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Sample records for congenital amaurosis-like phenotype

  1. The phenotypic spectrum of congenital Zika syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Campo, Miguel; Feitosa, Ian M L; Ribeiro, Erlane M; Horovitz, Dafne D G; Pessoa, André L S; França, Giovanny V A; García-Alix, Alfredo; Doriqui, Maria J R; Wanderley, Hector Y C; Sanseverino, Maria V T; Neri, João I C F; Pina-Neto, João M; Santos, Emerson S; Verçosa, Islane; Cernach, Mirlene C S P; Medeiros, Paula F V; Kerbage, Saile C; Silva, André A; van der Linden, Vanessa; Martelli, Celina M T; Cordeiro, Marli T; Dhalia, Rafael; Vianna, Fernanda S L; Victora, Cesar G; Cavalcanti, Denise P; Schuler-Faccini, Lavinia

    2017-04-01

    In October 2015, Zika virus (ZIKV) outbreak the Brazilian Ministry of Health (MoH). In response, the Brazilian Society of Medical Genetics established a task force (SBGM-ZETF) to study the phenotype of infants born with microcephaly due to ZIKV congenital infection and delineate the phenotypic spectrum of this newly recognized teratogen. This study was based on the clinical evaluation and neuroimaging of 83 infants born during the period from July, 2015 to March, 2016 and registered by the SBGM-ZETF. All 83 infants had significant findings on neuroimaging consistent with ZIKV congenital infection and 12 had confirmed ZIKV IgM in CSF. A recognizable phenotype of microcephaly, anomalies of the shape of skull and redundancy of the scalp consistent with the Fetal Brain Disruption Sequence (FBDS) was present in 70% of infants, but was most often subtle. In addition, features consistent with fetal immobility, ranging from dimples (30.1%), distal hand/finger contractures (20.5%), and feet malpositions (15.7%), to generalized arthrogryposis (9.6%), were present in these infants. Some cases had milder microcephaly or even a normal head circumference (HC), and other less distinctive findings. The detailed observation of the dysmorphic and neurologic features in these infants provides insight into the mechanisms and timings of the brain disruption and the sequence of developmental anomalies that may occur after prenatal infection by the ZIKV. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Genotype-phenotype associations in children with congenital hyperinsulinism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melikyan, Maria; Brusgaard, Klaus; Petraykina, Elena

    Congenital hyperinsulinism (CHI) is a heterogeneous disease in terms of clinical presentation, genetics and histology. Mutations in eight genes are known to be a cause of CHI, of which ABCC8, KCNJ11 and GCK are among the most common. We investigated genotype-phenotype associations in a cohort...

  3. Heterogeneity in Phenotype of Usher-Congenital Hyperinsulinism Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al Mutair, Angham N; Brusgaard, Klaus; Bin-Abbas, Bassam

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVETo evaluate the phenotype of 15 children with congenital hyperinsulinism (CHI) and profound hearing loss, known as homozygous 11p15-p14 deletion syndrome (MIM #606528).METHODSProspective clinical follow-up and genetic analysis by direct sequencing, Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Ampl.......CONCLUSIONSThe phenotype of homozygous 11p15-p14 deletion syndrome, or Usher-CHI syndrome, includes any severity of neonatal-onset CHI and severe, sensorineural hearing loss. Retinitis pigmentosa and nonautoimmune diabetes may occur in adolescence.......OBJECTIVETo evaluate the phenotype of 15 children with congenital hyperinsulinism (CHI) and profound hearing loss, known as homozygous 11p15-p14 deletion syndrome (MIM #606528).METHODSProspective clinical follow-up and genetic analysis by direct sequencing, Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe...

  4. Heterogeneity in Phenotype of Usher-Congenital Hyperinsulinism Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Mutair, Angham N.; Brusgaard, Klaus; Bin-Abbas, Bassam; Hussain, Khalid; Felimban, Naila; Al Shaikh, Adnan; Christesen, Henrik T.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the phenotype of 15 children with congenital hyperinsulinism (CHI) and profound hearing loss, known as Homozygous 11p15-p14 Deletion syndrome (MIM #606528). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Prospective clinical follow-up and genetic analysis by direct sequencing, multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification, and microsatellite markers. RESULTS Genetic testing identified the previous described homozygous deletion in 11p15, USH1C:c.(90+592)_ABCC8:c.(2694–528)del. Fourteen patients had severe CHI demanding near-total pancreatectomy. In one patient with mild, transient neonatal hypoglycemia and nonautoimmune diabetes at age 11 years, no additional mutations were found in HNF1A, HNF4A, GCK, INS, and INSR. Retinitis pigmentosa was found in two patients aged 9 and 13 years. No patients had enteropathy or renal tubular defects. Neuromotor development ranged from normal to severe delay with epilepsy. CONCLUSIONS The phenotype of Homozygous 11p15-p14 Deletion syndrome, or Usher-CHI syndrome, includes any severity of neonatal-onset CHI and severe, sensorineural hearing loss. Retinitis pigmentosa and nonautoimmune diabetes may occur in adolescence. PMID:23150283

  5. Prevalence and phenotypes of congenital myopathy due to α-actin 1 gene mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Witting, Nanna; Werlauff, Ulla; Duno, Morten

    2016-01-01

    airway pressure. Limb flexor/extensor muscles and upper and lower extremities were affected equally. Pronounced neck flexor weakness was noted. CONCLUSIONS: Congenital myopathy caused by ACTA1 mutations is fatal in infancy in most cases. This study shows that the prevalence of α-actin myopathy in older...... patients with congenital myopathy is not negligible and that phenotypes can be quite mild....

  6. Imaging techniques for visualizing and phenotyping congenital heart defects in murine models.

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    Liu, Xiaoqin; Tobita, Kimimasa; Francis, Richard J B; Lo, Cecilia W

    2013-06-01

    Mouse model is ideal for investigating the genetic and developmental etiology of congenital heart disease. However, cardiovascular phenotyping for the precise diagnosis of structural heart defects in mice remain challenging. With rapid advances in imaging techniques, there are now high throughput phenotyping tools available for the diagnosis of structural heart defects. In this review, we discuss the efficacy of four different imaging modalities for congenital heart disease diagnosis in fetal/neonatal mice, including noninvasive fetal echocardiography, micro-computed tomography (micro-CT), micro-magnetic resonance imaging (micro-MRI), and episcopic fluorescence image capture (EFIC) histopathology. The experience we have gained in the use of these imaging modalities in a large-scale mouse mutagenesis screen have validated their efficacy for congenital heart defect diagnosis in the tiny hearts of fetal and newborn mice. These cutting edge phenotyping tools will be invaluable for furthering our understanding of the developmental etiology of congenital heart disease. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Generalized smooth muscle hamartoma with multiple congenital anomalies without the "Michelin tire baby" phenotype.

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    Janicke, Elise C; Nazareth, Michael R; Rothman, Ilene L

    2014-01-01

    We report a patient with generalized smooth muscle hamartoma who presented with many of the variety of congenital anomalies that have been reported in babies with multiple symmetric circumferential rings of folded skin known as Michelin tire baby (MTB) syndrome, but our patient did not show the MTB phenotype. This constellation of findings in the absence of the MTB phenotype has not been previously reported. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. A Newborn with Congenital Mixed Phenotype Acute Leukemia After In Vitro Fertilization

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    Hacer Ergin

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Congenital leukemia is a rare disease. The majority of cases of this disease are acute myelogenous leukemia (AML. Congenital acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL is rare and most often is of B cell lineage. Rarely, some cases have been designated biphenotypic or mixed phenotype acute leukemia (MPAL. Herein, we report a preterm newborn referred to us as a result of the appearance of blue-violaceous dermal nodules on her body at birth. She was a twin and the product of an in vitro fertilization (IVF pregnancy. Physical examination showed jaundice, hepatosplenomegaly, and peripheral facial nerve palsy in addition to dermal nodules. Bone marrow aspiration showed 40% blasts of lymphoid lineage; skin biopsy and its immunohistochemistry revealed myeloblastic infiltration of the dermis. Cytogenetic analysis (46,XX, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH analysis, and cranial magnetic resonance were normal. The patient was diagnosed with congenital MPAL, and an association between IVF and congenital leukemia was suggested.

  9. The congenital "ant-egg" cataract phenotype is caused by a missense mutation in connexin46

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars; Yao, Wenliang; Eiberg, Hans

    2006-01-01

    "Ant-egg" cataract is a rare, distinct variety of congenital/infantile cataract that was reported in a large Danish family in 1967. This cataract phenotype is characterized by ant-egg-like bodies embedded in the lens in a laminar configuration and is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. We r...

  10. Genotype and Phenotype of 101 Dutch Patients with Congenital Stationary Night Blindness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijveld, M.M.C.; Florijn, R.J.; Bergen, A.A.B.; van den Born, L.I.; Kamermans, M.; Prick, L.; Riemslag, F.C.C.; van Schooneveld, M.J.; Kappers, A.M.L.; van Genderen, M.M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the relative frequency of the genetic causes of the Schubert-Bornschein type of congenital stationary night blindness (CSNB) and to determine the genotype-phenotype correlations in CSNB1 and CSNB2. Design: Clinic-based, longitudinal, multicenter study. Participants: A total

  11. Alternating Hypotropia with Pseudoptosis: A New Phenotype of Congenital Cranial Dysinnervation Disorder

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    Fady Sedarous

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Congenital cranial dysinnervation disorders, also known as CCDDs, are characterized by aberrant innervation to extraocular and facial muscles resulting in unusual forms of incomitant strabismus. Anomalous innervation to extraocular muscles can result in a wide variety of phenotypes causing various clinical conditions such as Duane syndrome, congenital fibrosis of the extraocular muscles, and Möbius syndrome. We report a case of bilateral dysinnervation disorder causing atypical ocular movements in both eyes as the patient changes fixation from one eye to the other and from right gaze to left gaze that fits with the wider diagnosis of CCDDs.

  12. Expanding the phenotype of congenital central hypoventilation syndrome impacts management decisions.

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    Byers, Heather M; Chen, Maida; Gelfand, Andrew S; Ong, Bruce; Jendras, Marisa; Glass, Ian A

    2018-04-25

    Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS) is a neurocristopathy caused by pathogenic heterozygous variants in the gene paired-like homeobox 2b (PHOX2B). It is characterized by severe infantile alveolar hypoventilation. Individuals may also have diffuse autonomic nervous system dysfunction, Hirschsprung disease and neural crest tumors. We report three individuals with CCHS due to an 8-base pair duplication in PHOX2B; c.691_698dupGGCCCGGG (p.Gly234Alafs*78) with a predominant enteral and neural crest phenotype and a relatively mild respiratory phenotype. The attenuated respiratory phenotype reported here and elsewhere suggests an emergent genotype:phenotype correlation which challenges the current paradigm of invoking mechanical ventilation for all infants diagnosed with CCHS. Best treatment requires careful clinical judgment and ideally the assistance of a care team with expertise in CCHS. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Use of global assays to understand clinical phenotype in congenital factor VII deficiency.

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    Greene, L A; Goldenberg, N A; Simpson, M L; Villalobos-Menuey, E; Bombardier, C; Acharya, S S; Santiago-Borrero, P J; Cambara, A; DiMichele, D M

    2013-09-01

    Congenital factor VII (FVII) deficiency is characterized by genotypic variability and phenotypic heterogeneity. Traditional screening and factor assays are unable to reliably predict clinical bleeding phenotype and guide haemorrhage prevention strategy. Global assays of coagulation and fibrinolysis may better characterize overall haemostatic balance and aid in haemorrhagic risk assessment. We evaluated the ability of novel global assays to better understand clinical bleeding severity in congenital FVII deficiency. Subjects underwent central determination of factor VII activity (FVII:C) as well as clot formation and lysis (CloFAL) and simultaneous thrombin and plasmin generation (STP) global assay analysis. A bleeding score was assigned to each subject through medical chart review. Global assay parameters were analysed with respect to bleeding score and FVII:C. Subgroup analyses were performed on paediatric subjects and subjects with FVII ≥ 1 IU dL(-1). CloFAL fibrinolytic index (FI2 ) inversely correlated with FVII:C while CloFAL maximum amplitude (MA) and STP maximum velocity of thrombin generation (VT max) varied directly with FVII:C. CloFAL FI2 directly correlated with bleeding score among subjects in both the total cohort and paediatric subcohort, but not among subjects with FVII ≥ 1 IU dL(-1) . Among subjects with FVII ≥ 1 IU dL(-1), STP time to maximum velocity of thrombin generation and time to maximum velocity of plasmin generation inversely correlated with bleeding score. These preliminary findings suggest a novel potential link between a hyperfibrinolytic state in bleeding severity and congenital FVII deficiency, an observation that should be further explored. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Prevalence, heritability and genetic correlations of congenital sensorineural deafness and pigmentation phenotypes in the Border Collie.

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    De Risio, Luisa; Lewis, Tom; Freeman, Julia; de Stefani, Alberta; Matiasek, Lara; Blott, Sarah

    2011-06-01

    The objectives of this study were to estimate prevalence, heritability and genetic correlations of congenital sensorineural deafness (CSD) and pigmentation phenotypes in the Border Collie. Entire litters of Border Collies that presented to the Animal Health Trust (1994-2008) for assessment of hearing status by brain stem auditory evoked response (BAER) at 4-10 weeks of age were included. Heritability and genetic correlations were estimated using residual maximum likelihood (REML). Of 4143 puppies that met the inclusion criteria, 97.6% had normal hearing status, 2.0% were unilaterally deaf and 0.4% were bilaterally deaf. Heritability of deafness as a trichotomous trait (normal/unilaterally deaf/bilaterally deaf) was estimated at 0.42 using multivariate analysis. Genetic correlations of deafness with iris colour and merle coat colour were 0.58 and 0.26, respectively. These results indicate that there is a significant genetic effect on CSD in Border Collies and that some of the genes determining deafness also influence pigmentation phenotypes. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. A rare CYP21A2 mutation in a congenital adrenal hyperplasia kindred displaying genotype-phenotype nonconcordance.

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    Khattab, Ahmed; Yuen, Tony; Al-Malki, Sultan; Yau, Mabel; Kazmi, Diya; Sun, Li; Harbison, Madeleine; Haider, Shozeb; Zaidi, Mone; New, Maria I

    2016-01-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) owing to 21-hydroxylase deficiency is caused by the autosomal recessive inheritance of mutations in the gene CYP21A2. CYP21A2 mutations lead to variable impairment of the 21-hydroxylase enzyme, which, in turn, is associated with three clinical phenotypes, namely, salt wasting, simple virilizing, and nonclassical CAH. However, it is known that a given mutation can associate with different clinical phenotypes, resulting in a high rate of genotype-phenotype nonconcordance. We aimed to study the genotype-phenotype nonconcordance in a family with three siblings affected with nonclassical CAH. All had hormonal evidence of nonclassical CAH, but this phenotype could not be explained by the genotype obtained from commercial CYP21A2 genetic testing, which revealed heterozygosity for the maternal 30 kb deletion mutation. We performed Sanger sequencing of the entire CYP21A2 gene in this family to search for a rare mutation that was not covered by commercial testing and found in the three siblings a second, rare c.1097G>A (p.R366H) mutation in exon 8. Computational modeling confirmed that this was a mild mutation consistent with nonclassical CAH. We recommend that sequencing of entire genes for rare mutations should be carried out when genotype-phenotype nonconcordance is observed in patients with autosomal recessive monogenic disorders, including CAH. © 2015 New York Academy of Sciences.

  16. 29 French adult patients with PMM2-congenital disorder of glycosylation: outcome of the classical pediatric phenotype and depiction of a late-onset phenotype.

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    Monin, Marie-Lorraine; Mignot, Cyril; De Lonlay, Pascale; Héron, Bénédicte; Masurel, Alice; Mathieu-Dramard, Michèle; Lenaerts, Catherine; Thauvin, Christel; Gérard, Marion; Roze, Emmanuel; Jacquette, Aurélia; Charles, Perrine; de Baracé, Claire; Drouin-Garraud, Valérie; Khau Van Kien, Philippe; Cormier-Daire, Valérie; Mayer, Michèle; Ogier, Hélène; Brice, Alexis; Seta, Nathalie; Héron, Delphine

    2014-12-11

    PMM2-CDG (formerly known as CDG Ia) a deficiency in phosphomannomutase, is the most frequent congenital disorder of glycosylation. The phenotype encompasses a wide range of neurological and non-neurological manifestations comprising cerebellar atrophy and intellectual deficiency. The phenotype of the disorder is well characterized in children but the long term course of the disease is unknown and the phenotype of late onset forms has not been comprehensively described. We thus retrospectively collected the clinical, biological and radiological data of 29 French PMM2-CDG patients aged 15 years or more with a proven molecular diagnosis (16 females and 13 males). In addition, thirteen of these patients were reexamined at the time of the study to obtain detailed information. 27 of the 29 patients had a typical PMM2-CDG phenotype, with infantile hypotonia, strabismus, developmental delay followed by intellectual deficiency, epilepsy, retinitis pigmentosa and/or visceral manifestations. The main health problems for these patients as teenagers and in adulthood were primary ovarian insufficiency, growth retardation, coagulation anomalies and thrombotic events, skeletal deformities and osteopenia/osteoporosis, retinitis pigmentosa, as well as peripheral neuropathy. Three patients had never walked and three lost their ability to walk. The two remaining patients had a late-onset phenotype unreported to date. All patients (n = 29) had stable cerebellar atrophy. Our findings are in line with those of previous adult PMM2-CDG cohorts and points to the need for a multidisciplinary approach to the follow up of PMM2-CDG patients to prevent late complications. Additionally, our findings add weight to the view that PMM2-CDG may be diagnosed in teenage/adult patients with cerebellar atrophy, even in the absence of intellectual deficiency or non-neurological involvement.

  17. Defining the phenotype and diagnostic considerations in adults with congenital disorders of N-linked glycosylation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolthuis, D.F.; Janssen, M.C.H.; Cassiman, D.; Lefeber, D.J.; Morava-Kozicz, E.

    2014-01-01

    Congenital disorders of N-glycosylation (CDG) form a rapidly growing group of more than 20 inborn errors of metabolism. Most patients are identified at the pediatric age with multisystem disease. There is no systematic review on the long-term outcome and clinical presentation in adult patients.

  18. Different Clinical Phenotypes in Familial Severe Congenital Neutropenia Cases with Same Mutation of the ELANE Gene

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Hye-Kyung; Jeon, In Sang

    2014-01-01

    Severe congenital neutropenia (SCN) is a heterogeneous group of disorders with a defect in granulopoiesis causing marked neutropenia and severe bacterial infections. A 17-month-old girl (patient 1) was admitted due to cervical lymphadenitis caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, with neutropenia. She had Pseudomonas aeruginosa sepsis and peritonitis with perforated appendicitis at 8-month of age. Her sister, a 37-month-old girl (patient 2), had recurrent stomatitis with profou...

  19. Expanding the BP1-BP2 15q11.2 Microdeletion Phenotype: Tracheoesophageal Fistula and Congenital Cataracts

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    D. Wong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The proximal q arm of chromosome 15 contains breakpoint regions BP1–BP5 with the classic deletion of BP1–BP3 best known to be associated with Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes. The region is approximately 500 kb and microdeletions within the BP1-BP2 region have been reported in patients with developmental delay, behavioral abnormalities, and motor apraxia as well as dysmorphic features including hypertelorism, cleft or narrow palate, ear abnormalities, and recurrent upper airway infections. We report two patients with unique, never-before-reported 15q11.2 BP1-2 microdeletion syndrome findings, one with proximal esophageal atresia and distal tracheoesophageal fistula (type C and one with congenital cataracts. Cataracts have been described in Prader-Willi syndrome but we could not find any description of cataracts in Angelman syndrome. Esophageal atresia and tracheoesophageal fistula have not been reported to our knowledge in either syndrome. A chance exists that both cases are sporadic birth defects; however, the findings of the concomitant microdeletion cannot be overlooked as a possible cause. Based on our review of the literature and the presentation of our patients, we recommend that esophageal atresia and distal tracheoesophageal fistula as well as congenital cataracts be included in the phenotypic spectrum of 15q11.2 BP1-2 microdeletion syndrome.

  20. Characterization of facial phenotypes of children with congenital hypopituitarism and their parents: a matched case-control study.

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    Manousaki, Despoina; Allanson, Judith; Wolf, Lior; Deal, Cheri

    2015-07-01

    Congenital Hypopituitarism (CH) has traditionally been associated with specific facial phenotypes subsumed under the term midface retrusion, based on cephalometric studies. In this study, we used a systematic anthropometric approach to facial morphology in 37 individuals with CH and their parents, primarily of French Canadian ancestry, and compared them to a control group of 78 French Canadian patients with well-controlled type 1 diabetes and their parents. We were able to demonstrate clear morphological differences, which were more prevalent in the affected group than in the control group. More specifically, we showed the presence of a shorter skull base width (P hypopituitarism and will provide further opportunities for data mining. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Phenotype of CNTNAP1: a study of patients demonstrating a specific severe congenital hypomyelinating neuropathy with survival beyond infancy.

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    Low, K J; Stals, K; Caswell, R; Wakeling, M; Clayton-Smith, J; Donaldson, A; Foulds, N; Norman, A; Splitt, M; Urankar, K; Vijayakumar, K; Majumdar, A; Study, Ddd; Ellard, S; Smithson, S F

    2018-06-01

    CHN is genetically heterogeneous and its genetic basis is difficult to determine on features alone. CNTNAP1 encodes CASPR, integral in the paranodal junction high molecular mass complex. Nineteen individuals with biallelic variants have been described in association with severe congenital hypomyelinating neuropathy, respiratory compromise, profound intellectual disability and death within the first year. We report 7 additional patients ascertained through exome sequencing. We identified 9 novel CNTNAP1 variants in 6 families: three missense variants, four nonsense variants, one frameshift variant and one splice site variant. Significant polyhydramnios occurred in 6/7 pregnancies. Severe respiratory compromise was seen in 6/7 (tracheostomy in 5). A complex neurological phenotype was seen in all patients who had marked brain hypomyelination/demyelination and profound developmental delay. Additional neurological findings included cranial nerve compromise: orobulbar dysfunction in 5/7, facial nerve weakness in 4/7 and vocal cord paresis in 5/7. Dystonia occurred in 2/7 patients and limb contractures in 5/7. All had severe gastroesophageal reflux, and a gastrostomy was required in 5/7. In contrast to most previous reports, only one patient died in the first year of life. Protein modelling was performed for all detected CNTNAP1 variants. We propose a genotype-phenotype correlation, whereby hypomorphic missense variants partially ameliorate the phenotype, prolonging survival. This study suggests that biallelic variants in CNTNAP1 cause a distinct recognisable syndrome, which is not caused by other genes associated with CHN. Neonates presenting with this phenotype will benefit from early genetic definition to inform clinical management and enable essential genetic counselling for their families.

  2. Phenotypes, genotypes, and prevalence of congenital myopathies older than 5 years in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Witting, Nanna; Werlauff, Ulla; Duno, Morten

    2017-01-01

    .3% NEB mutations. Less than 5% had mutations in ACTA1, TPM2/3, MTM1, TTN, SEPN1, or SC4NA. A genetic cause was established in 83% with specific histology (cores/rods/centronuclear myopathy) vs 29% with unspecific histology. The detailed clinical examination found gene-dependent discrepancies...... in the pattern of muscle affection and walking ability. Although walking ability was delayed in patients with ACTA1, TPM2/3, and RYR1 mutations, it was within normal limits in patients with NEB and DNM2 mutations. CONCLUSIONS: We found that overall, genetic and histologic prevalence of congenital myopathy...

  3. Different clinical phenotypes in familial severe congenital neutropenia cases with same mutation of the ELANE gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hye-Kyung; Jeon, In Sang

    2014-03-01

    Severe congenital neutropenia (SCN) is a heterogeneous group of disorders with a defect in granulopoiesis causing marked neutropenia and severe bacterial infections. A 17-month-old girl (patient 1) was admitted due to cervical lymphadenitis caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, with neutropenia. She had Pseudomonas aeruginosa sepsis and peritonitis with perforated appendicitis at 8-month of age. Her sister, a 37-month-old girl (patient 2), had recurrent stomatitis with profound neutropenia, and her mother, a 32-yr-old woman (patient 3), had had recurrent stomatitis until her early 20s with neutropenia. We found an ELANE gene mutation (c.597+1G > A) from them in direct DNA sequencing analysis. Patients 1 and 2 did not respond to granulocyte colony stimulating factor and patient 1 was treated with prolonged antibiotics and excision. We demonstrated inherited SCN cases showing different severity even with the same mutation of the ELANE gene in a family.

  4. Systemic Right Ventricle in Adults With Congenital Heart Disease: Anatomic and Phenotypic Spectrum and Current Approach to Management.

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    Brida, Margarita; Diller, Gerhard-Paul; Gatzoulis, Michael A

    2018-01-30

    The systemic right ventricle (SRV) is commonly encountered in congenital heart disease representing a distinctly different model in terms of its anatomic spectrum, adaptation, clinical phenotype, and variable, but overall guarded prognosis. The most common clinical scenarios where an SRV is encountered are complete transposition of the great arteries with previous atrial switch repair, congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries, double inlet right ventricle mostly with previous Fontan palliation, and hypoplastic left heart syndrome palliated with the Norwood-Fontan protocol. The reasons for the guarded prognosis of the SRV in comparison with the systemic left ventricle are multifactorial, including distinct fibromuscular architecture, shape and function, coronary artery supply mismatch, intrinsic abnormalities of the tricuspid valve, intrinsic or acquired conduction abnormalities, and varied SRV adaptation to pressure or volume overload. Management of the SRV remains an ongoing challenge because SRV dysfunction has implications on short- and long-term outcomes for all patients irrespective of underlying cardiac morphology. SRV dysfunction can be subclinical, underscoring the need for tertiary follow-up and timely management of target hemodynamic lesions. Catheter interventions and surgery have an established role in selected patients. Cardiac resynchronization therapy is increasingly used, whereas pharmacological therapy is largely empirical. Mechanical assist device and heart transplantation remain options in end-stage heart failure when other management strategies have been exhausted. The present report focuses on the SRV with its pathological subtypes, pathophysiology, clinical features, current management strategies, and long-term sequelae. Although our article touches on issues applicable to neonates and children, its main focus is on adults with SRV. © 2018 American Heart Association, Inc.

  5. Leber congenital amaurosis associated with optic disk neovascularization and vitreous hemorrhage.

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    Kurz, Daryl; Ciulla, Thomas A

    2003-05-01

    To report an unusual case of optic disk neovascularization and vitreous hemorrhage associated with Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA). Interventional case report. A 16-year-old Caucasian girl with a history of LCA presented with decreased vision in her left eye, diffuse retinal pigmentary abnormalities characteristic of LCA, and hemorrhage over the left optic disk and macula. Six months of follow-up revealed optic disk neovascularization. A small amount of neovascularization was noted in the right eye at 6 months. An extensive systemic evaluation indicated no other cause for the neovascularization. Panretinal photocoagulation was performed in both eyes, and subsequently the neovascularization regressed. Leber congenital amaurosis like retinitis pigmentosa, can rarely be associated with neovascularization of the disk, which is amenable to treatment with peripheral photocoagulation if it does not spontaneously regress.

  6. Phenotypic heterogeneity of intellectual disability in patients with congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis: A case report and literature review.

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    Liu, Zhenlei; Liu, Jiaqi; Liu, Gang; Cao, Wenjian; Liu, Sen; Chen, Yixin; Zuo, Yuzhi; Chen, Weisheng; Chen, Jun; Zhang, Yu; Huang, Shishu; Qiu, Guixing; Giampietro, Philip F; Zhang, Feng; Wu, Zhihong; Wu, Nan

    2018-01-01

    Congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis (CIPA) is a rare autosomal recessive heterogeneous disorder mainly caused by mutations in the neurotrophic tyrosine receptor kinase 1 gene ( NTRK1) and characterized by insensitivity to noxious stimuli, anhidrosis, and intellectual disability. We herein report the first north Han Chinese patient with CIPA who exhibited classic phenotypic features and severe intellectual disability caused by a homozygous c.851-33T>A mutation of NTRK1, resulting in aberrant splicing and an open reading frame shift. We reviewed the literature and performed in silico analysis to determine the association between mutations and intellectual disability in patients with CIPA. We found that intellectual disability was correlated with the specific Ntrk1 protein domain that a mutation jeopardized. Mutations located peripheral to the Ntrk1 protein do not influence important functional domains and tend to cause milder symptoms without intellectual disability. Mutations that involve critical amino acids in the protein are prone to cause severe symptoms, including intellectual disability.

  7. Unusual phenotype of congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) with a novel mutation of the CYP21A2 gene.

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    Raisingani, Manish; Contreras, Maria F; Prasad, Kris; Pappas, John G; Kluge, Michelle L; Shah, Bina; David, Raphael

    2016-07-01

    Gonadotropin independent sexual precocity (SP) may be due to congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH), and its timing usually depends on the type of mutation in the CYP21A2 gene. Compound heterozygotes are common and express phenotypes of varying severity. The objective of this case report was to investigate the hormonal pattern and unusual genetic profile in a 7-year-old boy who presented with pubic hair, acne, an enlarged phallus, slightly increased testicular volume and advanced bone age. Clinical, hormonal and genetic studies were undertaken in the patient as well as his parents. We found elevated serum 17-hydroxyprogesterone (17-OHP) and androstenedione that were suppressed with dexamethasone, and elevated testosterone that actually rose after giving dexamethasone, indicating activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. An initial search for common mutations was negative, but a more detailed genetic analysis of the CYP21A2 gene revealed two mutations including R341W, a non-classical mutation inherited from his mother, and g.823G>A, a novel not previously reported consensus donor splice site mutation inherited from his father, which is predicted to be salt wasting. However, the child had a normal plasma renin activity. He was effectively treated with low-dose dexamethasone and a GnRH agonist. His father was an unaffected carrier, but his mother had evidence of mild non-classical CAH. In a male child presenting with gonadotropin independent SP it is important to investigate adrenal function with respect to the androgen profile, and to carry out appropriate genetic studies.

  8. Adult siblings with homozygous G6PC3 mutations expand our understanding of the severe congenital neutropenia type 4 (SCN4 phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernandez Bridget A

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Severe congenital neutropenia type 4 (SCN4 is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the third subunit of the enzyme glucose-6-phosphatase (G6PC3. Its core features are congenital neutropenia and a prominent venous skin pattern, and affected individuals have variable birth defects. Oculocutaneous albinism type 4 (OCA4 is caused by autosomal recessive mutations in SLC45A2. Methods We report a sister and brother from Newfoundland, Canada with complex phenotypes. The sister was previously reported by Cullinane et al., 2011. We performed homozygosity mapping, next generation sequencing and conventional Sanger sequencing to identify mutations that cause the phenotype in this family. We have also summarized clinical data from 49 previously reported SCN4 cases with overlapping phenotypes and interpret the medical histories of these siblings in the context of the literature. Results The siblings’ phenotype is due in part to a homozygous mutation in G6PC3, [c.829C > T, p.Gln277X]. Their ages are 38 and 37 years respectively and they are the oldest SCN4 patients published to date. Both presented with congenital neutropenia and later developed Crohn disease. We suggest that the latter is a previously unrecognized SCN4 manifestation and that not all affected individuals have an intellectual disability. The sister also has a homozygous mutation in SLC45A2, which explains her severe oculocutaneous hypopigmentation. Her brother carried one SLC45A2 mutation and was diagnosed with “partial OCA” in childhood. Conclusions This family highlights that apparently novel syndromes can in fact be caused by two known autosomal recessive disorders.

  9. Normosmic congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism due to TAC3/TACR3 mutations: characterization of neuroendocrine phenotypes and novel mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Francou

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: TAC3/TACR3 mutations have been reported in normosmic congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (nCHH (OMIM #146110. In the absence of animal models, studies of human neuroendocrine phenotypes associated with neurokinin B and NK3R receptor dysfunction can help to decipher the pathophysiology of this signaling pathway. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the prevalence of TAC3/TACR3 mutations, characterize novel TACR3 mutations and to analyze neuroendocrine profiles in nCHH caused by deleterious TAC3/TACR3 biallelic mutations. RESULTS: From a cohort of 352 CHH, we selected 173 nCHH patients and identified nine patients carrying TAC3 or TACR3 variants (5.2%. We describe here 7 of these TACR3 variants (1 frameshift and 2 nonsense deleterious mutations and 4 missense variants found in 5 subjects. Modeling and functional studies of the latter demonstrated the deleterious consequence of one missense mutation (Tyr267Asn probably caused by the misfolding of the mutated NK3R protein. We found a statistically significant (p<0.0001 higher mean FSH/LH ratio in 11 nCHH patients with TAC3/TACR3 biallelic mutations than in 47 nCHH patients with either biallelic mutations in KISS1R, GNRHR, or with no identified mutations and than in 50 Kallmann patients with mutations in KAL1, FGFR1 or PROK2/PROKR2. Three patients with TAC3/TACR3 biallelic mutations had an apulsatile LH profile but low-frequency alpha-subunit pulses. Pulsatile GnRH administration increased alpha-subunit pulsatile frequency and reduced the FSH/LH ratio. CONCLUSION: The gonadotropin axis dysfunction associated with nCHH due to TAC3/TACR3 mutations is related to a low GnRH pulsatile frequency leading to a low frequency of alpha-subunit pulses and to an elevated FSH/LH ratio. This ratio might be useful for pre-screening nCHH patients for TAC3/TACR3 mutations.

  10. A compound heterozygous mutation in DPAGT1 results in a congenital disorder of glycosylation with a relatively mild phenotype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iqbal, Z.; Shahzad, M.; Vissers, L.E.L.M.; Scherpenzeel, M. van; Gilissen, C.; Razzaq, A.; Zahoor, M.Y.; Khan, S.N.; Kleefstra, T.; Veltman, J.A.; Brouwer, A.P.M. de; Lefeber, D.J.; Bokhoven, H. van; Riazuddin, S.

    2013-01-01

    Congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDG) are a large group of recessive multisystem disorders caused by impaired protein or lipid glycosylation. The CDG-I subgroup is characterized by protein N-glycosylation defects originating in the endoplasmic reticulum. The genetic defect is known for 17

  11. Novel PIGT Variant in Two Brothers: Expansion of the Multiple Congenital Anomalies-Hypotonia Seizures Syndrome 3 Phenotype

    OpenAIRE

    Skauli, Nadia; Wallace, Sean; Chiang, Samuel C. C.; Bar?y, Tuva; Holmgren, Asbj?rn; Stray-Pedersen, Asbj?rg; Bryceson, Yenan T.; Str?mme, Petter; Frengen, Eirik; Misceo, Doriana

    2016-01-01

    Biallelic PIGT variants were previously reported in seven patients from three families with Multiple Congenital Anomalies-Hypotonia Seizures Syndrome 3 (MCAHS3), characterized by epileptic encephalopathy, hypotonia, global developmental delay/intellectual disability, cerebral and cerebellar atrophy, craniofacial dysmorphisms, and skeletal, ophthalmological, cardiac, and genitourinary abnormalities. We report a novel homozygous PIGT missense variant c.1079G>T (p.Gly360Val) in two brothers w...

  12. Genome-wide association study of multiple congenital heart disease phenotypes identifies a susceptibility locus for atrial septal defect at chromosome 4p16

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordell, Heather J.; Bentham, Jamie; Topf, Ana; Zelenika, Diana; Heath, Simon; Mamasoula, Chrysovalanto; Cosgrove, Catherine; Blue, Gillian; Granados-Riveron, Javier; Setchfield, Kerry; Thornborough, Chris; Breckpot, Jeroen; Soemedi, Rachel; Martin, Ruairidh; Rahman, Thahira J.; Hall, Darroch; van Engelen, Klaartje; Moorman, Antoon F.M.; Zwinderman, Aelko H; Barnett, Phil; Koopmann, Tamara T.; Adriaens, Michiel E.; Varro, Andras; George, Alfred L.; dos Remedios, Christobal; Bishopric, Nanette H.; Bezzina, Connie R.; O’Sullivan, John; Gewillig, Marc; Bu’Lock, Frances A.; Winlaw, David; Bhattacharya, Shoumo; Devriendt, Koen; Brook, J. David; Mulder, Barbara J.M.; Mital, Seema; Postma, Alex V.; Lathrop, G. Mark; Farrall, Martin; Goodship, Judith A.; Keavney, Bernard D.

    2013-01-01

    We carried out a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of congenital heart disease (CHD). Our discovery cohort comprised 1,995 CHD cases and 5,159 controls, and included patients from each of the three major clinical CHD categories (septal, obstructive and cyanotic defects). When all CHD phenotypes were considered together, no regions achieved genome-wide significant association. However, a region on chromosome 4p16, adjacent to the MSX1 and STX18 genes, was associated (P=9.5×10−7) with the risk of ostium secundum atrial septal defect (ASD) in the discovery cohort (N=340 cases), and this was replicated in a further 417 ASD cases and 2520 controls (replication P=5.0×10−5; OR in replication cohort 1.40 [95% CI 1.19-1.65]; combined P=2.6×10−10). Genotype accounted for ~9% of the population attributable risk of ASD. PMID:23708191

  13. Heterogeneity in phenotype of usher-congenital hyperinsulinism syndrome: hearing loss, retinitis pigmentosa, and hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia ranging from severe to mild with conversion to diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Mutair, Angham N; Brusgaard, Klaus; Bin-Abbas, Bassam; Hussain, Khalid; Felimban, Naila; Al Shaikh, Adnan; Christesen, Henrik T

    2013-03-01

    To evaluate the phenotype of 15 children with congenital hyperinsulinism (CHI) and profound hearing loss, known as Homozygous 11p15-p14 Deletion syndrome (MIM #606528). Prospective clinical follow-up and genetic analysis by direct sequencing, multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification, and microsatellite markers. Genetic testing identified the previous described homozygous deletion in 11p15, USH1C:c.(90+592)_ABCC8:c.(2694-528)del. Fourteen patients had severe CHI demanding near-total pancreatectomy. In one patient with mild, transient neonatal hypoglycemia and nonautoimmune diabetes at age 11 years, no additional mutations were found in HNF1A, HNF4A, GCK, INS, and INSR. Retinitis pigmentosa was found in two patients aged 9 and 13 years. No patients had enteropathy or renal tubular defects. Neuromotor development ranged from normal to severe delay with epilepsy. The phenotype of Homozygous 11p15-p14 Deletion syndrome, or Usher-CHI syndrome, includes any severity of neonatal-onset CHI and severe, sensorineural hearing loss. Retinitis pigmentosa and nonautoimmune diabetes may occur in adolescence.

  14. Novel PIGT Variant in Two Brothers: Expansion of the Multiple Congenital Anomalies-Hypotonia Seizures Syndrome 3 Phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Skauli

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Biallelic PIGT variants were previously reported in seven patients from three families with Multiple Congenital Anomalies-Hypotonia Seizures Syndrome 3 (MCAHS3, characterized by epileptic encephalopathy, hypotonia, global developmental delay/intellectual disability, cerebral and cerebellar atrophy, craniofacial dysmorphisms, and skeletal, ophthalmological, cardiac, and genitourinary abnormalities. We report a novel homozygous PIGT missense variant c.1079G>T (p.Gly360Val in two brothers with several of the typical features of MCAHS3, but in addition, pyramidal tract neurological signs. Notably, they are the first patients with MCAHS3 without skeletal, cardiac, or genitourinary anomalies. PIGT encodes a crucial subunit of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI transamidase complex, which catalyzes the attachment of proteins to GPI-anchors, attaching the proteins to the cell membrane. In vitro studies in cells from the two brothers showed reduced levels of GPI-anchors and GPI-anchored proteins on the cell surface, supporting the pathogenicity of the novel PIGT variant.

  15. Novel mutation in TSPAN12 leads to autosomal recessive inheritance of congenital vitreoretinal disease with intra-familial phenotypic variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal, Moran; Levanon, Erez Y; Hujeirat, Yasir; Khayat, Morad; Pe'er, Jacob; Shalev, Stavit

    2014-12-01

    Developmental malformations of the vitreoretinal vasculature are a heterogeneous group of conditions with various modes of inheritance, and include familial exudative vitreoretinopathy (FEVR), persistent fetal vasculature (PFV), and Norrie disease. We investigated a large consanguineous kindred with multiple affected individuals exhibiting variable phenotypes of abnormal vitreoretinal vasculature, consistent with the three above-mentioned conditions and compatible with autosomal recessive inheritance. Exome sequencing identified a novel c.542G > T (p.C181F) apparently mutation in the TSPAN12 gene that segregated with the ocular disease in the family. The TSPAN12 gene was previously reported to cause dominant and recessive FEVR, but has not yet been associated with other vitreoretinal manifestations. The intra-familial clinical variability caused by a single mutation in the TSPAN12 gene underscores the complicated phenotype-genotype correlation of mutations in this gene, and suggests that there are additional genetic and environmental factors involved in the complex process of ocular vascularization during embryonic development. Our study supports considering PFV, FEVR, and Norrie disease a spectrum of disorders, with clinical and genetic overlap, caused by mutations in distinct genes acting in the Norrin/β-catenin signaling pathway. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Mutation update and genotype-phenotype correlations of novel and previously described mutations in TPM2 and TPM3 causing congenital myopathies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marttila, Minttu; Lehtokari, Vilma-Lotta; Marston, Steven; Nyman, Tuula A.; Barnerias, Christine; Beggs, Alan H.; Bertini, Enrico; Ceyhan-Birsoy, Ozge; Cintas, Pascal; Gerard, Marion; Gilbert-Dussardier, Brigitte; Hogue, Jacob S.; Longman, Cheryl; Eymard, Bruno; Frydman, Moshe; Kang, Peter B.; Klinge, Lars; Kolski, Hanna; Lochmüller, Hans; Magy, Laurent; Manel, Véronique; Mayer, Michèle; Mercuri, Eugenio; North, Kathryn N.; Peudenier-Robert, Sylviane; Pihko, Helena; Probst, Frank J.; Reisin, Ricardo; Stewart, Willie; Taratuto, Ana Lia; de Visser, Marianne; Wilichowski, Ekkehard; Winer, John; Nowak, Kristen; Laing, Nigel G.; Winder, Tom L.; Monnier, Nicole; Clarke, Nigel F.; Pelin, Katarina; Grönholm, Mikaela; Wallgren-Pettersson, Carina

    2014-01-01

    Mutations affecting skeletal muscle isoforms of the tropomyosin genes may cause nemaline myopathy, cap myopathy, core-rod myopathy, congenital fiber-type disproportion, distal arthrogryposes, and Escobar syndrome. We correlate the clinical picture of these diseases with novel (19) and previously

  17. Congenital Hypothyroidism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease Featured Resource Find an Endocrinologist Search Congenital Hypothyroidism March 2012 Download PDFs English Espanol Editors Rosalind S. ... Resources MedlinePlus (NIH) Mayo Clinic What is congenital hypothyroidism? Newborn babies who are unable to make enough ...

  18. Frequency and phenotype of patients carrying TPM2 and TPM3 gene mutations in a cohort of 94 patients with congenital myopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Citirak, Gülsenay; Witting, Nanna; Duno, Morten

    2014-01-01

    , two related female patients and two sporadic, male patients were found to carry mutations in the tropomyosin 2 (TPM2) and tropomyosin 3 (TPM3) genes, respectively. This indicates a low (4.3%) frequency of TPM2 and TPM3 mutations as a cause of congenital myopathy. Compared to previously described...... patients carrying the same mutations as found in our study (c.503G>A, and c.502C>T in TPM3, and c.415_417delGAG in TPM2), clinical presentation and muscle morphological findings differed in our patients. Differences included variation in distribution of muscle weakness, presence of scoliosis and ptosis...... had nemaline myopathy and fiber size disproportion, while three patients had congenital fiber type disproportion (CFTD) on muscle biopsies. TPM2-related CFTD has only been described in two cases, indicating that mutations in TPM2 are rare causes of CFTD....

  19. [Undifferentiated soft tissue tumor with rhabdoid phenotype (extra-renal rhabdoid tumor). Report of a congenital case associated with medulloblastoma in a brother].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costes, V; Medioni, D; Durand, L; Sarran, N; Marguerite, G; Baldet, P

    1997-03-01

    We report a case of congenital cervical rhabdoid tumor with association of a medulloblastoma in a brother. The immunohistochemical features of this tumor are compatible with a neuroectodermal differentiation (MIC 2+, Leu 7+). Extrarenal rhabdoid tumors share a common morphology but do not represent a single entity with only one histogenesis. Most of them are now considered to be of neuroectodermal origin. In our case, the association with a medulloblastoma in a brother seems to confirm this concept.

  20. Genetics Home Reference: congenital central hypoventilation syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Kravis EM, Zhou L, Rand CM, Weese-Mayer DE. Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome: PHOX2B mutations and phenotype. Am J Respir Crit ... BA, Leurgans SE, Berry-Kravis EM, Weese-Mayer DE. Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome: PHOX2B genotype determines risk for sudden death. Pediatr ...

  1. Congenital tuberculosis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof Ezechukwu

    2012-06-20

    Jun 20, 2012 ... Key words: Congenital tuberculo- sis, case report, miliary tuberculosis. Introduction. Congenital tuberculosis defines tuberculosis in infants of .... tary TB and otitis media, resulting in seizures, deafness, and death. It is therefore not surprising that the index case who presented at twelve weeks of age, had ...

  2. Congenital Abnormalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tube defects. However, there is also a genetic influence to this type of congenital anomaly. Unknown Causes The vast majority of congenital abnormalities have no known cause. This is particularly troubling for parents who plan to have more children, because there is no way to predict if ...

  3. Congenital rubella

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that usually closes shortly after birth remains open ( patent ductus arteriosus ) Narrowing of the large artery that ... prior to pregnancy can prevent congenital rubella. Pregnant women who have not had the vaccine should avoid ...

  4. Congenital amusias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillmann, B; Albouy, P; Caclin, A

    2015-01-01

    In contrast to the sophisticated music processing reported in the general population, individuals with congenital amusia show deficits in music perception and production. Congenital amusia occurs without brain damage, sensory or cognitive deficits, and has been suggested as a lifelong deficit with genetic origin. Even though recognized for a long time, this disorder has been systematically studied only relatively recently for its behavioral and neural correlates. The currently most investigated hypothesis about the underlying deficits concerns the pitch dimension, notably with impaired pitch discrimination and memory. Anatomic and functional investigations of pitch processing revealed that the amusic brain presents abnormalities in the auditory and inferior frontal cortices, associated with decreased connectivity between these structures. The deficit also impairs processing of pitch in speech material and processing of the time dimension in music for some of the amusic individuals, but does not seem to affect spatial processing. Some studies suggest at least partial dissociation in the disorder between perception and production. Recent studies revealed spared implicit pitch perception in congenital amusia, supporting the power of implicit cognition in the music domain. Current challenges consist in defining different subtypes of congenital amusia as well as developing rehabilitation programs for this "musical handicap." © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Congenital Hydrocephalus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estey, Chelsie M

    2016-03-01

    There are several types of hydrocephalus, which are characterized based on the location of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) accumulation. Physical features of animals with congenital hydrocephalus may include a dome-shaped skull, persistent fontanelle, and bilateral ventrolateral strabismus. Medical therapy involves decreasing the production of CSF. The most common surgical treatment is placement of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt. Postoperative complications may include infection, blockage, drainage abnormalities, and mechanical failure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Congenital diplopodia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brower, Jason S.; Wootton-Gorges, Sandra L.; Costouros, John G.; Boakes, Jennette; Greenspan, Adam

    2003-01-01

    Diplopodia, or duplicated foot, is a rare congenital anomaly. It differs from polydactyly in that supernumerary metatarsal and tarsal bones are present as well as extra digits. Only a few cases of this anomaly have been reported in the literature to date. We present a newborn male without intrauterine teratogen exposure who was born with a duplicate foot of the left lower extremity and imperforate anus. (orig.)

  7. Congenital toxoplasmosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieffer, François; Wallon, Martine

    2013-01-01

    Congenital toxoplasmosis results from the transplacental transmission of the parasite Toxoplasma gondii after a maternal infection acquired in pregnancy. Prevalence of congenital infection ranges from 0.1 to 0.3 per 1000 live births. The maternal-fetal transmission rate increases with gestational age at maternal seroconversion, from less than 15% at 13 weeks of gestation to over 70% at 36 weeks. Conversely, the later the maternal infection, the lower the risk of symptomatic congenital infection (infections acquired during the third trimester are most often asymptomatic at birth). Prenatal diagnosis is currently performed by PCR analysis in amniotic fluid. Antenatal management and treatment vary considerably among countries. In some European countries, maternal infections are detected through serological screening allowing a prompt treatment with spiramycin, which is expected to reduce the risk of vertical transmission. If PCR analysis in amniotic fluid is positive or if maternal infection was acquired in the third trimester of pregnancy, a combination with pyrimethamine and sulphonamide is given until delivery. Benefits of antenatal treatments remain controversial. Infected newborns are prescribed pyrimethamine and sulphonamide for 12 months. Despite antenatal and postnatal treatment, chorioretinitis can occur at any age (prevalence>20% at 10 years of age): long-term ophthalmological follow-up remains necessary. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. An Expanded Multi-Organ Disease Phenotype Associated with Mutations in YARS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tracewska-Siemiątkowska, Anna; Haer-Wigman, Lonneke; Bosch, Danielle G M

    2017-01-01

    Whole exome sequence analysis was performed in a Swedish mother-father-affected proband trio with a phenotype characterized by progressive retinal degeneration with congenital nystagmus, profound congenital hearing impairment, primary amenorrhea, agenesis of the corpus callosum, and liver disease...

  9. The genetic landscape of familial congenital hydrocephalus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaheen, Ranad; Sebai, Mohammed Adeeb; Patel, Nisha; Ewida, Nour; Kurdi, Wesam; Altweijri, Ikhlass; Sogaty, Sameera; Almardawi, Elham; Seidahmed, Mohammed Zain; Alnemri, Abdulrahman; Madirevula, Sateesh; Ibrahim, Niema; Abdulwahab, Firdous; Hashem, Mais; Al-Sheddi, Tarfa; Alomar, Rana; Alobeid, Eman; Sallout, Bahauddin; AlBaqawi, Badi; AlAali, Wajeih; Ajaji, Nouf; Lesmana, Harry; Hopkin, Robert J; Dupuis, Lucie; Mendoza-Londono, Roberto; Al Rukban, Hadeel; Yoon, Grace; Faqeih, Eissa; Alkuraya, Fowzan S

    2017-06-01

    Congenital hydrocephalus is an important birth defect, the genetics of which remains incompletely understood. To date, only 4 genes are known to cause Mendelian diseases in which congenital hydrocephalus is the main or sole clinical feature, 2 X-linked (L1CAM and AP1S2) and 2 autosomal recessive (CCDC88C and MPDZ). In this study, we aimed to determine the genetic etiology of familial congenital hydrocephalus with the assumption that these cases represent Mendelian forms of the disease. Exome sequencing combined, where applicable, with positional mapping. We identified a likely causal mutation in the majority of these families (21 of 27, 78%), spanning 16 genes, none of which is X-linked. Ciliopathies and dystroglycanopathies were the most common etiologies of congenital hydrocephalus in our cohort (19% and 26%, respectively). In 1 family with 4 affected members, we identified a homozygous truncating variant in EML1, which we propose as a novel cause of congenital hydrocephalus in addition to its suggested role in cortical malformation. Similarly, we show that recessive mutations in WDR81, previously linked to cerebellar ataxia, mental retardation, and disequilibrium syndrome 2, cause severe congenital hydrocephalus. Furthermore, we confirm the previously reported candidacy of MPDZ by presenting a phenotypic spectrum of congenital hydrocephalus associated with 5 recessive alleles. Our study highlights the importance of recessive mutations in familial congenital hydrocephalus and expands the locus heterogeneity of this condition. Ann Neurol 2017;81:890-897. © 2017 American Neurological Association.

  10. Congenital syphilis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sang Wook; Kim, Kyung Soo; Hur, Don

    1983-01-01

    In recent years, marked increase in incidence of congenital syphilis has occurred throughout the world due to changes in social norms and development of penicillin-resistant strains. Early diagnosis plays an important role in congenital syphilis as the clinical manifestations may simulate many other conditions in the paediatric age group. The authors analyzed 52 cases of congenital syphilis admitted to the department of paediatrics, Chosun University Hospital, clinically and radiologically. Among them, 18 cases were born in this hospital and 34 cases were admitted from OPD, during the period of 8 years from January, 1975 to December, 1982. The results obtained were as follows; 1. In 28 of 34 cases (82%), the first clinical manifestations were below the age of 3 months. 2. Among the 52 cases, a male predominance was observed with a male to female ratio of 2 : 1. 3. The serologic test (VDRL) of the 52 studied cases showed reactive response in 49 cases (94%), and that of syphilitic mothers except 6 cases, reactive in all studied cases. 4. The major manifestations of the 52 cases were bone tenderness (12%) and swelling of the joints (7%) in skeletal system, hepatosplenomegaly (79%) and skin lesions (73%) in extraskeletal one. 5. The radiological skeletal changes were detected in 45 of 52 cases (87%), and the commonest findings were detected in 45 of 52 cases (87%), and the commonest findings were metaphysitis (83%) and periostitis (81%). The most characteristic type of metaphysitis were transverse trophic line (74%) and zone of rarefaction (65%). 6. The commonest bones to be affected were growing metaphyses of the long bones, particulary about the wrist and the knee. The order of frequency were radius (80%), uina (80%), tibia (77%), femur (69%) and humerus (40%)

  11. Congenital amusia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Victoria J; Stewart, Lauren

    2013-01-01

    For most people, music, like language, is acquired effortlessly in early life. But a few percent of the population have lifelong difficulties in the perception and production of music. In this chapter we discuss psycho-acoustic and behavioral studies that have attempted to delineate the nature of the auditory perceptual deficits in this group and consider whether these difficulties extend outside the musical domain. Finally, we review structural imaging studies in this group which point to subtle anomalies in temporal and frontal areas. We suggest that amusia can be considered a disorder of neural development, which has relatively specific consequences at the behavioral level. Studies of congenital amusia provide a unique window on the neurocognitive architecture of music processing. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Genetics of congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tommiska, Johanna; Känsäkoski, Johanna; Christiansen, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (CHH) is a rare disorder characterized by incomplete/absent puberty caused by deficiency or defective action of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH). The phenotypic features of patients with CHH vary from genital hypoplasia and absent puberty to reversal...

  13. [Congenital hypothyroidism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castilla Peón, María Fernanda

    Congenital hypothyroidism (CH) is a cause of preventable mental retardation; therefore, timely diagnosis and treatment by the primary care physician is very important. CH screening must be performed between the second and fifth days of life with capillary blood done with a heel prick and must be confirmed by measurement of thyroid hormones in venous blood. The most common cause of CH is thyroid dysgenesis, which may be identified by a thyroid scan carried out before initiating treatment. Treatment should be with levothyroxine (10-15μg/kg/day) and should not be delayed or suspended during the first 3 years of life due to the deleterious effect on neurodevelopment in case of low thyroid hormones during this time. Preterm or sick infants or those with Down syndrome require special consideration. This article provides diagnostic and therapeutic algorithms for CH. Copyright © 2015 Hospital Infantil de México Federico Gómez. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  14. Congenital platelet function defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pool disorder; Glanzmann's thrombasthenia; Bernard-Soulier syndrome; Platelet function defects - congenital ... Congenital platelet function defects are bleeding disorders that cause reduced platelet function. Most of the time, people with these disorders have ...

  15. Congenital Heart Information Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... heart defects. Important Notice The Congenital Heart Information Network website is temporarily out of service. Please join ... and Uwe Baemayr for The Congenital Heart Information Network Exempt organization under Section 501(c)3. Copyright © ...

  16. Congenital heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) is a problem with the heart's structure and function that is present at birth. ... Fraser CD, Kane LC. Congenital heart disease. In: Townsend CM Jr, ... Sabiston Textbook of Surgery: The Biological Basis of Modern ...

  17. Congenital Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Woong Hee; Kim, Young Tong; Jou, Sung Shick; Shin, Hyeong Cheol [Soonchunhyang University, Asan (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-12-15

    Intrahepatic portosystemic shunts are an anomalous connection between the portal vein and hepatic vein/IVC, which may be either congenital or acquired secondary to liver cirrhosis or portal hypertension. Cases of congenital intrahepatic shunts are usually encountered in children and may spontaneously resolve. We report 5 cases of congenital intrahepatic portosystemic shunts in neonates and an adult

  18. Congenital nephrotic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamed, Radi Ma

    2003-01-01

    The congenital nephrotic syndrome (CNS) is an uncommon disorder with onset of the nephrotic syndrome usually in the first three months of life. Several different diseases may cause the syndrome. These may be inherited, sporadic, acquired or part of a general malformation syndrome. The clinical course is marked by failure to thrive, recurrent life threatening bacterial infections, and early death from sepsis and/or uremia. A characteristic phenotype may be seen in children with CNS. The majority of reported cases of CNS are of the Finnish type (CNF). Although the role of the glomerular basement membrane has been emphasized as the barrier for retaining plasma proteins, recent studies have clearly shown that the slit diaphragm is the structure most likely to be the barrier in the glomerular capillary wall. The gene (NPHS1) was shown to encode a novel protein that was termed nephrin, due to its specific location in the kidney filter barrier, where it seems to form a highly organized filter structure. Nephrin is a transmembrane protein that probably forms the main building block of an isoporous zipper-like slit diaphragm filter structure. Defects in nephrin lead to the abnormal or absent slit diaphragm resulting in massive proteinuria and renal failure.

  19. Congenital orbital teratoma

    OpenAIRE

    Aiyub, Shereen; Chan, Weng Onn; Szetu, John; Sullivan, Laurence J; Pater, John; Cooper, Peter; Selva, Dinesh

    2013-01-01

    We present a case of mature congenital orbital teratoma managed with lid-sparing exenteration and dermis fat graft. This is a case report on the management of congenital orbital teratoma. A full-term baby was born in Fiji with prolapsed right globe which was surrounded by a nonpulsatile, cystic mass. Clinical and imaging features were consistent with congenital orbital teratoma. Due to limited surgical expertise, the patient was transferred to Adelaide, Australia for further management. The p...

  20. Cytomegalovirus Congenital Cataract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ridha Wahyutomo

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Cytomegalovirus congenital infection is an infection caused by the the subfamily â Herpesviridae, during pregnancy. The incidence of infections among newborn infants is 1 %. One of the effects of congenitally acquired infection is the congenital cataract. A 6-year-old child complained to have a blurred vision diagnosed with cytomegalovirus congenital cataract. The diagnosis was confirmed by a positive serology testing for Ig M and Ig G CMV. The laboratory test using Giemsa staining to find inclusion bodies and a faster PCR could not be carried out (Sains Medika, 3(1:84-88.

  1. Genetics Home Reference: congenital hypothyroidism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Congenital hypothyroidism Congenital hypothyroidism Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Congenital hypothyroidism is a partial or complete loss of function ...

  2. Mitochondrial disorders in congenital myopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Kharlamov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The literature review gives data on the role of mitochondrial disorders in the pathogenesis of congenital myopathies: congenital muscular dystrophies and congenital structural myopathies. It describes changes in congenital muscular dystrophies with type VI collagen, in myodystrophy with giant mitochondria, in congenital central core myopathies, myotubular myopathy, etc. Clinical and experimental findings are presented. Approaches to therapy for energy disorders in congenital myopathies are depicted.

  3. Congenital heat disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higgins, C.B.; Silverman, N.H.; Kersting-Somerhoff, B.A.

    1990-01-01

    The book covers the tomographic anatomy of the normal and congenitally malformed heart and tomographic imaging of the normal heat. It then compares echocardiographic evaluation and the use of MR imaging in the diagnosis and evaluation of individual congenital cardiac malformations

  4. Key aspects congenital infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. V. Lobzin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The key questions to solve the problem of congenital infection in the Russian Federation are: using in national practice over world accepted terminology adapted to the recommendations of the World Health Organization; representation of the modern concepts of an infectious process in the classification of congenital infections; scientific development and introducing in clinical practice the «standard case definitions», applied to different congenital infections; optimization of protocols and clinical guidelines for diagnosis, treatment and prevention of congenital infections; improvement a knowledge in the infectious disease for all  pecialists involved in the risk assessment of congenital infections, manage pregnancy and children. Based on our experience and analysis of publications, the authors suggest possible solutions.

  5. Congenital muscular dystrophy. Part I: a review of phenotypical and diagnostic aspects Distrofia muscular congênita. Parte I: revisão dos aspectos fenotípicos e diagnósticos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umbertina Conti Reed

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The congenital muscular dystrophies (CMDs are a group of genetically and clinically heterogeneous hereditary myopathies with preferentially autosomal recessive inheritance, that are characterized by congenital hypotonia, delayed motor development and early onset of progressive muscle weakness associated with dystrophic pattern on muscle biopsy. The clinical course is broadly variable and can comprise the involvement of the brain and eyes. From 1994, a great development in the knowledge of the molecular basis has occurred and the classification of CMDs has to be continuously up dated. We initially present the main clinical and diagnostic data concerning the CMDs related to changes in the complex dystrophin-associated glycoproteins-extracellular matrix: CMD with merosin deficiency (CMD1A, collagen VI related CMDs (Ullrich CMD and Bethlem myopathy, CMDs with abnormal glycosylation of alpha-dystroglycan (Fukuyama CMD, Muscle-eye-brain disease, Walker-Warburg syndrome, CMD1C, CMD1D, and the much rarer CMD with integrin deficiency. Finally, we present other forms of CMDs not related with the dystrophin/glycoproteins/extracellular matrix complex (rigid spine syndrome, CMD1B, CMD with lamin A/C deficiency, and some apparently specific clinical forms not yet associated with a known molecular mechanism. The second part of this review concerning the pathogenesis and therapeutic perspectives of the different subtypes of CMD will be described in a next number.As distrofias musculares congênitas (DMCs são miopatias hereditárias geralmente, porém não exclusivamente, de herança autossômica recessiva, que apresentam grande heterogeneidade genética e clínica. São caracterizadas por hipotonia muscular congênita, atraso do desenvolvimento motor e fraqueza muscular de início precoce associada a padrão distrófico na biópsia muscular. O quadro clínico, de gravidade variável, pode também incluir anormalidades oculares e do sistema nervoso central. A

  6. Congenital symmastia revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sillesen, Nanna H; Hölmich, Lisbeth R; Siersen, Hans Erik

    2012-01-01

    Symmastia is defined as medial confluence of the breast. The term 'symmastia' is modified from Greek (syn meaning 'together', and mastos meaning 'breast') and was first presented by Spence et al. in 1983. Two forms of symmastia exist: an iatrogenic and a congenital version. Congenital symmastia...... is a rare condition in which web-like soft tissue traverses the sternum to connect the breasts medially. The literature on congenital symmastia is limited, few cases have been published, and knowledge about ideal treatment is still insufficient....

  7. Childhood growth in boys with congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Varimo, Tero; Hero, Matti; Laitinen, Eeva-Maria

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We describe childhood growth patterns in a series of well-characterized patients with congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (CHH) with special emphasis on genotype-phenotype correlation. METHODS: We retrospectively evaluated the growth charts of 36 males with CHH (27 from Finland...

  8. Allelic variation of the FRMD7 gene in congenital idiopathic nystagmus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Self, James E; Shawkat, Fatima; Malpas, Crispin T; Thomas, N Simon; Harris, Christopher M; Hodgkins, Peter R; Chen, Xiaoli; Trump, Dorothy; Lotery, Andrew J

    2007-09-01

    To perform a genotype-phenotype correlation study in an X-linked congenital idiopathic nystagmus pedigree (pedigree 1) and to assess the allelic variance of the FRMD7 gene in congenital idiopathic nystagmus. Subjects from pedigree 1 underwent detailed clinical examination including nystagmology. Screening of FRMD7 was undertaken in pedigree 1 and in 37 other congenital idiopathic nystagmus probands and controls. Direct sequencing confirmed sequence changes. X-inactivation studies were performed in pedigree 1. The nystagmus phenotype was extremely variable in pedigree 1. We identified 2 FRMD7 mutations. However, 80% of X-linked families and 96% of simplex cases showed no mutations. X-inactivation studies demonstrated no clear causal link between skewing and variable penetrance. We confirm profound phenotypic variation in X-linked congenital idiopathic nystagmus pedigrees. We demonstrate that other congenital nystagmus genes exist besides FRMD7. We show that the role of X inactivation in variable penetrance is unclear in congenital idiopathic nystagmus. Clinical Relevance We demonstrate that phenotypic variation of nystagmus occurs in families with FRMD7 mutations. While FRMD7 mutations may be found in some cases of X-linked congenital idiopathic nystagmus, the diagnostic yield is low. X-inactivation assays are unhelpful as a test for carrier status for this disease.

  9. Congenital orbital teratoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiyub, Shereen; Chan, Wengonn; Szetu, John; Sullivan, Laurence J; Pater, John; Cooper, Peter; Selva, Dinesh

    2013-12-01

    We present a case of mature congenital orbital teratoma managed with lid-sparing exenteration and dermis fat graft. This is a case report on the management of congenital orbital teratoma. A full-term baby was born in Fiji with prolapsed right globe which was surrounded by a nonpulsatile, cystic mass. Clinical and imaging features were consistent with congenital orbital teratoma. Due to limited surgical expertise, the patient was transferred to Adelaide, Australia for further management. The patient underwent a lid-sparing exenteration with frozen section control of the apical margin. A dermis fat graft from the groin was placed beneath the lid skin to provide volume. Histopathology revealed mature tissues from each of the three germ cell layers which confirmed the diagnosis of mature teratoma. We describe the successful use of demis fat graft in socket reconstruction following lid-sparing exenteration for congenital orbital teratoma.

  10. Congenital orbital teratoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shereen Aiyub

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of mature congenital orbital teratoma managed with lid-sparing exenteration and dermis fat graft. This is a case report on the management of congenital orbital teratoma. A full-term baby was born in Fiji with prolapsed right globe which was surrounded by a nonpulsatile, cystic mass. Clinical and imaging features were consistent with congenital orbital teratoma. Due to limited surgical expertise, the patient was transferred to Adelaide, Australia for further management. The patient underwent a lid-sparing exenteration with frozen section control of the apical margin. A dermis fat graft from the groin was placed beneath the lid skin to provide volume. Histopathology revealed mature tissues from each of the three germ cell layers which confirmed the diagnosis of mature teratoma. We describe the successful use of demis fat graft in socket reconstruction following lid-sparing exenteration for congenital orbital teratoma.

  11. Congenital Constriction Band Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Rajesh Gupta, Fareed Malik, Rishabh Gupta, M.A.Basit, Dara Singh

    2008-01-01

    Congenital constriction bands are anomalous bands that encircle a digit or an extremity. Congenitalconstriction band syndrome is rare condition and is mostly associated with other musculoskeletaldisorders.We report such a rare experience.

  12. Congenital anterior urethral diverticulum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Hyun Sub; Chung, Young Sun; Suh, Chee Jang; Won, Jong Jin

    1985-01-01

    Two cases of congenital anterior urethral diverticular which have occurred in a 4 year old and one month old boy are presented. Etiology, diagnostic procedures, and its clinical results are briefly reviewed

  13. Congenital chylous ascites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romanska-Kita, J.; Borszewska-Kornacka, M. K.; Rudzinska, I.; Wawrzoniak, T.; Dobrzanska, A.; Czech-Kowalska, J.

    2011-01-01

    Congenital chylous ascites is a rare entity, conditioned by numerous factors and with changing dynamics of the disease. Because of the lack of therapeutic and diagnostic standards, this disease constitutes to be a medical challenge. This article presents current knowledge on pathogenesis, diagnostics and management of this disease, as well as a case of a newborn with primary congenital chylous ascites in the abdominal cavity. (authors)

  14. Multifocal Congenital Hemangiopericytoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robl, Renata; Carvalho, Vânia Oliveira; Abagge, Kerstin Taniguchi; Uber, Marjorie; Lichtvan, Leniza Costa Lima; Werner, Betina; Mehrdad Nadji, Mehrdad

    2017-01-01

    Congenital hemangiopericytoma (HPC) is a rare mesenchymal tumor with less aggressive behavior and a more favorable prognosis than similar tumors in adults. Multifocal presentation is even less common than isolated HPC and hence its clinical and histologic recognition may be challenging. A newborn infant with multifocal congenital HPC causing severe deformity but with a favorable outcome after chemotherapy and surgical removal is reported. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Aberrant Myokine Signaling in Congenital Myotonic Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masayuki Nakamori

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Myotonic dystrophy types 1 (DM1 and 2 (DM2 are dominantly inherited neuromuscular disorders caused by a toxic gain of function of expanded CUG and CCUG repeats, respectively. Although both disorders are clinically similar, congenital myotonic dystrophy (CDM, a severe DM form, is found only in DM1. CDM is also characterized by muscle fiber immaturity not observed in adult DM, suggesting specific pathological mechanisms. Here, we revealed upregulation of the interleukin-6 (IL-6 myokine signaling pathway in CDM muscles. We also found a correlation between muscle immaturity and not only IL-6 expression but also expanded CTG repeat length and CpG methylation status upstream of the repeats. Aberrant CpG methylation was associated with transcriptional dysregulation at the repeat locus, increasing the toxic RNA burden that upregulates IL-6. Because the IL-6 pathway is involved in myocyte maturation and muscle atrophy, our results indicate that enhanced RNA toxicity contributes to severe CDM phenotypes through aberrant IL-6 signaling. : Congenital myotonic dystrophy (CDM manifests characteristic genetic (very large CTG repeat expansions, epigenetic (CpG hypermethylation upstream of the repeat, and phenotypic (muscle immaturity features not seen in adult DM. Nakamori et al. find phenotype-genotype and epigenotype correlation in CDM muscle and reveal involvement of the IL-6 myokine signaling pathway in the disease process. Keywords: CTCF, ER stress, IL-6, muscular dystrophy, NF-κB, trinucleotide, cytokine, splicing

  16. The association of congenital neuroblastoma and congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellah, R.; D'Andrea, A.; Children's Hospital, Boston, MA; Darillis, E.; Fellows, K.E.

    1989-01-01

    Several authors have reported an association between neuroblastoma and congenital heart disease; others contend that, unlike specific wellknown associations between malignancy and congenital defects (Wilm's tumor and aniridia, leukemia and Down's syndrome), no real relationship exists. We present three cases of cyanotic congenital heart disease in which subclinical neuroblastoma was found. We speculate that abnormal neural crest cell migration and development may be a common link between cardiac malformations and congenital neuroblastoma. (orig.)

  17. Congenital malaria in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Yong Tao

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Congenital malaria, in which infants are directly infected with malaria parasites from their mother prior to or during birth, is a potentially life-threatening condition that occurs at relatively low rates in malaria-endemic regions. It is recognized as a serious problem in Plasmodium falciparum-endemic sub-Saharan Africa, where recent data suggests that it is more common than previously believed. In such regions where malaria transmission is high, neonates may be protected from disease caused by congenital malaria through the transfer of maternal antibodies against the parasite. However, in low P. vivax-endemic regions, immunity to vivax malaria is low; thus, there is the likelihood that congenital vivax malaria poses a more significant threat to newborn health. Malaria had previously been a major parasitic disease in China, and congenital malaria case reports in Chinese offer valuable information for understanding the risks posed by congenital malaria to neonatal health. As most of the literature documenting congenital malaria cases in China are written in Chinese and therefore are not easily accessible to the global malaria research community, we have undertaken an extensive review of the Chinese literature on this subject. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we reviewed congenital malaria cases from three major searchable Chinese journal databases, concentrating on data from 1915 through 2011. Following extensive screening, a total of 104 cases of congenital malaria were identified. These cases were distributed mainly in the eastern, central, and southern regions of China, as well as in the low-lying region of southwest China. The dominant species was P. vivax (92.50%, reflecting the malaria parasite species distribution in China. The leading clinical presentation was fever, and other clinical presentations were anaemia, jaundice, paleness, diarrhoea, vomiting, and general weakness. With the exception of two cases, all patients

  18. Congenital cytomegalovirus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarina Rednak-Paradiž

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: CMV is the most common agent that causes congenital virus infection. Only 10 % of infected children have symptomatic infection immediately after birth. Signs of central nervous system damage, neurosensory deafness and delayed psychomotor development may manifest as a result of asimptomatic congenital infection later in childhood. In the article we present basic properties of CMV; we describe clinical picture of the congenital infection and possibilities of diagnose and its treatment. We present five children with symptomatic congenital CMV infection that were hospitalized for the period 1992–2002 at the Neonatal department in the University Children’s Hospital in Ljubljana.Conclusions: Identification of infected neonates, especially those with asimptomatic congenital CMV infection, is difficult. Latest incidence of infection in Slovenia is unknown. With new investigations the efficiency of antiviral therapy was discovered but exact indications for therapy are not yet known. CMV vaccine, once available, may ultimately be the best control strategy for this important public health problem. Proper educating women in childbearing age about the risks of CMV and how to avoid disease transmission during pregnancy (hand washing, avoiding mouth-to-mouth contact with preschool children, usage of gloves especially when handling dipers or respiratory secretions are the only control strategies available.

  19. Prevalence of congenital amusia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peretz, Isabelle; Vuvan, Dominique T

    2017-05-01

    Congenital amusia (commonly known as tone deafness) is a lifelong musical disorder that affects 4% of the population according to a single estimate based on a single test from 1980. Here we present the first large-based measure of prevalence with a sample of 20 000 participants, which does not rely on self-referral. On the basis of three objective tests and a questionnaire, we show that (a) the prevalence of congenital amusia is only 1.5%, with slightly more females than males, unlike other developmental disorders where males often predominate; (b) self-disclosure is a reliable index of congenital amusia, which suggests that congenital amusia is hereditary, with 46% first-degree relatives similarly affected; (c) the deficit is not attenuated by musical training and (d) it emerges in relative isolation from other cognitive disorder, except for spatial orientation problems. Hence, we suggest that congenital amusia is likely to result from genetic variations that affect musical abilities specifically.

  20. Loss-of-function mutations in SCN4A> cause severe foetal hypokinesia or 'classical' congenital myopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zaharieva, Irina T; Thor, Michael G; Oates, Emily C

    2016-01-01

    Congenital myopathies are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of muscle disorders characterized by congenital or early-onset hypotonia and muscle weakness, and specific pathological features on muscle biopsy. The phenotype ranges from foetal akinesia resulting in in utero or neonatal...

  1. An expanded multi-organ disease phenotype associated with mutations in YARS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tracewska-Siemiątkowska, Anna; Haer-Wigman, Lonneke; Bosch, Danielle G.M.; Nickerson, Deborah; Bamshad, Michael J.; Möller, J. C.; Kjellström, U.; Andréasson, S.; Van De Vorst, Maartje; Rendtorff, Nanna Dahl; Möller, Claes; Kjellström, Ulrika; Andréasson, Sten; Cremers, Frans P. M.; Tranebjærg, Lisbeth

    2017-01-01

    Whole exome sequence analysis was performed in a Swedish mother–father-affected proband trio with a phenotype characterized by progressive retinal degeneration with congenital nystagmus, profound congenital hearing impairment, primary amenorrhea, agenesis of the corpus callosum, and liver disease. A

  2. Nitrofurantoin and congenital abnormalities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Czeizel, A.E.; Rockenbauer, M.; Sørensen, Henrik Toft

    2001-01-01

    or fetuses with Down’s syndrome (patient controls), 23 (2.8%) pregnant women were treated with nitrofurantoin. The above differences between population controls and cases may be connected with recall bias, because the case-control pair analysis did not indicate a teratogenic potential of nitrofurantoin use......Objective: To study human teratogenic potential of oral nitrofurantoin treatment during pregnancy. Materials and Methods: Pair analysis of cases with congenital abnormalities and matched population controls in the population-based dataset of the Hungarian Case-Control Surveillance of Congenital...... during the second and the third months of gestation, i.e. in the critical period for major congenital abnormalities. Conclusion: Treatment with nitrofurantoin during pregnancy does not present detectable teratogenic risk to the fetus....

  3. Congenital syphilis: literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Chaida Sonda

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Syphilis is an infectious disease caused by Treponema pallidum and has high rates of vertical transmission, which can reach 100% depending on the maternal disease and stage of pregnancy. The diagnosis of gestational syphilis is simple and its screening is required during the prenatal period. However, this disease still has a high prevalence, affecting two million pregnant women worldwide. The procedures performed in newborns with congenital syphilis represent costs that are three-fold higher than the ones spent with a baby without this infection. The treatment is generally carried out with penicillin and must be extended to sexual partners. Inadequate or lack of treatment of congenital syphilis can result in miscarriage, premature birth, acute complications and other fetal sequelae. KEYWORDS: Congenital syphilis. Treponema pallidum. Vertical transmission.

  4. Congenital cataract screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhale Rajavi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital cataract is a leading cause of visual deprivation which can damage the developing visual system of a child; therefore early diagnosis, management and long-term follow-up are essential. It is recommended that all neonates be screened by red reflex examination at birth and suspected cases be referred to ophthalmic centers. Early surgery (1 year is highly recommended. After surgery, amblyopia treatment and periodic follow-up examinations should be started as soon as possible to achieve a satisfactory visual outcome. Practitioners should consider the possibility of posterior capsular opacity, elevated intraocular pressure and amblyopia during follow-up, especially in eyes with microphthalmia and/or associated congenital anomalies. All strabismic children should undergo slit lamp examination prior to strabismus surgery to rule out congenital lens opacities. From a social point of view, equal and fair medical care should be provided to all children regardless of gender.

  5. Congenital maxillary double lip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinesh Singh Chauhan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Double lip, also referred to as "macrocheilia," is a rare anomaly which affects the upper lip more commonly than the lower lip. It consists of a fold of excess or redundant hypertrophic tissue on the mucosal side of the lip. The congenital double lip is believed to be present at birth and becomes more prominent after eruption of teeth. It affects esthetics and also interferes with speech and mastication. Simple surgical excision produces good functional and cosmetic results. We report a case of a non-syndromic congenital maxillary double lip in a 21-year-old male patient.

  6. Congenital hearing impairment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robson, Caroline D. [Children' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Division of Neuroradiology, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2006-04-15

    Establishing the etiology of congenital hearing impairment can significantly improve treatment for certain causes of hearing loss and facilitates genetic counseling. High-resolution CT and MRI have contributed to the evaluation and management of hearing impairment. In addition, with the identification of innumerable genetic loci and genetic defects involved in hearing loss, genetic testing has emerged as an invaluable tool in the assessment of hearing impairment. Some of the common forms of congenital hearing loss are reviewed and their imaging features illustrated. (orig.)

  7. Congenital spinal malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ertl-Wagner, B.B.; Reiser, M.F.

    2001-01-01

    Congenital spinal malformations form a complex and heterogeneous group of disorders whose pathogenesis is best explained embryologically. Radiologically, it is important to formulate a diagnosis when the disorder first becomes symptomatic. However, it is also crucial to detect complications of the disorder or of the respective therapeutic interventions in the further course of the disease such as hydromyelia or re-tethering after repair of a meningomyelocele. Moreover, once a congenital spinal malformation is diagnosed, associated malformations should be sought after. A possible syndromal classification such as in OEIS- or VACTERL-syndromes should also be considered. (orig.) [de

  8. Congenital hearing impairment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robson, Caroline D.

    2006-01-01

    Establishing the etiology of congenital hearing impairment can significantly improve treatment for certain causes of hearing loss and facilitates genetic counseling. High-resolution CT and MRI have contributed to the evaluation and management of hearing impairment. In addition, with the identification of innumerable genetic loci and genetic defects involved in hearing loss, genetic testing has emerged as an invaluable tool in the assessment of hearing impairment. Some of the common forms of congenital hearing loss are reviewed and their imaging features illustrated. (orig.)

  9. Congenital laryngeal anomalies,

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Rutter

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: It is essential for clinicians to understand issues relevant to the airway management of infants and to be cognizant of the fact that infants with congenital laryngeal anomalies are at particular risk for an unstable airway. Objectives: To familiarize clinicians with issues relevant to the airway management of infants and to present a succinct description of the diagnosis and management of an array of congenital laryngeal anomalies. Methods: Revision article, in which the main aspects concerning airway management of infants will be analyzed. Conclusions: It is critical for clinicians to understand issues relevant to the airway management of infants.

  10. Congenital Heart Defects and CCHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and more. Stony Point, NY 10980 Close X Home > Complications & Loss > Birth defects & other health conditions > Congenital heart defects and ... in congenital heart defects. You have a family history of congenital heart ... syndrome or VCF. After birth Your baby may be tested for CCHD as ...

  11. An integrated diagnosis strategy for congenital myopathies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johann Böhm

    Full Text Available Congenital myopathies are severe muscle disorders affecting adults as well as children in all populations. The diagnosis of congenital myopathies is constrained by strong clinical and genetic heterogeneity. Moreover, the majority of patients present with unspecific histological features, precluding purposive molecular diagnosis and demonstrating the need for an alternative and more efficient diagnostic approach. We used exome sequencing complemented by histological and ultrastructural analysis of muscle biopsies to identify the causative mutations in eight patients with clinically different skeletal muscle pathologies, ranging from a fatal neonatal myopathy to a mild and slowly progressive myopathy with adult onset. We identified RYR1 (ryanodine receptor mutations in six patients and NEB (nebulin mutations in two patients. We found novel missense and nonsense mutations, unraveled small insertions/deletions and confirmed their impact on splicing and mRNA/protein stability. Histological and ultrastructural findings of the muscle biopsies of the patients validated the exome sequencing results. We provide the evidence that an integrated strategy combining exome sequencing with clinical and histopathological investigations overcomes the limitations of the individual approaches to allow a fast and efficient diagnosis, accelerating the patient's access to a better healthcare and disease management. This is of particular interest for the diagnosis of congenital myopathies, which involve very large genes like RYR1 and NEB as well as genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity.

  12. Severe congenital neutropenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borregaard, Niels

    2014-01-01

    In this issue of Blood, Tidwell et al1 demonstrate that mutations in the start codon (protein synthesis is initiated at the codon ATG) of neutrophil elastase (ELANE) result in the production of N-terminally truncated elastase, which mislocates to the nucleus and results in severe congenital neutr...... neutropenia (SCN)....

  13. Giant Congenital Melanocytic Nevus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Bo Sonnich; Henriksen, Trine Foged; Kølle, Stig-Frederik Trojahn

    2015-01-01

    Giant congenital melanocytic nevi (GCMN) occur in 1:20,000 livebirths and are associated with increased risk of malignant transformation. The treatment of GCMN from 1981 to 2010 in a tertiary referral center was reviewed evaluating the modalities used, cosmetic results, associated complications...

  14. Congenital neck masses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Peter A; Hirsch, David L; Dierks, Eric J

    2008-08-01

    Congenital neck lesions reflect abnormal embryogenesis in head and neck development. A thorough knowledge of embryology and anatomy is critical in the diagnosis and treatment of these lesions. The appropriate diagnosis of these lesions is necessary to provide appropriate treatment and long-term follow up, because some of these lesions may undergo malignant transformation or be harbingers of malignant disease.

  15. Congenital cystic eyeball

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta V

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available A rare case of histopathologically proved case of congenital cystic eye in a one day old girl is described. It was an unusually large cystic mass bulging forwards stretching the upperlid. There was no rudimentary eyeball in the orbit. The cystic eye′s predilection for the left eye has been pointed out for the first time in this article.

  16. Congenital extracranial meningioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, H.F.; Ng, S.H.; Wai, Y.Y.; Wan, Y.L.; Kong, M.S.

    1995-01-01

    The authors report a case of congenital meningioma in a newborn. This tumour is extremely rare and only six cases have been reported in the literature. Those reported cases were mainly intracranial. This is the first case of a neonatal extracranial meningioma that was evaluated preoperatively by computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. (orig.)

  17. Congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudhry, A.K.; Azam, M.; Maqsood, R.; Naz, B.; Salam, A.

    2003-01-01

    This case report presents the clinical picture, diagnostic methodology and surgical treatment of a female child who presented with chronic cough and dyspnoea due to congenital malformation of lung. A discussion of diagnosis and management is presented at the end. (author)

  18. Pseudoamblyopia in Congenital Cyclotropia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Frattolillo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To study the effect of surgery on amblyopia and suppression associated with congenital cyclovertical strabismus. Methods. The fixation pattern was investigated with microperimetry before and soon after surgery in ten consecutive children operated for congenital superior oblique palsy at the S. Martino Hospital, Belluno, Italy, between September 2014 and December 2015. Changes in visual performance in terms of best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA and stereopsis between the day before and one week after surgery were also evaluated. No other amblyopia treatment has been administered during the time study. Results. Surgical correction of the excyclodeviation in congenital SO palsy determined monocular and binocular sensory consequences: monocularly, in the cyclodeviated amblyopic eye, BCVA (0.46–0.03 LogMAR; p<0.0001 and the fixation pattern improved, as demonstrated by microperimetry examination. Binocularly, stereopsis improved or emerged while suppression at the Worth four-dot test disappeared. Conclusions. In the absence of further amblyopic factors such as coexisting constant vertical and/or horizontal deviation and anisometropia, the amblyopia encountered in congenital SO palsy may resolve soon after the surgical alignment. Therefore, it may be considered and defined “pseudoamblyopia.”

  19. Identification of congenital deafblindness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dammeyer, Jesper Herup

    2012-01-01

    . The study evaluated the assessment procedure of 190 children and adults found to be congenitally deafblind. Among the 190 individuals 76 percent were determined using functional assessment in addition to medical examination. A case example involving a 12-year-old child is also presented to illustrate...

  20. Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia: Unresolved Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yau, Mabel; Khattab, Ahmed; Poppas, Dix; Ghizzoni, Lucia; New, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) describes a family of disorders that comes from enzymatic deficiencies in cortisol production, with 21-hydroxylase deficiency causing ∼90% of cases. Distinction is made between the severe classical form and milder nonclassical form of CAH. Molecular genetic analysis is used to confirm the hormonal diagnosis. A high rate of genotype-phenotype disconcordance has been found in 21-hydroxylase deficiency. The goal of treatment is to replace with synthetic glucocorticoids and mineralocorticoids and suppress adrenal androgen production. The treatment of patients affected with nonclassical CAH, particularly males, remains controversial. Variable synthetic glucocorticoids are used and new modes of glucocorticoid delivery are under investigation. To improve height, growth hormone and other adjuvant therapies are employed. Long-term outcomes of genital surgery using modern techniques in females affected with classical CAH continue to be investigated. Prenatal treatment with dexamethasone is available to avoid ambiguous genitalia in these females. Although studies have shown its safety to mother and fetus, prenatal treatment is still regarded as experimental. Currently, prenatal diagnosis of CAH can only be obtained through invasive methods. Recently, the detection of cell-free fetal DNA in maternal plasma has made it possible to make this diagnosis earlier and noninvasively. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Congenital long QT syndrome in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cerović Ivana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Long QT syndrome (LQTS is a cardiac repolarization disorder characterized by prolonged QT interval on the electrocardiogram (ECG and increased propensity to ventricular tachyarrhythmias and cardiac events. LQTS might be acquired or congenital, which presents a group of channelopathies that occur due to mutation in one of 15 so far identified genes. The most frequent types of congenital LTQS are LQT1, LQT2 and LQT3. Prolonged or delayed repolarization leads to the increase of action potential duration which predisposes early afterdepolarization, as well as the amplification of transmural dispersion of repolarization, both contributing to the development of Torsades de Pointes ventricular tachycardia. Clinical manifestations of LQTS are palpitations, syncope, aborted cardiac arrest or sudden cardiac death, but it can also be asymptomatic. Trigger factors for symptoms are specific for certain genotype. LQTS examination includes thorough clinical and family history focused on distinctive data (repeated syncopes, cases of sudden cardiac death in the family, hereditary arrhythmias, resting ECG, exercise stress testing and genetic analysis, with additional methods (serial ECG records, 24h ECG Holter, epinephrine test. Clinical LQTS diagnosis is based on Schwartz's scoring system, while the criteria for final diagnosis of LQTS depend on Schwartz's score, QT interval duration, presence of pathogenic mutation and clinical symptoms. Treatment approach begins with lifestyle modifications and β-blockers therapy, while other options include implantable cardioverter- defibrillator, permanent pacemaker or surgical sympathectomy. Sudden cardiac death is the reason of 90% of sudden deaths in young athletes, while LQTS is one of its causes. Recommendations for physical activities in children with congenital LQTS arise from the ones for adults and they presume very strict limitations. Further researches are expected to advance the understanding of genotype-phenotype

  2. Adams-Oliver syndrome associated with cutis marmorata telangiectatica congenita and congenital cataract: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayol, Laurence; Garcia, Patricia; Denis, Danièle; Philip, Nicole; Simeoni, Umberto

    2006-04-01

    A female infant presented with Adams-Oliver syndrome (AOS), intrauterine growth retardation, severe cutis marmorata telangiectatica congenita, bilateral congenital cataract, and periventricular lesions. The here-reported association of bilateral congenital cataract with AOS is original. Adams-Oliver syndrome is a genetic defect that causes a vasculopathy and leads to a variety of phenotypes. This observation further supports the current understanding of the physiopathology of AOS.

  3. Congenital imprinting disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eggermann, Thomas; Netchine, Irène; Temple, I Karen

    2015-01-01

    Imprinting disorders (IDs) are a group of eight rare but probably underdiagnosed congenital diseases affecting growth, development and metabolism. They are caused by similar molecular changes affecting regulation, dosage or the genomic sequence of imprinted genes. Each ID is characterised...... by specific clinical features, and, as each appeared to be associated with specific imprinting defects, they have been widely regarded as separate entities. However, they share clinical characteristics and can show overlapping molecular alterations. Nevertheless, IDs are usually studied separately despite...... EUCID.net (European network of congenital imprinting disorders) now aims to promote better clinical care and scientific investigation of imprinting disorders by establishing a concerted multidisciplinary alliance of clinicians, researchers, patients and families. By encompassing all IDs and establishing...

  4. Congenital intestinal lymphangiectasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popović Dušan Đ.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Congenital intestinal lymphangiectasia is a disease which leads to protein losing enteropathy. Tortous, dilated lymphatic vessels in the intestinal wall and mesenterium are typical features of the disease. Clinical manifestations include malabsorption, diarrhea, steatorrhea, edema and effusions. Specific diet and medication are required for disease control. Case report. A 19-year old male patient was hospitalized due to diarrhea, abdominal swelling, weariness and fatigue. Physical examination revealed growth impairment, ascites, and lymphedema of the right hand and forearm. Laboratory assessment indicated iron deficiency anaemia, lymphopenia, malabsorption, inflammatory syndrome, and urinary infection. Enteroscopy and video capsule endoscopy demonstrated dilated lymphatic vessels in the small intestine. The diagnosis was confirmed by intestinal biopsy. The patient was put on high-protein diet containing medium-chain fatty acids, somatotropin and suportive therapy. Conclusion. Congenital intestinal lymphangiectasia is a rare disease, usually diagnosed in childhood. Early recognition of the disease and adequate treatment can prevent development of various complications.

  5. [Congenital intestinal lymphangiectasia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popović, Dugan D j; Spuran, Milan; Alempijević, Tamara; Krstić, Miodrag; Djuranović, Srdjan; Kovacević, Nada; Damnjanović, Svetozar; Micev, Marjan

    2011-03-01

    Congenital intestinal lymphangiectasia is a disease which leads to protein losing enteropathy. Tortuous, dilated lymphatic vessels in the intestinal wall and mesenterium are typical features of the disease. Clinical manifestations include malabsorption, diarrhea, steatorrhea, edema and effusions. Specific diet and medication are required for disease control. A 19-year old male patient was hospitalized due to diarrhea, abdominal swelling, weariness and fatigue. Physical examination revealed growth impairment, ascites, and lymphedema of the right hand and forearm. Laboratory assessment indicated iron deficiency anaemia, lymphopenia, malabsorption, inflammatory syndrome, and urinary infection. Enteroscopy and video capsule endoscopy demonstrated dilated lymphatic vessels in the small intestine. The diagnosis was confirmed by intestinal biopsy. The patient was put on high-protein diet containing medium-chain fatty acids, somatotropin and supportive therapy. Congenital intestinal lymphangiectasia is a rare disease, usually diagnosed in childhood. Early recognition of the disease and adequate treatment can prevent development of various complications.

  6. Congenital diaphramatic hernia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kline-Fath, Beth M. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Fetal Care Center of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, MLC 5031, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2012-01-15

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia, despite advances in therapy, remains a complex condition with significant morbidity and mortality. The etiology of the disorder is still incompletely understood, though the pulmonary hypoplasia and pulmonary hypertension that develop secondarily must be overcome to improve survival. Prenatal US and fetal MRI have helped in the development of a greater understanding of this disease. Also with these modalities, measurement techniques have been developed in an attempt to provide prognosticators for the development of pulmonary hypoplasia and pulmonary hypertension. There is a broad range of approaches for performing these measurements, and variability among imaging centers is noted. Despite inconsistent approaches, these techniques have become the foundation for counseling and prenatal and postnatal therapy. It is hoped that with further research with prenatal US and fetal MRI and the development of innovative medical and surgical therapies that the morbidity and mortality of children with congenital diaphragmatic hernias can be significantly reduced. (orig.)

  7. Congenital Hepatic Cyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldo Recinos

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Congenital hepatic cyst is a rare and nonsymptomatic condition in infants and children. Its incidence is 2.5% in the postnatal life with a much lower incidence in the prenatal period. Incidental finding on antenatal imaging is the most common presentation. We present a case of a newborn in whom fetal ultrasound detected a cyst within the fetal liver. Postnatal imaging revealed a liver cyst in the right lobe of the liver, with no other intrahepatic structure affected. Liver function tests were abnormal, but the patient was asymptomatic. Posterior follow-up imaging showed a minor decrease in size. Management of congenital hepatic cyst is usually conservative, done with periodic ultrasound monitoring. However, surgical treatment is the mainstay of treatment when hydrops, progressive enlargement, hemorrhage, torsion, or compression of adjacent structures occurs. Malignant transformation can occur, but it is extremely rare. Partial or total removal of the cyst is the preferred treatment in neonates with a large lesion.

  8. Congenital diaphramatic hernia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kline-Fath, Beth M.

    2012-01-01

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia, despite advances in therapy, remains a complex condition with significant morbidity and mortality. The etiology of the disorder is still incompletely understood, though the pulmonary hypoplasia and pulmonary hypertension that develop secondarily must be overcome to improve survival. Prenatal US and fetal MRI have helped in the development of a greater understanding of this disease. Also with these modalities, measurement techniques have been developed in an attempt to provide prognosticators for the development of pulmonary hypoplasia and pulmonary hypertension. There is a broad range of approaches for performing these measurements, and variability among imaging centers is noted. Despite inconsistent approaches, these techniques have become the foundation for counseling and prenatal and postnatal therapy. It is hoped that with further research with prenatal US and fetal MRI and the development of innovative medical and surgical therapies that the morbidity and mortality of children with congenital diaphragmatic hernias can be significantly reduced. (orig.)

  9. Characterizing Congenital Amusia

    OpenAIRE

    Stewart, Lauren

    2011-01-01

    The ability to make sense of the music in our environment involves sophisticated cognitive mechanisms that, for most people, are acquired effortlessly and in early life. A special population of individuals, with a disorder termed congenital amusia, report lifelong difficulties in this regard. Exploring the nature of this developmental disorder provides a window onto the cognitive architecture of typical musical processing, as well as allowing a study of the relationship between processing of ...

  10. The heart: Congenital disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higgins, C.B.

    1987-01-01

    The most important diagnostic requirement in congenital heart disease (CHD) is definition of cardiovascular pathoanatomy. The considerable success in operative correction of even the most complex anomalies in recent years compels ever increasing precision in preoperative demonstration of these anomalies. Early experience with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at several institutions indicated that this modality is an effective noninvasive technique for evaluation of CHD. Indeed, MRI seems to have some advantage over other techniques, including angiography, for definitive diagnosis of congenital anomalies of the heart and great arteries and veins. The absence of ionizing radiation and contrast medium in MRI is an additional advantage; the former is particularly important for children, who, up to this time, have frequently been subjected to enormous radiation burdens from multiple cineangiograms during initial diagnosis and follow-up. This chapter describes the MRI appearance of cardiovascular anatomy im the segmental fashion proposed for analysis of complex CHD. Likewise, MRI demonstration of congenital cardiovascular lesions is organized into abnormalities situated at the four segmental cardiovascular levels: great vessels, atria, ventricles, and visceroatrial relationship. The role of MRI in evaluation of complex ventricular anomalies such as single ventricle and thoracic aortic abnormalities is specifically described

  11. Radiology of congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amplatz, K.

    1986-01-01

    This is a text on the radiologic diagnosis of congenital heart disease and its clinical manifestations. The main thrust of the book is the logical approach which allows an understanding of the complex theory of congenital heart disease. The atlas gives a concise overview of the entire field of congenital heart disease. Emphasis is placed on the understanding of the pathophysiology and its clinical and radiological consequences. Surgical treatment is included since it provides a different viewpoint of the anatomy

  12. Early detection of congenital syphilis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagalakshmi Chowdhary

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Late congenital syphilis is a very rare clinical entity, and its early diagnosis and treatment is essential. Dental findings often provide valuable evidence for the diagnosis of late congenital syphilis. It occurs due to the transmission of the disease from an infected mother to her fetus through placenta. This long forgotten disease continues to effect pregnant women resulting in perinatal morbidity and mortality. Congenital syphilis is a preventable disease, and its presence reflects a failure of prenatal care delivery system, as well as syphilis control programs. We are reporting a case of late congenital syphilis with only Hutchinson′s teeth.

  13. Mosaicism for dominant collagen 6 mutations as a cause for intrafamilial phenotypic variability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donkervoort, S.; Hu, Y.; Stojkovic, T.; Voermans, N.C.; Foley, A.R.; Leach, M.E.; Dastgir, J.; Bolduc, V.; Cullup, T.; Becdelievre, A. de; Yang, L.; Su, H.; Meilleur, K.; Schindler, A.B.; Kamsteeg, E.J.; Richard, P.; Butterfield, R.J.; Winder, T.L.; Crawford, T.O.; Weiss, R.B.; Muntoni, F.; Allamand, V.; Bonnemann, C.G.

    2015-01-01

    Collagen 6-related dystrophies and myopathies (COL6-RD) are a group of disorders that form a wide phenotypic spectrum, ranging from severe Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy, intermediate phenotypes, to the milder Bethlem myopathy. Both inter- and intrafamilial variable expressivity are commonly

  14. Genetics Home Reference: congenital mirror movement disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Conditions Congenital mirror movement disorder Congenital mirror movement disorder Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable ... view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Congenital mirror movement disorder is a condition in which intentional movements ...

  15. Congenital stapes malformation: Rare conductive hearing loss in a patient with Waardenburg syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melzer, Jonathan M; Eliason, Michael; Conley, George S

    2016-04-01

    Waardenburg syndrome is a known autosomal dominant cause of congenital hearing loss. It is characterized by a distinctive phenotypic appearance and often involves sensorineural hearing loss. Temporal bone abnormalities and inner ear dysmorphisms have been described in association with the disease. However, middle ear abnormalities as causes of conductive hearing loss are not typically seen in Waardenburg syndrome. We discuss a case of an 8-year-old female who meets diagnostic criteria for Waardenburg syndrome type 3 and who presented with a bilateral conductive hearing loss associated with congenital stapes fixation. We discuss management strategy in this previously unreported phenotype. © 2015 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  16. Molecular and Genetic Studies of Congenital Myopathies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-21

    Central Core Disease; Centronuclear Myopathy; Congenital Fiber Type Disproportion; Multiminicore Disease; Myotubular Myopathy; Nemaline Myopathy; Rigid Spine Muscular Dystrophy; Undefined Congenital Myopathy

  17. Genetics Home Reference: Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with mental retardation Muscular dystrophy, congenital, Fukuyama type Muscular dystrophy, congenital, with central nervous system involvement Polymicrogyria with muscular dystrophy Related Information How ...

  18. Prevalence of Congenital Malformations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhavan Karbasi Sedighah

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Congenital malformation (CM will begin to emerge as one of the major childhood health problems .Treatment and rehabilitation of children with congenital malformations are costly and complete recovery is usually impossible. The aim of this study was to determine frequency of CM in Yazd central city of the Islamic Republic of Iran to find out if there has been any difference in the rate and types of CM in this area. This descriptive-observational study carried on 4800 births delivered at all maternity hospitals in Yazd from October 2003 to June 2004. Prevalence of CM was 2.83% (2.86 % in male and 2.68 % in female out of the 136 cases 69(51.88% were males and 64 (48.12% were females and 3 with ambiguous genitalia. Positive family history of CM in sibling was in only 6 cases (4.41%.Overall, musculoskeletal (0.83%, central nerv-ous system (0.47% and genital system (0.37% were accounted as the most common. Frequency of CM was more seen in still birth (12.5% as in comparison to live birth (2.71%. There was not statistical difference be-tween prevalence of CM and neonatal's gender, gestational age, birth order and mother's age, drug ingestion, illness and parental consanguinity. In this study the overall prevalence of congenital malformation among the newborn was higher than those previous reported in Iran and determining the causes of this difference needs more extensive studies.

  19. Congenital Midureteric Stricture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Shalinder

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital midureteric obstruction is a rare entity which can be caused by either ureteric valves or strictures. We report our experience with four patients with midureteric obstruction due to stricture over a six-year period. The condition needs to be differentiated from obstruction of the pelviureteric and vesicoureteric junctions. Obstruction can be initially screened by ultrasound and confirmed by a radionuclide scan with furosemide challenge. Retrograde ureteropyelography and/or intravenous urography may be required to define the level of the stricture.

  20. Nonclassic Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selma Feldman Witchel

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonclassic congenital adrenal hyperplasia (NCAH due to P450c21 (21-hydroxylase deficiency is a common autosomal recessive disorder. This disorder is due to mutations in the CYP21A2 gene which is located at chromosome 6p21. The clinical features predominantly reflect androgen excess rather than adrenal insufficiency leading to an ascertainment bias favoring diagnosis in females. Treatment goals include normal linear growth velocity and “on-time” puberty in affected children. For adolescent and adult women, treatment goals include regularization of menses, prevention of progression of hirsutism, and fertility. This paper will review key aspects regarding pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of NCAH.

  1. NAD Deficiency, Congenital Malformations, and Niacin Supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Hongjun; Enriquez, Annabelle; Rapadas, Melissa; Martin, Ella M M A; Wang, Roni; Moreau, Julie; Lim, Chai K; Szot, Justin O; Ip, Eddie; Hughes, James N; Sugimoto, Kotaro; Humphreys, David T; McInerney-Leo, Aideen M; Leo, Paul J; Maghzal, Ghassan J; Halliday, Jake; Smith, Janine; Colley, Alison; Mark, Paul R; Collins, Felicity; Sillence, David O; Winlaw, David S; Ho, Joshua W K; Guillemin, Gilles J; Brown, Matthew A; Kikuchi, Kazu; Thomas, Paul Q; Stocker, Roland; Giannoulatou, Eleni; Chapman, Gavin; Duncan, Emma L; Sparrow, Duncan B; Dunwoodie, Sally L

    2017-08-10

    Congenital malformations can be manifested as combinations of phenotypes that co-occur more often than expected by chance. In many such cases, it has proved difficult to identify a genetic cause. We sought the genetic cause of cardiac, vertebral, and renal defects, among others, in unrelated patients. We used genomic sequencing to identify potentially pathogenic gene variants in families in which a person had multiple congenital malformations. We tested the function of the variant by using assays of in vitro enzyme activity and by quantifying metabolites in patient plasma. We engineered mouse models with similar variants using the CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)-Cas9 system. Variants were identified in two genes that encode enzymes of the kynurenine pathway, 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid 3,4-dioxygenase (HAAO) and kynureninase (KYNU). Three patients carried homozygous variants predicting loss-of-function changes in the HAAO or KYNU proteins (HAAO p.D162*, HAAO p.W186*, or KYNU p.V57Efs*21). Another patient carried heterozygous KYNU variants (p.Y156* and p.F349Kfs*4). The mutant enzymes had greatly reduced activity in vitro. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) is synthesized de novo from tryptophan through the kynurenine pathway. The patients had reduced levels of circulating NAD. Defects similar to those in the patients developed in the embryos of Haao-null or Kynu-null mice owing to NAD deficiency. In null mice, the prevention of NAD deficiency during gestation averted defects. Disruption of NAD synthesis caused a deficiency of NAD and congenital malformations in humans and mice. Niacin supplementation during gestation prevented the malformations in mice. (Funded by the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia and others.).

  2. Congenital Syphilis Masquerading as Leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Tiffany; Bell, Stephanie; Scimeme, Jason; Maraqa, Nizar

    2017-01-01

    As of late, the incidence of congenital syphilis in the United States is increasing. Each new case represents a failure of preventing, diagnosing, and treating syphilis in pregnant women. Pediatricians should confirm that all women have received adequate screening for and management of syphilis during pregnancy. Congenital syphilis is easily treatable but may be a diagnostic challenge with high morbidity and mortality.

  3. What Are Congenital Heart Defects?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a baby with a congenital heart defect. Family history and genetics Congenital heart disease is not usually passed along ... you or your child to a specialist in genetic testing. Cardiac MRI to diagnose a ... Factors to review family history, smoking, and medicines that increase your risk of ...

  4. [Neonatal tumours and congenital malformations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berbel Tornero, O; Ortega García, J A; Ferrís i Tortajada, J; García Castell, J; Donat i Colomer, J; Soldin, O P; Fuster Soler, J L

    2008-06-01

    The association between pediatric cancer and congenital abnormalities is well known but, there is no exclusive data on the neonatal period and the underlying etiopathogenic mechanisms are unknown. First, to analyze the frequency of neonatal tumours associated with congenital abnormalities; and second, to comment on the likely etiopathogenic hypotheses of a relationship between neonatal tumours and congenital abnormalities. Historical series of neonatal tumours from La Fe University Children's Hospital in Valencia (Spain), from January 1990 to December 1999. Histological varieties of neonatal tumours and associated congenital abnormalities were described. A systematic review of the last 25 years was carried out using Medline, Cancerlit, Index Citation Science and Embase. The search profile used was the combination of "neonatal/congenital-tumors/cancer/neoplasms" and "congenital malformations/birth defects". 72 neonatal tumours were identified (2.8% of all pediatric cancers diagnosed in our hospital) and in 15 cases (20.8%) there was some associated malformation, disease or syndrome. The association between congenital abnormalities and neonatal tumours were: a) angiomas in three patients: two patients with congenital heart disease with a choanal stenosis, laryngomalacia; b) neuroblastomas in two patients: horseshoe kidney with vertebral anomalies and other with congenital heart disease; c) teratomas in two patients: one with cleft palate with vertebral anomalies and other with metatarsal varus; d) one tumour of the central nervous system with Bochdaleck hernia; e) heart tumours in four patients with tuberous sclerosis; f) acute leukaemia in one patient with Down syndrome and congenital heart disease; g) kidney tumour in one case with triventricular hydrocephaly, and h) adrenocortical tumour: hemihypertrophy. The publications included the tumours diagnosed in different pediatric periods and without unified criteria to classify the congenital abnormalities. Little data

  5. Congenital nystagmus and negative electroretinography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roussi M

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Mirella Roussi, Hélène Dalens, Jean Jacques Marcellier, Franck BacinDepartment of Ophthalmology, Clermont-Ferrand University, Clermont-Ferrand, FranceAbstract: Congenital nystagmus is a pathologic oculomotor state appearing at about three to four months of age. The precise diagnosis requires detailed clinical examination and electrophysiological findings. This case report presents two male patients with congenital nystagmus examined longitudinally from the age of six months until 17-18 years of age. Clinical and electrophysiological protocols were detailed. The first results showed electronegative electroretinography in the two cases and examination combined with electroretinographic findings helped us to make the diagnosis of Congenital Night Stationary Blindness (CSNB. This diagnosis was confirmed by genetic studies. CSNB is interesting to study because through electrophysiological findings, it enables a better understanding of the physiology of neural transmission in the outer part of the retina.Keywords: Congenital nystagmus, negative electroretinography, congenital night stationary blindness

  6. Congenital Leukemia in Down's syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iqbal, W.; Khan, F.; Muzaffar, M.; Khan, U. A.; Rehman, M. U.; Khan, M. A.; Bari, A.

    2006-01-01

    Congenital Leukemia is a condition and often associated with fatal outcome/sup 1/. Most of the neonatal cases reported have acute non-lymphoblastic leukemia, in contrast to the predominance of acute lymphoblastic leukemia found in later childhood. congenital leukemia is occasionally associated with number of congenital anomalies and with chromosomal disorders such as Down's syndrome. Subtle cytogenetic abnormalities may occur more commonly in the affected infants and their parents, when studied with newer cytogenetic techniques/sup 2/. Inherent unstable hematopoieses resulting from chromosomal aberration in children with Downs's syndrome can present with transient myeloproliferative disorder, mimicking leukemia which undergoes spontaneous recovery/sup 3/. Only few cases of congenital leukemia with Downs syndrome, presented as congenital leukemia. (author)

  7. Genetic diagnosis for congenital hemolytic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohga, Shouichi

    2016-01-01

    Congenital hemolytic anemia is a group of monogenic diseases presenting with anemia due to increased destruction of circulating erythrocytes. The etiology of inherited anemia accounts for germline mutations of the responsible genes coding for the structural components of erythrocytes and extra-erythrocytes. The erythrocyte abnormalities are classified into three major disorders of red cell membrane defects, hemoglobinopathies, and red cell enzymopathies. The extra-erythrocyte abnormalities, typified by consumption coagulopathy and intravascular hemolysis, include Upshaw-Schulman syndrome and atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. The clinical manifestations of congenital hemolytic anemia are anemia, jaundice, cholelithiasis and splenomegaly, while the onset mode and severity are both variable. Genetic overlapping of red cell membrane protein disorders, and distinct frequency and mutation spectra differing among races make it difficult to understand this disease entity. On the other hand, genetic modifiers for the phenotype of β-globin diseases provide useful information for selecting the optimal treatment and for long-term management. Recently, next generation sequencing techniques have enabled us to determine the novel causative genes in patients with undiagnosed hemolytic anemias. We herein review the concept and strategy for genetic diagnosis of inherited hemolytic anemias.

  8. Congenital Fibrosis of the Extraocular Muscles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leyla Niyaz

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Congenital fibrosis of the extraocular muscles (CFEOM is a rare disorder characterized by hereditary non-progressive restrictive strabismus and blepharoptosis. Although most of the cases are bilateral and isolated, some patients may have systemic findings. CFEOM is divided into three groups as CFEOM 1, 2, and 3 according to the phenotype. Primary responsible genes are KIF21A for CFEOM type 1 and 3 and PHOX2A/ARIX gene for CFEOM type 2. Studies suggest that abnormal innervation of the extraocular muscles is the cause of muscle fibrosis. Early treatment is important because of the risk of amblyopia. Surgery is the primary treatment option for strabismus and blepharoptosis. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2014; 44: 312-5

  9. Congenital nephrotic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Fanni

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available CNS (Congenital nephrotic syndrome is a disorder characterized by the presence of a nephrotic syndrome in the first three months of life. Different pathologies can cause this syndrome. In general, we can distinguish primary forms (sporadic and hereditary and secondary forms (acquired and associated with other syndromes. The most common form is the Finnish CNS (CNF, congenital nephrotic syndrome of the Finnish type, a hereditary form whose name derives from the fact that the highest incidence is described in that country (1.2:10,000. The pathogenesis, the clinical picture, the diagnostic criteria, the therapy and the outcome are described in details.  Proceedings of the International Course on Perinatal Pathology (part of the 10th International Workshop on Neonatology · October 22nd-25th, 2014 · Cagliari (Italy · October 25th, 2014 · The role of the clinical pathological dialogue in problem solving Guest Editors: Gavino Faa, Vassilios Fanos, Peter Van Eyken

  10. Congenital extrahepatic portosystemic shunts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray, Conor P.; Yoo, Shi-Joon; Babyn, Paul S. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Hospital for Sick Children, 555 University Avenue, M5G 1X8, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2003-09-01

    A congenital extrahepatic portosystemic shunt (CEPS) is uncommon. A type 1 CEPS exists where there is absence of intrahepatic portal venous supply and a type 2 CEPS where this supply is preserved. The diagnosis of congenital portosystemic shunt is important because it may cause hepatic encephalopathy. To describe the clinical and imaging features of three children with CEPS and to review the cases in the published literature. The diagnostic imaging and medical records for three children with CEPS were retrieved and evaluated. An extensive literature search was performed. Including our cases, there are 61 reported cases of CEPS, 39 type 1 and 22 type 2. Type 1 occurs predominantly in females, while type 2 shows no significant sexual preponderance. The age at diagnosis ranges from 31 weeks of intrauterine life to 76 years. Both types of CEPS have a number of associations, the most common being nodular lesions of the liver (n=25), cardiac anomalies (n=19), portosystemic encephalopathy (n=10), polysplenia (n=9), biliary atresia (n=7), skeletal anomalies (n=5), and renal tract anomalies (n=4). MRI is recommended as an important means of diagnosing and classifying cases of CEPS and examining the associated cardiovascular and hepatic abnormalities. Screening for CEPS in patients born with polysplenia is suggested. (orig.)

  11. Congenital extrahepatic portosystemic shunts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, Conor P.; Yoo, Shi-Joon; Babyn, Paul S.

    2003-01-01

    A congenital extrahepatic portosystemic shunt (CEPS) is uncommon. A type 1 CEPS exists where there is absence of intrahepatic portal venous supply and a type 2 CEPS where this supply is preserved. The diagnosis of congenital portosystemic shunt is important because it may cause hepatic encephalopathy. To describe the clinical and imaging features of three children with CEPS and to review the cases in the published literature. The diagnostic imaging and medical records for three children with CEPS were retrieved and evaluated. An extensive literature search was performed. Including our cases, there are 61 reported cases of CEPS, 39 type 1 and 22 type 2. Type 1 occurs predominantly in females, while type 2 shows no significant sexual preponderance. The age at diagnosis ranges from 31 weeks of intrauterine life to 76 years. Both types of CEPS have a number of associations, the most common being nodular lesions of the liver (n=25), cardiac anomalies (n=19), portosystemic encephalopathy (n=10), polysplenia (n=9), biliary atresia (n=7), skeletal anomalies (n=5), and renal tract anomalies (n=4). MRI is recommended as an important means of diagnosing and classifying cases of CEPS and examining the associated cardiovascular and hepatic abnormalities. Screening for CEPS in patients born with polysplenia is suggested. (orig.)

  12. A unique case of Shwachman-Diamond syndrome presenting with congenital hypopituitarism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jivani, Nurin; Torrado-Jule, Carmen; Vaiselbuh, Sarah; Romanos-Sirakis, Eleny

    2016-11-01

    Shwachman-Diamond syndrome (SDS) is an autosomal recessive bone marrow failure syndrome typically characterized by neutropenia and pancreatic dysfunction, although phenotypic presentations vary, and the endocrine phenotype is not well-described. We report a unique case of a patient with SDS who initially presented with hypoglycemia and micropenis in the newborn period and was diagnosed with congenital hypopituitarism. We are not aware of any other cases of SDS documented with this combination of complex endocrinopathies.

  13. Fetal chromosome abnormalities and congenital malformations: an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The results also showed that Multiple congenital anomalies (MCA) represented among 42.2%, congenital malformation of CNS represents 26.6%, congenital malformation of the skeletal system 20%, congenital polycystic kidney 8.8% and pyloric stenosis in 2.2%. Among the 21 women with abnormal karyotype of amniotic ...

  14. Genetics Home Reference: critical congenital heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Critical congenital heart disease Critical congenital heart disease Printable PDF Open All Close All ... for Disease Control and Prevention: Congenital Heart Defects Disease InfoSearch: Congenital Heart Defects KidsHealth from Nemours Lucile Packard Children's ...

  15. Chromosome abnormalities and the genetics of congenital corneal opacification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mataftsi, A; Islam, L; Kelberman, D; Sowden, J C; Nischal, K K

    2011-01-01

    Congenital corneal opacification (CCO) encompasses a broad spectrum of disorders that have different etiologies, including genetic and environmental. Terminology used in clinical phenotyping is commonly not specific enough to describe separate entities, for example both the terms Peters anomaly and sclerocornea have been ascribed to a clinical picture of total CCO, without investigating the presence or absence of iridocorneal adhesions. This is not only confusing but also unhelpful in determining valid genotype-phenotype correlations, and thereby revealing clues for pathogenesis. We undertook a systematic review of the literature focusing on CCO as part of anterior segment developmental anomalies (ASDA), and analyzed its association specifically with chromosomal abnormalities. Genes previously identified as being associated with CCO are also summarized. All reports were critically appraised to classify phenotypes according to described features, rather than the given diagnosis. Some interesting associations were found, and are discussed.

  16. General Concepts in Adult Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutluer, Ferit Onur; Çeliker, Alpay

    2018-01-20

    Congenital heart disease in adults (adult congenital heart disease) is a growing burden for healthcare systems. While infant mortality due to congenital heart disease in the last four decades decreased by almost 3-fold, adult congenital heart disease prevalence increased by more than 2-fold in United States. Adult congenital heart disease prevalence is expected to increase steadily until 2050 in projections. Adult congenital heart disease is a multifaceted problem with many dimensions. This manuscript aims to provide an overview of the common adult congenital heart diseases and summarize important points in management of these diseases with possible problems and complications that the patients and the physicians face.

  17. General Concepts in Adult Congenital Heart Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferit Onur Mutluer

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Congenital heart disease in adults (adult congenital heart disease is a growing burden for healthcare systems. While infant mortality due to congenital heart disease in the last four decades decreased by almost 3-fold, adult congenital heart disease prevalence increased by more than 2-fold in United States. Adult congenital heart disease prevalence is expected to increase steadily until 2050 in projections. Adult congenital heart disease is a multifaceted problem with many dimensions. This manuscript aims to provide an overview of the common adult congenital heart diseases and summarize important points in management of these diseases with possible problems and complications that the patients and the physicians face

  18. Congenital cataracts in two siblings with Wolfram syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mets, Rebecca B; Emery, Sarah B; Lesperance, Marci M; Mets, Marilyn B

    2010-12-01

    Wolfram syndrome is characterized by optic atrophy, insulin dependent diabetes mellitus, diabetes insipidus and deafness. There are several other associated conditions reported in the literature, but congenital or early childhood cataracts are not among them. Observational case series with confirmatory genetic analysis. A pair of siblings, followed over 17 years, who manifest congenital or early childhood cataracts, diabetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy, and deafness. They are both compound heterozygotes for mutations (V415 deletion and A684V substitution) in the WFS1 gene. Their father has congenital sensorineural hearing loss and developed optic atrophy. He is heterozygous for A684V in WFS1. Wolfram syndrome should be in the differential diagnosis of genetic syndromes associated with congenital and early childhood cataracts. Here, we report on a mother who is a phenotypically normal carrier of an autosomal recessive Wolfram syndrome gene, and a father who has some of the findings of the syndrome and carries a single mutation that appears to be responsible for his hearing loss and optic atrophy. Their 2 children are compound heterozygotes and manifest the full Wolfram syndrome, in addition to cataracts.

  19. Profiles in congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freed, M.D.; Keane, J.F.

    1986-01-01

    Pediatric cardiology has made great strides in the diagnosis, management, and correction of complex congenital malformations in the past two decades. The foundation of these advances is a more precise understanding of the physiology and anatomy of complex lesions that has been obtained from cardiac catheterization and angiography. The techniques for catheterization of infants and children have been discussed in another paper. This chapter focuses on brief profiles of some of the more important congenital abnormalities. The incidence cited in the discussion of each abnormality pertains to a population comprises of children and adults referred to The Children's Hospital Medical Center and Peter Bent Brigham Hospital, respectively, for evaluation of congenital heart disease

  20. Congenital pyriform aperture stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osovsky, Micky; Aizer-Danon, Anat; Horev, Gadi; Sirota, Lea

    2007-01-01

    Nasal airway obstruction is a potentially life-threatening condition in the newborn. Neonates are obligatory nasal breathers. The pyriform aperture is the narrowest, most anterior bony portion of the nasal airway, and a decrease in its cross-sectional area will significantly increase nasal airway resistance. Congenital nasal pyriform aperture stenosis (CNPAS) is a rare, unusual form of nasal obstruction. It should be considered in the differential diagnosis of any neonate or infant with signs and symptoms of upper airway compromise. It is important to differentiate this level of obstruction from the more common posterior choanal stenosis or atresia. CNPAS presents with symptoms of nasal airway obstruction, which are often characterized by episodic apnea and cyclical cyanosis. (orig.)

  1. Characterizing congenital amusia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Lauren

    2011-04-01

    The ability to make sense of the music in our environment involves sophisticated cognitive mechanisms that, for most people, are acquired effortlessly and in early life. A special population of individuals, with a disorder termed congenital amusia, report lifelong difficulties in this regard. Exploring the nature of this developmental disorder provides a window onto the cognitive architecture of typical musical processing, as well as allowing a study of the relationship between processing of music and other domains, such as language. The present article considers findings concerning pitch discrimination, pitch memory, contour processing, experiential aspects of music listening in amusia, and emerging evidence concerning the neurobiology of the disorder. A simplified model of melodic processing is outlined, and possible loci of the cognitive deficit are discussed.

  2. Neurobiology of Congenital Amusia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peretz, Isabelle

    2016-11-01

    The past decade of research has provided compelling evidence that musical engagement is a fundamental human trait, and its biological basis is increasingly scrutinized. In this endeavor, the detailed study of individuals who have musical deficiencies is instructive because of likely neurogenetic underpinnings. Such individuals have 'congenital amusia', an umbrella term for lifelong musical disabilities that cannot be attributed to intellectual disability, lack of exposure, or brain damage after birth. Key points are reviewed here that have emerged during recent years regarding the neurobiology of the disorder, focusing on the importance of recurrent processing between the right inferior frontal cortex and the auditory cortex for conscious monitoring of musical pitch, and how this relates to developmental cognitive disorders in general. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Congenital sensorineural hearing loss

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mafee, M.F.; Selis, J.E.; Yannias, D.A.; Valvassori, G.E.; Pruzansky, S.; Applebaum, E.L.; Capek, V.

    1984-01-01

    The ears of 47 selected patients with congenital sensorineural hearing loss were examined with complex-motion tomography. The patients were divided into 3 general categories: those with a recognized syndrome, those with sensorineural hearing loss unrelated to any known syndrome, and those with microtia. A great variety of inner ear anomalies was detected, but rarely were these characteristic of a particular clinical entity. The most common finding was the Mondini malformation or one of its variants. Isolated dysplasia of the internal auditory canal or the vestibular aqueduct may be responsible for sensorineural hearing loss in some patients. Patients with microtia may also have severe inner ear abnormalities despite the fact that the outer and inner ears develop embryologically from completely separate systems

  4. Congenital sensorineural hearing loss

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mafee, M.F.; Selis, J.E.; Yannias, D.A.; Valvassori, G.E.; Pruzansky, S.; Applebaum, E.L.; Capek, V.

    1984-02-01

    The ears of 47 selected patients with congenital sensorineural hearing loss were examined with complex-motion tomography. The patients were divided into 3 general categories: those with a recognized syndrome, those with sensorineural hearing loss unrelated to any known syndrome, and those with microtia. A great variety of inner ear anomalies was detected, but rarely were these characteristic of a particular clinical entity. The most common finding was the Mondini malformation or one of its variants. Isolated dysplasia of the internal auditory canal or the vestibular aqueduct may be responsible for sensorineural hearing loss in some patients. Patients with microtia may also have severe inner ear abnormalities despite the fact that the outer and inner ears develop embryologically from completely separate systems.

  5. Involvement of LCA5 in Leber congenital amaurosis and retinitis pigmentosa in the Spanish population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corton, M.; Avila-Fernandez, A.; Vallespin, E.; Lopez-Molina, M.I.; Almoguera, B.; Martin-Garrido, E.; Tatu, S.D.; Khan, M.I.; Blanco-Kelly, F.; Riveiro-Alvarez, R.; Brion, M.; Garcia-Sandoval, B.; Cremers, F.P.M.; Carracedo, A.; Ayuso, C.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We aimed to identify novel genetic defects in the LCA5 gene underlying Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) in the Spanish population and to describe the associated phenotype. DESIGN: Case series. PARTICIPANTS: A cohort of 217 unrelated Spanish families affected by autosomal recessive or

  6. High myopia and congenital myopathy with partial pachygyria in cutis laxa syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morava, E.; Willemsen, M.A.A.P.; Wopereis, S.; Laak, H.J. ter; Lefeber, D.J.; Wevers, R.A.; Cruysberg, J.R.M.

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: Several types of inborn errors of the O-glycan biosynthesis are known, leading to clinically very distinct phenotypes. Children with O-mannosyl glycan biosynthesis defects commonly present as a severe form of congenital muscular dystrophy with decreased alpha-dystroglycan staining,

  7. MTRR gene variants may predispose to the risk of Congenital Heart ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Down syndrome (DS), also called as trisomy 21, is one of the most leading cause of intellectual disability. DS is associated with a number of phenotypes including Congenital Heart Disease (CHD), Leukemia, Alzheimer's disease, Hirschsprung's disease and others. DS affects about 1 in 700 live births.

  8. Congenital broncho-oesophageal fistula

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1983-04-09

    Apr 9, 1983 ... Rigid bronchoscopy performed under general anaesthesia .... Blackburn WR, Armour)' RA. Congenital esophago-pulmonary fistulas without esophageal atresia: an analysis of 260 fistulas in infants, children and adults.

  9. Congenital heart defect corrective surgeries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... make it bigger with a patch made of Gore-tex, a man-made (synthetic) material. Another way ... 434. Bhatt AB, Foster E, Kuehl K, et al; American Heart Association Council on Clinical Cardiology. Congenital ...

  10. Congenital Heart Defects (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to be associated with genetic disorders, such as Down syndrome . But the cause of most congenital heart defects isn't known. While they can't be prevented, many treatments are available for the defects and related health ...

  11. Genetics Home Reference: congenital hyperinsulinism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Topic: Hypoglycemia Health Topic: Metabolic Disorders Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (1 link) Congenital hyperinsulinism Educational Resources (7 links) Boston Children's Hospital: Hypoglycemia and Low Blood Sugar in Children Cook Children's Hospital (PDF) Disease InfoSearch: ...

  12. CHRNE Mutation and Congenital Myasthenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The CHRNE e1293insG mutation was identified in 14 (60% of 23 North African families with an early onset form of congenital myasthenic syndrome studied at centers in France, Tunisia, Algeria, and UK.

  13. Congenital and perinatal cytomegalovirus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun Soo Kim

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cytomegalovirus (CMV is currently the most common agent of congenital infection and the leading infectious cause of brain damage and hearing loss in children. Symptomatic congenital CMV infections usually result from maternal primary infection during early pregnancy. One half of symptomatic infants have cytomegalic inclusion disease (CID, which is characterized by involvement of multiple organs, in particular, the reticuloendothelial and central nervous system (CNS. Moreover, such involvement may or may not include ocular and auditory damage. Approximately 90% of infants with congenital infection are asymptomatic at birth. Preterm infants with perinatal CMV infection can have symptomatic diseases such as pneumonia, hepatitis, and thrombocytopenia. Microcephaly and abnormal neuroradiologic imaging are associated with a poor prognosis. Hearing loss may occur in both symptomatic and asymptomatic infants with congenital infection and may progress through childhood. Congenital infection is defined by the isolation of CMV from infants within the first 3 weeks of life. Ganciclovir therapy can be considered for infants with symptomatic congenital CMV infection involving the CNS. Pregnant women of seronegative state should be counseled on the importance of good hand washing and other control measures to prevent CMV infection. Heat treatment of infected breast milk at 72?#608;for 5 seconds can eliminate CMV completely.

  14. Congenital Short QT Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Antzelevitch

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Long QT intervals in the ECG have long been associated with sudden cardiac death. The congenital long QT syndrome was first described in individuals with structurally normal hearts in 1957.1 Little was known about the significance of a short QT interval. In 1993, after analyzing 6693 consecutive Holter recordings Algra et al concluded that an increased risk of sudden death was present not only in patients with long QT interval, but also in patients with short QT interval (<400 ms.2 Because this was a retrospective analysis, further evaluation of the data was not possible. It was not until 2000 that a short-QT syndrome (SQTS was proposed as a new inherited clinical syndrome by Gussak et al.3 The initial report was of two siblings and their mother all of whom displayed persistently short QT interval. The youngest was a 17 year old female presenting with several episodes of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation requiring electrical cardioversion.3 Her QT interval measured 280 msec at a heart rate of 69. Her 21 year old brother displayed a QT interval of 272 msec at a heart rate of 58, whereas the 51 year old mother showed a QT of 260 msec at a heart rate of 74. The authors also noted similar ECG findings in another unrelated 37 year old patient associated with sudden cardiac death.

  15. Congenital hypothyroidism in neonates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aneela Anjum

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Congenital hypothyroidism (CH is one of the most common preventable causes of mental retardation in children and it occurs in approximately 1:2,000-1:4,000 newborns. Aims and Objectives: The aim of this study is to determine the frequency of CH in neonates. Settings and Design: This cross-sectional study was conducted in neonatal units of the Department of Pediatrics Unit-I, King Edward Medical University/Mayo Hospital, Lahore and Lady Willington Hospital Lahore in 6 months (January-June 2011. Materials and Methods: Sample was collected by non-probability purposive sampling. After consent, 550 newborn were registered for the study. Demographic data and relevant history was recorded. After aseptic measures, 2-3 ml venous blood analyzed for thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH level by immunoradiometric assay. Treatment was started according to the individual merit as per protocol. Statistical Analysis Used: Data was analyzed by SPSS 17 and Chi-square test was applied to find out the association of CH with different variables. Results: The study population consisted of 550 newborns. Among 550 newborns, 4 (0.8% newborns had elevated TSH level. CH had statistically significant association with mother′s hypothyroidism (P value 0.000 and mother′s drug intake during the pregnancy period (P value 0.013. Conclusion: CH is 0.8% in neonates. It has statistically significant association with mother′s hypothyroidism and mother′s drug intake during pregnancy.

  16. Congenital coronary artery fistula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Yeon Hee; Kim, Hong; Zeon, Seoc Kil; Suh, Soo Jhi

    1986-01-01

    Congenital coronary artery fistula (CCAF) is communication of a coronary artery or its main branch with one of the atria or ventricles, the coronary sinus, the superior vena cava, or the pulmonary artery. In Korean peoples, only 4 cases of the CCAF were reported as rare as worldwide and authors want to report another case of CCAF, confirmed by operation. 10-year-old girl shows a fistula between sinus node artery of the right coronary artery and right atrium on root aortogram with left-to-right shunt and Qp/Qs=1.58, in which simple ligation of the sinus node artery from right coronary artery was performed. All of the 5 Korean CCAF (4 were previously reported and 1 of authors) were originated from right coronary artery, and of which 4 were opening into right ventricle and 1 of authors were into right atrium. Associated cardiac anomaly was noted in only 1 case as single coronary artery. Ages were from 9 months of age to 10 years old and no adult left case were found. 3 were female and 2 were male patients.

  17. [Penile congenital abnormalities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boillot, B; Teklali, Y; Moog, R; Droupy, S

    2013-07-01

    Congenital abnormalities of the penis are usually diagnosed at birth and pose aesthetic and functional problems sometimes requiring surgical management. A literature review was conducted on Medline considering the articles listed until January 2012. Hypospadias is the most common malformation (1 in 250 boys. Familial forms: 7%). The causes remain hypothetical but the doubling of the incidence in 30 years could be linked to fetal exposure to endocrine disruptors "estrogen-like" used in the food industry in particular. Surgical treatment is usually intended to improve the aesthetic appearance but sometimes, in case of significant curvature or posterior meatus, necessary for normal sexual life and fertility. Other malformations (epispades, buried penis, transpositions, twists and preputial abnormalities) as well as management for functional or aesthetic consequences of these malformations in adulthood require complex surgical care in a specialized environment. The improvement of surgical techniques and pediatric anesthesia allows an early and effective specialized surgical approach of penile malformations. Management of sequelae in adulthood must be discussed and requires experience of surgical techniques on pediatric and adult penis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Congenital cystic lung malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoever, B.; Scheer, I.; Bassir, C.; Chaoui, R.; Henrich, W.; Schwabe, M.; Wauer, R.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the study concerning congenital cystic lung malformations was to evaluate prenatal diagnoses postnatally to determine prognostic factors as well as to define optimized perinatal management. Materials and Methods: The study is based on 45 prenatal ultrasound examinations depicting fetal cystic lung lesions. 32 of the mothers had follow-up examinations. 5 pregnancies were terminated due to CCAM and additional malformations. Complete regression of the lesions was seen prenatally in 8 cases and postnatally in 5 children. Results: Surgical intervention due to respiratory insufficiency was necessary in 4 neonates. According to the imaging results, CCAM was present in 4 cases and sequestration in 7 patients. No correlation between the imaging findings and the surgical results was found in 3 children: One child suffered from rhadomyoid dysplasia, and in the case of the second child, a left-sided hernia of the diaphragm and additional sequestration were detected. The third child showed AV malformation. The cystic lesions of the 14 children operated upon were proven histologically. The degree of accuracy in the present study was high. Conclusion: Precise perinatal management is warranted in order to determine according to the clinical relevance surgical intervention and to prevent complications after the first year of life. This is performed during the neonatal period for respiratory insufficient neonates and within the first year of life for clinically stable children. (orig.)

  19. Congenital pulmonary lymphangiectasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campisi Corradino

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Congenital pulmonary lymphangiectasia (PL is a rare developmental disorder involving the lung, and characterized by pulmonary subpleural, interlobar, perivascular and peribronchial lymphatic dilatation. The prevalence is unknown. PL presents at birth with severe respiratory distress, tachypnea and cyanosis, with a very high mortality rate at or within a few hours of birth. Most reported cases are sporadic and the etiology is not completely understood. It has been suggested that PL lymphatic channels of the fetal lung do not undergo the normal regression process at 20 weeks of gestation. Secondary PL may be caused by a cardiac lesion. The diagnostic approach includes complete family and obstetric history, conventional radiologic studies, ultrasound and magnetic resonance studies, lymphoscintigraphy, lung functionality tests, lung biopsy, bronchoscopy, and pleural effusion examination. During the prenatal period, all causes leading to hydrops fetalis should be considered in the diagnosis of PL. Fetal ultrasound evaluation plays a key role in the antenatal diagnosis of PL. At birth, mechanical ventilation and pleural drainage are nearly always necessary to obtain a favorable outcome of respiratory distress. Home supplemental oxygen therapy and symptomatic treatment of recurrent cough and wheeze are often necessary during childhood, sometimes associated with prolonged pleural drainage. Recent advances in intensive neonatal care have changed the previously nearly fatal outcome of PL at birth. Patients affected by PL who survive infancy, present medical problems which are characteristic of chronic lung disease.

  20. Congenital tracheal defects: embryonic development and animal models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zenab Arooj Sher

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Tracheal anomalies are potentially catastrophic congenital defects. As a newborn begins to breathe, the trachea needs to maintain an appropriate balance of elasticity and rigidity. If the tracheal cartilages are disorganized or structurally weak, the airways can collapse, obstructing breathing. Cartilage rings that are too small or too rigid can also obstruct breathing. These anomalies are frequently associated with craniofacial syndromes, and, despite the importance, are poorly understood. In this review, we summarize the spectrum of pathological phenotypes of the trachea and correlate them with the molecular events uncovered in mouse models.

  1. [Congenital cardiopathy and cerebral abscess].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paixão, A; de Andrade, F F; Sampayo, F

    1989-01-01

    During 1986 the authors came across two cases of brain abscess among children with congenital heart disease followed at the Pediatric Cardiology Service and decided to evaluate their global experience on the subject. In a retrospective study of 860 infants and children with cyanotic congenital heart disease and final diagnosis, there were four cases complicated with brain abscess. The following items were evaluated: prevalence of the complication, type of congenital heart disease, date and age at the diagnosis of brain abscess, diagnostic methods, neurosurgical treatment and results. The main findings were: all patients were above two years of age and had noncorrected cyanotic congenital heart disease belonging to the classic high risk group; the first two cases had been treated in other institutions and only scanty information was available; two recent cases had early diagnosis on CAT scan followed by neurosurgical treatment. All children survived. brain abscess is a rare but severe complication occurring in patients with noncorrected cyanotic congenital heart disease above two years of age; whenever prevention turns impossible, early diagnosis and treatment provide good short term and long term results. A multidisciplinar approach with full cooperation is advocated.

  2. Cyanotic congenital heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeon, Kyung Mo; Yoo, Shi Joon; Han, Man Chung; Hong, Chang Yee; Lee, Yung Kyoon [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1979-12-15

    Authors analyzed 265 cases of cyanotic congenital heart disease in which cardiac catheterization and angiocardiography were done at the Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital between April 1973 and August 1979. The results are as follows; 1. Among 265 cases, 178 patients were male and 87 patients were female. 240 patients were below the age of 20 and none was over 35 year. 2. The incidence of individual lesions are as follows: tetralogy of Fallot-176; double outlet right ventricle-20; pentalogy-12; trilogy-11; corrected transposition of great arteries-10; complete transposition of great arteries-8; pulmonary atresia-7; single ventricle-6; Ebstein's anomaly-5; total anomalous pulmonary venous return-4; tricuspid atresia-3; double outlet left ventricle-1; truncus arteriosus-1; hypoplastic left ventricle-1. 3. Fallot's teralogy, pentalogy and trilogy were characteristic in their simple chest and angiocardiographic manifestations, but in a few cases of tetralogy and pentalogy it was difficult to differentiate them from double outlet right ventricle or pulmonary atresia. 4. In double outlet right ventricle and transposition of great arteries which are the pathologic spectrum resulting from abnormal conal growth, differential points were ventricular and great arterial loop patterns and their connections but it was very difficult to differentiate them from each other by single injection into one ventricle alone. 5. Ebstein's anomaly and total anomalous pulmonary venous return were so characteristic in angiocardiography was done ventriculography alone. 6. In 7 cases with double outlet right ventricle and transposition of great arteries, selective biventriculography was done and more accurate diagnosis could be made, which was quite difficult with one ventriculography alone. In 31 cases, cineangiocardiography was done and it gave more accurate information about the type and degree of pulmonary stenosis and overriding of aorta, the origin

  3. Cyanotic congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeon, Kyung Mo; Yoo, Shi Joon; Han, Man Chung; Hong, Chang Yee; Lee, Yung Kyoon

    1979-01-01

    Authors analyzed 265 cases of cyanotic congenital heart disease in which cardiac catheterization and angiocardiography were done at the Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital between April 1973 and August 1979. The results are as follows; 1. Among 265 cases, 178 patients were male and 87 patients were female. 240 patients were below the age of 20 and none was over 35 year. 2. The incidence of individual lesions are as follows: tetralogy of Fallot-176; double outlet right ventricle-20; pentalogy-12; trilogy-11; corrected transposition of great arteries-10; complete transposition of great arteries-8; pulmonary atresia-7; single ventricle-6; Ebstein's anomaly-5; total anomalous pulmonary venous return-4; tricuspid atresia-3; double outlet left ventricle-1; truncus arteriosus-1; hypoplastic left ventricle-1. 3. Fallot's teralogy, pentalogy and trilogy were characteristic in their simple chest and angiocardiographic manifestations, but in a few cases of tetralogy and pentalogy it was difficult to differentiate them from double outlet right ventricle or pulmonary atresia. 4. In double outlet right ventricle and transposition of great arteries which are the pathologic spectrum resulting from abnormal conal growth, differential points were ventricular and great arterial loop patterns and their connections but it was very difficult to differentiate them from each other by single injection into one ventricle alone. 5. Ebstein's anomaly and total anomalous pulmonary venous return were so characteristic in angiocardiography was done ventriculography alone. 6. In 7 cases with double outlet right ventricle and transposition of great arteries, selective biventriculography was done and more accurate diagnosis could be made, which was quite difficult with one ventriculography alone. In 31 cases, cineangiocardiography was done and it gave more accurate information about the type and degree of pulmonary stenosis and overriding of aorta, the origin of great

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fletcher, B.D.; Jacobstein, M.D.

    1988-01-01

    Focusing primarily on MR imaging of the heart, this book covers other diagnostic imaging modalities as well. The authors review new technologies and diagnostic procedures pertinent to congenital heat disease and present each congenital heat abnormality as a separate entity

  5. Genetic Counseling for Congenital Heart Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Genetic Counseling for Congenital Heart Defects Updated:Jan 19,2018 ... with congenital heart disease considers having children. Genetic counseling can help answer these questions and address your ...

  6. CCT and sonographic findings in congenital craniopharyngioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helmke, K.; Hausdorf, G.; Moehrs, D.; Laas, R.

    1984-11-01

    In a case of congenital craniopharyngioma results of the sonographic and CCT examinations are reported and compared with postmortem macroscopic cuts. Comparison is made of clinical data from six cases with congenital craniopharyngioma as reported in the literature.

  7. CCT and sonographic findings in congenital craniopharyngioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helmke, K.; Hausdorf, G.; Moehrs, D.; Laas, R.

    1984-01-01

    In a case of congenital craniopharyngioma results of the sonographic and CCT examinations are reported and compared with postmortem macroscopic cuts. Comparison is made of clinical data from six cases with congenital craniopharyngioma as reported in the literature. (orig.)

  8. Genetics Home Reference: severe congenital neutropenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A characteristic of X-linked inheritance is that fathers cannot pass X-linked traits to their sons. ... Genetic Testing Registry: Severe congenital neutropenia 2, autosomal dominant Genetic Testing Registry: Severe congenital neutropenia 3, autosomal ...

  9. Genetics Home Reference: congenital dyserythropoietic anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions CDA Congenital dyserythropoietic anemia Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Congenital dyserythropoietic anemia ( CDA ) is an inherited blood disorder that affects ...

  10. Cerebral palsy and congenital malformations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garne, Ester; Dolk, Helen; Krägeloh-Mann, Inge

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To determine the proportion of children with cerebral palsy (CP) who have cerebral and non-cerebral congenital malformations. METHODS: Data from 11 CP registries contributing to the European Cerebral Palsy Database (SCPE), for children born in the period 1976-1996. The malformations were...... classified as recognized syndromes, chromosomal anomalies, cerebral malformations or non-cerebral malformations. Prevalence of malformations was compared to published data on livebirths from a European database of congenital malformations (EUROCAT). RESULTS: Overall 547 out of 4584 children (11.9%) with CP...... were reported to have a congenital malformation. The majority (8.6% of all children) were diagnosed with a cerebral malformation. The most frequent types of cerebral malformations were microcephaly and hydrocephaly. Non-cerebral malformations were present in 97 CP children and in further 14 CP children...

  11. Antenatal diagnosis of congenital deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaacson, G

    1988-01-01

    Advances in the field of antenatal diagnosis have made possible the detection of profound sensorineural hearing loss prior to birth. Fetal motion in response to sound and auditory evoked potential testing can determine the presence of fetal hearing in the third trimester of pregnancy. Imaging modalities including ultrasound, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging hold promise for the diagnosis of some forms of congenital deafness in the second trimester fetus. The methods by which congenital deafness soon may be diagnosed and the implications for the otologist are discussed.

  12. On diagnosis of congenital toxoplasmosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denisova, L.B.; Vorontsova, S.V.; Shvedov, V.A.

    1999-01-01

    Chemical manifestations are considered and CT-semiotics of congenital toxoplasmosis, which can form intracranial calcinates, is described. Taking a certain case of congenital toxoplasmosis observation as an example the potentialities and significance of X-ray computerized tomography (CT) in the identification of brain pathological changes are demonstrated. It is shown that intracranial calcificates may be a sign of toxoplasmosis infection. In case of cytomegalovirus infection the calcificates on CT-scans have mostly periventricular localization. Equally with the revealing of brain status in case of chronic stage of neutrotoxoplasmosis the CT has also played a decisive role in diagnosis of pseudotumoroseus course of ischemic insult [ru

  13. MRI of congenital urethroperineal fistula

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghadimi-Mahani, Maryam; Dillman, Jonathan R.; Pai, Deepa; DiPietro, Michael [C. S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Section of Pediatric Radiology, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Park, John [C. S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatric Urology, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2010-12-15

    We present the MRI features of a congenital urethroperineal fistula diagnosed in a 12-year-old boy being evaluated after a single urinary tract infection. This diagnosis was initially suggested by voiding cystourethrogram and confirmed by MRI. Imaging revealed an abnormal fluid-filled tract arising from the posterior urethra and tracking to the perineal skin surface that increased in size during micturition. Surgical resection and histopathological evaluation of the abnormal tract confirmed the diagnosis of congenital urethroperineal fistula. MRI played important roles in confirming the diagnosis and assisting surgical planning. (orig.)

  14. MRI of congenital urethroperineal fistula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghadimi-Mahani, Maryam; Dillman, Jonathan R.; Pai, Deepa; DiPietro, Michael; Park, John

    2010-01-01

    We present the MRI features of a congenital urethroperineal fistula diagnosed in a 12-year-old boy being evaluated after a single urinary tract infection. This diagnosis was initially suggested by voiding cystourethrogram and confirmed by MRI. Imaging revealed an abnormal fluid-filled tract arising from the posterior urethra and tracking to the perineal skin surface that increased in size during micturition. Surgical resection and histopathological evaluation of the abnormal tract confirmed the diagnosis of congenital urethroperineal fistula. MRI played important roles in confirming the diagnosis and assisting surgical planning. (orig.)

  15. Congenital hypothyroidism: insights into pathogenesis and treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Cherella, Christine E.; Wassner, Ari J.

    2017-01-01

    Congenital hypothyroidism occurs in approximately 1 in 2000 newborns and can have devastating neurodevelopmental consequences if not detected and treated promptly. While newborn screening has virtually eradicated intellectual disability due to severe congenital hypothyroidism in the developed world, more stringent screening strategies have resulted in increased detection of mild congenital hypothyroidism. Recent studies provide conflicting evidence about the potential neurodevelopmental risks...

  16. The prevalence of congenital anomalies in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dolk, Helen; Loane, Maria; Garne, Ester

    2010-01-01

    EUROCAT (European Surveillance of Congenital Anomalies) is the network of population-based registers of congenital anomaly in Europe, with a common protocol and data quality review, covering 1.5 million annual births in 22 countries. EUROCAT recorded a total prevalence of major congenital anomali...

  17. Congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism: implications of absent mini-puberty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, Andrew A; Jayasena, Channa N; Quinton, Richard

    2016-06-01

    The phenomenon known as "mini-puberty" refers to activation of the neonatal hypothalamo-pituitary axis causing serum concentrations of gonadotrophins and testosterone (T) to approach adult male levels. This early neonatal period is a key proliferative window for testicular germ cells and immature Sertoli cells. Although failure to spontaneously initiate (adolescent) puberty is the most evident consequence of a defective gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurosecretory network, absent mini-puberty is also likely to have a major impact on the reproductive phenotype of men with congenital hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism (CHH). Furthermore, the phase of male mini-puberty represents a key window-of-opportunity to identify congenital GnRH deficiency (either isolated CHH, or as part of combined pituitary hormone deficiency) in childhood. Among male neonates exhibiting "red flag" indicators for CHH (i.e. maldescended testes with or without cryptorchidism) a single serum sample (between 4-8 weeks of life) can pinpoint congenital GnRH deficiency far more rapidly and with much greater accuracy than dynamic tests performed in later childhood or adolescence. Potential consequences for missing absent mini-puberty in a male neonate include the lack of monitoring of pubertal progression/lack of progression, and the missed opportunity for early therapeutic intervention. This article will review our current understanding of the mechanisms and clinical consequences of mini-puberty. Furthermore, evidence for the optimal clinical management of patients with absent mini-puberty will be discussed.

  18. Congenital Aortic Stenosis and Aneurysms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. van der Linde (Denise)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractDue to improvements in pediatric cardio-thoracic surgery, anesthesia and diagnostics over the past decades, the number of adult patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) is growing. This causes an increasing demand in clinical practice for insight in long term outcome in both

  19. Severe congenital neutropenia (Kostmann Syndrome)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Severe congenital neutropenia (SCN), Kostmann syndrome is a heterogenous disorder of myelopoiesis characterized by severe chronic ... erogenous hematological disorders, characterized by extremely low circu- lating neutrophils and ..... tic activation of STAT5 and stimulate. G-CSF-induced cell proliferation.26, 27.

  20. Angiocardiography in congenital heart malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soto, B.; Pacifico, A.D.

    1990-01-01

    The contents of this book are well organized, it deals with the technique of angiocardiography, and describes the angiocardiographic anatomy of the normal heart and offers an excellent sequential analysis of cardiac morphology. The rest of the book describes the angiocardiographic findings observed in individual congenital cardiac disorders

  1. Congenital Pulmonary Malformation in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montasser Nadeem

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital Pulmonary Malformations (CPMs are a group of rare lung abnormalities affecting the airways, parenchyma, and vasculature. They represent a spectrum of abnormal development rather than discrete pathological entities. They are caused by aberrant embryological lung development which occurs at different stages of intrauterine life.

  2. [Genetics of congenital heart diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnet, Damien

    2017-06-01

    Developmental genetics of congenital heart diseases has evolved from analysis of serial slices in embryos towards molecular genetics of cardiac morphogenesis with a dynamic view of cardiac development. Genetics of congenital heart diseases has also changed from formal genetic analysis of familial recurrences or population-based analysis to screening for mutations in candidates genes identified in animal models. Close cooperation between molecular embryologists, pathologists involved in heart development and pediatric cardiologists is crucial for further increase of knowledge in the field of cardiac morphogenesis and genetics of cardiac defects. The genetic model for congenital heart disease has to be revised to favor a polygenic origin rather than a monogenic one. The main mechanism is altered genic dosage that can account for heart diseases in chromosomal anomalies as well as in point mutations in syndromic and isolated congenital heart diseases. The use of big data grouping information from cardiac development, interactions between genes and proteins, epigenetic factors such as chromatin remodeling or DNA methylation is the current source for improving our knowledge in the field and to give clues for future therapies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Genetics of Primary Congenital Hypothyroidism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwaveling-Soonawala, Nitash; van Trotsenburg, Paul

    2018-01-01

    Congenital hypothyroidism (CH) is one of the most common preventable forms of mental retardation and since the implementation of neonatal screening programs in the mid-1970s, early detection and treatment have proven to be very successful in preventing brain damage. CH may be of thyroidal (=

  4. Congenital Pulmonary Malformation in Children

    OpenAIRE

    Nadeem, Montasser; Elnazir, Basil; Greally, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Congenital Pulmonary Malformations (CPMs) are a group of rare lung abnormalities affecting the airways, parenchyma, and vasculature. They represent a spectrum of abnormal development rather than discrete pathological entities. They are caused by aberrant embryological lung development which occurs at different stages of intrauterine life.

  5. Neural Correlates of Congenital Amusia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance T1-weighted images were analyzed, using voxel-based morphometry (VBM, to detect brain anatomical differences in two independent groups of adults with congenital amusia (or tone-deafness compared to controls with normal pitch perception and no formal musical training.

  6. Congenital bronchobiliary fistula: MRI appearance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hourigan, Jon S.; Carr, Michael G.; Burton, Edward M.; Ledbetter, Joel C.

    2004-01-01

    Congenital bronchobiliary fistula (CBBF) is a rare anomaly. Twenty-three cases have been reported since the anomaly was first described in 1952. Most of these cases were diagnosed by bronchoscopy, cholangiography, or hepatobiliary nuclear imaging. Our case of a newborn with bilious emesis with CBBF was depicted by T1-weighted gradient-echo MRI sequences. (orig.)

  7. Congenital lymphoedema of the genitalia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolt, R. J.; Peelen, W.; Nikkels, P. G.; de Jong, T. P.

    1998-01-01

    Isolated congenital lymphoedema of the external genitalia in boys is extremely rare. It can have major physical and emotional consequences for the children. Three male patients with primary lymphoedema of the penis and scrotum are described. The first case presented with lymphoedema of the prepuce

  8. Asthma phenotypes in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Monica B; Covar, Ronina A

    2016-04-01

    This review describes the literature over the past 18 months that evaluated childhood asthma phenotypes, highlighting the key aspects of these studies, and comparing these studies to previous ones in this area. Recent studies on asthma phenotypes have identified new phenotypes on the basis of statistical analyses (using cluster analysis and latent class analysis methodology) and have evaluated the outcomes and associated risk factors of previously established early childhood asthma phenotypes that are based on asthma onset and patterns of wheezing illness. There have also been investigations focusing on immunologic, physiologic, and genetic correlates of various phenotypes, as well as identification of subphenotypes of severe childhood asthma. Childhood asthma remains a heterogeneous condition, and investigations into these various presentations, risk factors, and outcomes are important since they can offer therapeutic and prognostic relevance. Further investigation into the immunopathology and genetic basis underlying childhood phenotypes is important so therapy can be tailored accordingly.

  9. What's New in Congenital Scoliosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahys, Joshua M; Guille, James T

    2018-03-01

    Congenital scoliosis is a failure of vertebral formation, segmentation, or a combination of the 2 arising from abnormal vertebral development during weeks 4 to 6 of gestation. The associated spinal deformity can be of varying severity and result in a stable or progressive deformity based on the type and location of the anomalous vertebra(e). Bracing for congenital scoliosis is rarely indicated, while recent reports have demonstrated the utility of serial derotational casting for longer curves with multiple anomalous vertebrae as an effective "time buying strategy" to delay the need for surgery. Earlier hemivertebra excision and short-segment posterior spinal fusion have been advocated to prevent future curve progression of the deformity and/or the development of large compensatory curves. It has been shown in recent long-term follow-up studies that growth rates of the vertebral body and spinal canal are not as dramatically affected by pedicle screw instrumentation at a young age as once thought. Growth friendly surgery with either spine-based or rib-based anchors has demonstrated good results with curve correction while maintaining spinal growth. Rib-based anchors are typically more commonly indicated in the setting of chest wall abnormalities and/or when spinal anatomy precludes placement of spinal instrumentation. Recently, magnetically controlled growing rods have shown promising results in several studies that include a small subset of congenital scoliosis cases. A literature search was performed to identify existing studies related to the treatment of congenital scoliosis published from January 1, 2005 to June 1, 2016. Databases included PubMed, Medline, and the Cochrane Library. The search was limited to English articles and yielded 36 papers. This project was initiated by the Pediatric Orthopaedic Society of North America Publications Committee and was reviewed and approved by the Pediatric Orthopaedic Society of North America Presidential Line. A total of

  10. Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome: four families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, Amit; Waters, Karen; Suresh, Sadasivam; Nair, Rashmi

    2011-12-01

    Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS) is a rare condition that usually presents soon after birth and is potentially life-shortening if not treated. The defining abnormality is hypoventilation during sleep which requires life-long treatment with artificial ventilation. This syndrome may also be associated with generalised dysfunction of the autonomic nervous system and a sub-group with associated Hirschsprung's disease. The genetic basis of CCHS has been identified as mutations in the PHOX2B gene. We present four families, three with autosomal dominant inheritance and familial clustering, and one with a de novo mutation resulting in CCHS. We demonstrate that nasal mask ventilation from birth can provide adequate treatment and improved quality of life for these children. Phenotypic variability in expression of disease is seen in families with the same mutations in PHOX2B gene. The psychosocial costs of the disease and the unrecognised 'morbidity barter' that is part of current management needs to be factored into in all stages of management from childhood to adolescence to adulthood.

  11. Congenital leptin deficiency and thyroid function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paz-Filho Gilberto

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Thyroid function is closely related to leptin's secretion by the adipose tissue. In states of leptin-deficiency, the circadian rhythm of TSH is altered, leading to central hypothyroidism in animal models. In humans, central hypothyroidism has also been described in rare cases of congenital leptin deficiency. However, the thyroid phenotype in these cases is heterogeneous, with the occurrence of central hypothyroidism in a minority of cases. Here we describe thyroid function in four leptin-deficient humans (2 males aged 5 and 27, and 2 females aged 35 and 40, before and during leptin replacement with recombinant human methionyl leptin (r-metHuLeptin. The child was evaluated for four years, and the adults, for eight years. In addition, the adults were submitted to a brief withdrawal of leptin during six weeks in the sixth year. Our results show that, regardless of leptin replacement, our leptin-deficient patients have normal thyroid function. In spite of having an important role in regulating the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroidal axis, leptin is not required for normal thyroid function. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifiers: NCT00659828 and NCT00657605

  12. Congenital anomalies in Primorsky region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiku, P; Voronin, S; Golokhvast, K

    2015-01-01

    According to WHO hereditary diseases and congenital malformations contribute significantly to the health of population. Thus, the problems of epidemiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis and treatment of congenital abnormalities are of interest for many researchers [2]. In addition, the dynamic accounting for the incidence of congenital malformations and hereditary diseases allows the researchers to assess the ecological situation in the region [1]. The occurrence of congenital anomalies in the world varies; it depends heavily on how carefully the data is collected [4]. Multifactorial or polygenic diseases develop under the influence of environmental factors in the presence of defective genes. They can constitute up to 90% of all chronic pathology [2-5]. To determine the incidence of congenital anomalies under the influence of environmental factors. The study used the methodology of system evaluation of congenital anomalies incidence in Primorsky region, depending on bio-climatic and environmental conditions. The authors used health statistics for the period from 2000 to 2014, F.12 class for congenital abnormalities in adolescents and children that were compared in geographical and temporal aspects with environmental factors of 33 settlements in Primorsky region. The environment is represented by nature and climate (6 factor modules) and sanitation (7 factor modules) blocks of factors. When formalizing the information database of the environment a specially developed 10-point assessment scale was used. Statistical processing of the information was carried out using Pearson's chi-squared test and multiple regression method from SSPS application program package. The study found that over the 15-year period the level of congenital abnormalities in children increased by 27.5% and in adolescents - by 35.1%, and in 2014 it amounted to 1687.6 and 839.3 per 100 000 people, respectively. The predictive model shows a steady further growth of this pathology. The incidence

  13. Distal 4p microdeletion in a case of Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome with congenital diaphragmatic hernia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casaccia, Germana; Mobili, Luisa; Braguglia, Annabella; Santoro, Francesco; Bagolan, Pietro

    2006-03-01

    Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS) is a well-known genetic condition characterized by typical facial anomalies, midline defects, skeletal anomalies, prenatal and postnatal growth retardation, hypotonia, mental retardation, and seizures. Affected patients with a microdeletion on distal 4p present a milder phenotype that lacks congenital malformations. WHS is rarely associated with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH), and only 8 cases are reported in the literature. In almost all cases of CDH and WHS a large deletion of the short arm of chromosome 4 is present. A microdeletion of 2.6 Mb on distal 4p associated with CDH and multiple congenital malformations (i.e., cleft palate) is reported for the first time. Such a microdeletion should prompt a molecular study for WHS when in a fetus/newborn with CDH the association with cleft lip/palate and typical facial appearance (flat facial profile, hypertelorism) is found. Copyright 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Phenotype and genotype of 87 patients with Mowat-Wilson syndrome and recommendations for care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ivanovski, Ivan; Djuric, Olivera; Caraffi, Stefano Giuseppe

    2018-01-01

    PurposeMowat-Wilson syndrome (MWS) is a rare intellectual disability/multiple congenital anomalies syndrome caused by heterozygous mutation of the ZEB2 gene. It is generally underestimated because its rarity and phenotypic variability sometimes make it difficult to recognize. Here, we aimed to be...

  15. Clinical phenotypes of asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bel, Elisabeth H.

    2004-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Asthma is a phenotypically heterogeneous disorder and, over the years, many different clinical subtypes of asthma have been described. A precise definition of asthma phenotypes is now becoming more and more important, not only for a better understanding of pathophysiologic

  16. [Identification of risk factors for congenital malformations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canals C, Andrea; Cavada C, Gabriel; Nazer H, Julio

    2014-11-01

    The relative importance of congenital malformations as a cause of death in the first year of life is increasing along with the control of preventable causes of perinatal mortality. To identify risk factors for congenital malformations. Retrospective case-control study of births registered in the database of The Latin American Collaborative Study of Congenital Malformations (ECLAMC), in the period 2001-2010. Birth weight and gestational age were significantly lower in cases than controls, behaving as risk factors and associated with a greater severity of congenital malformations. The risk and severity of congenital malformations increased along with mother's age. Fetal growth retardation, a history of congenital malformations in the family, physical factors and acute illnesses of the mother in the first trimester of pregnancy were also significant risk factors for congenital malformations and their severity. The educational level of the mother was a protective factor for congenital malformations and their severity. Variables previously identified as risk factors for congenital malformations, were significantly related with the occurrence of congenital malformations and their severity.

  17. Neuropsychological phenotype of a patient with a de novo 970 kb interstitial deletion in the distal 16p11.2 region

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Egger, J.I.; Verhoeven, W.M.A.; Verbeeck, W.J.C.; Leeuw, N. de

    2014-01-01

    The 16p11.2 microdeletion syndrome is characterized by a wide range of phenotypic expressions and is frequently associated with developmental delay, symptoms from the autism spectrum, epilepsy, congenital anomalies, and obesity. These phenotypes are often related to a proximal 16p11.2 deletion of

  18. Neuropsychological phenotype of a patient with a de novo 970 kb interstitial deletion in the distal 16p11.2 region

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.I.M. Egger (Jos); W.M.A. Verhoeven (Wim); W. Verbeeck (Wim); N. de Leeuw (Nicole)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractThe 16p11.2 microdeletion syndrome is characterized by a wide range of phenotypic expressions and is frequently associated with developmental delay, symptoms from the autism spectrum, epilepsy, congenital anomalies, and obesity. These phenotypes are often related to a proximal 16p11.2

  19. A large de novo distal 16p11.2 deletion in a patient with normal intelligence: Evidence for a neuropsychological phenotype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Egger, J.I.M.; Verhoeven, W.M.A.; Verbeeck, W.J.C.; Leeuw, N. de

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The 16p11.2 microdeletion syndrome is characterized by a wide range of phenotypic expressions and is often associated with developmental delay, symptoms from the autism spectrum, epilepsy, congenital anomalies and obesity. Usually, these phenotypes are related to a proximal 16p11.2

  20. Prenatal education for congenital toxoplasmosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Mario, Simona; Basevi, Vittorio; Gagliotti, Carlo; Spettoli, Daniela; Gori, Gianfranco; D'Amico, Roberto; Magrini, Nicola

    2015-10-23

    Congenital toxoplasmosis is considered a rare but potentially severe infection. Prenatal education about congenital toxoplasmosis could be the most efficient and least harmful intervention, yet its effectiveness is uncertain. To assess the effects of prenatal education for preventing congenital toxoplasmosis. We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (31 May 2015), and reference lists of relevant papers, reviews and websites. Randomized and quasi-randomized controlled trials of all types of prenatal education on toxoplasmosis infection during pregnancy. Cluster-randomized trials were eligible for inclusion. Two review authors independently assessed trials for inclusion and risk of bias, extracted data and checked them for accuracy. Two cluster-randomized controlled trials (RCTs) (involving a total of 5455 women) met the inclusion criteria. The two included trials measured the effectiveness of the intervention in different ways, which meant that meta-analysis of the results was not possible. The overall quality of the two studies, as assessed using the GRADE approach, was low, with high risk of detection and attrition bias in both included trials.One trial (432 women enrolled) conducted in Canada was judged of low methodological quality. This trial did not report on any of the review's pre-specified primary outcomes and the secondary outcomes reported results only as P values. Moreover, losses to follow-up were high (34%, 147 out of 432 women initially enrolled). The authors concluded that prenatal education can effectively change pregnant women's behavior as it increased pet, personal and food hygiene. The second trial conducted in France was also judged of low methodological quality. Losses to follow-up were also high (44.5%, 2233 out of 5023 women initially enrolled) and differential (40% in the intervention group and 52% in the control group). The authors concluded that prenatal education for congenital toxoplasmoses has a

  1. Congenital adrenal hyperplasia: Case report.

    OpenAIRE

    Jaime Avaria E.; María José Vargas F.; Loreto Triviño F.; Andrea Gleisner E.

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) is an autosomal recessive disease whose main cause is the deficiency of 21-hydroxylase, an enzyme involved in the synthesis of cortisol and aldosterone. There are two forms of CAH, a classical and nonclassical form, being the first objective of analysis in the clinical case. Its clinical manifestations vary in severity, depending on the level of hormone deficiency. Within the classic is described the salt-wasting form, whose consequences are ...

  2. Congenital hypopituitarism and renal failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav Atreja

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital hypopituitarism is potentially fatal in the newborn period but treatable if the diagnosis is made early. We report a neonate who presented with hypothermia and severe hypoglycemia. He also had undescended testis and micropenis. Initial screening revealed panhypopituitarism, which was corrected promptly. He developed renal failure due to initial cardiovascular compromise related to hypotension but recovered quickly with standard management. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed absent stalk of anterior pituitary.

  3. Congenital unilateral hydrocephalus - CT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulman, H.; Landau, D.; Schulman, P.; Hertzanu, Y.

    2000-01-01

    Congenital unilateral hydrocephalus is extremely uncommon with 18 cases previously reported in the English literature. Two additional newborns with unilateral hydrocephalus are presented. The second baby also presented a mega cisterna magna. This unusual association between Dandy-Walker variant and unilateral hydrocephalus has not been previously reported. Following ventriculo-peritoneal shunt, the babies had a normal cognitive neurodevelopment. The role of cranial computed tomography (CT) in diagnosis and follow-up is emphasized

  4. Congenital uronephropathy pattern in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Husein Alatas

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available To obtain the basic data of congenital uronephropathy pattern and the affecting factors in children, we conducted a cross-sectional study at the Department of Child Health Cipto Mangunkusumo (CM Hospital Jakarta from 1995 to 1999 and 9 teaching hospitals throughout Indonesia. During the study period 134 patients were obtained, 116 patients from the CM Hospital and 18 patients from other teaching hospitals. Most patients (48.8% were below 1 year of age; male were affected more than female (2.4:1. The disorder was classified into two groups, i.e., congenital nephropathy and uropathy. There were 10 children with nephropathy, i.e., 4 with unilateral renal hypoplasia, 3 with polycystic kidney, and 3 with renal agenesis. In the uropathy group, 43 were with hypospadia, 22 with primary reflux vesicoureter, 18 with neurogenic bladder, and 17 with ureteropelvic junction obstruction. The complications found were urinary tract infection (71.2%, chronic renal failure (15.7%, hypertension (3.7%, and acute renal failure (1.5%. Consanguinity, familial disorders, maternal diseases, x-ray exposure and abortion efforts were found in a small proportion of patients. History of drug or herbs use in the first trimester of pregnancy was found in a large proportion of patients, mostly took analgesics (especially acetaminophen. In conclusion, uropathy disorders were much more common than congenital nephropathy. The most common complication was urinary tract infection, followed by chronic renal failure, hypertension, and acute renal failure.

  5. Hennekam syndrome presenting as nonimmune hydrops fetalis, congenital chylothorax, and congenital pulmonary lymphangiectasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bellini, Carlo; Mazzella, Massimo; Arioni, Cesare; Campisi, Corradino; Taddei, Gioconda; Tomà, Paolo; Boccardo, Francesco; Hennekam, Raoul C.; Serra, Giovanni

    2003-01-01

    We report a female infant with congenital lymphedema, facial anomalies, intestinal lymphangiectasia consistent with a diagnosis of Hennekam syndrome. At birth the patient presented with severe respiratory distress due to nonimmune hydrops fetalis, a congenital chylothorax (CC), and pulmonary

  6. RISK FACTORS IN CHILD CONGENITAL MALFORMATIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Alina-Costina LUCA; Mirabela SUBOTNICU

    2015-01-01

    Congenital heart malformations are among the most common congenital malformations. Congenital heart malformations occur due to genetic and environmental factors during embryonic morphogenesis period of the heart. About 25% of these malformations are severe, requiring intervention immediately after birth or in infancy. Abnormalities of structure and function of the heart and great vessels are the consequence of teratogenic factors occurring between day 19 and 45 of gestation. (Yagel et al...

  7. Hip dysplasia and congenital hip dislocation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lingg, G.; Nebel, G.; von Torklus, D.

    1981-11-01

    In human genetics and orthopedics quite different answers have been given to the question of hereditary transmission and frequency of hip dysplasia in families of children with congenital hip dislocation. We therefore have made roentgenometric measurements of 110 parents of children with congenital hip dislocation. In 25% we found abnormal flat acetabulae, whereas 12% had pathologic deep hips. This may propose a new concept of morphology of congenital hip dysplasia.

  8. Congenital pseudoarthrosis associated with venous malformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Hadidy, A.; Haroun, A.; Al-Ryalat, N.; Hamamy, H.; Al-Hadidi, S.

    2007-01-01

    Congenital pseudoarthrosis is a pathologic entity that may be isolated, or may be associated with neurofibromatosis. We report the case of a 3-year-old female with congenital pseudoarthrosis involving the right tibia and fibula. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and complementary magnetic resonance angiogram (MRA) revealed a lobulated mass with vivid enhancement, which led to the diagnosis of venous malformation. This is the first report of congenital pseudoarthrosis caused by the presence of a vascular malformation. (orig.)

  9. Congenital pseudoarthrosis associated with venous malformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Hadidy, A.; Haroun, A.; Al-Ryalat, N. [Jordan University Hospital, Radiology Department, P.O. Box 340621, Amman (Jordan); Hamamy, H. [Endocrinology and Genetics, National Center for Diabetes, Amman (Jordan); Al-Hadidi, S. [Jordan University Hospital, Departments of Orthopedics, Amman (Jordan)

    2007-06-15

    Congenital pseudoarthrosis is a pathologic entity that may be isolated, or may be associated with neurofibromatosis. We report the case of a 3-year-old female with congenital pseudoarthrosis involving the right tibia and fibula. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and complementary magnetic resonance angiogram (MRA) revealed a lobulated mass with vivid enhancement, which led to the diagnosis of venous malformation. This is the first report of congenital pseudoarthrosis caused by the presence of a vascular malformation. (orig.)

  10. Clinical and morphological characteristics of malformations in infants with congenital cytomegalovirus infection and congenital toxoplasmosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Yu. Barycheva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of following up infants with intrauterine infections and malformations were retrospectively analyzed. Infants with malformations were diagnosed as having congenital cytomegalovirus infection and congenital toxoplasmosis in 127 and 69 cases, respectively. The aim of the study was to characterize malformations in infants with congenital cytomegalovirus and congenital Toxoplasma infections. The infants with malformations in congenital cytomegalovirus infection were found to have higher mortality rates (61,4% than those with congenital toxoplasmosis (34,8%. Postmortem analysis indicated that there was a predominance of embryopathies in infants with congenital cytomegalovirus infection and that of fetopathies in those with congenital toxoplasmosis. The dead infants with congenital cytomegalovirus infection had more commonly developed visceral defects, including heart diseases, pneumopathies, gastrointestinal and genitourinary abnormalities; fetopathies of the central nervous system and eye were prevalent in congenital toxoplasmosis. The surviving children with congenital toxoplasmosis were more frequently observed to have disabling CNS and ocular sequels as obstructive hydrocephalus, infantile cerebral palsy, complete or partial blindness, and cerebrasthenic disorders than those with congenital cytomegalovirus infection. 

  11. Congenital heart defects and extracardiac malformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Rosana Cardoso M; Rosa, Rafael Fabiano M; Zen, Paulo Ricardo G; Paskulin, Giorgio Adriano

    2013-06-01

    To review the association between congenital heart defects and extracardiac malformations. Scientific articles were searched in the Medline, Lilacs, and SciELO databases, using the descriptors "congenital heart disease," "congenital heart defects," "congenital cardiac malformations," "extracardiac defects," and "extracardiac malformations." All case series that specifically explored the association between congenital heart defects and extracardiac malformations were included. Congenital heart diseases are responsible for about 40% of birth defects, being one of the most common and severe malformations. Extracardiac malformations are observed in 7 to 50% of the patients with congenital heart disease, bringing a greater risk of comorbidity and mortality and increasing the risks related to heart surgery. Different studies have attempted to assess the presence of extracardiac abnormalities in patients with congenital heart disease. Among the changes described, those of the urinary tract are more often reported. However, no study has evaluated all patients in the same way. Extracardiac abnormalities are frequent among patients with congenital heart disease, and patients with these alterations may present an increased risk of morbimortality. Therefore, some authors have been discussing the importance and cost-effectiveness of screening these children for other malformations by complementary exams.

  12. Congenital hypothyroidism presenting with postpartum bradycardia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kara, S.; Tayman, C.; Tonbul, A.; Tatli, M.; Andiran, N.; Turkay, S.

    2013-01-01

    Congenital hypothyroidism is a clinical condition characterized by lack of thyroid hormone because of thyroid gland developmental and thyroid hormone biosynthesis disorders. The most common cause of permanent hypothyroidism is congenital factors. Prompt diagnosis is critical. However, overt signs of hypothyroidism are rarely present at birth, and 95% of affected babies are asymptomatic. Hypoxemia, apnea, acidosis, increased intracranial pressure, vagal stimulus and central nerve system abnormalities represent the most common causes of bradycardia in the neonate. Bradycardia associated with congenital hypothyroidism is very rare. In this paper, a case of severe congenital hypothyroidism, induced by maternal blocker antibodies, who presented with bradycardia, is reported. (author)

  13. Major congenital anomalies in a Danish region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garne, Ester; Hansen, Anne Vinkel; Birkelund, Anne Sofie

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: This study describes the prevalence of congenital anomalies and changes over time in birth outcome, mortality and chronic maternal diseases. MATERIAL AND METHODS: This study was based on population data from the EUROCAT registry covering the Funen County, Denmark, 1995...... mortality decreased significantly over time for cases with major congenital anomalies (p congenital anomaly cases, 8% had a registration of one of these chronic maternal diseases......: diabetes, epilepsy, mental disorder, thyroid disease, asthma, or inflammatory bowel disease. Medication for these conditions accounted for 46% of maternal drug use. CONCLUSION: Maternal morbidity and use of potentially teratogenic medication have increased among congenital anomaly cases. Foetal and infant...

  14. Congenital rubella syndrome and delayed manifestations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dammeyer, Jesper Herup

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Several hypotheses of different medical and psychological delayed manifestations among people who have congenital rubella syndrome (CRS) have been discussed. This study tests some of these hypotheses of delayed manifestations. Methods: Gathering information about 35 individuals who hav...... which people with CRS face must primarily be understood in relation to congenital deafblindness and dual sensory and communicative deprivation....... CRS and who are congenitally deafblind. Results: None of the hypotheses could be confirmed when individuals with CRS were compared to a control group of individuals who were congenital deafblind with different aetiology than CRS. Conclusions: This study concludes that those health related problems...

  15. A rare combination: congenital factor VII deficiency with Chiari malformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bay, Ali; Aktekin, Elif; Erkutlu, Ibrahim

    2015-12-01

    Congenital factor (VII) deficiency is a rare bleeding disorder. We present a patient with congenital FVII deficiency and congenital hydrocephalus who underwent a ventriculoperitoneal shunt operation and needed no prophylaxis after the procedure.

  16. Congenital hydrocephalus in clinical practice : A genetic diagnostic approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhagen, J. M. A.; Schrander-Stumpel, C. T. R. M.; Krapels, P. C.; de Die-Smulders, C. E. M.; van Lint, F. H. M.; Willekes, C.; Weber, J. W.; Gavilanes, A. W. D.; Macville, M. V. E.; Stegmann, A. P. A.; Engelen, J. J. M.; Bakker, J.; Vos, Y. J.; Frints, S. G. M.

    2011-01-01

    Congenital hydrocephalus is a common and often disabling disorder. The etiology is very heterogeneous. Little is known about the genetic causes of congenital hydrocephalus. A retrospective survey was performed including patients with primary congenital hydrocephalus referred to the Department of

  17. Dynamics in prevalence of Down syndrome in children with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfitzer, Constanze; Helm, Paul C; Rosenthal, Lisa-Maria; Berger, Felix; Bauer, Ulrike M M; Schmitt, Katharina Rl

    2018-01-01

    We assessed the dynamics in the prevalence of children with congenital heart disease (CHD) and Down syndrome in Germany with regard to phenotype, severity, and gender. Data from patients with CHD and Down syndrome born between 1980 and 2014 were analyzed, who are registered with the German National Register for Congenital Heart Defects. One thousand six hundred eighteen CHD patients with Down syndrome were identified. The prevalence of children born with both Down syndrome and CHD was constant from 2005 to 2009 but increased from 2010 to 2014. Regarding CHD groups, complex and simple lesions have become more equal since 2005. The number of simple lesions with shunt has a peak prevalence in the period of 2010-2014. Atrioventricular septal defect was the most common CHD phenotype, but temporal changes were found within the group of CHD phenotypes over the observation period. Our findings suggest a growing number of CHD and Down syndrome, which may be the result of improved medical management and progress in educational, social, and financial support. This development is noteworthy as it adds new aspects to present discussions in the media and political settings. What is known: • Congenital heart disease is regarded to be the most important clinical phenomenon in children with Down syndrome, due to its significant impact on morbidity and mortality. • New developments in prenatal diagnostic and therapy management of congenital heart disease continue to influence the number of patients diagnosed with congenital heart disease and Down syndrome. What is New: • This study provides essential data giving the first overview of the dynamics in the prevalence of congenital heart disease and Down syndrome over an extended length of time up to 2015 in a large patient cohort, taking recent developments into account. • Our data suggest a growing prevalence of congenital heart disease and Down syndrome, which may be the result of improved medical management for Down syndrome

  18. Adrenomyeloneuropathy associated with congenital cataract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komori, Tetsuo; Nagashima, Toshiko; Hirose, Kazuhiko; Tanabe, Hitoshi; Tsubaki, Tadao

    1988-01-01

    Two cases of adrenomyeloneuropathy (AMN) in a family and the results of their MRI study are reported. Case 1, a 24-year-old male proband, was admitted to our hospital because of gait disturbance for three years. Bilateral cataracts were pointed out at birth, which required left side lenticotomy at age four. Neurological examinations on admission revealed a marked spastic paraparesis with pathological reflexes and a mild hypesthesia in the distal part of the left leg. No abnormal findings were detected in X-ray studies on the spine and spinal cord, electromyography and nerve conduction test. Serum very long chain fatty acids (VLCFAs) levels were apparently elevated, and the serum cortisol response to ACTH was low. Case 2, a 53-year-old woman, is the mother of Case 1 having a complaint of gait disturbance since age 51. She presented a mild spastic paraparesis with localized hypesthesia in the distal part of the both legs. She also had bilateral congenital cataracts. Her serum VLCFAs analysis indicated the intermediate levels between that of AMN and the normal control. Adrenal functions were normal. Cranial MRI (TR 2,000 msec/TE 80 msec) study disclosed high signal intensity areas in bilateral internal capsules in Case 1. These findings, suggesting the pathological change of dysmyelination, seemed to be well compatible with the clinical pictures. With these clinical findings and the laboratory data, these two cases were diagnosed as AMN. In addition, association of congenital cataract with AMN in both cases was characteristic in this family, which hasn't been reported in the literature. On regarding the genetic background of these two disorders, AMN and congenital cataract, it was speculated that each gene could be closely located on the same or very adjacent locus, possibly on Xq. (author)

  19. Surgery for congenital choanal atresia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cedin, Antonio C; Atallah, Alvaro N; Andriolo, Régis B; Cruz, Oswaldo L; Pignatari, Shirley N

    2012-02-15

    Congenital choanal atresia is a rare abnormality characterized by unilateral or bilateral lack of patency of the posterior end of the nasal cavity. With an incidence of 1:5000 to 1:8000 births, it is twice as prevalent in females as it is in males. Surgical procedures aim to provide adequate functional choanal patency and a low rate of restenosis, avoid harm to any structure in development, enable shorter surgery and hospitalization times, and minimize morbidity and mortality. To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of the available surgical techniques for the treatment of congenital choanal atresia in patients with unilateral and bilateral atresia. We searched the Cochrane Ear, Nose and Throat Disorders Group Trials Register; the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL); PubMed; EMBASE; CINAHL; Web of Science; BIOSIS Previews; Cambridge Scientific Abstracts; ISRCTN and additional sources for published and unpublished trials. The date of the search was 31 January 2011. We planned to include parallel randomized or quasi-randomized controlled trials testing surgical approaches for the treatment of congenital atresia (irrespective of gender and age) that evaluated normal/adequate respiratory function (self reported or preserved nasal airway) and restenosis as the main primary outcomes. We did not consider reoperation and non-congenital atresia (e.g. traumatic, iatrogenic atresias) for inclusion. Three review authors independently assessed the titles and abstracts of the identified articles to determine potential relevance. For dichotomous and continuous variables, we planned to calculate risk ratios (relative risks; RR) and mean differences (MD) with 95% confidence intervals (CI), respectively. We planned to use the random-effects model since we were expecting substantial clinical and methodological heterogeneity. No randomized controlled trials were identified. From the 120 reports retrieved using our search strategy, 46 primary studies had the

  20. Laboratory Diagnosis of Congenital Toxoplasmosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomares, Christelle

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that screening and treatment for toxoplasmosis during gestation result in a decrease of vertical transmission and clinical sequelae. Early treatment was associated with improved outcomes. Thus, laboratory methods should aim for early identification of infants with congenital toxoplasmosis (CT). Diagnostic approaches should include, at least, detection of Toxoplasma IgG, IgM, and IgA and a comprehensive review of maternal history, including the gestational age at which the mother was infected and treatment. Here, we review laboratory methods for the diagnosis of CT, with emphasis on serological tools. A diagnostic algorithm that takes into account maternal history is presented. PMID:27147724

  1. Schizencephaly/congenital cerebral clefts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedman, H.; Naidich, T.P.

    1987-01-01

    Schizencephaly (from the Greek meaning ''split brain''), is a term developed in the 1940s to explain symmetric clefts in the brain seen at autopsy in children with histories of severe neurologic defects. Use of the term has been expanded to include a variety of cerebral clefts. A review of the experience at Children's Memorial Hospital as well as case materials made available to the authors are presented, including CT, MR imaging, and US findings. Theories of etiology and pathogenesis of these congenital clefts, associated anomalies, and the spectrum of appearance of these clefts are discussed

  2. An Expanded Multi-Organ Disease Phenotype Associated with Mutations in YARS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tracewska-Siemiątkowska, Anna; Haer-Wigman, Lonneke; Bosch, Danielle G M

    2017-01-01

    Whole exome sequence analysis was performed in a Swedish mother-father-affected proband trio with a phenotype characterized by progressive retinal degeneration with congenital nystagmus, profound congenital hearing impairment, primary amenorrhea, agenesis of the corpus callosum, and liver disease....... A homozygous variant c.806T > C, p.(F269S) in the tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase gene (YARS) was the only identified candidate variant consistent with autosomal recessive inheritance. Mutations in YARS have previously been associated with both autosomal dominant Charcot-Marie-Tooth syndrome and a recently reported...

  3. Genetically caused congenital anomalies of reproductive system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. F. Kurilo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Classification of congenital disorders, their frequency of occurrence in populations, and some terminology questions discussed in the review. Genetically caused congenital anomalies of reproductive system are outlined. Full information about genetic syndromes is stated in the book: Kozlova S.I., Demikova N.S. Hereditary syndromes and genetic counseling. M., 2007.

  4. Congenital segmental dilatation of the colon

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Congenital segmental dilatation of the colon is a rare cause of intestinal obstruction in neonates. We report a case of congenital segmental dilatation of the colon and highlight the clinical, radiological, and histopathological features of this entity. Proper surgical treatment was initiated on the basis of preoperative radiological ...

  5. Congenital Heart Diseases associated with Identified Syndromes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Recognised syndromes were seen in 69(68%) cases. Down syndrome with 54 children contributed 78.3% of those with known syndromes. Other identified syndromes and associations were Marfan's, Noonan's, Edwards, Prune Belly, Apert, Ellis-van creveld syndrome and congenital rubella syndrome. Congenital heart ...

  6. Congenital lobar emphysema: Is surgery routinely necessary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Congenital lobar emphysema (CLE) is a rare congenital abnormality characterised by overinflation of a pulmonary lobe. Its aetiology is unknown. The management of CLE has traditionally been surgical. A newborn boy with a birthweight of 2.5 kg was delivered at full-term by caesarian section due to food delivery.

  7. Congenital Diverticular Disease of the Entire Colon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Patel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital or true colonic diverticulosis is a rare condition typified by the preservation of the colonic wall architecture within the diverticular outpouching. Cases of multiple jejunal diverticula have been reported as well as cases of solitary giant diverticula of the colon. There have been no reports in the literature of pancolonic congenital diverticulosis.

  8. Congenital malformations in paediatric and neurosurgical practices ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Congenital malformations in paediatric and neurosurgical practices: problems and pattern (A preliminary report) ... Open Access DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT ... over a 5-year period (1998 to 2002) with congenital anomalies to the Paediatric Surgery and Neurosurgery units of the University Teaching Hospital, Ilorin, Nigeria.

  9. Cyanotic congenital heart disease and atherosclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarp, Julie Bjerre; Jensen, Annette Schophuus; Engstrøm, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Improved treatment options in paediatric cardiology and congenital heart surgery have resulted in an ageing population of patients with cyanotic congenital heart disease (CCHD). The risk of acquired heart disease such as atherosclerosis increases with age.Previous studies have speculated whether...

  10. The changing epidemiology of congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Bom, Teun; Zomer, A. Carla; Zwinderman, Aeilko H.; Meijboom, Folkert J.; Bouma, Berto J.; Mulder, Barbara J. M.

    2011-01-01

    Congenital heart disease is the most common congenital disorder in newborns. Advances in cardiovascular medicine and surgery have enabled most patients to reach adulthood. Unfortunately, prolonged survival has been achieved at a cost, as many patients suffer late complications, of which heart

  11. Health in adults with congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuypers, Judith A. A. E.; Utens, Elisabeth M. W. J.; Roos-Hesselink, Jolien W.

    2016-01-01

    Since the introduction of cardiac surgery, the prospects for children born with a cardiac defect have improved spectacularly. Many reach adulthood and the population of adults with congenital heart disease is increasing and ageing. However, repair of congenital heart disease does not mean cure. Many

  12. Health in adults with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuypers, Judith A A E; Utens, Elisabeth M W J; Roos-Hesselink, Jolien W

    2016-09-01

    Since the introduction of cardiac surgery, the prospects for children born with a cardiac defect have improved spectacularly. Many reach adulthood and the population of adults with congenital heart disease is increasing and ageing. However, repair of congenital heart disease does not mean cure. Many adults with congenital heart disease encounter late complications. Late morbidity can be related to the congenital heart defect itself, but may also be the consequence of the surgical or medical treatment or longstanding alterations in hemodynamics, neurodevelopment and psychosocial development. This narrative review describes the cardiac and non-cardiac long-term morbidity in the adult population with congenital heart disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. [Congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus: about a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esselmani, Hicham; Yassine, Asmaa; Bouabdellah, Mounya; Benchekroun, Laila; Handor, Najat; Elalami, Sanae; Chabraoui, Layachi

    2013-01-01

    Congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus is a rare, hereditary in nature, characterized by an inability of the kidney to concentrate urine, secondary to the manifold resistance to the action of vasopressin. X-linked forms of transmission (90%) are expressed in boys, from the neonatal period in general, by polyuria and polydipsia. Symptomatology in transmissive girls is variable but can sometimes be quite marked. These forms are secondary to mutations in the gene encoding the vasopressin V2 receptor, located at position Xq28, responsible for a loss of function of this receptor. Some of these mutations may cause a partial phenotype, less severe. Forms of autosomal, recessive or dominant are more rare (10%). Treatment is symptomatic, sometimes difficult in infants. It aims to avoid episodes of dehydration. It is based on a conventional diet hypo-osmotic and administration of hydrochlorothiazide and indomethacin. We report here the case of a child with congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus hospitalized at Children's Hospital of Rabat and throughout this case we review the pathophysiology and clinical and biological characteristics of the disease and including importance of contribution of clinical biochemistry laboratory in the diagnosis and monitoring of this disease.

  14. Nutritional Therapies in Congenital Disorders of Glycosylation (CDG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Witters

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDG are a group of more than 130 inborn errors of metabolism affecting N-linked, O-linked protein and lipid-linked glycosylation. The phenotype in CDG patients includes frequent liver involvement, especially the disorders belonging to the N-linked protein glycosylation group. There are only a few treatable CDG. Mannose-Phosphate Isomerase (MPI-CDG was the first treatable CDG by high dose mannose supplements. Recently, with the successful use of d-galactose in Phosphoglucomutase 1 (PGM1-CDG, other CDG types have been trialed on galactose and with an increasing number of potential nutritional therapies. Current mini review focuses on therapies in glycosylation disorders affecting liver function and dietary intervention in general in N-linked glycosylation disorders. We also emphasize now the importance of early screening for CDG in patients with mild hepatopathy but also in cholestasis.

  15. Exome sequencing identifies mutations in ABCD1 and DACH2 in two brothers with a distinct phenotype

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yanliang; Liu, Yanhui; Li, Ya; Duan, Yong; Zhang, Keyun; Wang, Junwang; Dai, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Background We report on two brothers with a distinct syndromic phenotype and explore the potential pathogenic cause. Methods Cytogenetic tests and exome sequencing were performed on the two brothers and their parents. Variants detected by exome sequencing were validated by Sanger sequencing. Results The main phenotype of the two brothers included congenital language disorder, growth retardation, intellectual disability, difficulty in standing and walking, and urinary and fecal incontinence. T...

  16. The cardiac phenotype in patients with a CHD7 mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corsten-Janssen, Nicole; Kerstjens-Frederikse, Wilhelmina S; du Marchie Sarvaas, Gideon J

    2013-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in CHD7 cause Coloboma, Heart Disease, Atresia of Choanae, Retardation of Growth and/or Development, Genital Hypoplasia, and Ear Abnormalities With or Without Deafness (CHARGE) syndrome, a variable combination of multiple congenital malformations including heart defects....... Heart defects are reported in 70% to 92% of patients with a CHD7 mutation, but most studies are small and do not provide a detailed classification of the defects. We present the first, detailed, descriptive study on the cardiac phenotype of 299 patients with a CHD7 mutation and discuss the role of CHD7...

  17. Structural genomic variation in childhood epilepsies with complex phenotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helbig, Ingo; Swinkels, Marielle E M; Aten, Emmelien

    2014-01-01

    of CNVs in patients with unclassified epilepsies and complex phenotypes. A total of 222 patients from three European countries, including patients with structural lesions on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), dysmorphic features, and multiple congenital anomalies, were clinically evaluated and screened.......9%). Segregation of all identified variants could be assessed in 42 patients, 11 of which were de novo. The frequency of all structural variants and de novo variants was not statistically different between patients with or without MRI abnormalities or MRI subcategories. Patients with dysmorphic features were more...

  18. MRI of congenital pituitary insufficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida Magalhaes, Alvaro C. de; Uehara, Karla C.; Iezzi, Denise

    1995-01-01

    We compare 1,5 T magnetic resonance (MR) image findings in 193 patients with congenital pituitary congenital insufficiency. One hundred and thirty nine of the MR studies were obtained in patients who had isolated growth hormone deficiency. Other fifth - four patients had multiple pituitary hormone deficiency. On MR images, normal anterior and posterior lobes of the pituitary glands can be clearly differentiated because the posterior lobe has a characteristic high intensity on TI-weighted images. In fifty-four patients, the high- intensity of the posterior lobe was not seen, but a similar high signal intensity was observed at the proximal stump in fifty-one patients. this high- intensity area is the newly formed ectopic posterior lobe, which also secrets anti-diuretic hormone just as the posterior lobe would. MR imaging can demonstrate the transection of the pituitary stalk and the formation of the ectopic lobe, revealing to be a useful diagnostic tool in the definition of the type of alteration in growth defects of endocrine origin. (author)

  19. Corpuscular radiation and congenital anomalies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Shinji; Yajima, Akira

    1983-01-01

    Many explorations have been done by our antecessors to find out about the congenital anomalies which might be caused by X-ray or γ-ray and experimental teratological researches have also been done, with some results. However, there have been less systematic studies on corpuscular radiation. Neutron ray is a radioactive ray no electrically-charged equally as photon (X-ray, γ-ray). With an equal dosage of it as photon's, its localized energy is high so that it is different in RBE, OER, etc. In heavy charged particle (proton ray, He ion, Ne ion, π-meson ray), there is the characteristic that the energy increases at around the deepest spot within the range rather than at the point of injection into a system, which is called Bragg peak. The type and energy of this radiation reflected in the uniqueness in energy distribution, in ionization density and in LET makes it the most important radioactive biological parameter. At this paper, we shall review the types of radioactive rays and discuss the congenital anomalies (teratogenecity) including the experimental results obtained by application of our proton ray. (author)

  20. Agrin mutations lead to a congenital myasthenic syndrome with distal muscle weakness and atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicole, Sophie; Chaouch, Amina; Torbergsen, Torberg; Bauché, Stéphanie; de Bruyckere, Elodie; Fontenille, Marie-Joséphine; Horn, Morten A; van Ghelue, Marijke; Løseth, Sissel; Issop, Yasmin; Cox, Daniel; Müller, Juliane S; Evangelista, Teresinha; Stålberg, Erik; Ioos, Christine; Barois, Annie; Brochier, Guy; Sternberg, Damien; Fournier, Emmanuel; Hantaï, Daniel; Abicht, Angela; Dusl, Marina; Laval, Steven H; Griffin, Helen; Eymard, Bruno; Lochmüller, Hanns

    2014-09-01

    Congenital myasthenic syndromes are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of rare diseases resulting from impaired neuromuscular transmission. Their clinical hallmark is fatigable muscle weakness associated with a decremental muscle response to repetitive nerve stimulation and frequently related to postsynaptic defects. Distal myopathies form another clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of primary muscle disorders where weakness and atrophy are restricted to distal muscles, at least initially. In both congenital myasthenic syndromes and distal myopathies, a significant number of patients remain genetically undiagnosed. Here, we report five patients from three unrelated families with a strikingly homogenous clinical entity combining congenital myasthenia with distal muscle weakness and atrophy reminiscent of a distal myopathy. MRI and neurophysiological studies were compatible with mild myopathy restricted to distal limb muscles, but decrement (up to 72%) in response to 3 Hz repetitive nerve stimulation pointed towards a neuromuscular transmission defect. Post-exercise increment (up to 285%) was observed in the distal limb muscles in all cases suggesting presynaptic congenital myasthenic syndrome. Immunofluorescence and ultrastructural analyses of muscle end-plate regions showed synaptic remodelling with denervation-reinnervation events. We performed whole-exome sequencing in two kinships and Sanger sequencing in one isolated case and identified five new recessive mutations in the gene encoding agrin. This synaptic proteoglycan with critical function at the neuromuscular junction was previously found mutated in more typical forms of congenital myasthenic syndrome. In our patients, we found two missense mutations residing in the N-terminal agrin domain, which reduced acetylcholine receptors clustering activity of agrin in vitro. Our findings expand the spectrum of congenital myasthenic syndromes due to agrin mutations and show an unexpected

  1. Syndromic (phenotypic diarrhea in early infancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bodemer Christine

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Syndromic diarrhea (SD, also known as phenotypic diarrhea (PD or tricho-hepato-enteric syndrome (THE, is a congenital enteropathy presenting with early-onset of severe diarrhea requiring parenteral nutrition (PN. To date, no epidemiological data are available. The estimated prevalence is approximately 1/300,000–400,000 live births in Western Europe. Ethnic origin does not appear to be associated with SD. Infants are born small for gestational age and present with facial dysmorphism including prominent forehead and cheeks, broad nasal root and hypertelorism. Hairs are woolly, easily removed and poorly pigmented. Severe and persistent diarrhea starts within the first 6 months of life (≤ 1 month in most cases and is accompanied by severe malabsorption leading to early and relentless protein energy malnutrition with failure to thrive. Liver disease affects about half of patients with extensive fibrosis or cirrhosis. There is currently no specific biochemical profile, though a functional T-cell immune deficiency with defective antibody production was reported. Microscopic analysis of the hair show twisted hair (pili torti, aniso- and poilkilotrichosis, and trichorrhexis nodosa. Histopathological analysis of small intestine biopsy shows non-specific villous atrophy with low or no mononuclear cell infiltration of the lamina propria, and no specific histological abnormalities involving the epithelium. The etiology remains unknown. The frequent association of the disorder with parental consanguinity and/or affected siblings suggests a genetic origin with an autosomal recessive mode of transmission. Early management consists of total PN. Some infants have a rather milder phenotype with partial PN dependency or require only enteral feeding. Prognosis of this syndrome is poor, but most patients now survive, and about half of the patients may be weaned from PN at adolescence, but experience failure to thrive and final short stature. Disease name

  2. COPD: Definition and Phenotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestbo, J.

    2014-01-01

    particles or gases. Exacerbations and comorbidities contribute to the overall severity in individual patients. The evolution of this definition and the diagnostic criteria currently in use are discussed. COPD is increasingly divided in subgroups or phenotypes based on specific features and association...

  3. Phenotypic Resistance to Antibiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose L. Martinez

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The development of antibiotic resistance is usually associated with genetic changes, either to the acquisition of resistance genes, or to mutations in elements relevant for the activity of the antibiotic. However, in some situations resistance can be achieved without any genetic alteration; this is called phenotypic resistance. Non-inherited resistance is associated to specific processes such as growth in biofilms, a stationary growth phase or persistence. These situations might occur during infection but they are not usually considered in classical susceptibility tests at the clinical microbiology laboratories. Recent work has also shown that the susceptibility to antibiotics is highly dependent on the bacterial metabolism and that global metabolic regulators can modulate this phenotype. This modulation includes situations in which bacteria can be more resistant or more susceptible to antibiotics. Understanding these processes will thus help in establishing novel therapeutic approaches based on the actual susceptibility shown by bacteria during infection, which might differ from that determined in the laboratory. In this review, we discuss different examples of phenotypic resistance and the mechanisms that regulate the crosstalk between bacterial metabolism and the susceptibility to antibiotics. Finally, information on strategies currently under development for diminishing the phenotypic resistance to antibiotics of bacterial pathogens is presented.

  4. Lipodistrofia generalizada congênita Congenital generalized lipodystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo P. Figueiredo Filho

    2004-08-01

    of HDL cholesterol in seven, cardiac hypertrophy in one and diabetes mellitus in two patients. All patients are under dietetic and clinical control. COMMENTS: The phenotypic characteristics of congenital generalized lipodystrophy are well identified, which, in most cases, favors the clinical diagnosis. The congenital generalized lipodystrophy is a very unusual syndrome that illustrates the importance of the adipose tissue for the majority of metabolic processes. A better understanding of this syndrome may open new horizons in the research of more prevalent diseases such as diabetes mellitus and obesity.

  5. Computer based extraction of phenoptypic features of human congenital anomalies from the digital literature with natural language processing techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakülah, Gökhan; Dicle, Oğuz; Koşaner, Ozgün; Suner, Aslı; Birant, Çağdaş Can; Berber, Tolga; Canbek, Sezin

    2014-01-01

    The lack of laboratory tests for the diagnosis of most of the congenital anomalies renders the physical examination of the case crucial for the diagnosis of the anomaly; and the cases in the diagnostic phase are mostly being evaluated in the light of the literature knowledge. In this respect, for accurate diagnosis, ,it is of great importance to provide the decision maker with decision support by presenting the literature knowledge about a particular case. Here, we demonstrated a methodology for automated scanning and determining of the phenotypic features from the case reports related to congenital anomalies in the literature with text and natural language processing methods, and we created a framework of an information source for a potential diagnostic decision support system for congenital anomalies.

  6. [Sex differences in congenital heart disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubry, P; Demian, H

    2016-12-01

    Gender influences the clinical presentation and the management of some acquired cardiovascular diseases, such as coronary artery disease, resulting in different outcomes. Differences between women and men are also noticed in congenital heart disease. They are mainly related to the prevalence and severity of some congenital heart defects at birth, and in adulthood to the prognosis, incidence of Eisenmenger syndrome and risks of pregnancy. The role of gender on the risk of operative mortality of congenital heart surgery remains debated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance in congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cazacu, A.; Ciubotaru, A.

    2010-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of congenital heart disease can be attributed to major improvements in diagnosis and treatment. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging plays an important role in the clinical management strategy of patients with congenital heart disease. The development of new cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) techniques allows comprehensive assessment of complex cardiac anatomy and function and provides information about the long-term residual post-operative lesions and complications of surgery. It overcomes many of the limitations of echocardiography and cardiac catheterization. This review evaluates the role of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging modality in the management of subject with congenital heart disease (CHD). (authors)

  8. Congenital anomalies of the neonatal head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benson, C.B.; Teele, R.L.; Dobkin, G.R.; Fine, C.; Bundy, A.L.; Doubilet, P.M.

    1987-01-01

    US is a noninvasive modality that has proved highly valuable in the assessment of congenital intracranial anomalies in the neonate. The patterns of malformation must be familiar to those who obtain and interpret neonatal cranial sonograms. The authors present a variety of cases of congenital anomalies studied with US, including agenesis of the corpus callosum, Dandy-Walker malformation, occipital enecphalocele, congenital hydrocephalus, vein of Galen aneurysm, hydranencephaly, holoprosencephaly, absence of the septum pellucidum, schizencephaly, and hypoplastic cerebellum. Correlation with other radiographic modalities and pathologic follow-up, available in a majority of cases, is included

  9. Etiological evaluation of primary congenital hypothyroidism cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezen, Diğdem; Dilek, Emine; Torun, Neşe; Tütüncüler, Filiz

    2017-06-01

    Primary congenital hypothyroidism is frequently seen endocrine disorder and one of the preventable cause of mental retardation. Aim of study was to evaluate the frequency of permanent/transient hypothyrodism, and to detect underlying reason to identfy any marker which carries potential to discriminate permanent/transient form. Forty eight cases older than 3 years of age, diagnosed as primary congenital hypothyroidism and started thyroxin therapy in newborn-period, and followed up between January 2007-June 2013 were included in the study. Thyroid hormon levels were evaluated and thyroid ultrasonography was performed in cases who are at the end of their 3 years of age, after 6 weeks of thyroxine free period. Thyroid sintigraphy was performed if serum thyroid-stimulating hormone was high (≥ 5 mIU/mL) and perchlorate discharge test was performed if uptake was normal or increased on sintigraphy. Cases with thyroid-stimulating hormone levels ≥ 5 mIU/mL were defined as permanent primary congenital hypothyroidism group and as transient primary congenital hypothyroidism group with normal thyroid hormones during 6 months. The mean age was 3.8±0.7 years. Mean diagnosis age was 16.6±6.5 days and 14 cases (29.2%) were diagnosed by screening program of Ministry of Health. There were 23 cases (14F, 9M) in permanent primary congenital hypothyroidism group and 12 (52.2%) of them were dysgenesis (8 hypoplasia, 4 ectopia), and 11 (47.8%) dyshormonogenesis. In transient primary congenital hypothyroidism group, there were 25 cases (17M, 8F). The mean thyroid-stimulating hormone levels at diagnosis were similar in two groups. The mean thyroxin dose in permanent primary congenital hypothyroidism group was significantly higher than transient group at the time of thyroxin cessation (2.1±0.7, 1.5±0.5 mg/kg/d, respectively, p=0.004). Thyroxin dose ≥1.6 mcg/kg/d was 72% sensitive and 69.6% specific for predicting permenant primary congenital hypothyroidism. Transient primary

  10. Epidemiology of congenital diaphragmatic hernia in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McGivern, Mark R.; Best, Kate E.; Rankin, Judith

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Published prevalence rates of congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) vary. This study aims to describe the epidemiology of CDH using data from high-quality, population-based registers belonging to the European Surveillance of Congenital Anomalies (EUROCAT). METHODS: Cases of CDH...... for isolated cases (ie, CDH cases that did not occur with any other congenital anomaly). There was significant variation in total and isolated CDH prevalence between registers. The proportion of cases that survived to 1 week was 69.3% (1392 cases) for total CDH cases and 72.7% (1107) for isolated cases...

  11. Congenital Amegakaryocytic Thrombocytopenic Purpura (CAMT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghauri, R. I.; Naveed, M.; Mannan, J.

    2014-01-01

    Congenital amegakaryocytic thrombocytopenia (CAMT) is a rare, autosomal recessive disorder induced by mutations of the gene coding for thrombopoietin (TPO) receptor (c-MPL) despite high levels of serum TPO. Patients initially present with isolated thrombocytopenia that subsequently progresses into pancytopenia. Although the mechanisms leading to aplasia are unknown, the age of onset has been reported to depend on the severity of the c-MPL functional defect. The primary treatment for CAMT is bone marrow transplantation. This report describes a newborn girl who presented to us with symptoms of sepsis but septic profile came negative except thrombocytopenia. Bone marrow biopsy was done for thrombocytopenia which revealed amegakaryocytic thrombocytopenia. She was given prednisolone. (author)

  12. Imaging of congenital diaphragmatic hernias

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, George A.; Estroff, Judy A.; Atalabi, Omolola M.

    2009-01-01

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernias are complex and life-threatening lesions that are not just anatomic defects of the diaphragm, but represent a complex set of physiologic derangements of the lung, the pulmonary vasculature, and related structures. Imaging plays an increasingly important role in the care of these infants. Prenatal sonography and MRI have allowed early and accurate identification of the defect and associated anomalies. These tools have also been the key to defining the degree of pulmonary hypoplasia and to predicting neonatal survival and need for aggressive respiratory rescue strategies. In the postnatal period, conventional radiography supplemented by cross-sectional imaging in selected cases can be very useful in sorting out the differential diagnosis of intrathoracic masses, in the detection of associated anomalies, and in the management of complications. Understanding the pathogenesis of diaphragmatic defects, the underlying physiologic disturbances, and the strengths and limitations of current imaging protocols is essential to the effective and accurate management of these complex patients. (orig.)

  13. Imaging of congenital diaphragmatic hernias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, George A.; Estroff, Judy A. [Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Children' s Hospital Boston, Boston, MA (United States); Atalabi, Omolola M. [Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Children' s Hospital Boston, Boston, MA (United States); The College of Medicine/University College Hospital, Ibadan (Nigeria)

    2009-01-15

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernias are complex and life-threatening lesions that are not just anatomic defects of the diaphragm, but represent a complex set of physiologic derangements of the lung, the pulmonary vasculature, and related structures. Imaging plays an increasingly important role in the care of these infants. Prenatal sonography and MRI have allowed early and accurate identification of the defect and associated anomalies. These tools have also been the key to defining the degree of pulmonary hypoplasia and to predicting neonatal survival and need for aggressive respiratory rescue strategies. In the postnatal period, conventional radiography supplemented by cross-sectional imaging in selected cases can be very useful in sorting out the differential diagnosis of intrathoracic masses, in the detection of associated anomalies, and in the management of complications. Understanding the pathogenesis of diaphragmatic defects, the underlying physiologic disturbances, and the strengths and limitations of current imaging protocols is essential to the effective and accurate management of these complex patients. (orig.)

  14. Congenital rubella syndrome in Haiti

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golden Nancy

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To determine if there is an unrecognized problem of congenital rubella syndrome (CRS in Haiti, a country without a national rubella immunization program. Methods. During March 2001 and June 2001, screening physicals were conducted on approximately 80 orphans at three orphanages in Haiti that accept disabled children. Children were classified as probable CRS cases based on established clinical criteria. Photo documentation of findings was obtained whenever possible. Results. Six children met the criteria for probable CRS. Using data from surrounding Caribbean countries and from the United States of America prior to rubella immunization, we estimated that there are between 163 and 440 new cases of CRS per year in Haiti. Conclusions. CRS exists in Haiti, but its presence is generally unrecognized. A national rubella immunization policy should be considered.

  15. Congenital rubella syndrome in Haiti

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy Golden

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To determine if there is an unrecognized problem of congenital rubella syndrome (CRS in Haiti, a country without a national rubella immunization program. Methods. During March 2001 and June 2001, screening physicals were conducted on approximately 80 orphans at three orphanages in Haiti that accept disabled children. Children were classified as probable CRS cases based on established clinical criteria. Photo documentation of findings was obtained whenever possible. Results. Six children met the criteria for probable CRS. Using data from surrounding Caribbean countries and from the United States of America prior to rubella immunization, we estimated that there are between 163 and 440 new cases of CRS per year in Haiti. Conclusions. CRS exists in Haiti, but its presence is generally unrecognized. A national rubella immunization policy should be considered.

  16. Exercise and Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junnan; Liu, Bin

    2017-01-01

    Exercise is an essential part of the physical and mental health. However, many doctors and patients have a conservative attitude to participate in exercise in patients with congenital heart disease (CHD). Exercise in patients with CHD is a relatively new and controversial field. Taking into account the involvement of exercise in patients with CHD is likely to induce acute cardiovascular events and even sudden death; many doctors have a conservative attitude to participate in exercise in patients with CHD, leading to the occurrence of excessive self-protection. CHD has been transformed from the original fatal diseases into chronic diseases, medical treatment will also transform from the improvement of the survival rate to the improvement of the quality of life. It is still a problem that whether patients with CHD should participate in exercise and which kind of CHD should take part in exercise to improve the quality of life.

  17. Two Cases of Autosomal Recessive Congenital Ichthyosis due to CYP4F22 Mutations: Expanding the Genotype of Self-Healing Collodion Baby

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noguera-Morel, L.; Feito-Rodriguez, M.; Maldonado-Cid, P.; Garcia-Minaur, S.; Kamsteeg, E.J.; Gonzalez-Sarmiento, R.; Lucas-Laguna, R. De; Hernandez-Martin, A.; Torrelo, A.

    2016-01-01

    Collodion babies are born with a tight, shiny cast that sheds in a few weeks. After shedding, most patients will display features of autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis (ARCI) later in life but in up to 10% of cases, the skin eventually becomes normal or only minimally involved, a phenotype

  18. Fine mapping of a de novo interstitial 10q22-q23 duplication in a patient with congenital heart disease and microcephaly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erdogan, F; Belloso, J M; Gabau, E

    2008-01-01

    deletions or duplications elsewhere in the genome. The main clinical features of the patient are microcephaly and congenital heart disease, which are likely to be caused by dosage effect of one or several genes in the duplicated region. Similar phenotypes have been found in other patients with 10q11-q22...

  19. Cardio-facio-cutaneous syndrome: does genotype predict phenotype?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allanson, Judith E; Annerén, Göran; Aoki, Yoki; Armour, Christine M; Bondeson, Marie-Louise; Cave, Helene; Gripp, Karen W; Kerr, Bronwyn; Nystrom, Anna-Maja; Sol-Church, Katia; Verloes, Alain; Zenker, Martin

    2011-05-15

    Cardio-facio-cutaneous (CFC) syndrome is a sporadic multiple congenital anomalies/mental retardation condition principally caused by mutations in BRAF, MEK1, and MEK2. Mutations in KRAS and SHOC2 lead to a phenotype with overlapping features. In approximately 10–30% of individuals with a clinical diagnosis of CFC, a mutation in one of these causative genes is not found. Cardinal features of CFC include congenital heart defects, a characteristic facial appearance, and ectodermal abnormalities. Additional features include failure to thrive with severe feeding problems, moderate to severe intellectual disability and short stature with relative macrocephaly. First described in 1986, more than 100 affected individuals are reported. Following the discovery of the causative genes, more information has emerged on the breadth of clinical features. Little, however, has been published on genotype–phenotype correlations. This clinical study of 186 children and young adults with mutation-proven CFC syndrome is the largest reported to date. BRAF mutations are documented in 140 individuals (approximately 75%), while 46 (approximately 25%) have a mutation in MEK 1 or MEK 2. The age range is 6 months to 32 years, the oldest individual being a female from the original report [Reynolds et al. (1986); Am J Med Genet 25:413–427]. While some clinical data on 136 are in the literature, 50 are not previously published. We provide new details of the breadth of phenotype and discuss the frequency of particular features in each genotypic group. Pulmonary stenosis is the only anomaly that demonstrates a statistically significant genotype–phenotype correlation, being more common in individuals with a BRAF mutation.

  20. Identification of a novel missense mutation of MAF in a Japanese family with congenital cataract by whole exome sequencing: a clinical report and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narumi, Yoko; Nishina, Sachiko; Tokimitsu, Motoharu; Aoki, Yoko; Kosaki, Rika; Wakui, Keiko; Azuma, Noriyuki; Murata, Toshinori; Takada, Fumio; Fukushima, Yoshimitsu; Kosho, Tomoki

    2014-05-01

    Congenital cataracts are the most important cause of severe visual impairment in infants. Genetic factors contribute to the disease development and 29 genes are known to cause congenital cataracts. Identifying the genetic cause of congenital cataracts can be difficult because of genetic heterogeneity. V-maf avian musculoaponeurotic fibrosarcoma oncogene homolog (MAF) encodes a basic region/leucine zipper transcription factor that plays a key role as a regulator of embryonic lens fiber cell development. MAF mutations have been reported to cause juvenile-onset pulverulent cataract, microcornea, iris coloboma, and other anterior segment dysgenesis. We report on six patients in a family who have congenital cataracts were identified MAF mutation by whole exome sequencing (WES). The heterozygous MAF mutation Q303L detected in the present family occurs in a well conserved glutamine residue at the basic region of the DNA-binding domain. All affected members showed congenital cataracts. Three of the six members showed microcornea and one showed iris coloboma. Congenital cataracts with MAF mutation exhibited phenotypically variable cataracts within the family. Review of the patients with MAF mutations supports the notion that congenital cataracts caused by MAF mutations could be accompanied by microcornea and/or iris coloboma. WES is a useful tool for detecting disease-causing mutations in patients with genetically heterogeneous conditions. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Left-Sided Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia with Multiple Congenital Cardiac Anomalies, Hernia Sac, and Microscopic Hepatic Heterotopia: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Arafah

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital diaphragmatic hernia is a common congenital anomaly of uncertain etiology. Its association with multiple congenital anomalies in various organs is well recognized and antenatal radiological evidence of congenital diaphragmatic hernia warrants thorough evaluation to detect other anomalies, some of which can be life threatening. Rarely, heterotopic hepatic tissue is identified in the hernia, a rare pathological finding, exhibiting more than one macroscopic and microscopic characteristics, and always associated with cardiac congenital anomalies. Herein, we report a case of left-sided microscopic heterotopic hepatic tissue in a congenital diaphragmatic hernia in an infant with multiple cardiac congenital anomalies, but with preserved pericardium.

  2. Congenital heart disease linked to maternal autoimmunity against cardiac myosin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Charles R; Yutzey, Katherine E; Brar, Anoop K; Goessling, Lisa S; Van Vickle-Chavez, Sarah J; Cunningham, Madeleine W; Eghtesady, Pirooz

    2014-05-01

    Structural congenital heart disease (CHD) has not previously been linked to autoimmunity. In our study, we developed an autoimmune model of structural CHD that resembles hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS), a life-threatening CHD primarily affecting the left ventricle. Because cardiac myosin (CM) is a dominant autoantigen in autoimmune heart disease, we hypothesized that immunization with CM might lead to transplacental passage of maternal autoantibodies and a prenatal HLHS phenotype in exposed fetuses. Elevated anti-CM autoantibodies in maternal and fetal sera, as well as IgG reactivity in fetal myocardium, were correlated with structural CHD that included diminished left ventricular cavity dimensions in the affected progeny. Further, fetuses that developed a marked HLHS phenotype had elevated serum titers of anti-β-adrenergic receptor Abs, as well as increased protein kinase A activity, suggesting a potential mechanism for the observed pathological changes. Our maternal-fetal model presents a new concept linking autoimmunity against CM and cardiomyocyte proliferation with cardinal features of HLHS. To our knowledge, this report shows the first evidence in support of a novel immune-mediated mechanism for pathogenesis of structural CHD that may have implications in its future diagnosis and treatment.

  3. Congenital hearing loss. Is CT enough?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mahmoud Agha

    2014-01-24

    Jan 24, 2014 ... Congenital hearing loss is one of the developmental disorders that may be not clearly .... Alport syndrome, Klippel-Feil, Norrie disease and Waarden- .... Bismuth eye shield was routinely used for all patients (AttenuRad;.

  4. Optimization of physical rehabilitation in congenital clubfoot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.L. Golovakha

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to improve the results of treatment of children with typical form of congenital clubfoot by optimizing of physical rehabilitation. The study included the following objectives: to make the algorithm work with the child, to justify the basis of physical rehabilitation, to study its effects, to develop a framework of implementation and optimization of the physical rehabilitation of children with congenital clubfoot. In the course of the study were 62 children involved with the typical form of congenital clubfoot: the main group (n = 42 and control group (n = 42. Age children from 4 years to 7 years. Physical rehabilitation was a logical continuation of treatment. Optimization analysis was performed by clinical examination, radiometric data and indicators of functional methods of research. Comparative analysis of the results of the physical rehabilitation of children with congenital clubfoot in both groups showed a trend more pronounced positive changes in children the main group in all respects.

  5. Massive congenital tricuspid insufficiency in the newborn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogren, H.G.; Ikeda, R.; Riemenschneider, T.A.; Merten, D.F.; Janos, G.G.

    1979-01-01

    Three cases of massive congenital tricuspid incompetence in the newborn are reported and discussed from diagnostic, pathologic and etiologic points of view. The diagnosis is important as cases have been reported with spontaneous resolution. (Auth.)

  6. Japanese family with congenital factor VII deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakakibara, Kanae; Okayama, Yoshiki; Fukushima, Kenji; Kaji, Shunsaku; Muraoka, Michiko; Arao, Yujiro; Shimada, Akira

    2015-10-01

    Congenital factor VII (FVII) deficiency is a rare bleeding disorder with autosomal recessive inheritance. The present female patient was diagnosed with congenital FVII deficiency because of low hepaplastin test (HPT), although vitamin K was given. Heterozygous p.A191T mutation was detected in the peripheral blood, and the same mutation was also found in the mother and sister. To the best of our knowledge, this is the fourth reported case of p.A191T mutation of FVII in the literature and the first to be reported in Japan. FVII coagulation activity (FVII:C) in asymptomatic heterozygous carriers is mildly reduced. Therefore, some patients may not be accurately diagnosed with congenital FVII deficiency. In infants with low HPT without vitamin K deficiency, congenital FVII deficiency should be considered. © 2015 Japan Pediatric Society.

  7. Congenital hearing loss. Is CT enough?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mahmoud Agha

    2014-01-24

    Jan 24, 2014 ... children have potential impact on child educational, cognitive and social development. .... nerstone for management planning. It guides the selection of ..... 7. Timothy C.Hain. Congenital deafness. http://www.dizziness-and-.

  8. Anaesthesia and familial dysautonomia with congenital insensitivity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adele

    the HSANs are familial dysautonomia (Riley-Day syndrome or HSAN type III) and congenital ... sion, and excessive vagal reflexes. Central ... His skin was mottled, dry and pale. ... Eye protection is important since affected individuals lack tears,.

  9. Congenital multifocal osteomyelitis at 24 weeks' gestation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raupp, Peter; Shubbar, Adil; Baichoo, Vijaymani; Samson, Gregory

    2007-01-01

    We report an extremely rare case of congenital nonsyphilitic osteomyelitis in a very preterm infant, providing a unique illustration of the radiological appearances at birth, which may serve as a reference to facilitate diagnosis. (orig.)

  10. Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome and intestinal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS), also called 'Ondine's curse', is characterised by an abnormal ventilatory response to progressive hypercapnia and sustained hypoxaemia. Neonates with this condition experience hypoventilation or apnoea while asleep. Patients may also have congenital intestinal aganglionosis (CIA), ...

  11. Congenital asymmetric crying face: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semra Kara

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Congenital asymmetric crying face is an anomalia caused by unilateral absence or weakness of depressor anguli oris muscle The major finding of the disease is the absence or weakness in the outer and lower movement of the commissure during crying. The other expression muscles are normal and the face is symmetric at rest. The asymmetry in congenital asymmetric crying face is most evident during infancy but decreases by age. Congenital asymmetric crying face can be associated with cervicofacial, musclebone, respiratory, genitourinary and central nervous system anomalia. It is diagnosed by physical examination. This paper presents a six days old infant with Congenital asymmetric crying face and discusses the case in terms of diagnosis and disease features.

  12. The incidence of congenital hypotyroidism is increasing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leunbach, Tina Lund; Christensen, Pia Sønderby; Kristensen, Kurt

    2017-01-01

    The prognosis of primary congenital hypothyroidism, which has potentially devastating effects on neurodevelopment, has been almost eradicated after the implementation of the neonatal screening programme. Although early facilitation with substitution of levothyroxine is preventative, caution shoul...

  13. South African congenital disorders data, 2006 - 2014

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    conditions, and to plan prevention and rehabilitation programmes. ... congenital infections and genetic deafness, blindness, physical ... The major challenges identified included erratic compliance by health facilities and a ..... Resolution 63.17.

  14. Polymicrogyria and Congenital Parvovirus B19 Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grant S. Schulert

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Fetal parvovirus B19 infection causes anemia, hydrops, and pregnancy loss but is generally not considered teratogenic. Nevertheless, disturbances of neuronal migration have been described with congenital parvovirus infection. We evaluated a term infant with congenital parvovirus disease and polymicrogyria. We compared this case with four other reports of central nervous system disease after birth to parvovirus-infected mothers. After an extensive diagnostic evaluation, this infant was found to have congenital parvovirus disease with severe anemia and nonimmune hydrops as well as extensive polymicrogyria. Although rare, this report and literature review suggest that parvovirus B19 has the potential to disrupt normal neurodevelopment. We suggest that infants with severe congenital parvovirus infection have close developmental surveillance and if symptomatic undergo neuroimaging to assess for disorders of neuromigration.

  15. Congenital anomalies of the male urethra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levin, Terry L.; Han, Bokyung; Little, Brent P.

    2007-01-01

    The spectrum of congenital anomalies of the male urethra is presented. The embryologic basis of each anomaly, when known, is discussed. Clinical and imaging features of each entity are presented. (orig.)

  16. Congenital and Genetic Disease in Domestic Animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulvihill, John J.

    1972-01-01

    Reviews observations on domestic animals that have led to the identification of environmental teratogens, and have provided insight into the pathogenesis of congenital defects and genetic diseases in man." (Author/AL)

  17. Transposition of the great arteries - a phenotype associated with 16p11.2 duplications?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karunanithi, Zarmiga; Vestergaard, Else Marie; Lauridsen, Mette H

    2017-12-26

    Genetic analyses of patients with transposition of the great arteries have identified rare copy number variations, suggesting that they may be significant to the aetiology of the disease. This paper reports the identification of a 16p11.2 microduplication, a variation that has yet to be reported in association with transposition of the great arteries. The 16p11.2 microduplication is associated with autism spectrum disorder and developmental delay, but with highly variable phenotypic effects. Autism and attention deficit disorders are observed more frequently in children with congenital heart disease than in the general population. Neonatal surgery is proposed as a risk factor, but as yet unidentified genetic abnormalities should also be taken into account. Thus, congenital heart abnormalities may constitute a part of the phenotypic spectrum associated with duplications at 16p11.2. We suggest chromosomal microarray be considered part of the diagnostic work-up in patients with transposition of the great arteries.

  18. Mesenchymal neoplasia and congenital pulmonary cysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weinberg, A.G.; Currarino, G.; Moore, G.C.; Votteler, T.P.

    1980-01-01

    A malignant mesenchymoma exibiting a varied spectrum of differentation developed within a congenital pulmonary cyst 6 1/2 years after the cyst was first recognized. Related tumors with a similar gross appearance have been previously described and have included rhabdomyosarcomas and so-called pulmonary blastomas. There is a low but distinct risk for the developement of mesenchymal sarcomas within congenital peripheral pulmonary cysts. (orig.) [de

  19. Congenital Liver Cyst in a Neonatal Calf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nora Nogradi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital serous cysts attached to the liver capsule are usually small and multiple, but can be solitary, grow extremely large, and become symptomatic. They are considered rare incidental findings during laparotomies or necropsies and thier occurrence is well described in the human literature, with limited reports from the veterinary literature. This report describes the ante-mortem diagnosis and successful surgical removal of a large congenital liver cyst in a neonatal calf.

  20. Congenital Symmastia: A 3-Step Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Sadaka, Mohamed Saad; Allam, Atef A.

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Congenital symmastia is a medial confluence of the breasts. It is a rare anomaly with few reports in the literature and no standard treatment. In this article, we present a case of congenital symmastia treated by 3 steps: liposuction, fixation of the skin to the chest wall in the area of the intermammary sulcus, and postoperative intermammary compression. A successful result was achieved with normal cleavage between the breasts. So, this is considered the ideal treatment for this con...

  1. Congenital Symmastia: A 3-Step Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allam, Atef A.

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Congenital symmastia is a medial confluence of the breasts. It is a rare anomaly with few reports in the literature and no standard treatment. In this article, we present a case of congenital symmastia treated by 3 steps: liposuction, fixation of the skin to the chest wall in the area of the intermammary sulcus, and postoperative intermammary compression. A successful result was achieved with normal cleavage between the breasts. So, this is considered the ideal treatment for this condition. PMID:28293510

  2. Thickened cortical bones in congenital neutropenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boechat, M.I.; Gormley, L.S.; O'Laughlin, B.J.

    1987-01-01

    Congenital neutropenia is an uncommon entity which may be familial and has a wide spectrum of clinical expression. Three sisters with the severe form of the disease, that suffered from recurrent infections which lead to their demise are described. Review of their radiographs revealed the presence of cortical thickening of the bones. Although several syndroms with different bone abnormalities have been reported associated with neutropenia, the radiographic finding of thickened cortex in children with congenital neutropenia has not been previously described. (orig.)

  3. Thickened cortical bones in congenital neutropenia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boechat, M.I.; Gormley, L.S.; O' Laughlin, B.J.

    1987-02-01

    Congenital neutropenia is an uncommon entity which may be familial and has a wide spectrum of clinical expression. Three sisters with the severe form of the disease, that suffered from recurrent infections which lead to their demise are described. Review of their radiographs revealed the presence of cortical thickening of the bones. Although several syndroms with different bone abnormalities have been reported associated with neutropenia, the radiographic finding of thickened cortex in children with congenital neutropenia has not been previously described.

  4. Solitary ulcerated congenital giant juvenile xanthogranuloma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Yuen Ng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A 3-month-old female patient with a giant ulcerated nodule over the back since birth was diagnosed as congenital giant juvenile xanthogranuloma (JXG based on clinical and histopathological examination. Congenital giant JXG with ulceration at birth is a rare presentation of JXG and commonly misdiagnosed. This case emphasizes the importance of being aware of the myriad presentations of JXG in order to make a correct diagnosis and avoid unnecessary investigations or treatment.

  5. Common congenital malformations of the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naidich, T.P.; Zimmerman, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    In nearly all cases, congenital malformations are characterized most easily by their anatomic features and are best images with T1-weighted short TR/short TE pulse sequences. T2-weighted, long TR/long TE images are used primarily for the phakomatoses that are commonly associated with brain tumors. This chapter reviews the features of the most common congenital malformations and illustrates their typical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearance

  6. Renal abnormalities in congenital chloride diarrhea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Hamad, Nadia M.; Al-Eisa, Amal A.

    2004-01-01

    Congenital chloride diarrhea CLD is a rare autosomal recessive disorder caused by a defect in the chloride/ bicarbonate exchange in the ileum and colon. It is characterized by watery diarrhea, abdominal distension, hypochloremic hypokalemic metabolic alkalosis with high fecal content of chloride >90 mmol/l. We report 3 patients with CLD associated with various renal abnormalities including chronic renal failure secondary to renal hypoplasia, nephrocalcinosis and congenital nephrotic syndrome. (author)

  7. Congenital Scaphoid Megalourethra: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji Obara

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A congenital megalourethra is an enlargement of the pendulous urethra without evidence of distal obstruction. A 1-month-old boy presented to us with complaint of weak stream, ballooning of the penis before and during voiding and post voiding dribbling, since birth. Physical examination and cystourethroscope confirmed the diagnosis of congenital scaphoid megalourethra. He underwent reduction urethroplasty. During postoperative follow up, he had normal looking penis with good urinary stream.

  8. Angle closure glaucoma in congenital ectropion uvea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grace M. Wang

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Congenital ectropion uvea is a rare anomaly, which is associated with open, but dysplastic iridocorneal angles that cause childhood glaucoma. Herein, we present 3 cases of angle-closure glaucoma in children with congenital ectropion uvea. Observations: Three children were initially diagnosed with unilateral glaucoma secondary to congenital ectropion uvea at 7, 8 and 13 years of age. The three cases showed 360° of ectropion uvea and iris stromal atrophy in the affected eye. In one case, we have photographic documentation of progression to complete angle closure, which necessitated placement of a glaucoma drainage device 3 years after combined trabeculotomy and trabeculectomy. The 2 other cases, which presented as complete angle closure, also underwent glaucoma drainage device implantation. All three cases had early glaucoma drainage device encapsulation (within 4 months and required additional surgery (cycloablation or trabeculectomy. Conclusions and importance: Congenital ectropion uvea can be associated with angle-closure glaucoma, and placement of glaucoma drainage devices in all 3 of our cases showed early failure due to plate encapsulation. Glaucoma in congenital ectropion uvea requires attention to angle configuration and often requires multiple surgeries to obtain intraocular pressure control. Keywords: Congenital ectropion uvea, Juvenile glaucoma, Angle-closure glaucoma, Glaucoma drainage device

  9. Radiographic observation of congenital diaphragmatic hernia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhee, Chung Sik [Ewha Women' s University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1973-12-15

    Five cases of congenital diaphragmatic hernia. Case 1: A female infant, birth weight 2.25 kg, Apgar score 10, normal delivery at 11:33 P.M. on Feb.8, 1972. Lt side congenital diaphragmatic hernia. Case 2: A female infant, birth weight 1.48 kg, Apgar score 5, normal delivery at 11:20 A.M. on Oct.14, 1972. Lt. side congenital diaphragmatic hernia. This infant was twin. this infant's mother was toxemia. Case 3; A 33 years old women was admitted to the our hospital because of Lt.hip joint pain without other symptoms. Date of admission: Jan. 8, 1973. Rt side congenital diaphragmentic hernia. Case 4: A 4 month infant male was admitted to the our hospital because of vomiting, dyspnea and abdominal pain. He had cyanosis intermittently after one month ago. This infant was normal delivered. The family history was not contributory. Date of admission: This infant was normal delivered. The family history was not contributory. Date of admission: Aug. 30, 1971. Rt side congenital diaphragmatic hernia. Case 5: A 13 years old girl was admitted to our hospital because of general weakness without other symptoms. This patient was normal delivered. The family history was not contributory. Date of admission: March. 15, 1973. Lt. side congenital diaphragmentic hernia.

  10. Radiographic observation of congenital diaphragmatic hernia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhee, Chung Sik

    1973-01-01

    Five cases of congenital diaphragmatic hernia. Case 1: A female infant, birth weight 2.25 kg, Apgar score 10, normal delivery at 11:33 P.M. on Feb.8, 1972. Lt side congenital diaphragmatic hernia. Case 2: A female infant, birth weight 1.48 kg, Apgar score 5, normal delivery at 11:20 A.M. on Oct.14, 1972. Lt. side congenital diaphragmatic hernia. This infant was twin. this infant's mother was toxemia. Case 3; A 33 years old women was admitted to the our hospital because of Lt.hip joint pain without other symptoms. Date of admission: Jan. 8, 1973. Rt side congenital diaphragmentic hernia. Case 4: A 4 month infant male was admitted to the our hospital because of vomiting, dyspnea and abdominal pain. He had cyanosis intermittently after one month ago. This infant was normal delivered. The family history was not contributory. Date of admission: This infant was normal delivered. The family history was not contributory. Date of admission: Aug. 30, 1971. Rt side congenital diaphragmatic hernia. Case 5: A 13 years old girl was admitted to our hospital because of general weakness without other symptoms. This patient was normal delivered. The family history was not contributory. Date of admission: March. 15, 1973. Lt. side congenital diaphragmentic hernia

  11. Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia in an Elite Female Soccer Player; What Sports Medicine Clinicians Should Know about This?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angoorani, Hooman; Haratian, Zohreh; Halabchi, Farzin

    2012-09-01

    Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia (CAH) refers to a group of congenital conditions characterized by disordered cortisol synthesis. The correlation between CAH and sports performance has been less studied before and there is very limited information regarding the impacts of this congenital disease on sports performance. Probably, there are some limitations for patients who suffer from CAH in sports, but at the same time, they may enjoy some advantage due to the probable effect of endogenous hyperandrogenism on their exercise performance. The case is a 14 - year old girl with male phenotype who is a known case of congenital adrenal hyperplasia. She plays in the women's national soccer team of under 16. She has been in the first division league of indoor soccer for 4 years and was also selected in the preparation training camp of women's football team for Singapore's youth Olympic Games. Her illness and dependence on corticosteroid have caused some concerns for her participation in the international competitions of women. However, following consultations with the Therapeutic Use Exemption (TUE) Committee of games organization, she received TUE to use corticosteroid only within the games period. Despite all her problems, she is now playing in the Second Division League of indoor soccer. A female adolescent with CAH may compete at the high level of outdoor and indoor soccer. However, there are many questions regarding the advantages and disadvantages of this congenital disorder and its treatment on sports related issues.

  12. Sonic Hedgehog mutations are not a common cause of congenital hypopituitarism in the absence of complex midline cerebral defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulo, Sabrina Soares; Fernandes-Rosa, Fábio L; Turatti, Wendy; Coeli-Lacchini, Fernanda Borchers; Martinelli, Carlos E; Nakiri, Guilherme S; Moreira, Ayrton C; Santos, Antônio C; de Castro, Margaret; Antonini, Sonir R

    2015-04-01

    Sonic Hedgehog (SHH) and GLI2, an obligatory mediator of SHH signal transduction, are holoprosencephaly (HPE)-associated genes essential in pituitary formation. GLI2 variants have been found in patients with congenital hypopituitarism without complex midline cerebral defects (MCD). However, data on the occurrence of SHH mutations in these patients are limited. We screened for SHH and GLI2 mutations or copy number variations (CNV) in patients with congenital hypopituitarism without MCD or with variable degrees of MCD. Detailed data on clinical, laboratory and neuroimaging findings of 115 patients presenting with congenital hypopituitarism without MCD, septo-optic dysplasia or HPE were analysed. The SHH and GLI2 genes were directly sequenced, and the presence of gene CNV was analysed by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA). Anterior pituitary deficiency was found in 74% and 53% of patients with SOD or HPE, respectively. Diabetes insipidus was common in patients with HPE (47%) but infrequent in patients with congenital hypopituitarism or SOD (7% and 8%, respectively). A single heterozygous nonsense SHH mutation (p.Tyr175Ter) was found in a patient presenting with hypopituitarism and alobar HPE. No other SHH mutations or CNV were found. Nine GLI2 variations (8 missense and 1 frameshift) including a homozygous and a compound heterozygous variation were found in patients with congenital hypopituitarism or SOD, but not in HPE patients. No GLI2 CNV were found. SHH mutations or copy number variations are not a common cause of congenital hypopituitarism in patients without complex midline cerebral defects. GLI2 variants are found in some patients with congenital hypopituitarism without complex midline cerebral defects or septo-optic dysplasia. However, functional analyses of these variants are needed to strengthen genotype-phenotype relationship. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Phenotypic variability in patients with Fanconi anemia and biallelic FANCF mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tryon, Rebecca; Zierhut, Heather; MacMillan, Margaret L; Wagner, John E

    2017-01-01

    Fanconi anemia is a heterogeneous genetic disorder that is characterized by progressive bone marrow failure, congenital anomalies, and markedly increased risk for malignancies. Mutations in the FANCF (FA-F) gene represent approximately 2% of affected patients. Currently, information on the phenotypic findings of patients with Fanconi anemia from biallelic mutations in FANCF is limited. Here, we report three patients who illustrate the clinical variability within the FA-F group. This analysis suggests a more severe phenotype for those with the common c.484_485delCT mutation. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. A nonsense mutation in CRYGC associated with autosomal dominant congenital nuclear cataract in a Chinese family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Ke; Jin, Chongfei; Zhu, Ning; Wang, Wei; Wu, Renyi; Jiang, Jin; Shentu, Xingchao

    2008-07-09

    To identify the genetic defect associated with autosomal dominant congenital nuclear cataract in a Chinese family. Family history and phenotypic data were recorded, and the phenotypes were documented by slit lamp photography. The genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood leukocytes. All the exons and flanking intronic sequences of CRYGC and CRYGD were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and screened for mutation by direct DNA sequencing. Structural models of the wild type and mutant gammaC-crystallin were generated and analyzed by SWISS-MODEL. Sequencing of the coding regions of CRYGC and CRYGD showed the presence of a heterozygous C>A transversion at c.327 of the coding sequence in exon 3 of CRYGC (c.327C>A), which results in the substitution of a wild type cysteine to a nonsense codon (C109X). One and a half Greek key motifs at the COOH-terminus were found to be absent in the structural model of the mutant truncated gammaC-crystallin. A novel nonsense mutation in CRYGC was detected in a Chinese family with consistent autosomal dominant congenital nuclear cataract, providing clear evidence of a relationship between the genotype and the corresponding cataract phenotype.

  15. Syndromic Hirschsprung's disease and associated congenital heart disease: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duess, Johannes W; Puri, Prem

    2015-08-01

    Hirschsprung's disease (HD) occurs as an isolated phenotype in 70% of infants and is associated with additional congenital anomalies or syndromes in approximately 30% of patients. The cardiac development depends on neural crest cell proliferation and is closely related to the formation of the enteric nervous system. HD associated with congenital heart disease (CHD) has been reported in 5-8% of cases, with septation defects being the most frequently recorded abnormalities. However, the prevalence of HD associated with CHD in infants with syndromic disorders is not well documented. This systematic review was designed to determine the prevalence of CHD in syndromic HD. A systematic review of the literature using the keywords "Hirschsprung's disease", "aganglionosis", "congenital megacolon", "congenital heart disease" and "congenital heart defect" was performed. Resulting publications were reviewed for epidemiology and morbidity. Reference lists were screened for additional relevant studies. A total of fifty-two publications from 1963 to 2014 reported data on infants with HD associated with CHD. The overall reported prevalence of HD associated with CHD in infants without chromosomal disorders was 3%. In infants with syndromic disorders, the overall prevalence of HD associated with CHD ranged from 20 to 80 % (overall prevalence 51%). Septation defects were recorded in 57% (atrial septal defects in 29%, ventricular septal defects in 32%), a patent ductus arteriosus in 39%, vascular abnormalities in 16%, valvular heart defects in 4% and Tetralogy of Fallot in 7%. The prevalence of HD associated with CHD is much higher in infants with chromosomal disorders compared to infants without associated syndromes. A routine echocardiogram should be performed in all infants with syndromic HD to exclude cardiac abnormalities.

  16. Congenital Anorectal Malformation Severity Does Not Predict Severity of Congenital Heart Defects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonker, Jara E.; Liem, Eryn T.; Elzenga, Nynke J.; Molenbuur, Bouwe; Trzpis, Monika; Broens, Paul M. A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the prevalence of congenital heart defects (CHDs) in patients with mild or severe congenital anorectal malformations (CARMs), and whether all patients with CARM need pediatric cardiology screening. Study design We included 129 patients with CARM born between 2004 and 2013, and

  17. Congenital cholesteatoma of the infratemporal fossa with congenital aural atresia and mastoiditis: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdel-Aziz Mosaad

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Congenital cholesteatoma may be expected in abnormally developed ear, it may cause bony erosion of the middle ear cleft and extend to the infratemporal fossa. We present the first case of congenital cholesteatoma of the infratemporal fossa in a patient with congenital aural atresia that has been complicated with acute mastoiditis. Case presentation A sixteen year old Egyptian male patient presented with congenital cholesteatoma of the infratemporal fossa with congenital aural atresia complicated with acute mastoiditis. Two weeks earlier, the patient suffered pain necessitating hospital admission, magnetic resonance imaging revealed a soft tissue mass in the right infratemporal fossa. On presentation to our institute, Computerized tomography was done as a routine, it proved the diagnosis of mastoiditis, pure tone audiometry showed an air-bone gap of 60 dB. Cortical mastoidectomy was done for treatment of mastoiditis, removal of congenital cholesteatoma was carried out with reconstruction of external auditory canal. Follow-up of the patient for 2 years and 3 months showed a patent, infection free external auditory canal with an air-bone gap has been reduced to 35db. One year after the operation; MRI was done and it showed no residual or recurrent cholesteatoma. Conclusions Congenital cholesteatoma of the infratemporal fossa in cases of congenital aural atresia can be managed safely even if it was associated with mastoiditis. It is an original case report of interest to the speciality of otolaryngology.

  18. Burden and impact of congenital syndromes and comorbidities among adults with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracher, Isabelle; Padrutt, Maria; Bonassin, Francesca; Santos Lopes, Bruno; Gruner, Christiane; Stämpfli, Simon F; Oxenius, Angela; De Pasquale, Gabriella; Seeliger, Theresa; Lüscher, Thomas F; Attenhofer Jost, Christine; Greutmann, Matthias

    2017-08-01

    Our aim was to assess the overall burden of congenital syndromes and non-cardiac comorbidities among adults with congenital heart disease and to assess their impact on circumstances of living and outcomes. Within a cohort of 1725 adults with congenital heart defects (65% defects of moderate or great complexity) followed at a single tertiary care center, congenital syndromes and comorbidities were identified by chart review. Their association with arrhythmias, circumstances of living and survival was analyzed. Within the study cohort, 232 patients (13%) had a genetic syndrome, 51% at least one comorbidity and 23% ≥2 comorbidities. Most prevalent comorbidities were systemic arterial hypertension (11%), thyroid dysfunction (9%), psychiatric disorders (9%), neurologic disorders (7%), chronic lung disease (7%), and previous stroke (6%). In contrast to higher congenital heart defect complexity, the presence of comorbidities had no impact on living circumstances but patients with comorbidities were less likely to work full-time. Atrial arrhythmias were more common among patients with moderate/great disease complexity and those with comorbidities but were less common among patients with congenital syndromes (pCongenital syndromes and comorbidities are highly prevalent in adults with congenital heart disease followed at specialist centers and add to the overall complexity of care. The presence of these additional factors has an impact on living circumstances, is associated with arrhythmias and needs to be further explored as prognostic markers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Congenital prosopagnosia: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Rizek Schultz

    Full Text Available Abstract Prosopagnosia is a visual agnosia characterized by an inability to recognize previously known human faces and to learn new faces. The aim of this study was to present a forty-six year-old woman with congenital prosopagnosia, and to discuss the neural bases of perception and recognition of faces. The patients had a lifetime impairment in recognizing faces of family members, close friends, and even her own face in photos. She also had impairment in recognizing animals such as discriminating between cats and dogs. The patient's basic visual skills showed impairment in identifying and recognizing the animal form perception on the coding subtest of the WAIS-R, recognizing overlapping pictures (Luria, and in identifying silhouettes depicting animals and objects (VOSP. Unconventional tests using pictures evidenced impairment in her capacity to identify famous faces, facial emotions and animals. Her face perception abilities were preserved, but recognition could not take place. Therefore, it appears that the agnosia in this case best fits the group of categories termed "associative".

  20. [Genetic aspects in congenital hypothyrodism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perone, Denise; Teixeira, Silvânia S; Clara, Sueli A; Santos, Daniela C dos; Nogueira, Célia R

    2004-02-01

    Congenital hypothyroidism (CH) affects between 1:3,000 and 1:4,000 newborns. Many genes are essential for normal development of the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis and hormone production, and are associated with CH. About 85% of primary hypothyroidism is called thyroid digenesis and evidence suggests that mutations in transcription factors (TTF2, TTF1, and PAX-8) and TSH receptor gene could be responsible for the disease. Genetic defects of hormone synthesis could be caused by mutations in the following genes: NIS (natrium-iodide symporter), pendrine, thyreoglobulin (TG), peroxidase (TPO). Recently, mutations in the THOX-2 gene have also been related to organification defects. Central hypothyroidism affects about 1:20,000 newborns and has been associated with mutations in pituitary transcriptional factors (POUIF1, PROP1, LHX3, and HESX1). The syndrome of resistance to thyroid hormone is rare, implies a hypothyroidism state for some tissues and is frequently associated with dominant autosomal mutations in the beta-receptor (TRss).

  1. Angiographic features of rapidly involuting congenital hemangioma (RICH)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konez, Orhan; Burrows, Patricia E. [Department of Radiology, Children' s Hospital Boston, Harvard Medical School, 300 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Mulliken, John B. [Division of Plastic Surgery, Children' s Hospital Boston, Harvard Medical School, 300 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Fishman, Steven J. [Department of Pediatric Surgery, Children' s Hospital Boston, Harvard Medical School, 300 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Kozakewich, Harry P.W. [Department of Pathology, Children' s Hospital Boston, Harvard Medical School, 300 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115 (United States)

    2003-01-01

    Rapidly involuting congenital hemangioma (RICH) is a recently recognized entity in which the vascular tumor is fully developed at birth and undergoes rapid involution. Angiographic findings in two infants with congenital hemangioma are reported and compared with a more common postnatal infantile hemangioma and a congenital infantile fibrosarcoma. Congenital hemangiomas differed from infantile hemangiomas angiographically by inhomogeneous parenchymal staining, large and irregular feeding arteries in disorganized patterns, arterial aneurysms, direct arteriovenous shunts, and intravascular thrombi. Both infants had clinical evidence of a high-output cardiac failure and intralesional bleeding. This congenital high-flow vascular tumor is difficult to distinguish angiographically from arteriovenous malformation and congenital infantile fibrosarcoma. (orig.)

  2. Symptoms of Autism Among Children with Congenital Deafblindness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dammeyer, Jesper Herup

    2014-01-01

    concerning individuals with congenital deafblindness. This study examines symptoms of autism among 71 children with congenital deafblindness using the Autism Behavior Checklist. The cohort of children with congenital deafblindness was found to have symptoms of autism on a level similar to children......Associations between congenital deafness or blindness and autism have been found. The main consequences of congenital sensory impairment, being barriers for communication, language and social interaction development, may lead to symptoms of autism. To date only few studies have been reported...... with another developmental disorder than autism for example intellectual disability. No association was found between severity of congenital sensory impairment and severity or type of symptoms of autism....

  3. Congenital tumors of the central nervous system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Severino, Mariasavina [G. Gaslini Children' s Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology, Genoa (Italy); Schwartz, Erin S. [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Thurnher, Majda M. [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Radiology, Vienna (Austria); Rydland, Jana [MR Center, St. Olav' s Hospital HF, Trondheim (Norway); Nikas, Ioannis [Agia Sophia Children' s Hospital, Imaging Department, Athens (Greece); Rossi, Andrea [G. Gaslini Children' s Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology, Genoa (Italy); G. Gaslini Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatric Neuroradiology, Genoa (Italy)

    2010-06-15

    Congenital tumors of the central nervous system (CNS) are often arbitrarily divided into ''definitely congenital'' (present or producing symptoms at birth), ''probably congenital'' (present or producing symptoms within the first week of life), and ''possibly congenital'' (present or producing symptoms within the first 6 months of life). They represent less than 2% of all childhood brain tumors. The clinical features of newborns include an enlarged head circumference, associated hydrocephalus, and asymmetric skull growth. At birth, a large head or a tense fontanel is the presenting sign in up to 85% of patients. Neurological symptoms as initial symptoms are comparatively rare. The prenatal diagnosis of congenital CNS tumors, while based on ultrasonography, has significantly benefited from the introduction of prenatal magnetic resonance imaging studies. Teratomas constitute about one third to one half of these tumors and are the most common neonatal brain tumor. They are often immature because of primitive neural elements and, rarely, a component of mixed malignant germ cell tumors. Other tumors include astrocytomas, choroid plexus papilloma, primitive neuroectodermal tumors, atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumors, and medulloblastomas. Less common histologies include craniopharyngiomas and ependymomas. There is a strong predilection for supratentorial locations, different from tumors of infants and children. Differential diagnoses include spontaneous intracranial hemorrhage that can occur in the presence of coagulation factor deficiency or underlying vascular malformations, and congenital brain malformations, especially giant heterotopia. The prognosis for patients with congenital tumors is generally poor, usually because of the massive size of the tumor. However, tumors can be resected successfully if they are small and favorably located. The most favorable outcomes are achieved with choroid plexus tumors

  4. Congenital tumors of the central nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Severino, Mariasavina; Schwartz, Erin S.; Thurnher, Majda M.; Rydland, Jana; Nikas, Ioannis; Rossi, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    Congenital tumors of the central nervous system (CNS) are often arbitrarily divided into ''definitely congenital'' (present or producing symptoms at birth), ''probably congenital'' (present or producing symptoms within the first week of life), and ''possibly congenital'' (present or producing symptoms within the first 6 months of life). They represent less than 2% of all childhood brain tumors. The clinical features of newborns include an enlarged head circumference, associated hydrocephalus, and asymmetric skull growth. At birth, a large head or a tense fontanel is the presenting sign in up to 85% of patients. Neurological symptoms as initial symptoms are comparatively rare. The prenatal diagnosis of congenital CNS tumors, while based on ultrasonography, has significantly benefited from the introduction of prenatal magnetic resonance imaging studies. Teratomas constitute about one third to one half of these tumors and are the most common neonatal brain tumor. They are often immature because of primitive neural elements and, rarely, a component of mixed malignant germ cell tumors. Other tumors include astrocytomas, choroid plexus papilloma, primitive neuroectodermal tumors, atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumors, and medulloblastomas. Less common histologies include craniopharyngiomas and ependymomas. There is a strong predilection for supratentorial locations, different from tumors of infants and children. Differential diagnoses include spontaneous intracranial hemorrhage that can occur in the presence of coagulation factor deficiency or underlying vascular malformations, and congenital brain malformations, especially giant heterotopia. The prognosis for patients with congenital tumors is generally poor, usually because of the massive size of the tumor. However, tumors can be resected successfully if they are small and favorably located. The most favorable outcomes are achieved with choroid plexus tumors, where aggressive surgical treatment leads to disease

  5. Managing congenital hyperinsulinism: improving outcomes with a multidisciplinary approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ackermann AM

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Amanda M Ackermann, Andrew A Palladino Division of Endocrinology and Diabetes, The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA, USA Abstract: Congenital hyperinsulinism (CHI is the most common cause of persistent hypoglycemia in pediatric patients and is associated with significant risk of hypoglycemic seizures and developmental delays. CHI results from mutations in at least nine genes that play a role in regulating beta-cell insulin secretion. Thus, patients with CHI have dysregulated insulin secretion that is unresponsive to blood glucose level. Each different genetic etiology of CHI is associated with particular clinical characteristics that affect management decisions. Given the broad phenotypic spectrum and relatively rare prevalence of CHI, it is important that patients with CHI be evaluated by clinicians experienced with CHI and the multiple subspecialty services that are necessary for the management of the disorder. In this review, we summarize the pathophysiology and genetic causes of CHI and then focus primarily on the most common genetic cause (mutations in the ATP-gated potassium [KATP] channel for further discussion of diagnosis, medical and surgical management, and potential acute and chronic complications. We provide insight from relevant published studies and reports, in addition to anecdotal information from our center’s clinical experience in caring for over 400 patients with CHI. Careful assessment of each patient’s individual pathophysiology is necessary to determine the appropriate treatment regimen, and continued close follow-up and monitoring of disease- and treatment-related complications are essential. Although significant improvements have been made in the past several years with regard to diagnosis and management, given the continued high morbidity rate in patients with CHI, improved diagnostic techniques and new therapeutic options would be welcomed. Keywords: hypoglycemia, hyperinsulinism, beta

  6. The Congenital Heart Disease Genetic Network Study: Cohort description.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thanh T Hoang

    Full Text Available The Pediatric Cardiac Genomics Consortium (PCGC designed the Congenital Heart Disease Genetic Network Study to provide phenotype and genotype data for a large congenital heart defects (CHDs cohort. This article describes the PCGC cohort, overall and by major types of CHDs (e.g., conotruncal defects and subtypes of conotrucal heart defects (e.g., tetralogy of Fallot and left ventricular outflow tract obstructions (e.g., hypoplastic left heart syndrome. Cases with CHDs were recruited through ten sites, 2010-2014. Information on cases (N = 9,727 and their parents was collected through interviews and medical record abstraction. Four case characteristics, eleven parental characteristics, and thirteen parent-reported neurodevelopment outcomes were summarized using counts and frequencies and compared across CHD types and subtypes. Eleven percent of cases had a genetic diagnosis. Among cases without a genetic diagnosis, the majority had conotruncal heart defects (40% or left ventricular outflow tract obstruction (21%. Across CHD types, there were significant differences (p<0.05 in the distribution of all four case characteristics (e.g., sex, four parental characteristics (e.g., maternal pregestational diabetes, and five neurodevelopmental outcomes (e.g., learning disabilities. Several characteristics (e.g., sex were also significantly different across CHD subtypes. The PCGC cohort is one of the largest CHD cohorts available for the study of genetic determinants of risk and outcomes. The majority of cases do not have a genetic diagnosis. This description of the PCGC cohort, including differences across CHD types and subtypes, provides a reference work for investigators who are interested in collaborating with or using publically available resources from the PCGC.

  7. Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome: diagnostic and management challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasi AS

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Ajay S Kasi,1 Iris A Perez,1,2 Sheila S Kun,1 Thomas G Keens1,2 1Division of Pediatric Pulmonology and Sleep Medicine, Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, 2Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA Abstract: Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS is a rare genetic disorder with failure of central control of breathing and of the autonomic nervous system function due to a mutation in the paired-like homeobox 2B (PHOX2B gene. Affected patients have absent or negligible ventilatory sensitivity to hypercapnia and hypoxemia, and they do not exhibit signs of respiratory distress when challenged with hypercarbia or hypoxia. The diagnosis of CCHS must be confirmed with PHOX2B gene mutation. Generally, the PHOX2B mutation genotype can aid in anticipating the severity of the phenotype. They require ventilatory support for life. Home assisted ventilation options include positive pressure ventilation via tracheostomy, noninvasive positive pressure ventilation, and diaphragm pacing via phrenic nerve stimulation, but each strategy has its associated limitations and challenges. Since all the clinical manifestations of CCHS may not manifest at birth, periodic monitoring and early intervention are necessary to prevent complications and improve outcome. Life-threatening arrhythmias can manifest at different ages and a normal cardiac monitoring study does not exclude future occurrences leading to the dilemma of timing and frequency of cardiac rhythm monitoring and treatment. Given the rare incidence of CCHS, most health care professionals are not experienced with managing CCHS patients, particularly those with diaphragm pacers. With early diagnosis and advances in home mechanical ventilation and monitoring strategies, many CCHS children are surviving into adulthood presenting new challenges in their care. Keywords: congenital central hypoventilation syndrome, PHOX2B, home mechanical ventilation, diaphragm

  8. Missense Mutations in CRYAB Are Liable for Recessive Congenital Cataracts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodong Jiao

    Full Text Available This study was initiated to identify causal mutations responsible for autosomal recessive congenital cataracts in consanguineous familial cases.Affected individuals underwent a detailed ophthalmological and clinical examination, and slit-lamp photographs were ascertained for affected individuals who have not yet been operated for the removal of the cataractous lens. Blood samples were obtained, and genomic DNA was extracted from white blood cells. A genome-wide scan was completed with short tandem repeat (STR markers, and the logarithm of odds (LOD scores were calculated. Protein coding exons of CRYAB were sequenced, bi-directionally. Evolutionary conservation was investigated by aligning CRYAB orthologues, and the expression of Cryab in embryonic and postnatal mice lens was investigated with TaqMan probe.The clinical and ophthalmological examinations suggested that all affected individuals had nuclear cataracts. Genome-wide linkage analysis suggested a potential region on chromosome 11q23 harboring CRYAB. DNA sequencing identified a missense variation: c.34C>T (p.R12C in CRYAB that segregated with the disease phenotype in the family. Subsequent interrogation of our entire cohort of familial cases identified a second familial case localized to chromosome 11q23 harboring a c.31C>T (p.R11C mutation. In silico analyses suggested that the mutations identified in familial cases, p.R11C and p.R12C will not be tolerated by the three-dimensional structure of CRYAB. Real-time PCR analysis identified the expression of Cryab in mouse lens as early as embryonic day 15 (E15 that increased significantly until postnatal day 6 (P6 with steady level of expression thereafter.Here, we report two novel missense mutations, p.R11C and p.R12C, in CRYAB associated with autosomal recessive congenital nuclear cataracts.

  9. Neonatal diabetes mellitus and congenital diaphragmatic hernia: coincidence or concurrent etiology?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Topiol Emmanuelle S

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Neonatal diabetes mellitus (NDM is a rare metabolic disorder, affecting approximately 1 in 500,000 live births. The management of NDM is challenging, as the benefits of controlling hyperglycemia must be balanced with the risks of iatrogenic hypoglycemia. NDM occurs in both permanent and transient forms, which have been genetically and phenotypically well characterized. Herein, we present the previously unreported combination of transient NDM (TNDM and congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH. In addition to reviewing the management and genetics of NDM we discuss the potential for overlapping genetic or embryologic abnormalities to explain the concurrence of CDH and NDM.

  10. Congenital scoliosis: an up-to-date

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnei, G; Gavriliu, S; Vlad, C; Georgescu, I; Ghita, RA; Dughilă, C; Japie, EM; Onilă, A

    2015-01-01

    Congenital scoliosis represents a spinal malformation due to defects of formation, segmentation or mixed ones. It is characterized by a longitudinal and rotational imbalance. 54 patients were analyzed and 39 out of them were operated by various approaches with anterior and posterior instrumentations during 2000 and 2012. The impossibility to appoint some patients encountered in the daily practice into the known classifications, allowed us to purpose two categories of congenital scoliosis related to the predominance of spinal deviances in the coronal and transversal views. No certain etiology of congenital scoliosis has been identified until today. The susceptibility of some polygenic defects is obvious due to the presence of a sum of defects associated to most of the congenital scoliosis cases and the rarity of the presence of a unique defect. The diagnosis requires a thorough clinical and imaging examination in order to establish an individualized therapeutic strategy. The treatment of congenital scoliosis is different from the adolescent idiopathic one. Therapeutic criteria are significantly different. It is essential to assess the difference in growth of the concavity related to the convexity when choosing a particular procedure. The magnitude of the curve and the progressive rate are fundamental issues to the surgeon PMID:26351546

  11. Angle closure glaucoma in congenital ectropion uvea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Grace M; Thuente, Daniel; Bohnsack, Brenda L

    2018-06-01

    Congenital ectropion uvea is a rare anomaly, which is associated with open, but dysplastic iridocorneal angles that cause childhood glaucoma. Herein, we present 3 cases of angle-closure glaucoma in children with congenital ectropion uvea. Three children were initially diagnosed with unilateral glaucoma secondary to congenital ectropion uvea at 7, 8 and 13 years of age. The three cases showed 360° of ectropion uvea and iris stromal atrophy in the affected eye. In one case, we have photographic documentation of progression to complete angle closure, which necessitated placement of a glaucoma drainage device 3 years after combined trabeculotomy and trabeculectomy. The 2 other cases, which presented as complete angle closure, also underwent glaucoma drainage device implantation. All three cases had early glaucoma drainage device encapsulation (within 4 months) and required additional surgery (cycloablation or trabeculectomy). Congenital ectropion uvea can be associated with angle-closure glaucoma, and placement of glaucoma drainage devices in all 3 of our cases showed early failure due to plate encapsulation. Glaucoma in congenital ectropion uvea requires attention to angle configuration and often requires multiple surgeries to obtain intraocular pressure control.

  12. Congenital rubella syndrome in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eftekhar Hasan

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Congenital rubella syndrome (CRS can be prevented with appropriate vaccination programs. The prevalence rates of rubella and CRS in Iran are unknown; therefore, the risk of exposure in pregnant women is not clear. The prevalence of CRS in the pre-vaccine period can be estimated by evaluating the proportion of children in the population with sensorineural hearing loss attributable to rubella. Methods This was a case-control study to estimate prevalence of CRS in Tehran (Iran by evaluating the proportion of children with sensorineural hearing loss attributable to rubella. The study used rubella antibody titer as an indicator, and compared the prevalence of rubella antibody between children with and without sensorineural hearing loss. Using these findings, the proportion of cases of sensorineural hearing loss attributable to rubella was estimated. Results A total of 225 children aged 1 to 4 years were entered into the study (113 cases and 112 controls. There was a significant difference between cases and controls with regard to rubella antibody seropositivity (19.5% vs. 8.9%, respectively, odds ratio = 2.47, 95% CI = 1.04–5.97. The proportion of sensorineural hearing loss cases attributable to rubella was found to be 12%, corresponding to a CRS prevalence of 0.2/1000. Conclusion The prevalence of CRS was approximately 0.2/1000 before rubella vaccination in Iran, Moreover; the results suggest that implementation of appropriate rubella vaccination programs could potentially prevent about 12% of cases of sensorineural hearing loss in Iranian children. This data could potentially be used as baseline data, which in conjunction with an appropriate method, to establish a surveillance system for rubella vaccination in Iran. An appropriate surveillance system is needed, because the introduction of a rubella vaccine without epidemiological data and an adequate monitoring program could result in the shifting of rubella cases to higher

  13. Congenitally missing mandibular second premolars: clinical options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokich, Vincent G; Kokich, Vincent O

    2006-10-01

    Congenital absence of mandibular second premolars affects many orthodontic patients. The orthodontist must make the proper decision at the appropriate time regarding management of the edentulous space. These spaces can be closed or left open. If the space will be left open for an eventual restoration, the keys during orthodontic treatment are to create the correct amount of space and to leave the alveolar ridge in an ideal condition for a future restoration. If the space will be closed, the clinician must avoid any detrimental alterations to the occlusion and the facial profile. Some early decisions that the orthodontist makes for a patient whose mandibular second premolars are congenitally missing will affect his or her dental health for a lifetime. Therefore, the correct decision must be made at the appropriate time. In this article, we present and discuss various treatment alternatives for managing orthodontic patients with at least 1 congenitally missing mandibular second premolar.

  14. Helical CT of congenital ossicular anomalies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osada, Hisato; Machida, Kikuo; Honda, Norinari

    2001-01-01

    Since January 1996 to December 2000, 26 cases of congenital ossicular anomaly could be diagnosed with helical CT. All cases were unilateral. In 8 patients with malformation of the external ear, CT showed malleoincudal fixation (n=5), malleoincudal fixation and deformed incuts long process (n=1), deformed incus long process (n=1), and partial fusion of malleus neck and incus long process (n=1). In 18 patients with normal external ear, CT showed defect of the incus long process (n=5), defect of both the incus long process and stapes superstructure (n=8, 2 patients with congenital cholesteatoma, 1 with hypoplastic oval window), defect of the stapes superstructure (n=2, 1 patient with oval window absence), defect of the malleus manubrium (n=1), ossification of the stampede's tendon (n=1), and monopod stapes (n=1). Helical CT can evaluate the auditory ossicular chain in detail and is useful for diagnosing congenital ossicular anomaly. (author)

  15. MR imaging of congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kersting-Sommerhoff, B.A.; Diethelm, L.; Teitel, D.F.; Sommerhoff, C.P.; Higgins, C.B.

    1988-01-01

    Sensitivity and specificity of MR imaging for the evaluation of congenital heart disease was assessed in 51 patients (31 male and 20 female, aged 3-69 years), with a total of 115 congenital heart lesions. The true diagnosis was established by angiocardiography, catheterization, or surgery. Sensitivity at a specificity level of 90% was determined by means of receiver operating characteristic curves for great vessel relationships (100%), thoracic aorta anomalies (94%), atrial (91%) and ventricular (100%) septal defects, visceroatrial situs (100%), loop (100%), right ventricular outflow obstructions (95%), aortic valve (52%), mitral valve (62%), and tricuspid valve (76%). Spin-echo MR imaging is a reliable method for the noninvasive evaluation of congenital heart disease but is limited in the assessment of some valvular anomalies

  16. Spontaneous subconjunctival abscess in congenital lamellar ichthyosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivanand C Bubanale

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital lamellar ichthyosis is an autosomal recessive, heterogeneous disorder presenting at birth with generalized skin involvement. The most common ophthalmic manifestation noted is bilateral ectropion of the lower eyelids. A 1-month-old female neonate, the second born of a nonconsanguineous marriage, presented with 4 days' history of redness, discharge, and swelling in the right eye. There was severe right upper eyelid ectropion, conjunctival injection, chemosis, a subconjunctival mass on the temporal bulbar conjunctiva spontaneously draining pus and corneal haze. The anterior chamber, iris, lens and fundus appeared normal. Congenital lamellar ichthyosis was suspected because of scaling and excessive dryness of the entire body. The occurrence of a spontaneous subconjunctival abscess is not known in lamellar ichthyosis. We thus report the management of a rare case of unilateral upper eyelid ectropion, subconjunctival abscess with orbital cellulitis in congenital lamellar ichthyosis.

  17. Cyanotic Congenital Heart Defects – literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlad Drăgoi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Congenital heart defects are one of the most interesting and important chapters regarding abnormal fetal growth pathology. The objective of this article is to present a literature review for the main cyanotic congenital heart defects. The ones presented in the article are: tetralogy of Fallot, transposition of the great vessels, double outlet right ventricle, truncus arteriosus, total anomalous pulmonary venous circulation and additional information regarding very rare malformations such as pentalogy of Cantrell and Uhl anomaly. An early and precise identification of congenital heart defects is an important step in an accurate follow-up of a potential problematic pregnancy. Knowing the sonographic aspect, associated pathology and the current available treatment procedures are vital for the fetal outcome and for the physician to adapt the right management in every situation that might appear during the pregnancy and in the neonatal period.

  18. MR imaging evaluation of congenital spine anomalies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bury, E.A.; Zimmerman, R.A.; Grossman, R.I.; Goldberg, H.I.; Bilaniuk, L.T.; Hackney, D.B.

    1987-01-01

    Over a 2-year period, 135 patients between the ages of 1 week and 18 years were examined with MR imaging for possible congenital anomalies of the spine and spinal cord. Tethered cords with various other associated pathologies such as lipomas and myelomeningoceles were found in 36 patients. The remaining abnormal examinations consisted of syrinxes, Chiari malformations, diastematomyelia, and conus masses. In 55 patients the studies were interpreted as normal. Of these, three were subsequently shown by surgery of myelography to be abnormal. The first had a thickened filum with a small epidermoid, the second a thickened filum, and the third, with only sagittal images, a diastematomyelia. Children presenting with symptoms highly suspicious for congenital abnormalities but with a normal MR study in multiple planes may still require further evaluation with myelography. Multiplanar MR examination in most instances will be a sufficient evaluation for congenital anomalies

  19. Deprivation amblyopia and congenital hereditary cataract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansouri, Behzad; Stacy, Rebecca C; Kruger, Joshua; Cestari, Dean M

    2013-01-01

    Amblyopia is a neurodevelopmental disorder of vision associated with decreased visual acuity, poor or absent stereopsis, and suppression of information from one eye.(1,2) Amblyopia may be caused by strabismus (strabismic amblyopia), refractive error (anisometropic amblyopia), or deprivation from obstructed vision (deprivation amblyopia). 1 In the developed world, amblyopia is the most common cause of childhood visual impairment, 3 which reduces quality of life 4 and also almost doubles the lifetime risk of legal blindness.(5, 6) Successful treatment of amblyopia greatly depends on early detection and treatment of predisposing disorders such as congenital cataract, which is the most common cause of deprivational amblyopia. Understanding the genetic causes of congenital cataract leads to more effective screening tests, early detection and treatment of infants and children who are at high risk for hereditary congenital cataract.

  20. Renal anomalies in congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Byung Hee; Kim, In One; Yeon, Kyung Mo; Yoon, Yong Soo

    1987-01-01

    In general, the incidence of urinary tract anomalies in congenital heart disease is higher than that in general population. So authors performed abdominal cineradiography in 1045 infants and children undergoing cineangiographic examinations for congenital heart disease, as a screening method for the detection, the incidence, and the nature of associated urinary tract anomalies. The results were as follows: 1. The incidence of urinary tract anomaly associated with congenital heart disease was 4.1% (<2% in general population). 2. Incidence of urinary tract anomalies was 4.62% in 671 acyanotic heart diseases, 3.20% in 374 cyanotic heart diseases. 3. There was no constant relationship between the type of cardiac anomaly and the type of urinary tract anomaly

  1. Anticoagulation in adults with congenital heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, A S; Idorn, L; Nørager, B

    2015-01-01

    Adults with congenital heart disease are a growing population. One of the major challenges in the care of these patients is to prevent thromboembolic episodes. Despite relative young age and no typical cardiovascular risk factors, this cohort has a high prevalence of thrombotic events....... Furthermore, there is a lack of scientific evidence regarding how to prevent thromboembolic events with anticoagulation in adults with congenital heart disease. The aim of this paper is to review the current literature pertaining to anticoagulation in adults with congenital heart disease and hence enable....... It is difficult to use treatment algorithms from the general adult population with acquired heart disease in this heterogeneous population due to special conditions such as myocardial scarring after previous surgery, atypical atrial flutter, prothrombotic conditions and the presence of interatrial shunts...

  2. Left-sided congenital heart lesions in mosaic Turner syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouayed Abdelmoula, Nouha; Abdelmoula, Balkiss; Smaoui, Walid; Trabelsi, Imen; Louati, Rim; Aloulou, Samir; Aloulou, Wafa; Abid, Fatma; Kammoun, Senda; Trigui, Khaled; Bedoui, Olfa; Denguir, Hichem; Mallek, Souad; Ben Aziza, Mustapha; Dammak, Jamila; Kaabi, Oldez; Abdellaoui, Nawel; Turki, Fatma; Kaabi, Asma; Kamoun, Wafa; Jabeur, Jihen; Ltaif, Wided; Chaker, Kays; Fourati, Haytham; M'rabet, Samir; Ben Ameur, Hedi; Gouia, Naourez; Mhiri, Mohamed Nabil; Rebai, Tarek

    2018-04-01

    In the era of the diseasomes and interactome networks, linking genetics with phenotypic traits in Turner syndrome should be studied thoroughly. As a part of this stratagem, mosaicism of both X and Y chromosome which is a common finding in TS and an evaluation of congenital heart diseases in the different situations of mosaic TS types, can be helpful in the identification of disturbed sex chromosomes, genes and signaling pathway actors. Here we report the case of a mosaic TS associated to four left-sided CHD, including BAV, COA, aortic aneurysms and dissections at an early age. The mosaicism included two cell lines, well-defined at the cytogenetic and molecular levels: a cell line which is monosomic for Xp and Xq genes (45,X) and another which is trisomic for pseudoautosomal genes that are present on the X and Y chromosomes and escape X inactivation: 45,X[8]/46,X,idic(Y)(pter→q11.2::q11.2→pter)[42]. This case generates two hypotheses about the contribution of genes linked to the sex chromosomes and the signaling pathways involving these genes, in left-sided heart diseases. The first hypothesis suggests the interaction between X chromosome and autosomal genes or loci of aortic development, possibly dose-dependent, and which could be in the framework of TGF-β-SMAD signaling pathways. The second implies that left-sided congenital heart lesions involve sex chromosomes loci. The reduced dosage of X chromosome gene(s), escaping X inactivation during development, contributes to this type of CHD. Regarding our case, these X chromosome genes may have homologues at the Y chromosome, but the process of inactivation of the centromeres of the isodicentric Y spreads to the concerned Y chromosome genes. Therefore, this case emerges as an invitation to consider the mosaics of Turner syndrome and to study their phenotypes in correlation with their genotypes to discover the underlying developmental and genetic mechanisms, especially the ones related to sex chromosomes.

  3. From metabolome to phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khakimov, Bekzod; Rasmussen, Morten Arendt; Kannangara, Rubini Maya

    2017-01-01

    for ideal vegetable protein production and for augmented β-glucan production. Seeds from three barley lines (Bomi, lys3.a and lys5.f) were sampled eight times during grain filling and analysed for metabolites using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The lys3.a mutation disrupts a regulator gene...... their successful application to link genetic and environmental factors with the seed phenotype of unique and agro-economically important barley models for optimal vegetable protein and dietary fibre production......., causing an increase in proteins rich in the essential amino acid lysine, while lys5.f carries a mutation in an ADP-glucose transporter gene leading to a significant increase in production of mixed-linkage β-glucan at the expense of α-glucan. Unique metabolic patterns associated with the tricarboxylic acid...

  4. Demographic features of subjects with congenital glaucoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamçelik, Nevbahar; Atalay, Eray; Bolukbasi, Selim; Çapar, Olgu; Ozkok, Ahmet

    2014-01-01

    Context: Congenital glaucoma is a potentially blinding ocular disease of the childhood. Identification of the possible associated risk factors and may be helpful for prevention or early detection of this public health problem. Aims: To demonstrate the demographic features of congenital glaucoma subjects. Setting and Design: The charts of congenital glaucoma patients referred to Tamcelik Glaucoma Center were retrospectively reviewed through the dates of 2000 and 2013. Materials and Methods: Analyzed data included diagnosis, age at first presentation, symptoms at first presentation, laterality of the disease, sex, presence of consanguinity, family history of congenital glaucoma, maturity of the fetus at delivery, and maternal age at conception. Statistical Analysis Used: Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 19.0 by IBM (SPSS Inc, Chicago, Illinois, USA) was used to compare the mean of continuous variables with Student's t-test and analysis of variance (ANOVA) and χ2 test was used to test differences in proportions of categorical variables. Results: The data of 600 eyes of 311 patients were analyzed. The distribution of primary and secondary congenital glaucoma among the patients were 63.3% (n = 197) and 36.7% (n = 114), respectively. Of the 311 patients, 57.2% (n = 178) were male and 42.8% (n = 133) were female. The overall frequency of bilateral disease was 92.3% (n = 287). Overall rate of consanguinity and positive family history was 45.3% (n = 141) and 21.2% (n = 66), respectively. Conclusions: Bilateral disease in this study was more common than previously reported studies. Positive family history was more frequent in primary congenital glaucoma although not statistically significant. PMID:24881602

  5. Deep Learning for Plant Phenotyping

    OpenAIRE

    Mori, Matteo

    2016-01-01

    Plant Phenotyping is an emerging science which provides us the knowledge to better understand plants. Indeed, the study of the link between genetic background and environment in which plants develop can help us to determine cures for plants’ sicknesses and new ways to improve yields using limited resources. In this regard, one of the main aspects of Plant Phenotyping that were studied in the past, was Root Phenotyping, which is based on the study of the root architectures. In particular, toda...

  6. Clinical features for diagnosis and management of patients with PRDM12 congenital insensitivity to pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Stella; Malik Sharif, Saghira; Chen, Ya-Chun; Valente, Enza-Maria; Ahmed, Mushtaq; Sheridan, Eamonn; Bennett, Christopher; Woods, Geoffrey

    2016-08-01

    Congenital insensitivity to pain (CIP) is a rare extreme phenotype characterised by an inability to perceive pain present from birth due to lack of, or malfunction of, nociceptors. PRDM12 has recently been identified as a new gene that can cause CIP. The full phenotype and natural history have not yet been reported. We have ascertained five adult patients and report their clinical features. Based on our findings, and those of previous patients, we describe the natural history of the PRDM12-CIP disorder, and derive diagnostic and management features to guide the clinical management of patients. PRDM12-CIP is a distinct and diagnosable disorder, and requires specific clinical management to minimise predictable complications. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  7. Comprehensive mutational screening in a cohort of Danish families with hereditary congenital cataract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars; Mikkelsen, Annemette; Nürnberg, Peter

    2009-01-01

    , and a gene conversion is the most likely mutational event causing this variant. Ten families had microcornea cataract, and a mutation was identified in eight of those. Most families displayed mixed phenotypes with nuclear, lamellar, and polar opacities and no apparent genotype-phenotype correlation emerged......PURPOSE: Identification of the causal mutations in 28 unrelated families and individuals with hereditary congenital cataract identified from a national Danish register of hereditary eye diseases. Seven families have been published previously, and the data of the remaining 21 families are presented...... together with an overview of the results in all families. METHODS: A combined screening approach of linkage analysis and sequencing of 17 cataract genes were applied to mutation analyses of total 28 families. RESULTS: The study revealed a disease locus in seven of eight families that were amenable...

  8. [Congenital hyperthyroidism in maternal Basedow disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meden, H; Rath, W

    1989-09-01

    A case of congenital hyperthyroidism, after pregnancy complicated by Graves' disease is presented. Fetal tachycardia was the cardial symptom. Caesarean section was performed in the 29 years old patient with normal thyroid function in the 29th week of pregnancy. The neonate showed symptoms of a congenital hyperthyroidism with goitre. Antithyroid antibodies were found in the serum of both mother and child. At the age of ten weeks, after a short course of thyrostatic treatment, the infant was discharged with normal thyroid function following complicationfree progress.

  9. Congenital color blindness in young Turkish men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citirik, Mehmet; Acaroglu, Golge; Batman, Cosar; Zilelioglu, Orhan

    2005-04-01

    We investigated a healthy population of men from different regions of Turkey for the presence of congenital red-green color blindness. Using Ishihara pseudoisochromatic plates, 941 healthy men from the Turkish army were tested for congenital red-green color blindness. The prevalence of red-green color blindness was 7.33 +/- 0.98% (5.10% protans and 2.23% deutans). These ratios were higher than other reported samples from Mediterranean Europe. Higher percentages of color blindness were found in regions with a lower education level and more consanguineous marriages.

  10. Columellar sinus: A rare congenital isolated sinus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anindita Datta

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Midline congenital malformation of the nose is a very rare presentation and it's midline situation seems curious and is very difficult to explain on the basis of the present day conception of the embryology of the nose. The prevalence of lower lip sinuses has been estimated to be about 0.001 % of the general population. Upper lip sinuses are even more uncommon. We herein report a case of a 13 years old girl having congenital sinus affecting the upper part of the columella.

  11. Congenital intestinal lymphangiectasia. A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgios Mitsiakos

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Congenital intestinal lymphangiectasia, first described by Waldmann et al. in 1961, is a rare congenital malformation of the lymphatics, presented with generalized edema, hypoproteinemia and lymphopenia. Diagnosis is based on endoscopy findings and pathology.We present here a case of a male neonate, second child of an indigenous woman, delivered by caesarean section. Prenatally, multiple cystic abdominal masses were identified by ultrasound. The patient was treated successfully with enterectomy and anastomosis. Histopathology revealed primary intestinal lymphangiectasia with no features of malignancy.Intestinal lymphangiectasia is a rare pathology, which should be differentiated while exploring abdominal masses, hypoproteinemia and edema especially in neonates.

  12. Congenital milia En plaque on scalp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangita Ghosh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Milia en plaque is a rare disease entity characterized by confluence of multiple keratin-filled cysts resulting from the obstruction of hair follicle without any preceding primary dermatosis. Fewer than 40 cases have been reported so far in dermatological literature, and most cases are described to occur in adults and in the peri-auricular area. We describe a case of congenital MEP on scalp of a five-year-old boy with a blaschkoid extension into posterior nuchal area. This case report claims its uniqueness because of the unusual site and congenital presentation.

  13. Giant Congenital Melanocytic Naevi: review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Marchesi

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available giant congenital pigmented naevi is a great reconstructive challenge for the pediatric and plastic surgeons. due to the increased risk of malignant transformation in such lesions, many procedures have been used to remove giant congenital naevi like dermoabrasion, laser treatment or surgical excision combined with reconstruction through skin expansion or skin grafting; among these, only a complete excision can offer an efficacious treatment. in our centre we use the “tissue expansion” technique in order to achieve a sufficient quantity of normal skin to perform a both staged and radical excision of these giant lesions.

  14. Congenital nephrotic syndrome. Gallium-67 imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trepashko, D.W.; Gelfand, M.J.; Pan, C.C.

    1988-01-01

    Congenital nephrotic syndrome is a rare disorder. Heavy proteinuria, hypoalbuminemia, and edema occur during the first 3 months of life. Initial cases were reported from Finland and sporadic cases have occurred elsewhere. Finnish cases demonstrated an autosomal recessive inheritance pattern; currently, Finnish and non-Finnish types are recognized. The clinical course consists of failure to thrive, frequent infections, declining renal function, and early death by age 4 years from sepsis or uremia. Recently renal transplantation has improved the prognosis of patients with this disease. An abnormal Ga-67 scan in a case of congenital nephrotic syndrome is presented

  15. Straight line closure of congenital macrostomia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schwarz Richard

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of patients operated on by Nepal Cleft Lip and Palate Association (NECLAPA surgeons for congenital macrostomia were prospectively studied between January 2000 and December 2002. There were four males and three females with a median age of 10 years. Three had an associated branchial arch syndrome. In all patients an overlapping repair of orbicularis oris was done. Six patients had a straight line closure with excellent cosmetic results and one a Z-plasty with a more obvious scar. All had a normal appearing commissure. Overlapping orbicularis repair with straight line skin closure for this rare congenital anomaly is recommended.

  16. Reduced taste sensitivity in congenital blindness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gagnon, Lea; Kupers, Ron; Ptito, Maurice

    2013-01-01

    behavioral results showed that compared with the normal sighted, blind subjects have increased thresholds for taste detection and taste identification. This finding is at odds with the superior performance of congenitally blind subjects in several tactile, auditory and olfactory tasks. Our psychometric data...... thresholds of the 5 basic tastants in 13 congenitally blind and 13 sighted control subjects. Participants also answered several eating habits questionnaires, including the Food Neophobia Scale, the Food Variety Seeking Tendency Scale, the Intuitive Eating Scale, and the Body Awareness Questionnaire. Our...

  17. Congenital anomalies after assisted reproductive technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinborg, Anja; Henningsen, Anna-Karina Aaris; Malchau, Sara Sofie

    2013-01-01

    Worldwide, more than 5 million children have been born after assisted reproductive technology (ART), and in many developed countries ART infants represent more than 1% of the birth cohorts. It is well known that ART children are at increased risk of congenital malformations even after adjustment...... for known confounders such as maternal age. The proportion of ART children is not negligible, and knowledge about the causes of the higher risk of congenital malformations is crucial to develop prevention strategies to reduce the future risk in ART children. The aim of this review is to summarize...

  18. Congenital Absence of the Internal Carotid Artery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Florio, Francesco; Balzano, Silverio; Nardella, Michele; Strizzi, Vincenzo; Cammisa, Mario; Bozzini, Vincenzo; Catapano, Giuseppe; D'Angelo, Vincenzo

    1999-01-01

    We report three cases of congenital absence of an internal carotid artery (ICA), diagnosed incidentally by digital subtraction angiography. The analysis of the cases is based on the classification of segmental ICA agenesis proposed by Lasjaunias and Berenstein. Usually the patients with this rare vascular anomaly are asymptomatic; some may have symptoms related to cerebrovascular insufficiency, compression by enlarged intracranial collateral vessels, or complications associated with cerebral aneurysms. Diagnosis of congenital absence of ICA is made by skull base computed tomography (CT) scan, CT and magnetic resonance angiography, and conventional or digital subtraction angiography

  19. Pediatric congenital vertebral artery arteriovenous malformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shownkeen, Harish; Chenelle, Andrew G.; Origitano, Thomas C.; Bova, Davide

    2003-01-01

    Vertebral arteriovenous fistulas are rare in children and the congenital form has been seldom reported in the literature. Prior to using endovascular therapy techniques, only surgery was the main treatment. The most common endovascular treatment is through the use of detachable balloons. This report describes the clinical and radiological findings of a congenital vertebral artery fistula in a 20-month-old child. Balloons could not be safely employed; therefore, embolization was performed with Guglielmi detachable microcoils. We review the history and treatment of these lesions, their clinical presentation, and imaging features, including their outcome, with particular attention to the pediatric population. (orig.)

  20. Tracheal quadrifurcation associated with congenital heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhat, Venkatraman; Gadabanahalli, Karthik; Ahmad, Ozaire [Narayana Multispeciality Hospital and Mazumdar Shaw Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, Bangalore (India)

    2015-08-15

    Tracheal anomalies are known in association with congenital cardiac defects. Some of the well-described anomalies include accessory (displaced) tracheal bronchus with variants, tracheal trifurcation and accessory cardiac bronchus. Here we describe a case of tracheal quadrifurcation associated with complex congenital heart disease. Illustration of complex airway anatomy was simplified by the use of multidetector CT using a variety of image display options. Awareness of this complex anomaly will expand our knowledge of tracheal anomalies and equip the anesthesia and surgical team for better airway management. (orig.)

  1. Congenital generalized lipodystrophia: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malheiros, N.R.; Marchiori, E.; Praxedes, M.C.; Machado, D.M.; Carvalho, A.A.V.

    1995-01-01

    Congenital generalized lipodystrophia is a rare genetic disorder, transmitted as an autosomal recessive trait and is prevalent on female. This paper presents a case of a man, 36-year-old, suffering from congenital generalized lipodystrophia with clinical features of diabetes mellitus and dyspnea. Radiographic findings have shown cystic areas in the skeleton, interstitial pulmonary fibrosis and paucity of abdominal fat. Radiological and anatomo-pathological aspects are presented as well as a review of the medical literature about the case. (author). 8 refs, 4 figs

  2. PROBLEM OF DIAGNOSIS OF EARLY CONGENITAL SYPHILIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. P. Martynova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a case of delayed diagnosis of early congenital syphilis in a child whose mother was observed in prenatal clinic starting from the 14th week of pregnancy. The child had specific skin rash already in maternity. The child was discharged home without examination in the hospital. Only manifestations of nephritis lead to admission of the child into an inpatient hospital. Only at the age of 1 month and 23 days the child was suspected of early congenital syphilis with severe polisimptomnym, and the patient was transferred to specialized hospital. 

  3. Spectrum of congenital anomalies in pregnancies with pregestational diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garne, Ester; Loane, Maria; Dolk, Helen

    2012-01-01

    Maternal pregestational diabetes is a well-known risk factor for congenital anomalies. This study analyses the spectrum of congenital anomalies associated with maternal diabetes using data from a large European database for the population-based surveillance of congenital anomalies....

  4. Symptoms of Autism among Children with Congenital Deafblindness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dammeyer, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    Associations between congenital deafness or blindness and autism have been found. The main consequences of congenital sensory impairment, being barriers for communication, language and social interaction development, may lead to symptoms of autism. To date only few studies have been reported concerning individuals with congenital deafblindness.…

  5. Spectrum of congenital anomalies in pregnancies with pregestational diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garne, Ester; Loane, Maria; Dolk, Helen; Barisic, Ingeborg; Addor, Marie-Claude; Arriola, Larraitz; Bakker, Marian; Calzolari, Elisa; Dias, Carlos Matias; Doray, Berenice; Gatt, Miriam; Melve, Kari Klyungsoyr; Nelen, Vera; O'Mahony, Mary; Pierini, Anna; Randrianaivo-Ranjatoelina, Hanitra; Rankin, Judith; Rissmann, Anke; Tucker, David; Verellun-Dumoulin, Christine; Wiesel, Awi

    BACKGROUND Maternal pregestational diabetes is a well-known risk factor for congenital anomalies. This study analyses the spectrum of congenital anomalies associated with maternal diabetes using data from a large European database for the population-based surveillance of congenital anomalies.

  6. Congenital Amputation Involving the Hands and Feet: A Case Report

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There were forefoot amputations on both lower limbs. Scars were noticed over the amputation stumps with no associated congenital anomaly. Conclusion: Congenital amputation involving all limbs as an isolated entity is a rare condition; the cause of which is probably as a result of congenital amniotic bands. Keywords: ...

  7. A systematic review of trends and patterns of congenital heart ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Congenital heart diseases cause significant childhood morbidity and mortality. Several restricted studies have been conducted on the epidemiology in Nigeria. No truly nationwide data on patterns of congenital heart disease exists. Objectives: To determine the patterns of congenital heart disease in children in ...

  8. Congenital Heart Disease: Vascular Risk Factors and Medication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.P.M. Smedts (Dineke)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractCongenital heart disease (CHD) is among the most common congenital abnormalities and involves structural anomalies of the heart and/or related major blood vessels. Congenital heart disease arises in the fi rst trimester of pregnancy, occurring often and in many forms. The reported CHD

  9. Further evidence for P59L mutation in GJA3 associated with autosomal dominant congenital cataract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Congenital cataracts are one of the common eye disorders leading to visual impairment or blindness in children worldwide. We found a Chinese family with autosomal dominant pulverulent cataract. Aims: To identify the pathogenic gene mutation in a Chinese family with autosomal dominant inherited pulverulent cataract. Subjects and Methods: After obtained informed consent, detailed ophthalmic examinations were carried out; genomic DNAs were obtained from seven family members in a three-generation Chinese family with three affected. All exons of candidate genes were amplified by polymerase chain reaction and were sequenced performed by bidirectional sequencing. Results: By sequencing the encoding regions of the candidate genes, a missense mutation (c. 176C>T was detected in gap junction protein alpha 3 genes (GJA3, which resulted in the substitution of highly conserved proline by leucine at codon 59 (p.P59L. The mutation co-segregated with all patients and was absent in 100 normal Chinese controls. Conclusions: The study identified a missense mutation (c. 176C>T in GJA3 gene associated with autosomal dominant congenital pulverulent cataract in a Chinese family. It gave further evidence of phenotype heterogeneity for P59L mutation in GJA3 associated with congenital cataract.

  10. B3GALNT2 mutations associated with non-syndromic autosomal recessive intellectual disability reveal a lack of genotype-phenotype associations in the muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maroofian, R.; Riemersma, M.; Jae, L.T.; Zhianabed, N.; Willemsen, M.H.; Wissink-Lindhout, W.M.; Willemsen, M.A.A.P.; Brouwer, A.P.M. de; Mehrjardi, M.Y.V.; Ashrafi, M.R.; Kusters, B.; Kleefstra, T.; Jamshidi, Y.; Nasseri, M.; Pfundt, R.; Brummelkamp, T.R.; Abbaszadegan, M.R.; Lefeber, D.J.; Bokhoven, H. van

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The phenotypic severity of congenital muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy (MDDG) syndromes associated with aberrant glycosylation of alpha-dystroglycan ranges from the severe Walker-Warburg syndrome or muscle-eye-brain disease to mild, late-onset, isolated limb-girdle muscular

  11. Genotype–phenotype correlations in individuals with pathogenic RERE variants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Valerie K.; Fregeau, Brieana; Ge, Xiaoyan; Giordano, Jessica; Wapner, Ronald J.; Balci, Tugce B.; Carter, Melissa T.; Bernat, John A.; Moccia, Amanda N.; Srivastava, Anshika; Martin, Donna M.; Bielas, Stephanie L.; Pappas, John; Svoboda, Melissa D.; Rio, Marlène; Boddaert, Nathalie; Cantagrel, Vincent; Lewis, Andrea M.; Scaglia, Fernando; Kohler, Jennefer N.; Bernstein, Jonathan A.; Dries, Annika M.; Rosenfeld, Jill A.; DeFilippo, Colette; Thorson, Willa; Yang, Yaping; Sherr, Elliott H.; Bi, Weimin; Scott, Daryl A.

    2018-01-01

    Heterozygous variants in the arginine-glutamic acid dipeptide repeats gene (RERE) have been shown to cause neurodevelopmental disorder with or without anomalies of the brain, eye, or heart (NEDBEH). Here, we report nine individuals with NEDBEH who carry partial deletions or deleterious sequence variants in RERE. These variants were found to be de novo in all cases in which parental samples were available. An analysis of data from individuals with NEDBEH suggests that point mutations affecting the Atrophin-1 domain of RERE are associated with an increased risk of structural eye defects, congenital heart defects, renal anomalies, and sensorineural hearing loss when compared with loss-of-function variants that are likely to lead to haploinsufficiency. A high percentage of RERE pathogenic variants affect a histidine-rich region in the Atrophin-1 domain. We have also identified a recurrent two-amino-acid duplication in this region that is associated with the development of a CHARGE syndrome-like phenotype. We conclude that mutations affecting RERE result in a spectrum of clinical phenotypes. Genotype–phenotype correlations exist and can be used to guide medical decision making. Consideration should also be given to screening for RERE variants in individuals who fulfill diagnostic criteria for CHARGE syndrome but do not carry pathogenic variants in CHD7. PMID:29330883

  12. What’s new in genetics of congenital heart defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cristina Digilio

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies, clinical observations and advances in molecular genetics are contributing to the understanding of the etiology of congenital heart defects (CHDs. Several phenotype-genotype correlation studies have suggested that specific morphogenetic mechanisms put in motion by genes can result in a specific cardiac phenotype. The use of new technologies has increased the possibility of identification of new genes and chromosomal loci in syndromic and non-syndromic CHDs. There are a number of methods available for genetic research studies of CHDs, including cytogenetic analysis, linkage and association studies, copy number variation (CNV and DNA micro-array analysis, and whole exome sequencing. The altered dosage of contigous genes included inside CNVs can produce new syndromic CHDs, so that several different new genomic conditions have been identified. These include duplication 22q11.2 syndrome, distal 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, deletion and duplication 1q21.1, deletion 1p36 syndrome. Molecular techniques as whole exome sequancing has lead to the identification of new genes for monogenic syndromes with CHD, as for example in Adams-Oliver, Noonan and Kabuki syndrome. The variable expressivity and reduced penetrance of CHDs in genetic syndromes is likely influenced by genetic factors, and several studies have been performed showing the involvement of modifier genes. It is not easy to define precisely the genetic defects underlying non-syndromic CHDs, due to the genetic and clinical heterogeneity of these malformations. Recent experimental studies have identified multiple CNVs contributing to non-syndromic CHD. The number of identified genes for non-syndromic CHDs is at this time limited and each of the identified gene has been shown to be implicated only in a small proportion of CHD. The application of new technologies to specific cases of CHD and pedigrees with familial recurrence and filtering genes mapping in CNV regions can probably

  13. Educational series in congenital heart disease:Congenital left-sided heart obstruction

    OpenAIRE

    Carr, Michelle; Curtis, Stephanie; Marek, Jan

    2018-01-01

    Congenital obstruction of the left ventricular outflow tract remains a significant problem and multilevel obstruction can often coexist. Obstruction can take several morphological forms and may involve the subvalvar, valvar or supravalvar portion of the aortic valve complex. Congenital valvar stenosis presenting in the neonatal period represents a spectrum of disorders ranging from the hypoplastic left heart syndrome to almost normal hearts. Treatment options vary dependent on the severity of...

  14. Women with congenital factor VII deficiency: clinical phenotype and treatment options from two international studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napolitano, M; Di Minno, M N D; Batorova, A; Dolce, A; Giansily-Blaizot, M; Ingerslev, J; Schved, J-F; Auerswald, G; Kenet, G; Karimi, M; Shamsi, T; Ruiz de Sáez, A; Dolatkhah, R; Chuansumrit, A; Bertrand, M A; Mariani, G

    2016-09-01

    A paucity of data exists on the incidence, diagnosis and treatment of bleeding in women with inherited factor VII (FVII) deficiency. Here we report results of a comprehensive analysis from two international registries of patients with inherited FVII deficiency, depicting the clinical picture of this disorder in women and describing any gender-related differences. A comprehensive analysis of two fully compatible, international registries of patients with inherited FVII deficiency (International Registry of Factor VII deficiency, IRF7; Seven Treatment Evaluation Registry, STER) was performed. In our cohort (N = 449; 215 male, 234 female), the higher prevalence of mucocutaneous bleeds in females strongly predicted ensuing gynaecological bleeding (hazard ratio = 12.8, 95% CI 1.68-97.6, P = 0.014). Menorrhagia was the most prevalent type of bleeding (46.4% of patients), and was the presentation symptom in 12% of cases. Replacement therapies administered were also analysed. For surgical procedures (n = 50), a receiver operator characteristic analysis showed that the minimal first dose of rFVIIa to avoid postsurgical bleeding during the first 24 hours was 22 μg kg(-1) , and no less than two administrations. Prophylaxis was reported in 25 women with excellent or effective outcomes when performed with a total weekly rFVIIa dose of 90 μg kg(-1) (divided as three doses). Women with FVII deficiency have a bleeding disorder mainly characterized by mucocutaneous bleeds, which predicts an increased risk of ensuing gynaecological bleeding. Systematic replacement therapy or long-term prophylaxis with rFVIIa may reduce the impact of menorrhagia on the reproductive system, iron loss and may avoid unnecessary hysterectomies. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Inheritance of congenital cataracts and microphthalmia in the Miniature Schnauzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelatt, K N; Samuelson, D A; Bauer, J E; Das, N D; Wolf, E D; Barrie, K P; Andresen, T L

    1983-06-01

    Congenital cataracts and microphthalmia in the Miniature Schnauzer were inherited as an autosomal recessive trait. Eighteen matings of affected X affected Miniature Schnauzers resulted in 87 offspring with congenital cataracts and microphthalmia (49 males/38 females). Two matings of congenital cataractous and microphthalmic Miniature Schnauzers (2 females) X a normal Miniature Schnauzer (1 male) yielded 11 clinically normal Miniature Schnauzers (7 males/4 females). Eighteen matings of congenital cataractous and microphthalmic Miniature Schnauzers (6 males) X carrier Miniature Schnauzers (9 females) produced 81 offspring; 39 exhibited congenital cataracts and microphthalmia (20 males/19 females) and 42 had clinically normal eyes (17 males/25 females).

  16. Imaging diagnosis of congenital heart disease with single coronary artery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Ming; Li Yuhua; Zhong Yumin; Sun Aimin

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To report 56 cases of congenital heart disease with congenital single coronary artery and to evaluate the imaging diagnostic techniques. Methods: All 56 patients with congenital single coronary artery underwent angiocardiography. Contrast enhancement magnetic resonance angiography (CE MRA) was performed in 4 cases. 48 cases were confirmed by operation. Results: In these 56 cases, single left coronary artery was found in 44 cases and single right coronary artery was found in 12. Conclusion: Congenital heart disease with congenital single coronary artery is not rare and correct diagnosis is very important for surgery

  17. Congenital spine anomalies: the closed spinal dysraphisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwartz, Erin Simon [University of Pennsylvania, Department of Radiology, The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Rossi, Andrea [G. Gaslini Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Genoa (Italy)

    2015-09-15

    The term congenital spinal anomalies encompasses a wide variety of dysmorphology that occurs during early development. Familiarity with current terminology and a practical, clinico-radiologic classification system allows the radiologist to have a more complete understanding of malformations of the spine and improves accuracy of diagnosis when these entities are encountered in practice. (orig.)

  18. Congenital anophthalmia: current concepts in management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaranta-Leoni, Francesco M

    2011-09-01

    The introduction of hydrogel socket and orbital expanders has modified the approach towards the rehabilitation of congenital anophthalmia. This study highlights the most recent advances for the treatment of congenital anophthalmia based on personal experience and the review of recent literature. Hydrogel socket expanders may be positioned as an out-patient procedure with topical anaesthesia, using cyanoacrylate glue as opposed to temporary tarsorraphy. Increased orbital volume has been confirmed by computed tomography (CT) scan or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) following early dermis-fat graft in children with congenital anophthalmia. An orbital tissue expander made of an inflatable silicone globe sliding on a titanium T-plate and secured to the lateral orbital rim appears to be effective to stimulate orbital bone growth and development. Congenital anophthalmia has a complex cause with both genetic and environmental factors involved. The ideal treatment is simultaneous expansion of the eyelids, socket and orbital bones, and it should begin after birth as soon as possible. Socket expansion with self-inflating expanders is a useful technique, although custom-made conformers may produce similar results. Dermis-fat grafts are another reasonable option as an orbital implant, following adequate lid and socket expansion.

  19. DNA methylation abnormalities in congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra-Juhé, Clara; Cuscó, Ivon; Homs, Aïda; Flores, Raquel; Torán, Núria; Pérez-Jurado, Luis A

    2015-01-01

    Congenital heart defects represent the most common malformation at birth, occurring also in ∼50% of individuals with Down syndrome. Congenital heart defects are thought to have multifactorial etiology, but the main causes are largely unknown. We have explored the global methylation profile of fetal heart DNA in comparison to blood DNA from control subjects: an absolute correlation with the type of tissue was detected. Pathway analysis revealed a significant enrichment of differential methylation at genes related to muscle contraction and cardiomyopathies in the developing heart DNA. We have also searched for abnormal methylation profiles on developing heart-tissue DNA of syndromic and non-syndromic congenital heart defects. On average, 3 regions with aberrant methylation were detected per sample and 18 regions were found differentially methylated between groups. Several epimutations were detected in candidate genes involved in growth regulation, apoptosis and folate pathway. A likely pathogenic hypermethylation of several intragenic sites at the MSX1 gene, involved in outflow tract morphogenesis, was found in a fetus with isolated heart malformation. In addition, hypermethylation of the GATA4 gene was present in fetuses with Down syndrome with or without congenital heart defects, as well as in fetuses with isolated heart malformations. Expression deregulation of the abnormally methylated genes was detected. Our data indicate that epigenetic alterations of relevant genes are present in developing heart DNA in fetuses with both isolated and syndromic heart malformations. These epimutations likely contribute to the pathogenesis of the malformation by cis-acting effects on gene expression.

  20. Antenatal diagnosis of the congenital craniopharyngioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jurkiewicz, E.; Bekiesinska-Figatowska, M.; Duczkowski, M.; Grajkowska, W.; Roszkowski, M.; Czech-Kowalska, J.; Dobrzanska, A.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Craniopharyngioma is a rare fetal and neonatal tumor. Case Report: We report a case of a congenital craniopharyngioma diagnosed by prenatal magnetic resonance. This diagnosis was confirmed by postnatal MR imaging, neurosurgical treatment and histopathological examination. Conclusions: Outcome of neonatal craniopharyngioma is very poor, even if radical surgery is performed. The main problems are pituitary insufficiency, diabetes insipidus, and visual disturbance. (authors)

  1. Interventional Cardiology for Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, Damien

    2018-05-01

    Congenital heart interventions are now replacing surgical palliation and correction in an evolving number of congenital heart defects. Right ventricular outflow tract and ductus arteriosus stenting have demonstrated favorable outcomes compared to surgical systemic to pulmonary artery shunting, and it is likely surgical pulmonary valve replacement will become an uncommon procedure within the next decade, mirroring current practices in the treatment of atrial septal defects. Challenges remain, including the lack of device design focused on smaller infants and the inevitable consequences of somatic growth. Increasing parental and physician expectancy has inevitably lead to higher risk interventions on smaller infants and appreciation of the consequences of these interventions on departmental outcome data needs to be considered. Registry data evaluating congenital heart interventions remain less robust than surgical registries, leading to a lack of insight into the longer-term consequences of our interventions. Increasing collaboration with surgical colleagues has not been met with necessary development of dedicated equipment for hybrid interventions aimed at minimizing the longer-term consequences of scar to the heart. Therefore, great challenges remain to ensure children and adults with congenital heart disease continue to benefit from an exponential growth in minimally invasive interventions and technology. This can only be achieved through a concerted collaborative approach from physicians, industry, academia and regulatory bodies supporting great innovators to continue the philosophy of thinking beyond the limits that has been the foundation of our specialty for the past 50 years. Copyright © 2018. The Korean Society of Cardiology.

  2. Seasonality of congenital anomalies in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luteijn, Johannes Michiel; Dolk, Helen; Addor, Marie-Claude

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study describes seasonality of congenital anomalies in Europe to provide a baseline against which to assess the impact of specific time varying exposures such as the H1N1 pandemic influenza, and to provide a comprehensive and recent picture of seasonality and its possible relatio...

  3. Congenital heart disease in the dog

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matic, S.E.

    1988-01-01

    The clinical findings and investigation of dogs with congenital cardiac disease is described and the role of diagnostic aids including radiography, electrocardiography and echocardiography is outlined. The physical findings, prognosis and therapy of the common defects are reviewed and their aetiology is briefly discussed

  4. Congenital Duplex Gallbladder Anomaly Presenting as Gangrenous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Valued eMachines Customer

    A 43 year old female patient, Mrs. M.S, presented with a three week history of .... they develop gangrenous calculus cholecystitis as they may simulate a liver abscess ... Congenital anomalies of the gallbladder and anatomical variations of their ...

  5. Congenital Hyperterophic Pyloric Stenosis of Infants | Mbanaso ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We present a 7-week-old male infant with congenital hyperterophic pyloric stenosis. The essence of this case report is to show that this condition could be mistaken for failure to thrive, protein caloric malnutrition, or ignorance on the part of the mother on how to feed the first born child. All these were suggested in our patient, ...

  6. Congenital Central Hypoventilation Syndrome And Intestinal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS) or 'Ondine's curse' is characterised by an abnormal ventilatory response to progressive hypercapnia and sustained hypoxaemia. During the neonatal period, most patients with this condition present with hypoventilation or apnoea while asleep. Patients with CCHS may ...

  7. Drug safety in pregnancy - monitoring congenital anomalies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morgan, Margery; De Jong-Van Den Berg, Lolkje T. W.; Jordan, Sue

    Aim This paper outlines research into the causes of congenital anomalies, and introduces a pan-European study. The potential roles of nurses and midwives in this area are illustrated by a case report. Background Since the thalidomide disaster, use of drugs in pregnancy has been carefully monitored

  8. Dual Pathology Causing Congenital Bladder Outlet Obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwong, Ruth; Johal, Navroop S; Upasani, Anand; Paul, Anu; Cuckow, Peter

    2017-12-07

    Anterior urethral syringocele is an uncommon congenital deformity characterised by cystic dilatation of bulbo-urethral gland ducts and is usually asymptomatic. We present a case on 4-day-old male neonate who presented with bilateral antenatal hydroureteronephrosis and renal impairment and found to have urethral syringocele and posterior urethral valves (PUV). Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Congenital constriction of the foramen of Monro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marions, O.; Boethius, J.

    1986-01-01

    We report two cases of hydrocephalus in adults. The radiological investigations and direct inspection during surgery in one of the cases indicate that the hydrocephalus is caused in both cases by a benign stricture in the region of the foramen of Monro and that this constriction is congenital. This origin of hydrocephalus has not been reported previously in adults. (orig.)

  10. [A girl with congenital hemifacial hypertrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broeke, S.M. van den; Wolvius, E.B.; Adrichem, L.N. van; Baat, C. de

    2006-01-01

    A girl with congenital hemifacial hypertrophy had been observed and treated by a multidisciplinary team for craniofacial disorders in an academic medical centre since birth. At the age of 8 she was treated on account of considerable facial asymmetry and multiple intraoral problems. The two-step

  11. Congenital malformations prevalent among Egyptian children and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rabah M. Shawky

    Abstract According to the World Health Organization the term congenital anomaly includes any morphological, functional ... ical or molecular defects that may develop in the embryo and fetus from .... and in relation to environmental effects, but there is as yet little .... ing to or outsourced by the unified National Health System.

  12. Genetics Home Reference: Leber congenital amaurosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... correlations with genotypes, gene therapy trials update, and future directions. J AAPOS. 2009 Dec;13(6):587-92. doi: 10.1016/j.jaapos.2009.10.004. Review. Citation on PubMed Cremers FP, van den Hurk JA, den Hollander AI. Molecular genetics of Leber congenital amaurosis. Hum Mol ...

  13. Experience with the Management of Congenital Diaphragmatic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Those who did not undergo surgery had lower Apgar scores and higher incidence of associated congenital malformations than the patients who underwent surgical repairs. The differences in the mean of 5 minute Apgar scores among the three groups were not statistically significant (p> 0.05). Age at surgery was higher in ...

  14. Congenital malformation of inner ear, single cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres Pazmino, Julio Cesar; Marrugo Pardo, Gilberto Eduardo

    2010-01-01

    Congenital malformations of the inner ear are rare conditions, but their detection requires high diagnostic accuracy. In this report we describe the case of a patient with single or common cavity, discuss the corresponding radiological images, describe the treatment of this patient with a cochlear implant, and review the classification and differential diagnosis of the other anomalies of the inner ear.

  15. Congenital Pseudoarthrosis of the clavicle - Case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holguin Maldonado, Esteban; Rossellli Cock, Pablo

    2006-01-01

    Congenital pseudoarthrosis of the clavicle (CPC) is a tare malformation of the scapular waist of unknown etiology. The lesion is usually unilateral and right sided. It is seldom symptomatic and X rays confirm the diagnosis. Treatment is usually non surgical, unless functional or cosmetic compromise of the shoulder is present

  16. Congenital malformations prevalent among Egyptian children and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    According to the World Health Organization the term congenital anomaly includes any morphological, functional, biochemical or molecular defects that may develop in the embryo and fetus from conception until birth, present at birth, whether detected at that time or not. Based on World Health Organization report, about 3 ...

  17. Congenital lung malformations: correlation between prenatal and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: Congenital lung malformations are a common finding during prenatal ultrasonography (US). Investigations were completed by means of prenatal MRI and postnatal computed tomographic (CT) scan. The purpose of this study was to compare these prenatal findings with postnatal findings and pathological findings after ...

  18. Radiologic analysis of congenital limb anomalies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Hong Jun; Kim, Ok Hwa; Shinn, Kyung Sub; Kim, Nam Ae

    1994-01-01

    Congenital limb anomalies are manifested in various degree of severity and complexity bearing conclusion for description and nomenclature of each anomaly. We retrospectively analyzed the roentgenograms of congenital limb anomalies for the purpose of further understanding of the radiologic manifestations based on the embryonal defect and also to find the incidence of each anomaly. Total number of the patients was 89 with 137 anomalies. Recently the uniform system of classification for congenital anomalies of the upper limb was adopted by International Federation of Societies for Surgery of the Hand (IFSSH), which were categorized as 7 classifications. We used the IFSSH classification with some modification as 5 classifications; failure of formation of parts, failure of differentiation of parts, duplications, overgrowth and undergrowth. The patients with upper limb anomalies were 65 out of 89(73%), lower limb were 21(24%), and both upper and lower limb anomalies were 3(4%). Failure of formation was seen in 18%, failure of differentiation 39%, duplications 39%, overgrowth 8%, and undergrowth in 12%. Thirty-five patients had more than one anomaly, and 14 patients had intergroup anomalies. The upper limb anomalies were more common than lower limb. Among the anomalies, failure of differentiation and duplications were the most common types of congenital limb anomalies. Patients with failure of formation, failure of differentiation, and undergrowth had intergroup association of anomalies, but duplication and overgrowth tended to be isolated anomalies

  19. Underdiagnosis of Mild Congenital Anorectal Malformations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonker, Jara E.; Trzpis, Monika; Broens, Paul M. A.

    Objective: To determine whether the frequency and severity of congenital anorectal malformations (CARMs) differs by sex. Study design: We included 129 patients (0-319 weeks old) diagnosed with CARMs, who had been referred to our Department of Pediatric Surgery between 2004 and 2013. Rectoperineal

  20. Radiological findings of congenital urethral valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeon, Kyung Mo; Kook, Shin Ho

    1990-01-01

    Congenital urethral valve is the common cause of hydronephrosis in newborn infants and the most common cause of bladder outlet obstruction in male children. We reviewed and analysed radiological findings and associated anomalies of 16 cases of congenital urethral valve which were examined during the period from January 1985 to December 1989. The most frequent age was under one year old (56%). The main symptoms were urinary dribbing (37.5%), weak stream (25%) and urinary frequency and incontinence (25%). Anterior urethral valve (AUV) was 5 cases (31%) and posterior urethral valve (PUV) was 11 cases(69%), in which 10 cases were Type I and one case was Type III. Bladder wall thickening was seen in all cases and its severity was partly correlated with the degree of vesicoureteral reflux (VUR). VUR was observed in 12 cases (75%), and relatively severe in older age group. The degree of VUR was milder in AUV than PUV. Hydronephrosis was more severe in PUV than in anterior one, and its degree was correlated with the severity of VUR. Associated anomalies were ectopic urethral opening (2 cases), PDA (1 case), congenital megacolon (1 case) and patent urachus (1 case) in PUV. So early diagnosis and treatment of congenital urethral valve is essential to the prevention of renal damage

  1. Seasonality of Congenital Anomalies in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luteijn, Johannes Michiel; Dolk, Helen; Addor, Marie-Claude; Arriola, Larraitz; Barisic, Ingeborg; Bianchi, Fabrizio; Calzolari, Elisa; Draper, Elizabeth; Garne, Ester; Gatt, Miriam; Haeusler, Martin; Khoshnood, Babak; McDonnell, Bob; Nelen, Vera; O'Mahony, Mary; Mullaney, Carmel; Queisser-Luft, Annette; Rankin, Judith; Tucker, David; Verellen-Dumoulin, Christine; de Walle, Hermien; Yevtushok, Lyubov

    BackgroundThis study describes seasonality of congenital anomalies in Europe to provide a baseline against which to assess the impact of specific time varying exposures such as the H1N1 pandemic influenza, and to provide a comprehensive and recent picture of seasonality and its possible relation to

  2. Congenital Uterovaginal Prolapse Present at Birth

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of the buttocks down to the legs with crepe bandage for 72 h. Key words: Breech, congenital, Nigeria, prolapse, spina bifida, utero- ... pressure during breech delivery stretches the pelvic floor muscle and the ligaments thus increasing the risk of ... and mucosal ulceration sets in. In conclusion, UVP presenting at birth is a rare ...

  3. [Congenital toxoplasmosis: severe ocular and neurological complications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, F.; Buzing, C.; Sporken, J.M.J.; Erasmus, C.E.; Flier, M. van der; Semmekrot, B.A.

    2011-01-01

    Two infants with congenital toxoplasmosis are presented. A girl born prematurely was treated postnatally after the mother had received antimicrobial treatment during pregnancy for acute toxoplasmosis. Apart from being small for gestational age, she remained without symptoms and treatment was ceased

  4. Neonatal acute megakaryoblastic leukemia mimicking congenital neuroblastoma

    OpenAIRE

    Kawasaki, Yukako; Makimoto, Masami; Nomura, Keiko; Hoshino, Akihiro; Hamashima, Takeru; Hiwatari, Mitsuteru; Nakazawa, Atsuko; Takita, Junko; Yoshida, Taketoshi; Kanegane, Hirokazu

    2014-01-01

    Key Clinical Message We describe a neonate with abdominal distension, massive hepatomegaly, and high serum neuron-specific enolase level suggestive of congenital neuroblastoma. The patient died of pulmonary hemorrhage after therapy. Autopsy revealed that the tumor cells in the liver indicated acute megakaryocytic leukemia with the RBM15-MKL1 fusion gene.

  5. Vasopressin in perioperative management of congenital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Perioperative care of infants with diaphragmatic hernias can be a challenge because of pulmonary hypertension and systemic hypotension. The objective of this study was to report the usefulness of vasopressin infusion in improving pulmonary and systemic haemodynamics in an infant with congenital diaphragmatic hernia.

  6. Advances in congenital and postnatal cytomegalovirus infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gunkel, J.

    2017-01-01

    Congenital CMV infection (cCMV) is the most prevalent viral infection worldwide and the leading cause of non-genetic sensorineural hearing loss. Early diagnosis of cCMV infection is advantageous as it allows for regular follow-up and timely intervention in case of late-onset symptoms among

  7. Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome mimicking mitochondrial disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojnueangnit, Kitiwan; Descartes, Maria

    2018-03-01

    Later-onset congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (LO-CCHS) does not present only breathing problems but can be present as episodic multiple organs involvement. Our unique case demonstrated LO-CCHS should be considered in the differential diagnosis of mitochondrial diseases and having nontypical polysomnography result.

  8. Challenges of congenital malformations: an African perspective ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Congenital malformations are defects of morphogenesis of organs or body regions identifiable during the intrauterine life or after birth. The etiological factors proposed have varied in history based on prevailing understanding, culture, and religion. Worldwide historically, the role of the supernatural had been in ...

  9. Management of congenital esophageal stenosis associated with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim The aim of this work was to study the incidence, management of congenital esophageal stenosis (CES) associated with esophageal atresia (EA) and tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF), and its impact on esophageal stricture (ES) after primary repair. Patients and methods From January 2006 to December 2014, ...

  10. Congenital malformations among newborns in Kenya | Muga ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Therefore, a study was conducted to determine the patterns and incidence of congenital malformations at birth in newborns in Kenya and thereby analyze associated predisposing factors in their mothers. This single cross-sectional ... followed by malformations of the central nervous system (28.6%). Polydactyl was the most ...

  11. Congenital syphilitic hepatitis: a radionuclide study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gates, G.F.; Stanley, P.; Gwinn, J.L.; Miller, J.H.

    1978-01-01

    A two-month-old girl with congenital syphilitic hepatitis had bizarre liver scintigraphic features showing diminished hepatic uptake of a radiocolloid with accentuated pulmonary and bone marrow accumulation. These features were reversible following penicillin therapy and to our knowledge are previously undescribed manifestations of this multisystemic disease

  12. Enhanced heat discrimination in congenital blindness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Slimani, Hocine; Ptito, Maurice; Kupers, Ron

    2015-01-01

    domain. We therefore compared the capacity to detect small temperature increases in innocuous heat in a group of 12 congenitally blind and 12 age and sex-matched normally sighted participants. In addition, we also tested for group differences in the effects of spatial summation on temperature...

  13. Congenital clinical malaria: Incidence, management and outcome ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: With paucity of documentation of congenital clinical malaria in the world literature, we therefore aimed to review its rates, presentation, management and out come of this problem in neonates at the Usmanu Danfodiyo University Teaching Hospital, Sokoto. Methodology: This prospective study was carried out in ...

  14. Congenital syphilis as a notifiable disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    in incomplete abortions, and there were 2 (0,96%) ... Congenital syphilis is a significant health problem in South ... and the effectiveness of the programme in terms of ... Subjects and methods ... may be that the admitting staff failed adequately to ... Population Development No notifications were received from areas not merr.

  15. The right side in congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuuring, M.J.

    2014-01-01

    Life expectancy of children with congenital heart disease (CHD) has increased dramatically during the past years, due to the successes of cardiac surgery. At present, nearly all of these children with CHD can be operated at young age and more than 90% reach adulthood. At adult age, however, many

  16. Genetics Home Reference: congenital diaphragmatic hernia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of cells in the embryo. Environmental factors that influence development before birth may also increase the risk of ... occur? How can gene mutations affect health and development? More about Mutations and ... is only one affected individual in a family. When congenital diaphragmatic hernia occurs as a feature ...

  17. Modeling congenital disease and inborn errors of development in Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulton, Matthew J.; Letsou, Anthea

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Fly models that faithfully recapitulate various aspects of human disease and human health-related biology are being used for research into disease diagnosis and prevention. Established and new genetic strategies in Drosophila have yielded numerous substantial successes in modeling congenital disorders or inborn errors of human development, as well as neurodegenerative disease and cancer. Moreover, although our ability to generate sequence datasets continues to outpace our ability to analyze these datasets, the development of high-throughput analysis platforms in Drosophila has provided access through the bottleneck in the identification of disease gene candidates. In this Review, we describe both the traditional and newer methods that are facilitating the incorporation of Drosophila into the human disease discovery process, with a focus on the models that have enhanced our understanding of human developmental disorders and congenital disease. Enviable features of the Drosophila experimental system, which make it particularly useful in facilitating the much anticipated move from genotype to phenotype (understanding and predicting phenotypes directly from the primary DNA sequence), include its genetic tractability, the low cost for high-throughput discovery, and a genome and underlying biology that are highly evolutionarily conserved. In embracing the fly in the human disease-gene discovery process, we can expect to speed up and reduce the cost of this process, allowing experimental scales that are not feasible and/or would be too costly in higher eukaryotes. PMID:26935104

  18. Novel human CRYGD rare variant in a Brazilian family with congenital cataract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordano, Gabriel Gorgone; Tavares, Anderson; da Silva, Márcio José; de Vasconcellos, José Paulo Cabral; Arieta, Carlos Eduardo Leite; de Melo, Mônica Barbosa

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To describe a novel polymorphism in the γD-crystallin (CRYGD) gene in a Brazilian family with congenital cataract. Methods A Brazilian four-generation family was analyzed. The proband had bilateral lamellar cataract and the phenotypes were classified by slit lamp examination. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood and coding regions and intron/exon boundaries of the αA-crystallin (CRYAA), γC-crystallin (CRYGC), and CRYGD genes were amplified by polymerase chain reaction and directly sequenced. Results Sequencing of the coding regions of CRYGD showed the presence of a heterozygous A→G transversion at c.401 position, which results in the substitution of a tyrosine to a cysteine (Y134C). The polymorphism was identified in three individuals, two affected and one unaffected. Conclusions A novel rare variant in CRYGD (Y134C) was detected in a Brazilian family with congenital cataract. Because there is no segregation between the substitution and the phenotypes in this family, other genetic alterations are likely to be present. PMID:21866214

  19. Multiple congenital malformations of Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome are recapitulated in Fgfrl1 null mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catela, Catarina; Bilbao-Cortes, Daniel; Slonimsky, Esfir; Kratsios, Paschalis; Rosenthal, Nadia; Te Welscher, Pascal

    2009-01-01

    Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS) is caused by deletions in the short arm of chromosome 4 (4p) and occurs in about one per 20,000 births. Patients with WHS display a set of highly variable characteristics including craniofacial dysgenesis, mental retardation, speech problems, congenital heart defects, short stature and a variety of skeletal anomalies. Analysis of patients with 4p deletions has identified two WHS critical regions (WHSCRs); however, deletions targeting mouse WHSCRs do not recapitulate the classical WHS defects, and the genes contributing to WHS have not been conclusively established. Recently, the human FGFRL1 gene, encoding a putative fibroblast growth factor (FGF) decoy receptor, has been implicated in the craniofacial phenotype of a WHS patient. Here, we report that targeted deletion of the mouse Fgfrl1 gene recapitulates a broad array of WHS phenotypes, including abnormal craniofacial development, axial and appendicular skeletal anomalies, and congenital heart defects. Fgfrl1 null mutants also display a transient foetal anaemia and a fully penetrant diaphragm defect, causing prenatal and perinatal lethality. Together, these data support a wider role for Fgfrl1 in development, implicate FGFRL1 insufficiency in WHS, and provide a novel animal model to dissect the complex aetiology of this human disease.

  20. Plant Phenotype Characterization System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel W McDonald; Ronald B Michaels

    2005-09-09

    This report is the final scientific report for the DOE Inventions and Innovations Project: Plant Phenotype Characterization System, DE-FG36-04GO14334. The period of performance was September 30, 2004 through July 15, 2005. The project objective is to demonstrate the viability of a new scientific instrument concept for the study of plant root systems. The root systems of plants are thought to be important in plant yield and thus important to DOE goals in renewable energy sources. The scientific study and understanding of plant root systems is hampered by the difficulty in observing root activity and the inadequacy of existing root study instrumentation options. We have demonstrated a high throughput, non-invasive, high resolution technique for visualizing plant root systems in-situ. Our approach is based upon low-energy x-ray radiography and the use of containers and substrates (artificial soil) which are virtually transparent to x-rays. The system allows us to germinate and grow plant specimens in our containers and substrates and to generate x-ray images of the developing root system over time. The same plant can be imaged at different times in its development. The system can be used for root studies in plant physiology, plant morphology, plant breeding, plant functional genomics and plant genotype screening.

  1. Sex hormone binding globulin phenotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornelisse, M M; Bennett, Patrick; Christiansen, M

    1994-01-01

    Human sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) is encoded by a normal and a variant allele. The resulting SHBG phenotypes (the homozygous normal SHBG, the heterozygous SHBG and the homozygous variant SHBG phenotype) can be distinguished by their electrophoretic patterns. We developed a novel detection....... This method of detection was used to determine the distribution of SHBG phenotypes in healthy controls of both sexes and in five different pathological conditions characterized by changes in the SHBG level or endocrine disturbances (malignant and benign ovarian neoplasms, hirsutism, liver cirrhosis...... on the experimental values. Differences in SHBG phenotypes do not appear to have any clinical significance and no sex difference was found in the SHBG phenotype distribution....

  2. Prognostic factors of congenital diaphragmatic hernia accompanied by cardiovascular malformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Shigehiro; Sago, Haruhiko; Kanamori, Yutaka; Hayakawa, Masahiro; Okuyama, Hiroomi; Inamura, Noboru; Fujino, Yuji; Usui, Noriaki; Taguchi, Tomoaki

    2013-08-01

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia is associated with cardiovascular malformation. Many prognostic factors have been identified for isolated congenital diaphragmatic hernia; however, reports of concurrent congenital diaphragmatic hernia and cardiovascular malformation in infants are limited. This study evaluated congenital diaphragmatic hernia associated with cardiovascular malformation in infants. Factors associated with prognosis for patients were also identified. This retrospective cohort study was based on a Japanese survey of congenital diaphragmatic hernia patients between 2006 and 2010. Frequency and outcome of cardiovascular malformation among infants with congenital diaphragmatic hernia were examined. Severity of congenital diaphragmatic hernia and cardiovascular malformation were compared as predictors of mortality and morbidity. Cardiovascular malformation was identified in 76 (12.3%) of 614 infants with congenital diaphragmatic hernia. Mild cardiovascular malformation was detected in 19 (33.9%) and severe cardiovascular malformation in 37 (66.1%). Their overall survival rate at discharge was 46.4%, and the survival rate without morbidity was 23.2%. Mortality and morbidity at discharge were more strongly associated with severity of cardiovascular malformation (adjusted OR 7.69, 95%CI 1.96-30.27; adjusted OR 7.93, 95%CI 1.76-35.79, respectively) than with severity of congenital diaphragmatic hernia. The prognosis for infants with both congenital diaphragmatic hernia and cardiovascular malformation remains poor. Severity of cardiovascular malformation is a more important predictive factor for mortality and morbidity than severity of congenital diaphragmatic hernia. © 2013 The Authors. Pediatrics International © 2013 Japan Pediatric Society.

  3. Ring Chromosome 4 in a Child with Multiple Congenital Abnormalities: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. S. Paththinige

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A female child born preterm with intrauterine growth retardation and presenting with facial dysmorphism with clefts, microcephaly, limb deformities, and congenital abnormalities involving cardiovascular and urinary systems is described. Chromosomal analysis showed a de novo 46,XX,r(4(p15.3q35 karyotype. The clinical features of the patient were compared with the phenotypic characteristics of 17 previously reported cases with ring chromosome 4 and those with Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (4p-. Clinical features observed in this case are consistent with the consensus phenotype in ring chromosome 4. Patent ductus arteriosus and bilateral talipes equinovarus observed in this baby widen the phenotypic spectrum associated with ring chromosome 4.

  4. Genetic testing in congenital heart disease:A clinical approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marie A Chaix; Gregor Andelfinger; Paul Khairy

    2016-01-01

    Congenital heart disease(CHD) is the most common type of birth defect. Traditionally, a polygenic model defined by the interaction of multiple genes and environmental factors was hypothesized to account for different forms of CHD. It is now understood that the contribution of genetics to CHD extends beyond a single unified paradigm. For example, monogenic models and chromosomal abnormalities have been associated with various syndromic and non-syndromic forms of CHD. In such instances, genetic investigation and testing may potentially play an important role in clinical care. A family tree with a detailed phenotypic description serves as the initial screening tool to identify potentially inherited defects and to guide further genetic investigation. The selection of a genetic test is contingent upon the particular diagnostic hypothesis generated by clinical examination. Genetic investigation in CHD may carry the potential to improve prognosis by yielding valuable information with regards to personalized medical care, confidence in the clinical diagnosis, and/or targeted patient followup. Moreover, genetic assessment may serve as a tool to predict recurrence risk, define the pattern of inheritance within a family, and evaluate the need for further family screening. In some circumstances, prenatal or preimplantation genetic screening could identify fetuses or embryos at high risk for CHD. Although genetics may appear to constitute a highly specialized sector of cardiology, basic knowledge regarding inheritance patterns, recurrence risks, and available screening and diagnostic tools, including their strengths and limitations, could assist the treating physician in providing sound counsel.

  5. Otologic Manifestations of Autosomal Recessive Congenital Ichthyosis in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Santiago, A; Rodríguez-Pascual, M; Knöpfel, N; Hernández-Martín, Á

    2015-11-01

    Few studies have investigated ear involvement in nonsyndromic autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis (ARCI). To assess the type and frequency of otologic manifestations of ARCI in patients under follow-up at the pediatric dermatology department of our hospital. We prospectively studied the presence of ear pain, ear itching, tinnitus, otitis, cerumen impaction, accumulation of epithelial debris, and hearing loss. Daily hygiene measures, topical treatments, medical-surgical interventions, and frequency of visits to an ear, nose, and throat (ENT) specialist were noted in the patients' medical records. Ear examination and hearing tests were performed in all cases. Ten patients were studied: 2 had a self-healing collodion baby phenotype and 8 had ichthyosis. There was mention of otologic manifestations in the records of all 8 patients with ichthyosis (100%); 6 of these patients (75%) had abnormalities in the external auditory canal examination and 2 (25%) had conductive hearing loss. Our findings are limited by the small number of patients studied, all of whom were younger than 19 years. The involvement of both dermatologists and ENT specialists in the management of patients with ichthyosis is crucial to ensure the application of the best therapeutic and preventive measures. More studies are needed to assess the prevalence and impact on quality of life of ear involvement in patients with ichthyosis and to determine the optimal interval between ENT visits for these patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  6. [Central Nervous Involvement in Patients with Fukuyama Congenital Muscular Dystrophy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishigaki, Keiko

    2016-02-01

    Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy (FCMD), the second most common muscular dystrophy in the Japanese population, is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the fukutin (FKTN) gene. The main features of FCMD are a combination of infantile-onset hypotonia, generalized muscle weakness, eye abnormalities and central nervous system involvement with mental retardation and seizures associated with cortical migration defects. The FKTN gene product is thought to be necessary for maintaining migrating neurons in an immature state during migration, and for supporting migration via α-dystroglycan in the central nervous system. Typical magnetic resonance imaging findings in FCMD patients are cobblestone lissencephaly and cerebellar cystic lesions. White matter abnormalities with hyperintensity on T(2)-weighted images are seen especially in younger patients and those with severe phenotypes. Most FCMD patients are mentally retarded and the level is moderate to severe, with IQs ranging from 30 to 50. In our recent study, 62% of patients developed seizures. Among them, 71% had only febrile seizures, 6% had afebrile seizures from the onset, and 22% developed afebrile seizures following febrile seizures. Most patients had seizures that were controllable with just 1 type of antiepileptic drug, but 18% had intractable seizures that must be treated with 3 medications.

  7. Genetic testing in congenital heart disease: A clinical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaix, Marie A; Andelfinger, Gregor; Khairy, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) is the most common type of birth defect. Traditionally, a polygenic model defined by the interaction of multiple genes and environmental factors was hypothesized to account for different forms of CHD. It is now understood that the contribution of genetics to CHD extends beyond a single unified paradigm. For example, monogenic models and chromosomal abnormalities have been associated with various syndromic and non-syndromic forms of CHD. In such instances, genetic investigation and testing may potentially play an important role in clinical care. A family tree with a detailed phenotypic description serves as the initial screening tool to identify potentially inherited defects and to guide further genetic investigation. The selection of a genetic test is contingent upon the particular diagnostic hypothesis generated by clinical examination. Genetic investigation in CHD may carry the potential to improve prognosis by yielding valuable information with regards to personalized medical care, confidence in the clinical diagnosis, and/or targeted patient follow-up. Moreover, genetic assessment may serve as a tool to predict recurrence risk, define the pattern of inheritance within a family, and evaluate the need for further family screening. In some circumstances, prenatal or preimplantation genetic screening could identify fetuses or embryos at high risk for CHD. Although genetics may appear to constitute a highly specialized sector of cardiology, basic knowledge regarding inheritance patterns, recurrence risks, and available screening and diagnostic tools, including their strengths and limitations, could assist the treating physician in providing sound counsel. PMID:26981213

  8. Congenital heart disease with high origin of coronary artery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Ming; Li Yuhua; Zhong Yumin

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To report 6 cases of congenital heart disease with high origin of coronary artery and to evaluate the imaging method for diagnosis of congenital high origin of coronary artery. Methods: Six patients with congenital high origin of coronary artery underwent angiocardiography, echocardiography, and 2 patients also underwent magnetic resonance examination. All 6 cases were confirmed by operation. Results: All 6 cases were congenital high origin of right coronary artery. Angiocardiography made correct diagnosis in all 6 cases; MRI made the correct diagnosis in 1 of the 2 cases; echocardiography made 1 correct diagnosis. Conclusion: Correct diagnosis of congenital high origin of coronary artery was very important for patients with congenital heart disease. Angiocardiography was a very reliable imaging method and MRI can play an important role in preoperative diagnosis of congenital high origin of coronary artery

  9. Sonographic evaluation of children with congenital hypothyroidism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anelise de Almeida Sedassari

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available AbstractObjective:To establish benchmarks and study some sonographic characteristics of the thyroid gland in a group of euthyroid children aged up to 5 years as compared with age-matched children with congenital hypothyroidism.Materials and Methods:Thirty-six children (17 female and 19 male aged between 2 months and 5 years were divided into two groups – 23 euthyroid children and 13 children with congenital hypothyroidism – and were called to undergo ultrasonography.Results:In the group of euthyroid children (n = 23, mean total volume of the thyroid gland was 1.12 mL (minimum, 0.39 mL; maximum, 2.72 mL; a homogeneous gland was found in 17 children (73.91% and 6 children (26.08% had a heterogeneous gland. In the group of children with congenital hypothyroidism (n = 13, mean total volume of the thyroid gland was 2.73 mL (minimum, 0.20 mL; maximum, 11.00 mL. As regards thyroid location, 3 patients (23.07% had ectopic thyroid, and 10 (69.23% had topic thyroid, and out of the latter, 5 had a homogeneous gland (50% and 5, a heterogeneous gland (50%. In the group with congenital hypothyroidism, 6 (46.15% children had etiological diagnosis of dyshormoniogenesis, 3 (23.07%, of ectopic thyroid, and 4 (30.76%, of thyroid hypoplasia.Conclusion:Thyroid ultrasonography is a noninvasive imaging method, widely available, easy to perform and for these reasons could, and should, be performed at any time, including at birth, with no preparation or treatment discontinuation, to aid in the early etiological definition of congenital hypothyroidism.

  10. Congenital toxoplasmosis and prenatal care state programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Control programs have been executed in an attempt to reduce vertical transmission and the severity of congenital infection in regions with a high incidence of toxoplasmosis in pregnant women. We aimed to evaluate whether treatment of pregnant women with spiramycin associated with a lack of monitoring for toxoplasmosis seroconversion affects the prognosis of patients. Methods We performed a prospective cohort study with 246 newborns (NB) at risk for congenital toxoplasmosis in Goiânia (Brazil) between October 2003 and October 2011. We analyzed the efficacy of maternal treatment with spiramycin. Results A total of 40.7% (66/162) of the neonates were born seriously infected. Vertical transmission associated with reactivation during pregnancy occurred in 5.5% (9/162) of the NB, with one showing severe infection (systemic). The presence of specific immunoglobulins (fetal IgM and NB IgA) suggested the worst prognosis. Treatment of pregnant women by spiramycin resulted in reduced vertical transmission. When infected pregnant women did not undergo proper treatment, the risk of severe infection (neural-optical) in NB was significantly increased. Fetal IgM was associated with ocular impairment in 48.0% (12/25) of the fetuses and neonatal IgA-specific was related to the neuro-ophthalmologic and systemic forms of the disease. When acute toxoplasmosis was identified in the postpartum period, a lack of monitoring of seronegative pregnant women resulted in a higher risk of severe congenital infection. Conclusion Treatment of pregnant women with spiramycin reduces the possibility of transmission of infection to the fetus. However, a lack of proper treatment is associated with the onset of the neural-optical form of congenital infection. Primary preventive measures should be increased for all pregnant women during the prenatal period and secondary prophylaxis through surveillance of seroconversion in seronegative pregnant woman should be introduced to reduce the

  11. Changing Landscape of Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouma, Berto J; Mulder, Barbara J M

    2017-03-17

    Congenital heart disease is the most frequently occurring congenital disorder affecting ≈0.8% of live births. Thanks to great efforts and technical improvements, including the development of cardiopulmonary bypass in the 1950s, large-scale repair in these patients became possible, with subsequent dramatic reduction in morbidity and mortality. The ongoing search for progress and the growing understanding of the cardiovascular system and its pathophysiology refined all aspects of care for these patients. As a consequence, survival further increased over the past decades, and a new group of patients, those who survived congenital heart disease into adulthood, emerged. However, a large range of complications raised at the horizon as arrhythmias, endocarditis, pulmonary hypertension, and heart failure, and the need for additional treatment became clear. Technical solutions were sought in perfection and creation of new surgical techniques by developing catheter-based interventions, with elimination of open heart surgery and new electronic devices enabling, for example, multisite pacing and implantation of internal cardiac defibrillators to prevent sudden death. Over time, many pharmaceutical studies were conducted, changing clinical treatment slowly toward evidence-based care, although results were often limited by low numbers and clinical heterogeneity. More attention has been given to secondary issues like sports participation, pregnancy, work, and social-related difficulties. The relevance of these issues was already recognized in the 1970s when the need for specialized centers with multidisciplinary teams was proclaimed. Finally, research has become incorporated in care. Results of intervention studies and registries increased the knowledge on epidemiology of adults with congenital heart disease and their complications during life, and at the end, several guidelines became easily accessible, guiding physicians to deliver care appropriately. Over the past decades

  12. A nonsense mutation of γD-crystallin associated with congenital nuclear and posterior polar cataract in a Chinese family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Yi; Li, Jinyu; Zhu, Yanan; Xia, Yan; Wang, Wei; Yu, Yinhui; Yao, Ke

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this study was to characterize the disease-causing mutations in a Chinese family with congenital nuclear and posterior polar cataracts. Clinical data of patients in the family were recorded using slit-lamp photography and high definition video. Genomic DNA samples were extracted from the peripheral blood of the pedigree members and 100 healthy controls. Mutation screening was performed in the candidate genes by bi-directional sequencing of the amplified products. The congenital cataract phenotype of the pedigree was identified by slit-lamp examinations and observation during surgery as nuclear and posterior polar cataracts. Through the sequencing of the candidate genes, a heterozygous c. 418C>T change was detected in the coding region of the γD-crystallin gene (CRYGD). As a result of this change, a highly conserved arginine residue was replaced by a stop codon (p. R140X). This change was discovered among all of the affected individuals with cataracts, but not among the unaffected family members or the 100 ethnically matched controls. This study identified a novel congenital nuclear and posterior polar cataract phenotype caused by the recurrent mutation p. R140X in CRYGD.

  13. Congenital obstructive posterior urethral membranes and recurrent urinary tract infection: a rare case of congenital hypertrophy of the verumontanum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Bancin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Congenital obstructive posterior urethral membranes (COPUM is a complex disease closely related to several pathological changes in kidney development and function, as a result of urinary reflux since in utero. This congenital anomaly of urinary tract potentially causes hydroureteronephrosis that is often associated with recurrent urinary tract infections and, ultimately, one of the most common causes of end-stage renal disease in children.1,2 Congenital hypertrophy of the verumontanum as part of COPUM is very rare. Only a few reports have been written on congenital hypertrophy of the vermontanum causing congenital obstructive uropathy.3-6

  14. A de novo 1q22q23.1 Interstitial Microdeletion in a Girl with Intellectual Disability and Multiple Congenital Anomalies Including Congenital Heart Defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksiūnienė, Beata; Preiksaitiene, Egle; Morkūnienė, Aušra; Ambrozaitytė, Laima; Utkus, Algirdas

    2018-01-01

    Many studies have shown that molecular karyotyping is an effective diagnostic tool in individuals with developmental delay/intellectual disability. We report on a de novo interstitial 1q22q23.1 microdeletion, 1.6 Mb in size, detected in a patient with short stature, microcephaly, hypoplastic corpus callosum, cleft palate, minor facial anomalies, congenital heart defect, camptodactyly of the 4-5th fingers, and intellectual disability. Chromosomal microarray analysis revealed a 1.6-Mb deletion in the 1q22q23.1 region, arr[GRCh37] 1q22q23.1(155630752_157193893)×1. Real-time PCR analysis confirmed its de novo origin. The deleted region encompasses 50 protein-coding genes, including the morbid genes APOA1BP, ARHGEF2, LAMTOR2, LMNA, NTRK1, PRCC, RIT1, SEMA4A, and YY1AP1. Although the unique phenotype observed in our patient can arise from the haploinsufficiency of the dosage-sensitive LMNA gene, the dosage imbalance of other genes implicated in the rearrangement could also contribute to the phenotype. Further studies are required for the delineation of the phenotype associated with this rare chromosomal alteration and elucidation of the critical genes for manifestation of the specific clinical features. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Role of GLI2 in hypopituitarism phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnhold, Ivo J P; França, Marcela M; Carvalho, Luciani R; Mendonca, Berenice B; Jorge, Alexander A L

    2015-06-01

    GLI2 is a zinc-finger transcription factor involved in the Sonic Hedgehog pathway. Gli2 mutant mice have hypoplastic anterior and absent posterior pituitary glands. We reviewed the literature for patients with hypopituitarism and alterations in GLI2. Twenty-five patients (16 families) had heterozygous truncating mutations, and the phenotype frequently included GH deficiency, a small anterior pituitary lobe and an ectopic/undescended posterior pituitary lobe on magnetic resonance imaging and postaxial polydactyly. The inheritance pattern was autosomal dominant with incomplete penetrance and variable expressivity. The mutation was frequently inherited from an asymptomatic parent. Eleven patients had heterozygous non-synonymous GLI2 variants that were classified as variants of unknown significance, because they were either absent from or had a frequency lower than 0.001 in the databases. In these patients, the posterior pituitary was also ectopic, but none had polydactyly. A third group of variants found in patients with hypopituitarism were considered benign because their frequency was ≥ 0.001 in the databases. GLI2 is a large and polymorphic gene, and sequencing may identify variants whose interpretation may be difficult. Incomplete penetrance implies in the participation of other genetic and/or environmental factors. An interaction between Gli2 mutations and prenatal ethanol exposure has been demonstrated in mice dysmorphology. In conclusion, a relatively high frequency of GLI2 mutations and variants were identified in patients with congenital GH deficiency without other brain defects, and most of these patients presented with combined pituitary hormone deficiency and an ectopic posterior pituitary lobe. Future studies may clarify the relative role and frequency of GLI2 alterations in the aetiology of hypopituitarism. © 2015 Society for Endocrinology.

  16. Phenotypic plasticity, costs of phenotypes, and costs of plasticity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Callahan, Hilary S; Maughan, Heather; Steiner, Uli

    2008-01-01

    Why are some traits constitutive and others inducible? The term costs often appears in work addressing this issue but may be ambiguously defined. This review distinguishes two conceptually distinct types of costs: phenotypic costs and plasticity costs. Phenotypic costs are assessed from patterns...... of covariation, typically between a focal trait and a separate trait relevant to fitness. Plasticity costs, separable from phenotypic costs, are gauged by comparing the fitness of genotypes with equivalent phenotypes within two environments but differing in plasticity and fitness. Subtleties associated with both...... types of costs are illustrated by a body of work addressing predator-induced plasticity. Such subtleties, and potential interplay between the two types of costs, have also been addressed, often in studies involving genetic model organisms. In some instances, investigators have pinpointed the mechanistic...

  17. Deep Phenotyping: Deep Learning For Temporal Phenotype/Genotype Classification

    OpenAIRE

    Najafi, Mohammad; Namin, Sarah; Esmaeilzadeh, Mohammad; Brown, Tim; Borevitz, Justin

    2017-01-01

    High resolution and high throughput, genotype to phenotype studies in plants are underway to accelerate breeding of climate ready crops. Complex developmental phenotypes are observed by imaging a variety of accessions in different environment conditions, however extracting the genetically heritable traits is challenging. In the recent years, deep learning techniques and in particular Convolutional Neural Networks (CNNs), Recurrent Neural Networks (RNNs) and Long-Short Term Memories (LSTMs), h...

  18. Exome sequencing for gene discovery in lethal fetal disorders--harnessing the value of extreme phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filges, Isabel; Friedman, Jan M

    2015-10-01

    Massively parallel sequencing has revolutionized our understanding of Mendelian disorders, and many novel genes have been discovered to cause disease phenotypes when mutant. At the same time, next-generation sequencing approaches have enabled non-invasive prenatal testing of free fetal DNA in maternal blood. However, little attention has been paid to using whole exome and genome sequencing strategies for gene identification in fetal disorders that are lethal in utero, because they can appear to be sporadic and Mendelian inheritance may be missed. We present challenges and advantages of applying next-generation sequencing approaches to gene discovery in fetal malformation phenotypes and review recent successful discovery approaches. We discuss the implication and significance of recessive inheritance and cross-species phenotyping in fetal lethal conditions. Whole exome sequencing can be used in individual families with undiagnosed lethal congenital anomaly syndromes to discover causal mutations, provided that prior to data analysis, the fetal phenotype can be correlated to a particular developmental pathway in embryogenesis. Cross-species phenotyping allows providing further evidence for causality of discovered variants in genes involved in those extremely rare phenotypes and will increase our knowledge about normal and abnormal human developmental processes. Ultimately, families will benefit from the option of early prenatal diagnosis. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Population-based evaluation of a suggested anatomic and clinical classification of congenital heart defects based on the International Paediatric and Congenital Cardiac Code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goffinet François

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Classification of the overall spectrum of congenital heart defects (CHD has always been challenging, in part because of the diversity of the cardiac phenotypes, but also because of the oft-complex associations. The purpose of our study was to establish a comprehensive and easy-to-use classification of CHD for clinical and epidemiological studies based on the long list of the International Paediatric and Congenital Cardiac Code (IPCCC. Methods We coded each individual malformation using six-digit codes from the long list of IPCCC. We then regrouped all lesions into 10 categories and 23 subcategories according to a multi-dimensional approach encompassing anatomic, diagnostic and therapeutic criteria. This anatomic and clinical classification of congenital heart disease (ACC-CHD was then applied to data acquired from a population-based cohort of patients with CHD in France, made up of 2867 cases (82% live births, 1.8% stillbirths and 16.2% pregnancy terminations. Results The majority of cases (79.5% could be identified with a single IPCCC code. The category "Heterotaxy, including isomerism and mirror-imagery" was the only one that typically required more than one code for identification of cases. The two largest categories were "ventricular septal defects" (52% and "anomalies of the outflow tracts and arterial valves" (20% of cases. Conclusion Our proposed classification is not new, but rather a regrouping of the known spectrum of CHD into a manageable number of categories based on anatomic and clinical criteria. The classification is designed to use the code numbers of the long list of IPCCC but can accommodate ICD-10 codes. Its exhaustiveness, simplicity, and anatomic basis make it useful for clinical and epidemiologic studies, including those aimed at assessment of risk factors and outcomes.

  20. Activating mutations in FGFR3 and HRAS reveal a shared genetic origin for congenital disorders and testicular tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goriely, Anne; Hansen, Ruth M S; Taylor, Indira B

    2009-01-01

    Genes mutated in congenital malformation syndromes are frequently implicated in oncogenesis, but the causative germline and somatic mutations occur in separate cells at different times of an organism's life. Here we unify these processes to a single cellular event for mutations arising in male germ...... cells that show a paternal age effect. Screening of 30 spermatocytic seminomas for oncogenic mutations in 17 genes identified 2 mutations in FGFR3 (both 1948A>G, encoding K650E, which causes thanatophoric dysplasia in the germline) and 5 mutations in HRAS. Massively parallel sequencing of sperm DNA...... a common 'selfish' pathway supporting proliferation in the testis, leading to diverse phenotypes in the next generation including fetal lethality, congenital syndromes and cancer predisposition....

  1. PHENOTYPIC CORRELATIONS AND BODY WEIGHTS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Osondu

    Ethiopian Journal of Environmental Studies and Management Vol. 4 No.3 2011. PHENOTYPIC ... because of its high meat quality and acceptance by her populace. The meat is ... commands high price in the restaurants and markets than other ...

  2. CLPB mutations cause 3-methylglutaconic aciduria, progressive brain atrophy, intellectual disability, congenital neutropenia, cataracts, movement disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wortmann, Saskia B; Ziętkiewicz, Szymon; Kousi, Maria; Szklarczyk, Radek; Haack, Tobias B; Gersting, Søren W; Muntau, Ania C; Rakovic, Aleksandar; Renkema, G Herma; Rodenburg, Richard J; Strom, Tim M; Meitinger, Thomas; Rubio-Gozalbo, M Estela; Chrusciel, Elzbieta; Distelmaier, Felix; Golzio, Christelle; Jansen, Joop H; van Karnebeek, Clara; Lillquist, Yolanda; Lücke, Thomas; Õunap, Katrin; Zordania, Riina; Yaplito-Lee, Joy; van Bokhoven, Hans; Spelbrink, Johannes N; Vaz, Frédéric M; Pras-Raves, Mia; Ploski, Rafal; Pronicka, Ewa; Klein, Christine; Willemsen, Michel A A P; de Brouwer, Arjan P M; Prokisch, Holger; Katsanis, Nicholas; Wevers, Ron A

    2015-02-05

    We studied a group of individuals with elevated urinary excretion of 3-methylglutaconic acid, neutropenia that can develop into leukemia, a neurological phenotype ranging from nonprogressive intellectual disability to a prenatal encephalopathy with progressive brain atrophy, movement disorder, cataracts, and early death. Exome sequencing of two unrelated individuals and subsequent Sanger sequencing of 16 individuals with an overlapping phenotype identified a total of 14 rare, predicted deleterious alleles in CLPB in 14 individuals from 9 unrelated families. CLPB encodes caseinolytic peptidase B homolog ClpB, a member of the AAA+ protein family. To evaluate the relevance of CLPB in the pathogenesis of this syndrome, we developed a zebrafish model and an in vitro assay to measure ATPase activity. Suppression of clpb in zebrafish embryos induced a central nervous system phenotype that was consistent with cerebellar and cerebral atrophy that could be rescued by wild-type, but not mutant, human CLPB mRNA. Consistent with these data, the loss-of-function effect of one of the identified variants (c.1222A>G [p.Arg408Gly]) was supported further by in vitro evidence with the mutant peptides abolishing ATPase function. Additionally, we show that CLPB interacts biochemically with ATP2A2, known to be involved in apoptotic processes in severe congenital neutropenia (SCN) 3 (Kostmann disease [caused by HAX1 mutations]). Taken together, mutations in CLPB define a syndrome with intellectual disability, congenital neutropenia, progressive brain atrophy, movement disorder, cataracts, and 3-methylglutaconic aciduria. Copyright © 2015 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Echocardiography in the adult's congenital cardiopaties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escobar Q, Carlos I; Jaramillo U, Mario; Tenorio, Luis F; Molina V, Claudia; Saldarriaga A, Marcela; Arango, Angela M

    2003-01-01

    The number of adults with congenital heart disease is steadily increasing in the course of time. We ignore the prevalence and the most frequent diagnoses in our environment. A descriptive prospective study is presented. Between November 1 1999 and July 31 2001, 8871 Tran-thoracic and Tran-esophageal echocardiographies were performed in the Clinica Cardiovascular Santa Maria's echocardiography service. We found 143 congenital cardiopathies (1.6%) in 74 men and 69 women with a mean age of 37.7 +/- 18.4 years. the most frequent diagnoses were bicuspid aortic valve, atrial septal defect, ventricular septal defect, patent ductus arteriosus and Ebstein's anomaly. these findings agree with world wide data

  4. Congenital blindness improves semantic and episodic memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasqualotto, Achille; Lam, Jade S Y; Proulx, Michael J

    2013-05-01

    Previous studies reported that congenitally blind people possess superior verb-generation skills. Here we tested the impact of blindness on capacity and the fidelity of semantic memory by using a false memory paradigm. In the Deese-Roediger-McDermott paradigm, participants study lists of words that are all semantically related to a lure that is not presented. Subsequently, participants frequently recall the missing lure. We found that congenitally blind participants have enhanced memory performance for recalling the presented words and reduced false memories for the lure. The dissociation of memory capacity and fidelity provides further evidence for enhanced verbal ability in the blind, supported by their broader structural and functional brain reorganisation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Congenital lumbar vertebrae agenesis in a lamb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farajli Abbasi, Mohammad; Shojaei, Bahador; Azari, Omid

    2017-01-01

    Congenital agenesis of lumbar vertebrae was diagnosed in a day-old female lamb based on radiology and clinical examinations. There was no neurological deficit in hindlimb and forelimb associated with standing disability. Radiography of the abdominal region revealed absence of lumbar vertebrae. Necropsy confirmed clinical and radiographic results. No other anomaly or agenesis was seen macroscopically in the abdominal and thoracic regions as well as vertebral column. Partial absence of vertebral column has been reported in human and different animal species, as an independent occurrence or associated with other organs anomalies. The latter has been designated as caudal regression syndrome. Vertebral agenesis may arise from irregularity in the differentiation of somites to the sclerotome or sclerotome to the vertebral primordium. Most of the previously reported cases of agenesis were related to the lumbosacral region, lonely or along with other visceral absences. This case was the first report of congenital agenesis of lumbar vertebrae in a lamb.

  6. A case of congenital corneal keloid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jong-Suk; Kwon, Sangwon; Shyn, Kyung-Hwan

    2005-06-01

    To describe a case of unilateral comeal keloid and present the clinical and histopathological findings and the management. A 23-year-old Asian male patient was examined for a white spot on the left cornea that had been present since birth. On biomicroscopic examination, a well-demarcated vascularized comeal mass was found located nasal to the center. The pupil was displaced superiorly, and gonioscopic examination showed peripheral iridocomeal adhesion at 12 o'clock. The patient underwent penetrating keratoplasty. Histopathologic study showed a variously thickened epithelial layer, an absence of Bowman's layer, subepithelial fibrovascular hyperplasia, and an absence of dermal elements. These histopathologic findings suggested a congenital comeal keloid. The central graft comea remained clear at 18 months after surgery and the patient was satisfied with the result. Penetrating keratoplasty may be an effective surgical option for congenital keloids in young adult patients.

  7. THE CONGENITAL MOTOR DISABILITY EXPERIENCED AS COMMONSENSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolita Viluckienė

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The article applies Alfred Schutz’s phenomenologically grounded sociological perspective to explore how persons with a congenital motor disability or having a disability ever since their childhood construct and maintain their significant social reality through subjective meanings and how they interpret their disabled bodies. Their personal narratives are based on qualitative in-depth interviews and suggest that these persons face the disability only during secondary socialization, after internalization of social typifications of disabled body of negative meaning, the overcoming of which and successful socialization requires the involvement into new social group or community, i.e., into a positive social structure, confirming their identity. This article performs cognitive function and contributes to the social workers‘ understanding and knowledge building in order to get a re-evaluating the social needs of people with congenital physical disability.

  8. Immunobiology of congenitally athymic-asplenic mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gershwin, M.E.; Ahmed, A.; Ikeda, R.M.; Shifrine, M.; Wilson, F.

    1978-01-01

    A study has been made of congenitally athymic-asplenic mice obtained by the mating of nude by hereditarily asplenic (Dh/+) mice. The mice survived for up to 9 months, under specific pathogen-free conditions, with no evidence for increased risk of spontaneous neoplasia. Although lymphocyte surface markers and sera immunoglobulin levels of athymic-asplenic mice were similar to those of their nude and asplenic littermates, there were a number of major immunologic differences. The athymic-asplenic mice appeared more immunologically compromised than nude mice. There was an elevated rate of growth and a lower inoculated cell threshold needed for successful transplantation of a human malignant melanoma. There was no evidence for auto-antibody production in mice up to 9 months of age. Congenitally athymic-asplenic mice can be used for a variety of studies in which other immunologically deprived mouse mutants are desired. (author)

  9. Congenital anomalies and normal skeletal variants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guebert, G.M.; Yochum, T.R.; Rowe, L.J.

    1987-01-01

    Congenital anomalies and normal skeletal variants are a common occurrence in clinical practice. In this chapter a large number of skeletal anomalies of the spine and pelvis are reviewed. Some of the more common skeletal anomalies of the extremities are also presented. The second section of this chapter deals with normal skeletal variants. Some of these variants may simulate certain disease processes. In some instances there are no clear-cut distinctions between skeletal variants and anomalies; therefore, there may be some overlap of material. The congenital anomalies are presented initially with accompanying text, photos, and references, beginning with the skull and proceeding caudally through the spine to then include the pelvis and extremities. The normal skeletal variants section is presented in an anatomical atlas format without text or references

  10. Congenital anomalies of the spine: radiologic findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Jung Kyu; Kim, Sang Won; Ryu, Kyung Nam [Kyunghee University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-04-01

    Congenital anomalies of the spine are frequent and variable. Some are restricted to skeletal structures, while others involve combine neural tube defects or are associated with other multi-systemic disorders. Structural spinal anomalies can be classified according to their location: 1) the vertebral body, 2) the articular process, 3) the lamina with spinous process, 4) the pars interarticularis, 5) the facet joint, 6) the pedicle, or 7) other. Because of similarities between these congenital anomalies and (a) secondary changes involving infection or joint disease and (b) deformities resulting from trauma and uncertain tumorous conditions, significant confusion can occur during diagnosis. Moreover, since the anomalies often give rise to both functional impairment and cosmetic problem, appropriate treatment relies crucially on accurate diagnosis. The authors illustrate the pathogenesis and radiologic findings of the relatively common spinal anomalies confined to skeletal structures.

  11. Congenital Becker's nevus with a familial association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Book, S E; Glass, A T; Laude, T A

    1997-01-01

    Becker's nevus is a unilateral, hyperpigmented cutaneous hamartoma usually with hypertrichosis. It occurs predominantly in boys, becoming apparent during adolescence, although several cases of congenital Becker's nevus have been reported. Rarely it may be familial and as such is transmitted in an autosomal dominant pattern. We report a 16-month-old black boy with a hyperpigmented patch on his right shoulder and upper pectoral area that extended down his arm. The patient's father has a similar lesion with hair on his left shoulder which has been present since childhood. Histology of the child's lesion was consistent with Becker's nevus. We believe this to be the first reported case of a congenital Becker's nevus with a familial association.

  12. Congenital disorders of glycosylation: The Saudi experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsubhi, Sarah; Alhashem, Amal; Faqeih, Eissa; Alfadhel, Majid; Alfaifi, Abdullah; Altuwaijri, Waleed; Alsahli, Saud; Aldhalaan, Hesham; Alkuraya, Fowzan S; Hundallah, Khalid; Mahmoud, Adel; Alasmari, Ali; Mutairi, Fuad Al; Abduraouf, Hanem; AlRasheed, Layan; Alshahwan, Saad; Tabarki, Brahim

    2017-10-01

    We retrospectively reviewed Saudi patients who had a congenital disorder of glycosylation (CDG). Twenty-seven Saudi patients (14 males, 13 females) from 13 unrelated families were identified. Based on molecular studies, the 27 CDG patients were classified into different subtypes: ALG9-CDG (8 patients, 29.5%), ALG3-CDG (7 patients, 26%), COG6-CDG (7 patients, 26%), MGAT2-CDG (3 patients, 11%), SLC35A2-CDG (1 patient), and PMM2-CDG (1 patient). All the patients had homozygous gene mutations. The combined carrier frequency of CDG for the encountered founder mutations in the Saudi population is 11.5 per 10,000, which translates to a minimum disease burden of 14 patients per 1,000,000. Our study provides comprehensive epidemiologic information and prevalence figures for each of these CDG in a large cohort of congenital disorder of glycosylation patients. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Congenital abnormalities of the posterior fossa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosemani, Thangamadhan; Orman, Gunes; Boltshauser, Eugen; Tekes, Aylin; Huisman, Thierry A G M; Poretti, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    The frequency and importance of the evaluation of the posterior fossa have increased significantly over the past 20 years owing to advances in neuroimaging. Nowadays, conventional and advanced neuroimaging techniques allow detailed evaluation of the complex anatomic structures within the posterior fossa. A wide spectrum of congenital abnormalities has been demonstrated, including malformations (anomalies due to an alteration of the primary developmental program caused by a genetic defect) and disruptions (anomalies due to the breakdown of a structure that had a normal developmental potential). Familiarity with the spectrum of congenital posterior fossa anomalies and their well-defined diagnostic criteria is crucial for optimal therapy, an accurate prognosis, and correct genetic counseling. The authors discuss the spectrum of posterior fossa malformations and disruptions, with emphasis on neuroimaging findings (including diagnostic criteria), neurologic presentation, systemic involvement, prognosis, and risk of recurrence. RSNA, 2015

  14. Role of CT in Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajiah, Prabhakar; Saboo, Sachin S; Abbara, Suhny

    2017-01-01

    Congenital heart diseases (CHD) are being increasingly encountered in cardiac imaging due to improved outcomes from surgical and interventional techniques. Imaging plays an important role in the evaluation of CHD, both prior to and after surgeries and interventions. Computed tomography (CT) has several advantages in the evaluation of these disorders, particularly its high spatial resolution, multi-planar reconstruction capabilities at sub-millimeter isotropic resolution, good temporal resolution, wide field of view, and rapid turnaround time, which minimizes the need for sedation and anesthesia in young children or children with disabilities. With modern scanners, images can be acquired as fast as within one heartbeat. Although there is a risk of ionizing radiation, the radiation dose can be minimized by using several dose reduction strategies. There is a risk of contrast nephrotoxicity in patients with renal dysfunction. In this article, we will review the role of CT in the evaluation of several congenital heart diseases, both in children and adults.

  15. Prenatal diagnosis of congenital paraesophageal hiatal hernia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Jeng Cho

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstracts: Congenital paraesophageal hiatal hernia (CPEH is a rare condition. CPEH can cause important clinical problems such as gastric volvulus, hematemesis, vomiting, failure to thrive, and respiratory distress, it requires early diagnosis and prompt surgical treatment. In this paper, we describe a case of CPEH that was suspected in a prenatal ultrasound. Postnatal upper gastrointestinal contrast series confirmed a CPEH with intrathoracic gastric volvulus. An emergency operation was performed. The stomach was reduced, the hiatal defect was repaired by crural approximation, and a Nissen fundoplication was done. The prenatal diagnosis of CPEH is unusual, but prenatal detection is important because it allows planned neonatal surgery before the onset of complications and reduces long-term morbidity. Keywords: Congenital paraesophageal hiatal hernia, Antenatal diagnosis, Gastric volvulus

  16. [Tissular expansion in giant congenital nevi treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen Van Nuoi, V; Francois-Fiquet, C; Diner, P; Sergent, B; Zazurca, F; Franchi, G; Buis, J; Vazquez, M-P; Picard, A; Kadlub, N

    2014-08-01

    Surgical management of giant melanotic naevi remains a surgical challenge. Tissue expansion provides tissue of the same quality for the repair of defects. The aim of this study is to review tissular expansion for giant melanotic naevi. We conducted a retrospective study from 2000 to 2012. All children patients who underwent a tissular expansion for giant congenital naevi had been included. Epidemiological data, surgical procedure, complication rate and results had been analysed. Thirty-tree patients had been included; they underwent 61 procedures with 79 tissular-expansion prosthesis. Previous surgery, mostly simple excision had been performed before tissular expansion. Complete naevus excision had been performed in 63.3% of the cases. Complications occurred in 45% of the cases, however in 50% of them were minor. Iterative surgery increased the complication rate. Tissular expansion is a valuable option for giant congenital naevus. However, complication rate remained high, especially when iterative surgery is needed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Isolated and syndromic forms of congenital anosmia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karstensen, H G; Tommerup, N

    2012-01-01

    . Despite a strong degree of heritability, no human disease-causing mutations have been identified. Anosmia is part of the clinical spectrum in various diseases, as seen in Kallmann syndrome, various ciliopathies and congenital insensitivity to pain. This review will focus on ICA through already published......Loss of smell (anosmia) is common in the general population and the frequency increases with age. A much smaller group have no memory of ever being able to smell and are classified as having isolated congenital anosmia (ICA). Families are rare, and tend to present in a dominant inheritance pattern...... families and cases as well as syndromes where anosmia is part of the clinical disease spectrum. Furthermore, olfactory signal transduction pathway genes and animal models may shed light on potential candidate genes and pathways involved in ICA....

  18. Congenital epulides: A rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital epulis (CE or "Granular cell epulis" also previously termed as "Neumann′s tumor" is a benign growth arising from the mucosa of the gingiva, typically seen as a mass protruding from the infant′s mouth, often interfering with respiration and feeding. These tumors generally present as a single mass arising from the upper alveolus. We report a rare case of two congenital epulides arising from the maxillary and mandibular alveolus in a day old female infant, which was surgically excised, allowing for early initiation of breast feeding. The tumor cells stained negative for S100 protein hence differentiating from other granular cell tumors. The clinical presentation, differential diagnosis in regard to the various neonatal oral swellings and the management of CE has been discussed.

  19. Whole-Exome Sequencing Identifies ALMS1, IQCB1, CNGA3, and MYO7A Mutations in Patients with Leber Congenital Amaurosis

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xia; Wang, Hui; Cao, Ming; Li, Zhe; Chen, Xianfeng; Patenia, Claire; Gore, Athurva; Abboud, Emad B.; Al-Rajhi, Ali A.; Lewis, Richard A.; Lupski, James R.; Mardon, Graeme; Zhang, Kun; Muzny, Donna; Gibbs, Richard A.

    2011-01-01

    It has been well documented that mutations in the same retinal disease gene can result in different clinical phenotypes due to difference in the mutant allele and/or genetic background. To evaluate this, a set of consanguineous patient families with Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) that do not carry mutations in known LCA disease genes was characterized through homozygosity mapping followed by targeted exon/whole-exome sequencing to identify genetic variations. Among these families, a total o...

  20. Comparing Life Quality Strategies and Emotion Regulation in People with Congenital and Non-Congenital Motor Disability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyedeh Zeynab Miraghaei

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of the present study was to compare emotion regulation strategies and life quality of people with congenital and non-congenital motor disabilities. Method: This study is a casual-comparative study and its population consisted of all people with congenital and non-congenital motor disability in Kahrizak Charity Foundation in Tehran in 2016. To conduct the study, available sampling method was used, and congenital and non-congenital disabled people were selected (200 people. To collect data, Cognitive Emotion Regulation Scale by Granovsky and life quality questionnaire were used. Research hypotheses were tested using multivariate analysis of variance. Results: The findings of this study showed that there is a significant difference between emotion regulation components in people with congenital and non-congenital disabilities (p<0.05. Also, according to the findings, a significant difference was observed between life quality dimensions (physical and mental health in people with congenital and non-congenital disabilities (p<0.05. Conclusion: According to the significant difference between two groups of subjects, necessary measures regarding consultation and psychotherapy should be taken into consideration to let people benefit from desirable mental health level.

  1. Congenital diarrheal disorders: an updated diagnostic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrin, Gianluca; Tomaiuolo, Rossella; Passariello, Annalisa; Elce, Ausilia; Amato, Felice; Di Costanzo, Margherita; Castaldo, Giuseppe; Canani, Roberto Berni

    2012-01-01

    Congenital diarrheal disorders (CDDs) are a group of inherited enteropathies with a typical onset early in the life. Infants with these disorders have frequently chronic diarrhea of sufficient severity to require parenteral nutrition. For most CDDs the disease-gene is known and molecular analysis may contribute to an unequivocal diagnosis. We review CDDs on the basis of the genetic defect, focusing on the significant contribution of molecular analysis in the complex, multistep diagnostic work-up.

  2. Congenital Diarrheal Disorders: An Updated Diagnostic Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Castaldo

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Congenital diarrheal disorders (CDDs are a group of inherited enteropathies with a typical onset early in the life. Infants with these disorders have frequently chronic diarrhea of sufficient severity to require parenteral nutrition. For most CDDs the disease-gene is known and molecular analysis may contribute to an unequivocal diagnosis. We review CDDs on the basis of the genetic defect, focusing on the significant contribution of molecular analysis in the complex, multistep diagnostic work-up.

  3. Congenital pseudarthrosis of clavicle, differential diagnosis pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vergara A, Enrique; Villamarin, Fernando; Pina Q, Marcela

    2006-01-01

    The congenital pseudarthrosis of clavicle is a rare entity, frequently appearing without association to other pathologies and does not cause important limitations in the children. It can confuse with other traumatic pathologies like clavicle fracture. Most of the patients complain about the aesthetics and few times for pain. The treatment is generally surgical there is controversy about of carrying out surgery. We reported two clinical cases with pseudoarthrosis of the right clavicle that they received surgical treatment with satisfactory results.

  4. Congenital Heart Defects and Coronary Anatomy

    OpenAIRE

    Mawson, John B.

    2002-01-01

    Coronary artery anomalies are a well recognized feature of many cardiac malformations and have been catalogued in a number of reviews. This overview concentrates on 1) the interplay between congenital heart defects and coronary morphogenesis, examining how some of the embryology fits with the experiments of nature encountered in clinical practice; and 2) the influence of coronary anatomy on patient management. This overview uses, as examples, pulmonary atresia with intact ventricular septum, ...

  5. Congenital lamellar ichthyosis, a case report.

    OpenAIRE

    Joaquín Saavedra D.; María José Sierralta S.; Cristian Saavedra D; Vanesa Rivera C; Francisco Cerda C.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT INTRODUCTION: Lamellar Ichthyosis is a rare skin diseases belonging to the Group of the so-called genodermatoses. It is a form of congenital ichthyosis evident at birth. CASE REPORT: Male neonate, born at 36 weeks of gestation via cesarian section, appropriate for gestational age and Apgar Score 8. Nonconsanguineous parents. Affected brother with Ichthyosis lamellar. Is hospitalized in the Neonatal Intermediary Care Unit of the Hospital of San Fernando due to ...

  6. Recent Advances in Central Congenital Hypothyroidism

    OpenAIRE

    Schoenmakers, Nadia Adham; Alatzoglou, Kyriaki S; Chatterjee, Vengalil Krishna; Dattani, Mehul T

    2015-01-01

    Central Congenital Hypothyroidism (CCH) may occur in isolation, or more frequently in combination with additional pituitary hormone deficits with or without associated extrapituitary abnormalities. Although uncommon, it may be more prevalent than previously thought, affecting up to 1:16000 neonates in the Netherlands. Since TSH is not elevated, CCH will evade diagnosis in primary, TSH-based, CH screening programs and delayed detection may result in neurodevelopmental delay due to untreated ne...

  7. Recent advances in central congenital hypothyroidism

    OpenAIRE

    Schoenmakers, Nadia; Alatzoglou, Kyriaki S; Chatterjee, V Krishna; Dattani, Mehul T

    2015-01-01

    Central congenital hypothyroidism (CCH) may occur in isolation, or more frequently in combination with additional pituitary hormone deficits with or without associated extrapituitary abnormalities. Although uncommon, it may be more prevalent than previously thought, affecting up to 1:16?000 neonates in the Netherlands. Since TSH is not elevated, CCH will evade diagnosis in primary, TSH-based, CH screening programs and delayed detection may result in neurodevelopmental delay due to untreated n...

  8. Congenital pancreatic pseudocyst presenting as neonatal ascites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Alzaiem

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Congenital pancreatic pseudocysts are extremely rare in infants and very few cases have been reported in the literature. We are reporting a case of 2-month-old infant with pancreatic pseudocyst. He presented with progressive abdominal distension and large bilateral hydrocele. The diagnosis was based on the operative findings and further confirmed by histopathological examination of the wall of pseudocyst. Later on the patient was operated by laparoscopic assisted transgastric cystogastrostomy technique.

  9. Congenital lobar emphysema in neonates: Anaesthetic challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mridu Paban Nath

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital lobar emphysema (CLE is a potentially reversible, though possibly life-threatening, cause of respiratory distress in the neonate. It poses dilemma in diagnosis and management. We are presenting a 6-week-old baby who presented with a sudden onset of respiratory distress related to CLE affecting the left upper lobe. Lobectomy was performed under general anaesthesia with one lung ventilation. The details of anaesthetic challenges and management are described here.

  10. Open resections for congenital lung malformations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mullassery Dhanya

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Pediatric lung resection is a relatively uncommon procedure that is usually performed for congenital lesions. In recent years, thoracoscopic resection has become increasingly popular, particularly for small peripheral lesions. The aim of this study was to review our experience with traditional open lung resection in order to evaluate the existing "gold standard." Materials and Methods: We carried out a retrospective analysis of all children having lung resection for congenital lesions at our institution between 1997 and 2004. Data were collected from analysis of case notes, operative records and clinical consultation. The mean follow-up was 37.95 months. The data were analyzed using SPSS. Results: Forty-one children (13 F/28 M underwent major lung resections during the study period. Their median age was 4.66 months (1 day-9 years. The resected lesions included 21 congenital cystic adenomatoid malformations, 14 congenital lobar emphysema, four sequestrations and one bronchogenic cyst. Fifty percent of the lesions were diagnosed antenatally. Twenty-six patients had a complete lobectomy while 15 patients had parenchymal sparing resection of the lesion alone. Mean postoperative stay was 5.7 days. There have been no complications in any of the patients. All patients are currently alive, asymptomatic and well. None of the patients have any significant chest deformity. Conclusions: We conclude that open lung resection enables parenchymal sparing surgery, is versatile, has few complications and produces very good long-term results. It remains the "gold standard" against which minimally invasive techniques may be judged.

  11. Congenital lobar emphysema in a kitten.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blonk, M; Van de Maele, I; Combes, A; Stablay, B; De Cock, H; Polis, I; Rybachuk, G; de Rooster, H

    2017-11-01

    A five-month-old ragdoll cat presented with severe respiratory signs, unresponsive to medical therapy. Hyperinflation of the right middle lung lobe was diagnosed with radiography and computed tomography. Lung lobectomy following a median sternotomy led to full recovery. Histopathological analysis revealed lobar emphysema and, based on the animal's age, congenital lobar emphysema was considered the most likely diagnosis. © 2017 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  12. Congenital Hypothyroidism and Goitre in Childhood

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, Albert J.; Curtis, Joseph

    1990-01-01

    The problems of congenital hypothyroidism and goitre are relatively common in childhood. The investigation and treatment of these disorders requires a knowledge of their various causes, appropriate investigation, and referral for specialist consultation as necessary, as well as involvement of the family physician in the monitoring of effectiveness of and compliance with treatment. Many of these disorders have life-long implications for the individual affected.

  13. Aerobic Training in Patients with Congenital Myopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedermann, Gitte; Vissing, Christoffer Rasmus; Jensen, Karen

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Congenital myopathies (CM) often affect contractile proteins of the sarcomere, which could render patients susceptible to exercise-induced muscle damage. We investigated if exercise is safe and beneficial in patients with CM. METHODS: Patients exercised on a stationary bike for 30......: The Regional Committee on Health Research Ethics of the Capital Region of Denmark H-2-2013-066 and ClinicalTrials.gov H2-2013-066....

  14. Congenital cystic adenomatoid lung malformation of newborn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reither, M.; Peltner, H.U.; Weigel, W.; Braune, M.; Heiming, E.

    1980-01-01

    The congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation (CCAM) of the newborn is a particular form among the cystic disorders of the lung. The clinical findings, illustrated by four cases, and especially the roentgenographic symptoms are typical. Different radiologic examinations, including the computertomography, are discussed. The differential diagnosis of the disease is various, and therefore a correct and on time diagnosis is necessary, because the prognosis of the patient depends on an adequate therapy. (orig.) [de

  15. Congenital bronchopulmonary foregut malformations: concepts and controversies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newman, Beverley

    2006-01-01

    This article addresses the scope, etiology, important associations and imaging features of congenital bronchopulmonary foregut malformations. Etiologic concepts, including airway obstruction and vascular anomalies, are highlighted. Technical imaging advances, especially CT and MR, have greatly enhanced our diagnostic abilities in evaluating these lesions; however, thorough and careful assessment of all aspects of the malformation is still necessary. Several specific lesions are discussed in more detail, particularly regarding controversial issues in classification, understanding, imaging and management. (orig.)

  16. Congenital bronchopulmonary foregut malformations: concepts and controversies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newman, Beverley [University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2006-08-15

    This article addresses the scope, etiology, important associations and imaging features of congenital bronchopulmonary foregut malformations. Etiologic concepts, including airway obstruction and vascular anomalies, are highlighted. Technical imaging advances, especially CT and MR, have greatly enhanced our diagnostic abilities in evaluating these lesions; however, thorough and careful assessment of all aspects of the malformation is still necessary. Several specific lesions are discussed in more detail, particularly regarding controversial issues in classification, understanding, imaging and management. (orig.)

  17. Causes of congenital unilateral pulmonary hypoplasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Currarino, G.; Williams, B.; Children's Medical Center, Dallas, TX

    1985-01-01

    A review of the roentgenograms and clinical records of 33 children with primary congenital underdevelopment of one lung showed that 9 patients had simple pulmonary hypoplasia, 8 had anomalous venous return to the right atrium or the inferior vena cava (scimitar syndrome), 7 had an absence of ipsilateral pulmonary artery, 7 had an accessory diaphragm, and 2 had a pulmonary sequestration adjacent to a small diaphragmatic hernia. (orig.)

  18. Ultrasonographi assessment of congenital adrenal masses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muro Velilla, D.; Sanguesa, C.; Alberto, C.; Lopez, A., Benlloch, C.

    1996-01-01

    The demonstrate the utility of ultrasound (US) in the initial assessment and follow-up of newborns with adrenal masses. A series of 21 newborns presenting adrenal mass studied on the basis of US findings, clinical assessment and biochemical data. Seven patients had congenital neuroblastoma, two had a benign tumor and twelve presented adrenal hemorrhage. Postnatal US study of the course of these patients is essential for the differential diagnosis of their lesions when not diagnosed prenatally. (Author) 20 refs

  19. Congenital malformations of the skull and meninges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanev, Paul M

    2007-02-01

    The surgery and management of children who have congenital malformations of the skull and meninges require multidisciplinary care and long-term follow-up by multiple specialists in birth defects. The high definition of three-dimensional CT and MRI allows precise surgery planning of reconstruction and management of associated malformations. The reconstruction of meningoencephaloceles and craniosynostosis are challenging procedures that transform the child's appearance. The embryology, clinical presentation, and surgical management of these malformations are reviewed.

  20. A Biobank for Long-term and Sustainable Research in the Field of Congenital Heart Disease in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Pickardt

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Congenital heart disease (CHD is the most frequent birth defect (0.8%–1% of all live births. Due to the advance in prenatal and postnatal early diagnosis and treatment, more than 90% of these patients survive into adulthood today. However, several mid- and long-term morbidities are dominating the follow-up of these patients. Due to the rarity and heterogeneity of the phenotypes of CHD, multicenter registry-based studies are required. The CHD-Biobank was established in 2009 with the aim to collect DNA from patients and their parents (trios or from affected families, as well as cardiovascular tissues from patients undergoing corrective heart surgery for cardiovascular malformations. Clinical/phenotype data are matched to the International Paediatric and Congenital Cardiac Code (IPCCC and the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems 10th Revision (ICD-10. The DNA collection currently comprises samples from approximately 4200 participants with a wide range of CHD phenotypes. The collection covers about 430 trios and 120 families with more than one affected member. The cardiac tissue collection comprises 1143 tissue samples from 556 patients after open heart surgery. The CHD-Biobank provides a comprehensive basis for research in the field of CHD with high standards of data privacy, IT management, and sample logistics.

  1. CONGENITAL MYOTONIC DYSTROPHY – CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Neubauer

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Background. Myotonic dystrophy is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. It is characterized by myotonia, myopathy of voluntary and involuntary muscles, frontal baldness in men, cardiac conduction abnormalities, catharacts, intellectual deterioration and endocrinopathy. Men with this disorder have often gonadal atrophy and infertility. On the other hand women are generally fertile. During pregnancy their myopathy worsens, often causing severe obstetrical complications. Their children may develop congenital form of the disease with signs of myopathy in utero and have great difficulties in maintaining life functions after birth, together with other characteristical signs of this form: bilateral facial weakness, severe hypotonia, feeding difficulties, talipes equinovarus and mental retardation. The authors present a female newborn with such congenital form of myotonic dystrophy.Conclusions. The authors have emphasized the importance of medical history, regular updating of all the cases of neuromuscular diseases in the region and clinical characteristics for the recognition of congenital form of myotonic dystrophy because of possible prenatal diagnostics and better antenatal and postantal care.

  2. Ultrasonographic Findings of Fetal Congenital Intracranial Teratoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hak Jong [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Young Ho; Song, Mi Jin; Cho, Jeong Yeon; Min, Jee Yeon; Moon, Min Hwan; Kim, Jeong Ah [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-06-15

    To evaluate the sonographic findings of fetal congenital intracranial teratoma. From 1994 to 2002, of the 11 fetuses which had been diagnosed with fetal intracranial tumors after second level fetal ultrasonography, the six that were confirmed after autopsy as congenital intracranial teratomas were included in our study. The sonographic findings, including size, homogeneity, echogenicity compared with surrounding normal brain tissues, cystic components, and tumor related calcification, were retrospectively evaluated. The incidence of fetal congenital intracranial teratoma out of all fetal intracranial tumors was 54.5% (6 of 11 cases) during the 8-year period. The mean mass size was 7.4 cm (3.0-15.0 cm). Two thirds of (4/6) of the teratoma cases showed high echogenicity compared with normal brain tissues, and two thirds (4/6) showed heterogeneous echogenicity. Four teratoma cases (67%) showed cysts in the mass with a mean size of 1.9cm. One third (2/6) showed calcifications within the tumor. Out of the six cases, two had oropharyngeal teratoma with extension into the intracranial portion (so called epignathus) and showed homogenous mass without any cysts or calcifications. The typical sonographic appearance of intracranial teratoma was a heterogeneous, hyperechoic mass with cysts. In the epignathus cases, the sonographic appearances differed somewhat from the others. An understanding of the sonographic findings of fetal intracranial teratoma will help in the timely counseling of the parents and in obstetric decision making

  3. Intelligence Quotient (IQ) in Congenital Strabismus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri, Abbas; Fallahi, Mohammad Reza; Tamannaifard, Shima; Vajebmonfared, Sara; Zonozian, Saideh

    2013-04-01

    To evaluate intelligence quotient (IQ) in patients with congenital strabismus. All patients with congenital strabismus scheduled for surgery were enrolled consecutively over a one year period in a cross-sectional study and were evaluated for verbal, performance and total IQ scores, and compared to the mean normal IQ of 100±15. During the study period, 109 patients with mean age of 18.4±10.5 (range, 4-63) years were included. Educational status in most patients (80%) was less than high-school. Most patients (80%) lived in urban areas and 46 patients (42.2%) had some degrees of unilateral or bilateral amblyopia. Mean verbal IQ was 87.2±19.6 (range, 45-127), performance IQ was 81±15.5 (range, 44-111) and total IQ was 83.5±18.3 (range, 40-120). Total IQ was significantly lower in comparison to the normal population (PIQ levels. Verbal IQ was insignificantly higher in myopes than emmetropes and hyperopes. IQ was better with vertical deviations and was higher in esotropes than exotropes; however, these differences were not statistically significant (P>0.05 for all comparisons). Patients with congenital strabismus in this study had lower mean IQ scores than the normal population which may be due to genetic background or acquired causes secondary to strabismus.

  4. MR findings of congenital anorectal malformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yoo Kyung; Kim, Hyae Young; Kwag, Hyon Joo; Chung, Eun Chul; Lee, Jung Sik; Suh, Jeong Soo [Ewha Womens University, medical College, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-05-15

    To assess the usefulness of MRI in preoperative diagnosis of congenital anorectal malformation. MR findings of 11 cases with surgically proved anorectal malformations were retrospectively reviewed and compared with operative findings, according to the level of atresia, the development of sphincter muscle, fistula and associated anomalies of other organs. Four of 11 cases were low type of anorectal atresia, 3 cases were intermediate type, and 3 cases were high type. There was one case of Currarino triad with low type of anorectal stenosis. MRI demonstrated the levels of atresia correctly in all cases and revealed fistulas in all high type of anomalies. Degrees of the development of the sphincter muscles were good in all cases of low types and fair in a case of intermediate type and an anorectal stenosis, whereas the development was poor in 2 cases of intermediate type and all 4 cases of high type. The associated anomalies in anorectal malformation were renal agenesis, congenital hip dysplasia and sacral defect with presacral teratoma in Currarino triad. MRI was a simple and useful study to confirm the level of atresia, fistula and associated anomalies in the diagnosis of the congenital anorectal malformation.

  5. Congenital Unilateral Hypoplasia of Depressor Anguli Oris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seckin O. Ulualp

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Asymmetric facial appearance may originate from abnormalities of facial musculature or facial innervation. We describe clinical features of congenital hypoplasia of depressor anguli oris muscle in a child. Material and Methods. Chart of a 10-month-old female referred to a tertiary care pediatric hospital for assessment of facial paralysis was reviewed. Data included relevant history and physical examination, diagnostic work up, and management. Results. The child presented with asymmetric movement of lower lip since birth. Asymmetry of lower lip was more pronounced when she smiled and cried. Rest of the face movement was symmetric. On examination, the face appeared symmetric at rest. The child had inward deviation of right lower lip when she smiled. Facial nerve function, as determined by frowning/forehead, wrinkling, eye closure, nasolabial fold depth, and tearing, was symmetric. Magnetic resonance imaging of the temporal bones and internal auditory canals were within normal limits. Echocardiogram did not show cardiac abnormality. Auditory brainstem response showed no abnormality. Conclusions. Congenital hypoplasia of depressor anguli oris is a rare anomaly that causes asymmetric crying face. Pediatricians and otolaryngologists need to be cognizant of cardiac, head and neck, and central nervous system anomalies associated with congenital unilateral hypoplasia of depressor anguli oris.

  6. Neonatal screening for treatable congenital disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charoensiriwatana, W.; Janejai, N.; Boonwanich, W.; Krasao, P.; Waiyasilp, S.

    2001-01-01

    Congenital hypothyroidism is a treatable disease if detected at the early stage of life. It is one of the most frequent cause of mental retardation in children. In 85 % of cases, congenital hypothyroidism is a consequence of thyroid disgenesis, in which the gland is either absent, located ectopically and/or severely reduced in size. Early detection and treatment with thyroid hormone supplement can significantly reduce mental damage. In 1996, Thailand initiated a neonatal screening programme for congenital hypothyroidism (CHT) and phenylketonuria (PKU), with the objective of bringing a better quality of life to people throughout the country, but especially in the remote areas. The programme involves implementing routine screening nationwide. The plan of action was designed with the goal of having public health service units throughout the country provide neonatal screening by year 2002 for the 1.2 million babies born per annum in Thailand. The government supported the programme by allocating a five-year budget of approximately US$15 million. The programme received additional assistance through technical support and human resource development from the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the US Centers for Disease Control. This assistance promoted self-sustainability and strengthened the programme's technical base. The programme is on track. It is expected that by year 2002 all new born babies in Thailand will be screened for CHT and PKU

  7. MR findings of congenital anorectal malformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yoo Kyung; Kim, Hyae Young; Kwag, Hyon Joo; Chung, Eun Chul; Lee, Jung Sik; Suh, Jeong Soo

    1995-01-01

    To assess the usefulness of MRI in preoperative diagnosis of congenital anorectal malformation. MR findings of 11 cases with surgically proved anorectal malformations were retrospectively reviewed and compared with operative findings, according to the level of atresia, the development of sphincter muscle, fistula and associated anomalies of other organs. Four of 11 cases were low type of anorectal atresia, 3 cases were intermediate type, and 3 cases were high type. There was one case of Currarino triad with low type of anorectal stenosis. MRI demonstrated the levels of atresia correctly in all cases and revealed fistulas in all high type of anomalies. Degrees of the development of the sphincter muscles were good in all cases of low types and fair in a case of intermediate type and an anorectal stenosis, whereas the development was poor in 2 cases of intermediate type and all 4 cases of high type. The associated anomalies in anorectal malformation were renal agenesis, congenital hip dysplasia and sacral defect with presacral teratoma in Currarino triad. MRI was a simple and useful study to confirm the level of atresia, fistula and associated anomalies in the diagnosis of the congenital anorectal malformation

  8. Mondini dysplasia and congenital cytomegalovirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauman, N M; Kirby-Keyser, L J; Dolan, K D; Wexler, D; Gantz, B J; McCabe, B F; Bale, J F

    1994-01-01

    We report a case of bilateral temporal bone anomalies in a child with symptomatic congenital cytomegalovirus infection and severe, bilateral sensorineural hearing loss identified at 3 months of age. High-resolution temporal bone computed tomography (HRCT) revealed bilateral findings of a short, malformed cochlea lacking an interscalar septum, a short and wide internal auditory canal, and an enlarged vestibular aqueduct, features diagnostic of bilateral Mondini dysplasia. To determine the importance of this observation, we completed HRCT in five additional children between 7 months and 9 years of age who had evidence of symptomatic congenital cytomegalovirus infection. One child with profound sensorineural hearing loss had severe bilateral temporal bone dysplasia with a small cochlea lacking an interscalar septum, an abnormal vestibule, and a large cochlear aqueduct. Of the remaining four children, hearing thresholds ranged from normal to profoundly decreased, but their HRCT scans were normal to visual inspection. When inner ear dimensions of these temporal bones were compared with norms established by Pappas and coworkers, however, seven of the eight ears had short cochleas and narrow lateral semicircular canals, and three ears had short or narrow vestibules. These results indicate that congenital cytomegalovirus infection may cause anomalies or growth disturbances of the temporal bone.

  9. Congenital Malformations in River Buffalo (Bubalus bubalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Albarella

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The world buffalo population is about 168 million, and it is still growing, in India, China, Brazil, and Italy. In these countries, buffalo genetic breeding programs have been performed for many decades. The occurrence of congenital malformations has caused a slowing of the genetic progress and economic loss for the breeders, due to the death of animals, or damage to their reproductive ability or failing of milk production. Moreover, they cause animal welfare reduction because they can imply foetal dystocia and because the affected animals have a reduced fitness with little chances of survival. This review depicts, in the river buffalo (Bubalus bubalis world population, the present status of the congenital malformations, due to genetic causes, to identify their frequency and distribution in order to develop genetic breeding plans able to improve the productive and reproductive performance, and avoid the spreading of detrimental gene variants. Congenital malformations most frequently reported in literature or signaled by breeders to the Department of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Production of the University Federico II (Naples, Italy in river buffalo are: musculoskeletal defects (transverse hemimelia, arthrogryposis, umbilical hernia and disorders of sexual development. In conclusion this review put in evidence that river buffalo have a great variety of malformations due to genetic causes, and TH and omphalocele are the most frequent and that several cases are still not reported, leading to an underestimation of the real weight of genetic diseases in this species.

  10. Congenital anomalies and proximity to landfill sites.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Boyle, E

    2004-01-01

    The occurrence of congenital anomalies in proximity to municipal landfill sites in the Eastern Region (counties Dublin, Kildare, Wicklow) was examined by small area (district electoral division), distance and clustering tendancies in relation to 83 landfills, five of which were major sites. The study included 2136 cases of congenital anomaly, 37,487 births and 1423 controls between 1986 and 1990. For the more populous areas of the region 50% of the population lived within 2-3 km of a landfill and within 4-5 km for more rural areas. In the area-level analysis, the standardised prevalence ratios, empirical and full Bayesian modelling, and Kulldorff\\'s spatial scan statistic found no association between the residential area of cases and location of landfills. In the case control analysis, the mean distance of cases and controls from the nearest landfill was similar. The odds ratios of cases compared to controls for increasing distances from all landfills and major landfills showed no significant difference from the baseline value of 1. The kernel and K methods showed no tendency of cases to cluster in relationship to landfills. In conclusion, congenital anomalies were not found to occur more commonly in proximity to municipal landfills.

  11. Skeletal changes in congenital fibrinogen abnormalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagier, R.; Bouvier, C.A.; van Strijthem, N.

    1980-01-01

    We report anatomico-radiologic study of humerus, femur, and tibia from a case of total congenital afibrinogenemia. Juxtatrabecular hemorrhages occur mainly in metaphyses and seem to be related to normal lines of stress. They may lead to the formation of intraosseous cysts and to a remodelling of bone trabeculae. The radiologic lesions in a second case, diagnosed as congenital dysfibrinogenemia, are similar to those found in Case 1 (femoral trabeculae remodelling) but also resemble some alterations described in hemophilia (pseudotumor of the right iliac bone). Anatomic study of the lesions in Case 2 was not possible. The significance of these observations could be better defined by a more extended skeletal study (radiologic and when feasible anatomic) of patients with congenital clotting defects and especially with inherited disorders of the fibrinogen molecule. It would also be worthwhile investigating manifest or latent hemostatic disorders (particularly at the fibrinogen level) in patients with solitary or aneurysmal bone cysts, and even with bone infarct or unexplained trabecular remodelling.

  12. Congenital heart defects in Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Shi-Min

    2017-01-01

    Yuan SM. Congenital heart defects in Williams syndrome. Turk J Pediatr 2017; 59: 225-232. Williams syndrome (WS), also known as Williams-Beuren syndrome, is a rare genetic disorder involving multiple systems including the circulatory system. However, the etiologies of the associated congenital heart defects in WS patients have not been sufficiently elucidated and represent therapeutic challenges. The typical congenital heart defects in WS were supravalvar aortic stenosis, pulmonary stenosis (both valvular and peripheral), aortic coarctation and mitral valvar prolapse. The atypical cardiovascular anomalies include tetralogy of Fallot, atrial septal defects, aortic and mitral valvular insufficiencies, bicuspid aortic valves, ventricular septal defects, total anomalous pulmonary venous return, double chambered right ventricle, Ebstein anomaly and arterial anomalies. Deletion of the elastin gene on chromosome 7q11.23 leads to deficiency or abnormal deposition of elastin during cardiovascular development, thereby leading to widespread cardiovascular abnormalities in WS. In this article, the distribution, treatment and surgical outcomes of typical and atypical cardiac defects in WS are discussed.

  13. Congenital duodenal diaphragm in eight children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nawaz, Akhtar; Matta, Hilal; Jacobsz, Alic; Al-Salem, Ahmad H.; Trad, Omar

    2004-01-01

    Congenital duodenal obstruction (CDO) is common and usually easy to diagnose cause of intestinal obstruction in the newborn, except when the cause of the obstruction is duodenal diaphragm. We describe our experience with eight children who had intrinsic duodenal obstruction secondary to a duodenal diaphragm. The medical record of 22 children with the diagnosis of congenital intrinsic duodenal were reviewed for age, sex, gestation, birth weight, clinical features, associated anomalies, method of diagnosis, treatment and outcome. Operative findings and procedures were obtained from the operative notes. Eight of 22 children (36.4%) had congenital duodenal diaphragm (CDD). In all children, the diagnosis was made from the plain abdominal X-ray, which showed the classic double-bubble appearence, and barium meal, which showed duodenal obstruction. Four patients had associated anomalies, including two with Down's syndrome intraoperatively, five patients were found to have duodenal diaphragm with a central hole, while the other three had complete duodenal diaphragms. Postoperatively, all patients did well. Six required total parenteral nutrition. The 100% survival rate among these children is comparable to that in Western countries, and can be attributed to the lack of major associated abnormalities, good perioperative management, and the availability of total parenteral nutrition. (author)

  14. Familial aggregation of congenital hydrocephalus in a nationwide cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munch, Tina Nørgaard; Rostgaard, Klaus; Rasmussen, Marie-Louise Hee

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate familial aggregation of primary congenital hydrocephalus in an unselected, nationwide population. Based on the Danish Central Person Register, we identified all children born in Denmark between 1978 and 2008 and their family members (up to third......-degree relatives). Information on primary congenital hydrocephalus was obtained from the National Patient Discharge Register. Using binomial log-linear regression, we estimated recurrence risk ratios of congenital hydrocephalus. An alternative log-linear regression model was applied to quantify the genetic effect...... and the maternal effect. Of 1 928 683 live-born children, 2194 had a diagnosis of idiopathic congenital hydrocephalus (1.1/1000). Of those, 75 (3.4%) had at least one other family member with primary congenital hydrocephalus. Significantly increased recurrence risk ratios of primary congenital hydrocephalus were...

  15. Genetics of Congenital Heart Disease: Past and Present.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muntean, Iolanda; Togănel, Rodica; Benedek, Theodora

    2017-04-01

    Congenital heart disease is the most common congenital anomaly, representing an important cause of infant morbidity and mortality. Congenital heart disease represents a group of heart anomalies that include septal defects, valve defects, and outflow tract anomalies. The exact genetic, epigenetic, or environmental basis of congenital heart disease remains poorly understood, although the exact mechanism is likely multifactorial. However, the development of new technologies including copy number variants, single-nucleotide polymorphism, next-generation sequencing are accelerating the detection of genetic causes of heart anomalies. Recent studies suggest a role of small non-coding RNAs, micro RNA, in congenital heart disease. The recently described epigenetic factors have also been found to contribute to cardiac morphogenesis. In this review, we present past and recent genetic discoveries in congenital heart disease.

  16. Sequential segmental classification of feline congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scansen, Brian A; Schneider, Matthias; Bonagura, John D

    2015-12-01

    Feline congenital heart disease is less commonly encountered in veterinary medicine than acquired feline heart diseases such as cardiomyopathy. Understanding the wide spectrum of congenital cardiovascular disease demands a familiarity with a variety of lesions, occurring both in isolation and in combination, along with an appreciation of complex nomenclature and variable classification schemes. This review begins with an overview of congenital heart disease in the cat, including proposed etiologies and prevalence, examination approaches, and principles of therapy. Specific congenital defects are presented and organized by a sequential segmental classification with respect to their morphologic lesions. Highlights of diagnosis, treatment options, and prognosis are offered. It is hoped that this review will provide a framework for approaching congenital heart disease in the cat, and more broadly in other animal species based on the sequential segmental approach, which represents an adaptation of the common methodology used in children and adults with congenital heart disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Comorbid Conditions in Neonates With Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurthy, Ganga; Ratner, Veniamin; Bacha, Emile; Aspelund, Gudrun

    2016-08-01

    The objectives of this review are to discuss the pathophysiology, clinical impact and treatment of major noncardiac anomalies, and prematurity in infants with congenital heart disease. MEDLINE and PubMed. Mortality risk is significantly higher in patients with congenital heart disease and associated anomalies compared with those in whom the heart defect occurs in isolation. Although most noncardiac structural anomalies do not require surgery in the neonatal period, several require surgery for survival. Management of such infants poses multiple challenges. Premature infants with congenital heart disease face challenges imposed by their immature organ systems, which are susceptible to injury or altered function by congenital heart disease and abnormal circulatory physiology independent of congenital heart disease. For optimal outcomes in premature infants or in infants with multiple congenital anomalies, a collaborative interdisciplinary approach is necessary.

  18. Adult Congenital Heart Disease: Scope of the Problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazor Dray, Efrat; Marelli, Ariane J

    2015-11-01

    This article reviews the changing epidemiology of congenital heart disease summarizing its impact on the demographics of the congenital heart disease population and the progress made in order to improve outcomes in this patient population. Birth prevalence of congenital heart disease can be modified by many factors. As a result of decreasing mortality and increasing survival in all forms of congenital heart disease, the median age of patients has increased and adults now compose two-thirds of patients with congenital heart disease. Disease burden and resulting health services utilization increase significantly across the lifespan. Bridging the gap between policy and quality of care can be improved by referral to specialized adult congenital heart disease centers and planning delivery of specialized services that are commensurate with population needs, program accreditation criteria and certified training of designated workforce. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Rapidly involuting congenital hemangioma (RICH): a brief case report

    OpenAIRE

    Scalise, Robert; Bolton, Joanna; Gibbs, Neil F

    2014-01-01

    Congenital hemangiomas (CH) are benign vascular neoplasms that proliferate in utero and have completed development by birth. Two subtypes of CH are recognized: rapidly involuting congenital hemangiomas (RICH) and non-involuting congenital hemangiomas (NICH). Involution of the RICH subtype often begins in the first weeks of life. NICH does not involute, allowing the distinction between RICH and NICH. We report a case of an infant with RICH occurring on the scalp, examined at birth and followed...

  20. Cerebral glucose metabolic abnormality in patients with congenital scoliosis

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Weon Wook; Suh, Kuen Tak; Kim, Jeung Il; Ku, Ja Gyung; Lee, Hong Seok; Kim, Seong-Jang; Kim, In-Ju; Kim, Yong-Ki; Lee, Jung Sub

    2008-01-01

    A possible association between congenital scoliosis and low mental status has been recognized, but there are no reports describing the mental status or cerebral metabolism in patients with congenital scoliosis in detail. We investigated the mental status using a mini-mental status exam as well as the cerebral glucose metabolism using F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose brain positron emission tomography in 12 patients with congenital scoliosis and compared them with those of 14 age-matched patients with ...

  1. Congenital absence of the portal vein in a boy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohda, E.; Hiramatsu, K.; Saeki, Morihiro; Nakano, Miwako; Masaki, Hidekazu; Ogawa, Kenji; Nirasawa, Mali

    1999-01-01

    Congenital absence of the portal vein (CAPV) is a malformation that is generally thought to be limited to females. We encountered an 11-year-old boy with this malformation. In 17 previously reported cases of CAPV, 2 were male. Three male patients, including our case, were Abernethy type Ib malformation. They had no associated liver tumour and two had no additional congenital abnormality. Conversely, 13 of the 15 female patients had congenital abnormalities and 6 had liver mass lesions. (orig.)

  2. Fever in pregnancy and the risk of congenital malformations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sass, L; Urhoj, S K; Kjærgaard, J

    2017-01-01

    Background: In a variety of animal species, hyperthermia in pregnancy has been recognized as teratogenic. Hyperthermia interferes with protein synthesis via heat-shock proteins, which can entail membrane disruption, cell death, vascular disruption, and placental infarction. This can induce severe....... Congenital malformations within the first three and a half years of life were categorized according to EUROCAT's classification criteria. Logistic regression models were used to estimate the associations between fever in first trimester and overall congenital malformations and congenital malformations...

  3. Prevalence of congenital anomalies in newborns with congenital heart disease diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egbe, Alexander; Lee, Simon; Ho, Deborah; Uppu, Santosh; Srivastava, Shubhika

    2014-01-01

    There is a known association between congenital heart disease (CHD) and other congenital anomalies (CA). These associations have been altered by changes in prenatal factors in recent time. We reviewed the largest database of inpatient hospitalization information and analyzed the current association between common CHD diagnoses and other congenital anomalies. Case-control study design. We reviewed the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) database from 1998 to 2008 and identified all live births with CHD diagnosis (case) and live births without CHD diagnosis (control). We compared prevalence of associated congenital anomalies between the case and control groups. Our cohort consisted of 97,154 and 12,078,482 subjects in the case and control groups, respectively. In the CHD population, prevalence of non-syndromic congenital anomaly (NSCA), genetic syndrome (GS), and overall extra-cardiac congenital anomaly (CA) were 11.4, 2.2, and 13.6%, respectively. In the control group, prevalence of NSCA, GS, and CA were 6.7, 0.3, and 7.0%, respectively. NSCA (odds ratio (OR): 1.88, confidence interval (CI): 1.73-1.94), GS (OR 2.52, CI 2.44-2.61), and overall CA (OR: 2.01, CI: 1.97-2.14) were strongly associated with CHD. Prevalence of GS and multiple organ-system CA decreased significantly over the study period. This is the largest and most comprehensive population-based study evaluating association between CHD and extra-cardiac malformation (ECM) in newborns. There was significant decrease in prevalence of GS and multiple CA over the study period

  4. Congenital Malformations in River Buffalo (Bubalus bubalis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albarella, Sara; Ciotola, Francesca; D’Anza, Emanuele; Coletta, Angelo; Zicarelli, Luigi; Peretti, Vincenzo

    2017-01-01

    Simple Summary Congenital malformations (due to genetic causes) represent a hidden danger for animal production, above all when genetic selection is undertaken for production improvements. These malformations are responsible for economic losses either because they reduce the productivity of the farm, or because their spread in the population would decrease the total productivity of that species/breed. River buffalo is a species of increasing interest all over the world for its production abilities, as proved by the buffalo genome project and the genetic selection plans that are currently performed in different countries. The aim of this review is to provide a general view of different models of congenital malformations in buffalo and their world distribution. This would be useful either for those who performed buffalo genetic selection or for researchers in genetic diseases, which would be an advantage to their studies with respect to the knowledge of gene mutations and interactions in this species. Abstract The world buffalo population is about 168 million, and it is still growing, in India, China, Brazil, and Italy. In these countries, buffalo genetic breeding programs have been performed for many decades. The occurrence of congenital malformations has caused a slowing of the genetic progress and economic loss for the breeders, due to the death of animals, or damage to their reproductive ability or failing of milk production. Moreover, they cause animal welfare reduction because they can imply foetal dystocia and because the affected animals have a reduced fitness with little chances of survival. This review depicts, in the river buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) world population, the present status of the congenital malformations, due to genetic causes, to identify their frequency and distribution in order to develop genetic breeding plans able to improve the productive and reproductive performance, and avoid the spreading of detrimental gene variants. Congenital

  5. Congenital costo-vertebral fibrous band and congenital kyphoscoliosis: a previously unreported combination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eid, Tony; Ghostine, Bachir; Kreichaty, Gaby; Daher, Paul; Ghanem, Ismat

    2013-05-01

    Congenital kyphoscoliosis (CKS) results from abnormal vertebral chondrification. Congenital fibrous bands occur in several locations with variable impact on vertebral development. We report a previously unreported case of a female infant with CKS presenting with an L2 hypoplastic vertebra and a costo-vertebral fibrous band extending to the skin in the form of a dimple. We also describe the therapeutic approach, consisting of surgical excision of the fibrous band and postoperative fulltime bracing, with a 7-year follow-up. We recommend a high index of suspicion in any unusual presentation of CKS and insist on case by case management in such cases.

  6. Four novel ELANE mutations in patients with congenital neutropenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurnikova, Maria; Maschan, Michael; Dinova, Evgeniya; Shagina, Irina; Finogenova, Natalia; Mamedova, Elena; Polovtseva, Tatyana; Shagin, Dmitry; Shcherbina, Anna

    2011-08-01

    Congenital neutropenia is a heterogeneous bone marrow failure syndrome characterized by a maturation arrest of myelopoesis at the promyelocyte/myelocyte stage. Cyclic neutropenia (CyN) and severe congenital neutropenia (SCN) are two main forms of congenital neutropenia. Genetic analysis has shown that heterozygous mutations in the ELANE gene encoding the neutrophil elastase are the major cause of these disorders. We investigated the prevalence of ELANE mutations in a group of 16 patients from 14 families with congenital neutropenia. Five patients had typical manifestations of CyN, and 11 patients had SCN. Seven different heterozygous ELANE mutations were found, including four novel mutations. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. CT appearance of congenital defect resembling the Hangman's fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, J.P. III; Baker, D.H.; Miller, W.A.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose. Congenital defects of C2 are rare and can be confused with Hangman's fractures. CT has been advocated as aiding in differentiation between an acute fracture and congenital defects. Methods. We present a case of a 2-year-old recent accident victim, who was erroneously diagnosed by plain film and CT as having a Hangman's fracture. Results. The CT demonstrated an atypical appearance of a congenital defect. Conclusion. This case shows that the radiographic differentiation between a Hangman's fracture and a congenital defect is more difficult than previously described. (orig.)

  8. Congenital CMV Infection, An imaging perspective: A case report.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Nikunj Patel

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Brain imaging is most important tool for the accurate diagnosis of various congenital CNS infections. Infections of the foetal nervous system results in spectrum of findings that depends upon the inciting agent and the timing of infection. As a general rule earlier the infection, more severe are the findings. Congenital CMV infection can be diagnosed with accuracy with its specific features identified on brain imaging. We present a case of congenital CMV infection in an 8-months-old boy, its clinical presentation, imaging findings and laboratory reports. Specific literature review is included in order to point out major goals achieved in the diagnosis and prognosis of congenital CMV infection.

  9. CT diagnosis of congenital anomalies of the central nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Koreaki

    1980-01-01

    In the diagnosis of central nervous system congenital anomalies, understanding of embryology of the central nervous system and pathophysiology of each anomaly are essential. It is important for clinical approach to central nervous system congenital anomalies to evaluate the size of the head and tention of the anterior fontanelle. Accurate diagnosis of congenital anomalies depends on a correlation of CT findings to clinical pictures. Clinical diagnosis of congenital anomalies should include prediction of treatability and prognosis, in addition to recognition of a disease. (author)

  10. Pulmonary Hypertension in Congenital Heart Disease: Beyond Eisenmenger Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieger, Eric V; Leary, Peter J; Opotowsky, Alexander R

    2015-11-01

    Patients with adult congenital heart disease have an increased risk of developing pulmonary hypertension. There are several mechanisms of pulmonary hypertension in patients with adult congenital heart disease, and understanding them requires a systematic approach to define the patient's hemodynamics and physiology. This article reviews the updated classification of pulmonary hypertension in patients with adult congenital heart disease with a focus on pathophysiology, diagnostics, and the evaluation of pulmonary hypertension in special adult congenital heart disease populations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Extra-cardiac manifestations of adult congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaeta, Stephen A; Ward, Cary; Krasuski, Richard A

    2016-10-01

    Advancement in correction or palliation of congenital cardiac lesions has greatly improved the lifespan of congenital heart disease patients, resulting in a rapidly growing adult congenital heart disease (ACHD) population. As this group has increased in number and age, emerging science has highlighted the systemic nature of ACHD. Providers caring for these patients are tasked with long-term management of multiple neurologic, pulmonary, hepatic, renal, and endocrine manifestations that arise as syndromic associations with congenital heart defects or as sequelae of primary structural or hemodynamic abnormalities. In this review, we outline the current understanding and recent research into these extra-cardiac manifestations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Childhood asthma-predictive phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilbert, Theresa W; Mauger, David T; Lemanske, Robert F

    2014-01-01

    Wheezing is a fairly common symptom in early childhood, but only some of these toddlers will experience continued wheezing symptoms in later childhood. The definition of the asthma-predictive phenotype is in children with frequent, recurrent wheezing in early life who have risk factors associated with the continuation of asthma symptoms in later life. Several asthma-predictive phenotypes were developed retrospectively based on large, longitudinal cohort studies; however, it can be difficult to differentiate these phenotypes clinically as the expression of symptoms, and risk factors can change with time. Genetic, environmental, developmental, and host factors and their interactions may contribute to the development, severity, and persistence of the asthma phenotype over time. Key characteristics that distinguish the childhood asthma-predictive phenotype include the following: male sex; a history of wheezing, with lower respiratory tract infections; history of parental asthma; history of atopic dermatitis; eosinophilia; early sensitization to food or aeroallergens; or lower lung function in early life. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Genotype and Phenotype Correlation in Hereditary Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura (Upshaw-Schulman Syndrome)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-12

    Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura; Congenital Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura; Familial Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura; Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura, Congenital; Upshaw-Schulman Syndrome

  14. A Novel Role for CSRP1 in a Lebanese Family with Congenital Cardiac Defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amina Kamar

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite an obvious role for consanguinity in congenital heart disease (CHD, most studies fail to document a monogenic model of inheritance except for few cases. We hereby describe a first-degree cousins consanguineous Lebanese family with 7 conceived children: 2 died in utero of unknown causes, 3 have CHD, and 4 have polydactyly. The aim of the study is to unveil the genetic variant(s causing these phenotypes using next generation sequencing (NGS technology. Targeted exome sequencing identified a heterozygous duplication in CSRP1 which leads to a potential frameshift mutation at position 154 of the protein. This mutation is inherited from the father, and segregates only with the CHD phenotype. The in vitro characterization demonstrates that the mutation dramatically abrogates its transcriptional activity over cardiac promoters like NPPA. In addition, it differentially inhibits the physical association of CSRP1 with SRF, GATA4, and with the newly described partner herein TBX5. Whole exome sequencing failed to show any potential variant linked to polydactyly, but revealed a novel missense mutation in TRPS1. This mutation is inherited from the healthy mother, and segregating only with the cardiac phenotype. Both TRPS1 and CSRP1 physically interact, and the mutations in each abrogate their partnership. Our findings add fundamental knowledge into the molecular basis of CHD, and propose the di-genic model of inheritance as responsible for such malformations.

  15. Differential Protein Expression in Congenital and Acquired Cholesteatomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung-Ho Shin

    Full Text Available Congenital cholesteatomas are epithelial lesions that present as an epithelial pearl behind an intact eardrum. Congenital and acquired cholesteatomas progress quite differently from each other and progress patterns can provide clues about the unique origin and pathogenesis of the abnormality. However, the exact pathogenic mechanisms by which cholesteatomas develop remain unknown. In this study, key proteins that directly affect cholesteatoma pathogenesis are investigated with proteomics and immunohistochemistry. Congenital cholesteatoma matrices and retroauricular skin were harvested during surgery in 4 patients diagnosed with a congenital cholesteatoma. Tissue was also harvested from the retraction pocket in an additional 2 patients during middle ear surgery. We performed 2-dimensional (2D electrophoresis to detect and analyze spots that are expressed only in congenital cholesteatoma and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/MS to separate proteins by molecular weight. Protein expression was confirmed by immunohistochemical staining. The image analysis of 2D electrophoresis showed that 4 congenital cholesteatoma samples had very similar protein expression patterns and that 127 spots were exclusively expressed in congenital cholesteatomas. Of these 127 spots, 10 major spots revealed the presence of titin, forkhead transcription activator homolog (FKH 5-3, plectin 1, keratin 10, and leucine zipper protein 5 by MALDI-TOF/MS analysis. Immunohistochemical staining showed that FKH 5-3 and titin were expressed in congenital cholesteatoma matrices, but not in acquired cholesteatomas. Our study shows that protein expression patterns are completely different in congenital cholesteatomas, acquired cholesteatomas, and skin. Moreover, non-epithelial proteins, including FKH 5-3 and titin, were unexpectedly expressed in congenital cholesteatoma tissue. Our data indicates that congenital cholesteatoma origins

  16. A new disease? Persistent isolated beta.hydroxybutyrate ketosis and mild congenital hyperinsulinism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christesen, Henrik Thybo; Brusgaard, Klaus; Ditkovskaya, L

    A new disease? Persistent isolated beta.hydroxybutyrate ketosis and mild congenital hyperinsulinism.......A new disease? Persistent isolated beta.hydroxybutyrate ketosis and mild congenital hyperinsulinism....

  17. Increased Prevalence of Renal and Urinary Tract Anomalies in Children with Congenital Hypothyroidism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Juhi; Gordillo, Roberto; Kaskel, Frederick J.; Druschel, Charlotte M.; Woroniecki, Robert P.

    2013-01-01

    Objective We investigated the prevalence of congenital renal and urologic anomalies in children with congenital hypothyroidism to determine whether further renal and urologic investigations would be of benefit. Study design Prevalence of congenital hypothyroidism was obtained from the New York State Congenital Malformation Registry. The occurrence of urinary tract anomalies were calculated for children with congenital hypothyroidism and compared to children without congenital hypothyroidism. In addition we obtained congenital hypothyroidism data from New York State newborn screening, and the cases were matched to Congenital Malformation Registry. Results Analysis of Congenital Malformation Registry data showed 980 children with congenital hypothyroidism and 3 661 585 children without congenital hypothyroidism born in New York State (1992-2005). Children with congenital hypothyroidism have a significantly increased risk of congenital renal and urological anomalies with the odds ratio (OR) of 13.2 (10.6-16.5). The other significantly increased defects in congenital hypothyroidism were cardiac, gastrointestinal, and skeletal. Analysis of matched data confirmed an increase of congenital renal and urologic anomalies with OR of 4.8 (3.7-6.3). Conclusions Children with congenital hypothyroidism have an increased prevalence of congenital renal and urologic anomalies. We suggest that these children should be evaluated for the presence of congenital renal and urologic anomalies with renal ultrasonography, and that further studies of common genes involved in thyroid and kidney development are warranted. PMID:18823909

  18. Novel Calmodulin (CALM2) Mutations Associated with Congenital Arrhythmia Susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makita, Naomasa; Yagihara, Nobue; Crotti, Lia; Johnson, Christopher N.; Beckmann, Britt-Maria; Roh, Michelle S.; Shigemizu, Daichi; Lichtner, Peter; Ishikawa, Taisuke; Aiba, Takeshi; Homfray, Tessa; Behr, Elijah R.; Klug, Didier; Denjoy, Isabelle; Mastantuono, Elisa; Theisen, Daniel; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Satake, Wataru; Toda, Tatsushi; Nakagawa, Hidewaki; Tsuji, Yukiomi; Tsuchiya, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Hirokazu; Miyamoto, Yoshihiro; Endo, Naoto; Kimura, Akinori; Ozaki, Kouichi; Motomura, Hideki; Suda, Kenji; Tanaka, Toshihiro; Schwartz, Peter J.; Meitinger, Thomas; Kääb, Stefan; Guicheney, Pascale; Shimizu, Wataru; Bhuiyan, Zahurul A.; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Chazin, Walter J.; George, Alfred L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Genetic predisposition to life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias such as in congenital long-QT syndrome (LQTS) and catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT) represent treatable causes of sudden cardiac death in young adults and children. Recently, mutations in calmodulin (CALM1, CALM2) have been associated with severe forms of LQTS and CPVT, with life-threatening arrhythmias occurring very early in life. Additional mutation-positive cases are needed to discern genotype-phenotype correlations associated with calmodulin mutations. Methods and Results We employed conventional and next-generation sequencing approaches including exome analysis in genotype-negative LQTS probands. We identified five novel de novo missense mutations in CALM2 in three subjects with LQTS (p.N98S, p.N98I, p.D134H) and two subjects with clinical features of both LQTS and CPVT (p.D132E, p.Q136P). Age of onset of major symptoms (syncope or cardiac arrest) ranged from 1–9 years. Three of five probands had cardiac arrest and one of these subjects did not survive. Although all probands had LQTS, two subjects also exhibited electrocardiographic features consistent with CPVT. The clinical severity among subjects in this series was generally less than that originally reported for CALM1 and CALM2 associated with recurrent cardiac arrest during infancy. Four of five probands responded to β-blocker therapy whereas one subject with mutation p.Q136P died suddenly during exertion despite this treatment. Mutations affect conserved residues located within calcium binding loops III (p.N98S, p.N98I) or IV (p.D132E, p.D134H, p.Q136P) and caused reduced calcium binding affinity. Conclusions CALM2 mutations can be associated with LQTS and with overlapping features of LQTS and CPVT. PMID:24917665

  19. Heterozygous defects in PAX6 gene and congenital hypopituitarism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Masaki; Nagasaki, Keisuke; Fujiwara, Ikuma; Ishii, Tomohiro; Amano, Naoko; Asakura, Yumi; Muroya, Koji; Hasegawa, Yukihiro; Adachi, Masanori; Hasegawa, Tomonobu

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of congenital hypopituitarism (CH) attributable to known transcription factor mutations appears to be rare and other causative genes for CH remain to be identified. Due to the sporadic occurrence of CH, de novo chromosomal rearrangements could be one of the molecular mechanisms participating in its etiology, especially in syndromic cases. To identify the role of copy number variations (CNVs) in the etiology of CH and to identify novel genes implicated in CH. We enrolled 88 (syndromic: 30; non-syndromic: 58) Japanese CH patients. We performed an array comparative genomic hybridization screening in the 30 syndromic CH patients. For all the 88 patients, we analyzed PAX6 by PCR-based sequencing. We identified one heterozygous 310-kb deletion of the PAX6 enhancer region in one patient showing isolated GH deficiency (IGHD), cleft palate, and optic disc cupping. We also identified one heterozygous 6.5-Mb deletion encompassing OTX2 in a patient with bilateral anophthalmia and multiple pituitary hormone deficiency. We identified a novel PAX6 mutation, namely p.N116S in one non-syndromic CH patient showing IGHD. The p.N116S PAX6 was associated with an impairment of the transactivation capacities of the PAX6-binding elements. This study showed that heterozygous PAX6 mutations are associated with CH patients. PAX6 mutations may be associated with diverse clinical features ranging from severely impaired ocular and pituitary development to apparently normal phenotype. Overall, this study identified causative CNVs with a possible role in the etiology of CH in <10% of syndromic CH patients. © 2015 European Society of Endocrinology.

  20. Mutations in PIGY: expanding the phenotype of inherited glycosylphosphatidylinositol deficiencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilkovski, Biljana; Pagnamenta, Alistair T; O'Grady, Gina L; Kinoshita, Taroh; Howard, Malcolm F; Lek, Monkol; Thomas, Brett; Turner, Anne; Christodoulou, John; Sillence, David; Knight, Samantha J L; Popitsch, Niko; Keays, David A; Anzilotti, Consuelo; Goriely, Anne; Waddell, Leigh B; Brilot, Fabienne; North, Kathryn N; Kanzawa, Noriyuki; Macarthur, Daniel G; Taylor, Jenny C; Kini, Usha; Murakami, Yoshiko; Clarke, Nigel F

    2015-11-01

    Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins are ubiquitously expressed in the human body and are important for various functions at the cell surface. Mutations in many GPI biosynthesis genes have been described to date in patients with multi-system disease and together these constitute a subtype of congenital disorders of glycosylation. We used whole exome sequencing in two families to investigate the genetic basis of disease and used RNA and cellular studies to investigate the functional consequences of sequence variants in the PIGY gene. Two families with different phenotypes had homozygous recessive sequence variants in the GPI biosynthesis gene PIGY. Two sisters with c.137T>C (p.Leu46Pro) PIGY variants had multi-system disease including dysmorphism, seizures, severe developmental delay, cataracts and early death. There were significantly reduced levels of GPI-anchored proteins (CD55 and CD59) on the surface of patient-derived skin fibroblasts (∼20-50% compared with controls). In a second, consanguineous family, two siblings had moderate development delay and microcephaly. A homozygous PIGY promoter variant (c.-540G>A) was detected within a 7.7 Mb region of autozygosity. This variant was predicted to disrupt a SP1 consensus binding site and was shown to be associated with reduced gene expression. Mutations in PIGY can occur in coding and non-coding regions of the gene and cause variable phenotypes. This article contributes to understanding of the range of disease phenotypes and disease genes associated with deficiencies of the GPI-anchor biosynthesis pathway and also serves to highlight the potential importance of analysing variants detected in 5'-UTR regions despite their typically low coverage in exome data. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.