WorldWideScience

Sample records for confocal raman imaging

  1. Confocal direct imaging Raman microscope: design and applications in biology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sijtsema, N.M.; Wouters, Siddi D.; de Grauw, Cees J.; de Grauw, C.J.; Otto, Cornelis; Greve, Jan

    1998-01-01

    A confocal direct imaging Raman microscope (CDIRM) based on two synchronized scanning mirrors, a monochromator, and two charge-coupled device (CCD) cameras has been developed. With this system it is possible to make both Raman spectra of a small measurement volume and images of a larger sample area

  2. Submicron confocal Raman imaging of holograms in multicomponent photopolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagan, C. R.; Harris, T. D.; Harris, A. L.; Schilling, M. L.

    1998-04-01

    We report submicron chemical imaging of optical holograms in multicomponent photopolymers using a confocal scanning Raman microscope. The microscope is sensitive to the submicron, ˜1% concentration variations of the polymeric components that form refractive index modulations (Δn) responsible for hologram diffraction. Concentration variations are established by both small molecule diffusion and polymer matrix swelling during hologram writing. Both density and composition variations contribute to Δn. These measurements demonstrate that submicron Raman microscopy is applicable to multicomponent organic, inorganic, and hybrid materials as a route to correlate materials chemistry/morphology with their physical properties.

  3. Confocal Raman Microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Dieing, Thomas; Toporski, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Confocal Raman Microscopy is a relatively new technique that allows chemical imaging without specific sample preparation. By integrating a sensitive Raman spectrometer within a state-of-the-art microscope, Raman microscopy with a spatial resolution down to 200nm laterally and 500nm vertically can be achieved using visible light excitation. Recent developments in detector and computer technology as well as optimized instrument design have reduced integration times of Raman spectra by orders of magnitude, so that complete images consisting of tens of thousands of Raman spectra can be acquired in seconds or minutes rather than hours, which used to be standard just one decade ago. The purpose of this book is to provide the reader a comprehensive overview of the rapidly developing field of Confocal Raman Microscopy and its applications.

  4. Confocal Raman microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Dieing, Thomas; Hollricher, Olaf

    2018-01-01

    This second edition provides a cutting-edge overview of physical, technical and scientific aspects related to the widely used analytical method of confocal Raman microscopy. The book includes expanded background information and adds insights into how confocal Raman microscopy, especially 3D Raman imaging, can be integrated with other methods to produce a variety of correlative microscopy combinations. The benefits are then demonstrated and supported by numerous examples from the fields of materials science, 2D materials, the life sciences, pharmaceutical research and development, as well as the geosciences.

  5. Improving spatial resolution of confocal Raman microscopy by super-resolution image restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Han; Zhao, Weiqian; Wang, Yun; Fan, Ying; Qiu, Lirong; Zhu, Ke

    2016-05-16

    A new super-resolution image restoration confocal Raman microscopy method (SRIR-RAMAN) is proposed for improving the spatial resolution of confocal Raman microscopy. This method can recover the lost high spatial frequency of the confocal Raman microscopy by using Poisson-MAP super-resolution imaging restoration, thereby improving the spatial resolution of confocal Raman microscopy and realizing its super-resolution imaging. Simulation analyses and experimental results indicate that the spatial resolution of SRIR-RAMAN can be improved by 65% to achieve 200 nm with the same confocal Raman microscopy system. This method can provide a new tool for high spatial resolution micro-probe structure detection in physical chemistry, materials science, biomedical science and other areas.

  6. Detection and imaging of lipids ofScenedesmus obliquusbased on confocal Raman microspectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Yongni; Fang, Hui; Zhou, Hong; Wang, Qi; Zhu, Yiming; He, Yong

    2017-01-01

    In this study, confocal Raman microspectroscopy was used to detect lipids in microalgae rapidly and non-destructively. Microalgae cells were cultured under nitrogen deficiency. The accumulation of lipids in Scenedesmus obliquus was observed by Nile red staining, and the total amount of lipids accumulated in the cells was measured by gravimetric method. The signals from different microalgae cells were collected by confocal Raman microspectroscopy to establish a prediction model of intracellular lipid content, and surface scanning signals for drawing pseudo color images of lipids distribution. The images can show the location of pyrenoid and lipid accumulation in cells. Analyze Raman spectrum data and build PCA-LDA model using four different bands (full bands, pigments, lipids, and mixed features). Models of full bands or pigment characteristic bands were capable of identifying S. obliquus cells under different nitrogen stress culture time. The prediction accuracy of model of lipid characteristic bands is relatively low. The correlation between the fatty acid content measured by the gravimetric method and the integral Raman intensity of the oil characteristic peak (1445 cm -1 ) measured by Raman spectroscopy was analyzed. There was significant correlation ( R 2  = 0.83), which means that Raman spectroscopy is applicable to semi-quantitative detection of microalgal lipid content.

  7. Confocal Raman microspectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puppels, G.J.

    1991-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a technique that provides detailed structural information about molecules studied. In the field of molecular biophysics it has been extensively used for characterization of nucleic acids and proteins and for investigation of interactions between these molecules. It was felt that this technique would have great potential if it could be applied for in situ study of these molecules and their interactions, at the level of single living cell or a chromosome. To make this possible a highly sensitive confocal Raman microspectrometer (CRM) was developed. The instrument is described in detail in this thesis. It incorporates a number of recent technological developments. First, it employs a liquid nitrogen cooled CCD-camera. This type of detector, first used in astronomy, is the ultimate detector for Raman spectroscopy because it combines high quantum efficiency light detection with photon-noise limited operation. Second, an important factor in obtaining a high signal throughput of the spectrometer was the development of a new type of Raman notch filter. In the third place, the confocal detection principle was applied in the CRM. This limits the effective measuring volume to 3 . (author). 279 refs., 48 figs., 11 tabs

  8. Segmentation of confocal Raman microspectroscopic imaging data using edge-preserving denoising and clustering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrov, Theodore; Lasch, Peter

    2013-06-18

    Over the past decade, confocal Raman microspectroscopic (CRM) imaging has matured into a useful analytical tool to obtain spatially resolved chemical information on the molecular composition of biological samples and has found its way into histopathology, cytology, and microbiology. A CRM imaging data set is a hyperspectral image in which Raman intensities are represented as a function of three coordinates: a spectral coordinate λ encoding the wavelength and two spatial coordinates x and y. Understanding CRM imaging data is challenging because of its complexity, size, and moderate signal-to-noise ratio. Spatial segmentation of CRM imaging data is a way to reveal regions of interest and is traditionally performed using nonsupervised clustering which relies on spectral domain-only information with the main drawback being the high sensitivity to noise. We present a new pipeline for spatial segmentation of CRM imaging data which combines preprocessing in the spectral and spatial domains with k-means clustering. Its core is the preprocessing routine in the spatial domain, edge-preserving denoising (EPD), which exploits the spatial relationships between Raman intensities acquired at neighboring pixels. Additionally, we propose to use both spatial correlation to identify Raman spectral features colocalized with defined spatial regions and confidence maps to assess the quality of spatial segmentation. For CRM data acquired from midsagittal Syrian hamster ( Mesocricetus auratus ) brain cryosections, we show how our pipeline benefits from the complex spatial-spectral relationships inherent in the CRM imaging data. EPD significantly improves the quality of spatial segmentation that allows us to extract the underlying structural and compositional information contained in the Raman microspectra.

  9. A portable confocal hyperspectral microscope without any scan or tube lens and its application in fluorescence and Raman spectral imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingwei; Cai, Fuhong; Dong, Yongjiang; Zhu, Zhenfeng; Sun, Xianhe; Zhang, Hequn; He, Sailing

    2017-06-01

    In this study, a portable confocal hyperspectral microscope is developed. In traditional confocal laser scanning microscopes, scan lens and tube lens are utilized to achieve a conjugate relationship between the galvanometer and the back focal plane of the objective, in order to achieve a better resolution. However, these lenses make it difficult to scale down the volume of the system. In our portable confocal hyperspectral microscope (PCHM), the objective is placed directly next to the galvomirror. Thus, scan lens and tube lens are not included in our system and the size of this system is greatly reduced. Furthermore, the resolution is also acceptable in many biomedical and food-safety applications. Through reducing the optical length of the system, the signal detection efficiency is enhanced. This is conducive to realizing both the fluorescence and Raman hyperspectral imaging. With a multimode fiber as a pinhole, an improved image contrast is also achieved. Fluorescent spectral images for HeLa cells/fingers and Raman spectral images of kumquat pericarp are present. The spectral resolution and spatial resolutions are about 0.4 nm and 2.19 μm, respectively. These results demonstrate that this portable hyperspectral microscope can be used in in-vivo fluorescence imaging and in situ Raman spectral imaging.

  10. Advanced chemical imaging and comparison of human and porcine hair follicles for drug delivery by confocal Raman microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzen, Lutz; Mathes, Christiane; Hansen, Steffi; Windbergs, Maike

    2013-06-01

    Hair follicles have recently gained a lot of interest for dermal drug delivery. They provide facilitated penetration into the skin and a high potential to serve as a drug depot. In this area of research, excised pig ear is a widely accepted in vitro model to evaluate penetration of drug delivery into hair follicles. However, a comparison of human and porcine follicles in terms of chemical composition has not been performed so far. In this study, we applied confocal Raman microscopy as a chemically selective imaging technique to compare human and porcine follicle composition and to visualize component distribution within follicle cross-sections. Based on the evaluation of human and porcine Raman spectra optical similarity for both species was successfully confirmed. Furthermore, cyanoacrylate skin surface biopsies, which are generally used to determine the extent of follicular penetration, were imaged by a novel complementary analytical approach combining confocal Raman microscopy and optical profilometry. This all-encompassing analysis allows investigation of intactness and component distribution of the excised hair bulb in three dimensions. Confocal Raman microscopy shows a high potential as a noninvasive and chemically selective technique for the analysis of trans-follicular drug delivery.

  11. Surface determination of 3D confocal Raman microscopy imaging of the skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleusener, J.; Carrer, V.; Patzelt, A.; Lademann, J.; Darvin, M. E.

    2017-12-01

    A surface determination method for the application of 3D confocal Raman microscopy on inhomogeneous skin sections has been presented, which is based on depth profiles of the keratin contribution of the acquired Raman spectra. The method was compared to two similar auto-focusing methods that are based on the intensity of the reflected excitation light and Raman spectra, respectively. The measurements were performed on hair follicles containing skin sections of porcine ears ex vivo. The surface determination on such samples is especially challenging due to their different molecular composition and surface inhomogeneity. An advantage of this method is molecular sensitivity, whereby only the surface of the sample will be detected and not the substrate of the microscope slide, in the case of disruptions during the processing of samples. A disadvantage of the method is the increased overall acquisition time if only the surface spectra are to be applied for 2D mapping.

  12. 3D confocal Raman imaging of oil-rich emulsion from enzyme-assisted aqueous extraction of extruded soybean powder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Longkun; Wang, Limin; Qi, Baokun; Zhang, Xiaonan; Chen, Fusheng; Li, Yang; Sui, Xiaonan; Jiang, Lianzhou

    2018-05-30

    The understanding of the structure morphology of oil-rich emulsion from enzyme-assisted extraction processing (EAEP) was a critical step to break the oil-rich emulsion structure in order to recover oil. Albeit EAEP method has been applied as an alternative way to conventional solvent extraction method, the structure morphology of oil-rich emulsion was still unclear. The current study aimed to investigate the structure morphology of oil-rich emulsion from EAEP using 3D confocal Raman imaging technique. With increasing the enzymatic hydrolysis duration from 1 to 3 h, the stability of oil-rich emulsion was decreased as visualized in the 3D confocal Raman images that the protein and oil were mixed together. The subsequent Raman spectrum analysis further revealed that the decreased stability of oil-rich emulsion was due to the protein aggregations via SS bonds or protein-lipid interactions. The conformational transfer in protein indicated the formation of a compact structure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Interpreting the biochemical specificity of mouse spinal cord by confocal raman microspectral imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuze Gong

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Interpreting the biochemical specificity of spinal cord tissue is the essential requirement for understanding the biochemical mechanisms during spinal-cord-related pathological course. In this work, a longitudinal study was implemented to reveal a precise linkage between the spectral features and the molecular composition in ex vivo mouse spinal cord tissue by microspectral Raman imaging. It was testified that lipid-rich white matter could be distinguished from gray matter not only by the lipid Raman peaks at 1064, 1300, 1445 and 1660cm−1, but also by protein (1250 and 1328cm−1 and saccharides (913 and 1137cm−1 distributions. K-means cluster analysis was further applied to visualize the morphological basis of spinal cord tissue by chemical components and their distribution patterns. Two-dimensional chemical images were then generated to visualize the contrast between two different tissue types by integrating the intensities of the featured Raman bands. All the obtained results illustrated the biochemical characteristics of spinal cord tissue, as well as some specific substance variances between different tissue types, which formed a solid basis for the molecular investigation of spinal cord pathological alterations.

  14. Bacterial and abiotic decay in waterlogged archaeological Picea abies (L.) Karst studied by confocal Raman imaging and ATR-FTIR spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Nanna Bjerregaard; Gierlinger, Notburga; Thygesen, Lisbeth Garbrecht

    2015-01-01

    Waterlogged archaeological Norway spruce [Picea abies (L.) Karst] poles were studied by means of confocal Raman imaging (CRI) and attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) analysis to determine lignin and polysaccharide composition and distribution in the cell...

  15. Microdomain structure and chain orientation in polypropylene/polyethylene blends investigated by micro-Raman confocal imaging spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Quintana, S. L.; Schmidt, Pavel; Dybal, Jiří; Kratochvíl, Jaroslav; Pastor, J. M.; Merino, J. C.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 43, č. 19 (2002), s. 5187-5195 ISSN 0032-3861 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/97/1071; GA ČR GA106/02/1249 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4050913 Keywords : micro-raman confocal spectroscopy * polypropylene/polyethylene blends * morphology Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 1.838, year: 2002

  16. Mapping the intracellular distribution of carbon nanotubes after targeted delivery to carcinoma cells using confocal Raman imaging as a label-free technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamprecht, C; Unterauer, B; Plochberger, B; Brameshuber, M; Hinterdorfer, P; Ebner, A; Gierlinger, N; Hild, S; Heister, E

    2012-01-01

    The uptake of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by mammalian cells and their distribution within cells is being widely studied in recent years due to their increasing use for biomedical purposes. The two main imaging techniques used are confocal fluorescence microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The former, however, requires labeling of the CNTs with fluorescent dyes, while the latter is a work-intensive technique that is unsuitable for in situ bio-imaging. Raman spectroscopy, on the other hand, presents a direct, straightforward and label-free alternative. Confocal Raman microscopy can be used to image the CNTs inside cells, exploiting the strong Raman signal connected to different vibrational modes of the nanotubes. In addition, cellular components, such as the endoplasmic reticulum and the nucleus, can be mapped. We first validate our method by showing that only when using the CNTs’ G band for intracellular mapping accurate results can be obtained, as mapping of the radial breathing mode (RBM) only shows a small fraction of CNTs. We then take a closer look at the exact localization of the nanotubes inside cells after folate receptor-mediated endocytosis and show that, after 8-10 h incubation, the majority of CNTs are localized around the nucleus. In summary, Raman imaging has enormous potential for imaging CNTs inside cells, which is yet to be fully realized. (paper)

  17. Hybrid Rayleigh, Raman and TPE fluorescence spectral confocal microscopy of living cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pully, V.V.; Lenferink, Aufrid T.M.; Otto, Cornelis

    2010-01-01

    A hybrid fluorescence–Raman confocal microscopy platform is presented, which integrates low-wavenumber-resolution Raman imaging, Rayleigh scatter imaging and two-photon fluorescence (TPE) spectral imaging, fast ‘amplitude-only’ TPE-fluorescence imaging and high-spectral-resolution Raman imaging.

  18. A multimodal microcharacterisation of trace-element zonation and crystallographic orientation in natural cassiterite by combining cathodoluminescence, EBSD, EPMA and contribution of confocal Raman-in-SEM imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wille, G; Lerouge, C; Schmidt, U

    2018-01-16

    In cassiterite, tin is associated with metals (titanium, niobium, tantalum, indium, tungsten, iron, manganese, mercury). Knowledge of mineral chemistry and trace-element distribution is essential for: the understanding of ore formation, the exploration phase, the feasibility of ore treatment, and disposal/treatment of tailings after the exploitation phase. However, the availability of analytical methods make these characterisations difficult. We present a multitechnical approach to chemical and structural data that includes scanning electron microscopy (SEM)-based imaging and microanalysis techniques such as: secondary and backscattered electrons, cathodoluminescence (CL), electron probe microanalyser (EPMA), electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) and confocal Raman-imaging integrated in a SEM (RISE). The presented results show the complementarity of the used analytical techniques. SEM, CL, EBSD, EPMA provide information from the interaction of an electron beam with minerals, leading to atomistic information about their composition, whereas RISE, Raman spectroscopy and imaging completes the studies with information about molecular vibrations, which are sensitive to structural modifications of the minerals. The correlation of Raman bands with the presence/absence of Nb, Ta, Fe (heterovalent substitution) and Ti (homovalent substitution) is established at a submicrometric scale. Combination of the different techniques makes it possible to establish a direct link between chemical and crystallographic data of cassiterite. © 2018 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2018 Royal Microscopical Society.

  19. Submicron Confocal Raman Microscopy of Optical Holograms in Multicomponent Photopolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagan, C. R.; Harris, T. D.; Harris, A. L.; Schilling, M. L.

    1998-03-01

    We demonstrate submicron chemical imaging of optical holograms in multicomponent photopolymers using a scanning confocal Raman microscope. Our microscope is sensitive to the submicron, <1 percent concentration variations of the polymeric components that form the refractive index modulation responsible for hologram diffraction. Photopolymers are attractive media for holographic data storage, yet the mechanisms for generating the refractive index modulations responsible for hologram diffraction remain poorly understood. We obtain the first direct chemical evidence showing that these concentration modulations are established both by monomer diffusion and by polymer matrix swelling during hologram writing. Spatial variations in both density and composition contribute to the refractive index modulation. These measurements demonstrate the feasibility of submicron Raman microscopy in chemically imaging photodegradable organic and biological materials.

  20. Confocal Raman Microspectroscopy of Oral Streptococci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beier, Brooke D.

    Raman spectroscopy has been used in a variety of applications throughout the field of biomedical optics. It has the ability to acquire chemically-specific information in a non-invasive manner, without the need for exogenous markers. This makes it useful in the identification of bacterial species, as well as in the study of tissues and other cells. In this work, a species identification model has been created in order to discriminate between the oral bacterial species Streptococcus sanguinis and Streptococcus mutans. These are two of the most prevalent species within the human mouth and their relative concentrations can be an indicator of a patient's oral health and risk of tooth decay. They are predominantly found within plaque on the tooth's surface. To study a simplified model for dental plaque, we have examined S. sanguinis and S. mutans grown in biofilm forms. Raman spectroscopy has been implemented here through a confocal microscope. The optical system has been equipped with computationally controlled stages to allow for automated scanning, including autofocusing to probe a consistent depth within a sample. A spectrum has been acquired from each position within a scan and sent for spectral preprocessing before being submitted for species identification. This preprocessing includes an algorithm that has been developed to remove fluorescence features from known contaminants within the confocal volume, to include signal from a fluorescent substrate. Species classification has been accomplished using a principal component score-fed logistic regression model constructed from a variety of biofilm samples that have been transferred and allowed to dry, as might occur with the study of plaque samples. This binary classification model has been validated on other samples with identical preparations. The model has also been transferred to determine the species of hydrated biofilms studied in situ. Artificially mixed biofilms have been examined to test the spatial

  1. Confocal Raman microscopy for identification of bacterial species in biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beier, Brooke D.; Quivey, Robert G.; Berger, Andrew J.

    2011-03-01

    Implemented through a confocal microscope, Raman spectroscopy has been used to distinguish between biofilm samples of two common oral bacteria species, Streptococcus sanguinis and mutans, which are associated with healthy and cariogenic plaque, respectively. Biofilms of these species are studied as a model of dental plaque. A prediction model has been calibrated and validated using pure biofilms. This model has been used to identify the species of transferred and dehydrated samples (much like a plaque scraping) as well as hydrated biofilms in situ. Preliminary results of confocal Raman mapping of species in an intact two-species biofilm will be shown.

  2. Development of a beveled fiber-optic confocal Raman probe for enhancing in vivo epithelial tissue Raman measurements at endoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianfeng; Bergholt, Mads Sylvest; Zheng, Wei; Huang, Zhiwei

    2013-07-01

    We report on the development of a beveled fiber-optic confocal Raman probe coupled with a ball lens for enhancing in vivo epithelial tissue Raman measurements at endoscopy. Our Monte Carlo simulations show that by selecting a proper fiber-ball lens distance and beveled angle of collection fibers, the confocal Raman probe design can be optimized for maximizing shallower tissue Raman measurements in epithelial tissue; in addition, the ratio of epithelium to stromal Raman photons collected using an optimized confocal Raman probe is approximately 19-fold higher than that using a volume-type Raman probe. Further experiments confirm that the confocal Raman endoscopic probe developed is in favor of probing superficial tissue Raman signals from a two-layer tissue phantom as well as esophagus tissue in vivo during endoscopy. This work suggests the great potential of applying the beveled fiber-optic confocal Raman probe for improving in vivo diagnosis of precancer occurring in epithelial tissue at endoscopy.

  3. Confocal Raman microscopy to monitor extracellular matrix during dental pulp stem cells differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi, Hamideh; Collart-Dutilleul, Pierre-Yves; Gergely, Csilla; Cuisinier, Frédéric J. G.

    2015-07-01

    Regenerative medicine brings promising applications for mesenchymal stem cells, such as dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs). Confocal Raman microscopy, a noninvasive technique, is used to study osteogenic differentiation of DPSCs. Integrated Raman intensities in the 2800 to 3000 cm-1 region (C-H stretching) and the 960 cm-1 peak (ν1 PO43-) were collected (to image cells and phosphate, respectively), and the ratio of two peaks 1660 over 1690 cm-1 (amide I bands) to measure the collagen cross-linking has been calculated. Raman spectra of DPSCs after 21 days differentiation reveal several phosphate peaks: ν1 (first stretching mode) at 960 cm-1, ν2 at 430 cm-1, and ν4 at 585 cm-1 and collagen cross-linking can also be calculated. Confocal Raman microscopy enables monitoring osteogenic differentiation in vitro and can be a credible tool for clinical stem cell based research.

  4. Characterization of Developing Cotton Fibers by Confocal Raman Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Cabrales

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Cellulose deposition in developing cotton fibers has been studied previously with analytical techniques, such as Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC and Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA. Recent technological developments in instrumentation have made Raman microscopy emerge as an extraordinary analytical tool in biological and plant research. The advantage of using confocal Raman microscopy (CRM resides in the lateral spatial resolution and in the fact that Raman spectroscopy provides not only chemical composition information, but also structural information. Cross-sections of cotton fibers harvested at different developmental stages were studied with CRM. The Raman bands assigned to cellulose were analyzed. The results of this study indicate that CRM can be used as a tool to study cellulose deposition in cotton fibers and could provide useful information on cellulose deposition during cotton fiber development.

  5. Characterization of a hazardous eyeliner (kohl) by confocal Raman microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jallad, Karim N.; Hedderich, Hartmut G.

    2005-01-01

    A new method of analyzing kohl, a cosmetic eyeliner, using confocal Raman microscopy is reported. This technique offers an important alternative to conventional spectroscopic techniques that provide elemental/atomic composition. Raman spectra of three kohl samples have been measured between 150 and 3000 cm -1 at room temperature. The main component of two kohl samples was found to be lead(II) sulfide (PbS). Kohl is used as a traditional cosmetic and remedy in the Middle East, Far East, and Northern Africa. Since kohl products contain very high concentrations of lead, they constitute a risk for public health, particularly for children

  6. Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) differentiation study by confocal Raman microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi, H.; Collart-Dutilleul, P.-Y.; Gergely, C.; Cuisinier, F. J. G.

    2014-03-01

    Regenerative medicine brings a huge application for Mesenchymal stem cells such as Dental Pulp Stem Cells (DPSCs). Confocal Raman microscopy, a non-invasive, label free , real time and high spatial resolution imaging technique is used to study osteogenic differentiation of DPSCs. Integrated Raman intensities in the 2800-3000 cm-1 region (C-H stretching) and 960 cm-1 peak (phosphate PO4 3-) were collected. In Dental Pulp Stem Cells 21st day differentiated in buffer solution, phosphate peaks ν1 PO4 3- (first vibrational mode) at 960cm-1 and ν2 PO4 3- at 430cm-1 and ν4 PO4 3- at 585cm-1 are obviously present. Confocal Raman microscopy enables the detection of cell differentiation and it can be used to investigate clinical stem cell research.

  7. Confocal laser scanning microscope, Raman microscopy and Western blotting to evaluate inflammatory response after myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riezzo, Irene; Cantatore, Santina; DeCarlo, Dania; Fiore, Carmela; Neri, Margherita; Turillazzi, Emanuela; Fineschi, Vittorio

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac muscle necrosis is associated with inflammatory cascade that clears the infarct from dead cells and matrix debris, and then replaces the damaged tissue with scar, through three overlapping phases: the inflammatory phase, the proliferative phase and the maturation phase. Western blotting, laser confocal microscopy, Raman microscopy are valuable tools for studying the inflammatory response following myocardial infarction both humoral and cellular phase, allowing the identification and semiquantitative analysis of proteins produced during the inflammatory cascade activation and the topographical distribution and expression of proteins and cells involved in myocardial inflammation. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) is a relatively new technique for microscopic imaging, that allows greater resolution, optical sectioning of the sample and three-dimensional reconstruction of the same sample. Western blotting used to detect the presence of a specific protein with antibody-antigen interaction in the midst of a complex protein mixture extracted from cells, produced semi-quantitative data quite easy to interpret. Confocal Raman microscopy combines the three-dimensional optical resolution of confocal microscopy and the sensitivity to molecular vibrations, which characterizes Raman spectroscopy. The combined use of western blotting and confocal microscope allows detecting the presence of proteins in the sample and trying to observe the exact location within the tissue, or the topographical distribution of the same. Once demonstrated the presence of proteins (cytokines, chemokines, etc.) is important to know the topographical distribution, obtaining in this way additional information regarding the extension of the inflammatory process in function of the time stayed from the time of myocardial infarction. These methods may be useful to study and define the expression of a wide range of inflammatory mediators at several different timepoints providing a more

  8. Confocal Raman spectrocopy for the analysis of nail polish evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-López, Maria; Vaz, Joana; García-Ruiz, Carmen

    2015-06-01

    Nail polishes are cosmetic paints that may be susceptible of forensic analysis offering useful information to assist in a crime reconstruction. Although the nail polish appearance could allow a quick visual identification of the sample, this analysis is subjected to the perception and subjective interpretation of the forensic examiner. The chemical analysis of the nail polishes offers great deal of information not subjected to analyst interpretation. Confocal Raman spectroscopy is a well-suited technique for the analysis of paints due to its non-invasive and non-destructive nature and its ability to supply information about the organic and inorganic components of the sample. In this work, 77 regular and gel nail polishes were analyzed with confocal Raman spectroscopy using two laser wavelengths (532 and 780 nm). The sample behavior under the two laser wavelengths and the differences in the spectra taken at different points of the sample were studied for each nail polish. Additionally, the spectra obtained for all the nail polishes were visually compared. The results concluded that the longer laser wavelength prevents sample burning and fluorescence effects; the similarity among the spectra collected within the sample is not directly related with the presence of glitter particles; and 64% of the samples analyzed showed a characteristic spectrum. Additionally, the use of confocal Raman spectroscopy for the forensic analysis of nail polishes evidence in the form of flakes or smudges on different surfaces were studied. The results showed that both types of evidence can be analyzed by the technique. Also, two non-invasive sampling methods for the collection of the evidence from the nails of the suspect or the victim were proposed: (i) to use acetone-soaked cotton swabs to remove the nail varnishes and (ii) to scrape the nail polish from the nail with a blade. Both approaches, each exhibiting advantages and drawbacks in terms of transport and handling were appropriate

  9. Axial resolution of confocal Raman microscopes : Gaussian beam theory and practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grauw, C J De; Sijtsema, N M; Otto, C; Greve, J

    1997-01-01

    A straightforward and transparent model, based on Gaussian beam optics, for the axial ro resolution of a confocal microscope is presented, A confocal Raman microscope was used to determine the axial confocality in practice. The axial response of a thin planar object was measured for three different

  10. Axial Resolution of Confocal Raman Microscopes: Gaussian Beam Theory and Practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Grauw, C.J.; de Grauw, C.J.; Sijtsema, N.M.; Otto, Cornelis; Greve, Jan

    1997-01-01

    A straightforward and transparent model, based on Gaussian beam optics, for the axial r0 resolution of a confocal microscope is presented. A confocal Raman microscope was used to determine the axial confocality in practice. The axial response of a thin planar object was measured for three different

  11. Confocal mapping of myelin figures with micro-Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jung-Ren; Cheng, Yu-Che; Huang, Hung Ji; Chiang, Hai-Pang

    2018-01-01

    We employ confocal micro-Raman spectroscopy (CMRS) with submicron spatial resolution to study the myelin structures (cylindrical lamellae) composed of nested surfactant C12E3 or lipid DMPC bilayers. The CMRS mapping indicates that for a straight C12E3 myelin, the surfactant concentration increases with the myelin width and is higher in the center region than in the peripheral region. For a curved C12E3 myelin, the convex side has a higher surfactant concentration than the corresponding concave side. The spectrum of DMPC myelins undergoes a qualitative change as the temperature increases above 60 °C, suggesting that the surfactant molecules may be damaged. Our work demonstrates the utility of CMRS in bio-soft material research.

  12. Detection of apoptosis caused by anticancer drug paclitaxel in MCF-7 cells by confocal Raman microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi, H.; Middendorp, E.; Végh, A.-G.; Ramakrishnan, S.-K.; Gergely, C.; Cuisinier, F. J. G.

    2013-02-01

    Confocal Raman Microscopy, a non-invasive, label free imaging technique is used to study apoptosis in living MCF-7 cells. The images are based on Raman spectra of cells components. K-mean clustering was used to determine mitochondria position in cells and cytochrome c distribution inside the cells was based on correlation analysis. Cell apoptosis is defined as cytochrome c diffusion in cytoplasm. Co-localization of cytochrome c is found within mitochondria after three hours of incubation with 10 μM paclitaxel. Our results demonstrate that the presence of paclitaxel at this concentration in the culture media for 3 hours does not induce apoptosis of MCF7 cells via a caspase independent pathway.

  13. Analysis of multi-dimensional confocal images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samarabandu, J.K.; Acharya, R.; Edirisinghe, C.D.; Cheng, P.C.; Lin, T.H.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper, a confocal image understanding system is developed which used the blackboard model of problem solving to achieve computerized identification and characterization of confocal fluorescent images (serial optical sections). The system is capable of identifying a large percentage of structures (e.g. cell nucleus) in the presence of background noise and non specific staining of cellular structures. The blackboard architecture provides a convenient framework within which a combination of image processing techniques can be applied to successively refine the input image. The system is organized to find the surfaces of highly visible structures first, using simple image processing techniques and then to adjust and fill in the missing areas of these object surfaces using external knowledge, and a number of more complex image processing techniques when necessary. As a result, the image analysis system is capable of obtaining morphometrical parameters such as surface area, volume and position of structures of interest automatically

  14. Raman spectra of zinc phthalocyanine monolayers absorbed on glassy carbon and gold electrodes by application of a confocal Raman microspectrometer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palys-Staron, B.J.; Palys, B.J.; Puppels, G.J.; Puppels, G.J.; van den Ham, D.M.W.; van den Ham, D.M.W.; Feil, D.; Feil, D.

    1992-01-01

    Raman spectra of zinc phthalocyanine monolayers, adsorbed on gold and on glassy carbon surfaces (electrodes), are presented. These spectra have been recorded with the electrodes inside and outside an electrochemical cell filled with an aqueous electrolyte. A confocal Raman microspectrometer was

  15. Image inpainting for the differential confocal microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Lirong; Wang, Lei; Liu, Dali; Hou, Maosheng; Zhao, Weiqian

    2015-02-01

    In the process of zero-crossing trigger measurement of differential confocal microscope, the sample surface features or tilt will cause the edges can't be triggered. Meanwhile, environment vibration can also cause false triggering. In order to restore the invalid information of sample, and realize high-precision surface topography measurement, Total Variation (TV) inpainting model is applied to restore the scanning images. Emulation analysis and experimental verification of this method are investigated. The image inpainting algorithm based on TV model solves the minimization of the energy equation by calculus of variations, and it can effectively restore the non-textured image with noises. Using this algorithm, the simulation confocal laser intensity curve and height curve of standard step sample are restored. After inpainting the intensity curve below the threshold is repaired, the maximum deviation from ideal situation is 0.0042, the corresponding edge contour of height curve is restored, the maximum deviation is 0.1920, which proves the algorithm is effective. Experiment of grating inpainting indicates that the TV algorithm can restore the lost information caused by failed triggering and eliminate the noise caused by false triggering in zero-crossing trigger measurement of differential confocal microscope. The restored image is consistent with the scanning result of OLYMPUS confocal microscope, which can satisfy the request of follow-up measurement analysis.

  16. Confocal microscopy imaging of the biofilm matrix

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlafer, Sebastian; Meyer, Rikke L

    2017-01-01

    The extracellular matrix is an integral part of microbial biofilms and an important field of research. Confocal laser scanning microscopy is a valuable tool for the study of biofilms, and in particular of the biofilm matrix, as it allows real-time visualization of fully hydrated, living specimens....... Confocal microscopes are held by many research groups, and a number of methods for qualitative and quantitative imaging of the matrix have emerged in recent years. This review provides an overview and a critical discussion of techniques used to visualize different matrix compounds, to determine...... the concentration of solutes and the diffusive properties of the biofilm matrix....

  17. Microsphere imaging with confocal microscopy and two photon microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun, Hyung Su; An, Kyung Won; Lee, Jai Hyung

    2002-01-01

    We have acquired images of polystyrene and fused-silica microsphere by using conventional optical microscopy, confocal microscopy and two-photon microscopy, and performed comparative analysis of these images. Different from conventional optical microscopy, confocal and two-photon microscopy had good optical sectioning capability. In addition, confocal microscopy and two-photon microscopy had better lateral resolution than conventional optical microscopy. These results are attributed to confocality and nonlinearity of confocal microscopy and two photon microscopy, respectively.

  18. Near-infrared-excited confocal Raman spectroscopy advances in vivo diagnosis of cervical precancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duraipandian, Shiyamala; Zheng, Wei; Ng, Joseph; Low, Jeffrey J H; Ilancheran, Arunachalam; Huang, Zhiwei

    2013-06-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a unique optical technique that can probe the changes of vibrational modes of biomolecules associated with tissue premalignant transformation. This study evaluates the clinical utility of confocal Raman spectroscopy over near-infrared (NIR) autofluorescence (AF) spectroscopy and composite NIR AF/Raman spectroscopy for improving early diagnosis of cervical precancer in vivo at colposcopy. A rapid NIR Raman system coupled with a ball-lens fiber-optic confocal Raman probe was utilized for in vivo NIR AF/Raman spectral measurements of the cervix. A total of 1240 in vivo Raman spectra [normal (n=993), dysplasia (n=247)] were acquired from 84 cervical patients. Principal components analysis (PCA) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA) together with a leave-one-patient-out, cross-validation method were used to extract the diagnostic information associated with distinctive spectroscopic modalities. The diagnostic ability of confocal Raman spectroscopy was evaluated using the PCA-LDA model developed from the significant principal components (PCs) [i.e., PC4, 0.0023%; PC5, 0.00095%; PC8, 0.00022%, (pspectroscopy coupled with PCA-LDA modeling yielded the diagnostic accuracy of 84.1% (a sensitivity of 81.0% and a specificity of 87.1%) for in vivo discrimination of dysplastic cervix. The receiver operating characteristic curves further confirmed that the best classification was achieved using confocal Raman spectroscopy compared to the composite NIR AF/Raman spectroscopy or NIR AF spectroscopy alone. This study illustrates that confocal Raman spectroscopy has great potential to improve early diagnosis of cervical precancer in vivo during clinical colposcopy.

  19. Waterproofing in Arabidopsis: Following phenolics and lipids in situ by Confocal Raman Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prats Mateu, Batirtze; Hauser, Marie-Theres; Heredia, Antonio; Gierlinger, Notburga

    2016-02-01

    Waterproofing of the aerial organs of plants imposed a big evolutionary step during the colonization of the terrestrial environment. The main plant polymers responsible of water repelling are lipids and lignin, which play also important roles in the protection against biotic/abiotic stresses, regulation of flux of gases and solutes and mechanical stability against negative pressure, among others. While the lipids, non-polymerized cuticular waxes together with the polymerized cutin, protect the outer surface, lignin is confined to the secondary cell wall within mechanical important tissues. In the present work a micro cross-section of the stem of Arabidopsis thaliana was used to track in situ the distribution of these non-carbohydrate polymers by Confocal Raman Microscopy. Raman hyperspectral imaging gives a molecular fingerprint of the native waterproofing tissues and cells with diffraction limited spatial resolution (~300 nm) at relatively high speed and without any tedious sample preparation. Lipids and lignified tissues as well as their effect on water content was directly visualized by integrating the 1299 cm-1, 1600 cm-1 and 3400 cm-1 band, respectively. For detailed insights into compositional changes of these polymers vertex component analysis was performed on selected sample positions. Changes have been elucidated in the composition of lignin within the lignified tissues and between interfascicular fibers and xylem vessels. Hydrophobising changes were revealed from the epidermal layer to the cuticle as well as a change in the aromatic composition within the cuticle of trichomes. To verify Raman signatures of different waterproofing polymers additionally Raman spectra of the cuticle and cutin monomer from tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) as well as aromatic model polymers (milled wood lignin and dehydrogenation polymer of coniferyl alcohol) and phenolic acids were acquired. Keywords: Arabidopsis thaliana, lignin, cutin, wax, Raman, cuticle, waterproofing

  20. Waterproofing in Arabidopsis: Following phenolics and lipids in situ by Confocal Raman Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Batirtze ePrats Mateu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Waterproofing of the aerial organs of plants imposed a big evolutionary step during the colonization of the terrestrial environment. The main plant polymers responsible of water repelling are lipids and lignin, which play also important roles in the protection against biotic/abiotic stresses, regulation of flux of gases and solutes and mechanical stability against negative pressure, among others. While the lipids, non-polymerized cuticular waxes together with the polymerized cutin, protect the outer surface, lignin is confined to the secondary cell wall within mechanical important tissues. In the present work a micro cross-section of the stem of Arabidopsis thaliana was used to track in situ the distribution of these non-carbohydrate polymers by Confocal Raman Microscopy. Raman hyperspectral imaging gives a molecular fingerprint of the native waterproofing tissues and cells with diffraction limited spatial resolution (~300 nm at relatively high speed and without any tedious sample preparation. Lipids and lignified tissues as well as their effect on water content was directly visualized by integrating the 1299 cm-1, 1600 cm-1 and 3400 cm-1 band, respectively. For detailed insights into compositional changes of these polymers vertex component analysis was performed on selected sample positions. Changes have been elucidated in the composition of lignin within the lignified tissues and between interfascicular fibers and xylem vessels. Hydrophobising changes were revealed from the epidermal layer to the cuticle as well as a change in the aromatic composition within the cuticle of trichomes. To verify Raman signatures of different waterproofing polymers additionally Raman spectra of the cuticle and cutin monomer from tomato (Solanum lycopersicum as well as aromatic model polymers (milled wood lignin and dehydrogenation polymer of coniferyl alcohol and phenolic acids were acquired. Keywords: Arabidopsis thaliana, lignin, cutin, wax, Raman

  1. Integrated confocal Raman probe combined with a free-form reflector based lab-on-chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qing; Barbieri, Giancarlo; Thienpont, Hugo; Ottevaere, Heidi

    2017-08-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a powerful tool for analytical measurements in many applications. Traditional Raman spectroscopic analyses require bulky equipment, considerable time of signal acquisition and manual sampling of substances under test. In this paper, we take a step from bulky and manual consuming laboratory testing towards lab-on-chip (LOC) analyses. We miniaturize the Raman spectroscopic system by combining a free-form reflector based polymer LOC with a customized Raman probe. By using the confocal detection principle, we aim to enhance the detection of the Raman signals from the substance of interest due to the suppression of the background Raman signal from the polymer of the chip. Next to the LOC we miniaturize the external optical components, surrounding the reflector embedding optofluidic chip, and assemble these in a Raman probe. We evaluate the misalignment tolerance of internal optics (LOC) and external optics (Raman probe) by non-sequential ray tracing which shows that off-axis misalignment is around ±400μm and the maximum working distance of our Raman probe is 71mm. Using this probe, the system could be implemented as a portable reader unit containing the external optics, in which a low-cost, robust and mass manufacturable microfluidic LOC containing a freeform reflector is inserted, to enable confocal Raman spectroscopy measurements.

  2. Raman Imaging Techniques and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    Raman imaging has long been used to probe the chemical nature of a sample, providing information on molecular orientation, symmetry and structure with sub-micron spatial resolution. Recent technical developments have pushed the limits of micro-Raman microscopy, enabling the acquisition of Raman spectra with unprecedented speed, and opening a pathway to fast chemical imaging for many applications from material science and semiconductors to pharmaceutical drug development and cell biology, and even art and forensic science. The promise of tip-enhanced raman spectroscopy (TERS) and near-field techniques is pushing the envelope even further by breaking the limit of diffraction and enabling nano-Raman microscopy.

  3. Fluorescence confocal endomicroscopy in biological imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaney, Peter; Thomas, Steven; Allen, John; McLaren, Wendy; Murr, Elise; Harris, Martin

    2007-02-01

    In vivo fluorescence microscopic imaging of biological systems in human disease states and animal models is possible with high optical resolution and mega pixel point-scanning performance using optimised off-the-shelf turn-key devices. There are however various trade-offs between tissue access and instrument performance when miniaturising in vivo microscopy systems. A miniature confocal scanning technology that was developed for clinical human endoscopy has been configured into a portable device for direct hand-held interrogation of living tissue in whole animal models (Optiscan FIVE-1 system). Scanning probes of 6.3mm diameter with a distal tip diameter of 5.0mm were constructed either in a 150mm length for accessible tissue, or a 300mm probe for laparoscopic interrogation of internal tissues in larger animal models. Both devices collect fluorescence confocal images (excitation 488 nm; emission >505 or >550 nm) comprised of 1024 x 1204 sampling points/image frame, with lateral resolution 0.7um; axial resolution 7um; FOV 475 x 475um. The operator can dynamically control imaging depth from the tissue surface to approx 250um in 4um steps via an internally integrated zaxis actuator. Further miniaturisation is achieved using an imaging contact probe based on scanning the proximal end of a high-density optical fibre bundle (~30,000 fibres) of organs, albeit at lower resolution (30,000 sampling points/image). In rodent models, imaging was performed using various fluorescent staining protocols including fluorescently labelled receptor ligands, labelled antibodies, FITC-dextrans, vital dyes and labelled cells administered topically or intravenously. Abdominal organs of large animals were accessed laparoscopically and contrasted using i.v. fluorescein-sodium. Articular cartilage of sheep and pigs was fluorescently stained with calcein-AM or fluorescein. Surface and sub-surface cellular and sub-cellular details could be readily visualised in vivo at high resolution. In

  4. Confocal pattern period in multiple-aperture confocal imaging systems with coherent illumination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, M; Stehr, R L; Krause, A W

    1997-06-01

    We have built a programmable multiple-aperture confocal imaging system that uses a spatial light modulator (a Texas Instruments digital micromirror device). Excellent axial resolution and confocal imaging quality have been experimentally demonstrated with this system, even when the distance between adjacent ON pixels is four times the size of the pixel aperture. By contrast, typical pinhole-based systems (e.g., a Nipkow disk) employ an adjacent aperture distance-to-size ratio of 10x . We have achieved improvement over such systems by 6.25x in both light-utilization efficiency and confocal image rate without adding more components and extra processing time.

  5. In Vivo Human Skin Penetration Study of Sunscreens by Confocal Raman Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tippavajhala, Vamshi Krishna; de Oliveira Mendes, Thiago; Martin, Airton Abrahão

    2018-02-01

    This research work mainly deals with the application of confocal Raman spectroscopic technique to study in vivo human skin penetration of sunscreen products, as there are a lot of controversies associated with their skin penetration. Healthy human volunteers were tested for penetration of two commercial sunscreen products into their volar forearm skin for a period of 2 h. Measurements were taken before and after application of these sunscreen products. All the confocal Raman spectra were pre-processed and then subjected to multivariate two-dimensional principal component analysis and classical least squares analysis to determine the skin penetration of these sunscreens in comparison to the "sunscreen product spectrum" which was considered as the control. Score plots of principal component analysis of confocal Raman spectra indicated clear separation between the spectra before and after application of sunscreen products. Loading plots showed the maximum differences in the spectral region from 1590 to 1626 cm -1 where the characteristic peak of the pure sunscreen products was observed. Classical least squares analysis has shown a significant penetration to a depth of 10 μm in the volar forearm skin of healthy human volunteers for both these sunscreen products. The results confirm that the penetration of these tested sunscreen products was restricted to stratum corneum and also prove that confocal Raman spectroscopy is a simple, fast, nondestructive, and noninvasive semi-quantitative analytical technique for these studies.

  6. Preliminary identification of unicellular algal genus by using combined confocal resonance Raman spectroscopy with PCA and DPLS analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Shixuan; Xie, Wanyi; Zhang, Ping; Fang, Shaoxi; Li, Zhe; Tang, Peng; Gao, Xia; Guo, Jinsong; Tlili, Chaker; Wang, Deqiang

    2018-02-01

    The analysis of algae and dominant alga plays important roles in ecological and environmental fields since it can be used to forecast water bloom and control its potential deleterious effects. Herein, we combine in vivo confocal resonance Raman spectroscopy with multivariate analysis methods to preliminary identify the three algal genera in water blooms at unicellular scale. Statistical analysis of characteristic Raman peaks demonstrates that certain shifts and different normalized intensities, resulting from composition of different carotenoids, exist in Raman spectra of three algal cells. Principal component analysis (PCA) scores and corresponding loading weights show some differences from Raman spectral characteristics which are caused by vibrations of carotenoids in unicellular algae. Then, discriminant partial least squares (DPLS) classification method is used to verify the effectiveness of algal identification with confocal resonance Raman spectroscopy. Our results show that confocal resonance Raman spectroscopy combined with PCA and DPLS could handle the preliminary identification of dominant alga for forecasting and controlling of water blooms.

  7. In-situ detection of drugs-of-abuse on clothing using confocal Raman microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, Esam M.A. [Raman Spectroscopy Group, University Analytical Centre, Division of Chemical and Forensic Sciences, University of Bradford, Bradford BD7 1DP (United Kingdom); Edwards, Howell G.M. [Raman Spectroscopy Group, University Analytical Centre, Division of Chemical and Forensic Sciences, University of Bradford, Bradford BD7 1DP (United Kingdom)], E-mail: h.g.m.edwards@bradford.ac.uk; Hargreaves, Michael D.; Scowen, Ian J. [Raman Spectroscopy Group, University Analytical Centre, Division of Chemical and Forensic Sciences, University of Bradford, Bradford BD7 1DP (United Kingdom)

    2008-05-12

    This study describes the application of confocal Raman microscopy to the detection and identification of drugs-of-abuse in situ on undyed natural synthetic fibres, and coloured textile specimens. Raman spectra were obtained from drug particles trapped between the fibres of the specimens. Pure samples of cocaine hydrochloride and N-methyl-3,4-methylenedioxy-amphetamine HCl (MDMA-HCl) were used in this study. Raman spectra were collected from drug particles of an average size in the range 5-15 {mu}m. Despite the presence of spectral bands arising from the natural and synthetic polymer and dyed textiles, the drugs could be identified by their characteristic Raman bands. If necessary, interfering bands could be successfully removed by spectral subtraction. Furthermore, Raman spectra were recorded from drug particles trapped between the fibres of highly fluorescent specimens. Interference from the fibres, including background fluorescence, was overcome by careful focusing of the confocal beam and the resulting spectra allow ready differentiation from interference from the fibres substrate bands. Spectra of several drugs-of-abuse on dyed and undyed clothing substrates were readily obtained within 3 min with little or no sample preparation and with no alteration of the evidential material.

  8. In-situ detection of drugs-of-abuse on clothing using confocal Raman microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, Esam M.A.; Edwards, Howell G.M.; Hargreaves, Michael D.; Scowen, Ian J.

    2008-01-01

    This study describes the application of confocal Raman microscopy to the detection and identification of drugs-of-abuse in situ on undyed natural synthetic fibres, and coloured textile specimens. Raman spectra were obtained from drug particles trapped between the fibres of the specimens. Pure samples of cocaine hydrochloride and N-methyl-3,4-methylenedioxy-amphetamine HCl (MDMA-HCl) were used in this study. Raman spectra were collected from drug particles of an average size in the range 5-15 μm. Despite the presence of spectral bands arising from the natural and synthetic polymer and dyed textiles, the drugs could be identified by their characteristic Raman bands. If necessary, interfering bands could be successfully removed by spectral subtraction. Furthermore, Raman spectra were recorded from drug particles trapped between the fibres of highly fluorescent specimens. Interference from the fibres, including background fluorescence, was overcome by careful focusing of the confocal beam and the resulting spectra allow ready differentiation from interference from the fibres substrate bands. Spectra of several drugs-of-abuse on dyed and undyed clothing substrates were readily obtained within 3 min with little or no sample preparation and with no alteration of the evidential material

  9. Confocal Raman microscopy for in depth analysis in the field of cultural heritage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzetti, G.; Striova, J.; Zoppi, A.; Castellucci, E. M.

    2011-05-01

    In the field of cultural heritage, the main concern when a sample is analyzed is its safeguard, and this means that non-destructive techniques are required. In this work, we show how confocal Raman microscopy (CRM) may be successfully applied in the study of works of art as a valuable alternative to other well established techniques. CRM with a metallurgical objective was tested for the in depth study of thin samples that are of interest in the field of cultural heritage. The sensitivity of the instrumentation was first evaluated by analyzing single layers of pure polyethylene terephthalate (PET) films having a thickness of 12, 25, and 50 μm, respectively, and a multilayer sample of polypropylene (PP) and polyethylene (PE). Subsequently, the technique was applied to the analysis of historical dyed cotton yarns in order to check whether it was possible to achieve a better discrimination of the fibres' signals for an easier identification. A substantial improvement of the signal to noise ratio was found in the confocal arrangement with respect to the non-confocal one, suggesting the use of this technique for this kind of analysis in the field of cultural heritage. Furthermore, Raman spectroscopy in confocal configuration was exploited in the evaluation of cleaning performed on the mural painting specimens, treated with acrylic resin (Paraloid B72). Confocal Raman experiments were performed before and after laser cleaning (at different conditions) in order to monitor the presence and to approximate the polymer thickness: the method proved to be a valid comparative tool in assessment of cleaning efficiencies.

  10. Uncertainties in depth determination and comparison of multivariate with univariate analysis in confocal Raman studies of a laminated polymer and skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Chunhong; Flach, Carol R; Marcott, Curtis; Mendelsohn, Richard

    2004-04-01

    Confocal Raman microscopy data are reported for a laminated polymer (Paramount) and for pigskin. The nature of the laminated structure of the polymer provides a useful test for evaluation of thickness distortions in confocal measurements in soft samples, which are found to be quite significant. The spatial variation in line profiles generated from univariate analyses with scores derived from factor loadings are consistent for both samples and provide distinct diagnostic markers for stratum corneum and epidermis regions of skin. Univariate analysis of the C-C stretching region of skin reveals a spatial dependence of chain conformational order. In addition, variations in keratin-containing areas of the stratum corneum are readily identified from area maps of the S-S stretching vibrations. These data indicate that confocal Raman imaging studies of molecular structure changes in particular regions of skin during pathological processes will prove quite valuable in dermatology.

  11. Confocal Raman studies in determining crystalline nature of PECVD grown Si nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, Nafis; Bhargav, P. Balaji; Ramasamy, P. [SSN Research Centre, Kalavakkam-603110, Tamilnadu (India); Department of Physics, SSN College of Engineering, Kalavakkam-603110, Tamilnadu (India); Sivadasan, A. K.; Tyagi, A. K.; Dhara, S., E-mail: dhara@igcar.gov.in [Surface and Nanoscience Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam-603102 (India); Amirthapandian, S.; Panigrahi, B. K. [Materials Physics Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam-603102 (India); Bhattacharya, S. [SSN Research Centre, Kalavakkam-603110, Tamilnadu (India)

    2015-06-24

    Silicon nanowires of diameter ∼200 nm and length of 2-4 µm are grown in the plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition technique using nanoclustered Au catalyst assisted vapour-liquid-solid process. The crystallinity in the as-grown and annealed samples is studied using confocal Raman spectroscopic studies. Amorphous phase is formed in the as-grown samples. Structural studies using high resolution transmission electron microscopy confirm the polycrystalline nature in the annealed sample.

  12. In vivo study of dermal collagen of striae distensae by confocal Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lung, Pam Wen; Tippavajhala, Vamshi Krishna; de Oliveira Mendes, Thiago; Téllez-Soto, Claudio A; Schuck, Desirée Cigaran; Brohem, Carla Abdo; Lorencini, Marcio; Martin, Airton Abrahão

    2018-04-01

    This research work mainly deals with studying qualitatively the changes in the dermal collagen of two forms of striae distensae (SD) namely striae rubrae (SR) and striae albae (SA) when compared to normal skin (NS) using confocal Raman spectroscopy. The methodology includes an in vivo human skin study for the comparison of confocal Raman spectra of dermis region of SR, SA, and NS by supervised multivariate analysis using partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) to determine qualitatively the changes in dermal collagen. These groups are further analyzed for the extent of hydration of dermal collagen by studying the changes in the water content bound to it. PLS-DA score plot showed good separation of the confocal Raman spectra of dermis region into SR, SA, and NS data groups. Further analysis using loading plot and S-plot indicated the participation of various components of dermal collagen in the separation of these groups. Bound water content analysis showed that the extent of hydration of collagen is more in SD when compared to NS. Based on the results obtained, this study confirms the active involvement of dermal collagen in the formation of SD. It also emphasizes the need to study quantitatively the role of these various biochemical changes in the dermal collagen responsible for the variance between SR, SA, and NS.

  13. Quantitative analysis of microbicide concentrations in fluids, gels and tissues using confocal Raman spectroscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oranat Chuchuen

    Full Text Available Topical vaginal anti-HIV microbicides are an important focus in female-based strategies to prevent the sexual transmission of HIV. Understanding microbicide pharmacokinetics is essential to development, characterization and implementation of efficacious microbicide drug delivery formulations. Current methods to measure drug concentrations in tissue (e.g., LC-MS/MS, liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry are highly sensitive, but destructive and complex. This project explored the use of confocal Raman spectroscopy to detect microbicide drugs and to measure their local concentrations in fluids, drug delivery gels, and tissues. We evaluated three candidate microbicide drugs: tenofovir, Dapivirine and IQP-0528. Measurements were performed in freshly excised porcine buccal tissue specimens, gel vehicles and fluids using two Horiba Raman microscopes, one of which is confocal. Characteristic spectral peak calibrations for each drug were obtained using serial dilutions in the three matrices. These specific Raman bands demonstrated strong linear concentration dependences in the matrices and were characterized with respect to their unique vibrational signatures. At least one specific Raman feature was identified for each drug as a marker band for detection in tissue. Sensitivity of detection was evaluated in the three matrices. A specific peak was also identified for tenofovir diphosphate, the anti-HIV bioactive product of tenofovir after phosphorylation in host cells. Z-scans of drug concentrations vs. depth in excised tissue specimens, incubated under layers of tenofovir solution in a Transwell assay, showed decreasing concentration with depth from the surface into the tissue. Time-dependent concentration profiles were obtained from tissue samples incubated in the Transwell assay, for times ranging 30 minutes - 6 hours. Calibrations and measurements from tissue permeation studies for tenofovir showed good correlation with gold

  14. Integrated fingerprint and high wavenumber confocal Raman spectroscopy for in vivo diagnosis of cervical precancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duraipandian, Shiyamala; Zheng, Wei; Ng, Joseph; Low, Jeffrey J. H.; Ilancheran, A.; Huang, Zhiwei

    2013-03-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a vibrational spectroscopic technique capable of optically probing the compositional, conformational, and structural changes in the tissue associated with disease progression. The main goal of this work is to develop an integrated fingerprint (FP) and high wavenumber (HW) in vivo confocal Raman spectroscopy for simultaneous FP/HW tissue Raman spectral measurements. This work further explores the potential of integrated FP/HW Raman spectroscopy developed as a diagnostic tool for in vivo detection of cervical precancer. A total of 473 in vivo integrated FP/HW Raman spectra (340 normal and 133 precancer) were acquired from 35 patients within 1 s during clinical colposcopy. The major tissue Raman peaks are noticed around 854, 937, 1001, 1095, 1253, 1313, 1445, 1654, 2946 and 3400 cm-1, related to the molecular changes (e.g., proteins, lipids, glycogen, nucleic acids, water, etc.) that accompany the dysplastic transformation of tissue. The FP (800 - 1800 cm-1), HW (2800 - 3800 cm-1) and the integrated FP/HW Raman spectra were analyzed using partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) together with the leave-one patient-out, cross-validation. The developed PLS-DA classification models and receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curves for the FP, HW and integrated FP/HW spectroscopy further discloses that the performance of integrated FP/HW Raman spectroscopy is superior to that of all others in discriminating the dysplastic cervix. The results of this work indicate that the co-contributions of underlying rich biochemical information revealed by the complementary spectral modalities (FP and HW Raman) can improve the in vivo early diagnosis of cervical precancer at clinical colposcopy

  15. Revealing organization of cellulose in wood cell walls by Raman imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umesh P. Agarwal; Sally A. Ralph

    2007-01-01

    Anisotropy of cellulose organization in mature black spruce wood cell wall was investigated by Raman imaging using a 1 [mu]m lateral-resolution capable confocal Raman microscope. In these studies, wood cross sections (CS) and radial longitudinal sections (LS) that were partially delignified by acid chlorite treatment were used. In the case of CS where latewood cells...

  16. Assessing strain mapping by electron backscatter diffraction and confocal Raman microscopy using wedge-indented Si

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedman, Lawrence H.; Vaudin, Mark D.; Stranick, Stephan J.; Stan, Gheorghe; Gerbig, Yvonne B.; Osborn, William; Cook, Robert F., E-mail: robert.cook@nist.gov

    2016-04-15

    The accuracy of electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and confocal Raman microscopy (CRM) for small-scale strain mapping are assessed using the multi-axial strain field surrounding a wedge indentation in Si as a test vehicle. The strain field is modeled using finite element analysis (FEA) that is adapted to the near-indentation surface profile measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The assessment consists of (1) direct experimental comparisons of strain and deformation and (2) comparisons in which the modeled strain field is used as an intermediate step. Direct experimental methods (1) consist of comparisons of surface elevation and gradient measured by AFM and EBSD and of Raman shifts measured and predicted by CRM and EBSD, respectively. Comparisons that utilize the combined FEA–AFM model (2) consist of predictions of distortion, strain, and rotation for comparison with EBSD measurements and predictions of Raman shift for comparison with CRM measurements. For both EBSD and CRM, convolution of measurements in depth-varying strain fields is considered. The interconnected comparisons suggest that EBSD was able to provide an accurate assessment of the wedge indentation deformation field to within the precision of the measurements, approximately 2×10{sup −4} in strain. CRM was similarly precise, but was limited in accuracy to several times this value. - Highlights: • We map strain by electron backscatter diffraction and confocal Raman microscopy. • The test vehicle is the multi-axial strain field of wedge-indented silicon. • Strain accuracy is assessed by direct experimental intercomparison. • Accuracy is also assessed by atomic force microscopy and finite element analyses. • Electron diffraction measurements are accurate; Raman measurements need refinement.

  17. Confocal Raman spectroscopy to trace lipstick with their smudges on different surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-López, Maria; Özbek, Nil; García-Ruiz, Carmen

    2014-06-01

    Lipsticks are very popular cosmetic products that can be transferred by contact to different surfaces, being important forensic evidence with an intricate analysis if they are found in a crime scene. This study evaluates the use of confocal Raman microscopy at 780 nm excitation wavelength for the nondestructive identification of 49 lipsticks of different brands and colors, overcoming the lipstick fluorescence problem reported by previous works using other laser wavelengths. Although the lipsticks samples showed some fluorescence, this effect was not so intense to completely overwhelm the Raman spectra. Lipsticks smudges on twelve different surfaces commonly stained with these samples were also analyzed. In the case of the surfaces, some of them provided several bands to the smudge spectra compromising the identification of the lipstick. For these samples spectral subtraction of the interfering bands from the surface was performed. Finally, five different red lipsticks with very similar color were measured on different surfaces to evaluate the lipstick traceability with their smudges even on interfering surfaces. Although previous spectral subtraction was needed in some cases, all the smudged were linked to their corresponding lipsticks even when they are smeared on the interfering surfaces. As a consequence, confocal Raman microscopy using the 780 nm excitation laser is presented as a nondestructive powerful tool for the identification of these tricky samples. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Dental caries imaging using hyperspectral stimulated Raman scattering microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zi; Zheng, Wei; Jian, Lin; Huang, Zhiwei

    2016-03-01

    We report the development of a polarization-resolved hyperspectral stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) imaging technique based on a picosecond (ps) laser-pumped optical parametric oscillator system for label-free imaging of dental caries. In our imaging system, hyperspectral SRS images (512×512 pixels) in both fingerprint region (800-1800 cm-1) and high-wavenumber region (2800-3600 cm-1) are acquired in minutes by scanning the wavelength of OPO output, which is a thousand times faster than conventional confocal micro Raman imaging. SRS spectra variations from normal enamel to caries obtained from the hyperspectral SRS images show the loss of phosphate and carbonate in the carious region. While polarization-resolved SRS images at 959 cm-1 demonstrate that the caries has higher depolarization ratio. Our results demonstrate that the polarization resolved-hyperspectral SRS imaging technique developed allows for rapid identification of the biochemical and structural changes of dental caries.

  19. Investigation of domain walls in PPLN by confocal raman microscopy and PCA analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shur, Vladimir Ya.; Zelenovskiy, Pavel; Bourson, Patrice

    2017-07-01

    Confocal Raman microscopy (CRM) is a powerful tool for investigation of ferroelectric domains. Mechanical stresses and electric fields existed in the vicinity of neutral and charged domain walls modify frequency, intensity and width of spectral lines [1], thus allowing to visualize micro- and nanodomain structures both at the surface and in the bulk of the crystal [2,3]. Stresses and fields are naturally coupled in ferroelectrics due to inverse piezoelectric effect and hardly can be separated in Raman spectra. PCA is a powerful statistical method for analysis of large data matrix providing a set of orthogonal variables, called principal components (PCs). PCA is widely used for classification of experimental data, for example, in crystallization experiments, for detection of small amounts of components in solid mixtures etc. [4,5]. In Raman spectroscopy PCA was applied for analysis of phase transitions and provided critical pressure with good accuracy [6]. In the present work we for the first time applied Principal Component Analysis (PCA) method for analysis of Raman spectra measured in periodically poled lithium niobate (PPLN). We found that principal components demonstrate different sensitivity to mechanical stresses and electric fields in the vicinity of the domain walls. This allowed us to separately visualize spatial distribution of fields and electric fields at the surface and in the bulk of PPLN.

  20. Digital adaptive optics line-scanning confocal imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Changgeng; Kim, Myung K.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. A digital adaptive optics line-scanning confocal imaging (DAOLCI) system is proposed by applying digital holographic adaptive optics to a digital form of line-scanning confocal imaging system. In DAOLCI, each line scan is recorded by a digital hologram, which allows access to the complex optical field from one slice of the sample through digital holography. This complex optical field contains both the information of one slice of the sample and the optical aberration of the system, thus allowing us to compensate for the effect of the optical aberration, which can be sensed by a complex guide star hologram. After numerical aberration compensation, the corrected optical fields of a sequence of line scans are stitched into the final corrected confocal image. In DAOLCI, a numerical slit is applied to realize the confocality at the sensor end. The width of this slit can be adjusted to control the image contrast and speckle noise for scattering samples. DAOLCI dispenses with the hardware pieces, such as Shack–Hartmann wavefront sensor and deformable mirror, and the closed-loop feedbacks adopted in the conventional adaptive optics confocal imaging system, thus reducing the optomechanical complexity and cost. Numerical simulations and proof-of-principle experiments are presented that demonstrate the feasibility of this idea. PMID:26140334

  1. Quantification of whey in fluid milk using confocal Raman microscopy and artificial neural network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves da Rocha, Roney; Paiva, Igor Moura; Anjos, Virgílio; Furtado, Marco Antônio Moreira; Bell, Maria José Valenzuela

    2015-06-01

    In this work, we assessed the use of confocal Raman microscopy and artificial neural network as a practical method to assess and quantify adulteration of fluid milk by addition of whey. Milk samples with added whey (from 0 to 100%) were prepared, simulating different levels of fraudulent adulteration. All analyses were carried out by direct inspection at the light microscope after depositing drops from each sample on a microscope slide and drying them at room temperature. No pre- or posttreatment (e.g., sample preparation or spectral correction) was required in the analyses. Quantitative determination of adulteration was performed through a feed-forward artificial neural network (ANN). Different ANN configurations were evaluated based on their coefficient of determination (R2) and root mean square error values, which were criteria for selecting the best predictor model. In the selected model, we observed that data from both training and validation subsets presented R2>99.99%, indicating that the combination of confocal Raman microscopy and ANN is a rapid, simple, and efficient method to quantify milk adulteration by whey. Because sample preparation and postprocessing of spectra were not required, the method has potential applications in health surveillance and food quality monitoring. Copyright © 2015 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Confocal Raman microspectroscopy: measuring the effects of topical moisturizers on stratum corneum water gradient in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieg, Anke; Crowther, Jonathan; Blenkiron, Peter; Marcott, Curtis; Matts, Paul J.

    2006-02-01

    The stratum corneum (SC) water concentration gradient is fundamental to skin's role as a barrier, regulating its physical and biochemical properties. Standard instruments utilizing changes in SC electrical properties to estimate SC water concentration provide simple, rapid measurements but cannot provide true interval data as a function of depth. Confocal Raman spectroscopy (CRS) of human subjects provides non-invasive, real-time, in vivo measures of molecular concentration profiles. A state-of-the-art confocal Raman microspectrometer equipped with a fiber-coupled laser source operating at a wavelength of 671 nm was used to obtain measurements in the high wavenumber region (~2400-4000 cm -1). An aircooled, high-sensitivity back-illuminated, deep-depletion CCD camera captured radiation scattered inelastically from focal planes within the skin in vivo (a high-precision, computer-controlled piezo-electric stage and objective allowing depth resolutions of niacinamide on SC water concentration gradient, as measured by CRS, in vivo. The approach to compare SC water gradient effects will be discussed and the utility of this exciting new method will be compared and contrasted to existing methodology.

  3. Transcutaneous Raman spectroscopy of bone tissue using a non-confocal fiber optic array probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulmerich, Matthew V.; Finney, William F.; Popescu, Victoria; Morris, Michael D.; Vanasse, Thomas M.; Goldstein, Steven A.

    2006-02-01

    We demonstrate the first transcutaneous Raman spectroscopic measurements of bone tissue employing a fiber optic probe with a uniformly illuminated array of collection fibers. Uniform illumination reduces local power density to avoid damage to specimens. Non-confocal operation provides efficient signal collection, and together with NIR laser excitation (785 nm diode laser) allows good depth penetration enabling recovery of spectra from beneath the skin. Multivariate data reduction is used to resolve Raman spectra of bone tissue from the spectra generated from overlying tissue. The probe utilizes non-confocal optics and uniform illumination allowing the system to collect spectra from above and below the range of best focus while applying a low power density. Despite extensive photon migration in the tissue specimens, the system can resolve transcutaneous signals because the collection cone of each fiber is asymmetric with respect to the center of illumination. Here we report preliminary results of tissue specimens taken from chicken tibia as well as from a human elbow.

  4. Analysis of point source size on measurement accuracy of lateral point-spread function of confocal Raman microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Shihang; Zhang, Li; Hu, Yao; Ding, Xiang

    2018-01-01

    Confocal Raman Microscopy (CRM) has matured to become one of the most powerful instruments in analytical science because of its molecular sensitivity and high spatial resolution. Compared with conventional Raman Microscopy, CRM can perform three dimensions mapping of tiny samples and has the advantage of high spatial resolution thanking to the unique pinhole. With the wide application of the instrument, there is a growing requirement for the evaluation of the imaging performance of the system. Point-spread function (PSF) is an important approach to the evaluation of imaging capability of an optical instrument. Among a variety of measurement methods of PSF, the point source method has been widely used because it is easy to operate and the measurement results are approximate to the true PSF. In the point source method, the point source size has a significant impact on the final measurement accuracy. In this paper, the influence of the point source sizes on the measurement accuracy of PSF is analyzed and verified experimentally. A theoretical model of the lateral PSF for CRM is established and the effect of point source size on full-width at half maximum of lateral PSF is simulated. For long-term preservation and measurement convenience, PSF measurement phantom using polydimethylsiloxane resin, doped with different sizes of polystyrene microspheres is designed. The PSF of CRM with different sizes of microspheres are measured and the results are compared with the simulation results. The results provide a guide for measuring the PSF of the CRM.

  5. Confocal Raman Microscopy of Hybrid-Supported Phospholipid Bilayers within Individual C18-Functionalized Chromatographic Particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitt, Jay P; Harris, Joel M

    2016-09-06

    Measuring lipid-membrane partitioning of small molecules is critical to predicting bioavailability and investigating molecule-membrane interactions. A stable model membrane for such studies has been developed through assembly of a phospholipid monolayer on n-alkane-modified surfaces. These hybrid bilayers have recently been generated within n-alkyl-chain (C18)-modified porous silica and used in chromatographic retention studies of small molecules. Despite their successful application, determining the structure of hybrid bilayers within chromatographic silica is challenging because they reside at buried interfaces within the porous structure. In this work, we employ confocal Raman microscopy to investigate the formation and temperature-dependent structure of hybrid-phospholipid bilayers in C18-modified, porous-silica chromatographic particles. Porous silica provides sufficient surface area within a confocal probe volume centered in an individual particle to readily measure, with Raman microscopy, the formation of an ordered hybrid bilayer of 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) with the surface C18 chains. The DMPC surface density was quantified from the relative Raman scattering intensities of C18 and phospholipid acyl chains and found to be ∼40% of a DMPC vesicle membrane. By monitoring Raman spectra acquired versus temperature, the bilayer main phase transition was observed to be broadened and shifted to higher temperature compared to a DMPC vesicle, in agreement with differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) results. Raman scattering of deuterated phospholipid was resolved from protonated C18 chain scattering, showing that the lipid acyl and C18 chains melt simultaneously in a single phase transition. The surface density of lipid in the hybrid bilayer, the ordering of both C18 and lipid acyl chains upon bilayer formation, and decoupling of C18 methylene C-H vibrations by deuterated lipid acyl chains all suggest an interdigitated acyl chain

  6. Spontaneous confocal Raman microscopy--a tool to study the uptake of nanoparticles and carbon nanotubes into cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Gabriela; Rojas, Elena; Estrela-Lopis, Irina; Donath, Edwin; Moya, Sergio Enrique

    2011-06-01

    Confocal Raman microscopy as a label-free technique was applied to study the uptake and internalization of poly(lactide- co-glycolide) (PLGA) nanoparticles (NPs) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) into hepatocarcinoma human HepG2 cells. Spontaneous confocal Raman spectra was recorded from the cells exposed to oxidized CNTs and to PLGA NPs. The Raman spectra showed bands arising from the cellular environment: lipids, proteins, nucleic acids, as well as bands characteristic for either PLGA NPs or CNTs. The simultaneous generation of Raman bands from the cell and nanomaterials from the same spot proves internalization, and also indicates the cellular region, where the nanomaterial is located. For PLGA NPs, it was found that they preferentially co-localized with lipid bodies, while the oxidized CNTs are located in the cytoplasm.

  7. Single Cell Confocal Raman Spectroscopy of Human Osteoarthritic Chondrocytes: A Preliminary Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Kumar

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A great deal of effort has been focused on exploring the underlying molecular mechanism of osteoarthritis (OA especially at the cellular level. We report a confocal Raman spectroscopic investigation on human osteoarthritic chondrocytes. The objective of this investigation is to identify molecular features and the stage of OA based on the spectral signatures corresponding to bio-molecular changes at the cellular level in chondrocytes. In this study, we isolated chondrocytes from human osteoarthritic cartilage and acquired Raman spectra from single cells. Major spectral differences between the cells obtained from different International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS grades of osteoarthritic cartilage were identified. During progression of OA, a decrease in protein content and an increase in cell death were observed from the vibrational spectra. Principal component analysis and subsequent cross-validation was able to associate osteoarthritic chondrocytes to ICRS Grade I, II and III with specificity 100.0%, 98.1%, and 90.7% respectively, while, sensitivity was 98.6%, 82.8%, and 97.5% respectively. The overall predictive efficiency was 92.2%. Our pilot study encourages further use of Raman spectroscopy as a noninvasive and label free technique for revealing molecular features associated with osteoarthritic chondrocytes.

  8. Line-scanning confocal microendoscope for nuclear morphometry imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yubo; Carns, Jennifer; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca R.

    2017-11-01

    Fiber-optic endomicroscopy is a minimally invasive method to image cellular morphology in vivo. Using a coherent fiber bundle as an image relay, it allows additional imaging optics to be placed at the distal end of the fiber outside the body. In this research, we use this approach to demonstrate a compact, low-cost line-scanning confocal fluorescence microendoscope that can be constructed for pathological conditions.

  9. Modular Scanning Confocal Microscope with Digital Image Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Xianjun; McCluskey, Matthew D

    2016-01-01

    In conventional confocal microscopy, a physical pinhole is placed at the image plane prior to the detector to limit the observation volume. In this work, we present a modular design of a scanning confocal microscope which uses a CCD camera to replace the physical pinhole for materials science applications. Experimental scans were performed on a microscope resolution target, a semiconductor chip carrier, and a piece of etched silicon wafer. The data collected by the CCD were processed to yield images of the specimen. By selecting effective pixels in the recorded CCD images, a virtual pinhole is created. By analyzing the image moments of the imaging data, a lateral resolution enhancement is achieved by using a 20 × / NA = 0.4 microscope objective at 532 nm laser wavelength.

  10. Improvement in volume estimation from confocal sections after image deconvolution

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Difato, Francesco; Mazzone, F.; Scaglione, S.; Fato, M.; Beltrame, F.; Kubínová, Lucie; Janáček, Jiří; Ramoino, P.; Vicidomini, G.; Diaspro, A.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 64, č. 2 (2004), s. 151-155 ISSN 1059-910X Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : confocal microscopy * image deconvolution * point spread function Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology Impact factor: 2.609, year: 2004

  11. Structural changes in alginate-based microspheres exposed to in vivo environment as revealed by confocal Raman microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kroneková, Z.; Pelach, M.; Mazancová, P.; Uhelská, L.; Treľová, D.; Rázga, F.; Némethová, V.; Szalai, S.; Chorvát, D.; McGarrigle, J. J.; Omami, M.; Isa, D.; Ghani, S.; Majková, E.; Oberholzer, J.; Raus, Vladimír; Šiffalovič, P.; Lacík, I.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 8, 26 January (2018), s. 1-12, č. článku 1637. ISSN 2045-2322 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : confocal Raman microscopy * alginate * microcapsule Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry OBOR OECD: Polymer science Impact factor: 4.259, year: 2016

  12. Optical pathology study of human abdominal aorta tissues using confocal micro resonance Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Cheng-hui; Boydston-White, Susie; Wang, Wubao; Sordillo, Laura A.; Shi, Lingyan; Weisberg, Arel; Tomaselli, Vincent P.; Sordillo, Peter P.; Alfano, Robert R.

    2016-03-01

    Resonance Raman (RR) spectroscopic technique has a high potential for label-free and in-situ detection of biomedical lesions in vivo. This study evaluates the ability of RR spectroscopy method as an optical histopathology tool to detect the atherosclerotic plaque states of abdominal aorta in vitro. This part demonstrates the RR spectral molecular fingerprint features from different sites of the atherosclerotic abdominal aortic wall tissues. Total 57 sites of five pieces aortic samples in intimal and adventitial wall from an autopsy specimen were examined using confocal micro Raman system of WITec 300R with excitation wavelength of 532nm. The preliminary RR spectral biomarkers of molecular fingerprints indicated that typical calcified atherosclerotic plaque (RR peak at 964cm-1) tissue; fibrolipid plaque (RR peaks at 1007, 1161, 1517 and 2888cm-1) tissue, lipid pool with the fatty precipitation cholesterol) with collagen type I (RR peaks at 864, 1452, 1658, 2888 and 2948cm-1) in the soft tissue were observed and investigated.

  13. Confocal Raman microscopy supported by optical clearing treatment of the skin—influence on collagen hydration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sdobnov, Anton Yu; Tuchin, Valery V.; Lademann, Juergen; E Darvin, Maxim

    2017-07-01

    Confocal Raman microscopy (CRM) is employed to study the skin physiology, drug permeation and skin disease monitoring. In order to increase the depth of investigations, the effect of optical clearing was observed on porcine ear skin ex vivo. The optical clearing agents (OCAs) glycerol and iohexol (Omnipaque™) were applied to the porcine ear skin and investigated by CRM after 30 and 60 min of treatment. The extent of optical clearing by utilizing concentrations of 70% glycerol and 100% Omnipaque™ was evaluated. The intensity of the skin-related Raman peaks significantly increased starting from the depth 160 µm for Omnipaque™ and 40 µm for glycerol (p  ⩽  0.05) after 60 min of treatment. The OCAs’ influence on the collagen hydration in the deep-located dermis was investigated. Both OCAs induce skin dehydration, but the effect of glycerol treatment (30 min and 60 min) is stronger. The obtained results demonstrate that with increasing the treatment time, both glycerol and Omnipaque™ solutions improve the optical clearing of porcine skin making the deep-located dermal regions able for investigations. At the used concentrations and time intervals, glycerol is more effective than Omnipaque™. However, Omnipaque™ is more promising than glycerol for future in vivo applications as it is an already approved pharmaceutic substance without any known impact on the skin structure.

  14. Confocal Raman microscopy supported by optical clearing treatment of the skin—influence on collagen hydration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sdobnov, Anton Yu; Tuchin, Valery V; Lademann, Juergen; Darvin, Maxim E

    2017-01-01

    Confocal Raman microscopy (CRM) is employed to study the skin physiology, drug permeation and skin disease monitoring. In order to increase the depth of investigations, the effect of optical clearing was observed on porcine ear skin ex vivo . The optical clearing agents (OCAs) glycerol and iohexol (Omnipaque ™ ) were applied to the porcine ear skin and investigated by CRM after 30 and 60 min of treatment. The extent of optical clearing by utilizing concentrations of 70% glycerol and 100% Omnipaque ™ was evaluated. The intensity of the skin-related Raman peaks significantly increased starting from the depth 160 µ m for Omnipaque ™ and 40 µ m for glycerol ( p   ⩽  0.05) after 60 min of treatment. The OCAs’ influence on the collagen hydration in the deep-located dermis was investigated. Both OCAs induce skin dehydration, but the effect of glycerol treatment (30 min and 60 min) is stronger. The obtained results demonstrate that with increasing the treatment time, both glycerol and Omnipaque ™ solutions improve the optical clearing of porcine skin making the deep-located dermal regions able for investigations. At the used concentrations and time intervals, glycerol is more effective than Omnipaque ™ . However, Omnipaque ™ is more promising than glycerol for future in vivo applications as it is an already approved pharmaceutic substance without any known impact on the skin structure. (paper)

  15. High Fidelity Raman Chemical Imaging of Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobba, Venkata Nagamalli Koteswara Rao

    The development of high fidelity Raman imaging systems is important for a number of application areas including material science, bio-imaging, bioscience and healthcare, pharmaceutical analysis, and semiconductor characterization. The use of Raman imaging as a characterization tool for detecting the amorphous and crystalline regions in the biopolymer poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA) is the precis of my thesis. In the first chapter, a brief insight about the basics of Raman spectroscopy, Raman chemical imaging, Raman mapping, and Raman imaging techniques has been provided. The second chapter contains details about the successful development of tailored sample of PLLA. Biodegradable polymers are used in areas of tissue engineering, agriculture, packaging, and in medical field for drug delivery, implant devices, and surgical sutures. Detailed information about the sample preparation and characterization of these cold-drawn PLLA polymer substrates has been provided. Wide-field Raman hyperspectral imaging using an acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) was demonstrated in the early 1990s. The AOTF contributed challenges such as image walk, distortion, and image blur. A wide-field AOTF Raman imaging system has been developed as part of my research and methods to overcome some of the challenges in performing AOTF wide-field Raman imaging are discussed in the third chapter. This imaging system has been used for studying the crystalline and amorphous regions on the cold-drawn sample of PLLA. Of all the different modalities that are available for performing Raman imaging, Raman point-mapping is the most extensively used method. The ease of obtaining the Raman hyperspectral cube dataset with a high spectral and spatial resolution is the main motive of performing this technique. As a part of my research, I have constructed a Raman point-mapping system and used it for obtaining Raman hyperspectral image data of various minerals, pharmaceuticals, and polymers. Chapter four offers

  16. Ultrafast superresolution fluorescence imaging with spinning disk confocal microscope optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Shinichi; Okada, Yasushi

    2015-05-01

    Most current superresolution (SR) microscope techniques surpass the diffraction limit at the expense of temporal resolution, compromising their applications to live-cell imaging. Here we describe a new SR fluorescence microscope based on confocal microscope optics, which we name the spinning disk superresolution microscope (SDSRM). Theoretically, the SDSRM is equivalent to a structured illumination microscope (SIM) and achieves a spatial resolution of 120 nm, double that of the diffraction limit of wide-field fluorescence microscopy. However, the SDSRM is 10 times faster than a conventional SIM because SR signals are recovered by optical demodulation through the stripe pattern of the disk. Therefore a single SR image requires only a single averaged image through the rotating disk. On the basis of this theory, we modified a commercial spinning disk confocal microscope. The improved resolution around 120 nm was confirmed with biological samples. The rapid dynamics of micro-tubules, mitochondria, lysosomes, and endosomes were observed with temporal resolutions of 30-100 frames/s. Because our method requires only small optical modifications, it will enable an easy upgrade from an existing spinning disk confocal to a SR microscope for live-cell imaging. © 2015 Hayashi and Okada. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  17. Embryonic Heart Morphogenesis from Confocal Microscopy Imaging and Automatic Segmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongda Mao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Embryonic heart morphogenesis (EHM is a complex and dynamic process where the heart transforms from a single tube into a four-chambered pump. This process is of great biological and clinical interest but is still poorly understood for two main reasons. On the one hand, the existing imaging modalities for investigating EHM suffered from either limited penetration depth or limited spatial resolution. On the other hand, current works typically adopted manual segmentation, which was tedious, subjective, and time consuming considering the complexity of developing heart geometry and the large size of images. In this paper, we propose to utilize confocal microscopy imaging with tissue optical immersion clearing technique to image the heart at different stages of development for EHM study. The imaging method is able to produce high spatial resolution images and achieve large penetration depth at the same time. Furthermore, we propose a novel convex active contour model for automatic image segmentation. The model has the ability to deal with intensity fall-off in depth which is characterized by confocal microscopy images. We acquired the images of embryonic quail hearts from day 6 to day 14 of incubation for EHM study. The experimental results were promising and provided us with an insight view of early heart growth pattern and also paved the road for data-driven heart growth modeling.

  18. Nanoparticle Imaging with Polarization Interferometric Nonlinear Confocal Microscope

    OpenAIRE

    Fujita, Kohei; Egami, Chikara

    2014-01-01

    Polarization interferometric nonlinear confocal microscope has been developed for single nanoparticle analysis of drug delivery system (DDS). The microscope is a system based on a low cost and low power continuous wave (CW) laser light source. Also, the microscope observed shape anisotropy of the 200 nm diameter nanoparticle. According to nanoparticle imaging and CTF (contrast transfer function) curve observation of the microscope, three-dimensional resolution of the microscope measured up to...

  19. GFP fluorescence imaging with laser confocal scanning microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yanhua; Xing, Da; Shi, Qiaojuan; Zhou, Junchu

    1999-09-01

    With gene marking technique, green fluorescent protein (GFP) and nodule bacteria gene has been linked together to form a single fusion gene expression vector. Then the vector is transferred into the nodule bacteria and the astragalus sinicus is invaded by the vector. With laser confocal scanning microscope, some important morphological information in plant nitrogen fixation research about the invading of nodule bacteria and the formation process of root nodule has been obtained through the 3D imaging of GFP reporting fluorescence.

  20. Depth-profiling by confocal Raman microscopy (CRM): data correction by numerical techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomba, J Pablo; Eliçabe, Guillermo E; Miguel, María de la Paz; Perez, Claudio J

    2011-03-01

    The data obtained in confocal Raman microscopy (CRM) depth profiling experiments with dry optics are subjected to significant distortions, including an artificial compression of the depth scale, due to the combined influence of diffraction, refraction, and instrumental effects that operate on the measurement. This work explores the use of (1) regularized deconvolution and (2) the application of simple rescaling of the depth scale as methodologies to obtain an improved, more precise, confocal response. The deconvolution scheme is based on a simple predictive model for depth resolution and the use of regularization techniques to minimize the dramatic oscillations in the recovered response typical of problem inversion. That scheme is first evaluated using computer simulations on situations that reproduce smooth and sharp sample transitions between two materials and finally it is applied to correct genuine experimental data, obtained in this case from a sharp transition (planar interface) between two polymeric materials. It is shown that the methodology recovers very well most of the lost profile features in all the analyzed situations. The use of simple rescaling appears to be only useful for correcting smooth transitions, particularly those extended over distances larger than those spanned by the operative depth resolution, which limits the strategy to the study of profiles near the sample surface. However, through computer simulations, it is shown that the use of water immersion objectives may help to reduce optical distortions and to expand the application window of this simple methodology, which could be useful, for instance, to safely monitor Fickean sorption/desorption of penetrants in polymer films/coatings in a nearly noninvasive way.

  1. Using Photoshop with images created by a confocal system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedgewick, Jerry

    2014-01-01

    Many pure colors and grayscales tones that result from confocal imaging are not reproducible to output devices, such as printing presses, laptop projectors, and laser jet printers. Part of the difficulty in predicting the colors and tones that will reproduce lies in both the computer display, and in the display of unreproducible colors chosen for fluorophores. The use of a grayscale display for confocal channels and a LUT display to show saturated (clipped) tonal values aids visualization in the former instance and image integrity in the latter. Computer monitors used for post-processing in order to conform the image to the output device can be placed in darkened rooms, and the gamma for the display can be set to create darker shadow regions, and to control the display of color. These conditions aid in visualization of images so that blacks are set to grayer values that are more amenable to faithful reproduction. Preferences can be set in Photoshop for consistent display of colors, along with other settings to optimize use of memory. The Info window is opened so that tonal information can be shown via readouts. Images that are saved as indexed color are converted to grayscale or RGB Color, 16-bit is converted to 8-bit when desired, and colorized images from confocal software is returned to grayscale and re-colorized according to presented methods so that reproducible colors are made. Images may also be sharpened and noise may be reduced, or more than one image layered to show colocalization according to specific methods. Images are then converted to CMYK (Cyan, Magenta, Yellow and Black) for consequent assignment of pigment percentages for printing presses. Changes to single images and multiple images from image stacks are automated for efficient and consistent image processing changes. Some additional changes are done to those images destined for 3D visualization to better separate regions of interest from background. Files are returned to image stacks, saved and

  2. Nanostructured transdermal hormone replacement therapy for relieving menopausal symptoms: a confocal Raman spectroscopy study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Antonio Botelho

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine the safety and efficacy of a transdermal nanostructured formulation of progesterone (10% combined with estriol (0.1% + estradiol (0.25% for relieving postmenopausal symptoms. METHODS: A total of 66 postmenopausal Brazilian women with climacteric symptoms of natural menopause received transdermal nanostructured formulations of progesterone and estrogens in the forearm daily for 60 months to mimic the normal ovarian secretory pattern. Confocal Raman spectroscopy of hormones in skin layers was performed. Clinical parameters, serum concentrations of estradiol and follicle-stimulating hormone, blood pressure, BI-RADS classification from bilateral mammography, and symptomatic relief were compared between baseline and 60 months post-treatment. Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT02033512. RESULTS: An improvement in climacteric symptoms was reported in 92.5% of women evaluated before and after 60 months of treatment. The serum concentrations of estradiol and follicle-stimulating hormone changed significantly (p<0.05 after treatment; the values of serum follicle-stimulating hormone decreased after 60 months from 82.04±4.9 to 57.12±4.1 IU/mL. A bilateral mammography assessment of the breasts revealed normal results in all women. No adverse health-related events were attributed to this hormone replacement therapy protocol. CONCLUSION: The nanostructured formulation is safe and effective in re-establishing optimal serum levels of estradiol and follicle-stimulating hormone and relieving the symptoms of menopause. This transdermal hormone replacement therapy may alleviate climacteric symptoms in postmenopausal women.

  3. Statistical strategies to reveal potential vibrational markers for in vivo analysis by confocal Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira Mendes, Thiago de; Pinto, Liliane Pereira; Santos, Laurita dos; Tippavajhala, Vamshi Krishna; Téllez Soto, Claudio Alberto; Martin, Airton Abrahão

    2016-07-01

    The analysis of biological systems by spectroscopic techniques involves the evaluation of hundreds to thousands of variables. Hence, different statistical approaches are used to elucidate regions that discriminate classes of samples and to propose new vibrational markers for explaining various phenomena like disease monitoring, mechanisms of action of drugs, food, and so on. However, the technical statistics are not always widely discussed in applied sciences. In this context, this work presents a detailed discussion including the various steps necessary for proper statistical analysis. It includes univariate parametric and nonparametric tests, as well as multivariate unsupervised and supervised approaches. The main objective of this study is to promote proper understanding of the application of various statistical tools in these spectroscopic methods used for the analysis of biological samples. The discussion of these methods is performed on a set of in vivo confocal Raman spectra of human skin analysis that aims to identify skin aging markers. In the Appendix, a complete routine of data analysis is executed in a free software that can be used by the scientific community involved in these studies.

  4. Nanostructured transdermal hormone replacement therapy for relieving menopausal symptoms: a confocal Raman spectroscopy study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botelho, Marco Antonio; Queiroz, Dinalva Brito; Barros, Gisele; Guerreiro, Stela; Umbelino, Sonia; Lyra, Arao; Borges, Boniek; Freitas, Allan, E-mail: marcobotelho@pq.cnpq.br [Universidade Potiguar, Natal, RN (Brazil). Lab. de Nanotecnologia; Fechine, Pierre [Universidade Federal do Ceara (GQMAT/UFCE), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica Analitica. Grupo Avancado de Biomateriais em Quimica; Queiroz, Danilo Caldas de [Instituto Federal de Ciencia e Tecnologia (IFCT), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil). Lab. de Biotecnologia; Ruela, Ronaldo [Instituto de Biotecnologia Aplicada (INBIOS), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Almeida, Jackson Guedes [Universidade Federal do Vale de Sao Francisco (UNIVALE), Petrolina, PE (Brazil). Fac. de Ciencias Farmaceuticas; Quintans Junior, Lucindo [Universidade Federal de Sergipe (UFSE), Sao Cristovao, SE (Brazil). Dept. de Fisiologia

    2014-06-01

    Objective:to determine the safety and efficacy of a transdermal nanostructured formulation of progesterone (10%) combined with estriol (0.1%) + estradiol (0.25%) for relieving postmenopausal symptoms. Methods: a total of 66 postmenopausal Brazilian women with climacteric symptoms of natural menopause received transdermal nanostructured formulations of progesterone and estrogens in the forearm daily for 60 months to mimic the normal ovarian secretory pattern. Confocal Raman spectroscopy of hormones in skin layers was performed. Clinical parameters, serum concentrations of estradiol and follicle-stimulating hormone, blood pressure, BI-RADS classification from bilateral mammography, and symptomatic relief were compared between baseline and 60 months post-treatment. Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT02033512. Results: an improvement in climacteric symptoms was reported in 92.5% of women evaluated before and after 60 months of treatment. The serum concentrations of estradiol and follicle-stimulating hormone changed significantly (p<0.05) after treatment; the values of serum follicle-stimulating hormone decreased after 60 months from 82.04 ± 4.9 to 57.12 ± 4.1 IU/mL. A bilateral mammography assessment of the breasts revealed normal results in all women. No adverse health-related events were attributed to this hormone replacement therapy protocol. Conclusion: the nanostructured formulation is safe and effective in re-establishing optimal serum levels of estradiol and follicle-stimulating hormone and relieving the symptoms of menopause. This transdermal hormone replacement therapy may alleviate climacteric symptoms in postmenopausal women. (author)

  5. Nanostructured transdermal hormone replacement therapy for relieving menopausal symptoms: a confocal Raman spectroscopy study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botelho, Marco Antonio; Queiroz, Dinalva Brito; Barros, Gisele; Guerreiro, Stela; Umbelino, Sonia; Lyra, Arao; Borges, Boniek; Freitas, Allan; Almeida, Jackson Guedes; Quintans Junior, Lucindo

    2014-01-01

    Objective:to determine the safety and efficacy of a transdermal nanostructured formulation of progesterone (10%) combined with estriol (0.1%) + estradiol (0.25%) for relieving postmenopausal symptoms. Methods: a total of 66 postmenopausal Brazilian women with climacteric symptoms of natural menopause received transdermal nanostructured formulations of progesterone and estrogens in the forearm daily for 60 months to mimic the normal ovarian secretory pattern. Confocal Raman spectroscopy of hormones in skin layers was performed. Clinical parameters, serum concentrations of estradiol and follicle-stimulating hormone, blood pressure, BI-RADS classification from bilateral mammography, and symptomatic relief were compared between baseline and 60 months post-treatment. Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT02033512. Results: an improvement in climacteric symptoms was reported in 92.5% of women evaluated before and after 60 months of treatment. The serum concentrations of estradiol and follicle-stimulating hormone changed significantly (p<0.05) after treatment; the values of serum follicle-stimulating hormone decreased after 60 months from 82.04 ± 4.9 to 57.12 ± 4.1 IU/mL. A bilateral mammography assessment of the breasts revealed normal results in all women. No adverse health-related events were attributed to this hormone replacement therapy protocol. Conclusion: the nanostructured formulation is safe and effective in re-establishing optimal serum levels of estradiol and follicle-stimulating hormone and relieving the symptoms of menopause. This transdermal hormone replacement therapy may alleviate climacteric symptoms in postmenopausal women. (author)

  6. Nanoparticle uptake and their co-localization with cell compartments - a confocal Raman microscopy study at single cell level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrela-Lopis, I.; Romero, G.; Rojas, E.; Moya, S. E.; Donath, E.

    2011-07-01

    Confocal Raman Microscopy, a non-invasive, non-destructive and label-free technique, was employed to study the uptake and localization of nanoparticles (NPs) in the Hepatocarcinoma human cell line HepG2 at the level of single cells. Cells were exposed to carbon nanotubes (CNTs) the surface of which was engineered with polyelectrolytes and lipid layers, aluminium oxide and cerium dioxide nanoparticles. Raman spectra deconvolution was applied to obtain the spatial distributions of NPs together with lipids/proteins in cells. The colocalization of the NPs with different intracellular environments, lipid bodies, protein and DNA, was inferred. Lipid coated CNTs associated preferentially with lipid rich regions, whereas polyelectrolyte coated CNTs were excluded from lipid rich regions. Al2O3 NPs were found in the cytoplasm. CeO2 NPs were readily taken up and have been observed all over the cell. Raman z-scans proved the intracellular distribution of the respective NPs.

  7. 3D imaging of neutron tracks using confocal microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillmore, Gavin; Wertheim, David; Flowers, Alan

    2016-04-01

    Neutron detection and neutron flux assessment are important aspects in monitoring nuclear energy production. Neutron flux measurements can also provide information on potential biological damage from exposure. In addition to the applications for neutron measurement in nuclear energy, neutron detection has been proposed as a method of enhancing neutrino detectors and cosmic ray flux has also been assessed using ground-level neutron detectors. Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors (or SSNTDs) have been used extensively to examine cosmic rays, long-lived radioactive elements, radon concentrations in buildings and the age of geological samples. Passive SSNTDs consisting of a CR-39 plastic are commonly used to measure radon because they respond to incident charged particles such as alpha particles from radon gas in air. They have a large dynamic range and a linear flux response. We have previously applied confocal microscopy to obtain 3D images of alpha particle tracks in SSNTDs from radon track monitoring (1). As a charged particle traverses through the polymer it creates an ionisation trail along its path. The trail or track is normally enhanced by chemical etching to better expose radiation damage, as the damaged area is more sensitive to the etchant than the bulk material. Particle tracks in CR-39 are usually assessed using 2D optical microscopy. In this study 6 detectors were examined using an Olympus OLS4100 LEXT 3D laser scanning confocal microscope (Olympus Corporation, Japan). The detectors had been etched for 2 hours 50 minutes at 85 °C in 6.25M NaOH. Post etch the plastics had been treated with a 10 minute immersion in a 2% acetic acid stop bath, followed by rinsing in deionised water. The detectors examined had been irradiated with a 2mSv neutron dose from an Am(Be) neutron source (producing roughly 20 tracks per mm2). We were able to successfully acquire 3D images of neutron tracks in the detectors studied. The range of track diameter observed was between 4

  8. Live Imaging of Shoot Meristems on an Inverted Confocal Microscope Using an Objective Lens Inverter Attachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimchuk, Zachary L; Perdue, Tony D

    2017-01-01

    Live imaging of above ground meristems can lead to new insights in plant development not possible from static imaging of fixed tissue. The use of an upright confocal microscope offers several technical and biological advantages for live imaging floral or shoot meristems. However, many departments and core facilities possess only inverted confocal microscopes and lack the funding for an additional upright confocal microscope. Here we show that imaging of living apical meristems can be performed on existing inverted confocal microscopes with the use of an affordable and detachable InverterScope accessory.

  9. Structure of polypropylene/polyethylene blends assessed by polarised PA-FTIR spectroscopy, polarised FT Raman spectroscopy and confocal Raman microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Schmidt, Pavel; Dybal, Jiří; Ščudla, Jaroslav; Raab, Miroslav; Kratochvíl, Jaroslav; Eichhorn, K. J.; López-Quintana, S.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 184, - (2002), s. 107-122 ISSN 1022-1360. [European Symposium on Polymer Spectroscopy /14./. Dresden, 02.09.2001-05.09.2001] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/97/1071; GA ČR GA203/97/0539; GA AV ČR KSK4050111; GA AV ČR IAA4050904 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4050913 Keywords : polypropylene/polyethylene blends * polarized photoacoustic FTIR spectroscopy * confocal Raman microscopy Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 0.758, year: 2002

  10. Real-time evaluation of aggregation using confocal imaging and image analysis tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamrang, Zahra; Zindy, Egor; Clarke, David; Pluen, Alain

    2014-02-07

    Real-time confocal imaging was utilised to monitor the in situ loss of BSA monomers and aggregate formation using Spatial Intensity Distribution Analysis (SpIDA) and Raster Image Correlation Spectroscopy (RICS). At the proof of concept level this work has demonstrated the applicability of RICS and SpIDA for monitoring protein oligomerisation and larger aggregate formation.

  11. Confocal Raman microscopy for in situ detection of solid-phase extraction of pyrene into single C18-silica particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitt, Jay P; Harris, Joel M

    2014-02-04

    Solid-phase extraction (SPE) is a well-known method for separating and preconcentrating analytes prior to ex situ detection and quantification. Despite advances in the miniaturization of solid-phase extraction, the technique has not evolved to meet the needs for detection in small-scale microfluidic devices. Although successful efforts have led to smaller-scale extractors that allow preconcentration from small volumes, detection within correspondingly small volumes has remained out of reach because of analyte dilution during a postextraction transfer or "wash-off" step prior to detection. In this work, successful extraction into subpicoliter collection volumes is accomplished by using a single chromatographic particle as an extractor; wash-off dilution is completely avoided by using confocal Raman microscopy for in situ detection within the single-particle collection phase. Specifically, micromolar concentrations of pyrene in methanol/water solution were equilibrated with an individual C18-functionalized silica particle, and Raman spectra were acquired from a small confocal sampling volume (∼1 fL) within the particle interior. By comparing the Raman scattering intensity of the pyrene with that of the C18 chains in the stationary phase, it was possible to quantify the equilibrium coverage of pyrene relative to the C18 chains. Spectroscopic isotherms were measured to determine the saturation surface coverage of pyrene relative to C18 chains and to study how the preconcentration equilibrium can be controlled by the source-phase solution composition. For extraction from aqueous solutions having the lowest methanol concentration (5% by volume), the preconcentration factor for pyrene into the particle was found to be 4.8 (±0.8) × 10(4), which allowed detection of pyrene extracted from a 10 nM solution into a 0.52-pL particle volume.

  12. A classification model for non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) using confocal Raman micro-spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jie; Yu, Yang; Kang, Jeon Woong; Tam, Zhi Yang; Xu, Shuoyu; Fong, Eliza Li Shan; Singh, Surya Pratap; Song, Ziwei; Tucker Kellogg, Lisa; So, Peter; Yu, Hanry

    2017-07-01

    We combined Raman micro-spectroscopy and machine learning techniques to develop a classification model based on a well-established non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) mouse model, using spectrum pre-processing, biochemical component analysis (BCA) and logistic regression.

  13. Nanoparticle uptake and their co-localization with cell compartments - a confocal Raman microscopy study at single cell level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estrela-Lopis, I; Donath, E [Institute of Medical Physics and Biophysics, Leipzig University, Haertelstrasse 16, 04107 Leipzig (Germany); Romero, G; Rojas, E; Moya, S E, E-mail: Irina.Estrela-Lopis@medizin.uni-leipzig.de [CIC biomaGUNE, Paseo Miramon 182 Edificio Empresarial C, 20009 San Sebastian, Gipuzkoa (Spain)

    2011-07-06

    Confocal Raman Microscopy, a non-invasive, non-destructive and label-free technique, was employed to study the uptake and localization of nanoparticles (NPs) in the Hepatocarcinoma human cell line HepG2 at the level of single cells. Cells were exposed to carbon nanotubes (CNTs) the surface of which was engineered with polyelectrolytes and lipid layers, aluminium oxide and cerium dioxide nanoparticles. Raman spectra deconvolution was applied to obtain the spatial distributions of NPs together with lipids/proteins in cells. The colocalization of the NPs with different intracellular environments, lipid bodies, protein and DNA, was inferred. Lipid coated CNTs associated preferentially with lipid rich regions, whereas polyelectrolyte coated CNTs were excluded from lipid rich regions. Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} NPs were found in the cytoplasm. CeO{sub 2} NPs were readily taken up and have been observed all over the cell. Raman z-scans proved the intracellular distribution of the respective NPs.

  14. Improved sampling and analysis of images in corneal confocal microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaldemose, E L; Fontain, F I; Karlsson, P; Nyengaard, J R

    2017-10-01

    Corneal confocal microscopy (CCM) is a noninvasive clinical method to analyse and quantify corneal nerve fibres in vivo. Although the CCM technique is in constant progress, there are methodological limitations in terms of sampling of images and objectivity of the nerve quantification. The aim of this study was to present a randomized sampling method of the CCM images and to develop an adjusted area-dependent image analysis. Furthermore, a manual nerve fibre analysis method was compared to a fully automated method. 23 idiopathic small-fibre neuropathy patients were investigated using CCM. Corneal nerve fibre length density (CNFL) and corneal nerve fibre branch density (CNBD) were determined in both a manual and automatic manner. Differences in CNFL and CNBD between (1) the randomized and the most common sampling method, (2) the adjusted and the unadjusted area and (3) the manual and automated quantification method were investigated. The CNFL values were significantly lower when using the randomized sampling method compared to the most common method (p = 0.01). There was not a statistical significant difference in the CNBD values between the randomized and the most common sampling method (p = 0.85). CNFL and CNBD values were increased when using the adjusted area compared to the standard area. Additionally, the study found a significant increase in the CNFL and CNBD values when using the manual method compared to the automatic method (p ≤ 0.001). The study demonstrated a significant difference in the CNFL values between the randomized and common sampling method indicating the importance of clear guidelines for the image sampling. The increase in CNFL and CNBD values when using the adjusted cornea area is not surprising. The observed increases in both CNFL and CNBD values when using the manual method of nerve quantification compared to the automatic method are consistent with earlier findings. This study underlines the importance of improving the analysis of the

  15. Improved modeling of in vivo confocal Raman data using multivariate curve resolution (MCR) augmentation of ordinary least squares models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancewicz, Thomas M; Xiao, Chunhong; Zhang, Shuliang; Misra, Manoj

    2013-12-01

    In vivo confocal Raman spectroscopy has become the measurement technique of choice for skin health and skin care related communities as a way of measuring functional chemistry aspects of skin that are key indicators for care and treatment of various skin conditions. Chief among these techniques are stratum corneum water content, a critical health indicator for severe skin condition related to dryness, and natural moisturizing factor components that are associated with skin protection and barrier health. In addition, in vivo Raman spectroscopy has proven to be a rapid and effective method for quantifying component penetration in skin for topically applied skin care formulations. The benefit of such a capability is that noninvasive analytical chemistry can be performed in vivo in a clinical setting, significantly simplifying studies aimed at evaluating product performance. This presumes, however, that the data and analysis methods used are compatible and appropriate for the intended purpose. The standard analysis method used by most researchers for in vivo Raman data is ordinary least squares (OLS) regression. The focus of work described in this paper is the applicability of OLS for in vivo Raman analysis with particular attention given to use for non-ideal data that often violate the inherent limitations and deficiencies associated with proper application of OLS. We then describe a newly developed in vivo Raman spectroscopic analysis methodology called multivariate curve resolution-augmented ordinary least squares (MCR-OLS), a relatively simple route to addressing many of the issues with OLS. The method is compared with the standard OLS method using the same in vivo Raman data set and using both qualitative and quantitative comparisons based on model fit error, adherence to known data constraints, and performance against calibration samples. A clear improvement is shown in each comparison for MCR-OLS over standard OLS, thus supporting the premise that the MCR

  16. Noise Removal with Maintained Spatial Resolution in Raman Images of Cells Exposed to Submicron Polystyrene Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linnea Ahlinder

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The biodistribution of 300 nm polystyrene particles in A549 lung epithelial cells has been studied with confocal Raman spectroscopy. This is a label-free method in which particles and cells can be imaged without using dyes or fluorescent labels. The main drawback with Raman imaging is the comparatively low spatial resolution, which is aggravated in heterogeneous systems such as biological samples, which in addition often require long measurement times because of their weak Raman signal. Long measurement times may however induce laser-induced damage. In this study we use a super-resolution algorithm with Tikhonov regularization, intended to improve the image quality without demanding an increased number of collected pixels. Images of cells exposed to polystyrene particles have been acquired with two different step lengths, i.e., the distance between pixels, and compared to each other and to corresponding images treated with the super-resolution algorithm. It is shown that the resolution after application of super-resolution algorithms is not significantly improved compared to the theoretical limit for optical microscopy. However, to reduce noise and artefacts in the hyperspectral Raman images while maintaining the spatial resolution, we show that it is advantageous to use short mapping step lengths and super-resolution algorithms with appropriate regularization. The proposed methodology should be generally applicable for Raman imaging of biological samples and other photo-sensitive samples.

  17. Evolution of granule structure and drug content during fluidized bed granulation by X-ray microtomography and confocal Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poutiainen, Sami; Pajander, Jari; Savolainen, Armi; Ketolainen, Jarkko; Järvinen, Kristiina

    2011-12-01

    The distribution of the drug in the granular end product is a critical quality attribute in fluidized bed spray granulation of pharmaceuticals. The evolution of drug content inhomogeneity in a case study was examined as a function of granulation time. Intragranular structure was also investigated using confocal Raman spectroscopy and computerized X-ray microtomography. A principal component analysis was conducted on the results to investigate granule structure-drug content relationships. Inhomogeneity increased at the beginning of the process but later it was found to decrease. Changes in the homogeneity were accompanied by significant changes in the intragranular structure. It was concluded that segregation of the primary components explained the observed inhomogeneity at low saturation levels when the granules grow by layering, but at elevated moisture levels, granule growth is mediated by the coalescence of agglomerates, which promotes homogeneous distribution of the drug particles. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Repartition of oil miscible and water soluble UV filters in an applied sunscreen film determined by confocal Raman microspectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Myriam; Buehler, Theodor; Imanidis, Georgios

    2016-07-06

    Photoprotection provided by topical sunscreens is expressed by the sun protection factor (SPF) which depends primarily on the UV filters contained in the product and the applied sunscreen amount. Recently, the vehicle was shown to significantly impact film thickness distribution of an applied sunscreen and sunscreen efficacy. In the present work, repartition of the UV filters within the sunscreen film upon application is investigated for its role to affect sun protection efficacy. The spatial repartition of an oil-miscible and a water-soluble UV filter within the sunscreen film was studied using confocal Raman microspectroscopy. Epidermis of pig ear skin was used as substrate for application of three different sunscreen formulations, an oil-in-water emulsion, a water-in-oil emulsion, and a clear lipo-alcoholic spray (CAS) and SPF in vitro was measured. Considerable differences in the repartition of the UV filters upon application and evaporation of volatile ingredients were found between the tested formulations. A nearly continuous phase of lipid-miscible UV filter was formed only for the WO formulation with dispersed aggregates of water-soluble UV filter. OW emulsion and CAS exhibited interspersed patches of the two UV filters, whereas the segregated UV filter domains of the latter formulation were by comparison of a much larger scale and spanned the entire thickness of the sunscreen film. CAS therefore differed markedly from the other two formulations with respect to filter repartition. This difference should be reflected in SPF when the absorption spectra of the employed UV filters are not the same. Confocal Raman microspectroscopy was shown to be a powerful technique for studying this mechanism of sun protection performance of sunscreens.

  19. Spectroscopy and Raman imaging of inhomogeneous materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maslova, Olga

    2014-01-01

    This thesis is aimed at developing methodologies in Raman spectroscopy and imaging. After reviewing the statistical instruments which allow treating giant amount of data (multivariate analysis and classification), the study is applied to two families of well-known materials which are used as models for testing the limits of the implemented developments. The first family is a series of carbon materials pyrolyzed at various temperatures and exhibiting inhomogeneities at a nm scale which is suitable for Raman-X-ray diffraction combination. Another results concern the polishing effect on carbon structure. Since it is found to induce Raman artifacts leading to the overestimation of the local structural disorder, a method based on the use of the G band width is therefore proposed in order to evaluate the crystallite size in both unpolished and polished nano-graphites. The second class of materials presents inhomogeneities at higher (micrometric) scales by the example of uranium dioxide ceramics. Being well adapted in terms of spatial scale, Raman imaging is thus used for probing their surfaces. Data processing is implemented via an approach combining the multivariate (principal component) analysis and the classical fitting procedure with Lorentzian profiles. The interpretation of results is supported via electron backscattering diffraction (EBSD) analysis which enables us to distinguish the orientation effects of ceramic grains from other underlying contributions. The last ones are mainly localized at the grain boundaries, that is testified by the appearance of a specific Raman mode. Their origin seems to be caused by stoichiometric oxygen variations or impurities, as well as strain inhomogeneities. The perspectives of this work include both the implementation of other mathematical methods and in-depth analysis of UO 2 structure damaged by irradiation (anisotropic effects, role of grain boundaries). (author) [fr

  20. Raman hyperspectral imaging and analysis of fat spreads

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dalen, van G.; Velzen, van E.J.J.; Heussen, P.C.M.; Sovago, M.; Malssen, van K.F.; Duynhoven, van J.P.M.

    2017-01-01

    The microstructure of fat spreads is of fundamental importance to their sensorial properties such as texture, mouthfeel and spreadability. Fat spreads are water in oil emulsions,with a continuous phase supported by a fat crystal network. Confocal Raman microscopy offers the possibility for the

  1. Spatially Resolved Characterization of Cellulose Nanocrystal-Polypropylene Composite by Confocal Raman Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umesh P. Agarwal; Ronald Sabo; Richard S. Reiner; Craig M. Clemons; Alan W. Rudie

    2012-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy was used to analyze cellulose nanocrystal (CNC)–polypropylene (PP) composites and to investigate the spatial distribution of CNCs in extruded composite filaments. Three composites were made from two forms of nanocellulose (CNCs from wood pulp and the nanoscale fraction of microcrystalline cellulose) and two of the three composites investigated used...

  2. Chapter 1.4: Spatially Resolved Characterization of CNC-Polypropylene composite by Confocal Raman Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umesh Agarwal; Ronald Sabo; Richard Reiner; Craig Clemons; Alan Rudie

    2013-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy was used to analyze cellulose nanocrystal (CNC)-polypropylene (PP) composites and to investigate the spatial distribution of CNCs in extruded composite filaments. Three composites were made from two forms of nanocellulose (CNCs from wood pulp and the nanoscale fraction of microcrystalline cellulose), and two of the three composites...

  3. RELIABILITY OF CONFOCAL MICROSCOPY SPECTRAL IMAGING SYSTEMS: USE OF MULTISPECTRAL BEADS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: There is a need for a standardized, impartial calibration, and validation protocol on confocal spectral imaging (CSI) microscope systems. To achieve this goal, it is necessary to have testing tools to provide a reproducible way to evaluate instrument performance. ...

  4. Research and application on imaging technology of line structure light based on confocal microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Wenfeng; Xiao, Zexin; Wang, Xiaofen

    2009-11-01

    In 2005, the theory of line structure light confocal microscopy was put forward firstly in China by Xingyu Gao and Zexin Xiao in the Institute of Opt-mechatronics of Guilin University of Electronic Technology. Though the lateral resolution of line confocal microscopy can only reach or approach the level of the traditional dot confocal microscopy. But compared with traditional dot confocal microscopy, it has two advantages: first, by substituting line scanning for dot scanning, plane imaging only performs one-dimensional scanning, with imaging velocity greatly improved and scanning mechanism simplified, second, transfer quantity of light is greatly improved by substituting detection hairline for detection pinhole, and low illumination CCD is used directly to collect images instead of photoelectric intensifier. In order to apply the line confocal microscopy to practical system, based on the further research on the theory of the line confocal microscopy, imaging technology of line structure light is put forward on condition of implementation of confocal microscopy. Its validity and reliability are also verified by experiments.

  5. Study of the vitamins A, E and C esters penetration into the skin by confocal Raman spectroscopy in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogilevych, Borys; Isensee, Debora; Rangel, Joao L.; Dal Pizzol, Carine; Martinello, Valeska C. A.; Dieamant, Gustavo C.; Martin, Airton A.

    2015-06-01

    Vitamins A, E and C play important role in skin homeostasis and protection. Hence, they are extensively used in many cosmetic and cosmeceutic products. However, their molecules are unstable, and do not easily penetrate into the skin, which drastically decreases its efficiency in topical formulations. Liposoluble derivative of the vitamin A - retinyl palmitate, vitamin E - tocopheryl acetate, and vitamin C - tetraisopalmitoyl ascorbic acid, are more stable, and are frequently used as an active ingredient in cosmetic products. Moreover, increased hydrophobicity of these molecules could lead to a higher skin penetration. The aim of this work is to track and compare the absorption of the liposoluble derivatives of the vitamins and their encapsulated form, into the healthy human skin in vivo. We used Confocal Raman Spectroscopy (CRS) that is proven to be helpful in label-free non-destructive investigation of the biochemical composition and molecular conformational analysis of the biological samples. The measurements were performed in the volar forearm of the 10 healthy volunteers. Skin was treated with both products, and Raman spectra were obtained after 15 min, 3 hours, and 6 hours after applying the formulation. 3510 Skin Composition Analyzer (River Diagnostics, The Netherlands) with 785 nm laser excitation was used to acquire information in the fingerprint region. Significant difference in permeation of the products was observed. Whereas only free form of retinyl palmitate penetrate the skin within first 15 minutes, all three vitamin derivatives were present under the skin surface in case of nanoparticulated form.

  6. Confocal Raman observation of the efflorescence/deliquescence processes of individual NaNO3 particles on quartz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-Hong; Wang, Feng; Lu, Pei-Dong; Dong, Jin-Ling; Wang, Liang-Yu; Zhang, Yun-Hong

    2006-12-14

    Confocal Raman spectroscopy was used to study the structural changes of bulk NaNO3 solutions with molar water-to-solute ratios (WSRs) of 54.0-12.3 and NaNO3 droplets (10-100 microm) with WSRs of 9.5-1.0 on a quartz substrate. Upon reduction of the WSR, a blue shift of the symmetric stretching band (nu(1)(NO3-)) from approximately 1048 to approximately 1058 cm(-1) was observed in the confocal Raman spectra with high signal-to-noise ratios. Accordingly, the full width at half-height of the nu(1)(NO3-) band increased from approximately 8.4 cm-1 for the dilute solution (WSR = 54.0) to approximately 15.6 cm-1 for the extremely supersaturated droplet (WSR = 1.0), suggesting the formation of contact ion pairs with different structures. For the O-H stretching band, the ratio of weak hydrogen-bonding components to strong ones, i.e., I(3488)/I(3256), increased from approximately 1.2 at WSR = 54.0 to approximately 7.3 at WSR = 1.0, indicating that the strong hydrogen bonds were heavily destroyed between water molecules especially in the supersaturated droplets. In the humidifying process, two hygroscopic behaviors were observed depending on the morphology of solid NaNO3 particles. No surface water was detected for a solid NaNO3 particle with rhombohedral shape at relative humidities (RHs) below 86%. When the RH increased from 86% to 93%, it suddenly absorbed water and turned into a solution droplet. For a maple-leaf-shaped NaNO3 particle with a rough surface, however, a trace of residual water originally remained on the rough surface even at very low RH according to its Raman spectrum. Its initial water uptake from the ambient occurred at approximately 70% RH. The small amount of initially adsorbed water induced surface rearrangement of the maple-leaf-shaped particle. A further increase of RH made the particle gradually turn into a regular solid core swathed in a solution layer. Eventually, it completely deliquesced in the RH region of 86-93%, similar to the case of the NaNO3

  7. Raman imaging and spectroscopy of individual single-wall carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li

    Single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) are unique one-dimensional materials that are promising for many potential applications in various important areas. Their vibrational properties reflect the electron and phonon confinement as well as the structures of the tubes. Resonant Raman spectroscopy has been proven to be an exceedingly powerful tool for the characterization of the vibrational and electronic properties of SWNTs. This thesis focuses on the study of Raman spectroscopy of individual single carbon nanotubes. Single tube spectroscopy allows probing the structure dependent properties of SWNTs. A beam-scanning confocal Raman microscope system capable of large-area Raman imaging is first developed for characterizing SWNTs at the single tube level. Raman images and first-order Raman spectra of nanotubes, consisting of both semicoducting and metallic nanotubes, are systemically studied at room temperature in ambient air. The diameter of the nanotubes is determined from their radial breathing mode (RBM) frequency. A broad diameter distribution is observed for nanotubes synthesized by chemical vapor deposition. The tangential G mode Raman spectra of individual metallic nanotubes are found to exhibit a broad distribution of line shapes, which is attributed to shift of the Fermi level due to O2 adsorption. The doping dependence of Raman spectra of metallic tubes is further studied by both electrostatic gating and electrochemical gating. Significant changes in the G band Raman spectra of nanotubes are observed, suggesting the effect of doping on electron-phonon interaction. The observation of a gradual evolution of G band spectrum from a semiconducting type to the broad BWF type reveals evidence of phonon interaction between two G band modes. Raman imaging and Raman spectra of isolated SWNTs and single-layer graphenen are investigated at both room temperature and low temperature. The temperature-induced Raman spectral change of individual nanotubes is observed to be tube

  8. Applications of Micro-Raman Imaging in Biomedical Research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otto, Cornelis; de Grauw, C.J.; de Grauw, C.J.; Duindam, J.J.; Duindam, J.J.; Sijtsema, N.M.; Greve, Jan

    1997-01-01

    Recent results are presented of the application of imaging micro-Raman spectrometers in cellular biophysics and biomedical research. Various micro-Raman spectrometers have been developed that are now routinely applied in these fields. Results are presented that were obtained with a linescan Raman

  9. Confocal Microscope Alignment of Nanocrystals for Coherent Diffraction Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beitra, Loren; Watari, Moyu; Matsuura, Takashi; Shimamoto, Naonobu; Harder, Ross; Robinson, Ian

    2010-01-01

    We have installed and tested an Olympus LEXT confocal microscope at the 34-ID-C beamline of the Advanced Photon Source (APS). The beamline is for Coherent X-ray Diffraction (CXD) experiments in which a nanometre-sized crystal is aligned inside a focussed X-ray beam. The microscope was required for three-dimensional (3D) sample alignment to get around sphere-of-confusion issues when locating Bragg peaks in reciprocal space. In this way, and by use of strategic sample preparations, we have succeeded in measuring six Bragg peaks from a single 200 nm gold crystal and obtained six projections of its internal displacement field. This enables the clear identification of stacking-fault bands within the crystal. The confocal alignment method will allow a full determination of the strain tensor provided three or more Bragg reflections from the same crystal are found.

  10. STRUCTURAL AND MECHANICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF DEFORMED POLYMER USING CONFOCAL RAMAN MICROSCOPY AND DSC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgit Neitzel

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Polymers have various interesting properties, which depend largely on their inner structure. One way to influence the macroscopic behaviour is the deformation of the polymer chains, which effects the change in microstructure. For analyzing the microstructure of non-deformed and deformed polymer materials, Raman spectroscopy as well as differential scanning calorimetry (DSC were used. In the present study we compare the results for crystallinity measurements of deformed polymers using both methods in order to characterize the differences in micro-structure due to deformation. The study is ongoing, and we present the results of the first tests.

  11. Study of corrosion in archaeological gilded irons by Raman imaging and a coupled scanning electron microscope-Raman system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veneranda, Marco; Costantini, Ilaria; de Vallejuelo, Silvia Fdez-Ortiz; Garcia, Laura; García, Iñaki; Castro, Kepa; Azkarate, Agustín; Madariaga, Juan Manuel

    2016-12-01

    In this work, analytical and chemical imaging tools have been applied to the study of a gilded spur found in the medieval necropolis of Erenozar (Bizkaia, Spain). As a first step, a lot of portable equipment has been used to study the object in a non-invasive way. The hand-held energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence equipment allowed us to characterize the artefact as a rare example of an iron matrix item decorated by means of a fire gilding technique. On the other hand, the use of a portable Raman system helped us to detect the main degradation compounds affecting the spur. Afterwards, further information was acquired in the laboratory by analysing detached fragments. The molecular images obtained using confocal Raman microscopy permitted us to characterize the stratigraphic succession of iron corrosions. Furthermore, the combined use of this technique with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) was achieved owing to the use of a structural and chemical analyser interface. In this way, the molecular characterization, enhanced by the magnification feature of the SEM, allowed us to identify several micrometric degradation compounds. Finally, the effectiveness of one of the most used desalination baths (NaOH) was evaluated by comparing its effects with those provided by a reference bath (MilliQ). The comparison proved that basic treatment avoided any side effects on the spur decorated by fire gilding, compensating for the lack of bibliographic documentation in this field. This article is part of the themed issue "Raman spectroscopy in art and archaeology".

  12. Extended Field Laser Confocal Microscopy (EFLCM): Combining automated Gigapixel image capture with in silico virtual microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flaberg, Emilie; Sabelström, Per; Strandh, Christer; Szekely, Laszlo

    2008-01-01

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy has revolutionized cell biology. However, the technique has major limitations in speed and sensitivity due to the fact that a single laser beam scans the sample, allowing only a few microseconds signal collection for each pixel. This limitation has been overcome by the introduction of parallel beam illumination techniques in combination with cold CCD camera based image capture. Using the combination of microlens enhanced Nipkow spinning disc confocal illumination together with fully automated image capture and large scale in silico image processing we have developed a system allowing the acquisition, presentation and analysis of maximum resolution confocal panorama images of several Gigapixel size. We call the method Extended Field Laser Confocal Microscopy (EFLCM). We show using the EFLCM technique that it is possible to create a continuous confocal multi-colour mosaic from thousands of individually captured images. EFLCM can digitize and analyze histological slides, sections of entire rodent organ and full size embryos. It can also record hundreds of thousands cultured cells at multiple wavelength in single event or time-lapse fashion on fixed slides, in live cell imaging chambers or microtiter plates. The observer independent image capture of EFLCM allows quantitative measurements of fluorescence intensities and morphological parameters on a large number of cells. EFLCM therefore bridges the gap between the mainly illustrative fluorescence microscopy and purely quantitative flow cytometry. EFLCM can also be used as high content analysis (HCA) instrument for automated screening processes

  13. Superresolution upgrade for confocal spinning disk systems using image scanning microscopy (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isbaner, Sebastian; Hähnel, Dirk; Gregor, Ingo; Enderlein, Jörg

    2017-02-01

    Confocal Spinning Disk Systems are widely used for 3D cell imaging because they offer the advantage of optical sectioning at high framerates and are easy to use. However, as in confocal microscopy, the imaging resolution is diffraction limited, which can be theoretically improved by a factor of 2 using the principle of Image Scanning Microscopy (ISM) [1]. ISM with a Confocal Spinning Disk setup (CSDISM) has been shown to improve contrast as well as lateral resolution (FWHM) from 201 +/- 20 nm to 130 +/- 10 nm at 488 nm excitation. A minimum total acquisition time of one second per ISM image makes this method highly suitable for 3D live cell imaging [2]. Here, we present a multicolor implementation of CSDISM for the popular Micro-Manager Open Source Microscopy platform. Since changes in the optical path are not necessary, this will allow any researcher to easily upgrade their standard Confocal Spinning Disk system at remarkable low cost ( 5000 USD) with an ISM superresolution option. [1]. Müller, C.B. and Enderlein, J. Image Scanning Microscopy. Physical Review Letters 104, (2010). [2]. Schulz, O. et al. Resolution doubling in fluorescence microscopy with confocal spinning-disk image scanning microscopy. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 110, 21000-5 (2013).

  14. Confocal Raman spectroscopy: In vivo biochemical changes in the human skin by topical formulations under UV radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosato, M G; Orallo, D E; Ali, S M; Churio, M S; Martin, A A; Dicelio, L

    2015-12-01

    A new approach to the study of the effects on human skin of mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs) and gadusol (Gad) incorporated in polymer gel is proposed in this work. The depth profile and photoprotector effects of Pluronic F127® gels containing each of the natural actives were evaluated by in vivo confocal Raman spectroscopy aiming at the analysis of the biochemical changes on human skin. Hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) showed that the data corresponding to different depths of the skin, from surface to 4 μm, and from 6 to 16 μm, remained in the same cluster. In vivo Raman spectra, classified into five different layers of epidermis according to their similarities, indicated that the amount of Gad gel increased by about 26% in the outermost layer of the stratum corneum (SC) and that MAAs gel at 2 μm depth was 103.4% higher than in the outermost layer of the SC. Variations in the SC of urocanic acid at 1490-1515 cm(-1) and 1652 cm(-1) and histidine at 1318 cm(-1) were calculated, before and after UV exposure with or without gels. With the application of gels the vibrational modes that correspond to lipids in trans conformation (1063 and 1128 cm(-1)) increased with respect to normal skin, whereas gauche conformation (1085 cm(-1)) disappeared. Our studies suggest that gels protected the skin against the stress of the natural defense mechanism caused by high levels of UV exposure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Confocal scanning microscopy with multiple optical probes for high speed measurements and better imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Wanhee; Lee, SeungWoo; Gweon, Dae-Gab

    2008-02-01

    Confocal scanning microscopy (CSM) needs a scanning mechanism because only one point information of specimen can be obtained. Therefore the speed of the confocal scanning microscopy is limited by the speed of the scanning tool. To overcome this limitation from scanning tool we propose another scanning mechanism. We make three optical probes in the specimen under confocal condition of each point. Three optical probes are moved by beam scanning mechanism with shared resonant scanning mirror (RM) and galvanometer driven mirror (GM). As each optical probe scan allocated region of the specimen, information from three points is obtained simultaneously and image acquisition time is reduced. Therefore confocal scanning microscopy with multiple optical probes is expected to have three times faster speed of the image acquisition than conventional one. And as another use, multiple optical probes to which different light wavelength is applied can scan whole same region respectively. It helps to obtain better contrast image in case of specimens having different optical characteristics for specific light wavelength. In conclusion confocal scanning microscopy with multiple optical probes is useful technique for views of image acquisition speed and image quality.

  16. Studying DEHP migration in plasticized PVC used for blood bags by coupling Raman confocal microscopy to UV spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Salloum, H; Saunier, J; Tfayli, A; Yagoubi, N

    2016-04-01

    Plasticized PVC is widely used to make medical devices such as tubing, perfusion bags and blood bags. By using confocal Raman microscopy on a PVC sheet plasticized with around 40% of di-(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP), we propose a simple and sensitive approach to studying and understanding the diffusion of plasticizers from polymers into the surrounding media. Moreover, we sought to correlate our findings to standard measurements conducted by UV spectroscopy. This study showed differences in the concentration gradient observed due to the diffusion of the plasticizer inside a PVC sheet. We can thus follow the critical DEHP ratios that can impact the diffusion process. Water and ethanol were chosen as storage media: in ethanol, the lowest concentration of DEHP was observed at the surface resulting in the formation of a less plasticized layer near the interface; unlike ethanol, PVC sheets stored in water showed a greater concentration of DEHP on the film surface as an exudation of DEHP onto the surface. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Confocal Raman microspectroscopy as an alternative method to investigate the extraction of lipids from stratum corneum by emulsifiers and formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ziwei; Jasmin Lunter, Dominique

    2018-02-08

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of emulsifiers and formulations on intercellular lipids of porcine stratum corneum (SC) and evaluate confocal Raman microscopy (CRM) as an alternative method in this research context. To this end, four different formulations were used: three conventional creams that contained ionic and/or non-ionic emulsifiers and one surfactants-free emulsion stabilized by a polymeric emulsifier. Additionally, all emulsifiers were tested in aqueous solution/dispersion in the respective concentrations as present in the formulations. CRM and HPTLC were used to analyse changes in SC lipid content after treatment. Furthermore, lipid extraction was visualized by fluorescence staining and SC thickness was measured by CRM and light microscopy. Various emulsifiers and emulsifier mixtures showed different impact on SC lipid content and SC thickness, while none of the tested formulations had any effect on SC lipids. Emulsifiers and their mixtures that reduced the lipids content also reduced SC thickness, indicating lipid extraction is the reason for SC thinning. Results from CRM and conventional methods showed a strong positive correlation for both lipid content and SC thickness measurements. With easy sample preparation and fast analytical readout, CRM has the potential to be a standardized analytical method for skin lipids investigation. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Reconstructing skeletal fiber arrangement and growth mode in the coral Porites lutea (Cnidaria, Scleractinia: a confocal Raman microscopy study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Nehrke

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Confocal Raman microscopy (CRM mapping was used to investigate the microstructural arrangement and organic matrix distribution within the skeleton of the coral Porites lutea. Relative changes in the crystallographic orientation of crystals within the fibrous fan-system could be mapped, without the need to prepare thin sections, as required if this information is obtained by polarized light microscopy. Simultaneously, incremental growth lines can be visualized without the necessity of etching and hence alteration of sample surface. Using these methods two types of growth lines could be identified: one corresponds to the well-known incremental growth layers, whereas the second type of growth lines resemble denticle finger-like structures (most likely traces of former spines or skeletal surfaces. We hypothesize that these lines represent the outer skeletal surface before another growth cycle of elongation, infilling and thickening of skeletal areas continues. We show that CRM mapping with high spatial resolution can significantly improve our understanding of the micro-structural arrangement and growth patterns in coral skeletons.

  19. In Situ Analysis of a Silver Nanoparticle-Precipitating Shewanella Biofilm by Surface Enhanced Confocal Raman Microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gal Schkolnik

    Full Text Available Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is an electroactive bacterium, capable of reducing extracellular insoluble electron acceptors, making it important for both nutrient cycling in nature and microbial electrochemical technologies, such as microbial fuel cells and microbial electrosynthesis. When allowed to anaerobically colonize an Ag/AgCl solid interface, S. oneidensis has precipitated silver nanoparticles (AgNp, thus providing the means for a surface enhanced confocal Raman microscopy (SECRaM investigation of its biofilm. The result is the in-situ chemical mapping of the biofilm as it developed over time, where the distribution of cytochromes, reduced and oxidized flavins, polysaccharides and phosphate in the undisturbed biofilm is monitored. Utilizing AgNp bio-produced by the bacteria colonizing the Ag/AgCl interface, we could perform SECRaM while avoiding the use of a patterned or roughened support or the introduction of noble metal salts and reducing agents. This new method will allow a spatially and temporally resolved chemical investigation not only of Shewanella biofilms at an insoluble electron acceptor, but also of other noble metal nanoparticle-precipitating bacteria in laboratory cultures or in complex microbial communities in their natural habitats.

  20. Cellular features of psoriatic skin: imaging and quantification using in vivo reflectance confocal microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolberink, E.A.W.; Erp, P.E.J. van; Teussink, M.M.; Kerkhof, P.C.M. van de; Gerritsen, M.J.P.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In vivo reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) is a novel, exciting imaging technique. It provides images of cell-and tissue structures and dynamics in situ, in real time, without the need for ex vivo tissue samples. RCM visualizes the superficial part of human skin up to a depth of 250

  1. Coherent Raman scattering: Applications in imaging and sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Meng

    In this thesis, I discuss the theory, implementation and applications of coherent Raman scattering to imaging and sensing. A time domain interferometric method has been developed to collect high resolution shot-noise-limited Raman spectra over the Raman fingerprint regime and completely remove the electronic background signal in coherent Raman scattering. Compared with other existing coherent Raman microscopy methods, this time domain approach is proved to be simpler and more robust in rejecting background signal. We apply this method to image polymers and biological samples and demonstrate that the same setup can be used to collect two photon fluorescence and self phase modulation signals. A signal to noise ratio analysis is performed to show that this time domain method has a comparable signal to noise ratio to spectral domain methods, which we confirm experimentally. The coherent Raman method is also compared with spontaneous Raman scattering. The conditions under which coherent methods provide signal enhancement are discussed and experiments are performed to compare coherent Raman scattering with spontaneous Raman scattering under typical biological imaging conditions. A critical power, above which coherent Raman scattering is more sensitive than spontaneous Raman scattering, is experimentally determined to be ˜1mW in samples of high molecule concentration with a 75MHz laser system. This finding is contrary to claims that coherent methods provide many orders of magnitude enhancement under comparable conditions. In addition to the far field applications, I also discuss the combination of our time domain coherent Raman method with near field enhancement to explore the possibility of sensing and near field imaging. We report the first direct time-resolved coherent Raman measurement performed on a nanostructured substrate for molecule sensing. The preliminary results demonstrate that sub 20 fs pulses can be used to obtain coherent Raman spectra from a small number

  2. Identification of two organic bands showing different chemical composition within the skeleton of Porites lutea: a confocal Raman microscopy study

    OpenAIRE

    G. Nehrke; M. Wall

    2012-01-01

    Confocal Raman microscopy mapping was used to investigate the organic matrix distribution within the skeleton of the coral Porites lutea. Two types of growth lines could be identified: one corresponds to the well-known incremental growth layers, whereas the second type of growth lines showed an elemental composition that differed from the incremental growth layers. The position and shape of the latter growth lines resemble either denticle finger-like structures (most likely traces of former s...

  3. Confocal Raman and electronic microscopy studies on the topotactic conversion of calcium carbonate from Pomacea lineate shells into hydroxyapatite bioceramic materials in phosphate media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dePaula, S M; Huila, M F G; Araki, K; Toma, H E

    2010-12-01

    Conversion of Pomacea lineate shells into hydroxyapatite (HA) bioceramic materials was investigated by their in vitro treatment with phosphate solutions, at room temperature. Confocal Raman microscopy revealed that the conversion proceeds at distinct rates through the nacreous or periostracum sides of the shell. The conversion can be accelerated using powdered samples, yielding biocompatible materials of great interest in biomedicine. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Image segmentation for integrated multiphoton microscopy and reflectance confocal microscopy imaging of human skin in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guannan; Lui, Harvey; Zeng, Haishan

    2015-02-01

    Non-invasive cellular imaging of the skin in vivo can be achieved in reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) and multiphoton microscopy (MPM) modalities to yield complementary images of the skin based on different optical properties. One of the challenges of in vivo microscopy is the delineation (i.e., segmentation) of cellular and subcellular architectural features. In this work we present a method for combining watershed and level-set models for segmentation of multimodality images obtained by an integrated MPM and RCM imaging system from human skin in vivo. Firstly, a segmentation model based on watershed is introduced for obtaining the accurate structure of cell borders from the RCM image. Secondly,, a global region based energy level-set model is constructed for extracting the nucleus of each cell from the MPM image. Thirdly, a local region-based Lagrange Continuous level-set approach is used for segmenting cytoplasm from the MPM image. Experimental results demonstrated that cell borders from RCM image and boundaries of cytoplasm and nucleus from MPM image can be obtained by our segmentation method with better accuracy and effectiveness. We are planning to use this method to perform quantitative analysis of MPM and RCM images of in vivo human skin to study the variations of cellular parameters such as cell size, nucleus size and other mophormetric features with skin pathologies.

  5. Depth elemental imaging of forensic samples by confocal micro-XRF method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Kazuhiko; Nishi, Chihiro; Otsuki, Kazunori; Nishiwaki, Yoshinori; Tsuji, Kouichi

    2011-05-01

    Micro-XRF is a significant tool for the analysis of small regions. A micro-X-ray beam can be created in the laboratory by various focusing X-ray optics. Previously, nondestructive 3D-XRF analysis had not been easy because of the high penetration of fluorescent X-rays emitted into the sample. A recently developed confocal micro-XRF technique combined with polycapillary X-ray lenses enables depth-selective analysis. In this paper, we applied a new tabletop confocal micro-XRF system to analyze several forensic samples, that is, multilayered automotive paint fragments and leather samples, for use in the criminaliztics. Elemental depth profiles and mapping images of forensic samples were successfully obtained by the confocal micro-XRF technique. Multilayered structures can be distinguished in forensic samples by their elemental depth profiles. However, it was found that some leather sheets exhibited heterogeneous distribution. To confirm the validity, the result of a conventional micro-XRF of the cross section was compared with that of the confocal micro-XRF. The results obtained by the confocal micro-XRF system were in approximate agreement with those obtained by the conventional micro-XRF. Elemental depth imaging was performed on the paint fragments and leather sheets to confirm the homogeneity of the respective layers of the sample. The depth images of the paint fragment showed homogeneous distribution in each layer expect for Fe and Zn. In contrast, several components in the leather sheets were predominantly localized.

  6. Wide-Field, Deep UV Raman Hyperspectral Imager, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ChemImage Sensor Systems (CISS), teaming with the University of South Carolina, proposes a revolutionary wide-field Raman hyperspectral imaging system capable of...

  7. Automated Assessment of Keratocyte Density in Stromal Images from the ConfoScan 4 Confocal Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourne, William M.; Patel, Sanjay V.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. To develop a program to determine cell densities in images from the ConfoScan 4 (Nidek, Inc., Freemont, CA) confocal microscope and compare the densities with those determined in images obtained by the Tandem Scanning confocal microscope (Tandem Scanning Corp., Reston, VA). Methods. A program was developed that used image-processing routines to identify stromal cell nuclei in images from the ConfoScan 4 confocal microscope. Cell selection parameters were set to match cell densities from the program with those determined manually in 15 normal corneas of 15 volunteers. The program was tested on scans from 16 other normal volunteers and 17 volunteers 3 years after LASIK. Cell densities were compared to densities determined by manual assessment and to those in scans by the Tandem Scanning confocal microscope in the same corneas. Results. The difference in cell density between the automatic and manual assessment was −539 ± 3005 cells/mm3 (mean ± SD, P = 0.11) in the 16 test corneas. Densities estimated from the ConfoScan 4 agreed with those from the Tandem Scanning confocal microscope in all regions of the stroma except in the anterior 10%, where the ConfoScan 4 indicated a 30% lower density. Conclusions. Differences in anterior stromal cell density between the ConfoScan 4 and the Tandem Scanning confocal microscope can be explained by the different optical designs. The lower spatial resolution of the ConfoScan 4 limits its ability to resolve thin layers. The adaptation of our earlier cell-counting program to the ConfoScan 4 provides a timesaving, objective, and reproducible means of determining stromal cell densities in images from the ConfoScan 4. PMID:19892869

  8. Full-field transmission x-ray imaging with confocal polycapillary x-ray optics

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Tianxi; MacDonald, C. A.

    2013-01-01

    A transmission x-ray imaging setup based on a confocal combination of a polycapillary focusing x-ray optic followed by a polycapillary collimating x-ray optic was designed and demonstrated to have good resolution, better than the unmagnified pixel size and unlimited by the x-ray tube spot size. This imaging setup has potential application in x-ray imaging for small samples, for example, for histology specimens.

  9. Diagnostic accuracy of confocal microscopy imaging vs. punch biopsy for diagnosing and subtyping basal cell carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kadouch, D. J.; Leeflang, M. M.; Elshot, Y. S.; Longo, C.; Ulrich, M.; van der Wal, A. C.; Wolkerstorfer, A.; Bekkenk, M. W.; de Rie, M. A.

    2017-01-01

    BackgroundIn vivo reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) is a promising non-invasive skin imaging technique that could facilitate early diagnosis of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) instead of routine punch biopsies. However, the clinical value and utility of RCM vs. a punch biopsy in diagnosing and

  10. Confocal retinal imaging using scanning laser opthalmoscopy with annular beams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vohnsen, Brian; Lochocki, Benjamin; Vela-Garcia, Carmen; Rativa, Diego

    2012-01-01

    The human retina has been imaged in-vivo using scanning laser ophthalmoscopy employing annular incident beams adapted for resolution optimization. The pros and cons of the approach are discussed and the importance of coherence is explored.

  11. Super-resolution for everybody: An image processing workflow to obtain high-resolution images with a standard confocal microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, France; Cladière, Damien; Guillaume, Cyndélia; Wassmann, Katja; Bolte, Susanne

    2017-02-15

    In the presented work we aimed at improving confocal imaging to obtain highest possible resolution in thick biological samples, such as the mouse oocyte. We therefore developed an image processing workflow that allows improving the lateral and axial resolution of a standard confocal microscope. Our workflow comprises refractive index matching, the optimization of microscope hardware parameters and image restoration by deconvolution. We compare two different deconvolution algorithms, evaluate the necessity of denoising and establish the optimal image restoration procedure. We validate our workflow by imaging sub resolution fluorescent beads and measuring the maximum lateral and axial resolution of the confocal system. Subsequently, we apply the parameters to the imaging and data restoration of fluorescently labelled meiotic spindles of mouse oocytes. We measure a resolution increase of approximately 2-fold in the lateral and 3-fold in the axial direction throughout a depth of 60μm. This demonstrates that with our optimized workflow we reach a resolution that is comparable to 3D-SIM-imaging, but with better depth penetration for confocal images of beads and the biological sample. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Study of corrosion in archaeological gilded irons by Raman imaging and a coupled scanning electron microscope-Raman system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veneranda, Marco; Costantini, Ilaria; de Vallejuelo, Silvia Fdez-Ortiz; Garcia, Laura; García, Iñaki; Castro, Kepa; Azkarate, Agustín; Madariaga, Juan Manuel

    2016-12-13

    In this work, analytical and chemical imaging tools have been applied to the study of a gilded spur found in the medieval necropolis of Erenozar (Bizkaia, Spain). As a first step, a lot of portable equipment has been used to study the object in a non-invasive way. The hand-held energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence equipment allowed us to characterize the artefact as a rare example of an iron matrix item decorated by means of a fire gilding technique. On the other hand, the use of a portable Raman system helped us to detect the main degradation compounds affecting the spur. Afterwards, further information was acquired in the laboratory by analysing detached fragments. The molecular images obtained using confocal Raman microscopy permitted us to characterize the stratigraphic succession of iron corrosions. Furthermore, the combined use of this technique with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) was achieved owing to the use of a structural and chemical analyser interface. In this way, the molecular characterization, enhanced by the magnification feature of the SEM, allowed us to identify several micrometric degradation compounds. Finally, the effectiveness of one of the most used desalination baths (NaOH) was evaluated by comparing its effects with those provided by a reference bath (MilliQ). The comparison proved that basic treatment avoided any side effects on the spur decorated by fire gilding, compensating for the lack of bibliographic documentation in this field.This article is part of the themed issue 'Raman spectroscopy in art and archaeology'. © 2016 The Author(s).

  13. In vivo/ex vivo targeting of Langerhans cells after topical application of the immune response modifier TMX-202: confocal Raman microscopy and histology analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darvin, Maxim E.; Thiede, Gisela; Ascencio, Saul Mujica; Schanzer, Sabine; Richter, Heike; Vinzón, Sabrina E.; Hasche, Daniel; Rösl, Frank; May, Roberto; Hazot, Yohan; Tamarkin, Dov; Lademann, Juergen

    2016-05-01

    The increased ability of TMX-202 (derivative of imiquimod) to penetrate the intact stratum corneum (SC) and the follicular orifices of porcine ear skin was shown ex vivo using confocal Raman microscopy and laser scanning microscopy. Moreover, to assess whether TMX-202 is able to reach the immune cells, Langerhans cells extracted from pretreated human skin were investigated ex vivo using confocal Raman microscopy combined with multivariate statistical methods. Tracking the Raman peak of dimethyl sulfoxide centered at 690 cm-1, the absorption of TMX-202 containing formulation by Langerhans cells was shown. To answer the question whether the TMX-202 active ingredient is able to reach Langerhans cells, the attraction of immune cells to TMX-202 containing formulation treated skin was measured in the in vivo rodent model Mastomys coucha. The results show that TMX-202 active ingredient is able to reach Langerhans cells after penetrating through the intact skin and subsequently attract immune cells. Both the intercellular/transcellular as well as the follicular pathways allow the penetration through the intact barrier of the SC.

  14. Swept confocally-aligned planar excitation (SCAPE) microscopy for high speed volumetric imaging of behaving organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchard, Matthew B; Voleti, Venkatakaushik; Mendes, César S; Lacefield, Clay; Grueber, Wesley B; Mann, Richard S; Bruno, Randy M; Hillman, Elizabeth M C

    2015-02-01

    We report a new 3D microscopy technique that allows volumetric imaging of living samples at ultra-high speeds: Swept, confocally-aligned planar excitation (SCAPE) microscopy. While confocal and two-photon microscopy have revolutionized biomedical research, current implementations are costly, complex and limited in their ability to image 3D volumes at high speeds. Light-sheet microscopy techniques using two-objective, orthogonal illumination and detection require a highly constrained sample geometry, and either physical sample translation or complex synchronization of illumination and detection planes. In contrast, SCAPE microscopy acquires images using an angled, swept light-sheet in a single-objective, en-face geometry. Unique confocal descanning and image rotation optics map this moving plane onto a stationary high-speed camera, permitting completely translationless 3D imaging of intact samples at rates exceeding 20 volumes per second. We demonstrate SCAPE microscopy by imaging spontaneous neuronal firing in the intact brain of awake behaving mice, as well as freely moving transgenic Drosophila larvae.

  15. Fast imaging with inelastically scattered electrons by off-axis chromatic confocal electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Changlin; Zhu, Ye; Lazar, Sorin; Etheridge, Joanne

    2014-04-25

    We introduce off-axis chromatic scanning confocal electron microscopy, a technique for fast mapping of inelastically scattered electrons in a scanning transmission electron microscope without a spectrometer. The off-axis confocal mode enables the inelastically scattered electrons to be chromatically dispersed both parallel and perpendicular to the optic axis. This enables electrons with different energy losses to be separated and detected in the image plane, enabling efficient energy filtering in a confocal mode with an integrating detector. We describe the experimental configuration and demonstrate the method with nanoscale core-loss chemical mapping of silver (M4,5) in an aluminium-silver alloy and atomic scale imaging of the low intensity core-loss La (M4,5@840  eV) signal in LaB6. Scan rates up to 2 orders of magnitude faster than conventional methods were used, enabling a corresponding reduction in radiation dose and increase in the field of view. If coupled with the enhanced depth and lateral resolution of the incoherent confocal configuration, this offers an approach for nanoscale three-dimensional chemical mapping.

  16. Confocal pore size measurement based on super-resolution image restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dali; Wang, Yun; Qiu, Lirong; Mao, Xinyue; Zhao, Weiqian

    2014-09-01

    A confocal pore size measurement based on super-resolution image restoration is proposed to obtain a fast and accurate measurement for submicrometer pore size of nuclear track-etched membranes (NTEMs). This method facilitates the online inspection of the pore size evolution during etching. Combining confocal microscopy with super-resolution image restoration significantly improves the lateral resolution of the NTEM image, yields a reasonable circle edge-setting criterion of 0.2408, and achieves precise pore edge detection. Theoretical analysis shows that the minimum measuring diameter can reach 0.19 μm, and the root mean square of the residuals is only 1.4 nm. Edge response simulation and experiment reveal that the edge response of the proposed method is better than 80 nm. The NTEM pore size measurement results obtained by the proposed method agree well with that obtained by scanning electron microscopy.

  17. Ribbon scanning confocal for high-speed high-resolution volume imaging of brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan M Watson

    Full Text Available Whole-brain imaging is becoming a fundamental means of experimental insight; however, achieving subcellular resolution imagery in a reasonable time window has not been possible. We describe the first application of multicolor ribbon scanning confocal methods to collect high-resolution volume images of chemically cleared brains. We demonstrate that ribbon scanning collects images over ten times faster than conventional high speed confocal systems but with equivalent spectral and spatial resolution. Further, using this technology, we reconstruct large volumes of mouse brain infected with encephalitic alphaviruses and demonstrate that regions of the brain with abundant viral replication were inaccessible to vascular perfusion. This reveals that the destruction or collapse of large regions of brain micro vasculature may contribute to the severe disease caused by Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus. Visualization of this fundamental impact of infection would not be possible without sampling at subcellular resolution within large brain volumes.

  18. Non-mydriatic confocal retinal imaging using a digital light projector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Matthew S; Green, Jason J; Baskaran, Karthikeyan; Ingling, Allen W; Clendenon, Jeffrey L; Gast, Thomas J; Elsner, Ann E

    2015-02-07

    A digital light projector is implemented as an integrated illumination source and scanning element in a confocal non-mydriatic retinal camera, the Digital Light Ophthalmoscope (DLO). To simulate scanning, a series of illumination lines are rapidly projected on the retina. The backscattered light is imaged onto a 2-dimensional rolling shutter CMOS sensor. By temporally and spatially overlapping the illumination lines with the rolling shutter, confocal imaging is achieved. This approach enables a low cost, flexible, and robust design with a small footprint. The 3 rd generation DLO technical design is presented, using a DLP LightCrafter 4500 and USB3.0 CMOS sensor. Specific improvements over previous work include the use of yellow illumination, filtered from the broad green LED spectrum, to obtain strong blood absorption and high contrast images while reducing pupil constriction and patient discomfort.

  19. Modern Trends in Imaging VI: Raman Scattering in Pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachary J. Smith

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Raman scattering is the inelastic scattering of light by chemical bonds, and can therefore show molecular specificity. It can be used both in pure spectroscopy mode, and in imaging mode. While many applications of Raman spectroscopy and imaging in the biomedical field have been so far demonstrated, the use of this technology for pathology applications is still in early stages. In this paper we review some of the most important recent developments in this field, including a description of relevant technologies, applications to molecular sensing, characterization of cells and tissues of interest, and disease detection via Raman scattering.

  20. Confocal non-line-of-sight imaging based on the light-cone transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Toole, Matthew; Lindell, David B.; Wetzstein, Gordon

    2018-03-01

    How to image objects that are hidden from a camera’s view is a problem of fundamental importance to many fields of research, with applications in robotic vision, defence, remote sensing, medical imaging and autonomous vehicles. Non-line-of-sight (NLOS) imaging at macroscopic scales has been demonstrated by scanning a visible surface with a pulsed laser and a time-resolved detector. Whereas light detection and ranging (LIDAR) systems use such measurements to recover the shape of visible objects from direct reflections, NLOS imaging reconstructs the shape and albedo of hidden objects from multiply scattered light. Despite recent advances, NLOS imaging has remained impractical owing to the prohibitive memory and processing requirements of existing reconstruction algorithms, and the extremely weak signal of multiply scattered light. Here we show that a confocal scanning procedure can address these challenges by facilitating the derivation of the light-cone transform to solve the NLOS reconstruction problem. This method requires much smaller computational and memory resources than previous reconstruction methods do and images hidden objects at unprecedented resolution. Confocal scanning also provides a sizeable increase in signal and range when imaging retroreflective objects. We quantify the resolution bounds of NLOS imaging, demonstrate its potential for real-time tracking and derive efficient algorithms that incorporate image priors and a physically accurate noise model. Additionally, we describe successful outdoor experiments of NLOS imaging under indirect sunlight.

  1. Clinical features and confocal microscopic imaging characteristics of 466 cases with infectious keratitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Xiao

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To observe the role of confocal microscopy in infectious keratitis management. METHODS:Totally 466 patients(467 eyesdiagnosed as infectious keratitis from January 2010 to December 2013 were retrospectively studied. the corneas were examined early by in vivo confocal microscopy. The characteristics of their images and clinical features were studied and summarized.RESULTS:All patients were recorded, the average age was 54.4±13.0 years, in which 264 cases(56.7%were male, and 202 cases(43.3%were female. In the 466 patients, 190(40.8%were fungal keratitis, 148(31.8%were viral keratitis, 125(26.8%were bacterial keratitis and 3(0.6%were acanthamoeba keratitis. There were fungal hyphae in the images of fungal keratitis. Amebic cysts were found in acanthamoeba keratitis. CONCLUSION:Confocal microscope can help the early diagnose and treatment of infectious keratitis. It is a noninvasive imaging technique that provides high resolution images of ocular structures at a cellular level and infectious keratitis represents one of its most important clinical uses.

  2. Imaging Single ZnO Vertical Nanowire Laser Cavities using UV-Laser Scanning Confocal Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gargas, D.J.; Toimil-Molares, M.E.; Yang, P.

    2008-11-17

    We report the fabrication and optical characterization of individual ZnO vertical nanowire laser cavities. Dilute nanowire arrays with interwire spacing>10 ?m were produced by a modified chemical vapor transport (CVT) method yielding an ideal platform for single nanowire imaging and spectroscopy. Lasing characteristics of a single vertical nanowire are presented, as well as high-resolution photoluminescence imaging by UV-laser scanning confocal microscopy. In addition, three-dimensional (3D) mapping of the photoluminescence emission performed in both planar and vertical dimensions demonstrates height-selective imaging useful for vertical nanowires and heteronanostructures emerging in the field of optoelectronics and nanophotonics.

  3. Unsupervised identification of cone photoreceptors in non-confocal adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscope images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergeles, Christos; Dubis, Adam M; Davidson, Benjamin; Kasilian, Melissa; Kalitzeos, Angelos; Carroll, Joseph; Dubra, Alfredo; Michaelides, Michel; Ourselin, Sebastien

    2017-06-01

    Precise measurements of photoreceptor numerosity and spatial arrangement are promising biomarkers for the early detection of retinal pathologies and may be valuable in the evaluation of retinal therapies. Adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscopy (AOSLO) is a method of imaging that corrects for aberrations of the eye to acquire high-resolution images that reveal the photoreceptor mosaic. These images are typically graded manually by experienced observers, obviating the robust, large-scale use of the technology. This paper addresses unsupervised automated detection of cones in non-confocal, split-detection AOSLO images. Our algorithm leverages the appearance of split-detection images to create a cone model that is used for classification. Results show that it compares favorably to the state-of-the-art, both for images of healthy retinas and for images from patients affected by Stargardt disease. The algorithm presented also compares well to manual annotation while excelling in speed.

  4. A comparison of image restoration approaches applied to three-dimensional confocal and wide-field fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verveer, P. J; Gemkow, M. J; Jovin, T. M

    1999-01-01

    We have compared different image restoration approaches for fluorescence microscopy. The most widely used algorithms were classified with a Bayesian theory according to the assumed noise model and the type of regularization imposed. We considered both Gaussian and Poisson models for the noise in combination with Tikhonov regularization, entropy regularization, Good's roughness and without regularization (maximum likelihood estimation). Simulations of fluorescence confocal imaging were used to examine the different noise models and regularization approaches using the mean squared error criterion. The assumption of a Gaussian noise model yielded only slightly higher errors than the Poisson model. Good's roughness was the best choice for the regularization. Furthermore, we compared simulated confocal and wide-field data. In general, restored confocal data are superior to restored wide-field data, but given sufficient higher signal level for the wide-field data the restoration result may rival confocal data in quality. Finally, a visual comparison of experimental confocal and wide-field data is presented.

  5. Evaluation of Yogurt Microstructure Using Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy and Image Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skytte, Jacob Lercke; Ghita, Ovidiu; Whelan, Paul F.

    2015-01-01

    The microstructure of protein networks in yogurts defines important physical properties of the yogurt and hereby partly its quality. Imaging this protein network using confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM) has shown good results, and CSLM has become a standard measuring technique for fermented...... to image texture description. Here, CSLM images from a yogurt fermentation study are investigated, where production factors including fat content, protein content, heat treatment, and incubation temperature are varied. The descriptors are evaluated through nearest neighbor classification, variance analysis...... scanning microscopy images can be used to provide information on the protein microstructure in yogurt products. For large numbers of microscopy images, subjective evaluation becomes a difficult or even impossible approach, if the images should be incorporated in any form of statistical analysis alongside...

  6. Multispectral confocal microscopy images and artificial neural nets to monitor the photosensitizer uptake and degradation in Candida albicans cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Renan A.; Pratavieira, Sebastião.; da Silva, Ana P.; Kurachi, Cristina; Guimarães, Francisco E. G.

    2017-07-01

    This study clearly demonstrates that multispectral confocal microscopy images analyzed by artificial neural networks provides a powerful tool to real-time monitoring photosensitizer uptake, as well as photochemical transformations occurred.

  7. Semiautomated confocal imaging of fungal pathogenesis on plants: Microscopic analysis of macroscopic specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minker, Katharine R; Biedrzycki, Meredith L; Kolagunda, Abhishek; Rhein, Stephen; Perina, Fabiano J; Jacobs, Samuel S; Moore, Michael; Jamann, Tiffany M; Yang, Qin; Nelson, Rebecca; Balint-Kurti, Peter; Kambhamettu, Chandra; Wisser, Randall J; Caplan, Jeffrey L

    2018-02-01

    The study of phenotypic variation in plant pathogenesis provides fundamental information about the nature of disease resistance. Cellular mechanisms that alter pathogenesis can be elucidated with confocal microscopy; however, systematic phenotyping platforms-from sample processing to image analysis-to investigate this do not exist. We have developed a platform for 3D phenotyping of cellular features underlying variation in disease development by fluorescence-specific resolution of host and pathogen interactions across time (4D). A confocal microscopy phenotyping platform compatible with different maize-fungal pathosystems (fungi: Setosphaeria turcica, Cochliobolus heterostrophus, and Cercospora zeae-maydis) was developed. Protocols and techniques were standardized for sample fixation, optical clearing, species-specific combinatorial fluorescence staining, multisample imaging, and image processing for investigation at the macroscale. The sample preparation methods presented here overcome challenges to fluorescence imaging such as specimen thickness and topography as well as physiological characteristics of the samples such as tissue autofluorescence and presence of cuticle. The resulting imaging techniques provide interesting qualitative and quantitative information not possible with conventional light or electron 2D imaging. Microsc. Res. Tech., 81:141-152, 2018. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Comprehensive Detection and Discrimination of Campylobacter Species by Use of Confocal Micro-Raman Spectroscopy and Multilocus Sequence Typing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiaonan; Huang, Qian; Miller, William G.; Aston, D. Eric; Xu, Jie; Xue, Feng; Zhang, Hongwei; Rasco, Barbara A.

    2012-01-01

    A novel strategy for the rapid detection and identification of traditional and emerging Campylobacter strains based upon Raman spectroscopy (532 nm) is presented here. A total of 200 reference strains and clinical isolates of 11 different Campylobacter species recovered from infected animals and humans from China and North America were used to establish a global Raman spectroscopy-based dendrogram model for Campylobacter identification to the species level and cross validated for its feasibility to predict Campylobacter-associated food-borne outbreaks. Bayesian probability coupled with Monte Carlo estimation was employed to validate the established Raman classification model on the basis of the selected principal components, mainly protein secondary structures, on the Campylobacter cell membrane. This Raman spectroscopy-based typing technique correlates well with multilocus sequence typing and has an average recognition rate of 97.21%. Discriminatory power for the Raman classification model had a Simpson index of diversity of 0.968. Intra- and interlaboratory reproducibility with different instrumentation yielded differentiation index values of 4.79 to 6.03 for wave numbers between 1,800 and 650 cm−1 and demonstrated the feasibility of using this spectroscopic method at different laboratories. Our Raman spectroscopy-based partial least-squares regression model could precisely discriminate and quantify the actual concentration of a specific Campylobacter strain in a bacterial mixture (regression coefficient, >0.98; residual prediction deviation, >7.88). A standard protocol for sample preparation, spectral collection, model validation, and data analyses was established for the Raman spectroscopic technique. Raman spectroscopy may have advantages over traditional genotyping methods for bacterial epidemiology, such as detection speed and accuracy of identification to the species level. PMID:22740711

  9. Raman hyperspectral imaging of iron transport across membranes in cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Anupam; Costa, Xavier Felipe; Khmaladze, Alexander; Barroso, Margarida; Sharikova, Anna

    2016-09-01

    Raman scattering microscopy is a powerful imaging technique used to identify chemical composition, structural and conformational state of molecules of complex samples in biology, biophysics, medicine and materials science. In this work, we have shown that Raman techniques allow the measurement of the iron content in protein mixtures and cells. Since the mechanisms of iron acquisition, storage, and excretion by cells are not completely understood, improved knowledge of iron metabolism can offer insight into many diseases in which iron plays a role in the pathogenic process, such as diabetes, neurodegenerative diseases, cancer, and metabolic syndrome. Understanding of the processes involved in cellular iron metabolism will improve our knowledge of cell functioning. It will also have a big impact on treatment of diseases caused by iron deficiency (anemias) and iron overload (hereditary hemochromatosis). Previously, Raman studies have shown substantial differences in spectra of transferrin with and without bound iron, thus proving that it is an appropriate technique to determine the levels of bound iron in the protein mixture. We have extended these studies to obtain hyperspectral images of transferrin in cells. By employing a Raman scanning microscope together with spectral detection by a highly sensitive back-illuminated cooled CCD camera, we were able to rapidly acquire and process images of fixed cells with chemical selectivity. We discuss and compare various methods of hyperspectral Raman image analysis and demonstrate the use of these methods to characterize cellular iron content without the need for dye labeling.

  10. Emerging enhanced imaging technologies of the esophagus: spectroscopy, confocal laser endomicroscopy, and optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles, Lourdes Y; Singh, Satish; Fisichella, Piero Marco

    2015-05-15

    Despite advances in diagnoses and therapy, esophageal adenocarcinoma remains a highly lethal neoplasm. Hence, a great interest has been placed in detecting early lesions and in the detection of Barrett esophagus (BE). Advanced imaging technologies of the esophagus have then been developed with the aim of improving biopsy sensitivity and detection of preplastic and neoplastic cells. The purpose of this article was to review emerging imaging technologies for esophageal pathology, spectroscopy, confocal laser endomicroscopy (CLE), and optical coherence tomography (OCT). We conducted a PubMed search using the search string "esophagus or esophageal or oesophageal or oesophagus" and "Barrett or esophageal neoplasm" and "spectroscopy or optical spectroscopy" and "confocal laser endomicroscopy" and "confocal microscopy" and "optical coherence tomography." The first and senior author separately reviewed all articles. Our search identified: 19 in vivo studies with spectroscopy that accounted for 1021 patients and 4 ex vivo studies; 14 clinical CLE in vivo studies that accounted for 941 patients and 1 ex vivo study with 13 patients; and 17 clinical OCT in vivo studies that accounted for 773 patients and 2 ex vivo studies. Human studies using spectroscopy had a very high sensitivity and specificity for the detection of BE. CLE showed a high interobserver agreement in diagnosing esophageal pathology and an accuracy of predicting neoplasia. We also found several clinical studies that reported excellent diagnostic sensitivity and specificity for the detection of BE using OCT. Advanced imaging technology for the detection of esophageal lesions is a promising field that aims to improve the detection of early esophageal lesions. Although advancing imaging techniques improve diagnostic sensitivities and specificities, their integration into diagnostic protocols has yet to be perfected. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Quantification of Confocal Images Using LabVIEW for Tissue Engineering Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sfakis, Lauren; Kamaldinov, Tim; Larsen, Melinda; Castracane, James; Khmaladze, Alexander

    2016-11-01

    Quantifying confocal images to enable location of specific proteins of interest in three-dimensional (3D) is important for many tissue engineering (TE) applications. Quantification of protein localization is essential for evaluation of specific scaffold constructs for cell growth and differentiation for application in TE and tissue regeneration strategies. Although obtaining information regarding protein expression levels is important, the location of proteins within cells grown on scaffolds is often the key to evaluating scaffold efficacy. Functional epithelial cell monolayers must be organized with apicobasal polarity with proteins specifically localized to the apical or basolateral regions of cells in many organs. In this work, a customized program was developed using the LabVIEW platform to quantify protein positions in Z-stacks of confocal images of epithelial cell monolayers. The program's functionality is demonstrated through salivary gland TE, since functional salivary epithelial cells must correctly orient many proteins on the apical and basolateral membranes. Bio-LabVIEW Image Matrix Evaluation (Bio-LIME) takes 3D information collected from confocal Z-stack images and processes the fluorescence at each pixel to determine cell heights, nuclei heights, nuclei widths, protein localization, and cell count. As a demonstration of its utility, Bio-LIME was used to quantify the 3D location of the Zonula occludens-1 protein contained within tight junctions and its change in 3D position in response to chemical modification of the scaffold with laminin. Additionally, Bio-LIME was used to demonstrate that there is no advantage of sub-100 nm poly lactic-co-glycolic acid nanofibers over 250 nm fibers for epithelial apicobasal polarization. Bio-LIME will be broadly applicable for quantification of proteins in 3D that are grown in many different contexts.

  12. Pulsed Raman fiber laser and multispectral imaging in three dimensions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Joachim F.; Busck, Jens; Heiselberg, Henning

    2006-01-01

    are then constructed with submillimeter accuracy for all visible colors. The generation of a series of Stokes peaks by Raman scattering in a Si fiber is discussed in detail and the laser radar technique is demonstrated. The data recording takes only a few seconds, and the high accuracy 3D color imaging works at ranges......Raman scattering in single-mode optical fibers is exploited to generate multispectral light from a green nanolaser with high pulse repetition rate. Each pulse triggers a picosecond camera and measures the distance by time-of-flight in each of the 0.5 Mpixels. Three-dimensional images...

  13. Development and integration of Raman imaging capabilities to Sandia National Laboratories hyperspectral fluorescence imaging instrument.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timlin, Jerilyn Ann; Nieman, Linda T.

    2005-11-01

    Raman spectroscopic imaging is a powerful technique for visualizing chemical differences within a variety of samples based on the interaction of a substance's molecular vibrations with laser light. While Raman imaging can provide a unique view of samples such as residual stress within silicon devices, chemical degradation, material aging, and sample heterogeneity, the Raman scattering process is often weak and thus requires very sensitive collection optics and detectors. Many commercial instruments (including ones owned here at Sandia National Laboratories) generate Raman images by raster scanning a point focused laser beam across a sample--a process which can expose a sample to extreme levels of laser light and requires lengthy acquisition times. Our previous research efforts have led to the development of a state-of-the-art two-dimensional hyperspectral imager for fluorescence imaging applications such as microarray scanning. This report details the design, integration, and characterization of a line-scan Raman imaging module added to this efficient hyperspectral fluorescence microscope. The original hyperspectral fluorescence instrument serves as the framework for excitation and sample manipulation for the Raman imaging system, while a more appropriate axial transmissive Raman imaging spectrometer and detector are utilized for collection of the Raman scatter. The result is a unique and flexible dual-modality fluorescence and Raman imaging system capable of high-speed imaging at high spatial and spectral resolutions. Care was taken throughout the design and integration process not to hinder any of the fluorescence imaging capabilities. For example, an operator can switch between the fluorescence and Raman modalities without need for extensive optical realignment. The instrument performance has been characterized and sample data is presented.

  14. Cell death associated with abnormal mitosis observed by confocal imaging in live cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castiel, Asher; Visochek, Leonid; Mittelman, Leonid; Zilberstein, Yael; Dantzer, Francoise; Izraeli, Shai; Cohen-Armon, Malka

    2013-08-21

    Phenanthrene derivatives acting as potent PARP1 inhibitors prevented the bi-focal clustering of supernumerary centrosomes in multi-centrosomal human cancer cells in mitosis. The phenanthridine PJ-34 was the most potent molecule. Declustering of extra-centrosomes causes mitotic failure and cell death in multi-centrosomal cells. Most solid human cancers have high occurrence of extra-centrosomes. The activity of PJ-34 was documented in real-time by confocal imaging of live human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells transfected with vectors encoding for fluorescent γ-tubulin, which is highly abundant in the centrosomes and for fluorescent histone H2b present in the chromosomes. Aberrant chromosomes arrangements and de-clustered γ-tubulin foci representing declustered centrosomes were detected in the transfected MDA-MB-231 cells after treatment with PJ-34. Un-clustered extra-centrosomes in the two spindle poles preceded their cell death. These results linked for the first time the recently detected exclusive cytotoxic activity of PJ-34 in human cancer cells with extra-centrosomes de-clustering in mitosis, and mitotic failure leading to cell death. According to previous findings observed by confocal imaging of fixed cells, PJ-34 exclusively eradicated cancer cells with multi-centrosomes without impairing normal cells undergoing mitosis with two centrosomes and bi-focal spindles. This cytotoxic activity of PJ-34 was not shared by other potent PARP1 inhibitors, and was observed in PARP1 deficient MEF harboring extracentrosomes, suggesting its independency of PARP1 inhibition. Live confocal imaging offered a useful tool for identifying new molecules eradicating cells during mitosis.

  15. Methods for compensation of the light attenuation with depth of images captured by a confocal microscope

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čapek, Martin; Janáček, Jiří; Kubínová, Lucie

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 69, č. 8 (2006), s. 624-635 ISSN 1059-910X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06063; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA100110502; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA600110507; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA500200510; GA AV ČR(CZ) KJB6011309; GA ČR(CZ) GA304/05/0153 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : image enhancement * confocal microscopy * histogram warping Subject RIV: JC - Computer Hardware ; Software Impact factor: 1.680, year: 2006

  16. Optimization for imaging through scattering media for confocal microscopes with divided elliptical apertures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Hengjie; Wu, Chenxue; Gong, Wei; Zheng, Yao; Zhu, Xinpei; Wang, Jiahao; Si, Ke

    2017-12-29

    We develop a confocal system equipped with optimal elliptical apertures to improve axial point spread function and signal-to-background ratio (SBR) for different detector sizes. By adjusting the parameters of the elliptical apertures, the axial half width at half-maximum can be reduced to 4.986 (described in optical coordinates) and SBR can be improved to 0.176. We evaluate this system with the 1951 USAF resolution test chart and the primary cultured neuron from SD rat stained by Map-2, and observe better imaging performance, which indicates the potential applications in biological science. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Surface-enhanced Raman imaging of cell membrane by a highly homogeneous and isotropic silver nanostructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zito, Gianluigi; Rusciano, Giulia; Pesce, Giuseppe; Dochshanov, Alden; Sasso, Antonio

    2015-04-01

    Label-free chemical imaging of live cell membranes can shed light on the molecular basis of cell membrane functionalities and their alterations under membrane-related diseases. In principle, this can be done by surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) in confocal microscopy, but requires engineering plasmonic architectures with a spatially invariant SERS enhancement factor G(x, y) = G. To this end, we exploit a self-assembled isotropic nanostructure with characteristics of homogeneity typical of the so-called near-hyperuniform disorder. The resulting highly dense, homogeneous and isotropic random pattern consists of clusters of silver nanoparticles with limited size dispersion. This nanostructure brings together several advantages: very large hot spot density (~104 μm-2), superior spatial reproducibility (SD nanotoxicity issues. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr01341k

  18. Confocal Raman microscopy and multivariate statistical analysis for determination of different penetration abilities of caffeine and propylene glycol applied simultaneously in a mixture on porcine skin ex vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mujica Ascencio, Saul; Choe, ChunSik; Meinke, Martina C; Müller, Rainer H; Maksimov, George V; Wigger-Alberti, Walter; Lademann, Juergen; Darvin, Maxim E

    2016-07-01

    Propylene glycol is one of the known substances added in cosmetic formulations as a penetration enhancer. Recently, nanocrystals have been employed also to increase the skin penetration of active components. Caffeine is a component with many applications and its penetration into the epidermis is controversially discussed in the literature. In the present study, the penetration ability of two components - caffeine nanocrystals and propylene glycol, applied topically on porcine ear skin in the form of a gel, was investigated ex vivo using two confocal Raman microscopes operated at different excitation wavelengths (785nm and 633nm). Several depth profiles were acquired in the fingerprint region and different spectral ranges, i.e., 526-600cm(-1) and 810-880cm(-1) were chosen for independent analysis of caffeine and propylene glycol penetration into the skin, respectively. Multivariate statistical methods such as principal component analysis (PCA) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA) combined with Student's t-test were employed to calculate the maximum penetration depths of each substance (caffeine and propylene glycol). The results show that propylene glycol penetrates significantly deeper than caffeine (20.7-22.0μm versus 12.3-13.0μm) without any penetration enhancement effect on caffeine. The results confirm that different substances, even if applied onto the skin as a mixture, can penetrate differently. The penetration depths of caffeine and propylene glycol obtained using two different confocal Raman microscopes are comparable showing that both types of microscopes are well suited for such investigations and that multivariate statistical PCA-LDA methods combined with Student's t-test are very useful for analyzing the penetration of different substances into the skin. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. High-speed adaptive optics line scan confocal retinal imaging for human eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jing; Gu, Boyu; Wang, Xiaolin; Zhang, Yuhua

    2017-01-01

    Continuous and rapid eye movement causes significant intraframe distortion in adaptive optics high resolution retinal imaging. To minimize this artifact, we developed a high speed adaptive optics line scan confocal retinal imaging system. A high speed line camera was employed to acquire retinal image and custom adaptive optics was developed to compensate the wave aberration of the human eye's optics. The spatial resolution and signal to noise ratio were assessed in model eye and in living human eye. The improvement of imaging fidelity was estimated by reduction of intra-frame distortion of retinal images acquired in the living human eyes with frame rates at 30 frames/second (FPS), 100 FPS, and 200 FPS. The device produced retinal image with cellular level resolution at 200 FPS with a digitization of 512×512 pixels/frame in the living human eye. Cone photoreceptors in the central fovea and rod photoreceptors near the fovea were resolved in three human subjects in normal chorioretinal health. Compared with retinal images acquired at 30 FPS, the intra-frame distortion in images taken at 200 FPS was reduced by 50.9% to 79.7%. We demonstrated the feasibility of acquiring high resolution retinal images in the living human eye at a speed that minimizes retinal motion artifact. This device may facilitate research involving subjects with nystagmus or unsteady fixation due to central vision loss.

  20. Fluorescence confocal laser scanning microscopy for in vivo imaging of epidermal reactions to two experimental irritants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suihko, C.; Serup, J.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Fibre-optic fluorescence confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) is a novel non-invasive technique for in vivo imaging of skin. The cellular structure of the epidermis can be studied. A fluorophore, e.g. fluorescein sodium, is introduced by an intradermal injection or applied...... to the skin surface before scanning. Images are horizontal optical sections parallel to the skin surface. Fluorescence CLSM has hitherto not been applied to experimental contact dermatitis. Objective: The aim was to study the applicability of fluorescence CLSM for in situ imaging of irritant contact......, modified the physico-chemical properties of the skin surface and both disturbed epicutaneous labelling with the flurophore and immersion oil coupling between the skin surface and the optical system. Thus, SLS was technically more difficult to study by CLSM than PA. Conclusions: This preliminary study...

  1. Three-dimensional graphic reconstruction of the insect exoskeleton through confocal imaging of endogenous fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zill, S; Frazier, S F; Neff, D; Quimby, L; Carney, M; DiCaprio, R; Thuma, J; Norton, M

    2000-03-15

    The exoskeleton of the cockroach leg was imaged via confocal microscopy to generate digital graphic reconstructions of its three-dimensional structure. The cuticle is autofluorescent and can be visualized without staining, but is maximally imaged in aldehyde-fixed preparations viewed under krypton-argon laser illumination (yellow green (568 nm) excitation, commonly used in confocal microscopes). Images of the entire trochanteral segment of the leg were constructed as montages from optical sections taken as overlapping series that were coincident in the z-axis. Reconstructions of the exoskeleton from these images showed that strain sensing mechanoreceptors are located in association with buttresses and thickenings that form a consistent internal architecture in both juvenile and adult animals. Accuracy of reconstructions was gauged by embedding specimens in Spurr's resin and histologically sectioning them perpendicular to the optical plane of section (z-axis). Comparison of plastic sections with two-dimensional images generated by "resectioning" the software model showed that reconstructed exoskeleton had a high level of accuracy. Imaging of older and larger animals was limited by the sclerotization and increased thickness of the cuticle. Surface extraction algorithms were used to generate vector graphic files in CAD format for export to software used in engineering and design. Among other potential uses, these models have been studied by Finite Element Analysis to examine the distribution of mechanical strains in the exoskeleton that occur during posture and locomotion. The advantages and limitations of the techniques are discussed. These methods may be used in studying the exoskeleton and the anatomy of cuticular mechanoreceptors of other arthropods to similar advantage. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. Probing the cellular damage in bacteria induced by GaN nanoparticles using confocal laser Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahoo, Prasana, E-mail: prasanasahoo@gmail.com [Indira Gandhi Center for Atomic Research, Surface and Nanoscience Division (India); Murthy, P. Sriyutha [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Biofouling and Biofilm Processes Section, Water and Steam Chemistry Division (India); Dhara, S., E-mail: dhara@igcar.gov.in [Indira Gandhi Center for Atomic Research, Surface and Nanoscience Division (India); Venugopalan, V. P. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Biofouling and Biofilm Processes Section, Water and Steam Chemistry Division (India); Das, A.; Tyagi, A. K. [Indira Gandhi Center for Atomic Research, Surface and Nanoscience Division (India)

    2013-08-15

    Understanding the mechanism of nanoparticle (NP) induced toxicity in microbes is of potential importance to a variety of disciplines including disease diagnostics, biomedical implants, and environmental analysis. In this context, toxicity to bacterial cells and inhibition of biofilm formation by GaN NPs and their functional derivatives have been investigated against gram positive and gram negative bacterial species down to single cellular level. High levels of inhibition of biofilm formation (>80 %) was observed on treatments with GaN NPs at sub-micro molar concentrations. These results were substantiated with morphological features investigated with field emission scanning electron microscope, and the observed changes in vibrational modes of microbial cells using Raman spectroscopy. Raman spectra provided molecular interpretation of cell damage by registering signatures of molecular vibrations of individual living microbial cells and mapping the interplay of proteins at the cell membrane. As compared to the untreated cells, Raman spectra of NP-treated cells showed an increase in the intensities of characteristic protein bands, which confirmed membrane damage and subsequent release of cellular contents outside the cells. Raman spectral mapping at single cellular level can facilitate understanding of the mechanistic aspect of toxicity of GaN NPs. The effect may be correlated to passive diffusion causing mechanical damage to the membrane or ingress of Ga{sup 3+} (ionic radius {approx}0.076 nm) which can potentially interfere with bacterial metabolism, as it resembles Fe{sup 2+} (ionic radius {approx}0.077 nm), which is essential for energy metabolism.

  3. Probing the cellular damage in bacteria induced by GaN nanoparticles using confocal laser Raman spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahoo, Prasana; Murthy, P. Sriyutha; Dhara, S.; Venugopalan, V. P.; Das, A.; Tyagi, A. K.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the mechanism of nanoparticle (NP) induced toxicity in microbes is of potential importance to a variety of disciplines including disease diagnostics, biomedical implants, and environmental analysis. In this context, toxicity to bacterial cells and inhibition of biofilm formation by GaN NPs and their functional derivatives have been investigated against gram positive and gram negative bacterial species down to single cellular level. High levels of inhibition of biofilm formation (>80 %) was observed on treatments with GaN NPs at sub-micro molar concentrations. These results were substantiated with morphological features investigated with field emission scanning electron microscope, and the observed changes in vibrational modes of microbial cells using Raman spectroscopy. Raman spectra provided molecular interpretation of cell damage by registering signatures of molecular vibrations of individual living microbial cells and mapping the interplay of proteins at the cell membrane. As compared to the untreated cells, Raman spectra of NP-treated cells showed an increase in the intensities of characteristic protein bands, which confirmed membrane damage and subsequent release of cellular contents outside the cells. Raman spectral mapping at single cellular level can facilitate understanding of the mechanistic aspect of toxicity of GaN NPs. The effect may be correlated to passive diffusion causing mechanical damage to the membrane or ingress of Ga 3+ (ionic radius ∼0.076 nm) which can potentially interfere with bacterial metabolism, as it resembles Fe 2+ (ionic radius ∼0.077 nm), which is essential for energy metabolism

  4. 3D optical sectioning with a new hyperspectral confocal fluorescence imaging system.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nieman, Linda T.; Sinclair, Michael B.; Davidson, George S.; Van Benthem, Mark Hilary; Haaland, David Michael; Timlin, Jerilyn Ann; Sasaki, Darryl Yoshio; Bachand, George David; Jones, Howland D. T.

    2007-02-01

    A novel hyperspectral fluorescence microscope for high-resolution 3D optical sectioning of cells and other structures has been designed, constructed, and used to investigate a number of different problems. We have significantly extended new multivariate curve resolution (MCR) data analysis methods to deconvolve the hyperspectral image data and to rapidly extract quantitative 3D concentration distribution maps of all emitting species. The imaging system has many advantages over current confocal imaging systems including simultaneous monitoring of numerous highly overlapped fluorophores, immunity to autofluorescence or impurity fluorescence, enhanced sensitivity, and dramatically improved accuracy, reliability, and dynamic range. Efficient data compression in the spectral dimension has allowed personal computers to perform quantitative analysis of hyperspectral images of large size without loss of image quality. We have also developed and tested software to perform analysis of time resolved hyperspectral images using trilinear multivariate analysis methods. The new imaging system is an enabling technology for numerous applications including (1) 3D composition mapping analysis of multicomponent processes occurring during host-pathogen interactions, (2) monitoring microfluidic processes, (3) imaging of molecular motors and (4) understanding photosynthetic processes in wild type and mutant Synechocystis cyanobacteria.

  5. Raster image correlation spectroscopy (RICS) for measuring fast protein dynamics and concentrations with a commercial laser scanning confocal microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, C M; Dalal, R B; Hebert, B; Digman, M A; Horwitz, A R; Gratton, E

    2008-01-01

    Raster image correlation spectroscopy (RICS) is a new and novel technique for measuring molecular dynamics and concentrations from fluorescence confocal images. The RICS technique extracts information about molecular dynamics and concentrations from images of living cells taken on commercial confocal systems. Here we develop guidelines for performing the RICS analysis on an analogue commercial laser scanning confocal microscope. Guidelines for typical instrument settings, image acquisition settings and analogue detector characterization are presented. Using appropriate instrument/acquisition parameters, diffusion coefficients and concentrations can be determined, even for highly dynamic dye molecules in solution. Standard curves presented herein demonstrate the ability to detect protein concentrations as low as approximately 2 nM. Additionally, cellular measurements give accurate values for the diffusion of paxillin-enhanced-green fluorescent protein (EGFP), an adhesion adaptor molecule, in the cytosol of the cell and also show slower paxillin dynamics near adhesions where paxillin interacts with immobile adhesion components. Methods are presented to account for bright immobile structures within the cell that dominate spatial correlation functions; allowing the extraction of fast protein dynamics within and near these structures. A running average algorithm is also presented to address slow cellular movement or movement of cellular features such as adhesions. Finally, methods to determine protein concentration in the presence of immobile structures within the cell are presented. A table is presented giving guidelines for instrument and imaging setting when performing RICS on the Olympus FV300 confocal and these guidelines are a starting point for performing the analysis on other commercial confocal systems.

  6. Noninvasive imaging of the human rod photoreceptor mosaic using a confocal adaptive optics scanning ophthalmoscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubra, Alfredo; Sulai, Yusufu; Norris, Jennifer L.; Cooper, Robert F.; Dubis, Adam M.; Williams, David R.; Carroll, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    The rod photoreceptors are implicated in a number of devastating retinal diseases. However, routine imaging of these cells has remained elusive, even with the advent of adaptive optics imaging. Here, we present the first in vivo images of the contiguous rod photoreceptor mosaic in nine healthy human subjects. The images were collected with three different confocal adaptive optics scanning ophthalmoscopes at two different institutions, using 680 and 775 nm superluminescent diodes for illumination. Estimates of photoreceptor density and rod:cone ratios in the 5°–15° retinal eccentricity range are consistent with histological findings, confirming our ability to resolve the rod mosaic by averaging multiple registered images, without the need for additional image processing. In one subject, we were able to identify the emergence of the first rods at approximately 190 μm from the foveal center, in agreement with previous histological studies. The rod and cone photoreceptor mosaics appear in focus at different retinal depths, with the rod mosaic best focus (i.e., brightest and sharpest) being at least 10 μm shallower than the cones at retinal eccentricities larger than 8°. This study represents an important step in bringing high-resolution imaging to bear on the study of rod disorders. PMID:21750765

  7. High-resolution 3-D imaging of living cells in suspension using confocal axial tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renaud, Olivier; Viña, Jose; Yu, Yong; Machu, Christophe; Trouvé, Alain; Van der Voort, Hans; Chalmond, Bernard; Shorte, Spencer L

    2008-01-01

    Conventional flow cytometry (FC) methods report optical signals integrated from individual cells at throughput rates as high as thousands of cells per second. This is further combined with the powerful utility to subsequently sort and/or recover the cells of interest. However, these methods cannot extract spatial information. This limitation has prompted efforts by some commercial manufacturers to produce state-of-the-art commercial flow cytometry systems allowing fluorescence images to be recorded by an imaging detector. Nonetheless, there remains an immediate and growing need for technologies facilitating spatial analysis of fluorescent signals from cells maintained in flow suspension. Here, we report a novel methodological approach to this problem that combines micro-fluidic flow, and microelectrode dielectric-field control to manipulate, immobilize and image individual cells in suspension. The method also offers unique possibilities for imaging studies on cells in suspension. In particular, we report the system's immediate utility for confocal "axial tomography" using micro-rotation imaging and show that it greatly enhances 3-D optical resolution compared with conventional light reconstruction (deconvolution) image data treatment. That the method we present here is relatively rapid and lends itself to full automation suggests its eventual utility for 3-D imaging cytometry.

  8. Detecting multiple adulterants in dry milk using Raman chemical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Jianwei; Chao, Kuanglin; Kim, Moon S.

    2012-05-01

    This study investigated the potential of Raman chemical imaging for simultaneously detecting multiple adulterants in milk powder. Potential chemical adulterants, including ammonium sulfate, dicyandiamide, melamine, and urea, were together mixed into nonfat dry milk in the concentration range of 0.1%-5.0% for each adulterant. A benchtop point-scan Raman imaging system using a 785-nm laser was assembled to acquire hyperspectral images in the wavenumber range of 102-2538 cm-1. Each mixture was imaged in an area of 25×25 mm2 with a spatial resolution of 0.25 mm. Selfmodeling mixture analysis (SMA) was used to extract pure component spectra, by which the four types of the adulterants were identified at all concentration levels based on their spectral information divergence values to the reference spectra. Raman chemical images were created using the contribution images from SMA, and their use to effectively visualize identification and spatial distribution of the multiple adulterant particles in the dry milk was demonstrated.

  9. Narrow-linewidth passband filter for ultraviolet rotational Raman imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkelstein, N D; Lempert, W R; Miles, R B

    1997-04-15

    We present a narrow-passband spectral filter capable of frequency-resolved imaging of rotational Raman light scattering with strong spectral rejection of out-of-band Raman, Rayleigh, and Mie scattering. The filter is based on mercury-vapor absorption, and subsequent resonant fluorescence and has a passband of less than 1 cm(-1). It is paired with an injection-seeded, cavity-locked, frequency-tripled Ti:sapphire laser that produces >30 mJ/pulse of single-mode, tunable light in the vicinity of 253.7 nm. The laser and filter are combined to spectrally resolve scattering from individual rotational Raman lines of nitrogen and oxygen.

  10. Parameter-free binarization and skeletonization of fiber networks from confocal image stacks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Krauss

    Full Text Available We present a method to reconstruct a disordered network of thin biopolymers, such as collagen gels, from three-dimensional (3D image stacks recorded with a confocal microscope. The method is based on a template matching algorithm that simultaneously performs a binarization and skeletonization of the network. The size and intensity pattern of the template is automatically adapted to the input data so that the method is scale invariant and generic. Furthermore, the template matching threshold is iteratively optimized to ensure that the final skeletonized network obeys a universal property of voxelized random line networks, namely, solid-phase voxels have most likely three solid-phase neighbors in a 3 x 3 x 3 neighborhood. This optimization criterion makes our method free of user-defined parameters and the output exceptionally robust against imaging noise.

  11. Confocal Raman Microspectroscopy: The Measurement of VX Depth Profiles in Hairless Guinea Pig Skin and the Evaluation of RSDL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-01

    pad soaked with warm soapy water (Ivory unscented bar soap ). The yellowish skin oil was removed. After the cleaning, the soap was removed by gentle...to the evaluation of candidate decontamination products and postexposure treatments. Studies of anesthetized swine percutaneously exposed to VX have... products and to the timing of their administration. The River Diagnostics Raman Skin Analyzer uses a specially designed microscope objective to focus

  12. Metabolic changes of cultured DRG neurons induced by adenosine using confocal microscopy imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Liqin; Huang, Yimei; Chen, Jiangxu; Wang, Yuhua; Yang, Hongqin; Zhang, Yanding; Xie, Shusen

    2012-12-01

    Adenosine exerts multiple effects on pain transmission in the peripheral nervous system. This study was performed to use confocal microscopy to evaluate whether adenosine could affect dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons in vitro and test which adenosine receptor mediates the effect of adenosine on DRG neurons. After adding adenosine with different concentration, we compared the metabolic changes by the real time imaging of calcium and mitochondria membrane potential using confocal microscopy. The results showed that the effect of 500 μM adenosine on the metabolic changes of DRG neurons was more significant than others. Furthermore, four different adenosine receptor antagonists were used to study which receptor mediated the influences of adenosine on the cultured DRG neurons. All adenosine receptor antagonists especially A1 receptor antagonist (DPCPX) had effect on the Ca2+ and mitochondria membrane potential dynamics of DRG neurons. The above studies demonstrated that the effect of adenosine which may be involved in the signal transmission on the sensory neurons was dose-dependent, and all the four adenosine receptors especially the A1R may mediate the transmission.

  13. In vivo ocular imaging of the cornea of the normal female laboratory beagle using confocal microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strom, Ann R; Cortés, Dennis E; Thomasy, Sara M; Kass, Philip H; Mannis, Mark J; Murphy, Christopher J

    2016-01-01

    To obtain normative data for the normal laboratory beagle cornea using high-resolution in vivo confocal microscopy (IVCM). Sixteen eyes of eight healthy young female intact beagles. The central cornea was imaged using IVCM. Mixed effects linear regression was used for statistical analysis. in vivo confocal microscopy allowed detailed visualization and quantification of epithelial cells (superficial epithelial cell diameter: 43.25 ± 6.64 μm, basal cell diameter: 4.43 ± 0.67 μm), and nerve fibers (subepithelial nerve fiber diameter: 2.38 ± 0.69 μm, anterior stromal nerve fiber diameter: 16.93 ± 4.55 μm). Keratocyte density (anterior stroma 993.38 ± 134.24 cells/mm(2) , posterior stroma 789.38 ± 87.13 cells/mm(2) ) and endothelial cell density (2815.18 ± 212.59 cells/mm(2) ) were also measured. High-resolution IVCM provides detailed noninvasive evaluation of the cornea in the normal laboratory beagle. © 2015 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  14. Three-photon fluorescence imaging of melanin with a dual-wedge confocal scanning system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mega, Yair; Kerimo, Joseph; Robinson, Joseph; Vakili, Ali; Johnson, Nicolette; DiMarzio, Charles

    2012-03-01

    Confocal microscopy can be used as a practical tool in non-invasive applications in medical diagnostics and evaluation. In particular, it is being used for the early detection of skin cancer to identify pathological cellular components and, potentially, replace conventional biopsies. The detection of melanin and its spatial location and distribution plays a crucial role in the detection and evaluation of skin cancer. Our previous work has shown that the visible emission from melanin is strong and can be easily observed with a near-infrared CW laser using low power. This is due to a unique step-wise, (SW) three-photon excitation of melanin. This paper shows that the same SW, 3-photon fluorescence can also be achieved with an inexpensive, continuous-wave laser using a dual-prism scanning system. This demonstrates that the technology could be integrated into a portable confocal microscope for clinical applications. The results presented here are in agreement with images obtained with the larger and more expensive femtosecond laser system used earlier.

  15. Virtual pinhole confocal microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George, J.S.; Rector, D.M.; Ranken, D.M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Biophysics Group; Peterson, B. [SciLearn Inc. (United States); Kesteron, J. [VayTech Inc. (United States)

    1999-06-01

    Scanned confocal microscopes enhance imaging capabilities, providing improved contrast and image resolution in 3-D, but existing systems have significant technical shortcomings and are expensive. Researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory have developed a novel approach--virtual pinhole confocal microscopy--that uses state of the art illumination, detection, and data processing technologies to produce an imager with a number of advantages: reduced cost, faster imaging, improved efficiency and sensitivity, improved reliability and much greater flexibility. Work at Los Alamos demonstrated proof of principle; prototype hardware and software have been used to demonstrate technical feasibility of several implementation strategies. The system uses high performance illumination, patterned in time and space. The authors have built functional confocal imagers using video display technologies (LCD or DLP) and novel scanner based on a micro-lens array. They have developed a prototype system for high performance data acquisition and processing, designed to support realtime confocal imaging. They have developed algorithms to reconstruct confocal images from a time series of spatially sub-sampled images; software development remains an area of active development. These advances allow the collection of high quality confocal images (in fluorescence, reflectance and transmission modes) with equipment that can inexpensively retrofit to existing microscopes. Planned future extensions to these technologies will significantly enhance capabilities for microscopic imaging in a variety of applications, including confocal endoscopy, and confocal spectral imaging.

  16. PIV as a method for quantifying root cell growth and particle displacement in confocal images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengough, A Glyn; Hans, Joachim; Bransby, M Fraser; Valentine, Tracy A

    2010-01-01

    Particle image velocimetry (PIV) quantifies displacement of patches of pixels between successive images. We evaluated PIV as a tool for microscopists by measuring displacements of cells and of a surrounding granular medium in confocal laser scanning microscopy images of Arabidopsis thaliana roots labeled with cell-membrane targeted green fluorescent protein. Excellent accuracy (e.g., displacement standard deviation PIV-predicted and actual displacements (r(2) > 0.83). Root mean squared error for these distorted images was 0.4-1.1 pixels, increasing at higher magnification factors. Cell growth and rhizosphere deformation were tracked with good temporal (e.g., 1-min interval) and spatial resolution, with PIV patches located on recognizable cell features being tracked more successfully. Appropriate choice of GFP-label was important to decrease small-scale biological noise due to intracellular motion. PIV of roots grown in stiff 2% versus 0.7% agar showed patterns of cell expansion consistent with physically impeded roots of other species. Roots in glass ballotini underwent rapid changes in growth direction on a timescale of minutes, associated with localized arching of ballotini. By tracking cell vertices, we monitored automatically cell length, width, and area every minute for 0.5 h for cells in different stages of development. In conclusion, PIV measured displacements successfully in images of living root cells and the external granular medium, revealing much potential for use by microscopists. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Measurement of capillary lenght from 3D images acquired by confocal microscopy using image analysis and stereology

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kubínová, Lucie; Janáček, Jiří; Eržen, I.; Mao, X. W.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 16, Suppl.2 (2010), s. 736-737 ISSN 1431-9276. [Microscopy and Microanalysis 2010. Portland, 01.08.2010-05.08.2010] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06063; GA MŠk(CZ) ME09010; GA MŠk(CZ) MEB090910; GA ČR(CZ) GA304/09/0733 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : capillary length * confocal microscopy * image analysis Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology Impact factor: 2.179, year: 2010

  18. Confocal imaging reveals three-dimensional fine structure difference between ventral and dorsal nerve roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yuxiang; Sui, Tao; Cao, Xiaojian; Lv, Xiaohua; Zeng, Shaoqun; Sun, Peng

    2011-05-01

    Peripheral nerve injury repair is one of the most challenging problems in neurosurgery, partially due to lack of knowledge of three-dimensional (3-D) fine structure and organization of peripheral nerves. In this paper, we explored the structures of nerve fibers in ventral and dorsal nerves with a laser scanning confocal microscopy. Thick tissue staining results suggested that nerve fibers have a different 3-D structure in ventral and dorsal nerves, and reconstruction from serial sectioning images showed that in ventral nerves the nerve fibers travel in a winding form, while in dorsal nerves, the nerve fibers form in a parallel cable pattern. These structural differences could help surgeons to differentiate ventral and dorsal nerves in peripheral nerve injury repair, and also facilitate scientists to get a deeper understanding about nerve fiber organization.

  19. Fluorescence confocal laser scanning microscopy for in vivo imaging of epidermal reactions to two experimental irritants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suihko, C.; Serup, J.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Fibre-optic fluorescence confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) is a novel non-invasive technique for in vivo imaging of skin. The cellular structure of the epidermis can be studied. A fluorophore, e.g. fluorescein sodium, is introduced by an intradermal injection or applied...... dermatitis reactions caused by established model irritants, e.g. sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS) and pelargonic acid (PA). Methods: Twelve healthy individuals volunteered. The flexor aspect of the right and the left forearm was exposed to SLS in water and PA in isopropanol and occluded under Finn Chambers...... for 24 h. The reactions were rated clinically and, following epicutaneous and intra-dermal application of fluorescein sodium, studied by fluorescence CLSM, magnification x 1000. Results: Both irritants disturbed the epidermal intercellular borders, which became blurred, thickened and variably altered...

  20. Investigation of the cutaneous penetration behavior of dexamethasone loaded to nano-sized lipid particles by EPR spectroscopy, and confocal Raman and laser scanning microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohan, Silke B; Saeidpour, Siavash; Solik, Agnieszka; Schanzer, Sabine; Richter, Heike; Dong, Pin; Darvin, Maxim E; Bodmeier, Roland; Patzelt, Alexa; Zoubari, Gaith; Unbehauen, Michael; Haag, Rainer; Lademann, Jürgen; Teutloff, Christian; Bittl, Robert; Meinke, Martina C

    2017-07-01

    An improvement of the penetration efficiency combined with the controlled release of actives in the skin can facilitate the medical treatment of skin diseases immensely. Dexamethasone (Dx), a synthetic glucocorticoid, is frequently used for the treatment of inflammatory skin diseases. To investigate the penetration of nano-sized lipid particles (NLP) loaded with Dx in comparison to a commercially available base cream, different techniques were applied. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy was used to monitor the penetration of Dx, which was covalently labeled with the spin probe 3-(Carboxy)-2,2,5,5-tetramethyl-1-pyrrolidinyloxy (PCA). The penetration into hair follicles was studied using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) with curcumin-loaded NLP. The penetration of the vehicle was followed by confocal Raman microscopy (CRM). Penetration studies using excised porcine skin revealed a more than twofold higher penetration efficiency for DxPCA into the stratum corneum (SC) after 24h incubation compared to 4h incubation when loaded to the NLP, whereas when applied in the base cream, almost no further penetration was observed beyond 4h. The distribution of DxPCA within the SC was investigated by consecutive tape stripping. The release of DxPCA from the base cream after 24h in deeper SC layers and the viable epidermis was shown by EPR. For NLP, no release from the carrier was observed, although DxPCA was detectable in the skin after the complete SC was removed. This phenomenon can be explained by the penetration of the NLP into the hair follicles. However, penetration profiles measured by CRM indicate that NLP did not penetrate as deeply into the SC as the base cream formulation. In conclusion, NLP can improve the accumulation of Dx in the skin and provide a reservoir within the SC and in the follicular infundibula. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Confocal microscopy for astrocyte in vivo imaging: Recycle and reuse in microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Alvarez, Alberto; Araque, Alfonso; Martín, Eduardo D.

    2013-01-01

    In vivo imaging is one of the ultimate and fundamental approaches for the study of the brain. Two-photon laser scanning microscopy (2PLSM) constitutes the state-of-the-art technique in current neuroscience to address questions regarding brain cell structure, development and function, blood flow regulation and metabolism. This technique evolved from laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM), which impacted the field with a major improvement in image resolution of live tissues in the 1980s compared to widefield microscopy. While nowadays some of the unparalleled features of 2PLSM make it the tool of choice for brain studies in vivo, such as the possibility to image deep within a tissue, LSCM can still be useful in this matter. Here we discuss the validity and limitations of LSCM and provide a guide to perform high-resolution in vivo imaging of the brain of live rodents with minimal mechanical disruption employing LSCM. We describe the surgical procedure and experimental setup that allowed us to record intracellular calcium variations in astrocytes evoked by sensory stimulation, and to monitor intact neuronal dendritic spines and astrocytic processes as well as blood vessel dynamics. Therefore, in spite of certain limitations that need to be carefully considered, LSCM constitutes a useful, convenient, and affordable tool for brain studies in vivo. PMID:23658537

  2. Raman imaging of lignin and cellulose distribution in black spruce wood (Picea mariana) cell walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umesh P. Agarwal

    2005-01-01

    A detailed understanding of wood cell wall structure and organization is important from both fundamental and practical point of views. A state-of- the-art 633-nm laser based confocal Raman microscope was used in situ to investigate the cell wall organization of black spruce wood. Chemical information on lignin and cellulose from morphologically distinct cell wall...

  3. Development of a Raman chemical image detection algorithm for authenticating dry milk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Jianwei; Chao, Kuanglin; Kim, Moon S.

    2013-05-01

    This research developed a Raman chemical imaging method for detecting multiple adulterants in skim milk powder. Ammonium sulfate, dicyandiamide, melamine, and urea were mixed into the milk powder as chemical adulterants in the concentration range of 0.1-5.0%. A Raman imaging system using a 785-nm laser acquired hyperspectral images in the wavenumber range of 102-2538 cm-1 for a 25×25 mm2 area of each mixture. A polynomial curve-fitting method was used to correct fluorescence background in the Raman images. An image classification method was developed based on single-band fluorescence-free images at unique Raman peaks of the adulterants. Raman chemical images were created to visualize identification and distribution of the multiple adulterant particles in the milk powder. Linear relationship was found between adulterant pixel number and adulterant concentration, demonstrating the potential of the Raman chemical imaging for quantitative analysis of the adulterants in the milk powder.

  4. [Imaging of corneal dystrophies: Correlations between en face anterior segment OCT and in vivo confocal microscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghouali, W; Tahiri Joutei Hassani, R; Liang, H; Dupont-Monod, S; Auclin, F; Baudouin, C; Labbé, A

    2015-05-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of en face Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) for evaluation of corneal dystrophies and to describe correlations with in vivo confocal microscopy (IVCM). Thirty-two eyes of 16 patients with 4 types of corneal dystrophies (epithelial basement membrane dystrophy, Fuchs dystrophy, Reis-Bücklers corneal dystrophy and Crocodile Shagreen dystrophy) were enrolled in this study. Axial and reconstructed en face scans were acquired using OCT. Images were then correlated to IVCM findings. En face OCT provided new insights into the structure, size and depth of corneal tissue alterations in various corneal dystrophies. OCT en face images were well correlated with IVCM features. Despite lower resolution than IVCM, en face OCT offers the advantages of being non-invasive and allowing the analysis of larger corneal areas. En face OCT provides useful new information in corneal dystrophies. This imaging technique will probably increase in popularity in the near future for the assessment of various anterior segment diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Correlative scanning electron and confocal microscopy imaging of labeled cells coated by indium-tin-oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodighiero, Simona; Torre, Bruno; Sogne, Elisa; Ruffilli, Roberta; Cagnoli, Cinzia; Francolini, Maura; Di Fabrizio, Enzo; Falqui, Andrea

    2015-06-01

    Confocal microscopy imaging of cells allows to visualize the presence of specific antigens by using fluorescent tags or fluorescent proteins, with resolution of few hundreds of nanometers, providing their localization in a large field-of-view and the understanding of their cellular function. Conversely, in scanning electron microscopy (SEM), the surface morphology of cells is imaged down to nanometer scale using secondary electrons. Combining both imaging techniques have brought to the correlative light and electron microscopy, contributing to investigate the existing relationships between biological surface structures and functions. Furthermore, in SEM, backscattered electrons (BSE) can image local compositional differences, like those due to nanosized gold particles labeling cellular surface antigens. To perform SEM imaging of cells, they could be grown on conducting substrates, but obtaining images of limited quality. Alternatively, they could be rendered electrically conductive, coating them with a thin metal layer. However, when BSE are collected to detect gold-labeled surface antigens, heavy metals cannot be used as coating material, as they would mask the BSE signal produced by the markers. Cell surface could be then coated with a thin layer of chromium, but this results in a loss of conductivity due to the fast chromium oxidation, if the samples come in contact with air. In order to overcome these major limitations, a thin layer of indium-tin-oxide was deposited by ion-sputtering on gold-decorated HeLa cells and neurons. Indium-tin-oxide was able to provide stable electrical conductivity and preservation of the BSE signal coming from the gold-conjugated markers. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Correlative scanning electron and confocal microscopy imaging of labeled cells coated by indium-tin-oxide

    KAUST Repository

    Rodighiero, Simona

    2015-03-22

    Confocal microscopy imaging of cells allows to visualize the presence of specific antigens by using fluorescent tags or fluorescent proteins, with resolution of few hundreds of nanometers, providing their localization in a large field-of-view and the understanding of their cellular function. Conversely, in scanning electron microscopy (SEM), the surface morphology of cells is imaged down to nanometer scale using secondary electrons. Combining both imaging techniques have brought to the correlative light and electron microscopy, contributing to investigate the existing relationships between biological surface structures and functions. Furthermore, in SEM, backscattered electrons (BSE) can image local compositional differences, like those due to nanosized gold particles labeling cellular surface antigens. To perform SEM imaging of cells, they could be grown on conducting substrates, but obtaining images of limited quality. Alternatively, they could be rendered electrically conductive, coating them with a thin metal layer. However, when BSE are collected to detect gold-labeled surface antigens, heavy metals cannot be used as coating material, as they would mask the BSE signal produced by the markers. Cell surface could be then coated with a thin layer of chromium, but this results in a loss of conductivity due to the fast chromium oxidation, if the samples come in contact with air. In order to overcome these major limitations, a thin layer of indium-tin-oxide was deposited by ion-sputtering on gold-decorated HeLa cells and neurons. Indium-tin-oxide was able to provide stable electrical conductivity and preservation of the BSE signal coming from the gold-conjugated markers. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Handheld tunable focus confocal microscope utilizing a double-clad fiber coupler for in vivo imaging of oral epithelium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsovsky, Cory; Hinsdale, Taylor; Cuenca, Rodrigo; Cheng, Yi-Shing Lisa; Wright, John M.; Rees, Terry D.; Jo, Javier A.; Maitland, Kristen C.

    2017-05-01

    A reflectance confocal endomicroscope with double-clad fiber coupler and electrically tunable focus lens is applied to imaging of the oral mucosa. The instrument is designed to be lightweight and robust for clinical use. The tunable lens allows axial scanning through >250 μm in the epithelium when the probe tip is placed in contact with tissue. Images are acquired at 6.6 frames per second with a field of view diameter up to 850 μm. In vivo imaging of a wide range of normal sites in the oral cavity demonstrates the accessibility of the handheld probe. In vivo imaging of clinical lesions diagnosed as inflammation and dysplasia illustrates the ability of reflectance confocal endomicroscopy to image cellular changes associated with pathology.

  8. Inter-rater and intra-rater agreement of confocal microscopy imaging in diagnosing and subtyping basal cell carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kadouch, D. J.; van Haersma de With, A.; Elshot, Y. S.; Peppelman, M.; Bekkenk, M. W.; Wolkerstorfer, A.; Eekhout, I.; Prinsen, C. A. C.; de Rie, M. A.

    2017-01-01

    Reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) imaging can be used to diagnose and subtype basal cell carcinoma (BCC) but relies on individual morphologic pattern recognition that might vary among users. We assessed the inter-rater and intra-rater agreement of RCM in correctly diagnosing and subtyping BCC.

  9. The effect of compression on clinical diagnosis of glaucoma based on non-analyzed confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abramoff, M.D.

    2006-01-01

    Knowledge of the effect of compression of ophthalmic images on diagnostic reading is essential for effective tele-ophthalmology applications. It was therefore with great anticipation that I read the article “The Effect of Compression on Clinical Diagnosis of Glaucoma Based on Non-analyzed Confocal

  10. Spatiotemporal closure of fractional laser-ablated channels imaged by optical coherence tomography and reflectance confocal microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banzhaf, Christina A.; Wind, Bas S.; Mogensen, Mette

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective Optical coherence tomography (OCT) and reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) offer high-resolution optical imaging of the skin, which may provide benefit in the context of laser-assisted drug delivery. We aimed to characterize postoperative healing of ablative fractional...

  11. Spatiotemporal closure of fractional laser-ablated channels imaged by optical coherence tomography and reflectance confocal microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Banzhaf, Christina A.; Wind, Bas S.; Mogensen, Mette; Meesters, Arne A.; Paasch, Uwe; Wolkerstorfer, Albert; Haedersdal, Merete

    2016-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) and reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) offer high-resolution optical imaging of the skin, which may provide benefit in the context of laser-assisted drug delivery. We aimed to characterize postoperative healing of ablative fractional laser (AFXL)-induced

  12. Development of a viability standard curve for microencapsulated probiotic bacteria using confocal microscopy and image analysis software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Sarah; Kailasapathy, Kasipathy; Phillips, Michael; Jones, Mark R

    2015-07-01

    Microencapsulation is proposed to protect probiotic strains from food processing procedures and to maintain probiotic viability. Little research has described the in situ viability of microencapsulated probiotics. This study successfully developed a real-time viability standard curve for microencapsulated bacteria using confocal microscopy, fluorescent dyes and image analysis software. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Low-power, Confocal Imaging of Protein Localization in Living Cells (7214-150), Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed technology genetically labels intracellular structures and visualizes protein interactions in living cells using a compact, confocal microscope with...

  14. Confocal Raman microscopy as a tool to describe different mineral and organic phases at high spatial resolution within marine biogenic carbonates: case study on Nerita undata (Gastropoda, Neritopsina)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nehrke, G.; Nouet, J.

    2011-06-01

    Marine biogenic carbonates formed by invertebrates (e.g. corals and mollusk shells) represent complex composites of one or more mineral phases and organic molecules. This complexity ranges from the macroscopic structures observed with the naked eye down to sub micrometric structures only revealed by micro analytical techniques. Understanding to what extent and how organisms can control the formation of these structures requires that the mineral and organic phases can be identified and their spatial distribution related. Here we demonstrate the capability of confocal Raman microscopy applied to cross sections of a shell of Nerita undata to describe the distribution of calcite and aragonite including their crystallographic orientation with high lateral resolution (∼300 nm). Moreover, spatial distribution of functional groups of organic compounds can be simultaneously acquired, allowing to specifically relate them to the observed microstructures. The data presented in this case study highlights the possible new contributions of this method to the description of modalities of Nerita undata shell formation, and what could be expected of its application to other marine biogenic carbonates. Localization of areas of interest would also allow further investigations using more localized methods, such as TEM that would provide complementary information on the relation between organic molecules and crystallographic lattice.

  15. Simultaneous in situ characterisation of bubble dynamics and a spatially resolved concentration profile: a combined Mach–Zehnder holography and confocal Raman-spectroscopy sensor system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Guhathakurta

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available For a reaction between a gaseous phase and a liquid phase, the interaction between the hydrodynamic conditions, mass transport and reaction kinetics plays a crucial role with respect to the conversion and selectivity of the process. Within this work, a sensor system was developed to simultaneously characterise the bubble dynamics and the localised concentration measurement around the bubbles. The sensor system is a combination of a digital Mach–Zehnder holography subsystem to measure bubble dynamics and a confocal Raman-spectroscopy subsystem to measure localised concentration. The combined system was used to investigate the chemical absorption of CO2 bubbles in caustic soda in microchannels. The proposed set-up is explained and characterised in detail and the experimental results are presented, illustrating the capability of the sensor system to simultaneously measure the localised concentration of the carbonate ion with a good limit of detection and the 3-D position of the bubble with respect to the spot where the concentration was measured.

  16. Quantitation of cell-matrix adhesion using confocal image analysis of focal contact associated proteins and interference reflection microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usson, Y; Guignandon, A; Laroche, N; Lafage-Proust, M H; Vico, L

    1997-08-01

    We have developed an approach for the quantitation of vinculin, a focal contact associated protein, based on a multimodal confocal microscopy and image analysis. Vinculin spot distribution was imaged in confocal fluorescence microscopy and the corresponding focal contacts were imaged in confocal interference reflection microscopy. These images were analyzed with a SAMBA image cytometer. The image analysis program provided 12 morphometric features describing cellular area, shape, and proportions of vinculin spots as well as six topographical features describing the distribution of vinculin and the relative overlap of vinculin and focal contacts. This approach was applied to the study of rat osteosarcoma cells submitted to mechanical stresses: successions of 2g and 0g accelerations during a series of parabolic flights. The measured features were assessed by means of correlation analysis and stepwise discriminant analysis. After correlation analysis, only ten parameters were retained. Quantitation of cell morphological parameters indicated that cell area was significantly affected by gravitational stresses as well as vinculin distribution. Cell area was reduced by 50% and vinculin spots were restricted to cell periphery. Cell adhesion measured by IRM decreased significantly in the first part of the flight and remained stable at the end of the flight. These results suggest that cell-matrix adhesion is affected by gravitational stresses. Image analysis provides useful tools to investigate focal adhesion re-organization under different physiological stimuli.

  17. Large-scale automated identification of mouse brain cells in confocal light sheet microscopy images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frasconi, Paolo; Silvestri, Ludovico; Soda, Paolo; Cortini, Roberto; Pavone, Francesco S; Iannello, Giulio

    2014-09-01

    Recently, confocal light sheet microscopy has enabled high-throughput acquisition of whole mouse brain 3D images at the micron scale resolution. This poses the unprecedented challenge of creating accurate digital maps of the whole set of cells in a brain. We introduce a fast and scalable algorithm for fully automated cell identification. We obtained the whole digital map of Purkinje cells in mouse cerebellum consisting of a set of 3D cell center coordinates. The method is accurate and we estimated an F1 measure of 0.96 using 56 representative volumes, totaling 1.09 GVoxel and containing 4138 manually annotated soma centers. Source code and its documentation are available at http://bcfind.dinfo.unifi.it/. The whole pipeline of methods is implemented in Python and makes use of Pylearn2 and modified parts of Scikit-learn. Brain images are available on request. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press.

  18. Characterization of hydrogel microstructure using laser tweezers particle tracking and confocal reflection imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotlarchyk, M. A.; Botvinick, E. L.; Putnam, A. J.

    2010-05-01

    Hydrogels are commonly used as extracellular matrix mimetics for applications in tissue engineering and increasingly as cell culture platforms with which to study the influence of biophysical and biochemical cues on cell function in 3D. In recent years, a significant number of studies have focused on linking substrate mechanical properties to cell function using standard methodologies to characterize the bulk mechanical properties of the hydrogel substrates. However, current understanding of the correlations between the microstructural mechanical properties of hydrogels and cell function in 3D is poor, in part because of a lack of appropriate techniques. Here we have utilized a laser tracking system, based on passive optical microrheology instrumentation, to characterize the microstructure of viscoelastic fibrin clots. Trajectories and mean square displacements were observed as bioinert PEGylated (PEG: polyethylene glycol) microspheres (1, 2 or 4.7 µm in diameter) diffused within confined pores created by the protein phase of fibrin hydrogels. Complementary confocal reflection imaging revealed microstructures comprised of a highly heterogeneous fibrin network with a wide range of pore sizes. As the protein concentration of fibrin gels was increased, our quantitative laser tracking measurements showed a corresponding decrease in particle mean square displacements with greater resolution and sensitivity than conventional imaging techniques. This platform-independent method will enable a more complete understanding of how changes in substrate mechanical properties simultaneously influence other microenvironmental parameters in 3D cultures.

  19. Ex vivo and in vivo coherent Raman imaging of the peripheral and central nervous system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huff, Terry Brandon

    A hallmark of nervous system disorders is damage or degradation of the myelin sheath. Unraveling the mechanisms underlying myelin degeneration and repair represent one of the great challenges in medicine. This thesis work details the development and utilization of advanced optical imaging methods to gain insight into the structure and function of myelin in both healthy and diseased states in the in vivo environment. This first part of this thesis discusses ex vivo studies of the effects of high-frequency stimulation of spinal tissues on the structure of the node of Ranvier as investigated by coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) imaging (manuscript submitted to Journal of Neurosciece). Reversible paranodal myelin retraction at the nodes of Ranvier was observed during 200 Hz electrical stimulation, beginning minutes after the onset and continuing for up to 10 min after stimulation was ceased. A mechanistic study revealed a Ca2+ dependent pathway: high-frequency stimulation induced paranodal myelin retraction via pathologic calcium influx into axons, calpain activation, and cytoskeleton degradation through spectrin break-down. Also, the construction of dual-scanning CARS microscope for large area mapping of CNS tissues is detailed (Optics Express, 2008, 16:19396-193409). A confocal scanning head equipped with a rotating polygon mirror provides high speed, high resolution imaging and is coupled with a motorized sample stage to generate high-resolution large-area images of mouse brain coronal section and guinea pig spinal cord cross section. The polygon mirror decreases the mosaic acquisition time significantly without reducing the resolution of individual images. The ex vivo studies are then extended to in vivo imaging of mouse sciatic nerve tissue by CARS and second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging (Journal of Microscopy, 2007, 225: 175-182). Following a minimally invasive surgery to open the skin, CARS imaging of myelinated axons and SHG imaging of the

  20. Detecting protein complexes in living cells from laser scanning confocal image sequences by the cross correlation raster image spectroscopy method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Digman, Michelle A; Wiseman, Paul W; Horwitz, Alan R; Gratton, Enrico

    2009-01-01

    We describe a general method for detecting molecular complexes based on the analysis of single molecule fluorescence fluctuations from laser scanning confocal images. The method detects and quantifies complexes of two different fluorescent proteins noninvasively in living cells. Because in a raster scanned image successive pixels are measured at different times, the spatial correlation of the image contains information about dynamic processes occurring over a large time range, from the microseconds to seconds. The correlation of intensity fluctuations measured simultaneously in two channels detects protein complexes that carry two molecules of different colors. This information is obtained from the entire image. A map of the spatial distribution of protein complexes in the cell and their diffusion and/or binding properties can be constructed. Using this cross correlation raster image spectroscopy method, specific locations in the cell can be visualized where dynamics of binding and unbinding of fluorescent protein complexes occur. This fluctuation imaging method can be applied to commercial laser scanning microscopes thereby making it accessible to a large community of scientists.

  1. Penetration of silver nanoparticles into porcine skin ex vivo using fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy, Raman microscopy, and surface-enhanced Raman scattering microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yongjian; Choe, Chun-Sik; Ahlberg, Sebastian; Meinke, Martina C; Alexiev, Ulrike; Lademann, Juergen; Darvin, Maxim E

    2015-05-01

    In order to investigate the penetration depth of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) inside the skin, porcine ears treated with Ag NPs are measured by two-photon tomography with a fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (TPT-FLIM) technique, confocal Raman microscopy (CRM), and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) microscopy. Ag NPs are coated with poly-N-vinylpyrrolidone and dispersed in pure water solutions. After the application of Ag NPs, porcine ears are stored in the incubator for 24 h at a temperature of 37°C. The TPT-FLIM measurement results show a dramatic decrease of the Ag NPs' signal intensity from the skin surface to a depth of 4 μm. Below 4 μm, the Ag NPs' signal continues to decline, having completely disappeared at 12 to 14 μm depth. CRM shows that the penetration depth of Ag NPs is 11.1 ± 2.1 μm. The penetration depth measured with a highly sensitive SERS microscopy reaches 15.6 ± 8.3 μm. Several results obtained with SERS show that the penetration depth of Ag NPs can exceed the stratum corneum (SC) thickness, which can be explained by both penetration of trace amounts of Ag NPs through the SC barrier and by the measurements inside the hair follicle, which cannot be excluded in the experiment.

  2. Penetration of silver nanoparticles into porcine skin ex vivo using fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy, Raman microscopy, and surface-enhanced Raman scattering microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yongjian; Choe, Chun-Sik; Ahlberg, Sebastian; Meinke, Martina C.; Alexiev, Ulrike; Lademann, Juergen; Darvin, Maxim E.

    2015-05-01

    In order to investigate the penetration depth of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) inside the skin, porcine ears treated with Ag NPs are measured by two-photon tomography with a fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (TPT-FLIM) technique, confocal Raman microscopy (CRM), and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) microscopy. Ag NPs are coated with poly-N-vinylpyrrolidone and dispersed in pure water solutions. After the application of Ag NPs, porcine ears are stored in the incubator for 24 h at a temperature of 37°C. The TPT-FLIM measurement results show a dramatic decrease of the Ag NPs' signal intensity from the skin surface to a depth of 4 μm. Below 4 μm, the Ag NPs' signal continues to decline, having completely disappeared at 12 to 14 μm depth. CRM shows that the penetration depth of Ag NPs is 11.1±2.1 μm. The penetration depth measured with a highly sensitive SERS microscopy reaches 15.6±8.3 μm. Several results obtained with SERS show that the penetration depth of Ag NPs can exceed the stratum corneum (SC) thickness, which can be explained by both penetration of trace amounts of Ag NPs through the SC barrier and by the measurements inside the hair follicle, which cannot be excluded in the experiment.

  3. Application of a charge coupled device Raman microscope imaging system for quantitative analysis of aqueous surfactant phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Millichope, A.J.

    2000-04-01

    Tile development of the molecular optical laser examiner Raman microprobe during the 70's has provided the ability to acquire analytical quality Raman spectra with spatial resolution of the order of one micron. In recent years, with the introduction of charge coupled device detectors and holographic filters, this technology has become efficient enough to allow spectral mapping experiments to be possible. The main aim of this project was to modify the Jobin Yvon/Spex confocal Raman spectrometer to provide line imaging capabilities and use this feature to provide a rapid means of producing a phase composition diagram of a surface active agent with water. The surfactants chosen for phase behavior were polyoxyethylenes C 12 H 25 (OCH 2 CH 2 ) x OH [C 12 EO 8 ] and C 12 H 25 (OCH 2 CH 2 ) 6 OH [C 12 EO 6 ]. Each solid surfactant was placed at one end in a 0.4 mm pathlength borosilicate cell and water introduced at the other end. The different phases and boundaries were allowed to develop, in the cell by means of the diffuse interfacial transport method at different temperatures. These were then examined by line imaging and their corresponding composition determined using a series of external ethoxylate standards. The resulting phase boundaries were found to be comparable with those obtained using alternative methods, however the time taken to obtain them was considerably reduced. (author)

  4. Evaluation of atlas selection strategies for atlas-based image segmentation with application to confocal microscopy images of bee brains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohlfing, Torsten; Brandt, Robert; Menzel, Randolf; Maurer, Calvin R

    2004-04-01

    This paper evaluates strategies for atlas selection in atlas-based segmentation of three-dimensional biomedical images. Segmentation by intensity-based nonrigid registration to atlas images is applied to confocal microscopy images acquired from the brains of 20 bees. This paper evaluates and compares four different approaches for atlas image selection: registration to an individual atlas image (IND), registration to an average-shape atlas image (AVG), registration to the most similar image from a database of individual atlas images (SIM), and registration to all images from a database of individual atlas images with subsequent multi-classifier decision fusion (MUL). The MUL strategy is a novel application of multi-classifier techniques, which are common in pattern recognition, to atlas-based segmentation. For each atlas selection strategy, the segmentation performance of the algorithm was quantified by the similarity index (SI) between the automatic segmentation result and a manually generated gold standard. The best segmentation accuracy was achieved using the MUL paradigm, which resulted in a mean similarity index value between manual and automatic segmentation of 0.86 (AVG, 0.84; SIM, 0.82; IND, 0.81). The superiority of the MUL strategy over the other three methods is statistically significant (two-sided paired t test, P strategies performed better than the best possible SIM and IND strategies with optimal a posteriori atlas selection (mean similarity index for optimal SIM, 0.83; for optimal IND, 0.81). Our findings show that atlas selection is an important issue in atlas-based segmentation and that, in particular, multi-classifier techniques can substantially increase the segmentation accuracy.

  5. Ca(2+ release events in cardiac myocytes up close: insights from fast confocal imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vyacheslav M Shkryl

    Full Text Available The spatio-temporal properties of Ca(2+ transients during excitation-contraction coupling and elementary Ca(2+ release events (Ca(2+ sparks were studied in atrial and ventricular myocytes with ultra-fast confocal microscopy using a Zeiss LSM 5 LIVE system that allows sampling rates of up to 60 kHz. Ca(2+ sparks which originated from subsarcolemmal junctional sarcoplasmic reticulum (j-SR release sites in atrial myocytes were anisotropic and elongated in the longitudinal direction of the cell. Ca(2+ sparks in atrial cells originating from non-junctional SR and in ventricular myocytes were symmetrical. Ca(2+ spark recording in line scan mode at 40,000 lines/s uncovered step-like increases of [Ca(2+]i. 2-D imaging of Ca(2+ transients revealed an asynchronous activation of release sites and allowed the sequential recording of Ca(2+ entry through surface membrane Ca(2+ channels and subsequent activation of Ca(2+-induced Ca(2+ release. With a latency of 2.5 ms after application of an electrical stimulus, Ca(2+ entry could be detected that was followed by SR Ca(2+ release after an additional 3 ms delay. Maximum Ca(2+ release was observed 4 ms after the beginning of release. The timing of Ca(2+ entry and release was confirmed by simultaneous [Ca(2+]i and membrane current measurements using the whole cell voltage-clamp technique. In atrial cells activation of discrete individual release sites of the j-SR led to spatially restricted Ca(2+ release events that fused into a peripheral ring of elevated [Ca(2+]i that subsequently propagated in a wave-like fashion towards the center of the cell. In ventricular myocytes asynchronous Ca(2+ release signals from discrete sites with no preferential subcellular location preceded the whole-cell Ca(2+ transient. In summary, ultra-fast confocal imaging allows investigation of Ca(2+ signals with a time resolution similar to patch clamp technique, however in a less invasive fashion.

  6. Line-scanning confocal microscopy for high-resolution imaging of upconverting rare-earth-based contrast agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Laura M.; Zevon, Margot; Ganapathy, Vidya; Sheng, Yang; Tan, Mei Chee; Riman, Richard E.; Roth, Charles M.; Moghe, Prabhas V.; Pierce, Mark C.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Rare-earth (RE) doped nanocomposites emit visible luminescence when illuminated with continuous wave near-infrared light, making them appealing candidates for use as contrast agents in biomedical imaging. However, the emission lifetime of these materials is much longer than the pixel dwell times used in scanning intravital microscopy. To overcome this limitation, we have developed a line-scanning confocal microscope for high-resolution, optically sectioned imaging of samples labeled with RE-based nanomaterials. Instrument performance is quantified using calibrated test objects. NaYF4:Er,Yb nanocomposites are imaged in vitro, and in ex vivo tissue specimens, with direct comparison to point-scanning confocal microscopy. We demonstrate that the extended pixel dwell time of line-scanning confocal microscopy enables subcellular-level imaging of these nanomaterials while maintaining optical sectioning. The line-scanning approach thus enables microscopic imaging of this emerging class of contrast agents for preclinical studies, with the potential to be adapted for real-time in vivo imaging in the clinic. PMID:26603495

  7. 3D imaging of cement-based materials at submicron resolution by combining laser scanning confocal microscopy with serial sectioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yio, M H N; Mac, M J; Wong, H S; Buenfeld, N R

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, we present a new method to reconstruct large volumes of nontransparent porous materials at submicron resolution. The proposed method combines fluorescence laser scanning confocal microscopy with serial sectioning to produce a series of overlapping confocal z-stacks, which are then aligned and stitched based on phase correlation. The method can be extended in the XY plane to further increase the overall image volume. Resolution of the reconstructed image volume does not degrade with increase in sample size. We have used the method to image cementitious materials, hardened cement paste and concrete and the results obtained show that the method is reliable. Possible applications of the method such as three-dimensional characterization of the pores and microcracks in hardened concrete, three-dimensional particle shape characterization of cementitious materials and three-dimensional characterization of other porous materials such as rocks and bioceramics are discussed. © 2015 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2015 Royal Microscopical Society.

  8. Direct imaging Raman microscope based on tunable wavelength excitation and narrow band emission detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Puppels, G.J.; Puppels, G.J.; Grond, M.; Grond, M.; Greve, Jan

    1993-01-01

    A new type of imaging Raman microscope is described. First the advantages and disadvantages of the two possible approaches to Raman microscopy based on signal detection by means of a charge-coupled-device camera (i.e., direct imaging and image reconstruction) are discussed. Arguments are given to

  9. Multicolored stain-free histopathology with coherent Raman imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freudiger, Christian W; Pfannl, Rolf; Orringer, Daniel A; Saar, Brian G; Ji, Minbiao; Zeng, Qing; Ottoboni, Linda; Wei, Ying; Ying, Wei; Waeber, Christian; Sims, John R; De Jager, Philip L; Sagher, Oren; Philbert, Martin A; Xu, Xiaoyin; Kesari, Santosh; Xie, X Sunney; Young, Geoffrey S

    2012-10-01

    Conventional histopathology with hematoxylin & eosin (H&E) has been the gold standard for histopathological diagnosis of a wide range of diseases. However, it is not performed in vivo and requires thin tissue sections obtained after tissue biopsy, which carries risk, particularly in the central nervous system. Here we describe the development of an alternative, multicolored way to visualize tissue in real-time through the use of coherent Raman imaging (CRI), without the use of dyes. CRI relies on intrinsic chemical contrast based on vibrational properties of molecules and intrinsic optical sectioning by nonlinear excitation. We demonstrate that multicolor images originating from CH(2) and CH(3) vibrations of lipids and protein, as well as two-photon absorption of hemoglobin, can be obtained with subcellular resolution from fresh tissue. These stain-free histopathological images show resolutions similar to those obtained by conventional techniques, but do not require tissue fixation, sectioning or staining of the tissue analyzed.

  10. Fluorescence and confocal imaging of mammalian cells using conjugated oligoelectrolytes with phenylenevinylene core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milczarek, Justyna; Pawlowska, Roza; Zurawinski, Remigiusz; Lukasik, Beata; Garner, Logan E.; Chworos, Arkadiusz

    2017-05-01

    Over the last few years, considerable efforts are taken, in order to find a molecular fluorescent probe fulfilling their applicability requirements. Due to a good optical properties and affinity to biological structures conjugated oligoelectrolytes (COEs) can be considered as a promising dyes for application in fluorescence-based bioimaging. In this work, we synthetized COEs with phenylenevinylene core (PV-COEs) and applied as fluorescent membranous-specific probes. Cytotoxicity effects of each COE were probed on cancerous and non-cancerous cell types and little to no toxicity effects were observed at the high range of concentrations. The intensity of cell fluorescence following the COE staining was determined by the photoluminescence analysis and fluorescence activated cell sorting method (FACS). Intercalation of tested COEs into mammalian cell membranes was revealed by fluorescent and confocal microscopy colocalization with commercial dyes specific for cellular structures including mitochondria, Golgi apparatus and endoplasmic reticulum. The phenylenevinylene conjugated oligoelectrolytes have been found to be suitable for fluorescent bioimaging of mammalian cells and membrane-rich organelles. Due to their water solubility coupled with spontaneous intercalation into cells, favorable photophysical features, ease of cell staining, low cytotoxicity and selectivity for membranous structures, PV-COEs can be applied as markers for fluorescence imaging of a variety of cell types.

  11. Confocal spectroscopic imaging measurements of depth dependent hydration dynamics in human skin in-vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Behm

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available We present confocal spectroscopic imaging measurements applied to in-vivo studies to determine the depth dependent hydration profiles of human skin. The observed spectroscopic signal covers the spectral range from 810 nm to 2100 nm allowing to probe relevant absorption signals that can be associated with e.g. lipid and water-absorption bands. We employ a spectrally sensitive autofocus mechanism that allows an ultrafast focusing of the measurement spot on the skin and subsequently probes the evolution of the absorption bands as a function of depth. We determine the change of the water concentration in m%. The water concentration follows a sigmoidal behavior with an increase of the water content of about 70% within 5 μm in a depth of about 14 μm. We have applied our technique to study the hydration dynamics of skin before and after treatment with different concentrations of glycerol indicating that an increase of the glycerol concentration leads to an enhanced water concentration in the stratum corneum. Moreover, in contrast to traditional corneometry we have found that the application of Aluminium Chlorohydrate has no impact to the hydration of skin.

  12. Skeletal remodeling dynamics: New approaches with imaging instrumentation. [Laser confocal microscopy:a2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parks, N.J.; Pinkerton, K.E.; Seibert, J.A.; Pool, R.R.

    1991-01-01

    This report of progress and future objectives timetable is based on an included schematic of goals and objectives and the project abstract which is included as Appendix 1. Five matters are summarized in the order of (1) novel methods of calcified bone confocal microscopy and reconstruction image analysis of decalcified beagle and human cortical bone serial sections, (2) macroscopic cross-correlation of beagle and human cortical and cancellous bone fractions with CT analysis, (3) guidance to the most radiobiologically important skeletal regions of interest with the just completed {sup 90}Sr bone tumor map from life time beagle studies, (4) deposition patterns of radioactive agents that participate in apatite crystal nucleation processes in bone and leave radiation-excited electrons trapped in bone mineral, and (5) the budget period timetable. The discovery that beta particles from {sup 166}Ho (T{sub {1/2}} =26 hr, {beta}{sub max} = 1.8 MeV) phosphonic acid bone agents leave detectable, long-lived, electron paramagnetic resonance signals in bone is included in Appendix 2 as a joint report.

  13. Follow up of the functioning of a lithium-polymer battery using confocal Raman micro-spectroscopy; Suivi du fonctionnement d`un accumulateur lithium-polymere par microspectrometrie Raman confocale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rey, I.; Bruneel, J.L.; Lassegues, J.C.; Servant, L. [Bordeaux-1 Univ., 33 - Talence (France); Baudry, P.; Lascaud, S. [Electricite de France, 77 - Moret sur Loing (France). Direction des Etudes et Recherches; Majastre, H. [Bollore Technologies, 29 - Quimper (France)

    1996-12-31

    The confocal Raman micro-spectroscopy has been used for the study of a Lithium/polymer electrolyte-LiTFSI/V{sub 2}O{sub 5} type battery in which the polymer electrolyte thickness is of about 80 {mu}m. The analysis is performed on the side of the battery thanks to a specially designed cell which preserves all the characteristics of the real system. The analysis is performed on 20 points aligned between the anode and the cathode and with a depth of several tenth of {mu}m. The analysis of data obtained during charging/output cycles allows to evaluate the gradients of salt concentration inside the electrolyte, the pollutions of LiOH, Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, Li{sub 2}O and Li{sub 3}N -type at the lithium interface, but also the structural modifications of the cathode material. The in-situ study of concentration gradients inside the electrolyte is of prime importance for the understanding of dendrites growth. (J.S.) 11 refs.

  14. Monitoring pancreatic carcinogenesis by the molecular imaging of cathepsin E in vivo using confocal laser endomicroscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Li

    Full Text Available The monitoring of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC in high-risk populations is essential. Cathepsin E (CTSE is specifically and highly expressed in PDAC and pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasias (PanINs, and its expression gradually increases along with disease progression. In this study, we first established an in situ 7,12-dimethyl-1,2-benzanthracene (DMBA-induced rat model for PanINs and PDAC and then confirmed that tumorigenesis properties in this model were consistent with those of human PDAC in that CTSE expression gradually increased with tumor development using histology and immunohistochemistry. Then, using in vivo imaging of heterotopically implanted tumors generated from CTSE- overexpressing cells (PANC-1-CTSE in nude mice and in vitro imaging of PanINs and PDAC in DMBA-induced rats, the specificity of the synthesized CTSE-activatable probe was verified. Quantitative determination identified that the fluorescence signal ratio of pancreatic tumor to normal pancreas gradually increased in association with progressive pathological grades, with the exception of no significant difference between PanIN-II and PanIN-III grades. Finally, we monitored pancreatic carcinogenesis in vivo using confocal laser endomicroscopy (CLE in combination with the CTSE-activatable probe. A prospective double-blind control study was performed to evaluate the accuracy of this method in diagnosing PDAC and PanINs of all grades (>82.7%. This allowed us to establish effective diagnostic criteria for CLE in PDAC and PanINs to facilitate the monitoring of PDAC in high-risk populations.

  15. Imaging subsurface damage of grinded fused silica optics by confocal fluorescence microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    NEAUPORT, Jérôme; Cormont, P; Legros, P; Ambard, C; Destribats, J

    2009-01-01

    International audience; We report an experimental investigation of fluorescence confocal microscopy as a tool to measure subsurface damage on grinded fused silica optics. Confocal fluorescence microscopy was performed with an excitation at the wavelength of 405 nm on fixed abrasive diamond grinded fused silica samples. We detail the measured fluorescence spectrums and compare them to those of oil based coolants and grinding slurries. We evidence that oil based coolant used in diamond grinding...

  16. Anatomical and metabolic small-animal whole-body imaging using ring-shaped confocal photoacoustic computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Jun; Chatni, Muhammad; Maslov, Konstantin; Wang, Lihong V.

    2013-03-01

    Due to the wide use of animals for human disease studies, small animal whole-body imaging plays an increasingly important role in biomedical research. Currently, none of the existing imaging modalities can provide both anatomical and glucose metabolic information, leading to higher costs of building dual-modality systems. Even with image coregistration, the spatial resolution of the metabolic imaging modality is not improved. We present a ring-shaped confocal photoacoustic computed tomography (RC-PACT) system that can provide both assessments in a single modality. Utilizing the novel design of confocal full-ring light delivery and ultrasound transducer array detection, RC-PACT provides full-view cross-sectional imaging with high spatial resolution. Scanning along the orthogonal direction provides three-dimensional imaging. While the mouse anatomy was imaged with endogenous hemoglobin contrast, the glucose metabolism was imaged with a near-infrared dye-labeled 2-deoxyglucose. Through mouse tumor models, we demonstrate that RC-PACT may be a paradigm shifting imaging method for preclinical research.

  17. raman

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    also had the devoted and loyal assistance of Asutosh Dey, known to everyone in the Association as Ashu Babu. Raman soon ...... Even after reaching the hotel, the stream of photographers and news- paper reporters continued to show us their ...... My affection, loyalty and respect for him were something extraordinary and I ...

  18. Selenium Preferentially Accumulates in the Eye Lens Following Embryonic Exposure: A Confocal X-ray Fluorescence Imaging Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choudhury, Sanjukta; Thomas, Jith; Sylvain, Nicole J.; Ponomarenko, Olena; Gordon, Robert A.; Heald, Steve M.; Janz, David M.; Krone, Patrick H.; Coulthard, Ian; George, Graham N.; Pickering, Ingrid J.

    2015-02-17

    Maternal transfer of elevated selenium (Se) to offspring is an important route of Se exposure for fish in the natural environment. However, there is a lack of information on the tissue specific spatial distribution and speciation of Se in the early developmental stages of fish, which provide important information about Se toxicokinetics. The effect of maternal transfer of Se was studied by feeding adult zebrafish a Se-elevated or a control diet followed by collection of larvae from both groups. Novel confocal synchrotron-based techniques were used to investigate Se within intact preserved larvae. Confocal X-ray fluorescence imaging was used to compare Se distributions within specific planes of an intact larva from each of the two groups. The elevated Se treatment showed substantially higher Se levels than the control; Se preferentially accumulated to highest levels in the eye lens, with lower levels in the retina, yolk and other tissues. Confocal X-ray absorption spectroscopy was used to determine that the speciation of Se within the eye lens of the intact larva was a selenomethionine-like species. Preferential accumulation of Se in the eye lens may suggest a direct cause-and-effect relationship between exposure to elevated Se and Se-induced ocular impairments reported previously. This study illustrates the effectiveness of confocal X-ray fluorescence methods for investigating trace element distribution and speciation in intact biological specimens

  19. Probe-based confocal laser endomicroscopy (pCLE) - a new imaging technique for in situ localization of spermatozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trottmann, Matthias; Stepp, Herbert; Sroka, Ronald; Heide, Michael; Liedl, Bernhard; Reese, Sven; Becker, Armin J; Stief, Christian G; Kölle, Sabine

    2015-05-01

    In azoospermic patients, spermatozoa are routinely obtained by testicular sperm extraction (TESE). However, success rates of this technique are moderate, because the site of excision of testicular tissue is determined arbitrarily. Therefore the aim of this study was to establish probe-based laser endomicroscopy (pCLE) a noval biomedical imaging technique, which provides the opportunity of non-invasive, real-time visualisation of tissue at histological resolution. Using pCLE we clearly visualized longitudinal and horizontal views of the tubuli seminiferi contorti and localized vital spermatozoa. Obtained images and real-time videos were subsequently compared with confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) of spermatozoa and tissues, respectively. Comparative visualization of single native Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM, left) and probe-based laser endomicroscopy (pCLE, right) using Pro Flex(TM) UltraMini O after staining with acriflavine. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Quantitative volumetric Raman imaging of three dimensional cell cultures

    KAUST Repository

    Kallepitis, Charalambos

    2017-03-22

    The ability to simultaneously image multiple biomolecules in biologically relevant three-dimensional (3D) cell culture environments would contribute greatly to the understanding of complex cellular mechanisms and cell–material interactions. Here, we present a computational framework for label-free quantitative volumetric Raman imaging (qVRI). We apply qVRI to a selection of biological systems: human pluripotent stem cells with their cardiac derivatives, monocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages in conventional cell culture systems and mesenchymal stem cells inside biomimetic hydrogels that supplied a 3D cell culture environment. We demonstrate visualization and quantification of fine details in cell shape, cytoplasm, nucleus, lipid bodies and cytoskeletal structures in 3D with unprecedented biomolecular specificity for vibrational microspectroscopy.

  1. Novel strategies of Raman imaging for brain tumor research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anna, Imiela; Bartosz, Polis; Lech, Polis; Halina, Abramczyk

    2017-10-17

    Raman diagnostics and imaging have been shown to be an effective tool for the analysis and discrimination of human brain tumors from normal structures. Raman spectroscopic methods have potential to be applied in clinical practice as they allow for identification of tumor margins during surgery. In this study, we investigate medulloblastoma (grade IV WHO) (n= 5), low-grade astrocytoma (grades I-II WHO) (n =4), ependymoma (n=3) and metastatic brain tumors (n= 1) and the tissue from the negative margins used as normal controls. We compare a high grade medulloblastoma, low grade astrocytoma and non-tumor samples from human central nervous system (CNS) tissue. Based on the properties of the Raman vibrational features and Raman images we provide a real-time feedback method that is label-free to monitor tumor metabolism that reveals reprogramming of biosynthesis of lipids, proteins, DNA and RNA. Our results indicate marked metabolic differences between low and high grade brain tumors. We discuss molecular mechanisms causing these metabolic changes, particularly lipid alterations in malignant medulloblastoma and low grade gliomas that may shed light on the mechanisms driving tumor recurrence thereby revealing new approaches for the treatment of malignant glioma. We have found that the high-grade tumors of central nervous system (medulloblastoma) exhibit enhanced level of β-sheet conformation and down-regulated level of α-helix conformation when comparing against normal tissue. We have found that almost all tumors studied in the paper have increased Raman signals of nucleic acids. This increase can be interpreted as increased DNA/RNA turnover in brain tumors. We have shown that the ratio of Raman intensities I 2930 /I 2845 at 2930 and 2845 cm -1 is a good source of information on the ratio of lipid and protein contents. We have found that the ratio reflects the different lipid and protein contents of cancerous brain tissue compared to the non-tumor tissue. We found that

  2. Using Raman spectroscopic imaging for non-destructive analysis of filler distribution in chalk filled polypropylene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boros, Evelin; Porse, Peter Bak; Nielsen, Inga

    2016-01-01

    A feasibility study on using Raman spectral imaging for visualization and analysis of filler distribution in chalk filled poly-propylene samples has been carried out. The spectral images were acquired using a Raman spectrometer with 785 nm light source.Eight injection-molded samples with concentr...

  3. Imaging subsurface damage of grinded fused silica optics by confocal fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neauport, J; Cormont, P; Legros, P; Ambard, C; Destribats, J

    2009-03-02

    We report an experimental investigation of fluorescence confocal microscopy as a tool to measure subsurface damage on grinded fused silica optics. Confocal fluorescence microscopy was performed with an excitation at the wavelength of 405 nm on fixed abrasive diamond grinded fused silica samples. We detail the measured fluorescence spectrums and compare them to those of oil based coolants and grinding slurries. We evidence that oil based coolant used in diamond grinding induces a fluorescence that marks the subsurface damages and eases its observation. Such residual traces might also be involved in the laser damage process.

  4. Imaging drug delivery to skin with stimulated Raman scattering microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saar, Brian G; Contreras-Rojas, L Rodrigo; Xie, X Sunney; Guy, Richard H

    2011-06-06

    Efficient drug delivery to the skin is essential for the treatment of major dermatologic diseases, such as eczema, psoriasis and acne. However, many compounds penetrate the skin barrier poorly and require optimized formulations to ensure their bioavailability. Here, stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy, a recently developed, label-free chemical imaging tool, is used to acquire high resolution images of multiple chemical components of a topical formulation as it penetrates into mammalian skin. This technique uniquely provides label-free, nondestructive, three-dimensional images with high spatiotemporal resolution. It reveals novel features of (trans)dermal drug delivery in the tissue environment: different rates of drug penetration via hair follicles as compared to the intercellular pathway across the stratum corneum are directly observed, and the precipitation of drug crystals on the skin surface is visualized after the percutaneous penetration of the cosolvent excipient in the formulation. The high speed three-dimensional imaging capability of SRS thus reveals features that cannot be seen with other techniques, providing both kinetic information and mechanistic insight into the (trans)dermal drug delivery process.

  5. In vivo confocal Raman microscopic determination of depth profiles of the stratum corneum lipid organization influenced by application of various oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choe, ChunSik; Schleusener, Johannes; Lademann, Jürgen; Darvin, Maxim E

    2017-08-01

    The intercellular lipids (ICL) of stratum corneum (SC) play an important role in maintaining the skin barrier function. The lateral and lamellar packing order of ICL in SC is not homogenous, but rather depth-dependent. This study aimed to analyze the influence of the topically applied mineral-derived (paraffin and petrolatum) and plant-derived (almond oil and jojoba oil) oils on the depth-dependent ICL profile ordering of the SC in vivo. Confocal Raman microscopy (CRM), a unique tool to analyze the depth profile of the ICL structure non-invasively, is employed to investigate the interaction between oils and human SC in vivo. The results show that the response of SC to oils' permeation varies in the depths. All oils remain in the upper layers of the SC (0-20% of SC thickness) and show predominated differences of ICL ordering from intact skin. In these depths, skin treated with plant-derived oils shows more disordered lateral and lamellar packing order of ICL than intact skin (poils do not influence the lateral packing order of SC ICL (p>0.1), except plant-derived oils at the depth 30% of SC thickness. In the deeper layers of the SC (60-100% of SC thickness), no difference between ICL lateral packing order of the oil-treated and intact skin can be observed, except that at the depths of 70-90% of the SC thickness, where slight changes with more disorder states are measured for plant-derived oil treated skin (poil types remain in the superficial layers of the SC (0-20% of the SC thickness). Skin treated with mineral- and plant-derived oils shows significantly higher disordered lateral and lamellar packing order of ICL in these layers of the SC compared to intact skin. Plant-derived oils significantly changed the ICL ordering in the depths of 30% and 70-90% of the SC thickness, which is likely due to the penetration of free fatty acids in the deeper layers of the SC. Copyright © 2017 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights

  6. Development and Application of Raman Microspectroscopic and Raman Imaging Techniques for Cell Biological Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    PUPPELS, G J; SCHUT, T C B; SIJTSEMA, N M; GROND, M; MARABOEUF, F; DEGRAUW, C G; FIGDOR, C G; GREVE, J

    1995-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is being used to study biological molecules for some three decades now. Thanks to continuing advances in instrumentation more and more applications have become feasible in which molecules are studied in situ, and this has enabled Raman spectroscopy to enter the realms of

  7. Pushing back the limits of Raman imaging by coupling super-resolution and chemometrics for aerosols characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offroy, Marc; Moreau, Myriam; Sobanska, Sophie; Milanfar, Peyman; Duponchel, Ludovic

    2015-01-01

    The increasing interest in nanoscience in many research fields like physics, chemistry, and biology, including the environmental fate of the produced nano-objects, requires instrumental improvements to address the sub-micrometric analysis challenges. The originality of our approach is to use both the super-resolution concept and multivariate curve resolution (MCR-ALS) algorithm in confocal Raman imaging to surmount its instrumental limits and to characterize chemical components of atmospheric aerosols at the level of the individual particles. We demonstrate the possibility to go beyond the diffraction limit with this algorithmic approach. Indeed, the spatial resolution is improved by 65% to achieve 200 nm for the considered far-field spectrophotometer. A multivariate curve resolution method is then coupled with super-resolution in order to explore the heterogeneous structure of submicron particles for describing physical and chemical processes that may occur in the atmosphere. The proposed methodology provides new tools for sub-micron characterization of heterogeneous samples using far-field (i.e. conventional) Raman imaging spectrometer. PMID:26201867

  8. A novel method for evaluation of capillarity in human skeletal muscles from confocal 3D images

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Janáček, Jiří; Cvetko, E.; Kubínová, Lucie; Travnik, L.; Eržen, I.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 81, č. 2 (2011), s. 231-238 ISSN 0026-2862 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) MEB090910; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06063 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : confocal microscopy * 3D * capillaries * skeletal muscle * human Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.828, year: 2011

  9. Imaging inclusion complex formation in starch granules using confocal laser scanning microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manca, Marianna; Woortman, Albert J. J.; Loos, Katja; Loi, Maria A.

    The tendency of amylose to form inclusion complexes with guest molecules has been an object of wide interest due to its fundamental role in food processing. Here we investigated the features of starch granules from several botanical sources using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and

  10. Raman imaging of polymer gels and elastomer blends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appel, Rainer

    2000-12-01

    The incorporation of high-resolution optics in a Raman spectrometer allows sampling from areas less than one micron in diameter. The addition of a confocal microscope improves the axial resolution to a couple of microns. The fast data collection combined with high lateral and vertical resolutions makes possible scanning experiments in which the specimen is advanced in micron size steps. Analysis of the spectra provides information on the spatial composition of the sample. For macroporous N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPA) gel the temperature induced evolution of the pore structures is characterized. This model is used to explain surface roughness of the gels and characteristics of a NIPA- acrylamide (PAAM) interface. At room temperature, the average sizes of the pores and the width of polymer-rich areas are 75 μm and 20 μm, respectively. At higher temperatures polymer chains bunch together and this process accelerates rapidly near the volume phase transition temperature (34°C). The porous structure of the NIPA extends to the gel's boundary causing surface roughness, which, like the bulk material, is temperature dependent. A shrinking process results in a dense shell on the surface. Also, the surface becomes smoother due to hydrophobic interactions between isopropyl groups in the NIPA gel. For a polymer-polymer interface we showed that different drying and diffusion times affect the topography of the interfacial region. Phase separation in binary mixtures of two polymers, polyisobutadiene (BR) and brominated poly(isobuthylene- co-para-methylstyrene) (BIMS), is studied for different compositions of the blends. Binary blends of BIMS and BR do mix better in the presence of precipitated silica and domain sizes decrease from approximate 5 μm to less than 1μm. Blend components with polar groups like BIMS, silica, and zinc stearate can be found in close proximity to each other. The blend morphology of the uncured samples is dependent upon temperature. Increased temperature

  11. Mapping the lignin distribution in pretreated sugarcane bagasse by confocal and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Delignification pretreatments of biomass and methods to assess their efficacy are crucial for biomass-to-biofuels research and technology. Here, we applied confocal and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) using one- and two-photon excitation to map the lignin distribution within bagasse fibers pretreated with acid and alkali. The evaluated spectra and decay times are correlated with previously calculated lignin fractions. We have also investigated the influence of the pretreatment on the lignin distribution in the cell wall by analyzing the changes in the fluorescence characteristics using two-photon excitation. Eucalyptus fibers were also analyzed for comparison. Results Fluorescence spectra and variations of the decay time correlate well with the delignification yield and the lignin distribution. The decay dependences are considered two-exponential, one with a rapid (τ1) and the other with a slow (τ2) decay time. The fastest decay is associated to concentrated lignin in the bagasse and has a low sensitivity to the treatment. The fluorescence decay time became longer with the increase of the alkali concentration used in the treatment, which corresponds to lignin emission in a less concentrated environment. In addition, the two-photon fluorescence spectrum is very sensitive to lignin content and accumulation in the cell wall, broadening with the acid pretreatment and narrowing with the alkali one. Heterogeneity of the pretreated cell wall was observed. Conclusions Our results reveal lignin domains with different concentration levels. The acid pretreatment caused a disorder in the arrangement of lignin and its accumulation in the external border of the cell wall. The alkali pretreatment efficiently removed lignin from the middle of the bagasse fibers, but was less effective in its removal from their surfaces. Our results evidenced a strong correlation between the decay times of the lignin fluorescence and its distribution within the cell

  12. Confocal microscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This is elucidated by time-resolved confocal microscopy. Keywords. Porphyrin; micro-rod; anisotropy; exciton coupling; confocal microscopy. 1. Introduction. Supra-molecular assemblies of porphyrin play a central role in light harvesting during photosynthesis.1 10 In such a system, the absorbed photon shuttles between dif-.

  13. Rigid-layer Raman-active modes in N -layer transition metal dichalcogenides: interlayer force constants and hyperspectral Raman imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froehlicher, Guillaume; Lorchat, Etienne; Zill, Olivia; Romeo, Michelangelo; Berciaud, Stéphane

    2018-01-01

    We report a comparative study of rigid layer Raman-active modes in $N$-layer transition metal dichalcogenides. Trigonal prismatic (2Hc, such as MoSe$_2$, MoTe$_2$, WS$_2$, WSe$_2$) and distorted octahedral (1T', such as ReS$_2$ and ReSe$_2$) phases are considered. The Raman-active in-plane interlayer shear modes and out-of-plane interlayer breathing modes appear as well-defined features with wavenumbers in the range 0-40~cm$^{-1}$. These rigid layer modes are well-described by an elementary linear chain model from which the interlayer force constants are readily extracted. Remarkably, these force constants are all found to be of the same order of magnitude. Finally, we show that the prominent interlayer shear and breathing mode features allow high-precision hyperspectral Raman imaging of $N-$layer domains within a given transition metal dichalcogenide flake.

  14. Reconstruction of Axial Tomographic High Resolution Data from Confocal Fluorescence Microscopy: A Method for Improving 3D FISH Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Heintzmann

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescent confocal laser scanning microscopy allows an improved imaging of microscopic objects in three dimensions. However, the resolution along the axial direction is three times worse than the resolution in lateral directions. A method to overcome this axial limitation is tilting the object under the microscope, in a way that the direction of the optical axis points into different directions relative to the sample. A new technique for a simultaneous reconstruction from a number of such axial tomographic confocal data sets was developed and used for high resolution reconstruction of 3D‐data both from experimental and virtual microscopic data sets. The reconstructed images have a highly improved 3D resolution, which is comparable to the lateral resolution of a single deconvolved data set. Axial tomographic imaging in combination with simultaneous data reconstruction also opens the possibility for a more precise quantification of 3D data. The color images of this publication can be accessed from http://www.esacp.org/acp/2000/20‐1/heintzmann.htm. At this web address an interactive 3D viewer is additionally provided for browsing the 3D data. This java applet displays three orthogonal slices of the data set which are dynamically updated by user mouse clicks or keystrokes.

  15. Aberration correction during real time in vivo imaging of bone marrow with sensorless adaptive optics confocal microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhibin; Wei, Dan; Wei, Ling; He, Yi; Shi, Guohua; Wei, Xunbin; Zhang, Yudong

    2014-08-01

    We have demonstrated adaptive correction of specimen-induced aberration during in vivo imaging of mouse bone marrow vasculature with confocal fluorescence microscopy. Adaptive optics system was completed with wavefront sensorless correction scheme based on stochastic parallel gradient descent algorithm. Using image sharpness as the optimization metric, aberration correction was performed based upon Zernike polynomial modes. The experimental results revealed the improved signal and resolution leading to a substantially enhanced image contrast with aberration correction. The image quality of vessels at 38- and 75-μm depth increased three times and two times, respectively. The corrections allowed us to detect clearer bone marrow vasculature structures at greater contrast and improve the signal-to-noise ratio.

  16. Microsecond Scale Vibrational Spectroscopic Imaging by Multiplex Stimulated Raman Scattering Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Liao, Chien-Sheng; Slipchenko, Mikhail N.; Wang, Ping; Li, Junjie; Lee, Seung-Young; Oglesbee, Robert A.; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2015-01-01

    Real-time vibrational spectroscopic imaging is desired for monitoring cellular states and cellular processes in a label-free manner. Raman spectroscopic imaging of highly dynamic systems is inhibited by relatively slow spectral acquisition on millisecond to second scale. Here, we report microsecond scale vibrational spectroscopic imaging by lock-in free parallel detection of spectrally dispersed stimulated Raman scattering signal. Using a homebuilt tuned amplifier array, our method enables Ra...

  17. Raman imaging of millimeter-long carbon nanotubes grown by a gas flow method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kihara, Katsuya; Ishitani, Akihiro; Koyama, Tomohiro; Fukasawa, Mamoru; Inaba, Takumi; Shimizu, Maki; Homma, Yoshikazu

    2017-02-01

    Growing long carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is an important prerequisite for practical applications of CNTs. Although gas-flow-guided chemical vapor deposition can be used to produce millimeter-long CNTs, little is known regarding the associated growth mechanism. In the present work, Raman imaging was employed to characterize individual CNTs grown by the gas flow method, and Raman images of a CNT over 1.6 mm long were obtained. Two radial breathing modes were observed and the associated Raman images exhibited exactly identical distributions, indicating that the long CNT most likely had a double-walled structure, in which the CNT diameter was uniform along the whole length.

  18. Super-Resolution Raman Spectroscopy by Digital Image Processing

    OpenAIRE

    Tomita, Motohiro; Hashiguchi, Hiroki; Yamaguchi, Takuya; Takei, Munehisa; Kosemura, Daisuke; Ogura, Atsushi

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate the results of a strain (stress) evaluation obtained from Raman spectroscopy measurements with the super-resolution method (the so-called super-resolution Raman spectroscopy) for a Si substrate with a patterned SiN film (serving as a strained Si sample). To improve the spatial resolution of Raman spectroscopy, we used the super-resolution method and a high-numerical-aperture immersion lens. Additionally, we estimated the spatial resolution by an edge force model (EFM) calculati...

  19. Application of a novel confocal imaging technique for early the detection of dental decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousseau, Christel; Girkin, John M.; Vaidya, Shilpa; Hall, Andrew F.; Whitters, C. J.; Creanor, Steve L.

    2002-06-01

    In order to stop or prevent the progression of dental disease, early detection and quantification of decay are crucially important. Dental decay (caries) detection methods have traditionally involved clinical examination by eye, using probes and dental radiography, but up to 60% of lesions are missed. What the dentist requires is a cheap, reliable method of detection of early disease, ideally with information on the depth and rate of growth or healing. Conventional commercial scanning confocal microscopes are unsuitable for use on dental patients. We report on a fibre optic based confocal microscope designed for in vivo examination of caries lesions. The system utilizes a common fibre both as the source and to detect the reflected confocal signal. The initial system has been optimized using dielectric mirrors and the thickness of the stack has been measured with high precision. Dental samples have been examined and the system has been demonstrated to provide information on the depth and mineral loss of a lesion. Fibre optic microscopy (FOCM) demonstrates a practical route to developing an in vivo caries profiler. In this paper, the FOCM and its applications in caries detection are described and the potential of this scheme as a practical dental probe is discussed.

  20. Confocal Microscopy on Light-emitting Nanostructures and X-ray Imaging Detectors Based on Color Centers in Lithium Fluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonfigli, F.; Almaviva, S.; Montereali, R. M.

    2010-01-01

    Confocal Laser Scanning Microscope (CLSM) is a versatile and powerful optical instrument which is gaining a strong increase of interest for biological investigations and also for the characterization of materials, microstructures and devices. We exploit its capability for the characterization of light-emitting micro and nano-structures based on color centers in lithium fluoride. CLSM was successfully used as an advanced optical reading system to detect X-ray micro-radiographies of biological specimens stored in LiF imaging detectors.

  1. SU-F-T-665: Confocal Microscopy Imaging of Cell Cycle Distribution in Cells Treated with Pegylated Gold Nanoshells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadetaporn, D; Flint, D; McFadden, C; Sawakuchi, G; Asaithamby, A

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To use confocal microscopy to distinguish cells in different phases of the cell cycle before and after treatment with pegylated gold nanoshells (PEG-AuNSs). Methods: Transfected fibrosarcoma cells (HT1080-EYFP-53BP1-FUCCI) were cultured in T-25 flasks and seeded in glass bottom dishes. These cells express the fluorescent probe AmCyan during the G2/S phases of the cell cycle, mCherry during the G1 phase, and EYFP tagged to the DNA repair protein 53BP1. After allowing cells 4 h to adhere to dishes, PEG-AuNS (Nanospectra Biosciences, Houston, TX) at a concentration of 0.15 OD were administered. At time points of 8, 16 and 24 h following treatment, the PEG-AuNS-treated and control samples were washed with phosphate buffered saline (PBS) and fixed using 4% paraformaldehyde in PBS. Samples were imaged with an Olympus FV1200 confocal microscope using 473, 543, and 641 nm excitation lasers. We used band-pass filters to select AmCyan and mCherry fluorescence. Reflection from the 641 nm laser was used to detect PEG-AuNSs. Z-stack images were analyzed to assess cell cycle distribution through fluorescent probe expression. Live cells were imaged after PEG-AuNS treatment using a confocal microscope with a stage top CO2 incubator. Results: We were able to obtain high-resolution images of cells with internalized AuNSs. We were also able to distinguish cells in different phases of the cell cycle. Conclusion: This work demonstrates a new assay to investigate the effect of AuNSs on the cell cycle phase in live cells. Future work will employ confocal microscopy and flow cytometry to focus on effects of AuNS treatment on cell cycle distribution. This research was supported by the Sister Institution Network Fund and the Center for Radiation Oncology Research at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center and Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas. Gabriel Sawakuchi has research support from Elekta Inc.

  2. SU-F-T-665: Confocal Microscopy Imaging of Cell Cycle Distribution in Cells Treated with Pegylated Gold Nanoshells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadetaporn, D [Rice University, Houston, TX (United States); The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Flint, D; McFadden, C; Sawakuchi, G [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Asaithamby, A [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To use confocal microscopy to distinguish cells in different phases of the cell cycle before and after treatment with pegylated gold nanoshells (PEG-AuNSs). Methods: Transfected fibrosarcoma cells (HT1080-EYFP-53BP1-FUCCI) were cultured in T-25 flasks and seeded in glass bottom dishes. These cells express the fluorescent probe AmCyan during the G2/S phases of the cell cycle, mCherry during the G1 phase, and EYFP tagged to the DNA repair protein 53BP1. After allowing cells 4 h to adhere to dishes, PEG-AuNS (Nanospectra Biosciences, Houston, TX) at a concentration of 0.15 OD were administered. At time points of 8, 16 and 24 h following treatment, the PEG-AuNS-treated and control samples were washed with phosphate buffered saline (PBS) and fixed using 4% paraformaldehyde in PBS. Samples were imaged with an Olympus FV1200 confocal microscope using 473, 543, and 641 nm excitation lasers. We used band-pass filters to select AmCyan and mCherry fluorescence. Reflection from the 641 nm laser was used to detect PEG-AuNSs. Z-stack images were analyzed to assess cell cycle distribution through fluorescent probe expression. Live cells were imaged after PEG-AuNS treatment using a confocal microscope with a stage top CO2 incubator. Results: We were able to obtain high-resolution images of cells with internalized AuNSs. We were also able to distinguish cells in different phases of the cell cycle. Conclusion: This work demonstrates a new assay to investigate the effect of AuNSs on the cell cycle phase in live cells. Future work will employ confocal microscopy and flow cytometry to focus on effects of AuNS treatment on cell cycle distribution. This research was supported by the Sister Institution Network Fund and the Center for Radiation Oncology Research at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center and Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas. Gabriel Sawakuchi has research support from Elekta Inc.

  3. Confocal imaging of whole vertebrate embryos reveals novel insights into molecular and cellular mechanisms of organ development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadel, Diana M.; Keller, Bradley B.; Sandell, Lisa L.

    2014-03-01

    Confocal microscopy has been an invaluable tool for studying cellular or sub-cellular biological processes. The study of vertebrate embryology is based largely on examination of whole embryos and organs. The application of confocal microscopy to immunostained whole mount embryos, combined with three dimensional (3D) image reconstruction technologies, opens new avenues for synthesizing molecular, cellular and anatomical analysis of vertebrate development. Optical cropping of the region of interest enables visualization of structures that are morphologically complex or obscured, and solid surface rendering of fluorescent signal facilitates understanding of 3D structures. We have applied these technologies to whole mount immunostained mouse embryos to visualize developmental morphogenesis of the mammalian inner ear and heart. Using molecular markers of neuron development and transgenic reporters of neural crest cell lineage we have examined development of inner ear neurons that originate from the otic vesicle, along with the supporting glial cells that derive from the neural crest. The image analysis reveals a previously unrecognized coordinated spatial organization between migratory neural crest cells and neurons of the cochleovestibular nerve. The images also enable visualization of early cochlear spiral nerve morphogenesis relative to the developing cochlea, demonstrating a heretofore unknown association of neural crest cells with extending peripheral neurite projections. We performed similar analysis of embryonic hearts in mouse and chick, documenting the distribution of adhesion molecules during septation of the outflow tract and remodeling of aortic arches. Surface rendering of lumen space defines the morphology in a manner similar to resin injection casting and micro-CT.

  4. FluoRender: An application of 2D image space methods for 3D and 4D confocal microscopy data visualization in neurobiology research

    KAUST Repository

    Wan, Yong

    2012-02-01

    2D image space methods are processing methods applied after the volumetric data are projected and rendered into the 2D image space, such as 2D filtering, tone mapping and compositing. In the application domain of volume visualization, most 2D image space methods can be carried out more efficiently than their 3D counterparts. Most importantly, 2D image space methods can be used to enhance volume visualization quality when applied together with volume rendering methods. In this paper, we present and discuss the applications of a series of 2D image space methods as enhancements to confocal microscopy visualizations, including 2D tone mapping, 2D compositing, and 2D color mapping. These methods are easily integrated with our existing confocal visualization tool, FluoRender, and the outcome is a full-featured visualization system that meets neurobiologists\\' demands for qualitative analysis of confocal microscopy data. © 2012 IEEE.

  5. Preclinical Evaluation of Raman Nanoparticle Biodistribution for their Potential Use in Clinical Endoscopy Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zavaleta, Cristina L; Hartman, Keith B; Miao, Zheng

    2011-01-01

    toxicity. In this study, the natural biodistribution of gold surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) nanoparticles is evaluated by radiolabeling them with (64) Cu and imaging their localization over time using micropositron emission tomography (PET). Mice are injected either intravenously (IV...... intestine (5 h = 10.37% ID g(-1) ; 24 h = 0.42% ID g(-1) ) with minimal uptake in other organs. Raman imaging of excised tissues correlate well with biodistribution data. These results suggest that the topical application of SERS nanoparticles in the mouse colon appears to minimize their systemic...... with endoscopy. The use of an accessory Raman endoscope in conjunction with topically administered tumor-targeting Raman nanoparticles during a routine colonoscopy could offer a new way to sensitively detect dysplastic lesions while circumventing Raman's limited depth of penetration and avoiding systemic...

  6. Lateral Brightness Correction in Confocal Microscopy Images Using Mathematical Morphology Filters

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Michálek, Jan; Čapek, M.; Mao, X. W.; Kubínová, Lucie

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 16, Suppl.2 (2010), s. 758-759 ISSN 1431-9276. [Microscopy and Microanalysis 2010. Portland, 01.08.2010-05.08.2010] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06063; GA MŠk(CZ) ME09010; GA ČR(CZ) GA102/08/0691; GA ČR(CZ) GA304/09/0733 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : Lipschitz cover * lateral intensity correction * confocal microscopy Subject RIV: JD - Computer Applications, Robotics Impact factor: 2.179, year: 2010

  7. A femtosecond Raman generator for long wavelength two-photon and third harmonic generation imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Trägårdh

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate a femtosecond single pass Raman generator based on an YVO4 crystal pumped by a high energy fiber laser at a wavelength of 1064 nm and a repetition rate of 1 MHz. The Raman generator shifts the pump wavelength to 1175 nm, in a broadband spectrum, making it suitable for multi-photon microscopy. We use the Raman generator for third harmonic generation imaging of live plant specimens as well as for two-photon fluorescence imaging of red fluorescent protein expressing HeLa cells. We demonstrate that the photo-damage to a live specimen is low.

  8. Label-Free Raman Imaging to Monitor Breast Tumor Signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciubuc, John

    Methods built on Raman spectroscopy have shown major potential in describing and discriminating between malignant and benign specimens. Accurate, real-time medical diagnosis benefits in substantial improvements through this vibrational optical method. Not only is acquisition of data possible in milliseconds and analysis in minutes, Raman allows concurrent detection and monitoring of all biological components. Besides validating a significant Raman signature distinction between non-tumorigenic (MCF-10A) and tumorigenic (MCF-7) breast epithelial cells, this study reveals a label-free method to assess overexpression of epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFR) in tumor cells. EGFR overexpression sires Raman features associated with phosphorylated threonine and serine, and modifications of DNA/RNA characteristics. Investigations by gel electrophoresis reveal EGF induction of phosphorylated Akt, agreeing with the Raman results. The analysis presented is a vital step toward Raman-based evaluation of EGF receptors in breast cancer cells. With the goal of clinically applying Raman-guided methods for diagnosis of breast tumors, the current results lay the basis for proving label-free optical alternatives in making prognosis of the disease.

  9. Super-Resolution Raman Spectroscopy by Digital Image Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motohiro Tomita

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate the results of a strain (stress evaluation obtained from Raman spectroscopy measurements with the super-resolution method (the so-called super-resolution Raman spectroscopy for a Si substrate with a patterned SiN film (serving as a strained Si sample. To improve the spatial resolution of Raman spectroscopy, we used the super-resolution method and a high-numerical-aperture immersion lens. Additionally, we estimated the spatial resolution by an edge force model (EFM calculation. One- and two-dimensional stress distributions in the Si substrate with the patterned SiN film were obtained by super-resolution Raman spectroscopy. The results from both super-resolution Raman spectroscopy and the EFM calculation were compared and were found to correlate well. The best spatial resolution, 70 nm, was achieved by super-resolution Raman measurements with an oil immersion lens. We conclude that super-resolution Raman spectroscopy is a useful method for evaluating stress in miniaturized state-of-the-art transistors, and we believe that the super-resolution method will soon be a requisite technique.

  10. A preliminary assessment of using a white light confocal imaging profiler for cut mark analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Christopher W; Moore, Christopher R; Leifheit, Randell

    2012-01-01

    White light confocal microscopy creates detailed 3D representations of microsurfaces that can be qualitatively and quantitatively analyzed. The study describes its application to the analysis of cut marks on bone, particularly when discerning cuts made by steel tools from those made by stone. The process described comes from a study where cuts were manually made on a cow rib with seven cutting tools, four stone (an unmodified chert flake, a chert biface, a bifacially ground slate fragment, and an unsharpened piece of slate), and three steel (a Swiss Army Knife, a serrate steak knife, and a serrate saw). Kerfs were magnified ×20 and 3D data clouds were generated using a Sensofar(®) White Light Confocal Profiler (WLCP). Kerf profiles and surface areas, volumes, mean depths, and maximum depths were calculated with proprietary software (SensoScan(®) and SolarMap(®)). For the most part, the stone tools make shallower and wider cuts. Kerf floors can be studied at higher magnifications; they were viewed at ×100. When comparing the kerf floors of the unsharpened slate and the serrate steak knife it was found that the slate floor was more uneven, but the serrate steak knife generated more overall relief. Although preliminary, the approach described here successfully distinguishes stone and steel tools; the authors conclude that the WLCP is a promising technology for cut mark analysis because of the very detailed 3D representations it creates and the numerous avenues of analysis it provides.

  11. Preanalytical considerations in detection of colorectal cancer in blood serum using Raman molecular imaging (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treado, Patrick J.; Stewart, Shona D.; Smith, Aaron; Kirschner, Heather; Post, Christopher; Overholt, Bergein F.

    2016-03-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer in men and women in the United States. Raman Molecular Imaging (RMI) is an effective technique to evaluate human tissue, cells and bodily fluids, including blood serum for disease diagnosis. ChemImage Corporation, in collaboration with clinicians, has been engaged in development of an in vitro diagnostic Raman assay focused on CRC detection. The Raman Assay for Colorectal Cancer (RACC) exploits the high specificity of Raman imaging to distinguish diseased from normal dried blood serum droplets without additional reagents. Pilot Study results from testing of hundreds of biobank patient samples have demonstrated that RACC detects CRC with high sensitivity and specificity. However, expanded clinical trials, which are ongoing, are revealing a host of important preanalytical considerations associated with sample collection, sample storage and stability, sample shipping, sample preparation and sample interferents, which impact detection performance. Results from recent clinical studies will be presented.

  12. Live confocal imaging of intrashell cytoplasm and calcification process in a symbiotic large benthic foraminifer Amphisorus kudakajimensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Yoshikazu; Fuita, Kazuhiko; Toyofuku, Takashi; Nakamura, Takashi

    2015-04-01

    Algal symbiont-bearing large benthic foraminifers are primary and carbonate producers as well as paleoenvironmental indicators in tropical and subtropical reef environments. Despite their importance, their cellular physiology is not well known. In this study, we have developed methods to observe in vivo images of a living symbiotic porcelaneous large foraminifer, Amphisorus kudakajimensis. Nikon A1 confocal laser scanning microscope with Calcein-AM as a fluorescent indicator was used to visualize morphology and streaming of cytoplasm in living A. kudakajimensis. The observation showed that in the marginal part of intrashell cytoplasm, cytoplasm gradually became highly branched and vacuolated. We also succeeded in observing elevated pH (pH 9.0) and lowered pH (pH 6.0) vesicles in reticulopodia-like cytoplasms, using a cell membrane-impermeable fluorescent pH indicator with low toxicity (HPTS). This study demonstrate the use of confocal microscopy in studying cytoplasmic dynamics and initial calcification process such as seawater endocytosis and alkalization of seawater vacuoles.

  13. Referencing techniques for high-speed confocal fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) based on analog mean-delay (AMD) method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Byungyeon; Lee, Minsuk; Park, Byungjun; Lee, Seungrag; Won, Youngjae

    2017-02-01

    Analog mean-delay (AMD) method is a new powerful alternative method in determining the lifetime of a fluorescence molecule for high-speed confocal fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). Even though the photon economy and the lifetime precision of the AMD method are proven to be as good as the state-of-the-art time-correlated single photon counting (TC-SPC) method, there have been some speculations and concerns about the accuracy of this method. In the AMD method, the temporal waveform of an emitted fluorescence signal is directly recorded with a slow digitizer whose bandwidth is much lower than the temporal resolution of lifetime to be measured. We found that the drifts and the fluctuations of the absolute zero position in a measured temporal waveform are the major problems in the AMD method. As a referencing technique, we already proposed dual-channel waveform measurement scheme that may suppress these errors. In this study, we have demonstrated real-time confocal AMD-FLIM system with dual-channel waveform measurement technique.

  14. Monitoring polymorphic transformations by using in situ Raman hyperspectral imaging and image multiset analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piqueras, S; Duponchel, L; Tauler, R; de Juan, A

    2014-03-28

    Polymorphism is often encountered in many crystalline compounds. To control the quality of the products, it is relevant knowing the potential presence of polymorph transformations induced by different agents, such as light exposure or temperature changes. Raman images offer a great potential to identify polymorphs involved in a process and to accurately describe this kind of solid-state transformation in the surface scanned. As a way of example, this work proposes the use of multiset analysis on the series of Raman hyperspectral images acquired during a thermal induced transformation of carbamazepine as the optimal way to extract useful information about polymorphic or any other kind of dynamic transformation among process compounds. Image multiset analysis, performed by using Multivariate Curve Resolution-Alternating Least Squares (MCR-ALS), will furnish pure spectra and distribution maps of the compounds involved in the process and, hence, will allow the identification of polymorphs and, more important, the description of the process evolution at a global and local (pixel) level. Thus, process will be defined from a spatial point of view and by means of a set of global process profiles dependent on the process control variable. The results obtained confirm the power of this methodology and show the crucial role of the spatial information contained in the image (absent in conventional spectroscopy) for a correct process description. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Simultaneous detection of multiple adulterants in dry milk using macro-scale Raman chemical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Jianwei; Chao, Kuanglin; Kim, Moon S

    2013-06-01

    The potential of Raman chemical imaging for simultaneously detecting multiple adulterants in milk powder was investigated. Potential chemical adulterants, including ammonium sulphate, dicyandiamide, melamine, and urea, were mixed together into skim dry milk in the concentration range of 0.1-5.0% for each adulterant. Using a 785-nm laser, a Raman imaging system acquired hyperspectral images in the wavenumber range of 102-2538 cm(-1) for a 25 × 25 mm(2) area of each mixture sample, with a spatial resolution of 0.25 mm. Self-modelling mixture analysis (SMA) was used to extract pure component spectra, by which the four types of the adulterants were identified at all concentration levels based on their spectral information divergence values to the reference spectra. Raman chemical images were created using the contribution images from SMA, and their use to effectively visualise identification and spatial distribution of the multiple adulterant particles in the dry milk was demonstrated. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. A 1064 nm Dispersive Raman Spectral Imaging System for Food Safety and Quality Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuanglin Chao

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Raman spectral imaging is an effective method to analyze and evaluate the chemical composition and structure of a sample, and has many applications for food safety and quality research. This study developed a 1064 nm dispersive Raman spectral imaging system for surface and subsurface analysis of food samples. A 1064 nm laser module is used for sample excitation. A bifurcated optical fiber coupled with Raman probe is used to focus excitation laser on the sample and carry scattering signal to the spectrograph. A high throughput volume phase grating disperses the incoming Raman signal. A 512 pixels Indium-Gallium-Arsenide (InGaAs detector receives the dispersed light signal. A motorized positioning table moves the sample in two-axis directions, accumulating hyperspectral image of the sample by the point-scan method. An interface software was developed in-house for parameterization, data acquisition, and data transfer. The system was spectrally calibrated using naphthalene and polystyrene. It has the Raman shift range of 142 to 1820 cm−1, the spectral resolution of 12 cm−1 at full width half maximum (FWHM. The spatial resolution of the system was evaluated using a standard resolution glass test chart. It has the spatial resolution of 0.1 mm. The application of the system was demonstrated by surface and subsurface detection of metanil yellow contamination in turmeric powder. Results indicate that the 1064 nm dispersive Raman spectral imaging system is a useful tool for food safety and quality evaluation.

  17. Label-Free Raman Hyperspectral Imaging of Single Cells Cultured on Polymer Substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinjab, Faris; Sicilia, Giovanna; Shipp, Dustin W; Marlow, Maria; Notingher, Ioan

    2017-12-01

    While Raman hyperspectral imaging has been widely used for label-free mapping of biomolecules in cells, these measurements require the cells to be cultured on weakly Raman scattering substrates. However, many applications in biological sciences and engineering require the cells to be cultured on polymer substrates that often generate large Raman scattering signals. Here, we discuss the theoretical limits of the signal-to-noise ratio in the Raman spectra of cells in the presence of polymer signals and how optical aberrations may affect these measurements. We show that Raman spectra of cells cultured on polymer substrates can be obtained using automatic subtraction of the polymer signals and demonstrate the capabilities of these methods in two important applications: tissue engineering and in vitro toxicology screening of drugs. Apart from their scientific and technological importance, these applications are examples of the two most common measurement configurations: (1) cells cultured on an optically thick polymer substrate measured using an immersion/dipping objective; and (2) cells cultured on a transparent polymer substrate and measured using an inverted optical microscope. In these examples, we show that Raman hyperspectral data sets with sufficient quality can be successfully acquired to map the distribution of common biomolecules in cells, such as nucleic acids, proteins, and lipids, as well as detecting the early stages of apoptosis. We also discuss strategies for further improvements that could expand the application of Raman hyperspectral imaging on polymer substrates even further in biomedical sciences and engineering.

  18. A novel non-imaging optics based Raman spectroscopy device for transdermal blood analyte measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Chae-Ryon; Barman, Ishan; Dingari, Narahara Chari; Kang, Jeon Woong; Galindo, Luis; Dasari, Ramachandra R.; Feld, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    Due to its high chemical specificity, Raman spectroscopy has been considered to be a promising technique for non-invasive disease diagnosis. However, during Raman excitation, less than one out of a million photons undergo spontaneous Raman scattering and such weakness in Raman scattered light often require highly efficient collection of Raman scattered light for the analysis of biological tissues. We present a novel non-imaging optics based portable Raman spectroscopy instrument designed for enhanced light collection. While the instrument was demonstrated on transdermal blood glucose measurement, it can also be used for detection of other clinically relevant blood analytes such as creatinine, urea and cholesterol, as well as other tissue diagnosis applications. For enhanced light collection, a non-imaging optical element called compound hyperbolic concentrator (CHC) converts the wide angular range of scattered photons (numerical aperture (NA) of 1.0) from the tissue into a limited range of angles accommodated by the acceptance angles of the collection system (e.g., an optical fiber with NA of 0.22). A CHC enables collimation of scattered light directions to within extremely narrow range of angles while also maintaining practical physical dimensions. Such a design allows for the development of a very efficient and compact spectroscopy system for analyzing highly scattering biological tissues. Using the CHC-based portable Raman instrument in a clinical research setting, we demonstrate successful transdermal blood glucose predictions in human subjects undergoing oral glucose tolerance tests. PMID:22125761

  19. Cell Imaging by Spontaneous and Amplified Raman Spectroscopies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Rusciano

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Raman spectroscopy (RS is a powerful, noninvasive optical technique able to detect vibrational modes of chemical bonds. The high chemical specificity due to its fingerprinting character and the minimal requests for sample preparation have rendered it nowadays very popular in the analysis of biosystems for diagnostic purposes. In this paper, we first discuss the main advantages of spontaneous RS by describing the study of a single protozoan (Acanthamoeba, which plays an important role in a severe ophthalmological disease (Acanthamoeba keratitis. Later on, we point out that the weak signals that originated from Raman scattering do not allow probing optically thin samples, such as cellular membrane. Experimental approaches able to overcome this drawback are based on the use of metallic nanostructures, which lead to a huge amplification of the Raman yields thanks to the excitation of localized surface plasmon resonances. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS and tip-enhanced Raman scattering (TERS are examples of such innovative techniques, in which metallic nanostructures are assembled on a flat surface or on the tip of a scanning probe microscope, respectively. Herein, we provide a couple of examples (red blood cells and bacterial spores aimed at studying cell membranes with these techniques.

  20. Raman imaging of carious lesions using a hollow optical fiber probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Eriko; Kakino, Satoko; Matsuura, Yuji

    2008-08-10

    Raman spectroscopy using a hollow optical fiber probe with a glass ball lens at the distal end is proposed for detection of early caries lesions. Raman spectroscopy on carious lesions of extracted teeth showed that the probe enables measurement with a high signal-to-noise ratio when combined with a ball lens with a high refractive index. The proposed probe and lens combination detects changes in Raman spectra caused by morphological differences between sound and carious enamel. We also obtained a high-contrast image of an early carious lesion by scanning the tooth surface with the probe.

  1. Raman active components of skin cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xu; Moy, Austin J; Nguyen, Hieu T M; Zhang, Jason; Fox, Matthew C; Sebastian, Katherine R; Reichenberg, Jason S; Markey, Mia K; Tunnell, James W

    2017-06-01

    Raman spectroscopy (RS) has shown great potential in noninvasive cancer screening. Statistically based algorithms, such as principal component analysis, are commonly employed to provide tissue classification; however, they are difficult to relate to the chemical and morphological basis of the spectroscopic features and underlying disease. As a result, we propose the first Raman biophysical model applied to in vivo skin cancer screening data. We expand upon previous models by utilizing in situ skin constituents as the building blocks, and validate the model using previous clinical screening data collected from a Raman optical fiber probe. We built an 830nm confocal Raman microscope integrated with a confocal laser-scanning microscope. Raman imaging was performed on skin sections spanning various disease states, and multivariate curve resolution (MCR) analysis was used to resolve the Raman spectra of individual in situ skin constituents. The basis spectra of the most relevant skin constituents were combined linearly to fit in vivo human skin spectra. Our results suggest collagen, elastin, keratin, cell nucleus, triolein, ceramide, melanin and water are the most important model components. We make available for download (see supplemental information) a database of Raman spectra for these eight components for others to use as a reference. Our model reveals the biochemical and structural makeup of normal, nonmelanoma and melanoma skin cancers, and precancers and paves the way for future development of this approach to noninvasive skin cancer diagnosis.

  2. Analysis of a marine phototrophic biofilm by confocal laser scanning microscopy using the new image quantification software PHLIP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almeida Jonas S

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM is the method of choice to study interfacial biofilms and acquires time-resolved three-dimensional data of the biofilm structure. CLSM can be used in a multi-channel modus where the different channels map individual biofilm components. This communication presents a novel image quantification tool, PHLIP, for the quantitative analysis of large amounts of multichannel CLSM data in an automated way. PHLIP can be freely downloaded from http://phlip.sourceforge.net. Results PHLIP is an open source public license Matlab toolbox that includes functions for CLSM imaging data handling and ten image analysis operations describing various aspects of biofilm morphology. The use of PHLIP is here demonstrated by a study of the development of a natural marine phototrophic biofilm. It is shown how the examination of the individual biofilm components using the multi-channel capability of PHLIP allowed the description of the dynamic spatial and temporal separation of diatoms, bacteria and organic and inorganic matter during the shift from a bacteria-dominated to a diatom-dominated phototrophic biofilm. Reflection images and weight measurements complementing the PHLIP analyses suggest that a large part of the biofilm mass consisted of inorganic mineral material. Conclusion The presented case study reveals new insight into the temporal development of a phototrophic biofilm where multi-channel imaging allowed to parallel monitor the dynamics of the individual biofilm components over time. This application of PHLIP presents the power of biofilm image analysis by multi-channel CLSM software and demonstrates the importance of PHLIP for the scientific community as a flexible and extendable image analysis platform for automated image processing.

  3. Analysis of a marine phototrophic biofilm by confocal laser scanning microscopy using the new image quantification software PHLIP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Lukas N; de Brouwer, Jody F C; Almeida, Jonas S; Stal, Lucas J; Xavier, João B

    2006-01-16

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) is the method of choice to study interfacial biofilms and acquires time-resolved three-dimensional data of the biofilm structure. CLSM can be used in a multi-channel modus where the different channels map individual biofilm components. This communication presents a novel image quantification tool, PHLIP, for the quantitative analysis of large amounts of multichannel CLSM data in an automated way. PHLIP can be freely downloaded from http://phlip.sourceforge.net. PHLIP is an open source public license Matlab toolbox that includes functions for CLSM imaging data handling and ten image analysis operations describing various aspects of biofilm morphology. The use of PHLIP is here demonstrated by a study of the development of a natural marine phototrophic biofilm. It is shown how the examination of the individual biofilm components using the multi-channel capability of PHLIP allowed the description of the dynamic spatial and temporal separation of diatoms, bacteria and organic and inorganic matter during the shift from a bacteria-dominated to a diatom-dominated phototrophic biofilm. Reflection images and weight measurements complementing the PHLIP analyses suggest that a large part of the biofilm mass consisted of inorganic mineral material. The presented case study reveals new insight into the temporal development of a phototrophic biofilm where multi-channel imaging allowed to parallel monitor the dynamics of the individual biofilm components over time. This application of PHLIP presents the power of biofilm image analysis by multi-channel CLSM software and demonstrates the importance of PHLIP for the scientific community as a flexible and extendable image analysis platform for automated image processing.

  4. Nondestructive 3D confocal laser imaging with deconvolution of seven whole stardust tracks with complementary XRF and quantitative analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenberg, M.; Ebel, D.S.

    2009-01-01

    We present a nondestructive 3D system for analysis of whole Stardust tracks, using a combination of Laser Confocal Scanning Microscopy and synchrotron XRF. 3D deconvolution is used for optical corrections, and results of quantitative analyses of several tracks are presented. The Stardust mission to comet Wild 2 trapped many cometary and ISM particles in aerogel, leaving behind 'tracks' of melted silica aerogel on both sides of the collector. Collected particles and their tracks range in size from submicron to millimeter scale. Interstellar dust collected on the obverse of the aerogel collector is thought to have an average track length of ∼15 (micro)m. It has been our goal to perform a total non-destructive 3D textural and XRF chemical analysis on both types of tracks. To that end, we use a combination of Laser Confocal Scanning Microscopy (LCSM) and X Ray Florescence (XRF) spectrometry. Utilized properly, the combination of 3D optical data and chemical data provides total nondestructive characterization of full tracks, prior to flattening or other destructive analysis methods. Our LCSM techniques allow imaging at 0.075 (micro)m/pixel, without the use of oil-based lenses. A full textural analysis on track No.82 is presented here as well as analysis of 6 additional tracks contained within 3 keystones (No.128, No.129 and No.140). We present a method of removing the axial distortion inherent in LCSM images, by means of a computational 3D Deconvolution algorithm, and present some preliminary experiments with computed point spread functions. The combination of 3D LCSM data and XRF data provides invaluable information, while preserving the integrity of the samples for further analysis. It is imperative that these samples, the first extraterrestrial solids returned since the Apollo era, be fully mapped nondestructively in 3D, to preserve the maximum amount of information prior to other, destructive analysis.

  5. Sparse-sampling with time-encoded (TICO) stimulated Raman scattering for fast image acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakert, Hubertus; Eibl, Matthias; Karpf, Sebastian; Huber, Robert

    2017-07-01

    Modern biomedical imaging modalities aim to provide researchers a multimodal contrast for a deeper insight into a specimen under investigation. A very promising technique is stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy, which can unveil the chemical composition of a sample with a very high specificity. Although the signal intensities are enhanced manifold to achieve a faster acquisition of images if compared to standard Raman microscopy, there is a trade-off between specificity and acquisition speed. Commonly used SRS concepts either probe only very few Raman transitions as the tuning of the applied laser sources is complicated or record whole spectra with a spectrometer based setup. While the first approach is fast, it reduces the specificity and the spectrometer approach records whole spectra -with energy differences where no Raman information is present-, which limits the acquisition speed. Therefore, we present a new approach based on the TICO-Raman concept, which we call sparse-sampling. The TICO-sparse-sampling setup is fully electronically controllable and allows probing of only the characteristic peaks of a Raman spectrum instead of always acquiring a whole spectrum. By reducing the spectral points to the relevant peaks, the acquisition time can be greatly reduced compared to a uniformly, equidistantly sampled Raman spectrum while the specificity and the signal to noise ratio (SNR) are maintained. Furthermore, all laser sources are completely fiber based. The synchronized detection enables a full resolution of the Raman signal, whereas the analogue and digital balancing allows shot noise limited detection. First imaging results with polystyrene (PS) and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) beads confirm the advantages of TICO sparse-sampling. We achieved a pixel dwell time as low as 35 μs for an image differentiating both species. The mechanical properties of the applied voice coil stage for scanning the sample currently limits even faster acquisition.

  6. Confocal laser microscopic imaging of conspicuous facial pores in vivo: relation between the appearance and the internal structure of skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugata, Keiichi; Nishijima, Takafumi; Kitahara, Takashi; Takema, Yoshinori

    2008-05-01

    Conspicuous facial pores are one of the more serious esthetic defects of most concern to women. Previous microscopic observations of the skin surface around conspicuous pores have discovered large hollows and uneven skin tone. In this study, the observation area was extended from the skin surface to deeper skin to find the characteristic features of conspicuous pores in a wider spectrum. First, a magnified surface image of the cheek skin was obtained using a video microscope. Second, replicas were collected from the same area. Third, the horizontal cross-sectioned images of the epidermis and papillary dermis in different depths were non-invasively obtained using in vivo confocal laser scanning microscopy. These images were compared with each other to find a correlation between features of the skin surface and those of deeper layers. In cross-sectioned images of conspicuous pores, a strongly undulated epidermal-dermal junction was commonly observed around a pore's opening. Areas with this feature correlated well to the areas with larger hollows and an uneven skin tone. Our results indicate that there is a positive correlation between the incidence of the characteristic feature at the epidermal-dermal junction and the visual appearance of a pore.

  7. Precision automation of cell type classification and sub-cellular fluorescence quantification from laser scanning confocal images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hardy Craig Hall

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available While novel whole-plant phenotyping technologies have been successfully implemented into functional genomics and breeding programs, the potential of automated phenotyping with cellular resolution is largely unexploited. Laser scanning confocal microscopy has the potential to close this gap by providing spatially highly resolved images containing anatomic as well as chemical information on a subcellular basis. However, in the absence of automated methods, the assessment of the spatial patterns and abundance of fluorescent markers with subcellular resolution is still largely qualitative and time-consuming. Recent advances in image acquisition and analysis, coupled with improvements in microprocessor performance, have brought such automated methods within reach, so that information from thousands of cells per image for hundreds of images may be derived in an experimentally convenient time-frame. Here, we present a MATLAB-based analytical pipeline to 1 segment radial plant organs into individual cells, 2 classify cells into cell type categories based upon random forest classification, 3 divide each cell into sub-regions, and 4 quantify fluorescence intensity to a subcellular degree of precision for a separate fluorescence channel. In this research advance, we demonstrate the precision of this analytical process for the relatively complex tissues of Arabidopsis hypocotyls at various stages of development. High speed and robustness make our approach suitable for phenotyping of large collections of stem-like material and other tissue types.

  8. Video-mosaicking of in vivo reflectance confocal microscopy images for noninvasive examination of skin lesion (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kose, Kivanc; Gou, Mengran; Yelamos, Oriol; Cordova, Miguel A.; Rossi, Anthony; Nehal, Kishwer S.; Camps, Octavia I.; Dy, Jennifer G.; Brooks, Dana H.; Rajadhyaksha, Milind

    2017-02-01

    In this report we describe a computer vision based pipeline to convert in-vivo reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) videos collected with a handheld system into large field of view (FOV) mosaics. For many applications such as imaging of hard to access lesions, intraoperative assessment of MOHS margins, or delineation of lesion margins beyond clinical borders, raster scan based mosaicing techniques have clinically significant limitations. In such cases, clinicians often capture RCM videos by freely moving a handheld microscope over the area of interest, but the resulting videos lose large-scale spatial relationships. Videomosaicking is a standard computational imaging technique to register, and stitch together consecutive frames of videos into large FOV high resolution mosaics. However, mosaicing RCM videos collected in-vivo has unique challenges: (i) tissue may deform or warp due to physical contact with the microscope objective lens, (ii) discontinuities or "jumps" between consecutive images and motion blur artifacts may occur, due to manual operation of the microscope, and (iii) optical sectioning and resolution may vary between consecutive images due to scattering and aberrations induced by changes in imaging depth and tissue morphology. We addressed these challenges by adapting or developing new algorithmic methods for videomosaicking, specifically by modeling non-rigid deformations, followed by automatically detecting discontinuities (cut locations) and, finally, applying a data-driven image stitching approach that fully preserves resolution and tissue morphologic detail without imposing arbitrary pre-defined boundaries. We will present example mosaics obtained by clinical imaging of both melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancers. The ability to combine freehand mosaicing for handheld microscopes with preserved cellular resolution will have high impact application in diverse clinical settings, including low-resource healthcare systems.

  9. Automated Tracking of Root for Confocal Time-lapse Imaging of Cellular Processes

    OpenAIRE

    Doumane, Mehdi; Lionnet, Claire; Bayle, Vincent; Jaillais, Yvon; Caillaud, Marie-C?cile

    2017-01-01

    Here we describe a protocol that enables to automatically perform time-lapse imaging of growing root tips for several hours. Plants roots expressing fluorescent proteins or stained with dyes are imaged while they grow using automatic movement of the microscope stage that compensates for root growth and allows to follow a given region of the root over time. The protocol makes possible the image acquisition of multiple growing root tips, therefore increasing the number of recorded mitotic event...

  10. Rapid identification of heterogeneous mixture components with hyperspectral coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garbacik, E.T.; Herek, Jennifer Lynn; Otto, Cornelis; Offerhaus, Herman L.

    2012-01-01

    For the rapid analysis of complicated heterogeneous mixtures, we have developed a method to acquire and intuitively display hyperspectral coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) images. The imaging is performed with a conventional optical setup based around an optical parametric oscillator.

  11. Confocal Microscopy for Real Time Detection of Oral Cavity Neoplasia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Clark, Anne

    2003-01-01

    .... Reflectance confocal images were compared to histologic images from the same sample to determine which tissue features contribute to image contrast and can be potentially imaged using in vivo confocal microscopy...

  12. 3D digital image processing for biofilm quantification from confocal laser scanning microscopy: Multidimensional statistical analysis of biofilm modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielinski, Jerzy S.

    The dramatic increase in number and volume of digital images produced in medical diagnostics, and the escalating demand for rapid access to these relevant medical data, along with the need for interpretation and retrieval has become of paramount importance to a modern healthcare system. Therefore, there is an ever growing need for processed, interpreted and saved images of various types. Due to the high cost and unreliability of human-dependent image analysis, it is necessary to develop an automated method for feature extraction, using sophisticated mathematical algorithms and reasoning. This work is focused on digital image signal processing of biological and biomedical data in one- two- and three-dimensional space. Methods and algorithms presented in this work were used to acquire data from genomic sequences, breast cancer, and biofilm images. One-dimensional analysis was applied to DNA sequences which were presented as a non-stationary sequence and modeled by a time-dependent autoregressive moving average (TD-ARMA) model. Two-dimensional analyses used 2D-ARMA model and applied it to detect breast cancer from x-ray mammograms or ultrasound images. Three-dimensional detection and classification techniques were applied to biofilm images acquired using confocal laser scanning microscopy. Modern medical images are geometrically arranged arrays of data. The broadening scope of imaging as a way to organize our observations of the biophysical world has led to a dramatic increase in our ability to apply new processing techniques and to combine multiple channels of data into sophisticated and complex mathematical models of physiological function and dysfunction. With explosion of the amount of data produced in a field of biomedicine, it is crucial to be able to construct accurate mathematical models of the data at hand. Two main purposes of signal modeling are: data size conservation and parameter extraction. Specifically, in biomedical imaging we have four key problems

  13. Development of a fiber based Raman probe compatible with interventional magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashok, Praveen C.; Praveen, Bavishna B.; Rube, Martin; Cox, Benjamin; Melzer, Andreas; Dholakia, Kishan

    2014-02-01

    Raman spectroscopy has proven to be a powerful tool for discriminating between normal and abnormal tissue types. Fiber based Raman probes have demonstrated its potential for in vivo disease diagnostics. Combining Raman spectroscopy with Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) opens up new avenues for MR guided minimally invasive optical biopsy. Although Raman probes are commercially available, they are not compatible with a MRI environment due to the metallic components which are used to align the micro-optic components such as filters and lenses at the probe head. Additionally they are not mechanically compatible with a typical surgical environment as factors such as sterility and length of the probe are not addressed in those designs. We have developed an MRI compatible fiber Raman probe with a disposable probe head hence maintaining sterility. The probe head was specially designed to avoid any material that would cause MR imaging artefacts. The probe head that goes into patient's body had a diameter <1.5 mm so that it is compatible with biopsy needles and catheters. The probe has been tested in MR environment and has been proven to be capable of obtaining Raman signal while the probe is under real-time MR guidance.

  14. Automated Tracking of Root for Confocal Time-lapse Imaging of Cellular Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doumane, Mehdi; Lionnet, Claire; Bayle, Vincent; Jaillais, Yvon; Caillaud, Marie-Cécile

    2017-04-20

    Here we describe a protocol that enables to automatically perform time-lapse imaging of growing root tips for several hours. Plants roots expressing fluorescent proteins or stained with dyes are imaged while they grow using automatic movement of the microscope stage that compensates for root growth and allows to follow a given region of the root over time. The protocol makes possible the image acquisition of multiple growing root tips, therefore increasing the number of recorded mitotic events in a given experiment. The protocol also allows the visualization of more than one fluorescent protein or dye simultaneously, using multiple channel acquisition. We particularly focus on imaging of cytokinesis in Arabidopsis root tip meristem, but this protocol is also suitable to follow root hair growth, pollen tube growth, and other regions of root over time, in various plant species. It may as well be amendable to automatically track non-plant structures with an apical growth.

  15. Automated acquisition and processing of multidimensional image data in confocal in vivo microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kozubek, Michal; Matula, Pe.; Matula, Pa.; Kozubek, Stanislav

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 64, č. 2 (2004), s. 164-175 ISSN 1059-910X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/04/0907; GA AV ČR IBS5004010; GA AV ČR IAA5004306 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5004920 Keywords : image acquisition * image analysis * living cells Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.609, year: 2004

  16. In vivo imaging of the airway wall in asthma: fibered confocal fluorescence microscopy in relation to histology and lung function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bel Elisabeth H

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Airway remodelling is a feature of asthma including fragmentation of elastic fibres observed in the superficial elastin network of the airway wall. Fibered confocal fluorescence microscopy (FCFM is a new and non-invasive imaging technique performed during bronchoscopy that may visualize elastic fibres, as shown by in vitro spectral analysis of elastin powder. We hypothesized that FCFM images capture in vivo elastic fibre patterns within the airway wall and that such patterns correspond with airway histology. We aimed to establish the concordance between the bronchial elastic fibre pattern in histology and FCFM. Second, we examined whether elastic fibre patterns in histology and FCFM were different between asthmatic subjects and healthy controls. Finally, the association between these patterns and lung function parameters was investigated. Methods In a cross-sectional study comprising 16 subjects (8 atopic asthmatic patients with controlled disease and 8 healthy controls spirometry and bronchoscopy were performed, with recording of FCFM images followed by endobronchial biopsy at the airway main carina. Elastic fibre patterns in histological sections and FCFM images were scored semi-quantitatively. Agreement between histology and FCFM was analysed using linearly weighted kappa κw. Results The patterns observed in histological sections and FCFM images could be divided into 3 distinct groups. There was good agreement between elastic fibre patterns in histology and FCFM patterns (κw 0.744. The semi-quantitative pattern scores were not different between asthmatic patients and controls. Notably, there was a significant difference in post-bronchodilator FEV1 %predicted between the different patterns by histology (p = 0.001 and FCFM (p = 0.048, regardless of asthma or atopy. Conclusion FCFM captures the elastic fibre pattern within the airway wall in humans in vivo. The association between post-bronchodilator FEV1 %predicted and

  17. Wide-Field Vibrational Phase Contrast Imaging Based on Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering Holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lv Yong-Gang; Ji Zi-Heng; Dong Da-Shan; Gong Qi-Huang; Shi Ke-Bin

    2015-01-01

    We propose and implement a wide-field vibrational phase contrast detection to obtain imaging of imaginary components of third-order nonlinear susceptibility in a coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscope with full suppression of the non-resonant background. This technique is based on the unique ability of recovering the phase of the generated CARS signal based on holographic recording. By capturing the phase distributions of the generated CARS field from the sample and from the environment under resonant illumination, we demonstrate the retrieval of imaginary components in the CARS microscope and achieve background free coherent Raman imaging. (paper)

  18. Detecting benzoyl peroxide in wheat flour by line-scan macro-scale Raman chemical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Jianwei; Kim, Moon S.; Chao, Kuanglin; Gonzalez, Maria; Cho, Byoung-Kwan

    2017-05-01

    Excessive use of benzoyl peroxide (BPO, a bleaching agent) in wheat flour can destroy flour nutrients and cause diseases to consumers. A macro-scale Raman chemical imaging method was developed for direct detection of BPO mixed in the wheat flour. A 785 nm line laser was used in a line-scan Hyperspectral Raman imaging system. Raman images were collected from wheat flour mixed with BPO at eight concentrations (w/w) from 50 to 6,400 ppm. A sample holder (150×100×2 mm3) was used to present a thin layer (2 mm thick) of the powdered sample for image acquisition. A baseline correction method was used to correct the fluctuating fluorescence signals from the wheat flour. To isolate BPO particles from the flour background, a simple thresholding method was applied to the single-band fluorescence-free images at a unique Raman peak wavenumber (i.e., 1001 cm-1) preselected for the BPO detection. Chemical images were created to detect and map the BPO particles. Limit of detection for the BPO was estimated in the order of 50 ppm, which is on the same level with regulatory standards.

  19. Ex-vivo imaging of excised tissue using vital dyes and confocal microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Simon; Rabinovitch, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Vital dyes routinely used for staining cultured cells can also be used to stain and image live tissue slices ex-vivo. Staining tissue with vital dyes allows researchers to collect structural and functional data simultaneously and can be used for qualitative or quantitative fluorescent image collection. The protocols presented here are useful for structural and functional analysis of viable properties of cells in intact tissue slices, allowing for the collection of data in a structurally relevant environment. With these protocols, vital dyes can be applied as a research tool to disease processes and properties of tissue not amenable to cell culture based studies. PMID:22752953

  20. Potential Role of In Vivo Confocal Microscopy for Imaging Corneal Nerves in Transthyretin Familial Amyloid Polyneuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousseau, Antoine; Cauquil, Cecile; Dupas, Benedicte; Labbé, Antoine; Baudouin, Christophe; Barreau, Emmanuel; Théaudin, Marie; Lacroix, Catherine; Guiochon-Mantel, Anne; Benmalek, Anouar; Labetoulle, Marc; Adams, David

    2016-09-01

    Small fiber neuropathy (SFN) is an important feature of transthyretin familial amyloid polyneuropathy (TTR-FAP). A practical and objective method for the clinical evaluation of SFN is needed to improve the management of this disease. In vivo confocal microscopy (IVCM) of the corneal nerves, a rapid noninvasive technique, may be used as a surrogate marker of SFN. To determine the correlation of SFN with IVCM in patients with TTR-FAP. A prospective, single-center, cross-sectional controlled study was conducted at the French National Reference Center for TTR-FAP from June 1, 2013, to June 30, 2014. Fifteen patients with TTR-FAP underwent a complete neurologic examination, including Neuropathy Impairment Score of the Lower Limbs, hand grip strength, and evaluation of vegetative dysfunction, as well as electrophysiologic studies (nerve conduction and electrochemical skin conductance) and intraepidermal nerve fiber density quantification. Patients and 15 controls (matched for age and sex) underwent ophthalmologic assessments, including corneal esthesiometry and IVCM. Correlation of corneal nerve fiber length (CNFL) with the severity of SFN. Of the 15 patients enrolled in the study, 6 were women (40%); mean (SD) age was 54.4 [13.7] years. The CNFL was shorter in the patients than in controls (13.08 vs 17.57 mm/mm2; difference of 4.49 [95% CI, 0.72 to 8.27]; P = .02). The patients' CNFL correlated with the severity of both autonomic neuropathy assessed by the Compound Autonomic Dysfunction Test (rs = 0.66 [95% CI, 0.22 to 0.87]; P = .008) or electrochemical skin conductance (rs = 0.80 [95% CI, 0.50 to 0.93]; P < .001) and sensorimotor neuropathy assessed using the Neuropathy Impairment Score of the Lower Limbs (rs = -0.58 [95% CI, -0.84 to -0.11]; P = .02). Patients with altered sensory nerve action potentials and intraepidermal nerve fiber density had a shorter CNFL (P = .04 and P = .02, respectively). The CNFL could be measured in all

  1. A method for analysis of lipid vesicle domain structure from confocal image data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Husen, Peter Rasmussen; Fidorra, Matthias; Hartel, Steffen

    2012-01-01

    Quantitative characterization of the lateral structure of curved membranes based on fluorescence microscopy requires knowledge of the fluorophore distribution on the surface. We present an image analysis approach for extraction of the fluorophore distribution on a spherical lipid vesicle from....... The analysis allows for investigation of the morphology and size distribution of domains on the surface....

  2. Colocalization of fluorescence and Raman microscopic images for the identification of subcellular compartments: a validation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauß, Sascha D; Petersen, Dennis; Niedieker, Daniel; Fricke, Inka; Freier, Erik; El-Mashtoly, Samir F; Gerwert, Klaus; Mosig, Axel

    2015-04-07

    A major promise of Raman microscopy is the label-free detailed recognition of cellular and subcellular structures. To this end, identifying colocalization patterns between Raman spectral images and fluorescence microscopic images is a key step to annotate subcellular components in Raman spectroscopic images. While existing approaches to resolve subcellular structures are based on fluorescence labeling, we propose a combination of a colocalization scheme with subsequent training of a supervised classifier that allows label-free resolution of cellular compartments. Our colocalization scheme unveils statistically significant overlapping regions by identifying correlation between the fluorescence color channels and clusters from unsupervised machine learning methods like hierarchical cluster analysis. The colocalization scheme is used as a pre-selection to gather appropriate spectra as training data. These spectra are used in the second part as training data to establish a supervised random forest classifier to automatically identify lipid droplets and nucleus. We validate our approach by examining Raman spectral images overlaid with fluorescence labelings of different cellular compartments, indicating that specific components may indeed be identified label-free in the spectral image. A Matlab implementation of our colocalization software is available at .

  3. Raman-based imaging uncovers the effects of alginate hydrogel implants in spinal cord injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galli, Roberta; Tamosaityte, Sandra; Koch, Maria; Sitoci-Ficici, Kerim H.; Later, Robert; Uckermann, Ortrud; Beiermeister, Rudolf; Gelinsky, Michael; Schackert, Gabriele; Kirsch, Matthias; Koch, Edmund; Steiner, Gerald

    2015-07-01

    The treatment of spinal cord injury by using implants that provide a permissive environment for axonal growth is in the focus of the research for regenerative therapies. Here, Raman-based label-free techniques were applied for the characterization of morphochemical properties of surgically induced spinal cord injury in the rat that received an implant of soft unfunctionalized alginate hydrogel. Raman microspectroscopy followed by chemometrics allowed mapping the different degenerative areas, while multimodal multiphoton microscopy (e.g. the combination of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), endogenous two-photon fluorescence and second harmonic generation on the same platform) enabled to address the morphochemistry of the tissue at cellular level. The regions of injury, characterized by demyelination and scarring, were retrieved and the distribution of key tissue components was evaluated by Raman mapping. The alginate hydrogel was detected in the lesion up to six months after implantation and had positive effects on the nervous tissue. For instance, multimodal multiphoton microscopy complemented the results of Raman mapping, providing the micromorphology of lipid-rich tissue structures by CARS and enabling to discern lipid-rich regions that contained myelinated axons from degenerative regions characterized by myelin fragmentation and presence of foam cells. These findings demonstrate that Raman-based imaging methods provide useful information for the evaluation of alginate implant effects and have therefore the potential to contribute to new strategies for monitoring degenerative and regenerative processes induced in SCI, thereby improving the effectiveness of therapies.

  4. Imaging sulfur mustard lesions in human epidermal tissues and keratinocytes by confocal and multiphoton microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werrlein, Robert; Madren-Whalley, Janna S.

    2002-06-01

    Topical exposure to sulfur mustard (HD), a known theat agent, produces persistent and debilitating cutaneous blisters. The blisters occur at the dermal-epidermal junction following a dose-dependent latent period of 8-24 h, however, the primary lesions causing vesication remain uncertain. Immunofluorescent images reveal that a 5-min exposure to 400 (mu) M HD disrupts molecules that are also disrupted by epidermolysis bullosa-type blistering diseases of the skin. Using keratinocyte cultures and fluorochomes conjugated to two different keratin-14 (K14) antibodies (clones CKB1 and LL002), results have shown a statistically significant (p<0.1) 1-h decrease of 29.2% in expression of the CKB1 epitope, a nearly complete loss of CKB1 expression within 2 h, and progressive cytoskeletal (K14) collapse without loss in expression of the LL002 epitope. With human epidermal tissues, multi-photon images of (alpha) 6 integrin and laminin 5 showed disruptive changes in the cell-surface organization and integrity of these adhesion molecules. At 1 H postexposure, analyses showed a statistically significant (p<0.1) decrease of 27.3% in (alpha) 6 integrin emissions, and a 32% decrease in laminin 5 volume. Multi-photon imaging indicates that molecules essential for epidermal-dermal attachment are early targets in the alkylating events leading to HD-induced vesication.

  5. CHEMICAL MAPPING OF ELEMENTAL SULFUR ON PYRITE AND ARSENOPYRITE SURFACES USING NEAR-INFRARED RAMAN IMAGING MICROSCOPY. (R826189)

    Science.gov (United States)

    AbstractNear-infrared Raman imaging microscopy (NIRIM) was used to produce chemical images of the distribution of elemental sulfur on oxidized pyrite and arsenopyrite surfaces. Analysis using Savitsky¯Golay filtering permits an unambiguous identificati...

  6. 3D Segmentations of Neuronal Nuclei from Confocal Microscope Image Stacks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio eLaTorre

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present an algorithm to create 3D segmentations of neuronal cells from stacks of previously segmented 2D images. The idea behind this proposal is to provide a general method to reconstruct 3D structures from 2D stacks, regardless of how these 2D stacks have been obtained. The algorithm not only reuses the information obtained in the 2D segmentation, but also attempts to correct some typical mistakes made by the 2D segmentation algorithms (for example, under segmentation of tightly-coupled clusters of cells. We have tested our algorithm in a real scenario --- the segmentation of the neuronal nuclei in different layers of the rat cerebral cortex. Several representative images from different layers of the cerebral cortex have been considered and several 2D segmentation algorithms have been compared. Furthermore, the algorithm has also been compared with the traditional 3D Watershed algorithm and the results obtained here show better performance in terms of correctly identified neuronal nuclei.

  7. Flexible Spectral Imaging Color Enhancement and Probe-based Confocal Laser Endomicroscopy in Minimal Change Esophageal Reflux Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittayanon, Rapat; Aumkaew, Surasak; Rerknimitr, Rungsun; Wisedopas, Naruemon; Kullavanijaya, Pinit

    2016-07-25

    Although flexible spectral imaging color enhancement (FICE) can facilitate the diagnosis of minimal change esophageal reflux disease (MERD), the complicated diagnostic criteria cause suboptimal inter-observer agreement. Confocal laser endomicroscopy (CLE) yields good diagnostic results but its inter-observer agreement has never been explored. This study compares the diagnostic value of magnifying FICE and probe-based CLE (pCLE) for MERD and evaluates the inter-observer agreement of both techniques. Thirty-six patients with suspected MERD and 18 asymptomatic controls were recruited. Magnifying FICE was used for evaluation of distal esophagus. pCLE counted the number of intrapapillary capillary loops (IPCLs) using more than five IPCLs in 500×500 micron area as a criterion for MERD diagnosis. The validity scores and interobserever agreement of both FICE and pCLE were assessed. For FICE vs. pCLE, the accuracy was 79% vs. 87%, sensitivity 94% vs. 97%, specificity 50% vs. 66%, positive predictive value 79% vs. 85%, and negative predictive value 82% vs. 92%. Interobserver agreement of FICE was fair to substantial, whereas pCLE had substantial to almost perfect agreement. Both FICE and pCLE have good operating characteristics and can facilitate the MERD diagnosis. However, among different observers, pCLE is more consistent on MERD diagnosis.

  8. In Vivo Confocal Fluorescence Imaging of the Intratumor Distribution of the Photosensitizer Mono-l-Aspartylchlorin-e6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soumya Mitra

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available We present an in vivo fluorescence microscopic evaluation of intratumor distribution of the photosensitizer mono-l-aspartylchlorin-e6 (NPe6 in an intradermal mouse EMT6 tumor model. Although the identification of favorable photophysical and pharmacological properties has led to the development of new photosensitizers in photodynamic therapy, their intratumor distribution kinetics have remained relatively understudied. In this study, we used confocal fluorescence microscopy to follow the transport of NPe6 in vivo after systemic administration through the tail vein. Labeling of vasculature using fluorophore-conjugated anti-CD31 antibodies allows visualization of the uptake of NPe6 in tumor and normal vessels and its partitioning kinetics into the adjacent parenchyma for 3 hours after injection. During the initial 60 minutes after injection, the drug is predominantly confined to the vasculature. Subsequently, it significantly redistributes throughout the extravascular regions with no discernable difference in its extravasation rate between tumor and normal tissues. Further, we investigate the sensitizer’s altered intratumor distribution in response to photodynamic therapy irradiation and observe that treatment-induced changes in vessel permeability caused enhanced accumulation of NPe6 in the extravascular space. Our findings are of immediate clinical relevance and demonstrate the importance of an in vivo imaging approach to examine the dynamic process of intratumor drug distribution.

  9. Micro-Raman Imaging for Biology with Multivariate Spectral Analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Malvaso, Federica

    2015-05-05

    Raman spectroscopy is a noninvasive technique that can provide complex information on the vibrational state of the molecules. It defines the unique fingerprint that allow the identification of the various chemical components within a given sample. The aim of the following thesis work is to analyze Raman maps related to three pairs of different cells, highlighting differences and similarities through multivariate algorithms. The first pair of analyzed cells are human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), while the other two pairs are induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from T lymphocytes and keratinocytes, respectively. Although two different multivariate techniques were employed, ie Principal Component Analysis and Cluster Analysis, the same results were achieved: the iPSCs derived from T-lymphocytes show a higher content of genetic material both compared with the iPSCs derived from keratinocytes and the hESCs . On the other side, equally evident, was that iPS cells derived from keratinocytes assume a molecular distribution very similar to hESCs.

  10. Noninvasive imaging of protein metabolic labeling in single human cells using stable isotopes and Raman microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Manen, H.J.; Lenferink, Aufrid T.M.; Otto, Cornelis

    2008-01-01

    We have combined nonresonant Raman microspectroscopy and spectral imaging with stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) to selectively detect the incorporation of deuterium-labeled phenylalanine, tyrosine, and methionine into proteins in intact, single HeLa cells. The C−D

  11. Optical Coherence Tomography and Biomolecular Imaging with Coherent Raman Scattering Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson-Engels, Stefan; Andersen, Peter E.

    2014-01-01

    The Special Section on Selected Topics in Biophotonics: Optical Coherence Tomography and Biomolecular Imaging with Coherent Raman Scattering Microscopy comprises two invited review papers and several contributed papers from the summer school Biophotonics ’13, as well as contributed papers within...

  12. Raman, AFM and SNOM high resolution imaging of carotene crystals in a model carrot cell system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rygula, Anna; Oleszkiewicz, Tomasz; Grzebelus, Ewa; Pacia, Marta Z; Baranska, Malgorzata; Baranski, Rafal

    2018-05-15

    Three non-destructive and complementary techniques, Raman imaging, Atomic Force Microscopy and Scanning Near-field Optical Microscopy were used simultaneously to show for the first time chemical and structural differences of carotenoid crystals. Spectroscopic and microscopic scanning probe measurements were applied to the released crystals or to crystals accumulated in a unique, carotenoids rich callus tissue growing in vitro that is considered as a new model system for plant carotenoid research. Three distinct morphological crystal types of various carotenoid composition were identified, a needle-like, rhomboidal and helical. Raman imaging using 532 and 488 nm excitation lines provided evidence that the needle-like and rhomboidal crystals had similar carotenoid composition and that they were composed mainly of β-carotene accompanied by α-carotene. However, the presence of α-carotene was not identified in the helical crystals, which had the characteristic spatial structure. AFM measurements of crystals identified by Raman imaging revealed the crystal topography and showed the needle-like and rhomboidal crystals were planar but they differed in all three dimensions. Combining SNOM and Raman imaging enabled indication of carotenoid rich structures and visualised their distribution in the cell. The morphology of identified subcellular structures was characteristic for crystalline, membraneous and tubular chromoplasts that are plant organelles responsible for carotenoid accumulation in cells. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Spatiotemporal closure of fractional laser-ablated channels imaged by optical coherence tomography and reflectance confocal microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banzhaf, Christina A; Wind, Bas S; Mogensen, Mette; Meesters, Arne A; Paasch, Uwe; Wolkerstorfer, Albert; Haedersdal, Merete

    2016-02-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) and reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) offer high-resolution optical imaging of the skin, which may provide benefit in the context of laser-assisted drug delivery. We aimed to characterize postoperative healing of ablative fractional laser (AFXL)-induced channels and dynamics in their spatiotemporal closure using in vivo OCT and RCM techniques. The inner forearm of healthy subjects (n = 6) was exposed to 10,600 nm fractional CO2 laser using 5 and 25% densities, 120 μm beam diameter, 5, 15, and 25 mJ/microbeam. Treatment sites were scanned with OCT to evaluate closure of AFXL-channels and RCM to evaluate subsequent re-epithelialization. OCT and RCM identified laser channels in epidermis and upper dermis as black, ablated tissue defects surrounded by characteristic hyper-and hyporeflective zones. OCT imaged individual laser channels of the entire laser grid, and RCM imaged epidermal cellular and structural changes around a single laser channel to the depth of the dermoepidermal junction (DEJ) and upper papillary dermis. OCT images visualized a heterogeneous material in the lower part of open laser channels, indicating tissue fluid. By OCT the median percentage of open channels was evaluated at several time points within the first 24 hours and laser channels were found to gradually close, depending on the used energy level. Thus, at 5 mJ/microbeam, 87% (range 73-100%) of channels were open one hour after laser exposure, which declined to 27% (range 20-100%) and 20% (range 7-93%) at 12 and 24 hours after laser exposure, respectively. At 25 mJ/microbeam, 100% (range 100-100%) of channels were open 1 hour after laser exposure while 53% (range 33-100%) and 40% (range 0-100%) remained open at 12 and 24 hours after exposure. Median depth and width of open channels decreased over time depending of applied energy. RCM verified initial re-epithelialization from day 2 for all energy levels used. Morphology of ablation defects by OCT and

  14. Fiber array based hyperspectral Raman imaging for chemical selective analysis of malaria-infected red blood cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brückner, Michael [Leibniz Institute of Photonic Technology, 07745 Jena (Germany); Becker, Katja [Justus Liebig University Giessen, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 35392 Giessen (Germany); Popp, Jürgen [Leibniz Institute of Photonic Technology, 07745 Jena (Germany); Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Institute for Physical Chemistry, 07745 Jena (Germany); Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Abbe Centre of Photonics, 07745 Jena (Germany); Frosch, Torsten, E-mail: torsten.frosch@uni-jena.de [Leibniz Institute of Photonic Technology, 07745 Jena (Germany); Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Institute for Physical Chemistry, 07745 Jena (Germany); Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Abbe Centre of Photonics, 07745 Jena (Germany)

    2015-09-24

    A new setup for Raman spectroscopic wide-field imaging is presented. It combines the advantages of a fiber array based spectral translator with a tailor-made laser illumination system for high-quality Raman chemical imaging of sensitive biological samples. The Gaussian-like intensity distribution of the illuminating laser beam is shaped by a square-core optical multimode fiber to a top-hat profile with very homogeneous intensity distribution to fulfill the conditions of Koehler. The 30 m long optical fiber and an additional vibrator efficiently destroy the polarization and coherence of the illuminating light. This homogeneous, incoherent illumination is an essential prerequisite for stable quantitative imaging of complex biological samples. The fiber array translates the two-dimensional lateral information of the Raman stray light into separated spectral channels with very high contrast. The Raman image can be correlated with a corresponding white light microscopic image of the sample. The new setup enables simultaneous quantification of all Raman spectra across the whole spatial area with very good spectral resolution and thus outperforms other Raman imaging approaches based on scanning and tunable filters. The unique capabilities of the setup for fast, gentle, sensitive, and selective chemical imaging of biological samples were applied for automated hemozoin analysis. A special algorithm was developed to generate Raman images based on the hemozoin distribution in red blood cells without any influence from other Raman scattering. The new imaging setup in combination with the robust algorithm provides a novel, elegant way for chemical selective analysis of the malaria pigment hemozoin in early ring stages of Plasmodium falciparum infected erythrocytes. - Highlights: • Raman hyperspectral imaging allows for chemical selective analysis of biological samples with spatial heterogeneity. • A homogeneous, incoherent illumination is essential for reliable

  15. Fiber array based hyperspectral Raman imaging for chemical selective analysis of malaria-infected red blood cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brückner, Michael; Becker, Katja; Popp, Jürgen; Frosch, Torsten

    2015-01-01

    A new setup for Raman spectroscopic wide-field imaging is presented. It combines the advantages of a fiber array based spectral translator with a tailor-made laser illumination system for high-quality Raman chemical imaging of sensitive biological samples. The Gaussian-like intensity distribution of the illuminating laser beam is shaped by a square-core optical multimode fiber to a top-hat profile with very homogeneous intensity distribution to fulfill the conditions of Koehler. The 30 m long optical fiber and an additional vibrator efficiently destroy the polarization and coherence of the illuminating light. This homogeneous, incoherent illumination is an essential prerequisite for stable quantitative imaging of complex biological samples. The fiber array translates the two-dimensional lateral information of the Raman stray light into separated spectral channels with very high contrast. The Raman image can be correlated with a corresponding white light microscopic image of the sample. The new setup enables simultaneous quantification of all Raman spectra across the whole spatial area with very good spectral resolution and thus outperforms other Raman imaging approaches based on scanning and tunable filters. The unique capabilities of the setup for fast, gentle, sensitive, and selective chemical imaging of biological samples were applied for automated hemozoin analysis. A special algorithm was developed to generate Raman images based on the hemozoin distribution in red blood cells without any influence from other Raman scattering. The new imaging setup in combination with the robust algorithm provides a novel, elegant way for chemical selective analysis of the malaria pigment hemozoin in early ring stages of Plasmodium falciparum infected erythrocytes. - Highlights: • Raman hyperspectral imaging allows for chemical selective analysis of biological samples with spatial heterogeneity. • A homogeneous, incoherent illumination is essential for reliable

  16. Comparison of hair from rectum cancer patients and from healthy persons by Raman microspectroscopy and imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xiaoli; Wang, Xin; Fang, Yusheng; Huang, Qing

    2013-09-01

    In this work, Raman microspectroscopy and imaging was employed to analyze cancer patients' hair tissue. The comparison between the hair from rectum cancer patients and the hair from healthy people reveals some remarkable differences, such as for the rectum cancer patients, there are more lipids but less content of α-helix proteins in the hair medulla section. Though more statistic data are required to establish universary rules for practical and accurate diagnosis, this work based on case study demonstrates the possibility of applying Raman microspectroscopy to reveal abnormality in non-cancer tissues such as hair in order to predict and diagnose cancers.

  17. Effect of temperature on the stability of diamond particles and continuous thin films by Raman imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumaran, C. R.; Tiwari, Brajesh; Chandran, Maneesh; Bhattacharya, S. S.; Ramachandra Rao, M. S., E-mail: msrrao@iitm.ac.in [Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Nano Functional Materials Technology Centre (India)

    2013-03-15

    The stability of diamond thin films grown by hot filament CVD (HFCVD) upon thermal treatment was studied using Raman imaging. By adapting two different surface pretreatments, continuous microcrystalline diamond (MCD) thin films (grain size: 100-400 nm; cross-sectional thickness: {approx}300 nm) as well as thin film with isolated and coalesced diamond particles (particle size: 400-600 nm; cross-sectional thickness: {approx}200-300 nm) were grown. The thermal stability of isolated diamond particles and continuous MCD films annealed in air at atmospheric pressure was analyzed by Raman imaging. For Raman imaging, Raman spectra were collected over an area of 85 Multiplication-Sign 85 {mu}m using 532 nm laser (Nd:YAG) before and after thermal treatment. It was observed that the isolated diamond particles were stable for 1 h at {approx}750 Degree-Sign C, whereas for the same annealing duration, continuous MCD films grown under the same HFCVD condition were completely oxidized at 700 Degree-Sign C. From these results and analysis, the reason for the higher oxidation rates in the case of MCD and nanocrystalline diamond films is discussed.

  18. Raman Hyperspectral Imaging for Detection of Watermelon Seeds Infected with Acidovorax citrulli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hoonsoo; Kim, Moon S; Qin, Jianwei; Park, Eunsoo; Song, Yu-Rim; Oh, Chang-Sik; Cho, Byoung-Kwan

    2017-09-23

    The bacterial infection of seeds is one of the most important quality factors affecting yield. Conventional detection methods for bacteria-infected seeds, such as biological, serological, and molecular tests, are not feasible since they require expensive equipment, and furthermore, the testing processes are also time-consuming. In this study, we use the Raman hyperspectral imaging technique to distinguish bacteria-infected seeds from healthy seeds as a rapid, accurate, and non-destructive detection tool. We utilize Raman hyperspectral imaging data in the spectral range of 400-1800 cm -1 to determine the optimal band-ratio for the discrimination of watermelon seeds infected by the bacteria Acidovorax citrulli using ANOVA. Two bands at 1076.8 cm -1 and 437 cm -1 are selected as the optimal Raman peaks for the detection of bacteria-infected seeds. The results demonstrate that the Raman hyperspectral imaging technique has a good potential for the detection of bacteria-infected watermelon seeds and that it could form a suitable alternative to conventional methods.

  19. Screening of adulterants in powdered foods and ingredients using line-scan Raman chemical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Jianwei; Chao, Kuanglin; Kim, Moon S.

    2015-05-01

    A newly developed line-scan Raman imaging system using a 785 nm line laser was used to authenticate powdered foods and ingredients. The system was used to collect hyperspectral Raman images in a wavenumber range of 102-2865 cm-1 from three representative food powders mixed with selected adulterants with a concentration of 0.5%, including milk and melamine, flour and benzoyl peroxide, and starch and maleic anhydride. An acoustic mixer was used to create food adulterant mixtures. All the mixed samples were placed in sample holders with a surface area of 50 mm×50 mm. Spectral and image processing algorithms were developed based on single-band images at unique Raman peaks of the individual adulterants. Chemical images were created to show identification, spatial distribution, and morphological features of the adulterant particles mixed in the food powders. The potential of estimating mass concentrations of the adulterants using the percentages of the adulterant pixels in the chemical images was also demonstrated.

  20. New approaches to intracellular drug imaging by stimulated Raman scattering microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M.; Tipping, W. J.; Serrels, A.; Hulme, A. N.; Brunton, V. G.

    2017-02-01

    A range of proposed alkyne Raman tags are examined in-silico for activity and then synthesised generating a library of analogues of the natural product, anisomycin. We report the use of bisaryl butadiyne-anisomycin (BADY-anisomycin) in intracellular SRS microscopy studies of uptake and localisation within live and fixed cells. Following rational design and synthesis, BADY-anisomycin was shown to produce an intense Raman band at 2219 cm-1, that is centrally located within the cellular silent region and is approximately 60 times more Raman active than the corresponding propargylanisomycin. Finally, we demonstrate two-colour imaging utilising EdU, an alkyne-containing proliferation probe and BADY-anisomycin.

  1. Abstracts from the 2016 Joint Meeting of the International Confocal Group (ICG), the International Dermoscopy Society (IDS), and the International Society for Digital Imaging of the Skin (ISDIS)

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, DongKyun (DK); Rocha, Lilian; Guitera, Pascale; Sierra, Heidy; Kose, Kivanc; Peterson, Gary; Rajadhyaksha, Milind; Bozkurt, Alican; Ariafar, Setareh; Dy, Jennifer; Brooks, Dana; Dickensheets, David; Prow, Tarl W.; Hoang, Van; Lin, Lynlee

    2016-01-01

    What follows are the abstracts presented at the Joint Meeting of the International Confocal Group (ICG), the International Dermoscopy Society (IDS), and the International Society for Digital Imaging of the Skin (ISDIS). The meeting was held on March 5, 2016, in Washington, DC, USA, in conjunction with the annual meeting of the American Academy of Dermatology (Figure 1). The abstracts appear in the order in which they were presented.

  2. Confocal Raman microscope mapping as a tool to describe different mineral and organic phases at high spatial resolution within marine biogenic carbonates: case study on Nerita undata (Gastropoda, Neritopsina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Nouet

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Marine biogenic carbonates formed by invertebrates (e.g. corals and mollusks represent complex composites of one or more mineral phases and organic molecules. This complexity ranges from the macroscopic structures observed with the naked eye down to sub micrometric structures only revealed by micro analytical techniques. Understanding to what extent and how organisms can control the formation of these structures requires that the mineral and organic phases can be identified and their spatial distribution related. Here we demonstrate the capability of confocal Raman microscopy applied to cross sections of a shell of Nerita undata to describe the distribution of calcite and aragonite including their crystallographic orientation with high lateral resolution (~300 nm. Moreover, spatial distribution of functional groups of organic compounds can be simultaneously acquired, allowing to specifically relate them to the observed microstructures. The data presented in this case study highlights the possible new contributions of this method to the description of modalities of Nerita undata shell formation, and what could be expected of its application to other marine biogenic carbonates. Localization of areas of interest would also allow further investigations using more localized methods, such as TEM that would provide complementary information on the relation between organic molecules and crystal lattice.

  3. Confocal Raman microscope mapping as a tool to describe different mineral and organic phases at high spatial resolution within marine biogenic carbonates: case study on Nerita undata (Gastropoda, Neritopsina)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nehrke, G.; Nouet, J.

    2011-12-01

    Marine biogenic carbonates formed by invertebrates (e.g. corals and mollusks) represent complex composites of one or more mineral phases and organic molecules. This complexity ranges from the macroscopic structures observed with the naked eye down to sub micrometric structures only revealed by micro analytical techniques. Understanding to what extent and how organisms can control the formation of these structures requires that the mineral and organic phases can be identified and their spatial distribution related. Here we demonstrate the capability of confocal Raman microscopy applied to cross sections of a shell of Nerita undata to describe the distribution of calcite and aragonite including their crystallographic orientation with high lateral resolution (~300 nm). Moreover, spatial distribution of functional groups of organic compounds can be simultaneously acquired, allowing to specifically relate them to the observed microstructures. The data presented in this case study highlights the possible new contributions of this method to the description of modalities of Nerita undata shell formation, and what could be expected of its application to other marine biogenic carbonates. Localization of areas of interest would also allow further investigations using more localized methods, such as TEM that would provide complementary information on the relation between organic molecules and crystal lattice.

  4. Investigation of the composition of anabolic tablets using near infrared spectroscopy and Raman chemical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebiere, Hervé; Ghyselinck, Céline; Lempereur, Laurent; Brenier, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    The use of performance enhancing drugs is a widespread phenomenon in professional and leisure sports. A spectroscopic study was carried out on anabolic tablets labelled as 5 mg methandienone tablets provided by police departments. The analytical approach was based on a two-step methodology: a fast analysis of tablets using near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy to assess sample homogeneity based on their global composition, followed by Raman chemical imaging of one sample per NIR profile to obtain information on sample formulation. NIR spectroscopy assisted by a principal components analysis (PCA) enabled fast discrimination of different profiles based on the excipient formulation. Raman hyperspectral imaging and multivariate curve resolution - alternating least square (MCR-ALS) provided chemical images of the distribution of the active substance and excipients within tablets and facilitated identification of the active compounds. The combination of NIR spectroscopy and Raman chemical imaging highlighted dose-to-dose variations and succeeded in the discrimination of four different formulations out of eight similar samples of anabolic tablets. Some samples contained either methandienone or methyltestosterone whereas one sample did not contain an active substance. Other ingredients were sucrose, lactose, starch or talc. Both techniques were fast and non-destructive and therefore can be carried out as exploratory methods prior to destructive screening methods. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Confocal absorption spectral imaging of MoS2: optical transitions depending on the atomic thickness of intrinsic and chemically doped MoS2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhakal, Krishna P; Duong, Dinh Loc; Lee, Jubok; Nam, Honggi; Kim, Minsu; Kan, Min; Lee, Young Hee; Kim, Jeongyong

    2014-11-07

    We performed a nanoscale confocal absorption spectral imaging to obtain the full absorption spectra (over the range 1.5-3.2 eV) within regions having different numbers of layers and studied the variation of optical transition depending on the atomic thickness of the MoS2 film. Three distinct absorption bands corresponding to A and B excitons and a high-energy background (BG) peak at 2.84 eV displayed a gradual redshift as the MoS2 film thickness increased from the monolayer, to the bilayer, to the bulk MoS2 and this shift was attributed to the reduction of the gap energy in the Brillouin zone at the K-point as the atomic thickness increased. We also performed n-type chemical doping of MoS2 films using reduced benzyl viologen (BV) and the confocal absorption spectra modified by the doping showed a strong dependence on the atomic thickness: A and B exciton peaks were greatly quenched in the monolayer MoS2 while much less effect was shown in larger thickness and the BG peak either showed very small quenching for 1 L MoS2 or remained constant for larger thicknesses. Our results indicate that confocal absorption spectral imaging can provide comprehensive information on optical transitions of microscopic size intrinsic and doped two-dimensional layered materials.

  6. Simultaneous measurement of internal and surrounding flows of a moving droplet using multicolour confocal micro-particle image velocimetry (micro-PIV)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oishi, M; Kinoshita, H; Fujii, T; Oshima, M

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a micro-multiphase flow measurement technique, 'multicolour confocal micro-particle image velocimetry (PIV), and its application to the internal and surrounding flow measurement of a droplet moving through a microchannel. The present system measures the dynamic interaction between flows in two different phases, such as solid–liquid or liquid–liquid, simultaneously and separately. Unlike conventional confocal micro-PIV, this system features a wavelength separation optical device. The optical components (e.g., filters and dichroic mirror) are designed to separate fluorescent lights of tracer particles and to eliminate unnecessary scattered light depending on the characteristic wavelengths. The system can record a sequence of images at up to 2000 frames per second. It also has an in-plane spatial resolution of 0.284 µm/pixel in a field of 227.2 µm × 170.4 µm and a confocal depth of 3.43 µm using 1.0 µm particles and a 40× objective lens. This paper examines the performance of the present system, such as its ability to separate wavelengths. Furthermore, this system is applied to liquid–liquid two-phase flow, which consists of a water droplet and surrounding oil flow, in a microchannel. We succeeded in measuring each phase movement separately and simultaneously. As a result of the estimation of the out-of-plane velocity component, a three-dimensional flow structure is obtained and the interaction between each phase is investigated

  7. Raman imaging to investigate ultrastructure and composition of plant cell walls : distribution of lignin and cellulose in black spruce wood (Picea mariana)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umesh P. Agarwal

    2006-01-01

    A detailed understanding of the structural organization of the cell wall of vascular plants is important from both the perspectives of plant biology and chemistry and of commercial utilization. A state-of-the-art 633-nm laser-based confocal Raman microscope was used to determine the distribution of cell wall components in the cross section of black spruce wood in situ...

  8. Protein secondary structure imaging with ultrabroadband multiplex coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microspectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bito, Kotatsu; Okuno, Masanari; Kano, Hideaki; Tokuhara, Shihomi; Naito, Satoru; Masukawa, Yoshinori; Leproux, Philippe; Couderc, Vincent; Hamaguchi, Hiro-o

    2012-02-02

    Protein secondary structures in human hair have been studied with ultrabroadband multiplex coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microspectroscopy. The CARS peak-shift mapping method has been developed and applied to hair samples with and without treatments by chemical reduction and mechanical extension. It clearly visualizes the treatment induced changes in protein secondary structures and their spatial distributions. Using the new imaging technique, we found a multilayered structure in the human hair cortex.

  9. Raman Hyperspectral Imaging for Detection of Watermelon Seeds Infected with Acidovorax citrulli

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Hoonsoo; Kim, Moon S.; Qin, Jianwei; Park, Eunsoo; Song, Yu-Rim; Oh, Chang-Sik; Cho, Byoung-Kwan

    2017-01-01

    The bacterial infection of seeds is one of the most important quality factors affecting yield. Conventional detection methods for bacteria-infected seeds, such as biological, serological, and molecular tests, are not feasible since they require expensive equipment, and furthermore, the testing processes are also time-consuming. In this study, we use the Raman hyperspectral imaging technique to distinguish bacteria-infected seeds from healthy seeds as a rapid, accurate, and non-destructive det...

  10. Analysis of a marine phototrophic biofilm by confocal laser scanning microscopy using the new image quantification software PHLIP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Müller, L.N.; de Brouwer, J.F.C.; Almeida, J.S.; Stal, L.J.; Xavier, J.B.

    2006-01-01

    Background Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) is the method of choice to study interfacial biofilms and acquires time-resolved three-dimensional data of the biofilm structure. CLSM can be used in a multi-channel modus where the different channels map individual biofilm components. This

  11. High-throughput Raman chemical imaging for evaluating food safety and quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Jianwei; Chao, Kuanglin; Kim, Moon S.

    2014-05-01

    A line-scan hyperspectral system was developed to enable Raman chemical imaging for large sample areas. A custom-designed 785 nm line-laser based on a scanning mirror serves as an excitation source. A 45° dichroic beamsplitter reflects the laser light to form a 24 cm x 1 mm excitation line normally incident on the sample surface. Raman signals along the laser line are collected by a detection module consisting of a dispersive imaging spectrograph and a CCD camera. A hypercube is accumulated line by line as a motorized table moves the samples transversely through the laser line. The system covers a Raman shift range of -648.7-2889.0 cm-1 and a 23 cm wide area. An example application, for authenticating milk powder, was presented to demonstrate the system performance. In four minutes, the system acquired a 512x110x1024 hypercube (56,320 spectra) from four 47-mm-diameter Petri dishes containing four powder samples. Chemical images were created for detecting two adulterants (melamine and dicyandiamide) that had been mixed into the milk powder.

  12. A line-scan hyperspectral system for high-throughput Raman chemical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Jianwei; Chao, Kuanglin; Kim, Moon S

    2014-01-01

    A line-scan hyperspectral system was developed to enable Raman chemical imaging for large sample areas. A custom-designed 785 nm line laser based on a scanning mirror serves as an excitation source. A 45° dichroic beam splitter reflects the laser light to form a 24 cm × 1 mm excitation line normally incident on the sample surface. Raman signals along the laser line are collected by a detection module consisting of a dispersive imaging spectrograph and a CCD camera. A hypercube is accumulated line by line as a motorized table moves the samples transversely through the laser line. The system covers a Raman shift range of -648.7 to 2889.0 cm(-1) and a 23 cm wide area. An example application for authenticating milk powder is presented to demonstrate the system performance. In 4 min the system acquired a 512 × 110 × 1024 hypercube (56  320 spectra) from four, 47 mm diameter Petri dishes containing four powder samples. Chemical images were created for detecting two adulterants (melamine and dicyandiamide) that had been mixed into the milk powder.

  13. Microsecond Scale Vibrational Spectroscopic Imaging by Multiplex Stimulated Raman Scattering Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Chien-Sheng; Slipchenko, Mikhail N; Wang, Ping; Li, Junjie; Lee, Seung-Young; Oglesbee, Robert A; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    Real-time vibrational spectroscopic imaging is desired for monitoring cellular states and cellular processes in a label-free manner. Raman spectroscopic imaging of highly dynamic systems is inhibited by relatively slow spectral acquisition on millisecond to second scale. Here, we report microsecond scale vibrational spectroscopic imaging by lock-in free parallel detection of spectrally dispersed stimulated Raman scattering signal. Using a homebuilt tuned amplifier array, our method enables Raman spectral acquisition, within the window defined by the broadband pulse, at the speed of 32 microseconds and with close to shot-noise limited detection sensitivity. Incorporated with multivariate curve resolution analysis, our platform allows compositional mapping of lipid droplets in single live cells, observation of intracellular retinoid metabolism, discrimination of fat droplets from protein-rich organelles in Caenorhabditis elegans, spectral detection of fast flowing tumor cells, and monitoring drug diffusion through skin tissue in vivo . The reported technique opens new opportunities for compositional analysis of cellular compartment in a microscope setting and high-throughput spectral profiling of single cells in a flow cytometer setting.

  14. Development of Raman microspectroscopy for automated detection and imaging of basal cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larraona-Puy, Marta; Ghita, Adrian; Zoladek, Alina; Perkins, William; Varma, Sandeep; Leach, Iain H.; Koloydenko, Alexey A.; Williams, Hywel; Notingher, Ioan

    2009-09-01

    We investigate the potential of Raman microspectroscopy (RMS) for automated evaluation of excised skin tissue during Mohs micrographic surgery (MMS). The main aim is to develop an automated method for imaging and diagnosis of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) regions. Selected Raman bands responsible for the largest spectral differences between BCC and normal skin regions and linear discriminant analysis (LDA) are used to build a multivariate supervised classification model. The model is based on 329 Raman spectra measured on skin tissue obtained from 20 patients. BCC is discriminated from healthy tissue with 90+/-9% sensitivity and 85+/-9% specificity in a 70% to 30% split cross-validation algorithm. This multivariate model is then applied on tissue sections from new patients to image tumor regions. The RMS images show excellent correlation with the gold standard of histopathology sections, BCC being detected in all positive sections. We demonstrate the potential of RMS as an automated objective method for tumor evaluation during MMS. The replacement of current histopathology during MMS by a ``generalization'' of the proposed technique may improve the feasibility and efficacy of MMS, leading to a wider use according to clinical need.

  15. Raman microscopy of individual living human embryonic stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novikov, Sergey M.; Beermann, Jonas; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate the possibility of mapping the distribution of different biomolecules in living human embryonic stem cells grown on glass substrates, without the need for fluorescent markers. In our work we improve the quality of measurements by finding a buffer that gives low fluorescence, growing...... cells on glass substrates (whose Raman signals are relatively weak compared to that of the cells) and having the backside covered with gold to improve the image contrast under direct white light illumination. The experimental setup used for Raman microscopy is the commercially available confocal...... scanning Raman microscope (Alpha300R) from Witec and sub-μm spatially resolved Raman images were obtained using a 532 nm excitation wavelength....

  16. Insights into the early dissolution events of amlodipine using UV imaging and Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boetker, Johan P; Savolainen, Marja; Koradia, Vishal; Tian, Fang; Rades, Thomas; Müllertz, Anette; Cornett, Claus; Rantanen, Jukka; Østergaard, Jesper

    2011-08-01

    Traditional dissolution testing determines drug release to the bulk, but does not enable an understanding of the events happening close to the surface of a solid or a tablet. UV imaging is a new imaging approach that can be used to study the dissolution behavior of chemical compounds. The UV imaging instrumentation offers recording of absorbance maps with a high spatial and temporal resolution which facilitates the abundant collection of information regarding the evolving solution concentrations. In this study, UV imaging was used to visualize the dissolution behavior of amlodipine besylate (amorphous and dihydrate forms) and amlodipine free base. The dissolution of amlodipine besylate was faster from the amorphous form than from the crystalline forms. The UV imaging investigations suggested that a solvent mediated phase transformation occurred for the amorphous amlodipine besylate and the amlodipine free base samples. Raman spectroscopy was used to confirm and probe the changes at the solid surface occurring upon contact with the dissolution media and verified the recrystallization of the amorphous form to the monohydrate. The combination of UV imaging and Raman spectroscopy is an efficient tool to obtain a deeper insight into the early events of the dissolution process.

  17. Identification and Evaluation of Composition in Food Powder Using Point-Scan Raman Spectral Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sagar Dhakal

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study used Raman spectral imaging coupled with self-modeling mixture analysis (SMA for identification of three components mixed into a complex food powder mixture. Vanillin, melamine, and sugar were mixed together at 10 different concentration level (1% to 10%, w/w into powdered non-dairy creamer. SMA was used to decompose the complex multi-component spectra and extract the pure component spectra and corresponding contribution images. Spectral information divergence (SID values of the extracted pure component spectra and reference component spectra were computed to identify the components corresponding to the extracted spectra. The contribution images obtained via SMA were used to create Raman chemical images of the mixtures samples, to which threshold values were applied to obtain binary detection images of the components at all concentration levels. The detected numbers of pixels of each component in the binary images was found to be strongly correlated with the actual sample concentrations (correlation coefficient of 0.99 for all components. The results show that this method can be used for simultaneous identification of different components and estimation of their concentrations for authentication or quantitative inspection purposes.

  18. Study of optically trapped living Trypanosoma cruzi/Trypanosoma rangeli - Rhodnius prolixus interactions by real time confocal images using CdSe quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Thomaz, A. A.; Almeida, D. B.; Faustino, W. M.; Jacob, G. J.; Fontes, A.; Barbosa, L. C.; Cesar, C. L.; Stahl, C. V.; Santos-Mallet, J. R.; Gomes, S. A. O.; Feder, D.

    2008-08-01

    One of the fundamental goals in biology is to understand the interplay between biomolecules of different cells. This happen, for example, in the first moments of the infection of a vector by a parasite that results in the adherence to the cell walls. To observe this kind of event we used an integrated Optical Tweezers and Confocal Microscopy tool. This tool allow us to use the Optical Tweezers to trigger the adhesion of the Trypanosoma cruzi and Trypanosoma rangeli parasite to the intestine wall cells and salivary gland of the Rhodnius prolixus vector and to, subsequently observe the sequence of events by confocal fluorescence microscopy under optical forces stresses. We kept the microorganism and vector cells alive using CdSe quantum dot staining. Besides the fact that Quantum Dots are bright vital fluorescent markers, the absence of photobleaching allow us to follow the events in time for an extended period. By zooming to the region of interested we have been able to acquire confocal images at the 2 to 3 frames per second rate.

  19. Confocal Microscopy and Image Analysis Indicates a Region-Specific Relation between Active Caspases and Cytoplasm in Ejaculated and Epididymal Sperm

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Vazquez, Susana; Aragón Martínez, Andrés; Flores-Alonso, Juan Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Previously, it was suggested a relation between the presence of apoptosis markers with cytoplasm in mammalian sperm. In this work, flow cytometry, confocal microscopy and image analysis were used to analyze the relationship between active caspase-3 and -7 and intracellular esterases expression in ejaculated or epididymal ram sperm. Sperm obtained from ejaculates from the caput, corpus, or cauda of the epididymis were treated with an inhibitor of active caspase-3 and -7 and a marker of cytoplasmic esterases. Additionally, ejaculated sperm were incubated for one, two, or three hours before evaluation for active caspases. Sperm subpopulations positive for active caspases and/or intracellular esterases were detected by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy; however, image analysis of confocal images showed that the correlation between active caspases and cytoplasmic esterases in sperm is region-specific. Lower values of Spearman correlation coefficients were found when whole sperm or head sperm was analyzed; however, a high correlation was observed for midpiece sperm. Incubation of sperm for two or three hours promoted the autoactivation of caspases. It has been suggested that the presence of apoptotic markers in sperm are related with a process of abortive apoptosis and with errors during spermiogenesis. Our results permit us suggest that the origin of the relationship between active caspases and cytoplasmic esterases is due to differentiation errors occurring during spermiogenesis because the percentages of sperm with active caspases are not different in the caput, corpus, or cauda of the epididymis. In this study we demonstrate that existing sperm subpopulations can express active caspases and intracellular esterases and that the correlation between these molecules is high in midpiece sperm. PMID:22530029

  20. Confocal microscopy and image analysis indicates a region-specific relation between active caspases and cytoplasm in ejaculated and epididymal sperm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana García Vazquez

    Full Text Available Previously, it was suggested a relation between the presence of apoptosis markers with cytoplasm in mammalian sperm. In this work, flow cytometry, confocal microscopy and image analysis were used to analyze the relationship between active caspase-3 and -7 and intracellular esterases expression in ejaculated or epididymal ram sperm. Sperm obtained from ejaculates from the caput, corpus, or cauda of the epididymis were treated with an inhibitor of active caspase-3 and -7 and a marker of cytoplasmic esterases. Additionally, ejaculated sperm were incubated for one, two, or three hours before evaluation for active caspases. Sperm subpopulations positive for active caspases and/or intracellular esterases were detected by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy; however, image analysis of confocal images showed that the correlation between active caspases and cytoplasmic esterases in sperm is region-specific. Lower values of Spearman correlation coefficients were found when whole sperm or head sperm was analyzed; however, a high correlation was observed for midpiece sperm. Incubation of sperm for two or three hours promoted the autoactivation of caspases. It has been suggested that the presence of apoptotic markers in sperm are related with a process of abortive apoptosis and with errors during spermiogenesis. Our results permit us suggest that the origin of the relationship between active caspases and cytoplasmic esterases is due to differentiation errors occurring during spermiogenesis because the percentages of sperm with active caspases are not different in the caput, corpus, or cauda of the epididymis. In this study we demonstrate that existing sperm subpopulations can express active caspases and intracellular esterases and that the correlation between these molecules is high in midpiece sperm.

  1. Live Cell Imaging and 3D Analysis of Angiotensin Receptor Type 1a Trafficking in Transfected Human Embryonic Kidney Cells Using Confocal Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadam, Parnika; McAllister, Ryan; Urbach, Jeffrey S; Sandberg, Kathryn; Mueller, Susette C

    2017-03-27

    Live-cell imaging is used to simultaneously capture time-lapse images of angiotensin type 1a receptors (AT1aR) and intracellular compartments in transfected human embryonic kidney-293 (HEK) cells following stimulation with angiotensin II (Ang II). HEK cells are transiently transfected with plasmid DNA containing AT1aR tagged with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). Lysosomes are identified with a red fluorescent dye. Live-cell images are captured on a laser scanning confocal microscope after Ang II stimulation and analyzed by software in three dimensions (3D, voxels) over time. Live-cell imaging enables investigations into receptor trafficking and avoids confounds associated with fixation, and in particular, the loss or artefactual displacement of EGFP-tagged membrane receptors. Thus, as individual cells are tracked through time, the subcellular localization of receptors can be imaged and measured. Images must be acquired sufficiently rapidly to capture rapid vesicle movement. Yet, at faster imaging speeds, the number of photons collected is reduced. Compromises must also be made in the selection of imaging parameters like voxel size in order to gain imaging speed. Significant applications of live-cell imaging are to study protein trafficking, migration, proliferation, cell cycle, apoptosis, autophagy and protein-protein interaction and dynamics, to name but a few.

  2. Biological image construction by using Raman radiation and Pca: preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez E, J. C. [IPN, Unidad Profesional Interdisciplinaria de Ingenieria, Campus Guanajuato, Av. Mineral de Valenciana 200, Col. Fracc. Industrial Puerto Interior, 36275 Silao, Guanajuato (Mexico); Cordova F, T. [Universidad de Guanajuato, DIC, Departamento de Ingenieria Fisica, Loma del Bosque No. 103, Col. Lomas del Campestre, 37150 Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico); Hugo R, V., E-mail: jcmartineze@ipn.mx [Universidad de Guadalajara, Centro Universitario de Tonala, Morelos No. 180, 69584 Tonala, Jalisco (Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    Full text: In the last years, the Raman spectroscopy (Rs) technique has had some applications in the study and analysis of biological samples, due to it is able to detect concentrations or presence of certain organic and inorganic compounds of medical interest. In this work, raw data were obtained through measurements in selected points on a square regions in order to detect specific organic / inorganic compounds on biological samples. Gold nano stars samples were prepared and coated with membrane markers (CD 10+ and CD 19+) and diluted in leukemic B lymphocytes. Each data block was evaluated independently by the method of principal component analysis (Pca) in order to find representative dimensionless values (Cp) for each Raman spectrum in a specific coordinate. Each Cp was normalized in a range of 0-255 in order to generate a representative image of 8 bits of the region under study. Data acquisition was performed with Raman microscopy system Renishaw in Via in the range of 550 to 1700 cm-1 with a 785 nm laser source, with a power of 17 m W and 15 s of exposure time were used for each spectrum. In preliminary results could detect the presence of molecular markers CD 10+ and CD 19+ with gold nano stars and discrimination between both markers. The results suggest conducting studies with specific concentrations organic and inorganic materials. (Author)

  3. Raman microscopy of individual living human embryonic stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novikov, Sergey M.; Beermann, Jonas; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate the possibility of mapping the distribution of different biomolecules in living human embryonic stem cells grown on glass substrates, without the need for fluorescent markers. In our work we improve the quality of measurements by finding a buffer that gives low fluorescence, growing...... cells on glass substrates (whose Raman signals are relatively weak compared to that of the cells) and having the backside covered with gold to improve the image contrast under direct white light illumination. The experimental setup used for Raman microscopy is the commercially available confocal...

  4. Monitoring the dynamics of phase separation in a polymer blend by confocal imaging and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doroshenko, Mikheil; Gonzales, Maria; Best, Andreas; Butt, Hans-Jürgen; Koynov, Kaloian; Floudas, George

    2012-09-26

    The phase separation of the polymer blend polystyrene/poly(methyl phenyl siloxane) (PS/PMPS) is studied in situ by laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) and by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) at macroscopic and microscopic length scales, respectively. It is shown for the first time that FCS when combined with LSCM can provide independent information on the local concentration within the phase-separated domains as well as the interfacial width. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. The binding of cellulase variants to dislocations: a semi-quantitative analysis based on CLSM (confocal laser scanning microscopy) images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hidayat, Budi J.; Weisskopf, Carmen; Felby, Claus

    2015-01-01

    or slip planes. Here we study whether cellulases bind to dislocations to a higher extent than to the surrounding cell wall. The binding of fluorescently labelled cellobiohydrolases and endoglucanases to filter paper fibers was investigated using confocal laser scanning microscopy and a ratiometric method...... was developed to assess and quantify the abundance of the binding of cellulases to dislocations as compared to the surrounding cell wall. Only Humicola insolens EGV was found to have stronger binding preference to dislocations than to the surrounding cell wall, while no difference in binding affinity was seen...

  6. Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Nanoparticles as Optical Labels for Imaging Cell Surface Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLaughlin, Christina M.

    Assaying the expression of cell surface proteins has widespread application for characterizing cell type, developmental stage, and monitoring disease transformation. Immunophenotyping is conducted by treating cells with labelled targeting moieties that have high affinity for relevant surface protein(s). The sensitivity and specificity of immunophenotyping is defined by the choice of contrast agent and therefore, the number of resolvable signals that can be used to simultaneously label cells. Narrow band width surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) nanoparticles are proposed as optical labels for multiplexed immunophenotying. Two types of surface coatings were investigated to passivate the gold nanoparticles, incorporate SERS functionality, and to facilitate attachment of targeting antibodies. Thiolated poly(ethylene glycol) forms dative bonds with the gold surface and is compatible with multiple physisorbed Raman-active reporter molecules. Ternary lipid bilayers are used to encapsulate the gold nanoparticles particles, and incorporate three different classes of Raman reporters. TEM, UV-Visible absorbance spectroscopy, DLS, and electrophoretic light scattering were used characterize the particle coating. Colourimetric protein assay, and secondary antibody labelling were used to quantify the antibody conjugation. Three different in vitromodels were used to investigate the binding efficacy and specificity of SERS labels for their biomarker targets. Primary human CLL cells, LY10 B lymphoma, and A549 adenocarcinoma lines were targeted. Dark field imaging was used to visualize the colocalization of SERS labels with cells, and evidence of receptor clustering was obtained based on colour shifts of the particles' Rayleigh scattering. Widefield, and spatially-resolved Raman spectra were used to detect labels singly, and in combination from labelled cells. Fluorescence flow cytometry was used to test the particles' binding specificity, and SERS from labelled cells was also

  7. Measuring changes in chemistry, composition, and molecular structure within hair fibers by infrared and Raman spectroscopic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guojin; Senak, Laurence; Moore, David J.

    2011-05-01

    Spatially resolved infrared (IR) and Raman images are acquired from human hair cross sections or intact hair fibers. The full informational content of these spectra are spatially correlated to hair chemistry, anatomy, and structural organization through univariate and multivariate data analysis. Specific IR and Raman images from untreated human hair describing the spatial dependence of lipid and protein distribution, protein secondary structure, lipid chain conformational order, and distribution of disulfide cross-links in hair protein are presented in this study. Factor analysis of the image plane acquired with IR microscopy in hair sections, permits delineation of specific micro-regions within the hair. These data indicate that both IR and Raman imaging of molecular structural changes in a specific region of hair will prove to be valuable tools in the understanding of hair structure, physiology, and the effect of various stresses upon its integrity.

  8. Monitoring peripheral nerve degeneration in ALS by label-free stimulated Raman scattering imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Feng; Yang, Wenlong; Mordes, Daniel A.; Wang, Jin-Yuan; Salameh, Johnny S.; Mok, Joanie; Chew, Jeannie; Sharma, Aarti; Leno-Duran, Ester; Suzuki-Uematsu, Satomi; Suzuki, Naoki; Han, Steve S.; Lu, Fa-Ke; Ji, Minbiao; Zhang, Rosanna; Liu, Yue; Strominger, Jack; Shneider, Neil A.; Petrucelli, Leonard; Xie, X. Sunney; Eggan, Kevin

    2016-10-01

    The study of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and potential interventions would be facilitated if motor axon degeneration could be more readily visualized. Here we demonstrate that stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy could be used to sensitively monitor peripheral nerve degeneration in ALS mouse models and ALS autopsy materials. Three-dimensional imaging of pre-symptomatic SOD1 mouse models and data processing by a correlation-based algorithm revealed that significant degeneration of peripheral nerves could be detected coincidentally with the earliest detectable signs of muscle denervation and preceded physiologically measurable motor function decline. We also found that peripheral degeneration was an early event in FUS as well as C9ORF72 repeat expansion models of ALS, and that serial imaging allowed long-term observation of disease progression and drug effects in living animals. Our study demonstrates that SRS imaging is a sensitive and quantitative means of measuring disease progression, greatly facilitating future studies of disease mechanisms and candidate therapeutics.

  9. Label-free biomolecular characterization of human breast cancer tissue with stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) spectral imaging (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Fa-Ke F.; Calligaris, David; Suo, Yuanzhen; Santagata, Sandro; Golby, Alexandra J.; Xie, X. Sunney; Mallory, Melissa A.; Golshan, Mehra; Dillon, Deborah A.; Agar, Nathalie Y. R.

    2017-02-01

    Stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy has been used for rapid label-free imaging of various biomolecules and drugs in living cells and tissues (Science, doi:10.1126/science.aaa8870). Our recent work has demonstrated that lipid and protein mapping of cancer tissue renders pathology-like images, providing essential histopathological information with subcellular resolution of the entire specimen (Cancer Research, doi: 10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-16-027). We have also established the first SRS imaging Atlas of human brain tumors (Harvard Dataverse, doi: (doi:10.7910/DVN/EZW4EK). SRS imaging of tissue could provide invaluable information for cancer diagnosis and surgical guidance in two aspects: rapid surgical pathology and quantitative biomolecular characterization. In this work, we present the use of SRS microscopy for characterization of a few essential biomolecules in breast cancer. Human breast cancer tissue specimens at the tumor core, tumor margin and normal area (5 cm away from the tumor) from surgical cases will be imaged with SRS at multiple Raman shifts, including the peaks for lipid, protein, blood (absorption), collagen, microcalcification (calcium phosphates and calcium oxalate) and carotenoids. Most of these Raman shifts have relatively strong Raman cross sections, which ensures high-quality and fast imaging. This proof-of-principle study is sought to demonstrate the feasibility and potential of SRS imaging for ambient diagnosis and surgical guidance of breast cancer.

  10. New algorithm to determine true colocalization in combination with image restoration and time-lapse confocal microscopy to MAP kinases in mitochondria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Ignacio Villalta

    Full Text Available The subcellular localization and physiological functions of biomolecules are closely related and thus it is crucial to precisely determine the distribution of different molecules inside the intracellular structures. This is frequently accomplished by fluorescence microscopy with well-characterized markers and posterior evaluation of the signal colocalization. Rigorous study of colocalization requires statistical analysis of the data, albeit yet no single technique has been established as a standard method. Indeed, the few methods currently available are only accurate in images with particular characteristics. Here, we introduce a new algorithm to automatically obtain the true colocalization between images that is suitable for a wide variety of biological situations. To proceed, the algorithm contemplates the individual contribution of each pixel's fluorescence intensity in a pair of images to the overall Pearsońs correlation and Manders' overlap coefficients. The accuracy and reliability of the algorithm was validated on both simulated and real images that reflected the characteristics of a range of biological samples. We used this algorithm in combination with image restoration by deconvolution and time-lapse confocal microscopy to address the localization of MEK1 in the mitochondria of different cell lines. Appraising the previously described behavior of Akt1 corroborated the reliability of the combined use of these techniques. Together, the present work provides a novel statistical approach to accurately and reliably determine the colocalization in a variety of biological images.

  11. Simultaneous UV Imaging and Raman Spectroscopy for the Measurement of Solvent-Mediated Phase Transformations During Dissolution Testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostergaard, Jesper; Wu, Jian; Naelapää, Kaisa

    2014-01-01

    The current work reports the simultaneous use of UV imaging and Raman spectroscopy for detailed characterization of drug dissolution behavior including solid-state phase transformations during dissolution. The dissolution of drug substances from compacts of sodium naproxen in 0.1 HCl as well...... as theophylline anhydrate and monohydrate in water was studied utilizing a flow-through setup. The decreases in dissolution rates with time observed by UV imaging were associated with concomitant solid form changes detected by Raman spectroscopy. Sodium naproxen and theophylline anhydrate were observed to convert...... of UV imaging and Raman spectroscopy offers a detailed characterization of drug dissolution behavior in a time-effective and sample-sparing manner. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association J Pharm Sci 103:1149-1156, 2014....

  12. Vibrational imaging and microspectroscopies based on coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkmer, Andreas

    2005-01-01

    For noninvasive characterization of chemical species or biological components within a complex heterogeneous system, their intrinsic molecular vibrational properties can be used in contrast mechanisms in optical microscopy. A series of recent advances have made coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy a powerful technique that allows vibrational imaging with high sensitivity, high spectral resolution and three-dimensional sectioning capability. In this review, we discuss theoretical and experimental aspects of CARS microscopy in a collinear excitation beam geometry. Particular attention is given to the underlying physical principles behind the new features of CARS signal generation under tight focusing conditions. We provide a brief overview of the instrumentation of CARS microscopy and its experimental characterization by means of imaging of model systems and live unstained cells. CARS microscopy offers the possibility of spatially resolved vibrational spectroscopy, providing chemical and physical structure information of molecular specimens on the sub-micrometre length scale. We review multiplex CARS microspectroscopy allowing fast acquisition of frequency-resolved CARS spectra, time-resolved CARS microspectroscopy recording ultrafast Raman free induction decays and CARS correlation spectroscopy probing dynamical processes with chemical selectivity. (topical review)

  13. Visualization and Non-Destructive Quantification of Inkjet-Printed Pharmaceuticals on Different Substrates Using Raman Spectroscopy and Raman Chemical Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edinger, Magnus; Bar-Shalom, Daniel; Rantanen, Jukka

    2017-01-01

    and ethanol was developed. Inkjet printing technology was used to apply haloperidol ink onto three different substrates. Custom-made inorganic compacts and dry foam, as well as marketed paracetamol tablets were used as the substrates. RESULTS: Therapeutic personalized doses were printed by using one to ten...... printing rounds on the substrates. The haloperidol content in the finished dosage forms were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The distribution of the haloperidol on the dosage forms were visualized using Raman chemical imaging combined with principal components analysis (PCA......). Raman spectroscopy combined with modeling by partial least squares (PLS) regression was used for establishment of a quantitative model of the haloperidol content in the printed dosage forms. A good prediction of the haloperidol content was achieved for the inorganic compacts, while a slightly poorer...

  14. Application of Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy in Biology and Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Volkov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescence confocal laser scanning microscopy and reflectance confocal laser scanning microscopy are up-to-date highend study methods. Confocal microscopy is used in cell biology and medicine. By using confocal microscopy, it is possible to study bioplasts and localization of protein molecules and other compounds relative to cell or tissue structures, and to monitor dynamic cell processes. Confocal microscopes enable layer-by-layer scanning of test items to create demonstrable 3D models. As compared to usual fluorescent microscopes, confocal microscopes are characterized by a higher contrast ratio and image definition.

  15. Detection and quantification of adulterants in milk powder using a high-throughput Raman chemical imaging technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Jianwei; Kim, Moon S; Chao, Kuanglin; Dhakal, Sagar; Lee, Hoonsoo; Cho, Byoung-Kwan; Mo, Changyeun

    2017-02-01

    Milk is a vulnerable target for economically motivated adulteration. In this study, a line-scan high-throughput Raman imaging system was used to authenticate milk powder. A 5 W 785 nm line laser (240 mm long and 1 mm wide) was used as a Raman excitation source. The system was used to acquire hyperspectral Raman images in a wave number range of 103-2881 cm - 1 from the skimmed milk powder mixed with two nitrogen-rich adulterants (i.e., melamine and urea) at eight concentrations (w/w) from 50 to 10,000 ppm. The powdered samples were put in sample holders with a surface area of 150 ×100 mm and a depth of 2 mm for push-broom image acquisition. Varying fluorescence signals from the milk powder were removed using a correction method based on adaptive iteratively reweighted penalised least squares. Image classifications were conducted using a simple thresholding method applied to single-band fluorescence-corrected images at unique Raman peaks selected for melamine (673 cm - 1 ) and urea (1009 cm - 1 ). Chemical images were generated by combining individual binary images of melamine and urea to visualise identification, spatial distribution and morphological features of the two adulterant particles in the milk powder. Limits of detection for both melamine and urea were estimated in the order of 50 ppm. High correlations were found between pixel concentrations (i.e., percentages of the adulterant pixels in the chemical images) and mass concentrations of melamine and urea, demonstrating the potential of the high-throughput Raman chemical imaging method for the detection and quantification of adulterants in the milk powder.

  16. Quantitative image correction and calibration for confocal fluorescence microscopy using thin reference layers and SIPchart-based calibration procedures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwier, J.M.; Oomen, L.; Brocks, L.; Jalink, K.; Brakenhoff, G.J.

    2008-01-01

    The fluorescence intensity image of an axially integrated through-focus series of a thin standardized uniform fluorescent layer can be used for image intensity correction and calibration in sectioning microscopy. This intensity image is in fact available from the earlier introduced Sectioned Imaging

  17. Confocal microscopy findings of Acanthamoeba keratitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfister, D R; Cameron, J D; Krachmer, J H; Holland, E J

    1996-02-01

    Tandem scanning confocal microscopy was performed on two patients with Acanthamoeba keratitis to provide images detailing characteristic findings of the disease. Although tandem scanning confocal microscopy of Acanthamoeba has been described in previous reports, Acanthamoeba keratitis has not been fully characterized with this instrument. In vivo confocal micrographs showed the double-walled structure of the Acanthamoeba cyst and associated radial keratoneuritis (perineuritis). We reviewed the records of two patients with a clinical diagnosis of Acanthamoeba keratitis, one with culture-proven Acanthamoeba and the other with a suspected Acanthamoeba infection. Slit-lamp biomicroscopy and in vivo tandem scanning confocal microscopy were performed. The images obtained were compared with images from patients without corneal disease. High-contrast round bodies suggestive of Acanthamoeba cysts, as previously described, and irregular forms suggestive of Acanthamoeba trophozoites were found by tandem scanning confocal microscopy. Additionally, we showed conclusively that under certain circumstances (that is, corneal scarring) tandem scanning confocal microscopy can resolve the double-walled structure of the Acanthamoeba ectocyst surrounding the endocyst. Furthermore, radial keratoneuritis was demonstrated, consisting of an irregularly swollen nerve fiber with probable amoebic infiltration. Confocal microscopy can be a useful, noninvasive imaging technique helpful in the study, diagnosis, and treatment of Acanthamoeba keratitis.

  18. Aggregation of gold nanoparticles followed by methotrexate release enables Raman imaging of drug delivery into cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durgadas, C. V.; Sharma, C. P.; Paul, W.; Rekha, M. R.; Sreenivasan, K.

    2012-01-01

    This study refers an aqueous synthesis of methotrexate (MTX)-conjugated gold nanoparticles (GNPs), their interaction with HepG2 cells, and the use of Raman imaging to observe cellular internalization and drug delivery. GNPs of average size 3.5–5 nm were stabilized using the amine terminated bifunctional biocompatible copolymer and amended by conjugating MTX, an anticancer drug. The nanoparticles were released MTX at a faster rate in acidic pH and subsequently found to form aggregates. The Raman signals of cellular components were found to be enhanced by the aggregated particles enabling the mapping to visualize site-specific drug delivery. The methodology seems to have potential in optimizing the characteristics of nanodrug carriers for emptying the cargo precisely at specified sites.Graphical AbstractDrug release induced particle aggregation enhances Raman signals to aid in imaging.

  19. Label-Free Imaging of Nanoparticle Uptake Competition in Single Cells by Hyperspectral Stimulated Raman Scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Bin; Yan, Shuai; Xiao, Lin; Ji, Rong; Yang, Liuyan; Miao, Ai-Jun; Wang, Ping

    2018-03-01

    Imaging and quantification of nanoparticles in single cells in their most natural condition are expected to facilitate the biotechnological applications of nanoparticles and allow for better assessment of their biosafety risks. However, current imaging modalities either require tedious sample preparation or only apply to nanoparticles with specific physicochemical characteristics. Here, the emerging hyperspectral stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy, as a label-free and nondestructive imaging method, is used for the first time to investigate the subcellular distribution of nanoparticles in the protozoan Tetrahymena thermophila. The two frequently studied nanoparticles, polyacrylate-coated α-Fe 2 O 3 and TiO 2 , are found to have different subcellular distribution pattern as a result of their dissimilar uptake routes. Significant uptake competition between these two types of nanoparticles is further discovered, which should be paid attention to in future bioapplications of nanoparticles. Overall, this study illustrates the great promise of hyperspectral SRS as an analytical imaging tool in nanobiotechnology and nanotoxicology. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. The effect of compression on clinical diagnosis of glaucoma based on non-analyzed confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bélair, Marie-Lyne; Fansi, Alvine Kamdeu; Descovich, Denise; Leblanc, A R; Harasymowycz, Paul

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of different image compression formats of non-analyzed Heidelberg Retina Tomography (HRT; Heidelberg Engineering, Heidelberg, Germany) images on the diagnosis of glaucoma by ophthalmologists. Thirty-three topographic and reflectance images taken with the HRT representing different levels of disease were transformed using nine different compression formats. Three independent ophthalmologists, masked as to contour line and stereometric parameters, classified the original and compressed HRT images as normal, suspected glaucoma, or glaucoma, and Kappa agreement coefficients were calculated. The Tagged Image File Format had the largest file size and the Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG) 2000 format had the smallest size. The highest Kappa coefficient value was 1.00 for all ophthalmologists using the Tagged Image File Format. Kappa values for JPEG formats were all in the range of good to excellent agreement. Kappa values were lower for Portable Network Graphic and Graphics Interchange Format compression formats. Image compression with JPEG 2000 at a ratio of 20:1 provided sufficient quality for glaucoma analysis in conjunction with a relatively small image size format, and may prove to be attractive for HRT telemedicine applications. Further clinical studies validating the usefulness of interpreting non-analyzed HRT images are required.

  1. Confocal microendoscopy with chromatic sectioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Pierre M.; Elliott, Robert P.; MacAulay, Calum E.

    2003-07-01

    Placing a spatial light modulator, such as the Texas Instruments Digital Micromirror Device (DMD), in the light path of a microscope enables a variety of novel applications. One application enables reflectance in vivo confocal imaging of cells and tissue structure through a fiber-optic image guide. While multi-wavelength reflectance confocal microendoscopy with optical sectioning is a requirement for a clinically useful device, some form of axial scanning is also necessary. This is readily achieved using a multi-element lens system with some form of mechanical translation, however, this generally results in large probes and high cost. These limitations can be overcome using a two-element GRIN lens system in which the traditionally undesirable chromatic aberration of such a system can be exploited to allow for color-encoded optical sectioning. In our system a wavelength encoding range of 200 nm permits a sectioning range of 40 μm from the tip of the probe into the tissue.

  2. Label-Free Biomedical Imaging Using High-Speed Lock-In Pixel Sensor for Stimulated Raman Scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mars, Kamel; Lioe, De Xing; Kawahito, Shoji; Yasutomi, Keita; Kagawa, Keiichiro; Yamada, Takahiro; Hashimoto, Mamoru

    2017-11-09

    Raman imaging eliminates the need for staining procedures, providing label-free imaging to study biological samples. Recent developments in stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) have achieved fast acquisition speed and hyperspectral imaging. However, there has been a problem of lack of detectors suitable for MHz modulation rate parallel detection, detecting multiple small SRS signals while eliminating extremely strong offset due to direct laser light. In this paper, we present a complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) image sensor using high-speed lock-in pixels for stimulated Raman scattering that is capable of obtaining the difference of Stokes-on and Stokes-off signal at modulation frequency of 20 MHz in the pixel before reading out. The generated small SRS signal is extracted and amplified in a pixel using a high-speed and large area lateral electric field charge modulator (LEFM) employing two-step ion implantation and an in-pixel pair of low-pass filter, a sample and hold circuit and a switched capacitor integrator using a fully differential amplifier. A prototype chip is fabricated using 0.11 μm CMOS image sensor technology process. SRS spectra and images of stearic acid and 3T3-L1 samples are successfully obtained. The outcomes suggest that hyperspectral and multi-focus SRS imaging at video rate is viable after slight modifications to the pixel architecture and the acquisition system.

  3. Label-Free Biomedical Imaging Using High-Speed Lock-In Pixel Sensor for Stimulated Raman Scattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamel Mars

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Raman imaging eliminates the need for staining procedures, providing label-free imaging to study biological samples. Recent developments in stimulated Raman scattering (SRS have achieved fast acquisition speed and hyperspectral imaging. However, there has been a problem of lack of detectors suitable for MHz modulation rate parallel detection, detecting multiple small SRS signals while eliminating extremely strong offset due to direct laser light. In this paper, we present a complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS image sensor using high-speed lock-in pixels for stimulated Raman scattering that is capable of obtaining the difference of Stokes-on and Stokes-off signal at modulation frequency of 20 MHz in the pixel before reading out. The generated small SRS signal is extracted and amplified in a pixel using a high-speed and large area lateral electric field charge modulator (LEFM employing two-step ion implantation and an in-pixel pair of low-pass filter, a sample and hold circuit and a switched capacitor integrator using a fully differential amplifier. A prototype chip is fabricated using 0.11 μm CMOS image sensor technology process. SRS spectra and images of stearic acid and 3T3-L1 samples are successfully obtained. The outcomes suggest that hyperspectral and multi-focus SRS imaging at video rate is viable after slight modifications to the pixel architecture and the acquisition system.

  4. Classification and prediction of HCC tissues by Raman imaging with identification of fatty acids as potential lipid biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolstik, T; Marquardt, C; Beleites, C; Matthäus, C; Bielecki, C; Bürger, M; Krafft, C; Dirsch, O; Settmacher, U; Popp, J; Stallmach, A

    2015-03-01

    Patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) can only be treated curatively at early stages and then have a favorable prognosis of this often fatal disease. For this reason, an early detection and diagnostic confirmation are crucial. Raman imaging spectroscopy is a promising technology for high-resolution visualization of the spatial distribution of molecular composition in tissue sections. The aim of this study was to investigate molecular information of liver tissue by Raman imaging for classification and diagnostic prediction. Unstained cryosections of human hepatic tissues (23 patients) were measured by Raman spectroscope in the regions of HCC (n = 12) and fibrosis (n = 17). The acquired data set was used to generate a random forest classification model with 101 iterations of sevenfold cross-validation. The models obtained during cross-validation were also used to predict regions of tumor margin (n = 8) aside from independent testing. Raman spectra differed between malignant and non-malignant tissue regions. Based on these spectral data, a random forest classification model calculated a prediction accuracy of 86 % (76 % sensitivity and 93 % specificity). The ten most important variables were identified at 2895, 2856, 1439, 1298, 1080, 1063, 1023, 937, 920, and 719 cm(-1). In this study, Raman imaging spectroscopy was applied successfully for liver tissue to differentiate, classify, and predict with high accuracy malignant and non-malignant tissue regions. Furthermore, the most important differences were identified as the Raman signature of fatty acids. The demonstrated results highlight the enormous potential which vibrational spectroscopy techniques have for the future diagnostics and prognosis estimation of HCC.

  5. In vivo coherent Raman imaging of the melanomagenesis-associated pigment pheomelanin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hequn; Osseiran, Sam; Igras, Vivien; Nichols, Alexander J.; Roider, Elisabeth M.; Pruessner, Joachim; Tsao, Hensin; Fisher, David E.; Evans, Conor L.

    2016-11-01

    Melanoma is the most deadly form of skin cancer with a yearly global incidence over 232,000 patients. Individuals with fair skin and red hair exhibit the highest risk for developing melanoma, with evidence suggesting the red/blond pigment known as pheomelanin may elevate melanoma risk through both UV radiation-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Although the ability to identify, characterize, and monitor pheomelanin within skin is vital for improving our understanding of the underlying biology of these lesions, no tools exist for real-time, in vivo detection of the pigment. Here we show that the distribution of pheomelanin in cells and tissues can be visually characterized non-destructively and noninvasively in vivo with coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy, a label-free vibrational imaging technique. We validated our CARS imaging strategy in vitro to in vivo with synthetic pheomelanin, isolated melanocytes, and the Mc1re/e, red-haired mouse model. Nests of pheomelanotic melanocytes were observed in the red-haired animals, but not in the genetically matched Mc1re/e; Tyrc/c (“albino-red-haired”) mice. Importantly, samples from human amelanotic melanomas subjected to CARS imaging exhibited strong pheomelanotic signals. This is the first time, to our knowledge, that pheomelanin has been visualized and spatially localized in melanocytes, skin, and human amelanotic melanomas.

  6. Detection of explosives on the surface of banknotes by Raman hyperspectral imaging and independent component analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Mariana R; Correa, Deleon N; Zacca, Jorge J; Logrado, Lucio Paulo Lima; Poppi, Ronei J

    2015-02-20

    The aim of this study was to develop a methodology using Raman hyperspectral imaging and chemometric methods for identification of pre- and post-blast explosive residues on banknote surfaces. The explosives studied were of military, commercial and propellant uses. After the acquisition of the hyperspectral imaging, independent component analysis (ICA) was applied to extract the pure spectra and the distribution of the corresponding image constituents. The performance of the methodology was evaluated by the explained variance and the lack of fit of the models, by comparing the ICA recovered spectra with the reference spectra using correlation coefficients and by the presence of rotational ambiguity in the ICA solutions. The methodology was applied to forensic samples to solve an automated teller machine explosion case. Independent component analysis proved to be a suitable method of resolving curves, achieving equivalent performance with the multivariate curve resolution with alternating least squares (MCR-ALS) method. At low concentrations, MCR-ALS presents some limitations, as it did not provide the correct solution. The detection limit of the methodology presented in this study was 50 μg cm(-2). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Improving diagnostic sensitivity of combined dermoscopy and reflectance confocal microscopy imaging through double reader concordance evaluation in telemedicine settings: A retrospective study of 1000 equivocal cases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A M Witkowski

    Full Text Available Reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM is an imaging device that permits non-invasive visualization of cellular morphology and has been shown to improve diagnostic accuracy of dermoscopically equivocal cutaneous lesions. The application of double reader concordance evaluation of dermoscopy-RCM image sets in retrospective settings and its potential application to telemedicine evaluation has not been tested in a large study population.To improve diagnostic sensitivity of RCM image diagnosis using a double reader concordance evaluation approach; to reduce mismanagement of equivocal cutaneous lesions in retrospective consultation and telemedicine settings.1000 combined dermoscopy-RCM image sets were evaluated in blind by 10 readers with advanced training and internship in dermoscopy and RCM evaluation. We compared sensitivity and specificity of single reader evaluation versus double reader concordance evaluation as well as the effect of diagnostic confidence on lesion management in a retrospective setting.Single reader evaluation resulted in an overall sensitivity of 95.2% and specificity of 76.3%, with misdiagnosis of 8 melanomas, 4 basal cell carcinomas and 2 squamous cell carcinomas. Combined double reader evaluation resulted in an overall sensitivity of 98.3% and specificity of 65.5%, with misdiagnosis of 1 in-situ melanoma and 2 basal cell carcinomas.Evaluation of dermoscopy-RCM image sets of cutaneous lesions by single reader evaluation in retrospective settings is limited by sensitivity levels that may result in potential mismanagement of malignant lesions. Double reader blind concordance evaluation may improve the sensitivity of diagnosis and management safety. The use of a second check can be implemented in telemedicine settings where expert consultation and second opinions may be required.

  8. Monitoring the RNA distribution in human embryonic stem cells using Raman micro-spectroscopy and fluorescence imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falamas, A.; Kalra, S.; Chis, V.; Notingher, I.

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to monitor the intracellular distribution of nucleic acids in human embryonic stem cells. Raman micro-spectroscopy and fluorescence imaging investigations were employed to obtain high-spatial resolution maps of nucleic acids. The DNA Raman signal was identified based on the 782 cm-1 band, while the RNA characteristic signal was detected based on the 813 cm-1 fingerprint band assigned to O-P-O symmetric stretching vibrations. Additionally, principal components analysis was performed and nucleic acids characteristic Raman signals were identified in the data set, which were plotted at each position in the cells. In this manner, high intensity RNA signal was identified in the cells nucleolus and cytoplasm, while the nucleus presented a much lower signal.

  9. Study of the collagen structure in the superficial zone and physiological state of articular cartilage using a 3D confocal imaging technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Ming H

    2008-07-01

    the collagen network in the superficial zone during early physiological alteration of articular cartilage. The fibre confocal imaging technology used in this study has allowed developing confocal arthroscopy for in vivo studying the chondrocytes in different depth of articular cartilage. Therefore, the current study has potential to develop an in vivo 3D histology for diagnosis of early osteoarthritis.

  10. Label-free imaging and identification of typical cells of acute myeloid leukaemia and myelodysplastic syndrome by Raman microspectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanna, R; Ronchi, P; Lenferink, A T M; Tresoldi, C; Morasso, C; Mehn, D; Bedoni, M; Picciolini, S; Terstappen, L W M M; Ciceri, F; Otto, C; Gramatica, F

    2015-02-21

    In clinical practice, the diagnosis and classification of acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) start from the manual examination of stained smears of bone marrow (BM) and peripheral blood (PB) by using an optical microscope. This step is subjective and scarcely reproducible. Therefore, the development of subjective and potentially automatable methods for the recognition of typical AML/MDS cells is necessary. Here we have used Raman spectroscopy for distinguishing myeloblasts, promyelocytes, abnormal promyelocytes and erhytroblasts, which have to be counted for a correct diagnosis and morphological classification of AML and MDS. BM samples from patients affected by four different AML subtypes, mostly characterized by the presence of the four subpopulations selected for this study, were analyzed. First, each cell was scanned by acquiring 4096 spectra, thus obtaining Raman images which demonstrate an accurate description of morphological features characteristic of each subpopulation. Raman imaging coupled with hierarchical cluster analysis permitted the automatic discrimination and localization of the nucleus, the cytoplasm, myeloperoxidase containing granules and haemoglobin. Second, the averaged Raman fingerprint of each cell was analysed by multivariate analysis (principal component analysis and linear discriminant analysis) in order to study the typical vibrational features of each subpopulation and also for the automatic recognition of cells. The leave-one-out cross validation of a Raman-based classification model demonstrated the correct classification of myeloblasts, promyelocytes (normal/abnormal) and erhytroblasts with an accuracy of 100%. Normal and abnormal promyelocytes were distinguished with 95% accuracy. The overall classification accuracy considering the four subpopulations was 98%. This proof-of-concept study shows that Raman micro-spectroscopy could be a valid approach for developing label-free, objective and automatic

  11. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, Raster image correlation spectroscopy and Number & Brightness on a commercial confocal laser scanning microscope with analog detectors (Nikon C1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moens, Pierre D.J.; Gratton, Enrico; Salvemini, Iyrri L.

    2010-01-01

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) was developed in 1972 by Magde, Elson and Webb (Magde et al., 1972). Photon counting detectors and avalanche photodiodes have become standards in FCS to the point that there is a widespread belief that these detectors are essential to perform FCS experiments, despite the fact that FCS was developed using analog detectors. Spatial and temporal intensity fluctuation correlations using analog detection on a commercial Olympus Fluoview 300 microscope has been reported by Brown et al. (2008). However, each analog instrument has its own idiosyncrasies that need to be understood before using the instrument for FCS. In this work we explore the capabilities of the Nikon C1, a low cost confocal microscope, to obtain single point FCS, Raster-scan Image Correlation Spectroscopy (RICS) and Number & Brightness data both in solution and incorporated into the membrane of Giant Unilamellar Vesicles (GUVs). We show that it is possible to obtain dynamic information about fluorescent molecules from single point FCS, RICS and Number & Brightness using the Nikon C1. We highlighted the fact that care should be taken in selecting the acquisition parameters in order to avoid possible artifacts due to the detector noise. However, due to relatively large errors in determining the distribution of digital levels for a given microscope setting, the system is probably only adequate for determining relative brightness within the same image. PMID:20734406

  12. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, raster image correlation spectroscopy, and number and brightness on a commercial confocal laser scanning microscope with analog detectors (Nikon C1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moens, Pierre D J; Gratton, Enrico; Salvemini, Iyrri L

    2011-04-01

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) was developed in 1972 by Magde, Elson and Webb. Photon counting detectors and avalanche photodiodes have become standards in FCS to the point that there is a widespread belief that these detectors are essential to perform FCS experiments, despite the fact that FCS was developed using analog detectors. Spatial and temporal intensity fluctuation correlations using analog detection on a commercial Olympus Fluoview 300 microscope have been reported by Brown et al. (2008). However, each analog instrument has its own idiosyncrasies that need to be understood before using the instrument for FCS. In this work, we explore the capabilities of the Nikon C1, a low-cost confocal microscope, to obtain single point FCS, Raster-scan image correlation spectroscopy (RICS), and Number and Brightness data both in solution and incorporated into the membrane of giant unilamellar vesicles. We show that it is possible to obtain dynamic information about fluorescent molecules from single point FCS, RICS, and Number and Brightness using the Nikon C1. We highlighted the fact that care should be taken in selecting the acquisition parameters to avoid possible artifacts due to the detector noise. However, due to relatively large errors in determining the distribution of digital levels for a given microscope setting, the system is probably only adequate for determining relative brightness within the same image. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. A Marked Poisson Process Driven Latent Shape Model for 3D Segmentation of Reflectance Confocal Microscopy Image Stacks of Human Skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanta, Sindhu; Jordan, Michael I.; Kose, Kivanc; Brooks, Dana H.; Rajadhyaksha, Milind; Dy, Jennifer G.

    2016-01-01

    Segmenting objects of interest from 3D datasets is a common problem encountered in biological data. Small field of view and intrinsic biological variability combined with optically subtle changes of intensity, resolution and low contrast in images make the task of segmentation difficult, especially for microscopy of unstained living or freshly excised thick tissues. Incorporating shape information in addition to the appearance of the object of interest can often help improve segmentation performance. However, shapes of objects in tissue can be highly variable and design of a flexible shape model that encompasses these variations is challenging. To address such complex segmentation problems, we propose a unified probabilistic framework that can incorporate the uncertainty associated with complex shapes, variable appearance and unknown locations. The driving application which inspired the development of this framework is a biologically important segmentation problem: the task of automatically detecting and segmenting the dermal-epidermal junction (DEJ) in 3D reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) images of human skin. RCM imaging allows noninvasive observation of cellular, nuclear and morphological detail. The DEJ is an important morphological feature as it is where disorder, disease and cancer usually start. Detecting the DEJ is challenging because it is a 2D surface in a 3D volume which has strong but highly variable number of irregularly spaced and variably shaped “peaks and valleys”. In addition, RCM imaging resolution, contrast and intensity vary with depth. Thus a prior model needs to incorporate the intrinsic structure while allowing variability in essentially all its parameters. We propose a model which can incorporate objects of interest with complex shapes and variable appearance in an unsupervised setting by utilizing domain knowledge to build appropriate priors of the model. Our novel strategy to model this structure combines a spatial Poisson process

  14. Use of αv Integrin Linked to Green Fluorescent Protein in Osteosarcoma Cells and Confocal Microscopy to Image Molecular Dynamics During Lung Metastasis in Nude Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tome, Yasunori; Yano, Shuya; Sugimoto, Naotoshi; Mii, Sumiyuki; Uehara, Fuminari; Miwa, Shinji; Bouvet, Michael; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki; Kanaya, Fuminori; Hoffman, Robert M

    2016-08-01

    We report here imaging of the behavior of αv integrin linked to green fluorescent protein (GFP) in human osteosarcoma cells colonizing the lung of nude mice. 143B osteosarcoma cells expressing αv integrin-GFP were generated by transfection of an αv integrin-GFP fusion-gene vector pCMV-AC- ITGAV-GFP. In order to generate experimental lung metastases, 143B osteosarcoma cells (1×10(6)), stably expressing αv integrin-GFP, were injected intravenously via the tail vein. The osteosarcoma cells were transplanted orthotopically in the tibia of nude mice in order to generate spontaneous metastases. Lungs were harvested and imaged by confocal microscopy within 1 hour. In the experimental lung-metastasis model, extravasating and deformed osteosarcoma cells expressing αv integrin-GFP were observed. Pseudopodia of the osteosarcoma cells contained small puncta of αv integrin-GFP. In early-stage spontaneous lung metastasis, tumor emboli were observed in pulmonary vessels. At high magnification, small αv integrin-GFP puncta were observed in the tumor embolus. In late-stage spontaneous metastasis, tumor emboli were also observed in pulmonary vessels. Invading cancer cells with strong expression of αv integrin-GFP were observed at the margin of the tumor emboli. The results of this study demonstrate that molecular dynamics of αv integrin-GFP can be imaged in lung metastasis, which will allow further understanding of the role of αv integrin in this process. The results also suggest a general concept for imaging molecular behavior in vivo. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  15. Encapsulation of Cadmium Selenide Nanocrystals in Biocompatible Nanotubes: DFT Calculations, X‐ray Diffraction Investigations, and Confocal Fluorescence Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calatayud, David G.; Ge, Haobo; Kuganathan, Navaratnarajah; Mirabello, Vincenzo; Jacobs, Robert M. J.; Rees, Nicholas H.; Stoppiello, Craig T.; Khlobystov, Andrei N.; Tyrrell, Rex M.; Como, Enrico Da

    2018-01-01

    Abstract The encapsulation of CdSe nanocrystals within single‐walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) cavities of varying dimensions at elevated temperatures under strictly air‐tight conditions is described for the first time. The structures of CdSe nanocrystals under confinement inside SWNTs was established in a comprehensive study, combining both experimental and DFT theoretical investigations. The calculated binding energies show that all considered polymorphs [(3:3), (4:4), and (4:2)] may be obtained experimentally. The most thermodynamically stable structure (3:3) is directly compared to the experimentally observed CdSe structures inside carbon nanotubes. The gas‐phase DFT‐calculated energy difference between “free” 3:3 and 4:2 structures (whereby 3:3 models a novel tubular structure in which both Cd and Se form three coordination, as observed experimentally for HgTe inside SWNT, and 4:2 is a motif derived from the hexagonal CuI bulk structure in which both Cd and Se form 4 or 2 coordination) is surprisingly small, only 0.06 eV per formula unit. X‐ray powder diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, high‐resolution transmission electron microscopy, and energy‐dispersive X‐ray analyses led to the full characterization of the SWNTs filled with the CdSe nanocrystals, shedding light on the composition, structure, and electronic interactions of the new nanohybrid materials on an atomic level. A new emerging hybrid nanomaterial, simultaneously filled and beta‐d‐glucan coated, was obtained by using pristine nanotubes and bulk CdSe powder as starting materials. This displayed fluorescence in water dispersions and unexpected biocompatibility was found to be mediated by beta‐d‐glucan (a biopolymer extracted from barley) with respect to that of the individual inorganic material components. For the first time, such supramolecular nanostructures are investigated by life‐science techniques applied to functional nanomaterial characterization, opening the door

  16. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering imaging of lipids in cancer metastasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le, Thuc T; Huff, Terry B; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2009-01-01

    Lipid-rich tumours have been associated with increased cancer metastasis and aggressive clinical behaviours. Nonetheless, pathologists cannot classify lipid-rich tumours as a clinically distinctive form of carcinoma due to a lack of mechanistic understanding on the roles of lipids in cancer development. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy is employed to study cancer cell behaviours in excess lipid environments in vivo and in vitro. The impacts of a high fat diet on cancer development are evaluated in a Balb/c mice cancer model. Intravital flow cytometry and histology are employed to enumerate cancer cell escape to the bloodstream and metastasis to lung tissues, respectively. Cancer cell motility and tissue invasion capability are also evaluated in excess lipid environments. CARS imaging reveals intracellular lipid accumulation is induced by excess free fatty acids (FFAs). Excess FFAs incorporation onto cancer cell membrane induces membrane phase separation, reduces cell-cell contact, increases surface adhesion, and promotes tissue invasion. Increased plasma FFAs level and visceral adiposity are associated with early rise in circulating tumour cells and increased lung metastasis. Furthermore, CARS imaging reveals FFAs-induced lipid accumulation in primary, circulating, and metastasized cancer cells. Lipid-rich tumours are linked to cancer metastasis through FFAs-induced physical perturbations on cancer cell membrane. Most importantly, the revelation of lipid-rich circulating tumour cells suggests possible development of CARS intravital flow cytometry for label-free detection of early-stage cancer metastasis

  17. Micro-Raman imaging on 4H-SiC in contact with the electrode at room temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suda, Jun; Suwa, Satoshi; Mizuno, Shugo; Togo, Kouki; Mastuo, Yuya

    2018-03-01

    Raman images (30 μm × 30 μm × 180 μm) of a bulk 4H-SiC wafer in contact with a Ni/Au electrode film in 100 nm/200 nm thick were measured with Micro-Raman spectroscopy at room temperature. As the imaging area approached the interface between the SiC and electrode, the center frequency of the E2(TO) mode (778 cm- 1) immediately declined; in the Raman imaging, relative distribution of compressive residual stress around residual tensile stress, and linewidth were broadened due to crystal distortion. For LOPC (LO-phonon-plasmon-coupled) mode (970 cm- 1), center frequency showed variation right next to the interface, while linewidth decreased slowly as the imaging area approached the interface. We evaluated the temperature dependence of the line broadening and the center frequency of the LOPC mode in 4H-SiC in a high-temperature region. Free carrier concentration increased with temperature, and remained almost constant in the center frequency after impurities were ionized completely.

  18. Combining deep learning and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering imaging for automated differential diagnosis of lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Sheng; Xu, Xiaoyun; Li, Jiasong; Wong, Stephen T. C.

    2017-10-01

    Lung cancer is the most prevalent type of cancer and the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) is capable of providing cellular-level images and resolving pathologically related features on human lung tissues. However, conventional means of analyzing CARS images requires extensive image processing, feature engineering, and human intervention. This study demonstrates the feasibility of applying a deep learning algorithm to automatically differentiate normal and cancerous lung tissue images acquired by CARS. We leverage the features learned by pretrained deep neural networks and retrain the model using CARS images as the input. We achieve 89.2% accuracy in classifying normal, small-cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma, and squamous cell carcinoma lung images. This computational method is a step toward on-the-spot diagnosis of lung cancer and can be further strengthened by the efforts aimed at miniaturizing the CARS technique for fiber-based microendoscopic imaging.

  19. A novel technique using potassium permanganate and reflectance confocal microscopy to image biofilm extracellular polymeric matrix reveals non-eDNA networks in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swearingen, Matthew C; Mehta, Ajeet; Mehta, Amar; Nistico, Laura; Hill, Preston J; Falzarano, Anthony R; Wozniak, Daniel J; Hall-Stoodley, Luanne; Stoodley, Paul

    2016-02-01

    Biofilms are etiologically important in the development of chronic medical and dental infections. The biofilm extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) determines biofilm structure and allows bacteria in biofilms to adapt to changes in mechanical loads such as fluid shear. However, EPS components are difficult to visualize microscopically because of their low density and molecular complexity. Here, we tested potassium permanganate, KMnO4, for use as a non-specific EPS contrast-enhancing stain using confocal laser scanning microscopy in reflectance mode. We demonstrate that KMnO4 reacted with EPS components of various strains of Pseudomonas, Staphylococcus and Streptococcus, yielding brown MnO2 precipitate deposition on the EPS, which was quantifiable using data from the laser reflection detector. Furthermore, the MnO2 signal could be quantified in combination with fluorescent nucleic acid staining. COMSTAT image analysis indicated that KMnO4 staining increased the estimated biovolume over that determined by nucleic acid staining alone for all strains tested, and revealed non-eDNA EPS networks in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm. In vitro and in vivo testing indicated that KMnO4 reacted with poly-N-acetylglucosamine and Pseudomonas Pel polysaccharide, but did not react strongly with DNA or alginate. KMnO4 staining may have application as a research tool and for diagnostic potential for biofilms in clinical samples. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Live Cell Imaging Confocal Microscopy Analysis of HBV Myr-PreS1 Peptide Binding and Uptake in NTCP-GFP Expressing HepG2 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Alexander; Glebe, Dieter

    2017-01-01

    To obtain basic knowledge about specific molecular mechanisms involved in the entry of pathogens into cells is the basis for establishing pharmacologic substances blocking initial viral binding, infection, and subsequent viral spread. Lack of information about key cellular factors involved in the initial steps of HBV infection has hampered the characterization of HBV binding and entry for decades. However, recently, the liver-specific sodium-dependent taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (NTCP) has been discovered as a functional receptor for HBV and HDV, thus opening the field for new concepts of basic binding and entry of HBV and HDV. Here, we describe practical issues of a basic in vitro assay system to examine kinetics and mechanisms of receptor-dependent HBV binding, uptake, and intracellular trafficking by live-cell imaging confocal microscopy. The assay system is comprised of HepG2 cells expressing a NTCP-GFP fusion-protein and chemically synthesized, fluorophore-labeled part of HBV surface protein, spanning the first N-terminal 48 amino acids of preS1 of the large hepatitis B virus surface protein.

  1. Multiplex coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microspectroscopy of brain tissue with higher ranking data classification for biomedical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohling, Christoph; Bocklitz, Thomas; Duarte, Alex S.; Emmanuello, Cinzia; Ishikawa, Mariana S.; Dietzeck, Benjamin; Buckup, Tiago; Uckermann, Ortrud; Schackert, Gabriele; Kirsch, Matthias; Schmitt, Michael; Popp, Jürgen; Motzkus, Marcus

    2017-06-01

    Multiplex coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (MCARS) microscopy was carried out to map a solid tumor in mouse brain tissue. The border between normal and tumor tissue was visualized using support vector machines (SVM) as a higher ranking type of data classification. Training data were collected separately in both tissue types, and the image contrast is based on class affiliation of the single spectra. Color coding in the image generated by SVM is then related to pathological information instead of single spectral intensities or spectral differences within the data set. The results show good agreement with the H&E stained reference and spontaneous Raman microscopy, proving the validity of the MCARS approach in combination with SVM.

  2. New Ways of Imaging Uptake and Intracellular Fate of Liposomal Drug Carrier Systems inside Individual Cells, Based on Raman Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthäus, Christian; Kale, Amit; Chernenko, Tatyana; Torchilin, Vladimir; Diem, Max

    2009-01-01

    Recent developments, combining Raman spectroscopy with optical microscopy, provide a new noninvasive technique to assess and image cellular processes. Of particular interest are the uptake mechanisms of various cytologically active compounds. In order to distinguish the species of interest from their cellular environment spectroscopically, compounds may be labeled with deuterium. Here, we apply Raman microspectroscopy to follow the uptake of liposomal drug carrier systems that have been introduced to deliver biologically active compounds to their site of action within human breast adenocarcinoma MCF-7 cells. The distribution patterns of liposomes and liposomes surface-modified with a cell-penetrating peptide (TAT-peptide, TATp) have been imaged over time. The spectroscopic information obtained provides a clear evidence for variable rates, as well as different efficiencies of liposome uptake depending on their surface properties. Depending on the experimental setup, the technique may be applied to fixed or living cell organisms. PMID:18197626

  3. Raman line imaging for spatially and temporally resolved mole fraction measurements in internal combustion engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, P C

    1999-03-20

    An optical diagnostic system based on line imaging of Raman-scattered light has been developed to study the mixing processes in internal combustion engines. The system permits multipoint, single laser-shot measurements of CO(2), O(2), N(2), C(3)H(8), and H(2)O mole fractions with submillimeter spatial resolution. Selection of appropriate system hardware is discussed, as are subsequent data reduction and analysis procedures. Results are reported for data obtained at multiple crank angles and in two different engine flow fields. Measurements are made at 12 locations simultaneously, each location having measurement volume dimensions of 0.5 mm x 0.5 mm x 0.9 mm. The data are analyzed to obtain statistics of species mole fractions: mean, rms, histograms, and both spatial and cross-species covariance functions. The covariance functions are used to quantify the accuracy of the measured rms mole fraction fluctuations, to determine the integral length scales of the mixture inhomogeneities, and to quantify the cycle-to-cycle fluctuations in bulk mixture composition under well-mixed conditions.

  4. Intracellular imaging of docosanol in living cells by coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Sixian; Liu, Yuan; Arp, Zane; Zhao, Youbo; Chaney, Eric J.; Marjanovic, Marina; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2017-07-01

    Docosanol is an over-the-counter topical agent that has proved to be one of the most effective therapies for treating herpes simplex labialis. However, the mechanism by which docosanol suppresses lesion formation remains poorly understood. To elucidate its mechanism of action, we investigated the uptake of docosanol in living cells using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy. Based on direct visualization of the deuterated docosanol, we observed highly concentrated docosanol inside living cells 24 h after drug treatment. In addition, different spatial patterns of drug accumulation were observed in different cell lines. In keratinocytes, which are the targeted cells of docosanol, the drug molecules appeared to be docking at the periphery of the cell membrane. In contrast, the drug molecules in fibroblasts appeared to accumulate in densely packed punctate regions throughout the cytoplasm. These results suggest that this molecular imaging approach is suitable for the longitudinal tracking of drug molecules in living cells to identify cell-specific trafficking and may also have implications for elucidating the mechanism by which docosanol suppresses lesion formation.

  5. Single-Drop Raman Imaging Exposes the Trace Contaminants in Milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Zong; Lou, Ting-Ting; Huang, Zhi-Xuan; Zong, Jing; Xu, Ke-Xin; Li, Qi-Feng; Chen, Da

    2017-08-02

    Better milk safety control can offer important means to promote public health. However, few technologies can detect different types of contaminants in milk simultaneously. In this regard, the present work proposes a single-drop Raman imaging (SDRI) strategy for semiquantitation of multiple hazardous factors in milk solutions. By developing SDRI strategy that incorporates the coffee-ring effect (a natural phenomenon often presents in a condensed circle pattern after a drop evaporated) for sample pretreatment and discrete wavelet transform for spectra processing, the method serves well to expose typical hazardous molecular species in milk products, such as melamine, sodium thiocyanate and lincomycin hydrochloride, with little sample preparation. The detection sensitivity for melamine, sodium thiocyanate, and lincomycin hydrochloride are 0.1 mg kg -1 , 1 mg kg -1 , and 0.1 mg kg -1 , respectively. Theoretically, we establish that the SDRI represents a novel and environment-friendly method that screens the milk safety efficiently, which could be well extended to inspection of other food safety.

  6. Lipids, hemoproteins and carotenoids in alive Rhodotorula mucilaginosa cells under pesticide decomposition - Raman imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacia, Marta Z; Pukalski, Jan; Turnau, Katarzyna; Baranska, Malgorzata; Kaczor, Agnieszka

    2016-12-01

    Various species of yeasts are gaining attention as producers of nutraceuticals and biofuels and due to their capacity to biodegrade chemical waste. Rhodotorula mucilaginosa is one of the most oleaginous species of yeast, an efficient de novo carotenoid producer and was reported to be capable of decomposing of organic pesticides. In this work we studied the influence of a toxic pesticide, diazinone, on production of storage (lipids) and protective (carotenoids, hemoproteins) compounds by Rh. mucilaginosa alive cells with the help of Raman imaging. It occurred that the yeast in non-oleaginous phase and aerobic environment was rich in carotenoids and their level increased significantly under incubation with diazinone, while anaerobic environment resulted in production of both carotenoids and hemoproteins and the level of the latter decreased under the influence of the pesticide. For yeasts in oleaginous phase, it was concluded that lipid production (via triggering of NAD + accumulation and increase of the NO level) resulted in nitrosative stress leading to flavohemoprotein synthesis and was associated with the increase of the mitochondrial activity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Simultaneous UV imaging and raman spectroscopy for the measurement of solvent-mediated phase transformations during dissolution testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Østergaard, Jesper; Wu, Jian X; Naelapää, Kaisa; Boetker, Johan P; Jensen, Henrik; Rantanen, Jukka

    2014-04-01

    The current work reports the simultaneous use of UV imaging and Raman spectroscopy for detailed characterization of drug dissolution behavior including solid-state phase transformations during dissolution. The dissolution of drug substances from compacts of sodium naproxen in 0.1 HCl as well as theophylline anhydrate and monohydrate in water was studied utilizing a flow-through setup. The decreases in dissolution rates with time observed by UV imaging were associated with concomitant solid form changes detected by Raman spectroscopy. Sodium naproxen and theophylline anhydrate were observed to convert to the more stable forms (naproxen, and theophylline monohydrate) within approximately 5 min. Interestingly, the new approach revealed that three intermediate forms are involved in the dissolution process prior to the appearance of the neutral naproxen during dissolution in an acidic medium. The combination of UV imaging and Raman spectroscopy offers a detailed characterization of drug dissolution behavior in a time-effective and sample-sparing manner. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  8. Characterization of chloramphenicol palmitate drug polymorphs by Raman mapping with multivariate image segmentation using a spatial directed agglomeration clustering method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wei-Qi; Jiang, Jian-Hui; Yang, Hai-Feng; Ozaki, Yukihiro; Shen, Guo-Li; Yu, Ru-Qin

    2006-09-01

    Chemical imaging analysis holds great potential in probing the chemical heterogeneity of samples with high spatial resolution and molecular specificity. This paper demonstrates the implementation of Raman mapping for microscopic characterization of tablets containing chloramphenicol palmitate polymorphs with the aid of a new multivariate image segmentation approach based on spatial directed agglomeration clustering. This approach performs the agglomeration clustering by stepwise merging the pixels possessing both spatial closeness and spectral similarity into clusters that define the image segmentation. The incorporation of spatial closeness into the clustering process enables the approach to improve the robustness and avoid poorly defined image segmentation arising from clusters with highly separated pixels. Additionally, the stepwise merging of clusters offers an F-statistic-based procedure to automatically ascertain the number of image segments. Raman mapping analysis of tablets containing two polymorphs of chloramphenicol palmitate followed by multivariate image segmentation reveals that the proposed technique offers the identification of each polymorph and a quantitative visualization of the spatial distribution of the polymorphs identified. This technique holds promise in rapid, noninvasive, and quantitative polymorph analysis for pharmaceutical production processes.

  9. Book Review: Reiner Salzer and Heinz W. Siesler (Eds.): Infrared and Raman spectroscopic imaging, 2nd ed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, David Steven

    2015-01-01

    This second edition of 'Infrared and Raman Spectroscopic Imaging' propels practitioners in that wide-ranging field, as well as other readers, to the current state of the art in a well-produced and full-color, completely revised and updated, volume. This new edition chronicles the expanded application of vibrational spectroscopic imaging from yesterday's time-consuming point-by-point buildup of a hyperspectral image cube, through the improvements afforded by the addition of focal plane arrays and line scan imaging, to methods applicable beyond the diffraction limit, instructs the reader on the improved instrumentation and image and data analysis methods, and expounds on their application to fundamental biomedical knowledge, food and agricultural surveys, materials science, process and quality control, and many others

  10. Operando Raman Micro Spectroscopy of Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-16

    exchange site local symmetry. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by ECS. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons...Operando Raman spectroscopy.—All operando Raman spectra were acquired using a WITec Inc. (Ulm, Germany) Confocal Raman Microscope ( CRM 200). A 488

  11. Multicomponent chemical imaging of pharmaceutical solid dosage forms with broadband CARS microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartshorn, Christopher M; Lee, Young Jong; Camp, Charles H; Liu, Zhen; Heddleston, John; Canfield, Nicole; Rhodes, Timothy A; Hight Walker, Angela R; Marsac, Patrick J; Cicerone, Marcus T

    2013-09-03

    We compare a coherent Raman imaging modality, broadband coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (BCARS) microscopy, with spontaneous Raman microscopy for quantitative and qualitative assessment of multicomponent pharmaceuticals. Indomethacin was used as a model active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) and was analyzed in a tabulated solid dosage form, embedded within commonly used excipients. In comparison with wide-field spontaneous Raman chemical imaging, BCARS acquired images 10× faster, at higher spatiochemical resolution and with spectra of much higher SNR, eliminating the need for multivariate methods to identify chemical components. The significant increase in spatiochemical resolution allowed identification of an unanticipated API phase that was missed by the spontaneous wide-field method and bulk Raman spectroscopy. We confirmed the presence of the unanticipated API phase using confocal spontaneous Raman, which provided spatiochemical resolution similar to BCARS but at 100× slower acquisition times.

  12. Classification of inflammatory bowel diseases by means of Raman spectroscopic imaging of epithelium cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielecki, Christiane; Bocklitz, Thomas W.; Schmitt, Michael; Krafft, Christoph; Marquardt, Claudio; Gharbi, Akram; Knösel, Thomas; Stallmach, Andreas; Popp, Juergen

    2012-07-01

    We report on a Raman microspectroscopic characterization of the inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). Therefore, Raman maps of human colon tissue sections were analyzed by utilizing innovative chemometric approaches. First, support vector machines were applied to highlight the tissue morphology (=Raman spectroscopic histopathology). In a second step, the biochemical tissue composition has been studied by analyzing the epithelium Raman spectra of sections of healthy control subjects (n=11), subjects with CD (n=14), and subjects with UC (n=13). These three groups exhibit significantly different molecular specific Raman signatures, allowing establishment of a classifier (support-vector-machine). By utilizing this classifier it was possible to separate between healthy control patients, patients with CD, and patients with UC with an accuracy of 98.90%. The automatic design of both classification steps (visualization of the tissue morphology and molecular classification of IBD) paves the way for an objective clinical diagnosis of IBD by means of Raman spectroscopy in combination with chemometric approaches.

  13. QUANTITATIVE CONFOCAL LASER SCANNING MICROSCOPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merete Krog Raarup

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses recent advances in confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM for imaging of 3D structure as well as quantitative characterization of biomolecular interactions and diffusion behaviour by means of one- and two-photon excitation. The use of CLSM for improved stereological length estimation in thick (up to 0.5 mm tissue is proposed. The techniques of FRET (Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer, FLIM (Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy, FCS (Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy and FRAP (Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching are introduced and their applicability for quantitative imaging of biomolecular (co-localization and trafficking in live cells described. The advantage of two-photon versus one-photon excitation in relation to these techniques is discussed.

  14. Comparison of narrow-band imaging and confocal laser endomicroscopy for the detection of neoplasia in Barrett's esophagus: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Yi-Quan; Ma, Shu-Juan; Hu, Hao-Yue; Ge, Jing; Zhou, Li-Zhi; Huo, Shu-Ting; Qiu, Min; Chen, Qing

    2018-02-01

    Barrett's esophagus (BE) predisposes to the development of esophageal neoplasia, including high-grade dysplasia (HGD) and esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC). A systematic literature review and meta-analysis were performed to assess the accuracy of within-patient comparisons of narrow band imaging (NBI) and confocal laser endomicroscopy (CLE) for diagnosis of HGD/EAC in patients with BE. The following databases were examined up to April 2016 without language restriction: PubMed, Embase, Medline, Web of Science and the Cochrane Library. The QUADAS-2 tool for assessing the quality of included studies was used. The meta-analysis included pooled additional detection rate (ADR), diagnostic accuracy, and 95% confidence intervals (CI). The I 2 and Q-test were used to determine study heterogeneity. Five studies involving 251 patients, reported within-patient comparisons of NBI and CLE, were eligible for meta-analysis. Compared with NBI, pooled ADR of CLE for per-lesion detection of neoplasia in patients with BE was 19.3% (95% CI: 0.05-0.33, I 2 =74.6%). The pooled sensitivity of NBI was 62.8% (95% CI: 0.56-0.69, I 2 =94.6%), which was lower (not significantly) than that of CLE (72.3%, 95% CI: 0.66-0.78, I 2 =89.3%). The pooled specificity of NBI and CLE were similar [85.3% (95% CI: 0.84-0.87, I 2 =92.1%) vs 83.8% (95% CI: 0.82-0.85, I 2 =96.8%)]. When compared with NBI, CLE significantly increased the per-lesion detection rate of esophageal neoplasia, HGD, and EAC in BE patients. Whether CLE is superior to NBI in neoplasia detection at per-patient level needs to be further investigated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Epigenetic changes in cancer by Raman imaging, fluorescence imaging, AFM and scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM). Acetylation in normal and human cancer breast cells MCF10A, MCF7 and MDA-MB-231.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramczyk, Halina; Surmacki, Jakub; Kopeć, Monika; Olejnik, Alicja Klaudia; Kaufman-Szymczyk, Agnieszka; Fabianowska-Majewska, Krystyna

    2016-10-07

    This paper examines epigenetic changes in breast cancer by Raman imaging, fluorescence imaging, AFM and SNOM and discusses how they contribute to different aspects of tumourigenesis in malignant human breast epithelial cell lines MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 compared with non-malignant MCF10A cell lines. The paper focuses on information that can be extracted from Raman microscopy and Raman imaging for the biological material of nucleoli contained within the cell nucleus and lipid droplets within the cell cytoplasm. The biochemical composition of the nuclei and lipid droplets in the non-malignant and malignant human breast epithelial cell lines has been monitored. The potential of Raman microspectroscopy to monitor acetylation processes and a prognostic value of Raman biomarkers in breast cancer have been discussed.

  16. Confocal scanning microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bariani, Paolo

    This report is based on a metrological investigation on confocal microscopy technique carried out by Uffe Rolf Arlø Theilade and Paolo Bariani. The purpose of the experimental activity was twofold a metrological instrument characterization and application to assessment of rough PP injection moulded...... replicated topography. Confocal microscopy is seen to be a promising technique in metrology of microstructures. Some limitations with respect to surface metrology were found during the experiments. The experiments were carried out using a Zeiss LSM 5 Pascal microscope owned by the Danish Polymer Centre...

  17. New imaging-based biomarkers for melanoma diagnosis using coherent Raman Scattering microscopy (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hequn; Osseiran, Sam; Roider, Elisabeth; Fisher, David E.; Evans, Conor L.

    2016-02-01

    Recently, pheomelanin has been found to play a critical role in melanoma progression given its pro-oxidant chemical properties as well as its marked presence in pre-cancerous and malignant melanoma lesions, even in the absence of ultraviolet radiation. In addition, epidemiological evidence indicates a strong correlation between melanoma incidence and skin type, with the highest incidence occurring in individuals of the red-haired/fair-skinned phenotype. Interestingly, nevus count correlates well with melanoma incidence and skin type, except in the population most prone to developing melanoma, where nevus count strikingly drops. As such, a current hypothesis proposes that fair-skinned red-haired individuals, who are unable to stimulate production of eumelanin due to a mutation in MC1R in melanocytes, may actually harbor numerous "invisible", pheomelanin-rich nevi that evade clinical detection, supporting the high incidence of melanoma in that population. Here, we show for the very first time that melanocytes extracted from genetically modified MC1R-mutant, red-haired mice displayed bright perinuclear distributions of signal within the cells under coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy. Changes in pheomelanin production in siRNA knockdowns of cultured human melanoma cells were also sensed. We then successfully imaged pheomelanin distributions in both ex vivo and in vivo mouse ear skin. Finally, melanosomes within amelanotic melanoma patient tissue sections were found to show bright pheomelanin signals. This is the first time, to our knowledge, that pheomelanin has been found spatially localized in a human amelanotic melanoma sample. These pheomelanotic CARS features may be used as potential biomarkers for melanoma detection, especially for amelanotic melanomas.

  18. The new confocal heavy ion microprobe beamline at ANSTO: The first microprobe resolution tests and applications for elemental imaging and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastuovic, Z.; Siegele, R.; Cohen, D. D.; Mann, M.; Ionescu, M.; Button, D.; Long, S.

    2017-08-01

    The Centre for Accelerator Science facility at ANSTO has been expanded with the new NEC 6 MV ;SIRIUS; accelerator system in 2015. In this paper we present a detailed description of the new nuclear microprobe-Confocal Heavy Ion Micro-Probe (CHIMP) together with results of the microprobe resolution testing and the elemental analysis performed on typical samples of mineral ore deposits and hyper-accumulating plants regularly measured at ANSTO. The CHIMP focusing and scanning systems are based on the OM-150 Oxford quadrupole triplet and the OM-26 separated scan-coil doublet configurations. A maximum ion rigidity of 38.9 amu-MeV was determined for the following nuclear microprobe configuration: the distance from object aperture to collimating slits of 5890 mm, the working distance of 165 mm and the lens bore diameter of 11 mm. The overall distance from the object to the image plane is 7138 mm. The CHIMP beamline has been tested with the 3 MeV H+ and 6 MeV He2+ ion beams. The settings of the object and collimating apertures have been optimized using the WinTRAX simulation code for calculation of the optimum acceptance settings in order to obtain the highest possible ion current for beam spot sizes of 1 μm and 5 μm. For optimized aperture settings of the CHIMP the beam brightness was measured to be ∼0.9 pA μm-2 mrad-2 for 3 MeV H+ ions, while the brightness of ∼0.4 pA μm-2 mrad-2 was measured for 6 MeV He2+ ions. The smallest beam sizes were achieved using a microbeam with reduced particle rate of 1000 Hz passing through the object slit apertures several micrometers wide. Under these conditions a spatial resolution of ∼0.6 μm × 1.5 μm for 3 MeV H+ and ∼1.8 μm × 1.8 μm for 6 MeV He2+ microbeams in horizontal (and vertical) dimension has been achieved. The beam sizes were verified using STIM imaging on 2000 and 1000 mesh Cu electron microscope grids.

  19. The biocompatibility of carbon hydroxyapatite/β-glucan composite for bone tissue engineering studied with Raman and FTIR spectroscopic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sroka-Bartnicka, Anna; Kimber, James A; Borkowski, Leszek; Pawlowska, Marta; Polkowska, Izabela; Kalisz, Grzegorz; Belcarz, Anna; Jozwiak, Krzysztof; Ginalska, Grazyna; Kazarian, Sergei G

    2015-10-01

    The spectroscopic approaches of FTIR imaging and Raman mapping were applied to the characterisation of a new carbon hydroxyapatite/β-glucan composite developed for bone tissue engineering. The composite is an artificial bone material with an apatite-forming ability for the bone repair process. Rabbit bone samples were tested with an implanted bioactive material for a period of several months. Using spectroscopic and chemometric methods, we were able to determine the presence of amides and phosphates and the distribution of lipid-rich domains in the bone tissue, providing an assessment of the composite's bioactivity. Samples were also imaged in transmission using an infrared microscope combined with a focal plane array detector. CaF2 lenses were also used on the infrared microscope to improve spectral quality by reducing scattering artefacts, improving chemometric analysis. The presence of collagen and lipids at the bone/composite interface confirmed biocompatibility and demonstrate the suitability of FTIR microscopic imaging with lenses in studying these samples. It confirmed that the composite is a very good background for collagen growth and increases collagen maturity with the time of the bone growth process. The results indicate the bioactive and biocompatible properties of this composite and demonstrate how Raman and FTIR spectroscopic imaging have been used as an effective tool for tissue characterisation.

  20. Examining live cell cultures during apoptosis by digital holographic phase imaging and Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khmaladze, Alexander

    2017-11-01

    Cellular apoptosis is a unique, organized series of events, leading to programmed cell death. In this work, we present a combined digital holography/Raman spectroscopy technique to study live cell cultures during apoptosis. Digital holographic microscopy measurements of live cell cultures yield information about cell shape and volume, changes to which are indicative of alterations in cell cycle and initiation of cell death mechanisms. Raman spectroscopic measurements provide complementary information about cells, such as protein, lipid and nucleic acid content, and the spectral signatures associated with structural changes in molecules. Our work indicates that the chemical changes in proteins, which were detected by Raman measurements, preceded morphological changes, which were seen with digital holographic microscopy.

  1. Combined Raman spectroscopy and autofluoresence imaging method for in vivo skin tumor diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharov, V. P.; Bratchenko, I. A.; Myakinin, O. O.; Artemyev, D. N.; Khristoforova, Y. A.; Kozlov, S. V.; Moryatov, A. A.

    2014-09-01

    The fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy (RS) combined method of in vivo detection of malignant human skin cancer was demonstrated. The fluorescence analysis was used for detection of abnormalities during fast scanning of large tissue areas. In suspected cases of malignancy the Raman spectrum analysis of biological tissue was performed to determine the type of neoplasm. A special RS phase method was proposed for in vivo identification of skin tumor. Quadratic Discriminant Analysis was used for tumor type classification on phase planes. It was shown that the application of phase method provides a diagnosis of malignant melanoma with a sensitivity of 89% and a specificity of 87%.

  2. Surface-enhanced Raman imaging of fractal shaped periodic metal nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beermann, Jonas; Novikov, Sergey Mikhailovich; Albrektsen, Ole

    2009-01-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) from Rhodamine 6G (R6G) homogenously adsorbed on fractal shaped 170-nm-period square arrays formed by 50-nm-high gold nanoparticles (diameters of 80, 100, or 120 nm are constant within each array), fabricated on a smooth gold film by electron-beam lithogra......Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) from Rhodamine 6G (R6G) homogenously adsorbed on fractal shaped 170-nm-period square arrays formed by 50-nm-high gold nanoparticles (diameters of 80, 100, or 120 nm are constant within each array), fabricated on a smooth gold film by electron...

  3. Integration of Correlative Raman microscopy in a dual beam FIB-SEM J. of Raman Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmermans, Frank Jan; Liszka, B.; Lenferink, Aufrid T.M.; van Wolferen, Hendricus A.G.M.; Otto, Cornelis

    2016-01-01

    We present an integrated confocal Raman microscope in a focused ion beam scanning electron microscope (FIB SEM). The integrated system enables correlative Raman and electron microscopic analysis combined with focused ion beam sample modification on the same sample location. This provides new

  4. Self-diffusion of polycrystalline ice Ih under confining pressure: Hydrogen isotope analysis using 2-D Raman imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, Naoki; Kubo, Tomoaki; Durham, William B.; Kagi, Hiroyuki; Shimizu, Ichiko

    2016-08-01

    We have developed a high-resolution technique based on micro Raman spectroscopy to measure hydrogen isotope diffusion profiles in ice Ih. The calibration curve for quantitative analysis of deuterium in ice Ih was constructed using micro Raman spectroscopy. Diffusion experiments using diffusion couples composed of dense polycrystalline H2O and D2O ice were carried out under a gas confining pressure of 100 MPa (to suppress micro-fracturing and pore formation) at temperatures from 235 K to 245 K and diffusion times from 0.2 to 94 hours. Two-dimensional deuterium profiles across the diffusion couples were determined by Raman imaging. The location of small spots of frost from room air could be detected from the shapes of the Raman bands of OH and OD stretching modes, which change because of the effect of the molar ratio of deuterium on the molecular coupling interaction. We emphasize the validity for screening the impurities utilizing the coupling interaction. Some recrystallization and grain boundary migration occurred in recovered diffusion couples, but analysis of two-dimensional diffusion profiles of regions not affected by grain boundary migration allowed us to measure a volume diffusivity for ice at 100 MPa of (2.8 ± 0.4) ×10-3exp[ -57.0 ± 15.4kJ /mol RT ] m2 /s (R is the gas constant, T is temperature). Based on ambient pressure diffusivity measurements by others, this value indicates a high (negative) activation volume for volume diffusivity of -29.5 cm3/mol or more. We can also constrain the value of grain boundary diffusivity in ice at 100 MPa to be volume diffusivity.

  5. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy driving the future of loaded mesoporous silica imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fussell, A.L.; Mah, Pei Ting; Offerhaus, Herman L.; Niemi, Sanna-Mari; Salonen, Jarno; Santos, Helder A.; Strachan, Clare

    2014-01-01

    This study reports the use of variants of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy as a novel method for improved physicochemical characterization of drug-loaded silica particles. Ordered mesoporous silica is a biomaterial that can be loaded to carry a number of biochemicals,

  6. Applications of Raman spectroscopy in life science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Airton A.; T. Soto, Cláudio A.; Ali, Syed M.; Neto, Lázaro P. M.; Canevari, Renata A.; Pereira, Liliane; Fávero, Priscila P.

    2015-06-01

    Raman spectroscopy has been applied to the analysis of biological samples for the last 12 years providing detection of changes occurring at the molecular level during the pathological transformation of the tissue. The potential use of this technology in cancer diagnosis has shown encouraging results for the in vivo, real-time and minimally invasive diagnosis. Confocal Raman technics has also been successfully applied in the analysis of skin aging process providing new insights in this field. In this paper it is presented the latest biomedical applications of Raman spectroscopy in our laboratory. It is shown that Raman spectroscopy (RS) has been used for biochemical and molecular characterization of thyroid tissue by micro-Raman spectroscopy and gene expression analysis. This study aimed to improve the discrimination between different thyroid pathologies by Raman analysis. A total of 35 thyroid tissues samples including normal tissue (n=10), goiter (n=10), papillary (n=10) and follicular carcinomas (n=5) were analyzed. The confocal Raman spectroscopy allowed a maximum discrimination of 91.1% between normal and tumor tissues, 84.8% between benign and malignant pathologies and 84.6% among carcinomas analyzed. It will be also report the application of in vivo confocal Raman spectroscopy as an important sensor for detecting advanced glycation products (AGEs) on human skin.

  7. Fungal keratitis - improving diagnostics by confocal microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Esben; Heegaard, S; Prause, J U

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Introducing a simple image grading system to support the interpretation of in vivo confocal microscopy (IVCM) images in filamentous fungal keratitis. Setting: Clinical and confocal studies took place at the Department of Ophthalmology, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark. Histopathological...... analysis was performed at the Eye Pathology Institute, Department of Neuroscience and Pharmacology, University of Copenhagen, Denmark. Methods: A recent series of consecutive patients with filamentous fungal keratitis is presented to demonstrate the results from in-house IVCM. Based upon our experience...... with IVCM and previously published images, we composed a grading system for interpreting IVCM images of filamentous fungal keratitis. Results: A recent case series of filamentous fungal keratitis from 2011 to 2012 was examined. There were 3 male and 3 female patients. Mean age was 44.5 years (range 12...

  8. Practical aspects of quantitative confocal microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, John M

    2013-01-01

    Confocal microscopes are in principle well suited for quantitative imaging. The 3D fluorophore distribution in a specimen is transformed by the microscope optics and detector into the 2D intensity distribution of a digital image by a linear operation, a convolution. If multiple 2D images of the specimen at different focal planes are obtained, then the original 3D distribution in the specimen can be reconstructed. This reconstruction is a low-pass spatially filtered representation of the original, but quantitatively preserves relative fluorophore concentrations, with of course some limitations on accuracy and precision due to aberrations and noise. Given appropriate calibration, absolute fluorophore concentrations are accessible. A few simple guidelines are given for setting up confocal microscopes and checking their performance. With a little care, the images collected should be suitable for most types of quantitative analysis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Confocal Endomicroscopy of Colorectal Polyps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivian M. Ussui

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Confocal laser endomicroscopy (CLE is one of several novel methods that provide real-time, high-resolution imaging at a micron scale via endoscopes. CLE has the potential to be a disruptive technology in that it can change the current algorithms that depend on biopsy to perform surveillance of high-risk conditions. Furthermore, it allows on-table decision making that has the potential to guide therapy in real time and reduce the need for repeated procedures. CLE and related technologies are often termed “virtual biopsy” as they simulate the images seen in traditional histology. However, the imaging of living tissue allows more than just pragmatic convenience; it also allows imaging of living tissue such as active capillary circulation, cellular death, and vascular and endothelial translocation, thus extending beyond what is capable in traditional biopsy. Immediate potential applications of CLE are to guide biopsy sampling in Barrett's esophagus and inflammatory bowel disease surveillance, evaluation of colorectal polyps, and intraductal imaging of the pancreas and bile duct. Data on these applications is rapidly emerging, and more is needed to clearly demonstrate the optimal applications of CLE. In this paper, we will focus on the role of CLE as applied to colorectal polyps detected during colonoscopy.

  10. Raman Spectroscopy and Microscopy of Individual Cells andCellular Components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, J; Fore, S; Wachsmann-Hogiu, S; Huser, T

    2008-05-15

    Raman spectroscopy provides the unique opportunity to non-destructively analyze chemical concentrations on the submicron length scale in individual cells without the need for optical labels. This enables the rapid assessment of cellular biochemistry inside living cells, and it allows for their continuous analysis to determine cellular response to external events. Here, we review recent developments in the analysis of single cells, subcellular compartments, and chemical imaging based on Raman spectroscopic techniques. Spontaneous Raman spectroscopy provides for the full spectral assessment of cellular biochemistry, while coherent Raman techniques, such as coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering is primarily used as an imaging tool comparable to confocal fluorescence microscopy. These techniques are complemented by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy, which provides higher sensitivity and local specificity, and also extends the techniques to chemical indicators, i.e. pH sensing. We review the strengths and weaknesses of each technique, demonstrate some of their applications and discuss their potential for future research in cell biology and biomedicine.

  11. Evans blue dye-enhanced imaging of the brain microvessels using spectral focusing coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo-Ram Lee

    Full Text Available We performed dye-enhanced imaging of mouse brain microvessels using spectral focusing coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (SF-CARS microscopy. The resonant signals from C-H stretching in forward CARS usually show high background intensity in tissues, which makes CARS imaging of microvessels difficult. In this study, epi-detection of back-scattered SF-CARS signals showed a negligible background, but the overall intensity of resonant CARS signals was too low to observe the network of brain microvessels. Therefore, Evans blue (EB dye was used as contrasting agent to enhance the back-scattered SF-CARS signals. Breakdown of brain microvessels by inducing hemorrhage in a mouse was clearly visualized using backward SF-CARS signals, following intravenous injection of EB. The improved visualization of brain microvessels with EB enhanced the sensitivity of SF-CARS, detecting not only the blood vessels themselves but their integrity as well in the brain vasculature.

  12. Raman hyperspectral imaging in conjunction with independent component analysis as a forensic tool for explosive analysis: The case of an ATM explosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Mariana Ramos; Logrado, Lucio Paulo Lima; Zacca, Jorge Jardim; Correa, Deleon Nascimento; Poppi, Ronei Jesus

    2017-11-01

    In this work, Raman hyperspectral imaging, in conjunction with independent component analysis, was employed as an analytical methodology to detect an ammonium nitrate fuel oil (ANFO) explosive in banknotes after an ATM explosion experiment. The proposed methodology allows for the identification of the ANFO explosive without sample preparation or destroying the sample, at quantities as small as 70μgcm -2 . The explosive was identified following ICA data decomposition by the characteristic nitrate band at 1044cm -1 . The use of Raman hyperspectral imaging and independent component analysis shows great potential for identifying forensic samples by providing chemical and spatial information. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Gd2O3-doped silica @ Au nanoparticles for in vitro imaging cancer biomarkers using surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Lifu; Tian, Xiumei; Harihar, Sitaram; Li, Qifei; Li, Li; Welch, Danny R.; Zhou, Anhong

    2017-06-01

    There has been an interest in developing multimodal approaches to combine the advantages of individual imaging modalities, as well as to compensate for respective weaknesses. We previously reported a composite nano-system composed of gadolinium-doped mesoporous silica nanoparticle and gold nanoparticle (Gd-Au NPs) as an efficient MRI contrast agent for in vivo cancer imaging. However, MRI lacks sensitivity and is unsuitable for in vitro cancer detection. Thus, here we performed a study to use the Gd-Au NPs for detection and imaging of a widely recognized human cancer biomarker, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), in individual human cancer cells with surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). The Gd-Au NPs were sequentially conjugated with a monoclonal antibody recognizing EGFR and a Raman reporter molecule, 4-meraptobenzoic acid (MBA), to generate a characteristic SERS signal at 1075 cm- 1. By spatially mapping the SERS intensity at 1075 cm- 1, cellular distribution of EGFR and its relocalization on the plasma membrane were measured in situ. In addition, the EGFR expression levels in three human cancer cell lines (S18, A431 and A549) were measured using this SERS probe, which were consistent with the comparable measurements using immunoblotting and immunofluorescence. Our SERS results show that functionalized Gd-Au NPs successfully targeted EGFR molecules in three human cancer cell lines and monitored changes in single cell EGFR distribution in situ, demonstrating its potential to study cell activity under physiological conditions. This SERS study, combined with our previous MRI study, suggests the Gd-Au nanocomposite is a promising candidate contrast agent for multimodal cancer imaging.

  14. Molecular confocal laser endomicroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karstensen, John Gásdal; Klausen, Pia Helene; Saftoiu, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    endoscope or via a needle guided by endoscopic ultrasound. The second system has a confocal microscope integrated into the distal part of an endoscope. By adding molecular probes like fluorescein conjugated antibodies or fluorescent peptides to this procedure (either topically or systemically administered...... during on-going endoscopy), a novel world of molecular evaluation opens up. The method of molecular CLE could potentially be used for estimating the expression of important receptors in carcinomas, subsequently resulting in immediate individualization of treatment regimens, but also for improving...... as future challenges of molecular CLE in gastrointestinal diseases....

  15. HeNe laser (633 nm)-coupled confocal microscope allows simulating magnetic resonance imaging/computed tomography scan of the brain and eye: a noninvasive optical approach applicable to small laboratory animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Ping-Pin; Romme, Edwin; van der Spek, Peter J; Dirven, Clemens M F; Willemsen, Rob; Kros, Johan M

    2011-06-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) are noninvasive medical imaging techniques used for the detailed visualization of internal organs of the human body. Because CT uses X-rays for imaging, there is a risk of radiation exposure. In contrast, MRI uses radiowaves and magnetic fields for imaging; thus, there are no reported biological hazards. However, neither MRI nor CT is suitable as a noninvasive imaging tool applicable in small laboratory animals such as zebrafish embryos or larvae. The recently established micro-CT scanner is only suitable for scanning adult fish and a staining procedure is required for imaging. In addition, CT-based scanning is generally more suitable for skeletal imaging but not for visualization of soft tissues because of its lower contrast. In this study, we evaluated whether 633 nm HeNe laser-coupled confocal microscope allows simulating MRI/CT scan and imaging soft tissues such as brain and eye in zebrafish embryos/larvae. We show that the 633 nm HeNe laser can penetrate well into intact brain and eye of zebrafish. It represents a noninvasive imaging method with high resolution while not requiring contrast agents, enabling the detection of differential signals from normal and pathological organs such as brain and eye.

  16. Integrated femtosecond stimulated Raman scattering and two-photon fluorescence imaging of subcellular lipid and vesicular structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuesong; Lam, Wen Jiun; Cao, Zhe; Hao, Yan; Sun, Qiqi; He, Sicong; Mak, Ho Yi; Qu, Jianan Y.

    2015-11-01

    The primary goal of this study is to demonstrate that stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) as a new imaging modality can be integrated into a femtosecond (fs) nonlinear optical (NLO) microscope system. The fs sources of high pulse peak power are routinely used in multimodal nonlinear microscopy to enable efficient excitation of multiple NLO signals. However, with fs excitations, the SRS imaging of subcellular lipid and vesicular structures encounters significant interference from proteins due to poor spectral resolution and a lack of chemical specificity, respectively. We developed a unique NLO microscope of fs excitation that enables rapid acquisition of SRS and multiple two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) signals. In the in vivo imaging of transgenic C. elegans animals, we discovered that by cross-filtering false positive lipid signals based on the TPEF signals from tryptophan-bearing endogenous proteins and lysosome-related organelles, the imaging system produced highly accurate assignment of SRS signals to lipid. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the multimodal NLO microscope system could sequentially image lipid structure/content and organelles, such as mitochondria, lysosomes, and the endoplasmic reticulum, which are intricately linked to lipid metabolism.

  17. Recent advances in confocal microscopy for studying drug delivery to the eye: concepts and pharmaceutical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furrer, Pascal; Gurny, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Since its seminal introduction 50years ago, confocal microscopy has been applied in numerous fields in life sciences. This review presents the different key elements of confocal microscopes, in particular scanning techniques, light sources and especially laser sources are described in this review. Furthermore, an overview of the different image processing systems coupled with confocal microscopy is provided. The chapter closes with the applications of confocal microscopy in drug delivery to the eye. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Overview of the use of theory to understand infrared and Raman spectra and images of biomolecules: colorectal cancer as an example

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piva, J. A. A. C.; Silva, J. L. R.; Raniero, L.

    2011-01-01

    In this work, we present the state of the art in the use of theory (first principles, molecular dynamics, and statistical methods) for interpreting and understanding the infrared (vibrational) absorption and Raman scattering spectra. It is discussed how they can be used in combination with purely...... and that the models used must take this into account. Hence, the use of statistical methods to interpret and understand the infrared and Raman spectra and images from biological tissues, cells, parts of cells, fluids, and even whole organism should change accordingly. As the species, conformers and structures...... of biomolecules are very sensitive to their environment and aggregation state, the combined use of infrared and Raman spectroscopy and imaging and theoretical simulations are clearly fields, which can benefit from their joint and mutual development....

  19. Composition and (in)homogeneity of carotenoid crystals in carrot cells revealed by high resolution Raman imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Maciej; Marzec, Katarzyna M.; Grzebelus, Ewa; Simon, Philipp W.; Baranska, Malgorzata; Baranski, Rafal

    2015-02-01

    Three categories of roots differing in both β/α-carotene ratio and in total carotenoid content were selected based on HPLC measurements: high α- and β-carotene (HαHβ), low α- and high β-carotene (LαHβ), and low α- and low β-carotene (LαLβ). Single carotenoid crystals present in the root cells were directly measured using high resolution Raman imaging technique with 532 nm and 488 nm lasers without compound extraction. Crystals of the HαHβ root had complex composition and consisted of β-carotene accompanied by α-carotene. In the LαHβ and LαLβ roots, measurements using 532 nm laser indicated the presence of β-carotene only, but measurements using 488 nm laser confirmed co-occurrence of xanthophylls, presumably lutein. Thus the results show that independently on carotenoid composition in the root, carotenoid crystals are composed of more than one compound. Individual spectra extracted from Raman maps every 0.2-1.0 μm had similar shapes in the 1500-1550 cm-1 region indicating that different carotenoid molecules were homogeneously distributed in the whole crystal volume. Additionally, amorphous carotenoids were identified and determined as composed of β-carotene molecules but they had a shifted the ν1 band probably due to the effect of bonding of other plant constituents like proteins or lipids.

  20. Digital differential confocal microscopy based on spatial shift transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J; Wang, Y; Liu, C; Wilson, T; Wang, H; Tan, J

    2014-11-01

    Differential confocal microscopy is a particularly powerful surface profilometry technique in industrial metrology due to its high axial sensitivity and insensitivity to noise. However, the practical implementation of the technique requires the accurate positioning of point detectors in three-dimensions. We describe a simple alternative based on spatial transformation of a through-focus series of images obtained from a homemade beam scanning confocal microscope. This digital differential confocal microscopy approach is described and compared with the traditional Differential confocal microscopy approach. The ease of use of the digital differential confocal microscopy system is illustrated by performing measurements on a 3D standard specimen. © 2014 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2014 Royal Microscopical Society.

  1. Quantitative chemical imaging with background-free multiplex coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering by dual-soliton Stokes pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kun; Wu, Tao; Wei, Haoyun; Zhou, Tian; Li, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman microscopy (CARS) is a quantitative, chemically specific, and label-free optical imaging technique for studying inhomogeneous systems. However, the complicating influence of the nonresonant response on the CARS signal severely limits its sensitivity and specificity and especially limits the extent to which CARS microscopy has been used as a fully quantitative imaging technique. On the basis of spectral focusing mechanism, we establish a dual-soliton Stokes based CARS microspectroscopy and microscopy scheme capable of quantifying the spatial information of densities and chemical composition within inhomogeneous samples, using a single fiber laser. Dual-soliton Stokes scheme not only removes the nonresonant background but also allows robust acquisition of multiple characteristic vibrational frequencies. This all-fiber based laser source can cover the entire fingerprint (800-2200 cm−1) region with a spectral resolution of 15 cm−1. We demonstrate that quantitative degree determination of lipid-chain unsaturation in the fatty acids mixture can be achieved by the characterization of C = C stretching and CH2 deformation vibrations. For microscopy purposes, we show that the spatially inhomogeneous distribution of lipid droplets can be further quantitatively visualized using this quantified degree of lipid unsaturation in the acyl chain for contrast in the hyperspectral CARS images. The combination of compact excitation source and background-free capability to facilitate extraction of quantitative composition information with multiplex spectral peaks will enable wider applications of quantitative chemical imaging in studying biological and material systems. PMID:27867704

  2. Detection and imaging of quorum sensing in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm communities by surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodelón, Gustavo; Montes-García, Verónica; López-Puente, Vanesa; Hill, Eric H.; Hamon, Cyrille; Sanz-Ortiz, Marta N.; Rodal-Cedeira, Sergio; Costas, Celina; Celiksoy, Sirin; Pérez-Juste, Ignacio; Scarabelli, Leonardo; La Porta, Andrea; Pérez-Juste, Jorge; Pastoriza-Santos, Isabel; Liz-Marzán, Luis M.

    2016-11-01

    Most bacteria in nature exist as biofilms, which support intercellular signalling processes such as quorum sensing (QS), a cell-to-cell communication mechanism that allows bacteria to monitor and respond to cell density and changes in the environment. As QS and biofilms are involved in the ability of bacteria to cause disease, there is a need for the development of methods for the non-invasive analysis of QS in natural bacterial populations. Here, by using surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering spectroscopy, we report rationally designed nanostructured plasmonic substrates for the in situ, label-free detection of a QS signalling metabolite in growing Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms and microcolonies. The in situ, non-invasive plasmonic imaging of QS in biofilms provides a powerful analytical approach for studying intercellular communication on the basis of secreted molecules as signals.

  3. Dual filtered backprojection for micro-rotation confocal microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laksameethanasan, Danai; Brandt, Sami S; Renaud, Olivier; Shorte, Spencer L

    2009-01-01

    Micro-rotation confocal microscopy is a novel optical imaging technique which employs dielectric fields to trap and rotate individual cells to facilitate 3D fluorescence imaging using a confocal microscope. In contrast to computed tomography (CT) where an image can be modelled as parallel projection of an object, the ideal confocal image is recorded as a central slice of the object corresponding to the focal plane. In CT, the projection images and the 3D object are related by the Fourier slice theorem which states that the Fourier transform of a CT image is equal to the central slice of the Fourier transform of the 3D object. In the micro-rotation application, we have a dual form of this setting, i.e. the Fourier transform of the confocal image equals the parallel projection of the Fourier transform of the 3D object. Based on the observed duality, we present here the dual of the classical filtered back projection (FBP) algorithm and apply it in micro-rotation confocal imaging. Our experiments on real data demonstrate that the proposed method is a fast and reliable algorithm for the micro-rotation application, as FBP is for CT application

  4. ConfocalCheck--a software tool for the automated monitoring of confocal microscope performance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keng Imm Hng

    Full Text Available Laser scanning confocal microscopy has become an invaluable tool in biomedical research but regular quality testing is vital to maintain the system's performance for diagnostic and research purposes. Although many methods have been devised over the years to characterise specific aspects of a confocal microscope like measuring the optical point spread function or the field illumination, only very few analysis tools are available. Our aim was to develop a comprehensive quality assurance framework ranging from image acquisition to automated analysis and documentation. We created standardised test data to assess the performance of the lasers, the objective lenses and other key components required for optimum confocal operation. The ConfocalCheck software presented here analyses the data fully automatically. It creates numerous visual outputs indicating potential issues requiring further investigation. By storing results in a web browser compatible file format the software greatly simplifies record keeping allowing the operator to quickly compare old and new data and to spot developing trends. We demonstrate that the systematic monitoring of confocal performance is essential in a core facility environment and how the quantitative measurements obtained can be used for the detailed characterisation of system components as well as for comparisons across multiple instruments.

  5. Insights into the early dissolution events of amlodipine using UV imaging and Raman spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boetker, Johan P; Savolainen, Marja; Koradia, Vishal

    2011-01-01

    Traditional dissolution testing determines drug release to the bulk, but does not enable an understanding of the events happening close to the surface of a solid or a tablet. UV imaging is a new imaging approach that can be used to study the dissolution behavior of chemical compounds. The UV imag...

  6. Bioorthogonal chemical imaging of metabolic changes during epithelial-mesenchymal transition of cancer cells by stimulated Raman scattering microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Luyuan; Min, Wei

    2017-10-01

    Study of metabolic changes during epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of cancer cells is important for basic understanding and therapeutic management of cancer progression. We here used metabolic labeling and stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy, a strategy of bioorthogonal chemical imaging, to directly visualize changes in anabolic metabolism during cancer EMT at a single-cell level. MCF-7 breast cancer cell is employed as a model system. Four types of metabolites (amino acids, glucose, fatty acids, and choline) are labeled with either deuterium or alkyne (C≡C) tag. Their intracellular incorporations into MCF-7 cells before or after EMT are visualized by SRS imaging targeted at the signature vibration frequency of C-D or C≡C bonds. Overall, after EMT, anabolism of amino acids, glucose, and choline is less active, reflecting slower protein and membrane synthesis in mesenchymal cells. Interestingly, we also observed less incorporation of glucose and palmitate acids into membrane lipids, but more of them into lipid droplets in mesenchymal cells. This result indicates that, although mesenchymal cells synthesize fewer membrane lipids, they are actively storing energy into lipid droplets, either through de novo lipogenesis from glucose or direct scavenging of exogenous free fatty acids. Hence, metabolic labeling coupled with SRS can be a straightforward method in imaging cancer metabolism.

  7. The Use of Living Cancer Cells Expressing Green Fluorescent Protein in the Nucleus and Red Fluorescence Protein in the Cytoplasm for Real-time Confocal Imaging of Chromosome and Cytoplasmic Dynamics During Mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suetsugu, Atsushi; Jiang, Ping; Yang, Meng; Yamamoto, Norio; Moriwaki, Hisataka; Saji, Shigetoyo; Hoffman, Robert M

    2015-05-01

    A library of dual-color fluorescent cancer cells with green fluorescent protein (GFP), linked to histone H2B, expressed in the nucleus and red fluorescent protein (RFP) expressed in the cytoplasm was previously genetically engineered. The aim of the current study was to use the dual-color cancer cells to visualize chromosome and cytoplasmic dynamics during mitosis. Using an Olympus FV1000 confocal microscope, a library of dual-color cells from the major cancer types was cultured on plastic. The cells were imaged by confocal microscopy to demonstrate chromosome and cytoplasmic dynamics during mitosis. Nuclear GFP expression enabled visualization of chromosomes behavior, whereas simultaneous cytoplasmic RFP expression enabled visualization of cytoplasmic behavior during mitosis. Thus, total cellular dynamics can be visualized at high resolution, including individual chromosomes in some cases, in living dual-color cells in real time. Dual-color cancer cells expressing H2B-GFP in the nucleus and RFP in the cytoplasm provide unique tools for visualizing subcellular nuclear and cytoplasm dynamics, including the behavior of individual chromosomes during mitosis. The dual-color cells can be used to evaluate chromosomal loss or gain in real time during treatment with a variety of agents or as the cells are selected for increased or decreased malignancy in culture or in vivo. The dual color cells will be a useful tool to discover and evaluate novel strategies for killing cancer cells. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  8. Continuous and simultaneous measurement of the tank-treading motion of red blood cells and the surrounding flow using translational confocal micro-particle image velocimetry (micro-PIV) with sub-micron resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oishi, M; Utsubo, K; Kinoshita, H; Fujii, T; Oshima, M

    2012-01-01

    In this study, a translational confocal micro-particle image velocimetry (PIV) system is introduced to measure the microscopic interaction between red blood cells (RBCs) and the surrounding flow. Since the macroscopic behavior of RBCs, such as the tank-treading motion, is closely related to the axial migration and other flow characteristics in arterioles, the measurement method must answer the conflicting demands of sub-micron resolution, continuous measurement and applicability for high-speed flow. In order to avoid loss of the measurement target, i.e. RBCs, from the narrow field of view during high-magnification measurement, the translation stage with the flow device moves in the direction opposite the direction of flow. The proposed system achieves the measurement of higher absolute velocities compared with a conventional confocal micro-PIV system without the drawbacks derived from stage vibration. In addition, we have applied a multicolor separation unit, which can measure different phases simultaneously using different fluorescent particles, in order to clarify the interaction between RBCs and the surrounding flow. Based on our measurements, the tank-treading motion of RBCs depends on the shear stress gradient of the surrounding flow. Although, the relationship between the tank-treading frequency and the shear rate of the surrounding flow is of the same order as in the previous uniform shear rate experiments, our results reveal the remarkable behavior of the non-uniform membrane velocities and lateral velocity component of flow around the RBCs. (paper)

  9. Video-rate scanning confocal microscopy and microendoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Alexander J; Evans, Conor L

    2011-10-20

    Confocal microscopy has become an invaluable tool in biology and the biomedical sciences, enabling rapid, high-sensitivity, and high-resolution optical sectioning of complex systems. Confocal microscopy is routinely used, for example, to study specific cellular targets, monitor dynamics in living cells, and visualize the three dimensional evolution of entire organisms. Extensions of confocal imaging systems, such as confocal microendoscopes, allow for high-resolution imaging in vivo and are currently being applied to disease imaging and diagnosis in clinical settings. Confocal microscopy provides three-dimensional resolution by creating so-called "optical sections" using straightforward geometrical optics. In a standard wide-field microscope, fluorescence generated from a sample is collected by an objective lens and relayed directly to a detector. While acceptable for imaging thin samples, thick samples become blurred by fluorescence generated above and below the objective focal plane. In contrast, confocal microscopy enables virtual, optical sectioning of samples, rejecting out-of-focus light to build high resolution three-dimensional representations of samples. Confocal microscopes achieve this feat by using a confocal aperture in the detection beam path. The fluorescence collected from a sample by the objective is relayed back through the scanning mirrors and through the primary dichroic mirror, a mirror carefully selected to reflect shorter wavelengths such as the laser excitation beam while passing the longer, Stokes-shifted fluorescence emission. This long-wavelength fluorescence signal is then passed to a pair of lenses on either side of a pinhole that is positioned at a plane exactly conjugate with the focal plane of the objective lens. Photons collected from the focal volume of the object are collimated by the objective lens and are focused by the confocal lenses through the pinhole. Fluorescence generated above or below the focal plane will therefore not

  10. Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman spectroscopy has gained increased use and importance in recent years for accurate and precise detection of physical and chemical properties of food materials, due to the greater specificity and sensitivity of Raman techniques over other analytical techniques. This book chapter presents Raman s...

  11. Reflectance Confocal Microscopy in Lentigo Maligna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamo, R; Pampín, A; Floristán, U

    2016-12-01

    Lentigo maligna is the most common type of facial melanoma. Diagnosis is complicated, however, as it shares clinical and dermoscopic characteristics with other cutaneous lesions of the face. Reflectance confocal microscopy is an imaging technique that permits the visualization of characteristic features of lentigo maligna. These include a disrupted honeycomb pattern and pagetoid cells with a tendency to show folliculotropism. These cells typically have a dendritic morphology, although they may also appear as round cells measuring over 20μm with atypical nuclei. Poorly defined dermal papillae and atypical cells may be seen at the dermal-epidermal junction and can form bridges resembling mitochondrial structures. Other characteristic findings include junctional swelling with atypical cells located around the follicles, resembling caput medusae. Reflectance confocal microscopy is a very useful tool for diagnosing lentigo maligna. Copyright © 2016 AEDV. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Confocal profilometer with nanometric vertical resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, D.J.; Horsfall, A.; Hrynevych, M.; Kearney, P.D.; Nugent, K.A.

    1992-01-01

    An optical system is described which is based on the method of Kobayashi et al. The instrument is capable of simultaneous confocal imaging and profilometry with nanometric (nm) vertical resolution. The profile is independent of the reflectivity of the sample and is obtained by raster-scanning the sample without active feedback. It is shown that the vertical resolution of this technique may be extended down to 1 nm and have recorded images with a resolution of better than 3 nm. The concept and design is considerably simpler than most optical profilometers and may represent the most affordable method of profilometry with nanometric resolution available. 15 refs., 6 figs

  13. “Two-Step” Raman Imaging Technique To Guide Chemo-Photothermal Cancer Therapy

    KAUST Repository

    Deng, Lin

    2015-08-13

    Graphene oxide-wrapped gold nanorods (GO@AuNRs) offer efficient drug delivery as well as NIR laser photothermal therapy (PTT) in vitro and in vivo. However, no real-time observation of drug release has been reported to better understand the synergy of chemotherapy and PTT. Herein, surface-enhance Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is employed to guide chemo-photothermal cancer therapy by a two-step mechanism. In the presence of GO as an internal standard, SERS signals of DOX (doxorubicin) loaded onto GO@AuNRs are found to be pH-responsive. Both DOX and GO show strong SERS signals before the DOX@GO@AuNRs are endocytic. However, when the DOX@GO@AuNRs enter acidic microenvironments such as endosomes and/or lysosomes, the DOX signals start decreasing while the GO signals remain the same. This plasmonic antenna could be used to identify the appropriate time to apply the PTT laser during chemo-photothermal therapy.

  14. Raman Reporter-Coupled Ag(core)@Au(shell) Nanostars for in Vivo Improved Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering Imaging and Near-infrared-Triggered Photothermal Therapy in Breast Cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Leyong; Pan, Yuanwei; Wang, Shouju; Wang, Xin; Zhao, Xinmei; Ren, Wenzhi; Lu, Guangming; Wu, Aiguo

    2015-08-05

    Noble-metal nanomaterials were widely investigated as theranostic systems for surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) imaging, and also for photothermal therapy (PTT) of cancers. However, it was still a major challenge to explore multifunctional nanoprobes with high performance, high stability, and low toxicity. In this work, Raman reporter (DTTC)-coupled Agcore@Aushell nanostars (Ag@Au-DTTC) were synthesized and investigated for in vivo improved SERS imaging and near-infrared (NIR)-triggered PTT of breast cancers. By the two-step coupling of DTTC, the SERS signal was improved obviously, and the cytotoxicity of nanoparticles was also decreased by coating Au nanostars onto Ag nanoparticles. The as-prepared Ag@Au-DTTC nanostars showed high photostability and excellent photothermal performance, in which the photothermal conversion efficiency was up to 79.01% under the irradiation of an 808 nm laser. The in vitro and in vivo SERS measurements of Ag@Au-DTTC nanostars showed that the many sharp and narrow Raman peaks located at 508, 782, 844, 1135, 1242, 1331, 1464, 1510, and 1580 cm(-1) could be obviously observed in MCF-7 cells and in MCF-7 tumor-bearing nude mice, compared with that in pure DTTC. In 14-day treatments, the tumor volume of MCF-7 tumor-bearing nude mice injected with Ag@Au-DTTC nanostars and irradiated by an 808 nm laser almost disappeared. This study demonstrated that the as-prepared Ag@Au-DTTC nanostars could be excellent multifunctional agents for improved SERS imaging and NIR-triggered PTT of breast cancers with low risk.

  15. In- and ex-vivo molecular imaging of apoptosis to assess sensitivity of non-small cell lung cancer to EGFR inhibitors using probe-based confocal laser endomicroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guisier, Florian; Bohn, Pierre; Patout, Maxime; Piton, Nicolas; Farah, Insaf; Vera, Pierre; Thiberville, Luc; Salaün, Mathieu

    2017-01-01

    Prediction of treatment outcome of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with EGFR inhibitors on the basis of the genetic analysis of the tumor can be incorrect in case of rare or complex mutations, bypass molecular activation pathways, or pharmacodynamic variations. The aim of this study was to develop an ex vivo and in vivo real-time quantitative imaging test for EGFR inhibitors sensitivity assessment. Erlotinib resistant (A549, H460, H1975), insensitive (H1650) and hypersensitive (HCC827) cell lines were injected subcutaneously in Nude mice. Tumor xenografts from mice treated with Erlotinib were imaged ex vivo and in vivo using probe-based confocal laser endomicroscopy (pCLE) and NucView 488 Caspase 3 substrate, a fluorescent probe specific for the activated caspase 3. Assessment of apoptosis at 24h post treatment, both ex vivo in explanted tumor xenografts and in vivo, showed a significant difference between resistant cell lines (A549, H460 and H1975) and insensitive (H1650) or hypersensitive (HCC827) ones (pex vivo imaging, p≤0.02 for in vivo imaging). There was also a significant difference between insensitive and hypersensitive cell lines, both ex vivo (pex vivo assessment of apoptosis using pCLE differentiates resistant from sensitive NSCLC xenografts to Erlotinib.

  16. Fungal keratitis - improving diagnostics by confocal microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, E; Heegaard, S; Prause, J U; Ivarsen, A; Mortensen, K L; Hjortdal, J

    2013-09-01

    Introducing a simple image grading system to support the interpretation of in vivo confocal microscopy (IVCM) images in filamentous fungal keratitis. Clinical and confocal studies took place at the Department of Ophthalmology, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark. Histopathological analysis was performed at the Eye Pathology Institute, Department of Neuroscience and Pharmacology, University of Copenhagen, Denmark. A recent series of consecutive patients with filamentous fungal keratitis is presented to demonstrate the results from in-house IVCM. Based upon our experience with IVCM and previously published images, we composed a grading system for interpreting IVCM images of filamentous fungal keratitis. A recent case series of filamentous fungal keratitis from 2011 to 2012 was examined. There were 3 male and 3 female patients. Mean age was 44.5 years (range 12-69), 6 out of 17 (35%) cultures were positive and a total of 6/7 (86%) IVCM scans were positive. Three different categories of IVCM results for the grading of diagnostic certainty were formed. IVCM is a valuable tool for diagnosing filamentous fungal keratitis. In order to improve the reliability of IVCM, we suggest implementing a simple and clinically applicable grading system for aiding the interpretation of IVCM images of filamentous fungal keratitis.

  17. Fungal Keratitis - Improving Diagnostics by Confocal Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esben Nielsen

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Introducing a simple image grading system to support the interpretation of in vivo confocal microscopy (IVCM images in filamentous fungal keratitis. Setting: Clinical and confocal studies took place at the Department of Ophthalmology, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark. Histopathological analysis was performed at the Eye Pathology Institute, Department of Neuroscience and Pharmacology, University of Copenhagen, Denmark. Methods: A recent series of consecutive patients with filamentous fungal keratitis is presented to demonstrate the results from in-house IVCM. Based upon our experience with IVCM and previously published images, we composed a grading system for interpreting IVCM images of filamentous fungal keratitis. Results: A recent case series of filamentous fungal keratitis from 2011 to 2012 was examined. There were 3 male and 3 female patients. Mean age was 44.5 years (range 12-69, 6 out of 17 (35% cultures were positive and a total of 6/7 (86% IVCM scans were positive. Three different categories of IVCM results for the grading of diagnostic certainty were formed. Conclusion: IVCM is a valuable tool for diagnosing filamentous fungal keratitis. In order to improve the reliability of IVCM, we suggest implementing a simple and clinically applicable grading system for aiding the interpretation of IVCM images of filamentous fungal keratitis.

  18. Imaging microscopic distribution of antifungal agents in dandruff treatments with stimulated Raman scattering microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, Natalie L.; Singh, Bhumika; Jones, Andrew; Moger, Julian

    2017-06-01

    Treatment of dandruff condition usually involves use of antidandruff shampoos containing antifungal agents. Different antifungal agents show variable clinical efficacy based on their cutaneous distribution and bioavailability. Using stimulated Raman scattering (SRS), we mapped the distribution of unlabeled low-molecular weight antifungal compounds zinc pyrithione (ZnPT) and climbazole (CBZ) on the surface of intact porcine skin with cellular precision. SRS has sufficient chemical selectivity and sensitivity to detect the agents on the skin surface based on their unique chemical motifs that do not occur naturally in biological tissues. Moreover, SRS is able to correlate the distribution of the agents with the morphological features of the skin using the CH2 stretch mode, which is abundant in skin lipids. This is a significant strength of the technique since it allows the microscopic accumulation of the agents to be correlated with physiological features and their chemical environment without the use of counter stains. Our findings show that due to its lower solubility, ZnPT coats the surface of the skin with a sparse layer of crystals in the size range of 1 to 4 μm. This is consistent with the current understanding of the mode of action of ZnPT. In contrast, CBZ being more soluble and hydrophobic resulted in diffuse homogeneous distribution. It predominantly resided in microscopic lipid-rich crevasses and penetrated up to 60 μm into the infundibular spaces surrounding the hair shaft. The ability of the SRS to selectively map the distribution of agents on the skin's surface has the potential to provide insight into the mechanisms underpinning the topical application of antifungal or skin-active agents that could lead to the rational engineering of enhanced formulations.

  19. Stand-off imaging Raman spectroscopy for forensic analysis of post-blast scenes: trace detection of ammonium nitrate and 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceco, Ema; Önnerud, Hans; Menning, Dennis; Gilljam, John L.; Bââth, Petra; Östmark, Henric

    2014-05-01

    The following paper presents a realistic forensic capability test of an imaging Raman spectroscopy based demonstrator system, developed at FOI, the Swedish Defence Research Agency. The system uses a 532 nm laser to irradiate a surface of 25×25mm. The backscattered radiation from the surface is collected by an 8" telescope with subsequent optical system, and is finally imaged onto an ICCD camera. We present here an explosives trace analysis study of samples collected from a realistic scenario after a detonation. A left-behind 5 kg IED, based on ammonium nitrate with a TNT (2,4,6-trinitrotoluene) booster, was detonated in a plastic garbage bin. Aluminum sample plates were mounted vertically on a holder approximately 6 m from the point of detonation. Minutes after the detonation, the samples were analyzed with stand-off imaging Raman spectroscopy from a distance of 10 m. Trace amounts could be detected from the secondary explosive (ammonium nitrate with an analysis time of 1 min. Measurement results also indicated detection of residues from the booster (TNT). The sample plates were subsequently swabbed and analyzed with HPLC and GC-MS analyses to confirm the results from the stand-off imaging Raman system. The presented findings indicate that it is possible to determine the type of explosive used in an IED from a distance, within minutes after the attack, and without tampering with physical evidence at the crime scene.

  20. Fluorescence confocal polarizing microscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Much of the modern understanding of orientational order in liquid crystals (LCs) is based on polarizing microscopy (PM). A PM image bears only two-dimensional (2D) information, integrating the 3D pattern of optical birefringence over the path of light. Recently, we proposed a technique to image 3D director patterns by ...

  1. Multifunctional superparamagnetic nanoshells: combining two-photon luminescence imaging, surface-enhanced Raman scattering and magnetic separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xiulong; Li, Haiyan; Wang, Shanshan; Kong, Ni; Xu, Hong; Fu, Qihua; Gu, Hongchen; Ye, Jian

    2014-11-01

    With the increasing need for multi-purpose analysis in the biomedical field, traditional single diagnosis methods cannot meet the requirements. Therefore new multifunctional technologies and materials for the integration of sample collection, sensing and imaging are in great demand. Core-shell nanoparticles offer a unique platform to combine multifunctions in a single particle. In this work, we have constructed a novel type of core-shell superparamagnetic nanoshell (Fe3O4@SiO2@Au), composed of a Fe3O4 cluster core, a thin Au shell and a SiO2 layer in between. The obtained multifunctional nanoparticles combine the magnetic properties and plasmonic optical properties effectively, which were well investigated by a number of experimental characterization methods and theoretical simulations. We have demonstrated that Fe3O4@SiO2@Au nanoparticles can be utilized for two-photon luminescence (TPL) imaging, near-infrared surface-enhanced Raman scattering (NIR SERS) and cell collection by magnetic separation. The TPL intensity could be further greatly enhanced through the plasmon coupling effect in the self-assembled nanoparticle chains, which were triggered by an external magnetic field. In addition, Fe3O4@SiO2@Au nanoparticles may have great potential applications such as enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and photo-thermotherapy. Successful combination of multifunctions including magnetic response, biosensing and bioimaging in single nanoparticles allows further manipulation, real-time tracking, and intracellular molecule analysis of live cells at a single-cell level.With the increasing need for multi-purpose analysis in the biomedical field, traditional single diagnosis methods cannot meet the requirements. Therefore new multifunctional technologies and materials for the integration of sample collection, sensing and imaging are in great demand. Core-shell nanoparticles offer a unique platform to combine multifunctions in a single particle. In this work, we have

  2. Microscopy imaging system and method employing stimulated raman spectroscopy as a contrast mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xiaoliang Sunney [Lexington, MA; Freudiger, Christian [Boston, MA; Min, Wei [Cambridge, MA

    2011-09-27

    A microscopy imaging system includes a first light source for providing a first train of pulses at a first center optical frequency .omega..sub.1, a second light source for providing a second train of pulses at a second center optical frequency .omega..sub.2, a modulator system, an optical detector, and a processor. The modulator system is for modulating a beam property of the second train of pulses at a modulation frequency f of at least 100 kHz. The optical detector is for detecting an integrated intensity of substantially all optical frequency components of the first train of pulses from the common focal volume by blocking the second train of pulses being modulated. The processor is for detecting, a modulation at the modulation frequency f, of the integrated intensity of the optical frequency components of the first train of pulses to provide a pixel of an image for the microscopy imaging system.

  3. Raman imaging of carrier distribution in the channel of an ionic liquid-gated transistor fabricated with regioregular poly(3-hexylthiophene)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Y.; Enokida, I.; Yamamoto, J.; Furukawa, Y.

    2018-05-01

    Raman images of carriers (positive polarons) at the channel of an ionic liquid-gated transistor (ILGT) fabricated with regioregular poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) have been measured with excitation at 785 nm. The observed spectra indicate that carriers generated are positive polarons. The intensities of the 1415 cm-1 band attributed to polarons in the P3HT channel were plotted as Raman images; they showed the carrier density distribution. When the source-drain voltage VD is lower than the source-gate voltage VG (linear region), the carrier density was uniform. When VD is nearly equal to VG (saturation region), a negative carrier density gradient from the source electrode towards the drain electrode was observed. This carrier density distribution is associated with the observed current-voltage characteristics, which is not consistent with the "pinch-off" theory of inorganic semiconductor transistors.

  4. In vivo skin characterization by confocal Raman microspectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.J. Caspers (Peter)

    2003-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Various areas of skin research depend on detailed knowledge of the molecular composition of skin and molecular structure of skin constituents. On a microscopic scale the skin is a highly heterogeneous tissue. Molecular composition and structure vary

  5. Development of simultaneous hyperspectral coherent Raman imaging for advancing reduced emission combustion technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bohlin, G.A.

    2016-01-01

    Overall aim and key objectives Advances in optical imaging techniques over the past decades have revolutionized our ability to study chemically reactive flows encountered in air-breathing combustion systems. Emerging technology for unravelling clean- and efficient

  6. Spinning Disk Confocal System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-06-01

    high temporal resolution. An instrument has been developed for exactly this type of live-cell imaging. This new instrument scans 1000 microbeams across...Imaging System. Instead of scanning a single laser beam across the cell, this new instrument scans 1000 microbeams simultaneously using a spinning...multipoint-excitation, multipoint- emission characteristics of UltraView RS, which confers three main advantages over traditional beam scanning LSCMs for

  7. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and Raman imaging measurement of squalene content and distribution in human hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yan; Chen, Guoqiang; Ji, Chengdong; Hoptroff, Michael; Jones, Andrew; Collins, Luisa Z; Janssen, Hans-Gerd

    2016-03-01

    A sensitive and specific gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method was developed and validated for the measurement of the squalene content from root to tip, in both Chinese black virgin and bleached hair. Deuterated squalene was used as the internal standard. For quantification, selective ion monitoring (SIM) at m/z 410.0 and 347.0 were monitored for squalene and deuterated squalene, respectively. Different methods for the extraction of squalene from ex vivo human hair were compared including organic solvent extraction and acid/alkali hydrolysis. The best extraction efficiency was obtained by using a mixed solvent consisting of chloroform:methanol = 2:1 (v:v). The linear range of squalene ran from 1.0 to 50.0 μg mL(-1). The limit of detection (LOD) was 0.10 μg mL(-1) (corresponding to 0.005 mg g(-1) in human hair), which enabled quantification of squalene in human hair at very low level. The recovery of squalene was 96.4 ± 1.46% (n = 3). Using the above-mentioned mixed solvent extraction, squalene content in human hair was successfully quantified from root to tip. Meanwhile, a Raman imaging method was developed to visualize the squalene distribution in Chinese white virgin hair from cuticle to medulla.

  8. Raman Imaging Spectroscopy of a Putative Microfossil from the ∼3.46 Ga Apex Chert: Insights from Quartz Grain Orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bower, D M; Steele, A; Fries, M D; Green, O R; Lindsay, J F

    2016-02-01

    The utility of nondestructive laser Raman for testing the biogenicity of microfossil-like structures in ancient rocks is promising, yet results from deposits like the ∼3.46 Ga Apex chert remain contentious. The essence of the debate is that associated microstructures, which are not purported to be microfossils, also contain reduced carbon that displays Raman D- and G-band peaks similar to those seen in the purported microfossils. This has led to the hypothesis that all features including reported microfossils are due to compression of nonfossil carbon during crystal growth around quartz spherulites or more angular crystals. In this scenario, the precursor to this macromolecular carbon may or may not have been of biogenic origin, while the arcuate and linear features described would be pseudofossils. To test this hypothesis, we have undertaken 2-D micro-Raman imaging of the Eoleptonema apex holotype and associated features using instrumentation with a high spatial and spectral resolution. In addition to this, we utilized the ratio of two Raman active quartz mode intensities (I129/I461) to assess quartz grain orientation and grain-splitting artifacts. These data lead us to conclude that the holotype of Eoleptonema apex is a sheet-shaped pseudofossil that appears to be a carbon infilled intragranular crack; therefore other holotypes should be carefully reexamined for syngenicity.

  9. An integrated coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering and multiphoton imaging technique for liver disease diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jian; Lu, Fake; Zheng, Wei; Yu, Hanry; Sheppard, Colin; Huang, Zhiwei

    2012-03-01

    Liver steatosis and fibrosis are two prevalence liver diseases and may eventually develop into hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) Due to their prevalence and severity, much work has been done to develop efficient diagnostic methods and therapies. Nonlinear optical microscopy has high sensitivity and chemical specificity for major biochemical compounds, making it a powerful tool for tissue imaging without staining. In this study, three nonlinear microscopy imaging modalities are applied to the study of liver diseases in a bile duct ligation rat modal. CARS shows the distributions of fats or lipids quantitatively across the tissue; SHG visualizes the collagens; and TPEF reveals the morphology of hepatic cells. The results clearly show the development of liver steatosis and fibrosis with time, and the hepatic fat and collagen fibrils are quantified. This study demonstrates the ability of multimodal nonlinear optical microscopy for liver disease diagnosis, and may provide new insights into the understanding of the mechanisms of steatosis/fibrosis transformations at the cellular and molecular levels.

  10. Systems and methods for selective detection and imaging in coherent Raman microscopy by spectral excitation shaping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xiaoliang Sunney; Freudiger, Christian; Min, Wei

    2016-03-15

    A microscopy imaging system is disclosed that includes a light source system, a spectral shaper, a modulator system, an optics system, an optical detector and a processor. The light source system is for providing a first train of pulses and a second train of pulses. The spectral shaper is for spectrally modifying an optical property of at least some frequency components of the broadband range of frequency components such that the broadband range of frequency components is shaped producing a shaped first train of pulses to specifically probe a spectral feature of interest from a sample, and to reduce information from features that are not of interest from the sample. The modulator system is for modulating a property of at least one of the shaped first train of pulses and the second train of pulses at a modulation frequency. The optical detector is for detecting an integrated intensity of substantially all optical frequency components of a train of pulses of interest transmitted or reflected through the common focal volume. The processor is for detecting a modulation at the modulation frequency of the integrated intensity of substantially all of the optical frequency components of the train of pulses of interest due to the non-linear interaction of the shaped first train of pulses with the second train of pulses as modulated in the common focal volume, and for providing an output signal for a pixel of an image for the microscopy imaging system.

  11. Raman facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Raman scattering is a powerful light scattering technique used to diagnose the internal structure of molecules and crystals. In a light scattering experiment, light...

  12. Raman Plus X: Biomedical Applications of Multimodal Raman Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nandan K. Das

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Raman spectroscopy is a label-free method of obtaining detailed chemical information about samples. Its compatibility with living tissue makes it an attractive choice for biomedical analysis, yet its translation from a research tool to a clinical tool has been slow, hampered by fundamental Raman scattering issues such as long integration times and limited penetration depth. In this review we detail the how combining Raman spectroscopy with other techniques yields multimodal instruments that can help to surmount the translational barriers faced by Raman alone. We review Raman combined with several optical and non-optical methods, including fluorescence, elastic scattering, OCT, phase imaging, and mass spectrometry. In each section we highlight the power of each combination along with a brief history and presentation of representative results. Finally, we conclude with a perspective detailing both benefits and challenges for multimodal Raman measurements, and give thoughts on future directions in the field.

  13. Enhancing Raman signals with an interferometrically controlled AFM tip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oron-Carl, Matti; Krupke, Ralph

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate the upgrade of a commercial confocal Raman microscope into a tip-enhanced Raman microscope/spectroscopy system (TERS) by integrating an interferometrically controlled atomic force microscope into the base of an existing upright microscope to provide near-field detection and thus signal enhancement. The feasibility of the system is demonstrated by measuring the Raman near-field enhancement on thin PEDOT:PSS films and on carbon nanotubes within a device geometry. An enhancement factor of 2–3 and of 5–6 is observed, respectively. Moreover, on a nanotube device we show local conductivity measurement and its correlation to Raman and topography recordings. Upgrading an existing upright confocal Raman microscope in the demonstrated way is significantly cheaper than purchasing a complete commercial TERS system. (paper)

  14. Spectral confocal reflection microscopy using a white light source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, M.; Juškaitis, R.; Wilson, T.

    2008-08-01

    We present a reflection confocal microscope incorporating a white light supercontinuum source and spectral detection. The microscope provides images resolved spatially in three-dimensions, in addition to spectral resolution covering the wavelength range 450-650nm. Images and reflection spectra of artificial and natural specimens are presented, showing features that are not normally revealed in conventional microscopes or confocal microscopes using discrete line lasers. The specimens include thin film structures on semiconductor chips, iridescent structures in Papilio blumei butterfly scales, nacre from abalone shells and opal gemstones. Quantitative size and refractive index measurements of transparent beads are derived from spectral interference bands.

  15. Raman Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerrard, Donald L.

    1984-01-01

    Reviews literature on Raman spectroscopy from late 1981 to late 1983. Topic areas include: instrumentation and sampling; liquids and solutions; gases and matrix isolation; biological molecules; polymers; high-temperature and high-pressure studies; Raman microscopy; thin films and surfaces; resonance-enhanced and surface-enhanced spectroscopy; and…

  16. Raman spectroscopic studies on bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maquelin, Kees; Choo-Smith, Lin-P'ing; Endtz, Hubert P.; Bruining, Hajo A.; Puppels, Gerwin J.

    2000-11-01

    Routine clinical microbiological identification of pathogenic micro-organisms is largely based on nutritional and biochemical tests. Laboratory results can be presented to a clinician after 2 - 3 days for most clinically relevant micro- organisms. Most of this time is required to obtain pure cultures and enough biomass for the tests to be performed. In the case of severely ill patients, this unavoidable time delay associated with such identification procedures can be fatal. A novel identification method based on confocal Raman microspectroscopy will be presented. With this method it is possible to obtain Raman spectra directly from microbial microcolonies on the solid culture medium, which have developed after only 6 hours of culturing for most commonly encountered organisms. Not only does this technique enable rapid (same day) identifications, but also preserves the sample allowing it to be double-checked with traditional tests. This, combined with the speed and minimal sample handling indicate that confocal Raman microspectroscopy has much potential as a powerful new tool in clinical diagnostic microbiology.

  17. Confocal laser endomicroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karstensen, John Gásdal; Săftoiu, Adrian; Brynskov, Jørn

    2016-01-01

    and to examine whether these are risk factors for relapse. PATIENTS AND METHODS: This was a single-center prospective feasibility study of CLE imaging in patients with Crohn's disease. CLE imaging was performed in the terminal ileum and four colorectal sites, and was correlated with histopathology...... a 12-month follow-up period, ileal fluorescein leakage and microerosions were significant risk factors for relapse in the subgroup of patients in remission (log rank (P = 0.009 and (P = 0.007, respectively) as well as in the entire group of patients with Crohn's disease (log rank (P = 0.006 and (P = 0.......01, respectively). Inter- and intraobserver reproducibility was almost perfect (κ > 0.80) or substantial (κ > 0.60) for the majority of CLE parameters. CONCLUSIONS: CLE can identify reproducible microscopic changes in the terminal ileum that are risk factors for relapse in patients with otherwise inactive Crohn...

  18. Raman Spectroscopy for Homeland Security Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory Mogilevsky

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Raman spectroscopy is an analytical technique with vast applications in the homeland security and defense arenas. The Raman effect is defined by the inelastic interaction of the incident laser with the analyte molecule’s vibrational modes, which can be exploited to detect and identify chemicals in various environments and for the detection of hazards in the field, at checkpoints, or in a forensic laboratory with no contact with the substance. A major source of error that overwhelms the Raman signal is fluorescence caused by the background and the sample matrix. Novel methods are being developed to enhance the Raman signal’s sensitivity and to reduce the effects of fluorescence by altering how the hazard material interacts with its environment and the incident laser. Basic Raman techniques applicable to homeland security applications include conventional (off-resonance Raman spectroscopy, surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS, resonance Raman spectroscopy, and spatially or temporally offset Raman spectroscopy (SORS and TORS. Additional emerging Raman techniques, including remote Raman detection, Raman imaging, and Heterodyne imaging, are being developed to further enhance the Raman signal, mitigate fluorescence effects, and monitor hazards at a distance for use in homeland security and defense applications.

  19. Compressive confocal microscopy: 3D reconstruction algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, P.; Paredes, J. L.; Wu, Y.; Chen, C.; Arce, G. R.; Prather, D. W.

    2009-02-01

    In this paper, a new approach for Confocal Microscopy (CM) based on the framework of compressive sensing is developed. In the proposed approach, a point illumination and a random set of pinholes are used to eliminate out-of-focus information at the detector. Furthermore, a Digital Micromirror Device (DMD) is used to efficiently scan the 2D or 3D specimen but, unlike the conventional CM that uses CCD detectors, the measured data in the proposed compressive confocal microscopy (CCM) emerge from random sets of pinhole illuminated pixels in the specimen that are linearly combined (projected) and measured by a single photon detector. Compared to conventional CM or programmable array microscopy (PAM), the number of measurements needed for nearly perfect reconstruction in CCM is significantly reduced. Our experimental results are based on a testbed that uses a Texas Instruments DMD (an array of 1024×768 13.68×13.68 μm2 mirrors) for computing the linear projections of illuminated pixels and a single photon detector is used to obtain the compressive sensing measurement. The position of each element in the DMD is defined by the compressed sensing measurement matrices. Threedimensional image reconstruction algorithms are developed that exploit the inter-slice spatial image correlation as well as the correlation between different 2D slices. A comprehensive performance comparison between several binary projection patterns is shown. Experimental and simulation results are provided to illustrate the features of the proposed systems.

  20. Evidence for highly localized damage in internal tin and powder-in-tube Nb{sub 3}Sn strands rolled before reaction obtained from coupled magneto-optical imaging and confocal laser scanning microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polyanskii, A A; Lee, P J; Jewell, M C; Larbalestier, D C [Applied Superconductivity Center, National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32310 (United States); Barzi, E; Turrioni, D; Zlobin, A V [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States)

    2009-09-15

    Nb{sub 3}Sn strands for high-current, high-field magnets must be cabled before reaction while the conductor is still composed of ductile components. Even though still in the ductile, deformable state, significant damage can occur in this step, which expresses itself by inhomogeneous A15 formation, Sn leakage or even worse effects during later reaction. In this study, we simulate cabling damage by rolling recent high performance powder-in-tube (PIT) and internal tin (IT) strands in controlled increments, applying standard Nb{sub 3}Sn reaction heat treatments, and then examining the local changes using magneto-optical imaging (MOI), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). These combined characterizations allow any local damage to the filament architecture to be made clear. MOI directly reveals the local variation of superconductivity while CLSM is extremely sensitive in revealing Sn leakage beyond the diffusion barrier into the stabilizing Cu. These techniques reveal a markedly different response to deformation by the PIT and IT strands. The study demonstrates that these tools can provide a local, thorough, and detailed view of how strands degrade and thus complement more complex extracted strand studies.

  1. Identification of pesticide varieties by detecting characteristics of Chlorella pyrenoidosa using Visible/Near infrared hyperspectral imaging and Raman microspectroscopy technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Yongni; Li, Yuan; Jiang, Linjun; Pan, Jian; He, Yong; Dou, Xiaoming

    2016-11-01

    The main goal of this research is to examine the feasibility of applying Visible/Near-infrared hyperspectral imaging (Vis/NIR-HSI) and Raman microspectroscopy technology for non-destructive identification of pesticide varieties (glyphosate and butachlor). Both mentioned technologies were explored to investigate how internal elements or characteristics of Chlorella pyrenoidosa change when pesticides are applied, and in the meantime, to identify varieties of the pesticides during this procedure. Successive projections algorithm (SPA) was introduced to our study to identify seven most effective wavelengths. With those wavelengths suggested by SPA, a model of the linear discriminant analysis (LDA) was established to classify the pesticide varieties, and the correct classification rate of the SPA-LDA model reached as high as 100%. For the Raman technique, a few partial least squares discriminant analysis models were established with different preprocessing methods from which we also identified one processing approach that achieved the most optimal result. The sensitive wavelengths (SWs) which are related to algae's pigment were chosen, and a model of LDA was established with the correct identification reached a high level of 90.0%. The results showed that both Vis/NIR-HSI and Raman microspectroscopy techniques are capable to identify pesticide varieties in an indirect but effective way, and SPA is an effective wavelength extracting method. The SWs corresponding to microalgae pigments, which were influenced by pesticides, could also help to characterize different pesticide varieties and benefit the variety identification. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Axial Confocal Tomography of Capillary-Contained Colloidal Structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liber, Shir R.; Indech, Ganit; Wee, Van Der Ernest B.; Butenko, Alexander V.; Kodger, Thomas E.; Lu, Peter J.; Schofield, Andrew B.; Weitz, David A.; Blaaderen, Van Alfons; Sloutskin, Eli

    2017-01-01

    Confocal microscopy is widely used for three-dimensional (3D) sample reconstructions. Arguably, the most significant challenge in such reconstructions is posed by the resolution along the optical axis being significantly lower than in the lateral directions. In addition, the imaging rate is lower

  3. Confocal stereology: an efficient tool for measurement of microscopic structures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kubínová, Lucie; Janáček, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 360, č. 1 (2015), s. 13-28 ISSN 0302-766X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LH13028 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : 3-D images * confocal microscopy * geometrical characteristics * spatial probes * stereology Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology Impact factor: 2.948, year: 2015

  4. Characterization of the stem anatomy of the Eocene fern Dennstaedtiopsis aerenchymata (Dennstaedtiaceae) by use of confocal laser scanning microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Chris S; Schopf, J William; Kudryavtsev, Anatoliy B

    2013-08-01

    Permineralization provides the most faithful known mode of three-dimensional preservation of the morphology and cellular anatomy of fossil plants. Standard optical microscopic documentation of such structures can provide only an approximation of their true three-dimensional form and is incapable of revealing fine-structural (<300 nm) details, deficiencies that can be addressed by the use of confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). To demonstrate the usefulness of CLSM in such studies, we compare confocal laser scanning micrographs and optical photomicrographs of the permineralized tissues of rhizomes and petioles of the Eocene fern Dennstaedtiopsis aerenchymata preserved in cherts of the Clarno Formation of Oregon, USA, and the Allenby Formation (Princeton chert) of British Columbia, Canada. The laser-induced fluorescence detected by CLSM produces crisp high-resolution images of the three-dimensionally permineralized tissues of Dennstaedtiopsis aerenchymata. Tissues analyzed include the epidermis and epidermal hairs, cortex, aerenchyma, endodermis, vascular tissue, and pith-for each of which, CLSM yields results superior to those of standard optical microscopy. CLSM and previous Raman spectroscopic analyses of the same specimens provide evidence consistent with original biochemistry. Use of CLSM to characterize the morphology and cellular anatomy of permineralized fossil plants can provide accurate data in two and three dimensions at high spatial resolution, information that can be critically important to taxonomic, taphonomic, and developmental interpretations. Results presented here from this first detailed CLSM-based study of permineralized plant axes indicate that this nonintrusive, nondestructive technique should be widely applicable in paleobotany.

  5. Feasibility of Raman spectroscopy in vitro after 5-ALA-based fluorescence diagnosis in the bladder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimbergen, M. C. M.; van Swol, C. F. P.; van Moorselaar, R. J. A.; Mahadevan-Jansen, A.,; Stone, N.

    2006-02-01

    Photodynamic diagnosis (PDD) has become popular in bladder cancer detection. Several studies have however shown an increased false positive biopsies rate under PDD guidance compared to conventional cystoscopy. Raman spectroscopy is an optical technique that utilizes molecular specific, inelastic scattering of light photons to interrogate biological tissues, which can successfully differentiate epithelial neoplasia from normal tissue and inflammations in vitro. This investigation was performed to show the feasibility of NIR Raman spectroscopy in vitro on biopsies obtained under guidance of 5-ALA induced PPIX fluorescence imaging. Raman spectra of a PPIX solution was measured to obtain a characteristic signature for the photosensitzer without contributions from tissue constituents. Biopsies were obtained from patients with known bladder cancer instilled with 50ml, 5mg 5-ALA two hours prior to trans-urethral resection of tumor (TURT). Additional biopsies were obtained at a fluorescent and non-fluorescent area, snap-frozen in liquid nitrogen and stored at -80 °C. Each biopsy was thawed before measurements (10sec integration time) with a confocal Raman system (Renishaw Gloucestershire, UK). The 830 nm excitation (300mW) source is focused on the tissue by a 20X ultra-long-working-distance objective. Differences in fluorescence background between the two groups were removed by means of a special developed fluorescence subtraction algorithm. Raman spectra from ALA biopsies showed different fluorescence background which can be effectively removed by a fluorescence subtraction algorithm. This investigation shows that the interaction of the ALA induced PPIX with Raman spectroscopy in bladder samples. Combination of these techniques in-vivo may lead to a viable method of optical biopsies in bladder cancer detection.

  6. Investigation of free fatty acid associated recombinant membrane receptor protein expression in HEK293 cells using Raman spectroscopy, calcium imaging, and atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Juqiang; Xu, Han; Wu, Yangzhe; Tang, Mingjie; McEwen, Gerald D; Liu, Pin; Hansen, Dane R; Gilbertson, Timothy A; Zhou, Anhong

    2013-02-05

    G-protein-coupled receptor 120 (GPR120) is a previously orphaned G-protein-coupled receptor that apparently functions as a sensor for dietary fat in the gustatory and digestive systems. In this study, a cDNA sequence encoding a doxycycline (Dox)-inducible mature peptide of GPR120 was inserted into an expression vector and transfected in HEK293 cells. We measured Raman spectra of single HEK293 cells as well as GPR120-expressing HEK293-GPR120 cells at a 48 h period following the additions of Dox at several concentrations. We found that the spectral intensity of HEK293-GPR120 cells is dependent upon the dose of Dox, which correlates with the accumulation of GPR120 protein in the cells. However, the amount of the fatty acid activated changes in intracellular calcium (Ca(2+)) as measured by ratiometric calcium imaging was not correlated with Dox concentration. Principal components analysis (PCA) of Raman spectra reveals that the spectra from different treatments of HEK293-GPR120 cells form distinct, completely separated clusters with the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) area of 1, while those spectra for the HEK293 cells form small overlap clusters with the ROC area of 0.836. It was also found that expression of GPR120 altered the physiochemical and biomechanical properties of the parental cell membrane surface, which was quantitated by atomic force microscopy (AFM). These findings demonstrate that the combination of Raman spectroscopy, calcium imaging, and AFM may provide new tools in noninvasive and quantitative monitoring of membrane receptor expression induced alterations in the biophysical and signaling properties of single living cells.

  7. Raman imaging of carrier distribution in the channel of an ionic liquid-gated transistor fabricated with regioregular poly(3-hexylthiophene).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Y; Enokida, I; Yamamoto, J; Furukawa, Y

    2018-02-02

    Raman images of carriers (positive polarons) at the channel of an ionic liquid-gated transistor (ILGT) fabricated with regioregular poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) have been measured with excitation at 785 nm. The observed spectra indicate that carriers generated are positive polarons. The intensities of the 1415 cm -1 band attributed to polarons in the P3HT channel were plotted as Raman images; they showed the carrier density distribution. When the source-drain voltage V D is lower than the source-gate voltage V G (linear region), the carrier density was uniform. When V D is nearly equal to V G (saturation region), a negative carrier density gradient from the source electrode towards the drain electrode was observed. This carrier density distribution is associated with the observed current-voltage characteristics, which is not consistent with the "pinch-off" theory of inorganic semiconductor transistors. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Characterization of semi-solid Self-Emulsifying Drug Delivery Systems (SEDDS) of atorvastatin calcium by Raman image spectroscopy and chemometrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitkreitz, Márcia C; Sabin, Guilherme P; Polla, Griselda; Poppi, Ronei J

    2013-01-25

    A methodology based on Raman image spectroscopy and chemometrics for homogeneity evaluation of formulations containing atorvastatin calcium in Gelucire(®) 44/14 is presented. In the first part of the work, formulations with high amounts of Gelucire(®) 44/14 (80%) and solvents of different polarities (diethylene glycol monoethyl ether, propyleneglycol, propylene glycol monocaprylate and glyceryl mono/dicaprylate/caprate) were prepared for miscibility screening evaluation by classical least squares (CLS). It was observed that Gelucire(®) 44/14 presented higher affinity for the lipophilic solvents glyceryl mono/dicaprylate/caprate and propylene glycol monocaprylate, whose samples were observed to be homogeneous, and lower affinity for the hydrophilic solvents diethylene glycol monoethyl ether and propyleneglycol, whose samples were heterogeneous. In the second part of the work, the ratio of glyceryl mono/dicaprylate/caprate and Gelucire(®) 44/14 was determined based on studies in water and allowed the selection of the proportions of these two excipients in the preconcentrate that provided supersaturation of atorvastatin upon dilution. The preconcentrate was then evaluated for homogeneity by partial least squares (PLS) and an excellent miscibility was observed in this proportion as well. Therefore, it was possible to select a formulation that presented simultaneously homogeneous preconcentrate and solubility enhancement in water by Raman image spectroscopy and chemometrics. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. The lipid-reactive oxygen species phenotype of breast cancer. Raman spectroscopy and mapping, PCA and PLSDA for invasive ductal carcinoma and invasive lobular carcinoma. Molecular tumorigenic mechanisms beyond Warburg effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surmacki, Jakub; Brozek-Pluska, Beata; Kordek, Radzislaw; Abramczyk, Halina

    2015-04-07

    Vibrational signatures of human breast tissue (invasive ductal carcinoma and invasive lobular carcinoma) were used to identify, characterize and discriminate structures in normal (noncancerous) and cancerous tissues by confocal Raman imaging, Raman spectroscopy and IR spectroscopy. The most important differences between normal and cancerous tissues were found in regions characteristic for vibrations of carotenoids, fatty acids, proteins, and interfacial water. Particular attention was paid to the role played by unsaturated fatty acids and their derivatives. K-means clustering and basis analysis followed by PCA and PLSDA is employed to analyze Raman spectroscopic maps of human breast tissue and for a statistical analysis of the samples (82 patients, 164 samples). Raman maps successfully identify regions of carotenoids, fatty acids, and proteins. The intensities, frequencies and profiles of the average Raman spectra differentiate the biochemical composition of normal and cancerous tissues. The paper demonstrates that Raman imaging has reached a clinically relevant level in regard to breast cancer diagnosis applications. The sensitivity and specificity obtained directly from PLSLD and cross validation are equal to 90.5% and 84.8% for calibration and 84.7% and 71.9% for cross-validation respectively.

  10. Raman Microscopy: A Noninvasive Method to Visualize the Localizations of Biomolecules in the Cornea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaji, Yuichi; Akiyama, Toshihiro; Segawa, Hiroki; Oshika, Tetsuro; Kano, Hideaki

    2017-11-01

    In vivo and in situ visualization of biomolecules without pretreatment will be important for diagnosis and treatment of ocular disorders in the future. Recently, multiphoton microscopy, based on the nonlinear interactions between molecules and photons, has been applied to reveal the localizations of various molecules in tissues. We aimed to use multimodal multiphoton microscopy to visualize the localizations of specific biomolecules in rat corneas. Multiphoton images of the corneas were obtained from nonlinear signals of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering, third-order sum frequency generation, and second-harmonic generation. The localizations of the adhesion complex-containing basement membrane and Bowman layer were clearly visible in the third-order sum frequency generation images. The fine structure of type I collagen was observed in the corneal stroma in the second-harmonic generation images. The localizations of lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids (DNA/RNA) was obtained in the coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering images. Imaging technologies have progressed significantly and been applied in medical fields. Optical coherence tomography and confocal microscopy are widely used but do not provide information on the molecular structure of the cornea. By contrast, multiphoton microscopy provides information on the molecular structure of living tissues. Using this technique, we successfully visualized the localizations of various biomolecules including lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids in the cornea. We speculate that multiphoton microscopy will provide essential information on the physiological and pathological conditions of the cornea, as well as molecular localizations in tissues without pretreatment.

  11. Raman Chandrasekar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education. Raman Chandrasekar. Articles written in Resonance – Journal of Science Education. Volume 13 Issue 5 May 2008 pp 430-439 General Article. How Children Learn to Use Language - An Overview of R. Narasimhan's Ideas on Child Language Acquisition.

  12. CV Raman

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    style, philosophy and motivations. We thus have here an authoritative biography of the most .... What motivated Raman to do the extraordinary things he did against all odds? What was the secret of his success? ... to Professor S. Chandrasekhar for permission to quote some of his statements. I am very indebted to Prof.

  13. Ultrasensitive and selective detection of mercury (II) in serum based on the gold film sensor using a laser scanning confocal imaging-surface plasmon resonance system in real time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Sha; Zhang, Hongyan; Liu, Weimin; Wang, Pengfei

    2015-10-01

    Hg2+ ions are one of the most toxic heavy metal ion pollutants, and are caustic and carcinogenic materials with high cellular toxicity. The Hg2+ ions can accumulate in the human body through the food chain and cause serious and permanent damage to the brain with both acute and chronic toxicity. According to the US Environment Protection Agency (EPA) guidelines, Hg2+ ions must be at concentrations below 1 ng/ml (10 nM) in drinking water. If the Hg2+ ions are higher than 2.5 ng/ml in serum, that will bring mercury poisoning. The traditional testing for Hg2+ ions includes atomic absorption, atomic fluorescence, and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. These methods are usually coupled with gas chromatography, high-performance liquid chromatography, and capillary electrophoresis. However, these instrument-based techniques are rather complicated, time-consuming, costly, and unsuitable for online and portable use. An ultrasensitive and selective detection of mercury (II) in serum was investigated using a laser scanning confocal imaging-surface plasmon resonance system (LSCI-SPR). The detection limit was as low as 0.01 ng/ml for Hg2+ ions in fetal calf serum and that is lower than that was required Hg2+ ions must be at concentrations below 1 ng/ml by the US Environment Protection Agency (EPA) guidelines. This sensor was designed on a T-rich, single-stranded DNA (ssDNA)-modified gold film, which can be individually manipulated using specific T-Hg2+-T complex formation. The quenching intensity of the fluorescence images for rhodamine-labeled ssDNA fitted well with the changes in SPR. The changes varied with the Hg2+ ion concentration, which is unaffected by the presence of other metal ions. A good liner relation was got with the coefficients of 0.9116 in 30% fetal calf serums with the linear part over a range of 0.01 ng/ml to10 ng/ml.

  14. Value of probe-based confocal laser endomicroscopy (pCLE) and dual focus narrow-band imaging (dNBI) in diagnosing early squamous cell neoplasms in esophageal Lugol's voiding lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prueksapanich, Piyapan; Pittayanon, Rapat; Rerknimitr, Rungsun; Wisedopas, Naruemon; Kullavanijaya, Pinit

    2015-08-01

    Lugol's chromoendoscopy provides excellent sensitivity for the detection of early esophageal squamous cell neoplasms (ESCN), but its specificity is suboptimal. An endoscopy technique for real-time histology is required to decrease the number of unnecessary biopsies. This study aimed to compare the ESCN diagnostic capability of probed-based confocal laser endomicroscopy (pCLE) and dual focus narrow-band imaging (dNBI) in Lugol's voiding lesions. Patients with a history of head and neck cancer without dysphagia were recruited. Lugol's voiding lesions larger than 5 mm were sequentially characterized by dNBI and pCLE by two independent operators. Finally, all lesions larger than 5 mm were biopsied followed by histological analysis, which is considered to be the gold standard in cancer diagnosis. The primary outcomes were the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), and the accuracy of the two techniques. In total, 44 patients were enrolled with a mean age of 60 years; 80 % were male. Twenty-one Lugol's voiding lesions larger than 5 mm were detected in 12 patients. Seven lesions (33 %) from four patients were histologically diagnosed as ESCNs (four with high grade dysplasia and three with low grade dysplasia). The other 14 lesions were histologically confirmed as non-neoplastic: active esophagitis, glycogenation with inflammation, acute ulcer, inlet patch, and unremarkable changes. The sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV, and accuracy of pCLE vs. dNBI were 83 % vs. 85 %, 92 % vs. 62 %, 83 % vs. 54 %, 92 % vs. 89 %, and 89 % vs. 70 %, respectively (NS). Asymptomatic patients with a history of head and neck cancer underwent Lugol's chromoendoscopy based ESCN surveillance. Further characterization of the Lugol's voiding lesions by advanced imaging showed that both pCLE and dNBI provided good sensitivity in diagnosing ESCN, and pCLE tended to provide higher specificity, PPV, and accuracy than d

  15. Value of probe-based confocal laser endomicroscopy (pCLE) and dual focus narrow-band imaging (dNBI) in diagnosing early squamous cell neoplasms in esophageal Lugol’s voiding lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prueksapanich, Piyapan; Pittayanon, Rapat; Rerknimitr, Rungsun; Wisedopas, Naruemon; Kullavanijaya, Pinit

    2015-01-01

    Background and study aims: Lugol’s chromoendoscopy provides excellent sensitivity for the detection of early esophageal squamous cell neoplasms (ESCN), but its specificity is suboptimal. An endoscopy technique for real-time histology is required to decrease the number of unnecessary biopsies. This study aimed to compare the ESCN diagnostic capability of probed-based confocal laser endomicroscopy (pCLE) and dual focus narrow-band imaging (dNBI) in Lugol’s voiding lesions. Patients and methods: Patients with a history of head and neck cancer without dysphagia were recruited. Lugol’s voiding lesions larger than 5 mm were sequentially characterized by dNBI and pCLE by two independent operators. Finally, all lesions larger than 5 mm were biopsied followed by histological analysis, which is considered to be the gold standard in cancer diagnosis. The primary outcomes were the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), and the accuracy of the two techniques. Results: In total, 44 patients were enrolled with a mean age of 60 years; 80 % were male. Twenty-one Lugol’s voiding lesions larger than 5 mm were detected in 12 patients. Seven lesions (33 %) from four patients were histologically diagnosed as ESCNs (four with high grade dysplasia and three with low grade dysplasia). The other 14 lesions were histologically confirmed as non-neoplastic: active esophagitis, glycogenation with inflammation, acute ulcer, inlet patch, and unremarkable changes. The sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV, and accuracy of pCLE vs. dNBI were 83 % vs. 85 %, 92 % vs. 62 %, 83 % vs. 54 %, 92 % vs. 89 %, and 89 % vs. 70 %, respectively (NS). Conclusions: Asymptomatic patients with a history of head and neck cancer underwent Lugol’s chromoendoscopy based ESCN surveillance. Further characterization of the Lugol’s voiding lesions by advanced imaging showed that both pCLE and dNBI provided good sensitivity in

  16. Comparison of NIR chemical imaging with conventional NIR, Raman and ATR-IR spectroscopy for quantification of furosemide crystal polymorphs in ternary powder mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönbichler, S A; Bittner, L K H; Weiss, A K H; Griesser, U J; Pallua, J D; Huck, C W

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of near-infrared chemical imaging (NIR-CI), near-infrared (NIR), Raman and attenuated-total-reflectance infrared (ATR-IR) spectroscopy to quantify three polymorphic forms (I, II, III) of furosemide in ternary powder mixtures. For this purpose, partial least-squares (PLS) regression models were developed, and different data preprocessing algorithms such as normalization, standard normal variate (SNV), multiplicative scatter correction (MSC) and 1st to 3rd derivatives were applied to reduce the influence of systematic disturbances. The performance of the methods was evaluated by comparison of the standard error of cross-validation (SECV), R(2), and the ratio performance deviation (RPD). Limits of detection (LOD) and limits of quantification (LOQ) of all methods were determined. For NIR-CI, a SECVcorr-spec and a SECVsingle-pixel corrected were calculated to assess the loss of accuracy by taking advantage of the spatial information. NIR-CI showed a SECVcorr-spec (SECVsingle-pixel corrected) of 2.82% (3.71%), 3.49% (4.65%), and 4.10% (5.06%) for form I, II, III. NIR had a SECV of 2.98%, 3.62%, and 2.75%, and Raman reached 3.25%, 3.08%, and 3.18%. The SECV of the ATR-IR models were 7.46%, 7.18%, and 12.08%. This study proves that NIR-CI, NIR, and Raman are well suited to quantify forms I-III of furosemide in ternary mixtures. Because of the pressure-dependent conversion of form II to form I, ATR-IR was found to be less appropriate for an accurate quantification of the mixtures. In this study, the capability of NIR-CI for the quantification of polymorphic ternary mixtures was compared with conventional spectroscopic techniques for the first time. For this purpose, a new way of spectra selection was chosen, and two kinds of SECVs were calculated to achieve a better comparability of NIR-CI to NIR, Raman, and ATR-IR. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Identification of nodal tissue in the living heart using rapid scanning fiber-optics confocal microscopy and extracellular fluorophores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chao; Kaza, Aditya K; Hitchcock, Robert W; Sachse, Frank B

    2013-09-01

    Risks associated with pediatric reconstructive heart surgery include injury of the sinoatrial node (SAN) and atrioventricular node (AVN), requiring cardiac rhythm management using implantable pacemakers. These injuries are the result of difficulties in identifying nodal tissues intraoperatively. Here we describe an approach based on confocal microscopy and extracellular fluorophores to quantify tissue microstructure and identify nodal tissue. Using conventional 3-dimensional confocal microscopy we investigated the microstructural arrangement of SAN, AVN, and atrial working myocardium (AWM) in fixed rat heart. AWM exhibited a regular striated arrangement of the extracellular space. In contrast, SAN and AVN had an irregular, reticulated arrangement. AWM, SAN, and AVN tissues were beneath a thin surface layer of tissue that did not obstruct confocal microscopic imaging. Subsequently, we imaged tissues in living rat hearts with real-time fiber-optics confocal microscopy. Fiber-optics confocal microscopy images resembled images acquired with conventional confocal microscopy. We investigated spatial regularity of tissue microstructure from Fourier analysis and second-order image moments. Fourier analysis of fiber-optics confocal microscopy images showed that the spatial regularity of AWM was greater than that of nodal tissues (37.5 ± 5.0% versus 24.3 ± 3.9% for SAN and 23.8 ± 3.7% for AVN; Pfiber-optics confocal microscopy. Application of the approach in pediatric reconstructive heart surgery may reduce risks of injuring nodal tissues.

  18. Corneal Subbasal Nerve Density: A Comparison of Two Confocal Microscopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erie, Elizabeth A.; McLaren, Jay W.; Kittleson, Katrina M.; Patel, Sanjay V.; Erie, Jay C.; Bourne, William M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To compare subbasal nerve densities estimated from images recorded by the Tandem Scanning and the ConfoScan 4 confocal microscopes. Methods Confocal microscopy was used to estimate subbasal nerve density in 62 corneas of 40 subjects (18 corneas of 18 normal subjects and 44 corneas of 22 patients between 1 and 12 months after LASIK) At each examination, corneas were scanned first by using Tandem Scanning and then by using a ConfoScan 4 confocal microscope. Subbasal nerves from 2 to 4 scans per cornea were traced by using a semi-automated nerve analysis program. Nerve density was expressed as total nerve length divided by the sample area (µm/mm2). Differences in nerve density between instruments were examined by using paired tests. Results In normal corneas, subbasal nerve density was 10,658 ± 5,581 µm/mm2 (mean ± SD) with the ConfoScan 4 and 5,534 ± 1,850 µm/mm2 with the Tandem Scanning microscope (Pmicroscope. These differences must be considered when comparing subbasal nerve densities between studies that use different confocal microscopes. PMID:18997541

  19. Confocal microscopy patterns in nonmelanoma skin cancer and clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, S; Sánchez, V; González-Rodríguez, A; Parrado, C; Ullrich, M

    2014-06-01

    Reflectance confocal microscopy is currently the most promising noninvasive diagnostic tool for studying cutaneous structures between the stratum corneum and the superficial reticular dermis. This tool gives real-time images parallel to the skin surface; the microscopic resolution is similar to that of conventional histology. Numerous studies have identified the main confocal features of various inflammatory skin diseases and tumors, demonstrating the good correlation of these features with certain dermatoscopic patterns and histologic findings. Confocal patterns and diagnostic algorithms have been shown to have high sensitivity and specificity in melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancer. Possible present and future applications of this noninvasive technology are wide ranging and reach beyond its use in noninvasive diagnosis. This tool can also be used, for example, to evaluate dynamic skin processes that occur after UV exposure or to assess tumor response to noninvasive treatments such as photodynamic therapy. We explain the characteristic confocal features found in the main nonmelanoma skin tumors and discuss possible applications for this novel diagnostic technique in routine dermatology practice. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  20. Design considerations of a real-time clinical confocal microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masters, Barry R.

    1991-06-01

    A real-time clinical confocal light microscope provides the ophthalmologist with a new tool for the observation of the cornea and the ocular lens. In addition, the ciliary body, the iris, and the sclera can be observed. The real-time light microscopic images have high contrast and resolution. The transverse resolution is about one half micron and the range resolution is one micron. The following observations were made with visible light: corneal epithelial cells, wing cells, basal cells, Bowman's membrane, nerve fibers, basal lamina, fibroblast nuclei, Descemet's membrane, endothelial cells. Observation of the in situ ocular lens showed lens capsule, lens epithelium, lens fibrils, the interior of lens fibrils. The applications of the confocal microscope include: eye banking, laser refractive surgery, observation of wound healing, observation of the iris, the sciera, the ciliary body, the ocular lens, and the intraocular lens. Digital image processing can produce three-dimensional reconstructions of the cornea and the ocular lens.

  1. Automated identification of epidermal keratinocytes in reflectance confocal microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gareau, Dan

    2011-03-01

    Keratinocytes in skin epidermis, which have bright cytoplasmic contrast and dark nuclear contrast in reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM), were modeled with a simple error function reflectance profile: erf( ). Forty-two example keratinocytes were identified as a training set which characterized the nuclear size a = 8.6+/-2.8 μm and reflectance gradient b = 3.6+/-2.1 μm at the nuclear/cytoplasmic boundary. These mean a and b parameters were used to create a rotationally symmetric erf( ) mask that approximated the mean keratinocyte image. A computer vision algorithm used an erf( ) mask to scan RCM images, identifying the coordinates of keratinocytes. Applying the mask to the confocal data identified the positions of keratinocytes in the epidermis. This simple model may be used to noninvasively evaluate keratinocyte populations as a quantitative morphometric diagnostic in skin cancer detection and evaluation of dermatological cosmetics.

  2. EUS-Guided Needle-Based Confocal Laser Endomicroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhutani, Manoop S; Koduru, Pramoda; Joshi, Virendra

    2015-01-01

    the gut, providing further diagnostic and staging information. Confocal laser endomicroscopy (CLE) is a novel endoscopic method that enables imaging at a subcellular level of resolution during endoscopy, allowing up to 1000-fold magnification of tissue and providing an optical biopsy. A new procedure...... that has been developed in the past few years is needle-based confocal laser endomicroscopy (nCLE), which involves a mini-CLE probe that can be passed through a 1 9-gauge needle during EUS-FNA. This enables the real-time visualization of tissue at a microscopic level, with the potential to further improve....... The aim of this article is to review the role of EUS-guided nCLE in modern endoscopy and its implications in molecular imaging....

  3. Evaluation of Stimulated Raman Scattering Microscopy for Identifying Squamous Cell Carcinoma in Human Skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Richa; Balu, Mihaela; Krasieva, Tatiana; Potma, Eric O.; Elkeeb, Laila; Zachary, Christopher B.; Wilder-Smith, Petra

    2014-01-01

    Background and Significance There is a need to develop non-invasive diagnostic tools to achieve early and accurate detection of skin cancer in a non-surgical manner. In this study, we evaluate the capability of stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy, a potentially noninvasive optical imaging technique, for identifying the pathological features of s squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) tissue. Study design We studied ex vivo SCC and healthy skin tissues using SRS microscopy, and compared the SRS contrast with the contrast obtained in reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) and standard histology. Results and Conclusion SRS images obtained at the carbon-hydrogen stretching vibration at 2945 cm−1 exhibit contrast related protein density that clearly delineates the cell nucleus from the cell cytoplasm. The morphological features of SCC tumor seen in the SRS images show excellent correlation with the diagnostic features identified by histological examination. Additionally, SRS exhibits enhanced cellular contrast in comparison to that seen in confocal microscopy. In conclusion, SRS represents an attractive approach for generating protein density maps with contrast that closely resembles histopathological contrast of SCC in human skin. PMID:23996592

  4. In planta imaging of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid in Cannabis sativa L. with hyperspectral coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbacik, Erik T.; Korai, Roza P.; Frater, Eric H.; Korterik, Jeroen P.; Otto, Cees; Offerhaus, Herman L.

    2013-04-01

    Nature has developed many pathways to produce medicinal products of extraordinary potency and specificity with significantly higher efficiencies than current synthetic methods can achieve. Identification of these mechanisms and their precise locations within plants could substantially increase the yield of a number of natural pharmaceutics. We report label-free imaging of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCa) in Cannabis sativa L. using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy. In line with previous observations we find high concentrations of THCa in pistillate flowering bodies and relatively low amounts within flowering bracts. Surprisingly, we find differences in the local morphologies of the THCa-containing bodies: organelles within bracts are large, diffuse, and spheroidal, whereas in pistillate flowers they are generally compact, dense, and have heterogeneous structures. We have also identified two distinct vibrational signatures associated with THCa, both in pure crystalline form and within Cannabis plants; at present the exact natures of these spectra remain an open question.

  5. In vivo intraoral reflectance confocal microscopy of an amalgam tattoo

    OpenAIRE

    Yélamos, Oriol; Cordova, Miguel; Peterson, Gary; Pulitzer, Melissa P.; Singh, Bhuvanesh; Rajadhyaksha, Milind; DeFazio, Jennifer L.

    2017-01-01

    The majority of oral pigmentations are benign lesions such as nevi, melanotic macules, melanoacanthomas or amalgam tattoos. Conversely, mucosal melanomas are rare but often lethal; therefore, excluding oral melanomas in this setting is crucial. Reflectance confocal microscopy is a non-invasive, in vivo imaging system with cellular resolution that has been used to distinguish benign from malignant pigmented lesions in the skin, and more recently in the mucosa. However, lesions located posterio...

  6. Adaptive optics in digital micromirror based confocal microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Pozzi, P.; Wilding, D.; Soloviev, O.A.; Vdovine, Gleb; Verhaegen, M.H.G.; Bifano, Thomas G.; Kubby, Joel; Gigan, Sylvain

    2016-01-01

    This proceeding reports early results in the development of a new technique for adaptive optics in confocal microscopy. The term adaptive optics refers to the branch of optics in which an active element in the optical system is used to correct inhomogeneities in the media through which light propagates. In its most classical form, mostly used in astronomical imaging, adaptive optics is achieved through a closed loop in which the actuators of a deformable mirror are driven by a wavefront senso...

  7. Parallel detection experiment of fluorescence confocal microscopy using DMD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qingqing; Zheng, Jihong; Wang, Kangni; Gui, Kun; Guo, Hanming; Zhuang, Songlin

    2016-05-01

    Parallel detection of fluorescence confocal microscopy (PDFCM) system based on Digital Micromirror Device (DMD) is reported in this paper in order to realize simultaneous multi-channel imaging and improve detection speed. DMD is added into PDFCM system, working to take replace of the single traditional pinhole in the confocal system, which divides the laser source into multiple excitation beams. The PDFCM imaging system based on DMD is experimentally set up. The multi-channel image of fluorescence signal of potato cells sample is detected by parallel lateral scanning in order to verify the feasibility of introducing the DMD into fluorescence confocal microscope. In addition, for the purpose of characterizing the microscope, the depth response curve is also acquired. The experimental result shows that in contrast to conventional microscopy, the DMD-based PDFCM system has higher axial resolution and faster detection speed, which may bring some potential benefits in the biology and medicine analysis. SCANNING 38:234-239, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Two-beam ultrabroadband coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy for high resolution gas-phase multiplex imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohlin, Alexis; Kliewer, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    We propose and develop a method for wideband coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) in the gas phase and demonstrate the single-shot measurement of N 2 , H 2 , CO 2 , O 2 , and CH 4 . Pure-rotational and vibrational O-, Q-, and S- branch spectra are collected simultaneously, with high spectral and spatial resolution, and within a single-laser-shot. The relative intensity of the rotational and vibrational signals can be tuned arbitrarily using polarization techniques. The ultrashort 7 fs pump and Stokes pulses are automatically overlapped temporally and spatially using a two-beam CARS technique, and the crossed probe beam allows for excellent spatial sectioning of the probed location

  9. Tracking amino acid's uptake into the protozoan Acanthamoeba castellanii by stable-isotope labelling and Raman spectral imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naemat, Abida; Elsheikha, Hany M.; Notingher, Ioan

    2016-04-01

    The capacity of pathogens to acquire nutrients from their host cells is one of the most fundamental aspects of infection biology. Hence, measuring the patterns of nutrients' uptake by pathogens is essential for understanding the interactions of pathogens with eukaryotic host cells. In this study, we optimized a technique that allows fast and non-destructive measurement of the amino acid Phenylalanine (Phe) acquired by the trophozoite stage of the protozoan Acanthamoeba castellanii (A. castellanii) as they engage with individual human retinal pigment epithelial cells (ARPE-19). ARPE-19 host cells were pre-saturated with Deuterated Phe (L-Phe(D8)) to replace the native substrate Phe (L-Phe). The uptake of L-Phe(D8) by A. castellanii trophozoites was measured by Raman microspectroscopy. This approach allowed us to characterize the uptake patterns of this essential amino acid into A. castellanii trophozoites at a single cell level. At 24 hours post infection (PI) A. castellanii trophozoites are capable of salvaging L-Phe(D8) from host cells. The uptake pattern was time-dependent during the first 24 hours of infection and complete substitution with L-Phe(D8) in all parasites was detected at 48 hours PI. On the other hand, isolated A. castellanii trachyzoites (grown without host cells) did not show significant uptake for L-Phe(D8) from the media; only achieved an uptake ratio of 16-18% of L-Phe(D8) from the culture medium after 24 hours. These findings demonstrate the potential of combining Raman microspectroscopy and stable isotope labelling approaches to elucidate the role of metabolism in mediating A. castellanii interaction with host cells.

  10. Label-free imaging of Drosophila in vivo by coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering and two-photon excitation autofluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Cheng-Hao; Chen, Wei-Wen; Wu, June-Tai; Chang, Ta-Chau

    2011-01-01

    Drosophila is one of the most valuable model organisms for studying genetics and developmental biology. The fat body in Drosophila, which is analogous to the liver and adipose tissue in human, stores lipids that act as an energy source during its development. At the early stages of metamorphosis, the fat body remodeling occurs involving the dissociation of the fat body into individual fat cells. Here we introduce a combination of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) and two-photon excitation autofluorescence (TPE-F) microscopy to achieve label-free imaging of Drosophila in vivo at larval and pupal stages. The strong CARS signal from lipids allows direct imaging of the larval fat body and pupal fat cells. In addition, the use of TPE-F microscopy allows the observation of other internal organs in the larva and autofluorescent globules in fat cells. During the dissociation of the fat body, the findings of the degradation of lipid droplets and an increase in autofluorescent globules indicate the consumption of lipids and the recruitment of proteins in fat cells. Through in vivo imaging and direct monitoring, CARS microscopy may help elucidate how metamorphosis is regulated and study the lipid metabolism in Drosophila.

  11. Development of an add-on kit for scanning confocal microscopy (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Kaikai; Zheng, Guoan

    2017-03-01

    Scanning confocal microscopy is a standard choice for many fluorescence imaging applications in basic biomedical research. It is able to produce optically sectioned images and provide acquisition versatility to address many samples and application demands. However, scanning a focused point across the specimen limits the speed of image acquisition. As a result, scanning confocal microscope only works well with stationary samples. Researchers have performed parallel confocal scanning using digital-micromirror-device (DMD), which was used to project a scanning multi-point pattern across the sample. The DMD based parallel confocal systems increase the imaging speed while maintaining the optical sectioning ability. In this paper, we report the development of an add-on kit for high-speed and low-cost confocal microscopy. By adapting this add-on kit to an existing regular microscope, one can convert it into a confocal microscope without significant hardware modifications. Compared with current DMD-based implementations, the reported approach is able to recover multiple layers along the z axis simultaneously. It may find applications in wafer inspection and 3D metrology of semiconductor circuit. The dissemination of the proposed add-on kit under $1000 budget could also lead to new types of experimental designs for biological research labs, e.g., cytology analysis in cell culture experiments, genetic studies on multicellular organisms, pharmaceutical drug profiling, RNA interference studies, investigation of microbial communities in environmental systems, and etc.

  12. A comparative performance evaluation of micro-Raman ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. An indigenously designed and developed micro-Raman spectrograph, con- sisting of a diode-pumped solid-state green laser for the excitation of Raman scattering, a Raman imaging microscope, CCD as a detector and a notch filter, has been extensively studied to evaluate its performance. A dielectric edge filter ...

  13. Physical chemistry in a single live cell: confocal microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Md Asif; Nandi, Somen; Mondal, Prasenjit; Mahata, Tanushree; Ghosh, Surajit; Bhattacharyya, Kankan

    2017-05-24

    A live cell is a complex, yet extremely important container. Understanding the dynamics in a selected intracellular component is a challenging task. We have recently made significant progress in this direction using a confocal microscope as a tool. The smallest size of the focused spot in a confocal microscope is ∼0.2 μm (200 nm). This is nearly one hundred times smaller than the size of a live cell. Thus, one can selectively study different intracellular components/organelles in a live cell. In this paper, we discuss how one can image different intracellular components/organelles, record fluorescence spectra and decay at different locations, ascertain local polarity and viscosity, and monitor the dynamics of solvation, proton transfer, red-ox and other phenomena at specified locations/organelles inside a cell. We will highlight how this knowledge enriched us in differentiating between cancer and non-cancer cells, 3D tumor spheroids and towards drug delivery.

  14. Adaptive optics confocal microscopy using direct wavefront sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Xiaodong; Fernandez, Bautista; Azucena, Oscar; Fu, Min; Garcia, Denise; Zuo, Yi; Chen, Diana C; Kubby, Joel

    2011-04-01

    Optical aberrations due to the inhomogeneous refractive index of tissue degrade the resolution and brightness of images in deep-tissue imaging. We introduce a confocal fluorescence microscope with adaptive optics, which can correct aberrations based on direct wavefront measurements using a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor with a fluorescent bead used as a point source reference beacon. The results show a 4.3× improvement in the Strehl ratio and a 240% improvement in the signal intensity for fixed mouse tissues at depths of up to 100 μm.

  15. Confocal scanning microscope for nuclear photoemulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batusov, Yu.A.; Kovalev, Yu.S.; Soroko, L.M.

    2005-01-01

    The application of the confocal scanning microscope to the objects in the nuclear photoemulsion is described. An array of 27 microtomograms of single silver grain is shown. The cross sections of the same particle track of diameter 1 μm, detected by means of the confocal scanning microscope with open and annular apertures, are presented. It was shown that the confocal scanning microscope opens indeed new opportunities for the nuclear photoemulsion technique to get previously inaccessible information for physics of the short-living particles

  16. Classifying distinct basal cell carcinoma subtype by means of dermatoscopy and reflectance confocal microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, Caterina; Lallas, Aimilios; Kyrgidis, Athanassios; Rabinovitz, Harold; Moscarella, Elvira; Ciardo, Silvana; Zalaudek, Iris; Oliviero, Margaret; Losi, Amanda; Gonzalez, Salvador; Guitera, Pascale; Piana, Simonetta; Argenziano, Giuseppe; Pellacani, Giovanni

    2014-10-01

    The current guidelines for the management of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) suggest a different therapeutic approach according to histopathologic subtype. Although dermatoscopic and confocal criteria of BCC have been investigated, no specific studies were performed to evaluate the distinct reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) aspects of BCC subtypes. To define the specific dermatoscopic and confocal criteria for delineating different BCC subtypes. Dermatoscopic and confocal images of histopathologically confirmed BCCs were retrospectively evaluated for the presence of predefined criteria. Frequencies of dermatoscopic and confocal parameters are provided. Univariate and adjusted odds ratios were calculated. Discriminant analyses were performed to define the independent confocal criteria for distinct BCC subtypes. Eighty-eight BCCs were included. Dermatoscopically, superficial BCCs (n=44) were primarily typified by the presence of fine telangiectasia, multiple erosions, leaf-like structures, and revealed cords connected to the epidermis and epidermal streaming upon RCM. Nodular BCCs (n=22) featured the classic dermatoscopic features and well outlined large basaloid islands upon RCM. Infiltrative BCCs (n=22) featured structureless, shiny red areas, fine telangiectasia, and arborizing vessels on dermatoscopy and dark silhouettes upon RCM. The retrospective design. Dermatoscopy and confocal microscopy can reliably classify different BCC subtypes. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Optical trapping and Raman spectroscopy of single nanostructures using standing-wave Raman tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Mu-ying; He, Lin; Chen, Gui-hua; Yang, Guang; Li, Yong-qing

    2017-08-01

    Optical tweezers integrated with Raman spectroscopy allows analyzing a single trapped micro-particle, but is generally less effective for individual nano-sized objects in the 10-100 nm range. The main challenge is the weak gradient force on nanoparticles that is insufficient to overcome the destabilizing effect of scattering force and Brownian motion. Here, we present standing-wave Raman tweezers for stable trapping and sensitive characterization of single isolated nanostructures with a low laser power by combining a standing-wave optical trap (SWOT) with confocal Raman spectroscopy. This scheme has stronger intensity gradients and balanced scattering forces, and thus is more stable and sensitive in measuring nanoparticles in liquid with 4-8 fold increase in the Raman signals. It can be used to analyze many nanoparticles that cannot be measured with single-beam Raman tweezers, including individual single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT), graphene flakes, biological particles, polystyrene beads (100 nm), SERS-active metal nanoparticles, and high-refractive semiconductor nanoparticles with a low laser power of a few milliwatts. This would enable sorting and characterization of specific SWCNTs and other nanoparticles based on their increased Raman fingerprints.

  18. 3D Volumetric Analysis of Fluid Inclusions Using Confocal Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proussevitch, A.; Mulukutla, G.; Sahagian, D.; Bodnar, B.

    2009-05-01

    Fluid inclusions preserve valuable information regarding hydrothermal, metamorphic, and magmatic processes. The molar quantities of liquid and gaseous components in the inclusions can be estimated from their volumetric measurements at room temperatures combined with knowledge of the PVTX properties of the fluid and homogenization temperatures. Thus, accurate measurements of inclusion volumes and their two phase components are critical. One of the greatest advantages of the Laser Scanning Confocal Microscopy (LSCM) in application to fluid inclsion analsyis is that it is affordable for large numbers of samples, given the appropriate software analysis tools and methodology. Our present work is directed toward developing those tools and methods. For the last decade LSCM has been considered as a potential method for inclusion volume measurements. Nevertheless, the adequate and accurate measurement by LSCM has not yet been successful for fluid inclusions containing non-fluorescing fluids due to many technical challenges in image analysis despite the fact that the cost of collecting raw LSCM imagery has dramatically decreased in recent years. These problems mostly relate to image analysis methodology and software tools that are needed for pre-processing and image segmentation, which enable solid, liquid and gaseous components to be delineated. Other challenges involve image quality and contrast, which is controlled by fluorescence of the material (most aqueous fluid inclusions do not fluoresce at the appropriate laser wavelengths), material optical properties, and application of transmitted and/or reflected confocal illumination. In this work we have identified the key problems of image analysis and propose some potential solutions. For instance, we found that better contrast of pseudo-confocal transmitted light images could be overlayed with poor-contrast true-confocal reflected light images within the same stack of z-ordered slices. This approach allows one to narrow

  19. Confocal Laser Endomicroscopy in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Ditlev Nytoft; Karstensen, John Gásdal; Riis, Lene Buhl

    2015-01-01

    included. Next, eligible studies were analysed with respect to several parameters, such as technique and clinical aim and definitions of outcomes. RESULTS: Confocal laser endomicroscopy has been used for a wide range of purposes in inflammatory bowel disease, covering assessment of inflammatory severity...... of confocal laser endomicroscopy for inflammatory bowel disease. METHODS: Available literature was searched systematically for studies applying confocal laser endomicroscopy in Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis. Relevant literature was reviewed and only studies reporting original clinical data were...... of histological features such as colonic crypts, epithelial gaps and epithelial leakiness to fluorescein. CONCLUSIONS: Confocal laser endomicroscopy remains an experimental but emerging tool for assessment of inflammatory bowel disease. It is the only method that enables in vivo functional assessment...

  20. Resolution enhancement by subtraction of confocal signals taken at different pinhole sizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heintzmann, Rainer; Sarafis, Vassilios; Munroe, Paul; Nailon, John; Hanley, Quentin S; Jovin, Thomas M

    2003-01-01

    Subtractive imaging in confocal fluorescence light microscopy is based on the subtraction of a suitably weighted widefield image from a confocal image. An approximation to a widefield image can be obtained by detection with an opened confocal pinhole. The subtraction of images enhances the resolution in-plane as well as along the optic axis. Due to the linearity of the approach, the effect of subtractive imaging in Fourier-space corresponds to a reduction of low spatial frequency contributions leading to a relative enhancement of the high frequencies. Along the direction of the optic axis this also results in an improved sectioning. Image processing can achieve a similar effect. However, a 3D volume dataset must be acquired and processed, yielding a result essentially identical to subtractive imaging but superior in signal-to-noise ratio. The latter can be increased further with the technique of weighted averaging in Fourier-space. A comparison of 2D and 3D experimental data analysed with subtractive imaging, the equivalent Fourier-space processing of the confocal data only, and Fourier-space weighted averaging is presented.

  1. In situ protein expression in tumour spheres: development of an immunostaining protocol for confocal microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiswald, Louis-Bastien; Guinebretière, Jean-Marc; Richon, Sophie; Bellet, Dominique; Saubaméa, Bruno; Dangles-Marie, Virginie

    2010-01-01

    Multicellular tumour sphere models have been shown to closely mimic phenotype characteristics of in vivo solid tumours, or to allow in vitro propagation of cancer stem cells (CSCs). CSCs are usually characterized by the expression of specific membrane markers using flow cytometry (FC) after enzymatic dissociation. Consequently, the spatial location of positive cells within spheres is not documented. Confocal microscopy is the best technique for the imaging of thick biological specimens after multi-labelling but suffers from poor antibody penetration. Thus, we describe here a new protocol for in situ confocal imaging of protein expression in intact spheroids. Protein expression in whole spheroids (150 μm in diameter) from two human colon cancer cell lines, HT29 and CT320X6, has been investigated with confocal immunostaining, then compared with profiles obtained through paraffin immunohistochemistry (pIHC) and FC. Target antigens, relevant for colon cancer and with different expression patterns, have been studied. We first demonstrate that our procedure overcomes the well-known problem of antibody penetration in compact structures by performing immunostaining of EpCAM, a membrane protein expressed by all cells within our spheroids. EpCAM expression is detected in all cells, even the deepest ones. Likewise, antibody access is confirmed with CK20 and CD44 immunostaining. Confocal imaging shows that 100% of cells express β-catenin, mainly present in the plasma membrane with also cytoplasmic and nuclear staining, in agreement with FC and pIHC data. pIHC and confocal imaging show similar CA 19-9 cytoplasmic and membranar expression profile in a cell subpopulation. CA 19-9 + cell count confirms confocal imaging as a highly sensitive method (75%, 62% and 51%, for FC, confocal imaging and pIHC, respectively). Finally, confocal imaging reveals that the weak expression of CD133, a putative colon CSC marker, is restricted to the luminal cell surface of colorectal cancer acini

  2. Three-dimensional measurement and visualization of internal flow of a moving droplet using confocal micro-PIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, Haruyuki; Kaneda, Shohei; Fujii, Teruo; Oshima, Marie

    2007-03-01

    This paper presents a micro-flow diagnostic technique, 'high-speed confocal micro-particle image velocimetry (PIV)', and its application to the internal flow measurement of a droplet passing through a microchannel. A confocal micro-PIV system has been successfully constructed wherein a high-speed confocal scanner is combined with the conventional micro-PIV technique. The confocal micro-PIV system enables us to obtain a sequence of sharp and high-contrast cross-sectional particle images at 2000 frames s(-1). This study investigates the confocal depth, which is a significant parameter to determine the out-of-plane measurement resolution in confocal micro-PIV. Using the present confocal micro-PIV system, we can measure velocity distributions of micro-flows in a 228 microm x 171 microm region with a confocal depth of 1.88 microm. We also propose a three-dimensional velocity measurement method based on the confocal micro-PIV and the equation of continuity. This method enables us to measure three velocity components in a three-dimensional domain of micro flows. The confocal micro-PIV system is applied to the internal flow measurement of a droplet. We have measured three-dimensional distributions of three-component velocities of a droplet traveling in a 100 microm (width) x 58 microm (depth) channel. A volumetric velocity distribution inside a droplet is obtained by the confocal micro-PIV and the three-dimensional flow structure inside the droplet is investigated. The measurement results suggest that a three-dimensional and complex circulating flow is formed inside the droplet.

  3. Chromatic confocal microscope using hybrid aspheric diffractive lenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayer, Mathieu; Mansfield, Daniel

    2014-05-01

    A chromatic confocal microscope is a single point non-contact distance measurement sensor. For three decades the vast majority of the chromatic confocal microscope use refractive-based lenses to code the measurement axis chromatically. However, such an approach is limiting the range of applications. In this paper the performance of refractive, diffractive and Hybrid aspheric diffractive are compared. Hybrid aspheric diffractive lenses combine the low geometric aberration of a diffractive lens with the high optical power of an aspheric lens. Hybrid aspheric diffractive lenses can reduce the number of elements in an imaging system significantly or create large hyper- chromatic lenses for sensing applications. In addition, diffractive lenses can improve the resolution and the dynamic range of a chromatic confocal microscope. However, to be suitable for commercial applications, the diffractive optical power must be significant. Therefore, manufacturing such lenses is a challenge. We show in this paper how a theoretical manufacturing model can demonstrate that the hybrid aspheric diffractive configuration with the best performances is achieved by step diffractive surface. The high optical quality of step diffractive surface is then demonstrated experimentally. Publisher's Note: This paper, originally published on 5/10/14, was replaced with a corrected/revised version on 5/19/14. If you downloaded the original PDF but are unable to access the revision, please contact SPIE Digital Library Customer Service for assistance.

  4. The Reliability and Reproducibility of Corneal Confocal Microscopy in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacaud, Danièle; Romanchuk, Kenneth G; Tavakoli, Mitra; Gougeon, Claire; Virtanen, Heidi; Ferdousi, Maryam; Nettel-Aguirre, Alberto; Mah, Jean K; Malik, Rayaz A

    2015-08-01

    To assess the image and patient level interrater agreement and repeatability within 1 month for corneal nerve fiber length (CNFL) measured using in vivo corneal confocal microscopy (IVCCM) in children. Seventy-one subjects (mean [SD] age 14.3 [2.6] years, range 8-18 years; 44 with type 1 diabetes and 27 controls; 36 males and 35 females) were included. 547 images (∼6 images per subject) were analyzed manually by two independent and masked observers. One-month repeat visit images were analyzed by a single masked observer in 21 patients. Automated image analysis was then performed using a specialized computerized software (ACCMetrics). For CNFL, the ICC (95% CI) were 0.94 (0.93-0.95) for image-level, 0.86 (0.78-0.91) for patient-level, and 0.88 (0.72-0.95) for the 1-month repeat assessment, and the Bland-Altman plots showed minimal bias between observers. Although there was excellent agreement between manual and automated analysis according to an ICC 0.89 (0.82-0.93), the Bland-Altman plot showed a consistent bias with manual measurements providing higher readings. In vivo corneal confocal microscopy image analysis shows good reproducibility with excellent intraindividual and interindividual variability in pediatric subjects. Since the image-level reproducibility is stronger than the patient-level reproducibility, refinement of the method for image selection will likely further increase the robustness of this novel, rapid, and noninvasive approach to detect early neuropathy in children with diabetes. Further studies on the use of IVCCM to identify early subclinical neuropathy in children are indicated.

  5. Design and Performance of a Multi-Point Scan Confocal Microendoscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew D. Risi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Confocal fluorescence microendoscopy provides high-resolution cellular-level imaging via a minimally invasive procedure, but requires fast scanning to achieve real-time imaging in vivo. Ideal confocal imaging performance is obtained with a point scanning system, but the scan rates required for in vivo biomedical imaging can be difficult to achieve. By scanning a line of illumination in one direction in conjunction with a stationary confocal slit aperture, very high image acquisition speeds can be achieved, but at the cost of a reduction in image quality. Here, the design, implementation, and experimental verification of a custom multi-point aperture modification to a line-scanning multi-spectral confocal microendoscope is presented. This new design improves the axial resolution of a line-scan system while maintaining high imaging rates. In addition, compared to the line-scanning configuration, previously reported simulations predicted that the multi-point aperture geometry greatly reduces the effects of tissue scatter on image quality. Experimental results confirming this prediction are presented.

  6. Reflectance confocal microscopy: an effective tool for monitoring ultraviolet B phototherapy in psoriasis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolberink, E.A.W.; Erp, P.E.J. van; Boer-van Huizen, R.T. de; Kerkhof, P.C.M. van de; Gerritsen, M.J.P.

    2012-01-01

    Background In vivo reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) is a novel, noninvasive imaging technique which enables imaging of skin at a cellular resolution comparable to conventional microscopy. Objectives We performed a pilot study to evaluate RCM as a noninvasive tool for monitoring ultraviolet (UV)

  7. Raman imaging in geomicrobiology: endolithic phototrophic microorganisms in gypsum from the extreme sun irradiation area in the Atacama Desert

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vítek, Petr; Ascao, C.; Artieda, O.; Wierzchos, J.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 408, č. 15 (2016), s. 4083-4092 ISSN 1618-2642 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1415 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : hyperspectral imaging * carotenoids * astrobiology * photosynthesis * adaptation strategy * Mars Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 3.431, year: 2016

  8. FT-IR, FT-Raman, UV/Vis spectra and fluorescence imaging studies on 2-(bromoacetyl)benzo(b)furan by ab initio DFT calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veeraiah, A

    2015-08-05

    The vibrational and electronic properties of 2-(bromoacetyl)benzo(b)furan have been studied in the ground state using experimental techniques (FT-IR, FT-Raman and UV) and density functional theory (DFT) employing B3LYP exchange correlation with the 6-31G(d,p) basis set. The theoretically calculated optimized parameters, vibrational frequencies etc., were compared with the experimental values, which yield good agreement between the observed and calculated values. The complete assignments of fundamental modes were performed on the basis of the potential energy distribution (PED). UV-visible spectrum of the compound was recorded in the region 300-600 nm and compared with the theoretical spectrum obtained from SAC-CI calculations. A good agreement is observed between the experimental and theoretical spectra. Fluorescence microscopic imaging studies proved that the compound can be used as one of the potential light sources in the yellow region with suitable excitation. Further, the predicted electronic transitions between the MOs 47→64, 52→62, 56→65, 56→72, 56→77 of the compound show a strong line at 569.8 nm. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Use of a white light supercontinuum laser for confocal interference-reflection microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, L-D; Su, L; Reichelt, S; Amos, W B

    2012-05-01

    Shortly after its development, the white light supercontinuum laser was applied to confocal scanning microscopy as a more versatile substitute for the multiple monochromatic lasers normally used for the excitation of fluorescence. This light source is now available coupled to commercial confocal fluorescence microscopes. We have evaluated a supercontinuum laser as a source for a different purpose: confocal interferometric imaging of living cells and artificial models by interference reflection. We used light in the range 460-700 nm where this source provides a reasonably flat spectrum, and obtained images free from fringe artefacts caused by the longer coherence length of conventional lasers. We have also obtained images of cytoskeletal detail that is difficult to see with a monochromatic laser. © 2012 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2012 Royal Microscopical Society.

  10. Endoscopic probe optics for spectrally encoded confocal microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Dongkyun; Carruth, Robert W; Kim, Minkyu; Schlachter, Simon C; Shishkov, Milen; Woods, Kevin; Tabatabaei, Nima; Wu, Tao; Tearney, Guillermo J

    2013-01-01

    Spectrally encoded confocal microscopy (SECM) is a form of reflectance confocal microscopy that can achieve high imaging speeds using relatively simple probe optics. Previously, the feasibility of conducting large-area SECM imaging of the esophagus in bench top setups has been demonstrated. Challenges remain, however, in translating SECM into a clinically-useable device; the tissue imaging performance should be improved, and the probe size needs to be significantly reduced so that it can fit into luminal organs of interest. In this paper, we report the development of new SECM endoscopic probe optics that addresses these challenges. A custom water-immersion aspheric singlet (NA = 0.5) was developed and used as the objective lens. The water-immersion condition was used to reduce the spherical aberrations and specular reflection from the tissue surface, which enables cellular imaging of the tissue deep below the surface. A custom collimation lens and a small-size grating were used along with the custom aspheric singlet to reduce the probe size. A dual-clad fiber was used to provide both the single- and multi- mode detection modes. The SECM probe optics was made to be 5.85 mm in diameter and 30 mm in length, which is small enough for safe and comfortable endoscopic imaging of the gastrointestinal tract. The lateral resolution was 1.8 and 2.3 µm for the single- and multi- mode detection modes, respectively, and the axial resolution 11 and 17 µm. SECM images of the swine esophageal tissue demonstrated the capability of this device to enable the visualization of characteristic cellular structural features, including basal cell nuclei and papillae, down to the imaging depth of 260 µm. These results suggest that the new SECM endoscopic probe optics will be useful for imaging large areas of the esophagus at the cellular scale in vivo.

  11. Re-scan confocal microscopy (RCM) improves the resolution of confocal microscopy and increases the sensitivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Luca, Giulia; Breedijk, Ronald; Hoebe, Ron; Stallinga, Sjoerd; Manders, Erik

    2017-01-01

    Re-scan confocal microscopy (RCM) is a new super-resolution technique based on a standard confocal microscope extended with a re-scan unit in the detection path that projects the emitted light onto a sensitive camera. In this paper the fundamental properties of RCM, lateral resolution, axial

  12. Re-scan confocal microscopy (RCM) improves the resolution of confocal microscopy and increases the sensitivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Luca, G.; Breedijk, R.; Hoebe, R.; Stallinga, S.; Manders, E.

    Re-scan confocal microscopy (RCM) is a new super-resolution technique based on a standard confocal microscope extended with a re-scan unit in the detection path that projects the emitted light onto a sensitive camera. In this paper the fundamental properties of RCM, lateral resolution, axial

  13. Raman and Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) Mineral to Matrix Ratios Correlate with Physical Chemical Properties of Model Compounds and Native Bone Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Erik A; Lloyd, Ashley A; Salazar-Lara, Carolina; Donnelly, Eve

    2017-10-01

    Raman and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopic imaging techniques can be used to characterize bone composition. In this study, our objective was to validate the Raman mineral:matrix ratios (ν 1 PO 4 :amide III, ν 1 PO 4 :amide I, ν 1 PO 4 :Proline + hydroxyproline, ν 1 PO 4 :Phenylalanine, ν 1 PO 4 :δ CH 2 peak area ratios) by correlating them to ash fraction and the IR mineral:matrix ratio (ν 3 PO 4 :amide I peak area ratio) in chemical standards and native bone tissue. Chemical standards consisting of varying ratios of synthetic hydroxyapatite (HA) and collagen, as well as bone tissue from humans, sheep, and mice, were characterized with confocal Raman spectroscopy and FT-IR spectroscopy and gravimetric analysis. Raman and IR mineral:matrix ratio values from chemical standards increased reciprocally with ash fraction (Raman ν 1 PO 4 /Amide III: P IR P IR mineral:matrix ratio values were strongly correlated ( P IR spectra, developed by applying the Beer-Lambert law to calculate the relative extinction coefficients of HA and collagen over the same range of wavenumbers (800-1800 cm -1 ). The results confirm that the Raman mineral:matrix bone composition parameter correlates strongly to ash fraction and to its IR counterpart. Finally, the mineral:matrix ratio values of the native bone tissue are similar to those of both chemical standards and theoretical values, confirming the biological relevance of the chemical standards and the characterization techniques.

  14. Label-free identification and characterization of murine hair follicle stem cells located in thin tissue sections with Raman micro-spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Tsung-Hua; Short, Michael A; McLean, David I; Zeng, Haishan; McElwee, Kevin; Lui, Harvey

    2014-06-07

    Stem cells offer tremendous opportunities for regenerative medicine. Over the past decade considerable research has taken place to identify and characterize the differentiation states of stem cells in culture. Raman micro-spectroscopy has emerged as an ideal technology since it is fast, nondestructive, and does not require potentially toxic dyes. Raman spectroscopy systems can also be incorporated into confocal microscope imaging systems allowing spectra to be obtained from below the tissue surface. Thus there is significant potential for monitoring stem cells in living tissue. Stem cells that reside in hair follicles are suitable for testing this possibility since they are close to the skin surface, and typically clustered around the bulge area. One of the first steps needed would be to obtain Raman micro-spectra from stem cells located in thin sections of tissue, and then see whether these spectra are clearly different from those of the surrounding differentiated cells. To facilitate this test, standard 5 μm thick sections of murine skin tissue were stained to identify the location of hair follicle stem cells and their progeny. Raman spectra were then obtained from adjacent cells in a subsequent unstained 10 μm thick section. The spectra revealed significant differences in peak intensities associated with nucleic acids, proteins, lipids and amino acids. Statistical analyses of the Raman micro-spectra identified stem cells with 98% sensitivity and 94% specificity, as compared with a CD34 immunostaining gold standard. Furthermore analyses of the spectral variance indicated differences in cellular dynamics between the two cell groups. This study shows that Raman micro-spectroscopy has a potential role in identifying adult follicle stem cells, laying the groundwork for future applications of hair follicle stem cells and other somatic stem cells in situ.

  15. A confocal optical microscope for detection of single impurities in a bulk crystal at cryogenic temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Jenny; Rippe, Lars; Kröll, Stefan

    2016-03-01

    A compact sample-scanning confocal optical microscope for detection of single impurities below the surface of a bulk crystal at cryogenic temperatures is described. The sample, lens, and scanners are mounted inside a helium bath cryostat and have a footprint of only 19 × 19 mm. Wide field imaging and confocal imaging using a Blu-ray lens immersed in liquid helium are demonstrated with excitation at 370 nm. A spatial resolution of 300 nm and a detection efficiency of 1.6% were achieved.

  16. Gastric Tissue Damage Analysis Generated by Ischemia: Bioimpedance, Confocal Endomicroscopy, and Light Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nohra E. Beltran

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The gastric mucosa ischemic tissular damage plays an important role in critical care patients’ outcome, because it is the first damaged tissue by compensatory mechanism during shock. The aim of the study is to relate bioimpedance changes with tissular damage level generated by ischemia by means of confocal endomicroscopy and light microscopy. Bioimpedance of the gastric mucosa and confocal images were obtained from Wistar male rats during basal and ischemia conditions. They were anesthetized, and stain was applied (fluorescein and/or acriflavine. The impedance spectroscopy catheter was inserted and then confocal endomicroscopy probe. After basal measurements and biopsy, hepatic and gastric arteries clamping induced ischemia. Finally, pyloric antrum tissue was preserved in buffered formaldehyde (10% for histology processing using light microscopy. Confocal images were equalized, binarized, and boundary defined, and infiltrations were quantified. Impedance and infiltrations increased with ischemia showing significant changes between basal and ischemia conditions (. Light microscopy analysis allows detection of general alterations in cellular and tissular integrity, confirming gastric reactance and confocal images quantification increments obtained during ischemia.

  17. In vivo confocal microscopy for the detection of canine fungal keratitis and monitoring of therapeutic response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledbetter, Eric C; Norman, Mary L; Starr, Jennifer K

    2016-05-01

    To describe in vivo corneal confocal microscopy of dogs during the clinical course of fungal keratitis and correlate findings with clinical evaluations and an ex vivo experimental canine fungal keratitis model. Seven dogs with naturally acquired fungal keratitis and ex vivo canine corneas experimentally infected with clinical fungal isolates. Dogs with naturally acquired fungal keratitis were examined by in vivo laser scanning confocal microscopy. Initial confocal microscopic examinations were performed to assist in establishing the diagnosis of fungal keratitis. Serial confocal microscopic examinations were performed to guide antifungal chemotherapy. Confocal microscopy images of canine corneal fungal isolates were obtained by examination of experimentally infected ex vivo canine corneas to corroborate in vivo findings. Fungi cultured and detected by PCR from canine corneal samples included Candida albicans, Fusarium incarnatum-equiseti, Malassezia pachydermatis, and a Rhodotorula sp. Linear, branching, interlocking, hyperreflective structures were detected by confocal microscopy in dogs with filamentous fungal keratitis and round to oval hyperreflective structures were detected in dogs with yeast fungal keratitis. Antifungal chemotherapy was associated with a progressive reduction in the distribution and density of corneal fungal elements, alterations to fungal morphology, decreased leukocyte numbers, restoration of epithelial layers, and an increased number of visible keratocyte nuclei. No dogs had a recurrence of fungal keratitis following medication discontinuation. Confocal microscopic fungal morphologies were similar between in vivo and ex vivo examinations. In vivo corneal confocal microscopy is a rapid method of diagnosing fungal keratitis in dogs and provides a noninvasive mechanism for monitoring therapeutic response. © 2015 Ame