying the pathomechanism of muscular dystrophy. Histological examinations revealed a significantly higher degree of central nucleation in the soleus and extensor digitorum longus muscles compared with the flexor digitorum brevis and interosseus muscles. Muscular hypertrophy of 20-25% was likewise only observed in the soleus and extensor digitorum longus muscles from mdx mice, but not in the flexor digitorum brevis and interosseus muscles. For proteomic analysis, muscle protein extracts were separated by fluorescence two-dimensional (2D) gel electrophoresis. Proteins with a significant change in their expression were identified by mass spectrometry. Proteomic profiling established an altered abundance of 24, 17, 19 and 5 protein species in the dystrophin-deficient soleus, extensor digitorum longus, flexor digitorum brevis and interosseus muscle, respectively. The key proteomic findings were verified by immunoblot analysis. The identified proteins are involved in the contraction-relaxation cycle, metabolite transport, muscle metabolism and the cellular stress response. Thus, histological and proteomic profiling of muscle subtypes from mdx mice indicated that distinct skeletal muscles are differentially affected by the loss of the membrane cytoskeletal protein, dystrophin. Varying degrees of perturbed protein

  19. Skeletal Muscle Differentiation on a Chip Shows Human Donor Mesoangioblasts' Efficiency in Restoring Dystrophin in a Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serena, Elena; Zatti, Susi; Zoso, Alice; Lo Verso, Francesca; Tedesco, F Saverio; Cossu, Giulio; Elvassore, Nicola

    2016-12-01

    : Restoration of the protein dystrophin on muscle membrane is the goal of many research lines aimed at curing Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Results of ongoing preclinical and clinical trials suggest that partial restoration of dystrophin might be sufficient to significantly reduce muscle damage. Different myogenic progenitors are candidates for cell therapy of muscular dystrophies, but only satellite cells and pericytes have already entered clinical experimentation. This study aimed to provide in vitro quantitative evidence of the ability of mesoangioblasts to restore dystrophin, in terms of protein accumulation and distribution, within myotubes derived from DMD patients, using a microengineered model. We designed an ad hoc experimental strategy to miniaturize on a chip the standard process of muscle regeneration independent of variables such as inflammation and fibrosis. It is based on the coculture, at different ratios, of human dystrophin-positive myogenic progenitors and dystrophin-negative myoblasts in a substrate with muscle-like physiological stiffness and cell micropatterns. Results showed that both healthy myoblasts and mesoangioblasts restored dystrophin expression in DMD myotubes. However, mesoangioblasts showed unexpected efficiency with respect to myoblasts in dystrophin production in terms of the amount of protein produced (40% vs. 15%) and length of the dystrophin membrane domain (210-240 µm vs. 40-70 µm). These results show that our microscaled in vitro model of human DMD skeletal muscle validated previous in vivo preclinical work and may be used to predict efficacy of new methods aimed at enhancing dystrophin accumulation and distribution before they are tested in vivo, reducing time, costs, and variability of clinical experimentation. This study aimed to provide in vitro quantitative evidence of the ability of human mesoangioblasts to restore dystrophin, in terms of protein accumulation and distribution, within myotubes derived from

  20. Mitochondrial disorders in congenital myopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Kharlamov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The literature review gives data on the role of mitochondrial disorders in the pathogenesis of congenital myopathies: congenital muscular dystrophies and congenital structural myopathies. It describes changes in congenital muscular dystrophies with type VI collagen, in myodystrophy with giant mitochondria, in congenital central core myopathies, myotubular myopathy, etc. Clinical and experimental findings are presented. Approaches to therapy for energy disorders in congenital myopathies are depicted.

  1. Revertant fibers in the mdx murine model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy: an age- and muscle-related reappraisal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah R Pigozzo

    Full Text Available Muscles in Duchenne dystrophy patients are characterized by the absence of dystrophin, yet transverse sections show a small percentage of fibers (termed "revertant fibers" positive for dystrophin expression. This phenomenon, whose biological bases have not been fully elucidated, is present also in the murine and canine models of DMD and can confound the evaluation of therapeutic approaches. We analyzed 11 different muscles in a cohort of 40 mdx mice, the most commonly model used in pre-clinical studies, belonging to four age groups; such number of animals allowed us to perform solid ANOVA statistical analysis. We assessed the average number of dystrophin-positive fibers, both absolute and normalized for muscle size, and the correlation between their formation and the ageing process. Our results indicate that various muscles develop different numbers of revertant fibers, with different time trends; besides, they suggest that the biological mechanism(s behind dystrophin re-expression might not be limited to the early development phases but could actually continue during adulthood. Importantly, such finding was seen also in cardiac muscle, a fact that does not fit into the current hypothesis of the clonal origin of "revertant" myonuclei from satellite cells. This work represents the largest, statistically significant analysis of revertant fibers in mdx mice so far, which can now be used as a reference point for improving the evaluation of therapeutic approaches for DMD. At the same time, it provides new clues about the formation of revertant fibers/cardiomyocytes in dystrophic skeletal and cardiac muscle.

  2. Characterization of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) ATPase pumps in muscle of patients with myotonic dystrophy and with hypothyroid myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guglielmi, V; Oosterhof, A; Voermans, N C; Cardani, R; Molenaar, J P; van Kuppevelt, T H; Meola, G; van Engelen, B G; Tomelleri, G; Vattemi, G

    2016-06-01

    Sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) ATPase (SERCA) pumps play the major role in lowering cytoplasmic calcium concentration in skeletal muscle by catalyzing the ATP-dependent transport of Ca(2+) from the cytosol to the lumen of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). Although SERCA abnormalities have been hypothesized to contribute to the dysregulation of intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis and signaling in muscle of patients with myotonic dystrophy (DM) and hypothyroid myopathy, the characterization of SERCA pumps remains elusive and their impairment is still unclear. We assessed the activity of SR Ca(2+)-ATPase, expression levels and fiber distribution of SERCA1 and SERCA2, and oligomerization of SERCA1 protein in muscle of patients with DM type 1 and 2, and with hypothyroid myopathy. Our data provide evidence that SR Ca(2+) ATPase activity, protein levels and muscle fiber distribution of total SERCA1 and SERCA2, and SERCA1 oligomerization pattern are similar in patients with both DM1 and DM2, hypothyroid myopathy and in control subjects. We prove that SERCA1b, the neonatal isoform of SERCA1, is expressed at protein level in muscle of patients with DM2 and, in lower amount, of patients with DM1. Our present study demonstrates that SERCA function is not altered in muscle of patients with DM and with hypothyroid myopathy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Chronic administration of a leupeptin-derived calpain inhibitor fails to ameliorate severe muscle pathology in a canine model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin K Childers

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Calpains likely play a role in the pathogenesis of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD. Accordingly, calpain inhibition may provide therapeutic benefit to DMD patients. In the present study, we sought to measure benefit from administration of a novel calpain inhibitor, C101, in a canine muscular dystrophy model. Specifically, we tested the hypothesis that treatment with C101 mitigates progressive weakness and severe muscle pathology observed in young dogs with golden retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD. Young (6 week-old GRMD dogs were treated daily with either C101 (17mg/kg twice daily oral dose, n=9 or placebo (vehicle only, n=7 for 8 weeks. A battery of functional tests, including tibiotarsal joint angle, muscle/fat composition, and pelvic limb muscle strength were performed at baseline and every two weeks during the 8-week study. Results indicate that C101-treated GRMD dogs maintained strength in their cranial pelvic limb muscles (tibiotarsal flexors while placebo-treated dogs progressively lost strength. However, concomitant improvement was not observed in posterior pelvic limb muscles (tibiotarsal extensors. C101 treatment did not mitigate force drop following repeated eccentric contractions and no improvement was seen in the development of joint contractures, lean muscle mass or muscle histopathology. Taken together, these data do not support the hypothesis that treatment with C101 mitigates progressive weakness or ameliorates severe muscle pathology observed in young dogs with GRMD.

  4. Effects of Duchenne muscular dystrophy on muscle stiffness and response to electrically-induced muscle contraction: A 12-month follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacourpaille, Lilian; Gross, Raphaël; Hug, François; Guével, Arnaud; Péréon, Yann; Magot, Armelle; Hogrel, Jean-Yves; Nordez, Antoine

    2017-03-01

    The present study aimed to assess the ability of muscle stiffness (shear modulus) and response to electrically-induced muscle contraction to detect changes in muscle properties over a 12-month period in children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Ten children with DMD and nine age-matched healthy male controls participated in two experimental sessions (T 0 and T +12months ) separated by 12.4 ± 0.9 months. Two contractions of the biceps brachii were electrically-induced during which an ultrasound probe was placed over the muscle. The resting shear modulus was measured using elastography from six muscles. Evoked maximal torque was increased at T +12months in controls (+11.2 ± 7.6%, P muscle stiffness at T +12months in children with DMD for tibialis anterior (+75.1 ± 93.5%, P= 0.043), gastrocnemius medialis (+144.8 ± 180.6%, P= 0.050) and triceps brachii (+35.5 ± 32.2%, P= 0.005). This 12-month follow-up study demonstrates that electromechanical delay and elastography may help detect subtle muscle impairments in patients with DMD. These sensitive outcomes may improve the follow-up of innovative therapeutic interventions within the field of DMD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Orocaecal transit time in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    OpenAIRE

    Korman, S H; Bar-Oz, B; Granot, E; Meyer, S

    1991-01-01

    Smooth muscle degeneration may occur in Duchenne muscular dystrophy. We measured fasting orocaecal transit time in patients with advanced Duchenne muscular dystrophy and other muscular dystrophies and in healthy controls. No significant differences were found. In contrast to reports of gastric hypomotility in Duchenne muscular dystrophy, we found no evidence of impaired small intestinal motility.

  6. Tibialis anterior muscle needle biopsy and sensitive biomolecular methods: a useful tool in myotonic dystrophy type 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Iachettini

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1 is a neuromuscular disorder caused by a CTG repeat expansion in 3’UTR of DMPK gene. This mutation causes accumulation of toxic RNA in nuclear foci leading to splicing misregulation of specific genes. In view of future clinical trials with antisense oligonucleotides in DM1 patients, it is important to set up sensitive and minimally-invasive tools to monitor the efficacy of treatments on skeletal muscle. A tibialis anterior (TA muscle sample of about 60 mg was obtained from 5 DM1 patients and 5 healthy subjects through a needle biopsy. A fragment of about 40 mg was used for histological examination and a fragment of about 20 mg was used for biomolecular analysis. The TA fragments obtained with the minimally-invasive needle biopsy technique is enough to perform all the histopathological and biomolecular evaluations useful to monitor a clinical trial on DM1 patients.

  7. Neopterin/7,8-dihydroneopterin is elevated in Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients and protects mdx skeletal muscle function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Angus; Schmiechen, Alexandra; Chamberlain, Christopher M; Ervasti, James M; Lowe, Dawn A

    2018-05-23

    Macrophage infiltration is a hallmark of dystrophin-deficient muscle. We tested the hypothesis that Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients would have elevated levels of the macrophage synthesized pterins, neopterin and 7,8-dihydroneopterin compared to unaffected age-matched controls. Urinary neopterin/creatinine and 7,8-dihydroneopterin/creatinine were elevated in DMD patients and 7,8-dihydroneopterin/creatinine was associated with patient age and ambulation. 7,8-dihydroneopterin correction with specific gravity was also elevated in DMD patients. Because 7,8-dihydroneopterin is an antioxidant, we then identified a potential role for 7,8-dihydroneopterin in disease pathology. We assessed whether 7,8-dihydroneopterin could 1) protect against isometric force loss in wildtype skeletal muscle exposed to various pro-oxidants, and 2) protect wildtype and mdx muscle from eccentric contraction-induced force drop which has an oxidative component. Force drop was elicited in isolated Extensor Digitorum Longus (EDL) muscles by 10 eccentric contractions and recovery of force following the contractions was measured in the presence of exogenous 7,8-dihydroneopterin. 7,8-dihydroneopterin attenuated isometric force loss by wildtype EDL muscles when challenged by H 2 O 2 and HOCl, but exacerbated force loss when challenged by SIN-1 (NO · , O 2 · , ONOO - ). 7,8-dihydroneopterin attenuated eccentric contraction-induced force drop in mdx muscle. Isometric force by EDL muscles of mdx mice also recovered to a greater degree following eccentric contractions in the presence of 7,8-dihydroneopterin. The results corroborate macrophage activation in DMD patients, provide a potential protective role for 7,8-dihydroneopterin in the susceptibility of dystrophic muscle to eccentric contractions and indicate oxidative stress contributes to eccentric contraction-induced force drop in mdx skeletal muscle. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by

  8. Improved Muscle Function in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy through L-Arginine and Metformin: An Investigator-Initiated, Open-Label, Single-Center, Proof-Of-Concept-Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Hafner

    Full Text Available Altered neuronal nitric oxide synthase function in Duchenne muscular dystrophy leads to impaired mitochondrial function which is thought to be one cause of muscle damage in this disease. The study tested if increased intramuscular nitric oxide concentration can improve mitochondrial energy metabolism in Duchenne muscular dystrophy using a novel therapeutic approach through the combination of L-arginine with metformin. Five ambulatory, genetically confirmed Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients aged between 7–10 years were treated with L-arginine (3 x 2.5 g/d and metformin (2 x 250 mg/d for 16 weeks. Treatment effects were assessed using mitochondrial protein expression analysis in muscular biopsies, indirect calorimetry, Dual-Energy X-Ray Absorptiometry, quantitative thigh muscle MRI, and clinical scores of muscle performance. There were no serious side effects and no patient dropped out. Muscle biopsy results showed pre-treatment a significantly reduced mitochondrial protein expression and increased oxidative stress in Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients compared to controls. Post-treatment a significant elevation of proteins of the mitochondrial electron transport chain was observed as well as a reduction in oxidative stress. Treatment also decreased resting energy expenditure rates and energy substrate use shifted from carbohydrates to fatty acids. These changes were associated with improved clinical scores. In conclusion pharmacological stimulation of the nitric oxide pathway leads to improved mitochondria function and clinically a slowing of disease progression in Duchenne muscular dystrophy. This study shall lead to further development of this novel therapeutic approach into a real alternative for Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02516085.

  9. Improved Muscle Function in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy through L-Arginine and Metformin: An Investigator-Initiated, Open-Label, Single-Center, Proof-Of-Concept-Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafner, Patricia; Bonati, Ulrike; Erne, Beat; Schmid, Maurice; Rubino, Daniela; Pohlman, Urs; Peters, Thomas; Rutz, Erich; Frank, Stephan; Neuhaus, Cornelia; Deuster, Stefanie; Gloor, Monika; Bieri, Oliver; Fischmann, Arne; Sinnreich, Michael; Gueven, Nuri; Fischer, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Altered neuronal nitric oxide synthase function in Duchenne muscular dystrophy leads to impaired mitochondrial function which is thought to be one cause of muscle damage in this disease. The study tested if increased intramuscular nitric oxide concentration can improve mitochondrial energy metabolism in Duchenne muscular dystrophy using a novel therapeutic approach through the combination of L-arginine with metformin. Five ambulatory, genetically confirmed Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients aged between 7–10 years were treated with L-arginine (3 x 2.5 g/d) and metformin (2 x 250 mg/d) for 16 weeks. Treatment effects were assessed using mitochondrial protein expression analysis in muscular biopsies, indirect calorimetry, Dual-Energy X-Ray Absorptiometry, quantitative thigh muscle MRI, and clinical scores of muscle performance. There were no serious side effects and no patient dropped out. Muscle biopsy results showed pre-treatment a significantly reduced mitochondrial protein expression and increased oxidative stress in Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients compared to controls. Post-treatment a significant elevation of proteins of the mitochondrial electron transport chain was observed as well as a reduction in oxidative stress. Treatment also decreased resting energy expenditure rates and energy substrate use shifted from carbohydrates to fatty acids. These changes were associated with improved clinical scores. In conclusion pharmacological stimulation of the nitric oxide pathway leads to improved mitochondria function and clinically a slowing of disease progression in Duchenne muscular dystrophy. This study shall lead to further development of this novel therapeutic approach into a real alternative for Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02516085.

  10. A splice site mutation in laminin-α2 results in a severe muscular dystrophy and growth abnormalities in zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vandana A Gupta

    Full Text Available Congenital muscular dystrophy (CMD is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of inherited muscle disorders. In patients, muscle weakness is usually present at or shortly after birth and is progressive in nature. Merosin deficient congenital muscular dystrophy (MDC1A is a form of CMD caused by a defect in the laminin-α2 gene (LAMA2. Laminin-α2 is an extracellular matrix protein that interacts with the dystrophin-dystroglycan (DGC complex in membranes providing stability to muscle fibers. In an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea mutagenesis screen to develop zebrafish models of neuromuscular diseases, we identified a mutant fish that exhibits severe muscular dystrophy early in development. Genetic mapping identified a splice site mutation in the lama2 gene. This splice site is highly conserved in humans and this mutation results in mis-splicing of RNA and a loss of protein function. Homozygous lama2 mutant zebrafish, designated lama2(cl501/cl501, exhibited reduced motor function and progressive degeneration of skeletal muscles and died at 8-15 days post fertilization. The skeletal muscles exhibited damaged myosepta and detachment of myofibers in the affected fish. Laminin-α2 deficiency also resulted in growth defects in the brain and eye of the mutant fish. This laminin-α2 deficient mutant fish represents a novel disease model to develop therapies for modulating splicing defects in congenital muscular dystrophies and to restore the muscle function in human patients with CMD.

  11. [Comparison analysis of muscle enzymes in children with myocarditis and Duchene/Becker muscular dystrophy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yali; Wang, Hong; Yu, Xuexin; Xing, Yanlin; Wang, Ce; He, Rong

    2016-09-28

    To compare the changes in muscle enzyme between children with myocarditis and Duchene/Becker muscular dystrophy (DMD/BMD), and to seek the explanations for variation.
 The retrospective analysis for 83 myocarditis children (myocarditis group) and 69 DMD/BMD children (DMD/BMD group), who were collected from Department of Pediatric of Shengjing Hospital affiliated to China Medical University since January 2008 to May 2015, was carried out. At the same time, 24 healthy children from the Department of Pediatric Development served as a control group. The examination indexes included creatine kinase (CK), creatine kinase-isoenzyme MB (CK-MB), creatine kinase isoenzyme MB mass (CK-MB mass), cardiac troponin I (cTnI) and high-sensitive-cTnT (hs-cTnT).
 1) In the myocarditis group, the CK increased from 100 to 1 000 U/L, reached a peak after 5 days, which lasted for a week and then dropped to the normal; the CK-MB reached a peak after 5 to 7 days and dropped to the normal a month later; the CK-MB mass reached a peak on the first day and dropped to the normal after 3 weeks; the cTn reached to a peak after 5 days and dropped to the normal after about 17 days; hs-cTnT reached to a peak on the first day and dropped to the normal after about 19 days. 2) In the DMD/BMD group, the CK increased significantly and 27 cases had a CK value of more than 10 000 U/L. After the treatment for 1 to 2 weeks, their enzyme rose again after a slight drop. In terms of cTnI, 6 cases showed a moderate increase, 5 of them couldn't drop to the normal level until more than 3 weeks later; the hs-cTnT increased in the 45 cases, which lasted for more than 3 weeks in the 31 cases of them and showed a tendency of persisting increase.
 The cTnI and hs-cTnT rise significantly and possess wider observation window than CK and CK-MB mass in myocarditis children, with more sensitive and specific changes. The myocardial damage can occur before myasthenia and keep this trend for a long time in the DMD

  12. Galectin-1 Protein Therapy Prevents Pathology and Improves Muscle Function in the mdx Mouse Model of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Ry, Pam M; Wuebbles, Ryan D; Key, Megan; Burkin, Dean J

    2015-08-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a fatal neuromuscular disease caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene, leading to the loss of a critical component of the sarcolemmal dystrophin glycoprotein complex. Galectin-1 is a small 14 kDa protein normally found in skeletal muscle and has been shown to be a modifier of immune response, muscle repair, and apoptosis. Galectin-1 levels are elevated in the muscle of mouse and dog models of DMD. Together, these findings led us to hypothesize that Galectin-1 may serve as a modifier of disease progression in DMD. To test this hypothesis, recombinant mouse Galectin-1 was produced and used to treat myogenic cells and the mdx mouse model of DMD. Here we show that intramuscular and intraperitoneal injections of Galectin-1 into mdx mice prevented pathology and improved muscle function in skeletal muscle. These improvements were a result of enhanced sarcolemmal stability mediated by elevated utrophin and α7β1 integrin protein levels. Together our results demonstrate for the first time that Galectin-1 may serve as an exciting new protein therapeutic for the treatment of DMD.

  13. Oral muscles are progressively affected in Duchenne muscular dystrophy : Implications for dysphagia treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bert de Swart; W. Klein; L. van den Engel-Hoek; S. Pillen; J. Hendriks; Alexander Geurts; I. de Groot; L. Sie; C. Erasmus

    2012-01-01

    Dysphagia is reported in advanced stages of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). The population of DMD is changing due to an increasing survival. We aimed to describe the dysphagia in consecutive stages and to assess the underlying mechanisms of dysphagia in DMD, in order to develop mechanism based

  14. Oral muscles are progressively affected in Duchenne muscular dystrophy: implications for dysphagia treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engel-Hoek, L. van den; Erasmus, C.E.; Hendriks, J.C.M.; Geurts, A.C.H.; Klein, W.M.; Pillen, S.; Sie, L.T.L.; Swart, B.J.M. de; Groot, I.J.M. de

    2013-01-01

    Dysphagia is reported in advanced stages of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). The population of DMD is changing due to an increasing survival. We aimed to describe the dysphagia in consecutive stages and to assess the underlying mechanisms of dysphagia in DMD, in order to develop mechanism based

  15. Targeting early PKCθ-dependent T-cell infiltration of dystrophic muscle reduces disease severity in a mouse model of muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozanoska-Ochser, Biliana; Benedetti, Anna; Rizzo, Giuseppe; Marrocco, Valeria; Di Maggio, Rosanna; Fiore, Piera; Bouche, Marina

    2018-03-01

    Chronic muscle inflammation is a critical feature of Duchenne muscular dystrophy and contributes to muscle fibre injury and disease progression. Although previous studies have implicated T cells in the development of muscle fibrosis, little is known about their role during the early stages of muscular dystrophy. Here, we show that T cells are among the first cells to infiltrate mdx mouse dystrophic muscle, prior to the onset of necrosis, suggesting an important role in early disease pathogenesis. Based on our comprehensive analysis of the kinetics of the immune response, we further identify the early pre-necrotic stage of muscular dystrophy as the relevant time frame for T-cell-based interventions. We focused on protein kinase C θ (PKCθ, encoded by Prkcq), a critical regulator of effector T-cell activation, as a potential target to inhibit T-cell activity in dystrophic muscle. Lack of PKCθ not only reduced the frequency and number of infiltrating T cells but also led to quantitative and qualitative changes in the innate immune cell infiltrate in mdx/Prkcq -/- muscle. These changes were due to the inhibition of T cells, since PKCθ was necessary for T-cell but not for myeloid cell infiltration of acutely injured muscle. Targeting T cells with a PKCθ inhibitor early in the disease process markedly diminished the size of the inflammatory cell infiltrate and resulted in reduced muscle damage. Moreover, diaphragm necrosis and fibrosis were also reduced following treatment. Overall, our findings identify the early T-cell infiltrate as a therapeutic target and highlight the potential of PKCθ inhibition as a therapeutic approach to muscular dystrophy. Copyright © 2017 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Muscular Dystrophy (MD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... patients may need assisted ventilation to treat respiratory muscle weakness and a pacemaker for cardiac abnormalities. View Full Treatment Information Definition The muscular dystrophies (MD) are a group of more than 30 ...

  17. Longitudinal Evaluation of Muscle Composition Using Magnetic Resonance in 4 Boys With Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy: Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senesac, Claudia R; Lott, Donovan J; Forbes, Sean C; Mathur, Sunita; Arpan, Ishu; Senesac, Emily S; Walter, Glenn A; Vandenborne, Krista

    2015-07-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), an inherited recessive X chromosome-linked disease, is the most severe childhood form of muscular dystrophy. Boys with DMD experience muscle loss, with infiltration of intramuscular fat into muscles. This case series describes the progression of DMD in boys using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Magnetic resonance results are then compared with an established functional timed test. Four boys with DMD and 4 healthy age-matched controls were chosen from a larger cohort. Boys with DMD were assessed at 4 time points over 2 years, with controls assessed at baseline only. Progression of the disease was documented by assessing the plantar flexors using MRI and MRS techniques and by assessing ambulation using the 30-Foot Fast Walk Test. Transverse relaxation time (T2) values were elevated in all boys with DMD at baseline. The lipid ratio increased rapidly as the disease progressed in 2 boys. Discrete changes in T2 in the other 2 boys with DMD indicated a slower disease progression. Magnetic resonance imaging and MRS allowed monitoring of the disease over all time periods regardless of ambulation status. The magnetic resonance data were collected with 2 different magnets at 2 different field strengths (1.5 and 3.0 T). Although we corrected for this difference, care must be taken in interpreting data when different image collection systems are used. This was a case series of 4 boys with DMD taken from a larger cohort study. Magnetic resonance imaging and MRS are objective, noninvasive techniques for measuring muscle pathology and can be used to detect discrete changes in both people who are ambulatory and those who are nonambulatory. These techniques should be considered when monitoring DMD progression and assessing efficacy of therapeutic interventions. © 2015 American Physical Therapy Association.

  18. Isobaric Tagging-Based Quantification for Proteomic Analysis: A Comparative Study of Spared and Affected Muscles from mdx Mice at the Early Phase of Dystrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cintia Yuri Matsumura

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is the most common childhood myopathy, characterized by muscle loss and cardiorespiratory failure. While the genetic basis of DMD is well established, secondary mechanisms associated with dystrophic pathophysiology are not fully clarified yet. In order to obtain new insights into the molecular mechanisms of muscle dystrophy during earlier stages of the disease, we performed a comparative proteomic profile of the spared extraocular muscles (EOM vs. affected diaphragm from the mdx mice, using a label based shotgun proteomic approach. Out of the 857 identified proteins, 42 to 62 proteins had differential abundance of peptide ions. The calcium-handling proteins sarcalumenin and calsequestrin-1 were increased in control EOM compared with control DIA, reinforcing the view that constitutional properties of EOM are important for their protection against myonecrosis. The finding that galectin-1 (muscle regeneration, annexin A1 (anti-inflammatory and HSP 47 (fibrosis were increased in dystrophic diaphragm provides novel insights into the mechanisms through which mdx affected muscles are able to counteract dystrophy, during the early stage of the disease. Overall, the shotgun technique proved to be suitable to perform quantitative comparisons between distinct dystrophic muscles and allowed the suggestion of new potential biomarkers and drug targets for dystrophinopaties.

  19. Skeletal muscle fibrosis in the mdx/utrn+/- mouse validates its suitability as a murine model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutpell, Kelly M; Hrinivich, William T; Hoffman, Lisa M

    2015-01-01

    Various therapeutic approaches have been studied for the treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), but none of these approaches have led to significant long-term effects in patients. One reason for this observed inefficacy may be the use of inappropriate animal models for the testing of therapeutic agents. The mdx mouse is the most widely used murine model of DMD, yet it does not model the fibrotic progression observed in patients. Other murine models of DMD are available that lack one or both alleles of utrophin, a functional analog of dystrophin. The aim of this study was to compare fibrosis and myofiber damage in the mdx, mdx/utrn+/- and double knockout (dko) mouse models. We used Masson's trichrome stain and percentage of centrally-nucleated myofibers as indicators of fibrosis and myofiber regeneration, respectively, to assess disease progression in diaphragm and gastrocnemius muscles harvested from young and aged wild-type, mdx, mdx/utrn+/- and dko mice. Our results indicated that eight week-old gastrocnemius muscles of both mdx/utrn+/- and dko hind limb developed fibrosis whereas age-matched mdx gastrocnemius muscle did not (p = 0.002). The amount of collagen found in the mdx/utrn+/- diaphragm was significantly higher than that found in the corresponding diaphragm muscles of wild-type animals, but not of mdx animals (p = 0.0003). Aged mdx/utrn+/- mice developed fibrosis in both diaphragm and gastrocnemius muscles compared to wild-type controls (p = 0.003). Mdx diaphragm was fibrotic in aged mice as well (p = 0.0235), whereas the gastrocnemius muscle in these animals was not fibrotic. We did not measure a significant difference in collagen staining between wild-type and mdx gastrocnemius muscles. The results of this study support previous reports that the moderately-affected mdx/utrn+/- mouse is a better model of DMD, and we show here that this difference is apparent by 2 months of age.

  20. Dual AAV therapy ameliorates exercise-induced muscle injury and functional ischemia in murine models of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yadong; Yue, Yongping; Li, Liang; Hakim, Chady H; Zhang, Keqing; Thomas, Gail D; Duan, Dongsheng

    2013-09-15

    Neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) membrane delocalization contributes to the pathogenesis of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) by promoting functional muscle ischemia and exacerbating muscle injury during exercise. We have previously shown that supra-physiological expression of nNOS-binding mini-dystrophin restores normal blood flow regulation and prevents functional ischemia in transgenic mdx mice, a DMD model. A critical next issue is whether systemic dual adeno-associated virus (AAV) gene therapy can restore nNOS-binding mini-dystrophin expression and mitigate muscle activity-related functional ischemia and injury. Here, we performed systemic gene transfer in mdx and mdx4cv mice using a pair of dual AAV vectors that expressed a 6 kb nNOS-binding mini-dystrophin gene. Vectors were packaged in tyrosine mutant AAV-9 and co-injected (5 × 10(12) viral genome particles/vector/mouse) via the tail vein to 1-month-old dystrophin-null mice. Four months later, we observed 30-50% mini-dystrophin positive myofibers in limb muscles. Treatment ameliorated histopathology, increased muscle force and protected against eccentric contraction-induced injury. Importantly, dual AAV therapy successfully prevented chronic exercise-induced muscle force drop. Doppler hemodynamic assay further showed that therapy attenuated adrenergic vasoconstriction in contracting muscle. Our results suggest that partial transduction can still ameliorate nNOS delocalization-associated functional deficiency. Further evaluation of nNOS binding mini-dystrophin dual AAV vectors is warranted in dystrophic dogs and eventually in human patients.

  1. Merosin/laminin-2 and muscular dystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wewer, U M; Engvall, E

    1996-01-01

    structural organization of domains, some of which have been assigned biological activities, including self-assembly and interactions with other proteins. The particular importance of laminins for the formation and stability of cell adhesion complexes is highlighted in severe inherited diseases of muscle...... and skin. Merosin is the collective name for laminins that share a common subunit, the laminin alpha 2 chain. Merosin-deficient congenital muscular dystrophy (CMD) is caused by mutations in the laminin alpha 2 chain gene. The skin disease Herlitz junctional epidermolysis bullosa is caused by mutations...

  2. Genetics Home Reference: congenital fibrosis of the extraocular muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in the development of a particular branch of cranial nerve III, which emerges from the brain and controls ... nerve cells, preventing the normal development of these cranial nerves and the extraocular muscles they control. Abnormal function ...

  3. Protein Turnover and Cellular Stress in Mildly and Severely Affected Muscles from Patients with Limb Girdle Muscular Dystrophy Type 2I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauerslev, Simon; Sveen, Marie-Louise; Vissing, John

    2013-01-01

    Patients with Limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2I (LGMD2I) are characterized by progressive muscle weakness and wasting primarily in the proximal muscles, while distal muscles often are spared. Our aim was to investigate if wasting could be caused by impaired regeneration in the proximal...... by using the developmental markers embryonic myosin heavy chain (eMHC) and neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) and also assessing satellite cell activation status by myogenin positivity. Severe muscle histopathology was occasionally observed in the proximal muscles of patients with LGMD2I whereas distal...... highly increased in severely affected muscles compared to mildly affected muscles. Our results indicate that alterations in the protein turnover and myostatin levels could progressively impair the muscle mass maintenance and/or regeneration resulting in gradual muscular atrophy....

  4. CONGENITAL NUTRITIONAL MYODEGENERATION (WHITE MUSCLE DISEASE) IN A GIRAFFE ( GIRAFFA CAMELOPARDALIS) CALF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bos, Jan H; Klip, Fokko C; Kik, Marja J L

    2017-12-01

    It is well known that vitamin E and selenium deficiencies in domestic ruminants can lead to white muscle disease. After a clinically normal gestation period at Ouwehand Zoo in the Netherlands, a newborn giraffe ( Giraffa camelopardalis) calf showed clinical signs of white muscle disease almost immediately after birth. The calf was rejected by the mother and was euthanized 3 days later because of deterioration of clinical signs. At necropsy, pulmonary edema and pallor of skeletal and heart muscles was noted. Histologically, there was hyaline degeneration of skeletal muscle myocytes and pulmonary edema. Blood concentrations of vitamin E were ≤ 0.7 mg/L. Based on clinical, biochemical, and gross and microscopic pathological findings, congenital nutritional myodegeneration was diagnosed. This case of neonatal white muscle disease is particularly remarkable given that the diet of the dam contained more than the recommended amount of vitamin E.

  5. The ultrasound-guided nerve blocks of abdominal wall contributed to anesthetic management of cholecystectomy in a patient with Becker muscular dystrophy without using muscle relaxants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Masato; Kuzumoto, Naoya; Akasaki, Yuka; Morioka, Masayo; Nakayama, Kana; Matsuzawa, Nobuyoshi; Kimoto, Katsuhiro; Shimomura, Toshiyuki

    2017-01-01

    Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) is a progressive neuromuscular disorder caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene. The sensitivity to non-depolarizing muscle relaxant in a patient with muscle dystrophy is reportedly higher than that in normal individuals, and the duration of the effect is known to be prolonged. In this report, we present the case of a 58-year-old man with BMD who underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy for symptomatic cholelithiasis under total intravenous anesthesia without the use of muscle-relaxant drugs and supplemented with regional anesthesia. Anesthesia was induced and maintained with propofol, remifentanil, and fentanyl; ultrasound-guided bilateral rectus sheath block (RSB) and right-sided subcostal transversus abdominis plane block (TAP) were performed. The procedure required conversion to open surgery because of hard conglutination; intraoperative and postoperative periods were uneventful. Adequate analgesia was maintained after extubation because of the effect of RSB and TAP.

  6. Spatially localized phosphorous metabolism of skeletal muscle in Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients: 24-month follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooijmans, M T; Doorenweerd, N; Baligand, C; Verschuuren, J J G M; Ronen, I; Niks, E H; Webb, A G; Kan, H E

    2017-01-01

    To assess the changes in phosphodiester (PDE)-levels, detected by 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), over 24-months to determine the potential of PDE as marker for muscle tissue changes in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) patients. Spatially resolved phosphorous datasets were acquired in the right lower leg of 18 DMD patients (range: 5-15.4 years) and 12 age-matched healthy controls (range: 5-14 years) at three time-points (baseline, 12-months, and 24-months) using a 7T MR-System (Philips Achieva). 3-point Dixon images were acquired at 3T (Philips Ingenia) to determine muscle fat fraction. Analyses were done for six muscles that represent different stages of muscle wasting. Differences between groups and time-points were assessed with non-parametric tests with correction for multiple comparisons. Coefficient of variance (CV) were determined for PDE in four healthy adult volunteers in high and low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) datasets. PDE-levels were significantly higher (two-fold) in DMD patients compared to controls in all analyzed muscles at almost every time point and did not change over the study period. Fat fraction was significantly elevated in all muscles at all time points compared to healthy controls, and increased significantly over time, except in the tibialis posterior muscle. The mean within subject CV for PDE-levels was 4.3% in datasets with high SNR (>10:1) and 5.7% in datasets with low SNR. The stable two-fold increase in PDE-levels found in DMD patients in muscles with different levels of muscle wasting over 2-year time, including DMD patients as young as 5.5 years-old, suggests that PDE-levels may increase very rapidly early in the disease process and remain elevated thereafter. The low CV values in high and low SNR datasets show that PDE-levels can be accurately and reproducibly quantified in all conditions. Our data confirms the great potential of PDE as a marker for muscle tissue changes in DMD patients.

  7. Spatially localized phosphorous metabolism of skeletal muscle in Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients: 24–month follow-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doorenweerd, N.; Baligand, C.; Verschuuren, J. J. G. M.; Ronen, I.; Niks, E. H.; Webb, A. G.; Kan, H. E.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To assess the changes in phosphodiester (PDE)-levels, detected by 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), over 24-months to determine the potential of PDE as marker for muscle tissue changes in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) patients. Methods Spatially resolved phosphorous datasets were acquired in the right lower leg of 18 DMD patients (range: 5–15.4 years) and 12 age-matched healthy controls (range: 5–14 years) at three time-points (baseline, 12-months, and 24-months) using a 7T MR-System (Philips Achieva). 3-point Dixon images were acquired at 3T (Philips Ingenia) to determine muscle fat fraction. Analyses were done for six muscles that represent different stages of muscle wasting. Differences between groups and time-points were assessed with non-parametric tests with correction for multiple comparisons. Coefficient of variance (CV) were determined for PDE in four healthy adult volunteers in high and low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) datasets. Results PDE-levels were significantly higher (two-fold) in DMD patients compared to controls in all analyzed muscles at almost every time point and did not change over the study period. Fat fraction was significantly elevated in all muscles at all time points compared to healthy controls, and increased significantly over time, except in the tibialis posterior muscle. The mean within subject CV for PDE-levels was 4.3% in datasets with high SNR (>10:1) and 5.7% in datasets with low SNR. Discussion and conclusion The stable two-fold increase in PDE-levels found in DMD patients in muscles with different levels of muscle wasting over 2-year time, including DMD patients as young as 5.5 years-old, suggests that PDE-levels may increase very rapidly early in the disease process and remain elevated thereafter. The low CV values in high and low SNR datasets show that PDE-levels can be accurately and reproducibly quantified in all conditions. Our data confirms the great potential of PDE as a marker for muscle tissue

  8. Treatment with the anti-IL-6 receptor antibody attenuates muscular dystrophy via promoting skeletal muscle regeneration in dystrophin-/utrophin-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Eiji; Tanihata, Jun; Iwamura, Akira; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Hayashi, Yukiko K; Matsuda, Ryoichi

    2017-10-27

    Chronic increases in the levels of the inflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6) in serum and skeletal muscle are thought to contribute to the progression of muscular dystrophy. Dystrophin/utrophin double-knockout (dKO) mice develop a more severe and progressive muscular dystrophy than the mdx mice, the most common murine model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). In particular, dKO mice have smaller body sizes and muscle diameters, and develop progressive kyphosis and fibrosis in skeletal and cardiac muscles. As mdx mice and DMD patients, we found that IL-6 levels in the skeletal muscle were significantly increased in dKO mice. Thus, in this study, we aimed to analyze the effects of IL-6 receptor (IL-6R) blockade on the muscle pathology of dKO mice. Male dKO mice were administered an initial injection (200 mg/kg intraperitoneally (i.p.)) of either the anti-IL-6R antibody MR16-1 or an isotype-matched control rat IgG at the age of 14 days, and were then given weekly injections (25 mg/kg i.p.) until 90 days of age. Treatment of dKO mice with the MR16-1 antibody successfully inhibited the IL-6 pathway in the skeletal muscle and resulted in a significant reduction in the expression levels of phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 in the skeletal muscle. Pathologically, a significant increase in the area of embryonic myosin heavy chain-positive myofibers and muscle diameter, and reduced fibrosis in the quadriceps muscle were observed. These results demonstrated the therapeutic effects of IL-6R blockade on promoting muscle regeneration. Consistently, serum creatine kinase levels were decreased. Despite these improvements observed in the limb muscles, degeneration of the diaphragm and cardiac muscles was not ameliorated by the treatment of mice with the MR16-1 antibody. As no adverse effects of treatment with the MR16-1 antibody were observed, our results indicate that the anti-IL-6R antibody is a potential therapy for muscular dystrophy

  9. Skeletal Muscle-derived Hematopoietic Stem Cells: Muscular Dystrophy Therapy by Bone Marrow Transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Asakura, Atsushi

    2012-01-01

    For postnatal growth and regeneration of skeletal muscle, satellite cells, a self-renewing pool of muscle stem cells, give rise to daughter myogenic precursor cells that contribute to the formation of new muscle fibers. In addition to this key myogenic cell class, adult skeletal muscle also contains hematopoietic stem cell and progenitor cell populations which can be purified as a side population (SP) fraction or as a hematopoietic marker CD45-positive cell population. These muscle-derived he...

  10. Comparative study on conjoint fascial sheath suspension and levator muscle resection for moderate or severe congenital ptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Lin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To compare the curative effect of conjoint fascial sheath(CSFsuspension and levator muscle resection for moderate or severe congenital ptosis. METHODS: Forty-three patients(74 eyeswith moderate or severe ptosis were treated by CSF suspension or levator muscle resection randomly, and followed up for 6mo. The normalization rates of the two operations were then compared by statistical method, and the complications of the two operations were analyzed.RESULTS: The two operations appeared no significant difference on the normalization rate for moderate congenital ptosis(P>0.05, while the normalization rate of CSF suspension on severe congenital ptosis was significantly higher than that of levator muscle resection(PCONCLUSION: CSF suspension is more effective on the treatment of severe congenital ptosis than levator muscle resection, and has advantages such as less trauma, repeatable, and less complication.

  11. Changes in calsequestrin, TNF-α, TGF-β and MyoD levels during the progression of skeletal muscle dystrophy in mdx mice: a comparative analysis of the quadriceps, diaphragm and intrinsic laryngeal muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros Maranhão, Juliana; de Oliveira Moreira, Drielen; Maurício, Adriana Fogagnolo; de Carvalho, Samara Camaçari; Ferretti, Renato; Pereira, Juliano Alves; Santo Neto, Humberto; Marques, Maria Julia

    2015-10-01

    In Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), the search for new biomarkers to follow the evolution of the disease is of fundamental importance in the light of the evolving gene and pharmacological therapies. In addition to the lack of dystrophin, secondary events including changes in calcium levels, inflammation and fibrosis greatly contribute to DMD progression and the molecules involved in these events may represent potential biomarkers. In this study, we performed a comparative evaluation of the progression of dystrophy within muscles that are differently affected by dystrophy (diaphragm; DIA and quadriceps; QDR) or spared (intrinsic laryngeal muscles) using the mdx mice model of DMD. We assessed muscle levels of calsequestrin (calcium-related protein), tumour necrosis factor (TNF-α; pro-inflammatory cytokine), tumour growth factor (TGF-β; pro-fibrotic factor) and MyoD (muscle proliferation) vs. histopathology at early (1 and 4 months of age) and late (9 months of age) stages of dystrophy. Fibrosis was the primary feature in the DIA of mdx mice (9 months: 32% fibrosis), which was greater than in the QDR (9 months: 0.6% fibrosis). Muscle regeneration was the primary feature in the QDR (9 months: 90% of centrally nucleated fibres areas vs. 33% in the DIA). The QDR expressed higher levels of calsequestrin than the DIA. Laryngeal muscles showed normal levels of TNF-α, TGF-β and MyoD. A positive correlation between histopathology and cytokine levels was observed only in the diaphragm, suggesting that TNF-α and TGF-β serve as markers of dystrophy primarily for the diaphragm. © 2015 The Authors. International Journal of Experimental Pathology © 2015 International Journal of Experimental Pathology.

  12. Translational Research for Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    muscle dystrophy with abnormal waddling gait at 4 weeks of age. At 10 weeks of age, double mutants exhibit skeletal muscle degeneration, necrosis... dystrophy (MCMD). Homozygous dyW mice are passive, small, and emaciated, and demonstrate partial hindleg weakness and clasping. Their muscles contain...was statistically significant for both single- treatment groups. Figure 4. Effect of GW and AICAR on body mass, muscle mass, and behavioral

  13. Congenital absence of anterior papillary muscle of the tricuspid valve and surgical repair with artificial chordae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Chuan; Pan, Shiwei

    2017-02-01

    We report the case of a 26-year old woman who underwent successful tricuspid valve repair for the absence of the anterior papillary of the tricuspid valve. Preoperative echocardiography revealed grade IV tricuspid valve regurgitation, caused by congenital absence of the anterior papillary muscle and prolapse of the anterior leaflet. Tricuspid valve repair was performed using artificial chords consisting of two polytetrafluoroethylene sutures and a concomitant ring annuloplasty. Postoperative echocardiography revealed mild tricuspid valve regurgitation. This approach represented a safe and effective technique for tricuspid valve repair in congenital absence of papillary muscle. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  14. Generalized smooth muscle hamartoma with multiple congenital anomalies without the "Michelin tire baby" phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janicke, Elise C; Nazareth, Michael R; Rothman, Ilene L

    2014-01-01

    We report a patient with generalized smooth muscle hamartoma who presented with many of the variety of congenital anomalies that have been reported in babies with multiple symmetric circumferential rings of folded skin known as Michelin tire baby (MTB) syndrome, but our patient did not show the MTB phenotype. This constellation of findings in the absence of the MTB phenotype has not been previously reported. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. B3GALNT2 mutations associated with non-syndromic autosomal recessive intellectual disability reveal a lack of genotype-phenotype associations in the muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maroofian, R.; Riemersma, M.; Jae, L.T.; Zhianabed, N.; Willemsen, M.H.; Wissink-Lindhout, W.M.; Willemsen, M.A.A.P.; Brouwer, A.P.M. de; Mehrjardi, M.Y.V.; Ashrafi, M.R.; Kusters, B.; Kleefstra, T.; Jamshidi, Y.; Nasseri, M.; Pfundt, R.; Brummelkamp, T.R.; Abbaszadegan, M.R.; Lefeber, D.J.; Bokhoven, H. van

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The phenotypic severity of congenital muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy (MDDG) syndromes associated with aberrant glycosylation of alpha-dystroglycan ranges from the severe Walker-Warburg syndrome or muscle-eye-brain disease to mild, late-onset, isolated limb-girdle muscular

  16. Detection of the mutation may guide treatment of heart and muscle in Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Finsterer J

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Josef Finsterer,1 Sinda Zarrouk-Mahjoub21Krankenanstalt Rudolfstiftung, Vienna, Austria; 2Genomics Platform, Pasteur Institute of Tunis, Tunis, Tunisia We read with great interest the article, by Kono et al, about a 32-year-old male with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD, who was admitted for dilated cardiomyopathy manifesting as heart failure, left bundle branch block, Mobitz-II block, bradycardia, and arterial hypotension. He profited from implantation of a cardiac resynchronization therapy-D system with a defibrillator and beta-blocker treatment. View original article by Kono et al.  

  17. Morphological and functional analyses of skeletal muscles from an immunodeficient animal model of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2E.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovannelli, Gaia; Giacomazzi, Giorgia; Grosemans, Hanne; Sampaolesi, Maurilio

    2018-02-24

    Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2E (LGMD2E) is caused by mutations in the β-sarcoglycan gene, which is expressed in skeletal, cardiac, and smooth muscles. β-Sarcoglycan-deficient (Sgcb-null) mice develop severe muscular dystrophy and cardiomyopathy with focal areas of necrosis. In this study we performed morphological (histological and cellular characterization) and functional (isometric tetanic force and fatigue) analyses in dystrophic mice. Comparison studies were carried out in 1-month-old (clinical onset of the disease) and 7-month-old control mice (C57Bl/6J, Rag2/γc-null) and immunocompetent and immunodeficient dystrophic mice (Sgcb-null and Sgcb/Rag2/γc-null, respectively). We found that the lack of an immunological system resulted in an increase of calcification in striated muscles without impairing extensor digitorum longus muscle performance. Sgcb/Rag2/γc-null muscles showed a significant reduction of alkaline phosphate-positive mesoangioblasts. The immunological system counteracts skeletal muscle degeneration in the murine model of LGMD2E. Muscle Nerve, 2018. © 2018 The Authors. Muscle & Nerve Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Timed function tests, motor function measure, and quantitative thigh muscle MRI in ambulant children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy: A cross-sectional analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Simone; Hafner, Patricia; Klein, Andrea; Rubino-Nacht, Daniela; Gocheva, Vanya; Schroeder, Jonas; Naduvilekoot Devasia, Arjith; Zuesli, Stephanie; Bernert, Guenther; Laugel, Vincent; Bloetzer, Clemens; Steinlin, Maja; Capone, Andrea; Gloor, Monika; Tobler, Patrick; Haas, Tanja; Bieri, Oliver; Zumbrunn, Thomas; Fischer, Dirk; Bonati, Ulrike

    2018-01-01

    The development of new therapeutic agents for the treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy has put a focus on defining outcome measures most sensitive to capture treatment effects. This cross-sectional analysis investigates the relation between validated clinical assessments such as the 6-minute walk test, motor function measure and quantitative muscle MRI of thigh muscles in ambulant Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients, aged 6.5 to 10.8 years (mean 8.2, SD 1.1). Quantitative muscle MRI included the mean fat fraction using a 2-point Dixon technique, and transverse relaxation time (T2) measurements. All clinical assessments were highly significantly inter-correlated with p muscle MRI values significantly correlated with all clinical assessments with the extensors showing the strongest correlation. In contrast to the clinical assessments, quantitative muscle MRI values were highly significantly correlated with age. In conclusion, the motor function measure and timed function tests measure disease severity in a highly comparable fashion and all tests correlated with quantitative muscle MRI values quantifying fatty muscle degeneration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Protein turnover and cellular stress in mildly and severely affected muscles from patients with limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2I.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Hauerslev

    Full Text Available Patients with Limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2I (LGMD2I are characterized by progressive muscle weakness and wasting primarily in the proximal muscles, while distal muscles often are spared. Our aim was to investigate if wasting could be caused by impaired regeneration in the proximal compared to distal muscles. Biopsies were simultaneously obtained from proximal and distal muscles of the same patients with LGMD2I (n = 4 and healthy subjects (n = 4. The level of past muscle regeneration was evaluated by counting internally nucleated fibers and determining actively regenerating fibers by using the developmental markers embryonic myosin heavy chain (eMHC and neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM and also assessing satellite cell activation status by myogenin positivity. Severe muscle histopathology was occasionally observed in the proximal muscles of patients with LGMD2I whereas distal muscles were always relatively spared. No difference was found in the regeneration markers internally nucleated fibers, actively regenerating fibers or activation status of satellite cells between proximal and distal muscles. Protein turnover, both synthesis and breakdown, as well as cellular stress were highly increased in severely affected muscles compared to mildly affected muscles. Our results indicate that alterations in the protein turnover and myostatin levels could progressively impair the muscle mass maintenance and/or regeneration resulting in gradual muscular atrophy.

  20. NMR-CT in muscular disorders. Muscle T/sub 1/ values in Duchenne muscular dystrophy carriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumura, Kiichiro; Nakano, Imaharu; Fukuda, Nobuo; Ikehira, Hiroo; Tateno, Yukio

    1987-02-01

    Proton NMR-CT (magnetic field strength 0.1 Tesla, resonant frequency 4.5 MHz) was performed in 10 normal females and 19 Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) carriers. The mean age was 39 +- 12 years for the normal females and 42 +- 6 years for the DMD carriers. In DMD carriers, there were 4 definite, 4 probable, and 11 possible carriers. T/sub 1/ (spin-lattice relaxation time) image was obtained for a slice at the buttock, mid-thigh and calf levels respectively. T/sub 1/ values were measured for the medial portion of the gluteus maximus, the vastus lateralis of the quadriceps femoris, and the gastrocnemius. The bound water fraction (BWF) was calculated from Fullerton's equation based on the fast proton diffusion model. The following results were obtained: (1) In normal females, muscle T/sub 1/ value was highest in the gastrocnemius and lowest in the gluteus maximus. (2) In DMD carriers, T/sub 1/ values of the gluteus maximus and quadriceps femoris were significantly higher than those of the normal females. There was, however, no significant difference in T/sub 1/ value of the gastrocnemius between DMD carriers and normal females. (3) In DMD carriers, BWFs of the gluteus maximus and quadriceps femoris were significantly lower than those of the normal females. (4) In DMD carriers, no significant correlation was observed between the muscle T/sub 1/ values and the serum creatine phosphokinase values. Increased tissue water content in the lower parts of the body due to gravity is considered to be the primary cause of the high T/sub 1/ value in the gastrocnemius of normal females. The presence of the degenerating muscle fibers are presumed responsible for the high T/sub 1/ value and low BWF in the proximal muscles of DMD carriers.

  1. NMR-CT in muscular disorders. Muscle T/sub 1/ values in Duchenne muscular dystrophy carriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumura, Kiichiro; Nakano, Imaharu; Fukuda, Nobuo; Ikehira, Hiroo; Tateno, Yukio

    1987-02-01

    Proton NMR-CT (magnetic field strength 0.1 Tesla, resonant frequency 4.5 MHz) was performed in 10 normal females and 19 Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) carriers. The mean age was 39 +- 12 years for the normal females and 42 +- 6 years for the DMD carriers. In DMD carriers, there were 4 definite, 4 probable, and 11 possible carriers. T/sub 1/ (spin-lattice relaxation time) image was obtained for a slice at the buttock, mid-thigh and calf levels respectively. T/sub 1/ values were measured for the medial portion of the gluteus maximus, the vastus lateralis of the quadriceps femoris, and the gastrocnemius. The bound water fraction (BWF) was calculated from Fullerton's equation based on the fast proton diffusion model. The following results were obtained: (1) In normal females, muscle T/sub 1/ value was highest in the gastrocnemius and lowest in the gluteus maximus. (2) In DMD carriers, T/sub 1/ values of the gluteus maximus and quadriceps femoris were significantly higher than those of the normal females. There was, however, no significant difference in T/sub 1/ value of the gastrocnemius between DMD carriers and normal females. (3) In DMD carriers, BWFs of the gluteus maximus and quadriceps femoris were significantly lower than those of the normal females. (4) In DMD carriers, no significant correlation was observed between the muscle T/sub 1/ values and the serum creatine phosphokinase values. Increased tissue water content in the lower parts of the body due to gravity is considered to be the primary cause of the high T/sub 1/ value in the gastrocnemius of normal females. The presence of the degenerating muscle fibers are presumed responsible for the high T/sub 1/ value and low BWF in the proximal muscles of DMD carriers.

  2. Treatment with a nitric oxide-donating NSAID alleviates functional muscle ischemia in the mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Gail D; Ye, Jianfeng; De Nardi, Claudio; Monopoli, Angela; Ongini, Ennio; Victor, Ronald G

    2012-01-01

    In patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and the standard mdx mouse model of DMD, dystrophin deficiency causes loss of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOSμ) from the sarcolemma, producing functional ischemia when the muscles are exercised. We asked if functional muscle ischemia would be eliminated and normal blood flow regulation restored by treatment with an exogenous nitric oxide (NO)-donating drug. Beginning at 8 weeks of age, mdx mice were fed a standard diet supplemented with 1% soybean oil alone or in combination with a low (15 mg/kg) or high (45 mg/kg) dose of HCT 1026, a NO-donating nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agent which has previously been shown to slow disease progression in the mdx model. After 1 month of treatment, vasoconstrictor responses to intra-arterial norepinephrine (NE) were compared in resting and contracting hindlimbs. In untreated mdx mice, the usual effect of muscle contraction to attenuate NE-mediated vasoconstriction was impaired, resulting in functional ischemia: NE evoked similar decreases in femoral blood flow velocity and femoral vascular conductance (FVC) in the contracting compared to resting hindlimbs (ΔFVC contraction/ΔFVC rest=0.88 ± 0.03). NE-induced functional ischemia was unaffected by low dose HCT 1026 (ΔFVC ratio=0.92 ± 0.04; P>0.05 vs untreated), but was alleviated by the high dose of the drug (ΔFVC ratio=0.22 ± 0.03; Ptreatment up to 3 months. The effect of the NO-donating drug HCT 1026 to normalize blood flow regulation in contracting mdx mouse hindlimb muscles suggests a putative novel treatment for DMD. Further translational research is warranted.

  3. Human muscle proteins: analysis by two-dimensional electrophoresis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giometti, C.S.; Danon, M.J.; Anderson, N.G.

    1983-09-01

    Proteins from single frozen sections of human muscle were separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and detected by fluorography or Coomassie Blue staining. The major proteins were identical in different normal muscles obtained from either sex at different ages, and in Duchenne and myotonic dystrophy samples. Congenital myopathy denervation atrophy, polymyositis, and Becker's muscular dystrophy samples, however, showed abnormal myosin light chain compositions, some with a decrease of fast-fiber myosin light chains and others with a decrease of slow-fiber light chains. These protein alterations did not correlate with any specific disease, and may be cause by generalized muscle-fiber damage.

  4. Zebrafish integrin-linked kinase is required in skeletal muscles for strengthening the integrin-ECM adhesion complex.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postel, R.; Vakeel, P.; Topczewski, J.; Knoll, R.; Bakkers, J.

    2008-01-01

    Mechanical instability of skeletal muscle cells is the major cause of congenital muscular dystrophy. Here we show that the zebrafish lost-contact mutant, that lacks a functional integrin-linked kinase (ilk) gene, suffers from mechanical instability of skeletal muscle fibres. With genetic and

  5. Functional ability and muscle force in healthy children and ambulant Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beenakker, EAC; Maurits, NM; Fock, JM; Brouwer, OF; van der Hoeven, JH

    2005-01-01

    Neuromuscular disorders are characterised by progressive muscle weakness, which in time causes functional impairment. To quantify the extent of disease progression, muscle force and functional ability can be measured. Which of these parameters changes most depends on the disease stage. In a previous

  6. Evaluation of skeletal muscle DTI in patients with duchenne muscular dystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooijmans, M. T.; Damon, B. M.; Froeling, M.; Versluis, M. J.; Burakiewicz, J.; Verschuuren, J. J G M; Niks, E. H.; Webb, A. G.; Kan, H. E.

    2015-01-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is a popular method to assess differences in fiber organization in diseased and healthy muscle tissue. Previous work has shown that muscle DTI measurements depend on signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), %fat, and tissue T2. The goal of this study was to evaluate the potential

  7. Use of capillary Western immunoassay (Wes) for quantification of dystrophin levels in skeletal muscle of healthy controls and individuals with Becker and Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beekman, Chantal; Janson, Anneke A; Baghat, Aabed; van Deutekom, Judith C; Datson, Nicole A

    2018-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a neuromuscular disease characterized by progressive weakness of the skeletal and cardiac muscles. This X-linked disorder is caused by open reading frame disrupting mutations in the DMD gene, resulting in strong reduction or complete absence of dystrophin protein. In order to use dystrophin as a supportive or even surrogate biomarker in clinical studies on investigational drugs aiming at correcting the primary cause of the disease, the ability to reliably quantify dystrophin expression in muscle biopsies of DMD patients pre- and post-treatment is essential. Here we demonstrate the application of the ProteinSimple capillary immunoassay (Wes) method, a gel- and blot-free method requiring less sample, antibody and time to run than conventional Western blot assay. We optimized dystrophin quantification by Wes using 2 different antibodies and found it to be highly sensitive, reproducible and quantitative over a large dynamic range. Using a healthy control muscle sample as a reference and α-actinin as a protein loading/muscle content control, a panel of skeletal muscle samples consisting of 31 healthy controls, 25 Becker Muscle dystrophy (BMD) and 17 DMD samples was subjected to Wes analysis. In healthy controls dystrophin levels varied 3 to 5-fold between the highest and lowest muscle samples, with the reference sample representing the average of all 31 samples. In BMD muscle samples dystrophin levels ranged from 10% to 90%, with an average of 33% of the healthy muscle average, while for the DMD samples the average dystrophin level was 1.3%, ranging from 0.7% to 7% of the healthy muscle average. In conclusion, Wes is a suitable, efficient and reliable method for quantification of dystrophin expression as a biomarker in DMD clinical drug development.

  8. Characteristic of muscle involvement evaluated by CT scans in early stages of progressive muscular dystrophy; Comparison between Duchenne and Fukuyama types

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arai, Yumi (Tokyo Women' s Medical Coll. (Japan))

    1993-10-01

    Muscle CT scans were performed in order to compare the characteristic distribution of progressive muscle involvement in the early stages of Duchenne type (DMD) and Fukuyama type muscular dystrophy (FCMD). Muscle images at the levels of the 3rd lumbar vertebra, thigh and calf were assessed by visual inspection, and mean CT numbers calculated for individual muscles were statistically analysed. On visual inspection, intramuscular low density areas and muscular atrophy were observed in the muscles of older patients with either disease. These changes were, however, more extensive at thigh level in DMD, and at calf level in FCMD. Nevertheless, the mean CT numbers of muscles in which only slight changes were grossly visible on CT scans displayed progressive decreases with increasing age. Moreover, a significant negative relationship was recognizable between age and mean CT number in almost all muscles examined. Comparison of the slopes of the regression lines revealed that the so-called selective pattern of muscle involvement characteristic of the symptomatic stage had already partially manifested in the preclinical or early stages of both diseases. In FCMD, the rates of decrease in CT numbers were extremely rapid for calf muscles as compared with those in DMD, indicating that this is one reason for FCMD patients never becoming ambulatory. However, for almost all of the other muscles, the CT numbers in FCMD decreased in parallel with the corresponding CT numbers in DMD; thus, these diseases displayed a similarity in the pattern of muscle involvement, despite their different pathogenetic mechanisms and inheritance patterns. (author).

  9. Long-term follow-up of MRI changes in thigh muscles of patients with Facioscapulohumeral dystrophy: A quantitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatehi, Farzad; Salort-Campana, Emmanuelle; Le Troter, Arnaud; Lareau-Trudel, Emilie; Bydder, Mark; Fouré, Alexandre; Guye, Maxime; Bendahan, David; Attarian, Shahram

    2017-01-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is one of the most common hereditary muscular disorders. Currently FSHD has no known effective treatment and detailed data on the natural history are lacking. Determination of the efficacy of a given therapeutic approach might be difficult in FSHD given the slow and highly variable disease progression. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been widely used to qualitatively and quantitatively evaluate in vivo the muscle alterations in various neuromuscular disorders. The main aim of the present study was to investigate longitudinally the time-dependent changes occurring in thigh muscles of FSHD patients using quantitative MRI and to assess the potential relationships with the clinical findings. Thirty-five FSHD1 patients (17 females) were enrolled. Clinical assessment tools including manual muscle testing using medical research council score (MRC), and motor function measure (MFM) were recorded each year for a period ranging from 1 to 2 years. For the MRI measurements, we used a new quantitative index, i.e., the mean pixel intensity (MPI) calculated from the pixel-intensity distribution in T1 weighted images. The corresponding MPI scores were calculated for each thigh, for each compartment and for both thighs totally (MPItotal). The total mean pixel intensity (MPItotal) refers to the sum of each pixel signal intensity divided by the corresponding number of pixels. An increased MPItotal indicates both a raised fat infiltration together with a reduced muscle volume thereby illustrating disease progression. Clinical scores did not change significantly over time whereas MPItotal increased significantly from an initial averaged value of 39.6 to 41.1 with a corresponding rate of 0.62/year. While clinical scores and MPItotal measured at the start of the study were significantly related, no correlation was found between the rate of MPItotal and MRC sum score changes, MFMtotal and MFM subscores. The relative rate of MPItotal

  10. Long-term follow-up of MRI changes in thigh muscles of patients with Facioscapulohumeral dystrophy: A quantitative study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzad Fatehi

    Full Text Available Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD is one of the most common hereditary muscular disorders. Currently FSHD has no known effective treatment and detailed data on the natural history are lacking. Determination of the efficacy of a given therapeutic approach might be difficult in FSHD given the slow and highly variable disease progression. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI has been widely used to qualitatively and quantitatively evaluate in vivo the muscle alterations in various neuromuscular disorders. The main aim of the present study was to investigate longitudinally the time-dependent changes occurring in thigh muscles of FSHD patients using quantitative MRI and to assess the potential relationships with the clinical findings. Thirty-five FSHD1 patients (17 females were enrolled. Clinical assessment tools including manual muscle testing using medical research council score (MRC, and motor function measure (MFM were recorded each year for a period ranging from 1 to 2 years. For the MRI measurements, we used a new quantitative index, i.e., the mean pixel intensity (MPI calculated from the pixel-intensity distribution in T1 weighted images. The corresponding MPI scores were calculated for each thigh, for each compartment and for both thighs totally (MPItotal. The total mean pixel intensity (MPItotal refers to the sum of each pixel signal intensity divided by the corresponding number of pixels. An increased MPItotal indicates both a raised fat infiltration together with a reduced muscle volume thereby illustrating disease progression. Clinical scores did not change significantly over time whereas MPItotal increased significantly from an initial averaged value of 39.6 to 41.1 with a corresponding rate of 0.62/year. While clinical scores and MPItotal measured at the start of the study were significantly related, no correlation was found between the rate of MPItotal and MRC sum score changes, MFMtotal and MFM subscores. The relative rate of

  11. Electrical stimuli are anti-apoptotic in skeletal muscle via extracellular ATP. Alteration of this signal in Mdx mice is a likely cause of dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valladares, Denisse; Almarza, Gonzalo; Contreras, Ariel; Pavez, Mario; Buvinic, Sonja; Jaimovich, Enrique; Casas, Mariana

    2013-01-01

    ATP signaling has been shown to regulate gene expression in skeletal muscle and to be altered in models of muscular dystrophy. We have previously shown that in normal muscle fibers, ATP released through Pannexin1 (Panx1) channels after electrical stimulation plays a role in activating some signaling pathways related to gene expression. We searched for a possible role of ATP signaling in the dystrophy phenotype. We used muscle fibers from flexor digitorum brevis isolated from normal and mdx mice. We demonstrated that low frequency electrical stimulation has an anti-apoptotic effect in normal muscle fibers repressing the expression of Bax, Bim and PUMA. Addition of exogenous ATP to the medium has a similar effect. In dystrophic fibers, the basal levels of extracellular ATP were higher compared to normal fibers, but unlike control fibers, they do not present any ATP release after low frequency electrical stimulation, suggesting an uncoupling between electrical stimulation and ATP release in this condition. Elevated levels of Panx1 and decreased levels of Cav1.1 (dihydropyridine receptors) were found in triads fractions prepared from mdx muscles. Moreover, decreased immunoprecipitation of Cav1.1 and Panx1, suggest uncoupling of the signaling machinery. Importantly, in dystrophic fibers, exogenous ATP was pro-apoptotic, inducing the transcription of Bax, Bim and PUMA and increasing the levels of activated Bax and cytosolic cytochrome c. These evidence points to an involvement of the ATP pathway in the activation of mechanisms related with cell death in muscular dystrophy, opening new perspectives towards possible targets for pharmacological therapies.

  12. Congenital muscular dystrophy. Part I: a review of phenotypical and diagnostic aspects Distrofia muscular congênita. Parte I: revisão dos aspectos fenotípicos e diagnósticos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umbertina Conti Reed

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The congenital muscular dystrophies (CMDs are a group of genetically and clinically heterogeneous hereditary myopathies with preferentially autosomal recessive inheritance, that are characterized by congenital hypotonia, delayed motor development and early onset of progressive muscle weakness associated with dystrophic pattern on muscle biopsy. The clinical course is broadly variable and can comprise the involvement of the brain and eyes. From 1994, a great development in the knowledge of the molecular basis has occurred and the classification of CMDs has to be continuously up dated. We initially present the main clinical and diagnostic data concerning the CMDs related to changes in the complex dystrophin-associated glycoproteins-extracellular matrix: CMD with merosin deficiency (CMD1A, collagen VI related CMDs (Ullrich CMD and Bethlem myopathy, CMDs with abnormal glycosylation of alpha-dystroglycan (Fukuyama CMD, Muscle-eye-brain disease, Walker-Warburg syndrome, CMD1C, CMD1D, and the much rarer CMD with integrin deficiency. Finally, we present other forms of CMDs not related with the dystrophin/glycoproteins/extracellular matrix complex (rigid spine syndrome, CMD1B, CMD with lamin A/C deficiency, and some apparently specific clinical forms not yet associated with a known molecular mechanism. The second part of this review concerning the pathogenesis and therapeutic perspectives of the different subtypes of CMD will be described in a next number.As distrofias musculares congênitas (DMCs são miopatias hereditárias geralmente, porém não exclusivamente, de herança autossômica recessiva, que apresentam grande heterogeneidade genética e clínica. São caracterizadas por hipotonia muscular congênita, atraso do desenvolvimento motor e fraqueza muscular de início precoce associada a padrão distrófico na biópsia muscular. O quadro clínico, de gravidade variável, pode também incluir anormalidades oculares e do sistema nervoso central. A

  13. Congenital muscular dystrophy. Part II: a review of pathogenesis and therapeutic perspectives Distrofia muscular congênita. Parte II: revisão da patogênese e perspectivas terapêuticas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umbertina Conti Reed

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The congenital muscular dystrophies (CMDs are a group of genetically and clinically heterogeneous hereditary myopathies with preferentially autosomal recessive inheritance, that are characterized by congenital hypotonia, delayed motor development and early onset of progressive muscle weakness associated with dystrophic pattern on muscle biopsy. The clinical course is broadly variable and can comprise the involvement of the brain and eyes. From 1994, a great development in the knowledge of the molecular basis has occurred and the classification of CMDs has to be continuously up dated. In the last number of this journal, we presented the main clinical and diagnostic data concerning the different subtypes of CMD. In this second part of the review, we analyse the main reports from the literature concerning the pathogenesis and the therapeutic perspectives of the most common subtypes of CMD: MDC1A with merosin deficiency, collagen VI related CMDs (Ullrich and Bethlem, CMDs with abnormal glycosylation of alpha-dystroglycan (Fukuyama CMD, Muscle-eye-brain disease, Walker Warburg syndrome, MDC1C, MDC1D, and rigid spine syndrome, another much rare subtype of CMDs not related with the dystrophin/glycoproteins/extracellular matrix complex.As distrofias musculares congênitas (DMCs são miopatias hereditárias geralmente, porém não exclusivamente, de herança autossômica recessiva, que apresentam grande heterogeneidade genética e clínica. São caracterizadas por hipotonia muscular congênita, atraso do desenvolvimento motor e fraqueza muscular de início precoce associada a padrão distrófico na biópsia muscular. O quadro clínico, de gravidade variável, pode também incluir anormalidades oculares e do sistema nervoso central. A partir de 1994, os conhecimentos sobre genética e biologia molecular das DMCs progrediram rapidamente, sendo a classificação continuamente atualizada. Os aspectos clínicos e diagnósticos dos principais subtipos de DMC

  14. E2F transcription factor-1 deficiency reduces pathophysiology in the mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy through increased muscle oxidative metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchet, Emilie; Annicotte, Jean-Sébastien; Pradelli, Ludivine A; Hugon, Gérald; Matecki, Stéfan; Mornet, Dominique; Rivier, François; Fajas, Lluis

    2012-09-01

    E2F1 deletion leads to increased mitochondrial number and function, increased body temperature in response to cold and increased resistance to fatigue with exercise. Since E2f1-/- mice show increased muscle performance, we examined the effect of E2f1 genetic inactivation in the mdx background, a mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). E2f1-/-;mdx mice demonstrated a strong reduction of physiopathological signs of DMD, including preservation of muscle structure, decreased inflammatory profile, increased utrophin expression, resulting in better endurance and muscle contractile parameters, comparable to normal mdx mice. E2f1 deficiency in the mdx genetic background increased the oxidative metabolic gene program, mitochondrial activity and improved muscle functions. Interestingly, we observed increased E2F1 protein levels in DMD patients, suggesting that E2F1 might represent a promising target for the treatment of DMD.

  15. Galectin-3 and N-acetylglucosamine promote myogenesis and improve skeletal muscle function in the mdx model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rancourt, Ann; Dufresne, Sébastien S; St-Pierre, Guillaume; Lévesque, Julie-Christine; Nakamura, Haruka; Kikuchi, Yodai; Satoh, Masahiko S; Frenette, Jérôme; Sato, Sachiko

    2018-06-12

    The muscle membrane, sarcolemma, must be firmly attached to the basal lamina. The failure of proper attachment results in muscle injury, which is the underlying cause of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), in which mutations in the dystrophin gene disrupts the firm adhesion. In patients with DMD, even moderate contraction causes damage, leading to progressive muscle degeneration. The damaged muscles are repaired through myogenesis. Consequently, myogenesis is highly active in patients with DMD, and the repeated activation of myogenesis leads to the exhaustion of the myogenic stem cells. Therefore, approaches to reducing the risk of the exhaustion are to develop a treatment that strengthens the interaction between the sarcolemma and the basal lamina and increases the efficiency of the myogenesis. Galectin-3 is an oligosaccharide-binding protein and is known to be involved in cell-cell interactions and cell-matrix interactions. Galectin-3 is expressed in myoblasts and skeletal muscle, although its function in muscle remains elusive. In this study, we found evidence that galectin-3 and the monosaccharide N-acetylglucosamine, which increases the synthesis of binding partners (oligosaccharides) of galectin-3, promote myogenesis in vitro. Moreover, in the mdx mouse model of DMD, treatment with N-acetylglucosamine increased muscle-force production. The results suggest that treatment with N-acetylglucosamine might mitigate the burden of DMD.-Rancourt, A., Dufresne, S. S., St-Pierre, G., Lévesque, J.-C., Nakamura, H., Kikuchi, Y., Satoh, M. S., Frenette, J., Sato, S. Galectin-3 and N-acetylglucosamine promote myogenesis and improve skeletal muscle function in the mdx model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

  16. Nanospan, an alternatively spliced isoform of sarcospan, localizes to the sarcoplasmic reticulum in skeletal muscle and is absent in limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Angela K; Miller, Gaynor; Capote, Joana; DiFranco, Marino; Solares-Pérez, Alhondra; Wang, Emily L; Heighway, Jim; Coral-Vázquez, Ramón M; Vergara, Julio; Crosbie-Watson, Rachelle H

    2017-06-06

    Sarcospan (SSPN) is a transmembrane protein that interacts with the sarcoglycans (SGs) to form a tight subcomplex within the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex that spans the sarcolemma and interacts with laminin in the extracellular matrix. Overexpression of SSPN ameliorates Duchenne muscular dystrophy in murine models. Standard cloning approaches were used to identify nanospan, and nanospan-specific polyclonal antibodies were generated and validated. Biochemical isolation of skeletal muscle membranes and two-photon laser scanning microscopy were used to analyze nanospan localization in muscle from multiple murine models. Duchenne muscular dystrophy biopsies were analyzed by immunoblot analysis of protein lysates as well as indirect immunofluorescence analysis of muscle cryosections. Nanospan is an alternatively spliced isoform of sarcospan. While SSPN has four transmembrane domains and is a core component of the sarcolemmal dystrophin-glycoprotein complex, nanospan is a type II transmembrane protein that does not associate with the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex. We demonstrate that nanospan is enriched in the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) fractions and is not present in the T-tubules. SR fractions contain membranes from three distinct structural regions: a region flanking the T-tubules (triadic SR), a SR region across the Z-line (ZSR), and a longitudinal SR region across the M-line (LSR). Analysis of isolated murine muscles reveals that nanospan is mostly associated with the ZSR and triadic SR, and only minimally with the LSR. Furthermore, nanospan is absent from the SR of δ-SG-null (Sgcd -/- ) skeletal muscle, a murine model for limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2F. Analysis of skeletal muscle biopsies from Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients reveals that nanospan is preferentially expressed in type I (slow) fibers in both control and Duchenne samples. Furthermore, nanospan is significantly reduced in Duchenne biopsies. Alternative splicing of proteins from the SG

  17. Attenuated muscle regeneration is a key factor in dysferlin-deficient muscular dystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chiu, Yen-Hui; Hornsey, Mark A; Klinge, Lars

    2009-01-01

    in a mouse model of dysferlinopathy, with delayed removal of necrotic fibres, an extended inflammatory phase and delayed functional recovery. Satellite cell activation and myoblast fusion appear normal, but there is a reduction in early neutrophil recruitment in regenerating and also needle wounded muscle...... kinase levels and a prominent inflammatory infiltrate. We have observed that dysferlinopathy patient biopsies show an excess of immature fibres and therefore investigated the role of dysferlin in muscle regeneration. Using notexin-induced muscle damage, we have shown that regeneration is attenuated...... with the sarcolemma dysferlin is also involved in the release of chemotactic agents. Reduced neutrophil recruitment results in incomplete cycles of regeneration in dysferlinopathy which combines with the membrane repair deficit to ultimately trigger dystrophic pathology. This study reveals a novel pathomechanism...

  18. Concentration of sulfur-containing amino acids at turkey broilers during and after muscle dystrophy, fed with deficient feed supplemented with oxidised fat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Stoyanchev

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. The aim of the present study was to reproduce experimentally muscular dystrophy in 50 broiler turkeys, through early nutrition with a diet deficient in vitamin E, selenium and sulfur-containing amino acids, supplemented with oxidised fat and to study blood plasma sulfur containing amino acids (methionine rd and cysteine. The experiments were conducted with 1 day-old broiler turkeys. By the 3 day of life, they were divided into 40 experimental (II group and 10 control birds (I group; the latter were fed a standard compound feed, whereas the former group received a diet deficient in sulfur-containing amino acids methionine and cysteine (reduced up to 50%, vitamin E, and Se (from 0.2 mg/kg in standard feed to 0.01 mg/kg, further supplemented with oxidized fat containing peroxides and aldehydes with peroxide number of the food 8.0 meq O /kg. The clinical signs of experimental muscle dystrophy in broiler turkeys 2 th appeared first by the 25 day of feeding, when the mild clinical form (II A group and the severe clinical form (II B group werewas established. The results indicated clearly that in turkey broilers suffering from muscle dystrophy, the concentrations of sulfur-containing amino acids cysteine and methionine decreased. After the treatment of turkey broilers withmuscle dystrophy, and supplementation with non-deficient forage with Se, vitamin E, but also with sulfurcontaining amino acids cysteine ormethionine with Seled at a dosage 0.06mg/kg, the plasma levels of sulfur-containing amino acids cysteine andmethionine ® was normalized in the mild clinical form (II A group. The birds affected by the severe clinical form of disease (II B group, which were not treated with Seled and whose deficient feed was not corrected, could not recover and levels of sulfur-containing amino acids cysteine and methionine did not normalize.

  19. Frontalis muscle flap suspension for the correction of congenital blepharoptosis in early age children.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dianju Hou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We aimed to report our successful use of frontalis muscle flap suspension for the correction of congenital blepharoptosis in early age children. METHODS: This retrospective study included 61 early age children (41 boys, 20 girls with an average age of 6 years (range, 3-10 years with congenital blepharoptosis who received surgery during the period from March 2007 to January 2011. There were 39 cases of unilateral blepharoptosis and 22 cases of bilateral blepharoptosis, thus a total of 83 eyes were affected. If patient had bilateral blepharoptosis, both eyes were operated on in the same surgery. Patients were followed for 3 months to 5 years. The procedure was performed without complications in all cases. RESULTS: The postoperative healing grade was good in 81 eyes (97.6%; the correction of blepharoptosis was satisfactory, the double eyelid folds were natural and aesthetic, the eyelid position and the curvature were ideal, and the eyes were bilaterally symmetrical. The postoperative healing grade was fair in 2 eyes (2.4%; blepharoptosis was improved compared with that before surgery. At discharge, lagophthalmos was noted in 10 eyes of which 4 cases resolved by the last follow-up. The remaining 6 cases were mild. Eleven eyes received reoperation for residual ptosis after the first surgery. The curvature of the palpebral margin was not natural in 4 eyes. These unnatural curvature possibly was caused by an excessively low lateral fixation point or postoperative avulsion. CONCLUSION: Frontalis muscle flap suspension under general anesthesia for the correction of congenital blepharoptosis in early age children can achieve good surgical results.

  20. Genetic deletion of muscle RANK or selective inhibition of RANKL is not as effective as full-length OPG-fc in mitigating muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufresne, Sébastien S; Boulanger-Piette, Antoine; Bossé, Sabrina; Argaw, Anteneh; Hamoudi, Dounia; Marcadet, Laetitia; Gamu, Daniel; Fajardo, Val A; Yagita, Hideo; Penninger, Josef M; Russell Tupling, A; Frenette, Jérôme

    2018-04-24

    Although there is a strong association between osteoporosis and skeletal muscle atrophy/dysfunction, the functional relevance of a particular biological pathway that regulates synchronously bone and skeletal muscle physiopathology is still elusive. Receptor-activator of nuclear factor κB (RANK), its ligand RANKL and the soluble decoy receptor osteoprotegerin (OPG) are the key regulators of osteoclast differentiation and bone remodelling. We thus hypothesized that RANK/RANKL/OPG, which is a key pathway for bone regulation, is involved in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) physiopathology. Our results show that muscle-specific RANK deletion (mdx-RANK mko ) in dystrophin deficient mdx mice improves significantly specific force [54% gain in force] of EDL muscles with no protective effect against eccentric contraction-induced muscle dysfunction. In contrast, full-length OPG-Fc injections restore the force of dystrophic EDL muscles [162% gain in force], protect against eccentric contraction-induced muscle dysfunction ex vivo and significantly improve functional performance on downhill treadmill and post-exercise physical activity. Since OPG serves a soluble receptor for RANKL and as a decoy receptor for TRAIL, mdx mice were injected with anti-RANKL and anti-TRAIL antibodies to decipher the dual function of OPG. Injections of anti-RANKL and/or anti-TRAIL increase significantly the force of dystrophic EDL muscle [45% and 17% gains in force, respectively]. In agreement, truncated OPG-Fc that contains only RANKL domains produces similar gains, in terms of force production, than anti-RANKL treatments. To corroborate that full-length OPG-Fc also acts independently of RANK/RANKL pathway, dystrophin/RANK double-deficient mice were treated with full-length OPG-Fc for 10 days. Dystrophic EDL muscles exhibited a significant gain in force relative to untreated dystrophin/RANK double-deficient mice, indicating that the effect of full-length OPG-Fc is in part independent of the RANKL

  1. Upper limb congenital muscular hypertrophy and aberrant muscle syndrome in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahan, Emmanuel; Chaves, Camilo; Bachy, Manon; Fitoussi, Frank

    2018-01-01

    Congenital muscle hypertrophy of the upper limb is a very rare condition with unknown aetiology. This descriptive observational and retrospective series included eight children followed by a multidisciplinary team from 2005 to 2017. The diagnosis was based on a cluster of clinical and radiological characteristics after elimination of differential diagnoses. Patients were categorized according to: anomalies of the wrist, anomalies of long fingers of intrinsic or extrinsic origin; and anomalies of the thumb with or without first web space contracture. Treatment begins in young children with hand orthoses to limit muscle contraction and joint malposition. The purpose of surgical treatment was to release contractures and to restore muscle balance through, in the main, finger intrinsic releases and first web releases. At the 2-year follow-up, we found that limited surgical procedures improved finger, thumb and wrist positions. We conclude that muscle hypertrophy is the main cause of deformity and that selective releases of contracted musculo-tendinous units and skin lengthening are effective. IV.

  2. An elderly-onset limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 1B (LGMD1B) with pseudo-hypertrophy of paraspinal muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuta, Mitsuru; Sumi-Akamaru, Hisae; Takahashi, Masanori P; Hayashi, Yukiko K; Nishino, Ichizo; Mochizuki, Hideki

    2016-09-01

    Mutations in LMNA, encoding A-type lamins, lead to diverse disorders, collectively called "laminopathies," which affect the striated muscle, cardiac muscle, adipose tissue, skin, peripheral nerve, and premature aging. We describe a patient with limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 1B (LGMD1B) carrying a heterozygous p.Arg377His mutation in LMNA, in whom skeletal muscle symptom onset was at the age of 65 years. Her weakness started at the erector spinae muscles, which showed marked pseudo-hypertrophy even at the age of 72 years. Her first episode of syncope was at 44 years; however, aberrant cardiac conduction was not revealed until 60 years. The p.Arg377His mutation has been previously reported in several familial LMNA-associated myopathies, most of which showed muscle weakness before the 6th decade. This is the first report of pseudo-hypertrophy of paravertebral muscles in LMNA-associated myopathies. The pseudo-hypertrophy of paravertebral muscles and the elderly-onset of muscle weakness make this case unique and reportable. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Transgenic overexpression of ADAM12 suppresses muscle regeneration and aggravates dystrophy in aged mdx mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Louise Helskov; Jensen, Charlotte Harken; Wewer, Ulla M

    2007-01-01

    mice (ADAM12(+)) after a knife cut lesion and observed that the regeneration process was significantly impaired. ADAM12 seemed to inhibit the satellite cell response and delay myoblast differentiation. These results discourage long-term therapeutic use of ADAM12. They also point to impaired...... effect of ADAM12 was suggested to be mediated via a membrane-stabilizing up-regulation of utrophin, alpha7B integrin, and dystroglycans. Ectopic ADAM12 expression in normal mouse skeletal muscle also improved regeneration after freeze injury, presumably by the same mechanism. Hence, it was suggested...... overexpressing ADAM12 (ADAM12(+)/mdx mice), even though their utrophin levels were mildly elevated compared with age-matched controls. Thus, membrane stabilization was not sufficient to provide protection during prolonged disease. Consequently, we reinvestigated skeletal muscle regeneration in ADAM12 transgenic...

  4. Roles of Fukutin, the Gene Responsible for Fukuyama-Type Congenital Muscular Dystrophy, in Neurons: Possible Involvement in Synaptic Function and Neuronal Migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiroi, Atsuko; Yamamoto, Tomoko; Shibata, Noriyuki; Osawa, Makiko; Kobayashi, Makio

    2011-01-01

    Fukutin is a gene responsible for Fukuyama-type congenital muscular dystrophy (FCMD), accompanying ocular and brain malformations represented by cobblestone lissencephaly. Fukutin is related to basement membrane formation via the glycosylation of α-dystoglycan (α-DG), and astrocytes play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of the brain lesion. On the other hand, its precise function in neurons is unknown. In this experiment, the roles of fukutin in mature and immature neurons were examined using brains from control subjects and FCMD patients and cultured neuronal cell lines. In quantitative PCR, the expression level of fukutin looked different depending on the region of the brain examined. A similar tendency in DG expression appears to indicate a relation between fukutin and α-DG in mature neurons. An increase of DG mRNA and core α-DG in the FCMD cerebrum also supports the relation. In immunohistochemistry, dot-like positive reactions for VIA4-1, one of the antibodies detecting the glycosylated α-DG, in Purkinje cells suggest that fukutin is related to at least a post-synaptic function via the glycosylation of α-DG. As for immature neurons, VIA4-1 was predominantly positive in cells before and during migration with expression of fukutin, which suggest a participation of fukutin in neuronal migration via the glycosylation of α-DG. Moreover, fukutin may prevent neuronal differentiation, because its expression was significantly lower in the adult cerebrum and in differentiated cultured cells. A knockdown of fukutin was considered to induce differentiation in cultured cells. Fukutin seems to be necessary to keep migrating neurons immature during migration, and also to support migration via α-DG

  5. A mouse anti-myostatin antibody increases muscle mass and improves muscle strength and contractility in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy and its humanized equivalent, domagrozumab (PF-06252616), increases muscle volume in cynomolgus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St Andre, Michael; Johnson, Mark; Bansal, Prashant N; Wellen, Jeremy; Robertson, Andrew; Opsahl, Alan; Burch, Peter M; Bialek, Peter; Morris, Carl; Owens, Jane

    2017-11-09

    The treatments currently approved for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), a progressive skeletal muscle wasting disease, address the needs of only a small proportion of patients resulting in an urgent need for therapies that benefit all patients regardless of the underlying mutation. Myostatin is a member of the transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) family of ligands and is a negative regulator of skeletal muscle mass. Loss of myostatin has been shown to increase muscle mass and improve muscle function in both normal and dystrophic mice. Therefore, myostatin blockade via a specific antibody could ameliorate the muscle weakness in DMD patients by increasing skeletal muscle mass and function, thereby reducing patients' functional decline. A murine anti-myostatin antibody, mRK35, and its humanized analog, domagrozumab, were developed and their ability to inhibit several TGB-β ligands was measured using a cell-based Smad-activity reporter system. Normal and mdx mice were treated with mRK35 to examine the antibody's effect on body weight, lean mass, muscle weights, grip strength, ex vivo force production, and fiber size. The humanized analog (domagrozumab) was tested in non-human primates (NHPs) for changes in skeletal muscle mass and volume as well as target engagement via modulation of circulating myostatin. Both the murine and human antibodies are specific and potent inhibitors of myostatin and GDF11. mRK35 is able to increase body weight, lean mass, and muscle weights in normal mice. In mdx mice, mRK35 significantly increased body weight, muscle weights, grip strength, and ex vivo force production in the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle. Further, tibialis anterior (TA) fiber size was significantly increased. NHPs treated with domagrozumab demonstrated a dose-dependent increase in lean mass and muscle volume and exhibited increased circulating levels of myostatin demonstrating target engagement. We demonstrated that the potent anti-myostatin antibody mRK35 and

  6. Comparative study on conjoint fascial sheath suspension and levator muscle resection for moderate or severe congenital ptosis

    OpenAIRE

    Wei Lin; Yang Xu; Fei-Lun Ye

    2016-01-01

    AIM:To compare the curative effect of conjoint fascial sheath(CSF)suspension and levator muscle resection for moderate or severe congenital ptosis. METHODS: Forty-three patients(74 eyes)with moderate or severe ptosis were treated by CSF suspension or levator muscle resection randomly, and followed up for 6mo. The normalization rates of the two operations were then compared by statistical method, and the complications of the two operations were analyzed.RESULTS: The two operations appeared no ...

  7. Magnetic Resonance Assessment of Hypertrophic and Pseudo-Hypertrophic Changes in Lower Leg Muscles of Boys with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy and Their Relationship to Functional Measurements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravneet S Vohra

    Full Text Available The primary objectives of this study were to evaluate contractile and non-contractile content of lower leg muscles of boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD and determine the relationships between non-contractile content and functional abilities.Lower leg muscles of thirty-two boys with DMD and sixteen age matched unaffected controls were imaged. Non-contractile content, contractile cross sectional area and non-contractile cross sectional area of lower leg muscles (tibialis anterior, extensor digitorum longus, peroneal, medial gastrocnemius and soleus were assessed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Muscle strength, timed functional tests and the Brooke lower extremity score were also assessed.Non-contractile content of lower leg muscles (peroneal, medial gastrocnemius, and soleus was significantly greater than control group (p<0.05. Non-contractile content of lower leg muscles correlated with Brooke score (rs = 0.64-0.84 and 30 feet walk (rs = 0.66-0.80. Dorsiflexor (DF and plantarflexor (PF specific torque was significantly different between the groups.Overall, non-contractile content of the lower leg muscles was greater in DMD than controls. Furthermore, there was an age dependent increase in contractile content in the medial gastrocnemius of boys with DMD. The findings of this study suggest that T1 weighted MR images can be used to monitor disease progression and provide a quantitative estimate of contractile and non-contractile content of tissue in children with DMD.

  8. Implications of compound heterozygous insulin receptor mutations in congenital muscle fibre type disproportion myopathy for the receptor kinase activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klein, H H; Müller, R; Vestergaard, H

    1999-01-01

    We studied insulin receptor kinase activation in two brothers with congenital muscle fibre type disproportion myopathy and compound heterozygous mutations of the insulin receptor gene, their parents, and their unaffected brother. In the father who has a heterozygote Arg1174-->Gln mutation, in sit...

  9. Meaning of Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is very similar to Duchenne, except kids with Becker MD may not have problems until much later, when they're teenagers or adults. It takes a long time for their muscles to become weak. How Does a Kid Get Muscular Dystrophy? MD is not contagious (say: con-TAY-juss), ...

  10. Análise da expressão do colágeno VI na distrofia muscular congênita Analysis of the expression of collagen VI in congenital muscular dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Toni Loureiro de Freitas

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available A distrofia muscular congênita (DMC compõe um grupo de miopatias caracterizadas por hipotonia e fraqueza muscular notadas já no primeiro ano de vida. A forma de Ullrich é caracterizada por retrações musculares proximais e hiperextensibilidade distal. Cerca de 40% destes pacientes apresentam mutações em um dos genes que codificam as três sub-unidades do colágeno VI (COL6, acarretando deficiência total ou parcial na marcação da proteína. Analisamos, através de imunofluorescência, a marcação do COL6 em fragmentos musculares de 50 pacientes com DMC, 20 deles com ausência da marcação para merosina. Identificamos 4 casos com deficiência total da marcação do COL6 (8% do total, representando 13% dos casos com marcação normal para merosina. As alterações histológicas musculares dos pacientes com COL6 deficiente eram indistinguíveis das outras formas de DMC, porém mais brandas que as observadas na DMC com deficiência de merosina. Em três dos pacientes com COL6 deficiente observou-se hipotonia e fraqueza muscular, notadas já no período neonatal, atraso do desenvolvimento motor, retrações musculares em joelhos e cotovelos, hiperextensibilidade distal e luxação congênita do quadril (dois pacientes. Um paciente perdeu a capacidade para a marcha, e outro faleceu por problemas respiratórios. A análise da marcação do COL6, assim como da merosina, no tecido muscular de pacientes com DMC pode auxiliar na identificação e caracterização fenotípica dos diversos subtipos de DMC.Congenital muscular dystrophy (CMD composes a group of disorders characterized by hypotonia and muscular weakness noticed in the first year of life. The Ullrich's form is characterized by proximal joint contractures and distal hiperextensibility. About 40% of these patients present mutations in one of the genes that codify the sub-units of the collagen VI protein (COL6, producing total or partial deficiency of the protein expression. We analyzed

  11. Defective muscle basement membrane and lack of M-laminin in the dystrophic dy/dy mouse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, H; Christmas, P; Wu, X R

    1994-01-01

    -linked Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies. We have examined M-laminin expression in mice with autosomal recessive muscular dystrophy caused by the mutation dy. The heavy chain of M-laminin was undetectable in skeletal muscle, heart muscle, and peripheral nerve by immunofluorescence and immunoblotting......M-laminin is a major member of the laminin family of basement membrane proteins. It is prominently expressed in striated muscle and peripheral nerve. M-laminin is deficient in patients with the autosomal recessive Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy but is normal in patients with the sex...... tissue from dy/dy mice, suggesting that M-laminin heavy-chain mRNA may be produced at very low levels or is unstable. Information about the chromosomal localization of the M heavy-chain in human and mouse suggests that a mutation in the M-chain gene causes the muscular dystrophy in dy/dy mice. The dy...

  12. Magnetic Resonance Assessment of Hypertrophic and Pseudo-Hypertrophic Changes in Lower Leg Muscles of Boys with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy and Their Relationship to Functional Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vohra, Ravneet S; Lott, Donovan; Mathur, Sunita; Senesac, Claudia; Deol, Jasjit; Germain, Sean; Bendixen, Roxanna; Forbes, Sean C; Sweeney, H Lee; Walter, Glenn A; Vandenborne, Krista

    2015-01-01

    The primary objectives of this study were to evaluate contractile and non-contractile content of lower leg muscles of boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and determine the relationships between non-contractile content and functional abilities. Lower leg muscles of thirty-two boys with DMD and sixteen age matched unaffected controls were imaged. Non-contractile content, contractile cross sectional area and non-contractile cross sectional area of lower leg muscles (tibialis anterior, extensor digitorum longus, peroneal, medial gastrocnemius and soleus) were assessed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Muscle strength, timed functional tests and the Brooke lower extremity score were also assessed. Non-contractile content of lower leg muscles (peroneal, medial gastrocnemius, and soleus) was significantly greater than control group (pmuscles correlated with Brooke score (rs = 0.64-0.84) and 30 feet walk (rs = 0.66-0.80). Dorsiflexor (DF) and plantarflexor (PF) specific torque was significantly different between the groups. Overall, non-contractile content of the lower leg muscles was greater in DMD than controls. Furthermore, there was an age dependent increase in contractile content in the medial gastrocnemius of boys with DMD. The findings of this study suggest that T1 weighted MR images can be used to monitor disease progression and provide a quantitative estimate of contractile and non-contractile content of tissue in children with DMD.

  13. Superpulsed low-level laser therapy protects skeletal muscle of mdx mice against damage, inflammation and morphological changes delaying dystrophy progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal-Junior, Ernesto Cesar Pinto; de Almeida, Patrícia; Tomazoni, Shaiane Silva; de Carvalho, Paulo de Tarso Camillo; Lopes-Martins, Rodrigo Álvaro Brandão; Frigo, Lucio; Joensen, Jon; Johnson, Mark I; Bjordal, Jan Magnus

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of preventive treatment with low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on progression of dystrophy in mdx mice. Ten animals were randomly divided into 2 experimental groups treated with superpulsed LLLT (904 nm, 15 mW, 700 Hz, 1 J) or placebo-LLLT at one point overlying the tibialis anterior muscle (bilaterally) 5 times per week for 14 weeks (from 6th to 20th week of age). Morphological changes, creatine kinase (CK) activity and mRNA gene expression were assessed in animals at 20th week of age. Animals treated with LLLT showed very few morphological changes in skeletal muscle, with less atrophy and fibrosis than animals treated with placebo-LLLT. CK was significantly lower (p=0.0203) in animals treated with LLLT (864.70 U.l-1, SEM 226.10) than placebo (1708.00 U.l-1, SEM 184.60). mRNA gene expression of inflammatory markers was significantly decreased by treatment with LLLT (pmuscle damage and inflammation in mdx mice. This indicates that LLLT has potential to decrease progression of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

  14. EPA protects against muscle damage in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy by promoting a shift from the M1 to M2 macrophage phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Samara Camaçari de; Apolinário, Leticia Montanholi; Matheus, Selma Maria Michelin; Santo Neto, Humberto; Marques, Maria Julia

    2013-11-15

    In dystrophic mdx mice and in Duchenne muscular dystrophy, inflammation contributes to myonecrosis. Previously, we demonstrated that eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) decreased inflammation and necrosis in dystrophic muscle. In the present study, we examined the effects of EPA and the corticoid deflazacort (DFZ) as modulators of M1 (iNOS-expressing cells) and M2 (CD206-expressing cells) macrophages. Mdx mice (14 days old) received EPA or DFZ for 16 days. The diaphragm, biceps brachii and quadriceps muscles were studied. Immunofluorescence, immunoblotting and ELISA assays showed that EPA increased interleucin-10, reduced interferon-γ and was more effective than DFZ in promoting a shift from M1 to M2. © 2013.

  15. Test of Antifibrotic Drugs in a Cellular Model of Fibrosis Based on Muscle-Derived Fibroblasts from Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanotti, Simona; Mora, Marina

    2018-01-01

    An in vitro model of muscle fibrosis, based on the use of primary human fibroblasts isolated from muscle biopsies of patients affected by Duchenne muscular dystrophies (DMD) and cultivated in monolayer and 3D conditions, is used to test the potential antifibrotic activity of pirfenidone (PFD). This in vitro model may be usefully also to evaluate the toxicity and efficacy of other candidate molecules for the treatment of fibrosis. The drug toxicity is evaluated using a colorimetric assay based on the conversion of tetrazolium salt (MTT) to insoluble formazan, while the effect of the drug on cell proliferation is measured with the bromodeoxyuridine incorporation assay. The efficacy of the drug is evaluated in fibroblast monolayers by quantitating synthesis and deposition of intracellular collagen with a spectrophotometric picrosirius red-based assay, and by quantitating cell migration using a "scratch" assay. The efficacy of PFD as antifibrotic drug is also evaluated in a 3D fibroblast model by measuring diameters and number of nodules.

  16. Diffusion-Tensor Imaging of Thigh Muscles in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy: Correlation of Apparent Diffusion Coefficient and Fractional Anisotropy Values With Fatty Infiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gui Dian; Liang, Ying Yin; Xu, Ping; Ling, Jian; Chen, Ying Ming

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the correlation of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and fractional anisotropy (FA) values with fatty infiltration in the thigh muscles of patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) using diffusion-tensor imaging (DTI). Twenty-one boys with DMD were recruited. The grade of fatty infiltration and the ADC and FA values of four thigh muscles (rectus femoris, semitendinosus, sartorius, and gracilis) were measured, and the FA and ADC values were compared with the grade of fatty infiltration. Twenty age-matched healthy boys were enrolled as the control group. The differences in the ADC and FA values of the thigh muscles between patients with DMD and the control group were compared. The patients with DMD showed lower FA values and higher ADC values in all measured muscles when compared with the control group. The FA and ADC values were correlated with the grade of fatty infiltration. For the rectus femoris muscle, r = -0.753 and p = 0.007 for FA, and r = 0.685 and p = 0.001 for ADC. For the semitendinosus muscle, r = -0.621 and p = 0.041 for FA, and r = 0.705 and p = 0.021 for ADC. For the sartorius muscle, r = -0.662 and p = 0.027 for FA, and r = 0.701 and p = 0.017 for ADC. For the gracilis muscle, r = -0.618 and p = 0.043 for FA, and r = 0.695 and p = 0.022 for ADC. Damage to the thigh muscles in patients with DMD can be detected by ADC and FA values using DTI. DTI can be used to assess the severity of the disease.

  17. Serum miR-206 and other muscle-specific microRNAs as non-invasive biomarkers for Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jun; Kong, Min; Ye, Yuanzhen; Hong, Siqi; Cheng, Li; Jiang, Li

    2014-06-01

    Creatine kinase has been utilized as a diagnostic marker for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), but it correlates less well with the DMD pathological progression. In this study, we hypothesized that muscle-specific microRNAs (miR-1, -133, and -206) in serum may be useful for monitoring the DMD pathological progression, and explored the possibility of these miRNAs as potential non-invasive biomarkers for the disease. By using real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction in a randomized and controlled trial, we detected that miR-1, -133, and -206 were significantly over-expressed in the serum of 39 children with DMD (up to 3.20 ± 1.20, 2(-ΔΔCt) ): almost 2- to 4-fold enriched in comparison to samples from the healthy controls (less than 1.15 ± 0.34, 2(-ΔΔCt) ). To determine whether these miRNAs were related to the clinical features of children with DMD, we analyzed the associations compared to creatine kinase. There were very good inverse correlations between the levels of these miRNAs, especially miR-206, and functional performances: high levels corresponded to low muscle strength, muscle function, and quality of life. Moreover, by receiver operating characteristic curves analyses, we revealed that these miRNAs, especially miR-206, were able to discriminate DMD from controls. Thus, miR-206 and other muscle-specific miRNAs in serum are useful for monitoring the DMD pathological progression, and hence as potential non-invasive biomarkers for the disease. There has been a long-standing need for reliable, non-invasive biomarkers for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). We found that the levels of muscle-specific microRNAs, especially miR-206, in the serum of DMD were 2- to 4-fold higher than in the controls. High levels corresponded to low muscle strength, muscle function, and quality of life (QoL). These miRNAs were able to discriminate DMD from controls by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves analyses. Thus, miR-206 and other

  18. Inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3)-dependent Ca2+ signaling mediates delayed myogenesis in Duchenne muscular dystrophy fetal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farini, Andrea; Sitzia, Clementina; Cassinelli, Letizia; Colleoni, Federica; Parolini, Daniele; Giovanella, Umberto; Maciotta, Simona; Colombo, Augusto; Meregalli, Mirella; Torrente, Yvan

    2016-02-15

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a progressive neuromuscular disorder characterized by muscle wasting and premature death. The defective gene is dystrophin, a structural protein, absence of which causes membrane fragility and myofiber necrosis. Several lines of evidence showed that in adult DMD patients dystrophin is involved in signaling pathways that regulate calcium homeostasis and differentiation programs. However, secondary aspects of the disease, such as inflammation and fibrosis development, might represent a bias in the analysis. Because fetal muscle is not influenced by gravity and does not suffer from mechanical load and/or inflammation, we investigated 12-week-old fetal DMD skeletal muscles, highlighting for the first time early alterations in signaling pathways mediated by the absence of dystrophin itself. We found that PLC/IP3/IP3R/Ryr1/Ca(2+) signaling is widely active in fetal DMD skeletal muscles and, through the calcium-dependent PKCα protein, exerts a fundamental regulatory role in delaying myogenesis and in myofiber commitment. These data provide new insights into the origin of DMD pathology during muscle development. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  19. Upper Limb Evaluation in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy: Fat-Water Quantification by MRI, Muscle Force and Function Define Endpoints for Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricotti, Valeria; Evans, Matthew R B; Sinclair, Christopher D J; Butler, Jordan W; Ridout, Deborah A; Hogrel, Jean-Yves; Emira, Ahmed; Morrow, Jasper M; Reilly, Mary M; Hanna, Michael G; Janiczek, Robert L; Matthews, Paul M; Yousry, Tarek A; Muntoni, Francesco; Thornton, John S

    2016-01-01

    A number of promising experimental therapies for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) are emerging. Clinical trials currently rely on invasive biopsies or motivation-dependent functional tests to assess outcome. Quantitative muscle magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could offer a valuable alternative and permit inclusion of non-ambulant DMD subjects. The aims of our study were to explore the responsiveness of upper-limb MRI muscle-fat measurement as a non-invasive objective endpoint for clinical trials in non-ambulant DMD, and to investigate the relationship of these MRI measures to those of muscle force and function. 15 non-ambulant DMD boys (mean age 13.3 y) and 10 age-gender matched healthy controls (mean age 14.6 y) were recruited. 3-Tesla MRI fat-water quantification was used to measure forearm muscle fat transformation in non-ambulant DMD boys compared with healthy controls. DMD boys were assessed at 4 time-points over 12 months, using 3-point Dixon MRI to measure muscle fat-fraction (f.f.). Images from ten forearm muscles were segmented and mean f.f. and cross-sectional area recorded. DMD subjects also underwent comprehensive upper limb function and force evaluation. Overall mean baseline forearm f.f. was higher in DMD than in healthy controls (pmuscle f.f. as a biomarker to monitor disease progression in the upper limb in non-ambulant DMD, with sensitivity adequate to detect group-level change over time intervals practical for use in clinical trials. Clinical validity is supported by the association of the progressive fat transformation of muscle with loss of muscle force and function.

  20. Emerging strategies for cell and gene therapy of the muscular dystrophies

    OpenAIRE

    Muir, Lindsey A.; Chamberlain, Jeffrey S.

    2009-01-01

    The muscular dystrophies are a heterogeneous group of over 40 disorders that are characterised by muscle weakness and wasting. The most common are Duchenne muscular dystrophy and Becker muscular dystrophy, which result from mutations within the gene encoding dystrophin; myotonic dystrophy type 1, which results from an expanded trinucleotide repeat in the myotonic dystrophy protein kinase gene; and facioscapulohumeral dystrophy, which is associated with contractions in the subtelomeric region ...

  1. A low absolute number of expanded transcripts is involved in myotonic dystrophy type 1 manifestation in muscle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gudde, A.E.; Gonzalez-Barriga, A.; Broek, W.J. van den; Wieringa, B.; Wansink, D.G.

    2016-01-01

    Muscular manifestation of myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1), a common inheritable degenerative multisystem disorder, is mainly caused by expression of RNA from a (CTG.CAG)n-expanded DM1 locus. Here, we report on comparative profiling of expression of normal and expanded endogenous or transgenic

  2. CT findings of muscular dystrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saitoh, Hiroshi

    1991-01-01

    CT scans of muscles in patients with limb girdle type (LG), myotonic type (MYD) and Duchenne type (DMD) dystrophies were obtained at five different body levels: the neck, L3 vertebral body, pelvic girdle, thigh and lower leg. CT numbers, cross sectional areas (CSA) and %CSA of muscle or fat were evaluated in each muscle. The characteristic CT patterns for each type of muscular dystrophy were obtained. Compared with DMD, the gracilis and soleus were more severely damaged in LG and the biceps femoris remained relatively preserved among the hamstrings. In addition, the multifidus of the neck and sternocleidomastoid also were more severely damaged in MYD. This study suggests that CT scan will be useful in the differential diagnosis of these types of muscular dystrophy as well as in planning appropriate rehabilitation and detecting damaged muscles. (author)

  3. 3-Methylhistidine excretion in myotonic dystrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griggs, R.C.; Moxley, R.T. III; Forbes, G.B.

    1980-12-01

    3-Methylhistidine (3-MH) excretion reflects the rate of muscle protein catabolism, since 3-MH occurs almost exclusively in muscle actin and myosin and is not reutilized or catabolized. We studied 3-MH excretion in 9 patients with myotonic dystrophy, 8 normals, and 10 disease controls with Duchenne dystrophy and other disorders. 3-MH excretion was expressed relative to muscle mass as determined by both urinary creatinine and total body potassium (/sup 40/K method). Absolute 3-MH excretion was decreased in myotonic dystrophy patients but was normal when related to muscle mass. The finding of normal 3-MH excretion in myotonic dystrophy suggests that the muscle wasting in this disorder results from impaired anabolic processes rather than accelerated muscle destruction.

  4. 3-Methylhistidine excretion in myotonic dystrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griggs, R.C.; Moxley, R.T. III; Forbes, G.B.

    1980-01-01

    3-Methylhistidine (3-MH) excretion reflects the rate of muscle protein catabolism, since 3-MH occurs almost exclusively in muscle actin and myosin and is not reutilized or catabolized. We studied 3-MH excretion in 9 patients with myotonic dystrophy, 8 normals, and 10 disease controls with Duchenne dystrophy and other disorders. 3-MH excretion was expressed relative to muscle mass as determined by both urinary creatinine and total body potassium ( 40 K method). Absolute 3-MH excretion was decreased in myotonic dystrophy patients but was normal when related to muscle mass. The finding of normal 3-MH excretion in myotonic dystrophy suggests that the muscle wasting in this disorder results from impaired anabolic processes rather than accelerated muscle destruction

  5. Gene expression in mdx mouse muscle in relation to age and exercise: aberrant mechanical-metabolic coupling and implications for pre-clinical studies in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camerino, Giulia Maria; Cannone, Maria; Giustino, Arcangela; Massari, Ada Maria; Capogrosso, Roberta Francesca; Cozzoli, Anna; De Luca, Annamaria

    2014-11-01

    Weakness and fatigability are typical features of Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients and are aggravated in dystrophic mdx mice by chronic treadmill exercise. Mechanical activity modulates gene expression and muscle plasticity. Here, we investigated the outcome of 4 (T4, 8 weeks of age) and 12 (T12, 16 weeks of age) weeks of either exercise or cage-based activity on a large set of genes in the gastrocnemius muscle of mdx and wild-type (WT) mice using quantitative real-time PCR. Basal expression of the exercise-sensitive genes peroxisome-proliferator receptor γ coactivator 1α (Pgc-1α) and Sirtuin1 (Sirt1) was higher in mdx versus WT mice at both ages. Exercise increased Pgc-1α expression in WT mice; Pgc-1α was downregulated by T12 exercise in mdx muscles, along with Sirt1, Pparγ and the autophagy marker Bnip3. Sixteen weeks old mdx mice showed a basal overexpression of the slow Mhc1 isoform and Serca2; T12 exercise fully contrasted this basal adaptation as well as the high expression of follistatin and myogenin. Conversely, T12 exercise was ineffective in WT mice. Damage-related genes such as gp91-phox (NADPH-oxidase2), Tgfβ, Tnfα and c-Src tyrosine kinase were overexpressed in mdx muscles and not affected by exercise. Likewise, the anti-inflammatory adiponectin was lower in T12-exercised mdx muscles. Chronic exercise with minor adaptive effects in WT muscles leads to maladaptation in mdx muscles with a disequilibrium between protective and damaging signals. Increased understanding of the pathways involved in the altered mechanical-metabolic coupling may help guide appropriate physical therapies while better addressing pharmacological interventions in translational research. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Inherited myopathies and muscular dystrophies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cardamone, Michael; Darras, Basil T.; Ryan, Monique M.

    The inherited myopathies and muscular dystrophies are a diverse group of muscle diseases presenting with common complaints and physical signs: weakness, motor delay, and respiratory and bulbar dysfunction. The myopathies are caused by genetic defects in the contractile apparatus of muscle, and

  7. Quantitative Skeletal Muscle MRI: Part 2, MR Spectroscopy and T2 Relaxation Time Mapping-Comparison Between Boys With Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy and Healthy Boys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hee Kyung; Serai, Suraj; Lindquist, Diana; Merrow, Arnold C; Horn, Paul S; Kim, Dong Hoon; Wong, Brenda L

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to validate the use of MR spectroscopy (MRS) in measuring muscular fat and to compare it with T2 maps in differentiating boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) from healthy boys. Forty-two boys with DMD and 31 healthy boys were evaluated with MRI with (1)H-MRS and T2 maps. Grading of muscle fat and edema on conventional images, calculation of fat fractions ([fat / fat] + water) on MRS, and calculation of T2 fat values on T2 maps of the gluteus maximus and vastus lateralis muscles were performed. Group comparisons were made. The 95% reference interval (RI) of fat fraction for the control group was applied and compared with T2 map results. Minimal fat on T1-weighted images was seen in 90.3% (gluteus maximus) and 71.0% (vastus lateralis) of healthy boys, versus 33.3% (gluteus maximus) and 52.4% (vastus lateralis) of boys with DMD. Muscle edema was seen in none of the healthy boys versus 52.4% (gluteus maximus) and 57.1% (vastus lateralis) of the boys with DMD. Fat fractions were higher in the DMD group (52.7%, gluteus maximus; 27.3%, vastus lateralis) than in the control group (12.8%, gluteus maximus; 13.7%, vastus lateralis) (p muscle edema in DMD.

  8. Inhibition of muscle fibrosis results in increases in both utrophin levels and the number of revertant myofibers in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levi, Oshrat; Genin, Olga; Angelini, Corrado; Halevy, Orna; Pines, Mark

    2015-09-15

    Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy is characterized by: near absence of dystrophin in skeletal muscles; low percentage of revertant myofibers; up-regulation of utrophin synthesis; and a high degree of muscle fibrosis. In patient quadriceps femoris biopsies (n = 6, ages between 3-9 years) an inverse correlation was observed between the levels of collagen type I - representing fibrosis - and the levels of utrophin. This correlation was independent of the patient's age and was observed in the entire muscle biopsy sections. In the mdx mice diaphragm (n = 6/group), inhibition of fibrosis by halofuginone resulted in increases in the levels of utrophin. The utrophin/fibrosis relationships were not limited to collagen type I, but also applied to other constituents of the fibrosis machinery. The inverse correlation was found also in old mdx mice with established fibrosis. In addition, inhibition of collagen type I levels was associated with increases in the numbers of revertant myofibers, both as single myofibers and in clusters in the diaphragm and the gastrocnemius. In summary, our results demonstrate an inverse correlation between the level of muscle fibrosis and the level of utrophin and that of the number of revertant myofibers. These findings may reveal common links between the fibrotic and utrophin-synthesis pathways and offer new insights into the regulation of utrophin synthesis.

  9. Avaliação da função motora em crianças com distrofia muscular congênita com deficiência da merosina Motor function evaluation in merosin-deficient congenital muscular dystrophy children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda M. Rocco

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available A distrofia muscular congênita (DMC compõe um grupo de miopatias caracterizadas por hipotonia e fraqueza muscular notadas até o primeiro ano de vida. Em torno de 40% a 50% dos casos são decorrentes de deficiência primária da proteína merosina (DM, os quais apresentam um fenótipo mais homogêneo, com grave comprometimento motor e respiratório. Foram avaliadas neste estudo onze crianças com diagnóstico clínico e histológico de DMC-DM, com idade de 3 a 15 anos, através de exame de força muscular ("Medical Research Council", análise goniométrica, avaliação das habilidades motoras e das atividades de vida diária (AVDs (indicador de Barthel, com o objetivo de caracterizar as principais limitações funcionais motoras. Os grupos musculares mais comprometidos foram os flexores cervicais, paravertebrais e proximais dos membros. Os grupos musculares dos membros superiores estavam tão comprometidos quanto os dos membros inferiores, enquanto que os extensores encontravam-se mais comprometidos que os flexores. Todas as crianças apresentavam importantes retrações musculares nos quadris, joelhos e cotovelos. Outras deformidades freqüentes foram escoliose e pés eqüino-varo. Nenhuma criança possuía a habilidade motora necessária para engatinhar, ficar de pé ou andar; e todas foram classificadas como dependentes ou semidependentes para a maioria das AVDs estudadas. Nossos achados confirmam o envolvimento difuso e intenso da musculatura esquelética na DMC-DM, acarretando graves limitações funcionais motoras e deformidades músculo-esqueléticas.Congenital muscular dystrophy (CMD is a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by early onset of hypotonia and weakness. Almost 50% of the cases are caused by primary deficiency of a protein named merosin (MD, and present a homogenous phenotype with a severe motor and respiratory involvement. Eleven children with clinical and histological diagnosis of CMD-MD, aged of 3 to 15 years

  10. Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1 Management and Therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Cheryl A; Gutmann, Laurie

    2016-12-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM1) is the most common form of adult muscular dystrophy. It is a multisystem disorder with a complex pathophysiology. Although inheritance is autosomal dominant, disease variability is attributed to anticipation, a maternal expansion bias, variable penetrance, somatic mosaicism, and a multitude of aberrant pre-mRNA splicing events. Patient presentations range from asymptomatic or mild late onset adult to severe congenital forms. Multiple organ systems may be affected. Patients may experience early cataracts, myotonia, muscle weakness/atrophy, fatigue, excessive daytime sleepiness, central/obstructive apnea, respiratory failure, cardiac arrhythmia, insulin resistance, dysphagia, GI dysmotility, cognitive impairment, Cluster C personality traits, and/or mood disorders. At present, there is no curative or disease-modifying treatment, although clinical treatment trials have become more promising. Management focuses on genetic counseling, preserving function and independence, preventing cardiopulmonary complications, and symptomatic treatment (e.g., pain, myotonia, hypersomnolence, etc.). Currently, there is an increasing international consensus on monitoring and treatment options for these patients which necessitates a multidisciplinary team to provide comprehensive, coordinated clinical care.

  11. T₂ mapping provides multiple approaches for the characterization of muscle involvement in neuromuscular diseases: a cross-sectional study of lower leg muscles in 5-15-year-old boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arpan, Ishu; Forbes, Sean C; Lott, Donovan J; Senesac, Claudia R; Daniels, Michael J; Triplett, William T; Deol, Jasjit K; Sweeney, H Lee; Walter, Glenn A; Vandenborne, Krista

    2013-03-01

    Skeletal muscles of children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) show enhanced susceptibility to damage and progressive lipid infiltration, which contribute to an increase in the MR proton transverse relaxation time (T₂). Therefore, the examination of T₂ changes in individual muscles may be useful for the monitoring of disease progression in DMD. In this study, we used the mean T₂, percentage of elevated pixels and T₂ heterogeneity to assess changes in the composition of dystrophic muscles. In addition, we used fat saturation to distinguish T₂ changes caused by edema and inflammation from fat infiltration in muscles. Thirty subjects with DMD and 15 age-matched controls underwent T₂ -weighted imaging of their lower leg using a 3-T MR system. T₂ maps were developed and four lower leg muscles were manually traced (soleus, medial gastrocnemius, peroneal and tibialis anterior). The mean T₂ of the traced regions of interest, width of the T₂ histograms and percentage of elevated pixels were calculated. We found that, even in young children with DMD, lower leg muscles showed elevated mean T₂, were more heterogeneous and had a greater percentage of elevated pixels than in controls. T₂ measures decreased with fat saturation, but were still higher (P muscles than in controls. Further, T₂ measures showed positive correlations with timed functional tests (r = 0.23-0.79). The elevated T₂ measures with and without fat saturation at all ages of DMD examined (5-15 years) compared with unaffected controls indicate that the dystrophic muscles have increased regions of damage, edema and fat infiltration. This study shows that T₂ mapping provides multiple approaches that can be used effectively to characterize muscle tissue in children with DMD, even in the early stages of the disease. Therefore, T₂ mapping may prove to be clinically useful in the monitoring of muscle changes caused by the disease process or by therapeutic interventions in DMD

  12. The MRI study of the sphincter muscle complex in congenital anorectal malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Shaotao; Mao Yongzhong; Wang Yong; Dong Ning; Ruan Qinglan; Peng Zhenjun; Kong Xiangquan; Liu Dingxi

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the development of the sphincter muscle complex (SMC) and defecation function in pediatric patients with congenital anorectal malformations (ARM). Methods: A total of 64 children underwent MRI, among whom 39 were patients with ARM, and the others were patients without ARM undergoing MRI because of other dieases. The dimensions of the SMC in different planes were evaluated with different sequences and coils. The relationship between the SMC development and the defecation function was investigated. Results: In control group, the absolute value of SMC width was (3.63 ± 0.22)mm, which had a high correlation with age (r=0.998, P 0.05). The SMCs in intermediate ARM patients [muscle index (MI)=0.47 ± 0.05] and low ARM patients (MI=0.49 ± 0.05) were well developed. The SMCs in a portion of patients with high ARM (MI=0.28 ± 0.06) were poorly developed, when MI≤0.18, anorectal contraction pressure was significantly lower (t=3.55, P 0.18[(0.85 ± 0.20) vs (2.24 ± 1.02) kPa]. The length of anal canal with high-pressure[(10.88 ± 3.64) vs (20.26 ± 4.34)mm] was shorter (t= 5.18, P 0.18, the anorectal angle was less than 90 degrees, and normal continent function was found in 21 of 23 cases (91%). Conclusion: MRI can be employed to evaluate the development of SMC in patients with ARM, MI was an objective criteria to evaluate the development of SMC. When MI≤0.18, maldevelopment of SMC will be highly suspected. (authors)

  13. Brain Abnormalities in Congenital Fibrosis of the Extraocular Muscles Type 1: A Multimodal MRI Imaging Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Miao

    Full Text Available To explore the possible brain structural and functional alterations in congenital fibrosis of extraocular muscles type 1 (CFEOM1 patients using multimodal MRI imaging.T1-weighted, diffusion tensor images and functional MRI data were obtained from 9 KIF21A positive patients and 19 age- and gender-matched healthy controls. Voxel based morphometry and tract based spatial statistics were applied to the T1-weighted and diffusion tensor images, respectively. Amplitude of low frequency fluctuations and regional homogeneity were used to process the functional MRI data. We then compared these multimodal characteristics between CFEOM1 patients and healthy controls.Compared with healthy controls, CFEOM1 patients demonstrated increased grey matter volume in bilateral frontal orbital cortex and in the right temporal pole. No diffusion indices changes were detected, indicating unaffected white matter microstructure. In addition, from resting state functional MRI data, trend of amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations increases were noted in the right inferior parietal lobe and in the right frontal cortex, and a trend of ReHo increase (p<0.001 uncorrected in the left precentral gyrus, left orbital frontal cortex, temporal pole and cingulate gyrus.CFEOM1 patients had structural and functional changes in grey matter, but the white matter was unaffected. These alterations in the brain may be due to the abnormality of extraocular muscles and their innervating nerves. Future studies should consider the possible correlations between brain morphological/functional findings and clinical data, especially pertaining to eye movements, to obtain more precise answers about the role of brain area changes and their functional consequence in CFEOM1.

  14. Brain Abnormalities in Congenital Fibrosis of the Extraocular Muscles Type 1: A Multimodal MRI Imaging Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Wen; Man, Fengyuan; Wu, Shaoqin; Lv, Bin; Wang, Zhenchang; Xian, Junfang; Sabel, Bernhard A; He, Huiguang; Jiao, Yonghong

    2015-01-01

    To explore the possible brain structural and functional alterations in congenital fibrosis of extraocular muscles type 1 (CFEOM1) patients using multimodal MRI imaging. T1-weighted, diffusion tensor images and functional MRI data were obtained from 9 KIF21A positive patients and 19 age- and gender-matched healthy controls. Voxel based morphometry and tract based spatial statistics were applied to the T1-weighted and diffusion tensor images, respectively. Amplitude of low frequency fluctuations and regional homogeneity were used to process the functional MRI data. We then compared these multimodal characteristics between CFEOM1 patients and healthy controls. Compared with healthy controls, CFEOM1 patients demonstrated increased grey matter volume in bilateral frontal orbital cortex and in the right temporal pole. No diffusion indices changes were detected, indicating unaffected white matter microstructure. In addition, from resting state functional MRI data, trend of amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations increases were noted in the right inferior parietal lobe and in the right frontal cortex, and a trend of ReHo increase (pleft precentral gyrus, left orbital frontal cortex, temporal pole and cingulate gyrus. CFEOM1 patients had structural and functional changes in grey matter, but the white matter was unaffected. These alterations in the brain may be due to the abnormality of extraocular muscles and their innervating nerves. Future studies should consider the possible correlations between brain morphological/functional findings and clinical data, especially pertaining to eye movements, to obtain more precise answers about the role of brain area changes and their functional consequence in CFEOM1.

  15. Brain Abnormalities in Congenital Fibrosis of the Extraocular Muscles Type 1: A Multimodal MRI Imaging Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shaoqin; Lv, Bin; Wang, Zhenchang; Xian, Junfang; Sabel, Bernhard A.; He, Huiguang; Jiao, Yonghong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To explore the possible brain structural and functional alterations in congenital fibrosis of extraocular muscles type 1 (CFEOM1) patients using multimodal MRI imaging. Methods T1-weighted, diffusion tensor images and functional MRI data were obtained from 9 KIF21A positive patients and 19 age- and gender- matched healthy controls. Voxel based morphometry and tract based spatial statistics were applied to the T1-weighted and diffusion tensor images, respectively. Amplitude of low frequency fluctuations and regional homogeneity were used to process the functional MRI data. We then compared these multimodal characteristics between CFEOM1 patients and healthy controls. Results Compared with healthy controls, CFEOM1 patients demonstrated increased grey matter volume in bilateral frontal orbital cortex and in the right temporal pole. No diffusion indices changes were detected, indicating unaffected white matter microstructure. In addition, from resting state functional MRI data, trend of amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations increases were noted in the right inferior parietal lobe and in the right frontal cortex, and a trend of ReHo increase (pleft precentral gyrus, left orbital frontal cortex, temporal pole and cingulate gyrus. Conclusions CFEOM1 patients had structural and functional changes in grey matter, but the white matter was unaffected. These alterations in the brain may be due to the abnormality of extraocular muscles and their innervating nerves. Future studies should consider the possible correlations between brain morphological/functional findings and clinical data, especially pertaining to eye movements, to obtain more precise answers about the role of brain area changes and their functional consequence in CFEOM1. PMID:26186732

  16. Application of three-dimensional CT reconstruction technology on inferior oblique muscle in congenital superior oblique palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Zhang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To investigate the viability of the morphology of inferior oblique muscle observed stereoscopically using 3-dimensional CT reconstruction technique. METHODS: This control study included of 29 cases which were clinically diagnosed with monocular congenital superior oblique palsy, examined by dimensional CT. The images of the inferior oblique muscle were reconstructed by Mimics software. 3D digital images on the basis of CT scanning data of the individuals were established. Observing the morphology of binocular inferior oblique muscle by self-controlled design, we compared the maximum transverse diameter of inferior oblique muscle of paralyzed eye with non-paralyzed one. We chose 5% as the significant level.RESULTS: The reconstructed results of 3-dimensional CT scan showed that not all of the inferior oblique abdominal muscle of paralyzed eyes were thinner than that of the non-paralyzed eye in maximum transverse diameter of cross-sectional area. The maximum transverse diameter of inferior oblique muscle was measured. The average maximum transverse diameter of the paralyzed eye was 6.797±1.083mm and the non-paralyzed eye was 6.507±0.848mm. The maximum transverse diameter of inferior oblique muscle of paralyzed eye did not, however, differ significantly from the normal(P>0.05. CONCLUSION: The three-dimensional CT reconstruction technology can be used for preoperative evaluation of the morphology of inferior oblique muscle.

  17. Reliability of hand-held dynamometry for measurement of lower limb muscle strength in children with Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei SHI

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective To determine the reliability of hand-held dynamometry (HHD for lower limb isometric muscle strength measurement in children with Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy (DMD/BMD.  Methods A total of 21 children [20 males and one female; mean age was (7.88 ± 2.87 years, ranging between 3.96-14.09 years; mean age at diagnosis was (5.88 ± 2.88 years, ranging between 1.35-12.89 years; mean height was (120.64 ± 16.30 cm, ranging between 97-153 cm; mean body weight was (24.62 ± 9.05 kg, ranging between 14-50 kg] with DMD (19/21 and BMD (2/21 were involved from Rehabilitation Center of Children's Hospital of Fudan University. The muscle strength of hip, knee and ankle was measured by HHD under standardized test methods. The test-retest results were compared to determine the inter-test reliability, and the results among testers were compared to determine the inter-tester reliability.  Results HHD showed fine inter-tester reliability (ICC = 0.762-0.978 and inter-test reliability (ICC = 0.690-0.938 in measuring lower limb muscle strength of children with DMD/BMD. Results also showed relatively poor reliability in distal muscle groups (foot plantar flexion and dorsiflexion.  Conclusions HHD, showing fine inter-tester and inter-test reliability in measuring the lower limb muscle strength of children with DMD/BMD, can be used in monitoring muscle strength changing and assessing effects of clinical interventions. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2015.05.009

  18. [Muscle biopsy in children: Usefulness in 2012].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuisset, J-M; Maurage, C-A; Carpentier, A; Briand, G; Thévenon, A; Rouaix, N; Vallée, L

    2013-01-01

    Muscle biopsy is a mainstay diagnostic tool for investigating neuromuscular disorders in children. We report the yield of pediatric muscle biopsy in a population of 415 children by a retrospective study of 419 biopsies performed between 1/01/2000 and 31/12/2009 in a neuropediatric department, including mitochondrial respiratory chain analysis for 87 children. Two hundred and fifty-five biopsies were from boys (61%) 164 from girls (39%). Their mean age at biopsy was 6.5years; 155 (37%) biopsies were obtained before the child was 5years old. Final histopathological diagnoses were: congenital myopathy (n=193, including 15 structural congenital myopathies); progressive muscular dystrophy (n=75 [18%] including 57 dystrophinopathies); congenital muscular dystrophy (n=17, including six primary merosinopathies); dermatomyositis (n=11); spinal muscular atrophy (n=9, including six atypical spinal muscular atrophies); metabolic myopathy (n=32, including 19 mitochondrial myopathies); encephalomyopathy (n=53 [13%], including 27 with a mitochondrial respiratory chain defect). Pathological diagnosis remained undetermined in 16 cases. In 184 patients (44%), the muscle biopsy revealed specific histopathological anomalies (dystrophic process; specific ultrastructural abnormalities; perifascicular atrophy; neurogenic atrophy; metabolic anomalies) enabling a precise etiological diagnosis. For 85% of progressive muscular dystrophies, the biopsy resulted in a genetic diagnosis after identification of the protein defect. In 15% of the congenital myopathies, histopathological anomalies focused attention on one or several genes. Concerning dystrophinopathies, quantification of dystrophin deficiency on the biopsy specimen contributed to the definition of the clinical phenotype: Duchenne, or Becker. In children with a myopathy, muscle biopsy is often indispensable to establish the etiological diagnosis. Based on the results from this series, muscle biopsy can provide a precise

  19. Becker muscular dystrophy: an unusual presentation.

    OpenAIRE

    Thakker, P B; Sharma, A

    1993-01-01

    A 15 year old boy who presented with passing painless dark urine was found to have myoglobinuria. His creatine phosphokinase was raised, and a muscle biopsy specimen showed non-specific dystrophic changes. Subsequent DNA analysis led to the diagnosis of Becker muscular dystrophy. Myoglobinuria may be a presenting symptom of Becker muscular dystrophy.

  20. Responsiveness of performance-based outcome measures for mobility, balance, muscle strength and manual dexterity in adults with myotonic dystrophy type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kierkegaard, Marie; Petitclerc, Émilie; Hébert, Luc J; Mathieu, Jean; Gagnon, Cynthia

    2018-02-28

    To assess changes and responsiveness in outcome measures of mobility, balance, muscle strength and manual dexterity in adults with myotonic dystrophy type 1. A 9-year longitudinal study conducted with 113 patients. The responsiveness of the Timed Up and Go test, Berg Balance Scale, quantitative muscle testing, grip and pinch-grip strength, and Purdue Pegboard Test was assessed using criterion and construct approaches. Patient-reported perceived changes (worse/stable) in balance, walking, lower-limb weakness, stair-climbing and hand weakness were used as criteria. Predefined hypotheses about expected area under the receiver operating characteristic curves (criterion approach) and correlations between relative changes (construct approach) were explored. The direction and magnitude of median changes in outcome measures corresponded with patient-reported changes. Median changes in the Timed Up and Go test, grip strength, pinch-grip strength and Purdue Pegboard Test did not, in general, exceed known measurement errors. Most criterion (72%) and construct (70%) approach hypotheses were supported. Promising responsiveness was found for outcome measures of mobility, balance and muscle strength. Grip strength and manual dexterity measures showed poorer responsiveness. The performance-based outcome measures captured changes over the 9-year period and responsiveness was promising. Knowledge of measurement errors is needed to interpret the meaning of these longitudinal changes.

  1. Quantitative Assessment of the T2 Relaxation Time of the Gluteus Muscles in Children with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy: a Comparative Study Before and After Steroid Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hee Kyung; Laor, Tal; Wong, Brenda; Horn, Paul S.

    2010-01-01

    To determine the feasibility of using T2 mapping as a quantitative method to longitudinally follow the disease activity in children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) who are treated with steroids. Eleven boys with DMD (age range: 5-14 years) underwent evaluation with the clinical functional score (CFS), and conventional pelvic MRI and T2 mapping before and during steroid therapy. The gluteus muscle inflammation and fatty infiltration were evaluated on conventional MRI. The histograms and mean T2 relaxation times were obtained from the T2 maps. The CFS, the conventional MRI findings and the T2 values were compared before and during steroid therapy. None of the patients showed interval change of their CFSs. On conventional MRI, none of the images showed muscle inflammation. During steroid treatment, two boys showed increased fatty infiltration on conventional MRI, and both had an increase of the mean T2 relaxation time (p < 0.05). The remaining nine boys had no increase in fatty infiltration. Of these, three showed an increased mean T2 relaxation time (p < 0.05), two showed no change and four showed a decreased mean T2 relaxation time (p < 0.05). T2 mapping is a feasible technique to evaluate the longitudinal muscle changes in those children who receive steroid therapy for DMD. The differences of the mean T2 relaxation time may reflect alterations in disease activity, and even when the conventional MRI and CFS remain stable

  2. Quantitative Assessment of the T2 Relaxation Time of the Gluteus Muscles in Children with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy: a Comparative Study Before and After Steroid Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hee Kyung; Laor, Tal; Wong, Brenda [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati (United States); Horn, Paul S. [University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati (United States)

    2010-06-15

    To determine the feasibility of using T2 mapping as a quantitative method to longitudinally follow the disease activity in children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) who are treated with steroids. Eleven boys with DMD (age range: 5-14 years) underwent evaluation with the clinical functional score (CFS), and conventional pelvic MRI and T2 mapping before and during steroid therapy. The gluteus muscle inflammation and fatty infiltration were evaluated on conventional MRI. The histograms and mean T2 relaxation times were obtained from the T2 maps. The CFS, the conventional MRI findings and the T2 values were compared before and during steroid therapy. None of the patients showed interval change of their CFSs. On conventional MRI, none of the images showed muscle inflammation. During steroid treatment, two boys showed increased fatty infiltration on conventional MRI, and both had an increase of the mean T2 relaxation time (p < 0.05). The remaining nine boys had no increase in fatty infiltration. Of these, three showed an increased mean T2 relaxation time (p < 0.05), two showed no change and four showed a decreased mean T2 relaxation time (p < 0.05). T2 mapping is a feasible technique to evaluate the longitudinal muscle changes in those children who receive steroid therapy for DMD. The differences of the mean T2 relaxation time may reflect alterations in disease activity, and even when the conventional MRI and CFS remain stable.

  3. Quantitative assessment of the T2 relaxation time of the gluteus muscles in children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy: a comparative study before and after steroid treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hee Kyung; Laor, Tal; Horn, Paul S; Wong, Brenda

    2010-01-01

    To determine the feasibility of using T2 mapping as a quantitative method to longitudinally follow the disease activity in children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) who are treated with steroids. ELEVEN BOYS WITH DMD (AGE RANGE: 5-14 years) underwent evaluation with the clinical functional score (CFS), and conventional pelvic MRI and T2 mapping before and during steroid therapy. The gluteus muscle inflammation and fatty infiltration were evaluated on conventional MRI. The histograms and mean T2 relaxation times were obtained from the T2 maps. The CFS, the conventional MRI findings and the T2 values were compared before and during steroid therapy. None of the patients showed interval change of their CFSs. On conventional MRI, none of the images showed muscle inflammation. During steroid treatment, two boys showed increased fatty infiltration on conventional MRI, and both had an increase of the mean T2 relaxation time (p muscle changes in those children who receive steroid therapy for DMD. The differences of the mean T2 relaxation time may reflect alterations in disease activity, and even when the conventional MRI and CFS remain stable.

  4. Upper Limb Evaluation in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy: Fat-Water Quantification by MRI, Muscle Force and Function Define Endpoints for Clinical Trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Ricotti

    Full Text Available A number of promising experimental therapies for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD are emerging. Clinical trials currently rely on invasive biopsies or motivation-dependent functional tests to assess outcome. Quantitative muscle magnetic resonance imaging (MRI could offer a valuable alternative and permit inclusion of non-ambulant DMD subjects. The aims of our study were to explore the responsiveness of upper-limb MRI muscle-fat measurement as a non-invasive objective endpoint for clinical trials in non-ambulant DMD, and to investigate the relationship of these MRI measures to those of muscle force and function.15 non-ambulant DMD boys (mean age 13.3 y and 10 age-gender matched healthy controls (mean age 14.6 y were recruited. 3-Tesla MRI fat-water quantification was used to measure forearm muscle fat transformation in non-ambulant DMD boys compared with healthy controls. DMD boys were assessed at 4 time-points over 12 months, using 3-point Dixon MRI to measure muscle fat-fraction (f.f.. Images from ten forearm muscles were segmented and mean f.f. and cross-sectional area recorded. DMD subjects also underwent comprehensive upper limb function and force evaluation.Overall mean baseline forearm f.f. was higher in DMD than in healthy controls (p<0.001. A progressive f.f. increase was observed in DMD over 12 months, reaching significance from 6 months (p<0.001, n = 7, accompanied by a significant loss in pinch strength at 6 months (p<0.001, n = 9 and a loss of upper limb function and grip force observed over 12 months (p<0.001, n = 8.These results support the use of MRI muscle f.f. as a biomarker to monitor disease progression in the upper limb in non-ambulant DMD, with sensitivity adequate to detect group-level change over time intervals practical for use in clinical trials. Clinical validity is supported by the association of the progressive fat transformation of muscle with loss of muscle force and function.

  5. The 6-minute walk test, motor function measure and quantitative thigh muscle MRI in Becker muscular dystrophy: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Dirk; Hafner, Patricia; Rubino, Daniela; Schmid, Maurice; Neuhaus, Cornelia; Jung, Hans; Bieri, Oliver; Haas, Tanja; Gloor, Monika; Fischmann, Arne; Bonati, Ulrike

    2016-07-01

    Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) has an incidence of 1 in 16 000 male births. This cross-sectional study investigated the relation between validated functional scores and quantitative MRI (qMRI) of thigh muscles in 20 ambulatory BMD patients, aged 18.3-60 years (mean 31.2; SD 11.1). Clinical assessments included the motor function measure (MFM) and its subscales, as well as timed function tests such as the 6-minute walk test (6MWT) and the timed 10-m run/walk test. Quantitative MRI of the thigh muscles included the mean fat fraction (MFF) using a 2-point Dixon (2-PD) technique, and transverse relaxation time (T2) measurements. The mean MFM value was 80.4%, SD 9.44 and the D1 subscore 54.5%, SD 19.9. The median 6MWT was 195m, IQR 160-330.2. The median 10-m run/walk test was 7.4 seconds, IQR 6.1-9.3. The mean fat fraction of the thigh muscles was 55.6%, SD 17.4%, mean T2 relaxation times of all muscles: 69.9 ms, SD 14.4. The flexors had the highest MFF and T2 relaxation times, followed by the extensors and the adductors. MFF and global T2 relaxation times were highly negatively correlated with the MFM total, D1-subscore and 6MWT, and positively correlated with the 10 m run/walk test time (p < 0.01). Age was not correlated with MFF, global T2 relaxation time or clinical assessments. Both MFF and T2 measures in the thigh muscle were well correlated with clinical function in BMD and may serve as a surrogate outcome measure in clinical trials. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Duchenne muscular dystrophy carriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumura, K.; Nakano, I.

    1989-01-01

    By means of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the proton spin-lattice relaxation times (T1 values) of the skeletal muscles were measured in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) carriers and normal controls. The bound water fraction (BWF) was calculated from the T1 values obtained, according to the fast proton diffusion model. In the DMD carriers, T1 values of the gluteus maximus and quadriceps femoris muscles were significantly higher, and BWFs of these muscles were significantly lower than in normal control. Degenerative muscular changes accompanied by interstitial edema were presumed responsible for this abnormality. No correlation was observed between the muscle T1 and serum creatine kinase values. The present study showed that MRI could be a useful method for studying the dynamic state of water in both normal and pathological skeletal muscles. Its possible utility for DMD carrier detection was discussed briefly. (orig.)

  7. Intramuscular renin-angiotensin system is activated in human muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Guilian; Haginoya, Kazuhiro; Dai, Hongmei; Chiba, Yoko; Uematsu, Mitsugu; Hino-Fukuyo, Naomi; Onuma, Akira; Iinuma, Kazuie; Tsuchiya, Shigeru

    2009-05-15

    To investigate the role of the muscular renin-angiotensin system (RAS) in human muscular dystrophy, we used immunohistochemistry and Western blotting to examine the cellular localization of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1) and the angiotensin II type 2 receptor (AT2) in muscle biopsies from patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD), and congenital muscular dystrophy (CMD). In normal muscle, ACE was expressed in vascular endothelial cells and neuromuscular junctions (NMJs), whereas AT1 was immunolocalized to the smooth muscle cells of blood vessels and intramuscular nerve twigs. AT2 was immunolocalized in the smooth muscle cells of blood vessels. These findings suggest that the RAS has a functional role in peripheral nerves and NMJs. ACE and AT1, but AT2 immunoreactivity were increased markedly in dystrophic muscle as compared to controls. ACE and the AT1 were strongly expressed in the cytoplasm and nuclei of regenerating muscle fibers, fibroblasts, and in macrophages infiltrating necrotic fibers. Double immunolabeling revealed that activated fibroblasts in the endomysium and perimysium of DMD and CMD muscle were positive for ACE and AT1. Triple immunolabeling demonstrated that transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) and ACE were colocalized on the cytoplasm of activated fibroblasts in dystrophic muscle. Furthermore, Western blotting showed increases in the expression of AT1 and TGF-beta1 protein in dystrophic muscle, which coincided with our immunohistochemical results. The overexpression of ACE and AT1 in dystrophic muscle would likely result in the increased production of Ang II, which may act on these cells in an autocrine manner via AT1. The activation of AT1 may induce fibrous tissue formation through overexpression of TGF-beta1, which potently activates fibrogenesis and suppresses regeneration. In conclusion, our results imply that the intramuscular RAS-TGF-beta1 pathway

  8. Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Surveillance Tracking and Research Network , known as MD STAR net . Learn more about CDC’s other muscular dystrophy ... for Disease Control and Prevention Email Recommend Tweet YouTube Instagram Listen Watch RSS ABOUT About CDC Jobs ...

  9. Correction of congenital ptosis of the eyelid by frontal muscle transposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jevtović Dobrica

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital ptosis (CP represents a significant reconstructive problem Numerous studies have not yet provided full and satisfactory results. In this study, we have presented our experience in the surgical treatment of 108 patients by the use of Son Ye Guang's modified method - frontal muscle transposition. A total of 108 patients with CP were surgically treated at the Clinic for Plastic Surgery and Burns of the Military Medical Academy in the period 1991-2000. Unilateral ptosis was operated in 85 patients, and bilateral in 23 patients. CP was more frequently found in males (58.34% than in females (41.66%. The youngest patient was only 5.5 years old, and the oldest was 42, the average age was 21.3 years. All patients were operated on by the same surgeon, and were monitored monthly during the first six months and then twice a year for the next 3 years. Postoperative results were evaluated after 6 months: the action of raising the eyelids was compared to the full amplitude of movement of the eye on the healthy side. The closure of the eyelids and the symmetry of the palpebral fissure in a steady horizontal view was also assessed. The action of the opening as well as closure of the eyelids in full amplitude was obtained in all operated patients. Asymmetry of the palpebral fissure in a steady horizontal view up to 1 mm did not require additional correction. In 9 cases, asymmetry of the palpebral fissure greater than 1 mm was subsequently corrected. The advantages of this surgical method compared to the other, previously described techniques, were emphasized in the conclusion. The main advantage was the elimination of postoperative lagophthalmos, which represented the problem in all previously used methods.

  10. An unusual variant of Becker muscular dystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Visser, M.; Bakker, E.; Defesche, J. C.; Bolhuis, P. A.; van Ommen, G. J.

    1990-01-01

    We report on 5 brothers with slowly progressive limbgirdle weakness. Calf hypertrophy was absent. The levels of creatine kinase, electromyography, and findings from a muscle biopsy specimen were compatible with muscular dystrophy. The propositus's biopsy specimen also showed numerous rimmed

  11. Limb girdle muscular dystrophy due to mutations in POMT2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Sofie Thurø; Johnson, Katherine; Stojkovic, Tanya

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mutations in the gene coding for protein O-mannosyl-transferase 2 (POMT2) are known to cause severe congenital muscular dystrophy, and recently, mutations in POMT2 have also been linked to a milder limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) phenotype, named LGMD type 2N (LGMD2N). Only four...

  12. Reversible immortalisation enables genetic correction of human muscle progenitors and engineering of next-generation human artificial chromosomes for Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetti, Sara; Uno, Narumi; Hoshiya, Hidetoshi; Ragazzi, Martina; Ferrari, Giulia; Kazuki, Yasuhiro; Moyle, Louise Anne; Tonlorenzi, Rossana; Lombardo, Angelo; Chaouch, Soraya; Mouly, Vincent; Moore, Marc; Popplewell, Linda; Kazuki, Kanako; Katoh, Motonobu; Naldini, Luigi; Dickson, George; Messina, Graziella; Oshimura, Mitsuo; Cossu, Giulio; Tedesco, Francesco Saverio

    2018-02-01

    Transferring large or multiple genes into primary human stem/progenitor cells is challenged by restrictions in vector capacity, and this hurdle limits the success of gene therapy. A paradigm is Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), an incurable disorder caused by mutations in the largest human gene: dystrophin. The combination of large-capacity vectors, such as human artificial chromosomes (HACs), with stem/progenitor cells may overcome this limitation. We previously reported amelioration of the dystrophic phenotype in mice transplanted with murine muscle progenitors containing a HAC with the entire dystrophin locus (DYS-HAC). However, translation of this strategy to human muscle progenitors requires extension of their proliferative potential to withstand clonal cell expansion after HAC transfer. Here, we show that reversible cell immortalisation mediated by lentivirally delivered excisable hTERT and Bmi1 transgenes extended cell proliferation, enabling transfer of a novel DYS-HAC into DMD satellite cell-derived myoblasts and perivascular cell-derived mesoangioblasts. Genetically corrected cells maintained a stable karyotype, did not undergo tumorigenic transformation and retained their migration ability. Cells remained myogenic in vitro (spontaneously or upon MyoD induction) and engrafted murine skeletal muscle upon transplantation. Finally, we combined the aforementioned functions into a next-generation HAC capable of delivering reversible immortalisation, complete genetic correction, additional dystrophin expression, inducible differentiation and controllable cell death. This work establishes a novel platform for complex gene transfer into clinically relevant human muscle progenitors for DMD gene therapy. © 2017 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  13. Functional and molecular effects of arginine butyrate and prednisone on muscle and heart in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo D Guerron

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The number of promising therapeutic interventions for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD is increasing rapidly. One of the proposed strategies is to use drugs that are known to act by multiple different mechanisms including inducing of homologous fetal form of adult genes, for example utrophin in place of dystrophin.In this study, we have treated mdx mice with arginine butyrate, prednisone, or a combination of arginine butyrate and prednisone for 6 months, beginning at 3 months of age, and have comprehensively evaluated the functional, biochemical, histological, and molecular effects of the treatments in this DMD model. Arginine butyrate treatment improved grip strength and decreased fibrosis in the gastrocnemius muscle, but did not produce significant improvement in muscle and cardiac histology, heart function, behavioral measurements, or serum creatine kinase levels. In contrast, 6 months of chronic continuous prednisone treatment resulted in deterioration in functional, histological, and biochemical measures. Arginine butyrate-treated mice gene expression profiling experiments revealed that several genes that control cell proliferation, growth and differentiation are differentially expressed consistent with its histone deacetylase inhibitory activity when compared to control (saline-treated mdx mice. Prednisone and combination treated groups showed alterations in the expression of genes that control fibrosis, inflammation, myogenesis and atrophy.These data indicate that 6 months treatment with arginine butyrate can produce modest beneficial effects on dystrophic pathology in mdx mice by reducing fibrosis and promoting muscle function while chronic continuous treatment with prednisone showed deleterious effects to skeletal and cardiac muscle. Our results clearly indicate the usefulness of multiple assays systems to monitor both beneficial and toxic effects of drugs with broad range of in vivo activity.

  14. GLPG0492, a novel selective androgen receptor modulator, improves muscle performance in the exercised-mdx mouse model of muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozzoli, Anna; Capogrosso, Roberta Francesca; Sblendorio, Valeriana Teresa; Dinardo, Maria Maddalena; Jagerschmidt, Catherine; Namour, Florence; Camerino, Giulia Maria; De Luca, Annamaria

    2013-06-01

    Anabolic drugs may counteract muscle wasting and dysfunction in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD); however, steroids have unwanted side effects. We focused on GLPG0492, a new non-steroidal selective androgen receptor modulator that is currently under development for musculo-skeletal diseases such as sarcopenia and cachexia. GLPG0492 was tested in the exercised mdx mouse model of DMD in a 4-week trial at a single high dose (30 mg/kg, 6 day/week s.c.), and the results were compared with those from the administration of α-methylprednisolone (PDN; 1 mg/kg, i.p.) and nandrolone (NAND, 5 mg/kg, s.c.). This assessment was followed by a 12-week dose-dependence study (0.3-30 mg/kg s.c.). The outcomes were evaluated in vivo and ex vivo on functional, histological and biochemical parameters. Similar to PDN and NAND, GLPG0492 significantly increased mouse strength. In acute exhaustion tests, a surrogate of the 6-min walking test used in DMD patients, GLPG0492 preserved running performance, whereas vehicle- or comparator-treated animals showed a significant increase in fatigue (30-50%). Ex vivo, all drugs resulted in a modest but significant increase of diaphragm force. In parallel, a decrease in the non-muscle area and markers of fibrosis was observed in GLPG0492- and NAND-treated mice. The drugs exerted minor effects on limb muscles; however, electrophysiological biomarkers were ameliorated in extensor digitorum longus muscle. The longer dose-dependence study confirmed the effect on mdx mouse strength and resistance to fatigue and demonstrated the efficacy of lower drug doses on in vivo and ex vivo functional parameters. These results support the interest of further studies of GLPG0492 as a potential treatment for DMD. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Functional and molecular effects of arginine butyrate and prednisone on muscle and heart in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerron, Alfredo D; Rawat, Rashmi; Sali, Arpana; Spurney, Christopher F; Pistilli, Emidio; Cha, Hee-Jae; Pandey, Gouri S; Gernapudi, Ramkishore; Francia, Dwight; Farajian, Viken; Escolar, Diana M; Bossi, Laura; Becker, Magali; Zerr, Patricia; de la Porte, Sabine; Gordish-Dressman, Heather; Partridge, Terence; Hoffman, Eric P; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina

    2010-06-21

    The number of promising therapeutic interventions for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) is increasing rapidly. One of the proposed strategies is to use drugs that are known to act by multiple different mechanisms including inducing of homologous fetal form of adult genes, for example utrophin in place of dystrophin. In this study, we have treated mdx mice with arginine butyrate, prednisone, or a combination of arginine butyrate and prednisone for 6 months, beginning at 3 months of age, and have comprehensively evaluated the functional, biochemical, histological, and molecular effects of the treatments in this DMD model. Arginine butyrate treatment improved grip strength and decreased fibrosis in the gastrocnemius muscle, but did not produce significant improvement in muscle and cardiac histology, heart function, behavioral measurements, or serum creatine kinase levels. In contrast, 6 months of chronic continuous prednisone treatment resulted in deterioration in functional, histological, and biochemical measures. Arginine butyrate-treated mice gene expression profiling experiments revealed that several genes that control cell proliferation, growth and differentiation are differentially expressed consistent with its histone deacetylase inhibitory activity when compared to control (saline-treated) mdx mice. Prednisone and combination treated groups showed alterations in the expression of genes that control fibrosis, inflammation, myogenesis and atrophy. These data indicate that 6 months treatment with arginine butyrate can produce modest beneficial effects on dystrophic pathology in mdx mice by reducing fibrosis and promoting muscle function while chronic continuous treatment with prednisone showed deleterious effects to skeletal and cardiac muscle. Our results clearly indicate the usefulness of multiple assays systems to monitor both beneficial and toxic effects of drugs with broad range of in vivo activity.

  16. Successful bone marrow transplantation in a patient with Diamond-Blackfan anemia with co-existing Duchenne muscular dystrophy: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaur Jasmeet

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Diamond-Blackfan anemia and Duchenne muscular dystrophy are two rare congenital anomalies. Both anomalies occurring in the same child is extremely rare. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is a well-established therapy for Diamond-Blackfan anemia. However, in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy, stem cell therapy still remains experimental. Case presentation We report the case of a nine-year-old boy of north Indian descent with Diamond-Blackfan anemia and Duchenne muscular dystrophy who underwent successful allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. He is transfusion-independent, and his Duchenne muscular dystrophy has shown no clinical deterioration over the past 45 months. His creatine phosphokinase levels have significantly decreased to 300 U/L from 14,000 U/L pre-transplant. The patient is 100% donor chimera in the hematopoietic system, and his muscle tissue has shown 8% to 10.4% cells of donor origin. Conclusion Our patient's Diamond-Blackfan anemia was cured by allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The interesting clinical observation of a possible benefit in Duchenne muscular dystrophy cannot be ruled out. However, further clinical follow-up with serial muscle biopsies and molecular studies are needed to establish this finding.

  17. The quantitative in vivo analysis of the muscle degeneration in Duchenne type muscular dystrophy using NMR-CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikehira, Hiroo; Aoki, Yoshio; Matsumura, Kiichiro

    1986-01-01

    In order to develop a simple noninvasive method to determine progressive stages of Duchenne type muscular dystrophy (DMD), we proposed two muscular degeneration parameters calculated from NMR-CT data. The parameters are W.C.P. (water concentration parameter) and F.C.P. (fat concentration parameter). We examined 15 normal male and 10 normal female volunteers, 19 carrier females and 21 DMD patients. The normal value indicated 0 to 30 % F.C.P., while the results of DMD patients showed abnormally high W.C.P. at the early stage and increased F.C.P. corresponding to the clinical stages (Ueda's disability stages). But there was not any difference between the DMD carrier's data and the control data. The present study suggested the possibilities of clinical stagings and early detection of DMD with the parameters. (author)

  18. Glycosaminoglycan modifications in Duchenne muscular dystrophy: specific remodeling of chondroitin sulfate/dermatan sulfate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Negroni, E.; Henault, E.; Chevalier, F.; Gilbert-Sirieix, M.; Kuppevelt, T.H. van; Papy-Garcia, D.; Uzan, G.; Albanese, P.

    2014-01-01

    Widespread skeletal muscle degeneration and impaired regeneration lead to progressive muscle weakness and premature death in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Dystrophic muscles are progressively replaced by nonfunctional tissue because of exhaustion of muscle precursor cells and

  19. Deletion of Galgt2 (B4Galnt2) reduces muscle growth in response to acute injury and increases muscle inflammation and pathology in dystrophin-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Rui; Singhal, Neha; Serinagaoglu, Yelda; Chandrasekharan, Kumaran; Joshi, Mandar; Bauer, John A; Janssen, Paulus M L; Martin, Paul T

    2015-10-01

    Transgenic overexpression of Galgt2 (official name B4Galnt2) in skeletal muscle stimulates the glycosylation of α dystroglycan (αDG) and the up-regulation of laminin α2 and dystrophin surrogates known to inhibit muscle pathology in mouse models of congenital muscular dystrophy 1A and Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Skeletal muscle Galgt2 gene expression is also normally increased in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy compared with the wild-type mice. To assess whether this increased endogenous Galgt2 expression could affect disease, we quantified muscular dystrophy measures in mdx mice deleted for Galgt2 (Galgt2(-/-)mdx). Galgt2(-/-) mdx mice had increased heart and skeletal muscle pathology and inflammation, and also worsened cardiac function, relative to age-matched mdx mice. Deletion of Galgt2 in wild-type mice also slowed skeletal muscle growth in response to acute muscle injury. In each instance where Galgt2 expression was elevated (developing muscle, regenerating muscle, and dystrophic muscle), Galgt2-dependent glycosylation of αDG was also increased. Overexpression of Galgt2 failed to inhibit skeletal muscle pathology in dystroglycan-deficient muscles, in contrast to previous studies in dystrophin-deficient mdx muscles. This study demonstrates that Galgt2 gene expression and glycosylation of αDG are dynamically regulated in muscle and that endogenous Galgt2 gene expression can ameliorate the extent of muscle pathology, inflammation, and dysfunction in mdx mice. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Dysphagia in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wohlgemuth, M.; Swart, B.J.M. de; Kalf, J.G.; Joosten, F.B.M.; Vliet, A.M. van der; Padberg, G.W.A.M.

    2006-01-01

    Dysphagia is not considered a symptom of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD). In this study, the authors found that dysphagia does occur in patients with advanced FSHD showing mild involvement of the jaw and lingual muscles. Dysphagia is seldom life threatening in these patients. The

  1. Prednisone Therapy for Duchenne Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available The effects of prednisone on muscle function and the extent of steroid-related adverse effects were studied in 17 ambulant children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD at University Hospital, Groningen; Rehabilitation Centre, Utrecht; and Leiden University Medical Centre, the Netherlands.

  2. Faecal incontinence in myotonic dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Abercrombie, J; Rogers, J; Swash, M

    1998-01-01

    Two siblings with myotonic dystrophy presented for treatment of faecal incontinence. The pathophysiology of this functional disorder is described with the results of anorectal manometry, EMG, and biopsy of smooth and striated muscle of the anorectal sphincters. Both medical and surgical management of the incontinence was unsatisfactory in the long term. Involvement of gastrointestinal musculature is a characteristic feature the disease.



  3. Transgenic mice expressing mutant Pinin exhibit muscular dystrophy, nebulin deficiency and elevated expression of slow-type muscle fiber genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Hsu-Pin; Hsu, Shu-Yuan; Wu, Wen-Ai; Hu, Ji-Wei; Ouyang, Pin

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: •Pnn CCD domain functions as a dominant negative mutant regulating Pnn expression and function. •Pnn CCD mutant Tg mice have a muscle wasting phenotype during development and show dystrophic histological features. •Pnn mutant muscles are susceptible to slow fiber type gene transition and NEB reduction. •The Tg mouse generated by overexpression of the Pnn CCD domain displays many characteristics resembling NEB +/− mice. -- Abstract: Pinin (Pnn) is a nuclear speckle-associated SR-like protein. The N-terminal region of the Pnn protein sequence is highly conserved from mammals to insects, but the C-terminal RS domain-containing region is absent in lower species. The N-terminal coiled-coil domain (CCD) is, therefore, of interest not only from a functional point of view, but also from an evolutionarily standpoint. To explore the biological role of the Pnn CCD in a physiological context, we generated transgenic mice overexpressing Pnn mutant in skeletal muscle. We found that overexpression of the CCD reduces endogenous Pnn expression in cultured cell lines as well as in transgenic skeletal muscle fibers. Pnn mutant mice exhibited reduced body mass and impaired muscle function during development. Mutant skeletal muscles show dystrophic histological features with muscle fibers heavily loaded with centrally located myonuclei. Expression profiling and pathway analysis identified over-representation of genes in gene categories associated with muscle contraction, specifically those related to slow type fiber. In addition nebulin (NEB) expression level is repressed in Pnn mutant skeletal muscle. We conclude that Pnn downregulation in skeletal muscle causes a muscular dystrophic phenotype associated with NEB deficiency and the CCD domain is incapable of replacing full length Pnn in terms of functional capacity

  4. Transgenic mice expressing mutant Pinin exhibit muscular dystrophy, nebulin deficiency and elevated expression of slow-type muscle fiber genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Hsu-Pin; Hsu, Shu-Yuan [Department of Anatomy, Chang Gung University Medical College, Taiwan (China); Wu, Wen-Ai; Hu, Ji-Wei [Transgenic Mouse Core Laboratory, Chang Gung University, Taiwan (China); Ouyang, Pin, E-mail: ouyang@mail.cgu.edu.tw [Department of Anatomy, Chang Gung University Medical College, Taiwan (China); Transgenic Mouse Core Laboratory, Chang Gung University, Taiwan (China); Molecular Medicine Research Center, Chang Gung University, Taiwan (China)

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •Pnn CCD domain functions as a dominant negative mutant regulating Pnn expression and function. •Pnn CCD mutant Tg mice have a muscle wasting phenotype during development and show dystrophic histological features. •Pnn mutant muscles are susceptible to slow fiber type gene transition and NEB reduction. •The Tg mouse generated by overexpression of the Pnn CCD domain displays many characteristics resembling NEB{sup +/−} mice. -- Abstract: Pinin (Pnn) is a nuclear speckle-associated SR-like protein. The N-terminal region of the Pnn protein sequence is highly conserved from mammals to insects, but the C-terminal RS domain-containing region is absent in lower species. The N-terminal coiled-coil domain (CCD) is, therefore, of interest not only from a functional point of view, but also from an evolutionarily standpoint. To explore the biological role of the Pnn CCD in a physiological context, we generated transgenic mice overexpressing Pnn mutant in skeletal muscle. We found that overexpression of the CCD reduces endogenous Pnn expression in cultured cell lines as well as in transgenic skeletal muscle fibers. Pnn mutant mice exhibited reduced body mass and impaired muscle function during development. Mutant skeletal muscles show dystrophic histological features with muscle fibers heavily loaded with centrally located myonuclei. Expression profiling and pathway analysis identified over-representation of genes in gene categories associated with muscle contraction, specifically those related to slow type fiber. In addition nebulin (NEB) expression level is repressed in Pnn mutant skeletal muscle. We conclude that Pnn downregulation in skeletal muscle causes a muscular dystrophic phenotype associated with NEB deficiency and the CCD domain is incapable of replacing full length Pnn in terms of functional capacity.

  5. Dystrophin analysis in carriers of Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogerwaard, Edo M.; Ginjaar, Ieke B.; Bakker, Egbert; de Visser, Marianne

    2005-01-01

    Associations between clinical phenotype (muscle weakness, dilated cardiomyopathy) and dystrophin abnormalities in muscle tissue among definite carriers of Duchenne (DMD) and Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) were investigated. No associations between dystrophin abnormalities and clinical variables in

  6. Signs and symptoms of Duchenne muscular dystrophy and Becker muscular dystrophy among carriers in the Netherlands : a cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogerwaard, EM; Bakker, E; Ippel, PF; Oosterwijk, JC; Majoor-Krakauer, DF; Leschot, NJ; Van Essen, AJ; Brunner, HG; van der Wouw, PA; Wilde, AAM; de Visser, Marianne

    1999-01-01

    Background Carriers of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) may show muscle weakness or dilated cardiomyopathy. Studies focusing on skeletal-muscle involvement were done before DNA analysis was possible. We undertook a cross-sectional study in a population of

  7. Signs and symptoms of Duchenne muscular dystrophy and Becker muscular dystrophy among carriers in The Netherlands: a cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogerwaard, E. M.; Bakker, E.; Ippel, P. F.; Oosterwijk, J. C.; Majoor-Krakauer, D. F.; Leschot, N. J.; van Essen, A. J.; Brunner, H. G.; van der Wouw, P. A.; Wilde, A. A.; de Visser, M.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Carriers of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) may show muscle weakness or dilated cardiomyopathy. Studies focusing on skeletal-muscle involvement were done before DNA analysis was possible. We undertook a cross-sectional study in a population of

  8. CINRG: Systems Biology of Glucocoricoids in Muscle Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    amyotrophic lateral sclerosis; BMD, Becker muscular dystrophy ; COX, cytochrome c oxidase; DMD, Duchenne mus- cular dystrophy ; FSH...to a lesser extent, in Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD; dystrophin mutation), LGMD2A (limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A; CALP3 [calpain 3...muscular dystrophy (FSH), normal human skeletal muscle (NHM), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), acute quadriplegic myopathy (AQM), Becker muscular

  9. Can Quantitative Muscle Strength and Functional Motor Ability Differentiate the Influence of Age and Corticosteroids in Ambulatory Boys with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckon, Cathleen; Sienko, Susan; Bagley, Anita; Sison-Williamson, Mitell; Fowler, Eileen; Staudt, Loretta; Heberer, Kent; McDonald, Craig M; Sussman, Michael

    2016-07-08

    In the absence of a curative treatment for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD), corticosteroid therapy (prednisone, deflazacort) has been adopted as the standard of care, as it slows the progression of muscle weakness and enables longer retention of functional mobility. The ongoing development of novel pharmacological agents that target the genetic defect underlying DMD offer hope for a significant alteration in disease progression; however, substantiation of therapeutic efficacy has proved challenging. Identifying functional outcomes sensitive to the early, subtle changes in muscle function has confounded clinical trials. Additionally, the alterations in disease progression secondary to corticosteroid therapy are not well described making it difficult to ascertain the benefits of novel agents, often taken concurrently with corticosteroids. The purpose of this study was to examine outcome responsiveness to corticosteroid therapy and age at the onset of a natural history study of ambulatory boys with DMD. Eighty-five ambulatory boys with DMD (mean age 93 mo, range 49 to 180 mo) were recruited into this study. Fifty participants were on corticosteroid therapy, while 33 were corticosteroid naïve at the baseline assessment. Within each treatment group boys were divided in two age groups, 4 to 7 years and 8 and greater years of age. The Biodex System 3 Pro isokinetic dynamometer was used to assess muscle strength. Motor skills were assessed using the upper two dimensions (standing/walking, running & jumping) of the Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM 88) and Timed Motor Tests (TMTs) (10-meter run, sit to stand, supine to stand, climb 4-stairs). Two way analysis of variance and Pearson correlations were used for analysis. A main effect for age was seen in select lower extremity muscle groups (hip flexors, knee extensors and ankle dorsiflexors), standing dimension skills, and all TMTs with significantly greater weakness and loss of motor skill ability seen in the older age

  10. CT finding and cerebrospinal fluid proteins in muscular dystrophy patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirase, Tsutomu; Ide, Masami; Araki, Shukuro; Okamoto, Hiroshi; Kawasaki, Shoichiro; Imamura, Shigehiro.

    1983-01-01

    We analyzed the microcomponents of protein fractions in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with various types of muscular dystrophy. The degenerative pattern is characterized by an increase in the prealbumin and a decrease in the γ-globulin fraction is shown in the Duchenne and congenital muscular dystrophy. The increase in CSF IgG, γ-globulin fraction is shown in the myotonic dystrophy. In addition to the abnormality of IQ, EEG, and brain CT, abnormal CSF proteins obviously suggest the presence of CNS involvement in muscular dystrophy. (author)

  11. CT finding and cerebrospinal fluid proteins in muscular dystrophy patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirase, Tsutomu; Ide, Masami; Araki, Shukuro; Okamoto, Hiroshi (Kumamoto Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine); Kawasaki, Shoichiro; Imamura, Shigehiro

    1983-06-01

    We analyzed the microcomponents of protein fractions in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with various types of muscular dystrophy. The degenerative pattern is characterized by an increase in the prealbumin and a decrease in the ..gamma..-globulin fraction is shown in the Duchenne and congenital muscular dystrophy. The increase in CSF IgG, ..gamma..-globulin fraction is shown in the myotonic dystrophy. In addition to the abnormality of IQ, EEG, and brain CT, abnormal CSF proteins obviously suggest the presence of CNS involvement in muscular dystrophy.

  12. Analysis of fatty infiltration and inflammation of the pelvic and thigh muscles in boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD): grading of disease involvement on MR imaging and correlation with clinical assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hee Kyung; Merrow, Arnold C; Shiraj, Sahar; Wong, Brenda L; Horn, Paul S; Laor, Tal

    2013-10-01

    Prior reports focus primarily on muscle fatty infiltration in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). However, the significance of muscle edema is uncertain. To evaluate the frequency and degree of muscle fat and edema, and correlate these with clinical function. Forty-two boys (ages 5-19 years) with DMD underwent pelvic MRI. Axial T1- and fat-suppressed T2-weighted images were evaluated to grade muscle fatty infiltration (0-4) and edema (0-3), respectively. Degree and frequency of disease involvement were compared to clinical evaluations. Gluteus maximus had the greatest mean fatty infiltration score, followed by adductor magnus and gluteus medius muscles, and had the most frequent and greatest degree of fatty infiltration. Gluteus maximus also had the greatest mean edema score, followed by vastus lateralis and gluteus medius muscles. These muscles had the most frequent edema, although the greatest degree of edema was seen in other muscles. There was correlation between cumulative scores of fatty infiltration and all clinical evaluations (P muscles with the most frequent fatty infiltration had the greatest degree of fatty infiltration and correlated with patient function. However, the muscles with the most frequent edema were different from those with the greatest degree of edema. Thus, edema may not predict patient functional status.

  13. Determining the role of skewed X-chromosome inactivation in developing muscle symptoms in carriers of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viggiano, Emanuela; Ergoli, Manuela; Picillo, Esther; Politano, Luisa

    2016-07-01

    Duchenne and Becker dystrophinopathies (DMD and BMD) are X-linked recessive disorders caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene that lead to absent or reduced expression of dystrophin in both skeletal and heart muscles. DMD/BMD female carriers are usually asymptomatic, although about 8 % may exhibit muscle or cardiac symptoms. Several mechanisms leading to a reduced dystrophin have been hypothesized to explain the clinical manifestations and, in particular, the role of the skewed XCI is questioned. In this review, the mechanism of XCI and its involvement in the phenotype of BMD/DMD carriers with both a normal karyotype or with X;autosome translocations with breakpoints at Xp21 (locus of the DMD gene) will be analyzed. We have previously observed that DMD carriers with moderate/severe muscle involvement, exhibit a moderate or extremely skewed XCI, in particular if presenting with an early onset of symptoms, while DMD carriers with mild muscle involvement present a random XCI. Moreover, we found that among 87.1 % of the carriers with X;autosome translocations involving the locus Xp21 who developed signs and symptoms of dystrophinopathy such as proximal muscle weakness, difficulty to run, jump and climb stairs, 95.2 % had a skewed XCI pattern in lymphocytes. These data support the hypothesis that skewed XCI is involved in the onset of phenotype in DMD carriers, the X chromosome carrying the normal DMD gene being preferentially inactivated and leading to a moderate-severe muscle involvement.

  14. Secreted Protein Acidic and Rich in Cysteine (SPARC) in Human Skeletal Muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, Louise H.; Petersson, Stine J.; Sellathurai, Jeeva; Andersen, Ditte C.; Thayssen, Susanne; Sant, Dorte J.; Jensen, Charlotte H.; Schrøder, Henrik D.

    2009-01-01

    Secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC)/osteonectin is expressed in different tissues during remodeling and repair, suggesting a function in regeneration. Several gene expression studies indicated that SPARC was expressed in response to muscle damage. Studies on myoblasts further indicated a function of SPARC in skeletal muscle. We therefore found it of interest to study SPARC expression in human skeletal muscle during development and in biopsies from Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy and congenital muscular dystrophy, congenital myopathy, inclusion body myositis, and polymyositis patients to analyze SPARC expression in a selected range of inherited and idiopathic muscle wasting diseases. SPARC-positive cells were observed both in fetal and neonatal muscle, and in addition, fetal myofibers were observed to express SPARC at the age of 15–16 weeks. SPARC protein was detected in the majority of analyzed muscle biopsies (23 of 24), mainly in mononuclear cells of which few were pax7 positive. Myotubes and regenerating myofibers also expressed SPARC. The expression-degree seemed to reflect the severity of the lesion. In accordance with these in vivo findings, primary human-derived satellite cells were found to express SPARC both during proliferation and differentiation in vitro. In conclusion, this study shows SPARC expression both during muscle development and in regenerating muscle. The expression is detected both in satellite cells/myoblasts and in myotubes and muscle fibers, indicating a role for SPARC in the skeletal muscle compartment. (J Histochem Cytochem 57:29–39, 2009) PMID:18796407

  15. Phenotype-Genotype Analysis of Chinese Patients with Early-Onset LMNA-Related Muscular Dystrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dandan Tan

    Full Text Available This study aimed to analyze the correlation between the phenotype and genotype of Chinese patients with early-onset lamin A (LMNA-related muscular dystrophy (MD. The clinical and myopathological data of 21 Chinese pediatric patients with early-onset LMNA-related MD were collected and analyzed. LMNA gene mutation analysis was performed by direct sequencing of genomic DNA. Sublocalization of wild-type and mutant proteins were observed by immunofluorescence using cultured fibroblasts and human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK 293 cell. Seven patients were diagnosed with Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (EDMD and 14 were diagnosed with LMNA-associated congenital muscular dystrophy (L-CMD. Four biopsy specimens from the L-CMD cases exhibited inflammatory changes. Abnormal nuclear morphology was observed with both transmission electron microscopy and lamin A/C staining. We identified 10 novel and nine known LMNA gene mutations in the 21 patients. Some mutations (c.91G>A, c.94_96delAAG, c.116A>G, c.745C>T, c.746G>A, and c.1580G>C were well correlated with EDMD or L-CMD. LMNA-related MD has a common symptom triad of muscle weakness, joint contractures, and cardiac involvement, but the severity of symptoms and disease progression differ greatly. Inflammatory change in biopsied muscle is a characteristic of early-stage L-CMD. Phenotype-genotype analysis determines that some mutations are well correlated with LMNA-related MD.

  16. Systems Biology of Glucocorticoids in Muscle Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    Introduction Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most common and incurable muscular dystrophy of childhood. Muscle regeneration fails with...SUBJECT TERMS Duchenne Muscular dystrophy , Glucocorticoids, Systems biology, Drug mechanism 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: U 17. LIMITATION...better targeted and more effective therapies for Duchenne muscular dystrophy dynamically. This MDA grant proposal is led by Dr. Eric Hoffman, and it

  17. Congenital tri-cavernous hemangiomas of the right buccal region, right accessory parotid gland, and masseter muscle region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tao; Gu, Yongchun; Zhang, Li; Hua, Zequan

    2014-03-01

    We report a rare case of congenital tri-cavernous hemangiomas of the right buccal region, right accessory parotid gland, and masseter muscle region in an adult. The patient, a 25-year-old woman, complained of 3 masses in her right midcheek. Ultrasonographic and computed tomographic findings showed an irregular-shaped mass (multiple calcifications) with a well-defined margin in the masseter muscle region, an ellipse-shaped mass (multiple calcifications) with a well-defined margin in the right buccal region, and a comma-shaped mass (no calcifications) with a well-defined margin separate from the parotid gland in the right accessory parotid gland region. These iconographic findings suggested that the masses were all hemangiomas separately originating from the parotid gland, accessory parotid gland, and masseter muscle. The masses were completely removed through a standard parotid incision without postoperative facial palsy, skin deformity, and difficulty in secreting saliva. Findings from histologic examination of the tumor revealed multiple, thin-walled, and dilated blood vessels, confirming the diagnosis of cavernous hemangiomas. Ultrasonographic and computed tomographic findings were extremely useful in diagnosing the mass/masses as hemangioma before surgery, clarifying relationships between the mass and adjacent structures, and determining the surgical approach to the mass/masses.

  18. Quantitative Skeletal Muscle MRI: Part 1, Derived T2 Fat Map in Differentiation Between Boys With Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy and Healthy Boys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Jennifer H; Kim, Hee Kyung; Merrow, Arnold C; Laor, Tal; Serai, Suraj; Horn, Paul S; Kim, Dong Hoon; Wong, Brenda L

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to validate derived T2 maps as an objective measure of muscular fat for discrimination between boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and healthy boys. Forty-two boys with DMD (mean age, 9.9 years) and 31 healthy boys (mean age, 11.4 years) were included in the study. Age, body mass index, and clinical function scale grade were evaluated. T1-weighted MR images and T2 maps with and without fat suppression were obtained. Fatty infiltration was graded 0-4 on T1-weighted images, and derived T2 fat values (difference between mean T2 values from T2 maps with and without fat suppression) of the gluteus maximus and vastus lateralis muscles were calculated. Group comparisons were performed. The upper limit of the 95% reference interval of T2 fat values from the control group was applied. There was no significant difference in age or body mass index between groups. All healthy boys and 19 boys (45.2%) with DMD had a normal clinical function scale grade. Grade 1 fatty infiltration was seen in 90.3% (gluteus maximus) and 71.0% (vastus lateralis) of healthy boys versus 33.3% (gluteus maximus) and 52.4% (vastus lateralis) of boys with DMD. T2 fat values of boys with DMD were significantly longer than in the control group (p < 0.001). Using a 95% reference interval for healthy boys for the gluteus maximus (28.3 milliseconds) allowed complete separation from boys with DMD (100% sensitivity, 100% specificity), whereas the values for the vastus lateralis (7.28 milliseconds) resulted in 83.3% sensitivity and 100% specificity. Measurement of muscular fat with T2 maps is accurate for differentiating boys with DMD from healthy boys.

  19. ADAM12 alleviates the skeletal muscle pathology in mdx dystrophic mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kronqvist, Pauliina; Kawaguchi, Nobuko; Albrechtsen, Reidar

    2002-01-01

    Muscular dystrophy is characterized by muscle degeneration and insufficient regeneration and replacement of muscle fibers by connective tissue. New therapeutic strategies directed toward various forms of muscular dystrophy are needed to preserve muscle mass and promote regeneration. In this study...

  20. The Sonographic Correlation between The Sternocleidomastoid Muscle Thickness and the Prognosis of Congenital Muscular Torticollis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Dae Keon; Kwon, Woo Cheol; Cha, Seung Whan; Yoo, Ho Seok; Lim, Sang Hyeok; Park, Jeong Mee; Kim, Myung Soon

    2009-01-01

    We wanted to predict the prognosis of patients with CMT by the A/N ratio of the thickness and the circumference of the SCM muscle on ultrasonography, and we wanted to correlate the echogenecity of the affected muscle and the prognosis. Ultrasonography was performed on 24 patients from June 2004 to March 2007. We measured the thickness and the cross sectional circumference of the SCM muscle at three levels; below the mastoid process, at the level of the carotid artery bifurcation and at the level of the sternum and clavicle. The ratio of the affected side to the normal side (the A/N ratio) of the SCM muscle was calculated. We performed followed up ultrasonography at 2 months intervals until the end of treatment. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to correlate the A/N ratio before and after the treatment. Spearman's rank test was used to correlate the A/N ratio and the total treatment duration. Paired T-tests were used to correlate the echogenecity of the SCM muscle and the treatment duration divided by less than or greater than 12 months. With measuring the thickness of the SCM muscle, the A/N ratio after treatment (1.36) was decreased compared with the initial A/N ratio (2.31) (p<0.05). The correlation between the A/N ratio of the thickness with the total treatment duration was statistically significant (p<0.05). The echogenecity of the affected SCM muscle was not correlated with the duration of treatment. The A/N ratio of the thickness of the SCM muscle is useful to predict the prognosis of patients with CMT

  1. New Advances in Molecular Therapy for Muscle Repair after Diseases and Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    muscle regeneration in a preclinical mouse model of muscle regeneration and Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD...improve the regeneration of muscles damaged by trauma or by chronic muscle diseases, such as Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies . In the past...selected MDX mice, a mouse model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy [DMD], to investigate if MMP1 could enhance muscle cell migration and

  2. Contractile properties are disrupted in Becker muscular dystrophy, but not in limb girdle type 2I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løkken, Nicoline; Hedermann, Gitte; Thomsen, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    We investigated whether a linear relationship between muscle strength and cross-sectional area (CSA) is preserved in calf muscles of patients with Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD, n = 14) and limb-girdle type 2I muscular dystrophy (LGMD2I, n = 11), before and after correcting for muscle fat...

  3. CINRG: Systems Biology of Glucocorticoids in Muscle Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Contract W81XWH-09-1-0726 SYSTEMS BIOLOGY OF GLUCOCORTICOIDS IN MUSCLE DISEASE Introduction Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most... muscle and enable the development of better targeted and more effective therapies for Duchenne muscular dystrophy dynamically. This MDA grant...common and incurable muscular dystrophy of childhood. Muscle regeneration fails with advancing age, leading to considerable fibrosis. Corticosteroid

  4. A new chart for weight control in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    OpenAIRE

    Griffiths, R D; Edwards, R H

    1988-01-01

    Weight control is desirable in the muscle wasting conditions. A new chart is presented to allow the prediction of an ideal weight, free of excess fat, specifically for boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

  5. Strength training and albuterol in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Kooi, EL; Vogels, OJM; van Asseldonk, RJGP; Lindeman, E; Hendriks, JCM; Wohlgemuth, M; van der Maarel, SM; Padberg, GW

    2004-01-01

    Background: In animals and healthy volunteers beta2-adrenergic agonists increase muscle strength and mass, in particular when combined with strength training. In patients with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) albuterol may exert anabolic effects. The authors evaluated the effect of

  6. Best practice guidelines and recommendations on the molecular diagnosis of myotonic dystrophy types 1 and 2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamsteeg, E.J.; Kress, W.; Catalli, C.; Hertz, J.M.; Witsch-Baumgartner, M.; Buckley, M.F.; Engelen, B.G.M. van; Schwartz, M.; Scheffer, H.

    2012-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy is an autosomal dominant, multisystem disorder that is characterized by myotonic myopathy. The symptoms and severity of myotonic dystrophy type l (DM1) ranges from severe and congenital forms, which frequently result in death because of respiratory deficiency, through to

  7. Genetic modifiers of Duchenne and facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hightower, Rylie M; Alexander, Matthew S

    2018-01-01

    Muscular dystrophy is defined as the progressive wasting of skeletal muscles that is caused by inherited or spontaneous genetic mutations. Next-generation sequencing has greatly improved the accuracy and speed of diagnosis for different types of muscular dystrophy. Advancements in depth of coverage, convenience, and overall reduced cost have led to the identification of genetic modifiers that are responsible for phenotypic variability in affected patients. These genetic modifiers have been postulated to explain key differences in disease phenotypes, including age of loss of ambulation, steroid responsiveness, and the presence or absence of cardiac defects in patients with the same form of muscular dystrophy. This review highlights recent findings on genetic modifiers of Duchenne and facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophies based on animal and clinical studies. These genetic modifiers hold great promise to be developed into novel therapeutic targets for the treatment of muscular dystrophies. Muscle Nerve 57: 6-15, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Ultra-structural time-course study in the C. elegans model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy highlights a crucial role for sarcomere-anchoring structures and sarcolemma integrity in the earliest steps of the muscle degeneration process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouilly, Nicolas; Lecroisey, Claire; Martin, Edwige; Pierson, Laura; Mariol, Marie-Christine; Qadota, Hiroshi; Labouesse, Michel; Streichenberger, Nathalie; Mounier, Nicole; Gieseler, Kathrin

    2015-11-15

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a genetic disease characterized by progressive muscle degeneration due to mutations in the dystrophin gene. In spite of great advances in the design of curative treatments, most patients currently receive palliative therapies with steroid molecules such as prednisone or deflazacort thought to act through their immunosuppressive properties. These molecules only slightly slow down the progression of the disease and lead to severe side effects. Fundamental research is still needed to reveal the mechanisms involved in the disease that could be exploited as therapeutic targets. By studying a Caenorhabditis elegans model for DMD, we show here that dystrophin-dependent muscle degeneration is likely to be cell autonomous and affects the muscle cells the most involved in locomotion. We demonstrate that muscle degeneration is dependent on exercise and force production. Exhaustive studies by electron microscopy allowed establishing for the first time the chronology of subcellular events occurring during the entire process of muscle degeneration. This chronology highlighted the crucial role for dystrophin in stabilizing sarcomeric anchoring structures and the sarcolemma. Our results suggest that the disruption of sarcomeric anchoring structures and sarcolemma integrity, observed at the onset of the muscle degeneration process, triggers subcellular consequences that lead to muscle cell death. An ultra-structural analysis of muscle biopsies from DMD patients suggested that the chronology of subcellular events established in C. elegans models the pathogenesis in human. Finally, we found that the loss of sarcolemma integrity was greatly reduced after prednisone treatment suggesting a role for this molecule in plasma membrane stabilization. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Limb girdle muscular dystrophies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vissing, John

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The aim of the study was to describe the clinical spectrum of limb girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMDs), the pitfalls of the current classification system for LGMDs, and emerging therapies for these conditions. RECENT FINDINGS: Close to half of all LGMD subtypes have been...... or are registered in other classification systems for muscle disease. On the contrary, diseases that fulfill classical criteria for LGMD have found no place in the LGMD classification system. These shortcomings call for revision/creation of a new classification system for LGMD. The rapidly expanding gene sequencing...... capabilities have helped to speed up new LGMD discoveries, and unveiled pheno-/genotype relations. Parallel to this progress in identifying new LGMD subtypes, emerging therapies for LGMDs are under way, but no disease-specific treatment is yet available for nonexperimental use. SUMMARY: The field of LGMD...

  10. B3GALNT2 mutations associated with non-syndromic autosomal recessive intellectual disability reveal a lack of genotype-phenotype associations in the muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maroofian, Reza; Riemersma, Moniek; Jae, Lucas T; Zhianabed, Narges; Willemsen, Marjolein H; Wissink-Lindhout, Willemijn M; Willemsen, Michèl A; de Brouwer, Arjan P M; Mehrjardi, Mohammad Yahya Vahidi; Ashrafi, Mahmoud Reza; Kusters, Benno; Kleefstra, Tjitske; Jamshidi, Yalda; Nasseri, Mojila; Pfundt, Rolph; Brummelkamp, Thijn R; Abbaszadegan, Mohammad Reza; Lefeber, Dirk J; van Bokhoven, Hans

    2017-12-22

    The phenotypic severity of congenital muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy (MDDG) syndromes associated with aberrant glycosylation of α-dystroglycan ranges from the severe Walker-Warburg syndrome or muscle-eye-brain disease to mild, late-onset, isolated limb-girdle muscular dystrophy without neural involvement. However, muscular dystrophy is invariably found across the spectrum of MDDG patients. Using linkage mapping and whole-exome sequencing in two families with an unexplained neurodevelopmental disorder, we have identified homozygous and compound heterozygous mutations in B3GALNT2. The first family comprises two brothers of Dutch non-consanguineous parents presenting with mild ID and behavioral problems. Immunohistochemical analysis of muscle biopsy revealed no significant aberrations, in line with the absence of a muscular phenotype in the affected siblings. The second family includes five affected individuals from an Iranian consanguineous kindred with mild-to-moderate intellectual disability (ID) and epilepsy without any notable neuroimaging, muscle, or eye abnormalities. Complementation assays of the compound heterozygous mutations identified in the two brothers had a comparable effect on the O-glycosylation of α-dystroglycan as previously reported mutations that are associated with severe muscular phenotypes. In conclusion, we show that mutations in B3GALNT2 can give rise to a novel MDDG syndrome presentation, characterized by ID associated variably with seizure, but without any apparent muscular involvement. Importantly, B3GALNT2 activity does not fully correlate with the severity of the phenotype as assessed by the complementation assay.

  11. Results at 2 Years after Gene Therapy for RPE65-Deficient Leber Congenital Amaurosis and Severe Early-Childhood-Onset Retinal Dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weleber, Richard G; Pennesi, Mark E; Wilson, David J; Kaushal, Shalesh; Erker, Laura R; Jensen, Lauren; McBride, Maureen T; Flotte, Terence R; Humphries, Margaret; Calcedo, Roberto; Hauswirth, William W; Chulay, Jeffrey D; Stout, J Timothy

    2016-07-01

    To provide an initial assessment of the safety of a recombinant adeno-associated virus vector expressing RPE65 (rAAV2-CB-hRPE65) in adults and children with retinal degeneration caused by RPE65 mutations. Nonrandomized, multicenter clinical trial. Eight adults and 4 children, 6 to 39 years of age, with Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) or severe early-childhood-onset retinal degeneration (SECORD). Patients received a subretinal injection of rAAV2-CB-hRPE65 in the poorer-seeing eye, at either of 2 dose levels, and were followed up for 2 years after treatment. The primary safety measures were ocular and nonocular adverse events. Exploratory efficacy measures included changes in best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), static perimetry central 30° visual field hill of vision (V30) and total visual field hill of vision (VTOT), kinetic perimetry visual field area, and responses to a quality-of-life questionnaire. All patients tolerated subretinal injections and there were no treatment-related serious adverse events. Common adverse events were those associated with the surgical procedure and included subconjunctival hemorrhage in 8 patients and ocular hyperemia in 5 patients. In the treated eye, BCVA increased in 5 patients, V30 increased in 6 patients, VTOT increased in 5 patients, and kinetic visual field area improved in 3 patients. One subject showed a decrease in BCVA and 2 patients showed a decrease in kinetic visual field area. Treatment with rAAV2-CB-hRPE65 was not associated with serious adverse events, and improvement in 1 or more measures of visual function was observed in 9 of 12 patients. The greatest improvements in visual acuity were observed in younger patients with better baseline visual acuity. Evaluation of more patients and a longer duration of follow-up will be needed to determine the rate of uncommon or rare side effects or safety concerns. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Ophthalmology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Surgical Orthodontic Treatment of a Patient Affected by Type 1 Myotonic Dystrophy (Steinert Syndrome)

    OpenAIRE

    Cacucci, Laura; Ricci, Beatrice; Moretti, Maria; Gasparini, Giulio; Pelo, Sandro; Grippaudo, Cristina

    2017-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy, or Steinert’s disease, is the most common form of muscular dystrophy that occurs in adults. This multisystemic form involves the skeletal muscles but affects also the eye, the endocrine system, the central nervous system, and the cardiac system. The weakness of the facial muscles causes a characteristic facial appearance frequently associated with malocclusions. Young people with myotonic dystrophy, who also have severe malocclusions, have bad oral functions such as chewin...

  13. Quantitative assessment of calf circumference in Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beenakker, EAC; de Vries, Joeke; Fock, JM; van Tol, M; Brouwer, OF; Maurits, NM; van der Hoeven, JH

    2002-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is clinically characterised by progressive muscle weakness and a gradual increase in the size of some affected muscles, especially calf muscles. The extent of calf enlargement is usually determined by subjective visual assessment. The purpose of this study was to

  14. Ex vivo gene editing of the dystrophin gene in muscle stem cells mediated by peptide nucleic acid single stranded oligodeoxynucleotides induces stable expression of dystrophin in a mouse model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nik-Ahd, Farnoosh; Bertoni, Carmen

    2014-07-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a fatal disease caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene, which result in the complete absence of dystrophin protein throughout the body. Gene correction strategies hold promise to treating DMD. Our laboratory has previously demonstrated the ability of peptide nucleic acid single-stranded oligodeoxynucleotides (PNA-ssODNs) to permanently correct single-point mutations at the genomic level. In this study, we show that PNA-ssODNs can target and correct muscle satellite cells (SCs), a population of stem cells capable of self-renewing and differentiating into muscle fibers. When transplanted into skeletal muscles, SCs transfected with correcting PNA-ssODNs were able to engraft and to restore dystrophin expression. The number of dystrophin-positive fibers was shown to significantly increase over time. Expression was confirmed to be the result of the activation of a subpopulation of SCs that had undergone repair as demonstrated by immunofluorescence analyses of engrafted muscles using antibodies specific to full-length dystrophin transcripts and by genomic DNA analysis of dystrophin-positive fibers. Furthermore, the increase in dystrophin expression detected over time resulted in a significant improvement in muscle morphology. The ability of transplanted cells to return into quiescence and to activate upon demand was confirmed in all engrafted muscles following injury. These results demonstrate the feasibility of using gene editing strategies to target and correct SCs and further establish the therapeutic potential of this approach to permanently restore dystrophin expression into muscle of DMD patients. © 2014 AlphaMed Press.

  15. Skeletal muscle laminin and MDC1A: pathogenesis and treatment strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gawlik Kinga I

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Laminin-211 is a cell-adhesion molecule that is strongly expressed in the basement membrane of skeletal muscle. By binding to the cell surface receptors dystroglycan and integrin α7β1, laminin-211 is believed to protect the muscle fiber from damage under the constant stress of contractions, and to influence signal transmission events. The importance of laminin-211 in skeletal muscle is evident from merosin-deficient congenital muscular dystrophy type 1A (MDC1A, in which absence of the α2 chain of laminin-211 leads to skeletal muscle dysfunction. MDC1A is the commonest form of congenital muscular dystrophy in the European population. Severe hypotonia, progressive muscle weakness and wasting, joint contractures and consequent impeded motion characterize this incurable disorder, which causes great difficulty in daily life and often leads to premature death. Mice with laminin α2 chain deficiency have analogous phenotypes, and are reliable models for studies of disease mechanisms and potential therapeutic approaches. In this review, we introduce laminin-211 and describe its structure, expression pattern in developing and adult muscle and its receptor interactions. We will also discuss the molecular pathogenesis of MDC1A and advances toward the development of treatment.

  16. Adult patient with Becker dystrophy undergoing orthopedic surgery: an anesthesia challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parish, Masoud; Farzin, Haleh

    2018-01-01

    Muscular dystrophies are considered to be a series of neuromuscular diseases with genetic causes and are characterized by progressive muscle weakness and degeneration of the skeletal muscle. The case of an adult man with Becker dystrophy referred for repair of the patella tendon tearing and patella fracture is described. He underwent successful surgery using total intravenous anesthesia without any complications.

  17. Miyoshi-type distal muscular dystrophy - Clinical spectrum in 24 Dutch patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linssen, WHJP; Notermans, NC; VanderGraaf, Y; Wokke, JHJ; VanDoorn, PA; Howeler, CJ; Busch, HFM; DeJager, AEJ; DeVisser, M

    1997-01-01

    Miyoshi-type distal muscular dystrophy has now been found to be more frequent outside Japan than was previously thought. We studied 24 Dutch patients with Miyoshi-type distal muscular dystrophy and focused on its clinical expression and natural history, muscle CT-scans and muscle biopsy findings.

  18. Miyoshi-type distal muscular dystrophy. Clinical spectrum in 24 Dutch patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linssen, W. H.; Notermans, N. C.; van der Graaf, Y.; Wokke, J. H.; van Doorn, P. A.; Höweler, C. J.; Busch, H. F.; de Jager, A. E.; de Visser, M.

    1997-01-01

    Miyoshi-type distal muscular dystrophy has now been found to be more frequent outside Japan than was previously thought. We studied 24 Dutch patients with Miyoshi-type distal muscular dystrophy and focused on its clinical expression and natural history, muscle CT-scans and muscle biopsy findings.

  19. Miyoshi-type distal muscular dystrophy. Clinical spectrum in 24 Dutch patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.H.J.P. Linssen (Wim); N.C. Notermans (Nicolette); Y. van der Graaf (Yolanda); J.H.J. Wokke (John); P.A. van Doorn (Pieter); C.J. Höweler (Chris); H.F.M. Busch (Herman); A.E.J. de Jager (Aeiko); M. de Visser (Marianne)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractMiyoshi-type distal muscular dystrophy has now been found to be more frequent outside Japan than was previously thought. We studied 24 Dutch patients with Miyoshi-type distal muscular dystrophy and focused on its clinical expression and natural history muscle CT-scans and muscle biopsy

  20. A Drosophila model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plas, Mariska Cathelijne van der

    2008-01-01

    Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) is a severe X-linked disease characterized by progressive muscle wasting and sometimes mild mental retardation. The disease is caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene. DMD is correlated with the absence of Dp427, which is located along the sarcolemma in skeletal

  1. Duchenne muscular dystrophy models show their age

    OpenAIRE

    Chamberlain, Jeffrey S.

    2010-01-01

    The lack of appropriate animal models has hampered efforts to develop therapies for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). A new mouse model lacking both dystrophin and telomerase (Sacco et al., 2010) closely mimics the pathological progression of human DMD and shows that muscle stem cell activity is a key determinant of disease severity.

  2. Hereditary muscular dystrophies and the heart

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermans, M. C. E.; Pinto, Y. M.; Merkies, I. S. J.; de Die-Smulders, C. E. M.; Crijns, H. J. G. M.; Faber, C. G.

    2010-01-01

    Cardiac disease is a common clinical manifestation of neuromuscular disorders, particularly of muscular dystrophies. Heart muscle cells as well as specialized conducting myocardial fibres may be affected by the dystrophic process. The incidence and nature of cardiac involvement vary with different

  3. Pneumothoraces in collagen VI-related dystrophy: a case series and recommendations for management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin L. Fraser

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Collagen VI-related dystrophy (collagen VI-RD is a rare neuromuscular condition caused by mutations in the COL6A1, COL6A2 or COL6A3 genes. The phenotypic spectrum includes early-onset Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy, adult-onset Bethlem myopathy and an intermediate phenotype. The disorder is characterised by distal hyperlaxity and progressive muscle weakness, joint contractures and respiratory insufficiency. Respiratory insufficiency is attributed to chest wall contractures, scoliosis, impaired diaphragmatic function and intercostal muscle weakness. To date, intrinsic parenchymal lung disease has not been implicated in the inevitable respiratory decline of these patients. This series focuses on pneumothorax, an important but previously under-recognised disease manifestation of collagen VI-RD. We describe two distinct clinical presentations within collagen VI-RD patients with pneumothorax. The first cohort consists of neonates and children with a single pneumothorax in the setting of large intrathoracic pressure changes. The second group is made up of adult patients with recurrent pneumothoraces, associated with chest computed tomography scan evidence of parenchymal lung disease. We describe treatment challenges in this unique population with respect to expectant observation, tube thoracostomy and open pleurodesis. Based on this experience, we offer recommendations for early identification of lung disease in collagen VI-RD and definitive intervention.

  4. Identification of a gene expression core signature for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) via integrative analysis reveals novel potential compounds for treatment

    KAUST Repository

    Ichim-Moreno, Norú ; Aranda, Manuel; Voolstra, Christian R.

    2010-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a recessive X-linked form of muscular dystrophy and one of the most prevalent genetic disorders of childhood. DMD is characterized by rapid progression of muscle degeneration, and ultimately death. Currently

  5. Fascicular Phrenic Nerve Neurotization for Restoring Physiological Motion in a Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia Reconstruction With a Reverse Innervated Latissimus Dorsi Muscle Flap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horta, Ricardo; Henriques-Coelho, Tiago; Costa, Joana; Estevão-Costa, José; Monteiro, Diana; Dias, Mariana; Braga, José; Silva, Alvaro; Azevedo, Inês; Amarante, José Manuel

    2015-08-01

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia is a severe developmental anomaly characterized by the malformation of the diaphragm. An innervated reversed latissimus dorsi flap reconstruction for recurrent congenital diaphragmatic hernia has been described as an alternative to prosthetic patch repair to achieve pleuroperitoneal separation. However, there is very little supporting scientific data; therefore, there is no real basic understanding of the condition of the phrenic nerve in the absence of diaphragmatic muscle or even the neurotization options for restoring neodiaphragmatic muscle motion. We have reviewed the literature regarding phrenic nerve anatomy and neurotization options, and to our knowledge, this is the first time that the application of a fascicular repair is being described where the continuity of one remaining fascicle of the diaphragm has been preserved close to the phrenic nerve distal division. The procedure was undertaken in a 3 year-old boy, with the diagnosis of congenital large posteromedial diaphragmatic hernia and dependence of mechanical ventilation in consequence of severe bronchopulmonary dysplasia.The phrenic nerve divides itself into several terminal branches, usually three, at the diaphragm level, or just above it. This allows the selective coaptation of separate fascicular branches. In the case described, videofluoroscopy evaluation showed no evidence of paradoxical neodiaphragmatic motion, with synchronous contraction movements and intact pleura-peritoneal separation. The child is now asymptomatic and shows improvement of his previous restrictive pulmonary disease.We believe that fascicular repair can achieve some reinnervation of the flap without jeopardizing the potential of diaphragmatic function by contraction of reminiscent native diaphragm.

  6. Defective [U-14 C] palmitic acid oxidation in Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carroll, J.E.; Norris, B.J.; Brooke, M.H.

    1985-01-01

    Compared with normal skeletal muscle, muscle from patients with Duchenne dystrophy had decreased [U-14 C] palmitic acid oxidation. [1-14 C] palmitic acid oxidation was normal. These results may indicate a defect in intramitochondrial fatty acid oxidation

  7. Defective (U-14 C) palmitic acid oxidation in Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carroll, J.E.; Norris, B.J.; Brooke, M.H.

    1985-01-01

    Compared with normal skeletal muscle, muscle from patients with Duchenne dystrophy had decreased (U-14 C) palmitic acid oxidation. (1-14 C) palmitic acid oxidation was normal. These results may indicate a defect in intramitochondrial fatty acid oxidation.

  8. Physiotherapy, based on the Bobath concept, may influence the gait pattern in persons with limb-girdle muscle dystrophy: a multiple case series study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oygard, Kjellaug; Haestad, Helge; Jørgensen, Lone

    2011-03-01

     There are few studies on possible effects of physiotherapy for adults with muscular dystrophy. The aim of this study was to examine if treatment based on the Bobath concept may influence specific gait parameters in some of these patients.   A single-subject experimental design with A-B-A-A phases was used, and four patients, three with limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) and one with fascioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD), were included. The patients had 1 hour of individually tailored physiotherapy at each working day for a period of 3 weeks. Step length, step width and gait velocity were measured during the A-B-A-A phases by use of an electronic walkway. Walking distance and endurance were measured by use of the '6 minute walk test'.  . The three LGMD patients, who initially walked with a wide base of support, had a narrower, velocity-adjusted step width after treatment, accompanied with the same or even longer step length. These changes lasted throughout follow-up. Moreover, two of the patients were able to walk a longer distance within 6 minutes after the treatment period. The fourth patient (with FSHD) had a normal step width at baseline, which did not change during the study.   The results indicate that physiotherapy treatment based on the Bobath concept may influence the gait pattern in patients with LGMD. However, in order to evaluate the effectiveness of physiotherapy to patients with muscular dystrophies, we call for larger studies and controlled trials. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Defective myoblasts identified in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    OpenAIRE

    Blau, H M; Webster, C; Pavlath, G K

    1983-01-01

    A defect in the proliferative capacity of satellite cells, mononucleated precursors of mature muscle fibers, was found in clonal analyses of cells cultured from Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients. The total yield of myoblasts per gram of muscle biopsy was decreased to 5% of normal. Of the DMD myoblast clones obtained, a large proportion contained a morphological class of flat distended cells that had an increased generation time and ceased to proliferate beyond 100-1,000 cells but cou...

  10. Identification of new dystroglycan complexes in skeletal muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric K Johnson

    Full Text Available The dystroglycan complex contains the transmembrane protein β-dystroglycan and its interacting extracellular mucin-like protein α-dystroglycan. In skeletal muscle fibers, the dystroglycan complex plays an important structural role by linking the cytoskeletal protein dystrophin to laminin in the extracellular matrix. Mutations that affect any of the proteins involved in this structural axis lead to myofiber degeneration and are associated with muscular dystrophies and congenital myopathies. Because loss of dystrophin in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD leads to an almost complete loss of dystroglycan complexes at the myofiber membrane, it is generally assumed that the vast majority of dystroglycan complexes within skeletal muscle fibers interact with dystrophin. The residual dystroglycan present in dystrophin-deficient muscle is thought to be preserved by utrophin, a structural homolog of dystrophin that is up-regulated in dystrophic muscles. However, we found that dystroglycan complexes are still present at the myofiber membrane in the absence of both dystrophin and utrophin. Our data show that only a minority of dystroglycan complexes associate with dystrophin in wild type muscle. Furthermore, we provide evidence for at least three separate pools of dystroglycan complexes within myofibers that differ in composition and are differentially affected by loss of dystrophin. Our findings indicate a more complex role of dystroglycan in muscle than currently recognized and may help explain differences in disease pathology and severity among myopathies linked to mutations in DAPC members.

  11. Bones, Muscles, and Joints: The Musculoskeletal System

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... stabilize it while the bone heals. Muscular dystrophy . Muscular dystrophy is an inherited group of diseases that affect the muscles, causing them to weaken and break down over time. The most common form in childhood is called Duchenne muscular dystrophy, and it most often affects boys. ...

  12. Mitochondrial disorders in progressive muscular dystrophies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Kharlamov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The literature review gives data on the role of mitochondrial disorders in the pathogenesis of different progressive muscular dystrophies. It describes changes in Duchenne, limb-girdle, facial scapulohumeral (Landuzi—Degerina muscular dystrophies. The review is based on both clinical and experimental animal studies. Along with the implication of mitochondria in the pathogenesis of the diseases, it describes muscular dystrophy treatment options compensating for energy disorders and overcoming oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. Mitochondrial studies in different muscle diseases hand physicians treatment modalities that fail to lead to recovery, but compensate for disorders caused by mutations in the genetic apparatus. 

  13. Muscular Dystrophies at Different Ages: Metabolic and Endocrine Alterations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oriana del Rocío Cruz Guzmán

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Common metabolic and endocrine alterations exist across a wide range of muscular dystrophies. Skeletal muscle plays an important role in glucose metabolism and is a major participant in different signaling pathways. Therefore, its damage may lead to different metabolic disruptions. Two of the most important metabolic alterations in muscular dystrophies may be insulin resistance and obesity. However, only insulin resistance has been demonstrated in myotonic dystrophy. In addition, endocrine disturbances such as hypogonadism, low levels of testosterone, and growth hormone have been reported. This eventually will result in consequences such as growth failure and delayed puberty in the case of childhood dystrophies. Other consequences may be reduced male fertility, reduced spermatogenesis, and oligospermia, both in childhood as well as in adult muscular dystrophies. These facts all suggest that there is a need for better comprehension of metabolic and endocrine implications for muscular dystrophies with the purpose of developing improved clinical treatments and/or improvements in the quality of life of patients with dystrophy. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to describe the current knowledge about of metabolic and endocrine alterations in diverse types of dystrophinopathies, which will be divided into two groups: childhood and adult dystrophies which have different age of onset.

  14. Non-Targeted Metabolomics Analysis of Golden Retriever Muscular Dystrophy-Affected Muscles Reveals Alterations in Arginine and Proline Metabolism, and Elevations in Glutamic and Oleic Acid In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Muhammad; Kornegay, Joe N.; Honcoop, Aubree; Parry, Traci L.; Balog-Alvarez, Cynthia J.; Muehlbauer, Michael J.; Newgard, Christopher B.; Patterson, Cam

    2017-01-01

    Background: Like Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), the Golden Retriever Muscular Dystrophy (GRMD) dog model of DMD is characterized by muscle necrosis, progressive paralysis, and pseudohypertrophy in specific skeletal muscles. This severe GRMD phenotype includes moderate atrophy of the biceps femoris (BF) as compared to unaffected normal dogs, while the long digital extensor (LDE), which functions to flex the tibiotarsal joint and serves as a digital extensor, undergoes the most pronounced atrophy. A recent microarray analysis of GRMD identified alterations in genes associated with lipid metabolism and energy production. Methods: We, therefore, undertook a non-targeted metabolomics analysis of the milder/earlier stage disease GRMD BF muscle versus the more severe/chronic LDE using GC-MS to identify underlying metabolic defects specific for affected GRMD skeletal muscle. Results: Untargeted metabolomics analysis of moderately-affected GRMD muscle (BF) identified eight significantly altered metabolites, including significantly decreased stearamide (0.23-fold of controls, p = 2.89 × 10−3), carnosine (0.40-fold of controls, p = 1.88 × 10−2), fumaric acid (0.40-fold of controls, p = 7.40 × 10−4), lactamide (0.33-fold of controls, p = 4.84 × 10−2), myoinositol-2-phosphate (0.45-fold of controls, p = 3.66 × 10−2), and significantly increased oleic acid (1.77-fold of controls, p = 9.27 × 10−2), glutamic acid (2.48-fold of controls, p = 2.63 × 10−2), and proline (1.73-fold of controls, p = 3.01 × 10−2). Pathway enrichment analysis identified significant enrichment for arginine/proline metabolism (p = 5.88 × 10−4, FDR 4.7 × 10−2), where alterations in L-glutamic acid, proline, and carnosine were found. Additionally, multiple Krebs cycle intermediates were significantly decreased (e.g., malic acid, fumaric acid, citric/isocitric acid, and succinic acid), suggesting that altered energy metabolism may be underlying the observed GRMD BF muscle

  15. Targeted massively parallel sequencing and histological assessment of skeletal muscles for the molecular diagnosis of inherited muscle disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, Atsuko; Mitsuhashi, Satomi; Miyata, Naomasa; Nishino, Ichizo

    2017-02-01

    Inherited skeletal muscle diseases are genetically heterogeneous diseases caused by mutations in more than 150 genes. This has made it challenging to establish a high-throughput screening method for identifying causative gene mutations in clinical practice. In the present study, we developed a useful method for screening gene mutations associated with the pathogenesis of skeletal muscle diseases. We established four target gene panels, each covering all exonic and flanking regions of genes involved in the pathogenesis of the following muscle diseases: (1) muscular dystrophy (MD), (2) congenital myopathy/congenital myasthenic syndrome, (3) metabolic myopathy and (4) myopathy with protein aggregations/rimmed vacuoles. We assigned one panel to each patient based on the results of clinical and histological analyses of biopsied muscle samples and performed high-throughput sequencing by using Ion PGM next-generation sequencer. We also performed protein analysis to confirm defective proteins in patients with major muscular dystrophies. Further, we performed muscle-derived cDNA analysis to identify splice-site mutations. We identified possible causative gene mutations in 33% of patients (62/188) included in this study. Our results showed that the MD panel was the most useful, with a diagnostic rate of 46.2%. Thus, we developed a high-throughput sequencing technique for diagnosing inherited muscle diseases. The use of this technique along with histological and protein analyses may be useful and cost-effective for screening mutations in patients with inherited skeletal muscle diseases. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  16. [DIAGNOSTIC VARIATIONS OF X-LINKED MUSCULAR DYSTROPHY WITH CONTRACTURES].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvirkvelia, N; Shakarishvili, R; Gugutsidze, D; Khizanishvili, N

    2015-01-01

    Case report with review describes X-linked muscular dystrophy with contractures in 28 years old man and his cousin. The disease revealed itself in an early stage (age 5-10), the process was progressing with apparent tendons retraction and contraction, limited movement in the areas of the neck and back of spine, atrophy of shoulder and pelvic yard and back muscles. Intellect was intact. Cardyomyopathy was exhibited. CK was normal. EMG showed classic myopathic features. Muscle biopsy showed different caliber groups of muscle fibers, growth of endo-perimesial connective tissue. Clinical manifestations together with electrophysiological and histological data suggest consistency with Rotthauwe-Mortier-Bayer X-linked muscular dystrophy.

  17. Pulmonary Endpoints in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy. A Workshop Summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finder, Jonathan; Mayer, Oscar Henry; Sheehan, Daniel; Sawnani, Hemant; Abresch, R Ted; Benditt, Joshua; Birnkrant, David J; Duong, Tina; Henricson, Erik; Kinnett, Kathi; McDonald, Craig M; Connolly, Anne M

    2017-08-15

    Development of novel therapeutics for treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) has led to clinical trials that include pulmonary endpoints that allow assessment of respiratory muscle status, especially in nonambulatory subjects. Parent Project Muscular Dystrophy (PPMD) convened a workshop in Bethesda, Maryland, on April 14 and 15, 2016, to summarize published respiratory data in DMD and give guidance to clinical researchers assessing the effect of interventions on pulmonary outcomes in DMD.

  18. Concurrence of myotonic dystrophy and epilepsy: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Worku, Dawit Kibru

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Myotonic dystrophy is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous multisystem disorder with a prevalence of 1 in 8000 in the general population. Case presentation A 25-year-old Ethiopian man presented with symptoms of myotonia, muscle wasting, gait problems, frontal baldness, and family history characterizing the hereditary disorder myotonic dystrophy. He had been on treatment for idiopathic generalized epilepsy for over 15 years. A needle electromyography showed insertional class...

  19. Muscle Stem Cell Therapy for the Treatment of DMD Associated Cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    cardiomyopathy. Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), one of the progressive muscular dystrophies , is an X-linked muscle disease caused by mutations in the...including Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), develop progressive cardiomyopathy. Cellular cardiomyoplasty, which involves the transplantation of...hepatic failure in a clinically relevant non-human primate model of this process. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Project 1: Duchenne muscular dystrophy

  20. Dystromirs as serum biomarkers for monitoring the disease severity in Duchenne muscular Dystrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina T Zaharieva

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular Dystrophy (DMD is an inherited disease caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene that disrupt the open reading frame, while in frame mutations result in Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD. Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD is due to mutations affecting collagen VI genes. Specific muscle miRNAs (dystromirs are potential non-invasive biomarkers for monitoring the outcome of therapeutic interventions and disease progression. We quantified miR-1, miR-133a,b, miR-206 and miR-31 in serum from patients with DMD, BMD, UCMD and healthy controls. MiR-1, miR-133a,b and miR-206 were upregulated in DMD, but unchanged in UCMD compared to controls. Milder DMD patients had higher levels of dystromirs than more severely affected patients. Patients with low forced vital capacity (FVC values, indicating respiratory muscle weakness, had low levels of serum miR-1 and miR-133b. There was no significant difference in the level of the dystromirs in BMD compared to controls. We also assessed the effect of dystrophin restoration on the expression of the five dystromirs in serum of DMD patients treated systemically for 12 weeks with antisense oligomer eteplirsen that induces skipping of exon 51 in the dystrophin gene. The dystromirs were also analysed in muscle biopsies of DMD patients included in a single dose intramuscular eteplirsen clinical trial. Our analysis detected a trend towards normalization of these miRNA between the pre- and post-treatment samples of the systemic trial, which however failed to reach statistical significance. This could possibly be due to the small number of patients and the short duration of these clinical trials. Although longer term studies are needed to clarify the relationship between dystrophin restoration following therapeutic intervention and the level of circulating miRNAs, our results indicate that miR-1 and miR-133 can be considered as exploratory biomarkers for monitoring the progression of muscle weakness

  1. Intramuscular degeneration process in Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Takeshi; Matsumra, Kiichiro; Hashimoto, Takahiro; Ikehira, Hiroo; Fukuda, Hiroshi; Tateno, Yukio.

    1992-01-01

    Intramuscular degeneration process of Duchenne dystrophy skeletal muscles was investigated by longitudinal skeletal muscle imaging with high-field-strength NMR-CT of 1.5 Tesla. Thigh muscles in 10 cases ranging in age from 4 to 19 years were examined by T 1 -weighted longitudinal images (TR=215∼505 ms, TE=19∼20 ms). The following results were obtained. Skeletal muscle degeneration was depicted as high signal intensity area reflecting its high fat contents. These high signal intensity areas had a longitudinally streaky appearance in parallel direction with myofibers. These findings were more prominent toward myotendon junction than muscle bellies. Skeletal muscle degeneration progressed rapidly between 7 to 10 years of age, and reached a plateau after that. (author)

  2. [Combined spinal-epidural anesthesia for cesarean section in a parturient with myotonic dystrophy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Kosuke; Mizuno, Ju; Nagaoka, Takehiko; Harashima, Toshiya; Morita, Sigeho

    2010-08-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (MD) is a muscle disorder characterized by progressive muscle wasting and weakness, and is the most common form of muscular dystrophy that begins in adulthood, often after pregnancy. MD might be related to occurrence of malignant hyperthermia. Therefore, the cesarean section is often performed for the parturient with MD. We had an experience of combined spinal-epidural anesthesia for cesarean section in a parturient complicated with MD. A 40-year-old woman had rhabdomyolysis caused by ritodrine at 15-week gestation and was diagnosed as MD by electromyography. Her first baby died due to respiratory failure fourth day after birth. She had hatchet face, slight weakness of her lower extremities, and easy fatigability. Her manual muscle test was 5/5 at upper extremities and 4/5 at lower extremities. She underwent emergency cesarean section for premature rupture of the membrane, weak pain during labor, and obstructed labor at 33-week gestation. We placed an epidural catheter from T12/L1 and punctured arachnoid with 25 G spinal needle. We performed spinal anesthesia using 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine 1.5 ml and epidural anesthesia using 2% lidocaine 6 ml. Her anesthetic level reached bilaterally to T7 and operation started 18 minutes after combined spinal-epidural anesthesia. Her baby was born 23 minutes after the anesthesia. As her baby was 1/5 at Apgar score, the baby was tracheally intubated and artificially ventilated. The cesarean section was finished in 33 minutes uneventfully. She had no adverse events and was discharged on the 8th postoperative day. Later her baby was diagnosed as congenital MD by gene analysis. Combined spinal-epidural anesthesia with the amide-typed local anesthetic agents could be useful and safe for cesarean section in the parturient with MD.

  3. [Human myopathy and animal muscular dystrophy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schapira, G; Dreyfus, J C; Schapira, F

    1977-08-01

    Two hereditary muscular dystrophies similar to human progressive muscular dystrophy (P.M.D. Duchenne type) have been isolated in animals, one in mouse, the other in chicken. The decrease in the activity of glycogenolytic enzymes is similar to that observed in denervated muscle. Isozymic fetal types for several muscular enzymes have been observed as well in chicken as in man, but this fetal type may also be found in neurogenic atrophy. The release in circulation of muscle enzymes seems more specific. But the origin of the genetic lesion is still unknown. We describe here the three different theories about this problem: i.e. neurogenic, vascular, or myogenic. This last theory implies a trouble of membrane permeability.

  4. Morphologic imaging in muscular dystrophies and inflammatory myopathies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degardin, Adrian; Lacour, Arnaud; Vermersch, Patrick; Morillon, David; Cotten, Anne; Stojkovic, Tanya

    2010-01-01

    To determine if magnetic resonance imaging (MR imaging) is useful in the diagnostic workup of muscular dystrophies and idiopathic inflammatory myopathies for describing the topography of muscle involvement. MR imaging was performed in 31 patients: 8 with dystrophic myotony types 1 (n = 4) or 2 (n = 4); 11 with limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, including dysferlinopathy, calpainopathy, sarcoglycanopathy, and dystrophy associated with fukutin-related protein mutation; 3 with Becker muscular dystrophy; and 9 with idiopathic inflammatory myopathies, including polymyositis, dermatomyositis, and sporadic inclusion body myositis. Analysis of T1 images enabled us to describe the most affected muscles and the muscles usually spared for each muscular disease. In particular, examination of pelvis, thigh, and leg muscles demonstrated significant differences between the muscular diseases. On STIR images, hyperintensities were present in 62% of our patients with muscular dystrophies. A specific pattern of muscular involvement was established for each muscular disease. Hyperintensities observed on STIR images precede fatty degeneration and are not specific for inflammatory myopathies. (orig.)

  5. Morphologic imaging in muscular dystrophies and inflammatory myopathies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Degardin, Adrian; Lacour, Arnaud; Vermersch, Patrick [CHU de Lille, Clinique neurologique, Lille (France); Morillon, David; Cotten, Anne [CHRU de Lille, Service de Radiologie Osteoarticulaire, Hopital Roger Salengro, Lille (France); Stojkovic, Tanya [G-H Pitie-Salpetriere, Institut de Myologie, Paris (France)

    2010-12-15

    To determine if magnetic resonance imaging (MR imaging) is useful in the diagnostic workup of muscular dystrophies and idiopathic inflammatory myopathies for describing the topography of muscle involvement. MR imaging was performed in 31 patients: 8 with dystrophic myotony types 1 (n = 4) or 2 (n = 4); 11 with limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, including dysferlinopathy, calpainopathy, sarcoglycanopathy, and dystrophy associated with fukutin-related protein mutation; 3 with Becker muscular dystrophy; and 9 with idiopathic inflammatory myopathies, including polymyositis, dermatomyositis, and sporadic inclusion body myositis. Analysis of T1 images enabled us to describe the most affected muscles and the muscles usually spared for each muscular disease. In particular, examination of pelvis, thigh, and leg muscles demonstrated significant differences between the muscular diseases. On STIR images, hyperintensities were present in 62% of our patients with muscular dystrophies. A specific pattern of muscular involvement was established for each muscular disease. Hyperintensities observed on STIR images precede fatty degeneration and are not specific for inflammatory myopathies. (orig.)

  6. Evaluation of Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-06

    Becker Muscular Dystrophy; Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy, Type 2A (Calpain-3 Deficiency); Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy, Type 2B (Miyoshi Myopathy, Dysferlin Deficiency); Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy, Type 2I (FKRP-deficiency)

  7. Disability and Survival in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Kohler, M; Clarenbach, C F; Bahler, C; Brack, T; Russi, E W; Bloch, K E

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) leads to progressive impairment of muscle function, respiratory failure and premature death. Longitudinal data on the course of physical disability and respiratory function are sparse. OBJECTIVES: To prospectively assess physical impairment and disability, respiratory function and survival in DMD patients over several years in order to describe the course of the disease with current care. METHODS: In 43 patients with DMD, aged 5-35 years, yearly a...

  8. Myosin Binding Protein-C Slow Phosphorylation is Altered in Duchenne Dystrophy and Arthrogryposis Myopathy in Fast-Twitch Skeletal Muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, Maegen A; Ward, Christopher W; Gurnett, Christina; Kontrogianni-Konstantopoulos, Aikaterini

    2015-08-19

    Myosin Binding Protein-C slow (sMyBP-C), encoded by MYBPC1, comprises a family of regulatory proteins of skeletal muscles that are phosphorylated by PKA and PKC. MYBPC1 missense mutations are linked to the development of Distal Arthrogryposis-1 (DA-1). Although structure-function details for this myopathy are evolving, function is undoubtedly driven by sequence variations and post-translational modifications in sMyBP-C. Herein, we examined the phosphorylation profile of sMyBP-C in mouse and human fast-twitch skeletal muscles. We used Flexor Digitorum Brevis (FDB) isolated from young (~2-months old) and old (~14-months old) wild type and mdx mice, and human Abductor Hallucis (AH) and gastrocnemious muscles carrying the DA-1 mutations. Our results indicate both constitutive and differential phosphorylation of sMyBP-C in aged and diseased muscles. We report a 7-35% reduction in the phosphorylation levels of select sites in old wild type and young or old mdx FDB mouse muscles, compared to young wild type tissue. Similarly, we observe a 30-70% decrease in the phosphorylation levels of all PKA and PKC phospho-sites in the DA-1 AH, but not gastrocnemius, muscle. Overall, our studies show that the phosphorylation pattern of sMyBP-C is differentially regulated in response to age and disease, suggesting that phosphorylation plays important roles in these processes.

  9. Bilateral nanophthalmos and pigmentary retinal dystrophy--an unusual syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proença, Helena; Castanheira-Dinis, A; Monteiro-Grillo, M

    2006-09-01

    To report the clinical picture of the rare association of nanophthalmos and pigmentary retinal dystrophy and its cataract surgery outcome. We report a case of a 60-year-old female who presented with bilateral slowly progressive visual loss. The patient presented with bilateral light perception visual acuity, exotropia, brunescent cataract hindering fundus examination and hypodontia. Ultrasonography revealed bilateral nanophthalmos. A visual-evoked potential was also performed preoperatively. Cataract surgery with +40D IOL implantation was uneventful. Postoperative fundus examination revealed pigmentary retinal dystrophy, confirmed by electrophysiologic tests. Glycosaminoglycan urinary excretion was normal. Congenital bilateral nanophthalmos may rarely be associated with pigmentary retinal dystrophy. We suggest thorough preoperative evaluation in nanophthalmic eyes for the exclusion of significant features concerning visual prognosis.

  10. Rhabdomyolysis featuring muscular dystrophies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahoria, Rajat; Milone, Margherita

    2016-02-15

    Rhabdomyolysis is a potentially life threatening condition of various etiology. The association between rhabdomyolysis and muscular dystrophies is under-recognized in clinical practice. To identify muscular dystrophies presenting with rhabdomyolysis at onset or as predominant feature. We retrospectively reviewed clinical and laboratory data of patients with a genetically confirmed muscular dystrophy in whom rhabdomyolysis was the presenting or main clinical manifestation. Thirteen unrelated patients (males=6; females=7) were identified. Median age at time of rhabdomyolysis was 18 years (range, 2-47) and median duration between the first episode of rhabdomyolysis and molecular diagnosis was 2 years. Fukutin-related protein (FKRP) muscular dystrophy (n=6) was the most common diagnosis, followed by anoctaminopathy-5 (n=3), calpainopathy-3 (n=2) and dystrophinopathy (n=2). Four patients experienced recurrent rhabdomyolysis. Eight patients were asymptomatic and 3 reported myalgia and exercise intolerance prior to the rhabdomyolysis. Exercise (n=6) and fever (n=4) were common triggers; rhabdomyolysis was unprovoked in 3 patients. Twelve patients required hospitalization. Baseline CK levels were elevated in all patients (median 1200 IU/L; range, 600-3600). Muscular dystrophies can present with rhabdomyolysis; FKRP mutations are particularly frequent in causing such complication. A persistently elevated CK level in patients with rhabdomyolysis warrants consideration for underlying muscular dystrophy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Common recessive limb girdle muscular dystrophies differential diagnosis: why and how?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Cotta

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Limb girdle muscular dystrophies are heterogeneous autosomal hereditary neuromuscular disorders. They produce dystrophic changes on muscle biopsy and they are associated with mutations in several genes involved in muscular structure and function. Detailed clinical, laboratorial, imaging, diagnostic flowchart, photographs, tables, and illustrated diagrams are presented for the differential diagnosis of common autosomal recessive limb girdle muscular dystrophy subtypes diagnosed nowadays at one reference center in Brazil. Preoperative image studies guide muscle biopsy site selection. Muscle involvement image pattern differs depending on the limb girdle muscular dystrophy subtype. Muscle involvement is conspicuous at the posterior thigh in calpainopathy and fukutin-related proteinopathy; anterior thigh in sarcoglycanopathy; whole thigh in dysferlinopathy, and telethoninopathy. The precise differential diagnosis of limb girdle muscular dystrophies is important for genetic counseling, prognostic orientation, cardiac and respiratory management. Besides that, it may probably, in the future, provide specific genetic therapies for each subtype.

  12. Muscular dystrophies: key elements for everyday diagnosis and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Palladino

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Muscular dystrophies are a heterogeneous group of inherited disorders that share similar clinical features and dystrophic changes on muscle biopsy, associated with progressive weakness. Weakness may be noted at birth or develop in late adult life. In recent years, cardiac involvement has been observed in a growing number of genetic muscle diseases, and considerable progress has been made in understanding the relationships between disease skeletal muscle and cardiac muscle disease. This review will focus on the skeletal muscle diseases most commonly associated with cardiac complications that can be diagnosed by echocardiography, such as dystrophinopathies including Duchenne (DMD and Becker (BMD muscular dystrophies, cardiomyopathy of DMD/BMD carriers and X-L dilated cardiomyopathy.

  13. Prevalence of muscular dystrophy in patients with muscular disorders in Tehran, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khadijeh Hajinaghi Tehrani

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Muscular dystrophy is a group of diseases that is characterized by progressive muscle wasting and the weakness of variable distribution and severity. On the basis of the distribution of predominant muscle weakness, there are many different kinds of muscular dystrophy. Some dystrophies are especially frequent in certain populations. There are no studies on the prevalence of muscular dystrophy in Iran. This study was aimed to survey the prevalence of muscular dystrophy among Iranian patients with muscular disorders. This analytical cross-sectional study was conducted on 1000 patients with musculoskeletal disorders who visited the dystrophy association of Bou-Ali Hospital (Tehran from June 2014 to June 2016. Patients’ data were extracted using a checklist that included age, gender, age of onset, family history, findings from clinical diagnostic tests and types of muscular dystrophy. The clinical findings were the results of genetic tests; EMG-NCV; para-clinical findings, including LDH and CPK; and pathological findings. All data were analyzed by SPSS V.22 (IBM Inc., NY with Chi Square and One way ANOVA tests. All analyses were performed with P = 0.05 considered as the threshold of statistical significant. Out of the 337 patients studied, 262 (77.7% were male and 75 (22.3% were female. Subjects had a mean (± SD age of 26.08 (± 11.86 years with an age range of 3 to 59 years. The most common types of muscular dystrophy were found to be Duchenne dystrophy (131 cases, 38.9%, limb-girdle dystrophy (91 cases, 27%, Becker dystrophy (58 cases, 17.2%, FSHD dystrophy (31 cases, 9.2%, and SMA (26 cases, 7.7%, respectively. The results showed that a statistically significant relationship between dystrophy types and gender, age, family history, age of diagnosis, CPK and LDH levels (P < 0.001. There were no statistical relationship between dystrophy types and pathological findings (P = 0.57, EMG-NCV test results (P = 0.062, and genetic findings (P = 0

  14. TNF inhibits Notch-1 in skeletal muscle cells by Ezh2 and DNA methylation mediated repression: implications in duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swarnali Acharyya

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Classical NF-kappaB signaling functions as a negative regulator of skeletal myogenesis through potentially multiple mechanisms. The inhibitory actions of TNFalpha on skeletal muscle differentiation are mediated in part through sustained NF-kappaB activity. In dystrophic muscles, NF-kappaB activity is compartmentalized to myofibers to inhibit regeneration by limiting the number of myogenic progenitor cells. This regulation coincides with elevated levels of muscle derived TNFalpha that is also under IKKbeta and NF-kappaB control.Based on these findings we speculated that in DMD, TNFalpha secreted from myotubes inhibits regeneration by directly acting on satellite cells. Analysis of several satellite cell regulators revealed that TNFalpha is capable of inhibiting Notch-1 in satellite cells and C2C12 myoblasts, which was also found to be dependent on NF-kappaB. Notch-1 inhibition occurred at the mRNA level suggesting a transcriptional repression mechanism. Unlike its classical mode of action, TNFalpha stimulated the recruitment of Ezh2 and Dnmt-3b to coordinate histone and DNA methylation, respectively. Dnmt-3b recruitment was dependent on Ezh2.We propose that in dystrophic muscles, elevated levels of TNFalpha and NF-kappaB inhibit the regenerative potential of satellite cells via epigenetic silencing of the Notch-1 gene.

  15. TNF Inhibits Notch-1 in Skeletal Muscle Cells by Ezh2 and DNA Methylation Mediated Repression: Implications in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharyya, Swarnali; Sharma, Sudarshana M.; Cheng, Alfred S.; Ladner, Katherine J.; He, Wei; Kline, William; Wang, Huating; Ostrowski, Michael C.; Huang, Tim H.; Guttridge, Denis C.

    2010-01-01

    Background Classical NF-κB signaling functions as a negative regulator of skeletal myogenesis through potentially multiple mechanisms. The inhibitory actions of TNFα on skeletal muscle differentiation are mediated in part through sustained NF-κB activity. In dystrophic muscles, NF-κB activity is compartmentalized to myofibers to inhibit regeneration by limiting the number of myogenic progenitor cells. This regulation coincides with elevated levels of muscle derived TNFα that is also under IKKβ and NF-κB control. Methodology/Principal Findings Based on these findings we speculated that in DMD, TNFα secreted from myotubes inhibits regeneration by directly acting on satellite cells. Analysis of several satellite cell regulators revealed that TNFα is capable of inhibiting Notch-1 in satellite cells and C2C12 myoblasts, which was also found to be dependent on NF-κB. Notch-1 inhibition occurred at the mRNA level suggesting a transcriptional repression mechanism. Unlike its classical mode of action, TNFα stimulated the recruitment of Ezh2 and Dnmt-3b to coordinate histone and DNA methylation, respectively. Dnmt-3b recruitment was dependent on Ezh2. Conclusions/Significance We propose that in dystrophic muscles, elevated levels of TNFα and NF-κB inhibit the regenerative potential of satellite cells via epigenetic silencing of the Notch-1 gene. PMID:20814569

  16. Learning about Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... protein. Often these boys are classified as having Becker muscular dystrophy. Genetic testing (looking at the body's genetic instructions) ... National Library of Medicine Web site Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy [ghr.nlm.nih.gov] From Genetics Home Reference ...

  17. Adult patient with Becker dystrophy undergoing orthopedic surgery: an anesthesia challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parish M

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Masoud Parish, Haleh Farzin Anesthesiology Department, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Shohada Teaching Hospital, Tabriz, Iran Abstract: Muscular dystrophies are considered to be a series of neuromuscular diseases with genetic causes and are characterized by progressive muscle weakness and degeneration of the skeletal muscle. The case of an adult man with Becker dystrophy referred for repair of the patella tendon tearing and patella fracture is described. He underwent successful surgery using total intravenous anesthesia without any complications. Keywords: Becker dystrophy, orthopedic surgery, adult, intravenous anesthesia

  18. Fatal cardiac arrhythmia and long-QT syndrome in a new form of congenital generalized lipodystrophy with muscle rippling (CGL4 due to PTRF-CAVIN mutations.

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    Anna Rajab

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available We investigated eight families with a novel subtype of congenital generalized lipodystrophy (CGL4 of whom five members had died from sudden cardiac death during their teenage years. ECG studies revealed features of long-QT syndrome, bradycardia, as well as supraventricular and ventricular tachycardias. Further symptoms comprised myopathy with muscle rippling, skeletal as well as smooth-muscle hypertrophy, leading to impaired gastrointestinal motility and hypertrophic pyloric stenosis in some children. Additionally, we found impaired bone formation with osteopenia, osteoporosis, and atlanto-axial instability. Homozygosity mapping located the gene within 2 Mbp on chromosome 17. Prioritization of 74 candidate genes with GeneDistiller for high expression in muscle and adipocytes suggested PTRF-CAVIN (Polymerase I and transcript release factor/Cavin as the most probable candidate leading to the detection of homozygous mutations (c.160delG, c.362dupT. PTRF-CAVIN is essential for caveolae biogenesis. These cholesterol-rich plasmalemmal vesicles are involved in signal-transduction and vesicular trafficking and reside primarily on adipocytes, myocytes, and osteoblasts. Absence of PTRF-CAVIN did not influence abundance of its binding partner caveolin-1 and caveolin-3. In patient fibroblasts, however, caveolin-1 failed to localize toward the cell surface and electron microscopy revealed reduction of caveolae to less than 3%. Transfection of full-length PTRF-CAVIN reestablished the presence of caveolae. The loss of caveolae was confirmed by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM in combination with fluorescent imaging. PTRF-CAVIN deficiency thus presents the phenotypic spectrum caused by a quintessential lack of functional caveolae.

  19. Bestrophin-3 (vitelliform macular dystrophy 2-like 3 protein) is essential for the cGMP-dependent calcium-activated chloride conductance in vascular smooth muscle cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matchkov, Vladimir; Larsen, Per; Bouzinova, Elena V.

    2008-01-01

    have recently characterized a cGMP-dependent Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) current with unique characteristics in smooth muscle cells. This novel current has been shown to coexist with a "classic" (cGMP-independent) Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) current and to have characteristics distinct from those previously...... known for Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) currents. Here, we suggest that a bestrophin, a product of the Best gene family, is responsible for the cGMP-dependent Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) current based on similarities between the membrane currents produced by heterologous expressions of bestrophins and the cGMP......-dependent Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) current. This is supported by similarities in the distribution pattern of the cGMP-dependent Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) current and bestrophin-3 (the product of Best-3 gene) expression in different smooth muscle. Furthermore, downregulation of Best-3 gene expression with small...

  20. The Effect of Cleft Palate Repair on Contractile Properties of Single Permeabilized Muscle Fibers From Congenitally Cleft Goats Palates

    Science.gov (United States)

    A cleft palate goat model was used to study the contractile properties of the levator veli palatini (LVP) muscle which is responsible for the movement of the soft palate. In 15-25% of patients that undergo palatoplasty, residual velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI) remains a problem and often require...

  1. Types of CMT

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Marie-Tooth Disease (CMT) Congenital Muscular Dystrophy (CMD) Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) Emery-Dreifuss Muscular Dystrophy Endocrine Myopathies Metabolic Diseases of Muscle Mitochondrial Myopathies (MM) Myotonic Dystrophy (DM) Spinal-Bulbar ...

  2. Dermatomyositis: Signs and Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Marie-Tooth Disease (CMT) Congenital Muscular Dystrophy (CMD) Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) Emery-Dreifuss Muscular Dystrophy Endocrine Myopathies Metabolic Diseases of Muscle Mitochondrial Myopathies (MM) Myotonic Dystrophy (DM) Spinal-Bulbar ...

  3. Dermatomyositis: Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Marie-Tooth Disease (CMT) Congenital Muscular Dystrophy (CMD) Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) Emery-Dreifuss Muscular Dystrophy Endocrine Myopathies Metabolic Diseases of Muscle Mitochondrial Myopathies (MM) Myotonic Dystrophy (DM) Spinal-Bulbar ...

  4. Signs and Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Marie-Tooth Disease (CMT) Congenital Muscular Dystrophy (CMD) Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) Emery-Dreifuss Muscular Dystrophy Endocrine Myopathies Metabolic Diseases of Muscle Mitochondrial Myopathies (MM) Myotonic Dystrophy (DM) Spinal-Bulbar ...

  5. Polymyositis: Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Marie-Tooth Disease (CMT) Congenital Muscular Dystrophy (CMD) Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) Emery-Dreifuss Muscular Dystrophy Endocrine Myopathies Metabolic Diseases of Muscle Mitochondrial Myopathies (MM) Myotonic Dystrophy (DM) Spinal-Bulbar ...

  6. Causes of Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease (CMT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Marie-Tooth Disease (CMT) Congenital Muscular Dystrophy (CMD) Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) Emery-Dreifuss Muscular Dystrophy Endocrine Myopathies Metabolic Diseases of Muscle Mitochondrial Myopathies (MM) Myotonic Dystrophy (DM) Spinal-Bulbar ...

  7. Histopathological findings in Becker-type muscular dystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Houten, R.; de Visser, M.

    1984-01-01

    Muscle biopsy specimens from 14 patients with Becker-type muscular dystrophy were analyzed to investigate possible neurogenic factors underlying the histopathological changes. Group atrophy, pyknotic nuclear clumps, and angular small fibers were seen respectively in 71%, 85%, and 100% of the cases.

  8. Becker′s Muscular Dystrophy-A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajendran P

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of Becker′s Muscular dystrophy (BMD in a 26-year-old male is reported. Muscle biopsy immunohistochemical staining showed absence of labelling for dystrophin along the sacrolemmal membrane in majority of the fibres. Antibodies to adhalin and merosin showed normal localisation along the sacrolemma.

  9. Computed tomographic findings in manifesting carriers of Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Visser, M.; Verbeeten, B.

    1985-01-01

    Clinical and computed tomographic (CT) findings in 3 manifesting carriers of Duchenne muscular dystrophy are reported. CT proved to be an important adjunct to the clinical examination: in all our 3 cases a decrease in density was found in various non-paretic muscles

  10. Antisense mediated exon skipping therapy for duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brolin, Camilla; Shiraishi, Takehiko

    2011-01-01

    Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) is a lethal disease caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene (DMD) that result in the absence of essential muscle protein dystrophin. Among many different approaches for DMD treatment, exon skipping, mediated by antisense oligonucleotides, is one of the most...

  11. Occult Macular Dystrophy

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    Işıl Sayman Muslubaş

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Occult macular dystrophy is an inherited macular dystrophy characterized by a progressive decline of bilateral visual acuity with normal fundus appearance, fluorescein angiogram and full-field electroretinogram. This case report presents a 20-year-old female patient with bilateral progressive decline of visual acuity for six years. Her visual acuity was 3-4/10 in both eyes. Anterior segment and fundus examination, fluorescein angiogram and full-field electroretinogram were normal. She could read all Ishihara pseudoisochromatic plates. Fundus autofluorescence imaging was normal. There was a mild central hyporeflectance on fundus infrared reflectance imaging in both eyes. Reduced foveal thickness and alterations of the photoreceptor inner and outer segment junction were observed by optical coherence tomography in both eyes. Central scotoma was also found by microperimetry and reduced central response was revealed by multifocal electroretinogram in both eyes. These findings are consistent with the clinical characteristics of occult macular dystrophy

  12. Rimmed vacuoles in Becker muscular dystrophy have similar features with inclusion myopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momma, Kazunari; Noguchi, Satoru; Malicdan, May Christine V; Hayashi, Yukiko K; Minami, Narihiro; Kamakura, Keiko; Nonaka, Ikuya; Nishino, Ichizo

    2012-01-01

    Rimmed vacuoles in myofibers are thought to be due to the accumulation of autophagic vacuoles, and can be characteristic in certain myopathies with protein inclusions in myofibers. In this study, we performed a detailed clinical, molecular, and pathological characterization of Becker muscular dystrophy patients who have rimmed vacuoles in muscles. Among 65 Becker muscular dystrophy patients, we identified 12 patients who have rimmed vacuoles and 11 patients who have deletions in exons 45-48 in DMD gene. All patients having rimmed vacuoles showed milder clinical features compared to those without rimmed vacuoles. Interestingly, the rimmed vacuoles in Becker muscular dystrophy muscles seem to represent autophagic vacuoles and are also associated with polyubiquitinated protein aggregates. These findings support the notion that rimmed vacuoles can appear in Becker muscular dystrophy, and may be related to the chronic changes in muscle pathology induced by certain mutations in the DMD gene.

  13. Rimmed vacuoles in Becker muscular dystrophy have similar features with inclusion myopathies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazunari Momma

    Full Text Available Rimmed vacuoles in myofibers are thought to be due to the accumulation of autophagic vacuoles, and can be characteristic in certain myopathies with protein inclusions in myofibers. In this study, we performed a detailed clinical, molecular, and pathological characterization of Becker muscular dystrophy patients who have rimmed vacuoles in muscles. Among 65 Becker muscular dystrophy patients, we identified 12 patients who have rimmed vacuoles and 11 patients who have deletions in exons 45-48 in DMD gene. All patients having rimmed vacuoles showed milder clinical features compared to those without rimmed vacuoles. Interestingly, the rimmed vacuoles in Becker muscular dystrophy muscles seem to represent autophagic vacuoles and are also associated with polyubiquitinated protein aggregates. These findings support the notion that rimmed vacuoles can appear in Becker muscular dystrophy, and may be related to the chronic changes in muscle pathology induced by certain mutations in the DMD gene.

  14. Effects of vitamin C, vitamin E, zinc gluconate, and selenomethionine supplementation on muscle function and oxidative stress biomarkers in patients with facioscapulohumeral dystrophy: a double-blind randomized controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passerieux, Emilie; Hayot, Maurice; Jaussent, Audrey; Carnac, Gilles; Gouzi, Fares; Pillard, Fabien; Picot, Marie-Christine; Böcker, Koen; Hugon, Gerald; Pincemail, Joel; Defraigne, Jean O; Verrips, Theo; Mercier, Jacques; Laoudj-Chenivesse, Dalila

    2015-04-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by progressive weakness and atrophy of specific skeletal muscles. As growing evidence suggests that oxidative stress may contribute to FSHD pathology, antioxidants that might modulate or delay oxidative insults could help in maintaining FSHD muscle function. Our primary objective was to test whether oral administration of vitamin C, vitamin E, zinc gluconate, and selenomethionine could improve the physical performance of patients with FSHD. Adult patients with FSHD (n=53) were enrolled at Montpellier University Hospital (France) in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot clinical trial. Patients were randomly assigned to receive 500 mg vitamin C, 400mg vitamin E, 25mg zinc gluconate and 200 μg selenomethionine (n=26), or matching placebo (n=27) once a day for 17 weeks. Primary outcomes were changes in the two-minute walking test (2-MWT), maximal voluntary contraction, and endurance limit time of the dominant and nondominant quadriceps (MVCQD, MVCQND, TlimQD, and TlimQND, respectively) after 17 weeks of treatment. Secondary outcomes were changes in the antioxidant status and oxidative stress markers. Although 2-MWT, MVCQ, and TlimQ were all significantly improved in the supplemented group at the end of the treatment compared to baseline, only MVCQ and TlimQ variations were significantly different between groups (MVCQD: P=0.011; MVCQND: P=0.004; TlimQD: P=0.028; TlimQND: P=0.011). Similarly, the vitamin C (P<0.001), vitamin E as α-tocopherol (P<0.001), vitamin C/vitamin E ratio (P=0.017), vitamin E γ/α ratio (P=0.022) and lipid peroxides (P<0.001) variations were significantly different between groups. In conclusion, vitamin E, vitamin C, zinc, and selenium supplementation has no significant effect on the 2-MWT, but improves MVCQ and TlimQ of both quadriceps by enhancing the antioxidant defenses and reducing oxidative stress. This trial was registered at

  15. Computed tomography in Duchenne type muscular dystrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawai, Mitsuru; Kunimoto, Masanari; Motoyoshi, Yasufumi; Kuwata, Takashi; Nakano, Imaharu

    1985-01-01

    The computed tomography (CT) scan was performed on 91 Duchenne type muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients on the following four levels; (1) at the level of L3 vertebra, (2) 2-3cm above the symphysis pubica, (3) midposition of the thigh, (4) largest-diameter section of the lower leg. The CT of muscles common to most of the DMD patients were as follows: 1. Muscle atrophy: Muscle atrophy was shown as a reduction in the cross-sectional area of the muscles. Very mild muscle atrophy could be detected either by the clearly identified muscle border or by scattered low-density areas of so-called ''moth-eaten'' appearance within muscles. 2. Fat infiltration: The decrease in radio-density of muscles was interpreted as infiltration of fatty tissue. This type of density change was further classified into diffuse, streaked, cobblestone and salt-and-pepper patterns according to the spacial distribution of low-density areas. 3. Selectivity pattern: As the chronological sequence of DMD muscle degeneration is usually different among individual muscles, it may be seen, in some stages, that some of the synergistic muscles are still only slightly involved, while the others are quite severely atrophied with evident fat infiltration. In certain stages of the disease, most of the patients show relative preservation of particular muscles although they assumed a rounded shape. The most resistent muscle was musculus gracilis, followed by the musculus sartorius, musculus semitendinosus (and/or musculus semimembranosus) in that order. According to the severity of the CT changes, 86 of the 91 patients were classed into five stages from A1 to A5. Morphological stages (A1-A5) were well correlated to the functional disability stages by Ueda with a correlation factor of r=0.88. (J.P.N.)

  16. Dystrophin Immunity in Duchenne’s Muscular Dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Mendell, Jerry R.; Campbell, Katherine; Rodino-Klapac, Louise; Sahenk, Zarife; Shilling, Chris; Lewis, Sarah; Bowles, Dawn; Gray, Steven; Li, Chengwen; Galloway, Gloria; Malik, Vinod; Coley, Brian; Clark, K. Reed; Li, Juan; Xiao, Xiao

    2010-01-01

    We report on delivery of a functional dystrophin transgene to skeletal muscle in six patients with Duchenne’s muscular dystrophy. Dystrophin-specific T cells were detected after treatment, providing evidence of transgene expression even when the functional protein was not visualized in skeletal muscle. Circulating dystrophin-specific T cells were unexpectedly detected in two patients before vector treatment. Revertant dystrophin fibers, which expressed functional, truncated dystrophin from th...

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging of children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schreiber, A.; Smith, W.L.; Franken, E.A.; Dunn, V.; Ehrhardt, J.; Ionasescu, V.; Zellweger, H.

    1987-10-01

    Eight children representing a spectrum of clinical states of biopsy-proven Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) underwent magnetic resonance (MR) scans to assess the degree of muscular involvement and disease progression. Five muscle groups (neck, shoulder girdle, pelvic girdle, thigh and calf) were evaluated. In each case, involved muscles were clearly demarcated. Image estimates of disease severity by degree of muscle involvement correlated well with clinical staging. In our experience MR is useful for assessment of disease stage, selection of appropriate muscles for biopsy and planning for courses of physical and rehabilitation therapy.

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging of children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreiber, A.; Smith, W.L.; Franken, E.A.; Dunn, V.; Ehrhardt, J.; Ionasescu, V.; Zellweger, H.

    1987-01-01

    Eight children representing a spectrum of clinical states of biopsy-proven Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) underwent magnetic resonance (MR) scans to assess the degree of muscular involvement and disease progression. Five muscle groups (neck, shoulder girdle, pelvic girdle, thigh and calf) were evaluated. In each case, involved muscles were clearly demarcated. Image estimates of disease severity by degree of muscle involvement correlated well with clinical staging. In our experience MR is useful for assessment of disease stage, selection of appropriate muscles for biopsy and planning for courses of physical and rehabilitation therapy. (orig.)

  19. NAD+ Biosynthesis Ameliorates a Zebrafish Model of Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goody, Michelle F.; Kelly, Meghan W.; Reynolds, Christine J.; Khalil, Andre; Crawford, Bryan D.; Henry, Clarissa A.

    2012-01-01

    Muscular dystrophies are common, currently incurable diseases. A subset of dystrophies result from genetic disruptions in complexes that attach muscle fibers to their surrounding extracellular matrix microenvironment. Cell-matrix adhesions are exquisite sensors of physiological conditions and mediate responses that allow cells to adapt to changing conditions. Thus, one approach towards finding targets for future therapeutic applications is to identify cell adhesion pathways that mediate these dynamic, adaptive responses in vivo. We find that nicotinamide riboside kinase 2b-mediated NAD+ biosynthesis, which functions as a small molecule agonist of muscle fiber-extracellular matrix adhesion, corrects dystrophic phenotypes in zebrafish lacking either a primary component of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex or integrin alpha7. Exogenous NAD+ or a vitamin precursor to NAD+ reduces muscle fiber degeneration and results in significantly faster escape responses in dystrophic embryos. Overexpression of paxillin, a cell adhesion protein downstream of NAD+ in this novel cell adhesion pathway, reduces muscle degeneration in zebrafish with intact integrin receptors but does not improve motility. Activation of this pathway significantly increases organization of laminin, a major component of the extracellular matrix basement membrane. Our results indicate that the primary protective effects of NAD+ result from changes to the basement membrane, as a wild-type basement membrane is sufficient to increase resilience of dystrophic muscle fibers to damage. The surprising result that NAD+ supplementation ameliorates dystrophy in dystrophin-glycoprotein complex– or integrin alpha7–deficient zebrafish suggests the existence of an additional laminin receptor complex that anchors muscle fibers to the basement membrane. We find that integrin alpha6 participates in this pathway, but either integrin alpha7 or the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex is required in conjunction with integrin

  20. NAD+ biosynthesis ameliorates a zebrafish model of muscular dystrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle F Goody

    Full Text Available Muscular dystrophies are common, currently incurable diseases. A subset of dystrophies result from genetic disruptions in complexes that attach muscle fibers to their surrounding extracellular matrix microenvironment. Cell-matrix adhesions are exquisite sensors of physiological conditions and mediate responses that allow cells to adapt to changing conditions. Thus, one approach towards finding targets for future therapeutic applications is to identify cell adhesion pathways that mediate these dynamic, adaptive responses in vivo. We find that nicotinamide riboside kinase 2b-mediated NAD+ biosynthesis, which functions as a small molecule agonist of muscle fiber-extracellular matrix adhesion, corrects dystrophic phenotypes in zebrafish lacking either a primary component of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex or integrin alpha7. Exogenous NAD+ or a vitamin precursor to NAD+ reduces muscle fiber degeneration and results in significantly faster escape responses in dystrophic embryos. Overexpression of paxillin, a cell adhesion protein downstream of NAD+ in this novel cell adhesion pathway, reduces muscle degeneration in zebrafish with intact integrin receptors but does not improve motility. Activation of this pathway significantly increases organization of laminin, a major component of the extracellular matrix basement membrane. Our results indicate that the primary protective effects of NAD+ result from changes to the basement membrane, as a wild-type basement membrane is sufficient to increase resilience of dystrophic muscle fibers to damage. The surprising result that NAD+ supplementation ameliorates dystrophy in dystrophin-glycoprotein complex- or integrin alpha7-deficient zebrafish suggests the existence of an additional laminin receptor complex that anchors muscle fibers to the basement membrane. We find that integrin alpha6 participates in this pathway, but either integrin alpha7 or the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex is required in conjunction

  1. Sarcopenia and sarcopenic obesity in patients with muscular dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano eMerlini

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Aging sarcopenia and muscular dystrophy are two conditions characterized by lower skeletal muscle quantity, lower muscle strength, and lower physical performance. Aging is associated with a peculiar alteration in body composition called sarcopenic obesity characterized by a decrease in lean body mass and increase in fat mass. To evaluate the presence of sarcopenia and obesity in a cohort of adult patients with muscular dystrophy we have used the measurement techniques considered golden standard for sarcopenia that is for muscle mass dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA, for muscle strength hand held dynamometry, and for physical performance gait speed. The study involved 14 adult patients with different types of muscular dystrophy. We were able to demonstrate that all patient were sarcopenic-obese. We showed in fact that all were sarcopenic based on appendicular lean, fat & bone free, mass index (ALMI. In addition all resulted obese according to the % of body fat determined by DXA in contrast with their body mass index ranging from underweight to obese. Skeletal muscle mass determined by DXA was markedly reduced in all patients and correlated with residual muscle strength determined by hand held dynamometry, and physical performances determined by gait speed and respiratory function. Finally we showed that ALMI was the best linear explicator of muscle strength and physical function. Altogether, our study suggest the relevance of a proper evaluation of body composition in muscular dystrophy and we propose to use, both in research and practice, the measurement techniques that has already been demonstrated effective in aging sarcopenia.

  2. CRB2 acts as a modifying factor of CRB1-related retinal dystrophies in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pellissier, L.P.; Lundvig, D.M.S.; Tanimoto, N.; Klooster, J.; Vos, R.M.; Richard, F.; Sothilingam, V.; Garrido, M. Garcia; Bivic, A. le; Seeliger, M.W.; Wijnholds, J.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the CRB1 gene lead to retinal dystrophies ranging from Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) to early-onset retinitis pigmentosa (RP), due to developmental defects or loss of adhesion between photoreceptors and Muller glia cells, respectively. Whereas over 150 mutations have been found, no

  3. CRB2 acts as a modifying factor of CRB1-related retinal dystrophies in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pellissier, Lucie P; Lundvig, Ditte M S; Tanimoto, Naoyuki; Klooster, J.; Vos, Rogier M; Richard, Fabrice; Sothilingam, Vithiyanjali; Garcia Garrido, Marina; Le Bivic, André; Seeliger, Mathias W; Wijnholds, J.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the CRB1 gene lead to retinal dystrophies ranging from Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) to early-onset retinitis pigmentosa (RP), due to developmental defects or loss of adhesion between photoreceptors and Müller glia cells, respectively. Whereas over 150 mutations have been found, no

  4. FHL1 reduces dystrophy in transgenic mice overexpressing FSHD muscular dystrophy region gene 1 (FRG1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra J Feeney

    Full Text Available Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD is an autosomal-dominant disease with no effective treatment. The genetic cause of FSHD is complex and the primary pathogenic insult underlying the muscle disease is unknown. Several disease candidate genes have been proposed including DUX4 and FRG1. Expression analysis studies of FSHD report the deregulation of genes which mediate myoblast differentiation and fusion. Transgenic mice overexpressing FRG1 recapitulate the FSHD muscular dystrophy phenotype. Our current study selectively examines how increased expression of FRG1 may contribute to myoblast differentiation defects. We generated stable C2C12 cell lines overexpressing FRG1, which exhibited a myoblast fusion defect upon differentiation. To determine if myoblast fusion defects contribute to the FRG1 mouse dystrophic phenotype, this strain was crossed with skeletal muscle specific FHL1-transgenic mice. We previously reported that FHL1 promotes myoblast fusion in vitro and FHL1-transgenic mice develop skeletal muscle hypertrophy. In the current study, FRG1 mice overexpressing FHL1 showed an improvement in the dystrophic phenotype, including a reduced spinal kyphosis, increased muscle mass and myofiber size, and decreased muscle fibrosis. FHL1 expression in FRG1 mice, did not alter satellite cell number or activation, but enhanced myoblast fusion. Primary myoblasts isolated from FRG1 mice showed a myoblast fusion defect that was rescued by FHL1 expression. Therefore, increased FRG1 expression may contribute to a muscular dystrophy phenotype resembling FSHD by impairing myoblast fusion, a defect that can be rescued by enhanced myoblast fusion via expression of FHL1.

  5. Contractility and supersensitivity to adrenaline in dystrophic muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamori, M

    1975-01-01

    In the adductor pollicis muscle of patients with limb-girdle and facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophies and possible carriers of Duchenne type muscular dystrophy, abnormal active state properties were found at the time when there was no alteration of needle electromyography and evoked muscle action potentials. Adrenaline induced a marked reduction of incomplete tetanus via beta receptors without change in neuromuscular transmission. PMID:1151415

  6. The protective efficacy and safety of bandage contact lenses in children aged 5 to 11 after frontalis muscle flap suspension for congenital blepharoptosis: A single-center randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin; Pi, Lianhong; Ke, Ning; Chen, Xinke; Liu, Qing

    2017-09-01

    Postoperative complications, lagophthalmos and exposure keratopathy sometimes occur after surgery for congenital blepharoptosis. Bandage contact lenses (BCL) can help prevent some ocular surface disorders. The study aims to evaluate the efficacy and safety of BCL for protection of the ocular surface in children aged 5 to 11 years after frontalis muscle flap suspension for congenital blepharoptosis. We conducted a prospective randomized clinical study of 30 eyes of 30 patients with congenital blepharoptosis consecutively enrolled at the Ophthalmology Ward of the Children's Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, China from September 1, 2016, to February 30, 2017. After frontalis muscle flap suspension surgery, patients were randomly assigned to undergo BCL application (BCL group, 15 eyes) or no BCL application (control group, 15 eyes). All patients were treated with bramycin 0.3% and polyvinyl alcohol drops after surgery. The primary outcomes were dry eye assessed by tear film break time (TFBUT), fluoresce in corneal staining (FCS) on slit-lamp on days 1, 3, and 15 postoperatively, and lower tear meniscus height (LTMH) on optical coherence tomography on days 1 and 15 postoperatively. Secondary outcomes were pairwise correlation of TFBUT, FCS and LTMH. In the BCL group, abnormal TFBUT and FCS were only found in 2 patients (13.33%) on postoperative day 15. In the control group, the incidence of dry eye assessed by TFBUT was 67.00% (10/15 eyes) on day 1, 73.33% (11/15 eyes) on day 3, and 53.33% (8/15 eyes) on day 15 (P days 1 and 15 post-operation. For LTMH and FCSS (R = -0.815, P day 1, but not correlated on day 15. Silicone hydrogel BCL were safe and efficacious for protective use in children after frontalis muscle flap suspension for congenital blepharoptosis.

  7. The muscular dystrophies associated with central nervous system lesions: a brief review from a standpoint of the localization and function of causative genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Tomoko; Hiroi, Atsuko; Osawa, Makiko; Shibata, Noriyuki

    2014-01-01

    The muscular dystrophies have been traditionally classified based mainly on clinical manifestation and mode of inheritance. Owing to the discoveries of causative genes, new terminologies derived from each gene, such as dystrophinopathy, α-dystroglycanopathy, sarcoglycanopathy and fukutinopathy, have also become common. Mutations of each gene may cause several clinical phenotypes. Some muscular dystrophies accompany central nervous system (CNS) lesions, especially in the congenital muscular dystrophies. Cobblestone lissencephaly (type II lissencephaly) is a well-known CNS malformation observed in severe forms of α-dystroglycanopathy. Moreover, CNS involvement has been reported in other muscular dystrophies, such as Duchenne muscular dystrophy. In this review, genes related to the muscular dystrophies associated with CNS lesions are briefly described along with the molecular characteristics of each gene and the pathomechanism of the CNS lesions. Understanding of both the clinicopathological characteristics of these CNS lesions and their molecular mechanisms is important for the diagnosis, care of patients, and development of new therapeutic strategies.

  8. Muscle Stem Cell Therapy for the Treatment of DMD Associated Cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    SUBTITLE Muscle Stem Cell Therapy for the Treatment of DMD Associated Cardiomyopathy 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Subproject 1: Muscle Stem Cell Therapy...various muscle diseases, including Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), develop progressive cardiomyopathy. Cellular cardiomyoplasty, which involves the

  9. [Atypical reaction to anesthesia in Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Helga Cristina Almeida da; Hiray, Marcia; Vainzof, Mariz; Schmidt, Beny; Oliveira, Acary Souza Bulle; Amaral, José Luiz Gomes do

    2017-05-31

    Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophy affects skeletal muscles and leads to progressive muscle weakness and risk of atypical anesthetic reactions following exposure to succinylcholine or halogenated agents. The aim of this report is to describe the investigation and diagnosis of a patient with Becker muscular dystrophy and review the care required in anesthesia. Male patient, 14 years old, referred for hyperCKemia (chronic increase of serum creatine kinase levels - CK), with CK values of 7,779-29,040IU.L -1 (normal 174IU.L -1 ). He presented with a discrete delay in motor milestones acquisition (sitting at 9 months, walking at 18 months). He had a history of liver transplantation. In the neurological examination, the patient showed difficulty in walking on one's heels, myopathic sign (hands supported on the thighs to stand), high arched palate, calf hypertrophy, winged scapulae, global muscle hypotonia and arreflexia. Spirometry showed mild restrictive respiratory insufficiency (forced vital capacity: 77% of predicted). The in vitro muscle contracture test in response to halothane and caffeine was normal. Muscular dystrophy analysis by Western blot showed reduced dystrophin (20% of normal) for both antibodies (C and N-terminal), allowing the diagnosis of Becker muscular dystrophy. On preanesthetic assessment, the history of delayed motor development, as well as clinical and/or laboratory signs of myopathy, should encourage neurological evaluation, aiming at diagnosing subclinical myopathies and planning the necessary care to prevent anesthetic complications. Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophy, although it does not increase susceptibility to MH, may lead to atypical fatal reactions in anesthesia. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  10. Sarcospan Regulates Cardiac Isoproterenol Response and Prevents Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy-Associated Cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parvatiyar, Michelle S; Marshall, Jamie L; Nguyen, Reginald T; Jordan, Maria C; Richardson, Vanitra A; Roos, Kenneth P; Crosbie-Watson, Rachelle H

    2015-12-23

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a fatal cardiac and skeletal muscle disease resulting from mutations in the dystrophin gene. We have previously demonstrated that a dystrophin-associated protein, sarcospan (SSPN), ameliorated Duchenne muscular dystrophy skeletal muscle degeneration by activating compensatory pathways that regulate muscle cell adhesion (laminin-binding) to the extracellular matrix. Conversely, loss of SSPN destabilized skeletal muscle adhesion, hampered muscle regeneration, and reduced force properties. Given the importance of SSPN to skeletal muscle, we investigated the consequences of SSPN ablation in cardiac muscle and determined whether overexpression of SSPN into mdx mice ameliorates cardiac disease symptoms associated with Duchenne muscular dystrophy cardiomyopathy. SSPN-null mice exhibited cardiac enlargement, exacerbated cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, and increased fibrosis in response to β-adrenergic challenge (isoproterenol; 0.8 mg/day per 2 weeks). Biochemical analysis of SSPN-null cardiac muscle revealed reduced sarcolemma localization of many proteins with a known role in cardiomyopathy pathogenesis: dystrophin, the sarcoglycans (α-, δ-, and γ-subunits), and β1D integrin. Transgenic overexpression of SSPN in Duchenne muscular dystrophy mice (mdx(TG)) improved cardiomyofiber cell adhesion, sarcolemma integrity, cardiac functional parameters, as well as increased expression of compensatory transmembrane proteins that mediate attachment to the extracellular matrix. SSPN regulates sarcolemmal expression of laminin-binding complexes that are critical to cardiac muscle function and protects against transient and chronic injury, including inherited cardiomyopathy. © 2015 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  11. Congenital Hypothyroidism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease Featured Resource Find an Endocrinologist Search Congenital Hypothyroidism March 2012 Download PDFs English Espanol Editors Rosalind S. ... Resources MedlinePlus (NIH) Mayo Clinic What is congenital hypothyroidism? Newborn babies who are unable to make enough ...

  12. In Situ Immunofluorescent Staining of Autophagy in Muscle Stem Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Castagnetti, Francesco; Fiacco, Elisabetta; Imbriano, Carol; Latella, Lucia

    2017-01-01

    with productive muscle regeneration. These data uncover the crucial role of autophagy in satellite cell activation during muscle regeneration in both normal and pathological conditions, such as muscular dystrophies. Here, we provide a protocol to monitor

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging phenotyping of Becker muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faridian-Aragh, Neda; Wagner, Kathryn R; Leung, Doris G; Carrino, John A

    2014-12-01

    There is little information on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) phenotypes of Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD). This study presents the MRI phenotyping of the upper and lower extremities of a large cohort of BMD patients. In this retrospective study, MRI images of 33 BMD subjects were evaluated for severity, distribution, and symmetry of involvement. Teres major, triceps long head, biceps brachii long head, gluteus maximus, gluteus medius, vasti, adductor longus, adductor magnus, semitendinosus, semimembranosus, and biceps femoris muscles showed the highest severity and frequency of involvement. All analyzed muscles had a high frequency of symmetric involvement. There was significant variability of involvement between muscles within some muscle groups, most notably the arm abductors, posterior arm muscles, media