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Sample records for congenital long-qt syndrome

  1. Congenital long QT syndrome in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cerović Ivana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Long QT syndrome (LQTS is a cardiac repolarization disorder characterized by prolonged QT interval on the electrocardiogram (ECG and increased propensity to ventricular tachyarrhythmias and cardiac events. LQTS might be acquired or congenital, which presents a group of channelopathies that occur due to mutation in one of 15 so far identified genes. The most frequent types of congenital LTQS are LQT1, LQT2 and LQT3. Prolonged or delayed repolarization leads to the increase of action potential duration which predisposes early afterdepolarization, as well as the amplification of transmural dispersion of repolarization, both contributing to the development of Torsades de Pointes ventricular tachycardia. Clinical manifestations of LQTS are palpitations, syncope, aborted cardiac arrest or sudden cardiac death, but it can also be asymptomatic. Trigger factors for symptoms are specific for certain genotype. LQTS examination includes thorough clinical and family history focused on distinctive data (repeated syncopes, cases of sudden cardiac death in the family, hereditary arrhythmias, resting ECG, exercise stress testing and genetic analysis, with additional methods (serial ECG records, 24h ECG Holter, epinephrine test. Clinical LQTS diagnosis is based on Schwartz's scoring system, while the criteria for final diagnosis of LQTS depend on Schwartz's score, QT interval duration, presence of pathogenic mutation and clinical symptoms. Treatment approach begins with lifestyle modifications and β-blockers therapy, while other options include implantable cardioverter- defibrillator, permanent pacemaker or surgical sympathectomy. Sudden cardiac death is the reason of 90% of sudden deaths in young athletes, while LQTS is one of its causes. Recommendations for physical activities in children with congenital LQTS arise from the ones for adults and they presume very strict limitations. Further researches are expected to advance the understanding of genotype

  2. The congenital long QT syndrome Type 3: An update

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    Andrés Ricardo Pérez-Riera

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital long QT syndrome type 3 (LQT3 is the third in frequency compared to the 15 forms known currently of congenital long QT syndrome (LQTS. Cardiac events are less frequent in LQT3 when compared with LQT1 and LQT2, but more likely to be lethal; the likelihood of dying during a cardiac event is 20% in families with an LQT3 mutation and 4% with either an LQT1 or an LQT2 mutation. LQT3 is consequence of mutation of gene SCN5A which codes for the Nav1.5 Na+ channel α-subunit and electrocardiographically characterized by a tendency to bradycardia related to age, prolonged QT/QTc interval (mean QTc value 478 ± 52 ms, accentuated QT dispersion consequence of prolonged ST segment, late onset of T wave and frequent prominent U wave because of longer repolarization of the M cell across left ventricular wall.

  3. Long QT syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contreras Z, Eduardo; Gomez M, Juan E; Zuluaga M, Sandra X.

    2008-01-01

    Long QT syndrome is a disease characterized by the electrocardiographic alteration in ventricular repolarization manifested by prolonged QT interval, secondary to prolonged ventricular repolarization. This makes these patients more vulnerable to very fast ventricular arrhythmias such as torsade des pointes or ventricular fibrillation. This syndrome is generally observed in young people and is associated with sudden death. It may appear as part of congenital LQTS (Jervell and Lange-Nielsen and Romano- Ward), or may be secondarily acquired due to metabolic or toxic alterations or to other pathophysiologic factors.

  4. Pregnancy and the risk of torsades de pointes in congenital long-QT syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meregalli, P. G.; Westendorp, I. C. D.; Tan, H. L.; Elsman, P.; Kok, W. E. M.; Wilde, A. A. M.

    2008-01-01

    Patients with congenital long-QT syndrome (LQTS) are at increased risk of ventricular arrhythmias during stressful situations. Large-scale studies have pointed out that affected individuals are particularly at risk in the period following pregnancy (post-partum). This is recognised especially for

  5. Prognostic implications of mutation-specific QTc standard deviation in congenital long QT syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mathias, Andrew; Moss, Arthur J.; Lopes, Coeli M.; Barsheshet, Alon; McNitt, Scott; Zareba, Wojciech; Robinson, Jennifer L.; Locati, Emanuela H.; Ackerman, Michael J.; Benhorin, Jesaia; Kaufman, Elizabeth S.; Platonov, Pyotr G.; Qi, Ming; Shimizu, Wataru; Towbin, Jeffrey A.; Michael Vincent, G.; Wilde, Arthur A. M.; Zhang, Li; Goldenberg, Ilan

    2013-01-01

    Individual corrected QT interval (QTc) may vary widely among carriers of the same long QT syndrome (LQTS) mutation. Currently, neither the mechanism nor the implications of this variable penetrance are well understood. To hypothesize that the assessment of QTc variance in patients with congenital

  6. Perioperative considerations in a newly described subtype of congenital long QT syndrome.

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    Joseph-Reynolds, Ann; Auden, Steve; Sobczyzk, Walter

    1997-05-01

    An infant with a newly-described subtype of congenital long QT syndrome is presented, along with her perioperative management on three separate occasions. During each anaesthetic characteristic arrhythmias occurred. The available literature and rational approaches to these high risk patients are reviewed. 1997 Blackwell Science Ltd.

  7. Identification of a Kir3.4 Mutation in Congenital Long QT Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Yanzong; Yang, Yiqing; Liang, Bo

    2010-01-01

    Congenital long QT syndrome (LQTS) is a hereditary disorder that leads to sudden cardiac death secondary to fatal cardiac arrhythmias. Although many genes for LQTS have been described, the etiology remains unknown in 30%-40% of cases. In the present study, a large Chinese family (four generations...

  8. Prognostic implications of mutation-specific QTc standard deviation in congenital long QT syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathias, Andrew; Moss, Arthur J; Lopes, Coeli M; Barsheshet, Alon; McNitt, Scott; Zareba, Wojciech; Robinson, Jennifer L; Locati, Emanuela H; Ackerman, Michael J; Benhorin, Jesaia; Kaufman, Elizabeth S; Platonov, Pyotr G; Qi, Ming; Shimizu, Wataru; Towbin, Jeffrey A; Michael Vincent, G; Wilde, Arthur A M; Zhang, Li; Goldenberg, Ilan

    2013-05-01

    Individual corrected QT interval (QTc) may vary widely among carriers of the same long QT syndrome (LQTS) mutation. Currently, neither the mechanism nor the implications of this variable penetrance are well understood. To hypothesize that the assessment of QTc variance in patients with congenital LQTS who carry the same mutation provides incremental prognostic information on the patient-specific QTc. The study population comprised 1206 patients with LQTS with 95 different mutations and ≥ 5 individuals who carry the same mutation. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was used to assess the effect of mutation-specific standard deviation of QTc (QTcSD) on the risk of cardiac events (comprising syncope, aborted cardiac arrest, and sudden cardiac death) from birth through age 40 years in the total population and by genotype. Assessment of mutation-specific QTcSD showed large differences among carriers of the same mutations (median QTcSD 45 ms). Multivariate analysis showed that each 20 ms increment in QTcSD was associated with a significant 33% (P = .002) increase in the risk of cardiac events after adjustment for the patient-specific QTc duration and the family effect on QTc. The risk associated with QTcSD was pronounced among patients with long QT syndrome type 1 (hazard ratio 1.55 per 20 ms increment; P<.001), whereas among patients with long QT syndrome type 2, the risk associated with QTcSD was not statistically significant (hazard ratio 0.99; P = .95; P value for QTcSD-by-genotype interaction = .002). Our findings suggest that mutations with a wider variation in QTc duration are associated with increased risk of cardiac events. These findings appear to be genotype-specific, with a pronounced effect among patients with the long QT syndrome type 1 genotype. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Contractility Dispersion in Long QT Syndrome

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    MH Nikoo

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Previous studies, using M mode echocardiography, provided unexpected evidence of a mechanical alteration in patients with long QT syndrome. The aim of this study was to evaluate entire left ventricular (LV wall motion characteristics in patients with long QT syndrome using tissue Doppler imaging. Methods: We enrolled 17 patients with congenital long QT syndrome [11 female and 6 male], aged 21 to 45 years. 10 subjects without cardiac disease were also selected as a control group. Two-dimensional tissue Doppler imaging (TDI recording of the LV was obtained from the basal and mid-segments from apical four-chamber, two-chamber, and long-axis views. ‘Myocardial Contraction Duration’ [MCD] was defined as the time from start of R wave on ECG to end of S wave on TDI. MCD was measured in the six LV wall positions: septal, anteroseptal, lateral, inferior, posterior and anterior positions.Results: LV contractility dispersion was significantly greater in long QT syndrome patients compared to control group [0.051 ± 0.011 vs. 0.016 ± 0.06; P < 0.001]. Conclusion: Our study evaluated left ventricular dispersion of contractility duration in patients with long QT syndrome. This mechanical dispersion may be a reflection of the inhomogeneity of repolarisation in the long QT syndrome.

  10. Clinical characteristics in genetically distinct forms of the congenital long QT syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawahara, Yosuke; Sawayama, Toshitami; Samukawa, Masanobu; Nezuo, Shoso; Tanaka, Junji; Suetsuna, Ryoji; Kamiyama, Norio

    1998-01-01

    The clinical characteristics in genetically distinct forms of the congenital long QT syndrome (LQTs) were examined on the balance of bilateral sympathetic nerves, and ECG findings. The subjects (mean: 19.4 years old) were three genetically distinct forms of LQTs, including 3 patients in A-family (the high risk family with sudden death), 2 patients in B-family and 3 patients in C-family. All patients met the standard diagnostic criteria according to Schwartz. As the index of the balance of bilateral sympathetic nerves, the dissociation of Tl and MIBG uptake (D) was examined and the radioactivity ratio (the A/L ratio) of anteroseptal wall to posterolateral wall was calculated. The T-wave patterns of ECG and the situation at syncope were examined. In A-family, all 3 patients showed the lowered A/L ratio, D(+), and similar T-wave patterns in ECG. The syndrome developed at exercise, and their QTc extended at exercise. In B-family, all 2 patients showed normal A/L ratio and long T-wave at QT onset, and their QTc shortened at exercise. All patients had developed syncope at rest. In C-family, all 3 patients showed a little decrease of A/L ratio and similar T-wave patterns. Their QTc extended at exercise. These results suggest that the characteristics of the sympathetic nerve balance, ECG wave patterns and the syndrome may depend on each family. (K.H.)

  11. QT Adaptation and Intrinsic QT Variability in Congenital Long QT Syndrome.

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    Seethala, Srikanth; Singh, Prabhpreet; Shusterman, Vladimir; Ribe, Margareth; Haugaa, Kristina H; Němec, Jan

    2015-12-16

    Increased variability of QT interval (QTV) has been linked to arrhythmias in animal experiments and multiple clinical situations. Congenital long QT syndrome (LQTS), a pure repolarization disease, may provide important information on the relationship between delayed repolarization and QTV. Twenty-four-hour Holter monitor tracings from 78 genotyped congenital LQTS patients (52 females; 51 LQT1, 23 LQT2, 2 LQT5, 2 JLN, 27 symptomatic; age, 35.2±12.3 years) were evaluated with computer-assisted annotation of RR and QT intervals. Several models of RR-QT relationship were tested in all patients. A model assuming exponential decrease of past RR interval contributions to QT duration with 60-second time constant provided the best data fit. This model was used to calculate QTc and residual "intrinsic" QTV, which cannot be explained by heart rate change. The intrinsic QTV was higher in patients with long QTc (r=0.68; Padaptation to heart rate changes occurs with time constant ≈60 seconds, similar to results reported in control subjects. Intrinsic QTV correlates with the degree of repolarization delay and might reflect action potential instability observed in animal models of LQTS. © 2015 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  12. Relation of increased short-term variability of QT interval to congenital long-QT syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hinterseer, Martin; Beckmann, Britt-Maria; Thomsen, Morten B

    2009-01-01

    Apart from clinical symptoms the diagnosis and risk stratification in long-QT syndrome (LQTS) is usually based on the surface electrocardiogram. Studies have indicated that not only prolongation of the QT interval but also an increased short-term variability of QT interval (STV(QT)) is a marker...... that an STV(QT) of 4.9 ms was the optimal cut-off value to predict mutation carriers. When incorporating an STV(QT) >4.9 ms for those whose QTc interval was within the normal limits, sensitivity to distinguish mutation carriers increased to 83% with a specificity of 68%, so that another 15 mutation carriers...

  13. Mouse models of long QT syndrome

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    Salama, Guy; London, Barry

    2007-01-01

    Congenital long QT syndrome is a rare inherited condition characterized by prolongation of action potential duration (APD) in cardiac myocytes, prolongation of the QT interval on the surface electrocardiogram (ECG), and an increased risk of syncope and sudden death due to ventricular tachyarrhythmias. Mutations of cardiac ion channel genes that affect repolarization cause the majority of the congenital cases. Despite detailed characterizations of the mutated ion channels at the molecular level, a complete understanding of the mechanisms by which individual mutations may lead to arrhythmias and sudden death requires study of the intact heart and its modulation by the autonomic nervous system. Here, we will review studies of molecularly engineered mice with mutations in the genes (a) known to cause long QT syndrome in humans and (b) specific to cardiac repolarization in the mouse. Our goal is to provide the reader with a comprehensive overview of mouse models with long QT syndrome and to emphasize the advantages and limitations of these models. PMID:17038432

  14. Reconstruction of action potential of repolarization in patients with congenital long-QT syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kandori, Akihiko; Shimizu, Wataru; Yokokawa, Miki; Kamakura, Shiro; Miyatake, Kunio; Murakami, Masahiro; Miyashita, Tsuyoshi; Ogata, Kuniomi; Tsukada, Keiji

    2004-01-01

    A method for reconstructing an action potential during the repolarization period was developed. This method uses a current distribution-plotted as a current-arrow map (CAM)-calculated using magnetocardiogram (MCG) signals. The current arrows are summarized during the QRS complex period and subtracted during the ST-T wave period in order to reconstruct the action-potential waveform. To ensure the similarity between a real action potential and the reconstructed action potential using CAM, a monophasic action potential (MAP) and an MCG of the same patient with type-I long-QT syndrome were measured. Although the MAP had one notch that was associated with early afterdepolarization (EAD), the reconstructed action potential had two large and small notches. The small notch timing agreed with the occurrence of the EAD in the MAP. On the other hand, the initiation time of an abnormal current distribution coincides with the appearance timing of the first large notch, and its end time coincides with that of the second small notch. These results suggest that a simple reconstruction method using a CAM based on MCG data can provide a similar action-potential waveform to a MAP waveform without having to introduce a catheter

  15. Implantable cardioverter-defibrillator explantation for overdiagnosed or overtreated congenital long QT syndrome.

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    Gaba, Prakriti; Bos, J Martijn; Cannon, Bryan C; Cha, Yong-Mei; Friedman, Paul A; Asirvatham, Samuel J; Ackerman, Michael J

    2016-04-01

    Primary treatment of long QT syndrome (LQTS) currently consists of beta-blocker therapy, although an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) is considered for high-risk patients. However, both overdiagnosis and overtreatment must be avoided because their sequelae can be significant. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence and details of ICD explants in a cohort of patients from a tertiary genetic heart rhythm clinic for a previously rendered diagnosis of LQTS. Overall, 1227 consecutive patients were included in the study. All patients had been referred to the Mayo Clinic for evaluation of possible LQTS and subsequently were either diagnosed with LQTS or dismissed as normal. Further stratification of patients was conducted to assess how many patients had an ICD and how many had a subsequent ICD explant. In total, 170 patients (14%) had an ICD, including 157 of 670 patients (23%) with confirmed LQTS and 13 of 557 patients (2%) who did not have LQTS. Among these, 12 of 1227 (1%) had the ICD removed: 7 of 157 LQTS patients (4.5%) compared to 5 of 14 non-LQTS patients (36%). Before explant, 5 of 12 patients (42%) experienced inappropriate shocks, ranging from 2 to as many as 54 shocks. In addition, 4 had a device-related infection, and 9 had device malfunction (including lead dysfunction or fracture). None of these patients had a breakthrough cardiac event since removal of their ICD during 5.5 ± 3.5 years of follow-up. Implications of overdiagnosis and overtreatment are profound because unnecessary ICD placement can be associated with infection, malfunction, inappropriate shocks, and subsequent anxiety. Copyright © 2016 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Giant T-U waves precede torsades de pointes in long QT syndrome: a systematic electrocardiographic analysis in patients with acquired and congenital QT prolongation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kirchhof, Paulus; Franz, Michael R.; Bardai, Abdennasser; Wilde, Arthur M.

    2009-01-01

    This study sought to identify electrocardiographic (ECG) criteria that are associated with initiation of torsades de pointes (TdP) in patients with acquired (a-) and congenital (c-) long QT syndrome (LQTS). Electrocardiographic criteria used as risk predictors for TdP commonly rely on a prolonged QT

  17. The application of root mean square electrocardiography (RMS ECG) for the detection of acquired and congenital long QT syndrome.

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    Lux, Robert L; Sower, Christopher Todd; Allen, Nancy; Etheridge, Susan P; Tristani-Firouzi, Martin; Saarel, Elizabeth V

    2014-01-01

    Precise measurement of the QT interval is often hampered by difficulty determining the end of the low amplitude T wave. Root mean square electrocardiography (RMS ECG) provides a novel alternative measure of ventricular repolarization. Experimental data have shown that the interval between the RMS ECG QRS and T wave peaks (RTPK) closely reflects the mean ventricular action potential duration while the RMS T wave width (TW) tracks the dispersion of repolarization timing. Here, we tested the precision of RMS ECG to assess ventricular repolarization in humans in the setting of drug-induced and congenital Long QT Syndrome (LQTS). RMS ECG signals were derived from high-resolution 24 hour Holter monitor recordings from 68 subjects after receiving placebo and moxifloxacin and from standard 12 lead ECGs obtained in 97 subjects with LQTS and 97 age- and sex-matched controls. RTPK, QTRMS and RMS TW intervals were automatically measured using custom software and compared to traditional QT measures using lead II. All measures of repolarization were prolonged during moxifloxacin administration and in LQTS subjects, but the variance of RMS intervals was significantly smaller than traditional lead II measurements. TW was prolonged during moxifloxacin and in subjects with LQT-2, but not LQT-1 or LQT-3. These data validate the application of RMS ECG for the detection of drug-induced and congenital LQTS. RMS ECG measurements are more precise than the current standard of care lead II measurements.

  18. Diagnostic criteria for congenital long QT syndrome in the era of molecular genetics: Do we need a scoring system?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofman, Nynke; Wilde, Arthur A.M.; Kääb, Stefan; Van Langen, Irene M.; Tanck, Michael W.T.; Mannens, Marcel M.A.M.; Hinterseer, Martin; Beckmann, Britt-Maria; Tan, Hanno L.

    2007-01-01

    Aims: Previously published diagnostic systems, based on ECG analysis and clinical parameters (Schwartz criteria and Keating criteria), have been used to estimate the probability of inherited long QT syndrome (LQTS). Nowadays, a certain diagnosis can often be made by DNA testing. We aimed to

  19. Gene-specific paradoxical QT responses during rapid eye movement sleep in women with congenital long QT syndrome

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lanfranchi, P. A.; Ackerman, M. J.; Kára, T.; Shamsuzzaman, A. S.; Wolk, R.; Jurák, Pavel; Amin, R.; Somers, V. K.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 8 (2010), s. 1067-1074 ISSN 1547-5271 R&D Projects: GA MZd NS10098; GA MZd NS10099 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : autonomic nervous system * heart rate * long QT syndrome * QT interval * sex * sleep Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery Impact factor: 4.246, year: 2010

  20. Cryo-EM Structure of a KCNQ1/CaM Complex Reveals Insights into Congenital Long QT Syndrome.

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    Sun, Ji; MacKinnon, Roderick

    2017-06-01

    KCNQ1 is the pore-forming subunit of cardiac slow-delayed rectifier potassium (I Ks ) channels. Mutations in the kcnq1 gene are the leading cause of congenital long QT syndrome (LQTS). Here, we present the cryoelectron microscopy (cryo-EM) structure of a KCNQ1/calmodulin (CaM) complex. The conformation corresponds to an "uncoupled," PIP 2 -free state of KCNQ1, with activated voltage sensors and a closed pore. Unique structural features within the S4-S5 linker permit uncoupling of the voltage sensor from the pore in the absence of PIP 2 . CaM contacts the KCNQ1 voltage sensor through a specific interface involving a residue on CaM that is mutated in a form of inherited LQTS. Using an electrophysiological assay, we find that this mutation on CaM shifts the KCNQ1 voltage-activation curve. This study describes one physiological form of KCNQ1, depolarized voltage sensors with a closed pore in the absence of PIP 2 , and reveals a regulatory interaction between CaM and KCNQ1 that may explain CaM-mediated LQTS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Does KCNE5 play a role in long QT syndrome?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofman-Bang, Jacob; Jespersen, Thomas; Grunnet, Morten

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Long QT syndrome [LQTS] is a congenital cardiac disease characterised by prolonged QTC-time, syncopes and sudden cardiac death. LQTS is caused by mutations in genes coding for ion channels involved in the action potential. KCNE5 codes for a novel beta-subunit of the ion channel conduc...

  2. Drug-Induced QT Prolongation as a Result of an Escitalopram Overdose in a Patient with Previously Undiagnosed Congenital Long QT Syndrome

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    Paul Singh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of drug-induced QT prolongation caused by an escitalopram overdose in a patient with previously undiagnosed congenital LQTS. A 15-year-old Caucasian female presented following a suicide attempt via an escitalopram overdose. The patient was found to have a prolonged QT interval with episodes of torsades de pointes. The patient was admitted to the telemetry unit and treated. Despite the resolution of the torsades de pointes, she continued to demonstrate a persistently prolonged QT interval. She was seen by the cardiology service and diagnosed with congenital long QT syndrome. This case illustrates the potential for an escitalopram overdose to cause an acute QT prolongation in a patient with congenital LQTS and suggests the importance of a screening electrocardiogram prior to the initiation of SSRIs, especially in patients at high risk for QT prolongation.

  3. Long QT in children with congenital deafness: a brief report

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    Naseraldin Akbari Asbagh

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Long QT syndromes (LQT are genetic abnormalities of ventricular repo-larization, with an estimated incidence of about one per 10000 births. It is characterized by prolongation of the QT interval in electrocardiogram (EKG and associated with a high risk for syncope and sudden death in patients. Type of this syndrome is association with congenital deafness. Our objective was to evaluate QT interval in children with congenital deafness.Methods: For 219 patients referred to Imam Khomeini Hospital audiometric clinic in 2011, questionnaire were completed. A total of 23 congenitally deaf children were incl-uded. All patients’ examinations were done by a pediatric cardiologist. Electrocardio-gram is conducted in all children (23 patients with sever and deep congenital deafness. Then the QT interval was measured based on Bazett’s formula. Echocardiography was also performed in these children to assess left ventricular function and the presence of mitral valve prolapse.Results: The overall patients were two hundred and nineteen children. A total of twenty three congenitally deaf children were included and electrocardiogram was obtained. Three children had obviously prolonged QTc (0.48±0.02 second. The median age of them was 6.1±5 year, the median weight was 18±11.3 kilogram and the median of QT interval was 0.48±0.02 second.Conclusion: The QT interval obtained 0.48±0.02 second. In the present study we found prolonged QT in congenital deafness, thus we recommend to evaluate the electrocardio-gram of children with congenital deafness.

  4. [Long QT syndrome. History, genetics, clinical symptoms, causes and therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krönauer, T; Friederich, P

    2015-08-01

    The long QT syndrome is caused by a change in cardiac repolarization due to functional ion channel defects. A differentiation is made between a congenital (cLQTS) and an acquired (aLQTS) form of the disease. The disease results in the name-giving prolongation of the QT interval in the electrocardiogram and represents a predisposition for cardiac arrhythmia and sudden cardiac death. This article summarizes the current knowledge on the history, pathophysiology, clinical symptoms and therapy of cLQTS and aLQTS. This knowledge of pathophysiological features of the symptoms allows the underlying anesthesiological approach for individualized perioperative concepts for patients suffering from LQTS to be derived.

  5. Landiolol suppression of electrical storm of torsades de pointes in patients with congenital long-QT syndrome type 2 and myocardial ischemia

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    Ryota Kitajima, MD

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A 76-year-old man who had been diagnosed with long-QT syndrome type 2 had frequent syncopal attacks. The electrocardiogram was monitored, and frequent torsades de pointes (TdP was detected despite administration of conventional medications: oral propranolol, verapamil, intravenous magnesium sulfate, verapamil, and lidocaine. In contrast, 2 μg/kg/min landiolol could completely suppress TdP. Subsequently, an implantable cardioverter defibrillator was placed, and he was diagnosed with silent myocardial ischemia using myocardial perfusion scintigraphy and coronary angiography. This is the first case report wherein landiolol effectively suppressed TdP due to long-QT syndrome with silent myocardial ischemia.

  6. Síndrome de QT prolongado congénito y embarazo: reporte de dos casos Congenital long QT syndrome and pregnancy: report of two cases

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    Julián M Aristizábal

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available El síndrome de QT prolongado congénito, es una entidad clínica que se caracteriza por la alteración en la repolarización miocárdica dada por una prolongación significativa del intervalo QT con riesgo aumentado de síncope, taquicardia ventricular polimórfica y muerte súbita. Se produce por la alteración en la función de canales iónicos responsables del potencial de acción de las células cardíacas, como consecuencia de múltiples mutaciones, de las cuales las más frecuentes se dan en los canales de sodio y potasio. La relación con el embarazo y principalmente la presencia de eventos en el posparto, está determinada por arritmias ventriculares o episodios de muerte súbita, lo cual debe llevar a una evaluación exhaustiva de QTc prolongado y sus factores desencadenantes o enfermedades concomitantes. Se muestran los casos clínicos de dos pacientes que presentaron muerte súbita en el posparto en las cuales se diagnosticó síndrome de QT largo congénito.Congenital long QT syndrome is a clinical entity characterized by impairment of myocardial repolarization given by significant prolongation of the corrected QT interval with an increased risk of syncope, polymorphic ventricular tachycardia and sudden death. This is produced by an alteration in the function of ion channels responsible for the action potential of cardiac cells as a consequence of multiple mutations, the most common of which are in the sodium and potassium channels. The relationship with pregnancy and especially the presence of events in the postpartum period is clearly determined by the presence of ventricular arrhythmias or episodes of sudden death, that should lead to a thorough evaluation of prolonged QTc and its triggers or concomitant diseases. We present the clinical records of two patients who had sudden death during the postpartum and were diagnosed as congenital long QT Syndrome.

  7. Long QT Syndrome: A Clinical Entity Resembling Epilepsy

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    Mehmet Güney Şenol

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Scientific BACKGROUND: Long QT Syndrome (LQTS is a cardiac repolarization defect, characterized by lengthened QT interval in the ECG. It can cause syncope due to rapid, polimorphic ventricular tachycardia known as Torsades de Pointes (TdP or it may cause sudden cardiac death. This clinical entity is frequently mistaken for epilepsy. CASE: In this report, a 24-year old male patient with congenital LQTS is presented. The patient was originally followed-up for epilepsy. During the evaluation process his loss of consciousness attacks were linked with ventricular tachycardia -TdP- periods and thus a diagnosis of LQTS was reached. When cardiac arrest ocurred in this patient, "stellate ganglion blockage” was performed. CONCLUSION: One must bear LQTS in mind in all patients with suspicious-looking syncope attacks and it must not be forgotten that early diagnosis and timely therapy will save the life of the individual

  8. Fatal cardiac arrhythmia and long-QT syndrome in a new form of congenital generalized lipodystrophy with muscle rippling (CGL4 due to PTRF-CAVIN mutations.

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    Anna Rajab

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available We investigated eight families with a novel subtype of congenital generalized lipodystrophy (CGL4 of whom five members had died from sudden cardiac death during their teenage years. ECG studies revealed features of long-QT syndrome, bradycardia, as well as supraventricular and ventricular tachycardias. Further symptoms comprised myopathy with muscle rippling, skeletal as well as smooth-muscle hypertrophy, leading to impaired gastrointestinal motility and hypertrophic pyloric stenosis in some children. Additionally, we found impaired bone formation with osteopenia, osteoporosis, and atlanto-axial instability. Homozygosity mapping located the gene within 2 Mbp on chromosome 17. Prioritization of 74 candidate genes with GeneDistiller for high expression in muscle and adipocytes suggested PTRF-CAVIN (Polymerase I and transcript release factor/Cavin as the most probable candidate leading to the detection of homozygous mutations (c.160delG, c.362dupT. PTRF-CAVIN is essential for caveolae biogenesis. These cholesterol-rich plasmalemmal vesicles are involved in signal-transduction and vesicular trafficking and reside primarily on adipocytes, myocytes, and osteoblasts. Absence of PTRF-CAVIN did not influence abundance of its binding partner caveolin-1 and caveolin-3. In patient fibroblasts, however, caveolin-1 failed to localize toward the cell surface and electron microscopy revealed reduction of caveolae to less than 3%. Transfection of full-length PTRF-CAVIN reestablished the presence of caveolae. The loss of caveolae was confirmed by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM in combination with fluorescent imaging. PTRF-CAVIN deficiency thus presents the phenotypic spectrum caused by a quintessential lack of functional caveolae.

  9. The role of CAV3 in long-QT syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedley, Paula L; Kanters, Jørgen K.; Dembic, Maja

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in CAV3, coding for caveolin-3, the major constituent scaffolding protein of cardiac caveolae, have been associated with skeletal muscle disease, cardiomyopathy, and most recently long-QT syndrome (LQTS) and sudden infant death syndrome. We examined the occurrence of CAV3 mutations...

  10. Long QT syndrome: an emerging role for inflammation and immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Enea eLazzerini

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The Long QT Syndrome (LQTS, classified as congenital or acquired, is a multi-factorial disorder of myocardial repolarization predisposing to life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias, particularly torsades de pointes. In the latest years inflammation and immunity have been increasingly recognized as novel factors crucially involved in modulating ventricular repolarization. In the present paper we critically review the available information on this topic, also analyzing putative mechanisms and potential interplays with the other etiologic factors, either acquired and inherited.Accumulating data indicate inflammatory activation as a potential cause of acquired LQTS. The putative underlying mechanisms are complex but essentially cytokine-mediated, including both direct actions on cardiomyocyte ion channels expression and function, and indirect effects resulting from an increased central nervous system sympathetic drive on the heart. Autoimmunity represents another recently arising cause of acquired LQTS. Indeed, increasing evidence demonstrates that autoantibodies may affect myocardial electric properties by directly cross-reacting with the cardiomyocyte and interfering with specific ion currents as a result of molecular mimicry mechanisms. Intriguingly, recent data suggest that inflammation and immunity may be also involved in modulating the clinical expression of congenital forms of LQTS, possibly triggering or enhancing electrical instability in patients who already are genetically predisposed to arrhythmias. In this view, targeting immuno-inflammatory pathways may in the future represent an attractive therapeutic approach in a number of LQTS patients, thus opening new exciting avenues in antiarrhythmic therapy.

  11. T(peak)T(end) interval in long QT syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kanters, Jørgen Kim; Haarmark, Christian; Vedel-Larsen, Esben

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The T(peak)T(end) (T(p)T(e)) interval is believed to reflect the transmural dispersion of repolarization. Accordingly, it should be a risk factor in long QT syndrome (LQTS). The aim of the study was to determine the effect of genotype on T(p)T(e) interval and test whether it was relat...

  12. Genotype-Phenotype Aspects of Type 2 Long QT Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shimizu, Wataru; Moss, Arthur J.; Wilde, Arthur A. M.; Towbin, Jeffrey A.; Ackerman, Michael J.; January, Craig T.; Tester, David J.; Zareba, Wojciech; Robinson, Jennifer L.; Qi, Ming; Vincent, G. Michael; Kaufman, Elizabeth S.; Hofman, Nynke; Noda, Takashi; Kamakura, Shiro; Miyamoto, Yoshihiro; Shah, Samit; Amin, Vinit; Goldenberg, Ilan; Andrews, Mark L.; McNitt, Scott

    2009-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of location, coding type, and topology of KCNH2(hERG) mutations on clinical phenotype in type 2 long QT syndrome (LQTS). Background Previous studies were limited by population size in their ability to examine phenotypic effect of

  13. Clinical Aspects of Type 3 Long-QT Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilde, Arthur A M; Moss, Arthur J; Kaufman, Elizabeth S

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: -Risk stratification in patients with type 3 long QT syndrome (LQT3) by clinical and genetic characteristics and effectiveness of ß-blocker therapy have not been studied previously in a large LQT3 population. METHODS: -The study population included 406 LQT3 patients with 51 different......-blocker therapy reduces this risk in females, but efficacy in males could not be conclusively determined due to low number of events....

  14. Hypothetical "anatomy" of Brugada phenomenon: "Long QT sine Long QT" syndrome implicating morphologically undefined specific "Brugada's myocells".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stirbys, Petras

    2017-01-01

    The Brugada syndrome (BrS) is associated with increased risk of ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. It generates genetically mediated arrhythmias posing a true pathophysiological challenge. In search of the similarities between BrS and long QT syndrome some novel insights are suggested. In patients with BrS the duration of QT interval is usually normal. Some investigators have found prolonged QT interval in the syndrome's natural course or the duration of QT segment have been extended by provocative tests unmasking BrS. Thus, BrS might be characterized as "long QT sine long QT" syndrome. The existence of two functional types of myocites is suspected. Regarding structure and function the majority of ventricular myocardium is probably mostly healthy. The rest of myocardium (preferably the subepicardium of right ventricular outflow tract) due to its genotypic peculiarities demonstrates no negative influence on ventricular performance until early adulthood is reached and/or other unstable preconditions are fulfilled (nocturnal time, fever, specific drugs, etc.). Based on published findings of positive outcomes, following the epicardial ablation of the right ventricular outflow tract region, a new hypothetical concept suggesting the presence of specific, genetically affected "Brugada's myocells" is proposed. These cells as a suitable arrhythmogenic substrate reside intramurally within the subepicardial region of the outflow tract of right ventricle. In the daytime these cells likely are dormant but at rest their nocturnal proarrhythmic behavior is activated occasionally. Presumptions regarding the pathophysiology of BrS might be the focus of further discussion.

  15. Anthracyclines and Acquired Long QT Syndrome. A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Rodríguez Armada

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Acquired long QT syndrome results from secondary causes and can be caused by more than 100 non-antiarrhythmic drugs. Cardiac arrest due to Torsades de pointes induced by drugs causing prolonged QT syndrome is a rare but potentially fatal event, even in hospitals. The case of a 47-year-old patient diagnosed with non-Hodgkin lymphoma admitted to the hematology department of the Dr. Gustavo Aldereguía Lima University General Hospital in Cienfuegos is presented. The patient had been previously treated with anthracyclines and developed episodes of palpitations and syncope later. The treatment included monitoring the patient, avoiding other QT prolonging agents and administrating magnesium sulfate and potassium chloride with a proper maintenance of the fluid and acid-base balance. The presentation of this case aims at motivating interest in new reports on the subject and establishing a direct causal relationship through the evidence provided by new experiences.

  16. In silico cardiac risk assessment in patients with long QT syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoefen, Ryan; Reumann, Matthias; Goldenberg, Ilan

    2012-01-01

    The study was designed to assess the ability of computer-simulated electrocardiography parameters to predict clinical outcomes and to risk-stratify patients with long QT syndrome type 1 (LQT1).......The study was designed to assess the ability of computer-simulated electrocardiography parameters to predict clinical outcomes and to risk-stratify patients with long QT syndrome type 1 (LQT1)....

  17. Mechanisms, Risk Factors, and Management of Acquired Long QT Syndrome: A Comprehensive Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleftherios M. Kallergis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Long QT syndrome is characterized by prolongation of the corrected QT (QTc interval on the surface electrocardiogram and is associated with precipitation of torsade de pointes (TdP, a polymorphic ventricular tachycardia that may cause sudden death. Acquired long QT syndrome describes pathologic excessive prolongation of the QT interval, upon exposure to an environmental stressor, with reversion back to normal following removal of the stressor. The most common environmental stressor in acquired long QT syndrome is drug therapy. Acquired long QT syndrome is an important issue for clinicians and a significant public health problem concerning the large number of drugs with this adverse effect with a potentially fatal outcome, the large number of patients exposed to these drugs, and our inability to predict the risk for a given individual. In this paper, we focus on mechanisms underlying QT prolongation, risk factors for torsades de pointes and describe the short- and long-term treatment of acquired long QT syndrome.

  18. Safe drug use in long QT syndrome and Brugada syndrome: comparison of website statistics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postema, Pieter G.; Neville, Jon; de Jong, Jonas S. S. G.; Romero, Klaus; Wilde, Arthur A. M.; Woosley, Raymond L.

    2013-01-01

    We sought to obtain insights into the efficacy of two websites, www.QTdrugs.org and www.BrugadaDrugs.org, that have the intention to prevent fatal arrhythmias due to unsafe drug use in Long QT syndrome and Brugada syndrome. Prospective web-use statistical analysis combined with online surveys were

  19. Prevalence of long QT syndrome and other cardiac defects in deaf-mute children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niaz, A.; Rizvi, S.F.U.; Khurram, D.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Long QT syndrome is considered a fatal disease because of its association with ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. Objectives of study were to determine the prevalence of long QT syndrome and other heart diseases, in deaf-mute children. Methods: A Cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted at Cholistan special education centre and Cardiology department, Sheikh Zayed hospital Rahim Yar Khan, Pakistan in September 2006. A total of 104 congenitally deaf-mute children were assessed. Height, weight and blood pressure measured, 12-lead electrocardiogram done and QTc calculated using Bazette's formula. Children with prolonged QTc underwent 24-hour ambulatory ECG recording. All were auscultated following complete protocol. A child with murmur was further evaluated with colour Doppler echocardiography. Audiometry was performed on all the children and the result interpreted according to WHO recommendations. Diagnosis of LQTS was based on Revised Schwartz criteria. Results: Out of 104 children, 62 were male with mean age 11.89 yrs. The average systolic and diastolic BP was 97/67 mmHg. Average height was 126 Cm. All children had moderate to severe bilateral sensorineural hearing loss (40-80 dB). One child had associated Patent Ductus Arteriosis. Fifteen had an innocent murmur. Prevalence of congenital heart disease was found to be 0.1/1000. Four children had QT interval more than 440 mSec, (range 0.46-0.47 mSec.). Both genders were equally affected. Three children had high probability of LQTS and one had intermediate probability. Screening of family of these 4 patients showed prolonged QT interval in the sibling of one patient. Conclusion: Our study highlights the significant prevalence of Jervell Lange-Nielsen Syndrome in Pakistani deaf-mute children, which may be associated to the high level of consanguinity in this region. Awareness of this syndrome among health care providers is needed as timely diagnosis and subsequent treatment may prevent

  20. Long QT interval in Turner syndrome: a high prevalence of LQTS gene mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trolle, Christian

    Objective: QT interval prolongation of unknown aetiology is common in Turner syndrome (TS). This study set out to explore the presence of known pathogenic long QT (LQT) mutations in TS and to examine the corrected QT interval (QTc) over time and relate the findings to the TS phenotype. Methods......QTc). The prevalence of mutations in genes related to Long QT syndrome (LQTS) was determined in females with TS and a QTc >432.0 milliseconds (ms). Echocardiographic assessment of aortic valve morphology, 24-hour blood pressures and blood samples were done. Results: The mean hQTc in females with TS (414.0±25.5 ms...

  1. Phenotype guided characterization and molecular analysis of Indian patients with long QT syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bijal Vyas

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: This study in a cohort of Asian Indian patients highlights the mutation spectrum of common Long QT syndromes. The clinical utility for prevention of unexplained sudden cardiac deaths is an important sequel to identification of the mutation in at-risk family members.

  2. Glucose ingestion causes cardiac repolarization disturbances in type 1 long QT syndrome patients and healthy subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyltén-Cavallius, Louise; Iepsen, Eva W; Christiansen, Michael

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Both hypoglycemia and severe hyperglycemia constitute known risk factors for cardiac repolarization changes potentially leading to malignant arrhythmias. Patients with loss of function mutations in KCNQ1 are characterized by long QT syndrome (LQTS) and may be at increased risk...

  3. High distress in parents whose children undergo predictive testing for long QT syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grosfeld, FJM; Wilde, AAM; van den Bout, J; van Langen, IM; van Tintelen, JP; ten Kroode, HFJ

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the psychological effect of predictive testing in parents of children at risk for long QT syndrome (LQTS) in a prospective study. Methods: After their child was clinically screened by electrocardiography and blood was taken for DNA analysis, and shortly after delivery of the

  4. Use of mutant-specific ion channel characteristics for risk stratification of long QT syndrome patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jons, Christian; O-Uchi, Jin; Moss, Arthur J

    2011-01-01

    Inherited long QT syndrome (LQTS) is caused by mutations in ion channels that delay cardiac repolarization, increasing the risk of sudden death from ventricular arrhythmias. Currently, the risk of sudden death in individuals with LQTS is estimated from clinical parameters such as age, gender, and...

  5. Classification of the long-QT syndrome based on discriminant analysis of T-wave morphology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Struijk, Johannes J.; Kanters, Jørgen K.; Andersen, M P

    2006-01-01

    The long QT syndrome (LQTS) is a genetic disorder, typically characterized by a prolonged QT interval in the ECG due to abnormal cardiac repolarization. LQTS may lead to syncopal episodes and sudden cardiac death. Various parameters based on T-wave morphology, as well as the QT interval itself ha...

  6. Prenatal diagnosis of long QT syndrome with the superior vena cava-aorta Doppler approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabaneix, Julie; Andelfinger, Gregor; Fournier, Anne; Fouron, Jean-Claude; Raboisson, Marie-Josée

    2012-10-01

    We describe a fetus at 36 weeks with long QT syndrome presenting with variable types of atrioventricular blocks, ventricular premature beats, and torsades de pointes. All these diagnoses were made with the superior vena cava-aorta Doppler approach and confirmed with postnatal electrocardiography. Copyright © 2012 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Measure of the QT-RR Dynamic Coupling in Patients with the Long QT Syndrome

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Halámek, Josef; Couderc, J. P.; Jurák, Pavel; Vondra, Vlastimil; Zareba, W.; Viščor, Ivo; Leinveber, P.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 4 (2012), s. 323-330 ISSN 1082-720X R&D Projects: GA MŠk ME09050 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : Long QT syndrome * Dynamic QT-RR coupling * Holter recording * QT adaptation * QT parameters Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery Impact factor: 1.084, year: 2012

  8. Long QT interval in Turner syndrome--a high prevalence of LQTS gene mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trolle, Christian; Mortensen, Kristian H; Pedersen, Lisbeth N; Berglund, Agnethe; Jensen, Henrik K; Andersen, Niels H; Gravholt, Claus H

    2013-01-01

    QT-interval prolongation of unknown aetiology is common in Turner syndrome. This study set out to explore the presence of known long QT mutations in Turner syndrome and to examine the corrected QT-interval (QTc) over time and relate the findings to the Turner syndrome phenotype. Adult women with Turner syndrome (n = 88) were examined thrice and 68 age-matched healthy controls were examined once. QTc was measured by one blinded reader (intra-reader variability: 0.7%), and adjusted for influence of heart rate by Bazett's (bQTc) and Hodges's formula (hQTc). The prevalence of mutations in genes related to Long QT syndrome was determined in women with Turner syndrome and a QTc >432.0 milliseconds (ms). Echocardiographic assessment of aortic valve morphology, 24-hour blood pressures and blood samples were done. The mean hQTc in women with Turner syndrome (414.0 ± 25.5 ms) compared to controls (390.4 ± 17.8 ms) was prolonged (pTurner syndrome karyotypes (418.2 ± 24.8 vs. 407.6 ± 25.5 ms; p = 0.055). In women with Turner syndrome and a bQTc >432 ms, 7 had mutations in major Long QT syndrome genes (SCN5A and KCNH2) and one in a minor Long QT syndrome gene (KCNE2). There is a high prevalence of mutations in the major LQTS genes in women with TS and prolonged QTc. It remains to be settled, whether these findings are related to the unexplained excess mortality in Turner women. NCT00624949. https://register.clinicaltrials.gov/prs/app/action/SelectProtocol/sid/S0001FLI/selectaction/View/ts/3/uid/U000099E.

  9. Long QT interval in Turner syndrome--a high prevalence of LQTS gene mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Trolle

    Full Text Available QT-interval prolongation of unknown aetiology is common in Turner syndrome. This study set out to explore the presence of known long QT mutations in Turner syndrome and to examine the corrected QT-interval (QTc over time and relate the findings to the Turner syndrome phenotype.Adult women with Turner syndrome (n = 88 were examined thrice and 68 age-matched healthy controls were examined once. QTc was measured by one blinded reader (intra-reader variability: 0.7%, and adjusted for influence of heart rate by Bazett's (bQTc and Hodges's formula (hQTc. The prevalence of mutations in genes related to Long QT syndrome was determined in women with Turner syndrome and a QTc >432.0 milliseconds (ms. Echocardiographic assessment of aortic valve morphology, 24-hour blood pressures and blood samples were done.The mean hQTc in women with Turner syndrome (414.0 ± 25.5 ms compared to controls (390.4 ± 17.8 ms was prolonged (p432 ms, 7 had mutations in major Long QT syndrome genes (SCN5A and KCNH2 and one in a minor Long QT syndrome gene (KCNE2.There is a high prevalence of mutations in the major LQTS genes in women with TS and prolonged QTc. It remains to be settled, whether these findings are related to the unexplained excess mortality in Turner women.NCT00624949. https://register.clinicaltrials.gov/prs/app/action/SelectProtocol/sid/S0001FLI/selectaction/View/ts/3/uid/U000099E.

  10. KCNQ1 Long QT syndrome patients have hyperinsulinemia and symptomatic hypoglycemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torekov, Signe S; Iepsen, Eva; Christiansen, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Patients with loss-of-function mutations in KCNQ1 have KCNQ1 long QT syndrome (LQTS). KCNQ1 encodes a voltage-gated K+ channel located in both cardiomyocytes and pancreatic b-cells. Inhibition of KCNQ1 in b-cells increases insulin secretion. Therefore KCNQ1 LQTS patients may exhibit increased...... min (low potassium after an oral glucose challenge, suggesting that KCNQ1...

  11. Acquired Long QT Syndrome and Torsade de Pointes Associated with HIV Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Shimabukuro-Vornhagen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Here, we report the case of an HIV infected patient that was treated for pneumonia with a macrolid antibiotic. The patient experienced a prolongation of the already pathologic QTc interval resulting in repeated torsades de pointes necessitating CPR and implantation of an AICD. This case exemplifies that torsades de pointes due to acquired long QT syndrome is a serious and potentially fatal complication in HIV-positive patients.

  12. Long QT syndrome genotyping by electrocardiography: fact, fiction, or something in between?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kanters, Jørgen K.; Graff, Claus; Andersen, Mads Peter

    2006-01-01

    Diagnosis of long QT syndrome (LQTS) is difficult. A prolonged QT interval is easily overlooked, and in 10% of all patients with LQTS, the QT interval is normal. Genotyping is unfortunately not able to detect all patients and healthy subjects correctly. Although QT prolongation is the most used r...... evaluation can serve as a guide for genotyping and can reduce the costs by suggesting which gene to start sequencing, but it is fiction that the ECG can replace genotyping....

  13. Cardiac Events During Competitive, Recreational, and Daily Activities in Children and Adolescents With Long QT Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, Kristina D; Beausejour Ladouceur, Virginie; Alexander, Mark E; Hylind, Robyn J; Bevilacqua, Laura; Mah, Douglas Y; Bezzerides, Vassilios; Triedman, John K; Walsh, Edward P; Abrams, Dominic J

    2017-09-21

    The 2005 Bethesda Conference Guidelines advise patients with long QT syndrome against competitive sports. We assessed cardiac event rates during competitive and recreational sports, and daily activities among treated long QT syndrome patients. Long QT syndrome patients aged ≥4 years treated with anti-adrenergic therapy were included. Demographics included mechanism of presentation, corrected QT interval pretreatment, symptom history, medication compliance, and administration of QT-prolonging medications. Corrected QT interval ≥550 ms or prior cardiac arrest defined high risk. Sports were categorized by cardiovascular demand per the 2005 Bethesda Conference Guidelines. Each was classified as recreational or competitive. One hundred seventy-two patients (90; 52% female) with median age 15.2 years (interquartile range 11.4, 19.4) were included. Evaluation was performed for family history (102; 59%), incidental finding (34; 20%), and symptoms (36; 21%). Median corrected QT interval was 474 ms (interquartile range 446, 496) and 14 patients (8%) were deemed high risk. Treatment included β-blockers (171; 99%), implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (27; 16%), left cardiac sympathetic denervation (7; 4%), and pacemaker (3; 2%). Sports participation was recreational (66; 38%) or competitive (106; 62%), with 92 (53%) exercising against the Bethesda Conference Guidelines. There were no cardiac events in competitive athletes and no deaths. There were 13 cardiac events in 9 previously symptomatic patients during either recreational exercise or activities of daily life. In this cohort of appropriately managed children with long QT syndrome, cardiac event rates were low and occurred during recreational but not competitive activities. This study further supports the need for increased assessment of arrhythmia risk during exercise in this patient population. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  14. Long QT syndrome unmasked in an adult subject presenting with excited delirium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozeman, William P; Ali, Karim; Winslow, James E

    2013-02-01

    Excited delirium is increasingly recognized as a risk factor for sudden death, though the specific pathophysiology of these deaths is typically unclear. We describe a survivor of excited delirium that displayed a transient severe prolongation of the QT interval, suggesting unmasking of long QT syndrome as a possible mechanism of sudden death. A 30-year-old man was arrested by police for violent assaultive behavior. Officers at the scene noted confusion, nonsensical speech, sweating, and bizarre agitated behavior; he was transported to the Emergency Department for medical evaluation of possible excited delirium. His initial electrocardiogram revealed a markedly prolonged corrected QT interval of over 600 ms. Intravenous hydration and sodium bicarbonate were administered, with normalization of the QT; he was admitted and recovered uneventfully. We discuss the possible association between long QT syndrome and unexplained sudden deaths seen with excited delirium. Sodium bicarbonate may be considered when long QT syndrome is identified during or after agitated delirium, though its routine use cannot be recommended based on a case report. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The genetic basis of long QT and short QT syndromes: a mutation update

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedley, Paula L; Jørgensen, Poul; Schlamowitz, Sarah

    2009-01-01

    Long QT and short QT syndromes (LQTS and SQTS) are cardiac repolarization abnormalities that are characterized by length perturbations of the QT interval as measured on electrocardiogram (ECG). Prolonged QT interval and a propensity for ventricular tachycardia of the torsades de pointes (TdP) type......-Nielsen syndrome (JLNS), Andersen syndrome (AS), and Timothy syndrome (TS). The genetics are further complicated by the occurrence of double and triple heterozygotes in LQTS and a considerable number of nonpathogenic rare polymorphisms in the involved genes. SQTS is a very rare condition, caused by mutations...

  16. Functional assessment of compound mutations in the KCNQ1 and KCNH2 genes associated with long QT syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grunnet, Morten; Behr, Elijah Raphael; Calloe, Kirstine

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Long QT syndrome (LQTS) is a cardiovascular disorder characterized by prolonged QTc time, syncope, or sudden death caused by torsades de pointes and ventricular fibrillation. We investigated the clinical and electrophysiologic phenotype of individual mutations and the compound mutations...

  17. Long QT syndrome and torsades de pointes complicating mitral valve replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shegu Gilbert

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Severe QT interval prolongation >500 ms occurs in one quarter of cardiac surgical patients in the perioperative period while moderate prolongation occurs in most of them. Prolonged QT interval may be associated with torsades de pointes and lead to sudden cardiac death. Because of the high incidence of prolonged QT in cardiac surgery patients and its perioperative adverse outcomes, it is vital to identify it early and take necessary precautions. We report and discuss the catastrophic events and management of two patients with long QT syndrome complicating mitral valve replacement.

  18. First International Symposium on Long QT Syndrome through the Internet, April 2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Dubner

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available With the First Virtual Symposium on Long QT Syndrome already finished; which was held over the month of April, 2004 as an educational activity of the International Society for Holter and Noninvasive Electrocardiology (ISHNE, and completely through the Internet; we, the Presidents of the Scientific and Steering Committees, Sergio Dubner, Edgardo Schapachnik and Andrés Ricardo Pérez Riera, are wondering gladly surprised, which may have been the main causes of such a huge success as we have reached, and the enormous interest arisen. Just to have an idea of the dimension achieved, data obtained from http://www.a9.com (an Amazon.com site or with the traditional search engine Google, prove that the first reply when you request information about long QT Syndrome is the access site of the Symposium. We believe that the response to this question may be summarized in one word: REALIZATION. The best definition for success is realization. The huge motivation in each one of us made the difference. We worked with a cohesive group, like a team, aware of the unparalleled and great opportunity Prof. Arthur Moss had initially assigned to Sergio Dubner and Edgardo Schapachnik, an invitation that the latter extended to Andrés Ricardo Pérez Riera.

  19. Beat-to-beat variability of QT intervals is increased in patients with drug-induced long-QT syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hinterseer, Martin; Thomsen, Morten Bækgaard; Beckmann, Britt-Maria

    2008-01-01

    Torsades de pointes arrhythmias (TdP) occur by definition in the setting of prolonged QT intervals. Animal models of drug induced Long-QT syndrome (dLQTS) have shown higher predictive value for proarrhythmia with beat-to-beat variability of repolarization duration (BVR) when compared with QT inte...... intervals. Here, we evaluate variability of QT intervals in patients with a history of drug-induced long QT syndrome (dLQTS) and TdP in absence of a mutation in any of the major LQTS genes.......Torsades de pointes arrhythmias (TdP) occur by definition in the setting of prolonged QT intervals. Animal models of drug induced Long-QT syndrome (dLQTS) have shown higher predictive value for proarrhythmia with beat-to-beat variability of repolarization duration (BVR) when compared with QT...

  20. Combined gating and trafficking defect in Kv11.1 manifests as a malignant long QT syndrome phenotype in a large Danish p.F29L founder family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kanters, Jørgen K.; Skibsbye, Lasse; Hedley, Paula L.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Congenital long QT syndrome (LQTS) is a hereditary cardiac channelopathy characterized by delayedventricular repolarization, syncope, torsades de pointes and sudden cardiac death. Thirty-three members of fi ve apparently‘ unrelated ’Danish families carry the KCNH2:c.87C A; p.F29L...

  1. Prevalence and spectrum of large deletions or duplications in the major long QT syndrome-susceptibility genes and implications for long QT syndrome genetic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tester, David J; Benton, Amber J; Train, Laura; Deal, Barbara; Baudhuin, Linnea M; Ackerman, Michael J

    2010-10-15

    Long QT syndrome (LQTS) is a cardiac channelopathy associated with syncope, seizures, and sudden death. Approximately 75% of LQTS is due to mutations in genes encoding for 3 cardiac ion channel α-subunits (LQT1 to LQT3). However, traditional mutational analyses have limited detection capabilities for atypical mutations such as large gene rearrangements. We set out to determine the prevalence and spectrum of large deletions/duplications in the major LQTS-susceptibility genes in unrelated patients who were mutation negative after point mutation analysis of LQT1- to LQT12-susceptibility genes. Forty-two unrelated, clinically strong LQTS patients were analyzed using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification, a quantitative fluorescent technique for detecting multiple exon deletions and duplications. The SALSA multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification LQTS kit from MRC-Holland was used to analyze the 3 major LQTS-associated genes, KCNQ1, KCNH2, and SCN5A, and the 2 minor genes, KCNE1 and KCNE2. Overall, 2 gene rearrangements were found in 2 of 42 unrelated patients (4.8%, confidence interval 1.7 to 11). A deletion of KCNQ1 exon 3 was identified in a 10-year-old Caucasian boy with a corrected QT duration of 660 ms, a personal history of exercise-induced syncope, and a family history of syncope. A deletion of KCNQ1 exon 7 was identified in a 17-year-old Caucasian girl with a corrected QT duration of 480 ms, a personal history of exercise-induced syncope, and a family history of sudden cardiac death. In conclusion, because nearly 5% of patients with genetically elusive LQTS had large genomic rearrangements involving the canonical LQTS-susceptibility genes, reflex genetic testing to investigate genomic rearrangements may be of clinical value. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. [Long QT syndrome and polymorphic ventricular tachycardia due to hypopituitarism. Report of one case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Castro, José Miguel; García-Martín, Antonia; Guirao-Arrabal, Emilio; Carrillo-Alascio, Pedro Luis

    2017-07-01

    Symptoms of hypopituitarism are usually chronic and nonspecific, but rarely the disease can have acute and life threatening manifestations. We report a 53 years old female with a pituitary adenoma that was admitted to our hospital because of syncope. The electrocardiogram showed sinus bradycardia with a prolonged QT interval. Frequent runs of non-sustained polymorphic ventricular tachycardia were noted on telemetry. The patient had a history of severe acute headaches in the previous days and laboratory tests revealed severe secondary hypothyroidism, adrenal insufficiency and a decrease in pituitary hormones. A magnetic resonance imaging of the head showed changes in the size and contrast enhancement of the adenoma. A diagnosis of hypopituitarism secondary to pituitary apoplexy was made and treatment with hydrocortisone and, subsequently, levothyroxine was started. Hormonal disorders such as hypothyroidism, adrenal insufficiency or hypopituitarism should be considered as unusual causes for reversible cardiomyopathy, long QT syndrome and ventricular arrhythmias.

  3. The Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome; atrial pacing combined with ß-blocker therapy, a favorable approach in young high-risk patients with long QT syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Früh, Andreas; Siem, Geir; Holmström, Henrik; Døhlen, Gaute; Haugaa, Kristina H

    2016-11-01

    Patients with Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome (JLNS) exhibit severe phenotypes that are characterized by congenital deafness, very long QT intervals, and high risk of life-threatening arrhythmias. Current treatment strategies include high doses of beta-blocker medication, left cardiac sympathetic denervation, and ICD placement, which is challenging in young children. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and effect of pacing in addition to beta-blocker treatment in children with JLNS. All genetically confirmed patients with JLNS born since 1999 in Norway were included in the study. Data on history of long QT syndrome-related symptoms, QT interval, and beta-blocker and pacemaker treatment were recorded. A total of 9 patients with QT intervals ranging from 510 to 660 ms were identified. Eight patients developed long QT syndrome-related symptoms, and 1 patient died before diagnosis. The survivors received beta-blocker medication. Seven patients also received a pacemaker; 1 had a ventricular lead and 6 had atrial leads. The patient with the ventricular lead died during follow-up. The 6 patients with atrial leads survived without events at a mean follow-up of 6.9 years after pacemaker implantation. Two patients received prophylactic upgrade to a 2-chamber ICD. No arrhythmic events occurred in 6 very young JLNS patients who received atrial pacing in combination with increased doses of beta-blockers during 7-year follow-up. If confirmed in additional patients, this treatment strategy may prevent life-threatening arrhythmias in this high-risk patient group and may act as a bridge to insertion of a 2-chamber ICD when left cardiac sympathetic denervation is not available. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Interventricular dispersion in repolarization causes bifid T waves in dogs with dofetilide-induced long QT syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijborg, Veronique M F; Chauveau, Samuel; Janse, Michiel J; Anyukhovsky, Evgeny P; Danilo, Peter R; Rosen, Michael R; Opthof, Tobias; Coronel, Ruben

    BACKGROUND: Long QT2 (LQT2) syndrome is characterized by bifid (or notched) T waves, whose mechanism is not understood. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to test whether increased interventricular dispersion of repolarization induces bifid T waves. METHODS: We simultaneously recorded surface

  5. Interventricular dispersion in repolarization causes bifid T waves in dogs with dofetilide-induced long QT syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijborg, Veronique M. F.; Chauveau, Samuel; Janse, Michiel J.; Anyukhovsky, Evgeny P.; Danilo, Peter R.; Rosen, Michael R.; Opthof, Tobias; Coronel, Ruben

    2015-01-01

    Long QT2 (LQT2) syndrome is characterized by bifid (or notched) T waves, whose mechanism is not understood. The purpose of this study was to test whether increased interventricular dispersion of repolarization induces bifid T waves. We simultaneously recorded surface ECG and unipolar electrograms at

  6. The Importance of the Family History in Caring for Families With Long QT Syndrome and Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruiter, J.S.; Berkenbosch-Nieuwhof, K.; van den Berg, M.P.; van Dijk, R.; Middel, B.; van Tintelen, J.P.

    In potentially inherited cardiac diseases, the family history is of great importance. We looked at the way cardiologists take a family history in patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) or long QT syndrome (LQTS) and whether this led to screening of relatives or other follow-up. We

  7. Epidemiology of symptomatic drug-induced long QT syndrome and Torsade de Pointes in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarganas, Giselle; Garbe, Edeltraut; Klimpel, Andreas; Hering, Rolf C; Bronder, Elisabeth; Haverkamp, Wilhelm

    2014-01-01

    Drug-induced long QT syndrome (diLQTS) leading to Torsade de Pointes (TdP) is a potentially lethal condition, which has led to several post-marketing drug withdrawals in the past decade. The true incidence of diLQTS/TdP is largely unknown. One explanation is under-reporting of this potentially life-threatening adverse event by physicians and other medical staff to pharmacovigilance agencies. To gain more insight into the incidence of diLQTS and TdP, the Berlin Pharmacovigilance Center (PVZ-FAKOS) has actively and prospectively identified patients who developed this particular type of drug-induced adverse event. Here, the basic characteristics of the affected patients are summarized and suspected drugs are discussed. Furthermore, an extrapolation of the Berlin incidence rates to the German Standard Population is presented. Using a Berlin-wide network of 51 collaborating hospitals (>180 clinical departments), adult patients presenting with long QT syndrome (LQTS/TdP) between 2008 and 2011 were identified by active surveillance of these hospitals. Drug exposures as well as other possible risk factors were obtained from the patient's files and in a face-to-face interview with the patient. One-hundred and seventy patients of possible LQTS/TdP were reported to the Pharmacovigilance Center of whom 58 cases were confirmed in a thorough validation process. The majority (66%) of these cases were female and 60% had developed LQTS/TdP in the outpatient setting. Thirty-five (60%) of 58 confirmed cases were assessed as drug-related based on a standardized causality assessment applying the criteria of the World Health Organization. Drugs assessed as related in more than two cases were metoclopramide, amiodarone, melperone, citalopram, and levomethadone. The age-standardized incidence of diLQTS/TdP in Berlin was estimated to be 2.5 per million per year for males and 4.0 per million per year for females. While European annual reporting rates based on spontaneous reports suggest an

  8. BAG3-related myopathy, polyneuropathy and cardiomyopathy with long QT syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostera-Pruszczyk, Anna; Suszek, Małgorzata; Płoski, Rafał; Franaszczyk, Maria; Potulska-Chromik, Anna; Pruszczyk, Piotr; Sadurska, Elżbieta; Karolczak, Justyna; Kamińska, Anna M; Rędowicz, Maria Jolanta

    2015-12-01

    BAG3 belongs to BAG family of molecular chaperone regulators interacting with HSP70 and anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2. It is ubiquitously expressed with strong expression in skeletal and cardiac muscle, and is involved in a panoply of cellular processes. Mutations in BAG3 and aberrations in its expression cause fulminant myopathies, presenting with progressive limb and axial muscle weakness, and respiratory insufficiency and neuropathy. Herein, we report a sporadic case of a 15-years old girl with symptoms of myopathy, demyelinating polyneuropathy and asymptomatic long QT syndrome. Genetic testing demonstrated heterozygous mutation Pro209Leu (c.626C > T) in exon 3 of BAG3 gene causing severe myopathy and neuropathy, often associated with restrictive cardiomyopathy. We did not find a mutation in any known LQT syndrome genes. Analysis of muscle biopsy revealed profound disintegration of Z-discs with extensive accumulation of granular debris and large inclusions within fibers. We demonstrated profound alterations in BAG3 distribution as the protein localized to long filamentous structures present across the fibers that were positively stained not only for α-actinin but also for desmin and filamin indicating that those disintegrated Z-disc regions contained also other sarcomeric proteins. The mutation caused a decrease in the content of BAG3 and HSP70, and also of α-actinin desmin, filamin and fast myosin heavy chain, confirming its severe effect on the muscle fiber morphology and thus function. We provide further evidence that BAG3 is associated with Z-disc maintenance, and the Pro209Leu mutation may occur worldwide. We also provide a summary of cases associated with this mutation reported so far.

  9. Cardiovascular Effects of Energy Drinks in Familial Long QT Syndrome: A Randomized Cross-Over Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Belinda; Ingles, Jodie; Medi, Caroline; Driscoll, Timothy; Semsarian, Christopher

    2017-03-15

    Caffeinated energy drinks may trigger serious cardiac effects. The aim of this study was to determine the cardiovascular effects of caffeinated energy drink consumption in patients with familial long QT syndrome (LQTS). From 2014-2016, 24 LQTS patients aged 16-50 years were recruited to a randomized, double-blind, cross-over study of energy drink (ED) versus control (CD) with participants acting as their own controls (one week washout). The primary study outcome was an increase in corrected QT interval (QTc) by >20ms. Secondary outcomes were changes in systolic and diastolic blood pressure. In 24 patients with LQTS (no dropout), mean age was 29±9 years, 13/24 (54%) were female, and 8/24 (33%) were probands. Intention to treat analysis revealed no significant change in QTc with ED compared with CD (12±28ms vs 16±27ms, 3% vs 4%, p=0.71). The systolic and diastolic blood pressure significantly increased with ED compared to CD (peak change 7±16mmHg vs 1±16mmHg, 6% vs 0.8%, p=0.046 and 8±10 vs 2±9mmHg, 11% vs 3% p=0.01 respectively). These changes correlated with significant increases in serum caffeine (14.6±11.3 vs 0.5±0.1μmol/L, penergy drink consumption. Caffeinated energy drinks have significant haemodynamic effects in patients with LQTS, especifically an acute increase in blood pressure. Since dangerous QTc prolongation was seen in some LQTS patients, we recommend caution in young patients with LQTS consuming energy drinks. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Flecainide provocation reveals concealed brugada syndrome in a long QT syndrome family with a novel L1786Q mutation in SCN5A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kanters, Jørgen K.; Yuan, Lei; Hedley, Paula L

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mutations in SCN5A can result in both long QT type 3 (LQT3) and Brugada syndrome (BrS), and a few mutations have been found to have an overlapping phenotype. Long QT syndrome is characterized by prolonged QT interval, and a prerequisite for a BrS diagnosis is ST elevation in the right...... interval. The proband presented with an aborted cardiac arrest, and his mother died suddenly and unexpectedly at the age of 65. Flecainide treatment revealed coved ST elevation in all mutation carriers. Electrophysiological investigations of the mutant in HEK293 cells indicated a reduced peak current...

  11. Congenital Short QT Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Antzelevitch

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Long QT intervals in the ECG have long been associated with sudden cardiac death. The congenital long QT syndrome was first described in individuals with structurally normal hearts in 1957.1 Little was known about the significance of a short QT interval. In 1993, after analyzing 6693 consecutive Holter recordings Algra et al concluded that an increased risk of sudden death was present not only in patients with long QT interval, but also in patients with short QT interval (<400 ms.2 Because this was a retrospective analysis, further evaluation of the data was not possible. It was not until 2000 that a short-QT syndrome (SQTS was proposed as a new inherited clinical syndrome by Gussak et al.3 The initial report was of two siblings and their mother all of whom displayed persistently short QT interval. The youngest was a 17 year old female presenting with several episodes of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation requiring electrical cardioversion.3 Her QT interval measured 280 msec at a heart rate of 69. Her 21 year old brother displayed a QT interval of 272 msec at a heart rate of 58, whereas the 51 year old mother showed a QT of 260 msec at a heart rate of 74. The authors also noted similar ECG findings in another unrelated 37 year old patient associated with sudden cardiac death.

  12. Spectrum of pathogenic mutations and associated polymorphisms in a cohort of 44 unrelated patients with long QT syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millat, G; Chevalier, P; Restier-Miron, L; Da Costa, A; Bouvagnet, P; Kugener, B; Fayol, L; Gonzàlez Armengod, C; Oddou, B; Chanavat, V; Froidefond, E; Perraudin, R; Rousson, R; Rodriguez-Lafrasse, C

    2006-09-01

    Long QT syndrome (LQTS) is a rare and clinically heterogeneous inherited disorder characterized by a long QT interval on the electrocardiogram, increased risk of syncope and sudden death caused by arrhythmias. This syndrome is mostly caused by mutations in genes encoding various cardiac ion channels. The clinical heterogeneity is usually attributed to variable penetrance. One of the reasons for this variability in expression could be the coexistence of common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on LQTS-causing genes and/or unknown genes. Some synonymous and nonsynonymous exonic SNPs identified in LQTS-causing genes may have an effect on the cardiac repolarization process and modulate the clinical expression of a latent LQTS pathogenic mutation. We report the molecular pattern of 44 unrelated patients with LQTS using denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography analysis of the KCNQ1, KCNH2, SCN5A, KCNE1 and KCNE2 genes. Forty-five disease-causing mutations (including 24 novel ones) were identified in this cohort. Most of our patients (84%) showed complex molecular pattern with one mutation (and even two for four patients) associated with several SNPs located in several LQTS genes.

  13. Can parents adjust to the idea that their child is at risk for a sudden death?: Psychological impact of risk for Long QT Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, Karin S. W. H.; Grosfeld, F. J. M.; van Tintelen, J. P.; van Langen, I. M.; Wilde, A. A. M.; van den Bout, J.; ten Kroode, H. F. J.

    2005-01-01

    Can a parent adjust to the idea that its child is at risk for a sudden death? This question is raised by a diagnostic procedure in which children were tested for an inherited Long QT Syndrome (LQTS). This potentially life-threatening but treatable cardiac arrhythmia syndrome may cause sudden death,

  14. Can parents adjust to the idea that their child is at risk for a sudden death? : Psychological impact of risk for Long QT Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, Karin S. W. H.; Grosfeld, FJM; van Tintelen, JP; van Langen, IM; Wilde, AAM; van den Bout, J; ten Kroode, HFJ

    2005-01-01

    Can a parent adjust to the idea that its child is at risk for a sudden death? This question is raised by a diagnostic procedure in which children were tested for an inherited Long QT Syndrome (LQTS). This potentially life-threatening but treatable cardiac arrhythmia syndrome may cause sudden death,

  15. Generation of human induced pluripotent stem cell line from a patient with a long QT syndrome type 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azra Fatima

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We report here the generation of human iPS cell line UKKi009-A from dermal fibroblasts of a patient carrying heterozygous mutation c.3035-3045delTCCCTCGATGC, p.Leu1012Pro (fs*55 in KCNH2 gene leading to long QT syndrome type 2 (LQT2. We used the Sleeping Beauty transposon-based plasmids expressing OSKM along with microRNAs 307/367 to reprogram the fibroblasts. The iPS cells possess pluripotent stem cell characteristics and differentiate to cell lineages of all three germ layers. This cell line can serve as a source for in vitro modeling of LQT2. This cell line is distributed by the European Collection of Authenticated Cell Cultures (ECACC.

  16. A high-risk patient with long-QT syndrome with no response to cardioselective beta-blockers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyota, Naoki; Miyazaki, Aya; Sakaguchi, Heima; Shimizu, Wataru; Ohuchi, Hideo

    2015-09-01

    We present a case of a high-risk 19-year-old female with long-QT syndrome (LQTS) with compound mutations. She had a history of aborted cardiac arrest and syncope and had received treatment with propranolol for 15 years. However, because she developed adult-onset asthma we tried to switch propranolol, a nonselective beta-blocker, to beta-1-cardioselective agents, bisoprolol and metoprolol. These resulted in both a markedly prolonged corrected QT interval and the development of LQTS-associated arrhythmias. Eventually, propranolol was reinitiated at a higher dose with the addition of verapamil, and she has had no further cardiac or asthmatic events for 5 years.

  17. Mutations in conserved amino acids in the KCNQ1 channel and risk of cardiac events in type-1 long-QT syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jons, Christian; Moss, Arthur J; Lopes, Coeli M

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Type-1 long-QT syndrome (LQT1) is caused by mutations in the KCNQ1 gene. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether KCNQ1 mutations in highly conserved amino acid residues within the voltage-gated potassium channel family are associated with an increased risk of cardiac even...

  18. In Vitro and In Silico Risk Assessment in Acquired Long QT Syndrome: The Devil Is in the Details.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, William; Windley, Monique J; Vandenberg, Jamie I; Hill, Adam P

    2017-01-01

    Acquired long QT syndrome, mostly as a result of drug block of the Kv11. 1 potassium channel in the heart, is characterized by delayed cardiac myocyte repolarization, prolongation of the T interval on the ECG, syncope and sudden cardiac death due to the polymorphic ventricular arrhythmia Torsade de Pointes (TdP). In recent years, efforts are underway through the Comprehensive in vitro proarrhythmic assay (CiPA) initiative, to develop better tests for this drug induced arrhythmia based in part on in silico simulations of pharmacological disruption of repolarization. However, drug binding to Kv11.1 is more complex than a simple binary molecular reaction, meaning simple steady state measures of potency are poor surrogates for risk. As a result, there is a plethora of mechanistic detail describing the drug/Kv11.1 interaction-such as drug binding kinetics, state preference, temperature dependence and trapping-that needs to be considered when developing in silico models for risk prediction. In addition to this, other factors, such as multichannel pharmacological profile and the nature of the ventricular cell models used in simulations also need to be considered in the search for the optimum in silico approach. Here we consider how much of mechanistic detail needs to be included for in silico models to accurately predict risk and further, how much of this detail can be retrieved from protocols that are practical to implement in high throughout screens as part of next generation of preclinical in silico drug screening approaches?

  19. The importance of the family history in caring for families with long QT syndrome and dilated cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiter, Jolien S; Berkenbosch-Nieuwhof, Karin; van den Berg, Maarten P; van Dijk, Rene; Middel, Berrie; van Tintelen, J Peter

    2010-03-01

    In potentially inherited cardiac diseases, the family history is of great importance. We looked at the way cardiologists take a family history in patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) or long QT syndrome (LQTS) and whether this led to screening of relatives or other follow-up. We performed retrospective cross-sectional analyses of adult index patients with DCM or LQTS in a general hospital (GH) or a University Medical Center (UMC). We identified 82 index patients with DCM (34 GH; 48 UMC) and 20 with LQTS (all UMC) between 1996 and 2005. Mean follow-up was 58 months. A family history was recorded in 90% of both LQTS and DCM patients most of the cases restricted to first-degree family members. The genetic aspects, counseling and screening of family members was discussed significantly more often with LQTS than DCM patients (all P family members, DNA analysis and referral) was performed significantly more often in LQTS than DCM patients. Cardiologists in the UMC referred DCM index patients for genetic counseling more often than those in the GH (25% vs. 6%; P familial. Since early recognition and treatment may reduce morbidity and mortality we recommend cardiologists take a more thorough family history and always consider referring to a clinical genetics department in such index patients. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. KCNE1 D85N polymorphism — a sex-specific modifier in type 1 long QT syndrome?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjamaa Annukka

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Long QT syndrome (LQTS is an inherited ion channel disorder manifesting with prolongation of the cardiac repolarization phase and severe ventricular arrhythmias. The common KCNE1 D85N potassium channel variant prolongs QT interval by inhibiting IKs (KCNQ1 and IKr (KCNH2 currents and is therefore a suitable candidate for a modifier gene in LQTS. Methods We studied the effect of D85N on age-, sex-, and heart rate-adjusted QT-interval duration by linear regression in LQTS patients carrying the Finnish founder mutations KCNQ1 G589D (n = 492, KCNQ1 IVS7-2A>G (n = 66, KCNH2 L552S (n = 73, and KCNH2 R176W (n = 88. We also investigated the association between D85N and clinical variables reflecting the severity of the disease. Results D85N was associated with a QT prolongation by 26 ms (SE 8.6, p = 0.003 in males with KCNQ1 G589D (n = 213, but not in females with G589D (n = 279. In linear regression, the interaction between D85N genotype and sex was significant (p = 0.028. Within the KCNQ1 G589D mutation group, KCNE1 D85N carriers were more often probands of the family (p = 0.042 and were more likely to use beta blocker medication (p = 0.010 than non-carriers. The number of D85N carriers in other founder mutation groups was too small to assess its effects. Conclusions We propose that KCNE1 D85N is a sex-specific QT-interval modifier in type 1 LQTS and may also associate with increased severity of disease. Our data warrant additional studies on the role of KCNE1 D85N in other genetically homogeneous groups of LQTS patients.

  1. Determinants of torsades de pointes in older patients with drug-associated long QT syndrome: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goutelle, Sylvain; Sidolle, Elodie; Ducher, Michel; Caron, Jacques; Timour, Quadiri; Nony, Patrice; Gouraud, Aurore

    2014-08-01

    Many elderly patients are routinely exposed to drugs that may prolong the cardiac QT interval and cause Torsades de pointes (TdP). However, predictors of TdP in patients with drug-associated long QT syndrome (LQTS) are not fully understood, especially in the geriatric population. The objective of this study was to identify risk factors of TdP in elderly patients with drug-associated LQTS. In this retrospective, case-control study, documented reports of drug-associated LQTS plus TdP (n = 125) and LQTS without TdP (n = 81) in patients ≥65 years of age were retrieved from the French Pharmacovigilance Database over a 10-year period. Available clinical, biological, and drug therapy data were compared in the two groups and logistic regression was performed to identify significant predictors of TdP. The uncorrected QT interval was significantly longer in patients with TdP than in patients without TdP (577 ± 79 vs. 519 ± 68 ms; p = 0.0001). The number of drugs with a known risk of TdP administered to each patient was not a predictor of arrhythmia, nor was female gender. Logistic regression analysis identified the uncorrected QT interval as the only significant predictor of TdP. The receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was characterized by an area under the curve of 0.77 (95 % confidence interval 0.64-0.88) and a QT cutoff of 550 ms. The uncorrected QT interval was significantly associated with the probability of TdP in elderly patients with acquired, drug-associated LQTS.

  2. In Vitro and In Silico Risk Assessment in Acquired Long QT Syndrome: The Devil Is in the Details

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Lee

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Acquired long QT syndrome, mostly as a result of drug block of the Kv11. 1 potassium channel in the heart, is characterized by delayed cardiac myocyte repolarization, prolongation of the T interval on the ECG, syncope and sudden cardiac death due to the polymorphic ventricular arrhythmia Torsade de Pointes (TdP. In recent years, efforts are underway through the Comprehensive in vitro proarrhythmic assay (CiPA initiative, to develop better tests for this drug induced arrhythmia based in part on in silico simulations of pharmacological disruption of repolarization. However, drug binding to Kv11.1 is more complex than a simple binary molecular reaction, meaning simple steady state measures of potency are poor surrogates for risk. As a result, there is a plethora of mechanistic detail describing the drug/Kv11.1 interaction—such as drug binding kinetics, state preference, temperature dependence and trapping—that needs to be considered when developing in silico models for risk prediction. In addition to this, other factors, such as multichannel pharmacological profile and the nature of the ventricular cell models used in simulations also need to be considered in the search for the optimum in silico approach. Here we consider how much of mechanistic detail needs to be included for in silico models to accurately predict risk and further, how much of this detail can be retrieved from protocols that are practical to implement in high throughout screens as part of next generation of preclinical in silico drug screening approaches?

  3. Long QT Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medical center. Support from family and friends also can help relieve stress and anxiety. Let your loved ones know how you feel and what they can do to help you. Some people learn they have LQTS because ...

  4. Patients with Long QT Syndrome Due to Impaired hERG-encoded Kv11.1 Potassium Channel Have Exaggerated Endocrine Pancreatic and Incretin Function Associated with Reactive Hypoglycemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyltén-Cavallius, Louise; Iepsen, Eva W; Wewer Albrechtsen, Nicolai J

    2017-01-01

    Background -Loss-of-function mutations in hERG (encoding the Kv11.1 voltage-gated potassium channel) cause long QT syndrome (LQT2) due to prolonged cardiac repolarization. However, Kv11.1 is also present in pancreatic α and β cells and intestinal L and K cells, secreting glucagon, insulin, and th...

  5. A model of cardiac ryanodine receptor gating predicts experimental Ca2+-dynamics and Ca2+-triggered arrhythmia in the long QT syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Dan; Ermentrout, Bard; Němec, Jan; Salama, Guy

    2017-09-01

    Abnormal Ca2+ handling is well-established as the trigger of cardiac arrhythmia in catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia and digoxin toxicity, but its role remains controversial in Torsade de Pointes (TdP), the arrhythmia associated with the long QT syndrome (LQTS). Recent experimental results show that early afterdepolarizations (EADs) that initiate TdP are caused by spontaneous (non-voltage-triggered) Ca2+ release from Ca2+-overloaded sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) rather than the activation of the L-type Ca2+-channel window current. In bradycardia and long QT type 2 (LQT2), a second, non-voltage triggered cytosolic Ca2+ elevation increases gradually in amplitude, occurs before overt voltage instability, and then precedes the rise of EADs. Here, we used a modified Shannon-Puglisi-Bers model of rabbit ventricular myocytes to reproduce experimental Ca2+ dynamics in bradycardia and LQT2. Abnormal systolic Ca2+-oscillations and EADs caused by SR Ca2+-release are reproduced in a modified 0-dimensional model, where 3 gates in series control the ryanodine receptor (RyR2) conductance. Two gates control RyR2 activation and inactivation and sense cytosolic Ca2+ while a third gate senses luminal junctional SR Ca2+. The model predicts EADs in bradycardia and low extracellular [K+] and cessation of SR Ca2+-release terminate salvos of EADs. Ca2+-waves, systolic cell-synchronous Ca2+-release, and multifocal diastolic Ca2+ release seen in subcellular Ca2+-mapping experiments are observed in the 2-dimensional version of the model. These results support the role of SR Ca2+-overload, abnormal SR Ca2+-release, and the subsequent activation of the electrogenic Na+/Ca2+-exchanger as the mechanism of TdP. The model offers new insights into the genesis of cardiac arrhythmia and new therapeutic strategies.

  6. Role of sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium in development of secondary calcium rise and early afterdepolarizations in long QT syndrome rabbit model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Po-Cheng Chang

    Full Text Available L-type calcium current reactivation plays an important role in development of early afterdepolarizations (EADs and torsades de pointes (TdP. Secondary intracellular calcium (Cai rise is associated with initiation of EADs.To test whether inhibition of sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR Ca2+ cycling suppresses secondary Cai rise and genesis of EADs.Langendorff perfusion and dual voltage and Cai optical mapping were conducted in 10 rabbit hearts. Atrioventricular block (AVB was created by radiofrequency ablation. After baseline studies, E4031, SR Ca2+ cycling inhibitors (ryanodine plus thapsigargin and nifedipine were then administrated subsequently, and the protocols were repeated.At baseline, there was no spontaneous or pacing-induced TdP. After E4031 administration, action potential duration (APD was significantly prolonged and the amplitude of secondary Cai rise was enhanced, and 7 (70% rabbits developed spontaneous or pacing-induced TdP. In the presence of ryanodine plus thapsigargin, TdP inducibility was significantly reduced (2 hearts, 20%, p = 0.03. Although APD was significantly prolonged (from 298 ± 30 ms to 457 ± 75 ms at pacing cycle length of 1000 m, p = 0.007 by ryanodine plus thapsigargin, the secondary Cai rise was suppressed (from 8.8 ± 2.6% to 1.2 ± 0.9%, p = 0.02. Nifedipine inhibited TdP inducibility in all rabbit hearts.In this AVB and long QT rabbit model, inhibition of SR Ca2+ cycyling reduces the inducibility of TdP. The mechanism might be suppression of secondary Cai rise and genesis of EADs.

  7. Anestesia e síndrome do QT longo Anestesia e síndrome del QT largo Anesthesia and the long QT syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Nacur Lorentz

    2007-10-01

    la operación.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Cardiac arrhythmias are important factors of perioperative morbidity and mortality. Among the causes of arrhythmias, the long QT syndrome, both in the genetic and acquired types, should be remembered since several drugs used in anesthesia, as well as in the perioperative period, can prolong the QT interval and trigger potentially malignant arrhythmias. CONTENTS: A review of the long QT syndrome (LQTS, discussing its causes and definition, as well as the mechanisms of the disease. Besides mentioning several drugs implicated in prolonging the QT interval, and the most adequate anesthetic approaches to affected patients are recommended. CONCLUSION: The long QT syndrome, possible cause of intra- and postoperative morbidity and mortality, can be related to drugs used during anesthesia. The anesthesiologist should have knowledge of this syndrome, in order to avoid an unfavorable outcome.

  8. Long QT 1 mutation KCNQ1A344V increases local anesthetic sensitivity of the slowly activating delayed rectifier potassium current

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siebrands, Cornelia C; Binder, Stephan; Eckhoff, Ulrike

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Anesthesia in patients with long QT syndrome (LQTS) is a matter of concern. Congenital LQTS is most frequently caused by mutations in KCNQ1 (Kv7.1), whereas drug-induced LQTS is a consequence of HERG (human ether-a-go-go-related gene) channel inhibition. The aim of this study was to i...

  9. High-risk Long QT Syndrome Mutations in the Kv7.1 (KCNQ1) Pore Disrupt the Molecular Basis for Rapid K+ Permeation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Don E.; Bartos, Daniel C.; Reloj, Allison R.; Campbell, Kenneth S.; Johnson, Jonathan N.; Tester, David J.; Ackerman, Michael J.; Fressart, Véronique; Denjoy, Isabelle; Guicheney, Pascale; Moss, Arthur J.; Ohno, Seiko; Horie, Minoru; Delisle, Brian P.

    2012-01-01

    Type 1 long QT syndrome (LQT1) syndrome is caused by loss-of-function mutations in the KCNQ1, which encodes the K+ channel (Kv7.1) that underlies the slowly activating delayed rectifier K+ current in the heart. Intragenic risk stratification suggests LQT1 mutations that disrupt conserved amino acid residues in the pore are an independent risk factor for LQT1-related cardiac events. The purpose of this study is to determine possible molecular mechanisms that underlie the loss-of-function for these high-risk mutations. Extensive genotype-phenotype analyses of LQT1 patients showed that T322M-, T322A-, or G325R-Kv7.1 confer a high risk for LQT1-related cardiac events. Heterologous expression of these mutations with KCNE1 revealed they generated non-functional channels and caused dominant negative suppression of WT-Kv7.1 current. Molecular dynamic simulations (MDS) of analogous mutations in KcsA (T85M-, T85A-, and G88R-KcsA) demonstrated that they disrupted the symmetrical distribution of the carbonyl oxygen atoms in the selectivity filter, which upset the balance between the strong attractive and K+-K+ repulsive forces required for rapid K+ permeation. We conclude high-risk LQT1 mutations in the pore likely disrupt the architectural and physical properties of the K+ channel selectivity filter. PMID:23092362

  10. A Síndrome do QT Longo Associada ao uso de Citalopram e Escitalopram / The Long QT Syndrome Associated to Citalopram and Escitalopram

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipe Santos Falani

    2016-06-01

    benefit-risk should be evaluated before use. Citalopram is the selective inhibitor of serotonin reuptake most widely prescribed in the world as escitalopram is widely used in major depressive disorder. Escitalopram is also widely prescribed because of its mild and transient side effects. The Long QT syndrome occurs because of a change in the cardiac electrical system. A duration of the QT interval greater than 450ms in men and 460ms in women should be considered anomalous, with specific etiology. However, cardiac arrhythmias occur more frequently when QT is greater than 500ms. The primary mechanism of drug-induced long QT is the inhibition of the hERG potassium channel, particularly in those patients with the polymorphic variant. Conclusion: Despite the low prevalence of QT interval prolongation induced in second-generation antidepressant users, given its wide use by the population, a greater concern for electrocardiographic monitoring is required, especially when there are risk factors or signs of overdose.

  11. High-risk long QT syndrome mutations in the Kv7.1 (KCNQ1) pore disrupt the molecular basis for rapid K(+) permeation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Don E; Bartos, Daniel C; Reloj, Allison R; Campbell, Kenneth S; Johnson, Jonathan N; Tester, David J; Ackerman, Michael J; Fressart, Véronique; Denjoy, Isabelle; Guicheney, Pascale; Moss, Arthur J; Ohno, Seiko; Horie, Minoru; Delisle, Brian P

    2012-11-13

    Type 1 long QT syndrome (LQT1) is caused by loss-of-function mutations in the KCNQ1 gene, which encodes the K(+) channel (Kv7.1) that underlies the slowly activating delayed rectifier K(+) current in the heart. Intragenic risk stratification suggests LQT1 mutations that disrupt conserved amino acid residues in the pore are an independent risk factor for LQT1-related cardiac events. The purpose of this study is to determine possible molecular mechanisms that underlie the loss of function for these high-risk mutations. Extensive genotype-phenotype analyses of LQT1 patients showed that T322M-, T322A-, or G325R-Kv7.1 confers a high risk for LQT1-related cardiac events. Heterologous expression of these mutations with KCNE1 revealed they generated nonfunctional channels and caused dominant negative suppression of WT-Kv7.1 current. Molecular dynamics simulations of analogous mutations in KcsA (T85M-, T85A-, and G88R-KcsA) demonstrated that they disrupted the symmetrical distribution of the carbonyl oxygen atoms in the selectivity filter, which upset the balance between the strong attractive and K(+)-K(+) repulsive forces required for rapid K(+) permeation. We conclude high-risk LQT1 mutations in the pore likely disrupt the architectural and physical properties of the K(+) channel selectivity filter.

  12. Readthrough of long-QT syndrome type 1 nonsense mutations rescues function but alters the biophysical properties of the channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmer, Stephen C; Mohal, Jagdeep S; Kemp, Duncan; Tinker, Andrew

    2012-05-01

    The nonsense mutations R518X-KCNQ1 and Q530X-KCNQ1 cause LQT1 (long-QT syndrome type 1) and result in a complete loss of I(Ks) channel function. In the present study we attempted to rescue the function of these mutants, in HEK (human embryonic kidney)-293 cells, by promoting readthrough of their PTCs (premature termination codons) using the pharmacological agents G-418, gentamicin and PTC124. Gentamicin and G-418 acted to promote full-length channel protein expression from R518X at 100 μM and from Q530X at 1 mM. In contrast, PTC124 did not, at any dose tested, induce readthrough of either mutant. G-418 (1 mM) treatment also acted to significantly (Pbiophysical properties of the currents produced from R518X, while similar, were not identical with wild-type as the voltage-dependence of activation was significantly (P<0.05) shifted by +25 mV. Overall, these findings indicate that although functional rescue of LQT1 nonsense mutations is possible, it is dependent on the degree of readthrough achieved and the effect on channel function of the amino acid substituted for the PTC. Such considerations will determine the success of future therapies.

  13. Transient Outward K+ Current (Ito) Underlies the Right Ventricular Initiation of Polymorphic Ventricular Tachycardia in a Transgenic Rabbit Model of Long-QT Syndrome Type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Bum-Rak; Li, Weiyan; Terentyev, Dmitry; Kabakov, Anatoli Y; Zhong, Mingwang; Rees, Colin M; Terentyeva, Radmila; Kim, Tae Yun; Qu, Zhilin; Peng, Xuwen; Karma, Alain; Koren, Gideon

    2018-06-01

    Sudden death in long-QT syndrome type 1 (LQT1), an inherited disease caused by loss-of-function mutations in KCNQ1, is triggered by early afterdepolarizations (EADs) that initiate polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (pVT). We investigated ionic mechanisms that underlie pVT in LQT1 using a transgenic rabbit model of LQT1. Optical mapping, cellular patch clamping, and computer modeling were used to elucidate the mechanisms of EADs in transgenic LQT1 rabbits. The results showed that shorter action potential duration in the right ventricle (RV) was associated with focal activity during pVT initiation. RV cardiomyocytes demonstrated higher incidence of EADs under 50 nmol/L isoproterenol. Voltage-clamp studies revealed that the transient outward potassium current (I to ) magnitude was 28% greater in RV associated with KChiP2 but with no differences in terms of calcium-cycling kinetics and other sarcolemmal currents. Perfusing with the I to blocker 4-aminopyridine changed the initial focal sites of pVT from the RV to the left ventricle, corroborating the role of I to in pVT initiation. Computer modeling showed that EADs occur preferentially in the RV because of the larger conductance of the slow-inactivating component of I to , which repolarizes the membrane potential sufficiently rapidly to allow reactivation of I Ca,L before I Kr has had sufficient time to activate. I to heterogeneity creates both triggers and an arrhythmogenic substrate in LQT1. In the absence of I Ks , I to interactions with I Ca,L and I Kr promote EADs in the RV while prolonging action potential duration in the left ventricle. This heterogeneity of action potential enhances dispersion of refractoriness and facilitates conduction blocks that initiate pVTs. © 2018 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. An NMR investigation of the structure, function and role of the hERG channel selectivity filter in the long QT syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravel, Andrée E; Arnold, Alexandre A; Dufourc, Erick J; Marcotte, Isabelle

    2013-06-01

    The human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG) voltage-gated K(+) channels are located in heart cell membranes and hold a unique selectivity filter (SF) amino acid sequence (SVGFG) as compared to other K(+) channels (TVGYG). The hERG provokes the acquired long QT syndrome (ALQTS) when blocked, as a side effect of drugs, leading to arrhythmia or heart failure. Its pore domain - including the SF - is believed to be a cardiotoxic drug target. In this study combining solution and solid-state NMR experiments we examine the structure and function of hERG's L(622)-K(638) segment which comprises the SF, as well as its role in the ALQTS using reported active drugs. We first show that the SF segment is unstructured in solution with and without K(+) ions in its surroundings, consistent with the expected flexibility required for the change between the different channel conductive states predicted by computational studies. We also show that the SF segment has the potential to perturb the membrane, but that the presence of K(+) ions cancels this interaction. The SF moiety appears to be a possible target for promethazine in the ALQTS mechanism, but not as much for bepridil, cetirizine, diphenhydramine and fluvoxamine. The membrane affinity of the SF is also affected by the presence of drugs which also perturb model DMPC-based membranes. These results thus suggest that the membrane could play a role in the ALQTS by promoting the access to transmembrane or intracellular targets on the hERG channel, or perturbing the lipid-protein synergy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Mechanistic Basis for Type 2 Long QT Syndrome Caused by KCNH2 Mutations that Disrupt Conserved Arginine Residue in the Voltage Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Christie M.; Smith, Ashley M.; Smith, Jennifer L.; Reloj, Allison R.; Velasco, Ellyn J.; Powell, Jonathan; Elayi, Claude S.; Bartos, Daniel C.; Burgess, Don E.

    2013-01-01

    KCNH2 encodes the Kv11.1 channel, which conducts the rapidly activating delayed rectifier K+ current (IKr) in the heart. KCNH2 mutations cause type 2 long QT syndrome (LQT2), which increases the risk for life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias. LQT2 mutations are predicted to prolong the cardiac action potential (AP) by reducing IKr during repolarization. Kv11.1 contains several conserved basic amino acids in the fourth transmembrane segment (S4) of the voltage sensor that are important for normal channel trafficking and gating. This study sought to determine the mechanism(s) by which LQT2 mutations at conserved arginine residues in S4 (R531Q, R531W or R534L) alter Kv11.1 function. Western blot analyses of HEK293 cells transiently expressing R531Q, R531W or R534L suggested that only R534L inhibited Kv11.1 trafficking. Voltage-clamping experiments showed that R531Q or R531W dramatically altered Kv11.1 current (IKv11.1) activation, inactivation, recovery from inactivation and deactivation. Coexpression of wild type (to mimic the patients’ genotypes) mostly corrected the changes in IKv11.1 activation and inactivation, but deactivation kinetics were still faster. Computational simulations using a human ventricular AP model showed that accelerating deactivation rates was sufficient to prolong the AP, but these effects were minimal compared to simply reducing IKr. These are the first data to demonstrate that coexpressing wild type can correct activation and inactivation dysfunction caused by mutations at a critical voltage-sensing residue in Kv11.1. We conclude that some Kv11.1 mutations might accelerate deactivation to cause LQT2 but that the ventricular AP duration is much more sensitive to mutations that decrease IKr. This likely explains why most LQT2 mutations are nonsense or trafficking-deficient. PMID:23546015

  16. Mechanistic basis for type 2 long QT syndrome caused by KCNH2 mutations that disrupt conserved arginine residues in the voltage sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Christie M; Smith, Ashley M; Smith, Jennifer L; Reloj, Allison R; Velasco, Ellyn J; Powell, Jonathan; Elayi, Claude S; Bartos, Daniel C; Burgess, Don E; Delisle, Brian P

    2013-05-01

    KCNH2 encodes the Kv11.1 channel, which conducts the rapidly activating delayed rectifier K+ current (I Kr) in the heart. KCNH2 mutations cause type 2 long QT syndrome (LQT2), which increases the risk for life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias. LQT2 mutations are predicted to prolong the cardiac action potential (AP) by reducing I Kr during repolarization. Kv11.1 contains several conserved basic amino acids in the fourth transmembrane segment (S4) of the voltage sensor that are important for normal channel trafficking and gating. This study sought to determine the mechanism(s) by which LQT2 mutations at conserved arginine residues in S4 (R531Q, R531W or R534L) alter Kv11.1 function. Western blot analyses of HEK293 cells transiently expressing R531Q, R531W or R534L suggested that only R534L inhibited Kv11.1 trafficking. Voltage-clamping experiments showed that R531Q or R531W dramatically altered Kv11.1 current (I Kv11.1) activation, inactivation, recovery from inactivation and deactivation. Coexpression of wild type (to mimic the patients' genotypes) mostly corrected the changes in I Kv11.1 activation and inactivation, but deactivation kinetics were still faster. Computational simulations using a human ventricular AP model showed that accelerating deactivation rates was sufficient to prolong the AP, but these effects were minimal compared to simply reducing I Kr. These are the first data to demonstrate that coexpressing wild type can correct activation and inactivation dysfunction caused by mutations at a critical voltage-sensing residue in Kv11.1. We conclude that some Kv11.1 mutations might accelerate deactivation to cause LQT2 but that the ventricular AP duration is much more sensitive to mutations that decrease I Kr. This likely explains why most LQT2 mutations are nonsense or trafficking-deficient.

  17. Toward Personalized Medicine: Using Cardiomyocytes Differentiated From Urine-Derived Pluripotent Stem Cells to Recapitulate Electrophysiological Characteristics of Type 2 Long QT Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouni, Mariam; Si-Tayeb, Karim; Es-Salah-Lamoureux, Zeineb; Latypova, Xenia; Champon, Benoite; Caillaud, Amandine; Rungoat, Anais; Charpentier, Flavien; Loussouarn, Gildas; Baró, Isabelle; Zibara, Kazem; Lemarchand, Patricia; Gaborit, Nathalie

    2015-09-01

    Human genetically inherited cardiac diseases have been studied mainly in heterologous systems or animal models, independent of patients' genetic backgrounds. Because sources of human cardiomyocytes (CMs) are extremely limited, the use of urine samples to generate induced pluripotent stem cell-derived CMs would be a noninvasive method to identify cardiac dysfunctions that lead to pathologies within patients' specific genetic backgrounds. The objective was to validate the use of CMs differentiated from urine-derived human induced pluripotent stem (UhiPS) cells as a new cellular model for studying patients' specific arrhythmia mechanisms. Cells obtained from urine samples of a patient with long QT syndrome who harbored the HERG A561P gene mutation and his asymptomatic noncarrier mother were reprogrammed using the episomal-based method. UhiPS cells were then differentiated into CMs using the matrix sandwich method.UhiPS-CMs showed proper expression of atrial and ventricular myofilament proteins and ion channels. They were electrically functional, with nodal-, atrial- and ventricular-like action potentials recorded using high-throughput optical and patch-clamp techniques. Comparison of HERG expression from the patient's UhiPS-CMs to the mother's UhiPS-CMs showed that the mutation led to a trafficking defect that resulted in reduced delayed rectifier K(+) current (IKr). This phenotype gave rise to action potential prolongation and arrhythmias. UhiPS cells from patients carrying ion channel mutations can be used as novel tools to differentiate functional CMs that recapitulate cardiac arrhythmia phenotypes. © 2015 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  18. The human Nav1.5 F1486 deletion associated with long QT syndrome leads to impaired sodium channel inactivation and reduced lidocaine sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Weihua; Xiao, Yucheng; Chen, Hanying; Ashpole, Nicole M; Piekarz, Andrew D; Ma, Peilin; Hudmon, Andy; Cummins, Theodore R; Shou, Weinian

    2012-01-01

    The deletion of phenylalanine 1486 (F1486del) in the human cardiac voltage-gated sodium channel (hNav1.5) is associated with fatal long QT (LQT) syndrome. In this study we determined how F1486del impairs the functional properties of hNav1.5 and alters action potential firing in heterologous expression systems (human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells) and their native cardiomyocyte background. Cells expressing hNav1.5-F1486del exhibited a loss-of-function alteration, reflected by an 80% reduction of peak current density, and several gain-of-function alterations, including reduced channel inactivation, enlarged window current, substantial augmentation of persistent late sodium current and an increase in ramp current. We also observed substantial action potential duration (APD) prolongation and prominent early afterdepolarizations (EADs) in neonatal cardiomyocytes expressing the F1486del channels, as well as in computer simulations of myocyte activity. In addition, lidocaine sensitivity was dramatically reduced, which probably contributed to the poor therapeutic outcome observed in the patient carrying the hNav1.5-F1486del mutation. Therefore, despite the significant reduction in peak current density, the F1486del mutation also leads to substantial gain-of-function alterations that are sufficient to cause APD prolongation and EADs, the predominant characteristic of LQTs. These data demonstrate that hNav1.5 mutations can have complex functional consequences and highlight the importance of identifying the specific molecular defect when evaluating potential treatments for individuals with prolonged QT intervals. PMID:22826127

  19. The Role of KCNQ1 Mutations and Maternal Beta Blocker Use During Pregnancy in the Growth of Children With Long QT Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heta Huttunen

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTwo missense mutations in KCNQ1, an imprinted gene that encodes the alpha subunit of the voltage-gated potassium channel Kv7.1, cause autosomal dominant growth hormone deficiency and maternally inherited gingival fibromatosis. We evaluated endocrine features, birth size, and subsequent somatic growth of patients with long QT syndrome 1 (LQT1 due to loss-of-function mutations in KCNQ1.DesignMedical records of 104 patients with LQT1 in a single tertiary care center between 1995 and 2015 were retrospectively reviewed.MethodsClinical and endocrine data of the LQT1 patients were included in the analyses.ResultsAt birth, patients with a maternally inherited mutation (n = 52 were shorter than those with paternal inheritance of the mutation (n = 29 (birth length, −0.70 ± 1.1 SDS vs. −0.2 ± 1.0 SDS, P < 0.05. Further analyses showed, however, that only newborns (n = 19 of mothers who had received beta blockers during pregnancy were shorter and lighter at birth than those with paternal inheritance of the mutation (n = 29 (−0.89 ± 1.0 SDS vs. −0.20 ± 1.0 SDS, P < 0.05; and 3,173 ± 469 vs. 3,515 ± 466 g, P < 0.05. Maternal beta blocker treatment during the pregnancy was also associated with lower cord blood TSH levels (P = 0.011 and significant catch-up growth during the first year of life (Δ0.08 SDS/month, P = 0.004. Later, childhood growth of the patients was unremarkable.ConclusionLoss-of-function mutations in KCNQ1 are not associated with abnormalities in growth, whereas maternal beta blocker use during pregnancy seems to modify prenatal growth of LQT1 patients—a phenomenon followed by catch-up growth after birth.

  20. Complex aberrant splicing in the induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes from a patient with long-QT syndrome carrying KCNQ1-A344Aspl mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuriyanghai, Yimin; Makiyama, Takeru; Sasaki, Kenichi; Kamakura, Tsukasa; Yamamoto, Yuta; Hayano, Mamoru; Harita, Takeshi; Nishiuchi, Suguru; Chen, Jiarong; Kohjitani, Hirohiko; Hirose, Sayako; Yokoi, Fumika; Gao, Jingshan; Chonabayashi, Kazuhisa; Watanabe, Ken; Ohno, Seiko; Yoshida, Yoshinori; Kimura, Takeshi; Horie, Minoru

    2018-05-29

    Long-QT syndrome type 1 (LQT1) is caused by mutations in KCNQ1, which encodes the α-subunit of the slow delayed rectifier potassium current (I Ks ) channel. We previously reported that a synonymous mutation, c.1032G>A, p.A344Aspl in KCNQ1 is most commonly identified in the genotyped LQT1 Japanese patients, and the aberrant splicing was analyzed in the lymphocytes isolated from patients' blood samples. However, the mechanisms underlying the observed processes in human cardiomyocytes remains unclear. To establish and analyze patient-specific human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocyte (hiPSC-CM) model carrying KCNQ1-A344Aspl. We generated hiPSCs from the peripheral blood mononuclear cells obtained from an LQT1 patient carrying KCNQ1-A344Aspl. Using the differentiated cardiomyocytes, we analyzed splicing variants and performed electrophysiological studies. We identified seven aberrant RNA variants in A344Aspl-hiPSC-CMs, more complex compared with those in the peripheral lymphocytes. Multi-electrode array analysis revealed that 1 μM isoproterenol significantly prolonged the duration of corrected field potential in A344Aspl-hiPSC-CMs, compared with that in the controls. Additionally, 100 nM E-4031, I Kr blocker, was shown to induce early afterdepolarization-like waveforms in A344Aspl-hiPSC-CMs. Action potential durations (APDs) did not significantly differ between the hiPSC-CM groups. After administrating 500 nM isoproterenol, APDs of A344Aspl-hiPSC-CMs were significantly longer than those of the controls. ML277 and phenylboronic acid, I Ks activators, ameliorated the APDs of hiPSC-CMs. We identified complex aberrant mRNA variants in the A344Aspl-hiPSC-CM model, and successfully recapitulated the clinical phenotypes of the patient with concealed LQT1. This model allows the investigation of the underlying mechanisms and development of novel therapies. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Visualizing Mutation-Specific Differences in the Trafficking-Deficient Phenotype of Kv11.1 Proteins Linked to Long QT Syndrome Type 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Allison R; Anderson, Corey L; Smith, Jennifer L; Mirshahi, Tooraj; Elayi, Claude S; January, Craig T; Delisle, Brian P

    2018-01-01

    KCNH2 encodes the Kv11.1 α-subunit that underlies the rapidly activating delayed-rectifier K + current in the heart. Loss-of-function KCNH2 mutations cause long QT syndrome type 2 (LQT2), and most LQT2-linked missense mutations inhibit the trafficking of Kv11.1 channel protein to the cell surface membrane. Several trafficking-deficient LQT2 mutations (e.g., G601S) generate Kv11.1 proteins that are sequestered in a microtubule-dependent quality control (QC) compartment in the transitional endoplasmic reticulum (ER). We tested the hypothesis that the QC mechanisms that regulate LQT2-linked Kv11.1 protein trafficking are mutation-specific. Confocal imaging analyses of HEK293 cells stably expressing the trafficking-deficient LQT2 mutation F805C showed that, unlike G601S-Kv11.1 protein, F805C-Kv11.1 protein was concentrated in several transitional ER subcompartments. The microtubule depolymerizing drug nocodazole differentially affected G601S- and F805C-Kv11.1 protein immunostaining. Nocodazole caused G601S-Kv11.1 protein to distribute into peripheral reticular structures, and it increased the diffuse immunostaining of F805C-Kv11.1 protein around the transitional ER subcompartments. Proteasome inhibition also affected the immunostaining of G601S- and F805C-Kv11.1 protein differently. Incubating cells in MG132 minimally impacted G601S-Kv11.1 immunostaining, but it dramatically increased the diffuse immunostaining of F805C-Kv11.1 protein in the transitional ER. Similar results were seen after incubating cells in the proteasome inhibitor lactacystin. Differences in the cellular distribution of G601S-Kv11.1 and F805C-Kv11.1 protein persisted in transfected human inducible pluripotent stem cell derived cardiomyocytes. These are the first data to visually demonstrate mutation-specific differences in the trafficking-deficient LQT2 phenotype, and this study has identified a novel way to categorize trafficking-deficient LQT2 mutations based on differences in intracellular

  2. Assessment of the predictive accuracy of five in silico prediction tools, alone or in combination, and two metaservers to classify long QT syndrome gene mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Ivone U S; Stuckey, Alexander; Lai, Daniel; Skinner, Jonathan R; Love, Donald R

    2015-05-13

    Long QT syndrome (LQTS) is an autosomal dominant condition predisposing to sudden death from malignant arrhythmia. Genetic testing identifies many missense single nucleotide variants of uncertain pathogenicity. Establishing genetic pathogenicity is an essential prerequisite to family cascade screening. Many laboratories use in silico prediction tools, either alone or in combination, or metaservers, in order to predict pathogenicity; however, their accuracy in the context of LQTS is unknown. We evaluated the accuracy of five in silico programs and two metaservers in the analysis of LQTS 1-3 gene variants. The in silico tools SIFT, PolyPhen-2, PROVEAN, SNPs&GO and SNAP, either alone or in all possible combinations, and the metaservers Meta-SNP and PredictSNP, were tested on 312 KCNQ1, KCNH2 and SCN5A gene variants that have previously been characterised by either in vitro or co-segregation studies as either "pathogenic" (283) or "benign" (29). The accuracy, sensitivity, specificity and Matthews Correlation Coefficient (MCC) were calculated to determine the best combination of in silico tools for each LQTS gene, and when all genes are combined. The best combination of in silico tools for KCNQ1 is PROVEAN, SNPs&GO and SIFT (accuracy 92.7%, sensitivity 93.1%, specificity 100% and MCC 0.70). The best combination of in silico tools for KCNH2 is SIFT and PROVEAN or PROVEAN, SNPs&GO and SIFT. Both combinations have the same scores for accuracy (91.1%), sensitivity (91.5%), specificity (87.5%) and MCC (0.62). In the case of SCN5A, SNAP and PROVEAN provided the best combination (accuracy 81.4%, sensitivity 86.9%, specificity 50.0%, and MCC 0.32). When all three LQT genes are combined, SIFT, PROVEAN and SNAP is the combination with the best performance (accuracy 82.7%, sensitivity 83.0%, specificity 80.0%, and MCC 0.44). Both metaservers performed better than the single in silico tools; however, they did not perform better than the best performing combination of in silico

  3. Calmodulin is essential for cardiac IKS channel gating and assembly: impaired function in long-QT mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shamgar, Liora; Ma, Lijuan; Schmitt, Nicole

    2006-01-01

    The slow IKS K+ channel plays a major role in repolarizing the cardiac action potential and consists of the assembly of KCNQ1 and KCNE1 subunits. Mutations in either KCNQ1 or KCNE1 genes produce the long-QT syndrome, a life-threatening ventricular arrhythmia. Here, we show that long-QT mutations ...

  4. A novel KCNQ1 nonsense variant in the isoform-specific first exon causes both jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome 1 and long QT syndrome 1: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Motoi; Ueda, Marehiko; Ebata, Ryota; Utsuno, Emi; Ishii, Takuma; Matsushita, Kazuyuki; Ohara, Osamu; Shimojo, Naoki; Kobayashi, Yoshio; Nomura, Fumio

    2017-06-08

    According to previous KCNQ1 (potassium channel, voltage gated, KQT-like subfamily, member 1) gene screening studies, missense variants, but not nonsense or frame-shift variants, cause the majority of long QT syndrome (LQTS; Romano-Ward syndrome [RWS]) 1 cases. Several missense variants are reported to cause RWS by a dominant-negative mechanism, and some KCNQ1 variants can cause both Jervell and Lange-Nielsen Syndrome (JLNS; in an autosomal recessive manner) and LQTS1 (in an autosomal dominant manner), while other KCNQ1 variants cause only JLNS. The human KCNQ1 gene is known to have two transcript isoforms (kidney isoform and pancreas isoform), and both isoforms can form a functional cardiac potassium channel. Here, we report a novel nonsense KCNQ1 variant causing not only JLNS, but also significant QTc prolongation identical to RWS in an autosomal dominant manner. Our case study supports that haploinsufficiency in the KCNQ1 gene is causative of significant QTc prolongation identical to RWS. Interestingly, the nonsense variant (NM_000218.2:c.115G > T [p.Glu39X]) locates in exon 1a of KCNQ1, which is a kidney-isoform specific exon. The variant is located closer to the N-terminus than previously identified nonsense or frame-shift variants. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report showing that a nonsense variant in exon 1a of KCNQ1, which is the kidney-isoform specific exon, causes JLNS. Our findings may be informative to the genetic pathogenesis of RWS and JLNS caused by KCNQ1 variants.

  5. Congenital Constriction Band Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Rajesh Gupta, Fareed Malik, Rishabh Gupta, M.A.Basit, Dara Singh

    2008-01-01

    Congenital constriction bands are anomalous bands that encircle a digit or an extremity. Congenitalconstriction band syndrome is rare condition and is mostly associated with other musculoskeletaldisorders.We report such a rare experience.

  6. Low-Pass Filtering Approach via Empirical Mode Decomposition Improves Short-Scale Entropy-Based Complexity Estimation of QT Interval Variability in Long QT Syndrome Type 1 Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlasta Bari

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Entropy-based complexity of cardiovascular variability at short time scales is largely dependent on the noise and/or action of neural circuits operating at high frequencies. This study proposes a technique for canceling fast variations from cardiovascular variability, thus limiting the effect of these overwhelming influences on entropy-based complexity. The low-pass filtering approach is based on the computation of the fastest intrinsic mode function via empirical mode decomposition (EMD and its subtraction from the original variability. Sample entropy was exploited to estimate complexity. The procedure was applied to heart period (HP and QT (interval from Q-wave onset to T-wave end variability derived from 24-hour Holter recordings in 14 non-mutation carriers (NMCs and 34 mutation carriers (MCs subdivided into 11 asymptomatic MCs (AMCs and 23 symptomatic MCs (SMCs. All individuals belonged to the same family developing long QT syndrome type 1 (LQT1 via KCNQ1-A341V mutation. We found that complexity indexes computed over EMD-filtered QT variability differentiated AMCs from NMCs and detected the effect of beta-blocker therapy, while complexity indexes calculated over EMD-filtered HP variability separated AMCs from SMCs. The EMD-based filtering method enhanced features of the cardiovascular control that otherwise would have remained hidden by the dominant presence of noise and/or fast physiological variations, thus improving classification in LQT1.

  7. Using the genome aggregation database, computational pathogenicity prediction tools, and patch clamp heterologous expression studies to demote previously published long QT syndrome type 1 mutations from pathogenic to benign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemens, Daniel J; Lentino, Anne R; Kapplinger, Jamie D; Ye, Dan; Zhou, Wei; Tester, David J; Ackerman, Michael J

    2018-04-01

    Mutations in the KCNQ1-encoded Kv7.1 potassium channel cause long QT syndrome (LQTS) type 1 (LQT1). It has been suggested that ∼10%-20% of rare LQTS case-derived variants in the literature may have been published erroneously as LQT1-causative mutations and may be "false positives." The purpose of this study was to determine which previously published KCNQ1 case variants are likely false positives. A list of all published, case-derived KCNQ1 missense variants (MVs) was compiled. The occurrence of each MV within the Genome Aggregation Database (gnomAD) was assessed. Eight in silico tools were used to predict each variant's pathogenicity. Case-derived variants that were either (1) too frequently found in gnomAD or (2) absent in gnomAD but predicted to be pathogenic by ≤2 tools were considered potential false positives. Three of these variants were characterized functionally using whole-cell patch clamp technique. Overall, there were 244 KCNQ1 case-derived MVs. Of these, 29 (12%) were seen in ≥10 individuals in gnomAD and are demotable. However, 157 of 244 MVs (64%) were absent in gnomAD. Of these, 7 (4%) were predicted to be pathogenic by ≤2 tools, 3 of which we characterized functionally. There was no significant difference in current density between heterozygous KCNQ1-F127L, -P477L, or -L619M variant-containing channels compared to KCNQ1-WT. This study offers preliminary evidence for the demotion of 32 (13%) previously published LQT1 MVs. Of these, 29 were demoted because of their frequent sighting in gnomAD. Additionally, in silico analysis and in vitro functional studies have facilitated the demotion of 3 ultra-rare MVs (F127L, P477L, L619M). Copyright © 2017 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Congenital nephrotic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Fanni

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available CNS (Congenital nephrotic syndrome is a disorder characterized by the presence of a nephrotic syndrome in the first three months of life. Different pathologies can cause this syndrome. In general, we can distinguish primary forms (sporadic and hereditary and secondary forms (acquired and associated with other syndromes. The most common form is the Finnish CNS (CNF, congenital nephrotic syndrome of the Finnish type, a hereditary form whose name derives from the fact that the highest incidence is described in that country (1.2:10,000. The pathogenesis, the clinical picture, the diagnostic criteria, the therapy and the outcome are described in details.  Proceedings of the International Course on Perinatal Pathology (part of the 10th International Workshop on Neonatology · October 22nd-25th, 2014 · Cagliari (Italy · October 25th, 2014 · The role of the clinical pathological dialogue in problem solving Guest Editors: Gavino Faa, Vassilios Fanos, Peter Van Eyken

  9. Arrhythmia phenotype in mouse models of human long QT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salama, Guy; Baker, Linda; Wolk, Robert; Barhanin, Jacques; London, Barry

    2009-03-01

    Enhanced dispersion of repolarization (DR) was proposed as a unifying mechanism, central to arrhythmia genesis in the long QT (LQT) syndrome. In mammalian hearts, K(+) channels are heterogeneously expressed across the ventricles resulting in 'intrinsic' DR that may worsen in long QT. DR was shown to be central to the arrhythmia phenotype of transgenic mice with LQT caused by loss of function of the dominant mouse K(+) currents. Here, we investigated the arrhythmia phenotype of mice with targeted deletions of KCNE1 and KCNH2 genes which encode for minK/IsK and Merg1 (mouse homolog of human ERG) proteins resulting in loss of function of I(Ks) and I(Kr), respectively. Both currents are important human K(+) currents associated with LQT5 and LQT2. Loss of minK, a protein subunit that interacts with KvLQT1, results in a marked reduction of I(Ks) giving rise to the Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome and the reduced KCNH2 gene reduces MERG and I(Kr). Hearts were perfused, stained with di-4-ANEPPS and optically mapped to compare action potential durations (APDs) and arrhythmia phenotype in homozygous minK (minK(-/-)) and heterozygous Merg1 (Merg(+/-)) deletions and littermate control mice. MinK(-/-) mice has similar APDs and no arrhythmias (n = 4). Merg(+/-) mice had prolonged APDs (from 20 +/- 6 to 32 +/- 9 ms at the base, p mice (60% vs. 10%). A comparison of mouse models of LQT based on K(+) channel mutations important to human and mouse repolarization emphasizes DR as a major determinant of arrhythmia vulnerability.

  10. Congenital nephrotic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamed, Radi Ma

    2003-01-01

    The congenital nephrotic syndrome (CNS) is an uncommon disorder with onset of the nephrotic syndrome usually in the first three months of life. Several different diseases may cause the syndrome. These may be inherited, sporadic, acquired or part of a general malformation syndrome. The clinical course is marked by failure to thrive, recurrent life threatening bacterial infections, and early death from sepsis and/or uremia. A characteristic phenotype may be seen in children with CNS. The majority of reported cases of CNS are of the Finnish type (CNF). Although the role of the glomerular basement membrane has been emphasized as the barrier for retaining plasma proteins, recent studies have clearly shown that the slit diaphragm is the structure most likely to be the barrier in the glomerular capillary wall. The gene (NPHS1) was shown to encode a novel protein that was termed nephrin, due to its specific location in the kidney filter barrier, where it seems to form a highly organized filter structure. Nephrin is a transmembrane protein that probably forms the main building block of an isoporous zipper-like slit diaphragm filter structure. Defects in nephrin lead to the abnormal or absent slit diaphragm resulting in massive proteinuria and renal failure.

  11. Congenital Leukemia in Down's syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iqbal, W.; Khan, F.; Muzaffar, M.; Khan, U. A.; Rehman, M. U.; Khan, M. A.; Bari, A.

    2006-01-01

    Congenital Leukemia is a condition and often associated with fatal outcome/sup 1/. Most of the neonatal cases reported have acute non-lymphoblastic leukemia, in contrast to the predominance of acute lymphoblastic leukemia found in later childhood. congenital leukemia is occasionally associated with number of congenital anomalies and with chromosomal disorders such as Down's syndrome. Subtle cytogenetic abnormalities may occur more commonly in the affected infants and their parents, when studied with newer cytogenetic techniques/sup 2/. Inherent unstable hematopoieses resulting from chromosomal aberration in children with Downs's syndrome can present with transient myeloproliferative disorder, mimicking leukemia which undergoes spontaneous recovery/sup 3/. Only few cases of congenital leukemia with Downs syndrome, presented as congenital leukemia. (author)

  12. Congenital Heart Diseases associated with Identified Syndromes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Recognised syndromes were seen in 69(68%) cases. Down syndrome with 54 children contributed 78.3% of those with known syndromes. Other identified syndromes and associations were Marfan's, Noonan's, Edwards, Prune Belly, Apert, Ellis-van creveld syndrome and congenital rubella syndrome. Congenital heart ...

  13. Severe congenital neutropenia (Kostmann Syndrome)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Severe congenital neutropenia (SCN), Kostmann syndrome is a heterogenous disorder of myelopoiesis characterized by severe chronic ... erogenous hematological disorders, characterized by extremely low circu- lating neutrophils and ..... tic activation of STAT5 and stimulate. G-CSF-induced cell proliferation.26, 27.

  14. Pharmacological activation of Kv11.1 in transgenic long QT-1 rabbits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentzen, Bo Hjorth; Bahrke, Sophia; Wu, Kezhong

    2011-01-01

    Transgenic rabbits expressing pore mutants of K(V)7.1 display a long QT syndrome 1 (LQT1) phenotype. Recently, NS1643 has been described to increase I(Kr).We hypothesized that NS1643 would shorten the action potential duration (APD(90)) in LQT1 rabbits. Transgenic LQT1 rabbits were compared...... with littermate control (LMC) rabbits. In vivo electrocardiogram studies in sedated animals were performed at baseline and during 45 minutes of intravenous infusion of NS1643 or vehicle in a crossover design. Ex vivo monophasic action potentials were recorded from Langendorff-perfused hearts at baseline...

  15. Identifying drug-induced repolarization abnormalities from distinct ECG patterns in congenital long QT syndrome: a study of sotalol effects on T-wave morphology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graff, Claus; Andersen, Mads P; Xue, Joel Q

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The electrocardiographic QT interval is used to identify drugs with potential harmful effects on cardiac repolarization in drug trials, but the variability of the measurement can mask drug-induced ECG changes. The use of complementary electrocardiographic indices of abnormal repolariz......BACKGROUND: The electrocardiographic QT interval is used to identify drugs with potential harmful effects on cardiac repolarization in drug trials, but the variability of the measurement can mask drug-induced ECG changes. The use of complementary electrocardiographic indices of abnormal...... are typical ECG patterns in LQT2. Blinded to labels, the new morphology measures were tested in a third group of 39 healthy subjects receiving sotalol. Over 3 days the sotalol group received 0, 160 and 320 mg doses, respectively, and a 12-lead Holter ECG was recorded for 22.5 hours each day. Drug...... with QTcF, p ECG patterns in LQT2 carriers effectively quantified repolarization changes induced by sotalol. Further studies are needed to validate whether this measure has...

  16. Congenital varicella syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atul Chaudhary

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A 7 month old female presented with localized scarring over right buttock and right leg with hypoplasia of right lower limb. Mother had history of chicken pox at tenth week of pregnancy. We confirm the diagnosis of varicella zoster syndrome clinically.

  17. Congenital Short QT Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lia Crotti

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The Short QT Syndrome is a recently described new genetic disorder, characterized by abnormally short QT interval, paroxysmal atrial fibrillation and life threatening ventricular arrhythmias. This autosomal dominant syndrome can afflict infants, children, or young adults; often a remarkable family background of cardiac sudden death is elucidated. At electrophysiological study, short atrial and ventricular refractory periods are found, with atrial fibrillation and polymorphic ventricular tachycardia easily induced by programmed electrical stimulation. Gain of function mutations in three genes encoding K+ channels have been identified, explaining the abbreviated repolarization seen in this condition: KCNH2 for Ikr (SQT1, KCNQ1 for Iks (SQT2 and KCNJ2 for Ik1 (SQT3. The currently suggested therapeutic strategy is an ICD implantation, although many concerns exist for asymptomatic patients, especially in pediatric age. Pharmacological treatment is still under evaluation; quinidine has shown to prolong QT and reduce the inducibility of ventricular arrhythmias, but awaits additional confirmatory clinical data.

  18. Genetics Home Reference: congenital central hypoventilation syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Kravis EM, Zhou L, Rand CM, Weese-Mayer DE. Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome: PHOX2B mutations and phenotype. Am J Respir Crit ... BA, Leurgans SE, Berry-Kravis EM, Weese-Mayer DE. Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome: PHOX2B genotype determines risk for sudden death. Pediatr ...

  19. Genetics Home Reference: Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Edition for Patients and Caregivers: Long QT Syndrome and Torsades de Pointes Ventricular Tachycardia Orphanet: Familial long QT syndrome Orphanet: Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome Patient Support ...

  20. Long QT Syndrome–Associated Mutations in Intrauterine Fetal Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crotti, Lia; Tester, David J.; White, Wendy M.; Bartos, Daniel C.; Insolia, Roberto; Besana, Alessandra; Kunic, Jennifer D.; Will, Melissa L.; Velasco, Ellyn J.; Bair, Jennifer J.; Ghidoni, Alice; Cetin, Irene; Van Dyke, Daniel L.; Wick, Myra J.; Brost, Brian; Delisle, Brian P.; Facchinetti, Fabio; George, Alfred L.; Schwartz, Peter J.; Ackerman, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Importance Intrauterine fetal death or stillbirth occurs in approximately 1 out of every 160 pregnancies and accounts for 50% of all perinatal deaths. Postmortem evaluation fails to elucidate an underlying cause in many cases. Long QT syndrome (LQTS) may contribute to this problem. Objective To determine the spectrum and prevalence of mutations in the 3 most common LQTS susceptible genes (KCNQ1, KCNH2, and SCN5A) for a cohort of unexplained cases. Design, Setting, and Patients In this case series, retrospective postmortem genetic testing was conducted on a convenience sample of 91 unexplained intrauterine fetal deaths (mean [SD] estimated gestational age at fetal death, 26.3 [8.7] weeks) that were collected from 2006-2012 by the Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, or the Fondazione IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo, Pavia, Italy. More than 1300 ostensibly healthy individuals served as controls. In addition, publicly available exome databases were assessed for the general population frequency of identified genetic variants. Main Outcomes and Measures Comprehensive mutational analyses of KCNQ1 (KV7.1, LQTS type 1), KCNH2 (HERG/KV11.1, LQTS type 2), and SCN5A (NaV1.5, LQTS type 3) were performed using denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography and direct DNA sequencing on genomic DNA extracted from decedent tissue. Functional analyses of novel mutations were performed using heterologous expression and patch-clamp recording. Results The 3 putative LQTS susceptibility missense mutations (KCNQ1, p.A283T; KCNQ1, p.R397W; and KCNH2[1b], p.R25W), with a heterozygous frequency of less than 0.05% in more than 10000 publicly available exomes and absent in more than 1000 ethnically similar control patients, were discovered in 3 intrauterine fetal deaths (3.3% [95% CI, 0.68%-9.3%]). Both KV7.1-A283T (16-week male) and KV7.1-R397W (16-week female) mutations were associated with marked KV7.1 loss-of-function consistent with in utero LQTS type 1, whereas the HERG1b-R25W mutation

  1. Congenital rubella syndrome in Haiti

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golden Nancy

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To determine if there is an unrecognized problem of congenital rubella syndrome (CRS in Haiti, a country without a national rubella immunization program. Methods. During March 2001 and June 2001, screening physicals were conducted on approximately 80 orphans at three orphanages in Haiti that accept disabled children. Children were classified as probable CRS cases based on established clinical criteria. Photo documentation of findings was obtained whenever possible. Results. Six children met the criteria for probable CRS. Using data from surrounding Caribbean countries and from the United States of America prior to rubella immunization, we estimated that there are between 163 and 440 new cases of CRS per year in Haiti. Conclusions. CRS exists in Haiti, but its presence is generally unrecognized. A national rubella immunization policy should be considered.

  2. Congenital rubella syndrome in Haiti

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy Golden

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To determine if there is an unrecognized problem of congenital rubella syndrome (CRS in Haiti, a country without a national rubella immunization program. Methods. During March 2001 and June 2001, screening physicals were conducted on approximately 80 orphans at three orphanages in Haiti that accept disabled children. Children were classified as probable CRS cases based on established clinical criteria. Photo documentation of findings was obtained whenever possible. Results. Six children met the criteria for probable CRS. Using data from surrounding Caribbean countries and from the United States of America prior to rubella immunization, we estimated that there are between 163 and 440 new cases of CRS per year in Haiti. Conclusions. CRS exists in Haiti, but its presence is generally unrecognized. A national rubella immunization policy should be considered.

  3. Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome and intestinal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS), also called 'Ondine's curse', is characterised by an abnormal ventilatory response to progressive hypercapnia and sustained hypoxaemia. Neonates with this condition experience hypoventilation or apnoea while asleep. Patients may also have congenital intestinal aganglionosis (CIA), ...

  4. Congenital rubella syndrome and delayed manifestations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dammeyer, Jesper Herup

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Several hypotheses of different medical and psychological delayed manifestations among people who have congenital rubella syndrome (CRS) have been discussed. This study tests some of these hypotheses of delayed manifestations. Methods: Gathering information about 35 individuals who hav...... which people with CRS face must primarily be understood in relation to congenital deafblindness and dual sensory and communicative deprivation....... CRS and who are congenitally deafblind. Results: None of the hypotheses could be confirmed when individuals with CRS were compared to a control group of individuals who were congenital deafblind with different aetiology than CRS. Conclusions: This study concludes that those health related problems...

  5. Acquired long QT syndrome and Torsades de Poin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Seyfeddin Gurbuz

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Acetylcholinesterase inhibitors are group of drugs commonly used in Alzheimer disease and have beneficial effects on treatment. Although they have many known side effects, cardiovascular side effects are rarely seen. We present a 84 year old female who was admitted to emergency service due to repetitive syncope episodes while taking donepezil. Her electrocardiogram showed QT prolongation and on follow-up a Torsades de Pointes episode occurred. Patient was discharged with normal corrected QT time after removal of donepezil.

  6. Congenital rubella syndrome in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eftekhar Hasan

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Congenital rubella syndrome (CRS can be prevented with appropriate vaccination programs. The prevalence rates of rubella and CRS in Iran are unknown; therefore, the risk of exposure in pregnant women is not clear. The prevalence of CRS in the pre-vaccine period can be estimated by evaluating the proportion of children in the population with sensorineural hearing loss attributable to rubella. Methods This was a case-control study to estimate prevalence of CRS in Tehran (Iran by evaluating the proportion of children with sensorineural hearing loss attributable to rubella. The study used rubella antibody titer as an indicator, and compared the prevalence of rubella antibody between children with and without sensorineural hearing loss. Using these findings, the proportion of cases of sensorineural hearing loss attributable to rubella was estimated. Results A total of 225 children aged 1 to 4 years were entered into the study (113 cases and 112 controls. There was a significant difference between cases and controls with regard to rubella antibody seropositivity (19.5% vs. 8.9%, respectively, odds ratio = 2.47, 95% CI = 1.04–5.97. The proportion of sensorineural hearing loss cases attributable to rubella was found to be 12%, corresponding to a CRS prevalence of 0.2/1000. Conclusion The prevalence of CRS was approximately 0.2/1000 before rubella vaccination in Iran, Moreover; the results suggest that implementation of appropriate rubella vaccination programs could potentially prevent about 12% of cases of sensorineural hearing loss in Iranian children. This data could potentially be used as baseline data, which in conjunction with an appropriate method, to establish a surveillance system for rubella vaccination in Iran. An appropriate surveillance system is needed, because the introduction of a rubella vaccine without epidemiological data and an adequate monitoring program could result in the shifting of rubella cases to higher

  7. [Congenital sensorineural deafness and associated syndromes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moatti, L; Garabedian, E N; Lacombe, H; Spir-Jacob, C

    1990-01-01

    The etiology of perceptive deafness, especially the congenital variety, requires investigation. The presence of a variety of signs associated with deafness constitutes an "associated syndrome" and helps to define a possible genetic origin. These syndromes only represent a small percentage of overall causes of deafness in children, since at most they account for only 10% of cases. Certain syndromes are encountered more often or are well known, others are extremely rare or have only been described recently. The authors report six of these very rare syndromes discovered among their patients: a KID syndrome, a Leopard syndrome, a Norrie syndrome, a Jervell and Lange Nielsen syndrome, a recently described entity called CEE with deafness and an External Neuro-Cochleo-Pancreatic syndrome which would not appear to have been previously described.

  8. Congenital nephrotic syndrome. Gallium-67 imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trepashko, D.W.; Gelfand, M.J.; Pan, C.C.

    1988-01-01

    Congenital nephrotic syndrome is a rare disorder. Heavy proteinuria, hypoalbuminemia, and edema occur during the first 3 months of life. Initial cases were reported from Finland and sporadic cases have occurred elsewhere. Finnish cases demonstrated an autosomal recessive inheritance pattern; currently, Finnish and non-Finnish types are recognized. The clinical course consists of failure to thrive, frequent infections, declining renal function, and early death by age 4 years from sepsis or uremia. Recently renal transplantation has improved the prognosis of patients with this disease. An abnormal Ga-67 scan in a case of congenital nephrotic syndrome is presented

  9. Congenital Central Hypoventilation Syndrome And Intestinal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS) or 'Ondine's curse' is characterised by an abnormal ventilatory response to progressive hypercapnia and sustained hypoxaemia. During the neonatal period, most patients with this condition present with hypoventilation or apnoea while asleep. Patients with CCHS may ...

  10. Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome mimicking mitochondrial disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojnueangnit, Kitiwan; Descartes, Maria

    2018-03-01

    Later-onset congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (LO-CCHS) does not present only breathing problems but can be present as episodic multiple organs involvement. Our unique case demonstrated LO-CCHS should be considered in the differential diagnosis of mitochondrial diseases and having nontypical polysomnography result.

  11. Hennekam syndrome presenting as nonimmune hydrops fetalis, congenital chylothorax, and congenital pulmonary lymphangiectasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bellini, Carlo; Mazzella, Massimo; Arioni, Cesare; Campisi, Corradino; Taddei, Gioconda; Tomà, Paolo; Boccardo, Francesco; Hennekam, Raoul C.; Serra, Giovanni

    2003-01-01

    We report a female infant with congenital lymphedema, facial anomalies, intestinal lymphangiectasia consistent with a diagnosis of Hennekam syndrome. At birth the patient presented with severe respiratory distress due to nonimmune hydrops fetalis, a congenital chylothorax (CC), and pulmonary

  12. Isolated and syndromic forms of congenital anosmia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karstensen, H G; Tommerup, N

    2012-01-01

    . Despite a strong degree of heritability, no human disease-causing mutations have been identified. Anosmia is part of the clinical spectrum in various diseases, as seen in Kallmann syndrome, various ciliopathies and congenital insensitivity to pain. This review will focus on ICA through already published......Loss of smell (anosmia) is common in the general population and the frequency increases with age. A much smaller group have no memory of ever being able to smell and are classified as having isolated congenital anosmia (ICA). Families are rare, and tend to present in a dominant inheritance pattern...... families and cases as well as syndromes where anosmia is part of the clinical disease spectrum. Furthermore, olfactory signal transduction pathway genes and animal models may shed light on potential candidate genes and pathways involved in ICA....

  13. Congenital heart defects in Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Shi-Min

    2017-01-01

    Yuan SM. Congenital heart defects in Williams syndrome. Turk J Pediatr 2017; 59: 225-232. Williams syndrome (WS), also known as Williams-Beuren syndrome, is a rare genetic disorder involving multiple systems including the circulatory system. However, the etiologies of the associated congenital heart defects in WS patients have not been sufficiently elucidated and represent therapeutic challenges. The typical congenital heart defects in WS were supravalvar aortic stenosis, pulmonary stenosis (both valvular and peripheral), aortic coarctation and mitral valvar prolapse. The atypical cardiovascular anomalies include tetralogy of Fallot, atrial septal defects, aortic and mitral valvular insufficiencies, bicuspid aortic valves, ventricular septal defects, total anomalous pulmonary venous return, double chambered right ventricle, Ebstein anomaly and arterial anomalies. Deletion of the elastin gene on chromosome 7q11.23 leads to deficiency or abnormal deposition of elastin during cardiovascular development, thereby leading to widespread cardiovascular abnormalities in WS. In this article, the distribution, treatment and surgical outcomes of typical and atypical cardiac defects in WS are discussed.

  14. Dispersion of repolarization and refractoriness are determinants of arrhythmia phenotype in transgenic mice with long QT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    London, Barry; Baker, Linda C; Petkova-Kirova, Polina; Nerbonne, Jeanne M; Choi, Bum-Rak; Salama, Guy

    2007-01-01

    Enhanced dispersion of repolarization (DR) and refractoriness may be a unifying mechanism central to arrhythmia genesis in the long QT (LQT) syndrome. The role of DR in promoting arrhythmias was investigated in several strains of molecularly engineered mice: (a) Kv4.2 dominant negative transgenic (Kv4.2DN) that lacks the fast component of the transient outward current, I(to,f), have action potential (AP) and QT prolongation, but no spontaneous arrhythmias, (b) Kv1.4 targeted mice (Kv1.4-/-) that lack the slow component of I(to) (I(to,s)), have no QT prolongation and no spontaneous arrhythmias, and (c) double transgenic (Kv4.2DN x Kv1.4-/-) mice that lack both I(to,f) and I(to,s), have AP and QT prolongation, and spontaneous ventricular tachyarrhythmias. Hearts were perfused, stained with di-4-ANEPPS and optically mapped. Activation patterns and conduction velocities were similar between the strains but AP duration at 75% recovery (APD75) was longer in Kv4.2DN (28.0 +/- 2.5 ms, P mice than controls (20.3 +/- 1.0 ms, n = 5). Dispersion of refractoriness between apex and base was markedly reduced in Kv4.2DN (0.3 +/- 0.5 ms, n = 6, P mice compared with controls (10 +/- 2 ms, n = 5). A premature pulse elicited ventricular tachycardia (VT) in Kv1.4-/- (n = 4/5) and Kv4.2DN x Kv1.4-/- hearts (n = 5/5) but not Kv4.2DN hearts (n = 0/6). Voltage-clamp recordings showed that I(to,f) was 30% greater in myocytes from the apex than base which may account for the absence of DR in Kv4.2DN mice. Thus, dispersion of repolarization (DR) appears to be an important determinant of arrhythmia vulnerability.

  15. Hyperthyroidism hidden by congenital central hypoventilation syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Danya A; Weese-Mayer, Debra E; Wensley, David F; Stewart, Laura L

    2015-05-01

    Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS) is a rare neurocristopathy with severe central hypoventilation. CCHS results from a mutation in the paired-like homeobox 2B gene (PHOX2B). In addition to hypoventilation, patients with CCHS display a wide array of autonomic nervous system abnormalities, including decreased heart rate variability and abrupt sinus pauses, esophageal dysmotility, abnormal pupillary light response, and temperature dysregulation, to name a few. To date, there has been no documentation of a child with both CCHS and hyperthyroidism. We report the case of a young child with CCHS who presented with tachycardia, which was later found to be due to Grave's disease, after many months of investigation.

  16. Lutembacher's syndrome: A rare combination of congenital and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Because the mitral stenosis was, in fact, rheumatic in aetiology, the syndrome was defined eventually as a combination of congenital atrial septal defect and acquired, almost always rheumatic, mitral stenosis. Keywords:Lutembacher's syndrome, congenital heart disease, valvular heart disease, atrial septal defect, mitral ...

  17. Investigação de variantes gênicas de canais iônicos em pacientes com síndrome do QT longo Investigación de variantes génicas de canales iónicos en pacientes con síndrome del QT largo Investigation of ion channel gene variants in patients with long QT syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernesto Curty

    2011-03-01

    ético y mejor manejo de la enfermedad. OBJETIVO: Investigación molecular y análisis computacional de variantes génicas de KCNQ1, KCNH2 y SCN5A asociadas a la SQTL en familias portadoras de la enfermedad. MÉTODOS: Las regiones codificantes de los genes KCNQ1, KCNH2 y SCN5A de pacientes con SQTL y familiares fueron secuenciadas y analizadas utilizando el software Geneious Pro®. RESULTADOS: Fueron investigadas dos familias con criterios clínicos para SQTL. La probanda de la Familia A presentaba QT C = 562 ms, Escore de Schwartz = 5,5. El genotipaje identificó la mutación G1714A en el gen KCNH2. Fue observado QT C = 521 ± 42 ms en los familiares portadores de la mutación contra QT C = 391 ± 21 ms de no portadores. La probanda de la Familia B presentaba QT C = 551 ms, Escore de Schwartz = 5. El genotipaje identificó la mutación G1600T, en el mismo gen. El análisis de los familiares reveló QT C = 497 ± 42 ms en los portadores de la mutación, contra QT C = 404 ± 29 ms en los no portadores. CONCLUSIÓN: Fueron encontradas dos variantes génicas previamente asociadas a la SQTL en dos familias con diagnóstico clínico de SQTL. En todos los familiares portadores de las mutaciones fue observada la prolongación del intervalo QT. Fue desarrollada una estrategia para identificación de variantes de los genes KCNQ1, KCNH2 y SCN5A, posibilitando el entrenamiento de personal técnico para futura aplicación en la rutina diagnóstica.BACKGROUND: The long QT syndrome (LQTS is an inherited arrhythmia syndrome with increased QT interval and risk of sudden death. Mutations in genes KCNQ1, KCNH2 and SCN5A account for 90% of cases with genotype determined, and genotyping is informative for genetic counseling and better disease management. OBJECTIVE: Molecular investigation and computational analysis of gene variants of KCNQ1, KCNH2 and SCN5A associated with LQTS, in families with the disease. METHODS: The coding regions of genes KCNQ1, KCNH2 and SCN5A in patients with LQTS and

  18. Burden and impact of congenital syndromes and comorbidities among adults with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracher, Isabelle; Padrutt, Maria; Bonassin, Francesca; Santos Lopes, Bruno; Gruner, Christiane; Stämpfli, Simon F; Oxenius, Angela; De Pasquale, Gabriella; Seeliger, Theresa; Lüscher, Thomas F; Attenhofer Jost, Christine; Greutmann, Matthias

    2017-08-01

    Our aim was to assess the overall burden of congenital syndromes and non-cardiac comorbidities among adults with congenital heart disease and to assess their impact on circumstances of living and outcomes. Within a cohort of 1725 adults with congenital heart defects (65% defects of moderate or great complexity) followed at a single tertiary care center, congenital syndromes and comorbidities were identified by chart review. Their association with arrhythmias, circumstances of living and survival was analyzed. Within the study cohort, 232 patients (13%) had a genetic syndrome, 51% at least one comorbidity and 23% ≥2 comorbidities. Most prevalent comorbidities were systemic arterial hypertension (11%), thyroid dysfunction (9%), psychiatric disorders (9%), neurologic disorders (7%), chronic lung disease (7%), and previous stroke (6%). In contrast to higher congenital heart defect complexity, the presence of comorbidities had no impact on living circumstances but patients with comorbidities were less likely to work full-time. Atrial arrhythmias were more common among patients with moderate/great disease complexity and those with comorbidities but were less common among patients with congenital syndromes (pCongenital syndromes and comorbidities are highly prevalent in adults with congenital heart disease followed at specialist centers and add to the overall complexity of care. The presence of these additional factors has an impact on living circumstances, is associated with arrhythmias and needs to be further explored as prognostic markers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Congenital rubella syndrome in Haiti (Short communication).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Nancy; Kempker, Russell; Khator, Parul; Summerlee, Robert; Fournier, Arthur

    2002-10-01

    To determine if there is an unrecognized problem of congenital rubella syndrome (CRS) in Haiti, a country without a national rubella immunization program. During March 2001 and June 2001, screening physicals were conducted on approximately 80 orphans at three orphanages in Haiti that accept disabled children. Children were classified as probable CRS cases based on established clinical criteria. Photo documentation of findings was obtained whenever possible. Six children met the criteria for probable CRS. Using data from surrounding Caribbean countries and from the United States of America prior to rubella immunization, we estimated that there are between 163 and 440 new cases of CRS per year in Haiti. CRS exists in Haiti, but its presence is generally unrecognized. A national rubella immunization policy should be considered.

  20. Congenital diseases and syndromes. An illustrated radiological guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Tubaikh, Jarrah Ali [Universitaetsklinikum Muenchen, Klinikum Grosshadern (Germany). Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie; Sabah Hospital (Kuwait). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology; Reiser, Maximilian F. [Universitaetsklinikum Muenchen, Klinikum Grosshadern (Germany). Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie

    2009-07-01

    Congenital Diseases and Syndromes - An Illustrated Radiological Guide is designed to serve the radiologist as an easy-to-use visual guide that illustrates the typical diagnostic radiological features of the most common congenital diseases and syndromes. The book is organised according to body system, with chapters focusing on the CNS, the head and neck, the chest and heart, the abdomen and pelvis, and the musculoskeletal system. A final chapter is devoted to phakomatosis. Each syndrome or disease is illustrated by multiple images as well as by high-quality digital medical illustrations depicting those radiological signs that are difficult to detect. The reader is thereby familiarised with the various congenital anomalies from the radiological point of view. In addition, etiology, diagnostic criteria, and main symptoms are described, and potential differential diagnoses highlighted. This book will be immensely useful for junior radiologists, radiology students, and doctors in any specialty who are interested in congenital malformations and syndromes. (orig.)

  1. NNDSS - Table II. Rabies, animal to Rubella, congenital syndrome

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Rabies, animal to Rubella, congenital syndrome - 2018. In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported...

  2. NNDSS - Table II. Rabies, animal to Rubella, congenital syndrome

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Rabies, animal to Rubella, congenital syndrome - 2017. In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported...

  3. Congenital diseases and syndromes. An illustrated radiological guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Tubaikh, Jarrah Ali; Sabah Hospital; Reiser, Maximilian F.

    2009-01-01

    Congenital Diseases and Syndromes - An Illustrated Radiological Guide is designed to serve the radiologist as an easy-to-use visual guide that illustrates the typical diagnostic radiological features of the most common congenital diseases and syndromes. The book is organised according to body system, with chapters focusing on the CNS, the head and neck, the chest and heart, the abdomen and pelvis, and the musculoskeletal system. A final chapter is devoted to phakomatosis. Each syndrome or disease is illustrated by multiple images as well as by high-quality digital medical illustrations depicting those radiological signs that are difficult to detect. The reader is thereby familiarised with the various congenital anomalies from the radiological point of view. In addition, etiology, diagnostic criteria, and main symptoms are described, and potential differential diagnoses highlighted. This book will be immensely useful for junior radiologists, radiology students, and doctors in any specialty who are interested in congenital malformations and syndromes. (orig.)

  4. Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome: four families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, Amit; Waters, Karen; Suresh, Sadasivam; Nair, Rashmi

    2011-12-01

    Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS) is a rare condition that usually presents soon after birth and is potentially life-shortening if not treated. The defining abnormality is hypoventilation during sleep which requires life-long treatment with artificial ventilation. This syndrome may also be associated with generalised dysfunction of the autonomic nervous system and a sub-group with associated Hirschsprung's disease. The genetic basis of CCHS has been identified as mutations in the PHOX2B gene. We present four families, three with autosomal dominant inheritance and familial clustering, and one with a de novo mutation resulting in CCHS. We demonstrate that nasal mask ventilation from birth can provide adequate treatment and improved quality of life for these children. Phenotypic variability in expression of disease is seen in families with the same mutations in PHOX2B gene. The psychosocial costs of the disease and the unrecognised 'morbidity barter' that is part of current management needs to be factored into in all stages of management from childhood to adolescence to adulthood.

  5. Congenital bilateral perisylvian syndrome with pituitary hypoplasia and ectopic neurohypophysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yekeler, Ensar; Genchellac, Hakan; Dursun, Memduh; Acunas, Gulden [Istanbul Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Istanbul (Turkey); Ozmen, Meral [Istanbul Faculty of Medicine, Department of Paediatric Neurology, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2004-11-01

    Congenital bilateral perisylvian syndrome (CBPS) is a congenital neurological syndrome characterized by pseudobulbar palsy, cognitive deficits and bilateral perisylvian abnormalities observed on imaging. The described abnormality in CBPS is polymicrogyria located in the frontal, parietal, and/or occipital lobes. A few syndromes or abnormalities associated with this syndrome have been documented. Pituitary abnormalities are rare disorders. Association of CBPS with pituitary abnormalities has not been reported previously. In this case, a combination of bilateral perisylvian polymicrogyria with pituitary hypoplasia and ectopic neurohypophysis, caused by a possible single common insult, is presented. (orig.)

  6. Congenital bilateral perisylvian syndrome with pituitary hypoplasia and ectopic neurohypophysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yekeler, Ensar; Genchellac, Hakan; Dursun, Memduh; Acunas, Gulden; Ozmen, Meral

    2004-01-01

    Congenital bilateral perisylvian syndrome (CBPS) is a congenital neurological syndrome characterized by pseudobulbar palsy, cognitive deficits and bilateral perisylvian abnormalities observed on imaging. The described abnormality in CBPS is polymicrogyria located in the frontal, parietal, and/or occipital lobes. A few syndromes or abnormalities associated with this syndrome have been documented. Pituitary abnormalities are rare disorders. Association of CBPS with pituitary abnormalities has not been reported previously. In this case, a combination of bilateral perisylvian polymicrogyria with pituitary hypoplasia and ectopic neurohypophysis, caused by a possible single common insult, is presented. (orig.)

  7. Rapsyn congenital myasthenic syndrome worsened by fluoxetine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, Amy C; Laughlin, Ruple S; Litchy, William J; Benarroch, Eduardo E; Milone, Margherita

    2017-01-01

    Fluoxetine is a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor and long-lived open channel blocker of the acetylcholine receptor, often used in the treatment of slow-channel congenital myasthenic syndromes (CMS). We report a 42-year-old woman who had a history of episodic limb weakness that worsened after initiation of fluoxetine for treatment of depression. Genetic testing for CMS revealed a homozygous pathogenic mutation in the rapsyn (RAPSN) gene (p.Asn88Lys). Electrodiagnostic testing was performed before and 1 month after discontinuation of fluoxetine. The 2 Hz repetitive nerve stimulation of the fibular and spinal accessory nerves showed a baseline decrement of 36% and 14%, respectively. One month after discontinuing fluoxetine, the spinal accessory nerve decrement was no longer present, and the decrement in the fibular nerve was improved at 17%. This case demonstrates worsening of both clinical and electrophysiologic findings in a patient with CMS secondary to a RAPSN mutation treated with fluoxetine. Muscle Nerve 55: 131-135, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Genomic imbalances in syndromic congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molck, Miriam Coelho; Simioni, Milena; Paiva Vieira, Társis; Sgardioli, Ilária Cristina; Paoli Monteiro, Fabíola; Souza, Josiane; Fett-Conte, Agnes Cristina; Félix, Têmis Maria; Lopes Monlléo, Isabella; Gil-da-Silva-Lopes, Vera Lúcia

    To identify pathogenic genomic imbalances in patients presenting congenital heart disease (CHD) with extra cardiac anomalies and exclusion of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2 DS). 78 patients negative for the 22q11.2 deletion, previously screened by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and/or multiplex ligation probe amplification (MLPA) were tested by chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA). Clinically significant copy number variations (CNVs ≥300kb) were identified in 10% (8/78) of cases. In addition, potentially relevant CNVs were detected in two cases (993kb duplication in 15q21.1 and 706kb duplication in 2p22.3). Genes inside the CNV regions found in this study, such as IRX4, BMPR1A, SORBS2, ID2, ROCK2, E2F6, GATA4, SOX7, SEMAD6D, FBN1, and LTPB1 are known to participate in cardiac development and could be candidate genes for CHD. These data showed that patients presenting CHD with extra cardiac anomalies and exclusion of 22q11.2 DS should be investigated by CMA. The present study emphasizes the possible role of CNVs in CHD. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  9. CT and MRI of congenital nasal lesions in syndromic conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ginat, Daniel T. [University of Chicago, Department of Radiology, Chicago, IL (United States); Robson, Caroline D. [Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston Children' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Congenital malformations of the nose can be associated with a variety of syndromes, including solitary median maxillary central incisor syndrome, CHARGE syndrome, Bosma syndrome, median cleft face syndrome, PHACES association, Bartsocas-Papas syndrome, Binder syndrome, duplication of the pituitary gland-plus syndrome and syndromic craniosynsotosis (e.g., Apert and Crouzon syndromes) among other craniofacial syndromes. Imaging with CT and MRI plays an important role in characterizing the nasal anomalies as well as the associated brain and cerebrovascular lesions, which can be explained by the intimate developmental relationship between the face and intracranial structures, as well as certain gene mutations. These conditions have characteristic imaging findings, which are reviewed in this article. (orig.)

  10. lutembacher's syndrome: a rare combination of congenital and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FOBUR

    Lutembacher's syndrome is defined as the rare combination of congenital atrial septal defect and acquired ... atrial septal defect. The definition of Lutembacher's syndrome has undergone many changes. The earliest description in medical literature was found in a letter written ... atrial fibrillation with her chest x-ray showing.

  11. Major congenital anomalies in babies born with Down syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morris, Joan K; Garne, Ester; Wellesley, Diana

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that over 40% of babies with Down syndrome have a major cardiac anomaly and are more likely to have other major congenital anomalies. Since 2000, many countries in Europe have introduced national antenatal screening programs for Down syndrome. This study aimed...... to determine if the introduction of these screening programs and the subsequent termination of prenatally detected pregnancies were associated with any decline in the prevalence of additional anomalies in babies born with Down syndrome. The study sample consisted of 7,044 live births and fetal deaths with Down...... syndrome registered in 28 European population-based congenital anomaly registries covering seven million births during 2000-2010. Overall, 43.6% (95% CI: 42.4-44.7%) of births with Down syndrome had a cardiac anomaly and 15.0% (14.2-15.8%) had a non-cardiac anomaly. Female babies with Down syndrome were...

  12. Clinicopathological features of transient myeloproliferative syndrome and congenital leukaemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sajid, N.; Ahmed, N.; Mahmood, S.

    2010-01-01

    The objectives of the study were to determine the spectrum of the clinical and pathological findings, the management and prognosis of patients of transient myeloproliferative syndrome (TMS) and congenital leukaemia. Study Design: Case series. Place and Duration of Study: The study was conducted over a period of 8 years, from January 2000 to December 2007, at the Children's Hospital and the Institute of Child Health, Lahore. Methodology: Suspected patients presenting with fever, pallor, bruises and hepatosplenomegaly and diagnosed as either transient myeloproliferative disorder or congenital leukaemia were studied. The complete blood count, reticulocyte count, leukocyte alkaline phosphatase score, liver function tests, karyotyping studies and bone marrow aspiration biopsy were performed in all of those patients. Management and out come was noted. Results were described as frequency percentages. Results: Out of 10,000 patients presenting during this period, 24 patients were diagnosed as either of transient myeloproliferative syndrome or congenital leukaemia. Fifteen of these were diagnosed as patients of TMS and 9 as patients of congenital leukaemia. Down syndrome (DS) was diagnosed in 75% of these patients. TMS patients were put on supportive treatment and recovered spontaneously. One DS patient with congenital leukaemia went into spontaneous remission and 2 of DS patients with congenital leukaemia responded to chemotherapy while rest of them either died or lost to follow-up. Conclusion: TMS and congenital leukaemia were not very uncommon in the studied population. Majority had Down syndrome. It is important to differentiate their clinical and pathological presentations for proper management. TMS may resolve with supportive treatment while congenital leukaemia is a fatal condition requiring chemotherapy. (author)

  13. Congenital cataracts in two siblings with Wolfram syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mets, Rebecca B; Emery, Sarah B; Lesperance, Marci M; Mets, Marilyn B

    2010-12-01

    Wolfram syndrome is characterized by optic atrophy, insulin dependent diabetes mellitus, diabetes insipidus and deafness. There are several other associated conditions reported in the literature, but congenital or early childhood cataracts are not among them. Observational case series with confirmatory genetic analysis. A pair of siblings, followed over 17 years, who manifest congenital or early childhood cataracts, diabetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy, and deafness. They are both compound heterozygotes for mutations (V415 deletion and A684V substitution) in the WFS1 gene. Their father has congenital sensorineural hearing loss and developed optic atrophy. He is heterozygous for A684V in WFS1. Wolfram syndrome should be in the differential diagnosis of genetic syndromes associated with congenital and early childhood cataracts. Here, we report on a mother who is a phenotypically normal carrier of an autosomal recessive Wolfram syndrome gene, and a father who has some of the findings of the syndrome and carries a single mutation that appears to be responsible for his hearing loss and optic atrophy. Their 2 children are compound heterozygotes and manifest the full Wolfram syndrome, in addition to cataracts.

  14. Congenital upper eyelids ectropion in Down’s syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corredor-Osorio, Rafael

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Congenital bilateral ectropion of the upper eyelids is a rare, benign condition reported in ophthalmic literature. It is more frequently associated with Down’s syndrome, ichthyosis, and sporadic cases in newborns from black population. We report three cases of congenital bilateral upper eyelid ectropion associated with Down’s syndrome. Management of these patients usually requires medial and lateral canthoplasties, full-thickness pentagonal resection of the upper eyelids and placement of skin grafts. We present herein the evolution of one of these patients and we will discuss the mechanism of the eyelid ectropion and its treatment.

  15. Congenital rubella syndrome: a matter of concern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efrén Martínez-Quintana

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Congenital rubella syndrome (CRS, an important cause of severe birth defects, remains a public health problem in a significant number of countries. Therefore, global health experts encourage use of rubella vaccination, with the primary aim of preventing CRS. While large-scale rubella vaccination during the last decade has drastically reduced or eliminated both the virus and CRS in Europe and the Americas, many countries in Africa, South-East Asia, the Eastern Mediterranean, and the Western Pacific have not yet incorporated any type of rubella-containing vaccine into their immunization schedule. As a result, through travel and migration, rubella has been imported into countries that had successfully eliminated the virus, leading to outbreaks and the reestablishment of endemic transmission. The objective of this study was to identify the key factors required for CRS elimination (prevalence reduction, vaccination strategies, and surveillance methods by reviewing publications in PubMed on rubella and CRS (systematic reviews, country experiences, and position papers from the World Health Organization (WHO and other intergovernmental organizations. Based on the results of the review, to eliminate rubella and CRS in endemic areas and reduce re-emergence in previously disease-free areas, all countries should carry out two types of mass rubella vaccination campaigns: 1 one single mass national immunization campaign targeting all men and women 5-39+ years old (with the upper age limit depending on the year in which the rubella-containing vaccine was introduced and the epidemiology of rubella in the country and 2 incorporation of an rubella-containing vaccine in routine childhood immunization programs, including regular vaccination campaigns for 12-month-olds and measles follow-up campaigns. In addition to mass rubella immunization campaigns and routine childhood vaccination programs, the following measures should be taken to help fight rubella and CRS: 1

  16. Heterogeneity in Phenotype of Usher-Congenital Hyperinsulinism Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al Mutair, Angham N; Brusgaard, Klaus; Bin-Abbas, Bassam

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVETo evaluate the phenotype of 15 children with congenital hyperinsulinism (CHI) and profound hearing loss, known as homozygous 11p15-p14 deletion syndrome (MIM #606528).METHODSProspective clinical follow-up and genetic analysis by direct sequencing, Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Ampl.......CONCLUSIONSThe phenotype of homozygous 11p15-p14 deletion syndrome, or Usher-CHI syndrome, includes any severity of neonatal-onset CHI and severe, sensorineural hearing loss. Retinitis pigmentosa and nonautoimmune diabetes may occur in adolescence.......OBJECTIVETo evaluate the phenotype of 15 children with congenital hyperinsulinism (CHI) and profound hearing loss, known as homozygous 11p15-p14 deletion syndrome (MIM #606528).METHODSProspective clinical follow-up and genetic analysis by direct sequencing, Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe...

  17. Congenital Chylothorax in a Newborn with Down Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazan Neslihan Doğan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In the neonatal period, the most common cause of pleural effusion is idiopathic congenital chylothorax. Congenital chylothorax is rarely associated with chromosomal abnormalities, such as Down, Turner and Noonan syndromes. The diagnosis can be made after analysis of the pleural fluid drained by thoracentesis or chest tube placement. During the neonatal period, chylothorax treatment is composed of conservative and surgical therapies. Nowadays, for cases among which conservative therapies fail, treatment with octreotide has been reported to be beneficial with promising results. In this report, a case of congenital chylothorax, in a newborn with Down syndrome, treated by octreotide after failure of chest tube drainage and medical treatment (total parenteral nutrition and medium chain fatty acid formula is presented.

  18. Congenital hypoventilation syndrome and Hirschsprung's disease - Haddad syndrome: A neonatal case presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaiyeola, P; El-Metwally, D; Viscardi, R; Greene, C; Woo, H

    2015-01-01

    Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS) is an uncommon cause of apnea in the newborn characterized by the occurrence of apnea predominantly during sleep. Haddad syndrome is CCHS with Hirschsprung's disease. We report a newborn with Haddad syndrome that had a family history of spinal muscular atrophy and discuss aspects of CCHS and important considerations in the evaluation of apnea in the term newborn.

  19. Congenital varicella syndrome in a monochorionic diamniotic twin pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vania A Villota

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital varicella syndrome encompasses a broad spectrum of malformations present in children of mothers who developed chickenpox during the first 20 weeks of gestation. We report a case of a monochorionic diamniotic twin pregnancy, with maternal exposure to chickenpox during the thirteenth week of gestation, which produced one symptomatic and one healthy child.

  20. Congenital varicella syndrome in a monochorionic diamniotic twin pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villota, Vania A; Delgado, Julián; Pachajoa, Harry

    2014-05-01

    Congenital varicella syndrome encompasses a broad spectrum of malformations present in children of mothers who developed chickenpox during the first 20 weeks of gestation. We report a case of a monochorionic diamniotic twin pregnancy, with maternal exposure to chickenpox during the thirteenth week of gestation, which produced one symptomatic and one healthy child.

  1. Congenital staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome in a premature infant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haveman, LM; Fleer, A; de Vries, LS; Gerards, LJ

    2004-01-01

    A case of congenital staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome (SSSS) with fatal outcome in a premature infant is reported. An intrauterine infection with Staphylococcus aureus was probably the cause for the fulminant course of the disease. Despite adequate antibiotic treatment, the infant died within 24

  2. Congenital constriction ring syndrome of the limbs: A prospective ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the upper limb malformations involved 42 digits; in the lower limb malformations involved 33 toes, one foot and fi ve legs. Four main types of lesions were found: constriction rings, intrauterine amputations, acrosyndactyly, and simple syndactyly. Conclusion: Congenital constriction ring syndrome is of uncertain aetiology ...

  3. Laboratory-confirmed Congenital Rubella Syndrome at the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Esem

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE. Laboratory-confirmed Congenital Rubella Syndrome at the University Teaching Hospital in Lusaka,. Zambia-Case Reports. 1,2. 3. 3. 4 ... microcephaly. Rubella Immunoglobulin M (IgM) results were positive. The third case, a girl, was seen at twelve weeks and brought in for slow growth rate. On.

  4. [Exudative enteropathy in congenital lymphedema-lymphangiectasia syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heruth, M; Müller, P; Liebscher, L; Kurze, G; Richter, T

    2006-01-01

    Congenital peripheral elephantiasiformic alterations are very rare in paediatric patients. In a patient with lymphangiectasia-lymphedema syndrome we demonstrate over a 8-year follow-up that not only cosmetic and social indications for surgical treatments but also internal care become important during the course. We report on a boy with congenital lymphedemas of the extremities and the genital region, which were several times surgically treated. The patient became symptomatic firstly with tetanic cramps caused by malabsorption syndrome due to intestinal lymphangiectasia at the age of 6 years. Synopsis of clinical and laboratory findings and the patient's course are pointing to a mild Hennekam syndrome with still unknown aetiology. The boy developed adequately with permanent oral substitution of electrolytes and vitamins, protein-rich diet, supplementation of medium-chain fatty acids and compressing bandages. Infusions of human albumin to correct persistent hypalbuminemia as well as cytostatic treatment with cyclophosphamide as a formal trial were ineffective and are not advisable, therefore.

  5. Nitric Oxide-Sensitive Pulmonary Hypertension in Congenital Rubella Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Raimondi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Persistent pulmonary hypertension is a very rare presentation of congenital virus infection. We discuss the case of complete congenital rubella syndrome presenting at echocardiography with pulmonary hypertension that worsened after ductus ligation. Cardiac catheterization showed a normal pulmonary valve and vascular tree but a PAP=40 mmHg. The infant promptly responded to inhaled nitric oxide while on mechanical ventilation and was later shifted to oral sildenafil. It is not clear whether our observation may be due to direct viral damage to the endothelium or to the rubella virus increasing the vascular tone via a metabolic derangement.

  6. Congenital absence of the portal vein in a child with Turner syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noe, Jacob A.; Burton, Edward M.; Pittman, Heather C.

    2006-01-01

    Congenital absence of the portal vein (CAPV) is a rare malformation associated with hepatic encephalopathy and liver function abnormalities. We report a case of a 2-year-old with Turner syndrome, CAPV, and congenital heart malformations. (orig.)

  7. Congenital absence of the portal vein in a child with Turner syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noe, Jacob A.; Burton, Edward M. [Department of Radiology, University of Tennessee College of Medicine-Chattanooga Branch, Chattanooga, TN (United States); Pittman, Heather C. [Department of Pediatrics, University of Tennessee College of Medicine-Chattanooga Branch, Chattanooga, TN (United States)

    2006-06-15

    Congenital absence of the portal vein (CAPV) is a rare malformation associated with hepatic encephalopathy and liver function abnormalities. We report a case of a 2-year-old with Turner syndrome, CAPV, and congenital heart malformations. (orig.)

  8. The phenotypic spectrum of congenital Zika syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Campo, Miguel; Feitosa, Ian M L; Ribeiro, Erlane M; Horovitz, Dafne D G; Pessoa, André L S; França, Giovanny V A; García-Alix, Alfredo; Doriqui, Maria J R; Wanderley, Hector Y C; Sanseverino, Maria V T; Neri, João I C F; Pina-Neto, João M; Santos, Emerson S; Verçosa, Islane; Cernach, Mirlene C S P; Medeiros, Paula F V; Kerbage, Saile C; Silva, André A; van der Linden, Vanessa; Martelli, Celina M T; Cordeiro, Marli T; Dhalia, Rafael; Vianna, Fernanda S L; Victora, Cesar G; Cavalcanti, Denise P; Schuler-Faccini, Lavinia

    2017-04-01

    In October 2015, Zika virus (ZIKV) outbreak the Brazilian Ministry of Health (MoH). In response, the Brazilian Society of Medical Genetics established a task force (SBGM-ZETF) to study the phenotype of infants born with microcephaly due to ZIKV congenital infection and delineate the phenotypic spectrum of this newly recognized teratogen. This study was based on the clinical evaluation and neuroimaging of 83 infants born during the period from July, 2015 to March, 2016 and registered by the SBGM-ZETF. All 83 infants had significant findings on neuroimaging consistent with ZIKV congenital infection and 12 had confirmed ZIKV IgM in CSF. A recognizable phenotype of microcephaly, anomalies of the shape of skull and redundancy of the scalp consistent with the Fetal Brain Disruption Sequence (FBDS) was present in 70% of infants, but was most often subtle. In addition, features consistent with fetal immobility, ranging from dimples (30.1%), distal hand/finger contractures (20.5%), and feet malpositions (15.7%), to generalized arthrogryposis (9.6%), were present in these infants. Some cases had milder microcephaly or even a normal head circumference (HC), and other less distinctive findings. The detailed observation of the dysmorphic and neurologic features in these infants provides insight into the mechanisms and timings of the brain disruption and the sequence of developmental anomalies that may occur after prenatal infection by the ZIKV. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Congenital Rubella Syndrome - A Major Review and Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nure Ishrat Nazme

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Rubella is a major public health problem which is usually a mild rash illness in children and adults. However, it has devastating systemic consequences when rubella virus crosses the placental barrier and infects fetal tissue resulting in congenital rubella syndrome (CRS. Congenital rubella syndrome is an under-recognized public health problem in Bangladesh and the burden of the disease weighs heavily on patients and society; therefore, routine vaccination and other preventative strategies are strongly encouraged. Extensive surveillance studies should be conducted to eliminate CRS from our country. In this review, we will characterize the epidemiology of CRS; describe the patho-phyisiology, clinical features and laboratory testing for the disease, and discuss measures needed for prevention of rubella and CRS.

  10. The syndrome of perisylvian polymicrogyria with congenital arthrogryposis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poduri, Annapurna; Chitsazzadeh, Vida; D'Arrigo, Stefano; Fedrizzi, Ermellina; Pantaleoni, Chiara; Riva, Daria; Busse, Claudia; Küster, Helmut; Duplessis, Adre; Gaitanis, John; Sahin, Mustafa; Garganta, Cheryl; Topcu, Meral; Dies, Kira A; Barry, Brenda J; Partlow, Jennifer; Barkovich, A James; Walsh, Christopher A; Chang, Bernard S

    2010-08-01

    Bilateral perisylvian polymicrogyria (BPP) is a well-recognized malformation of cortical development commonly associated with epilepsy, cognitive impairment, and oromotor apraxia. Reports have suggested the association of BPP with arthrogryposis multiplex congenita. We sought to investigate the clinical, electrophysiological, and neuroradiological features of this combined syndrome to determine if there are unique features that distinguish BPP with arthrogryposis from BPP alone. Cases of BPP with congenital arthrogryposis were identified from a large research database of individuals with polymicrogyria. Clinical features (including oromotor function, seizures, and joint contractures), MR brain imaging, and results of neuromuscular testing were reviewed. Ten cases of BPP with congenital arthrogryposis were identified. Most cases had some degree of oromotor apraxia. Only a few had seizures, but a majority of cases were still young children. Electrophysiological studies provided evidence for lower motor neuron or peripheral nervous system involvement. On brain imaging, bilateral polymicrogyria (PMG) centered along the Sylvian fissures was seen, with variable extension frontally or parietally; no other cortical malformations were present. We did not identify obvious neuroimaging features that distinguish this syndrome from that of BPP without arthrogryposis. The clinical and neuroimaging features of the syndrome of BPP with congenital arthrogryposis appear similar to those seen in cases of isolated BPP without joint contractures, but electrophysiological studies often demonstrate coexistent lower motor neuron or peripheral nervous system pathology. These findings suggest that BPP with arthrogryposis may have a genetic etiology with effects at two levels of the neuraxis. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Congenital high airway obstruction syndrome (CHAOS) associated with cervical myelomeningocele.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adin, Mehmet Emin

    2017-10-01

    Congenital high airway obstruction syndrome (CHAOS) is a rare and potentially fatal entity resulting from complete or near complete developmental airway obstruction. Although most reported cases of CHAOS are sporadic, the condition may also be associated with certain syndromes and a variety of cervical masses. Meningocele and myelomeningocele have not yet been reported in association with CHAOS. We describe the typical constellation of sonographic findings in a case of early diagnosis of CHAOS associated with cervical myelomeningocele. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Clin Ultrasound 45:507-510, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. [Pulmonary hypertension associated with congenital heart disease and Eisenmenger syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón-Colmenero, Juan; Sandoval Zárate, Julio; Beltrán Gámez, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a common complication of congenital heart disease (CHD). Congenital cardiopathies are the most frequent congenital malformations. The prevalence in our country remains unknown, based on birthrate, it is calculated that 12,000 to 16,000 infants in our country have some cardiac malformation. In patients with an uncorrected left-to-right shunt, increased pulmonary pressure leads to vascular remodeling and endothelial dysfunction secondary to an imbalance in vasoactive mediators which promotes vasoconstriction, inflammation, thrombosis, cell proliferation, impaired apotosis and fibrosis. The progressive rise in pulmonary vascular resistance and increased pressures in the right heart provocated reversal of the shunt may arise with the development of Eisenmenger' syndrome the most advanced form de Pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with congenital heart disease. The prevalence of Pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with CHD has fallen in developed countries in recent years that is not yet achieved in developing countries therefore diagnosed late as lack of hospital infrastructure and human resources for the care of patients with CHD. With the development of targeted medical treatments for pulmonary arterial hypertension, the concept of a combined medical and interventional/surgical approach for patients with Pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with CHD is a reality. We need to know the pathophysiological factors involved as well as a careful evaluation to determine the best therapeutic strategy. Copyright © 2014 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  13. Long QTc Syndrome Type 2 Presenting in a Postpartum Patient on Medroxyprogesterone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Kern

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Congenital long QT syndrome type 2 (LQTS2 is a rare inherited cardiac abnormality resulting in increased risk of polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (PVT. Case Description. A 21-year-old postpartum female presented with syncopal episode after phone alarm. She was noted to have PVT on telemetry monitoring in the emergency department. EKG revealed QTc of 530. The patient’s only medication was medroxyprogesterone. She ultimately received a dual chamber pacemaker with ICD. Discussion. LQTS2 is associated with alarm sounds as a precipitating factor. Postpartum hormonal shifts as well as medroxyprogesterone have significant effect on native QTc duration.

  14. Atrial Fibrillation and Long QT Syndrome Presenting in a 12-Year-Old Girl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan W. Knoche

    2012-01-01

    inherited with mutations leading to abnormalities in cardiac ion channel function. Mutations in KCNQ1 are the most common cause of LQTS. Although rare, mutations in KCNQ1 also can cause familial AF. This report describes a child with a KCNQ1 missense mutation who uniquely expresses concomitant AF and LQTS. Due to the potential for increased morbidity and mortality, young patients who present with AF and a family history suggestive of inherited arrhythmias should trigger further investigation for LQTS and subsequent familial genetic counseling.

  15. Clinical presentation and course of long QT syndrome in Thai children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankavipar Saprungruang, MD

    2015-10-01

    Conclusions: All 20 patients with LQTS were mostly symptomatic at presentation. Owing to the geographical region and ethnicity of the Thai population, we conclude that the ratio of patients who develop cardiac symptoms at rest or during sleep might be higher than in other Asian countries.

  16. Tachycardia-Induced Cardiomyopathy in a 12-Year-Old Child With Long QT Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghandi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy (TIC is a ventricular dysfunction secondary to chronic and persistent tachycardia that can regress partially or completely following heart rate normalization. Paroxysmal atrial tachycardia and permanent junctional reciprocating tachycardia are two types of frequent arrhythmias that can cause cardiomyopathy in children. Case Presentation A 12-year-old child with obesity (body mass index > 26.8 was admitted with fatigue, pallor and tachypnea to the clinic. He had palpitation for the past 24 hours. On the cardiac auscultation, holosystolic 2/6 murmur was heard in the apex as well as gallop rhythm. Electrocardiogram revealed heart rate of 150 - 160 bpm and negative P waves in II, III and AVF leads. The echocardiography revealed dilated cardiomyopathy with an ejection fraction of 30%. Conclusions Diagnosis of tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy in children is important, since appropriate treatment improves the prognosis. Every child with recurrent and persistent palpitation with the first episode of congestive heart failure should be evaluated for tachycardia- induced cardiomyopathy.

  17. Iron Overload Leading to Torsades de Pointes in β-Thalassemia and Long QT Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Refaat, Marwan M; El Hage, Lea; Steffensen, Annette Buur

    2016-01-01

    The authors present a unique case of torsades de pointes in a β-thalassemia patient with early iron overload in the absence of any structural abnormalities as seen in hemochromatosis. Genetic testing showed a novel KCNQ1 gene mutation 1591C>T [Gln531Ter(X)]. Testing of the gene mutation in Xenopus...

  18. Keratitis-Ichthyosis-Deafness syndrome: A rare congenital disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanker, Vinay; Gupta, Mudita; Prashar, Aditi

    2012-01-01

    Keratitis-Icthyosis-Deafness syndrome is a rare congenital disorder characterized by keratitis, ichthyosis, and deafness. We report a 13 year old female child who presented with diffuse alopecia of the scalp and body. There was erythrokeratoderma of face and discrete hyperkeratotic hyperpigmented papulo plaque lesions on the body. Patient also had reticulate hyperkeratosis of palms and soles. There was history of recurrent episodes of folliculitis over the scalp and body. There was no evidence of any malignancy. Eye involvement in the form of bilateral vascularising keratitis was present. There was bilateral mixed hearing loss. PMID:23130264

  19. Keratitis-Ichthyosis-Deafness syndrome: A rare congenital disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinay Shanker

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Keratitis-Icthyosis-Deafness syndrome is a rare congenital disorder characterized by keratitis, ichthyosis, and deafness. We report a 13 year old female child who presented with diffuse alopecia of the scalp and body. There was erythrokeratoderma of face and discrete hyperkeratotic hyperpigmented papulo plaque lesions on the body. Patient also had reticulate hyperkeratosis of palms and soles. There was history of recurrent episodes of folliculitis over the scalp and body. There was no evidence of any malignancy. Eye involvement in the form of bilateral vascularising keratitis was present. There was bilateral mixed hearing loss.

  20. Type V Pouch Colon, Prune Belly Syndrome, and Congenital Anterior Urethrocutaneous Fistula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, Prince; Birua, Hirendra

    2017-01-01

    Congenital pouch colon (CPC) or short colon syndrome is a rare type of anorectal malformation(ARM). Type V is the rarest form of CPC. We present a 1-day-old male child with type V CPC with prune belly syndrome and congenital anterior urethrocutaneous fistula (CAUF).

  1. Congenital short bowel syndrome as the presenting symptom in male patients with FLNA mutations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Werf, Christine S.; Sribudiani, Yunia; Verheij, Joke B. G. M.; Carroll, Matthew; O'Loughlin, Edward; Chen, Chien-Huan; Brooks, Alice S.; Liszewski, M. Kathryn; Atkinson, John P.; Hofstra, Robert M. W.

    Purpose: Autosomal recessive congenital short bowel syndrome is caused by mutations in CLMP. No mutations were found in the affected males of a family with presumed X-linked congenital short bowel syndrome or in an isolated male patient. Our aim was to identify the disease-causing mutation in these

  2. Congenital megalourethra in 2 weeks old boy associated with Prune-Belly syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawal Barau Abdullahi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The megalourethra is a rare congenital anomaly of the penile urethra. It is characterized by the congenital absence of the corpus spongiosum and/or corpus cavernosum. It is especially common associated with Prune-Belly syndrome, and with upper tract abnormalities. We present a 2 weeks old boy with congenital megalourethra because of its association with the Prune-Belly syndrome.

  3. Jervell and Lange-Nielson Syndrome masquerading as intractable epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagdish P Goyal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The long QT syndrome (LQTS is a cause of syncope and sudden death. Jervell and Lange-Nielson syndrome (JLNS is an uncommon form of LQTS, having autosomal recessive transmission, and is associated with congenital deafness. We report a case of JLNS in a child who presented to us with refractory epilepsy. The cardiac cause of seizures was suspected as the child was hypotensive and pulseless during the episode of seizures. The child was diagnosed as JLNS based on Schwartz diagnostic criteria for LQTS and congenital sensorineural deafness. The child responded well to β-blocker therapy. Antiepileptic drugs were stopped. The screening of family members with ECG revealed a QT interval more than required for diagnosis of LQTS but they were asymptomatic. All asymptomatic family members were also put on metoprolol. All of them showed great improvement with the reduction of the QT interval on ECG. The patient was doing well on immediate follow-up.

  4. Association between Michelin tire baby syndrome and congenital panhyopituitarism in an Iranian girl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghshenas, Zahra; Tajziehchi, Leila; Ghavami, Fakhredin

    2014-08-01

    Michelin tire baby syndrome is a rare syndrome, diagnosed clinically by multiple circumferential skin folds. Multiple noncutaneous anomalies have been described with this syndrome. We report a case of Michelin tire baby syndrome with congenital panhypopituitarism. To date, there is no report of association between these two disorders.

  5. Congenital hereditary endothelial dystrophy with progressive sensorineural deafness (Harboyan syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abramowicz Marc

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Harboyan syndrome is a degenerative corneal disorder defined as congenital hereditary endothelial dystrophy (CHED accompanied by progressive, postlingual sensorineural hearing loss. To date, 24 cases from 11 families of various origin (Asian Indian, South American Indian, Sephardi Jewish, Brazilian Portuguese, Dutch, Gypsy, Moroccan, Dominican have been reported. More than 50% of the reported cases have been associated with parental consanguinity. The ocular manifestations in Harboyan syndrome include diffuse bilateral corneal edema occurring with severe corneal clouding, blurred vision, visual loss and nystagmus. They are apparent at birth or within the neonatal period and are indistinguishable from those characteristic of the autosomal recessive CHED (CHED2. Hearing deficit in Harboyan is slowly progressive and typically found in patients 10–25 years old. There are no reported cases with prelinglual deafness, however, a significant hearing loss in children as young as 4 years old has been detected by audiometry, suggesting that hearing may be affected earlier, even at birth. Harboyan syndrome is caused by mutations in the SLC4A11 gene located at the CHED2 locus on chromosome 20p13-p12, indicating that CHED2 and Harboyan syndrome are allelic disorders. A total of 62 different SLC4A11 mutations have been reported in 98 families (92 CHED2 and 6 Harboyan. All reported cases have been consistent with autosomal recessive transmission. Diagnosis is based on clinical criteria, detailed ophthalmological assessment and audiometry. A molecular confirmation of the clinical diagnosis is feasible. A variety of genetic, metabolic, developmental and acquired diseases presenting with clouding of the cornea should be considered in the differential diagnosis (Peters anomaly, sclerocornea, limbal dermoids, congenital glaucoma. Audiometry must be performed to differentiate Harboyan syndrome from CHED2. Autosomal recessive types of CHED (CHED2 and

  6. Myasthenia Gravis, Lambert-Eaton Myasthenic Syndrome & Congenital Myasthenic Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2011 MDA A Bacteria B Nerve cell Antibodies Muscle cell Normally (A), the immune system releases antibodies to attack foreign invaders, such as bacteria. In autoim- mune diseases (B), the antibodies mistakenly attack ... damage muscle cells; in Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome, they at ...

  7. Congenital heart defects in molecularly proven Kabuki syndrome patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Digilio, Maria Cristina; Gnazzo, Maria; Lepri, Francesca; Dentici, Maria Lisa; Pisaneschi, Elisa; Baban, Anwar; Passarelli, Chiara; Capolino, Rossella; Angioni, Adriano; Novelli, Antonio; Marino, Bruno; Dallapiccola, Bruno

    2017-11-01

    The prevalence of congenital heart defects (CHD) in Kabuki syndrome ranges from 28% to 80%. Between January 2012 and December 2015, 28 patients had a molecularly proven diagnosis of Kabuki syndrome. Pathogenic variants in KMT2D (MLL2) were detected in 27 patients, and in KDM6A gene in one. CHD was diagnosed in 19/27 (70%) patients with KMT2D (MLL2) variant, while the single patient with KDM6A change had a normal heart. The anatomic types among patients with CHD included aortic coarctation (4/19 = 21%) alone or associated with an additional CHD, bicuspid aortic valve (4/19 = 21%) alone or associated with an additional CHD, perimembranous subaortic ventricular septal defect (3/19 = 16%), atrial septal defect ostium secundum type (3/19 = 16%), conotruncal heart defects (3/19 = 16%). Additional CHDs diagnosed in single patients included aortic dilatation with mitral anomaly and hypoplastic left heart syndrome. We also reviewed CHDs in patients with a molecular diagnosis of Kabuki syndrome reported in the literature. In conclusion, a CHD is detected in 70% of patients with KMT2D (MLL2) pathogenic variants, most commonly left-sided obstructive lesions, including multiple left-sided obstructions similar to those observed in the spectrum of the Shone complex, and septal defects. Clinical management of Kabuki syndrome should include echocardiogram at the time of diagnosis, with particular attention to left-sided obstructive lesions and mitral anomalies, and annual monitoring for aortic arch dilatation. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Congenital Auricular Malformations: Description of Anomalies and Syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartel-Friedrich, Sylva

    2015-12-01

    Half of the malformations in the ear, nose, and throat region affect the ear. Malformations of the external ear (pinna or auricle with external auditory canal [EAC]) are collectively termed microtia. Microtia is a congenital anomaly that ranges in severity from mild structural abnormalities to complete absence of the external ear (anotia). Microtia occurs more frequently in males (∼2 or 3:1), is predominantly unilateral (∼70-90%), and more often involves the right ear (∼60%). The reported prevalence varies geographically from 0.83 to 17.4 per 10,000 births. Microtia may be genetic (with family history, spontaneous mutations) or acquired. Malformations of the external ear can also involve the middle ear and/or inner ear. Microtia may be an isolated birth defect, but associated anomalies or syndromes are described in 20 to 60% of cases, depending on study design. These generally fit within the oculo-auriculo-vertebral spectrum; defects are located most frequently in the facial skeleton, facial soft tissues, heart, and vertebral column, or comprise a syndrome (e.g., Treacher Collins syndrome). Diagnostic investigation of microtia includes clinical examination, audiologic testing, genetic analysis and, especially in higher grade malformations with EAC deformities, computed tomography (CT) or cone-beam CT for the planning of surgery and rehabilitation procedures, including implantation of hearing aids. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  9. Heterogeneity in Phenotype of Usher-Congenital Hyperinsulinism Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Mutair, Angham N.; Brusgaard, Klaus; Bin-Abbas, Bassam; Hussain, Khalid; Felimban, Naila; Al Shaikh, Adnan; Christesen, Henrik T.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the phenotype of 15 children with congenital hyperinsulinism (CHI) and profound hearing loss, known as Homozygous 11p15-p14 Deletion syndrome (MIM #606528). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Prospective clinical follow-up and genetic analysis by direct sequencing, multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification, and microsatellite markers. RESULTS Genetic testing identified the previous described homozygous deletion in 11p15, USH1C:c.(90+592)_ABCC8:c.(2694–528)del. Fourteen patients had severe CHI demanding near-total pancreatectomy. In one patient with mild, transient neonatal hypoglycemia and nonautoimmune diabetes at age 11 years, no additional mutations were found in HNF1A, HNF4A, GCK, INS, and INSR. Retinitis pigmentosa was found in two patients aged 9 and 13 years. No patients had enteropathy or renal tubular defects. Neuromotor development ranged from normal to severe delay with epilepsy. CONCLUSIONS The phenotype of Homozygous 11p15-p14 Deletion syndrome, or Usher-CHI syndrome, includes any severity of neonatal-onset CHI and severe, sensorineural hearing loss. Retinitis pigmentosa and nonautoimmune diabetes may occur in adolescence. PMID:23150283

  10. Recurrent Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia in Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, I.C.; Ko, S.F.; Shieh, C.S.; Huang, C.F.; Chien, S.J.; Liang, C.D.

    2006-01-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) includes a group of connective tissue disorders with abnormal collagen metabolism and a diverse clinical spectrum. We report two siblings with EDS who both presented with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH). The elder sister suffered from recurrent diaphragmatic hernia twice and EDS was overlooked initially. Echocardiography as well as contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) showed dilatation of the pulmonary artery, and marked elongation and tortuosity of the aorta and its branches. A diagnosis of EDS was eventually established when these findings were coupled with the clinical features of hyperelastic skin. Her younger brother also had similar features. This report emphasizes that EDS may present as CDH in a small child which could easily be overlooked. Without appropriate surgery, diaphragmatic hernia might occur. Echocardiographic screening is recommended in patients with CDH. Contrast-enhanced MRA can be helpful in delineation of abnormally tortuous aortic great vessels that are an important clue to the early diagnosis of EDS

  11. Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome: diagnostic and management challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasi AS

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Ajay S Kasi,1 Iris A Perez,1,2 Sheila S Kun,1 Thomas G Keens1,2 1Division of Pediatric Pulmonology and Sleep Medicine, Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, 2Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA Abstract: Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS is a rare genetic disorder with failure of central control of breathing and of the autonomic nervous system function due to a mutation in the paired-like homeobox 2B (PHOX2B gene. Affected patients have absent or negligible ventilatory sensitivity to hypercapnia and hypoxemia, and they do not exhibit signs of respiratory distress when challenged with hypercarbia or hypoxia. The diagnosis of CCHS must be confirmed with PHOX2B gene mutation. Generally, the PHOX2B mutation genotype can aid in anticipating the severity of the phenotype. They require ventilatory support for life. Home assisted ventilation options include positive pressure ventilation via tracheostomy, noninvasive positive pressure ventilation, and diaphragm pacing via phrenic nerve stimulation, but each strategy has its associated limitations and challenges. Since all the clinical manifestations of CCHS may not manifest at birth, periodic monitoring and early intervention are necessary to prevent complications and improve outcome. Life-threatening arrhythmias can manifest at different ages and a normal cardiac monitoring study does not exclude future occurrences leading to the dilemma of timing and frequency of cardiac rhythm monitoring and treatment. Given the rare incidence of CCHS, most health care professionals are not experienced with managing CCHS patients, particularly those with diaphragm pacers. With early diagnosis and advances in home mechanical ventilation and monitoring strategies, many CCHS children are surviving into adulthood presenting new challenges in their care. Keywords: congenital central hypoventilation syndrome, PHOX2B, home mechanical ventilation, diaphragm

  12. Type IV neonatal Bartter syndrome complicated with congenital chloride diarrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakallı, Hale; Bucak, Hakan İbrahim

    2012-01-01

    Pseudo-Bartter syndrome encompasses a heterogenous group of disorders similar to Bartter syndrome. Sometimes a few status may be nested, as in our case presented here. An 8-month-old boy was referred to our hospital with of intractable diarrhea, polyuria, persistent hypokalemia, abdominal distension and failure to thrive. He was born in the 34 6/7 gestational week (GW) to consanguineous parents. In the 30(th) GW polyhydramnios was verified by ultrasonography. The laboratory results showed hypokalemic-hypochloremic metabolic alkalosis, hyponatremia, and increased urinary loss of chloride, potassium and calcium. An audiogram test revealed complete sensorineural deafness. Ultrasonography revealed medullary nephrocalcinosis in both kidneys. Elevated plasma renin activity and aldosterone were found and a provisional diagnosis of type-IV neonatal Bartter syndrome was made. Treatment with indomethacin, spironolactone and additional intake of NaCl/KCl was initiated. Despite these therapies, the child's diarrhea persisted but serum potassium concentration normalized, and hypercalciuria and urine output reduced. After determining the high fecal chloride concentration, there was an immediate decompensation of the disease on indomethacin withdrawal, thus a diagnosis of type IV neonatal Bartter syndrome complicated with congenital chloride diarrhea was considered. Indomethacin, spironolactone and supplementary therapies with NaCl/KCl were continued, which resulted in the normalization of serum electrolytes as well as his physical development, but high contents of chloride in urine and faeces and nephrocalcinosis remains unchanged during 1-year follow-up. Because of the clinical and laboratory simulations between the various diseases that lead to hypokalemic-hypochloremic metabolic alkalosis, patients must be evaluated carefully.

  13. Anterior uveitis and congenital fibrosis of the extraocular muscles in a patient with Noonan syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elgohary Mostafa

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a patient with Noonan syndrome who presented with Human Leukocyte Antigen B27-associated recurrent acute anterior uveitis and manifestations of congenital fibrosis of the extraocular muscles, which has not been reported before.

  14. Overview of Usher's Syndrome: Congenital Deafness and Progressive Loss of Vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernon, McCay

    1974-01-01

    Usher's syndrome, a genetic condition causing congenital profound hearing loss and a progressive blindness due to retinitis pigmentosa, affects an estimated three to six percent of children in educational and rehabilitative programs for the hearing impaired. (Author)

  15. Nonclassic congenital adrenal hyperplasia misdiagnosed as Turner syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vineet V Mishra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a patient with nonclassic congenital adrenal hyperplasia (NCAH misdiagnosed as mosaic Turner syndrome. She presented with complaints of primary infertility. Short stature, the presence of facial hair and hoarse voice was also noted. She had primary amenorrhea and was advised for karyotype at 16 years of age, which was reported as 45, X[20]/46, XX[80], stating her as a case of mosaic Turner syndrome. Clitoroplasty was done at 21 years of age for clitoromegaly, which was noticed during puberty. The diagnosis of mosaic Turner could not explain the virilization. Therefore, we repeated the karyotype, which revealed 46, XX in more than 100 metaphases and was sufficient to exclude mosaicism. Furthermore, the endocrinological evaluation revealed high testosterone level with a normal 17 alpha-hydroxyprogesterone (17-OHP. The presence of pubertal onset virilization with a karyotype of 46, XX and raised testosterone level with normal 17-OHP level, raised the suspicion of NCAH for which adrenocorticotropic hormone stimulation test was done which confirmed the diagnosis of NCAH.

  16. Congenital chloride diarrhea misdiagnosed as pseudo-Bartter syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saneian, Hossein; Bahraminia, Emad

    2013-09-01

    Congenital chloride diarrhea (CCD) is a rare autosomal recessive disease which is characterized by intractable diarrhea of infancy, failure to thrive, high fecal chloride, hypochloremia, hypokalemia, hyponatremia and metabolic alkalosis. In this case report, we present the first female and the second official case of CCD in Iran. A 15-month-old girl referred to our hospital due to failure to thrive and poor feeding. She had normal kidneys, liver and spleen. Treating her with Shohl's solution, thiazide and zinc sulfate did not result in weight gain. Consequently, pseudo-Bartter syndrome was suspected, she was treated with intravenous (IV) therapy to which she responded dramatically. In addition, hypokalemia resolved quickly. Since this does not usually happen in patients with the pseudo-Bartter syndrome, stool tests were performed. Abnormal level of chloride in stool suggested CCD and she was thus treated with IV fluid replacement, Total parentral nutrition and high dose of oral omeprazole (3 mg/kg/day). She gained 1 kg of weight and is doing fine until present. CCD is a rare hereditary cause of intractable diarrhea of infancy. It should be considered in infants with unknown severe electrolyte disturbances.

  17. Adams-Oliver syndrome associated with cutis marmorata telangiectatica congenita and congenital cataract: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayol, Laurence; Garcia, Patricia; Denis, Danièle; Philip, Nicole; Simeoni, Umberto

    2006-04-01

    A female infant presented with Adams-Oliver syndrome (AOS), intrauterine growth retardation, severe cutis marmorata telangiectatica congenita, bilateral congenital cataract, and periventricular lesions. The here-reported association of bilateral congenital cataract with AOS is original. Adams-Oliver syndrome is a genetic defect that causes a vasculopathy and leads to a variety of phenotypes. This observation further supports the current understanding of the physiopathology of AOS.

  18. Hippocampal volume reduction in congenital central hypoventilation syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul M Macey

    Full Text Available Children with congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS, a genetic disorder characterized by diminished drive to breathe during sleep and impaired CO(2 sensitivity, show brain structural and functional changes on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI scans, with impaired responses in specific hippocampal regions, suggesting localized injury.We assessed total volume and regional variation in hippocampal surface morphology to identify areas affected in the syndrome. We studied 18 CCHS (mean age+/-std: 15.1+/-2.2 years; 8 female and 32 healthy control (age 15.2+/-2.4 years; 14 female children, and traced hippocampi on 1 mm(3 resolution T1-weighted scans, collected with a 3.0 Tesla MRI scanner. Regional hippocampal volume variations, adjusted for cranial volume, were compared between groups based on t-tests of surface distances to the structure midline, with correction for multiple comparisons. Significant tissue losses emerged in CCHS patients on the left side, with a trend for loss on the right; however, most areas affected on the left also showed equivalent right-sided volume reductions. Reduced regional volumes appeared in the left rostral hippocampus, bilateral areas in mid and mid-to-caudal regions, and a dorsal-caudal region, adjacent to the fimbria.The volume losses may result from hypoxic exposure following hypoventilation during sleep-disordered breathing, or from developmental or vascular consequences of genetic mutations in the syndrome. The sites of change overlap regions of abnormal functional responses to respiratory and autonomic challenges. Affected hippocampal areas have roles associated with memory, mood, and indirectly, autonomic regulation; impairments in these behavioral and physiological functions appear in CCHS.

  19. Congenital diaphragmatic hernia as a part of Nance-Horan syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kammoun, Molka; Brady, Paul; De Catte, Luc; Deprest, Jan; Devriendt, Koenraad; Vermeesch, Joris Robert

    2018-03-01

    Nance-Horan syndrome is a rare X-linked developmental disorder characterized by bilateral congenital cataract, dental anomalies, facial dysmorphism, and intellectual disability. Here, we identify a patient with Nance-Horan syndrome caused by a new nonsense NHS variant. In addition, the patient presented congenital diaphragmatic hernia. NHS gene expression in murine fetal diaphragm was demonstrated, suggesting a possible involvement of NHS in diaphragm development. Congenital diaphragmatic hernia could result from NHS loss of function in pleuroperitoneal fold or in somites-derived muscle progenitor cells leading to an impairment of their cells migration.

  20. Left-sided congenital heart lesions in mosaic Turner syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouayed Abdelmoula, Nouha; Abdelmoula, Balkiss; Smaoui, Walid; Trabelsi, Imen; Louati, Rim; Aloulou, Samir; Aloulou, Wafa; Abid, Fatma; Kammoun, Senda; Trigui, Khaled; Bedoui, Olfa; Denguir, Hichem; Mallek, Souad; Ben Aziza, Mustapha; Dammak, Jamila; Kaabi, Oldez; Abdellaoui, Nawel; Turki, Fatma; Kaabi, Asma; Kamoun, Wafa; Jabeur, Jihen; Ltaif, Wided; Chaker, Kays; Fourati, Haytham; M'rabet, Samir; Ben Ameur, Hedi; Gouia, Naourez; Mhiri, Mohamed Nabil; Rebai, Tarek

    2018-04-01

    In the era of the diseasomes and interactome networks, linking genetics with phenotypic traits in Turner syndrome should be studied thoroughly. As a part of this stratagem, mosaicism of both X and Y chromosome which is a common finding in TS and an evaluation of congenital heart diseases in the different situations of mosaic TS types, can be helpful in the identification of disturbed sex chromosomes, genes and signaling pathway actors. Here we report the case of a mosaic TS associated to four left-sided CHD, including BAV, COA, aortic aneurysms and dissections at an early age. The mosaicism included two cell lines, well-defined at the cytogenetic and molecular levels: a cell line which is monosomic for Xp and Xq genes (45,X) and another which is trisomic for pseudoautosomal genes that are present on the X and Y chromosomes and escape X inactivation: 45,X[8]/46,X,idic(Y)(pter→q11.2::q11.2→pter)[42]. This case generates two hypotheses about the contribution of genes linked to the sex chromosomes and the signaling pathways involving these genes, in left-sided heart diseases. The first hypothesis suggests the interaction between X chromosome and autosomal genes or loci of aortic development, possibly dose-dependent, and which could be in the framework of TGF-β-SMAD signaling pathways. The second implies that left-sided congenital heart lesions involve sex chromosomes loci. The reduced dosage of X chromosome gene(s), escaping X inactivation during development, contributes to this type of CHD. Regarding our case, these X chromosome genes may have homologues at the Y chromosome, but the process of inactivation of the centromeres of the isodicentric Y spreads to the concerned Y chromosome genes. Therefore, this case emerges as an invitation to consider the mosaics of Turner syndrome and to study their phenotypes in correlation with their genotypes to discover the underlying developmental and genetic mechanisms, especially the ones related to sex chromosomes.

  1. Spastic quadriplegia in Down syndrome with congenital duodenal stenosis/atresia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurosawa, Kenji; Enomoto, Keisuke; Tominaga, Makiko; Furuya, Noritaka; Sameshima, Kiyoko; Iai, Mizue; Take, Hiroshi; Shinkai, Masato; Ishikawa, Hiroshi; Yamanaka, Michiko; Matsui, Kiyoshi; Masuno, Mitsuo

    2012-06-01

    Down syndrome is an autosomal chromosome disorder, characterized by intellectual disability and muscle hypotonia. Muscle hypotonia is observed from neonates to adulthood in Down syndrome patients, but muscle hypertonicity is extremely unusual in this syndrome. During a study period of nine years, we found three patients with severe spastic quadriplegia among 20 cases with Down syndrome and congenital duodenal stenosis/atresia (3/20). However, we could find no patient with spastic quadriplegia among 644 cases with Down syndrome without congenital duodenal stenosis/atresia during the same period (0/644, P quadriplegia among 17 patients with congenital duodenal stenosis/atresia without Down syndrome admitted during the same period to use as a control group (0/17, P quadriplegia in patients with Down syndrome. Long-term survival is improving, and the large majority of people with Down syndrome are expected to live well into adult life. Management and further study for the various problems, representing a low prevalence but serious and specific to patients with Down syndrome, are required to improve their quality of life. © 2012 The Authors. Congenital Anomalies © 2012 Japanese Teratology Society.

  2. Postmortem magnetic resonance appearances of congenital high airway obstruction syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arthurs, Owen J. [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); UCL Institute of Child Health, London (United Kingdom); Chitty, Lyn S. [UCL Institute of Child Health, Genetics and Genomic Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Great Ormond Street and UCLH NHS Foundation Trusts, London (United Kingdom); Judge-Kronis, Lydia [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Histopathology, London (United Kingdom); Sebire, Neil J. [UCL Institute of Child Health, London (United Kingdom); Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Histopathology, London (United Kingdom)

    2015-04-01

    Congenital high airway obstruction syndrome (CHAOS) is a rare life-threatening condition characterised by complete or near-complete developmental obstruction of the foetal airway. Although antenatal imaging findings have been described, the postmortem MRI findings have not been reported. To present postmortem MRI features of CHAOS. We retrospectively reviewed our hospital pathology and imaging databases for cases of CHAOS over a 2-year period. We identified two cases of CHAOS. In both cases, postmortem plain radiographs demonstrated gross abdominal distension with distortion and splaying of the rib cage. Both foetuses had characteristic postmortem MRI findings including large-volume fluid-filled lungs on T2-weighted imaging, diaphragmatic eversion, fluid-filled airway dilatation below the level of obstruction, centrally positioned and compressed heart, and massive ascites. One foetus had an associated limb abnormality. Postmortem MRI in foetuses suspected of having CHAOS allows confirmation of the diagnosis, determination of the anatomical level of the atresia or stenosis, and identification of associated abnormalities without the need for invasive autopsy. (orig.)

  3. Growth curves in Down syndrome with congenital heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline D’Azevedo Sica

    Full Text Available SUMMARY Introduction: To assess dietary habits, nutritional status and food frequency in children and adolescents with Down syndrome (DS and congenital heart disease (CHD. Additionally, we attempted to compare body mass index (BMI classifications according to the World Health Organization (WHO curves and curves developed for individuals with DS. Method: Cross-sectional study including individuals with DS and CHD treated at a referral center for cardiology, aged 2 to 18 years. Weight, height, BMI, total energy and food frequency were measured. Nutritional status was assessed using BMI for age and gender, using curves for evaluation of patients with DS and those set by the WHO. Results: 68 subjects with DS and CHD were evaluated. Atrioventricular septal defect (AVSD was the most common heart disease (52.9%. There were differences in BMI classification between the curves proposed for patients with DS and those proposed by the WHO. There was an association between consumption of vitamin E and polyunsaturated fatty acids. Conclusion: Results showed that individuals with DS are mostly considered normal weight for age, when evaluated using specific curves for DS. Reviews on specific curves for DS would be the recommended practice for health professionals so as to avoid precipitated diagnosis of overweight and/or obesity in this population.

  4. Visual impairment evaluation in 119 children with congenital Zika syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura, Liana O; Ventura, Camila V; Dias, Natália de C; Vilar, Isabelle G; Gois, Adriana L; Arantes, Tiago E; Fernandes, Luciene C; Chiang, Michael F; Miller, Marilyn T; Lawrence, Linda

    2018-06-01

    To assess visual impairment in a large sample of infants with congenital Zika syndrome (CZS) and to compare with a control group using the same assessment protocol. The study group was composed of infants with confirmed diagnosis of CZS. Controls were healthy infants matched for age, sex, and socioeconomic status. All infants underwent comprehensive ophthalmologic evaluation including visual acuity, visual function assessment, and visual developmental milestones. The CZS group included 119 infants; the control group, 85 infants. At examination, the mean age of the CZS group was 8.5 ± 1.2 months (range, 6-13 months); of the controls, 8.4 ± 1.8 months (range, 5-12 months; P = 0.598). Binocular Teller Acuity Card (TAC) testing was abnormal in 107 CZS infants and in 4 controls (89.9% versus 5% [P visual development milestones were less achieved by infants with CZS compared to controls (P visual impairment. A protocol for assessment of the ocular findings, visual acuity, and visual developmental milestones tested against age-matched controls is suggested. Copyright © 2018 American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Visual impairment in children with congenital Zika syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura, Liana O; Ventura, Camila V; Lawrence, Linda; van der Linden, Vanessa; van der Linden, Ana; Gois, Adriana L; Cavalcanti, Milena M; Barros, Eveline A; Dias, Natalia C; Berrocal, Audina M; Miller, Marilyn T

    2017-08-01

    To describe the visual impairment associated with ocular and neurological abnormalities in a cohort of children with congenital Zika syndrome (CZS). This cross-sectional study included infants with microcephaly born in Pernambuco, Brazil, from May to December 2015. Immunoglobulin M antibody capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the Zika virus on the cerebrospinal fluid samples was positive for all infants. Clinical evaluation consisted of comprehensive ophthalmologic examination including visual acuity, visual function assessment, visual developmental milestone, neurologic examination, and neuroimaging. A total of 32 infants (18 males [56%]) were included. Mean age at examination was 5.7 ± 0.9 months (range, 4-7 months). Visual function and visual developmental milestone could not be tested in 1 child (3%). Visual impairment was detected in 32 infants (100%). Retinal and/or optic nerve findings were observed in 14 patients (44%). There was no statistical difference between the patients with ocular findings and those without (P = 0.180). All patients (100%) demonstrated neurological and neuroimaging abnormalities; 3 (9%) presented with late-onset of microcephaly. Children with CZS demonstrated visual impairment regardless of retina and/or optic nerve abnormalities. This finding suggests that cortical/cerebral visual impairment may be the most common cause of blindness identified in children with CZS. Copyright © 2017 American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The Perlman syndrome: familial renal dysplasia with Wilms tumor, fetal gigantism and multiple congenital anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neri, G; Martini-Neri, M E; Katz, B E; Opitz, J M

    1984-09-01

    We describe a familial syndrome of renal dysplasia, Wilms tumor, hyperplasia of the endocrine pancreas, fetal gigantism, multiple congenital anomalies and mental retardation. This condition was previously described by Perlman et al [1973, 1975] and we propose to call it the "Perlman syndrome." It appears to be transmitted as an autosomal recessive trait. The possible relationships between dysplasia, neoplasia and malformation are discussed.

  7. Bilateral Wyburn-Mason Syndrome presenting as acute subarachnoid haemorrhage - a very rare congenital neurocutaneuos disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cortnum, Søren Ole Stigaard; Sørensen, Preben; Andresen, J

    2008-01-01

    . Wyburn-Mason syndrome is a very rare congenital neurocutaneuos disorder comprising of vascular malformations of the retina, ipsilateral cerebral AVMs and occasionally lesions in the oronasopharyngeal area. Subarachnoid haemorrhage associated with Wyburn-Mason syndrome has been described in only 5...

  8. Congenital stapes malformation: Rare conductive hearing loss in a patient with Waardenburg syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melzer, Jonathan M; Eliason, Michael; Conley, George S

    2016-04-01

    Waardenburg syndrome is a known autosomal dominant cause of congenital hearing loss. It is characterized by a distinctive phenotypic appearance and often involves sensorineural hearing loss. Temporal bone abnormalities and inner ear dysmorphisms have been described in association with the disease. However, middle ear abnormalities as causes of conductive hearing loss are not typically seen in Waardenburg syndrome. We discuss a case of an 8-year-old female who meets diagnostic criteria for Waardenburg syndrome type 3 and who presented with a bilateral conductive hearing loss associated with congenital stapes fixation. We discuss management strategy in this previously unreported phenotype. © 2015 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  9. Congenital yellow nail syndrome: a case report and its relationship to nonimmune fetal hydrops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanda, Arti; Al-Essa, Fahad H; El-Shafei, Wael M; Alsaleh, Qasem A

    2010-01-01

    Yellow nail syndrome (YNS) is an uncommon disorder characterized by a triad of nail dystrophy, lymphedema, and pleural effusion. It is rare in children and congenital occurrence of YNS has been very rarely described. We report a 2-year-old Arab boy having congenital yellow nail syndrome with mild facial dysmorphism and bilateral conjunctival pigmentation born to consanguineous parents. One of his older siblings had died of nonimmune fetal hydrops (NIFH). The case supports the genetic basis of yellow nail syndrome with a possible relationship to nonimmune fetal hydrops. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Echocardiographic findings in infants with presumed congenital Zika syndrome: Retrospective case series study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Cleusa C.; Feitosa, Fabiana G.; Ribeiro, Maria C.; Menge, Paulo; Lira, Izabelle M.

    2017-01-01

    Objective To report the echocardiographic evaluation of 103 infants with presumed congenital Zika syndrome. Methods An observational retrospective study was performed at Instituto de Medicina Integral Prof. Fernando Figueira (IMIP), Recife, Brazil. 103 infants with presumed congenital Zika syndrome. All infants had microcephaly and head computed tomography findings compatible with congenital Zika syndrome. Zika IgM antibody was detected in cerebrospinal fluid samples of 23 infants. In 80 infants, the test was not performed because it was not available at that time. All infants had negative serology for HIV, syphilis, rubella, cytomegalovirus and toxoplasmosis. A complete transthoracic two-dimensional, M-mode, continuous wave and pulsed wave Doppler and color Doppler echocardiographic (PHILIPS HD11XE or HD15) examination was performed on all infants. Results 14/103 (13.5%) echocardiograms were compatible with congenital heart disease: 5 with an ostium secundum atrial septal defect, 8 had a hemodynamically insignificant small apical muscular ventricular septal defect and one infant with dyspnea had a large membranous ventricular septal defect. The echocardiograms considered normal included 45 infants with a persistent foramen ovale and 16 with a minimum patent ductus arteriosus. Conclusions Preliminarily this study suggests that congenital Zika syndrome may be associated with an increase prevalence of congenital heart disease. However the types of defects noted were septal defects, a proportion of which would not be hemodynamically significant. PMID:28426680

  11. Echocardiographic findings in infants with presumed congenital Zika syndrome: Retrospective case series study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle Di Cavalcanti

    Full Text Available To report the echocardiographic evaluation of 103 infants with presumed congenital Zika syndrome.An observational retrospective study was performed at Instituto de Medicina Integral Prof. Fernando Figueira (IMIP, Recife, Brazil. 103 infants with presumed congenital Zika syndrome. All infants had microcephaly and head computed tomography findings compatible with congenital Zika syndrome. Zika IgM antibody was detected in cerebrospinal fluid samples of 23 infants. In 80 infants, the test was not performed because it was not available at that time. All infants had negative serology for HIV, syphilis, rubella, cytomegalovirus and toxoplasmosis. A complete transthoracic two-dimensional, M-mode, continuous wave and pulsed wave Doppler and color Doppler echocardiographic (PHILIPS HD11XE or HD15 examination was performed on all infants.14/103 (13.5% echocardiograms were compatible with congenital heart disease: 5 with an ostium secundum atrial septal defect, 8 had a hemodynamically insignificant small apical muscular ventricular septal defect and one infant with dyspnea had a large membranous ventricular septal defect. The echocardiograms considered normal included 45 infants with a persistent foramen ovale and 16 with a minimum patent ductus arteriosus.Preliminarily this study suggests that congenital Zika syndrome may be associated with an increase prevalence of congenital heart disease. However the types of defects noted were septal defects, a proportion of which would not be hemodynamically significant.

  12. Pulmonary Hypertension in Congenital Heart Disease: Beyond Eisenmenger Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieger, Eric V; Leary, Peter J; Opotowsky, Alexander R

    2015-11-01

    Patients with adult congenital heart disease have an increased risk of developing pulmonary hypertension. There are several mechanisms of pulmonary hypertension in patients with adult congenital heart disease, and understanding them requires a systematic approach to define the patient's hemodynamics and physiology. This article reviews the updated classification of pulmonary hypertension in patients with adult congenital heart disease with a focus on pathophysiology, diagnostics, and the evaluation of pulmonary hypertension in special adult congenital heart disease populations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Bartter syndrome type III and congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract: an antenatal presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westland, Rik; Hack, Wilfried W; van der Horst, Henricus J R; Uittenbogaard, Lukas B; van Hagen, Johanna M; van der Valk, Paul; Kamsteeg, Erik J; van den Heuvel, Lambert P; van Wijk, Joanna A E

    2012-12-01

    Bartter syndrome encompasses a variety of inheritable renal tubular transport disorders characterized by hypokalemia and hypochloremic metabolic alkalosis. Bartter syndrome Type III is caused by genetic alterations in the chloride channel kidney B (CLCNKB) gene and often presents in the first 2 years of life, known as classic Bartter syndrome. However, in rare cases Bartter syndrome Type III has an antenatal presentation with polyhydramnios, premature delivery and severe dehydration in the first weeks of life. Associations between congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract and Bartter syndrome are extremely rare. This case report presents a girl with Bartter syndrome Type III due to a homozygous CLCNKB mutation and bilateral congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract. In addition, we describe the antenatal presentation as well as its perinatal management.

  14. Management of laryngomalacia in children with congenital syndrome: the role of supraglottoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escher, Anette; Probst, Rudolf; Gysin, Claudine

    2015-04-01

    Supraglottoplasty is the surgical procedure of choice for severe laryngomalacia and has shown to be successful in most cases; however, patients with medical comorbidities present a higher rate of failure. To date, the best management of laryngomalacia in children with congenital syndrome remains unclear. To study the outcome of supraglottoplasty in children with severe laryngomalacia, and to analyze the management and outcome in infants with a congenital syndrome. Retrospective medical records review from January 2003 to October 2012 of all patients who underwent laser supraglottoplasty for severe laryngomalacia at the University Children's Hospital Zurich, Switzerland. Thirty-one patients were included; median age at time of surgery was 3.5 months. Three patients (10%) had a genetically proven congenital syndrome with associated neurologic anomalies. Overall success rate was 87%. Failures were observed in four (13%) of 31 cases; including all three patients presenting a congenital syndrome. Supraglottoplasty is an effective and safe treatment for laryngomalacia in otherwise healthy children. Signs of a possible underlying predominant neurologic origin and discrepancy between the clinical presentation and the endoscopic findings have to be taken into account, as in children with congenital syndrome with neurologic anomalies the risk of failure is higher. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Muscle-Eye-Brain Disease; a Rare Form of Syndromic Congenital Muscular Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gosal Gurinder S

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Congenital muscular dystrophy (CMD is a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by muscular hypotonia since birth and the histologic features of muscular dystrophy. Syndromic congenital muscular dystrophies are clinically similar autosomal recessive disorders characterized by congenital muscular dystrophy, lissencephaly, and eye anomalies. We present a case of a rare form of syndromic congenital muscular dystrophy in an eight year old girl, born of first- degree consanguinity. She had: global developmental delay; a seizure disorder; hypotonia; progressive muscle contractures including bilateral symmetrical flexion contractures of hips, knees, equinus contracture and thoracolumbar scoliosis; diminished deep tendon reflexes: bilateral premature cataract; pseudophakia; and nystagmus. The patient was also highly myopic. Based on clinical features, muscle biopsy and MRI of the brain, a diagnosis of muscle- eye- brain disease was made. Identification of these patients may help to prevent this crippling disorder in the future siblings of probands by utilizing genetic counselling and mutation analysis.

  16. Congenital malformations of hands and feet in Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Kovalenko-Klychkova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome is rare genetic disorder with multiple limb malformations and neurological manifestation, caused by inborn defect of cholesterol metabolism. Congenital deformities of feet and hands are most common orthopedic symptoms in this syndrome. Description of a girl with Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome demonstrates specific features of this disorder and emphasize the importance of proper interpretation of orthopedic malformations for early diagnosis of genetic conditions.

  17. [Good's syndrome and congenital toxoplasmosis due to maternal reactivation during pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahiri, J; Fouyssac, F; Morel, O; Maatouk, A

    2017-05-01

    Good syndrome is a rare condition in which thymoma is associated with hypogammaglobulinemia. It is characterized by an increased susceptibility to infections. We report a woman with Good's syndrome diagnosed after severe congenital toxoplasmosis in her daughter, even though she was immunized against this infection during pregnancy. This presentation is very unusual by its early diagnosis and to our knowledge is the first report of parasitic infection in this syndrome. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  18. The neuropathology of hereditary congenital facial palsy vs Mobius syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verzijl, H.T.F.M.; Zwaag, B. van der; Lammens, M.M.Y.; Donkelaar, H.J. ten; Padberg, G.W.A.M.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To characterize the neuropathology of hereditary congenital facial palsy. METHODS: The authors compared brainstem pathology of three members of one family with autosomal dominant congenital facial palsy to that in three age-matched controls. The neuropathologic findings of the familial

  19. Congenital mydriasis and prune belly syndrome in a child with an ACTA2 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodsky, Michael C; Turan, Kadriye Erkan; Khanna, Cheryl L; Patton, Alice; Kirmani, Salman

    2014-08-01

    We report the association of congenital mydriasis with prune belly syndrome and cerebrovascular anomalies in a 9-year-old boy who was found to have an ACTA2 mutation. This case illustrates the spectrum of systemic malformations that are attributable to mutations in ACTA2 and expands the spectrum of cerebrovascular anomalies that are now known to accompany congenital mydriasis. Copyright © 2014 American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Congenital pouch colon syndrome: A report of 17 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhat, Nisar Ahmad

    2007-01-01

    Congenital pouch syndrome (CPC) is rare condition seen in an association with anorectal malformation that occurs almost exclusively in northern India. We viewed cases seen in our institution to study aspects of clinical presentation, diagnosis, embryogeneis, and management and raise awareness of this relatively frequent entity. From March 2002 to September 2004, 17 neonates/infants (11 males and 6 females) treated for CPC associated with anorectal malformations included 13 with type IV and 4 with type I CPC. Diagnosis was made by a single large air-fluid level on the infantogram occupying more than 50% of the entire abdominal dimension. In all patients, the pouch had fistulous communication with the genitourinary system, and there were other associated anomalies as well. Of 13 patients with pouch colon type IV, 11 neonates underwent laparotomy, ligation of the fistula, excision of the colonic pouch and end colostomy as a stage I procedure. Subsequently, these patients underwent definitive surgery, i.e. abdominal posterior sagittal anorectoplasty (AP-PSARP), with or without covering colostomy. Two of the 4 patients with type I CPC underwent laparotomy, ligation of the fistula and colorrhaphy as a first-stage operation before AP-PSARP. In our series, 4 patients were diagnosed intraoperatively and were treated in accordance with their operative findings. Post-operatively, there were no major complications except wound infection in some patients. There was one death that was not related to surgery. There are variants of the anomaly, but the possibility of CPC needs to be kept in mind as a possible association with anorectal malformations. (author)

  1. Congenital Myasthenic Syndrome in a Mixed Breed Dog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theresa J. Blakey

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A 6-month-old, male, intact mixed breed dog was presented for a 3-month history of progressive generalized weakness. Neurologic examination revealed non-ambulatory tetraparesis, weakness of the head and neck, and decreased withdrawal reflexes in all limbs consistent with a generalized neuromuscular disorder. Electromyography and motor nerve conduction velocity were normal. Repetitive nerve stimulation showed a decremental response of the compound muscle action potential with improvement upon intravenous administration of edrophonium chloride. The serum acetylcholine receptor (AChR antibody titer was within reference range. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis was unremarkable. A presumptive diagnosis of post-synaptic congenital myasthenic syndrome (CMS was made. Treatment with pyridostigmine bromide was initiated with titrated increases in dosage resulting in an incomplete improvement in clinical signs. The dog was euthanized 2 months after initiation of treatment due to poor quality of life. Immunostaining for localization of antibodies against end-plate proteins in muscle biopsies was negative. Immunofluorescence staining for AChRs in external intercostal muscle biopsies showed absence of AChRs and biochemical quantitation showed a markedly decreased concentration of AChRs with no detectable AChR-bound autoantibody which confirmed the diagnosis of a CMS. Evaluation for the CHRNE mutation previously identified as the causative mutation of CMS in Jack Russell Terriers was performed and was negative. This is the first reported confirmed case of CMS in a mixed breed dog and provides a review of typical clinical and diagnostic findings as well as treatment considerations.

  2. MR imaging appearance of laryngeal atresia (congenital high airway obstruction syndrome): unique course in a fetus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuwashima, Shigeko; Kitajima, Kazuhiro; Kaji, Yasushi [Dokkyo Medical University, Department of Radiology, Mibu, Shimotsuga-gun, Tochigi (Japan); Watanabe, Hiroshi [Dokkyo Medical University, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Mibu (Japan); Watabe, Yoshiyuki; Suzumura, Hiroshi [Dokkyo Medical University, Department of Pediatrics, Mibu (Japan)

    2008-03-15

    Congenital high airway obstruction syndrome (CHAOS) is a rare life-threatening syndrome. Most cases are diagnosed prenatally by US. We report a fetus with this syndrome that showed a unique course revealed on MRI. Ultrasonography at 22 weeks demonstrated that the fetus had ascites and bilaterally enlarged hyperechoic lungs. Congenital infection, congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation or CHAOS was suspected. Subsequent MRI performed at 24 weeks demonstrated bilaterally enlarged high-signal lungs, dilated bronchi, massive ascites, subcutaneous oedema and polyhydramnios. MRI confirmed the diagnosis of CHAOS. A second MRI at 35 weeks showed that the bilateral lung enlargement, ascites, oedema and polyhydramnios had resolved, but that the appearance of the airway was unchanged. The infant was delivered by caesarean section at 38 weeks of gestation and immediate tracheostomy was performed. This spontaneous regression was explained by a tracheo-oesophageal fistula that may have decreased the intrathoracic pressure. (orig.)

  3. MR imaging appearance of laryngeal atresia (congenital high airway obstruction syndrome): unique course in a fetus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuwashima, Shigeko; Kitajima, Kazuhiro; Kaji, Yasushi; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Watabe, Yoshiyuki; Suzumura, Hiroshi

    2008-01-01

    Congenital high airway obstruction syndrome (CHAOS) is a rare life-threatening syndrome. Most cases are diagnosed prenatally by US. We report a fetus with this syndrome that showed a unique course revealed on MRI. Ultrasonography at 22 weeks demonstrated that the fetus had ascites and bilaterally enlarged hyperechoic lungs. Congenital infection, congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation or CHAOS was suspected. Subsequent MRI performed at 24 weeks demonstrated bilaterally enlarged high-signal lungs, dilated bronchi, massive ascites, subcutaneous oedema and polyhydramnios. MRI confirmed the diagnosis of CHAOS. A second MRI at 35 weeks showed that the bilateral lung enlargement, ascites, oedema and polyhydramnios had resolved, but that the appearance of the airway was unchanged. The infant was delivered by caesarean section at 38 weeks of gestation and immediate tracheostomy was performed. This spontaneous regression was explained by a tracheo-oesophageal fistula that may have decreased the intrathoracic pressure. (orig.)

  4. Left ventricular epicardial activation increases transmural dispersion of repolarization in healthy, long QT, and dilated cardiomyopathy dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Rong; Lü, Jiagao; Pu, Jun; Liu, Nian; Zhou, Qiang; Ruan, Yanfei; Niu, Huiyan; Zhang, Cuntai; Wang, Lin; Kam, Ruth

    2005-10-01

    Benefits of cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) are well established. However, less is understood concerning its effects on myocardial repolarization and the potential proarrhythmic risk. Healthy dogs (n = 8) were compared to a long QT interval (LQT) model (n = 8, induced by cesium chloride, CsCl) and a dilated cardiomyopathy with congestive heart failure (DCM-CHF, induced by rapid ventricular pacing, n = 5). Monophasic action potential (MAP) recordings were obtained from the subendocardium, midmyocardium, subepicardium, and the transmural dispersion of repolarization (TDR) was calculated. The QT interval and the interval from the peak to the end of the T wave (T(p-e)) were measured. All these characteristics were compared during left ventricular epicardial (LV-Epi), right ventricular endocardial (RV-Endo), and biventricular (Bi-V) pacing. In healthy dogs, TDR prolonged to 37.54 ms for Bi-V pacing and to 47.16 ms for LV-Epi pacing as compared to 26.75 ms for RV-Endo pacing (P canine models in addition to their intrinsic transmural heterogeneity in the intact heart. This mechanism may contribute to the development of malignant ventricular arrhythmias, such as torsades de pointes (TdP) in congestive heart failure (CHF) patients treated with CRT.

  5. Dynamics in prevalence of Down syndrome in children with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfitzer, Constanze; Helm, Paul C; Rosenthal, Lisa-Maria; Berger, Felix; Bauer, Ulrike M M; Schmitt, Katharina Rl

    2018-01-01

    We assessed the dynamics in the prevalence of children with congenital heart disease (CHD) and Down syndrome in Germany with regard to phenotype, severity, and gender. Data from patients with CHD and Down syndrome born between 1980 and 2014 were analyzed, who are registered with the German National Register for Congenital Heart Defects. One thousand six hundred eighteen CHD patients with Down syndrome were identified. The prevalence of children born with both Down syndrome and CHD was constant from 2005 to 2009 but increased from 2010 to 2014. Regarding CHD groups, complex and simple lesions have become more equal since 2005. The number of simple lesions with shunt has a peak prevalence in the period of 2010-2014. Atrioventricular septal defect was the most common CHD phenotype, but temporal changes were found within the group of CHD phenotypes over the observation period. Our findings suggest a growing number of CHD and Down syndrome, which may be the result of improved medical management and progress in educational, social, and financial support. This development is noteworthy as it adds new aspects to present discussions in the media and political settings. What is known: • Congenital heart disease is regarded to be the most important clinical phenomenon in children with Down syndrome, due to its significant impact on morbidity and mortality. • New developments in prenatal diagnostic and therapy management of congenital heart disease continue to influence the number of patients diagnosed with congenital heart disease and Down syndrome. What is New: • This study provides essential data giving the first overview of the dynamics in the prevalence of congenital heart disease and Down syndrome over an extended length of time up to 2015 in a large patient cohort, taking recent developments into account. • Our data suggest a growing prevalence of congenital heart disease and Down syndrome, which may be the result of improved medical management for Down syndrome

  6. COLQ-mutant congenital myasthenic syndrome with microcephaly: A unique case with literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Mobarak Sulaiman Bazee

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Congenital Myasthenic Syndrome (CMS is a group of inherited neuromuscular junction disorders caused by defects in several genes. Clinical features include delayed motor milestones, recurrent respiratory illnesses and variable fatigable weakness. The central nervous system involvement is typically not part of the CMS. We report here a Saudi girl with genetically proven Collagen Like Tail Subunit Of Asymmetric Acetylcholinesterase (COLQ mutation type CMS who has global developmental delay, microcephaly and respiratory failure. We have reviewed the literature regarding COLQ-type CMS and to the best of our knowledge this is the first ever reported association of congenital myasthenia syndrome with microcephaly.

  7. Parenting Styles and the Depressive Syndrome in Congenitally Blind Individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Robert; West, Malcolm

    1980-01-01

    The article discusses the effect on congenitally blind children of three types of parents: those who are overprotective, those who push the child toward independence too soon, and those who are "good enough." (Author)

  8. Agrin mutations lead to a congenital myasthenic syndrome with distal muscle weakness and atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicole, Sophie; Chaouch, Amina; Torbergsen, Torberg; Bauché, Stéphanie; de Bruyckere, Elodie; Fontenille, Marie-Joséphine; Horn, Morten A; van Ghelue, Marijke; Løseth, Sissel; Issop, Yasmin; Cox, Daniel; Müller, Juliane S; Evangelista, Teresinha; Stålberg, Erik; Ioos, Christine; Barois, Annie; Brochier, Guy; Sternberg, Damien; Fournier, Emmanuel; Hantaï, Daniel; Abicht, Angela; Dusl, Marina; Laval, Steven H; Griffin, Helen; Eymard, Bruno; Lochmüller, Hanns

    2014-09-01

    Congenital myasthenic syndromes are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of rare diseases resulting from impaired neuromuscular transmission. Their clinical hallmark is fatigable muscle weakness associated with a decremental muscle response to repetitive nerve stimulation and frequently related to postsynaptic defects. Distal myopathies form another clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of primary muscle disorders where weakness and atrophy are restricted to distal muscles, at least initially. In both congenital myasthenic syndromes and distal myopathies, a significant number of patients remain genetically undiagnosed. Here, we report five patients from three unrelated families with a strikingly homogenous clinical entity combining congenital myasthenia with distal muscle weakness and atrophy reminiscent of a distal myopathy. MRI and neurophysiological studies were compatible with mild myopathy restricted to distal limb muscles, but decrement (up to 72%) in response to 3 Hz repetitive nerve stimulation pointed towards a neuromuscular transmission defect. Post-exercise increment (up to 285%) was observed in the distal limb muscles in all cases suggesting presynaptic congenital myasthenic syndrome. Immunofluorescence and ultrastructural analyses of muscle end-plate regions showed synaptic remodelling with denervation-reinnervation events. We performed whole-exome sequencing in two kinships and Sanger sequencing in one isolated case and identified five new recessive mutations in the gene encoding agrin. This synaptic proteoglycan with critical function at the neuromuscular junction was previously found mutated in more typical forms of congenital myasthenic syndrome. In our patients, we found two missense mutations residing in the N-terminal agrin domain, which reduced acetylcholine receptors clustering activity of agrin in vitro. Our findings expand the spectrum of congenital myasthenic syndromes due to agrin mutations and show an unexpected

  9. The Perlman syndrome: familial renal dysplasia with Wilms tumor, fetal gigantism and multiple congenital anomalies. 1984.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neri, Giovanni; Martini-Neri, Maria Enrica; Katz, Ben E; Opitz, John M

    2013-11-01

    The ensuing paper by Professor Giovanni Neri and colleagues was originally published in 1984, American Journal of Medical Genetics 19:195–207. The original article described a new family with a condition that the authors designated as the Perlman syndrome. This disorder, while uncommon, is an important multiple congenital anomaly and dysplasia syndrome; the causative gene was recently identified. This paper is a seminal work and is graciously republished by Wiley-Blackwell in the Special Festschrift issue honoring Professor Neri. We describe a familial syndrome of renal dysplasia, Wilms tumor, hyperplasia of the endocrine pancreas, fetal gigantism, multiple congenital anomalies and mental retardation. This condition was previously described by Perlman et al. [1973, 1975] and we propose to call it the "Perlman syndrome." It appears to be transmitted as an autosomal recessive trait. The possible relationships between dysplasia, neoplasia and malformation are discussed. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Syndromic Hirschsprung's disease and associated congenital heart disease: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duess, Johannes W; Puri, Prem

    2015-08-01

    Hirschsprung's disease (HD) occurs as an isolated phenotype in 70% of infants and is associated with additional congenital anomalies or syndromes in approximately 30% of patients. The cardiac development depends on neural crest cell proliferation and is closely related to the formation of the enteric nervous system. HD associated with congenital heart disease (CHD) has been reported in 5-8% of cases, with septation defects being the most frequently recorded abnormalities. However, the prevalence of HD associated with CHD in infants with syndromic disorders is not well documented. This systematic review was designed to determine the prevalence of CHD in syndromic HD. A systematic review of the literature using the keywords "Hirschsprung's disease", "aganglionosis", "congenital megacolon", "congenital heart disease" and "congenital heart defect" was performed. Resulting publications were reviewed for epidemiology and morbidity. Reference lists were screened for additional relevant studies. A total of fifty-two publications from 1963 to 2014 reported data on infants with HD associated with CHD. The overall reported prevalence of HD associated with CHD in infants without chromosomal disorders was 3%. In infants with syndromic disorders, the overall prevalence of HD associated with CHD ranged from 20 to 80 % (overall prevalence 51%). Septation defects were recorded in 57% (atrial septal defects in 29%, ventricular septal defects in 32%), a patent ductus arteriosus in 39%, vascular abnormalities in 16%, valvular heart defects in 4% and Tetralogy of Fallot in 7%. The prevalence of HD associated with CHD is much higher in infants with chromosomal disorders compared to infants without associated syndromes. A routine echocardiogram should be performed in all infants with syndromic HD to exclude cardiac abnormalities.

  11. Emergence of Epidemic Zika Virus Transmission and Congenital Zika Syndrome: Are Recently Evolved Traits to Blame?

    OpenAIRE

    Scott C. Weaver

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The mechanisms responsible for the dramatic emergence of Zika virus (ZIKV), accompanied by congenital Zika syndrome and Guillain-Barr? syndrome (GBS), remain unclear. However, two hypotheses are prominent: (i) evolution for enhanced urban transmission via adaptation to mosquito vectors, or for enhanced human infection to increase amplification, or (ii) the stochastic introduction of ZIKV into large, naive human populations in regions with abundant Aedes aegypti populations, leading t...

  12. Congenital glaucoma as an ophthalmic manifestation of Frank-Ter Haar syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aktas, Zeynep; Karaca, Emine Esra; Dogan, Nurcan; Çakmak, Tugba; Unlu, Metin; Tok, Levent; Hasanreisoglu, Murat

    2014-04-01

    We report on a patient with Frank-Ter Haar syndrome that is associated with high intraocular pressures. A 21-day-old male patient was referred to our clinic for surgical treatment of congenital glaucoma. On ophthalmic examination, he had buphthalmos, mild corneal edema and high IOP readings in both eyes. The patient underwent uneventful trabeculotomy surgery, bilaterally. Marked bilateral anterior iris insertion was noted during the surgery. Childhood glaucoma may be associated with Frank-Ter Haar syndrome.

  13. Congenital varicella syndrome: cranial MRI in a long-term survivor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deasy, N.P.; Jarosz, J.M.; Cox, T.C.S.; Hughes, E.

    1999-01-01

    Congenital varicella syndrome is a rare disorder which follows maternal infection in the first or early second trimester. The syndrome comprises a number of malformations including microcephaly, cortical destruction and limb hypoplasia. We describe a case where there has been long-term survival following second trimester maternal infection. The clinical findings, including the characteristic lower limb hypoplasia, are documented, as are the appearances on cranial MRI indicating an encephaloclastic porencephaly. (orig.) (orig.)

  14. A unique case of Shwachman-Diamond syndrome presenting with congenital hypopituitarism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jivani, Nurin; Torrado-Jule, Carmen; Vaiselbuh, Sarah; Romanos-Sirakis, Eleny

    2016-11-01

    Shwachman-Diamond syndrome (SDS) is an autosomal recessive bone marrow failure syndrome typically characterized by neutropenia and pancreatic dysfunction, although phenotypic presentations vary, and the endocrine phenotype is not well-described. We report a unique case of a patient with SDS who initially presented with hypoglycemia and micropenis in the newborn period and was diagnosed with congenital hypopituitarism. We are not aware of any other cases of SDS documented with this combination of complex endocrinopathies.

  15. Variants in SLC18A3, vesicular acetylcholine transporter, cause congenital myasthenic syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O'Grady, Gina L.; Verschuuren, Corien; Yuen, Michaela; Webster, Richard; Menezes, Manoj; Fock, Johanna M.; Pride, Natalie; Best, Heather A.; Damm, Tatiana Benavides; Turner, Christian; Lek, Monkol; Engel, Andrew G.; North, Kathryn N.; Clarke, Nigel F.; MacArthur, Daniel G.; Kamsteeg, Erik-Jan; Cooper, Sandra T.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To describe the clinical and genetic characteristics of presynaptic congenital myasthenic syndrome secondary to biallelic variants in SLC18A3. Methods: Individuals from 2 families were identified with biallelic variants in SLC18A3, the gene encoding the vesicular acetylcholine transporter

  16. Brugada syndrome and calcium channel mutation in a patient with congenital deaf mutism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uğur Canpolat

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available To the best of our knowledge, for the first time in the literature, we described a congenitally deaf-mute patient with Brugada syndrome (BrS in whom a mutation in L-type Ca+2 channel [CACNA1C (Cav1.2α1] was identified.

  17. Ichthyosis prematurity syndrome: a well-defined congenital ichthyosis subtype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bygum, Anette; Westermark, Per; Brandrup, Flemming

    2008-01-01

    Ichthyosis prematurity syndrome is a rare syndrome characterized by the clinical triad of premature birth, thick caseous desquamating epidermis, and neonatal asphyxia. We describe two siblings with ichthyosis prematurity syndrome. The index patient was born at gestational week 34. Immediately aft...... in the stratum corneum and stratum granulosum. Diagnosing this syndrome is important to reassure parents, obstetricians, and pediatricians about its benign course after complications in the perinatal period....

  18. Hereditary syndromes associated with the congenital heart diseases in Azerbaijan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Gadzhieva

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This article is devoted to the study of the incidence and structure of the genetic syndromes associated with congenital heart diseases in Azerbaijan. The results of observation of 430 children with congenital heart diseases, which have been stayed in the Child Department of Scientific Surgery Center named after Academician M.A. Topchubashov during 2010-2015 period, have been analyzed. It was demonstrated that the incidence of the chromosomal and monogenic pathological conditions is 6.5±1.2% (28 children among the above population. The chromosomal syndromes were diagnosed in 20 (4.7±1.0% children, monogenic ones – in 8 (1.9+0.7% children. The chromosomal pathological condition was mostly presented with the Down’s syndrome (in 12 patents. As to the monogenic syndromes, it was mostly the heterotoxic syndrome (4 children. These data testify that in spite of the multifactorial genesis of the most of the congenital heart diseases and role of the unfavorable factors of the antenatal period, the genetic component influences with a great importance upon the prevalence rate of the malformations. 

  19. During childhood unrecognized congenital heart defect in patient with Turner syndrome, and its implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klaskova, E.; Kapralova, S.; Zapletalova, J.; Tuedoes, Z.

    2015-01-01

    Congenital heart disease affects approximately 50 % of individuals with Turner syndrome (TS). Bicuspid aortic valve, aortic coarctation, ascending aorta dilatation and arterial hypertension are important risk factors for life-threatening aortic dissection or rupture. Authors discuss the importance of a careful cardiac examination including cardiac magnetic resonance imaging study and life-long follow-up by experienced cardiologist in TS patients, and point out high maternal mortality and morbidity during pregnancy. They present a case report of woman with TS and the above-mentioned in childhood unrecognized congenital heart defects that underwent infertility treatment without pre conceptional counselling focused on cardiovascular risk for aortic dissection. (author)

  20. Congenital leukemoid reaction followed by fatal leukemia. A case with Down's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, H P; Menaka, H; Lim, K H; Yong, H S

    1980-10-01

    A serial clinical, hematologic, and cytogenetic study was done on a baby with Down's syndrome in whom a myeloid leukemoid reaction developed at birth that spontaneously regressed within a month only to relapse two years later to an acute undifferentiated stem cell leukemia. He died 1 1/2 months after onset. The unresolved controversy of the diagnosis of the congenital leukemia-like state is discussed. The importance of following up such patients with apparent remission of their congenital leukemia-like disorder is emphasized.

  1. LATE POTENTIALS IN A BRADYCARDIA-DEPENDENT LONG QT-SYNDROME ASSOCIATED WITH SUDDEN-DEATH DURING SLEEP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    TOBE, TJM; DELANGEN, CDJ; BINKBOELKENS, MTE; MOOK, PH; VIERSMA, JW; LIE, KI; WESSELING, H

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence of late potentials and their relation to QT prolongation in a family with a high incidence of sudden death during sleep at a young age and bradycardia-dependent QT prolongation (n = 9) and to compare the findings with those in consanguineous

  2. Antiarrhythmic properties of a rapid delayed-rectifier current activator in rabbit models of acquired long QT syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diness, Thomas G; Yeh, Yung-Hsin; Qi, Xiao Yan

    2008-01-01

    effect of a novel compound (NS1643) that activates the rapid delayed-rectifier K+ current, I(Kr), in two rabbit models of acquired LQTS. METHODS AND RESULTS: We used two clinically relevant in vivo rabbit models of TdP in which we infused NS1643 or vehicle: (i) three-week atrioventricular block...

  3. A common single nucleotide polymorphism can exacerbate long-QT type 2 syndrome leading to sudden infant death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nof, Eyal; Cordeiro, Jonathan M; Pérez, Guillermo J

    2010-01-01

    the mother (both asymptomatic), led to 2 cases of sudden infant death. METHODS AND RESULTS: KCNQ1, KCNH2, SCN5A, KCNE1, KCNE2, CACNA1c, CACNB2b, and KCNJ2 genes were amplified and analyzed by direct sequencing. Functional electrophysiological studies were performed with the single nucleotide polymorphism...... and mutation expressed singly and in combination in Chinese ovary (CHO-K1) and COS-1 cells. An asymptomatic woman presenting after the death of her 2-day-old infant and spontaneous abortion of a second baby in the first trimester was referred for genetic analysis. The newborn infant had nearly incessant...... ventricular tachycardia while in utero and a prolonged QTc (560 ms). The mother was asymptomatic but displayed a prolonged QTc. Genetic screening of the mother revealed a heterozygous nonsense mutation (P926AfsX14) in KCNH2, predicting a stop codon. The father was asymptomatic with a normal QTc but had...

  4. High Prevalence of Long QT Syndrome Associated SCN5A Variants in Patients with Early-Onset Lone Atrial Fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Morten S; Yuan, Lei; Liang, Bo

    2012-01-01

    a mechanistic overlap between LQTS3 and early-onset lone AF. In 9 of 10 identified mutations and rare variants, we observed compromised biophysical properties affecting the transient peak current. CONCLUSIONS: In a cohort of patients with early-onset lone AF, we identified a high prevalence of SCN5A mutations...

  5. Partial subclavian steal syndrome in a congenitally anomalous subclavian artery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krnic, A.; Sucic, Z.; Vucic, N.; Krolo, I.

    2006-01-01

    Background. A subclavian steal syndrome results from the abnormal flow of blood due to the occlusion in the subclavian artery proximal to the origin of the vertebral artery. A case of a male patient with a partial subclavian steal syndrome is presented. Case report. The syndrome was caused by a stenotic lesion of an aberrant right subclavian artery (the so called lusorian artery). The partial subclavian steal was recognized using the duplex ultrasound which showed the to and fro pattern in the right vertebral artery. Angiography of the aortic arch revealed the arterial anomaly. In our case, duplex ultrasound was a crucial method in diagnosing the partial subclavian steal syndrome. However, in order to show the arterial anomaly, the final evaluation had to be performed using arteriography. Conclusions. The early recognized partial subclavian steal syndrome provides good understanding of patient's symptoms, successful follow up, and a variety of treatment options. (author)

  6. Congenital rubella syndrome surveillance as a platform for surveillance of other congenital infections, Peru, 2004-2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittembury, Alvaro; Galdos, Jorge; Lugo, María; Suárez-Ognio, Luis; Ortiz, Ana; Cabezudo, Edwin; Martínez, Mario; Castillo-Solórzano, Carlos; Andrus, Jon Kim

    2011-09-01

    Rubella during pregnancy can cause serious fetal abnormalities and death. Peru has had integrated measles/rubella surveillance since 2000 but did not implement congenital rubella syndrome (CRS) surveillance until 2004, in accordance with the Pan American Health Organization recommendations for rubella elimination. The article describes the experience from the CRS sentinel surveillance system in Peru. Peru has maintained a national sentinel surveillance system for reporting confirmed and suspected CRS cases since 2004. A surveillance protocol was implemented with standardized case definitions and instruments in the selected sentinel sites. Each sentinel site completes their case investigations and report forms and sends the reports to the Health Region Epidemiology Department, which forwards the data to the national Epidemiology Department. CRS surveillance data were analyzed for the period 2004-2007. During the period 2004-2007, 16 health facilities, which are located in 9 of the 33 health regions, representing the 3 main geographical areas (coast, mountain, and jungle), were included as sentinel sites for the CRS surveillance. A total of 2061 suspected CRS cases were reported to the system. Of these, 11 were classified as CRS and 23 as congenital rubella infection. Factors significantly associated with rubella vertical transmission were: (1) in the mother, maternal history of rash during pregnancy (odds ratio [OR], 12.0; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.8-37.8); (2) and in the infant, pigmentary retinopathy (OR, 18.4; 95% CI, 3.2-104.6), purpura (OR, 14.7; 95% CI, 2.8-78.3), and developmental delay (OR, 4.4; 95% CI, 1.75-11.1). The surveillance system has been able to identify rubella vertical transmission, reinforcing the evidence that rubella was a public health problem in Peru. This system may serve as a platform to implement surveillance for other congenital infections in Peru.

  7. Pseudo-Bartter syndrome in an infant with congenital chloride diarrhoea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igrutinović Zoran

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Pseudo-Bartter syndrome encompasses a heterogenous group of disorders similar to Bartter syndrome. We are presenting an infant with pseudo-Bartter syndrome caused by congenital chloride diarrhoea. Case Outline. A male newborn born in the 37th gestational week (GW to young healthy and non-consanguineous parents. In the 35th GW a polyhydramnios with bowel dilatation was verified by ultrasonography. After birth he manifested several episodes of hyponatremic dehydration with hypochloraemia, hypokalaemia and metabolic alkalosis, so as Bartter syndrome was suspected treatment with indomethacin, spironolactone and additional intake of NaCl was initiated. However, this therapy gave no results, so that at age six months he was rehospitalized under the features of persistent watery diarrhoea, vomiting, dehydration and acute renal failure (serum creatinine 123 μmol/L. The laboratory results showed hyponatraemia (123 mmol/L, hypokalaemia (3.1 mmol/L, severe hypochloraemia (43 mmol/L, alcalosis (blood pH 7.64, bicarbonate 50.6 mmol/L, high plasma renin (20.6 ng/ml and aldosterone (232.9 ng/ml, but a low urinary chloride concentration (2.1 mmol/L. Based on these findings, as well as the stool chloride concentration of 110 mmol/L, the patient was diagnosed congenital chloride diarrhoea. In further course, the patient was treated by intensive fluid, sodium and potassium supplementation which resulted in the normalization of serum electrolytes, renal function, as well as his mental and physical development during 10 months of follow-up. Conclusion. Persistent watery diarrhoea with a high concentration of chloride in stool is the key finding in the differentiation of congenital chloride diarrhoea from Bartter syndrome. The treatment of congenital chloride diarrhoea consists primarily of adequate water and electrolytes replacement.

  8. Pseudo-Bartter syndrome in an infant with congenital chloride diarrhoea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igrutinović, Zoran; Peco-Antić, Amira; Radlović, Nedeljko; Vuletić, Biljana; Marković, Slavica; Vujić, Ana; Rasković, Zorica

    2011-01-01

    Pseudo-Bartter syndrome encompasses a heterogenous group of disorders similar to Bartter syndrome. We are presenting an infant with pseudo-Bartter syndrome caused by congenital chloride diarrhoea. A male newborn born in the 37th gestational week (GW) to young healthy and non-consanguineous parents. In the 35th GW a polyhydramnios with bowel dilatation was verified by ultrasonography. After birth he manifested several episodes of hyponatremic dehydration with hypochloraemia, hypokalaemia and metabolic alkalosis, so as Bartter syndrome was suspected treatment with indomethacin, spironolactone and additional intake of NaCl was initiated. However, this therapy gave no results, so that at age six months he was rehospitalized under the features of persistent watery diarrhoea, vomiting, dehydration and acute renal failure (serum creatinine 123 micromol/L). The laboratory results showed hyponatraemia (123 mmol/L), hypokalaemia (3.1 mmol/L), severe hypochloraemia (43 mmol/L), alcalosis (blood pH 7.64, bicarbonate 50.6 mmol/L), high plasma renin (20.6 ng/ml) and aldosterone (232.9 ng/ml), but a low urinary chloride concentration (2.1 mmol/L). Based on these findings, as well as the stool chloride concentration of 110 mmol/L, the patient was diagnosed congenital chloride diarrhoea. In further course, the patient was treated by intensive fluid, sodium and potassium supplementation which resulted in the normalization of serum electrolytes, renal function, as well as his mental and physical development during 10 months of follow-up. Persistent watery diarrhoea with a high concentration of chloride in stool is the key finding in the differentiation of congenital chloride diarrhoea from Bartter syndrome. The treatment of congenital chloride diarrhoea consists primarily of adequate water and electrolytes replacement.

  9. Distal 4p microdeletion in a case of Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome with congenital diaphragmatic hernia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casaccia, Germana; Mobili, Luisa; Braguglia, Annabella; Santoro, Francesco; Bagolan, Pietro

    2006-03-01

    Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS) is a well-known genetic condition characterized by typical facial anomalies, midline defects, skeletal anomalies, prenatal and postnatal growth retardation, hypotonia, mental retardation, and seizures. Affected patients with a microdeletion on distal 4p present a milder phenotype that lacks congenital malformations. WHS is rarely associated with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH), and only 8 cases are reported in the literature. In almost all cases of CDH and WHS a large deletion of the short arm of chromosome 4 is present. A microdeletion of 2.6 Mb on distal 4p associated with CDH and multiple congenital malformations (i.e., cleft palate) is reported for the first time. Such a microdeletion should prompt a molecular study for WHS when in a fetus/newborn with CDH the association with cleft lip/palate and typical facial appearance (flat facial profile, hypertelorism) is found. Copyright 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. An unusual type of congenital heart disease associated with the Holt-Oram-Syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruzic, B.; Bosnar, B.; Beleznay, O.

    1981-01-01

    Case report of a very rare case of Holt-Oram-Syndrome (in a seven months old baby) associated with tricuspid atresia (itself a rare condition of isolated congenital heart desease) and anomalous return of pulmonary vein into the right atrium. According to the classification based on anatomy, our case corresponds to type Ia. The diagnosis was confirmed clinically, electrocardiographically, radiologically and angiographically. (orig.) [de

  11. Congenital heart disease and genetic syndromes: new insights into molecular mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcagni, Giulio; Unolt, Marta; Digilio, Maria Cristina; Baban, Anwar; Versacci, Paolo; Tartaglia, Marco; Baldini, Antonio; Marino, Bruno

    2017-09-01

    Advances in genetics allowed a better definition of the role of specific genetic background in the etiology of syndromic congenital heart defects (CHDs). The identification of a number of disease genes responsible for different syndromes have led to the identification of several transcriptional regulators and signaling transducers and modulators that are critical for heart morphogenesis. Understanding the genetic background of syndromic CHDs allowed a better characterization of the genetic basis of non-syndromic CHDs. In this sense, the well-known association of typical CHDs in Down syndrome, 22q11.2 microdeletion and Noonan syndrome represent paradigms as chromosomal aneuploidy, chromosomal microdeletion and intragenic mutation, respectively. Area covered: For each syndrome the anatomical features, distinctive cardiac phenotype and molecular mechanisms are discussed. Moreover, the authors include recent genetic findings that may shed light on some aspects of still unclear molecular mechanisms of these syndromes. Expert commentary: Further investigations are needed to enhance the translational approach in the field of genetics of CHDs. When there is a well-established definition of genotype-phenotype (reverse medicine) and genotype-prognosis (predictive and personalized medicine) correlations, hopefully preventive medicine will make its way in this field. Subsequently a reduction will be achieved in the morbidity and mortality of children with CHDs.

  12. Genetics Home Reference: Andersen-Tawil syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... abnormal side-to-side curvature of the spine ( scoliosis ). The signs and symptoms of Andersen-Tawil syndrome ... Information from MedlinePlus (5 links) Diagnostic Tests Drug Therapy Genetic ... from the Nemours Foundation: Arrhythmias Merck Manual Consumer Version: Long QT Syndrome and Torsades de ...

  13. Cardiac channelopathies and sudden infant death syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tfelt-Hansen, Jacob; Winkel, Bo Gregers; Grunnet, Morten

    2011-01-01

    Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is always a devastating and unexpected occurrence. SIDS is the leading cause of death in the first 6 months after birth in the industrialized world. Since the discovery in 1998 of long QT syndrome as an underlying substrate for SIDS, around 10-20% of SIDS cases...

  14. CLMP is required for intestinal development, and loss-of-function mutations cause congenital short-bowel syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Der Werf, Christine S.; Wabbersen, Tara D.; Hsiao, Nai-Hua; Paredes, Joana; Etchevers, Heather C.; Kroisel, Peter M.; Tibboel, Dick; Babarit, Candice; Schreiber, Richard A.; Hoffenberg, Edward J.; Vekemans, Michel; Zeder, Sirkka L.; Ceccherini, Isabella; Lyonnet, Stanislas; Ribeiro, Ana S.; Seruca, Raquel; Meerman, Gerard J. Te; van Ijzendoorn, Sven C. D.; Shepherd, Iain T.; Verheij, Joke B. G. M.; Hofstra, Robert M. W.

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Short-bowel syndrome usually results from surgical resection of the small intestine for diseases such as intestinal atresias, volvulus, and necrotizing enterocolitis. Patients with congenital short-bowel syndrome (CSBS) are born with a substantial shortening of the small

  15. Beals syndrome (congenital contractural arachnodactyly in children: Clinical symptoms, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Semyachkina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with a rare monogenic connective tissue disease from a group of fibrillinopathies with autosomal dominant inheritance — Beals syndrome caused by a mutation in the FBN2 gene. Attention is drawn to the high phenotypic similarity of this disease and Marfan syndrome (FBN1 gene mutation, which is associated with the almost complete identity of two proteins: fibrillin 1 and fibrillin 2.The paper describes a clinical case of a child with Beals syndrome and the typical manifestations of the disease: asthenic constitution, arachnodactyly of the hands and feet, congenital contractures of the large and small joints, chest deformity, kyphoscoliosis, talpes, and crushed ears. The investigators made a differential diagnosis with other connective tissue diseases, such as Marfan syndrome, Stickler syndrome, Ehlers–Danlos syndrome, homocystenuria, and arthrogryposis. DNA diagnosis verified the Beals syndrome in the proband. Exon 28 in the FBN2 gene showed the previously undescribed missense mutation of c.3719G>A, resulting in the amino acid substitution of cysteine for tyrosine (p.Cys1240Tyr in the structure of the protein fibrillin 2. A de novo mutation occurred. There is evidence for its pathogenicity in the development of the clinical symptoms of the disease. The problems of effective medical genetic counseling in this family are discussed. 

  16. Lumbo-costo-vertebral syndrome with congenital lumbar hernia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Lucky; Mala, Tariq Ahmed; Gupta, Rahul; Malla, Shahid Amin

    2014-01-01

    Lumbo-costo-vertebral syndrome (LCVS) is a set of rare abnormalities involving vertebral bodies, ribs, and abdominal wall. We present a case of LCVS in a 2-year-old girl who had a progressive swelling over left lumbar area noted for the last 12 months. Clinical examination revealed a reducible swelling with positive cough impulse. Ultrasonography showed a defect containing bowel loops in the left lumbar region. Chest x-ray showed scoliosis and hemivertebrae with absent lower ribs on left side. Meshplasty was done.

  17. Outcome for Fetuses with Prenatally Detected Congenital Heart Disease and Cardiac Arrhythmias in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-Mou Hsiao

    2007-01-01

    Conclusion: Outcome for fetuses with prenatally detected CHD remains poor, with the prognosis negatively influenced by the presence of complex heart defects as well as extracardiac and chromosomal anomalies. However, prognosis is good for fetuses with cardiac arrhythmia, except with long QT syndrome or hydrops fetalis.

  18. Emergence of Epidemic Zika Virus Transmission and Congenital Zika Syndrome: Are Recently Evolved Traits to Blame?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott C. Weaver

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms responsible for the dramatic emergence of Zika virus (ZIKV, accompanied by congenital Zika syndrome and Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS, remain unclear. However, two hypotheses are prominent: (i evolution for enhanced urban transmission via adaptation to mosquito vectors, or for enhanced human infection to increase amplification, or (ii the stochastic introduction of ZIKV into large, naive human populations in regions with abundant Aedes aegypti populations, leading to enough rare, severe infection outcomes for their first recognition. Advances in animal models for human infection combined with improvements in serodiagnostics, better surveillance, and reverse genetic approaches should provide more conclusive evidence of whether mosquito transmission or human pathogenesis changed coincidentally with emergence in the South Pacific and the Americas. Ultimately, understanding the mechanisms of epidemic ZIKV emergence, and its associated syndromes, is critical to predict future risks as well as to target surveillance and control measures in key locations.

  19. Congenital non-syndromal autosomal recessive deafness in Bengkala, an isolated Balinese village.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winata, S; Arhya, I N; Moeljopawiro, S; Hinnant, J T; Liang, Y; Friedman, T B; Asher, J H

    1995-01-01

    Bengkala is an Indonesian village located on the north shore of Bali that has existed for over 700 years. Currently, 2.2% of the 2185 people in this village have profound congenital deafness. In response to the high incidence of deafness, the people of Bengkala have developed a village specific sign language which is used by many of the hearing and deaf people. Deafness in Bengkala is congenital, sensorineural, non-syndromal, and caused by a fully penetrant autosomal recessive mutation at the DFNB3 locus. The frequency of the DFNB3 mutation is estimated to be 9.4% among hearing people who have a 17.2% chance of being heterozygous for DFNB3. PMID:7616538

  20. Inflammation and Rupture of a Congenital Pericardial Cyst Manifesting Itself as an Acute Chest Pain Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aertker, Robert A; Cheong, Benjamin Y C; Lufschanowski, Roberto

    2016-12-01

    We present the case of a 63-year-old woman with a remote history of supraventricular tachycardia and hyperlipidemia, who presented with recurrent episodes of acute-onset chest pain. An electrocardiogram showed no evidence of acute coronary syndrome. A chest radiograph revealed a prominent right-sided heart border. A suspected congenital pericardial cyst was identified on a computed tomographic chest scan, and stranding was noted around the cyst. The patient was treated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and the pain initially abated. Another flare-up was treated similarly. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging was then performed after symptoms had resolved, and no evidence of the cyst was seen. The suspected cause of the patient's chest pain was acute inflammation of a congenital pericardial cyst with subsequent rupture and resolution of symptoms.

  1. Genetic Syndromes Associated with Congenital Cardiac Defects and Ophthalmologic Changes - Systematization for Diagnosis in the Clinical Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira, Priscila H. A.; Souza, Beatriz S.; Pacheco, Eimi N.; Menegazzo, Michele S.; Corrêa, Ivan S.; Zen, Paulo R. G.; Rosa, Rafael F. M.; Cesa, Claudia C.; Pellanda, Lucia C.; Vilela, Manuel A. P.

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Background: Numerous genetic syndromes associated with heart disease and ocular manifestations have been described. However, a compilation and a summarization of these syndromes for better consultation and comparison have not been performed yet. Objective: The objective of this work is to systematize available evidence in the literature on different syndromes that may cause congenital heart diseases associated with ocular changes, focusing on the types of anatomical and functional ...

  2. Fragile X syndrome in two siblings with major congenital malformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giampietro, P.F.; Haas, B.R.; Lipper, E. [Cornell Univ. Medical Center, New York, NY (United States)] [and others

    1996-05-17

    We report on 2 brothers with both fragile X and VACTERL-H syndrome. The first sibling, age 5, had bilateral cleft lip and palate, ventricular septal defect, and a hypoplastic thumb. The second sibling, age 2{1/2}, had a trachesophageal fistula, esophageal atresia, and vertebral abnormality. High-resolution chromosome analysis showed a 46,XY chromosome constitution in both siblings. By PCR and Southern blot analysis, the siblings were found to have large triplet repeat expansions in the fragile X gene (FMR 1) and both had methylation mosaicism. Enzyme kinetic studies of iduronate sulfatase demonstrated a two-fold increase in activity in the first sib as compared to the second. Possible mechanisms through which the fragile X mutation can cause down-regulation of adjacent loci are discussed. 24 refs., 4 figs.

  3. Identification of a novel locus for a USH3 like syndrome combined with congenital cataract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dad, S.; Østergaard, Elsebet; Thykjær, T.

    2010-01-01

    Usher syndrome (USH) is the most common genetic disease that causes both deafness and blindness. USH is divided into three types, USH1, USH2 and USH3, depending on the age of onset, the course of the disease, and on the degree of vestibular dysfunction. By homozygosity mapping of a consanguineous...... Danish family of Dutch descent, we have identified a novel locus for a rare USH3-like syndrome. The affected family members have a unique association of retinitis pigmentosa, progressive hearing impairment, vestibular dysfunction, and congenital cataract. The phenotype is similar, but not identical...... to that of USH3 patients, as congenital cataract has not been reported for USH3. By homozygosity mapping, we identified a 7.3 Mb locus on chromosome 15q22.2-23 with a maximum multipoint LOD score of 2.0. The locus partially overlaps with the USH1 locus, USH1H, a novel unnamed USH2 locus, and the non-syndromic...

  4. Identification of a novel locus for a USH3 like syndrome combined with congenital cataract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dad, S; Østergaard, E; Thykjaer, T; Albrectsen, A; Ravn, K; Rosenberg, T; Møller, L B

    2010-10-01

    Usher syndrome (USH) is the most common genetic disease that causes both deafness and blindness. USH is divided into three types, USH1, USH2 and USH3, depending on the age of onset, the course of the disease, and on the degree of vestibular dysfunction. By homozygosity mapping of a consanguineous Danish family of Dutch descent, we have identified a novel locus for a rare USH3-like syndrome. The affected family members have a unique association of retinitis pigmentosa, progressive hearing impairment, vestibular dysfunction, and congenital cataract. The phenotype is similar, but not identical to that of USH3 patients, as congenital cataract has not been reported for USH3. By homozygosity mapping, we identified a 7.3 Mb locus on chromosome 15q22.2-23 with a maximum multipoint LOD score of 2.0. The locus partially overlaps with the USH1 locus, USH1H, a novel unnamed USH2 locus, and the non-syndromic deafness locus DFNB48. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  5. Follow-up brain imaging of 37 children with congenital Zika syndrome: case series study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petribu, Natacha Calheiros de Lima; Aragao, Maria de Fatima Vasco; van der Linden, Vanessa; Parizel, Paul; Jungmann, Patricia; Araújo, Luziany; Abath, Marília; Fernandes, Andrezza; Brainer-Lima, Alessandra; Holanda, Arthur; Mello, Roberto; Sarteschi, Camila; Duarte, Maria do Carmo Menezes Bezerra

    2017-10-13

    Objective  To compare initial brain computed tomography (CT) scans with follow-up CT scans at one year in children with congenital Zika syndrome, focusing on cerebral calcifications. Design  Case series study. Setting  Barão de Lucena Hospital, Pernambuco state, Brazil. Participants  37 children with probable or confirmed congenital Zika syndrome during the microcephaly outbreak in 2015 who underwent brain CT shortly after birth and at one year follow-up. Main outcome measure  Differences in cerebral calcification patterns between initial and follow-up scans. Results  37 children were evaluated. All presented cerebral calcifications on the initial scan, predominantly at cortical-white matter junction. At follow-up the calcifications had diminished in number, size, or density, or a combination in 34 of the children (92%, 95% confidence interval 79% to 97%), were no longer visible in one child, and remained unchanged in two children. No child showed an increase in calcifications. The calcifications at the cortical-white matter junction which were no longer visible at follow-up occurred predominately in the parietal and occipital lobes. These imaging changes were not associated with any clear clinical improvements. Conclusion  The detection of cerebral calcifications should not be considered a major criterion for late diagnosis of congenital Zika syndrome, nor should the absence of calcifications be used to exclude the diagnosis. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  6. Sleeping problems in mothers and fathers of patients suffering from congenital central hypoventilation syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paddeu, Erika Maria; Giganti, Fiorenza; Piumelli, Raffaele; De Masi, Salvatore; Filippi, Luca; Viggiano, Maria Pia; Donzelli, Gianpaolo

    2015-09-01

    Advanced medical technology has resulted in an increased survival rate of children suffering from congenital central hypoventilation syndrome. After hospitalization, these technology-dependent patients require special home care for assuring ventilator support and the monitoring of vital parameters mainly during sleep. The daily challenges associated with caring for these children can place primary caregivers under significant stress, especially at night. Our study aimed at investigating how this condition affects mothers and fathers by producing poor sleep quality, high-level diurnal sleepiness, anxiety, and depression. The study included parents of 23 subjects with congenital central hypoventilation syndrome and 23 healthy subjects. All parents filled out the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) questionnaire, Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II), and Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI). A comparison between the two groups showed that parents of patients had poorer sleep quality, greater sleepiness, and higher BDI-II scores compared to that of parents of healthy subjects (respectively, PSQI score 6.5 vs 3.8, ESS score 6.2 vs 4.3, BDI-II score 8.4 vs 5.7). Specifically, mothers of patients showed poorer sleep quality and higher BDI-II scores compared to that of mothers of controls (respectively, PSQI score 7.5 vs 3.8, BDI-II score 9.3 vs 5.9), whereas fathers of patients showed greater levels of sleepiness with respect to fathers of healthy children (respectively, ESS score 6.8 vs 4.0). These differences emerged in parents of younger children. Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome impacts the family with different consequences for mothers and fathers. Indeed, while the patients' sleep is safeguarded, sleeping problems may occur in primary caregivers often associated with other psychological disorders. Specifically, this disease affects sleep quality and mood in the mothers and sleepiness levels in the fathers.

  7. Pharmacological correction of long QT-linked mutations in KCNH2 (hERG) increases the trafficking of Kv11.1 channels stored in the transitional endoplasmic reticulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jennifer L; Reloj, Allison R; Nataraj, Parvathi S; Bartos, Daniel C; Schroder, Elizabeth A; Moss, Arthur J; Ohno, Seiko; Horie, Minoru; Anderson, Corey L; January, Craig T; Delisle, Brian P

    2013-11-01

    KCNH2 encodes Kv11.1 and underlies the rapidly activating delayed rectifier K(+) current (IKr) in the heart. Loss-of-function KCNH2 mutations cause the type 2 long QT syndrome (LQT2), and most LQT2-linked missense mutations inhibit the trafficking of Kv11.1 channels. Drugs that bind to Kv11.1 and block IKr (e.g., E-4031) can act as pharmacological chaperones to increase the trafficking and functional expression for most LQT2 channels (pharmacological correction). We previously showed that LQT2 channels are selectively stored in a microtubule-dependent compartment within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). We tested the hypothesis that pharmacological correction promotes the trafficking of LQT2 channels stored in this compartment. Confocal analyses of cells expressing the trafficking-deficient LQT2 channel G601S showed that the microtubule-dependent ER compartment is the transitional ER. Experiments with E-4031 and the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide suggested that pharmacological correction promotes the trafficking of G601S stored in this compartment. Treating cells in E-4031 or ranolazine (a drug that blocks IKr and has a short half-life) for 30 min was sufficient to cause pharmacological correction. Moreover, the increased functional expression of G601S persisted 4-5 h after drug washout. Coexpression studies with a dominant-negative form of Rab11B, a small GTPase that regulates Kv11.1 trafficking, prevented the pharmacological correction of G601S trafficking from the transitional ER. These data suggest that pharmacological correction quickly increases the trafficking of LQT2 channels stored in the transitional ER via a Rab11B-dependent pathway, and we conclude that the pharmacological chaperone activity of drugs like ranolazine might have therapeutic potential.

  8. Branchial cleft anomaly, congenital heart disease, and biliary atresia: Goldenhar complex or Lambert syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, J; Schanen, N C

    2000-01-01

    The features of Goldenhar complex have been well-described and classically include branchial arch abnormalities, epibulbar dermoid and vertebral abnormalities. We have identified an infant with these features in association with complex congenital heart disease and intrahepatic biliary atresia. Although Lambert described an autosomal recessive disorder with an association of biliary atresia and branchial arch abnormalities, none of those cases had epibulbar dermoid. Diagnostic considerations in this case include inclusion of biliary atresia as a new feature in the expanding spectrum of the Goldenhar complex, versus Lambert syndrome with epibulbar dermoid.

  9. Meier-Gorlin syndrome: Report of an additional patient with congenital heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabah M. Shawky

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We report a 7 year old female child with the classical triad of Meier-Gorlin syndrome (MGS, (microtia, absent patella and short stature. She had the characteristic facial features, with normal mentality and defective speech, skeletal abnormalities, conductive hearing loss, cystitis and normal growth hormone level. She suffered from recurrent chest infection during the first year of life which improved gradually with age. Although congenital heart is rarely observed in MGS, our patient had in addition fenestrated interatrial septal defect.

  10. Prolonged Tp-e Interval in Down Syndrome Patients with Congenitally Normal Hearts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucuk, Mehmet; Karadeniz, Cem; Ozdemir, Rahmi; Meşe, Timur

    2018-03-25

    Heterogeneity of ventricular repolarization has been assessed by using the QT dispersion in Down syndrome (DS) patients with congenitally normal hearts. However, novel repolarization indexes, the Tp-e interval and Tp-e/QT ratio, have not previously been evaluated in these patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the Tp-e interval and Tp-e/QT ratio in DS patients without congenital heart defects. Twelve-lead surface electrocardiograms of 160 DS patients and 110 age- and sex-matched healthy controls were used to evaluate and compare the Tp-e interval, Tp-e dispersion, and Tp-e/QT ratio. Heart rate, Tp-e interval, Tp-e dispersion, Tp-e/QT and Tp-e/QTc ratios were significantly higher in DS group than in the controls. Myocardial repolarization indexes in DS patients with congenitally normal hearts were found to be prolonged compared to those in normal controls. Further evaluation is warranted to reveal a relationship between prolonged repolarization indexes and arrhythmic events in these patients. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  11. Diabetic retinopathy in two patients with congenital IGF-I deficiency (Laron syndrome).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laron, Zvi; Weinberger, Dov

    2004-07-01

    Animal and clinical studies have shown that excessive amounts of growth hormone or insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) promote the development of diabetes and diabetic retinopathy. Forthwith, we present two patients with congenital IGF-I deficiency who developed type II diabetes and subsequently retinopathy. Eighteen adult patients with classical Laron syndrome (8 males, 10 females, aged 20-62 years) were followed by us since childhood or underwent fundus photography with a Nikon NF 505 instrument. Three had been treated in childhood with IGF-I, the rest were never treated, including the two patients reported. Two never-treated patients were diagnosed with type II diabetes (DM) at ages 39 and 41 respectively. There was no diabetes in the families. Oral treatment was followed by insulin injections. Metabolic control was not optimal and one patient developed proliferative diabetic retinopathy, necessitating laser surgery. He also has nephropathy and severe neuropathy. The other patient has background diabetic retinopathy and has developed, progressively, exudates, microaneurisms, hemorrhages and clinically significant macular edema. He also has subacute ischemic heart disease. Our findings show that congenital IGF-I deficiency, similar to excess, causes vascular complications of DM, denoting also that vascular endothelial growth factor can induce neovascularization in the presence of congenital IGF-I deficiency.

  12. Is Congenital Amusia a Disconnection Syndrome? A Study Combining Tract- and Network-Based Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jieqiong Wang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies on congenital amusia mainly focused on the impaired fronto-temporal pathway. It is possible that neural pathways of amusia patients on a larger scale are affected. In this study, we investigated changes in structural connections by applying both tract-based and network-based analysis to DTI data of 12 subjects with congenital amusia and 20 demographic-matched normal controls. TBSS (tract-based spatial statistics was used to detect microstructural changes. The results showed that amusics had higher diffusivity indices in the corpus callosum, the right inferior/superior longitudinal fasciculus, and the right inferior frontal-occipital fasciculus (IFOF. The axial diffusivity values of the right IFOF were negatively correlated with musical scores in the amusia group. Network-based analysis showed that the efficiency of the brain network was reduced in amusics. The impairments of WM tracts were also found to be correlated with reduced network efficiency in amusics. This suggests that impaired WM tracts may lead to the reduced network efficiency seen in amusics. Our findings suggest that congenital amusia is a disconnection syndrome.

  13. Is Congenital Amusia a Disconnection Syndrome? A Study Combining Tract- and Network-Based Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jieqiong; Zhang, Caicai; Wan, Shibiao; Peng, Gang

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies on congenital amusia mainly focused on the impaired fronto-temporal pathway. It is possible that neural pathways of amusia patients on a larger scale are affected. In this study, we investigated changes in structural connections by applying both tract-based and network-based analysis to DTI data of 12 subjects with congenital amusia and 20 demographic-matched normal controls. TBSS (tract-based spatial statistics) was used to detect microstructural changes. The results showed that amusics had higher diffusivity indices in the corpus callosum, the right inferior/superior longitudinal fasciculus, and the right inferior frontal-occipital fasciculus (IFOF). The axial diffusivity values of the right IFOF were negatively correlated with musical scores in the amusia group. Network-based analysis showed that the efficiency of the brain network was reduced in amusics. The impairments of WM tracts were also found to be correlated with reduced network efficiency in amusics. This suggests that impaired WM tracts may lead to the reduced network efficiency seen in amusics. Our findings suggest that congenital amusia is a disconnection syndrome.

  14. Congenital rubella syndrome: a review of laboratory data from 2002 to 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraswathy, T S; Rozainanee, M Z; Asshikin, R Nurul; Zainah, S

    2013-05-01

    Rubella infection in pregnant women during the first trimester of pregnancy can lead to fetal anomalies, commonly known as congenital rubella syndrome (CRS). The objective of our study was to analyze the serological test results among infants suspected of having CRS aged Malaysia were examined for rubella specific IgM and IgG antibodies using a Axsym, automated analyzer (Abbott Laboratories). Forty-eight samples were positive for rubella specific IgM antibodies and 494 samples were positive for rubella specific IgG antibodies. These were then age stratified and their clinical history reviewed for any CRS symptoms. Fifteen of 38 rubella IgM positive infants (39.5%) aged < 3 months, had a clinical appearance compatible with CRS. However, only 1 IgM positive infant aged 3 to 6 months and one infant aged 7 to 11 months had clinical appearance compatible with CRS. The most common abnormal findings in these cases were congenital heart defects and cataracts. Forty-eight point eight percent of IgM positive cases and 53.1% of IgG positive cases, had inadequate information in the chart to determine the presence of CRS. Clinical findings and timely laboratory diagnosis to determine the presence of CRS are important in infants born with congenital defects. Physicians should also be aware of the appropriate interpretation of these findings.

  15. Prenatally diagnosed 17q12 microdeletion syndrome with a novel association with congenital diaphragmatic hernia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrix, Nancy W; Clemens, Michele; Canavan, Timothy P; Surti, Urvashi; Rajkovic, Aleksandar

    2012-01-01

    We describe the first reported case of a prenatally diagnosed and recently described 17q12 microdeletion syndrome. The fetus was noted to have a congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH), echogenic kidneys and cystic left lung on prenatal ultrasound. The patient underwent amniocentesis which resulted in a normal fluorescence in-situ hybridization and karyotype. An oligonucleotide microarray was then performed which demonstrated a 1.4-Mb deletion within the 17q12 region. The deletion caused haploinsufficiency for 17 genes, including AATF, ACACA, DDX52, DUSP14, GGNBP2, HNF-1B, LHX1, PIGW, SYNRG, TADA2A, and ZNHIT3. The deleted region on 17q12 is similar in size and gene content to previously reported 17q12 microdeletion syndromes, which have a minimal critical region of 1.52 Mb. The newly described 17q12 microdeletion syndrome has been associated with MODY5 (maturity-onset of diabetes of the young type 5), cystic renal disease, pancreatic atrophy, liver abnormalities, cognitive impairment and structural brain abnormalities. CDH has not been previously described with the 17q12 microdeletion syndrome. We hypothesize that CDH is part of the spectrum of this syndrome and likely not detected postnatally due to high prenatal mortality. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Are there any association between polycistic ovary syndrome and congenital abnormalities of Müllerian ducts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubić-Pavlović, Aleksandra; Radović-Janosević, Dragana; Petrić, Aleksandra; Stefanović, Milan

    2014-06-01

    There are many specificities of merital infertility and sometimes surprising connections between some thinks with no connections at first sight. Examinations of these patients imply diagnostic actions such as the blood basal hormone sample, doing hysterosalpingography, ultrahysterosonography, ultrasound examinations, and sometimes laparoscopy and hysteroscopy if there are necessary. The aim of the study was to determine the characteristics of the connection between policystic ovary (PCO) syndrome (Sy) and congenital Müllerian ducts abnormalities. This study included 356 patients treated in the period from January 1, to December 31, 2009, in the Department of Infertility of the Clinic for Obstetrics and Gynecology in Nis, Serbia. Exclusion criteria were no myoma, ovary cysts, tubal and male factors of infertility. A total of 180 patients were divided into 3 groups: the group I with PCO sy, the group II with uterine congenital malformation and the group III with a combination of these disorders. The middle age of patients was 29.6 +/- 4.8, body mass index (BMI) was 26.1 +/- 4,8 kg/m2 the middle thicknes of endometrium was 5.2 + 2.7 mm, and there were no significant differences between the examined groups. There were no significant among in a number of miscarriages in the examined groups. We found that PCO Sy and congenital abnormalities of Müllerian ducts were conjoint in 30% of examined patients. Conjoined PCO Sy and congenital abnormalities of Müllerian ducts do not result in a higher number of miscarriages than only either PCO Sy or abnormalities of Müllerian ducts. It is important to check BMI, basal level of follicle stimulating hormone and number of antral follicles because the induction protocol and concentracion of inductors depends on these characteristics, thus, the succsessful cycles and pregnancy.

  17. Cost-effectiveness of genotyping in inherited arrhythmia syndromes: are we getting value for the money?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilde, Arthur A. M.; Pinto, Yigal M.

    2009-01-01

    Over the last decade, the identification of the diverse genetic basis of most important inherited arrhythmia syndromes has remarkably changed our attitude toward these life-threatening diseases. Just over 10 years ago, long-QT syndrome (LQTS) was considered one disease entity, Brugada -QT syndrome

  18. Congenital malformations and other comorbidities in 125 women with Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapczuk, Karina; Iwaniec, Kinga; Friebe, Zbigniew; Kędzia, Witold

    2016-12-01

    To describe congenital malformations and coexisting disorders occurring in 125 Polish women with Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser syndrome (MRKHS). The syndrome is defined as uterovaginal aplasia in female with normal 46,XX karyotype. A retrospective analysis of the clinical data of MRKHS patients diagnosed or treated at the Gynecology and Obstetrics Clinical Hospital of Poznan University of Medical Sciences between 2010 and 2015. Sixty-eight patients (54,4%) were found to have one or more coexisting anomalies. Thirty-eight patients (55,9% of cases with concomitant malformations, 30,4% of the entire study group) had coexisting anomalies of at least two organ systems. The most frequent extragenital malformations were skeletal anomalies found in 40 patients (32%) and renal anomalies found in 36 patients (28,8%). Fifty-seven patients (45,6%) were diagnosed with typical form (type 1) and 16 (12,8%) with the atypical form (type 2) of MRKHS. In the other 52 patients (41,6%) we diagnosed MURCS association. Five of our patients (4%) had karyotype abnormalities. Our study confirms complexity and clinical heterogeneity of MRKHS. Concomitant congenital malformations are present in about half of MRKHS women. A significant proportion of patients have coexisting anomalies of at least two organ systems. The most common coexisting findings are musculoskeletal and renal abnormalities. Chromosomal aberrations may be present in patients with either typical or atypical form of MRKHS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Ocular abnormalities in congenital Zika syndrome: are the ophthalmoscopic findings "the top of the iceberg"?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira Dias, João Rafael; Ventura, Camila V; de Paula Freitas, Bruno; Prazeres, Juliana; Ventura, Liana O; Bravo-Filho, Vasco; Aleman, Tomas; Ko, Albert Icksang; Zin, Andréa; Belfort, Rubens; Maia, Mauricio

    2018-04-23

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an arbovirus mainly transmitted to humans by mosquitoes from Aedes genus. Other ways of transmission include the perinatal and sexual routes, blood transfusion, and laboratory exposure. Although the first human cases were registered in 1952 in African countries, outbreaks were only reported since 2007, when entire Pacific islands were affected. In March 2015, the first cases of ZIKV acute infection were notified in Brazil and, to date, 48 countries and territories in the Americas have confirmed local mosquito-borne transmission of ZIKV. Until 2015, ZIKV infection was thought to only cause asymptomatic or mild exanthematous febrile infections. However, after explosive ZIKV outbreaks in Polynesia and Latin American countries, it was confirmed that ZIKV could also lead to Guillain-Barré syndrome and congenital birth abnormalities. These abnormalities, which can include neurologic, ophthalmologic, audiologic, and skeletal findings, are now considered congenital Zika syndrome (CZS). Brain abnormalities in CZS include cerebral calcifications, malformations of cortical development, ventriculomegaly, lissencephaly, hypoplasia of the cerebellum and brainstem. The ocular findings, which are present in up to 70% of infants with CZS, include iris coloboma, lens subluxation, cataract, congenital glaucoma, and especially posterior segment findings. Loss of retinal pigment epithelium, the presence of a thin choroid, a perivascular choroidal inflammatory infiltrate, and atrophic changes within the optic nerve were seen in histologic analyses of eyes from deceased fetuses. To date, there is no ZIKV licensed vaccines or antiviral therapies are available for treatment. Preventive measures include individual protection from mosquito bites, control of mosquito populations and the use of barriers measures such as condoms during sexual intercourse or sexual abstinence for couples either at risk or after confirmed infection. A literature review based on studies that

  20. Brain imaging findings of patients with congenital cataracts, facial dysmorphism neuropathy syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zlatareva, D.; Penev, L.; Hadjidekov, V.; Chamova, T.; Guergeltcheva, V.; Tournev, I.; Tournev, I.; Bojinova, V.; Kaprelian, A.; Tzoneva, D.

    2012-01-01

    Congenital cataracts, facial dysmorphism neuropathy (CCFDN) syndrome is a rare genetic disorder of autosomal recessive inheritance, observed in patients of Gypsy ancestry. All patients are homozygous for the same mutation in the CTDP1 gene mapping to 18qter. The clinical manifestations of the disease include congenital cataracts, facial dysmorphism, peripheral neuropathy due to primary hypomyelination, intellectual impairment and involvement of central nervous system.The aim of this study is to analyze CNS magnetic resonance imaging findings of patients with CCFDN syndrome and to apply severity score system. MRI of 20 patients (10 children - 4 girls and 6 boys and 10 adults - 6 women and 4 men with CCFDN was performed on 1,5T unit. We apply severity score system (previously used for metachromatic leukodystrophy) to evaluate patients with CCFDN which was adapted to the changes observed in CCFDN patients. This score system assessed WM involvement, as well as the presence of cerebral and cerebellar atrophy. We have found pathologic findings in 19 patients (95%). White matter hyperintensities were found in 18 and cerebral atrophy in 18 patients. The severity score have varied from 0 to 18 points. In contrast to previous studies we have found higher frequency of white matter hyperintensities. The findings are more prominent with patients' age. The most common MRI findings are cerebral atrophy and periventricular hyperintensities. This study gives the first detailed description of MRI findings in CCFDN syndrome patients where severity score system was applied. The score system could be applied in follow-up studies to evaluate progression of CNS findings. (authors)

  1. Genetic Syndromes Associated with Congenital Cardiac Defects and Ophthalmologic Changes - Systematization for Diagnosis in the Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Priscila H A; Souza, Beatriz S; Pacheco, Eimi N; Menegazzo, Michele S; Corrêa, Ivan S; Zen, Paulo R G; Rosa, Rafael F M; Cesa, Claudia C; Pellanda, Lucia C; Vilela, Manuel A P

    2018-01-01

    Numerous genetic syndromes associated with heart disease and ocular manifestations have been described. However, a compilation and a summarization of these syndromes for better consultation and comparison have not been performed yet. The objective of this work is to systematize available evidence in the literature on different syndromes that may cause congenital heart diseases associated with ocular changes, focusing on the types of anatomical and functional changes. A systematic search was performed on Medline electronic databases (PubMed, Embase, Cochrane, Lilacs) of articles published until January 2016. Eligibility criteria were case reports or review articles that evaluated the association of ophthalmic and cardiac abnormalities in genetic syndrome patients younger than 18 years. The most frequent genetic syndromes were: Down Syndrome, Velo-cardio-facial / DiGeorge Syndrome, Charge Syndrome and Noonan Syndrome. The most associated cardiac malformations with ocular findings were interatrial communication (77.4%), interventricular communication (51.6%), patent ductus arteriosus (35.4%), pulmonary artery stenosis (25.8%) and tetralogy of Fallot (22.5%). Due to their clinical variability, congenital cardiac malformations may progress asymptomatically to heart defects associated with high morbidity and mortality. For this reason, the identification of extra-cardiac characteristics that may somehow contribute to the diagnosis of the disease or reveal its severity is of great relevance.

  2. Genetic Syndromes Associated with Congenital Cardiac Defects and Ophthalmologic Changes - Systematization for Diagnosis in the Clinical Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila H. A. Oliveira

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Numerous genetic syndromes associated with heart disease and ocular manifestations have been described. However, a compilation and a summarization of these syndromes for better consultation and comparison have not been performed yet. Objective: The objective of this work is to systematize available evidence in the literature on different syndromes that may cause congenital heart diseases associated with ocular changes, focusing on the types of anatomical and functional changes. Method: A systematic search was performed on Medline electronic databases (PubMed, Embase, Cochrane, Lilacs of articles published until January 2016. Eligibility criteria were case reports or review articles that evaluated the association of ophthalmic and cardiac abnormalities in genetic syndrome patients younger than 18 years. Results: The most frequent genetic syndromes were: Down Syndrome, Velo-cardio-facial / DiGeorge Syndrome, Charge Syndrome and Noonan Syndrome. The most associated cardiac malformations with ocular findings were interatrial communication (77.4%, interventricular communication (51.6%, patent ductus arteriosus (35.4%, pulmonary artery stenosis (25.8% and tetralogy of Fallot (22.5%. Conclusion: Due to their clinical variability, congenital cardiac malformations may progress asymptomatically to heart defects associated with high morbidity and mortality. For this reason, the identification of extra-cardiac characteristics that may somehow contribute to the diagnosis of the disease or reveal its severity is of great relevance.

  3. The Prevalence of Celiac Disease in Down syndrome Children with and without Congenital Heart Defects

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    Noor Mohammad Noori

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background The prevalence of celiac disease (CD is remarkably varied in Down syndrome(DSpatientscompared with other diseases.  This study aimed to assess celiac disease prevalence in Down syndrome children with and without congenital heart defects (CHD and its comparison with controls. Materials and Methods This case-control study was performed at a single center on 132 participants in three groups. Clinical and genetic tests were performed on all patients suspected with Down syndrome to confirm their diseases.  After that in patients with confirmed Down syndrome echocardiography was carried out to diagnosis of CHD. Healthy children selected randomly among those who referred to the center for annual check-up. Statistical evaluation was done using SPSS-16. Results For the factors of age, weight, height and Body Mass Index (BMI not observed significant differences between three groups of participants, but it would be observed statistically differences for the variable of tTG- IgA.  For variables of weight, tTG- IgA and BMI was observed statistically different in the case and controls. The status of tTG- IgA (normal or 20 had significant correlation with three groups of controls, Down syndrome with and without CHD. The status of tTG- IgA also had significant correlation with groups of case and controls. In comparison of tTG- IgA in DS patients with and without CHD, no significant differences were observed. Conclusion The prevalence of CD in DS patients was higher compared the controls population; and in DS patients with CHD was higher compared the DS patients without CHD.

  4. Congenital Hyperinsulinism in Infants with Turner Syndrome: Possible Association with Monosomy X and KDM6A Haploinsufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Christopher E; Boodhansingh, Kara E; Li, Changhong; Conlin, Laura; Chen, Pan; Becker, Susan A; Bhatti, Tricia; Bamba, Vaneeta; Adzick, N Scott; De Leon, Diva D; Ganguly, Arupa; Stanley, Charles A

    2018-06-14

    Previous case reports have suggested a possible association of congenital hyperinsulinism with Turner syndrome. We examined the clinical and molecular features in girls with both congenital hyperinsulinism and Turner syndrome seen at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) between 1974 and 2017. Records of girls with hyperinsulinism and Turner syndrome were reviewed. Insulin secretion was studied in pancreatic islets and in mouse islets treated with an inhibitor of KDM6A, an X chromosome gene associated with hyperinsulinism in Kabuki syndrome. Hyperinsulinism was diagnosed in 12 girls with Turner syndrome. Six were diazoxide-unresponsive; 3 had pancreatectomies. The incidence of Turner syndrome among CHOP patients with hyperinsulinism (10 of 1,050 from 1997 to 2017) was 48 times more frequent than expected. The only consistent chromosomal anomaly in these girls was the presence of a 45,X cell line. Studies of isolated islets from 1 case showed abnormal elevated cytosolic calcium and heightened sensitivity to amino acid-stimulated insulin release; similar alterations were demonstrated in mouse islets treated with a KDM6A inhibitor. These results demonstrate a higher than expected frequency of Turner syndrome among children with hyperinsulinism. Our data suggest that haploinsufficiency for KDM6A due to mosaic X chromosome monosomy may be responsible for hyperinsulinism in Turner syndrome. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Congenital chloride diarrhea needs to be distinguished from Bartter and Gitelman syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunoshita, Natsuki; Nozu, Kandai; Yoshikane, Masahide; Kawaguchi, Azusa; Fujita, Naoya; Morisada, Naoya; Ishimori, Shingo; Yamamura, Tomohiko; Minamikawa, Shogo; Horinouchi, Tomoko; Nakanishi, Keita; Fujimura, Junya; Ninchoji, Takeshi; Morioka, Ichiro; Nagase, Hiroaki; Taniguchi-Ikeda, Mariko; Kaito, Hiroshi; Iijima, Kazumoto

    2018-05-30

    Pseudo-Bartter/Gitelman syndrome (p-BS/GS) encompasses a clinically heterogeneous group of inherited or acquired disorders similar to Bartter syndrome (BS) or Gitelman syndrome (GS), both renal salt-losing tubulopathies. Phenotypic overlap frequently occurs between p-BS/GS and BS/GS, which are difficult to diagnose based on their clinical presentation and require genetic tests for accurate diagnosis. In addition, p-BS/GS can occur as a result of other inherited diseases such as cystic fibrosis, autosomal dominant hypocalcemia, Dent disease, or congenital chloride diarrhea (CCD). However, the detection of the variants in genes other than known BS/GS-causing genes by conventional Sanger sequencing requires substantial time and resources. We studied 27 cases clinically diagnosed with BS/GS, but with negative genetic tests for known BS/GS genes. We conducted targeted sequencing for 22 genes including genes responsible for tubulopathies and other inherited diseases manifesting with p-BS/GS symptoms. We detected the SLC26A3 gene variants responsible for CCD in two patients. In Patient 1, we found the SLC26A3 compound heterozygous variants: c.354delC and c.1008insT. In Patient 2, we identified the compound heterozygous variants: c.877G > A, p.(Glu293Lys), and c.1008insT. Our results suggest that a comprehensive genetic screening system using targeted sequencing is useful for the diagnosis of patients with p-BS/GS with alternative genetic origins.

  6. Trauma due to Self-aggression in Patient with Waardenburg Syndrome associated with Congenital Anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marta, Sara Nader; Kawakami, Roberto Yoshio; Sgavioli, Claudia Almeida Prado Piccino; Correa, Ana Eliza; D'Árk de Oliveira El Kadre, Guaniara; Carvalho, Ricardo Sandri

    2016-08-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is an inherited autosomal dominant genetic disorder presenting variable penetrance and expressivity, with an estimated prevalence of 1:42,000. Clinical characteristics of WS include lateral displacement of the internal eye canthus, hyperplasia of the medial portion of the eyebrows, prominent and broad nasal base, congenital deafness, pigmentation of the iris and skin, and white forelock. A 24-year-old male patient, previously diagnosed with WS, was referred to the Special Needs Dental Clinic of Sacred Heart University, Bauru, Brazil. Parents reported that the patient was experiencing self-mutilation, particularly in the oral region. He presented multiple congenital anomalies, including anophthalmia, mental retardation, low-set ears, and leg deformities. Clinical oral examination revealed hypodontia, abnormalities in dental morphology, extensive dental caries, periodontal disease, and fistulae. Extensive scars on the tongue, lips, and hands caused by self-mutilation were also observed. In accordance with his family and neurologist, full-mouth extraction under general anesthesia was performed, especially considering his severe self-aggressive behavior and the necessity to be fed with soft-food diet due to his inability to chew. After the surgical procedure, a significant reduction in the patient's irritability and gain of weight were reported in the follow-ups of 30, 60, and 180 days.

  7. Multiple congenital malformations of Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome are recapitulated in Fgfrl1 null mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catela, Catarina; Bilbao-Cortes, Daniel; Slonimsky, Esfir; Kratsios, Paschalis; Rosenthal, Nadia; Te Welscher, Pascal

    2009-01-01

    Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS) is caused by deletions in the short arm of chromosome 4 (4p) and occurs in about one per 20,000 births. Patients with WHS display a set of highly variable characteristics including craniofacial dysgenesis, mental retardation, speech problems, congenital heart defects, short stature and a variety of skeletal anomalies. Analysis of patients with 4p deletions has identified two WHS critical regions (WHSCRs); however, deletions targeting mouse WHSCRs do not recapitulate the classical WHS defects, and the genes contributing to WHS have not been conclusively established. Recently, the human FGFRL1 gene, encoding a putative fibroblast growth factor (FGF) decoy receptor, has been implicated in the craniofacial phenotype of a WHS patient. Here, we report that targeted deletion of the mouse Fgfrl1 gene recapitulates a broad array of WHS phenotypes, including abnormal craniofacial development, axial and appendicular skeletal anomalies, and congenital heart defects. Fgfrl1 null mutants also display a transient foetal anaemia and a fully penetrant diaphragm defect, causing prenatal and perinatal lethality. Together, these data support a wider role for Fgfrl1 in development, implicate FGFRL1 insufficiency in WHS, and provide a novel animal model to dissect the complex aetiology of this human disease.

  8. Unlikely culprit: congenital middle aortic syndrome diagnosed in the sixth decade of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Muhammad Sajawal; Tchernodrinski, Stefan; Mohananey, Divyanshu; Ali, Ahya Sajawal

    2016-08-16

    A 58-year-old woman was admitted with acute heart failure. She had a long history of resistant hypertension, with an unremarkable work up for secondary causes in the past. Her brachial blood pressure was 210/70 mm Hg, with ankle blood pressure of 100/70 mm Hg. CT angiogram revealed marked narrowing of the descending thoracic aorta between the left subclavian artery and the diaphragm, consistent with middle aortic syndrome (MAS). She was initially managed with diuretics and antihypertensives. Subsequently thoracotomy revealed a severely hypoplastic segment of the descending aorta. The diseased segment was resected and aortic reconstruction performed. Histopathology showed fragmentation of the medial elastic fibres and fibrosis of the medial and intimal layers. These findings along with gross aortic hypoplasia and absence of features of Takayasu's arteritis, suggest that our patient had congenital MAS. The patient has done well since her surgery. We believe this is the first case of congenital MAS reported in the sixth decade of life. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  9. Congenital short QT syndrome and implantable cardioverter defibrillator treatment: inherent risk for inappropriate shock delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimpf, Rainer; Wolpert, Christian; Bianchi, Francesca; Giustetto, Carla; Gaita, Florenzo; Bauersfeld, Urs; Borggrefe, Martin

    2003-12-01

    A congenital short QT interval constitutes a new primary electrical abnormality associated with syncope and/or sudden cardiac death. We report on the initial use of implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) therapy in patients with inherited short QT interval and discuss sensing abnormalities and detection issues. In five consecutive patients from two unrelated European families who had structurally normal hearts, excessively shortened QT intervals, and a strong positive family history of sudden cardiac death, ICDs were placed for primary and secondary prevention. Mean QT intervals were 252 +/- 13 ms (QTc 287 +/- 13 ms). Despite normal sensing behavior during intraoperative and postoperative device testing, 3 of 5 patients experienced inappropriate shock therapies for T wave oversensing 30 +/- 26 days after implantation. Programming lower sensitivities and decay delays prevented further inappropriate discharges. The congenital short QT syndrome constitutes a new clinical entity with an increased risk for sudden cardiac death. Currently, ICD treatment is the only therapeutic option. In patients with short QT interval and implanted ICD, increased risk for inappropriate therapy is inherent due to the detection of short-coupled and prominent T waves. Careful testing of ICD function and adaptation of sensing levels and decay delays without sacrificing correct arrhythmia detection are essential.

  10. Rubella and Congenital Rubella Syndrome in the Philippines: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Lena Lopez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. As part of regional elimination efforts, rubella-containing vaccines (RCV have recently been introduced in the Philippines, yet the true burden of rubella and congenital rubella syndrome (CRS in the country is largely unknown. Objective. To provide baseline information on rubella and CRS prior to routine vaccine introduction in the Philippines. Methods. We conducted a systematic literature review on rubella and CRS in the Philippines, including a cross-sectional study conducted in 2002 among 383 pregnant women attending the obstetric outpatient clinic of the Philippine General Hospital to assess rubella susceptibility of women of childbearing age. Results. 15 locally published and unpublished studies were reviewed. Susceptibility to rubella among women of childbearing age was higher in rural communities. Retrospective reviews revealed congenital heart diseases, cataracts, and hearing impairments to be most common presentations in children of CRS. In the cross-sectional study, 59 (15.4% of the 383 pregnant women enrolled were seronegative for rubella IgG. Conclusion. Similar to other countries introducing RCV, it was only recently that surveillance for rubella has been established. Previous studies show substantial disabilities due to CRS and a substantial proportion of susceptible women who are at risk for having babies affected with CRS. Establishment of CRS surveillance and enhanced awareness on rubella case detection should be prioritized.

  11. Detection of chromosomal abnormalities, congenital abnormalities and transfusion syndrome in twins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sperling, L.; Kiil, C.; Larsen, Lene Unmack

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the outcome of screening for structural malformations in twins and the outcome of screening for twin-twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS) among monochorionic twins through a number of ultrasound scans from 12 weeks' gestation. METHODS: Enrolled into this prospective multicenter...... by assisted reproduction. The incidence of TTTS was 23% from 12 weeks until delivery, and all those monochorionic twin pregnancies that miscarried had signs of TTTS. CONCLUSION: Twin pregnancies have an increased risk of congenital malformations and one out of four monochorionic pregnancies develops TTTS....... Ultrasound screening to assess chorionicity and follow-up of monochorionic pregnancies to detect signs of TTTS, as well as malformation screening, are therefore essential in the antenatal care of twin pregnancies....

  12. Fetal and neonatal abnormalities due to congenital rubella syndrome: a review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazigi, Alexandre; De Pecoulas, Aurelia Eldin; Vauloup-Fellous, Christelle; Grangeot-Keros, Liliane; Ayoubi, Jean-Marc; Picone, Olivier

    2017-02-01

    Rubella virus infection during the first trimester of pregnancy can cause congenital rubella syndrome (CRS). We aimed to describe the abnormalities in order to define the ultrasound features to look for when performing prenatal scans. The goal of this review is to focus specifically on the signs of CRS accessible to prenatal diagnosis. We analyzed every case of CRS described before and/or after birth that we identified in the Pubmed database and classified them as accessible or not to prenatal diagnosis. The most frequently reported malformations accessible to prenatal diagnosis were: cardiac septal defects, pulmonary artery stenosis, microcephaly, cataract, microphtalmia, and hepatosplenomegaly. This extensive literature review shows that the ultrasound features of CRS are not well known, even though rubella was the first teratogenic virus described. This review will help clinicians in the management of rubella during pregnancy by clarifying the findings to be sought.

  13. Expanding the phenotype of congenital central hypoventilation syndrome impacts management decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byers, Heather M; Chen, Maida; Gelfand, Andrew S; Ong, Bruce; Jendras, Marisa; Glass, Ian A

    2018-04-25

    Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS) is a neurocristopathy caused by pathogenic heterozygous variants in the gene paired-like homeobox 2b (PHOX2B). It is characterized by severe infantile alveolar hypoventilation. Individuals may also have diffuse autonomic nervous system dysfunction, Hirschsprung disease and neural crest tumors. We report three individuals with CCHS due to an 8-base pair duplication in PHOX2B; c.691_698dupGGCCCGGG (p.Gly234Alafs*78) with a predominant enteral and neural crest phenotype and a relatively mild respiratory phenotype. The attenuated respiratory phenotype reported here and elsewhere suggests an emergent genotype:phenotype correlation which challenges the current paradigm of invoking mechanical ventilation for all infants diagnosed with CCHS. Best treatment requires careful clinical judgment and ideally the assistance of a care team with expertise in CCHS. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Klippel–Trenaunay syndrome in combination with congenital dislocation of the hip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Hu

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Klippel–Trenaunay syndrome (KTS is a rare and sporadic disorder characterized by the triad of capillary malformations, venous varicosities, and limb hypertrophy. The clinical manifestations of KTS are heterogeneous. In this report, we present a unique case of KTS in combination with congenital dislocation of the hip (CDH in a 4-day-old female neonate. The patient had a widespread port-wine stain surrounded by regions of unaffected skin in a mosaic pattern, cutaneous hemangioma on the upper lip, left-sided hemihypertrophy involving the entire body, and also evidence of left CDH (based on the results of a physical examination and radiographic interpretation. We present this case for the rarity of presentation, discuss the relationship between KTS and CDH, and the treatment options available with a brief review of the literature.

  15. Neonatal Bartter Syndrome in association with congenital adrenal hyperplasia in a neonate - a rare combination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Shabbir

    2016-05-01

    Neonatal Bartter syndrome (NBS) is an autosomal recessive renal tubulopathy characterized by hypokalaemic, hypochloraemic metabolic alkalosis associated with increased urinary loss of sodium, potassium, calcium and chloride. There is hyperreninaemia and hyperaldosteronaemia but normotension. Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH), another autosomal recessive condition, may present in the neonatal period with vomiting, hypovolaemia, failure to gain weight or ambiguous genitalia. We report a case of NBS and CAH combination in a neonate. A male neonate born at term was admitted with history of recurrent vomiting and dehydration episodes. Investigations revealed electrolytes imbalance, metabolic alkalosis, raised aldosterone and renin levels suggestive of NBS. He was treated successfully and discharged. He was re-admitted with the same symptoms. Further evaluation confirmed the presence of CAH as well. We report this case because of the rarity of this combination (NBS plus CAH) and to the best of our knowledge this is the first such case report from Pakistan.

  16. Bilateral congenital lacrimal fistulas in an adult as part of ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia-clefting syndrome: A rare anomaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Debangshu; Saha, Somnath; Basu, Sumit Kumar

    2015-10-01

    Ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia and clefting syndrome or "Lobster claw" deformity is a rare congenital anomaly that affects tissues of ectodermal and mesodermal origin. Nasolacrimal duct (NLD) obstruction with or without atresia of lacrimal passage is a common finding of such a syndrome. The authors report here even a rarer presentation of the syndrome which manifested as bilateral NLD obstruction and lacrimal fistula along with cleft lip and palate, syndactyly affecting all four limbs, mild mental retardation, otitis media, and sinusitis. Lacrimal duct obstruction and fistula were managed successfully with endoscopic dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR) which is a good alternative to lacrimal probing or open DCR in such a case.

  17. Bilateral congenital lacrimal fistulas in an adult as part of ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia-clefting syndrome: A rare anomaly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debangshu Ghosh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia and clefting syndrome or "Lobster claw" deformity is a rare congenital anomaly that affects tissues of ectodermal and mesodermal origin. Nasolacrimal duct (NLD obstruction with or without atresia of lacrimal passage is a common finding of such a syndrome. The authors report here even a rarer presentation of the syndrome which manifested as bilateral NLD obstruction and lacrimal fistula along with cleft lip and palate, syndactyly affecting all four limbs, mild mental retardation, otitis media, and sinusitis. Lacrimal duct obstruction and fistula were managed successfully with endoscopic dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR which is a good alternative to lacrimal probing or open DCR in such a case.

  18. Choline transporter mutations in severe congenital myasthenic syndrome disrupt transporter localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haicui; Salter, Claire G; Refai, Osama; Hardy, Holly; Barwick, Katy E S; Akpulat, Ugur; Kvarnung, Malin; Chioza, Barry A; Harlalka, Gaurav; Taylan, Fulya; Sejersen, Thomas; Wright, Jane; Zimmerman, Holly H; Karakaya, Mert; Stüve, Burkhardt; Weis, Joachim; Schara, Ulrike; Russell, Mark A; Abdul-Rahman, Omar A; Chilton, John; Blakely, Randy D; Baple, Emma L; Cirak, Sebahattin; Crosby, Andrew H

    2017-11-01

    The presynaptic, high-affinity choline transporter is a critical determinant of signalling by the neurotransmitter acetylcholine at both central and peripheral cholinergic synapses, including the neuromuscular junction. Here we describe an autosomal recessive presynaptic congenital myasthenic syndrome presenting with a broad clinical phenotype due to homozygous choline transporter missense mutations. The clinical phenotype ranges from the classical presentation of a congenital myasthenic syndrome in one patient (p.Pro210Leu), to severe neurodevelopmental delay with brain atrophy (p.Ser94Arg) and extend the clinical outcomes to a more severe spectrum with infantile lethality (p.Val112Glu). Cells transfected with mutant transporter construct revealed a virtually complete loss of transport activity that was paralleled by a reduction in transporter cell surface expression. Consistent with these findings, studies to determine the impact of gene mutations on the trafficking of the Caenorhabditis elegans choline transporter orthologue revealed deficits in transporter export to axons and nerve terminals. These findings contrast with our previous findings in autosomal dominant distal hereditary motor neuropathy of a dominant-negative frameshift mutation at the C-terminus of choline transporter that was associated with significantly reduced, but not completely abrogated choline transporter function. Together our findings define divergent neuropathological outcomes arising from different classes of choline transporter mutation with distinct disease processes and modes of inheritance. These findings underscore the essential role played by the choline transporter in sustaining acetylcholine neurotransmission at both central and neuromuscular synapses, with important implications for treatment and drug selection. © The Author (2017). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Pacing in congenital heart disease - A four-decade experience in a single tertiary centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midha, Disha; Chen, Zhong; Jones, David G; Williams, Howell J; Lascelles, Karen; Jarman, Julian; Clague, Jonathan; Till, Janice; Dimopoulos, Konstatinos; Babu-Narayan, Sonya V; Markides, Vias; Gatzoulis, Michael A; Wong, Tom

    2017-08-15

    The increased risk of brady- and tachy-arrhythmias in the congenital heart disease (CHD) population means that cardiac rhythm management devices are often required at an early age and expose patients to device-related complications. The present study drew upon four decades of experience at a tertiary adult congenital heart disease ACHD center and aimed to investigate the indication for cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) and predictors of late device-related complication requiring re-intervention. A retrospective review of pacing records of ACHD patients over forty years was carried out. The primary outcome measure was device related complication requiring re-intervention. Between 1970 and 2009, 238 structural CHD patients who received CIEDs with follow-up data were identified (structural group). As a comparator group, 98 patients with congenital conduction disease or long QT syndrome with a structurally normal heart (electrical group) were included in the study. During a mean follow-up of 9.6±8.5years, 72 (21%) patients (44 structural group, 28 electrical group) required ≥1 re-intervention due to device related complications. Multivariate analysis showed that age at the time of device implant was an independent predictor of late device-related complications (HR 0.77, 95% CI 0.60-0.98, p=0.04). Sub-analysis of the structural group showed that ACHD complexity (Bethesda guideline) was the only predictor late device-related complication in the structural group (HR 2.96, 95% CI: 1.67-5.26, p<0.01). Increasing age at device implant was inversely associated with late device-related complications. ACHD patients with complex anatomy are at increased risk of device-related complications at mid and long-term follow-up. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Prenatal detection of congenital bilateral cataract leading to the diagnosis of Nance-Horan syndrome in the extended family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reches, Adi; Yaron, Yuval; Burdon, Kathryn; Crystal-Shalit, Ornit; Kidron, Dvora; Malcov, Mira; Tepper, Ron

    2007-07-01

    To describe a family in which it was possible to perform prenatal diagnosis of Nance-Horan Syndrome (NHS). The fetus was evaluated by 2nd trimester ultrasound. The family underwent genetic counseling and ophthalmologic evaluation. The NHS gene was sequenced. Ultrasound demonstrated fetal bilateral congenital cataract. Clinical evaluation revealed other family members with cataract, leading to the diagnosis of NHS in the family. Sequencing confirmed a frameshift mutation (3908del11bp) in the NHS gene. Evaluation of prenatally diagnosed congenital cataract should include a multidisciplinary approach, combining experience and input from sonographer, clinical geneticist, ophthalmologist, and molecular geneticist.

  1. Recurrent progressive anterior segment fibrosis syndrome following a descemet-stripping endothelial keratoplasty in an infant with congenital aniridia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihir Kothari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Progressive anterior segment fibrosis syndrome (ASFS, after intraocular surgery in older children (≥9 years and adults with congenital aniridia, is described in the literature. In this report, we describe an unique case of ASFS in an infant with congenital aniridia following a combined trabeculotomy-ectomy and its recurrence after a descemet stripping endothelial keratoplasty. The ophthalmologists should be well aware of this entity and warn the parents about its possibilities. Use of immunomodulators or prolonged anti-inflammatory therapy may be considered to prevent its occurrence.

  2. Pediatric patient with systemic lupus erythematosus & congenital acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: An unusual case and a review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rezaee Fariba

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The coexistence of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE in patients with congenital human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection is rare. This is a case report of a child diagnosed with SLE at nine years of age. She initially did well on non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents, hydroxychloroquine, and steroids. She then discontinued her anti-lupus medications and was lost to follow-up. At 13 years of age, her lupus symptoms had resolved and she presented with intermittent fevers, cachexia, myalgias, arthralgias, and respiratory symptoms. Through subsequent investigations, the patient was ultimately diagnosed with congenitally acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS.

  3. Clinical Characteristics of Down Syndrome Children With Congenital Heart Disease in a Developing Country

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mottaghi Moghaddam

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background Down syndrome (DS is the most common chromosomal abnormality in newborns and is associated with other congenital malformations and health problems. The features of Down syndrome differ according to ethnicity and geographic region. Objectives The main aim was to assess the clinical characteristics of DS patients in a referral pediatric cardiology department. Patients and Methods In this cross-sectional study, we assessed the clinical characteristics of children with Down syndrome and heart defects in an educational hospital over 11 years (from September 2001 to September 2012 in Iran. All data were collected according to a checklist created by the researchers, which included the clinical information, genetic characteristics, cardiac and non-cardiac co-existing diseases, and parental variables of the children. An independent t-test and a chi-square test were used to compare qualitative variables such as birth weight and age of diagnosis. P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results 100 patients with Down syndrome and congenital heart disease were evaluated; 52 were female (52% and 48 were male (48%. The average birth weight of the subjects was 2745 ± 523 (mean ± SD grams. The mean age of the patients’ mothers was 32 ± 6 years, and the mean age of the patients’ fathers was 36 ± 6 years. Chromosomal analysis was performed for 61 patients, 60 of whom had free trisomy (98.4%, one of whom had translocation (1.6%, and none of whom had a mosaic pattern of chromosomal abnormality. The parents of 33 the patients in this study were consanguineous. All patients had cardiac disorders, but non-cardiac disorder also was recorded in 37 patients (37%. The most common non-cardiac disorder in patients was hypothyroidism, and the second most common was gastrointestinal problems. Conclusions Parents were blood relatives in 33 (33% of the patient cases, which is a very high rate. Therefore, non-random mating is an important issue in

  4. Congenital platelet function defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pool disorder; Glanzmann's thrombasthenia; Bernard-Soulier syndrome; Platelet function defects - congenital ... Congenital platelet function defects are bleeding disorders that cause reduced platelet function. Most of the time, people with these disorders have ...

  5. Congenital nephrotic syndrome may respond to cyclosporine A: A case report and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mulić Bilsana

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Congenital nephrotic syndrome (CNF is manifested at birth or within the first three months of life. The Finnish-type of CNF is caused by the mutation of the NPHS1 gene, which encodes nephrin in the podocyte slit diaphragm. It is a very severe disease, for which immunosuppressive therapy is not advised. Here we describe a patient with CNF who responded to CsA by partial remission. Case outline. A girl aged 2.5 months presented with severe non-syndromic steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome. She needed aggressive support including daily albumin infusions and diuretics. Substitution of vitamin D, thyroxin, and anticoagulants were regularly administered. She was also treated with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor, without clear benefits regarding proteinuria. In addition, she received intravenous gamma-globulin replacement therapy and antibiotics during frequent infections. While waiting for the results of genetic analyses and faced with many problems related to daily albumin infusions, infections, and thromboembolic complications, cyclosporine A (CsA was introduced as an alternative to early nephrectomy and consequent renal failure. The patient responded by partial remission and CsA treatment continued at home without the albumin infusions. After almost five years since the beginning of the treatment, the patient’s renal function remains unreduced. Conclusion. Our case demonstrates that CsA can induce partial remission in patients with genetic forms of steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome without influencing the glomerular filtration rate. However, its long-term effect and safety should carefully be monitored. [Project of the Ministry of Education, Science and Technological Development of Republic of Serbia, Grant No. 175079

  6. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV : unusual congenital anomalies in a mother and son with a COL3A1 mutation and a normal collagen III protein profile

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroes, HY; Pals, G; van Essen, AJ

    A mother and son with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) type IV and unusual congenital anomalies are described. The congenital anomalies include, in the mother, amniotic band-like constrictions on one hand, a unilateral clubfoot, and macrocephaly owing to normal-pressure hydrocephaly and, in the son, an

  7. Variations in NPHP5 in Patients With Nonsyndromic Leber Congenital Amaurosis and Senior-Loken Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Edwin M.; Cideciyan, Artur V.; Aleman, Tomas S.; Scheetz, Todd E.; Sumaroka, Alexander; Ehlinger, Mary A.; Schwartz, Sharon B.; Fishman, Gerald A.; Traboulsi, Elias I.; Lam, Byron L.; Fulton, Anne B.; Mullins, Robert F.; Sheffield, Val C.; Jacobson, Samuel G.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether mutations in NPHP5 can cause Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) without early-onset renal disease. Methods DNA samples from 276 individuals with non-syndromic LCA were screened for variations in the NPHP5 gene. Each had been previously screened for mutations in 8 known LCA genes without identifying a disease-causing genotype. Results Nine of the 276 LCA probands (3.2%) harbored 2 plausible disease-causing mutations (7 different alleles) in NPHP5. Four of these have been previously reported in patients with Senior-Loken syndrome (F141del, R461X, H506del, and R489X) and 3 are novel (A111del, E346X, and R455X). All 9 patients had severe visual loss from early childhood but none had overt renal disease in the first decade of life. Two patients were diagnosed with nephronophthisis in the second decade. Retinal imaging studies showed retained photoreceptor nuclei and retinal pigment epithelium integrity mainly in the cone-rich central retina, a phenotype with strong similarities to that of NPHP6 disease. Conclusions Mutations in NPHP5 can cause LCA without early-onset renal disease. Abnormalities observed in the photoreceptor outer segments (a cilial structure) may explain the severe visual loss in NPHP5-associated LCA. Clinical Relevance The persistence of central photoreceptor nuclei despite severe visual loss in NPHP5 disease is encouraging for future therapeutic interventions. PMID:21220633

  8. Global Progress Toward Rubella and Congenital Rubella Syndrome Control and Elimination - 2000-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Gavin B; Reef, Susan E; Dabbagh, Alya; Gacic-Dobo, Marta; Strebel, Peter M

    2015-09-25

    Rubella virus usually causes a mild fever and rash in children and adults. However, infection during pregnancy, especially during the first trimester, can result in miscarriage, fetal death, stillbirth, or a constellation of congenital malformations known as congenital rubella syndrome (CRS). In 2011, the World Health Organization (WHO) updated guidance on the preferred strategy for introduction of rubella-containing vaccine (RCV) into national routine immunization schedules, including an initial vaccination campaign usually targeting children aged 9 months-15 years . The Global Vaccine Action Plan endorsed by the World Health Assembly in 2012 and the Global Measles and Rubella Strategic Plan (2012-2020) published by Measles and Rubella Initiative partners in 2012 both include goals to eliminate rubella and CRS in at least two WHO regions by 2015, and at least five WHO regions by 2020 (2,3). This report updates a previous report and summarizes global progress toward rubella and CRS control and elimination during 2000-2014. As of December 2014, RCV had been introduced in 140 (72%) countries, an increase from 99 (51%) countries in 2000 (for this report, WHO member states are referred to as countries). Reported rubella cases declined 95%, from 670,894 cases in 102 countries in 2000 to 33,068 cases in 162 countries in 2014, although reporting is inconsistent. To achieve the 2020 Global Vaccine Action Plan rubella and CRS elimination goals, RCV introduction needs to continue as country criteria indicating readiness are met, and rubella and CRS surveillance need to be strengthened to ensure that progress toward elimination can be measured.

  9. Screening of Long Q-T Syndrome in Patients with Congenital Sensorineural Hearing Loss (Jervell and Lange Neilesen Syndrome: Prevention of Fatal Events

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    Farid Matin

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective:The idiopathic long Q-T syndrome is an infrequently occurring disorder in which affected individuals have an unusual electrocardiographic repolarization abnormality presenting as syncope or loss of consciousness related to ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation. Congenital long Q-T prolongation can be associated with congenital deafness in an autosomal recessive manner (Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome. The purpose of this stuff was to screen this electrocardiographic abnormality in deaf-mute school children in our population, which has not been yet performed. Materials & Methods:  Of 1190 patients with hearing loss, 779 had congenital sensorineural deafness (CSD, aged 13±3.8 years (4-24, 63% female and 37% male. The family history of deafness was as follows: Cardiac axis deviation was found in 56 (7% patients. Electrical conduction abnormalities were found in 12 (15% patients, Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, sinus bradycardia, and sinus arrhythmia were found in 2 (0.25%, 4 (0.5%, and 3 (0.38% patients, respectively. The Q-T interval, and Q-Tc duration were 312.6±28.9 ms (200-500 ms, median 320 ms, and 383.6±29.3 ms (232-527 ms, median 413ms, respectively. Long Q-T syndrome was found in 4 (0.5% patients (3F and 1M. Results: Two of these 4 patients had total deafness and 2 had profound hearing loss. None of the patients with mild deafness had Q-T prolongation. Only one of these patients was symptomatic, and had been treated as a case of epilepsy for several years. Conclusion: This data supports the presence of long Q-T syndrome in patients with sensorineural hearing loss in our population, so routine electrocardiographic screening of anyone with congenital deafness is warranted to prevent subsequent associated cardiac arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death.

  10. Novel PIGT Variant in Two Brothers: Expansion of the Multiple Congenital Anomalies-Hypotonia Seizures Syndrome 3 Phenotype

    OpenAIRE

    Skauli, Nadia; Wallace, Sean; Chiang, Samuel C. C.; Bar?y, Tuva; Holmgren, Asbj?rn; Stray-Pedersen, Asbj?rg; Bryceson, Yenan T.; Str?mme, Petter; Frengen, Eirik; Misceo, Doriana

    2016-01-01

    Biallelic PIGT variants were previously reported in seven patients from three families with Multiple Congenital Anomalies-Hypotonia Seizures Syndrome 3 (MCAHS3), characterized by epileptic encephalopathy, hypotonia, global developmental delay/intellectual disability, cerebral and cerebellar atrophy, craniofacial dysmorphisms, and skeletal, ophthalmological, cardiac, and genitourinary abnormalities. We report a novel homozygous PIGT missense variant c.1079G>T (p.Gly360Val) in two brothers w...

  11. Coffin-Siris syndrome with the rarest constellation of congenital cardiac defects: A case report with review of literature

    OpenAIRE

    Nemani, Lalita; Barik, Ramachandra; Patnaik, Amar Narayana; Mishra, Ramesh C; Rao, Amaresh M; Kapur, Pragati

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of type-A Coffin-Siris syndrome (CSS) with a unique constellation of congenital heart defects. A 17-year-old Indian boy was referred to our hospital for central cyanosis with features of right heart failure. The cardiac abnormalities included biventricular outflow tract obstruction, small atrial septal defect (ASD), subaortic ventricular septal defect, drainage of left superior venacava to left atrial appendage, and aortic arch anomaly. Patient underwent successful right vent...

  12. Spectrum of steroid-resistant and congenital nephrotic syndrome in children: the PodoNet registry cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trautmann, Agnes; Bodria, Monica; Ozaltin, Fatih; Gheisari, Alaleh; Melk, Anette; Azocar, Marta; Anarat, Ali; Caliskan, Salim; Emma, Francesco; Gellermann, Jutta; Oh, Jun; Baskin, Esra; Ksiazek, Joanna; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Erdogan, Ozlem; Akman, Sema; Dusek, Jiri; Davitaia, Tinatin; Özkaya, Ozan; Papachristou, Fotios; Firszt-Adamczyk, Agnieszka; Urasinski, Tomasz; Testa, Sara; Krmar, Rafael T; Hyla-Klekot, Lidia; Pasini, Andrea; Özcakar, Z Birsin; Sallay, Peter; Cakar, Nilgun; Galanti, Monica; Terzic, Joelle; Aoun, Bilal; Caldas Afonso, Alberto; Szymanik-Grzelak, Hanna; Lipska, Beata S; Schnaidt, Sven; Schaefer, Franz

    2015-04-07

    Steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome is a rare kidney disease involving either immune-mediated or genetic alterations of podocyte structure and function. The rare nature, heterogeneity, and slow evolution of the disorder are major obstacles to systematic genotype-phenotype, intervention, and outcome studies, hampering the development of evidence-based diagnostic and therapeutic concepts. To overcome these limitations, the PodoNet Consortium has created an international registry for congenital nephrotic syndrome and childhood-onset steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome. Since August of 2009, clinical, biochemical, genetic, and histopathologic information was collected both retrospectively and prospectively from 1655 patients with childhood-onset steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome, congenital nephrotic syndrome, or persistent subnephrotic proteinuria of likely genetic origin at 67 centers in 21 countries through an online portal. Steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome manifested in the first 5 years of life in 64% of the patients. Congenital nephrotic syndrome accounted for 6% of all patients. Extrarenal abnormalities were reported in 17% of patients. The most common histopathologic diagnoses were FSGS (56%), minimal change nephropathy (21%), and mesangioproliferative GN (12%). Mutation screening was performed in 1174 patients, and a genetic disease cause was identified in 23.6% of the screened patients. Among 14 genes with reported mutations, abnormalities in NPHS2 (n=138), WT1 (n=48), and NPHS1 (n=41) were most commonly identified. The proportion of patients with a genetic disease cause decreased with increasing manifestation age: from 66% in congenital nephrotic syndrome to 15%-16% in schoolchildren and adolescents. Among various intensified immunosuppressive therapy protocols, calcineurin inhibitors and rituximab yielded consistently high response rates, with 40%-45% of patients achieving complete remission. Confirmation of a genetic diagnosis but not the

  13. Quantitative Assessment of Microstructural Changes of the Retina in Infants With Congenital Zika Syndrome.

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    Aleman, Tomas S; Ventura, Camila V; Cavalcanti, Milena M; Serrano, Leona W; Traband, Anastasia; Nti, Akosua A; Gois, Adriana L; Bravo-Filho, Vasco; Martins, Thayze T; Nichols, Charles W; Maia, Mauricio; Belfort, Rubens

    2017-10-01

    A better pathophysiologic understanding of the neurodevelopmental abnormalities observed in neonates exposed in utero to Zika virus (ZIKV) is needed to develop treatments. The retina as an extension of the diencephalon accessible to in vivo microcopy with spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) can provide an insight into the pathophysiology of congenital Zika syndrome (CZS). To quantify the microstructural changes of the retina in CZS and compare these changes with those of cobalamin C (cblC) deficiency, a disease with potential retinal maldevelopment. This case series included 8 infants with CZS and 8 individuals with cblC deficiency. All patients underwent ophthalmologic evaluation at 2 university teaching hospitals and SD-OCT imaging in at least 1 eye. Patients with cblC deficiency were homozygous or compound heterozygotes for mutations in the methylmalonic aciduria and homocystinuria type C (MMACHC) gene. Data were collected from January 1 to March 17, 2016, for patients with CZS and from May 4, 2015, to April 23, 2016, for patients with cblC deficiency. The SD-OCT cross-sections were segmented using automatic segmentation algorithms embedded in the SD-OCT systems. Each retinal layer thickness was measured at critical eccentricities using the position of the signal peaks and troughs on longitudinal reflectivity profiles. Eight infants with CZS (5 girls and 3 boys; age range, 3-5 months) and 8 patients with cblC deficiency (3 girls and 5 boys; age range, 4 months to 15 years) were included in the analysis. All 8 patients with CZS had foveal abnormalities in the analyzed eyes (8 eyes), including discontinuities of the ellipsoid zone, thinning of the central retina with increased backscatter, and severe structural disorganization, with 3 eyes showing macular pseudocolobomas. Pericentral retina with normal lamination showed a thinned (<30% of normal thickness) ganglion cell layer (GCL) that colocalized in 7 of 8 eyes with a normal photoreceptor layer

  14. Novel Calmodulin (CALM2) Mutations Associated with Congenital Arrhythmia Susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makita, Naomasa; Yagihara, Nobue; Crotti, Lia; Johnson, Christopher N.; Beckmann, Britt-Maria; Roh, Michelle S.; Shigemizu, Daichi; Lichtner, Peter; Ishikawa, Taisuke; Aiba, Takeshi; Homfray, Tessa; Behr, Elijah R.; Klug, Didier; Denjoy, Isabelle; Mastantuono, Elisa; Theisen, Daniel; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Satake, Wataru; Toda, Tatsushi; Nakagawa, Hidewaki; Tsuji, Yukiomi; Tsuchiya, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Hirokazu; Miyamoto, Yoshihiro; Endo, Naoto; Kimura, Akinori; Ozaki, Kouichi; Motomura, Hideki; Suda, Kenji; Tanaka, Toshihiro; Schwartz, Peter J.; Meitinger, Thomas; Kääb, Stefan; Guicheney, Pascale; Shimizu, Wataru; Bhuiyan, Zahurul A.; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Chazin, Walter J.; George, Alfred L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Genetic predisposition to life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias such as in congenital long-QT syndrome (LQTS) and catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT) represent treatable causes of sudden cardiac death in young adults and children. Recently, mutations in calmodulin (CALM1, CALM2) have been associated with severe forms of LQTS and CPVT, with life-threatening arrhythmias occurring very early in life. Additional mutation-positive cases are needed to discern genotype-phenotype correlations associated with calmodulin mutations. Methods and Results We employed conventional and next-generation sequencing approaches including exome analysis in genotype-negative LQTS probands. We identified five novel de novo missense mutations in CALM2 in three subjects with LQTS (p.N98S, p.N98I, p.D134H) and two subjects with clinical features of both LQTS and CPVT (p.D132E, p.Q136P). Age of onset of major symptoms (syncope or cardiac arrest) ranged from 1–9 years. Three of five probands had cardiac arrest and one of these subjects did not survive. Although all probands had LQTS, two subjects also exhibited electrocardiographic features consistent with CPVT. The clinical severity among subjects in this series was generally less than that originally reported for CALM1 and CALM2 associated with recurrent cardiac arrest during infancy. Four of five probands responded to β-blocker therapy whereas one subject with mutation p.Q136P died suddenly during exertion despite this treatment. Mutations affect conserved residues located within calcium binding loops III (p.N98S, p.N98I) or IV (p.D132E, p.D134H, p.Q136P) and caused reduced calcium binding affinity. Conclusions CALM2 mutations can be associated with LQTS and with overlapping features of LQTS and CPVT. PMID:24917665

  15. Implantable cardioverter defibrillator therapy in pediatric and congenital heart disease patients: a single tertiary center experience in Korea

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    Bo Kyung Jin

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The use of implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs to prevent sudden cardiac death is increasing in children and adolescents. This study investigated the use of ICDs in children with congenital heart disease. Methods: This retrospective study was conducted on the clinical characteristics and effectiveness of ICD implantation at the department of pediatrics of a single tertiary center between 2007 and 2011. Results: Fifteen patients underwent ICD implantation. Their mean age at the time of implantation was 14.5±5.4 years (range, 2 to 22 years. The follow-up duration was 28.9±20.4 months. The cause of ICD implantation was cardiac arrest in 7, sustained ventricular tachycardia in 6, and syncope in 2 patients. The underlying disorders were as follows: ionic channelopathy in 6 patients (long QT type 3 in 4, catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia [CPVT] in 1, and J wave syndrome in 1, cardiomyopathy in 5 patients, and postoperative congenital heart disease in 4 patients. ICD coils were implanted in the pericardial space in 2 children (ages 2 and 6 years. Five patients received appropriate ICD shock therapy, and 2 patients received inappropriate shocks due to supraventricular tachycardia.During follow-up, 2 patients required lead dysfunction-related revision. One patient with CPVT suffered from an ICD storm that was resolved using sympathetic denervation surgery. Conclusion: The overall ICD outcome was acceptable in most pediatric patients. Early diagnosis and timely ICD implantation are recommended for preventing sudden death in high-risk children and patients with congenital heart disease.

  16. Associated genetic syndromes and extracardiac malformations strongly influence outcomes of fetuses with congenital heart diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensemlali, Myriam; Bajolle, Fanny; Ladouceur, Magalie; Fermont, Laurent; Lévy, Marilyne; Le Bidois, Jérôme; Salomon, Laurent J; Bonnet, Damien

    2016-05-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) is often associated with extracardiac malformations (ECMs) and genetic syndromes. To determine the effect of cytogenetic anomalies and/or ECMs associated with CHD on parental decision to choose termination of pregnancy (TOP) or compassionate care (CC), as well as on the outcome of children born alive. This 10-year retrospective study included all prenatally diagnosed cases of CHD in a single tertiary referral centre. From January 2002 to December 2011, 2036 consecutive cases of fetal CHD (798 TOPs and 1238 live births, including 59 with postnatal CC) were included. CHD was associated with a known cytogenetic anomaly in 9.8% of cases and a major ECM in 11.7% of cases. The proportion of prenatally identified associated cytogenetic anomalies was significantly lower in the live-birth group than in the TOP plus CC group (4.2% vs 17.5%; P<0.001); this was also true for ECMs (8.1% vs 16.7%; P<0.001). The mortality rate was higher in the group with an associated cytogenetic anomaly or ECM (29.1%) than in cases with isolated CHD; a 2.4-fold increase in the death rate was observed (95% confidence interval 1.34-4.38; P=0.003). These associations remained significant after multivariable analysis, including the severity of the CHD (uni- or biventricular physiology). Prenatal diagnosis of a known cytogenetic anomaly or major ECM strongly influences parental decision to choose TOP or postnatal CC. Genetic syndromes and ECMs are associated with a higher mortality rate, independent of the complexity of the CHD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Cognitive Impairment and Brain Imaging Characteristics of Patients with Congenital Cataracts, Facial Dysmorphism, Neuropathy Syndrome

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    Teodora Chamova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital cataracts, facial dysmorphism, neuropathy (CCFDN syndrome is a complex autosomal recessive multisystem disorder. The aim of the current study is to evaluate the degree of cognitive impairment in a cohort of 22 CCFDN patients and its correlation with patients’ age, motor disability, ataxia, and neuroimaging changes. Twenty-two patients with genetically confirmed diagnosis of CCFDN underwent a detailed neurological examination. Verbal and nonverbal intelligence, memory, executive functions, and verbal fluency wеre assessed in all the patients aged 4 to 47 years. Brain magnetic resonance imaging was performed in 20 affected patients. Eighteen affected were classified as having mild intellectual deficit, whereas 4 had borderline intelligence. In all psychometric tests, evaluating different cognitive domains, CCFDN patients had statistically significant lower scores when compared to the healthy control group. All cognitive domains seemed equally affected. The main abnormalities on brain MRI found in 19/20 patients included diffuse cerebral atrophy, enlargement of the lateral ventricles, and focal lesions in the subcortical white matter, different in number and size, consistent with demyelination more pronounced in the older CCFDN patients. The correlation analysis of the structural brain changes and the cognitive impairment found a statistically significant correlation only between the impairment of short-term verbal memory and the MRI changes.

  18. Drosophila studies support a role for a presynaptic synaptotagmin mutation in a human congenital myasthenic syndrome.

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    Mallory C Shields

    Full Text Available During chemical transmission, the function of synaptic proteins must be coordinated to efficiently release neurotransmitter. Synaptotagmin 2, the Ca2+ sensor for fast, synchronized neurotransmitter release at the human neuromuscular junction, has recently been implicated in a dominantly inherited congenital myasthenic syndrome associated with a non-progressive motor neuropathy. In one family, a proline residue within the C2B Ca2+-binding pocket of synaptotagmin is replaced by a leucine. The functional significance of this residue has not been investigated previously. Here we show that in silico modeling predicts disruption of the C2B Ca2+-binding pocket, and we examine the in vivo effects of the homologous mutation in Drosophila. When expressed in the absence of native synaptotagmin, this mutation is lethal, demonstrating for the first time that this residue plays a critical role in synaptotagmin function. To achieve expression similar to human patients, the mutation is expressed in flies carrying one copy of the wild type synaptotagmin gene. We now show that Drosophila carrying this mutation developed neurological and behavioral manifestations similar to those of human patients and provide insight into the mechanisms underlying these deficits. Our Drosophila studies support a role for this synaptotagmin point mutation in disease etiology.

  19. Congenital cervical kyphosis in an infant with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobets, Andrew J; Komlos, Daniel; Houten, John K

    2018-07-01

    Ehler-Danlos syndome (EDS) refers to a group of heritable connective tissue disorders; rare manifestations of which are cervical kyphosis and clinical myelopathy. Surgical treatment is described for the deformity in the thoracolumbar spine in adolescents but not for infantile cervical spine. Internal fixation for deformity correction in the infantile cervical spine is challenging due to the diminutive size of the bony anatomy and the lack of spinal instrumentation specifically designed for young children. We describe the first case of successful surgical treatment in an infant with a high cervical kyphotic deformity in EDS. A 15-month-old female with EDS presented with several months of regression in gross motor skills in all four extremities. Imaging demonstrated 45° of kyphosis from the C2-4 levels with spinal cord compression. Corrective surgery consisted of a C3 corpectomy and C2-4 anterior fusion with allograft block and anterior fixation with dual 2 × 2 hole craniofacial miniplates, supplemented by C2-4 posterior fusion using four craniofacial miniplates fixated to the lamina. Radiographs at 20 months post-surgery demonstrated solid fusion both anteriorly and posteriorly with maintenance of correction. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome may present in the pediatric population with congenital kyphosis from cervical deformity in addition to the more commonly seen thoracolumbar deformities.

  20. Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Caused by Biallelic TNXB Variants in Patients with Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wuyan; Perritt, Ashley F; Morissette, Rachel; Dreiling, Jennifer L; Bohn, Markus-Frederik; Mallappa, Ashwini; Xu, Zhi; Quezado, Martha; Merke, Deborah P

    2016-09-01

    Some variants that cause autosomal-recessive congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) also cause hypermobility type Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) due to the monoallelic presence of a chimera disrupting two flanking genes: CYP21A2, encoding 21-hydroxylase, necessary for cortisol and aldosterone biosynthesis, and TNXB, encoding tenascin-X, an extracellular matrix protein. Two types of CAH tenascin-X (CAH-X) chimeras have been described with a total deletion of CYP21A2 and characteristic TNXB variants. CAH-X CH-1 has a TNXB exon 35 120-bp deletion resulting in haploinsufficiency, and CAH-X CH-2 has a TNXB exon 40 c.12174C>G (p.Cys4058Trp) variant resulting in a dominant-negative effect. We present here three patients with biallelic CAH-X and identify a novel dominant-negative chimera termed CAH-X CH-3. Compared with monoallelic CAH-X, biallelic CAH-X results in a more severe phenotype with skin features characteristic of classical EDS. We present evidence for disrupted tenascin-X function and computational data linking the type of TNXB variant to disease severity. © 2016 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  1. Association between congenital heart defects and severe infections in children with Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, Paula Foresti; Nicolau, Juliana Augusta Zeglin; Melek, Marina Zaponi; de Oliveira, Nanci de Santa Palmieri; Bermudez, Beatriz Elizabeth Bagatin Veleda; Nisihara, Renato Mitsunori

    2014-01-01

    There is a high prevalence of congenital heart disease (CHD) in Down syndrome (DS) patients. Children with DS and CHD also present greater susceptibility to pulmonary infections than those without CHD. To investigate the prevalence and types of CHD and their association with severe infections in children with DS in southern Brazil seen in a reference outpatient clinic. Children aged between six and 48 months with a diagnosis of DS were included consecutively in the period May 2001 to May 2012, and the presence of CHD and severe infections (pneumonia and sepsis) was investigated, classified and analyzed. A total of 127 patients were included, of whom 89 (70.1%) had some type of CHD, 33 (37.7%) of them requiring surgical correction. Severe infections (pneumonia and sepsis) were seen in 23.6% and 5.5%, respectively. Of the cases of pneumonia, 70% had associated CHD (p=0.001) and of those with sepsis, 85% presented CHD (p=0.001). Our study showed a high prevalence of CHD and its association with severe infections in children with DS seen in southern Brazil. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  2. Congenital rubella syndrome and autism spectrum disorder prevented by rubella vaccination - United States, 2001-2010

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    Omer Saad B

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Congenital rubella syndrome (CRS is associated with several negative outcomes, including autism spectrum disorders (ASDs. The objective of this study was to estimate the numbers of CRS and ASD cases prevented by rubella vaccination in the United States from 2001 through 2010. Methods Prevention estimates were calculated through simple mathematical modeling, with values of model parameters determined from published literature. Model parameters included pre-vaccine era CRS incidence, vaccine era CRS incidence, the number of live births per year, and the percentage of CRS cases presenting with an ASD. Results Based on our estimates, 16,600 CRS cases (range: 8300-62,250 were prevented by rubella vaccination from 2001 through 2010 in the United States. An estimated 1228 ASD cases were prevented by rubella vaccination in the United States during this time period. Simulating a slight expansion in ASD diagnostic criteria in recent decades, we estimate that a minimum of 830 ASD cases and a maximum of 6225 ASD cases were prevented. Conclusions We estimate that rubella vaccination prevented substantial numbers of CRS and ASD cases in the United States from 2001 through 2010. These findings provide additional incentive to maintain high measles-mumps-rubella (MMR vaccination coverage.

  3. Lethal congenital contracture syndrome (LCCS) and other lethal arthrogryposes in Finland--an epidemiological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakkasjärvi, Niklas; Ritvanen, Annukka; Herva, Riitta; Peltonen, Leena; Kestilä, Marjo; Ignatius, Jaakko

    2006-09-01

    Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita is a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by multiple contractures with an estimated frequency of 1 in 3,000 births. With improving diagnostic methods, increasing numbers of fetuses with arthrogryposis are found. The pathogenetic mechanisms are relatively well known but the epidemiology and genetics of the prenatally lethal forms of arthrogryposis are less well known. In this study we collected all cases of a multiple contractures diagnosed in Finland during 1987-2002 including live born infants, stillbirths, and terminated pregnancies. Ninety-two cases of 214 suffered intrauterine demise (68 selective pregnancy terminations and 24 stillbirths) and 58 died in infancy. In 141 out of these cases the diagnosis could be included within lethal arthrogryposes, with a prevalence of 1 in 6,985 (1.43/10,000) births. Of these, 59 had spinal cord pathology at autopsy and thus were of neurogenic origin. Thirty-nine cases had lethal congenital contracture syndrome (LCCS) clinically characterized by total immobility of the fetus at all ultrasound examinations (12 weeks or later), multiple joint contractures in both upper and lower limbs, hydrops, and fetal death before the 32nd week of pregnancy. LCCS is noted as a unique Finnish disorder with a prevalence of 1 in 25,250 (0.40/10,000) births and is a major cause of lethal arthrogryposis in Finland.

  4. Loss of smell but not taste in adult women with Turner's syndrome and other congenital hypogonadisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ros, Cristina; Alobid, Isam; Centellas, Silvia; Balasch, Juan; Mullol, Joaquim; Castelo-Branco, Camil

    2012-11-01

    To assess the impact of Turner's syndrome (TS) and other congenital hypogonadisms (OCH) on the sense of smell and taste. An analytical study of three independent cohorts was designed: patients affected by TS, OCH, and a control group of healthy women taking contraception. Gynaecological Endocrinology Unit and Smell Clinic in Rhinology Unit of Hospital Clinic of Barcelona. Thirty TS patients between 20 and 50 years of age receiving hormone replacement treatment (HT) were included as the exposed cohort; fourteen age-matched women with OCH taking HT were recruited; forty-three age-matched healthy controls receiving hormone contraception treatment were selected as the control group. This group was matched with an historical cohort of forty healthy women without contraception, used to validate BAST-24 in Hospital Clinic of Barcelona. Clinical history, presence of nasal symptoms, general physical examination, nasal endoscopy, and Barcelona Smell Test-24 (BAST-24) and gustometry were carried out on all patients. TS physical dysmorphology features, intensity of nasal symptoms and signs of nasal obstruction were collected. BAST-24 test included 24 odours to assess both sensory (detection, memory and forced choice) and sensitivity (intensity, irritability, freshness and pleasantness) odour characteristics, as well as 4 tastes to evaluate taste domains (detection and forced choice). Healthy women taking hormone contraception felt odours with more intensity (p=0.002) and less irritability (psmell memory (psmell but not of taste, compared to OCH and healthy controls taking contraception. Smell sensitivity was not affected. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A novel syndrome of abnormal striatum and congenital cataract: evidence for linkage to chromosomes 11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Owain, M; Al-Zahrani, J; Al-Bakheet, A; Abudheim, N; Al-Younes, B; Aldhalaan, H; Al-Zaidan, H; Colak, D; Almohaileb, F; Abouzied, M E; Al-Fadhli, F; Meyer, B; Kaya, N

    2013-09-01

    We report a consanguineous family of three girls and one boy affected with a novel syndrome involving the lens and the basal ganglia. The phenotype is strikingly similar between affected siblings with cognitive impairment, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), microcephaly, growth retardation, congenital cataract, and dystonia. The magnetic resonance imaging showed unusual pattern of swelling of the caudate heads and thinning of the putamina with severe degree of hypometabolism on the [18F] deoxyglucose positron emission tomography. Furthermore, the clinical assessment provides the evidence that the neurological phenotype is very slowly progressive. We utilized the 10K single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) microarray genotyping for linkage analysis. Genome-wide scan indicated a 45.9-Mb region with a 4.2353 logarithm of the odds score on chromosome 11. Affymetrix genome-wide human SNP array 6.0 assay did not show any gross chromosomal abnormality. Targeted sequencing of two candidate genes within the linkage interval (PAX6 and B3GALTL) as well as mtDNA genome sequencing did not reveal any putative mutations. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Vocal cord collapse during phrenic nerve-paced respiration in congenital central hypoventilation syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domanski, Mark C; Preciado, Diego A

    2012-01-01

    Phrenic nerve pacing can be used to treat congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS). We report how the lack of normal vocal cord tone during phrenic paced respiration can result in passive vocal cord collapse and produce obstructive symptoms. We describe a case of passive vocal cord collapse during phrenic nerve paced respiration in a patient with CCHS. As far as we know, this is the first report of this etiology of airway obstruction. The patient, a 7-year-old with CCHS and normal waking vocal cord movement, continued to require nightly continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) despite successful utilization of phrenic nerve pacers. On direct laryngoscopy, the patient's larynx was observed while the diaphragmatic pacers were sequentially engaged. No abnormal vocal cord stimulation was witnessed during engaging of either phrenic nerve stimulator. However, the lack of normal inspiratory vocal cord abduction during phrenic nerve-paced respiration resulted in vocal cord collapse and partial obstruction due to passive adduction of the vocal cords through the Bernoulli effect. Bilateral phrenic nerve stimulation resulted in more vocal cord collapse than unilateral stimulation. The lack of vocal cord abduction on inspiration presents a limit to phrenic nerve pacers.

  7. Congenital diaphragmatic hernia may be associated with 17q12 microdeletion syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goumy, Carole; Laffargue, Fanny; Eymard-Pierre, Eléonore; Kemeny, Stéphen; Gay-Bellile, Mathilde; Gouas, Laetiti; Gallot, Denis; Francannet, Christine; Tchirkov, Andrei; Pebrel-Richard, Céline; Vago, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Microdeletions of 17q12 encompassing TCF2 are associated with maturity-onset of diabetes of the young type 5, cystic renal disease, pancreatic atrophy, Mullerian aplasia in females and variable cognitive impairment. We report on a patient with a de novo 17q12 microdeletion, 1.8 Mb in size, associated with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH). The 5-year-old male patient presented multicystic renal dysplasia kidneys, minor facial dysmorphic features and skeletal anomalies, but neither developmental delay nor behavioral abnormalities. CDH has been previously associated with the 17q12 microdeletion syndrome only in one prenatal case. The present study reinforces the hypothesis that CDH is part of the phenotype for 17q12 microdeletion and that 17q12 encompasses candidate(s) gene(s) involved in diaphragm development. We suggest that PIGW, a gene involved in an early step of GPI biosynthesis, could be a strong candidate gene for CDH. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Congenital hypothyroidism due to ectopic sublingual thyroid gland in Prader-Willi Syndrome: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocchini, Sarah; Fintini, Danilo; Grugni, Graziano; Boiani, Arianna; Convertino, Alessio; Crinò, Antonino

    2017-09-22

    Thyroid gland disorders are variably associated with Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS). Many of the clinical features in newborns with PWS are similar to those found in congenital hypothyroidism (CH). We report a case of a girl with CH and PWS. At the age of 9 months CH caused by an ectopic sublingual thyroid was diagnosed, and hormone replacement therapy was started. In spite of this treatment a decrease in growth velocity, weight excess and delayed development were observed. At the age of 9 years PWS was suspected on the basis of phenotype and genetic tests confirmed a maternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 15. This is the second reported case of hypothyroidism due to an ectopic sublingual thyroid gland in PWS suggesting that, although rare, an association between CH and PWS may exist. In our case diagnosis of PWS was delayed because mental retardation, hypotonia, obesity and short stature were initially attributed to hypothyroidism. In this context PWS should be considered in obese children with CH who do not improve adequately with l-thyroxine therapy. Also, thyroid function in all PWS children should be assessed regularly in order to avoid delayed diagnosis of hypothyroidism.

  9. An outbreak investigation of congenital rubella syndrome in Solomon Islands, 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kara N Durski

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: During May 2012, a rubella outbreak was declared in Solomon Islands. A suspected case of congenital rubella syndrome (CRS was reported from one hospital 11 months later in 2013. This report describes the subsequent CRS investigation, findings and measures implemented. Methods: Prospective CRS surveillance was conducted at the newborn nursery, paediatric and post-natal wards, and the paediatric cardiology and ophthalmology clinics of the study hospital from April to July 2013. Retrospective case finding by reviewing medical records was also undertaken to identify additional cases born between January and March 2013 for the same wards and clinics. Cases were identified using established World Health Organization case definitions for CRS. Results: A total of 13 CRS cases were identified, including two laboratory-confirmed, four clinically confirmed and seven suspected cases. Five CRS cases were retrospectively identified, including four suspected and one clinically confirmed case. There was no geospatial clustering of residences. The mothers of the cases were aged between 20 and 36 years. Three of the six mothers available for interview recalled an acute illness with rash during the first trimester of pregnancy. Discussion: Additional CRS cases not captured in this investigation are likely. Caring for CRS cases is a challenge in resource-poor settings. Rubella vaccination is safe and effective and can prevent the serious consequences of CRS. Well-planned and funded vaccination activities can prevent future CRS cases.

  10. Biphasic response of subscapular skinfold thickness to hGH or IGF-1 administration to patients with congenital IGHD, congenital MPHD and Laron syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisker-Kassif, Orly; Kauli, Rivka; Lilos, Pearl; Laron, Zvi

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate changes in adiposity in congenital GH/IGF-1 deficient children during hGH or IGF-1 treatment. 27 children with congenital isolated growth hormone deficiency (cIGHD) treated with hGH for 2.5-€“15.2 years (mean 10.0 ± 3.4), 18 children with congenital multiple pituitary hormone deficiency (cMPHD), treated with hGH for 2.3-€“17.9 years (mean 6.1 ± 4.3), and 14 children with Laron syndrome (LS) treated with IGF-1 for 1.2-12 years (mean 5.5 ± 3.7) were studied. Changes in the degree of adiposity were evaluated by subscapular skinfold thickness (SSFT), before, during and up to 2 years after treatment. All the children had various degrees of obesity. During the pretreatment period, cIGHD patients showed little changes in SSFT (P = 0.45), cMPHD and LS patients showed an increase in SSFT (P = 0.01, P = 0.06 respectively). During the initial 0.6-1.1 years of hGH/IGF-1 treatment, the SSFT decreased in all 3 groups (P < 0.001), while during subsequent years a significant increase in SSFT (P < 0.001) was observed, in all types of patients, notably in females. Only the cIGHD patients demonstrated a significant correlation between the degree of SSFT decrease and height SDS gain (R = -ˆ’0.56, P = 0.002) in the first period of treatment. Short term replacement therapy of 0.6-€“1.1 years with either hGH or IGF-1, induced a reduction in subscapular subcutaneous fat whereas prolongation of therapy led to an increase in the subcutaneous fat. © 2014 Asian Oceanian Association for the Study of Obesity . Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Hirschsprung disease and congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT): a novel syndromic association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pini Prato, Alessio; Musso, Marco; Ceccherini, Isabella; Mattioli, Girolamo; Giunta, Camilla; Ghiggeri, Gian Marco; Jasonni, Vincenzo

    2009-03-01

    Congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT) can be associated with Hirschsprung disease (HSCR). Based on the common genetic background of enteric nervous system and kidney development, the reported association of CAKUT and HSCR seems underestimated. Therefore, we designed a prospective study aimed at determining the prevalence of CAKUT in HSCR patients and at identifying RET, glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), and GDNF family receptor alpha1 (GFRalpha1) mutations or haplotypes associated with this subset of HSCR patients. Eighty-four HSCR patients consecutively admitted to our department between July 2006 and July 2007 underwent interviews, notes review, ultrasound screening (further investigation according to detected anomaly), urinalysis, and DNA extraction for molecular genetics study. Another 27 patients with isolated CAKUT were included as a control group for the molecular genetics study. Twenty-one patients (25%) with HSCR had associated CAKUT, with hydronephrosis and hypoplasia being the most frequent diagnoses. Nine of 21 CAKUT were symptomatic. Six additional patients had other non-CAKUT anomalies (for example, stones, Barter syndrome) that were excluded from association and molecular genetics analysis to avoid bias of inclusion criteria. RET mutations were found in 5 patients (4 HSCR, 1 HSCR + CAKUT, 0 CAKUT) and GDNF mutations in 3 (2 HSCR, 1 CAKUT, 0 HSCR + CAKUT). No GFRalpha1 mutations were found. Finally, the HSCR-predisposing T haplotype of RET proto-oncogene was found in 64% of HSCR, 50% of HSCR + CAKUT, and in 24% of CAKUT patients. The incidence of CAKUT in HSCR patients is 4- to 6-fold higher than expected. Therefore, a patient with HSCR has a 3- to 18-fold higher risk of developing a CAKUT, particularly hydronephrosis or hypoplasia. If we consider that the proportion of predisposing haplotype in HSCR + CAKUT patients resembles that of other syndromic HSCR, we can conclude that HSCR + CAKUT has to be considered

  12. The combination of vestibular impairment and congenital sensorineural hearing loss predisposes patients to ocular anomalies, including Usher syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kletke, S; Batmanabane, V; Dai, T; Vincent, A; Li, S; Gordon, K A; Papsin, B C; Cushing, S L; Héon, E

    2017-07-01

    The co-occurrence of hearing impairment and visual dysfunction is devastating. Most deaf-blind etiologies are genetically determined, the commonest being Usher syndrome (USH). While studies of the congenitally deaf population reveal a variable degree of visual problems, there are no effective ophthalmic screening guidelines. We hypothesized that children with congenital sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) and vestibular impairment were at an increased risk of having USH. A retrospective chart review of 33 cochlear implants recipients for severe to profound SNHL and measured vestibular dysfunction was performed to determine the ocular phenotype. All the cases had undergone ocular examination and electroretinogram (ERG). Patients with an abnormal ERG underwent genetic testing for USH. We found an underlying ocular abnormality in 81.81% (27/33) of cases; of which 75% had refractive errors, and 50% of those patients showed visual improvement with refractive correction. A total of 14 cases (42.42%; 14/33) had generalized rod-cone dysfunction on ERG suggestive of Usher syndrome type 1, confirmed by mutational analysis. This work shows that adding vestibular impairment as a criterion for requesting an eye exam and adding the ERG to detect USH increases the chances of detecting ocular anomalies, when compared with previous literature focusing only on congenital SNHL. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. A Case of Bilateral Pigment Dispersion Syndrome Following Many Years of Uninterrupted Treatment With Atropine 1% for Bilateral Congenital Cataracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gizzi, Corrado; Mohamed-Noriega, Jibran; Murdoch, Ian

    2017-10-01

    Describe an unusual case of bilateral pigment dispersion syndrome (PDS) following years of uninterrupted treatment with atropine 1% for bilateral congenital cataracts, speculate on potential mechanisms leading to this condition. This is a case report. A 45-year-old white patient on long-term treatment with atropine 1% ointment since his infancy for bilateral congenital cataracts developed PDS with secondary ocular hypertension. The patient showed all the hallmarks of PDS with secondary ocular hypertension. An anterior segment Swept-Source optical coherence tomography was obtained to review the iris profile. The patient showed good pressure response to topical prostaglandin therapy. This is the second case report of PDS in a patient with chronic use of topical atropine. The proposed mechanisms for pigment dispersion are discussed and the possibility raised of dispersion being a potential side effect of the drug.

  14. Adrenomegaly and septic adrenal hemorrhage (Waterhouse-Friderichsen syndrome) in the setting of congenital adrenal hyperplasia

    OpenAIRE

    Saad, Amin F.; Ford, Kenneth L.; dePrisco, Gregory; Smerud, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia refers to a spectrum of autosomal recessive inherited disorders of steroidogenesis most commonly identified on newborn screenings. We describe a young woman who presented with abdominal pain and on subsequent imaging was found to have features of congenital adrenal hyperplasia. Imaging findings, treatment, and potential complications are discussed.

  15. Adrenomegaly and septic adrenal hemorrhage (Waterhouse-Friderichsen syndrome) in the setting of congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, Amin F; Ford, Kenneth L; Deprisco, Gregory; Smerud, Michael J

    2013-07-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia refers to a spectrum of autosomal recessive inherited disorders of steroidogenesis most commonly identified on newborn screenings. We describe a young woman who presented with abdominal pain and on subsequent imaging was found to have features of congenital adrenal hyperplasia. Imaging findings, treatment, and potential complications are discussed.

  16. Impaired neural structure and function contributing to autonomic symptoms in congenital central hypoventilation syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Ronald M; Kumar, Rajesh; Macey, Paul M; Harper, Rebecca K; Ogren, Jennifer A

    2015-01-01

    Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS) patients show major autonomic alterations in addition to their better-known breathing deficiencies. The processes underlying CCHS, mutations in the PHOX2B gene, target autonomic neuronal development, with frame shift extent contributing to symptom severity. Many autonomic characteristics, such as impaired pupillary constriction and poor temperature regulation, reflect parasympathetic alterations, and can include disturbed alimentary processes, with malabsorption and intestinal motility dyscontrol. The sympathetic nervous system changes can exert life-threatening outcomes, with dysregulation of sympathetic outflow leading to high blood pressure, time-altered and dampened heart rate and breathing responses to challenges, cardiac arrhythmia, profuse sweating, and poor fluid regulation. The central mechanisms contributing to failed autonomic processes are readily apparent from structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging studies, which reveal substantial cortical thinning, tissue injury, and disrupted functional responses in hypothalamic, hippocampal, posterior thalamic, and basal ganglia sites and their descending projections, as well as insular, cingulate, and medial frontal cortices, which influence subcortical autonomic structures. Midbrain structures are also compromised, including the raphe system and its projections to cerebellar and medullary sites, the locus coeruleus, and medullary reflex integrating sites, including the dorsal and ventrolateral medullary nuclei. The damage to rostral autonomic sites overlaps metabolic, affective and cognitive regulatory regions, leading to hormonal disruption, anxiety, depression, behavioral control, and sudden death concerns. The injuries suggest that interventions for mitigating hypoxic exposure and nutrient loss may provide cellular protection, in the same fashion as interventions in other conditions with similar malabsorption, fluid turnover, or hypoxic exposure.

  17. Congenital Tracheobronchomegaly (Mounier-Kuhn Syndrome) in a Woman with Human Immunodeficiency Virus: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Amanda; Stowell, Justin; Jamoulis, Socrates

    2017-04-04

    Congenital tracheobronchomegaly (Mounier-Kuhn Syndrome, MKS) is a rare idiopathic disorder characterized by dilation of the central airways, including the trachea and first through fourth order bronchi. MKS disproportionately affects men and results in chronic respiratory tract infections. The diagnosis is made through the synthesis of clinical and radiological data. Here we report a unique case of MKS in a patient with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. A 45-year-old African American woman with a past medical history of HIV, tobacco and recreational drug abuse, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, sleep apnea, and a 15-year history of recurrent respiratory infections presented with dyspnea, wheezing, a productive cough, increased yellow-green sputum production, and subjective fevers. Computerized tomography (CT) of the chest revealed striking dilation of the trachea and central bronchi. Fiberoptic bronchoscopy demonstrated a dilated trachea and bronchial tree with complete collapse of the trachea and bilateral mainstem bronchi during expiration. Serial imaging over 14 years allowed the radiologist to confidently diagnose her underlying disorder and recommend appropriate clinical management, which included mucolytics, chest physiotherapy, prophylactic vaccinations, and antibiotics during infectious exacerbations. To the best of our knowledge, there is only one reported case of MKS in the setting of HIV in the English literature. We report the second such case and outline the clinical presentation, diagnostic criteria, and management of MKS with the hope that increased awareness will prevent delayed or misdiagnosis for patients with MKS. This case highlights the common diagnostic delay for MKS and the need to include MKS in the differential diagnosis of recurrent respiratory tract infections.

  18. Congenital high airway obstruction syndrome: MR/US findings, effect on management, and outcome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mong, Andrew; Johnson, Ann M.; Kramer, Sandra S.; Jaramillo, Diego [Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Coleman, Beverly G. [Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Hedrick, Holly L.; Flake, Alan; Johnson, Mark; Wilson, R.D.; Adzick, N.S. [Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, The Center for Fetal Diagnosis and Treatment, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Kreiger, Portia [Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2008-11-15

    Congenital high airway obstruction syndrome (CHAOS) is a rare disorder defined as any fetal abnormality that obstructs the larynx or trachea. Prompt airway intervention at delivery after accurate prenatal diagnosis may allow survival of this otherwise fatal condition. To identify prenatal MRI findings in CHAOS, to compare these findings with those of fetal US, to determine if imaging alters diagnosis and management decisions, and to correlate prenatal with postnatal imaging findings. Records and MRI scans of ten fetuses with CHAOS were reviewed, and the findings correlated with outside and same-day fetal US and postnatal imaging findings. Fetal lung volumes were measured on MRI scans. Large lung volumes were found in 90% of the fetuses. Increased lung signal intensity, inverted diaphragm, and a dilated, fluid-filled lower airway were identified in all. The obstruction level was identified in 90%. MRI changed screening US diagnosis in 70%, but was concordant with the tertiary care US imaging in 90%. Seven fetuses were terminated or died in utero, and three fetuses survived after ex utero intrapartum tracheostomy placement. Autopsy or bronchoscopy performed in 60% confirmed CHAOS. Postnatal chest radiographs and CT showed hyperinflation, while US and fluoroscopy showed diminished diaphragmatic motion. MRI demonstrates large lung volumes, increased lung signal intensity, inverted diaphragm, and dilated fluid-filled lower airway, and usually identifies the obstruction level. The degree of correlation between MRI and tertiary prenatal US is high, but CHAOS is frequently misdiagnosed on screening US. Correct diagnosis may enable planned airway management. Voluminous lungs and diaphragmatic abnormalities persist on postnatal imaging. (orig.)

  19. Congenital high airway obstruction syndrome: MR/US findings, effect on management, and outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mong, Andrew; Johnson, Ann M.; Kramer, Sandra S.; Jaramillo, Diego; Coleman, Beverly G.; Hedrick, Holly L.; Flake, Alan; Johnson, Mark; Wilson, R.D.; Adzick, N.S.; Kreiger, Portia

    2008-01-01

    Congenital high airway obstruction syndrome (CHAOS) is a rare disorder defined as any fetal abnormality that obstructs the larynx or trachea. Prompt airway intervention at delivery after accurate prenatal diagnosis may allow survival of this otherwise fatal condition. To identify prenatal MRI findings in CHAOS, to compare these findings with those of fetal US, to determine if imaging alters diagnosis and management decisions, and to correlate prenatal with postnatal imaging findings. Records and MRI scans of ten fetuses with CHAOS were reviewed, and the findings correlated with outside and same-day fetal US and postnatal imaging findings. Fetal lung volumes were measured on MRI scans. Large lung volumes were found in 90% of the fetuses. Increased lung signal intensity, inverted diaphragm, and a dilated, fluid-filled lower airway were identified in all. The obstruction level was identified in 90%. MRI changed screening US diagnosis in 70%, but was concordant with the tertiary care US imaging in 90%. Seven fetuses were terminated or died in utero, and three fetuses survived after ex utero intrapartum tracheostomy placement. Autopsy or bronchoscopy performed in 60% confirmed CHAOS. Postnatal chest radiographs and CT showed hyperinflation, while US and fluoroscopy showed diminished diaphragmatic motion. MRI demonstrates large lung volumes, increased lung signal intensity, inverted diaphragm, and dilated fluid-filled lower airway, and usually identifies the obstruction level. The degree of correlation between MRI and tertiary prenatal US is high, but CHAOS is frequently misdiagnosed on screening US. Correct diagnosis may enable planned airway management. Voluminous lungs and diaphragmatic abnormalities persist on postnatal imaging. (orig.)

  20. The cerebral cost of breathing: an FMRI case-study in congenital central hypoventilation syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mike Sharman

    Full Text Available Certain motor activities--like walking or breathing--present the interesting property of proceeding either automatically or under voluntary control. In the case of breathing, brainstem structures located in the medulla are in charge of the automatic mode, whereas cortico-subcortical brain networks--including various frontal lobe areas--subtend the voluntary mode. We speculated that the involvement of cortical activity during voluntary breathing could impact both on the "resting state" pattern of cortical-subcortical connectivity, and on the recruitment of executive functions mediated by the frontal lobe. In order to test this prediction we explored a patient suffering from central congenital hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS, a very rare developmental condition secondary to brainstem dysfunction. Typically, CCHS patients demonstrate efficient cortically-controlled breathing while awake, but require mechanically-assisted ventilation during sleep to overcome the inability of brainstem structures to mediate automatic breathing. We used simultaneous EEG-fMRI recordings to compare patterns of brain activity between these two types of ventilation during wakefulness. As compared with spontaneous breathing (SB, mechanical ventilation (MV restored the default mode network (DMN associated with self-consciousness, mind-wandering, creativity and introspection in healthy subjects. SB on the other hand resulted in a specific increase of functional connectivity between brainstem and frontal lobe. Behaviorally, the patient was more efficient in cognitive tasks requiring executive control during MV than during SB, in agreement with her subjective reports in everyday life. Taken together our results provide insight into the cognitive and neural costs of spontaneous breathing in one CCHS patient, and suggest that MV during waking periods may free up frontal lobe resources, and make them available for cognitive recruitment. More generally, this study reveals how the

  1. Does Congenital Heart Disease Affect Neurodevelopmental Outcomes in Children with Down Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsaied, Tarek; Marino, Bradley S; Esbensen, Anna J; Anixt, Julia S; Epstein, Jeffery N; Cnota, James F

    2016-01-01

    The impact that congenital heart disease (CHD) has on the neurodevelopment of children with Down syndrome (DS) is unknown and potentially has implications for targeted early intervention. This study assessed the relationship between CHD that required surgery in the first year of life and neurodevelopmental, behavioral and emotional functioning outcomes in children with DS. A retrospective chart review of 1092 children (0-18 years) with DS who visited a single institution from 8/08-8/13 was performed. Children who underwent at least one of nine neurodevelopmental (cognitive, language, developmental) or academic tests were included in the analysis (N = 178). Cohort was age-divided into infants/toddlers (0-2 years), preschoolers (3-5 years), and school age/adolescent (6-18 years). Test scores of children with DS who underwent cardiac surgery in the first year of life were compared to children with DS without CHD. T test, chi-square and Mann Whitney U tests were used where appropriate. Infants/toddlers with cardiac surgery had lower scores for receptive (P = .01), expressive (P = .021) and composite language (P children with cardiac surgery there were no differences in IQ scores, language scores, or academic achievement scores compared to those without CHD. Also at school-age there was no difference in the incidence of ADHD, executive function or on internalizing and externalizing behavior scores. Children with DS undergoing cardiac surgery during the first year demonstrated poorer neurodevelopmental outcomes as infants/toddler but had no difference at school age compared to children with DS without CHD. These results will guide early interventions to optimize neurodevelopmental outcomes in children with DS and will help with family counseling after CHD repair. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. A COLQ missense mutation in Labrador Retrievers having congenital myasthenic syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caitlin J Rinz

    Full Text Available Congenital myasthenic syndromes (CMSs are heterogeneous neuromuscular disorders characterized by skeletal muscle weakness caused by disruption of signal transmission across the neuromuscular junction (NMJ. CMSs are rarely encountered in veterinary medicine, and causative mutations have only been identified in Old Danish Pointing Dogs and Brahman cattle to date. Herein, we characterize a novel CMS in 2 Labrador Retriever littermates with an early onset of marked generalized muscle weakness. Because the sire and dam share 2 recent common ancestors, CMS is likely the result of recessive alleles inherited identical by descent (IBD. Genome-wide SNP profiles generated from the Illumina HD array for 9 nuclear family members were used to determine genomic inheritance patterns in chromosomal regions encompassing 18 functional candidate genes. SNP haplotypes spanning 3 genes were consistent with autosomal recessive transmission, and microsatellite data showed that only the segment encompassing COLQ was inherited IBD. COLQ encodes the collagenous tail of acetylcholinesterase, the enzyme responsible for termination of signal transduction in the NMJ. Sequences from COLQ revealed a variant in exon 14 (c.1010T>C that results in the substitution of a conserved amino acid (I337T within the C-terminal domain. Both affected puppies were homozygous for this variant, and 16 relatives were heterozygous, while 288 unrelated Labrador Retrievers and 112 dogs of other breeds were wild-type. A recent study in which 2 human CMS patients were found to be homozygous for an identical COLQ mutation (c.1010T>C; I337T provides further evidence that this mutation is pathogenic. This report describes the first COLQ mutation in canine CMS and demonstrates the utility of SNP profiles from nuclear family members for the identification of private mutations.

  3. Cataract Surgery with Foldable Single Piece IOLs in Congenital Cataract-Microcornea Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niphon Chirapapaisan, M.D.

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To present the visual outcomes and intraocular lens (IOLs stability after cataract surgery with foldable single piece IOLs in a patient with congenital cataract-microcornea syndrome (CCMC. Case presentation: A 28-year-old woman presented with bilateral microcornea and posterior polar cataract. Her uncorrected (UDVA and corrected (CDVA distance visual acuities were 20/100, 20/160 and 20/80, 20/80, respectively. The horizontal cornea diameter was 9.0 mm in both eyes. Anterior chamber angle assessment (ACAA with Scheie classification showed grade 3 on the superior, inferior, and temporal site and grade 2 on the nasal site in both eyes. On ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM, the anterior chamber depths were 2.35 mm. OD and 2.41 mm. OS. The axial lengths were 23.28 mm., OD and 22.50 mm. OS with the A-scan ultrasound biometry. The IOLs power calculation with SRK/T formulas was +25.00 diopter OD and +22.50 diopter OS (A-constant 118.4. Phacoemulsification was performed on both eyes. After lens aspiration, ruptured posterior capsule, a common complication occurred. Then anterior vitrectomy was performed. A foldable single piece IOLs without haptic trimming was implanted in the sulcus in each eye. CDVA was 20/63 equally in both eyes. The intraocular pressure was 12 and 14 mmHg. ACAA showed grade 2 and no pigment dispersion. The IOLs had no tilt or decentration. UBM showed the IOLs were in the proper position and were not rubbing the iris. Conclusion: The foldable single piece IOLs without haptic trimming in the sulcus were safely implanted in both eyes with microcornea in CCMC.

  4. Impaired Neural Structure and Function Contributing to Autonomic Symptoms in Congenital Central Hypoventilation Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald M Harper

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS patients show major autonomic alterations in addition to their better-known breathing deficiencies. The processes underlying CCHS, mutations in the PHOX2B gene, target autonomic neuronal development, with frame shift extent contributing to symptom severity. Many autonomic characteristics, such as impaired pupillary constriction and poor temperature regulation, reflect parasympathetic alterations, and can include disturbed alimentary processes, with malabsorption and intestinal motility dyscontrol. The sympathetic nervous system changes can exert life-threatening outcomes, with dysregulation of sympathetic outflow leading to high blood pressure, time-altered and dampened heart rate and breathing responses to challenges, cardiac arrhythmia, profuse sweating, and poor fluid regulation. The central mechanisms contributing to failed autonomic processes are readily apparent from structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging studies, which reveal substantial cortical thinning, tissue injury, and disrupted functional responses in hypothalamic, hippocampal, posterior thalamic, and basal ganglia sites and their descending projections, as well as insular, cingulate, and medial frontal cortices, which influence subcortical autonomic structures. Midbrain structures are also compromised, including the raphe system and its projections to cerebellar and medullary sites, the locus coeruleus, and medullary reflex integrating sites, including the dorsal and ventrolateral medullary nuclei. The damage to rostral autonomic sites overlaps metabolic, affective and cognitive regulatory regions, leading to hormonal disruption, anxiety, depression, behavioral control, and sudden death concerns. The injuries suggest that interventions for mitigating hypoxic exposure and nutrient loss may provide cellular protection, in the same fashion as interventions in other conditions with similar malabsorption, fluid turnover

  5. Oxaliplatin-induced acquired long QT syndrome with torsades de pointes and myocardial injury in a patient with dilated cardiomyopathy and rectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rei-Yeuh Chang

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available A 67-year-old woman presented with a history of dilated cardiomyopathy with congestive heart failure since 2003, who subsequently developed lower rectal cancer (adenocarcinoma with liver, bone, and lymph node metastasis. Abdominoperineal resection and hepatectomy were performed. The patient received two rounds of intravenous chemotherapy, including 12 and six courses of FOLFOX4 (5-fluorouracil, leucovorin, and oxaliplatin; 85 mg/m2 per cycle. She underwent a third round of intravenous FOLFOX4 because of tumor progression. During the 21st course of FOLFOX4 regimen, the patient developed ST segment depression in lead II and prolongation of QT interval with polymorphic ventricular tachycardia, torsades de pointes right after the start of oxaliplatin infusion. Immediate defibrillation and cardiopulmonary resuscitation were administered, and the patient regained spontaneous circulation and consciousness. Twelve-lead electrocardiogram showed ST segment elevation in III, aVF, and ST segment depression in V4–6 after resuscitation. To our knowledge, prolongation of QT interval with torsades de pointes and coronary spasm with myocardial injury that were stabilized in one patient following oxaliplatin infusion has not been reported. We present a patient with these rare complications.

  6. Overlapping LQT1 and LQT2 phenotype in a patient with long QT syndrome associated with loss-of-function variations in KCNQ1 and KCNH2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cordeiro, Jonathan M; Perez, Guillermo J; Schmitt, Nicole

    2010-01-01

    . The proband (MMRL0362), a 32-year-old female, exhibited multiple ventricular extrasystoles and one syncope. Her ECG (QT interval corrected for heart rate (QTc) = 518ms) showed an LQT2 morphology in leads V4-V6 and LQT1 morphology in leads V1-V2. Genomic DNA was isolated from lymphocytes. All exons and intron...... borders of 7 LQTS susceptibility genes were amplified and sequenced. Variations were detected predicting a novel missense mutation (V110I) in KCNQ1, as well as a common polymorphism in KCNH2 (K897T). We expressed wild-type (WT) or V110I Kv7.1 channels in CHO-K1 cells cotransfected with KCNE1 and performed.......15 mV for K897T and WT, respectively; p loss-of-function mutation in KCNQ1 and a loss-of-function polymorphism in KCNH2. Our results suggest...

  7. Computational Cardiac Modeling Reveals Mechanisms of Ventricular Arrhythmogenesis in Long QT Syndrome Type 8: CACNA1C R858H Mutation Linked to Ventricular Fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jieyun Bai

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Functional analysis of the L-type calcium channel has shown that the CACNA1C R858H mutation associated with severe QT interval prolongation may lead to ventricular fibrillation (VF. This study investigated multiple potential mechanisms by which the CACNA1C R858H mutation facilitates and perpetuates VF. The Ten Tusscher-Panfilov (TP06 human ventricular cell models incorporating the experimental data on the kinetic properties of L-type calcium channels were integrated into one-dimensional (1D fiber, 2D sheet, and 3D ventricular models to investigate the pro-arrhythmic effects of CACNA1C mutations by quantifying changes in intracellular calcium handling, action potential profiles, action potential duration restitution (APDR curves, dispersion of repolarization (DOR, QT interval and spiral wave dynamics. R858H “mutant” L-type calcium current (ICaL augmented sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium content, leading to the development of afterdepolarizations at the single cell level and focal activities at the tissue level. It also produced inhomogeneous APD prolongation, causing QT prolongation and repolarization dispersion amplification, rendering R858H “mutant” tissue more vulnerable to the induction of reentry compared with other conditions. In conclusion, altered ICaL due to the CACNA1C R858H mutation increases arrhythmia risk due to afterdepolarizations and increased tissue vulnerability to unidirectional conduction block. However, the observed reentry is not due to afterdepolarizations (not present in our model, but rather to a novel blocking mechanism.

  8. Coffin-Siris syndrome with the rarest constellation of congenital cardiac defects: A case report with review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lalita Nemani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of type-A Coffin-Siris syndrome (CSS with a unique constellation of congenital heart defects. A 17-year-old Indian boy was referred to our hospital for central cyanosis with features of right heart failure. The cardiac abnormalities included biventricular outflow tract obstruction, small atrial septal defect (ASD, subaortic ventricular septal defect, drainage of left superior venacava to left atrial appendage, and aortic arch anomaly. Patient underwent successful right ventricular infundibular resection, subaortic membrane resection, closure of atrial and ventricular septal defect, rerouting left superior vena cava to left pulmonary artery and aortic valve replacement.

  9. Severe Short Stature in an Adolescent Male with Prader-Willi Syndrome and Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia: A Therapeutic Conundrum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meredith Wasserman

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency results in excess androgen production which can lead to early epiphyseal fusion and short stature. Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS is a genetic disorder resulting from a defect on chromosome 15 due to paternal deletion, maternal uniparental disomy, or imprinting defect. Ninety percent of patients with PWS have short stature. In this article we report a patient with simple-virilizing CAH and PWS who was overtreated with glucocorticoids for CAH and not supplemented with growth hormone for PWS, resulting in a significantly short adult height.

  10. Noninvasive ventilatory strategies in the management of a newborn infant and three children with congenital central hypoventilation syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibballs, James; Henning, Robert D

    2003-12-01

    Four children with congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS) treated with noninvasive techniques of ventilation are presented. Two infants (one in the newborn period) were treated with nasal mask bilevel positive airway pressure (BiPAP), and then both were transitioned to negative pressure chamber ventilation at several years of age because of possible midface hypoplasia. Tracheostomies were not performed. Two older children were transitioned from mechanical ventilation via tracheostomy to nasal mask BiPAP, and then in one case to negative pressure chamber ventilation, and in the other to phrenic nerve pacing. Their tracheostomies were removed. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. Coffin-Siris syndrome with the rarest constellation of congenital cardiac defects: A case report with review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemani, Lalita; Barik, Ramachandra; Patnaik, Amar Narayana; Mishra, Ramesh C; Rao, Amaresh M; Kapur, Pragati

    2014-09-01

    We report a case of type-A Coffin-Siris syndrome (CSS) with a unique constellation of congenital heart defects. A 17-year-old Indian boy was referred to our hospital for central cyanosis with features of right heart failure. The cardiac abnormalities included biventricular outflow tract obstruction, small atrial septal defect (ASD), subaortic ventricular septal defect, drainage of left superior venacava to left atrial appendage, and aortic arch anomaly. Patient underwent successful right ventricular infundibular resection, subaortic membrane resection, closure of atrial and ventricular septal defect, rerouting left superior vena cava to left pulmonary artery and aortic valve replacement.

  12. Perioperative Anaesthetic Management of a Patient of Gilbert’s Syndrome with Adult Congenital Heart Disease - A Rare Presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sambhunath Das

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Gilbert's syndrome is a hereditary condition with the genetic mutation of the enzyme uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferase, characterized by intermittent jaundice in the absence of hemolysis or underlying liver disease. These patients develop jaundice when subjected to fasting, stress and exercise. Majority of anaesthetics are metabolized by liver. Anaesthesia, surgery and cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB can act as triggers to hepatic injury. The successful perioperative management of an adult congenital heart disease patient for atrial septal defect closure under cardiopulmonary bypass was discussed in this report.

  13. Rational use of rubella vaccine for prevention of congenital rubella syndrome in the Americas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan R. Hinman

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available Rubella is a viral disease with minor morbidity and few complications unless it is contracted by a pregnant woman. Rubella infection during the first trimester of pregnancy often leads to fetal death or severe congenital defects (congenital rubella syndrome, CRS. Rubella remains endemic in many countries of Latin America and the Caribbean. It has been estimated that 20000 or more infants are perhaps born with CRS each year in Latin American and Caribbean countries. While the inclusion of rubella vaccination into routine childhood immunization will decrease rubella virus circulation among young children, it will not have immediate impact on the transmission of rubella among adults or the occurrence of CRS. A one-time mass campaign targeting both males and females 5 to 39 years of age with measles-mumps-rubella or measles-rubella vaccine followed by the use of measles-mumps-rubella vaccine in routine early childhood vaccination will prevent and control both rubella and CRS promptly. In April 1988, the Ministers of Health of the English-speaking Caribbean targeted rubella for elimination by the end of the year 2000 using the vaccination strategy outlined above. The rubella elimination experience of these countries will provide useful information for the eventual elimination of rubella virus from the Americas.La rubéola es una enfermedad vírica que produce poca morbilidad y pocas complicaciones, a no ser que la contraiga una mujer embarazada. La infección con rubéola durante el primer trimestre del embarazo a menudo termina en muerte fetal o en deformidades congénitas graves (síndrome de anomalías congénitas por rubéola, o SCR. La rubéola sigue siendo endémica en muchos países de América Latina y el Caribe. Se estima que quizá 20 000 niños o más nacen cada año con SCR en países latinoamericanos y caribeños. Si bien la adición de la vacuna contra la rubéola a los programas de inmunización infantil de rutina disminuirá la

  14. Human syndromes with congenital patellar anomalies and the underlying gene defects.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bongers, E.M.H.F.; Kampen, A. van; Bokhoven, J.H.L.M. van; Knoers, N.V.A.M.

    2005-01-01

    Genetic disorders characterized by congenital patellar aplasia or hypoplasia belong to a clinically diverse and genetically heterogeneous group of lower limb malformations. Patella development involves different molecular and cellular mechanisms regulating dorso-ventral patterning, cartilage and

  15. Ephedrine for myasthenia gravis, neonatal myasthenia and the congenital myasthenic syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrinten, C.; van der Zwaag, A.M.; Weinreich, S.S.; Scholten, R.J.; Verschuuren, J.J.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Myasthenia is a condition in which neuromuscular transmission is affected by antibodies against neuromuscular junction components (autoimmune myasthenia gravis, MG; and neonatal myasthenia gravis, NMG) or by defects in genes for neuromuscular junction proteins (congenital myasthenic

  16. Vaccination in secondary school students expedites rubella control and prevents congenital rubella syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Hanqing; Yan, Rui; Tang, Xuewen; Zhou, Yang; Deng, Xuan; Xie, Shuyun

    2016-11-30

    In order to control the spread of rubella and reduce the risk for congenital rubella syndrome, an additional rubella vaccination program was set up for all secondary school students since 2008 in Zhejiang, China. We conducted a descriptive analysis of rubella incidence among different age groups from 2005 to 2015 and a serosurvey of female subjects aged 15-39 years to understand the possible effects of this immunization program. The average annual rubella incidence rate had decreased from 15.86 per 100,000 population (2005-2007) to 0.75 per 100,000 population (2013-2015) in Zhejiang. The decrease in the rate of rubella incidence in girls aged 15-19 years was more accelerated (from 138.30 to 0.34 per 100,000) than in the total population during 2008-2015 (from 32.20 to 0.46 per 100,000). Of 1225 female subjects in the serosurvey, 256 (20.9%) were not immune to rubella. The proportion of subjects immune to rubella was significantly different among different age groups (Wald χ2 = 22.19, p = 0.000), and subjects aged 15-19 years old had the highest immunity (88.0%). Rubella antibody levels were significantly lower in women aged 25-30 years with 26.7% of them not immune, followed by the group aged 20-24 years (25.0%) and 30-35 years (24.5%). Rubella vaccine included in the Expanded Program on Immunization together with vaccination activities for secondary school students can help in rubella control, particularly in targeted age groups in the program. Seroprevalence of antibodies to the rubella virus amongst the female population within childbearing age in Zhejiang, China, is still too low to provide immunity. In addition to vaccination programs in the secondary schools, rubella vaccination should also be encouraged in women of childbearing age, which can be done effectively combined with pre-marital examination in China.

  17. Congenital Arthrogryposis: An Extension of the 15q11.2 BP1-BP2 Microdeletion Syndrome?

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    K. M. Usrey

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The proximal 15q11–q13 region contains 5 breakpoints (BP1–BP5. The BP1-BP2 region spans approximately 500 kb and contains four evolutionarily conserved genes. The genes in this region are known to play a role in central nervous system development and/or function. Microdeletions within the 15q11.2 BP1-BP2 region have been reported in patients with neurological dysfunction, developmental delays, behavioral problems, and dysmorphic features. We report two unrelated subjects with the 15q11.2 BP1-BP2 microdeletion and presenting with congenital arthrogryposis, a feature which has not been previously reported as part of this newly recognized microdeletion syndrome. While arthrogryposis seen in these two subjects may be coincidental, we propose that congenital arthrogryposis may result from neurological dysfunction and involvement of the microdeletion of the 15q11.2 BP1-BP2 region, further expanding the phenotype of this microdeletion syndrome. We encourage others to report patients with this chromosome microdeletion and neurological findings to further characterize the clinical phenotype.

  18. Raine Syndrome (OMIM #259775), Caused By FAM20C Mutation, Is Congenital Sclerosing Osteomalacia With Cerebral Calcification (OMIM 259660).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whyte, Michael P; McAlister, William H; Fallon, Michael D; Pierpont, Mary Ella; Bijanki, Vinieth N; Duan, Shenghui; Otaify, Ghada A; Sly, William S; Mumm, Steven

    2017-04-01

    In 1985, we briefly reported infant sisters with a unique, lethal, autosomal recessive disorder designated congenital sclerosing osteomalacia with cerebral calcification. In 1986, this condition was entered into Mendelian Inheritance In Man (MIM) as osteomalacia, sclerosing, with cerebral calcification (MIM 259660). However, no attestations followed. Instead, in 1989 Raine and colleagues published an affected neonate considering unprecedented the striking clinical and radiographic features. In 1992, "Raine syndrome" entered MIM formally as osteosclerotic bone dysplasia, lethal (MIM #259775). In 2007, the etiology emerged as loss-of-function mutation of FAM20C that encodes family with sequence similarity 20, member C. FAM20C is highly expressed in embryonic calcified tissues and encodes a kinase (dentin matrix protein 4) for most of the secreted phosphoproteome including FGF23, osteopontin, and other regulators of skeletal mineralization. Herein, we detail the clinical, radiological, biochemical, histopathological, and FAM20C findings of our patients. Following premortem tetracycline labeling, the proposita's non-decalcified skeletal histopathology after autopsy indicated no rickets but documented severe osteomalacia. Archival DNA revealed the sisters were compound heterozygotes for a unique missense mutation and a novel deletion in FAM20C. Individuals heterozygous for the missense mutation seemed to prematurely fuse their metopic suture and develop a metopic ridge sometimes including trigonocephaly. Our findings clarify FAM20C's role in hard tissue formation and mineralization, and show that Raine syndrome is congenital sclerosing osteomalacia with cerebral calcification. © 2016 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. © 2016 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  19. Ocular motility disturbances (Duane retraction syndrome and double elevator palsy with congenital heart disease, a rare association with Goldenhar syndrome-A case report

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    Verma Manju

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available This report is a case of a 4 year old male child who was admitted for meningitis. On clinical examination he was diagnosed as a case of oculo-suriculo-vertebral dysplasia with congenital heart disease, i.e., tetralogy of Fallots besides his presenting picture of meningitis. During his ophthalmic checkup for the conspicuous presence of epibulbar dermoid, he was discovered to have upper lid coloboma, double elevator palsy, and Grade 1 Duane retraction syndrome in his right eye while the pathognomic feature, a dermolipoma, was present in the left eye. The oculo-auriculo-vertebral dysplasia, as described by Goldenhar, is a disease complex of structures developed from the Ist and IInd branchial arch. The important feature of this case is the bilateral involvement of the disease complex over and above the presence of ocular motility disorders--Duane retraction syndrome and double elevator palsy.

  20. Novel syndrome with conductive hearing loss and congenital glaucoma in three generations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Kazuhiko; Kitano, Masako; Sakaida, Hiroshi; Masuda, Sawako

    2017-08-01

    The objective of this paper was to describe the clinical and otological findings in multiple members of a family with congenital glaucoma, cardiac anomaly, and conductive hearing loss due to ossicular chain anomalies. We performed a retrospective review of the medical charts and otological materials of multiple members of the same family. Congenital glaucoma and hearing loss were inherited by the proband and her daughter, son, and mother, suggesting autosomal dominant inheritance. The son and daughter also showed atrial septal defects. Exploratory tympanotomies revealed anomalies of the long process of the incus in the proband and her daughter, and tympanoplasty improved hearing loss in both patients. This represents the first description of coexisting congenital glaucoma and conductive hearing loss due to ossicular chain anomalies in multiple members of a single family. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Application of whole-exome sequencing to unravel the molecular basis of undiagnosed syndromic congenital neutropenia with intellectual disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier-Vasserot, Alexandra; Thauvin-Robinet, Christel; Bruel, Ange-Line; Duffourd, Yannis; St-Onge, Judith; Jouan, Thibaud; Rivière, Jean-Baptiste; Heron, Delphine; Donadieu, Jean; Bellanné-Chantelot, Christine; Briandet, Claire; Huet, Frédéric; Kuentz, Paul; Lehalle, Daphné; Duplomb-Jego, Laurence; Gautier, Elodie; Maystadt, Isabelle; Pinson, Lucile; Amram, Daniel; El Chehadeh, Salima; Melki, Judith; Julia, Sophia; Faivre, Laurence; Thevenon, Julien

    2017-01-01

    Neutropenia can be qualified as congenital when of neonatal onset or when associated with extra-hematopoietic manifestations. Overall, 30% of patients with congenital neutropenia (CN) remain without a molecular diagnosis after a multidisciplinary consultation and tedious diagnostic strategy. In the rare situations when neutropenia is identified and associated with intellectual disability (ID), there are few diagnostic hypotheses to test. This retrospective multicenter study reports on a clinically heterogeneous cohort of 10 unrelated patients with CN associated with ID and no molecular diagnosis prior to whole-exome sequencing (WES). WES provided a diagnostic yield of 40% (4/10). The results suggested that in many cases neutropenia and syndromic manifestations could not be assigned to the same molecular alteration. Three sub-groups of patients were highlighted: (i) severe, symptomatic chronic neutropenia, detected early in life, and related to a known mutation in the CN spectrum (ELANE); (ii) mild to moderate benign intermittent neutropenia, detected later, and associated with mutations in genes implicated in neurodevelopmental disorders (CHD2, HUWE1); and (iii) moderate to severe intermittent neutropenia as a probably undiagnosed feature of a newly reported syndrome (KAT6A). Unlike KAT6A, which seems to be associated with a syndromic form of CN, the other reported mutations may not explain the entire clinical picture. Although targeted gene sequencing can be discussed for the primary diagnosis of severe CN, we suggest that performing WES for the diagnosis of disorders associating CN with ID will not only provide the etiological diagnosis but will also pave the way towards personalized care and follow-up. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Juvenile-Onset Diabetes and Congenital Cataract: “Double-Gene” Mutations Mimicking a Syndromic Diabetes Presentation

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    Caroline Lenfant

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Monogenic forms of diabetes may account for 1–5% of all cases of diabetes, and may occur in the context of syndromic presentations. We investigated the case of a girl affected by insulin-dependent diabetes, diagnosed at 6 years old, associated with congenital cataract. Her consanguineous parents and her four other siblings did not have diabetes or cataract, suggesting a recessive syndrome. Using whole exome sequencing of the affected proband, we identified a heterozygous p.R825Q ABCC8 mutation, located at the exact same amino-acid position as the p.R825W recurring diabetes mutation, hence likely responsible for the diabetes condition, and a homozygous p.G71S mutation in CRYBB1, a gene known to be responsible for congenital cataract. Both mutations were predicted to be damaging and were absent or extremely rare in public databases. Unexpectedly, we found that the mother was also homozygous for the CRYBB1 mutation, and both the mother and one unaffected sibling were heterozygous for the ABCC8 mutation, suggesting incomplete penetrance of both mutations. Incomplete penetrance of ABCC8 mutations is well documented, but this is the first report of an incomplete penetrance of a CRYBB1 mutation, manifesting between susceptible subjects (unaffected mother vs. affected child and to some extent within the patient herself, who had distinct cataract severities in both eyes. Our finding illustrates the importance of family studies to unmask the role of confounding factors such as double-gene mutations and incomplete penetrance that may mimic monogenic syndromes including in the case of strongly evocative family structure with consanguinity.

  3. Kocher-Debré-Sémélaigne syndrome and congenital nystagmus

    OpenAIRE

    Radhakrishnan, K.; Walia, B. N. S.; Venkateswarlu, K.; Mann, S. B. S.

    1982-01-01

    A 11-year-old boy with hypothyroidism developed generalized muscle hypertrophy and proximal muscular weakness. Electromyographic findings were suggestive of myopathy. He had had congenital nystagmus (CN) since early infancy. Although the association of childhood hypothyroidism and CN has been documented before, the triad of hypothyroidism, hypertrophic myopathy and CN exhibited by the patient is believed to be unique.

  4. High myopia and congenital myopathy with partial pachygyria in cutis laxa syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morava, E.; Willemsen, M.A.A.P.; Wopereis, S.; Laak, H.J. ter; Lefeber, D.J.; Wevers, R.A.; Cruysberg, J.R.M.

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: Several types of inborn errors of the O-glycan biosynthesis are known, leading to clinically very distinct phenotypes. Children with O-mannosyl glycan biosynthesis defects commonly present as a severe form of congenital muscular dystrophy with decreased alpha-dystroglycan staining,

  5. QTc interval prolongation in children with Turner syndrome: the results of exercise testing and 24-h ECG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalla Pozza, Robert; Bechtold, Susanne; Urschel, Simon; Netz, Heinrich; Schwarz, Hans-Peter

    2009-01-01

    Turner syndrome (TS) is the most common sex chromosome abnormality in females. Recently, a prolongation of the rate-corrected QT (QTc) interval in the electrocardiogram (ECG) of TS patients has been reported. A prolonged QTc interval has been correlated to an increased risk for sudden cardiac death, and medical treatment is warranted in patients with congenital long QT syndrome (LQTS). Additionally, several drugs of common use are contraindicated in LQTS because of their effects on myocardial repolarization. The importance of the QTc prolongation in TS patients is not known at present. Eighteen TS patients with a prolonged QTc interval (group 1) and 11 TS patients with a normal QTc interval (group 2) (mean age 12.6+/-3.1 vs. 11.8+/-2.1 years, respectively) were tested. The QTc interval was calculated during exercise testing and during 24-h ECG recordings. None of the patients experienced adverse cardiac events during the tests. The mean QTc interval decreased from 0.467 to 0.432 s in group 1 and from 0.432 to 0.412 s in group 2. During the 24-h ECG, the maximum QTc interval was significantly prolonged in group 1 (0.51 vs. 0.465 s, pinformation about the cardiac risk in the single TS patient with a prolonged QTc interval. This helps in counseling these girls, as clear therapeutic guidelines are currently lacking.

  6. [Vasopressin V2 receptor-related pathologies: congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus and nephrogenic syndrome of inappropiate antidiuresis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Denis

    2014-12-01

    Congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus is a rare hereditary disease with mainly an X-linked inheritance (90% of the cases) but there are also autosomal recessive and dominant forms. Congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus is characterized by a resistance of the renal collecting duct to the action of the arginine vasopressin hormone responsible for the inability of the kidney to concentrate urine. The X-linked form is due to inactivating mutations of the vasopressin 2 receptor gene leading to a loss of function of the mutated receptors. Affected males are often symptomatic in the neonatal period with a lack of weight gain, dehydration and hypernatremia but mild phenotypes may also occur. Females carrying the mutation may be asymptomatic but, sometimes, severe polyuria is found due to the random X chromosome inactivation. The autosomal recessive and dominant forms, occurring in both genders, are linked to mutations in the aquaporin-2 gene. The treatment remains difficult, especially in infants, and is based on a low osmotic diet with increased water intake and the use of thiazides and indomethacin. The main goal is to avoid hypernatremic episodes and maintain a good hydration state. Potentially, specific treatment, in some cases of X-linked congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, with pharmacological chaperones such as non-peptide vasopressin-2 receptor antagonists will be available in the future. Conversely, the nephrogenic syndrome of inappropriate antidiuresis (NSIAD) is linked to a constitutive activation of the V(2)-receptor due to activating mutations with clinical and biological features of inappropriate antidiuresis but with low or undetectable plasma arginine vasopressin hormone levels. Copyright © 2014 Association Société de néphrologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Studies of malformation syndromes in man XXXX: multiple congenital anomalies/mental retardation syndrome or variant familial developmental pattern; differential diagnosis and description of the McDonough syndrome (with XXY son from XY/XXY father).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuhäuser, G; Opitz, J M

    1975-11-13

    The McDonough syndrome is a "new" MCA/MR syndrome which was found in 3 children (1 girl, 2 boys) of non-consanguineous parents. The affected children were mentally retarded (IQ 47--67) and had congenital heart defect, sternal deformity, kyphosis and craniofacila anomalies (anteverted auricles, upward slanted palpebral fissures, squint); cryptorchidism was present in the 2 boys. In addition a possible VFDP is postulated as the explanation for similar features in affected and unaffected siblings and parents. However, the McDonough syndrome may be an autosomal recessive trait with minor manifestations in heterozygotes. The klinefelter syndrome in one affected boy and a 46,XY/47,XXY chromosome constitution in the father was a coincidental finding.

  8. Coffin-Siris syndrome with multiple congenital malformations and intrauterine death: towards a better delineation of the severe end of the spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulibaly, Béma; Sigaudy, Sabine; Girard, Nadine; Popovici, Cornel; Missirian, Chantal; Heckenroth, Hélène; Tasei, Anne-Marie; Fernandez, Carla

    2010-01-01

    Coffine-Siris syndrome or "fifth digit" syndrome is a multiple congenital anomaly-mental retardation syndrome with severe developmental delay, coarse facial features, hirsutism and absent fifth fingernails or toenails or fifth distal phalanges. The etiology of this syndrome remains uncertain. Here we report a stillborn male baby born from consanguineous parents who might represent a very severe form of Coffine-Siris syndrome with cardiac defect and multiple brain malformations including corpus callosum agenesis and Dandy Walker malformation. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first case leading to intrauterine death. Karyotype and array comparative genomic hybridization were normal; these results give additional support to mendelian inheritance for this syndrome. In our family, the most likely mode of inheritance is autosomal recessive and the recurrence is probably as high as 25%. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Combined laparoscopic and open technique for repair of congenital abdominal hernia: A case report of prune belly syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Qinghuang; Chen, Yan; Zhu, Jinhui; Wang, Yuedong

    2017-10-01

    Prune belly syndrome (PBS) is a rare congenital disorder among adults, and the way for repairing abdominal wall musculature has no unified standard. We described combining laparoscopic and open technique in an adult male who presented with PBS. Physical examination and radiological imaging verified the case of PBS. The deficiency of abdominal wall musculature was repaired by combining laparoscopic and open technique using a double-deck complex patch. The patient successfully underwent abdominal wall repair by combining laparoscopic and open technique. Postoperative recovery was uneventful, and improvement in symptom was significant in follow-up after 3, 6, 12, and 24 months. Combining laparoscopic and open technique for repair of deficiency of abdominal wall musculature in PBS was an exploratory way to improve life quality.

  10. Unilateral right pulmonary artery agenesis and congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation of the right lung with Ortner′s syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Jackie David

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a 2.5-year-old girl who presented with hoarseness of voice since 3 months of age and failure to thrive. Chest X-ray showed cardiomegaly with a deviation of the trachea and mediastinum to the right side. Two-dimensional echocardiography showed decreased flow across the right pulmonary artery, a small atrial septal defect (ASD with a right-to-left shunt, and a dilated right atrium and right ventricle with severe tricuspid regurgitation suggestive of severe pulmonary hypertension. A silent large patent ductus arteriosus was also seen. Multiple detector computerized tomography aortogram confirmed the findings of absent right pulmonary artery and hypoplastic right lung with small cystic lesions suggestive of congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation in the right lower lobe. Hoarseness of voice was due to the left vocal cord palsy probably secondary to severe pulmonary hypertension (Ortner′s syndrome.

  11. Prenatal ultrasound findings observed in the Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome: data from the registry of congenital malformations in Auvergne.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debost-Legrand, Anne; Goumy, Carole; Laurichesse-Delmas, Hélène; Déchelotte, Pierre; Beaufrère, Anne-Marie; Lémery, Didier; Francannet, Christine; Gallot, Denis

    2013-12-01

    Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS) is associated with facial dysmorphism including high forehead, high nasal bridge, hypertelorism and severe mental retardation. WHS results from a 4p16.3 deletion. Only a small number of reports have been made on the prenatal ultrasound findings observed in WHS. Here we report our experience on 10 cases of WHS ascertained prenatally between 1983 and 2009 through the CEMC-Auvergne registry of congenital malformations. The assumption that a "Greek warrior helmet" facies is pathognomonic of WHS could lead to misdiagnosis. Other clinical findings such as severe and early onset intrauterine growth retardation, facial dysmorphism (high forehead, high nasal bridge, low-set ears, micrognathia, hypertelorism), atrial or ventricular septal defect, and renal dysplasia should help obstetricians to suspect the diagnosis of WHS prenatally. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Novel PIGT Variant in Two Brothers: Expansion of the Multiple Congenital Anomalies-Hypotonia Seizures Syndrome 3 Phenotype

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    Nadia Skauli

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Biallelic PIGT variants were previously reported in seven patients from three families with Multiple Congenital Anomalies-Hypotonia Seizures Syndrome 3 (MCAHS3, characterized by epileptic encephalopathy, hypotonia, global developmental delay/intellectual disability, cerebral and cerebellar atrophy, craniofacial dysmorphisms, and skeletal, ophthalmological, cardiac, and genitourinary abnormalities. We report a novel homozygous PIGT missense variant c.1079G>T (p.Gly360Val in two brothers with several of the typical features of MCAHS3, but in addition, pyramidal tract neurological signs. Notably, they are the first patients with MCAHS3 without skeletal, cardiac, or genitourinary anomalies. PIGT encodes a crucial subunit of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI transamidase complex, which catalyzes the attachment of proteins to GPI-anchors, attaching the proteins to the cell membrane. In vitro studies in cells from the two brothers showed reduced levels of GPI-anchors and GPI-anchored proteins on the cell surface, supporting the pathogenicity of the novel PIGT variant.

  13. Therapy-resistant anaemia in congenital nephrotic syndrome of the Finnish type--implication of EPO, transferrin and transcobalamin losses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toubiana, Julie; Schlageter, Marie-Hélène; Aoun, Bilal; Dunand, Olivier; Vitkevic, Renata; Bensman, Albert; Ulinski, Tim

    2009-04-01

    Congenital nephrotic syndrome of the Finnish type (CNF) is due to NPHS1 mutation and is responsible for a variety of urinary protein losses. We report the case of a 4-month-old girl with a particularly severe form (proteinuria approximately 150 g/l) of CNF. She developed severe non-regenerative anaemia requiring bi-monthly blood transfusions despite daily EPO (600 UI/kg) and iron supplementation. Epoetin pharmacokinetics revealed a urinary loss of 27% of the given dose within the first 24 h after IV injection. However, plasma levels remained increased after 24 h (228 UI/l). Plasma transferrin and transcobalamin levels were undetectable. Atransferrinaemia and atranscobalaminaemia seem to be responsible for disturbed erythropoiesis.

  14. Congenital Heart Defects and CCHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and more. Stony Point, NY 10980 Close X Home > Complications & Loss > Birth defects & other health conditions > Congenital heart defects and ... in congenital heart defects. You have a family history of congenital heart ... syndrome or VCF. After birth Your baby may be tested for CCHD as ...

  15. Polybezoar in a child with Down's Syndrome after corrective surgery of congenital duodenal stenosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arlart, I

    1980-11-01

    Case report of a mongoloid child (Trisomie 21), age 9, operated on in his neonatal period for congenital stenosis of the duodenum; now presenting with acute clinical signs of gastric outlet obstruction and increasing weight loss. Radiologic work-up showed this to be due to a large gastric and duodenal polybezoar, claimed to be due to emotional disturbance as part of this patients primary disease.

  16. Polybezoar in a child with Down's Syndrome after corrective surgery of congenital duodenal stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arlart, I.

    1980-01-01

    Case report of a mongoloid child (Trisomie 21), age 9, operated on in his neonatal period for congenital stenosis of the duodenum; now presenting with acute clinical signs of gastric outlet obstruction and increasing weight loss. Radiologic work-up showed this to be due to a large gastric and duodenal polybezoar, claimed to be due to emotional disturbance as part of this patients primary disease. (orig.) [de

  17. Síndromes nefróticos congénitos y hereditarios Congenital and heritable nephrotic syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandalio Durán Álvarez

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available En los últimos años se han identificado muchos síndromes nefróticos familiares y esporádicos que no responden a los tratamientos habituales (esteroides e inmunosupresores, evolucionan con relativa rapidez a la insuficiencia renal crónica y se producen por mutaciones genéticas. La mayoría de los síndromes nefróticos que se trasmiten genéticamente y que pueden ser congénitos, presentarse en el primer año de la vida, o en el niño mayor, son atribuidos a mutaciones en los genes NPHS1, NPHS2, WT1 y LAMB2. Otros síndromes nefróticos producidos por mutaciones genéticas pueden no manifestarse hasta la adultez. El objetivo fundamental de esta revisión fue llamar la atención sobre los síndromes nefróticos producidos por mutaciones genéticas en los que no sólo no se obtienen resultados con los tratamientos inmunosupresores, si no en los que dichos tratamientos pueden ser perjudiciales para el paciente.In past years many familial and sporadic nephrotic syndromes refractory to usual treatments (steroids and immunosuppressives, evolve quickly to a chronic renal failure produced by genetic mutations. Most of nephrotic syndromes genetically transmitted and that may be congenital, present in the first year of life or in the older child, are attributable to NPHS1, NPHS2, WT1 and KLAMB2 gen mutations. Other nephrotic syndromes produced by genetic mutations may not appear until adulthood. The main objective of present review was to alert on the nephrotic syndromes produced by genetic mutations without response to immunosuppressive treatments, but on those in which such treatment may be dangerous for patient.

  18. Zika Virus Infection as a Cause of Congenital Brain Abnormalities and Guillain–Barré Syndrome: Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reveiz, Ludovic; Oladapo, Olufemi T.; Martínez-Vega, Ruth; Haefliger, Anina

    2017-01-01

    Background The World Health Organization (WHO) stated in March 2016 that there was scientific consensus that the mosquito-borne Zika virus was a cause of the neurological disorder Guillain–Barré syndrome (GBS) and of microcephaly and other congenital brain abnormalities based on rapid evidence assessments. Decisions about causality require systematic assessment to guide public health actions. The objectives of this study were to update and reassess the evidence for causality through a rapid and systematic review about links between Zika virus infection and (a) congenital brain abnormalities, including microcephaly, in the foetuses and offspring of pregnant women and (b) GBS in any population, and to describe the process and outcomes of an expert assessment of the evidence about causality. Methods and Findings The study had three linked components. First, in February 2016, we developed a causality framework that defined questions about the relationship between Zika virus infection and each of the two clinical outcomes in ten dimensions: temporality, biological plausibility, strength of association, alternative explanations, cessation, dose–response relationship, animal experiments, analogy, specificity, and consistency. Second, we did a systematic review (protocol number CRD42016036693). We searched multiple online sources up to May 30, 2016 to find studies that directly addressed either outcome and any causality dimension, used methods to expedite study selection, data extraction, and quality assessment, and summarised evidence descriptively. Third, WHO convened a multidisciplinary panel of experts who assessed the review findings and reached consensus statements to update the WHO position on causality. We found 1,091 unique items up to May 30, 2016. For congenital brain abnormalities, including microcephaly, we included 72 items; for eight of ten causality dimensions (all except dose–response relationship and specificity), we found that more than half the

  19. Zika Virus Infection as a Cause of Congenital Brain Abnormalities and Guillain-Barré Syndrome: Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauer, Fabienne; Riesen, Maurane; Reveiz, Ludovic; Oladapo, Olufemi T; Martínez-Vega, Ruth; Porgo, Teegwendé V; Haefliger, Anina; Broutet, Nathalie J; Low, Nicola

    2017-01-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) stated in March 2016 that there was scientific consensus that the mosquito-borne Zika virus was a cause of the neurological disorder Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) and of microcephaly and other congenital brain abnormalities based on rapid evidence assessments. Decisions about causality require systematic assessment to guide public health actions. The objectives of this study were to update and reassess the evidence for causality through a rapid and systematic review about links between Zika virus infection and (a) congenital brain abnormalities, including microcephaly, in the foetuses and offspring of pregnant women and (b) GBS in any population, and to describe the process and outcomes of an expert assessment of the evidence about causality. The study had three linked components. First, in February 2016, we developed a causality framework that defined questions about the relationship between Zika virus infection and each of the two clinical outcomes in ten dimensions: temporality, biological plausibility, strength of association, alternative explanations, cessation, dose-response relationship, animal experiments, analogy, specificity, and consistency. Second, we did a systematic review (protocol number CRD42016036693). We searched multiple online sources up to May 30, 2016 to find studies that directly addressed either outcome and any causality dimension, used methods to expedite study selection, data extraction, and quality assessment, and summarised evidence descriptively. Third, WHO convened a multidisciplinary panel of experts who assessed the review findings and reached consensus statements to update the WHO position on causality. We found 1,091 unique items up to May 30, 2016. For congenital brain abnormalities, including microcephaly, we included 72 items; for eight of ten causality dimensions (all except dose-response relationship and specificity), we found that more than half the relevant studies supported a causal

  20. Zika Virus Infection as a Cause of Congenital Brain Abnormalities and Guillain-Barré Syndrome: Systematic Review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabienne Krauer

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The World Health Organization (WHO stated in March 2016 that there was scientific consensus that the mosquito-borne Zika virus was a cause of the neurological disorder Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS and of microcephaly and other congenital brain abnormalities based on rapid evidence assessments. Decisions about causality require systematic assessment to guide public health actions. The objectives of this study were to update and reassess the evidence for causality through a rapid and systematic review about links between Zika virus infection and (a congenital brain abnormalities, including microcephaly, in the foetuses and offspring of pregnant women and (b GBS in any population, and to describe the process and outcomes of an expert assessment of the evidence about causality.The study had three linked components. First, in February 2016, we developed a causality framework that defined questions about the relationship between Zika virus infection and each of the two clinical outcomes in ten dimensions: temporality, biological plausibility, strength of association, alternative explanations, cessation, dose-response relationship, animal experiments, analogy, specificity, and consistency. Second, we did a systematic review (protocol number CRD42016036693. We searched multiple online sources up to May 30, 2016 to find studies that directly addressed either outcome and any causality dimension, used methods to expedite study selection, data extraction, and quality assessment, and summarised evidence descriptively. Third, WHO convened a multidisciplinary panel of experts who assessed the review findings and reached consensus statements to update the WHO position on causality. We found 1,091 unique items up to May 30, 2016. For congenital brain abnormalities, including microcephaly, we included 72 items; for eight of ten causality dimensions (all except dose-response relationship and specificity, we found that more than half the relevant studies supported

  1. Bartter syndrome Type III and congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract: an antenatal presentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westland, R.; Hack, W.W.; van der Horst, H.J.; Uittenbogaard, L.B.; van Hagen, J.M.; van der Valk, P.; Kamsteeg, E.J.; Heuvel, L.P.W.J. van den; van Wijk, J.A.

    2012-01-01

    Bartter syndrome encompasses a variety of inheritable renal tubular transport disorders characterized by hypokalemia and hypochloremic metabolic alkalosis. Bartter syndrome Type III is caused by genetic alterations in the chloride channel kidney B (CLCNKB) gene and often presents in the first 2

  2. The association of congenital neuroblastoma and congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellah, R.; D'Andrea, A.; Children's Hospital, Boston, MA; Darillis, E.; Fellows, K.E.

    1989-01-01

    Several authors have reported an association between neuroblastoma and congenital heart disease; others contend that, unlike specific wellknown associations between malignancy and congenital defects (Wilm's tumor and aniridia, leukemia and Down's syndrome), no real relationship exists. We present three cases of cyanotic congenital heart disease in which subclinical neuroblastoma was found. We speculate that abnormal neural crest cell migration and development may be a common link between cardiac malformations and congenital neuroblastoma. (orig.)

  3. The case for early use of rapid whole genome sequencing in management of critically ill infants: Late diagnosis of Coffin-Siris syndrome in an infant with left congenital diaphragmatic hernia, congenital heart disease and recurrent infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, Nathaly M; Nahas, Shareef A; Chowdhury, Shimul; Del Campo, Miguel; Jones, Marilyn C; Dimmock, David P; Kingsmore, Stephen F; Investigators, Rcigm

    2018-03-16

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) results from incomplete formation of the diaphragm leading to herniation of abdominal organs into the thoracic cavity. CDH is associated with pulmonary hypoplasia, congenital heart disease and pulmonary hypertension. Genetically, it is associated with aneuploidies, chromosomal copy number variants, and single gene mutations. CDH is the most expensive non-cardiac congenital defect: Management frequently requires implementation of Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation (ECMO), which increases management expenditures 2.4 - 3.5-fold. The cost of management of CDH has been estimated to exceed $250 million per year. Despite in hospital survival of 80-90%, current management is imperfect, as a great proportion of surviving children have long-term functional deficits. We report the case of a premature infant prenatally diagnosed with CDH and congenital heart disease, who had a protracted and complicated course in the intensive care unit with multiple surgical interventions, including post-cardiac surgery ECMO, gastrostomy tube placement with Nissen fundoplication, tracheostomy for respiratory failure, recurrent infections and developmental delay. Rapid whole genome sequencing (rWGS) identified a de novo, likely pathogenic, c.3096_3100delCAAAG (p.Lys1033Argfs*32) variant in ARID1B, providing a diagnosis of Coffin-Siris syndrome. Her parents elected palliative care and she died later that day. Had rWGS been performed as a neonate, eight months of suffering and futile healthcare utilization may have been avoided. Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  4. IGF-I replacement therapy in children with congenital IGF-I deficiency (Laron syndrome) maintains heart dimension and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheinowitz, Mickey; Feinberg, Micha S; Laron, Zvi

    2009-06-01

    Untreated patients with congenital growth hormone deficiency (GHD) and IGF-I deficiency are characterized not only by dwarfism but also by acromicria and organomicria, such as the heart. We assessed cardiac dimensions and function in very young patients with Laron syndrome (LS) undergoing IGF-I replacement therapy. Two to seven echocardiographic measurements were performed during IGF-I replacement therapy on male (n=4) and female (n=4) LS -patients, mean+/-SD age of 7.1+/-3.6 years (range 1.6-11.6 years), weight 16.1+/-9.7 kg, and height 89.9+/-18.5 cm. As aged- and gender-matched controls served 44 healthy children, age: 8.7+/-5.5 years, weight: 36.1+/-22.4 kg, and height: 129.7+/-33.1cm. Data of LS patients were normalized to body surface area and compared to the control group as well as nomograms of normal echocardiographic parameters for this age group. Left ventricular diastolic and systolic dimensions (LVDD/ LVSD, mm) and LV mass (gr) were significantly smaller in boys and girls with IGF-I treated LS compared with controls while the shortening fraction (%) and intraventricular septum thickness (mm) were similar. When compared with standard values for this age group, all treated LS patients were within 1 standard deviation of the mean. IGF-I therapy of young patients with Laron syndrome maintain LV dimensions and function within the normal range of aged-matched controls.

  5. Multiple congenital malformations in two sibs reminiscent of hydrolethalus and pseudotrisomy 13 syndromes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dincsoy, M.Y.; Salih, M.A.M.; Al-Jurayyan, N. [King Saud Univ, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia)] [and others

    1995-04-10

    We report on two sibs, born to consanguineous parents, with defects of the midline including cleft lip and palate, flat nose, hypotelorism, and dysgenesis of corpus callosum, in addition to short limbs, radiolucent tibial notch, digital anomalies, ambiguous genitalia, and hypopituitarism. In spite of the similarities between this condition and the hydrolethalus and pseudotrisomy 13 syndromes, our patients had neither preaxial nor postaxial polydactyly, but had previously undescribed bilateral radiolucent tibial notch, which is not known to be part of those two syndromes. The cases presented here may very well represent a new autosomal recessive syndrome. 20 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Unusual facies, arthrogryposis, advanced skeletal maturation and unique bone changes. A new congenital malformation syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jequier, S.; Kozlowski, K.

    1987-07-01

    Two strikingly similar infant siblings showed the following pattern of anomalies: unusual cranio-facial appearance, arthrogryposis, advanced bone age of the hips and unique skeletal X-ray abnormalities. They represent a previously unrecognised, fatal malformation syndrome.

  7. Fusion of lower limbs with severe urogenital malformation in a newborn, a rare congenital clinical syndrome: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al Hadhoud F

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Fatemah Al Hadhoud,1 Abeer H Kamal,1 Abdulmohsen Al Anjari,1 Michael FE Diejomaoh1,2 1Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Maternity Hospital, 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Medicine, Kuwait University, Kuwait City, Kuwait Background: Fused lower limbs combined with severe urogenital malformation, also known as sirenomelia, is a rare congenital clinical syndrome. The etiology is unknown, and the outcome for the affected fetus is rather uncertain. Case report: Mrs RB, a Kuwaiti woman primigravida, married to a non-consanguineous husband, had uneventful antenatal care in a private health service, until she was admitted to the Maternity Hospital, Kuwait, at 31 weeks of gestation with a 3-hour history of ruptured membranes. She had a negative family history for diabetes mellitus, and her past surgical/medical/gynecological history was noncontributory. General physical examination revealed a healthy parturient with normal vital signs, clear lungs and normal heart sounds. Obstetric examination revealed a fundal height compatible with the gestational age; there was a single living fetus in breech presentation; she was not in labor. The mother was managed conservatively with antibiotics and dexamethasone injections. Labor ensued later, progressing rapidly to the second stage. Assisted breech delivery was performed, and a live baby, birth weight 1570 g and Apgar score 3/9, was delivered. The neonate had multiple congenital abnormalities, including fusion of both lower limbs, ambiguous genitalia, cloacal anomaly and tracheoesophageal fistula. The neonate was admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit, fully investigated, managed medically and surgically and eventually discharged home after a hospital stay of 123 days for further management. Conclusion: A case of peculiar fetal anomaly called sirenomelia, the first case in Kuwait, has been presented. Survival of such babies requires costly management with average results

  8. Hyperammonemia and systemic inflammatory response syndrome predicts presence of hepatic encephalopathy in dogs with congenital portosystemic shunts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mickey S Tivers

    Full Text Available Hepatic encephalopathy (HE is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with liver disease. The pathogenesis of he is incompletely understood although ammonia and inflammatory cytokines have been implicated as key mediators. To facilitate further mechanistic understanding of the pathogenesis of HE, a large number of animal models have been developed which often involve the surgical creation of an anastomosis between the hepatic portal vein and the caudal vena cava. One of the most common congenital abnormalities in dogs is a congenital portosystemic shunt (cpss, which closely mimics these surgical experimental models of HE. Dogs with a cPSS often have clinical signs which mimic clinical signs observed in humans with HE. Our hypothesis is that the pathogenesis of HE in dogs with a cPSS is similar to humans with HE. The aim of the study was to measure a range of clinical, haematological and biochemical parameters, which have been linked to the development of HE in humans, in dogs with a cPSS and a known HE grade. One hundred and twenty dogs with a cPSS were included in the study and multiple regression analysis of clinical, haematological and biochemical variables revealed that plasma ammonia concentrations and systemic inflammatory response syndrome scores predicted the presence of HE. Our findings further support the notion that the pathogenesis of canine and human HE share many similarities and indicate that dogs with cPSS may be an informative spontaneous model of human HE. Further investigations on dogs with cPSS may allow studies on HE to be undertaken without creating surgical models of HE thereby allowing the number of large animals used in animal experimentation to be reduced.

  9. Congenital Heart Disease in Children with Down syndrome in Kermanshah, West of Iran during 2002 - 2016

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Jalili

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background Down syndrome is the most common chromosomal anomaly. Dysmorphic features can occur in several organs in this syndrome. Cardiac anomalies with a prevalence of 50% are the most common anomalies responsible for death during the first two years of life. We aimed to determine the prevalence of cardiac anomalies among Down syndrome patients admitted to two tertiary hospitals in Kermanshah, Iran from 2002 to 2016. Materials and Methods In this descriptive study, the medical records of all patients with Down syndrome admitted to two university hospitals namely Imam Ali and Imam Reza, Kermanshah city located in Western part of Iran in the study period were reviewed. All patients had received Echocardiography two-dimensional (2D. The required data including cardiac anomaly type, consanguinity of parents, maternal age, surgical interventions, and survival were collected into a checklist. Results:  During the study period, 166 patients with Down syndrome had received diagnostic and therapeutic services in the studied hospitals. There were 70 males (42.2% and 96 females (57.8%. Familial consanguinity was documented in 95 patients (57.2%. Mean ± standard deviation (SD maternal age at delivery was 26.33 (±4.7 years (range, 15 to 45 years. Of 166 studied patients, 123 (74.1% had cardiac anomaly. Ventricular septal defect (VSD was the most prevalent single defect seen in 32 (26% patients, followed by atrial septal defect (ASD detected in in 22 (17.8% patients. Seventy patients (42.1% required surgical interventions. A total of 74 patients experienced relative improvement of the symptoms. Also, seven patients (10.2% died including five females and two males. Conclusion: The frequency of cardiac anomalies in the studied population of Down syndrome patients was higher than former reported figures. The pattern of the anomalies is compatible with some former reports, but contradicts other reports.

  10. A new syndrome: multiple congenital abnormalities and mental retardation in two brothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dundar, M; Ozdemir, S Y; Fryns, J P

    2012-01-01

    In this report we present two brothers with abnormal neurological development, hypotonia, short stature, pylorus stenosis, pectus excavatum, brachycephaly due to craniosynostosis, frontal bossing, depressed nasal bridge, high arched-wide palate, downslant palpebral fissures, low-set, large ears, thin upper lip and bilateral cryptorchidism. The brothers were born to a couple of second cousins and were the third and fourth pregnancies of the mother. The father, the mother and the eldest sibling were phenotypically and chromosomally normal. The clinical findings of the brothers were found to be similar. These clinical findings were compared with syndromes showing some of the symptoms, namely Apert, FG, Floating-Harbor, Shprintzen-Goldberg and Rett Syndromes. However, when the findings were detailed, we observed that they did not match completely any of the syndromes in a discernable way. The MECP2 gene mutation was analysed because of mental retardation, poor neurological evolution and large ears, but no mutation was found. So these cases are presented as a new syndrome with apparent autosomal recessive inheritance.

  11. Prophylactic milrinone for the prevention of low cardiac output syndrome and mortality in children undergoing surgery for congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhardt, Barbara E U; Rücker, Gerta; Stiller, Brigitte

    2015-03-25

    Children with congenital heart disease often undergo heart surgery at a young age. They are at risk for postoperative low cardiac output syndrome (LCOS) or death. Milrinone may be used to provide inotropic and vasodilatory support during the immediate postoperative period. This review examines the effectiveness of prophylactic postoperative use of milrinone to prevent LCOS or death in children having undergone surgery for congenital heart disease. Electronic and manual literature searches were performed to identify randomised controlled trials. We searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE and Web of Science in February 2014 and conducted a top-up search in September 2014 as well as clinical trial registries and reference lists of published studies. We did not apply any language restrictions. Only randomised controlled trials were selected for analysis. We considered studies with newborn infants, infants, toddlers, and children up to 12 years of age. Two review authors independently extracted data according to a pre-defined protocol. We obtained additional information from all study authors. Three of the five included studies compared milrinone versus levosimendan, one study compared milrinone with placebo, and one compared milrinone verus dobutamine, with 101, 242, and 50 participants, respectively. Three trials were at low risk of bias while two were at higher risk of bias. The number and definitions of outcomes were non-uniform as well. In one study comparing two doses of milrinone and placebo, there was some evidence in an overall comparison of milrinone versus placebo that milrinone lowered risk for LCOS (risk ratio (RR) 0.52, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.28 to 0.96; 227 participants). The results from two small studies do not provide enough information to determine whether milrinone increases the risk of LCOS when compared to levosimendan (RR 1.22, 95% CI 0.32 to 4.65; 59 participants). Mortality rates in the studies were low, and there was insufficient evidence to

  12. Polyalanine expansion and frameshift mutations of the paired-like homeobox gene PHOX2B in congenital central hypoventilation syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiel, Jeanne; Laudier, Béatrice; Attié-Bitach, Tania; Trang, Ha; de Pontual, Loïc; Gener, Blanca; Trochet, Delphine; Etchevers, Heather; Ray, Pierre; Simonneau, Michel; Vekemans, Michel; Munnich, Arnold; Gaultier, Claude; Lyonnet, Stanislas

    2003-04-01

    Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS or Ondine's curse; OMIM 209880) is a life-threatening disorder involving an impaired ventilatory response to hypercarbia and hypoxemia. This core phenotype is associated with lower-penetrance anomalies of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) including Hirschsprung disease and tumors of neural-crest derivatives such as ganglioneuromas and neuroblastomas. In mice, the development of ANS reflex circuits is dependent on the paired-like homeobox gene Phox2b. Thus, we regarded its human ortholog, PHOX2B, as a candidate gene in CCHS. We found heterozygous de novo mutations in PHOX2B in 18 of 29 individuals with CCHS. Most mutations consisted of 5-9 alanine expansions within a 20-residue polyalanine tract probably resulting from non-homologous recombination. We show that PHOX2B is expressed in both the central and the peripheral ANS during human embryonic development. Our data support an essential role of PHOX2B in the normal patterning of the autonomous ventilation system and, more generally, of the ANS in humans.

  13. Sexual orientation and medical history among Iranian people with Complete Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome and Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khorashad, Behzad S; Roshan, Ghasem M; Reid, Alistair G; Aghili, Zahra; Hiradfar, Mehran; Afkhamizadeh, Mozhgan; Talaei, Ali; Aarabi, Azadeh; Ghaemi, Nosrat; Taghehchian, Negin; Saberi, Hedieh; Farahi, Nazanin; Abbaszadegan, Mohammad Reza

    2017-01-01

    To report sexual orientation, relationship status and medical history of Iranian people with Differences of Sex Development (DSD) who were raised female. Our participants consisted of nineteen 46,XY individuals with Complete Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome (CAIS) and eighteen 46,XX individuals with Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia (CAH) who were raised as females and older than 13years. As well as their relationship status and detailed medical history, an expert psychiatrist assessed their sexual orientation by a semi-structured psychiatric interview with them and, where applicable, their parents. Five percent of CAH participants and 42% of CAIS participants were in a relationship, which was significantly different. All CAH individuals had been diagnosed at birth; 89% of CAIS had been diagnosed after puberty and due to primary amenorrhea and 11% were diagnosed in childhood due to inguinal hernia. Genital reconstructive surgery had been performed in 100% of CAH participants and 37% of CAIS. Regarding sexual contact experiences and sexual fantasies (androphilic, gynephilic or both), no significant differences were found. However, CAH females had significantly more gynephilic dreams (P=0.045). This study, notable as one of the rare from a non-western culture, described sexual, medical and socioeconomic status of 46,XX CAH and 46,XY CAIS individuals living in Iran. Although broadly in line with previous findings from Western cultures, Iranian CAH individuals had fewer romantic relationships, but in contrast to previous studies their sexual orientation was only different from CAIS in the contents of sexual dreams. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Syndrome-Related Stigma in the General Social Environment as Reported by Women with Classical Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer-Bahlburg, Heino F L; Reyes-Portillo, Jazmin A; Khuri, Jananne; Ehrhardt, Anke A; New, Maria I

    2017-02-01

    Stigma defined as "undesired differentness" (Goffman, 1963) and subtyped as "experienced" or "enacted," "anticipated," and "internalized" has been documented for patients with diverse chronic diseases. However, no systematic data exist on the association of stigma with somatic intersexuality. The current report concerns women with classical congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH), the most prevalent intersex syndrome, and provides descriptive data on CAH-related stigma as experienced in the general social environment (excluding medical settings and romantic/sexual partners) during childhood, adolescence, and adulthood. A total of 62 adult women with classical CAH [41 with the salt-wasting (SW) variant and 21 with the simple-virilizing (SV) variant] underwent a qualitative retrospective interview, which focused on the impact of CAH and its medical treatment on many aspects of women's lives. Deductive content analysis was performed on the transcribed texts. The women's accounts of CAH-related stigma were identified and excerpted as vignettes, and the vignettes categorized according to social context, stigma type, and the associated features of the CAH condition. Nearly two-thirds of women with either variant of CAH provided stigma vignettes. The vignettes included all three stigma types, and most involved some somatic or behavioral feature related to sex or gender. Stigma situations were reported for all ages and all social contexts of everyday life: family, peers, colleagues at work, strangers, and the media. We conclude that there is a need for systematic documentation of stigma in intersexuality as a basis for the development of improved approaches to prevention and intervention.

  15. Lemierre syndrome presenting as acute mastoiditis in a 2-year-old girl with congenital dwarfism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason B. Fischer

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Lemierre syndrome is defined by septic thrombophlebitis of the internal jugular vein caused by Fusobacterium. Historically, these infections originate from the oropharynx and typically are seen in older children, adolescents and young adults. More recently, otogenic sources in younger children have been described with increasing frequency. We present a case of a two-year old, who initially developed an otitis media with perforation of the tympanic membrane and went on to develop mastoiditis and non-occlusive thrombosis of the venous sinus and right internal jugular vein. Fusobacterium necrophorum was grown from operative cultures of the mastoid, ensuing computed tomography scan revealed occlusion of the internal jugular vein and the patient was successfully treated with clindamycin, ciprofloxacin and enoxaparin. This case demonstrates the importance of considering Fusobacterium in otogenic infections and the consideration of Lemierre syndrome when F. necrophorum is identified.

  16. Upper limb congenital muscular hypertrophy and aberrant muscle syndrome in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahan, Emmanuel; Chaves, Camilo; Bachy, Manon; Fitoussi, Frank

    2018-01-01

    Congenital muscle hypertrophy of the upper limb is a very rare condition with unknown aetiology. This descriptive observational and retrospective series included eight children followed by a multidisciplinary team from 2005 to 2017. The diagnosis was based on a cluster of clinical and radiological characteristics after elimination of differential diagnoses. Patients were categorized according to: anomalies of the wrist, anomalies of long fingers of intrinsic or extrinsic origin; and anomalies of the thumb with or without first web space contracture. Treatment begins in young children with hand orthoses to limit muscle contraction and joint malposition. The purpose of surgical treatment was to release contractures and to restore muscle balance through, in the main, finger intrinsic releases and first web releases. At the 2-year follow-up, we found that limited surgical procedures improved finger, thumb and wrist positions. We conclude that muscle hypertrophy is the main cause of deformity and that selective releases of contracted musculo-tendinous units and skin lengthening are effective. IV.

  17. Neurally adjusted ventilatory assist (NAVA) mode as an adjunct diagnostic tool in congenital central hypoventilation syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahmani, A.; Rehman, N.U.; Chedid, F.

    2013-01-01

    A full term female newborn was admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) for continuous observation of apnea. Infant was noted to have apnea while asleep requiring intubation and mechanical ventilation. A video EEG was performed which demonstrated normal awake background without any seizure activity. Neurally adjusted ventilatory assist (NAVA) demonstrated the absence of electrical activity of the diaphragm (Edi) when the patient was in quiet phase of sleep. This finding on NAVA monitor raised the suspicion of central hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS) which was confirmed by genetic identification of the PHOX2B mutation. (author)

  18. Neurally adjusted ventilatory assist (NAVA) mode as an adjunct diagnostic tool in congenital central hypoventilation syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmani, Aiman; Ur Rehman, Naveed; Chedid, Fares

    2013-02-01

    A full term female newborn was admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) for continuous observation of apnea. Infant was noted to have apnea while asleep requiring intubation and mechanical ventilation. A video EEG was performed which demonstrated normal awake background without any seizure activity. Neurally adjusted ventilatory assist (NAVA) demonstrated the absence of electrical activity of the diaphragm (Edi) when the patient was in quiet phase of sleep. This finding on NAVA monitor raised the suspicion of central hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS) which was confirmed by genetic identification of the PHOX2B mutation.

  19. Physical Fitness and Metabolic Syndrome in Children with Repaired Congenital Heart Disease Compared with Healthy Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaqout, Mahmoud; Vandekerckhove, Kristof; Michels, Nathalie; Bove, Thierry; François, Katrien; De Wolf, Daniel

    2017-12-01

    To determine whether children who underwent surgery for congenital heart disease (CHD) are as fit as their peers. We studied 66 children (6-14 years) who underwent surgery for ventricular septal defect (n = 19), coarctation of aorta (n = 10), tetralogy of Fallot (n = 15), and transposition of great arteries (n = 22); and 520 healthy children (6-12 years). All children performed physical fitness tests: cardiorespiratory fitness, muscular strength, balance, flexibility, and speed. Metabolic score was assessed through z-score standardization using 4 components: waist circumference, blood pressure, blood lipids, and insulin resistance. Assessment also included self-reported and accelerometer-measured physical activity. Linear regression analyses with group (CHD vs control) as a predictor were adjusted for age, body mass index, physical activity, and parental education. Measured physical activity level, body mass index, cardiorespiratory fitness, flexibility, and total metabolic score did not differ between children with CHD and controls, whereas reported physical activity was greater in the CHD group than control group. Boys with CHD were less strong in upper muscular strength, speed, and balance, whereas girls with CHD were better in lower muscular strength and worse in balance. High-density lipoprotein was greater in boys and girls with CHD, whereas boys with CHD showed unhealthier glucose homeostasis. Appropriate physical fitness was achieved in children after surgery for CHD, especially in girls. Consequently, children with CHD were not at increased total metabolic risk. Lifestyle counseling should be part of every patient interaction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Sudden cardiac death in children and adolescents (excluding Sudden Infant Death Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gajewski Kelly

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Sudden death in the young is rare. About 25% of cases occur during sports. Most young people with sudden cardiac death (SCD have underlying heart disease, with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and coronary artery anomalies being commonest in most series. Arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia and long QT syndrome are the most common primary arrhythmic causes of SCD. It is estimated that early cardiopulmonary resuscitation and widespread availability of automatic external defibrillators could prevent about a quarter of pediatric sudden deaths.

  1. PHOX2B mutation-confirmed congenital central hypoventilation syndrome in a Chinese family: presentation from newborn to adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Peilin; Su, Yi-Ning; Yu, Chong-Jen; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Wu, Huey-Dong

    2009-02-01

    Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS) is characterized by compromised chemoreflexes resulting in sleep hypoventilation. We report a Chinese family with paired-like homeobox 2B (PHOX2B) mutation-confirmed CCHS, with a clinical spectrum from newborn to adulthood, to increase awareness of its various manifestations. After identifying central hypoventilation in an adult man (index case), clinical evaluation was performed on the complete family, which consisted of the parents, five siblings, and five offspring. Pulmonary function tests, overnight polysomnography, arterial blood gas measurements, hypercapnia ventilatory response, and PHOX2B gene mutation screening were performed on living family members. Brain MRI, 24-h Holter monitoring, and echocardiography were performed on members with clinically diagnosed central hypoventilation. The index patient and four offspring manifested clinical features of central hypoventilation. The index patients had hypoxia and hypercapnia while awake, polycythemia, and hematocrit levels of 70%. The first and fourth children had frequent cyanotic spells, and both died of respiratory failure. The second and third children remained asymptomatic until adulthood, when they experienced impaired hypercapnic ventilatory response. The third child had nocturnal hypoventilation with nadir pulse oximetric saturation of 59%. Adult-onset CCHS with PHOX2B gene mutation of the + 5 alanine expansions were confirmed in the index patient and the second and third children. The index patient and the third child received ventilator support system bilevel positive airway pressure treatment, which improved the hypoxemia, hypercapnia, and polycythemia without altering their chemosensitivity. Transmission of late-onset CCHS is autosomal-dominant. Genetic screening of family members of CCHS probands allows for early diagnosis and treatment.

  2. The Cerebral Cost of Breathing: An fMRI Case-Study in Congenital Central Hypoventilation Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharman, Mike; Gallea, Cécile; Lehongre, Katia; Galanaud, Damien; Nicolas, Nathalie; Similowski, Thomas; Cohen, Laurent; Straus, Christian; Naccache, Lionel

    2014-01-01

    Certain motor activities - like walking or breathing - present the interesting property of proceeding either automatically or under voluntary control. In the case of breathing, brainstem structures located in the medulla are in charge of the automatic mode, whereas cortico-subcortical brain networks - including various frontal lobe areas - subtend the voluntary mode. We speculated that the involvement of cortical activity during voluntary breathing could impact both on the “resting state” pattern of cortical-subcortical connectivity, and on the recruitment of executive functions mediated by the frontal lobe. In order to test this prediction we explored a patient suffering from central congenital hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS), a very rare developmental condition secondary to brainstem dysfunction. Typically, CCHS patients demonstrate efficient cortically-controlled breathing while awake, but require mechanically-assisted ventilation during sleep to overcome the inability of brainstem structures to mediate automatic breathing. We used simultaneous EEG-fMRI recordings to compare patterns of brain activity between these two types of ventilation during wakefulness. As compared with spontaneous breathing (SB), mechanical ventilation (MV) restored the default mode network (DMN) associated with self-consciousness, mind-wandering, creativity and introspection in healthy subjects. SB on the other hand resulted in a specific increase of functional connectivity between brainstem and frontal lobe. Behaviorally, the patient was more efficient in cognitive tasks requiring executive control during MV than during SB, in agreement with her subjective reports in everyday life. Taken together our results provide insight into the cognitive and neural costs of spontaneous breathing in one CCHS patient, and suggest that MV during waking periods may free up frontal lobe resources, and make them available for cognitive recruitment. More generally, this study reveals how the active

  3. Congenital spinal malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ertl-Wagner, B.B.; Reiser, M.F.

    2001-01-01

    Congenital spinal malformations form a complex and heterogeneous group of disorders whose pathogenesis is best explained embryologically. Radiologically, it is important to formulate a diagnosis when the disorder first becomes symptomatic. However, it is also crucial to detect complications of the disorder or of the respective therapeutic interventions in the further course of the disease such as hydromyelia or re-tethering after repair of a meningomyelocele. Moreover, once a congenital spinal malformation is diagnosed, associated malformations should be sought after. A possible syndromal classification such as in OEIS- or VACTERL-syndromes should also be considered. (orig.) [de

  4. [Cytomegalovirus: congenital infection and clinical presentation in infants with respiratory distress syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Contreras, Angélica; Lira, Rosalía; Soria-Rodríguez, Carmen; Hori-Oshima, Sawako; Maldonado-Rodríguez, Angélica; Rojas-Montes, Othón; Ayala-Figueroa, Rafael; Estrada-Guzmán, Julia; Álvarez-Muñoz, Ma Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) is a multifactorial and common disease that varies from 15 to 50 % in the newborn, causing 50 % of mortality. The RDS may be associated with bacterial and viral infections, and one of the most common viral agents is the cytomegalovirus (CMV). In the neonatal period the virus incidence goes from 0.4 to 2.5 % with a seroprevalence of 50 to 75 %; the incidence of infection in newborn with RDS is unknown. The objective was to determine the frequency of CMV infection in neonates with RDS and identify the risk factors associated with infection. The CMV-DNA was identified in plasma by quantitative PCR; maternal and neonatal variables that defined the clinical findings were analyzed by logistic regression.The CMV-DNA was identified in plasma by quantitative PCR; maternal and neonatal variables that defined the clinical findings were analyzed by logistic regression. The frequency of CMV infection in 197 infants with RDS was 8.6 % (95 % CI, 4.7-12.5). The significant variables in newborn were: neutropenia (p = 0.012), thrombocytopenia (p = 0.021), mottled skin (p = 0.03), and the maternal significant variable was cervicovaginitis (p = 0.05). We reported for the first time the highest frecuency of CMV infection in newborns with RDS and the association of various risk factors with CMV infection.

  5. Congenital Heart Defects (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to be associated with genetic disorders, such as Down syndrome . But the cause of most congenital heart defects isn't known. While they can't be prevented, many treatments are available for the defects and related health ...

  6. CHRNE Mutation and Congenital Myasthenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The CHRNE e1293insG mutation was identified in 14 (60% of 23 North African families with an early onset form of congenital myasthenic syndrome studied at centers in France, Tunisia, Algeria, and UK.

  7. Laparoscopic-assisted surgical reconstruction of a rare congenital abdominal wall defect in two children misdiagnosed with prune-belly syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, Andrew I; Franco, Israel

    2013-08-01

    Abdominal wall laxity is typically associated with prune-belly syndrome (PBS). Incomplete forms of PBS have been rarely reported with only the abdominal wall laxity. Herein, we describe a rare congenital abdominal wall defect that has been confused with PBS and illustrate the laparoscopic-assisted surgical technique used for reconstruction. Two boys with symmetrical, bilateral absence or hypoplasia of the internal and external oblique muscles and no genitourinary abnormalities underwent a laparoscopic-assisted abdominal wall reconstruction utilizing the technique previously described by Firlit. Each patient had a Ct scan which confirmed the absence of the oblique muscles. In one patient EMG data confirmed no electrical activity of the obliques. Radiologic evaluation of the urinary tracts revealed no abnormalities. The abdominal wall was plicated utilizing bilateral subcostal incisions. Both patients had excellent cosmetic and functional results with no weakness or bulging of the lateral abdominal wall and improvement of associated symptoms. We believe these two cases and their congenital abdominal wall defects are a rare and often misdiagnosed muscular deficiency separate from PBS. The novel laparoscopic-assisted surgical technique illustrated is feasible and highly successful for these and possible other patients with similar rare congenital abdominal wall defects. Copyright © 2012 Journal of Pediatric Urology Company. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Physiological Basis for the Etiology, Diagnosis, and Treatment of Adrenal Disorders: Cushing’s Syndrome, Adrenal Insufficiency, and Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raff, Hershel; Sharma, Susmeeta T.; Nieman, Lynnette K.

    2014-01-01

    The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is a classic neuroendocrine system. One of the best ways to understand the HPA axis is to appreciate its dynamics in the variety of diseases and syndromes that affect it. Excess glucocorticoid activity can be due to endogenous cortisol overproduction (spontaneous Cushing’s syndrome) or exogenous glucocorticoid therapy (iatrogenic Cushing’s syndrome). Endogenous Cushing’s syndrome can be subdivided into ACTH-dependent and ACTH-independent, the latter of which is usually due to autonomous adrenal overproduction. The former can be due to a pituitary corticotroph tumor (usually benign) or ectopic ACTH production from tumors outside the pituitary; both of these tumor types overexpress the proopiomelanocortin gene. The converse of Cushing’s syndrome is the lack of normal cortisol secretion and is usually due to adrenal destruction (primary adrenal insufficiency) or hypopituitarism (secondary adrenal insufficiency). Secondary adrenal insufficiency can also result from a rapid discontinuation of long-term, pharmacological glucocorticoid therapy because of HPA axis suppression and adrenal atrophy. Finally, mutations in the steroidogenic enzymes of the adrenal cortex can lead to congenital adrenal hyperplasia and an increase in precursor steroids, particularly androgens. When present in utero, this can lead to masculinization of a female fetus. An understanding of the dynamics of the HPA axis is necessary to master the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of pituitary-adrenal diseases. Furthermore, understanding the pathophysiology of the HPA axis gives great insight into its normal control. PMID:24715566

  9. Anaesthesia management of a case of Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome for minimally invasive bilateral thoracoscopic cervicothoracic sympathectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preety Mittal Roy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Long QT syndrome (LQTS is an arrhythmogenic cardiac disorder resulting from the malfunction of cardiac ion channels. Patient with LQTS may present with syncope, seizures or sudden cardiac death secondary to polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (VT or torsades de pointes. Patient may be asymptomatic in the pre-operative period but may develop VT for the first time in operation theatre. We are reporting anaesthetic management of a child with LQTS planned for bilateral thoracoscopic cervicothoracic sympathectomy.

  10. Homozygous disruption of PDZD7 by reciprocal translocation in a consanguineous family: a new member of the Usher syndrome protein interactome causing congenital hearing impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Eberhard; Märker, Tina; Daser, Angelika; Frey-Mahn, Gabriele; Beyer, Vera; Farcas, Ruxandra; Schneider-Rätzke, Brigitte; Kohlschmidt, Nicolai; Grossmann, Bärbel; Bauss, Katharina; Napiontek, Ulrike; Keilmann, Annerose; Bartsch, Oliver; Zechner, Ulrich; Wolfrum, Uwe; Haaf, Thomas

    2009-02-15

    A homozygous reciprocal translocation, 46,XY,t(10;11),t(10;11), was detected in a boy with non-syndromic congenital sensorineural hearing impairment. Both parents and their four other children were heterozygous translocation carriers, 46,XX,t(10;11) and 46,XY,t(10;11), respectively. Fluorescence in situ hybridization of region-specific clones to patient chromosomes was used to localize the breakpoints within bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) RP11-108L7 on chromosome 10q24.3 and within BAC CTD-2527F12 on chromosome 11q23.3. Junction fragments were cloned by vector ligation and sequenced. The chromosome 10 breakpoint was identified within the PDZ domain containing 7 (PDZD7) gene, disrupting the open reading frame of transcript PDZD7-C (without PDZ domain) and the 5'-untranslated region of transcript PDZD7-D (with one PDZ and two prolin-rich domains). The chromosome 11 breakpoint was localized in an intergenic segment. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed PDZD7 expression in the human inner ear. A murine Pdzd7 transcript that is most similar in structure to human PDZD7-D is known to be expressed in the adult inner ear and retina. PDZD7 shares sequence homology with the PDZ domain-containing genes, USH1C (harmonin) and DFNB31 (whirlin). Allelic mutations in harmonin and whirlin can cause both Usher syndrome (USH1C and USH2D, respectively) and congenital hearing impairment (DFNB18 and DFNB31, respectively). Protein-protein interaction assays revealed the integration of PDZD7 in the protein network related to the human Usher syndrome. Collectively, our data provide strong evidence that PDZD7 is a new autosomal-recessive deafness-causing gene and also a prime candidate gene for Usher syndrome.

  11. Genotype and Phenotype Correlation in Hereditary Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura (Upshaw-Schulman Syndrome)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-12

    Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura; Congenital Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura; Familial Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura; Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura, Congenital; Upshaw-Schulman Syndrome

  12. Genetically caused congenital anomalies of reproductive system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. F. Kurilo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Classification of congenital disorders, their frequency of occurrence in populations, and some terminology questions discussed in the review. Genetically caused congenital anomalies of reproductive system are outlined. Full information about genetic syndromes is stated in the book: Kozlova S.I., Demikova N.S. Hereditary syndromes and genetic counseling. M., 2007.

  13. Epífora congênita nos pacientes com síndrome de Down Congenital epiphora in patients with Down syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane Carvalho Salvio

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Identificar as causas de epífora congênita em pacientes com síndrome de Down. MÉTODOS: Foram analisados os prontuários de 695 pacientes com epífora congênita, atendidos no Ambulatório de Vias Lacrimais da Clínica Oftalmológica da Santa Casa de Misericórdia de São Paulo, de outubro de 1989 a julho de 2005. Todos foram previamente submetidos a exame oftalmológico completo e apresentavam como queixa principal epífora e/ou secreção ocular constante, uni ou bilateral, desde o nascimento. Os pacientes foram divididos em: grupo A, 30 pacientes com síndrome de Down, e grupo B, 665 pacientes controle. A avaliação das vias lacrimais foi realizada com a prova de irrigação sob anestesia geral. RESULTADOS: Os grupos A e B são semelhantes estatisticamente quanto à idade (p=0,07, sexo (p=0,63 e raça (p=0,68. As queixas bilaterais foram mais freqüentes no grupo A (p=0,0008. A obstrução anatômica das vias lacrimais foi encontrada em 32,73% do grupo A e em 85,51% do grupo B (pPURPOSE: To describe the causes of congenital epiphora in patients with Down syndrome. METHODS: Retrospective study of 695 patients with congenital epiphora, of the Lacrimal Sector of the Department of Ophthalmology, São Paulo "Santa Casa", Brazil, between October 1998 and July 2005. This study analyzed: the main symptom of continuous epiphora or mucous discharge, which affected one or both eyes, since birth. Subjects were separated in to two groups: group A, with 30 patients with Down syndrome and group B, with 665 control patients. The lacrimal evaluation was performed by the throw irrigation test after general anesthesia. RESULTS: Both groups were statistically similar regarding age (p=0.07, sex (p=0.63 and race (p=0.68. Bilateral symptoms were more frequent in group A (p=0.0008. Anatomic obstruction of the lacrimal canal was present in 32.73% of group A and in 85.51% of group B (p<0.0001. CONCLUSIONS: The most frequent cause of congenital epiphora

  14. Congenital Hypothyroidism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease Featured Resource Find an Endocrinologist Search Congenital Hypothyroidism March 2012 Download PDFs English Espanol Editors Rosalind S. ... Resources MedlinePlus (NIH) Mayo Clinic What is congenital hypothyroidism? Newborn babies who are unable to make enough ...

  15. Congenital Neutropenia Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Relations Cyber Infrastructure Computational Biology Equal Employment Opportunity Ethics Global Research Office of Mission Integration and Financial Management Strategic Planning Workforce Effectiveness Workplace Solutions Technology Transfer Intellectual Property Division of AIDS ...

  16. Ehlers Danlos syndrome, kyphoscoliotic type due to Lysyl Hydroxylase 1 deficiency in two children without congenital or early onset kyphoscoliosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, Fleur S.; Mancini, Grazia M. S.; Maugeri, Alessandra; Cobben, Jan M.

    2017-01-01

    We report two children with Ehlers Danlos, kyphoscoliotic type confirmed by Lysyl Hydroxylase 1 deficiency due to bi-allelic PLOD1 mutations (kEDS-PLOD1) who were initially thought to have either a diagnosis of classical EDS (cEDS) or a neuromuscular disorder due to absence of (congenital)

  17. Congenital maxillary double lip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinesh Singh Chauhan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Double lip, also referred to as "macrocheilia," is a rare anomaly which affects the upper lip more commonly than the lower lip. It consists of a fold of excess or redundant hypertrophic tissue on the mucosal side of the lip. The congenital double lip is believed to be present at birth and becomes more prominent after eruption of teeth. It affects esthetics and also interferes with speech and mastication. Simple surgical excision produces good functional and cosmetic results. We report a case of a non-syndromic congenital maxillary double lip in a 21-year-old male patient.

  18. Heterogeneity in phenotype of usher-congenital hyperinsulinism syndrome: hearing loss, retinitis pigmentosa, and hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia ranging from severe to mild with conversion to diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Mutair, Angham N; Brusgaard, Klaus; Bin-Abbas, Bassam; Hussain, Khalid; Felimban, Naila; Al Shaikh, Adnan; Christesen, Henrik T

    2013-03-01

    To evaluate the phenotype of 15 children with congenital hyperinsulinism (CHI) and profound hearing loss, known as Homozygous 11p15-p14 Deletion syndrome (MIM #606528). Prospective clinical follow-up and genetic analysis by direct sequencing, multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification, and microsatellite markers. Genetic testing identified the previous described homozygous deletion in 11p15, USH1C:c.(90+592)_ABCC8:c.(2694-528)del. Fourteen patients had severe CHI demanding near-total pancreatectomy. In one patient with mild, transient neonatal hypoglycemia and nonautoimmune diabetes at age 11 years, no additional mutations were found in HNF1A, HNF4A, GCK, INS, and INSR. Retinitis pigmentosa was found in two patients aged 9 and 13 years. No patients had enteropathy or renal tubular defects. Neuromotor development ranged from normal to severe delay with epilepsy. The phenotype of Homozygous 11p15-p14 Deletion syndrome, or Usher-CHI syndrome, includes any severity of neonatal-onset CHI and severe, sensorineural hearing loss. Retinitis pigmentosa and nonautoimmune diabetes may occur in adolescence.

  19. Congenital high airway obstruction syndrome in the breech presentation managed by ex utero intrapartum treatment procedure after intraoperative external cephalic version.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miwa, Ichiro; Sase, Masakatsu; Nakamura, Yasuhiko; Hasegawa, Keiko; Kawasaki, Masahiro; Ueda, Kazuyuki

    2012-05-01

    Congenital high airway obstruction syndrome (CHAOS) caused by laryngeal atresia was diagnosed by prenatal ultrasound in a male fetus at 26 weeks of gestation. Findings included massive ascites, subcutaneous edema, enlarged hyperechogenic lungs with diaphragmatic inversion, dilated trachea, polyhydramnios, and breech presentation. Those findings of CHAOS spontaneously returned to normal by 33 weeks of gestation. However, the placenta was localized to the anterior uterine wall. In addition, the fetal position had been breech until delivery. At 36 weeks of gestation, a planned ex utero intrapartum treatment (EXIT) procedure was performed following intraoperative external cephalic version (ECV) in which the fetus was approached from the posterior wall of the uterus. Laryngoscopy revealed the predicted laryngeal obstruction, and tracheostomy was placed. Intraoperative ECV may be a useful technique in breech presentation before EXIT procedure. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research © 2012 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  20. [Congenital hypothyroidism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castilla Peón, María Fernanda

    Congenital hypothyroidism (CH) is a cause of preventable mental retardation; therefore, timely diagnosis and treatment by the primary care physician is very important. CH screening must be performed between the second and fifth days of life with capillary blood done with a heel prick and must be confirmed by measurement of thyroid hormones in venous blood. The most common cause of CH is thyroid dysgenesis, which may be identified by a thyroid scan carried out before initiating treatment. Treatment should be with levothyroxine (10-15μg/kg/day) and should not be delayed or suspended during the first 3 years of life due to the deleterious effect on neurodevelopment in case of low thyroid hormones during this time. Preterm or sick infants or those with Down syndrome require special consideration. This article provides diagnostic and therapeutic algorithms for CH. Copyright © 2015 Hospital Infantil de México Federico Gómez. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  1. Klippel-Trenaunay Syndrome (KTS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Definition Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome (KTS) is a rare congenital malformation involving blood and lymph vessels and abnormal growth ... Definition Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome (KTS) is a rare congenital malformation involving blood and lymph vessels and abnormal growth ...

  2. Nitrofurantoin and congenital abnormalities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Czeizel, A.E.; Rockenbauer, M.; Sørensen, Henrik Toft

    2001-01-01

    or fetuses with Down’s syndrome (patient controls), 23 (2.8%) pregnant women were treated with nitrofurantoin. The above differences between population controls and cases may be connected with recall bias, because the case-control pair analysis did not indicate a teratogenic potential of nitrofurantoin use......Objective: To study human teratogenic potential of oral nitrofurantoin treatment during pregnancy. Materials and Methods: Pair analysis of cases with congenital abnormalities and matched population controls in the population-based dataset of the Hungarian Case-Control Surveillance of Congenital...... during the second and the third months of gestation, i.e. in the critical period for major congenital abnormalities. Conclusion: Treatment with nitrofurantoin during pregnancy does not present detectable teratogenic risk to the fetus....

  3. Recessive cardiac phenotypes in induced pluripotent stem cell models of Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome: disease mechanisms and pharmacological rescue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Miao; D'Aniello, Cristina; Verkerk, Arie O; Wrobel, Eva; Frank, Stefan; Ward-van Oostwaard, Dorien; Piccini, Ilaria; Freund, Christian; Rao, Jyoti; Seebohm, Guiscard; Atsma, Douwe E; Schulze-Bahr, Eric; Mummery, Christine L; Greber, Boris; Bellin, Milena

    2014-12-16

    Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome (JLNS) is one of the most severe life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias. Patients display delayed cardiac repolarization, associated high risk of sudden death due to ventricular tachycardia, and congenital bilateral deafness. In contrast to the autosomal dominant forms of long QT syndrome, JLNS is a recessive trait, resulting from homozygous (or compound heterozygous) mutations in KCNQ1 or KCNE1. These genes encode the α and β subunits, respectively, of the ion channel conducting the slow component of the delayed rectifier K(+) current, IKs. We used complementary approaches, reprogramming patient cells and genetic engineering, to generate human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC) models of JLNS, covering splice site (c.478-2A>T) and missense (c.1781G>A) mutations, the two major classes of JLNS-causing defects in KCNQ1. Electrophysiological comparison of hiPSC-derived cardiomyocytes (CMs) from homozygous JLNS, heterozygous, and wild-type lines recapitulated the typical and severe features of JLNS, including pronounced action and field potential prolongation and severe reduction or absence of IKs. We show that this phenotype had distinct underlying molecular mechanisms in the two sets of cell lines: the previously unidentified c.478-2A>T mutation was amorphic and gave rise to a strictly recessive phenotype in JLNS-CMs, whereas the missense c.1781G>A lesion caused a gene dosage-dependent channel reduction at the cell membrane. Moreover, adrenergic stimulation caused action potential prolongation specifically in JLNS-CMs. Furthermore, sensitivity to proarrhythmic drugs was strongly enhanced in JLNS-CMs but could be pharmacologically corrected. Our data provide mechanistic insight into distinct classes of JLNS-causing mutations and demonstrate the potential of hiPSC-CMs in drug evaluation.

  4. Delayed diagnosis of a patient with Usher syndrome 1C in a Louisiana Acadian family highlights the necessity of timely genetic testing for the diagnosis and management of congenital hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umrigar, Ayesha; Musso, Amanda; Mercer, Danielle; Hurley, Annette; Glausier, Cassondra; Bakeer, Mona; Marble, Michael; Hicks, Chindo; Tsien, Fern

    2017-01-01

    Advances in sequencing technologies and increased understanding of the contribution of genetics to congenital sensorineural hearing loss have led to vastly improved outcomes for patients and their families. Next-generation sequencing and diagnostic panels have become increasingly reliable and less expensive for clinical use. Despite these developments, the diagnosis of genetic sensorineural hearing loss still presents challenges for healthcare providers. Inherited sensorineural hearing loss has high levels of genetic heterogeneity and variable expressivity. Additionally, syndromic hearing loss (hearing loss and additional clinical abnormalities) should be distinguished from non-syndromic (hearing loss is the only clinical symptom). Although the diagnosis of genetic sensorineural hearing loss can be challenging, the patient's family history and ethnicity may provide critical information, as certain genetic mutations are more common in specific ethnic populations. The early identification of the cause of deafness can benefit patients and their families by estimating recurrence risks for future family planning and offering the proper interventions to improve their quality of life. Collaboration between pediatricians, audiologists, otolaryngologists, geneticists, and other specialists are essential in the diagnosis and management of patients with hearing disorders. An early diagnosis is vital for proper management and care, as some clinical manifestations of syndromic sensorineural hearing loss are not apparent at birth and have a delayed age of onset. We present a case of Usher syndrome (congenital deafness and childhood-onset blindness) illustrating the challenges encountered in the diagnosis and management of children presenting with congenital genetic sensorineural hearing loss, along with helpful resources for clinicians and families.

  5. Síndrome do QT longo e torsades de pointes pós-parto Síndrome de QT largo y torsades de pointes postparto Postpartum torsades de pointes and long QT syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Maulaz Barcelos

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Relatamos o caso de uma paciente puérpera, internada com diagnósticos de infecção do trato urinário e insuficiência cardíaca que evoluiu com arritmias ventriculares do tipo torsades de pointes, após hipopotassemia e uso de Ciprofloxacin. Não apresentou supressão das arritmias ventriculares após reposição de potássio e magnésio, mas após implante de marca-passo provisório. Recebeu alta hospitalar com QTc de 490 ms, em uso de Propranolol.Relatamos el caso de una paciente en puerperio, internada con diagnóstico de infección en el tracto urinario e insuficiencia cardíaca que evolucionó con arritmias ventriculares del tipo torsades de pointes, después de hipokalemia y uso de Ciprofloxacina. No presentó supresión de las arritmias ventriculares después de la reposición de potasio y magnesio, sino después de implante de marcapasos provisorio. Recibió alta hospitalaria con QTc de 490 ms, en uso de Propanolol.This article reports the case of a puerperal patient admitted with diagnosis of urinary tract infection and heart failure. This condition evolved with torsades de pointes ventricular arrhythmias, then, hypokalemia, and use of Ciprofloxacin. Ventricular arrhythmias did not present any improvement after potassium and magnesium replacement, but after implantation of temporary pacemaker, this condition showed signs of improvement. The patient was discharged with QTc at 490 ms, taking Propranolol.

  6. Congenital Hypothalamic "Hamartoblastoma" Versus "Hamartoma": Suggestions for Neuropathologic Terminology Emanating From a Mid-gestational Autopsy Case of Pallister-Hall Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunham, C; McFadden, D; Dahlgren, L; Butler, B; Hamilton, S; McKinnon, M

    2018-01-01

    Pallister-Hall syndrome (PHS) is a rare malformative disorder that is due to truncating functional repressor mutations in GLI3. Since the seminal publication in 1980, hypothalamic tumors have been recognized to be a cardinal feature of PHS. In their original description of the neuropathologic features of PHS, Clarren et al. coined the term "hamartoblastoma" to characterize what they deemed to be a dual malformative and neoplastic mass of the hypothalamus. In subsequent published cases/series of PHS, the term "hamartoma" was often substituted for hamartoblastoma given what appeared to be a benign natural history of this lesion. Additional confusion in the literature has ensued since most hypothalamic hamartomas (HH) encountered on the clinical neuropathology service are "isolated" in nature (ie, no other congenital malformations) and present in a very different and stereotypical fashion with gelastic seizures and/or precocious puberty. While genomic investigations of isolated HH have begun to uncover a mutational profile of these cases, GLI3 mutations have only been recognized in a small subset of isolated HH. Herein, we describe the autopsy findings from a 21-week gestational age fetus with features of PHS. Moreover, we provide a detailed description of the hypothalamic tumor affecting this fetus and propose a novel subclassification of HH, distinguishing syndromic from isolated forms based upon the presence or absence of neocortical-like areas.

  7. [Neonatal tumours and congenital malformations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berbel Tornero, O; Ortega García, J A; Ferrís i Tortajada, J; García Castell, J; Donat i Colomer, J; Soldin, O P; Fuster Soler, J L

    2008-06-01

    The association between pediatric cancer and congenital abnormalities is well known but, there is no exclusive data on the neonatal period and the underlying etiopathogenic mechanisms are unknown. First, to analyze the frequency of neonatal tumours associated with congenital abnormalities; and second, to comment on the likely etiopathogenic hypotheses of a relationship between neonatal tumours and congenital abnormalities. Historical series of neonatal tumours from La Fe University Children's Hospital in Valencia (Spain), from January 1990 to December 1999. Histological varieties of neonatal tumours and associated congenital abnormalities were described. A systematic review of the last 25 years was carried out using Medline, Cancerlit, Index Citation Science and Embase. The search profile used was the combination of "neonatal/congenital-tumors/cancer/neoplasms" and "congenital malformations/birth defects". 72 neonatal tumours were identified (2.8% of all pediatric cancers diagnosed in our hospital) and in 15 cases (20.8%) there was some associated malformation, disease or syndrome. The association between congenital abnormalities and neonatal tumours were: a) angiomas in three patients: two patients with congenital heart disease with a choanal stenosis, laryngomalacia; b) neuroblastomas in two patients: horseshoe kidney with vertebral anomalies and other with congenital heart disease; c) teratomas in two patients: one with cleft palate with vertebral anomalies and other with metatarsal varus; d) one tumour of the central nervous system with Bochdaleck hernia; e) heart tumours in four patients with tuberous sclerosis; f) acute leukaemia in one patient with Down syndrome and congenital heart disease; g) kidney tumour in one case with triventricular hydrocephaly, and h) adrenocortical tumour: hemihypertrophy. The publications included the tumours diagnosed in different pediatric periods and without unified criteria to classify the congenital abnormalities. Little data

  8. Congenital tuberculosis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof Ezechukwu

    2012-06-20

    Jun 20, 2012 ... Key words: Congenital tuberculo- sis, case report, miliary tuberculosis. Introduction. Congenital tuberculosis defines tuberculosis in infants of .... tary TB and otitis media, resulting in seizures, deafness, and death. It is therefore not surprising that the index case who presented at twelve weeks of age, had ...

  9. Congenital Abnormalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tube defects. However, there is also a genetic influence to this type of congenital anomaly. Unknown Causes The vast majority of congenital abnormalities have no known cause. This is particularly troubling for parents who plan to have more children, because there is no way to predict if ...

  10. Mutations in zebrafish pitx2 model congenital malformations in Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome but do not disrupt left-right placement of visceral organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Yongchang; Buel, Sharleen M; Amack, Jeffrey D

    2016-08-01

    Pitx2 is a conserved homeodomain transcription factor that has multiple functions during embryonic development. Mutations in human PITX2 cause autosomal dominant Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome (ARS), characterized by congenital eye and tooth malformations. Pitx2(-/-) knockout mouse models recapitulate aspects of ARS, but are embryonic lethal. To date, ARS treatments remain limited to managing individual symptoms due to an incomplete understanding of PITX2 function. In addition to regulating eye and tooth development, Pitx2 is a target of a conserved Nodal (TGFβ) signaling pathway that mediates left-right (LR) asymmetry of visceral organs. Based on its highly conserved asymmetric expression domain, the Nodal-Pitx2 axis has long been considered a common denominator of LR development in vertebrate embryos. However, functions of Pitx2 during asymmetric organ morphogenesis are not well understood. To gain new insight into Pitx2 function we used genome editing to create mutations in the zebrafish pitx2 gene. Mutations in the pitx2 homeodomain caused phenotypes reminiscent of ARS, including aberrant development of the cornea and anterior chamber of the eye and reduced or absent teeth. Intriguingly, LR asymmetric looping of the heart and gut was normal in pitx2 mutants. These results suggest conserved roles for Pitx2 in eye and tooth development and indicate Pitx2 is not required for asymmetric looping of zebrafish visceral organs. This work establishes zebrafish pitx2 mutants as a new animal model for investigating mechanisms underlying congenital malformations in ARS and high-throughput drug screening for ARS therapeutics. Additionally, pitx2 mutants present a unique opportunity to identify new genes involved in vertebrate LR patterning. We show Nodal signaling-independent of Pitx2-controls asymmetric expression of the fatty acid elongase elovl6 in zebrafish, pointing to a potential novel pathway during LR organogenesis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Prophylactic levosimendan for the prevention of low cardiac output syndrome and mortality in paediatric patients undergoing surgery for congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummel, Johanna; Rücker, Gerta; Stiller, Brigitte

    2017-08-02

    Low cardiac output syndrome remains a serious complication, and accounts for substantial morbidity and mortality in the postoperative course of paediatric patients undergoing surgery for congenital heart disease. Standard prophylactic and therapeutic strategies for low cardiac output syndrome are based mainly on catecholamines, which are effective drugs, but have considerable side effects. Levosimendan, a calcium sensitiser, enhances the myocardial function by generating more energy-efficient myocardial contractility than achieved via adrenergic stimulation with catecholamines. Thus potentially, levosimendan is a beneficial alternative to standard medication for the prevention of low cardiac output syndrome in paediatric patients after open heart surgery. To review the efficacy and safety of the postoperative prophylactic use of levosimendan for the prevention of low cardiac output syndrome and mortality in paediatric patients undergoing surgery for congenital heart disease. We identified trials via systematic searches of CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, and Web of Science, as well as clinical trial registries, in June 2016. Reference lists from primary studies and review articles were checked for additional references. We only included randomised controlled trials (RCT) in our analysis that compared prophylactic levosimendan with standard medication or placebo, in infants and children up to 18 years of age, who were undergoing surgery for congenital heart disease. Two review authors independently extracted data and assessed risk of bias according to a pre-defined protocol. We obtained additional information from all but one of the study authors of the included studies. We used the five GRADE considerations (study limitations, consistency of effect, imprecision, indirectness, and publication bias) to assess the quality of evidence from the studies that contributed data to the meta-analyses for the prespecified outcomes. We created a 'Summary of findings' table to

  12. Bilateral congenital corneal keloids and anterior segment mesenchymal dysgenesis in a case of Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Srinivas K; Fan, Dorothy S P; Pang, C P; Li, Winnie W Y; Ng, Joan S K; Good, William V; Lam, Dennis S C

    2002-01-01

    To report the unusual association of bilateral corneal keloids and anterior segment mesenchymal dysgenesis in a child with Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome. Case report of a 2-year-old boy. Excision of the epicorneal mass in the right eye was followed by recurrence of the lesion. Multiple penetrating keratoplasties were unsuccessful in reconstructing the anterior segment because of recurrent corneal epithelial breakdown, suggesting limbal stem cell insufficiency. Histopathology and electron microscopy of the excised mass lesion showed features typical of a corneal keloid: thickened keratinized epithelium, absent Bowman's layer, and fibrovascular hyperplasia, with haphazard orientation of the collagen lamellae. Ultrasound biomicroscopy and intraoperative findings suggested a diagnosis of Peter anomaly, but genetic analysis did not show a PAX6 mutation. The findings in our patient add to the spectrum of ocular changes described in Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome and confirm earlier reports of poor ocular prognosis in corneal keloids and Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome.

  13. Genetic Studies of Strabismus, Congenital Cranial Dysinnervation Disorders (CCDDs), and Their Associated Anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-21

    Congenital Fibrosis of Extraocular Muscles; Duane Retraction Syndrome; Duane Radial Ray Syndrome; Mobius Syndrome; Brown Syndrome; Marcus Gunn Syndrome; Strabismus Congenital; Horizontal Gaze Palsy; Horizontal Gaze Palsy With Progressive Scoliosis; Facial Palsy; Facial Paresis, Hereditary, Congenital; Third Nerve Palsy; Fourth Nerve Palsy; Sixth Nerve Palsy; Synkinesis; Ocular Motility Disorders; Levator-Medial Rectus Synkinesis; Athabaskan Brainstem Dysgenesis; Tongue Paralysis; Ninth Nerve Disorder; Fifth Nerve Palsy; Seventh Nerve Palsy; Eleventh Nerve Disorder; Twelfth Nerve Disorder; Vagus Nerve Paralysis; Moebius Sequence

  14. Congenital defects of C1 arches and odontoid process in a child with Down′s syndrome: A case presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Hatzantonis

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the case of a 2-year-old child with Down′s syndrome who presented to our unit with torticollis. Imaging studies revealed the rare occurrence of anterior and posterior C1 arch defects, absent odontoid process, and atlantoaxial subluxation. We managed her conservatively for 3 years without neurological deficits or worsening of atlantoaxial subluxation. We discuss the rare occurrences of anterior and posterior arch defects of the atlas, the radiological presentations of axis defects in patients, and the occurrence of atlantoaxial instability in patients with Down′s syndrome. Management options with consideration to surgery in asymptomatic and symptomatic patients are also discussed.

  15. [Congenital ectropion of the upper eyelids due to an anomaly of the eyelids in down's syndrome (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennighausen, U; Schmidt-Martens, F W; Reim, M

    1978-05-01

    A 5-months-old female baby with Down's Syndrome developed an intermittent spastic ectropion of the upper eyelids. The reasons for this are thought to be the flaccidity of the connective tissue, which is typical in Down's Syndrome, and a little anomaly of the eyelids, the tarsus was too short horizontally and very weak and the upper eyelids were somewhat larger than normal and elongated. Suturing Bangerter's lid-sheets on the upper eyelids for 15 days resulted in a scarring of the tarsus with the lax connective tissue of the upper eyelids. The ectropion disappeared and did not recur.

  16. Ultra high-resolution gene centric genomic structural analysis of a non-syndromic congenital heart defect, Tetralogy of Fallot.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas C Bittel

    Full Text Available Tetralogy of Fallot (TOF is one of the most common severe congenital heart malformations. Great progress has been made in identifying key genes that regulate heart development, yet approximately 70% of TOF cases are sporadic and nonsyndromic with no known genetic cause. We created an ultra high-resolution gene centric comparative genomic hybridization (gcCGH microarray based on 591 genes with a validated association with cardiovascular development or function. We used our gcCGH array to analyze the genomic structure of 34 infants with sporadic TOF without a deletion on chromosome 22q11.2 (n male = 20; n female = 14; age range of 2 to 10 months. Using our custom-made gcCGH microarray platform, we identified a total of 613 copy number variations (CNVs ranging in size from 78 base pairs to 19.5 Mb. We identified 16 subjects with 33 CNVs that contained 13 different genes which are known to be directly associated with heart development. Additionally, there were 79 genes from the broader list of genes that were partially or completely contained in a CNV. All 34 individuals examined had at least one CNV involving these 79 genes. Furthermore, we had available whole genome exon arrays from right ventricular tissue in 13 of our subjects. We analyzed these for correlations between copy number and gene expression level. Surprisingly, we could detect only one clear association between CNVs and expression (GSTT1 for any of the 591 focal genes on the gcCGH array. The expression levels of GSTT1 were correlated with copy number in all cases examined (r = 0.95, p = 0.001. We identified a large number of small CNVs in genes with varying associations with heart development. Our results illustrate the complexity of human genome structural variation and underscore the need for multifactorial assessment of potential genetic/genomic factors that contribute to congenital heart defects.

  17. Congenital hearing loss. Is CT enough?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mahmoud Agha

    2014-01-24

    Jan 24, 2014 ... Congenital hearing loss is one of the developmental disorders that may be not clearly .... Alport syndrome, Klippel-Feil, Norrie disease and Waarden- .... Bismuth eye shield was routinely used for all patients (AttenuRad;.

  18. Anaesthesia and familial dysautonomia with congenital insensitivity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adele

    the HSANs are familial dysautonomia (Riley-Day syndrome or HSAN type III) and congenital ... sion, and excessive vagal reflexes. Central ... His skin was mottled, dry and pale. ... Eye protection is important since affected individuals lack tears,.

  19. Surgical management of aortic root disease in Marfan syndrome and other congenital disorders associated with aortic root aneurysms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Treasure (Tom); J.J.M. Takkenberg (Hanneke); J. Pepper (John)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractElective root replacement in Marfan syndrome has improved life expectancy in affected patients. Three forms of surgery are now available: total root replacement (TRR) with a valved conduit, valve sparing root replacement (VSRR) and personalised external aortic root support (PEARS) with a

  20. Surgical management of aortic root disease in Marfan syndrome and other congenital disorders associated with aortic root aneurysms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Treasure (Tom); J.J.M. Takkenberg (Hanneke); J. Pepper (John)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractElective root replacement in Marfan syndrome has improved life expectancy in affected patients. Three forms of surgery are now available: total root replacement (TRR) with a valved conduit, valve sparing root replacement (VSRR) and personalised external aortic root support (PEARS) with a

  1. Oral-facial-digital syndrome type 1 in males: Congenital heart defects are included in its phenotypic spectrum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouman, Arjan; Alders, Mariëlle; Oostra, Roelof Jan; van Leeuwen, Elisabeth; Thuijs, Nikki; van der Kevie-Kersemaekers, Anne-Marie; van Maarle, Merel

    2017-01-01

    Oral-facial-digital syndrome type 1 (OFD1; OMIM# 311200) is an X-linked dominant ciliopathy caused by mutations in the OFD1 gene. This condition is characterized by facial anomalies and abnormalities of oral tissues, digits, brain, and kidneys. Almost all affected patients are female, as OFD1 is

  2. Congenital rubella

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that usually closes shortly after birth remains open ( patent ductus arteriosus ) Narrowing of the large artery that ... prior to pregnancy can prevent congenital rubella. Pregnant women who have not had the vaccine should avoid ...

  3. Reflections on Health Promotion and Disability in Low and Middle-Income Countries: Case Study of Parent-Support Programmes for Children with Congenital Zika Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah Kuper

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Universal health coverage (UHC has been adopted by many countries as a national target for 2030. People with disabilities need to be included within efforts towards UHC, as they are a large group making up 15% of the world’s population and are more vulnerable to poor health. UHC focuses both on covering the whole population as well as providing all the services needed and must include an emphasis on health promotion, as well as disease treatment and cure. Health promotion often focusses on tackling individual behaviours, such as encouraging exercise or good nutrition. However, these activities are insufficient to improve health without additional efforts to address poverty and inequality, which are the underlying drivers of poor health. In this article, we identify common challenges, opportunities and examples for health promotion for people with disabilities, looking at both individual behaviour change as well as addressing the drivers of poor health. We present a case study of a carer support programme for parents of children with Congenital Zika Syndrome in Brazil as an example of a holistic programme for health promotion. This programme operates both through improving skills of caregivers to address the health needs of their child and tackling poverty and exclusion.

  4. Mutations in a novel gene, NHS, cause the pleiotropic effects of Nance-Horan syndrome, including severe congenital cataract, dental anomalies, and mental retardation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdon, Kathryn P; McKay, James D; Sale, Michèle M; Russell-Eggitt, Isabelle M; Mackey, David A; Wirth, M Gabriela; Elder, James E; Nicoll, Alan; Clarke, Michael P; FitzGerald, Liesel M; Stankovich, James M; Shaw, Marie A; Sharma, Shiwani; Gajovic, Srecko; Gruss, Peter; Ross, Shelley; Thomas, Paul; Voss, Anne K; Thomas, Tim; Gécz, Jozef; Craig, Jamie E

    2003-11-01

    Nance-Horan syndrome (NHS) is an X-linked disorder characterized by congenital cataracts, dental anomalies, dysmorphic features, and, in some cases, mental retardation. NHS has been mapped to a 1.3-Mb interval on Xp22.13. We have confirmed the same localization in the original, extended Australian family with NHS and have identified protein-truncating mutations in a novel gene, which we have called "NHS," in five families. The NHS gene encompasses approximately 650 kb of genomic DNA, coding for a 1,630-amino acid putative nuclear protein. NHS orthologs were found in other vertebrates, but no sequence similarity to known genes was identified. The murine developmental expression profile of the NHS gene was studied using in situ hybridization and a mouse line containing a lacZ reporter-gene insertion in the Nhs locus. We found a complex pattern of temporally and spatially regulated expression, which, together with the pleiotropic features of NHS, suggests that this gene has key functions in the regulation of eye, tooth, brain, and craniofacial development.

  5. Parents' perceptions during the transition to home for their child with a congenital heart defect: How can we support families of children with hypoplastic left heart syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    March, Sarita

    2017-07-01

    The aim of the study was to explore the literature related to transitions in healthcare between the hospital and home that caregivers experience with a child who has a congenital heart defect (CHD), specifically related to hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS). A systematic literature review was conducted searching OVID Medline, CINAHL, and PubMed to discover the caregivers' perceptions on their transitions between hospital care and home care of their child with a CHD. Articles included those with focus on the transitions of caregivers between hospital and home care for children with CHD. Excluded articles were studies focused on adolescents, transition to adult healthcare, mortality results, other diseases associated with CHDs, comparison of CHD treatments, feasibility studies, differences in care between hospitals, home monitoring, and comparison of videoconference and telephone home communication. Ten articles were selected. Many parents voiced their concerns with feeding their child, learning medical skills and knowledge, reported a disrupted relationship between parents and their child, and identified stress and anxiety associated with taking care of a child with a CHD. There were limited studies on caregivers' transitions with a child with HLHS, but there also was limited focus on the caregivers' experiences with transitions between hospital and home care for their child with any CHD. Research on the transition experience between hospital care and home care for caregivers of children born with a CHD, and a specific focus on HLHS from the caregivers' viewpoint, would provide insight into the perspective of caregivers during the numerous transitions. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Mutations in GFPT1-related congenital myasthenic syndromes are associated with synaptic morphological defects and underlie a tubular aggregate myopathy with synaptopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauché, Stéphanie; Vellieux, Geoffroy; Sternberg, Damien; Fontenille, Marie-Joséphine; De Bruyckere, Elodie; Davoine, Claire-Sophie; Brochier, Guy; Messéant, Julien; Wolf, Lucie; Fardeau, Michel; Lacène, Emmanuelle; Romero, Norma; Koenig, Jeanine; Fournier, Emmanuel; Hantaï, Daniel; Streichenberger, Nathalie; Manel, Veronique; Lacour, Arnaud; Nadaj-Pakleza, Aleksandra; Sukno, Sylvie; Bouhour, Françoise; Laforêt, Pascal; Fontaine, Bertrand; Strochlic, Laure; Eymard, Bruno; Chevessier, Frédéric; Stojkovic, Tanya; Nicole, Sophie

    2017-08-01

    Mutations in GFPT1 (glutamine-fructose-6-phosphate transaminase 1), a gene encoding an enzyme involved in glycosylation of ubiquitous proteins, cause a limb-girdle congenital myasthenic syndrome (LG-CMS) with tubular aggregates (TAs) characterized predominantly by affection of the proximal skeletal muscles and presence of highly organized and remodeled sarcoplasmic tubules in patients' muscle biopsies. We report here the first long-term clinical follow-up of 11 French individuals suffering from LG-CMS with TAs due to GFPT1 mutations, of which nine are new. Our retrospective clinical evaluation stresses an evolution toward a myopathic weakness that occurs concomitantly to ineffectiveness of usual CMS treatments. Analysis of neuromuscular biopsies from three unrelated individuals demonstrates that the maintenance of neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) is dramatically impaired with loss of post-synaptic junctional folds and evidence of denervation-reinnervation processes affecting the three main NMJ components. Moreover, molecular analyses of the human muscle biopsies confirm glycosylation defects of proteins with reduced O-glycosylation and show reduced sialylation of transmembrane proteins in extra-junctional area. Altogether, these results pave the way for understanding the etiology of this rare neuromuscular disorder that may be considered as a "tubular aggregates myopathy with synaptopathy".

  7. Prenatal diagnosis of Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (4p- in association with congenital hypospadias and foot deformity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ermis Hayri

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome is caused by distal deletion of the short arm of chromosome 4 (4p-. We report a case in which intrauterine growth restriction, hypospadias and foot deformity were detected by prenatal ultrasound examination at 29 weeks of gestation. Case Presentation A 31-year-old gravida 2 partus 1 woman was referred at 29 weeks' gestation with suspicion of intrauterine growth restriction. Sonographic examination revealed deformity of the right lower limb and undescended testes with an irregular distal penis. A cordocentesis was performed and chromosome analysis revealed a 46,XY,del(4(p14 karyotype. Conclusion The prenatal detection of intrauterine growth restriction, hypospadias and foot deformity should lead doctors to suspect the presence of Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome.

  8. Prenatal diagnosis of Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (4p-) in association with congenital hypospadias and foot deformity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslan, Halil; Karaca, Nilay; Basaran, Seher; Ermis, Hayri; Ceylan, Yavuz

    2003-01-01

    Background Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome is caused by distal deletion of the short arm of chromosome 4 (4p-). We report a case in which intrauterine growth restriction, hypospadias and foot deformity were detected by prenatal ultrasound examination at 29 weeks of gestation. Case Presentation A 31-year-old gravida 2 partus 1 woman was referred at 29 weeks' gestation with suspicion of intrauterine growth restriction. Sonographic examination revealed deformity of the right lower limb and undescended testes with an irregular distal penis. A cordocentesis was performed and chromosome analysis revealed a 46,XY,del(4)(p14) karyotype. Conclusion The prenatal detection of intrauterine growth restriction, hypospadias and foot deformity should lead doctors to suspect the presence of Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome. PMID:12546710

  9. Prenatal and Postnatal Sonographic Confirmation of Congenital Absence of the Ductus Venosus in a Child with Noonan Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher L. Newman

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The ductus venosus serves as an important vascular pathway for intrauterine circulation. This case presents a description of an absent ductus venosus in a female patient with Noonan syndrome, including both prenatal and postnatal imaging of the anomaly. In the setting of the anomalous vascular connection, the umbilical vein courses inferiorly to the iliac vein in parallel configuration with the umbilical artery. This finding was suspected based on prenatal imaging and the case was brought to attention when placement of an umbilical catheter was thought to be malpositioned given its appearance on radiography. Ultrasound imaging confirmed the anomalous course. This is in keeping with prior descriptions in the literature of an association between Noonan syndrome and aberrant umbilical venous drainage. This case illustrates the need for awareness of this condition by the radiologist, allowing for identification on radiographs and the recommendation for further confirmatory imaging. Further, the case illustrates the value of paying particular attention to the fetal course of the umbilical vessels in patients with suspected Noonan syndrome, as this population is particularly at risk for anomalous vasculature.

  10. Germline mutations in ABL1 cause an autosomal dominant syndrome characterized by congenital heart defects and skeletal malformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xia; Charng, Wu-Lin; Chen, Chun-An; Rosenfeld, Jill A; Al Shamsi, Aisha; Al-Gazali, Lihadh; McGuire, Marianne; Mew, Nicholas Ah; Arnold, Georgianne L; Qu, Chunjing; Ding, Yan; Muzny, Donna M; Gibbs, Richard A; Eng, Christine M; Walkiewicz, Magdalena; Xia, Fan; Plon, Sharon E; Lupski, James R; Schaaf, Christian P; Yang, Yaping

    2017-04-01

    ABL1 is a proto-oncogene well known as part of the fusion gene BCR-ABL1 in the Philadelphia chromosome of leukemia cancer cells. Inherited germline ABL1 changes have not been associated with genetic disorders. Here we report ABL1 germline variants cosegregating with an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by congenital heart disease, skeletal abnormalities, and failure to thrive. The variant c.734A>G (p.Tyr245Cys) was found to occur de novo or cosegregate with disease in five individuals (families 1-3). Additionally, a de novo c.1066G>A (p.Ala356Thr) variant was identified in a sixth individual (family 4). We overexpressed the mutant constructs in HEK 293T cells and observed increased tyrosine phosphorylation, suggesting increased ABL1 kinase activities associated with both the p.Tyr245Cys and p.Ala356Thr substitutions. Our clinical and experimental findings, together with previously reported teratogenic effects of selective BCR-ABL inhibitors in humans and developmental defects in Abl1 knockout mice, suggest that ABL1 has an important role during organismal development.

  11. Germline mutations in ABL1 cause an autosomal dominant syndrome characterized by congenital heart defects and skeletal malformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xia; Charng, Wu-Lin; Chen, Chun-An; Rosenfeld, Jill A.; Shamsi, Aisha Al; Al-Gazali, Lihadh; McGuire, Marianne; Mew, Nicholas Ah; Arnold, Georgianne L.; Qu, Chunjing; Ding, Yan; Muzny, Donna M.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Eng, Christine M.; Walkiewicz, Magdalena; Xia, Fan; Plon, Sharon E.; Lupski, James R.; Schaaf, Christian P.; Yang, Yaping

    2017-01-01

    ABL1 is a proto-oncogene well known as part of the fusion gene BCR-ABL in the Philadelphia chromosome of leukemia cancer cells1. Inherited germline ABL1 changes have not been associated with genetic disorders. Here we report ABL1 germline variants co-segregating with an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by congenital heart disease, skeletal abnormalities, and failure to thrive. The variant c.734A>G (p.Tyr245Cys) was found as de novo or co-segregating with disease in five individuals (families 1-3). Additionally, a de novo c.1066G>A (p.Ala356Thr) variant was identified in the sixth individual (family 4). We overexpressed the mutant constructs in HEK 293T cells and observed increased tyrosine phosphorylation, suggesting increased ABL1 kinase activities associated with both p.Tyr245Cys and p.Ala356Thr substitutions. Our clinical and laboratory findings, together with previously reported teratogenic effects of selective BCR-ABL inhibitors in humans2-5 and developmental defects in Abl1 knock-out mice6,7, suggest ABL1 plays an important role during organismal development. PMID:28288113

  12. Congenital intestinal lymphangiectasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popović Dušan Đ.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Congenital intestinal lymphangiectasia is a disease which leads to protein losing enteropathy. Tortous, dilated lymphatic vessels in the intestinal wall and mesenterium are typical features of the disease. Clinical manifestations include malabsorption, diarrhea, steatorrhea, edema and effusions. Specific diet and medication are required for disease control. Case report. A 19-year old male patient was hospitalized due to diarrhea, abdominal swelling, weariness and fatigue. Physical examination revealed growth impairment, ascites, and lymphedema of the right hand and forearm. Laboratory assessment indicated iron deficiency anaemia, lymphopenia, malabsorption, inflammatory syndrome, and urinary infection. Enteroscopy and video capsule endoscopy demonstrated dilated lymphatic vessels in the small intestine. The diagnosis was confirmed by intestinal biopsy. The patient was put on high-protein diet containing medium-chain fatty acids, somatotropin and suportive therapy. Conclusion. Congenital intestinal lymphangiectasia is a rare disease, usually diagnosed in childhood. Early recognition of the disease and adequate treatment can prevent development of various complications.

  13. [Congenital intestinal lymphangiectasia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popović, Dugan D j; Spuran, Milan; Alempijević, Tamara; Krstić, Miodrag; Djuranović, Srdjan; Kovacević, Nada; Damnjanović, Svetozar; Micev, Marjan

    2011-03-01

    Congenital intestinal lymphangiectasia is a disease which leads to protein losing enteropathy. Tortuous, dilated lymphatic vessels in the intestinal wall and mesenterium are typical features of the disease. Clinical manifestations include malabsorption, diarrhea, steatorrhea, edema and effusions. Specific diet and medication are required for disease control. A 19-year old male patient was hospitalized due to diarrhea, abdominal swelling, weariness and fatigue. Physical examination revealed growth impairment, ascites, and lymphedema of the right hand and forearm. Laboratory assessment indicated iron deficiency anaemia, lymphopenia, malabsorption, inflammatory syndrome, and urinary infection. Enteroscopy and video capsule endoscopy demonstrated dilated lymphatic vessels in the small intestine. The diagnosis was confirmed by intestinal biopsy. The patient was put on high-protein diet containing medium-chain fatty acids, somatotropin and supportive therapy. Congenital intestinal lymphangiectasia is a rare disease, usually diagnosed in childhood. Early recognition of the disease and adequate treatment can prevent development of various complications.

  14. Oral?facial?digital syndrome type 1 in males: Congenital heart defects are included in its phenotypic spectrum

    OpenAIRE

    Bouman, Arjan; Alders, Mari?lle; Oostra, Roelof Jan; van Leeuwen, Elisabeth; Thuijs, Nikki; van der Kevie?Kersemaekers, Anne?Marie; van Maarle, Merel

    2017-01-01

    Oral?facial?digital syndrome type 1 (OFD1; OMIM# 311200) is an X?linked dominant ciliopathy caused by mutations in the OFD1 gene. This condition is characterized by facial anomalies and abnormalities of oral tissues, digits, brain, and kidneys. Almost all affected patients are female, as OFD1 is presumed to be lethal in males, mostly in the first or second trimester of pregnancy. Live born males with OFD1 are a rare occurrence, with only five reported patients to date. In four patients the pr...

  15. Fraser syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barisic, Ingeborg; Odak, Ljubica; Loane, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Fraser syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by cryptophthalmos, cutaneous syndactyly, laryngeal, and urogenital malformations. We present a population-based epidemiological study using data provided by the European Surveillance of Congenital Anomalies (EUROCAT) network of...

  16. High prevalence of genetic variants previously associated with LQT syndrome in new exome data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Refsgaard, Lena; Holst, Anders G; Sadjadieh, Golnaz

    2012-01-01

    To date, hundreds of variants in 13 genes have been associated with long QT syndrome (LQTS). The prevalence of LQTS is estimated to be between 1:2000 and 1:5000. The knowledge of genetic variation in the general population has until recently been limited, but newly published data from NHLBI GO...... variants KCNH2 P347S; SCN5A: S216L, V1951L; and CAV3 T78M in the control population (n=704) revealed prevalences comparable to those of ESP. Thus, we identified a much higher prevalence of previously LQTS-associated variants than expected in exome data from population studies. Great caution regarding...

  17. NJP VOLUME 39 No 4

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof Ezechukwu

    2012-03-29

    Mar 29, 2012 ... Key words: Child, Diagnostic Er- rors, Long QT Syndrome, Seizure. Introduction. Seizures can be caused by primary dysfunction of the .... child with congenital deafness and a history of seizures and recurrent syncope, a QTc interval of 0.72 sec was observed after years of investigation. In evaluating the.

  18. Anaesthesia for left thoracoscopic sympathectomy for refractory long ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Congenital long QT syndrome (LQTS) is a rare genetic disorder that has been associated with various genetic mutations ... Left thoracoscopic sympathectomy is an effective treatment for patients ... frequency of cardiac events/ICD shocks postoperatively. The ... inheritance, dental abnormalities, clinodactyly, and bidirectional.

  19. Isolated congenital heart block in undifferentiated connective tissue disease and in primary Sjögren’s syndrome: a clinical study of 81 pregnancies in 41 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Todesco

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the incidence and the features of congenital heart block (CHB in patients with undifferentiated connective tissue disease (UCTD and primary Sjögren’s syndrome (pSS. Methods: We studied 81 pregnancies of 41 women attending the Outpatients’ Clinic of the Rheumatology Unit of University Hospital of Padova from July 1989 to March 2004. Twenty five of these (61% were affected with UCTD and 16 (39% with pSS. Serologic inclusion criteria was anti-Ro/La positivity, assessed by counterimmunoelectrophoresis and ELISA. Results: CHB was found in 2 out of the 46 (4,3% pregnancies followed by our Staff and in 2 out of the 35 (5,7% included in the retrospective part of the study. In 3 cases CHB was a 3rd degree block, causing pregnancy termination in 2. The only 2nd degree block was identified in one patient at the 22nd week of gestation and treated with dexamethasone and plasma-exchange. All of the women were positive to 52 kd and 60 kd Ro autoantibodies. CHB mothers had higher titer antibodies to 52 kd Ro protein than did the mothers with healthy infants (P = 0,026. Electrocardiographic abnormalities at birth were found in 3 out of 29 asymptomatic infants. One presented sinus bradycardia, the second abnormalities of ventricular repolarization, both regressed spontaneously, while the third ventricular extrasystoles which continue even now at 5 months. Conclusion: These results showed that in UCTD and pSS there is a higher incidence of CHB than that reported in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus. Electrocardiographic screening in all infants born to mothers with anti-Ro/La antibodies would seem an important measure to identify those with irreversible heart conduction abnormalities.

  20. Evaluation of a commercial rubella IgM assay for use on oral fluid samples for diagnosis and surveillance of congenital rubella syndrome and postnatal rubella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijaylakshmi, P; Muthukkaruppan, V R; Rajasundari, A; Korukluoglu, G; Nigatu, W; L A Warrener; Samuel, D; Brown, D W G

    2006-12-01

    Clinical diagnosis (surveillance) of rubella is unreliable and laboratory confirmation is essential. Detection of virus specific IgM in serum is the most commonly used method. However, the use of serum necessitates the drawing of blood, either through venipuncture or finger/heel prick, which can be difficult in young babies. Oral fluid samples have proved useful as an alternative, less invasive sample for virus specific IgM detection however until recently no commercial rubella IgM tests were available, restricting the usefulness of this approach. To evaluate the performance of the Microimmune Rubella IgM capture EIA using oral fluid samples from outbreaks as well as in cases of suspected congenital rubella syndrome (CRS). Paired serum and oral fluids were collected from cases during a rubella outbreak in three provinces in Turkey. Matched serum and oral fluid samples were collected from children with suspected CRS in an active surveillance programme at the Aravind Eye Hospital in South India. Serum samples were collected as part of the measles surveillance programme in Ethiopia. On serum samples the sensitivity and specificity of the Microimmune Rubella IgM capture EIA compared to Behring Enzygnost rubella IgM test was 96.9% (62/64; 95% CI 94.2-100%) and 100% (53/53; 95% CI 93.2-100%). On oral fluids compared to matched Behring results on serum the sensitivity was 95.5% (42/44; 95% CI 84.5-99.4%). The sensitivity and specificity of Microimmune Rubella IgM capture EIA on oral fluids from suspected CRS cases compared to serum results using Behring Enzygnost IgM assay was 100% (95% CI 84.5-100%) and 100% (95% CI 95.8-100.0%) respectively. Microimmune Rubella IgM capture EIA has adequate performance for diagnosis and surveillance of rubella in outbreak using either serum or oral fluid specimens.

  1. A zebrafish model of lethal congenital contracture syndrome 1 reveals Gle1 function in spinal neural precursor survival and motor axon arborization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jao, Li-En; Appel, Bruce; Wente, Susan R

    2012-04-01

    In humans, GLE1 is mutated in lethal congenital contracture syndrome 1 (LCCS1) leading to prenatal death of all affected fetuses. Although the molecular roles of Gle1 in nuclear mRNA export and translation have been documented, no animal models for this disease have been reported. To elucidate the function of Gle1 in vertebrate development, we used the zebrafish (Danio rerio) model system. gle1 mRNA is maternally deposited and widely expressed. Altering Gle1 using an insertional mutant or antisense morpholinos results in multiple defects, including immobility, small eyes, diminished pharyngeal arches, curved body axis, edema, underdeveloped intestine and cell death in the central nervous system. These phenotypes parallel those observed in LCCS1 human fetuses. Gle1 depletion also results in reduction of motoneurons and aberrant arborization of motor axons. Unexpectedly, the motoneuron deficiency results from apoptosis of neural precursors, not of differentiated motoneurons. Mosaic analyses further indicate that Gle1 activity is required extrinsically in the environment for normal motor axon arborization. Importantly, the zebrafish phenotypes caused by Gle1 deficiency are only rescued by expressing wild-type human GLE1 and not by the disease-linked Fin(Major) mutant form of GLE1. Together, our studies provide the first functional characterization of Gle1 in vertebrate development and reveal its essential role in actively dividing cells. We propose that defective GLE1 function in human LCCS1 results in both neurogenic and non-neurogenic defects linked to the apoptosis of proliferative organ precursors.

  2. Adverse cardiac events in children with Williams syndrome undergoing cardiovascular surgery: An analysis of the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornik, Christoph P; Collins, Ronnie Thomas; Jaquiss, Robert D B; Jacobs, Jeffrey P; Jacobs, Marshall L; Pasquali, Sara K; Wallace, Amelia S; Hill, Kevin D

    2015-06-01

    Patients with Williams syndrome (WS) undergoing cardiac surgery are at risk for major adverse cardiac events (MACE). Prevalence and risk factors for such events have not been well described. We sought to define frequency and risk of MACE in patients with WS using a multicenter clinical registry. We identified cardiac operations performed in patients with WS using the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database (2000-2012). Operations were divided into 4 groups: isolated supravalvular aortic stenosis, complex left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT), isolated right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT), and combined LVOT/RVOT procedures. The proportion of patients with MACE (in-hospital mortality, cardiac arrest, or postoperative mechanical circulatory support) was described and the association with preoperative factors was examined. Of 447 index operations (87 centers), median (interquartile range) age and weight at surgery were 2.4 years (0.6-7.4 years) and 10.6 kg (6.5-21.5 kg), respectively. Mortality occurred in 20 patients (5%). MACE occurred in 41 patients (9%), most commonly after combined LVOT/RVOT (18 out of 87; 21%) and complex LVOT (12 out of 131; 9%) procedures, but not after isolated RVOT procedures. Odds of MACE decreased with age (odds ratio [OR], 0.99; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.98-0.99), weight (OR, 0.97; 95% CI, 0.93-0.99), but increased in the presence of any preoperative risk factor (OR, 2.08; 95% CI, 1.06-4.00), and in procedures involving coronary artery repair (OR, 5.37; 95% CI, 2.05-14.06). In this multicenter analysis, MACE occurred in 9% of patients with WS undergoing cardiac surgery. Demographic and operative characteristics were associated with risk. Further study is needed to elucidate mechanisms of MACE in this high-risk population. Copyright © 2015 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Congenital amusias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillmann, B; Albouy, P; Caclin, A

    2015-01-01

    In contrast to the sophisticated music processing reported in the general population, individuals with congenital amusia show deficits in music perception and production. Congenital amusia occurs without brain damage, sensory or cognitive deficits, and has been suggested as a lifelong deficit with genetic origin. Even though recognized for a long time, this disorder has been systematically studied only relatively recently for its behavioral and neural correlates. The currently most investigated hypothesis about the underlying deficits concerns the pitch dimension, notably with impaired pitch discrimination and memory. Anatomic and functional investigations of pitch processing revealed that the amusic brain presents abnormalities in the auditory and inferior frontal cortices, associated with decreased connectivity between these structures. The deficit also impairs processing of pitch in speech material and processing of the time dimension in music for some of the amusic individuals, but does not seem to affect spatial processing. Some studies suggest at least partial dissociation in the disorder between perception and production. Recent studies revealed spared implicit pitch perception in congenital amusia, supporting the power of implicit cognition in the music domain. Current challenges consist in defining different subtypes of congenital amusia as well as developing rehabilitation programs for this "musical handicap." © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Surgical management of aortic root disease in Marfan syndrome and other congenital disorders associated with aortic root aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treasure, Tom; Takkenberg, J J M; Pepper, John

    2014-10-01

    Elective root replacement in Marfan syndrome has improved life expectancy in affected patients. Three forms of surgery are now available: total root replacement (TRR) with a valved conduit, valve sparing root replacement (VSRR) and personalised external aortic root support (PEARS) with a macroporous mesh sleeve. TRR can be performed irrespective of aortic dimensions and a mechanical replacement valve is a secure and near certain means of correcting aortic valve regurgitation but has thromboembolic and bleeding risks. VSRR offers freedom from anticoagulation and attendant risks of bleeding but reoperation for aortic regurgitation runs at 1.3% per annum. A prospective multi-institutional study has found this to be an underestimate of the true rate of valve-related adverse events. PEARS conserves the aortic root anatomy and optimises the chance of maintaining valve function but average follow-up is under 5 years and so the long-term results are yet to be determined. Patients are on average in their 30s and so the cumulative lifetime need for reoperation, and of any valve-related complications, are consequently substantial. With lowering surgical risk of prophylactic root replacement, the threshold for intervention has reduced progressively over 30 years to 4.5 cm and so an increasing number of patients who are not destined to have a dissection are now having root replacement. In evaluation of these three forms of surgery, the number needed to treat to prevent dissection and the balance of net benefit and harm in future patients must be considered.

  5. Congenital sensorineural hearing loss

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mafee, M.F.; Selis, J.E.; Yannias, D.A.; Valvassori, G.E.; Pruzansky, S.; Applebaum, E.L.; Capek, V.

    1984-01-01

    The ears of 47 selected patients with congenital sensorineural hearing loss were examined with complex-motion tomography. The patients were divided into 3 general categories: those with a recognized syndrome, those with sensorineural hearing loss unrelated to any known syndrome, and those with microtia. A great variety of inner ear anomalies was detected, but rarely were these characteristic of a particular clinical entity. The most common finding was the Mondini malformation or one of its variants. Isolated dysplasia of the internal auditory canal or the vestibular aqueduct may be responsible for sensorineural hearing loss in some patients. Patients with microtia may also have severe inner ear abnormalities despite the fact that the outer and inner ears develop embryologically from completely separate systems

  6. Congenital sensorineural hearing loss

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mafee, M.F.; Selis, J.E.; Yannias, D.A.; Valvassori, G.E.; Pruzansky, S.; Applebaum, E.L.; Capek, V.

    1984-02-01

    The ears of 47 selected patients with congenital sensorineural hearing loss were examined with complex-motion tomography. The patients were divided into 3 general categories: those with a recognized syndrome, those with sensorineural hearing loss unrelated to any known syndrome, and those with microtia. A great variety of inner ear anomalies was detected, but rarely were these characteristic of a particular clinical entity. The most common finding was the Mondini malformation or one of its variants. Isolated dysplasia of the internal auditory canal or the vestibular aqueduct may be responsible for sensorineural hearing loss in some patients. Patients with microtia may also have severe inner ear abnormalities despite the fact that the outer and inner ears develop embryologically from completely separate systems.

  7. Alternative splicing of exon 17 and a missense mutation in exon 20 of the insulin receptor gene in two brothers with a novel syndrome of insulin resistance (congenital fiber-type disproportion myopathy)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vorwerk, P; Christoffersen, C T; Müller, J

    1999-01-01

    The insulin receptor (IR) in two brothers with a rare syndrome of congenital muscle fiber type disproportion myopathy (CFTDM) associated with diabetes and severe insulin resistance was studied. By direct sequencing of Epstein-Barr virus-transformed lymphocytes both patients were found...... either of the two mutated receptors lacked basal or stimulated IR beta-subunit autophosphorylation. A third brother who inherited both normal alleles has an normal muscle phenotype and insulin sensitivity, suggesting a direct linkage of these IR mutations with the CFTDM phenotype....

  8. Resuscitation of sudden cardiac death caused by acute epileptic seizures: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana-Oliviana Geavlete

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Symptomatic long QT syndrome in pediatric patients is a life-threatening condition. Sometimes, this pathology can be misdiagnosed and erroneously managed as generalized epilepsy due to similar clinical manifestations. The presented case discusses a 13-year-old female patient with generalized epilepsy since the age of 4, admitted for two episodes of resuscitated cardiac arrest due to torsades de pointes and ventricular fibrillation. The final diagnosis of congenital long QT was established and due to the patient's high-risk profile for future cardiac events, implantable cardiac defibrillator was subsequently indicated. Early recognition of congenital long QT and timing of cardiac therapy were crucial and potentially lower the incidence of fatal dysrhythmias commonly associated this condition. In high-risk patients, both medical and interventional therapy can be life-saving.

  9. Oculoauriculovertebral dysplasia (Goldenhar's syndrome).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nkrumah, F K

    1971-03-01

    A case of Goldenhar's Syndrome or Oculoauriculovertebral dysplasia in a Ghanaian infant is described. Significant were the additional findings of congenital esophageal atresia and arthrogryposis which have so far not been reported in association with the syndrome.

  10. Republished review: Surgical management of aortic root disease in Marfan syndrome and other congenital disorders associated with aortic root aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treasure, Tom; Takkenberg, J J M; Pepper, John

    2016-02-01

    Elective root replacement in Marfan syndrome has improved life expectancy in affected patients. Three forms of surgery are now available: total root replacement (TRR) with a valved conduit, valve sparing root replacement (VSRR) and personalised external aortic root support (PEARS) with a macroporous mesh sleeve. TRR can be performed irrespective of aortic dimensions and a mechanical replacement valve is a secure and near certain means of correcting aortic valve regurgitation but has thromboembolic and bleeding risks. VSRR offers freedom from anticoagulation and attendant risks of bleeding but reoperation for aortic regurgitation runs at 1.3% per annum. A prospective multi-institutional study has found this to be an underestimate of the true rate of valve-related adverse events. PEARS conserves the aortic root anatomy and optimises the chance of maintaining valve function but average follow-up is under 5 years and so the long-term results are yet to be determined. Patients are on average in their 30s and so the cumulative lifetime need for reoperation, and of any valve-related complications, are consequently substantial. With lowering surgical risk of prophylactic root replacement, the threshold for intervention has reduced progressively over 30 years to 4.5 cm and so an increasing number of patients who are not destined to have a dissection are now having root replacement. In evaluation of these three forms of surgery, the number needed to treat to prevent dissection and the balance of net benefit and harm in future patients must be considered. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  11. Cerebral palsy and congenital malformations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garne, Ester; Dolk, Helen; Krägeloh-Mann, Inge

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To determine the proportion of children with cerebral palsy (CP) who have cerebral and non-cerebral congenital malformations. METHODS: Data from 11 CP registries contributing to the European Cerebral Palsy Database (SCPE), for children born in the period 1976-1996. The malformations were...... classified as recognized syndromes, chromosomal anomalies, cerebral malformations or non-cerebral malformations. Prevalence of malformations was compared to published data on livebirths from a European database of congenital malformations (EUROCAT). RESULTS: Overall 547 out of 4584 children (11.9%) with CP...... were reported to have a congenital malformation. The majority (8.6% of all children) were diagnosed with a cerebral malformation. The most frequent types of cerebral malformations were microcephaly and hydrocephaly. Non-cerebral malformations were present in 97 CP children and in further 14 CP children...

  12. Congenital Hydrocephalus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estey, Chelsie M

    2016-03-01

    There are several types of hydrocephalus, which are characterized based on the location of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) accumulation. Physical features of animals with congenital hydrocephalus may include a dome-shaped skull, persistent fontanelle, and bilateral ventrolateral strabismus. Medical therapy involves decreasing the production of CSF. The most common surgical treatment is placement of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt. Postoperative complications may include infection, blockage, drainage abnormalities, and mechanical failure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Congenital diplopodia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brower, Jason S.; Wootton-Gorges, Sandra L.; Costouros, John G.; Boakes, Jennette; Greenspan, Adam

    2003-01-01

    Diplopodia, or duplicated foot, is a rare congenital anomaly. It differs from polydactyly in that supernumerary metatarsal and tarsal bones are present as well as extra digits. Only a few cases of this anomaly have been reported in the literature to date. We present a newborn male without intrauterine teratogen exposure who was born with a duplicate foot of the left lower extremity and imperforate anus. (orig.)

  14. Congenital toxoplasmosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieffer, François; Wallon, Martine

    2013-01-01

    Congenital toxoplasmosis results from the transplacental transmission of the parasite Toxoplasma gondii after a maternal infection acquired in pregnancy. Prevalence of congenital infection ranges from 0.1 to 0.3 per 1000 live births. The maternal-fetal transmission rate increases with gestational age at maternal seroconversion, from less than 15% at 13 weeks of gestation to over 70% at 36 weeks. Conversely, the later the maternal infection, the lower the risk of symptomatic congenital infection (infections acquired during the third trimester are most often asymptomatic at birth). Prenatal diagnosis is currently performed by PCR analysis in amniotic fluid. Antenatal management and treatment vary considerably among countries. In some European countries, maternal infections are detected through serological screening allowing a prompt treatment with spiramycin, which is expected to reduce the risk of vertical transmission. If PCR analysis in amniotic fluid is positive or if maternal infection was acquired in the third trimester of pregnancy, a combination with pyrimethamine and sulphonamide is given until delivery. Benefits of antenatal treatments remain controversial. Infected newborns are prescribed pyrimethamine and sulphonamide for 12 months. Despite antenatal and postnatal treatment, chorioretinitis can occur at any age (prevalence>20% at 10 years of age): long-term ophthalmological follow-up remains necessary. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Thickened cortical bones in congenital neutropenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boechat, M.I.; Gormley, L.S.; O'Laughlin, B.J.

    1987-01-01

    Congenital neutropenia is an uncommon entity which may be familial and has a wide spectrum of clinical expression. Three sisters with the severe form of the disease, that suffered from recurrent infections which lead to their demise are described. Review of their radiographs revealed the presence of cortical thickening of the bones. Although several syndroms with different bone abnormalities have been reported associated with neutropenia, the radiographic finding of thickened cortex in children with congenital neutropenia has not been previously described. (orig.)

  16. Thickened cortical bones in congenital neutropenia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boechat, M.I.; Gormley, L.S.; O' Laughlin, B.J.

    1987-02-01

    Congenital neutropenia is an uncommon entity which may be familial and has a wide spectrum of clinical expression. Three sisters with the severe form of the disease, that suffered from recurrent infections which lead to their demise are described. Review of their radiographs revealed the presence of cortical thickening of the bones. Although several syndroms with different bone abnormalities have been reported associated with neutropenia, the radiographic finding of thickened cortex in children with congenital neutropenia has not been previously described.

  17. Renal abnormalities in congenital chloride diarrhea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Hamad, Nadia M.; Al-Eisa, Amal A.

    2004-01-01

    Congenital chloride diarrhea CLD is a rare autosomal recessive disorder caused by a defect in the chloride/ bicarbonate exchange in the ileum and colon. It is characterized by watery diarrhea, abdominal distension, hypochloremic hypokalemic metabolic alkalosis with high fecal content of chloride >90 mmol/l. We report 3 patients with CLD associated with various renal abnormalities including chronic renal failure secondary to renal hypoplasia, nephrocalcinosis and congenital nephrotic syndrome. (author)

  18. [Sex differences in congenital heart disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubry, P; Demian, H

    2016-12-01

    Gender influences the clinical presentation and the management of some acquired cardiovascular diseases, such as coronary artery disease, resulting in different outcomes. Differences between women and men are also noticed in congenital heart disease. They are mainly related to the prevalence and severity of some congenital heart defects at birth, and in adulthood to the prognosis, incidence of Eisenmenger syndrome and risks of pregnancy. The role of gender on the risk of operative mortality of congenital heart surgery remains debated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Ambras syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhir Malwade

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ambras syndrome, a form of congenital hypertrichosis lanuginosa, is extremely rare in neonates. It is characterized by typical pattern of hair distribution, dysmorphic facial features and a familial pattern of inheritance. We report a case of Ambras syndrome in a preterm neonate with history of consanguinity and positive family history.

  20. Noonan syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Roberts, Amy E; Allanson, Judith E; Tartaglia, Marco; Gelb, Bruce D

    2013-01-01

    Noonan syndrome is a genetic multisystem disorder characterised by distinctive facial features, developmental delay, learning difficulties, short stature, congenital heart disease, renal anomalies, lymphatic malformations, and bleeding difficulties. Mutations that cause Noonan syndrome alter genes encoding proteins with roles in the RAS–MAPK pathway, leading to pathway dysregulation. Management guidelines have been developed. Several clinically relevant genotype–phenotype correlations aid ris...

  1. Prevalence and Aetiology of Congenitally Deafblind People in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dammeyer, Jesper Herup

    2010-01-01

    A study of prevalence and aetiology was performed on 63 children and 127 adults in Denmark with congenital deafblindness. Using a Scandinavian definition of deafblindness, the prevalence of congenital deafblindness was found to be 1:29,000. Thirty-five different aetiological causes of deafblindness...... were found. Causes of congenital deafblindness were different among adults compared to causes among children. Rubella syndrome (28%, n = 36) and Down syndrome (8%, n = 10) were the largest groups among people above 18 years of age. Among children CHARGE syndrome (16%, n = 13) was the largest group...

  2. Congenital syphilis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sang Wook; Kim, Kyung Soo; Hur, Don

    1983-01-01

    In recent years, marked increase in incidence of congenital syphilis has occurred throughout the world due to changes in social norms and development of penicillin-resistant strains. Early diagnosis plays an important role in congenital syphilis as the clinical manifestations may simulate many other conditions in the paediatric age group. The authors analyzed 52 cases of congenital syphilis admitted to the department of paediatrics, Chosun University Hospital, clinically and radiologically. Among them, 18 cases were born in this hospital and 34 cases were admitted from OPD, during the period of 8 years from January, 1975 to December, 1982. The results obtained were as follows; 1. In 28 of 34 cases (82%), the first clinical manifestations were below the age of 3 months. 2. Among the 52 cases, a male predominance was observed with a male to female ratio of 2 : 1. 3. The serologic test (VDRL) of the 52 studied cases showed reactive response in 49 cases (94%), and that of syphilitic mothers except 6 cases, reactive in all studied cases. 4. The major manifestations of the 52 cases were bone tenderness (12%) and swelling of the joints (7%) in skeletal system, hepatosplenomegaly (79%) and skin lesions (73%) in extraskeletal one. 5. The radiological skeletal changes were detected in 45 of 52 cases (87%), and the commonest findings were detected in 45 of 52 cases (87%), and the commonest findings were metaphysitis (83%) and periostitis (81%). The most characteristic type of metaphysitis were transverse trophic line (74%) and zone of rarefaction (65%). 6. The commonest bones to be affected were growing metaphyses of the long bones, particulary about the wrist and the knee. The order of frequency were radius (80%), uina (80%), tibia (77%), femur (69%) and humerus (40%)

  3. The genetic landscape of familial congenital hydrocephalus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaheen, Ranad; Sebai, Mohammed Adeeb; Patel, Nisha; Ewida, Nour; Kurdi, Wesam; Altweijri, Ikhlass; Sogaty, Sameera; Almardawi, Elham; Seidahmed, Mohammed Zain; Alnemri, Abdulrahman; Madirevula, Sateesh; Ibrahim, Niema; Abdulwahab, Firdous; Hashem, Mais; Al-Sheddi, Tarfa; Alomar, Rana; Alobeid, Eman; Sallout, Bahauddin; AlBaqawi, Badi; AlAali, Wajeih; Ajaji, Nouf; Lesmana, Harry; Hopkin, Robert J; Dupuis, Lucie; Mendoza-Londono, Roberto; Al Rukban, Hadeel; Yoon, Grace; Faqeih, Eissa; Alkuraya, Fowzan S

    2017-06-01

    Congenital hydrocephalus is an important birth defect, the genetics of which remains incompletely understood. To date, only 4 genes are known to cause Mendelian diseases in which congenital hydrocephalus is the main or sole clinical feature, 2 X-linked (L1CAM and AP1S2) and 2 autosomal recessive (CCDC88C and MPDZ). In this study, we aimed to determine the genetic etiology of familial congenital hydrocephalus with the assumption that these cases represent Mendelian forms of the disease. Exome sequencing combined, where applicable, with positional mapping. We identified a likely causal mutation in the majority of these families (21 of 27, 78%), spanning 16 genes, none of which is X-linked. Ciliopathies and dystroglycanopathies were the most common etiologies of congenital hydrocephalus in our cohort (19% and 26%, respectively). In 1 family with 4 affected members, we identified a homozygous truncating variant in EML1, which we propose as a novel cause of congenital hydrocephalus in addition to its suggested role in cortical malformation. Similarly, we show that recessive mutations in WDR81, previously linked to cerebellar ataxia, mental retardation, and disequilibrium syndrome 2, cause severe congenital hydrocephalus. Furthermore, we confirm the previously reported candidacy of MPDZ by presenting a phenotypic spectrum of congenital hydrocephalus associated with 5 recessive alleles. Our study highlights the importance of recessive mutations in familial congenital hydrocephalus and expands the locus heterogeneity of this condition. Ann Neurol 2017;81:890-897. © 2017 American Neurological Association.

  4. Natal teeth in an infant with congenital hypothyroidism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Venkatesh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Teeth erupting at birth are referred to as natal teeth. It is a common and benign finding in the neonatal period. However, they may be associated with genetic syndromes like Ellis Van Creveld syndrome and Hallermann-Streiff syndrome. We report here a case of natal teeth in an infant with congenital hypothyroidism.

  5. Molecular and clinical characterization of cardio-facio-cutaneous (CFC) syndrome: overlapping clinical manifestations with Costello syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Narumi, Yoko; Aoki, Yoko; Niihori, Tetsuya; Neri, Giovanni; Cave, Helene; Verloes, Alain; Nava, Caroline; Kavamura, Maria Ines; Okamoto, Nobuhiko; Kurosawa, Kenji; Hennekam, Raoul C. M.; Wilson, Louise C.; Gillessen-Kaesbach, Gabriele; Wieczorek, Dagmar; Lapunzina, Pablo; Ohashi, Hirofumi; Makita, Yoshio; Kondo, Ikuko; Tsuchiya, Shigeru; Ito, Etsuro; Sameshima, Kiyoko; Kato, Kumi; Kure, Shigeo; Matsubara, Yokhi

    2007-01-01

    Cardio-facio-cutaneous (CFC) syndrome is a multiple congenital anomaly/mental retardation syndrome characterized by heart defects, a distinctive facial appearance, ectodermal abnormalities and mental retardation. Clinically, it overlaps with both Noonan syndrome and Costello syndrome, which are

  6. DNA methylation abnormalities in congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra-Juhé, Clara; Cuscó, Ivon; Homs, Aïda; Flores, Raquel; Torán, Núria; Pérez-Jurado, Luis A

    2015-01-01

    Congenital heart defects represent the most common malformation at birth, occurring also in ∼50% of individuals with Down syndrome. Congenital heart defects are thought to have multifactorial etiology, but the main causes are largely unknown. We have explored the global methylation profile of fetal heart DNA in comparison to blood DNA from control subjects: an absolute correlation with the type of tissue was detected. Pathway analysis revealed a significant enrichment of differential methylation at genes related to muscle contraction and cardiomyopathies in the developing heart DNA. We have also searched for abnormal methylation profiles on developing heart-tissue DNA of syndromic and non-syndromic congenital heart defects. On average, 3 regions with aberrant methylation were detected per sample and 18 regions were found differentially methylated between groups. Several epimutations were detected in candidate genes involved in growth regulation, apoptosis and folate pathway. A likely pathogenic hypermethylation of several intragenic sites at the MSX1 gene, involved in outflow tract morphogenesis, was found in a fetus with isolated heart malformation. In addition, hypermethylation of the GATA4 gene was present in fetuses with Down syndrome with or without congenital heart defects, as well as in fetuses with isolated heart malformations. Expression deregulation of the abnormally methylated genes was detected. Our data indicate that epigenetic alterations of relevant genes are present in developing heart DNA in fetuses with both isolated and syndromic heart malformations. These epimutations likely contribute to the pathogenesis of the malformation by cis-acting effects on gene expression.

  7. Congenital amusia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Victoria J; Stewart, Lauren

    2013-01-01

    For most people, music, like language, is acquired effortlessly in early life. But a few percent of the population have lifelong difficulties in the perception and production of music. In this chapter we discuss psycho-acoustic and behavioral studies that have attempted to delineate the nature of the auditory perceptual deficits in this group and consider whether these difficulties extend outside the musical domain. Finally, we review structural imaging studies in this group which point to subtle anomalies in temporal and frontal areas. We suggest that amusia can be considered a disorder of neural development, which has relatively specific consequences at the behavioral level. Studies of congenital amusia provide a unique window on the neurocognitive architecture of music processing. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Effect of bosentan on exercise capacity and quality of life in adults with pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with congenital heart disease with and without Down's syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duffels, M.G.; Vis, J.C.; Loon, R.L. van; Nieuwkerk, P.T.; Dijk, A.P.J. van; Hoendermis, E.S.; Bruin-Bon, R.H. de; Bouma, B.J.; Bresser, P.; Berger, R.M.; Mulder, B.J.

    2009-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with congenital heart disease caused by systemic-to-pulmonary shunting was associated with a high risk of morbidity and mortality. In this retrospective study, the longer term treatment effect of bosentan on exercise capacity and quality of life (QoL) were

  9. Spectrum of congenital heart diseases in children with Down ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CHD) frequently occur in children with Down syndrome. ... at the Pediatric cardiology clinic and had echocardiography diagnosis of congenital heart diseases. ... Browse By Country · List All Titles · Free To Read Titles This Journal is Open Access.

  10. "CONGENTIAL PANHYPOPITUITARISM ASSOCIATED WITH IMPAIRED LIVER FUNCTION TESTS AND CONGENITAL HEART DISEASE"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Khalili-Matinzadeh

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The term congenital hypopituitarism defines deficiency of all of the pituitary hormones. Hypoglycemia and microphallus (in males are common findings, and some infants have shown evidence of the neonatal hepatitis syndrome. We report a case of congenital panhypopituitarism with deficiency of six major hormones and association with severe hypoglycemia, impaired liver function tests and congenital heart disease.

  11. Neuroimaging findings in Mowat-Wilson syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garavelli, Livia; Ivanovski, Ivan; Caraffi, Stefano Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: Mowat-Wilson syndrome (MWS) is a genetic disease characterized by distinctive facial features, moderate to severe intellectual disability, and congenital malformations, including Hirschsprung disease, genital and eye anomalies, and congenital heart defects, caused by haploinsufficiency o...

  12. Educational series in congenital heart disease:Congenital left-sided heart obstruction

    OpenAIRE

    Carr, Michelle; Curtis, Stephanie; Marek, Jan

    2018-01-01

    Congenital obstruction of the left ventricular outflow tract remains a significant problem and multilevel obstruction can often coexist. Obstruction can take several morphological forms and may involve the subvalvar, valvar or supravalvar portion of the aortic valve complex. Congenital valvar stenosis presenting in the neonatal period represents a spectrum of disorders ranging from the hypoplastic left heart syndrome to almost normal hearts. Treatment options vary dependent on the severity of...

  13. Congenital Midline Tongue Base Mass in An Infant: Lingual Hamartoma

    OpenAIRE

    Fadzilah, Noraziana; Azman, Mawaddah; See, Goh Bee

    2016-01-01

    Lingual hamartoma is a rare finding of congenital midline posterior tongue mass. The lesion may be seen as a single anomaly or maybe associated with syndrome especially the Oral Facial Digital Syndrome (OFDS). Here, we report an otherwise normal and healthy two-month-old boy with a congenital midline base of tongue mass presented with snoring and episodic vomiting since the age of 1 month. Tumour excision from the area of foramen of caecum recovered a pinkish pedunculated tumour. Histopatholo...

  14. [Genetics of congenital heart diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnet, Damien

    2017-06-01

    Developmental genetics of congenital heart diseases has evolved from analysis of serial slices in embryos towards molecular genetics of cardiac morphogenesis with a dynamic view of cardiac development. Genetics of congenital heart diseases has also changed from formal genetic analysis of familial recurrences or population-based analysis to screening for mutations in candidates genes identified in animal models. Close cooperation between molecular embryologists, pathologists involved in heart development and pediatric cardiologists is crucial for further increase of knowledge in the field of cardiac morphogenesis and genetics of cardiac defects. The genetic model for congenital heart disease has to be revised to favor a polygenic origin rather than a monogenic one. The main mechanism is altered genic dosage that can account for heart diseases in chromosomal anomalies as well as in point mutations in syndromic and isolated congenital heart diseases. The use of big data grouping information from cardiac development, interactions between genes and proteins, epigenetic factors such as chromatin remodeling or DNA methylation is the current source for improving our knowledge in the field and to give clues for future therapies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Imaging of Cranial Nerves III, IV, VI in Congenital Cranial Dysinnervation Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae Hyoung; Hwang, Jeong Min

    2017-06-01

    Congenital cranial dysinnervation disorders are a group of diseases caused by abnormal development of cranial nerve nuclei or their axonal connections, resulting in aberrant innervation of the ocular and facial musculature. Its diagnosis could be facilitated by the development of high resolution thin-section magnetic resonance imaging. The purpose of this review is to describe the method to visualize cranial nerves III, IV, and VI and to present the imaging findings of congenital cranial dysinnervation disorders including congenital oculomotor nerve palsy, congenital trochlear nerve palsy, Duane retraction syndrome, Möbius syndrome, congenital fibrosis of the extraocular muscles, synergistic divergence, and synergistic convergence. © 2017 The Korean Ophthalmological Society.

  16. Two case reports of anophthalmia and congenital heart disease: Adding a new dimension to this association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jenny; Steelman, Charlotte K; Vincent, Robert; Richburg, Delene; Chang, Tiffany S; Shehata, Bahig M

    2010-01-01

    Anophthalmia is the congenital absence of ocular tissue from the orbit. Many syndromes and malformations (e.g., anophthalmia-esophageal-genital syndrome, Matthew-Wood syndrome, CHARGE syndrome, oculo-facial-cardio-dental-syndome, heterotaxy, and Fraser syndrome) have been associated with anophthalmia. However, its relation with congenital heart disease has not been fully elucidated. In this article, we discuss two cases of patients with anophthalmia and congenital heart defects, and we compare these findings with other syndromes with which anophthalmia has been associated. One of our two patients showed complex congenital heart disease with heterotaxia, polysplenia, and normal lung lobation. These findings may reflect a new dimension of anophthalmia, heterotaxia, and congenital heart disease associations.

  17. Mapping X-linked ophthalmic diseases. IV. Provisional assignment of the locus for X-linked congenital cataracts and microcornea (the Nance-Horan syndrome) to Xp22.2-p22.3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, R A; Nussbaum, R L; Stambolian, D

    1990-01-01

    The Nance-Horan syndrome (NHS) is an infrequent X-linked disorder typified by dense congenital central cataracts, microcornea, anteverted and simplex pinnae, brachymetacarpalia, and numerous dental anomalies. The regional location of the genetic mutation causing NHS is unknown. The authors applied the modern molecular techniques of analysis of restriction fragment length polymorphisms to five multigenerational kindreds in which NHS segregated. Provisional linkage is established to two DNA markers--DXS143 at Xp22.3-p22.2 and DXS43 at Xp22.2. Regional localization of NHS will provide potential antenatal diagnosis in families at risk for the disease and will enhance understanding of the multifaceted genetic defects.

  18. Alternative splicing of exon 17 and a missense mutation in exon 20 of the insulin receptor gene in two brothers with a novel syndrome of insulin resistance (congenital fiber-type disproportion myopathy)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vorwerk, P; Christoffersen, C T; Müller, J

    1999-01-01

    to be compound heterozygotes for mutations in the IR gene. The maternal allele was alternatively spliced in exon 17 due to a point mutation in the -1 donor splice site of the exon. The abnormal skipping of exon 17 shifts the amino acid reading frame and leads to a truncated IR, missing the entire tyrosine kinase......The insulin receptor (IR) in two brothers with a rare syndrome of congenital muscle fiber type disproportion myopathy (CFTDM) associated with diabetes and severe insulin resistance was studied. By direct sequencing of Epstein-Barr virus-transformed lymphocytes both patients were found...... domain. In the correct spliced variant, the point mutation is silent and results in a normally translated IR. The paternal allele carries a missense mutation in the tyrosine kinase domain. All three cDNA variants were present in the lymphocytes of the patients. Purified IR from 293 cells overexpressing...

  19. Four novel ELANE mutations in patients with congenital neutropenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurnikova, Maria; Maschan, Michael; Dinova, Evgeniya; Shagina, Irina; Finogenova, Natalia; Mamedova, Elena; Polovtseva, Tatyana; Shagin, Dmitry; Shcherbina, Anna

    2011-08-01

    Congenital neutropenia is a heterogeneous bone marrow failure syndrome characterized by a maturation arrest of myelopoesis at the promyelocyte/myelocyte stage. Cyclic neutropenia (CyN) and severe congenital neutropenia (SCN) are two main forms of congenital neutropenia. Genetic analysis has shown that heterozygous mutations in the ELANE gene encoding the neutrophil elastase are the major cause of these disorders. We investigated the prevalence of ELANE mutations in a group of 16 patients from 14 families with congenital neutropenia. Five patients had typical manifestations of CyN, and 11 patients had SCN. Seven different heterozygous ELANE mutations were found, including four novel mutations. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Extra-cardiac manifestations of adult congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaeta, Stephen A; Ward, Cary; Krasuski, Richard A

    2016-10-01

    Advancement in correction or palliation of congenital cardiac lesions has greatly improved the lifespan of congenital heart disease patients, resulting in a rapidly growing adult congenital heart disease (ACHD) population. As this group has increased in number and age, emerging science has highlighted the systemic nature of ACHD. Providers caring for these patients are tasked with long-term management of multiple neurologic, pulmonary, hepatic, renal, and endocrine manifestations that arise as syndromic associations with congenital heart defects or as sequelae of primary structural or hemodynamic abnormalities. In this review, we outline the current understanding and recent research into these extra-cardiac manifestations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.