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Sample records for confined deuterium-tritium plasmas

  1. Confinement and heating of a deuterium-tritium plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawryluk, R.J.; Adler, H.; Alling, P.; Ancher, C.; Anderson, H.; Anderson, J.L.; Ashcroft, D.; Barnes, C.W.; Barnes, G.; Batha, S.; Bell, M.G.; Bell, R.; Bitter, M.; Blanchard, W.; Bretz, N.L.; Budny, R.; Bush, C.E.; Camp, R.; Caorlin, M.; Cauffman, S.; Chang, Z.; Cheng, C.Z.; Collins, J.; Coward, G.; Darrow, D.S.; DeLooper, J.; Duong, H.; Dudek, L.; Durst, R.; Efthimion, P.C.; Ernst, D.; Fisher, R.; Fonck, R.J.; Fredrickson, E.; Fromm, N.; Fu, G.Y.; Furth, H.P.; Gentile, C.; Gorelenkov, N.; Grek, B.; Grisham, L.R.; Hammett, G.; Hanson, G.R.; Heidbrink, W.; Herrmann, H.W.; Hill, K.W.; Hosea, J.; Hsuan, H.; Janos, A.; Jassby, D.L.; Jobes, F.C.; Johnson, D.W.; Johnson, L.C.; Kamperschroer, J.; Kugel, H.; Lam, N.T.; LaMarche, P.H.; Loughlin, M.J.; LeBlanc, B.; Leonard, M.; Levinton, F.M.; Machuzak, J.; Mansfield, D.K.; Martin, A.; Mazzucato, E.; Majeski, R.; Marmar, E.; McChesney, J.; McCormack, B.; McCune, D.C.; McGuire, K.M.; McKee, G.; Meade, D.M.; Medley, S.S.; Mikkelsen, D.R.; Muelle

    1994-05-30

    The Tomamak Fusion Test reactor has performed initial high-power experiments with the plasma fueled with nominally equal densities of deuterium and tritium. Compared to pure deuterium plasmas, the energy stored in the electron and ions increased by [similar to]20%. These increases indicate improvements in confinement associated with the use of tritium and possibly heating of electrons by [alpha] particles created by the D-T fusion reactions.

  2. Impact of first-principles properties of deuterium-tritium on inertial confinement fusion target designsa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, S. X.; Goncharov, V. N.; Boehly, T. R.; McCrory, R. L.; Skupsky, S.; Collins, L. A.; Kress, J. D.; Militzer, B.

    2015-05-01

    A comprehensive knowledge of the properties of high-energy-density plasmas is crucial to understanding and designing low-adiabat, inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions through hydrodynamic simulations. Warm-dense-matter (WDM) conditions are routinely accessed by low-adiabat ICF implosions, in which strong coupling and electron degeneracy often play an important role in determining the properties of warm dense plasmas. The WDM properties of deuterium-tritium (DT) mixtures and ablator materials, such as the equation of state, thermal conductivity, opacity, and stopping power, were usually estimated by models in hydro-codes used for ICF simulations. In these models, many-body and quantum effects were only approximately taken into account in the WMD regime. Moreover, the self-consistency among these models was often missing. To examine the accuracy of these models, we have systematically calculated the static, transport, and optical properties of warm dense DT plasmas, using first-principles (FP) methods over a wide range of densities and temperatures that cover the ICF "path" to ignition. These FP methods include the path-integral Monte Carlo (PIMC) and quantum-molecular dynamics (QMD) simulations, which treat electrons with many-body quantum theory. The first-principles equation-of-state table, thermal conductivities (κQMD), and first principles opacity table of DT have been self-consistently derived from the combined PIMC and QMD calculations. They have been compared with the typical models, and their effects to ICF simulations have been separately examined in previous publications. In this paper, we focus on their combined effects to ICF implosions through hydro-simulations using these FP-based properties of DT in comparison with the usual model simulations. We found that the predictions of ICF neutron yield could change by up to a factor of ˜2.5; the lower the adiabat of DT capsules, the more variations in hydro-simulations. The FP-based properties of DT

  3. Evidence for stratification of deuterium-tritium fuel in inertial confinement fusion implosions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, D T; Frenje, J A; Johnson, M Gatu; Manuel, M J-E; Rinderknecht, H G; Sinenian, N; Séguin, F H; Li, C K; Petrasso, R D; Radha, P B; Delettrez, J A; Glebov, V Yu; Meyerhofer, D D; Sangster, T C; McNabb, D P; Amendt, P A; Boyd, R N; Rygg, J R; Herrmann, H W; Kim, Y H; Bacher, A D

    2012-02-17

    Measurements of the D(d,p)T (dd) and T(t,2n)(4)He (tt) reaction yields have been compared with those of the D(t,n)(4)He (dt) reaction yield, using deuterium-tritium gas-filled inertial confinement fusion capsule implosions. In these experiments, carried out on the OMEGA laser, absolute spectral measurements of dd protons and tt neutrons were obtained. From these measurements, it was concluded that the dd yield is anomalously low and the tt yield is anomalously high relative to the dt yield, an observation that we conjecture to be caused by a stratification of the fuel in the implosion core. This effect may be present in ignition experiments planned on the National Ignition Facility.

  4. A new ion cyclotron range of frequency scenario for bulk ion heating in deuterium-tritium plasmas: How to utilize intrinsic impurities in our favour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazakov, Ye. O.; Ongena, J.; Van Eester, D.; Lerche, E.; Messiaen, A. [Laboratory for Plasma Physics, LPP-ERM/KMS, EUROfusion Consortium Member, Brussels (Belgium); Bilato, R. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Dumont, R. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Mantsinen, M. [Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies, Barcelona (Spain); Barcelona Supercomputing Center (BSC), Barcelona (Spain)

    2015-08-15

    A fusion reactor requires plasma pre-heating before the rate of deuterium-tritium fusion reactions becomes significant. In ITER, radio frequency (RF) heating of {sup 3}He ions, additionally puffed into the plasma, is one of the main options considered for increasing bulk ion temperature during the ramp-up phase of the pulse. In this paper, we propose an alternative scenario for bulk ion heating with RF waves, which requires no extra {sup 3}He puff and profits from the presence of intrinsic Beryllium impurities in the plasma. The discussed method to heat Be impurities in D-T plasmas is shown to provide an even larger fraction of fuel ion heating.

  5. Deuterium-tritium fusion reactors without external tritium breeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eliezer, S. [Soreq Nucl. Res. Center, Yavne (Israel). Dept. of Plasma Phys.]|[Instituto de Fusion Nuclear, Jose Gutierrez Abascal, 2, Madrid (Spain); Henis, Z. [Soreq Nucl. Res. Center, Yavne (Israel). Dept. of Plasma Phys.; Martinez-Val, J.M. [Instituto de Fusion Nuclear, Jose Gutierrez Abascal, 2, Madrid (Spain); Piera, M. [Instituto de Fusion Nuclear, Jose Gutierrez Abascal, 2, Madrid (Spain)]|[UNED, Madrid (Spain)

    1998-07-06

    An inherent property of deuterium fusion burn-up equations is presented, due to which deuterium-tritium reactions can be exploited without needing tritium breeding in external blankets. A small amount of tritium is added to the deuterium plasma in order to trigger ignition at less than 10 keV, and the same amount of tritium is found in the debris of the burnt-up plasma if the burning temperature is higher than 200 keV. Plasma parameters to exploit this property are very similar to those of inertial fusion confinement. Tritium inventory in a reactor would thus be reduced to a minimum value, because the initial composition of the fuel would be of the type DT{sub x}, with x{approx}0.02, and tritium would immediately be reprocessed to fabricate new fuel. (orig.) 13 refs.

  6. Preparations for deuterium--tritium experiments on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor*

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawryluk, R.J.; Adler, H.; Alling, P.; Ancher, C.; Anderson, H.; Anderson, J.L.; Anderson, J.W.; Arunasalam, V.; Ascione, G.; Aschroft, D.; Barnes, C.W.; Barnes, G.; Batchelor, D.B.; Bateman, G.; Batha, S.; Baylor, L.A.; Beer, M.; Bell, M.G.; Biglow, T.S.; Bitter, M.; Blanchard, W.; Bonoli, P.; Bretz, N.L.; Brunkhorst, C.; Budny, R.; Burgess, T.; Bush, H.; Bush, C.E.; Camp, R.; Caorlin, M.; Carnevale, H.; Chang, Z.; Chen, L.; Cheng, C.Z.; Chrzanowski, J.; Collazo, I.; Collins, J.; Coward, G.; Cowley, S.; Cropper, M.; Darrow, D.S.; Daugert, R.; DeLooper, J.; Duong, H.; Dudek, L.; Durst, R.; Efthimion, P.C.; Ernst, D.; Faunce, J.; Fonck, R.J.; Fredd, E.; Fredrickson, E.; Fromm, N.; Fu, G.Y.; Furth, H.P.; Garzotto, V.; Gentile, C.; Gettelfinger, G.; Gilbert, J.; Gioia, J.; Goldfinger, R.C.; Golian, T.; Gorelenkov, N.; Gouge, M.J.; Grek, B.; Grisham, L.R.; Hammett, G.; Hanson, G.R.; Heidbrink, W.; Hermann, H.W.; Hill, K.W.; Hirshman, S.; Hoffman, D.J.; Hosea, J.; Hulse, R.A.; Hsuan, H.; Ja

    1994-05-01

    The final hardware modifications for tritium operation have been completed for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) [Fusion Technol. [bold 21], 1324 (1992)]. These activities include preparation of the tritium gas handling system, installation of additional neutron shielding, conversion of the toroidal field coil cooling system from water to a Fluorinert[sup TM] system, modification of the vacuum system to handle tritium, preparation, and testing of the neutral beam system for tritium operation and a final deuterium--deuterium (D--D) run to simulate expected deuterium--tritium (D--T) operation. Testing of the tritium system with low concentration tritium has successfully begun. Simulation of trace and high power D--T experiments using D--D have been performed. The physics objectives of D--T operation are production of [approx]10 MW of fusion power, evaluation of confinement, and heating in deuterium--tritium plasmas, evaluation of [alpha]-particle heating of electrons, and collective effects driven by alpha particles and testing of diagnostics for confined [alpha] particles. Experimental results and theoretical modeling in support of the D--T experiments are reviewed.

  7. Effects of non-equilibrium particle distributions in deuterium-tritium burning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michta, D; Graziani, F; Pruet, J; Luu, T

    2009-08-18

    We investigate the effects of non-equilibrium particle distributions resulting from rapid deuterium-tritium burning in plasmas using a Fokker-Planck code that incorporates small-angle Coulomb scattering, Brehmsstrahlung, Compton scattering, and thermal-nuclear burning. We find that in inertial confinement fusion environments, deviations away from Maxwellian distributions for either deuterium or tritium ions are small and result in 1% changes in the energy production rates. The deuterium and tritium effective temperatures are not equal, but differ by only about 2.5% near the time of peak burn rate. Simulations with high Z (Xe) dopants show that the dopant temperature closely tracks that of the fuel. On the other hand, fusion product ion distributions are highly non-Maxwellian, and careful treatments of energy-exchange between these ions and other particles is important for determining burn rates.

  8. Anomalous yield reduction in direct-drive deuterium/tritium implosions due to 3He addition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, H. W.; Langenbrunner, J. R.; Mack, J. M.; Cooley, J. H.; Wilson, D. C.; Evans, S. C.; Sedillo, T. J.; Kyrala, G. A.; Caldwell, S. E.; Young, C. S.; Nobile, A.; Wermer, J.; Paglieri, S.; McEvoy, A. M.; Kim, Y.; Batha, S. H.; Horsfield, C. J.; Drew, D.; Garbett, W.; Rubery, M.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Roberts, S.; Frenje, J. A.

    2009-05-01

    Glass capsules were imploded in direct drive on the OMEGA laser [Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] to look for anomalous degradation in deuterium/tritium (DT) yield and changes in reaction history with H3e addition. Such anomalies have previously been reported for D/H3e plasmas but had not yet been investigated for DT/H3e. Anomalies such as these provide fertile ground for furthering our physics understanding of inertial confinement fusion implosions and capsule performance. Anomalous degradation in the compression component of yield was observed, consistent with the "factor of 2" degradation previously reported by Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) at a 50% H3e atom fraction in D2 using plastic capsules [Rygg, Phys. Plasmas 13, 052702 (2006)]. However, clean calculations (i.e., no fuel-shell mixing) predict the shock component of yield quite well, contrary to the result reported by MIT but consistent with Los Alamos National Laboratory results in D2/H3e [Wilson et al., J. Phys.: Conf. Ser. 112, 022015 (2008)]. X-ray imaging suggests less-than-predicted compression of capsules containing H3e. Leading candidate explanations are poorly understood equation of state for gas mixtures and unanticipated particle pressure variation with increasing H3e addition.

  9. Plasma confinement

    CERN Document Server

    Hazeltine, R D

    2003-01-01

    Detailed and authoritative, this volume examines the essential physics underlying international research in magnetic confinement fusion. It offers readable, thorough accounts of the fundamental concepts behind methods of confining plasma at or near thermonuclear conditions. Designed for a one- or two-semester graduate-level course in plasma physics, it also represents a valuable reference for professional physicists in controlled fusion and related disciplines.

  10. Deuterium-tritium experiments on TFTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bretz, N.L.; Adler, H.; Alling, P.; Ancher, C.; Anderson, H.; Anderson, J.W.; Arunasalam, V.; Ascione, G.; Barnes, C.W.; Barnes, G.; Batha, S.; Bateman, G.; Beer, M.; Bell, M.G.; Bell, R.; Bitter, M.; Blanchard, W.; Brunkhorst, C.; Budny, R.; Bush, C.E.; Camp, R.; Caorlin, M.; Carnevale, H.; Cauffman, S.; Chang, Z.; Cheng, C.; Chrzanowski, J.; Collins, J.; Coward, G.; Cropper, M.; Darrow, D.S.; Daugert, R.; DeLooper, J.; Dorland, W.; Dudek, L.; Duong, H.; Durst, R.; Efthimion, P.C.; Ernst, D.; Evensen, H.; Fisch, N.; Fisher, R.; Fonck, R.J.; Fredd, E.; Fredrickson, E.; Fromm, R.; Fu, G.; Fujita, T.; Furth, H.P.; Garzotto, V.; Gentile, C.; Gilbert, J.; Giola, J.; Gorelenkov, N.; Grek, B.; Grisham, L.R.; Hammett, G.; Hanson, G.R.; Hawryluk, R.J.; Heidbrink, W.; Herrmann, H.W.; Hill, K.W.; Hosea, J.; Hsuan, H.; Hughes, M.; Hulse, R.; Janos, A.; Jassby, D.L.; Jobes, F.C.; Johnson, D.W.; Johnson, L.C.; Kalish, M.; Kamperschroer, J.; Kesner, J.; Kugel, H.; Labik, G.; Lam, N.T.; LaMarche, P.H.; Lawson, E.; LeBlanc, B.; Levine, J.; Levinton, F.M.; Loesser, D.; Long, D.; Loughlin, M.J.; Machuzak, J.; Majeski, R.; Mansfield, D.K.; Marmar, E.; Marsala, R.; Martin, A.; Martin, G.; Mauel, M.; Mazzucato, E.; McCarthy, M.P.; McChesney, J.; McCormack, B.; McCune, D.C.; McGuire, K.M.; McKee, G.; Meade, D.M.; Medley, S.S.; Mikkelsen, D.R.; Mirnov, S.V.; Mueller, D.; Murakami, M.; Murphy, J.A.; Nagy, A.; Navratil, G.A.; Nazikian, R.; Newman, R.; Norris, M.; OConnor, T.; Oldaker, M.; Ongena, J.; Osakabe, M.; Owens, D.K.; Park, H.; Park, W.; Parks, P.; Paul, S.F.; Pearson, G.; Perry, E.; Persing, R.; Petrov, M.; Phillips, C.K.; Phillips, M.; Pitcher, S.; Pysher, R.; Qualls, A.L.; Raftapoulos, S.; Ramakrishnan, S.; Ramsey, A.; Rasmunsen, D.A.; Redi, M.H.; Renda, G.; Rewoldt, G.; Roberts, D.; Rogers, J.; Rossmassler, R.; Roquemore, A.L.; Ruskov, E.; Sabbaugh, S.A.; Sasao, M.; Schilling, G.; Schivell, J.; Schmidt, G.L.; Scillia, R.; Scott, S.D.; Semenov, I.; Senko, T.

    1995-09-01

    A peak fusion power production of 9.3{plus_minus}0.7 MW has been achieved on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) in deuterium plasmas heated by co and counter injected deuterium and tritium neutral beams with a total power of 33.7 MW. The ratio of fusion power output to heating power input is 0.27. At the time of the highest neutron flux the plasma conditions are: {ital T}{sub {ital e}}(0)=11.5 keV, {ital T}{sub {ital i}}(0)=44 keV, {ital n}{sub {ital e}}(0)=8.5{times}10{sup 19} m{sup {minus}3}, and {l_angle}{ital Z}{sub eff}{r_angle}=2.2 giving {tau}{sub {ital E}}=0.24 s. These conditions are similar to those found in the highest confinement deuterium plasmas. The measured D-T neutron yield is within 7% of computer code estimates based on profile measurements and within experimental uncertainties. These plasmas have an inferred central fusion alpha fraction of 0.2% and central fusion power density of 2 MW/m{sup 3} similar to that expected in a fusion reactor. Even though the alpha velocity exceeds the Alfven velocity throughout the time of high neutron output in most high power plasmas, MHD activity is similar to that in comparable deuterium plasmas and Alfven wave activity is low. The measured loss rate of energetic alpha particles is about 3% of the total as expected from alphas which are born on unconfined orbits. Compared to pure deuterium plasmas with similar externally applied conditions, the stored energy in electrons and ions is about 25% higher indicating improvements in confinement associated with D-T plasmas and consistent with modest electron heating expected from alpha particles. ICRF heating of D-T plasmas using up to 5.5 MW has resulted in 10 keV increases in central ion and 2.5 keV increases in central electron temperatures in relatively good agreement with code predictions. In these cases heating on the magnetic axis at 2{Omega}{sub {ital T}} gave up to 80% of the ICRF energy to ions. {copyright} {ital 1995 American Institute of Physics.}

  11. Study of high gain spherical shell ICF targets containing uniform layers of liquid deuterium tritium fuel. A numericial model for analyzing thermal layering of liquid mixtures of hydrogen isotopes inside a spherical inertial confinement fusion target: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, E.M.; Kim, Kyekyoon [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-05-01

    A numerical model has been developed to describe the thermally induced behavior of a liquid layer of hydrogen isotopes inside a spherical Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) target and to calculate the far-field temperature gradient which will sustain a uniform liquid layer. This method is much faster than the trial-and-error method previously employed. The governing equations are the equations of continuity, momentum, energy, mass diffusion-convection, and conservation of the individual isotopic species. Ordinary and thermal diffusion equations for the diffusion of fluxes of the species are included. These coupled equations are solved by a finite-difference method using upwind schemes, variable mesh, and rigorous boundary conditions. The solution methodology unique to the present problem is discussed in detail. in particular, the significance of the surface tension gradient driven flows (also called Marangoni flows) in forming uniform liquid layers inside ICF targets is demonstrated. Using the theoretical model, the values of the externally applied thermal gradients that give rise to uniform liquid layers of hydrogen inside a cryogenic spherical-shell ICF target are calculated, and the results compared with the existing experimental data.

  12. Transport properties of inertial confinement fusion plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Issanova, M.K.; Kodanova, S.K.; Ramazanov, T.S. [IETP, Al-Farabi Kazakh National University, Almaty (Kazakhstan); Hoffmann, D.H.H. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt (Germany)

    2016-06-15

    In this paper the transport properties of non-isothermal dense deuterium-tritium plasmas were studied. Based on the effective interaction potentials between particles, the Coulomb logarithm for a two-temperature nonisothermal dense plasma was obtained. These potentials take into consideration long-range multi-particle screening effects and short-range quantum-mechanical effects in two-temperature plasmas. Transport processes in such plasmas were studied using the Coulomb logarithm. The obtained results were compared with the theoretical works of other authors and with the results of molecular dynamics simulations. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  13. Cryogenic tritium-hydrogen-deuterium and deuterium-tritium layer implosions with high density carbon ablators in near-vacuum hohlraums

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meezan, N. B., E-mail: meezan1@llnl.gov; Hopkins, L. F. Berzak; Pape, S. Le; Divol, L.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Döppner, T.; Ho, D. D.; Jones, O. S.; Khan, S. F.; Ma, T.; Milovich, J. L.; Pak, A. E.; Ross, J. S.; Thomas, C. A.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bradley, D. K.; Celliers, P. M.; Clark, D. S.; Field, J. E.; Haan, S. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551-0808 (United States); and others

    2015-06-15

    High Density Carbon (or diamond) is a promising ablator material for use in near-vacuum hohlraums, as its high density allows for ignition designs with laser pulse durations of <10 ns. A series of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiments in 2013 on the National Ignition Facility [Moses et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)] culminated in a deuterium-tritium (DT) layered implosion driven by a 6.8 ns, 2-shock laser pulse. This paper describes these experiments and comparisons with ICF design code simulations. Backlit radiography of a tritium-hydrogen-deuterium (THD) layered capsule demonstrated an ablator implosion velocity of 385 km/s with a slightly oblate hot spot shape. Other diagnostics suggested an asymmetric compressed fuel layer. A streak camera-based hot spot self-emission diagnostic (SPIDER) showed a double-peaked history of the capsule self-emission. Simulations suggest that this is a signature of low quality hot spot formation. Changes to the laser pulse and pointing for a subsequent DT implosion resulted in a higher temperature, prolate hot spot and a thermonuclear yield of 1.8 × 10{sup 15} neutrons, 40% of the 1D simulated yield.

  14. Measurement of high-pressure shock waves in cryogenic deuterium-tritium ice layered capsule implosions on NIF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robey, H F; Moody, J D; Celliers, P M; Ross, J S; Ralph, J; Le Pape, S; Berzak Hopkins, L; Parham, T; Sater, J; Mapoles, E R; Holunga, D M; Walters, C F; Haid, B J; Kozioziemski, B J; Dylla-Spears, R J; Krauter, K G; Frieders, G; Ross, G; Bowers, M W; Strozzi, D J; Yoxall, B E; Hamza, A V; Dzenitis, B; Bhandarkar, S D; Young, B; Van Wonterghem, B M; Atherton, L J; Landen, O L; Edwards, M J; Boehly, T R

    2013-08-09

    The first measurements of multiple, high-pressure shock waves in cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) ice layered capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility have been performed. The strength and relative timing of these shocks must be adjusted to very high precision in order to keep the DT fuel entropy low and compressibility high. All previous measurements of shock timing in inertial confinement fusion implosions [T. R. Boehly et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 195005 (2011), H. F. Robey et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 215004 (2012)] have been performed in surrogate targets, where the solid DT ice shell and central DT gas regions were replaced with a continuous liquid deuterium (D2) fill. This report presents the first experimental validation of the assumptions underlying this surrogate technique.

  15. Deuterium-Tritium Pulse Propulsion with Hydrogen as Propellant and the Entire Spacecraft as a Gigavolt Capacitor for Ignition

    CERN Document Server

    Winterberg, Friedwardt

    2012-01-01

    A deuterium-tritium (DT) nuclear pulse propulsion concept for fast interplanetary transport is proposed utilizing almost all the energy for thrust and without the need for a large radiator: 1. By letting the thermonuclear micro-explosion take place in the center of a liquid hydrogen sphere with the radius of the sphere large enough to slow down and absorb the neutrons of the DT fusion reaction, heating the hydrogen to a fully ionized plasma at a temperature of ~ 105 K. 2. By using the entire spacecraft as a magnetically insulated gigavolt capacitor, igniting the DT micro-explosion with an intense GeV ion beam discharging the gigavolt capacitor, possible if the space craft has the topology of a torus.

  16. Protection of the primary circuits and effect on the design of the inner deuterium/tritium fuel cycle of ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glugla, M. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Tritium Laboratory, P.O. Box 3640, D 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)]. E-mail: manfred.glugla@hvt.fzk.de; Caldwell-Nichols, C. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Tritium Laboratory, P.O. Box 3640, D 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Cristescu, I.R. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Tritium Laboratory, P.O. Box 3640, D 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Doerr, L. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Tritium Laboratory, P.O. Box 3640, D 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Hellriegel, G. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Tritium Laboratory, P.O. Box 3640, D 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Laesser, R. [EFDA CSU, MPI fuer Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstr. 2, D 85748 Garching (Germany); Murdoch, D. [EFDA CSU, MPI fuer Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstr. 2, D 85748 Garching (Germany); Schaefer, P. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Tritium Laboratory, P.O. Box 3640, D 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2005-11-15

    The confinement of tritium within its respective processing systems is clearly one of the most important safety objectives for fusion reactors. Consequently, the functional safety of all the subsystems of the inner deuterium/tritium fuel cycle of ITER need to be carefully analyzed and the results implemented into the design of the Tritium Plant as a whole. The basic principles for the management of functional safety are laid out in the international standard IEC 61508. The tritium bearing systems need to be particularly protected against over-pressure and over-temperature, even at levels significantly below values at which sensors or components would loose their mechanical integrity. The design shall take into account the necessity to validate and test the protection measures, noting the contamination of the equipment with tritium and the restricted access due to multiple barriers. Any protection measure has its characteristic but limited credibility. Software based safeguarding, for example, is not fully satisfactory in certain cases. In spite of the developments in software and the increasing possibilities to assure its quality, hard-wired signal processing is still considered to be necessary within the ITER Tritium Plant.

  17. Study of thermonuclear particles emitted from laser compressed deuterium-tritium fusion targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fews, A.P.; Henshaw, D.L. (Bristol Univ. (UK). H.H. Wills Physics Lab.)

    1984-01-01

    In the study of laser driven deuterium-tritium (D-T) fusion reactions CR-39 has become an established detector. In this paper we will review our own work at the Central Laser Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, U.K. These studies fall into two categories (i) measurement of the number and energy spectrum of thermonuclear products and knock-on ions which escape the target. This measurement is used to determine the degree of target compression and (ii) a study of the stopping power to ..cap alpha..-particles and protons of hot dense matter of temperatures approx. 100 eV.

  18. Recent advances in fueling magnetically confined plasmas with pellets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baylor, L.R.; Combs, S.K.; Fisher, P.W.; Gouge, M.J.; Jernigan, T.C.

    2000-07-01

    Pellet injection has been used for many years in a number of magnetic confinement fusion experiments to provide plasma fueling and density profile control. A pellet fueling system for a reactor-sized device will need to supply hydrogenic fuel as deeply into the plasma as possible to replace the deuterium-tritium ions consumed and to provide a density gradient for plasma particle (especially helium ash) flow to the edge. Development of injection systems that can provide deep fueling with sufficient throughput to provide these features remains a high priority in the fusion technology program. Several tokamak devices, including DIII-D, ASDEX-Upgrade, and JET, have recently employed pellet injection from the high magnetic field side (inner wall). Injection from the high field side (HFS) yields improved fuel penetration and fueling efficiency over the usual simpler method of low-field-side injection from the outside midplane. There is a resulting improvement in fueling efficiency and fuel deposition. The improvement is believed to be due to a {del}B drift and curvature-induced drift of the pellet ablatant in the major radius direction. Curved guide tubes must be employed to inject from the inner wall in all current devices requiring slow to moderate pellet speeds to obtain intact pellets. Alternative injection schemes that take advantage of the HFS injection while allowing for high-speed pellet injection are possible using a vertical injection geometry. The technology to produce cryogenic pellets of hydrogenic isotopes has matured to the level of reliable pellet injection devices that produce and accelerate intact pellets at high repetition rates. New technology enhancements to pneumatic guns have been developed for the production of slower-speed pellets that can survive the curved guide tubes required for HFS injection. Centrifugal accelerators have also been operated at the low velocities required for HFS fueling. The understanding of pellet mechanical properties

  19. Gamma-ray spectroscopy at MHz counting rates with a compact LaBr{sub 3} detector and silicon photomultipliers for fusion plasma applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nocente, M., E-mail: massimo.nocente@mib.infn.it [EUROfusion Consortium, JET, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Milano-Bicocca, Milano (Italy); Istituto di Fisica del Plasma “Piero Caldirola,” Milano (Italy); Rigamonti, D.; Croci, G.; Gorini, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Milano-Bicocca, Milano (Italy); Istituto di Fisica del Plasma “Piero Caldirola,” Milano (Italy); Perseo, V. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Milano-Bicocca, Milano (Italy); Tardocchi, M.; Cremona, A.; Muraro, A. [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma “Piero Caldirola,” Milano (Italy); Boltruczyk, G.; Broslawski, A.; Gosk, M.; Korolczuk, S.; Zychor, I. [Narodowe Centrum Badan Jadrowych (NCBJ), Otwock-Swierk (Poland); Kiptily, V. [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, Culham (United Kingdom); Mazzocco, M.; Strano, E. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Padova (Italy); Collaboration: EUROfusion Consortium, JET, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon (United Kingdom)

    2016-11-15

    Gamma-ray spectroscopy measurements at MHz counting rates have been carried out, for the first time, with a compact spectrometer based on a LaBr{sub 3} scintillator and silicon photomultipliers. The instrument, which is also insensitive to magnetic fields, has been developed in view of the upgrade of the gamma-ray camera diagnostic for α particle measurements in deuterium-tritium plasmas of the Joint European Torus. Spectra were measured up to 2.9 MHz with a projected energy resolution of 3%-4% in the 3-5 MeV range, of interest for fast ion physics studies in fusion plasmas. The results reported here pave the way to first time measurements of the confined α particle profile in high power plasmas of the next deuterium-tritium campaign at the Joint European Torus.

  20. Development of a compact magnetic proton recoil spectrometer for measurement of deuterium-tritium neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jianfu, E-mail: zhangjfu@gmail.com; Ouyang, Xiaoping; Zhang, Xianpeng [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi’an 710024 (China); Qiu, Suizheng, E-mail: szqiu@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); Zhang, Guoguang [Applied Institute of Nuclear Technology, China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing 102413 (China); Ruan, Jinlu; Zhang, Xiaodong; Yang, Shaohua; Song, Jiwen; Liu, Linyue; Li, Hongyun [Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi’an 710024 (China)

    2015-12-15

    A new compact magnetic proton recoil (MPR) neutron spectrometer has been designed for precise measurement of deuterium-tritium (DT) neutrons. This design is presented emphasizing the magnetic analyzing system, which is based on a compact quadrupole-dipole (QD) electromagnet. The focal plane detector (FPD) is also discussed with respect to application for the next step. The characteristics of the MPR spectrometer were calculated by using Monte Carlo simulation. A preliminary experiment was performed to test the magnetic analyzing system and the proton images of the FPD. Since the QD electromagnet design allows for a larger foil thickness and solid angle to be utilized, the MPR spectrometer defined in this paper can achieve neutron detection efficiency more than 5 × 10{sup −7} at an energy resolution of 1.5% for measuring DT neutrons.

  1. Alternative approaches to plasma confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, J. R.

    1978-01-01

    The paper discusses 20 plasma confinement schemes each representing an alternative to the tokamak fusion reactor. Attention is given to: (1) tokamak-like devices (TORMAC, Topolotron, and the Extrap concept), (2) stellarator-like devices (Torsatron and twisted-coil stellarators), (3) mirror machines (Astron and reversed-field devices, the 2XII B experiment, laser-heated solenoids, the LITE experiment, the Kaktus-Surmac concept), (4) bumpy tori (hot electron bumpy torus, toroidal minimum-B configurations), (5) electrostatically assisted confinement (electrostatically stuffed cusps and mirrors, electrostatically assisted toroidal confinement), (6) the Migma concept, and (7) wall-confined plasmas. The plasma parameters of the devices are presented and the advantages and disadvantages of each are listed.

  2. Comment on 'Evidence for Stratification of Deuterium-Tritium Fuel in Inertial Confinement Fusion Implosions'

    CERN Document Server

    Zheng, Hua

    2013-01-01

    Recent implosion experiments performed at the OMEGA laser facility reported by Casey et al.[1], displayed an anomalously low dd proton yield and a high tt neutron yield as compared to dt fusion reactions, explained as a stratification of the fuel in the implosion core. We suggest that in the com- pression stage the fuel is out of equilibrium. Ions are inward accelerated to a velocity v0 independent on the particle type. Yield ratios are simply given by the ratios of fusion cross-sections obtained at the same velocity. A 'Hubble' type model gives also a reasonable description of the data. These considerations might be relevant for implosion experiments at the National Ignition Facility as well.

  3. CORRELATIONS IN CONFINED QUANTUM PLASMAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DUFTY J W

    2012-01-11

    This is the final report for the project 'Correlations in Confined Quantum Plasmas', NSF-DOE Partnership Grant DE FG02 07ER54946, 8/1/2007 - 7/30/2010. The research was performed in collaboration with a group at Christian Albrechts University (CAU), Kiel, Germany. That collaboration, almost 15 years old, was formalized during the past four years under this NSF-DOE Partnership Grant to support graduate students at the two institutions and to facilitate frequent exchange visits. The research was focused on exploring the frontiers of charged particle physics evolving from new experimental access to unusual states associated with confinement. Particular attention was paid to combined effects of quantum mechanics and confinement. A suite of analytical and numerical tools tailored to the specific inquiry has been developed and employed

  4. Review of deuterium--tritium results from the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor*

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGuire, K. M.; Adler, H.; Alling, P.; Ancher, C.; Anderson, H.; Anderson, J. L.; Anderson, J W.; Arunasalam, V.; Ascione, G.; Ashcroft, D.; Barnes, C. W.; Barnes, G.; Batha, S.; Bateman, G.; Beer, M; Bell, M. G.; Bell, R.; Bitter, M.; Blanchard, W.; Bretz, N. L.; Brunkhorst, C.; Budny, R.; Bush, C. E.; Camp, R.; Caorlin, M.; Carnevale, H.; Cauffman, S.; Chang, Z.; Chang, C. S.; Cheng, C. Z.; Chrzanowski, J.; Collins, J.; Coward, G.; Cropper, M.; Darrow, D. S; Daugert, R.; DeLooper, J.; Dendy, R.; Dorland, W.; Dudek, L.; Duong, H.; Durst, R.; Efthimion, P. C.; Ernst, D.; Evenson, H.; Fisch, N.; Fisher, R.; Fonck, R. J.; Fredd, E.; Fredrickson, E.; Fromm, N.; Fu, G. Y.; Fujita, T.; Furth, H. P.; Garzotto, V.; Gentile, C.; Gilbert, J.; Gioia, J.; Gorelenkov, N.; Grek, B.; Grisham, L. R.; Hammett, G.; Hanson, G. R.; Hawryluk, R. J.; Heidbrink, W.; Herrmann, H. W.; Hill, K. W.; Hosea, J.; Hsuan, H.; Hughes, M.; Hulse, R.; Janos, A.; Jassby, D. L.; Jobes, F. C.; Johnson, D. W.; Johnson, L. C.; Kalish, M.; Kamperschroer, J.; Kesner, J.; Kugel, H.; Labik, G.; Lam, N. T.; LaMarche, P. H.; Lawson, E.; LeBlanc, B.; Levine, J.; Levinton, F. M.; Loesser, D.; Long, D.; Loughlin, M. J.; Machuzak, J.; Majeski, R.; Mansfield, D. K.; Marmar, E. S.; Marsala, R.; Martin, A.; Martin, G.; Mazzucato, E.; Mauel, M.; McCarthy, M. P.; McChesney, J.; McCormack, B.; McCune, D. C.; McKee, G.; Meade, D. M.; Medley, S. S.; Mikkelsen, D. R.; Mirnov, S. V.; Mueller, D.; Murakami, M.; Murphy, J. A.; Nagy, A.; Navratil, G. A.; Nazikian, R.; Newman, R.; Norris, M.; O`Connor, T.; Oldaker, M.; Ongena, J.; Osakabe, M.; Owens, D. K.; Park, H.; Park, W.; Parks, P.; Paul, S. F.; Pearson, G.; Perry, E.; Persing, R.; Petrov, M.; Phillips, C. K.; Phillips, M.; Pitcher, S.; Pysher, R.; Qualls, A. L.; Raftopoulos, S.; Ramakrishnan, S.; Ramsey, A.; Rasmussen, D. A.; Redi, M. H.; Renda, G.; Rewoldt, G.; Roberts, D.; Rogers, J.; Rossmassler, R.; Roquemore, A. L.; Ruskov, E.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Sasao, M.; Schilling, G.; Schivell, J.; Schmidt, G.; Scillia, R.; Scott, S. D.; Semenov, I.; Senko, T.; Sesnic, S.; Sissingh, R.; Skinner, C. H.; Snipes, J.; Stencel, J.; Stevens, J.; Stevenson, T.; Stratton, B. C.; Strachan, J. D.; Stodiek, W.; Swanson, J.; Synakowski, E.; Takahashi, H.; Tang, W.; Taylor, G.; Terry, J.; Thompson, M. E.; Tighe, W.; Timberlake, J. R.; Tobita, K.; Towner, H. H.; Tuszewski, M.; Halle, A. Von; Vannoy, C.; Viola, M.; Goeler, S. Von; Voorhees, D.; Walters, R. T.; Wester, R.; White, R.; Wieland, R.; Wilgen, J. B.; Williams, M.; Wilson, J. R.; Winston, J.; Wright, K.; Wong, K. L.; Woskov, P.; Wurden, G. A.; Yamada, M.; Yoshikawa, S.; Young, K. M.; Zarnstorff, M. C.; Zavereev, V.; Zweben, S. J.

    1995-01-01

    The first magnetic fusion experiments to study plasmas using nearly equal concentrations of deuterium and tritium have been carried out on TFTR. At present the maximum fusion power of 10.7 MW, using 39.5 MW of neutral-beam heating, in a supershot discharge and 6.7 MW in a high-βp discharge following a current rampdown. The fusion power density in a core of the plasma is ≈ 2.8 MW m₋3, exceeding that expected in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) at 1500 MW total fusion power. The energy confinement time, τE, is observed to increase in D–T, relative to D plasmas, by 20% and the ni (0) Ti(0) τE product by 55%. The improvement in thermal confinement is caused primarily by a decrease in ion heat conductivity in both supershot and limiter-H-mode discharges. Extensive lithium pellet injection increased the confinement time to 0.27 s and enabled higher current operation in both supershot and high-βp discharges. Ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) heating of a D–T plasma, using the second harmonic of tritium, has been demonstrated. First measurements of the confined alpha particles have been performed and found to be in good agreement with TRANSP simulations. Initial measurements of the alpha ash profile have been compared with simulations using particle transport coefficients from He gas puffing experiments. The loss of alpha particles to a detector at the bottom of the vessel is well described by the first-orbit loss mechanism. No loss due to alpha-particle-driven instabilities has yet been observed. D–T experiments on TFTR will continue to explore the assumptions of the ITER design and to examine some of the physics issues associated with an advanced tokamak reactor.

  5. Monte Carlo simulations of down-scattered neutron and knock-on deuteron spectra in deuterium-tritium capsule implosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bin; Zheng, Jian

    2013-12-01

    A Monte Carlo particle tracking (MCPT) code has been developed and coupled to hydrodynamic simulations to generate and track primary and scattered neutrons in addition to scattered charged particles by post-processing. This code uses one dimensional (1-D) deuterium-tritium implosion profiles, and the computed down-scattered neutron and knock-on deuteron spectra are analyzed for different areal densities. The mixing effects on the spectra of down-scattered neutron and knock-on deuteron are also investigated. The implementation of the numerical scheme is analyzed, and the particle splitting technique is adopted, which is proven to efficiently reduce computational effort.

  6. First-principles thermal conductivity of warm-dense deuterium plasmas for inertial confinement fusion applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, S X; Collins, L A; Boehly, T R; Kress, J D; Goncharov, V N; Skupsky, S

    2014-04-01

    Thermal conductivity (κ) of both the ablator materials and deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel plays an important role in understanding and designing inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions. The extensively used Spitzer model for thermal conduction in ideal plasmas breaks down for high-density, low-temperature shells that are compressed by shocks and spherical convergence in imploding targets. A variety of thermal-conductivity models have been proposed for ICF hydrodynamic simulations of such coupled and degenerate plasmas. The accuracy of these κ models for DT plasmas has recently been tested against first-principles calculations using the quantum molecular-dynamics (QMD) method; although mainly for high densities (ρ > 100 g/cm3), large discrepancies in κ have been identified for the peak-compression conditions in ICF. To cover the wide range of density-temperature conditions undergone by ICF imploding fuel shells, we have performed QMD calculations of κ for a variety of deuterium densities of ρ = 1.0 to 673.518 g/cm3, at temperatures varying from T = 5 × 103 K to T = 8 × 106 K. The resulting κQMD of deuterium is fitted with a polynomial function of the coupling and degeneracy parameters Γ and θ, which can then be used in hydrodynamic simulation codes. Compared with the "hybrid" Spitzer-Lee-More model currently adopted in our hydrocode lilac, the hydrosimulations using the fitted κQMD have shown up to ∼20% variations in predicting target performance for different ICF implosions on OMEGA and direct-drive-ignition designs for the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The lower the adiabat of an imploding shell, the more variations in predicting target performance using κQMD. Moreover, the use of κQMD also modifies the shock conditions and the density-temperature profiles of the imploding shell at early implosion stage, which predominantly affects the final target performance. This is in contrast to the previous speculation that κQMD changes mainly the

  7. Numerical simulation by a random particle method of Deuterium-Tritium fusion reactions in a plasma*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Fréderique

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose and we justify a Monte-Carlo algorithm which solves a spatially homogeneous kinetic equation of Boltzmann type that models the fusion reaction between a deuterium ion and a tritium ion, and giving an α particle and a neutron. The proposed algorithm is validated with the use of explicit solutions of the kinetic model obtained by replacing the fusion cross-section by a Maxwellian cross section. On propose et on justifie un algorithme de type Monte-Carlo permettant de résoudre un modèle cinétique homogène en espace de type Boltzmann modélisant la réaction de fusion entre un ion deutérium et un ion tritium, et donnant une particule α et un neutron. L’algorithme proposé est par ailleurs validé via des solutions explicites du modèle cinétique obtenues en remplaçant la section efficace de fusion par une section efficace maxwellienne.

  8. Demonstration of High Performance in Layered Deuterium-Tritium Capsule Implosions in Uranium Hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Döppner, T; Callahan, D A; Hurricane, O A; Hinkel, D E; Ma, T; Park, H-S; Berzak Hopkins, L F; Casey, D T; Celliers, P; Dewald, E L; Dittrich, T R; Haan, S W; Kritcher, A L; MacPhee, A; Le Pape, S; Pak, A; Patel, P K; Springer, P T; Salmonson, J D; Tommasini, R; Benedetti, L R; Bond, E; Bradley, D K; Caggiano, J; Church, J; Dixit, S; Edgell, D; Edwards, M J; Fittinghoff, D N; Frenje, J; Gatu Johnson, M; Grim, G; Hatarik, R; Havre, M; Herrmann, H; Izumi, N; Khan, S F; Kline, J L; Knauer, J; Kyrala, G A; Landen, O L; Merrill, F E; Moody, J; Moore, A S; Nikroo, A; Ralph, J E; Remington, B A; Robey, H F; Sayre, D; Schneider, M; Streckert, H; Town, R; Turnbull, D; Volegov, P L; Wan, A; Widmann, K; Wilde, C H; Yeamans, C

    2015-07-31

    We report on the first layered deuterium-tritium (DT) capsule implosions indirectly driven by a "high-foot" laser pulse that were fielded in depleted uranium hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility. Recently, high-foot implosions have demonstrated improved resistance to ablation-front Rayleigh-Taylor instability induced mixing of ablator material into the DT hot spot [Hurricane et al., Nature (London) 506, 343 (2014)]. Uranium hohlraums provide a higher albedo and thus an increased drive equivalent to an additional 25 TW laser power at the peak of the drive compared to standard gold hohlraums leading to higher implosion velocity. Additionally, we observe an improved hot-spot shape closer to round which indicates enhanced drive from the waist. In contrast to findings in the National Ignition Campaign, now all of our highest performing experiments have been done in uranium hohlraums and achieved total yields approaching 10^{16} neutrons where more than 50% of the yield was due to additional heating of alpha particles stopping in the DT fuel.

  9. Investigation of Workplace-like Calibration Fields via a Deuterium-Tritium (D-T) Neutron Generator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozhayev, Andrey V; Piper, Roman K; Rathbone, Bruce A; McDonald, Joseph C

    2017-04-01

    Radiation survey meters and personal dosimeters are typically calibrated in reference neutron fields based on conventional radionuclide sources, such as americium-beryllium (Am-Be) or californium-252 (Cf), either unmodified or heavy-water moderated. However, these calibration neutron fields differ significantly from the workplace fields in which most of these survey meters and dosimeters are being used. Although some detectors are designed to yield an approximately dose-equivalent response over a particular neutron energy range, the response of other detectors is highly dependent upon neutron energy. This, in turn, can result in significant over- or underestimation of the intensity of neutron radiation and/or personal dose equivalent determined in the work environment. The use of simulated workplace neutron calibration fields that more closely match those present at the workplace could improve the accuracy of worker, and workplace, neutron dose assessment. This work provides an overview of the neutron fields found around nuclear power reactors and interim spent fuel storage installations based on available data. The feasibility of producing workplace-like calibration fields in an existing calibration facility has been investigated via Monte Carlo simulations. Several moderating assembly configurations, paired with a neutron generator using the deuterium tritium (D-T) fusion reaction, were explored.

  10. Plasma confinement system and methods for use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarboe, Thomas R.; Sutherland, Derek

    2017-09-05

    A plasma confinement system is provided that includes a confinement chamber that includes one or more enclosures of respective helicity injectors. The one or more enclosures are coupled to ports at an outer radius of the confinement chamber. The system further includes one or more conductive coils aligned substantially parallel to the one or more enclosures and a further set of one or more conductive coils respectively surrounding portions of the one or more enclosures. Currents may be provided to the sets of conductive coils to energize a gas within the confinement chamber into a plasma. Further, a heat-exchange system is provided that includes an inner wall, an intermediate wall, an outer wall, and pipe sections configured to carry coolant through cavities formed by the walls.

  11. First downscattered neutron images from Inertial Confinement Fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guler Nevzat

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Inertial Confinement Fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF are designed to understand and test the basic principles of self-sustaining fusion reactions by laser driven compression of deuterium-tritium (DT filled cryogenic plastic (CH capsules. The experimental campaign is ongoing to tune the implosions and characterize the burning plasma conditions. Nuclear diagnostics play an important role in measuring the characteristics of these burning plasmas, providing feedback to improve the implosion dynamics. The Neutron Imaging (NI diagnostic provides information on the distribution of the central fusion reaction region and the surrounding DT fuel by collecting images at two different energy bands for primary (13–15 MeV and downscattered (10–12 MeV neutrons. From these distributions, the final shape and size of the compressed capsule can be estimated and the symmetry of the compression can be inferred. The first downscattered neutron images from imploding ICF capsules are shown in this paper.

  12. Confinement in Wendelstein 7-X limiter plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, M.; Dinklage, A.; Alonso, A.; Fuchert, G.; Bozhenkov, S.; Höfel, U.; Andreeva, T.; Baldzuhn, J.; Beurskens, M.; Bosch, H.-S.; Beidler, C. D.; Biedermann, C.; Blanco, E.; Brakel, R.; Burhenn, R.; Buttenschön, B.; Cappa, A.; Czarnecka, A.; Endler, M.; Estrada, T.; Fornal, T.; Geiger, J.; Grulke, O.; Harris, J. H.; Hartmann, D.; Jakubowski, M.; Klinger, T.; Knauer, J.; Kocsis, G.; König, R.; Kornejew, P.; Krämer-Flecken, A.; Krawczyk, N.; Krychowiak, M.; Kubkowska, M.; Ksiazek, I.; Langenberg, A.; Laqua, H. P.; Lazerson, S.; Maaßberg, H.; Marushchenko, N.; Marsen, S.; Moncada, V.; Moseev, D.; Naujoks, D.; Otte, M.; Pablant, N.; Pasch, E.; Pisano, F.; Rahbarnia, K.; Schröder, T.; Stange, T.; Stephey, L.; Szepesi, T.; Pedersen, T. Sunn; Trimino Mora, H.; Thomsen, H.; Tsuchiya, H.; Turkin, Yu.; Wauters, T.; Weir, G.; Wenzel, U.; Werner, A.; Wolf, R.; Wurden, G. A.; Zhang, D.; the W7-X Team

    2017-08-01

    Observations on confinement in the first experimental campaign on the optimized Stellarator Wendelstein 7-X are summarized. In this phase W7-X was equipped with five inboard limiters only and thus the discharge length restricted to avoid local overheating. Stationary plasmas are limited to low densities  <2-3 · 1019 m-3. With the available 4.3 MW ECR Heating core T e ~ 8 keV, T i ~ 1-2 keV are achieved routinely resulting in energy confinement time τ E between 80 ms to 150 ms. For these conditions the plasmas show characteristics of core electron root confinement with peaked T e-profiles and positive E r up to about half of the minor radius. Profiles and plasma currents respond to on- and off-axis heating and co- and counter ECCD respectively.

  13. GAMMA-RAY DIAGNOSTICS OF ALPHA-SLOWING IN INERTIAL CONFINEMENT FUSION-TARGETS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DENDOOVEN, PG; DRAKE, RP; CABLE, MD; Dendooven, Peter

    1993-01-01

    For large inertial confinement fusion deuterium-tritium targets, a way to diagnose alpha slowing might be via capture reaction gamma rays. Calculations are presented for two such methods: one uses the alpha+T direct capture gamma rays, the other is based on a series of resonant alpha-capture

  14. A dynamical model for plasma confinement transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilarczyk, Paweł; García, Luis; Carreras, Benjamin A.; Llerena, Irene

    2012-03-01

    A three-equation model describing the evolution of the turbulence level, averaged shear flow and sheared zonal flow is analyzed using topological properties of the asymptotic solutions. An exploration in parameter space is done, identifying the attractor sets, which are fixed points and limit cycles. Then a more detailed analysis of all Morse sets is conducted using topological-combinatorial computations. This model allows the description of different types of transitions to improved plasma confinement regimes.

  15. Diagnostics of MCF plasmas using Lyman-{alpha} fluorescence excited by one or two photons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voslamber, D

    1998-11-01

    Laser-induced Lyman-{alpha} fluorescence of the hydrogen isotopes is investigated with regard to diagnostic applications in magnetically confined fusion plasmas. A formal analysis is presented for two excitation schemes: one-photon and Doppler-free two-photon excitation. The analysis includes estimates of the expected experimental errors arising from the photon noise and from the sensitivity of the observed fluorescence signals to variations of the plasma and laser parameters. Both excitation schemes are suitable primarily for application in the plasma edge, but even in the plasma bulk of large machines they can still be applied in combination with a diagnostic neutral beam. The two-photon excitation scheme is particularly attractive because it involves absorption spectra that are resolved within the Doppler width. This implies a large diagnostic potential and in particular offers a way to measure the deuterium-tritium fuel mix in fusion reactors. (author) 37 refs.

  16. The theory of toroidally confined plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    White, Roscoe B

    2014-01-01

    This graduate level textbook develops the theory of magnetically confined plasma, with the aim of bringing the reader to the level of current research in the field of thermonuclear fusion. It begins with the basic concepts of magnetic field description, plasma equilibria and stability, and goes on to derive the equations for guiding center particle motion in an equilibrium field. Topics include linear and nonlinear ideal and resistive modes and particle transport. It is of use to workers in the field of fusion both for its wide-ranging account of tokamak physics and as a kind of handbook or formulary. This edition has been extended in a number of ways. The material on mode-particle interactions has been reformulated and much new information added, including methodology for Monte Carlo implementation of mode destabilization. These results give explicit means of carrying out mode destabilization analysis, in particular for the dangerous fishbone mode. A new chapter on cyclotron motion in toroidal geometry has ...

  17. Confinement Studies in High Temperature Spheromak Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, D N; Mclean, H S; Wood, R D; Casper, T A; Cohen, B I; Hooper, E B; LoDestro, L L; Pearlstein, L D; Romero-Talamas, C

    2006-10-23

    Recent results from the SSPX spheromak experiment demonstrate the potential for obtaining good energy confinement (Te > 350eV and radial electron thermal diffusivity comparable to tokamak L-mode values) in a completely self-organized toroidal plasma. A strong decrease in thermal conductivity with temperature is observed and at the highest temperatures, transport is well below that expected from the Rechester-Rosenbluth model. Addition of a new capacitor bank has produced 60% higher magnetic fields and almost tripled the pulse length to 11ms. For plasmas with T{sub e} > 300eV, it becomes feasible to use modest (1.8MW) neutral beam injection (NBI) heating to significantly change the power balance in the core plasma, making it an effective tool for improving transport analysis. We are now developing detailed designs for adding NBI to SSPX and have developed a new module for the CORSICA transport code to compute the correct fast-ion orbits in SSPX so that we can simulate the effect of adding NBI; initial results predict that such heating can raise the electron temperature and total plasma pressure in the core by a factor of two.

  18. Plasma wall interaction and tritium retention in TFTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skinner, C. H. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Amarescu, E. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Ascione, G. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Synakowski, E. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States)

    1996-05-01

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) has been operating safely and routinely with deuterium-tritium fuel for more than two years. In this time, TFTR has produced an impressive number of record breaking results including core fusion power, ~ 2 MW/m³, comparable to that expected for ITER. Advances in wall conditioning via lithium pellet injection have played an essential role in achieving these results. Deuterium-tritium operation has also provided a special opportunity to address the issues of tritium recycling and retention. Tritium retention over two years of operation was approximately 40%. Recently, the in-torus tritium inventory was reduced by half through a combination of glow discharge cleaning, moist-air soaks, and plasma discharge cleaning. The tritium inventory is not a constraint in continued operations. The authors present recent results from TFTR in the context of plasma wall interactions and deuterium-tritium issues.

  19. Energy gain of ignitable targets in inertial confinement fusion (ICF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Parvazian,J Jafari

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available   In order to determine the fusion energy gain in a target due to inertial confinement fusion, it is necessary to solve hydrodynamic equations governed on plasma behavior during confinement time. To compress spherical multilayer targets having fuel in the central part, they are irradiated by laser or heavy ion beams. A suitable mass ratio of a pusher is used to ignite the central part of the target. When compression is maximum, fuel density exceeds from 500 to 1000 times of the cold density. Temperature in the cold fuel region rises rapidly and cause the plasma and fusion reaction to take place. Calculations of density, temperature and pressure profiles in the plasma are necessary to obtain the energy flux of neurons, electrons and radiations coming out from the target. Using numerical solutions for continuity, the momentum and energy equations based on a defined continuity equation we prepared a computer program to calculate density, temperature and pressure profiles. The gain of the target as output to input energy is determined. Using this procedure to a designed target with deuterium-tritium (DT fuel derived by heavy ion beams gives an energy gain over 400.

  20. Structural properties of hydrogen isotopes in solid phase in the context of inertial confinement fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guerrero Carlo

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Quality of Deuterium-Tritium capsules is a critical aspect in Inertial Confinement Fusion. In this work, we present a Quantum Molecular Dynamics methodology able to model hydrogen isotopes and their structural molecular organisation at extreme pressures and cryogenic temperatures (< 15 K. Our study sets up the basis for a future analysis on the mechanical and structural properties of DT-ice in inertial confinement fusion (ICF target manufacturing conditions.

  1. Fokker Planck kinetic modeling of suprathermal alpha-particles in a fusion plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Peigney, Benjamin-Edouard; Tikhonchuk, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    We present an ion kinetic model describing the ignition and burn of the deuterium-tritium fuel of inertial fusion targets. The analysis of the underlying physical model enables us to develop efficient numerical methods to simulate the creation, transport and collisional relaxation of fusion reaction products (alpha-particles) at a kinetic level. A two-energy-scale approach leads to a self-consistent modeling of the coupling between suprathermal alpha-particles and the thermal bulk of the imploding plasma. This method provides an accurate numerical treatment of energy deposition and transport processes involving suprathermal particles. The numerical tools presented here are validated against known analytical results. This enables us to investigate the potential role of ion kinetic effects on the physics of ignition and thermonuclear burn in inertial confinement fusion schemes.

  2. Improved energy confinement with nonlinear isotope effects in magnetically confined plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia, J; Jenko, F

    2016-01-01

    The efficient production of electricity from nuclear fusion in magnetically confined plasmas relies on a good confinement of the thermal energy. For more than thirty years, the observation that such confinement depends on the mass of the plasma isotope and its interaction with apparently unrelated plasma conditions has remained largely unexplained and it has become one of the main unsolved issues. By means of numerical studies based on the gyrokinetic theory, we quantitatively show how the plasma microturbulence depends on the isotope mass through nonlinear multiscale microturbulence effects involving the interplay between zonal flows, electromagnetic effects and the torque applied. This finding has crucial consequences for the design of future reactors since, in spite of the fact that they will be composed by multiple ion species, their extrapolation from present day experiments heavily relies on the knowledge obtained from a long experimental tradition based in single isotope plasmas.

  3. Physical investigation of a quad confinement plasma source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoll, Aaron; Lucca Fabris, Andrea; Young, Christopher; Cappelli, Mark

    2016-10-01

    Quad magnetic confinement plasma sources are novel magnetized DC discharges suitable for applications in a broad range of fields, particularly space propulsion, plasma etching and deposition. These sources contain a square discharge channel with magnetic cusps at the four lateral walls, enhancing plasma confinement and electron residence time inside the device. The magnetic field topology is manipulated using four independent electromagnets on each edge of the channel, tuning the properties of the generated plasma. We characterize the plasma ejected from the quad confinement sources using a combination of traditional electrostatic probes and non-intrusive laser-based diagnostics. Measurements show a strong ion acceleration layer located 8 cm downstream of the exit plane, beyond the extent of the magnetic field. The ion velocity field is investigated with different magnetic configurations, demonstrating how ion trajectories may be manipulated. C.Y. acknowledges support from the DOE NSSA Stewardship Science Graduate Fellowship under contract DE-FC52-08NA28752.

  4. NATO Advanced Study Institute entitled Physics of Plasma-Wall Interactions in Controlled Fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Behrisch, R; Physics of plasma-wall interactions in controlled fusion

    1986-01-01

    Controlled thermonuclear fusion is one of the possible candidates for long term energy sources which will be indispensable for our highly technological society. However, the physics and technology of controlled fusion are extremely complex and still require a great deal of research and development before fusion can be a practical energy source. For producing energy via controlled fusion a deuterium-tritium gas has to be heated to temperatures of a few 100 Million °c corres­ ponding to about 10 keV. For net energy gain, this hot plasma has to be confined at a certain density for a certain time One pro­ mising scheme to confine such a plasma is the use of i~tense mag­ netic fields. However, the plasma diffuses out of the confining magnetic surfaces and impinges on the surrounding vessel walls which isolate the plasma from the surrounding air. Because of this plasma wall interaction, particles from the plasma are lost to the walls by implantation and are partially reemitted into the plasma. In addition, wall...

  5. Measuring the absolute deuterium-tritium neutron yield using the magnetic recoil spectrometer at OMEGA and the NIF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, D T; Frenje, J A; Gatu Johnson, M; Séguin, F H; Li, C K; Petrasso, R D; Glebov, V Yu; Katz, J; Knauer, J P; Meyerhofer, D D; Sangster, T C; Bionta, R M; Bleuel, D L; Döppner, T; Glenzer, S; Hartouni, E; Hatchett, S P; Le Pape, S; Ma, T; MacKinnon, A; McKernan, M A; Moran, M; Moses, E; Park, H-S; Ralph, J; Remington, B A; Smalyuk, V; Yeamans, C B; Kline, J; Kyrala, G; Chandler, G A; Leeper, R J; Ruiz, C L; Cooper, G W; Nelson, A J; Fletcher, K; Kilkenny, J; Farrell, M; Jasion, D; Paguio, R

    2012-10-01

    A magnetic recoil spectrometer (MRS) has been installed and extensively used on OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) for measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum from inertial confinement fusion implosions. From the neutron spectrum measured with the MRS, many critical implosion parameters are determined including the primary DT neutron yield, the ion temperature, and the down-scattered neutron yield. As the MRS detection efficiency is determined from first principles, the absolute DT neutron yield is obtained without cross-calibration to other techniques. The MRS primary DT neutron measurements at OMEGA and the NIF are shown to be in excellent agreement with previously established yield diagnostics on OMEGA, and with the newly commissioned nuclear activation diagnostics on the NIF.

  6. Experimental investigation of magnetically confined plasma loops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tenfelde, Jan

    2012-12-11

    Arch-shaped magnetic flux tubes generated in a pulsed-power plasma experiment were investigated with a variety of diagnostics concerning their expansion properties. Specifically, the expansion velocity was of interest, which is observed as constant for a wide range of experimental parameters. An MHD transport mechanism is investigated as possible cause of a uniform arch cross section: Axial transport of poloidal magnetic flux along the plasma may cause a pinch force leading to a uniform diameter along the arch. Despite numerous experimental findings at a very similar experimental setup, no indication for the relevance of this process could be found. Instead, magnetic probe data showed that the plasma current in the apex region is constant. A constant expansion velocity was observed for considerably different experimental conditions. This included different plasma source designs with fundamentally different toroidal magnetic field topology and variation of the working gas, which lead to plasma densities lower by an order of magnitude. Inside the current channel of the arch, Alfven velocities were estimated. To this end, plasma density profiles obtained from interferometry were inverted to obtain local densities, which were in turn verified by means of Stark broadening of hydrogen Balmer lines. Furthermore, measurements of multiple components of the magnetic field of the plasma arch were performed. An estimate for the conductivity was obtained from Spitzer's formula for fully ionized plasma using electron temperatures obtained from elementary optical emission spectroscopy. From the presented data of ccd imaging, magnetic field probes, and to lesser extent, interferometry, the underlying assumption of residual plasma (and considerable plasma currents through it) below the actual arch structure is very plausible. Rough estimates of the electric field strength along the arch and results of the magnetic field measurements showed, that the detected expansion

  7. Apparatus for magnetic and electrostatic confinement of plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostoker, Norman [Irvine, CA; Binderbauer, Michl [Irvine, CA

    2009-08-04

    An apparatus and method for containing plasma and forming a Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) magnetic topology are described in which plasma ions are contained magnetically in stable, non-adiabatic orbits in the FRC. Further, the electrons are contained electrostatically in a deep energy well, created by tuning an externally applied magnetic field. The simultaneous electrostatic confinement of electrons and magnetic confinement of ions avoids anomalous transport and facilitates classical containment of both electrons and ions. In this configuration, ions and electrons may have adequate density and temperature so that upon collisions ions are fused together by nuclear force, thus releasing fusion energy. Moreover, the fusion fuel plasmas that can be used with the present confinement system and method are not limited to neutronic fuels only, but also advantageously include advanced fuels.

  8. Apparatus for magnetic and electrostatic confinement of plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rostoker, Norman; Binderbauer, Michl

    2016-07-05

    An apparatus and method for containing plasma and forming a Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) magnetic topology are described in which plasma ions are contained magnetically in stable, non-adiabatic orbits in the FRC. Further, the electrons are contained electrostatically in a deep energy well, created by tuning an externally applied magnetic field. The simultaneous electrostatic confinement of electrons and magnetic confinement of ions avoids anomalous transport and facilitates classical containment of both electrons and ions. In this configuration, ions and electrons may have adequate density and temperature so that upon collisions ions are fused together by nuclear force, thus releasing fusion energy. Moreover, the fusion fuel plasmas that can be used with the present confinement system and method are not limited to neutronic fuels only, but also advantageously include advanced fuels.

  9. Improving the hot-spot pressure and demonstrating ignition hydrodynamic equivalence in cryogenic deuterium tritium implosions on OMEGA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goncharov, V. N. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Sangster, T. C. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Betti, R. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Boehly, T. R. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Bonino, M. J. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Collins, T. J. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Craxton, R. S. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Delettrez, J. A. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Edgell, D. H. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Epstein, R. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Follett, R. K. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Forrest, C. J. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Froula, D. H. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Yu. Glebov, V. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Harding, D. R. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Henchen, R. J. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Hu, S. X. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Igumenshchev, I. V. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Janezic, R. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Kelly, J. H. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Kessler, T. J. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Kosc, T. Z. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Loucks, S. J. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Marozas, J. A. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Marshall, F. J. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Maximov, A. V. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; McCrory, R. L. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; McKenty, P. W. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Meyerhofer, D. D. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Michel, D. T. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Myatt, J. F. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Nora, R. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Radha, P. B. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Regan, S. P. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Seka, W. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Shmayda, W. T. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Short, R.W. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Shvydky, A. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Skupsky, S. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Stoeckl, C. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Yaakobi, B. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Frenje, J. A. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center; Gatu-Johnson, M. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center; Petrasso, R. D. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center; Casey, D. T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-05-01

    Reaching ignition in direct-drive (DD) inertial confinement fusion implosions requires achieving central pressures in excess of 100 Gbar. The OMEGA laser system [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] is used to study the physics of implosions that are hydrodynamically equivalent to the ignition designs on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [J. A. Paisner et al., Laser Focus World 30, 75 (1994)]. It is shown that the highest hot-spot pressures (up to 40 Gbar) are achieved in target designs with a fuel adiabat of α ≅ 4, an implosion velocity of 3.8 × 10⁷ cm/s, and a laser intensity of ~10¹⁵ W/cm². These moderate-adiabat implosions are well understood using two-dimensional hydrocode simulations. The performance of lower-adiabat implosions is significantly degraded relative to code predictions, a common feature between DD implosions on OMEGA and indirect-drive cryogenic implosions on the NIF. Simplified theoretical models are developed to gain physical understanding of the implosion dynamics that dictate the target performance. These models indicate that degradations in the shell density and integrity (caused by hydrodynamic instabilities during the target acceleration) coupled with hydrodynamics at stagnation are the main failure mechanisms in low-adiabat designs. To demonstrate ignition hydrodynamic equivalence in cryogenic implosions on OMEGA, the target-design robustness to hydrodynamic instability growth must be improved by reducing laser-coupling losses caused by cross beam energy transfer.

  10. Improvement of plasma energy confinement in tokamak under radiative cooling of the edge plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razumova, K. A.; Borschegovskiy, A. A.; Gorbunov, E. P.; Dremin, M. M.; Kasyanova, N. V.; Kirneva, N. A.; Kislov, A. Ya.; Klyuchnikov, L. A.; Krupin, V. A.; Krylov, S. V.; Lysenko, S. E.; Melnikov, A. V.; Myalton, T. B.; Nemets, A. R.; Notkin, G. E.; Nurgaliev, M. R.; Sarychev, D. V.; Sushkov, A. V.; Chistyakov, V. V.; Ongena, J.; Messiaen, A.

    2017-11-01

    Improvement of plasma energy confinement in the T-10 tokamak by injection of impurity gases was studied experimentally. Injection of Ne and He in the ohmic and ECR heating regimes allows one to separate the dependences of energy confinement on the plasma density and on the edge plasma cooling rate. It is shown that the well-known dependence of the energy confinement time on the plasma density is, in fact, the dependence on the radiative loss power. This phenomenon can be explained by plasma self-organization. The experiments are described by a thermodynamic model for self-organized plasma in which the transport coefficient depends on the difference between the actual and self-consistent pressure profiles. The reduction in the heat flux at the plasma edge due to radiative cooling leads to a decrease in the transport coefficient in this region and, accordingly, improves energy confinement. Results of approximate model calculations for experiments with Ne injection are presented.

  11. Thermonuclear plasma physic: inertial confinement fusion; Physique des plasmas thermonucleaires: la fusion par confinement inertiel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayer, Ch.; Juraszek, D

    2001-07-01

    Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) is an approach to thermonuclear fusion in which the fuel contained in a spherical capsule is strongly compressed and heated to achieve ignition and burn. The released thermonuclear energy can be much higher than the driver energy, making energetic applications attractive. Many complex physical phenomena are involved by the compression process, but it is possible to use simple analytical models to analyze the main critical points. We first determine the conditions to obtain fuel ignition. High thermonuclear gains are achieved if only a small fraction of the fuel called hot spot is used to trigger burn in the main fuel compressed on a low isentrope. A simple hot spot model will be described. The high pressure needed to drive the capsule compression are obtained by the ablation process. A simple Rocket model describe the main features of the implosion phase. Several parameters have to be controlled during the compression: irradiation symmetry, hydrodynamical stability and when the driver is a laser, the problems arising from interaction of the EM wave with the plasma. Two different schemes are examined: Indirect Drive which uses X-ray generated in a cavity to drive the implosion and the Fast Ignitor concept using a ultra intense laser beam to create the hot spot. At the end we present the Laser Megajoule (LMJ) project. LMJ is scaled to a thermonuclear gain of the order of ten. (authors)

  12. Thermo-diffusion in inertially confined plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Kagan, Grigory

    2013-01-01

    In a plasma of multiple ion species, thermodynamic forces such as pressure and temperature gradients can drive ion species separation via inter-species diffusion. Unlike its neutral mix counterpart, plasma thermo-diffusion is found comparable to, or even much larger than, baro-diffusion. It is shown that such a strong effect is due to the long-range nature of the Coulomb potential, as opposed to short-range interactions in neutral gases. A special composition of the tritium and 3He fuel is identified to have vanishing net diffusion during adiabatic compression, and hence provides an experimental test in which yield degradation is minimized during ICF implosions.

  13. Passive Spectroscopic Diagnostics for Magnetically-confined Fusion Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stratton, B. C.; Biter, M.; Hill, K. W.; Hillis, D. L.; Hogan, J. T.

    2007-07-18

    Spectroscopy of radiation emitted by impurities and hydrogen isotopes plays an important role in the study of magnetically-confined fusion plasmas, both in determining the effects of impurities on plasma behavior and in measurements of plasma parameters such as electron and ion temperatures and densities, particle transport, and particle influx rates. This paper reviews spectroscopic diagnostics of plasma radiation that are excited by collisional processes in the plasma, which are termed 'passive' spectroscopic diagnostics to distinguish them from 'active' spectroscopic diagnostics involving injected particle and laser beams. A brief overview of the ionization balance in hot plasmas and the relevant line and continuum radiation excitation mechanisms is given. Instrumentation in the soft X-ray, vacuum ultraviolet, ultraviolet, visible, and near-infrared regions of the spectrum is described and examples of measurements are given. Paths for further development of these measurements and issues for their implementation in a burning plasma environment are discussed.

  14. Plasma transport in the Scrape-off-Layer of magnetically confined plasma and the plasma exhaust

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jens Juul; Naulin, Volker; Nielsen, Anders Henry

    An overview of the plasma dynamics in the Scrape-off-Layer (SOL) of magnetically confined plasma is presented. The SOL is the exhaust channel of the warm plasma from the core, and the understanding of the SOL plasma dynamics is one of the key issues in contemporary fusion research. It is essential...... for operation of fusion experiments and ultimately fusion power plants. Recent results clearly demonstrate that the plasma transport through the SOL is dominated by turbulent intermittent fluctuations organized into filamentary structures convecting particles, energy, and momentum through the SOL region. Thus......, the transport cannot be described and parametrized by simple diffusive type models. The transport leads to strong localized power loads on the first wall and the plasma facing components, which have serious lasting influence....

  15. First-principles investigations on ionization and thermal conductivity of polystyrene for inertial confinement fusion applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, S. X.; Collins, L. A.; Goncharov, V. N.; Kress, J. D.; McCrory, R. L.; Skupsky, S.

    2016-04-01

    Using quantum molecular-dynamics (QMD) methods based on the density functional theory, we have performed first-principles investigations of the ionization and thermal conductivity of polystyrene (CH) over a wide range of plasma conditions (ρ = 0.5 to 100 g/cm3 and T = 15 625 to 500 000 K). The ionization data from orbital-free molecular-dynamics calculations have been fitted with a "Saha-type" model as a function of the CH plasma density and temperature, which gives an increasing ionization as the CH density increases even at low temperatures (T hydrodynamics codes for inertial confinement fusion simulations, the QMD results show a large difference in the low-temperature regime in which strong coupling and electron degeneracy play an essential role in determining plasma properties. Hydrodynamic simulations of cryogenic deuterium-tritium targets with CH ablators on OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility using the QMD-derived ionization and thermal conductivity of CH have predicted ˜20% variation in target performance in terms of hot-spot pressure and neutron yield (gain) with respect to traditional model simulations.

  16. Simulation of transition dynamics to high confinement in fusion plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anders Henry; Xu, G. S.; Madsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    The transition dynamics from the low (L) to the high (H) confinement mode in magnetically confined plasmas is investigated using a first-principles four-field fluid model. Numerical results are in agreement with measurements from the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak - EAST. Particula...... are highly relevant for developing predictive models of the transition, essential for understanding and optimizing future fusion power reactors........ Particularly, the slow transition with an intermediate dithering phase is well reproduced at proper parameters. The model recovers the power threshold for the L-H transition as well as the decrease in power threshold switching from single to double null configuration observed experimentally. The results...

  17. Hollow laser plasma self-confined microjet generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sizyuk, Valeryi; Hassanein, Ahmed; Center for Materials under Extreme Environment Team

    2017-10-01

    Hollow laser beam produced plasma (LPP) devices are being used for the generation of the self-confined cumulative microjet. Most important place by this LPP device construction is achieving of an annular distribution of the laser beam intensity by spot. An integrated model is being developed to detailed simulation of the plasma generation and evolution inside the laser beam channel. The model describes in two temperature approximation hydrodynamic processes in plasma, laser absorption processes, heat conduction, and radiation energy transport. The total variation diminishing scheme in the Lax-Friedrich formulation for the description of plasma hydrodynamic is used. Laser absorption and radiation transport models on the base of Monte Carlo method are being developed. Heat conduction part on the implicit scheme with sparse matrixes using is realized. The developed models are being integrated into HEIGHTS-LPP computer simulation package. The integrated modeling of the hollow beam laser plasma generation showed the self-confinement and acceleration of the plasma microjet inside the laser channel. It was found dependence of the microjet parameters including radiation emission on the hole and beam radiuses ratio. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation, PIRE project.

  18. Coronal Loops: Observations and Modeling of Confined Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Reale

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Coronal loops are the building blocks of the X-ray bright solar corona. They owe their brightness to the dense confined plasma, and this review focuses on loops mostly as structures confining plasma. After a brief historical overview, the review is divided into two separate but not independent parts: the first illustrates the observational framework, the second reviews the theoretical knowledge. Quiescent loops and their confined plasma are considered, and therefore topics such as loop oscillations and flaring loops (except for non-solar ones which provide information on stellar loops are not specifically addressed here. The observational section discusses loop classification and populations, and then describes the morphology of coronal loops, its relationship with the magnetic field, and the concept of loops as multi-stranded structures. The following part of this section is devoted to the characteristics of the loop plasma and of its thermal structure in particular, according to the classification into hot, warm, and cool loops. Then, temporal analyses of loops and the observations of plasma dynamics and flows are illustrated. In the modeling section some basics of loop physics are provided, supplying some fundamental scaling laws and timescales, a useful tool for consultation. The concept of loop modeling is introduced and models are distinguished between those treating loops as monolithic and static, and those resolving loops into thin and dynamic strands. Then, more specific discussions address modeling the loop fine structure and the plasma flowing along the loops. Special attention is devoted to the question of loop heating, with separate discussion of wave (AC and impulsive (DC heating. Finally, a brief discussion about stellar X-ray emitting structures related to coronal loops is included and followed by conclusions and open questions.

  19. Coronal Loops: Observations and Modeling of Confined Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Reale

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Coronal loops are the building blocks of the X-ray bright solar corona. They owe their brightness to the dense confined plasma, and this review focuses on loops mostly as structures confining plasma. After a brief historical overview, the review is divided into two separate but not independent parts: the first illustrates the observational framework, the second reviews the theoretical knowledge. Quiescent loops and their confined plasma are considered and, therefore, topics such as loop oscillations and flaring loops (except for non-solar ones, which provide information on stellar loops are not specifically addressed here. The observational section discusses the classification, populations, and the morphology of coronal loops, its relationship with the magnetic field, and the loop stranded structure. The section continues with the thermal properties and diagnostics of the loop plasma, according to the classification into hot, warm, and cool loops. Then, temporal analyses of loops and the observations of plasma dynamics, hot and cool flows, and waves are illustrated. In the modeling section, some basics of loop physics are provided, supplying fundamental scaling laws and timescales, a useful tool for consultation. The concept of loop modeling is introduced and models are divided into those treating loops as monolithic and static, and those resolving loops into thin and dynamic strands. More specific discussions address modeling the loop fine structure and the plasma flowing along the loops. Special attention is devoted to the question of loop heating, with separate discussion of wave (AC and impulsive (DC heating. Large-scale models including atmosphere boxes and the magnetic field are also discussed. Finally, a brief discussion about stellar coronal loops is followed by highlights and open questions.

  20. Magnetohydrodynamics equilibrium of a self-confined elliptical plasma ball

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, H. (CCAST (World Laboratory) P. O. Box 8730, Beijing 100080 and Institute of Mechanics, Academia Sinica, Beijing, People' s Republic of China (CN)); Oakes, M.E. (Department of Physics, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (USA))

    1991-08-01

    A variational principle is applied to the problem of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) equilibrium of a self-contained elliptical plasma ball, such as elliptical ball lightning. The principle is appropriate for an approximate solution of partial differential equations with arbitrary boundary shape. The method reduces the partial differential equation to a series of ordinary differential equations and is especially valuable for treating boundaries with nonlinear deformations. The calculations conclude that the pressure distribution and the poloidal current are more uniform in an oblate self-confined plasma ball than that of an elongated plasma ball. The ellipticity of the plasma ball is obviously restricted by its internal pressure, magnetic field, and ambient pressure. Qualitative evidence is presented for the absence of sighting of elongated ball lightning.

  1. An integrated approach to the control of magnetically confined plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albanese, R.; Ambrosino, G.; Ariola, M.; Bagatin, M.; Bellina, F.; Bettini, P.; Borghi, C.A.; Chitarin, G.; Coccorese, E.; Formisano, A.; Fresa, R.; De Magistris, M.; Gnesotto, F.; Guarnieri, M.; Marchiori, G.; Martone, R.; Pironti, A.; Ribani, P.L.; Rubinacci, G.; Stella, A. E-mail: stella@uniud.it; Trevisan, F.; Villone, F

    2001-10-01

    In this paper, a short review of the work done in the framework of a nation-wide research programme on 'Models and Methods for Plasma Control in Magnetically Confined Fusion Experiments' is presented. The broad aim of the overall programme is to develop and propose a new effective and reliable approach to the on-line plasma control for future fusion experiments, starting from the today's theoretical background, validated by experimental evidence from a number of tests performed on existing experiments. The proposed formulation to approach the control problem is a linearized model in terms of suitable state variables and input/output relationships. The basic project has been subdivided into four major areas of investigation: the linearized response plasma model, the three-dimensional electromagnetic model, the identification techniques and finally the plasma control requirements. The most remarkable results, achieved so far in each area above, are presented in the paper.

  2. Implicit Methods for the Magnetohydrodynamic Description of Magnetically Confined Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jardin, S C

    2010-09-28

    Implicit algorithms are essential for predicting the slow growth and saturation of global instabilities in today’s magnetically confined fusion plasma experiments. Present day algorithms for obtaining implicit solutions to the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations for highly magnetized plasma have their roots in algorithms used in the 1960s and 1970s. However, today’s computers and modern linear and non-linear solver techniques make practical much more comprehensive implicit algorithms than were previously possible. Combining these advanced implicit algorithms with highly accurate spatial representations of the vector fields describing the plasma flow and magnetic fields and with improved methods of calculating anisotropic thermal conduction now makes possible simulations of fusion experiments using realistic values of plasma parameters and actual configuration geometry.

  3. Progress toward the creation of magnetically confined pair plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saitoh, Haruhiko [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik (Germany); The University of Tokyo (Japan); Hergenhahn, Uwe; Paschkowski, Norbert; Stanja, Juliane; Stenson, Eve V. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik (Germany); Niemann, Holger; Sunn Pedersen, Thomas [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik (Germany); Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universitaet Greifswald (Germany); Stoneking, Matthew R. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik (Germany); Lawrence University (United States); Hugenschmidt, Christoph; Piochacz, Christian; Vohburger, Sebastian [Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Schweikhard, Lutz [Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universitaet Greifswald (Germany); Danielson, James R.; Surko, Clifford M. [University of California, San Diego (United States)

    2016-07-01

    The PAX (Positron Accumulation eXperiment) and APEX (A Positron Electron eXperiment) projects aim to experimentally study the unique wave propagation and stability properties of pair plasmas. We plan to accumulate a large number of positrons in a multicell-type trap system (PAX) and to confine them with electrons in APEX, a levitated dipole or stellarator configuration, operated at the NEPOMUC facility, the world's most intense positron source. In this contribution, we report on recent results from PAX and APEX. We have conducted electron experiments with a 2.3 T Penning-Malmberg trap; confinement for more than 1 hour and observation of a collective mode were demonstrated. At NEPOMUC, we have characterized the positron beam for a wide energy range. In a prototype permanent-magnet dipole trap, efficient (38%) injection of the remoderated 5 eV positron beam was realized using E x B drifts. Based on these results, design studies on the confinement of pair-plasmas in a levitated dipole trap are ongoing.

  4. Self-confined particle pairs in complex plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisina, I I; Lisin, E A; Vaulina, O S; Petrov, O F

    2017-01-01

    The liquid-crystal type of phase transition in complex plasmas has been observed repeatedly. However, more studies need to be done on the liquid-vapor transition in complex plasmas. In this paper, the phenomenon of coupling (condensation) of particles into self-confined particle pairs in an anisotropic plasma medium with ion flow is considered analytically and numerically using the Langevin molecular dynamics method. We obtain the stability conditions of the pair (bound) state depending on the interaction parameters and particle kinetic energy. It was shown that the breakup of the particle pair is very sensitive to the ratio of particle charges; for example, it is determined by the influence of the upper particle on the ion flow around the lower one. We also show that a self-confined pair of particles exists even if their total kinetic energy is much greater than the potential well depth for the pair state. This phenomenon occurs due to velocity correlation of particles, which arises with the nonreciprocity of interparticle interaction.

  5. High density plasmas formation in Inertial Confinement Fusion and Astrophysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez-Val, J. M.; Minguez, E.; Velarde, P.; Perlado, J. M.; Velarde, G.; Bravo, E.; Eliezer, S.; Florido, R.; Garcia Rubiano, J.; Garcia-Senz, D.; Gil de la Fe, J. M.; Leon, P. T.; Martel, P.; Ogando, F.; Piera, M.; Relano, A.; Rodriguez, R.; Garcia, C.; Gonzalez, E.; Lachaise, M.; Oliva, E.

    2005-07-01

    In inertially confined fusion (ICF), high densities are required to obtain high gains. In Fast Ignition, a high density, low temperature plasma can be obtained during the compression. If the final temperature reached is low enough, the electrons of the plasma can be degenerate. In degenerate plasmas. Bremsstrahlung emission is strongly suppressed an ignition temperature becomes lower than in classical plasmas, which offers a new design window for ICF. The main difficulty of degenerate plasmas in the compression energy needed for high densities. Besides that, the low specific heat of degenerate electrons (as compared to classical values) is also a problem because of the rapid heating of the plasma. Fluid dynamic evolution of supernovae remnants is a very interesting problem in order to predict the thermodynamical conditions achieved in their collision regions. Those conditions have a strong influence in the emission of light and therefore the detection of such events. A laboratory scale system has been designed reproducing the fluid dynamic field in high energy experiments. The evolution of the laboratory system has been calculated with ARWEN code, 2D Radiation CFD that works with Adaptive Mesh Refinement. Results are compared with simulations on the original system obtained with a 3D SPH astrophysical code. New phenomena at the collision plane and scaling of the laboratory magnitudes will be described. Atomic physics for high density plasmas has been studied with participation in experiments to obtain laser produced high density plasmas under NLTE conditions, carried out at LULI. A code, ATOM3R, has been developed which solves rate equations for optically thin plasmas as well as for homogeneous optically thick plasmas making use of escape factors. New improvements in ATOM3R are been done to calculate level populations and opacities for non homogeneous thick plasmas in NLTE, with emphasis in He and H lines for high density plasma diagnosis. Analytical expression

  6. Fast particle-driven ion cyclotron emission (ICE) in tokamak plasmas and the case for an ICE diagnostic in ITER

    CERN Document Server

    McClements, K G; Dendy, R O; Carbajal, L; Chapman, S C; Cook, J W S; Harvey, R W; Heidbrink, W W; Pinches, S D

    2014-01-01

    Fast particle-driven waves in the ion cyclotron frequency range (ion cyclotron emission or ICE) have provided a valuable diagnostic of confined and escaping fast ions in many tokamaks. This is a passive, non-invasive diagnostic that would be compatible with the high radiation environment of deuterium-tritium plasmas in ITER, and could provide important information on fusion {\\alpha}-particles and beam ions in that device. In JET, ICE from confined fusion products scaled linearly with fusion reaction rate over six orders of magnitude and provided evidence that {\\alpha}-particle confinement was close to classical. In TFTR, ICE was observed from super-Alfv\\'enic {\\alpha}-particles in the plasma edge. The intensity of beam-driven ICE in DIII-D is more strongly correlated with drops in neutron rate during fishbone excitation than signals from more direct beam ion loss diagnostics. In ASDEX Upgrade ICE is produced by both super-Alfv\\'enic DD fusion products and sub-Alfv\\'enic deuterium beam ions.

  7. Fusion Plasma Physics and ITER - An Introduction (1/4)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2011-01-01

    In November 2006, ministers representing the world’s major fusion research communities signed the agreement formally establishing the international project ITER. Sited at Cadarache in France, the project involves China, the European Union (including Switzerland), India, Japan, the Russian Federation, South Korea and the United States. ITER is a critical step in the development of fusion energy: its role is to confirm the feasibility of exploiting magnetic confinement fusion for the production of energy for peaceful purposes by providing an integrated demonstration of the physics and technology required for a fusion power plant. The ITER tokamak is designed to study the “burning plasma” regime in deuterium-tritium (D-T) plasmas by achieving a fusion amplification factor, Q (the ratio of fusion output power to plasma heating input power), of 10 for several hundreds of seconds with a nominal fusion power output of 500MW. It is also intended to allow the study of steady-state plasma operation at Q≥5 by me...

  8. Stability and transport in magnetic confined plasmas; estabilidad y transporte en plasmas confinados magneticamente

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinell, J.J.; Herrera, J.J.E.; Morozov, D.K.; Soboleva, T.K.; Vitela, E. [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, A.P. 70-543, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2000-07-01

    A tokamak is a device with a toroidal geometry that uses magnetic fields to confine a plasma inside a vacuum chamber, in order to produce thermonuclear fusion reactions, releasing large amounts of energy, larger than that employed in operating the device. There are two fundamental problems that have prevented us from achieving this goal: (1) the appearance of different instabilities that are capable of destroying confinement, and (2) the great energy losses resulting from transport to the plasma edge. For several years there has been an enormous effort to study the complex physics behind these two phenomena in order to understand the way they affect the plasma so it is possible to control the unwanted effects. In this Project, different aspects of the Tokamak plasma physics are studied, namely: (a) the transition phenomenon to an improved confinement mode (H mode), (b) the effect impurities have on plasma dynamics in the cooler edge region, (c) the processes leading to a detached divertor regime, which makes energy extraction more efficient, and (d) the burn control of a future nuclear fusion reactor using neural networks. All these are important problems and have to be well understood before the design and construction of a tokamak-based thermonuclear reactor can be undertaken. (Author)

  9. Fractional diffusion models of transport in magnetically confined plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castillo-Negrete, D. del; Carreras, B. A.; Lynch, V. E.

    2005-07-01

    Experimental and theoretical evidence suggests that transport in magnetically confined fusion plasmas deviates from the standard diffusion paradigm. Some examples include the confinement time scaling in L-mode plasmas, rapid pulse propagation phenomena, and inward transport in off-axis fueling experiments. The limitations of the diffusion paradigm can be traced back to the restrictive assumptions in which it is based. In particular, Fick's law, one of the cornerstones of diffusive transport, assumes that the fluxes only depend on local quantities, i. e. the spatial gradient of the field (s). another key issue is the Markovian assumption that neglects memory effects. Also, at a microscopic level, standard diffusion assumes and underlying Gaussian, uncorrelated stochastic process (i. e. a Brownian random walk) with well defined characteristic spatio-temporal scales. Motivated by the need to develop models of non-diffusive transport, we discuss here a class of transport models base on the use of fractional derivative operators. The models incorporates in a unified way non-Fickian transport, non-Markovian processes or memory effects, and non-diffusive scaling. At a microscopic level, the models describe an underlying stochastic process without characteristic spatio-temporal scales that generalizes the Brownian random walk. As a concrete case study to motivate and test the model, we consider transport of tracers in three-dimensional, pressure-gradient-driven turbulence. We show that in this system transport is non-diffusive and cannot be described in the context of the standard diffusion parading. In particular, the probability density function (pdf) of the radial displacements of tracers is strongly non-Gaussian with algebraic decaying tails, and the moments of the tracer displacements exhibit super-diffusive scaling. there is quantitative agreement between the turbulence transport calculations and the proposed fractional diffusion model. In particular, the model

  10. MHD Effects of a Ferritic Wall on Tokamak Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Paul E.

    It has been recognized for some time that the very high fluence of fast (14.1MeV) neutrons produced by deuterium-tritium fusion will represent a major materials challenge for the development of next-generation fusion energy projects such as a fusion component test facility and demonstration fusion power reactor. The best-understood and most promising solutions presently available are a family of low-activation steels originally developed for use in fission reactors, but the ferromagnetic properties of these steels represent a danger to plasma confinement through enhancement of magnetohydrodynamic instabilities and increased susceptibility to error fields. At present, experimental research into the effects of ferromagnetic materials on MHD stability in toroidal geometry has been confined to demonstrating that it is still possible to operate an advanced tokamak in the presence of ferromagnetic components. In order to better quantify the effects of ferromagnetic materials on tokamak plasma stability, a new ferritic wall has been installated in the High Beta Tokamak---Extended Pulse (HBT-EP) device. The development, assembly, installation, and testing of this wall as a modular upgrade is described, and the effect of the wall on machine performance is characterized. Comparative studies of plasma dynamics with the ferritic wall close-fitting against similar plasmas with the ferritic wall retracted demonstrate substantial effects on plasma stability. Resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) are applied, demonstrating a 50% increase in n = 1 plasma response amplitude when the ferritic wall is near the plasma. Susceptibility of plasmas to disruption events increases by a factor of 2 or more with the ferritic wall inserted, as disruptions are observed earlier with greater frequency. Growth rates of external kink instabilities are observed to be twice as large in the presence of a close-fitting ferritic wall. Initial studies are made of the influence of mode rotation frequency

  11. Plasma confinement time in trimix-M galatea multipole magnetic trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishaev, A. M.; Bugrova, A. I.; Kozintseva, M. V.; Lipatov, A. S.; Sigov, A. S.; Kharchevnikov, V. K.

    2010-05-01

    The confinement time of hydrogen plasma trapped in a Trimix-M magnetic multipole galatea was studied in a range of plasma densities (1 × 1016 - 6 × 1018 m-3) and ion energies (˜100-300 eV). It is established that (i) the confinement time increases with decreasing plasma density in the trap and (ii) as the barrier magnetic field is increased, the plasma confinement time grows faster than according to a linear law. The obtained results are indicative of a collisional character of plasma diffusion through the barrier field in the trap.

  12. Transmission Grating Imaging Spectrometer for Magnetically Confined Fusion Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blagojevic, B.; Stutman, D.; Vero, R.; Finkenthal, M.; Moos, H. W.

    2001-10-01

    The Johns Hopkins Plasma Spectroscopy Group is developing a transmission grating (TG) based imaging spectrometer for the soft and ultrasoft X-ray (USXR) ranges. The spectrometer will be integrated into a multi-purpose impurity diagnostic package for Magnetically Confined Fusion experiments, which will provide time and space resolved information about radiation losses, Zeff profiles and particle transport. The package will also include 2-D filtered USXR diode arrays and atomic physics and impurity transport computational capability. The spectrometer has a very simple layout, consisting of two collimating and space resolving slits, a TG and a 2-D imaging detector. As detector we are developing phosphor (P45) coated fiber optic plates with CCD and intensified CCD image readout. The performance of a test 5000 l/mm, 2:1 bar to open area ratio TG has been evaluated in the laboratory using a K-alpha Manson source and the emission from a Penning Discharge. The incident and diffracted photon flux was recorded in the 10-300 Å range with a gas flow proportional counter. The measurements show that spectral resolution and efficiency agree well with the predicted values. A device optimized for spectral resolution and higher order suppression will be tested on the CDX-U and NSTX tokamak at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. Work supported by DoE grant No. DE-FG02-86ER52314ATDoE

  13. Confinement physics for thermal, neutral, high-charge-state plasmas in nested-well solenoidal traps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolliver, D D; Ordonez, C A

    1999-06-01

    A theoretical study is presented which indicates that it is possible to confine a neutral plasma using static electric and solenoidal magnetic fields. The plasma consists of equal temperature electrons and highly stripped ions. The solenoidal magnetic field provides radial confinement, while the electric field, which produces an axial nested-well potential profile, provides axial confinement. A self-consistent, multidimensional numerical solution for the electric potential is obtained, and a fully kinetic theoretical treatment on axial transport is used to determine an axial confinement time scale. The effect on confinement of the presence of a radial electric field is explored with the use of ion trajectory calculations. A thermal, neutral, high-charge-state plasma confined in a nested-well trap opens new possibilities for fundamental studies on plasma recombination and cross-field transport processes under highly controlled conditions.

  14. Inertial plasma confinement in a miniature magnetic bottle induced by circularly polarized laser light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolka, E. (Plasma Physics Group, SOREQ N.R.C., Yavne (Israel)); Eliezer, S. (Plasma Physics Group, SOREQ N.R.C., Yavne (Israel)); Paiss, Y. (Plasma Physics Group, SOREQ N.R.C., Yavne (Israel))

    1993-08-30

    A megagauss magnetic field generated by circularity polarized laser light is used to get confinement of a plasma contained in a good conductor vessel. In this scheme the inertial confinement is supported by the magnetic forces and the Lawson criterion for a DT plasma might be achieved. (orig.)

  15. First-principles opacity table of warm dense deuterium for inertial-confinement-fusion applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, S. X.; Collins, L. A.; Goncharov, V. N.; Boehly, T. R.; Epstein, R.; McCrory, R. L.; Skupsky, S.

    2014-09-01

    Accurate knowledge of the optical properties of a warm dense deuterium-tritium (DT) mixture is important for reliable design of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions using radiation-hydrodynamics simulations. The opacity of a warm dense DT shell essentially determines how much radiation from hot coronal plasmas can be deposited in the DT fuel of an imploding capsule. Even for the simplest species of hydrogen, the accurate calculation of their opacities remains a challenge in the warm-dense matter regime because strong-coupling and quantum effects play an important role in such plasmas. With quantum-molecular-dynamics (QMD) simulations, we have derived a first-principles opacity table (FPOT) of deuterium (and the DT mixture by mass scaling) for a wide range of densities from ρD=0.5 to 673.518g/cm3 and temperatures from T=5000K up to the Fermi temperature TF for each density. Compared with results from the astrophysics opacity table (AOT) currently used in our hydrocodes, the FPOT of deuterium from our QMD calculations has shown a significant increase in opacity for strongly coupled and degenerate plasma conditions by a factor of 3-100 in the ICF-relevant photon-energy range. As conditions approach those of classical plasma, the opacity from the FPOT converges to the corresponding values of the AOT. By implementing the FPOT of deuterium and the DT mixture into our hydrocodes, we have performed radiation-hydrodynamics simulations for low-adiabat cryogenic DT implosions on the OMEGA laser and for direct-drive-ignition designs for the National Ignition Facility. The simulation results using the FPOT show that the target performance (in terms of neutron yield and energy gain) could vary from ˜10% up to a factor of ˜2 depending on the adiabat of the imploding DT capsule; the lower the adiabat, the more variation is seen in the prediction of target performance when compared to the AOT modeling.

  16. MHD instabilities and their effects on plasma confinement in the large helical device plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toi, K.; Ohdachi, S. [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Yamamoto, S. [Nagoya Univ., Dept. of Energy Engineering and Science, Nagoya, Aichi (JP)] [and others

    2002-11-01

    Characteristics of MHD instabilities and their impacts on plasma confinement are studied in current free plasmas of the Large Helical Device (LHD). Spontaneous L-H transition is often observed in high beta plasmas in the range of 2% averaged beta at low toroidal field (B{sub t} {<=} 0.6T). The stored energy rapidly rises with the transition, but quickly saturates due to the growth of m=2/n=3 and m=2/n=2 modes (m and n: poloidal and toroidal mode numbers) excited in the plasma edge region. Even in low beta plasmas, ELM activities are sometimes induced in high performance plasmas with a steep edge pressure gradient, and transiently reduce the stored energy by about 10%. Energetic ion driven MHD modes such as Alfven eigenmodes are studied in the very wide range of characteristic parameters: the averaged beta of energetic ions <{beta}{sub b//}> up to 5% and the ratio of energetic ion velocity to the Alfven velocity V{sub b//}/V{sub A} up to 2.5. In addition to the observation of toroidicity induced Alfven eigenmodes (TAEs), coherent magnetic fluctuations of helicity induced Alfven eigenmodes (HAEs) have been observed for the first time in NBI heated plasmas. The transition of the TAE to the global Alfven eigenmode (GAE) is also observed in a discharge with temporal evolution of the rotational transform profile, having a similarity to the phenomenon in a reversed shear tokamak. At low magnetic field, bursting TAEs transiently induce a significant loss of energetic ions, but lead to the transient improvement of bulk plasma confinement in the plasma central region. (author)

  17. MHD instabilities and their effects on plasma confinement in the large helical device plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toi, K.; Ohdachi, S. [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Yamamoto, S. [Nagoya Univ., Dept. of Energy Engineering and Science, Nagoya, Aichi (JP)] [and others

    2002-10-01

    Characteristics of MHD instabilities and their impacts on plasma confinement are studied in current free plasmas of the Large Helical Device (LHD). Spontaneous L-H transition is often observed in high beta plasmas in the range of 2% averaged beta at low toroidal field (B{sub t} {<=} 0.6 T). The stored energy rapidly rises by the transition, but quickly saturates by the growth of m=2/n=3 and m=2/n=2 modes (m and n: poloidal and toroidal mode numbers) excited in the plasma edge region. Even low beta plasmas, ELM like activities are sometimes induced in high performance plasmas with high edge pressure pedestal, and transiently reduce the stored energy by about 10%. Energetic ion driven MHD modes such as Alfven eigenmodes are studied in the very wide parameter range of the averaged beta of energetic ions <{beta}{sub b} sub (parallel)> up to 5% and the ratio of energetic ion velocity to the Alfven velocity V{sub b} sub (parallel)/V{sub A} up to 2.5. In addition to the observation of toroidicity induced Alfven eigenmodes (TAEs), coherent magnetic fluctuations of helicity induced Alfven eigenmodes (HAEs) have been observed for the first time in NBI heated plasmas. Transition of TAE to global Alfven eigenmode (GAE) is also observed in a discharge with temporal evolution of the rotational transform profile, having a similarity to the phenomenon in a reversed shear tokamak. At the low magnetic field, bursting TAEs enhance energetic ion loss transiently, but lead to the transient improvement of bulk plasma confinement in the plasma central region. (author)

  18. Ion cyclotron emission from fusion-born ions in large tokamak plasmas: a brief review from JET and TFTR to ITER

    CERN Document Server

    Dendy, R O

    2014-01-01

    Ion cyclotron emission (ICE) was the first collective radiative instability, driven by confined fusion-born ions, observed from deuterium-tritium plasmas in JET and TFTR. ICE comprises strongly suprathermal emission, which has spectral peaks at multiple ion cyclotron harmonic frequencies as evaluated at the outer mid-plane edge of tokamak plasmas. The measured intensity of ICE spectral peaks scaled linearly with measured fusion reactivity in JET. In other large tokamak plasmas, ICE is currently used as an indicator of fast ions physics. The excitation mechanism for ICE is the magnetoacoustic cyclotron instability (MCI); in the case of JET and TFTR, the MCI is driven by a set of centrally born fusion products, lying just inside the trapped-passing boundary in velocity space, whose drift orbits make large radial excursions to the outer mid-plane edge. Diagnostic exploitation of ICE in future experiments therefore rests in part on deep understanding of the MCI, and recent advances in computational plasma physics...

  19. Spindle-cusp confinement properties of laser-produced plasma in a low-beta regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshino, R.; Sekiguchi, T. (Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Engineering); Sato, K.

    1981-06-01

    Behavior of a spindle-cusp plasma produced at its central null-field point from a thin wire target by laser pulse is experimentally studied, mainly in a low plasma-beta regime, by means of many different plasma diagnostics. As the results, somewhat queer confinement properties have been found, and some considerations are given for the observed results.

  20. An electro- magneto-static field for confinement of charged particle beams and plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, Jose L.

    A system is presented that is capable of confining an ion beam or plasma within a region that is essentially free of applied fields. An Artificially Structured Boundary (ASB) produces a spatially periodic set of magnetic field cusps that provides charged particle confinement. Electrostatic plugging of the magnetic field cusps enhances confinement. An ASB that has a small spatial period, compared to the dimensions of a confined plasma, generates electro- magneto-static fields with a short range. An ASB-lined volume thus constructed creates an effectively field free region near its center. It is assumed that a non-neutral plasma confined within such a volume relaxes to a Maxwell- Boltzmann distribution. Space charge based confinement of a second species of charged particles is envisioned, where the second species is confined by the space charge of the first non-neutral plasma species. An electron plasma confined within an ASB-lined volume can potentially provide confinement of a positive ion beam or positive ion plasma. Experimental as well as computational results are presented in which a plasma or charged particle beam interact with the electro- magneto-static fields generated by an ASB. A theoretical model is analyzed and solved via self-consistent computational methods to determine the behavior and equilibrium conditions of a relaxed plasma. The equilibrium conditions of a relaxed two species plasma are also computed. In such a scenario, space charge based electrostatic confinement is predicted to occur where a second plasma species is confined by the space charge of the first plasma species. An experimental apparatus with cylindrical symmetry that has its interior surface lined with an ASB is presented. This system was developed by using a simulation of the electro- magneto-static fields present within the trap to guide mechanical design. The construction of the full experimental apparatus is discussed. Experimental results that show the characteristics of

  1. Spectroscopy on magnetically confined plasmas using electron beam ion trap spectrometers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Graf, A T; Brockington, S; Horton, R; Howard, S; Hwang, D; Beiersdorfer, P; Clementson, J; Hill, D; May, M; Mclean, H; Wood, R; Bitter, M; Terry, J; Rowan, W L; Lepson, J K; Delgado-Aparicio, L

    2008-01-01

    Multiple spectrometers originally designed for and used at the University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's electron beam ion trap have found use at various magnetically confined plasma facilities...

  2. Confinement of plasma in a magnetic bottle induced by circularly polarized laser light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eliezer, S.; Kolka, E.; Paiss, Y. [Plasma Physics Soreq Nuclear Research Center, Yavne 70600 (Israel)

    1994-10-05

    A concept of plasma confinement using a combination of inertial and magnetic methods is suggested. A miniature magnetic bottle with the megagauss field can be induced by circularly polarized laser radiation inside a good conductor vessel containing a plasma. The laser pulses also heat the plasma to {similar_to}5 KeV during a few nanoseconds. The Lawson criteria for a DT plasma might be satisfied for densities of the order 5{center_dot}10{sup 21} cm{sup {minus}3} and confinement time about 20 nsec.(AIP) {copyright}{ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics} 1994

  3. Enhanced Plasma Confinement in a Magnetic Well by Whistler Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balmashnov, A. A.; Juul Rasmussen, Jens

    1981-01-01

    The propagation of whistler waves in a magnetic field of mirror configuration is investigated experimentally. The strong interaction between waves and particles at the electron-cyclotron resonance leads to enhanced confinement in the magnetic well.......The propagation of whistler waves in a magnetic field of mirror configuration is investigated experimentally. The strong interaction between waves and particles at the electron-cyclotron resonance leads to enhanced confinement in the magnetic well....

  4. Unifying Role of Radial Electric Field Shear in the Confinement Trends of TFTR Supershot Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ernst, D.R.; Scott, S.D. [Princeton University Plasma Physics Laboratory, P.O.B. 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Coppi, B.; Porkolab, M. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    1998-09-01

    A model is presented to explain the favorable ion thermal confinement trends of supershot plasmas in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). Turbulence suppression by radial electric field shear is important to reproduce the measured temperatures. Supershot confinement scalings are reproduced in more than sixty discharges, including favorable core power scaling and variation with isotopic mass, density peakedness, edge recycling, and toroidal rotation. The results connect the transitionless supershot regime with improved confinement regimes which are attained through sharp confinement transitions in the core or edge. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  5. Ohmic energy confinement saturation and core toroidal rotation reversal in Alcator C-Mod plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rice, J. E.; Greenwald, M. J.; Podpaly, Y. A.; Reinke, M. L.; Hughes, J. W.; Howard, N. T.; Ma, Y.; Cziegler, I.; Ennever, P. C.; Ernst, D.; Fiore, C. L.; Gao, C.; Irby, J. H.; Marmar, E. S.; Porkolab, M.; Tsujii, N.; Wolfe, S. M. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, MIT, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Diamond, P. H. [UCSD, La Jolla, California 92903 (United States); Duval, B. P. [CRPP, EPFL, Lausanne 1015 (Switzerland)

    2012-05-15

    Ohmic energy confinement saturation is found to be closely related to core toroidal rotation reversals in Alcator C-Mod tokamak plasmas. Rotation reversals occur at a critical density, depending on the plasma current and toroidal magnetic field, which coincides with the density separating the linear Ohmic confinement regime from the saturated Ohmic confinement regime. The rotation is directed co-current at low density and abruptly changes direction to counter-current when the energy confinement saturates as the density is increased. Since there is a bifurcation in the direction of the rotation at this critical density, toroidal rotation reversal is a very sensitive indicator in the determination of the regime change. The reversal and confinement saturation results can be unified, since these processes occur in a particular range of the collisionality.

  6. Studies of plasma confinement in linear and RACETRACK mirror configurations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuthi, A.; Wong, A.Y.

    1986-06-30

    This report discusses research on the following magnetic mirror configurations: Racetrack; ECRH generated plasmas; RF generated plasmas; potential structures; surface multipole fields, and lamex; hot electron physics; axial loss processes; and RF induced effects.

  7. Investigation of impurity confinement in lower hybrid wave heated plasma on EAST tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Z.; Wu, Z. W.; Zhang, L.; Gao, W.; Ye, Y.; Chen, K. Y.; Yuan, Y.; Zhang, W.; Yang, X. D.; Chen, Y. J.; Zhang, P. F.; Huang, J.; Wu, C. R.; Morita, S.; Oishi, T.; Zhang, J. Z.; Duan, Y. M.; Zang, Q.; Ding, S. Y.; Liu, H. Q.; Chen, J. L.; Hu, L. Q.; Xu, G. S.; Guo, H. Y.; the EAST team

    2018-01-01

    The transient perturbation method with metallic impurities such as iron (Fe, Z  =  26) and copper (Cu, Z  =  29) induced in plasma-material interaction (PMI) procedure is used to investigate the impurity confinement characters in lower hybrid wave (LHW) heated EAST sawtooth-free plasma. The dependence of metallic impurities confinement time on plasma parameters (e.g. plasma current, toroidal magnetic field, electron density and heating power) are investigated in ohmic and LHW heated plasma. It is shown that LHW heating plays an important role in the reduction of the impurity confinement time in L-mode discharges on EAST. The impurity confinement time scaling is given as 42IP0.32Bt0.2\\overline{n}e0.43Ptotal-0.4~ on EAST, which is close to the observed scaling on Tore Supra and JET. Furthermore, the LHW heated high-enhanced-recycling (HER) H-mode discharges with ~25 kHz edge coherent modes (ECM), which have lower impurity confinement time and higher energy confinement time, provide promising candidates for high performance and steady state operation on EAST.

  8. Ion cyclotron emission in tokamak plasmas; Emission cyclotronique ionique dans les plasmas de tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraboulet, D.

    1996-09-17

    Detection of {alpha}(3.5 MeV) fusion products will be of major importance for the achievement of self sustained discharges in fusion thermonuclear reactors. Due to their cyclotronic gyration in the confining magnetic field of a tokamak, {alpha} particles are suspected to radiate in the radio-frequency band [RF: 10-500 MHz]. Our aim is to determine whether detection of RF emission radiated from a reactor plasma can provide information concerning those fusion products. We observed experimentally that the RF emission radiated from fast ions situated in the core of the discharge is detectable with a probe located at the plasma edge. For that purpose, fast temporal acquisition of spectral power was achieved in a narrow frequency band. We also propose two complementary models for this emission. In the first one, we describe locally the energy transfer between the photon population and the plasma and we compute the radiation equilibrium taking place in the tokamak. {alpha} particles are not the unique species involved in the equilibrium and it is necessary to take into account all other species present in the plasma (Deuterium, Tritium, electrons,...). Our second model consists in the numerical resolution of the Maxwell-Vlasov with the use of a variational formulation, in which all polarizations are considered and the 4 first cyclotronic harmonics are included in a 1-D slab geometry. The development of this second model leads to the proposal for an experimental set up aiming to the feasibility demonstration of a routine diagnostic providing the central {alpha} density in a reactor. (author). 166 refs.

  9. Plasma cortisol and metabolite level profiles in two isogenic strains of common carp during confinement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruane, N.M.; Huisman, E.A.; Komen, J.

    2001-01-01

    A rapid increase in common carp Cyprinus carpio plasma cortisol levels was noted, in two experiments, after 30 mins of a 3 h net confinement, which was sustained while the fish were held in the nets. After release from the nets, cortisol levels returned to control values in 1 h. Plasma glucose and

  10. Proceeding of 1998-workshop on MHD computations. Study on numerical methods related to plasma confinement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kako, T.; Watanabe, T. [eds.

    1999-04-01

    This is the proceeding of 'Study on Numerical Methods Related to Plasma Confinement' held in National Institute for Fusion Science. In this workshop, theoretical and numerical analyses of possible plasma equilibria with their stability properties are presented. These are also various talks on mathematical as well as numerical analyses related to the computational methods for fluid dynamics and plasma physics. The 14 papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  11. Analysis of tokamak plasma confinement modes using the fast ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-10-20

    Oct 20, 2016 ... absence of the outer field, and then compared with each other. The number of plasma modes and the safety factor q were determined using the FFT method in the presence and absence of the outer field. The safety factor q plays a significant role in determin- ing the stability of tokamak plasma and seems to.

  12. Alpha Heating and Burning Plasmas in Inertial Confinement Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betti, R; Christopherson, A R; Spears, B K; Nora, R; Bose, A; Howard, J; Woo, K M; Edwards, M J; Sanz, J

    2015-06-26

    Estimating the level of alpha heating and determining the onset of the burning plasma regime is essential to finding the path towards thermonuclear ignition. In a burning plasma, the alpha heating exceeds the external input energy to the plasma. Using a simple model of the implosion, it is shown that a general relation can be derived, connecting the burning plasma regime to the yield enhancement due to alpha heating and to experimentally measurable parameters such as the Lawson ignition parameter. A general alpha-heating curve is found, independent of the target and suitable to assess the performance of all laser fusion experiments whether direct or indirect drive. The onset of the burning plasma regime inside the hot spot of current implosions on the National Ignition Facility requires a fusion yield of about 50 kJ.

  13. Computational Support for Alternative Confinement Concepts Basic Plasma Science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalton D. Schnack

    2002-12-09

    This is the final report for contract DE-FG03-99ER54528, ''Computational Support for Alternative Confinement Concepts''. Progress was made in the following areas of investigation: (1) Extensive studies of the confinement properties of conventional Reversed-field Pinch (RFP) configurations (i.e., without current profile control) were performed in collaboration with the Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) in Stockholm, Sweden. These studies were carried out using the full 3-dimensional, finite-{beta}, resistive MHD model in the DEBS code, including ohmic heating and anisotropic heat conduction, and thus for the first time included the self-consistent effects of the dynamo magnetic fluctuations on the confinement properties of the RFP. By using multi-variant regression analysis of these results, scaling laws for various properties characterizing the conventional RFP were obtained. In particular, it was found that the, for constant ratio of I/N (where I is the current and N = na{sup 2} is the line density), and over a range of Lundquist numbers S that approaches 10{sup 6}, the fluctuations scale as {delta}B/B {approx} S{sup -0.14}, the temperature scales as T {approx} I{sup 0.56}, the poloidal beta scales as {beta}{sub {theta}} {approx} I{sup -0.4}, and the energy confinement time scales as {tau}{sub E} {approx} I{sup 0.34}. The degradation of poloidal beta with current is a result of the weak scaling of the fluctuation level with the Lundquist number, and leads to the unfavorable scaling laws for temperature and energy confinement time. These results compare reasonably well with experimental data, and emphasize the need for external control of the dynamo fluctuations in the RFP. (2) Studies of feedback stabilization of resistive wall modes in the RFP were performed with the DEBS code in collaboration with the CNR/RFX group in Padua, Italy. The ideal growth rates are ''passively'' reduced by the presence of a resistive wall

  14. Formation of a field reversed configuration for magnetic and electrostatic confinement of plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostoker, Norman; Binderbauer, Michl

    2003-12-16

    A system and method for containing plasma and forming a Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) magnetic topology are described in which plasma ions are contained magnetically in stable, non-adiabatic orbits in the FRC. Further, the electrons are contained electrostatically in a deep energy well, created by tuning an externally applied magnetic field. The simultaneous electrostatic confinement of electrons and magnetic confinement of ions avoids anomalous transport and facilitates classical containment of both electrons and ions. In this configuration, ions and electrons may have adequate density and temperature so that upon collisions they are fused together by nuclear force, thus releasing fusion energy. Moreover, the fusion fuel plasmas that can be used with the present confinement system and method are not limited to neutronic fuels only, but also advantageously include advanced fuels.

  15. Magnetic and electrostatic confinement of plasma with tuning of electrostatic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostoker, Norman [Irvine, CA; Binderbauer, Michl [Irvine, CA; Qerushi, Artan [Irvine, CA; Tahsiri, Hooshang [Irvine, CA

    2008-10-21

    A system and method for containing plasma and forming a Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) magnetic topology are described in which plasma ions are contained magnetically in stable, non-adiabatic orbits in the FRC. Further, the electrons are contained electrostatically in a deep energy well, created by tuning an externally applied magnetic field. The simultaneous electrostatic confinement of electrons and magnetic confinement of ions avoids anomalous transport and facilitates classical containment of both electrons and ions. In this configuration, ions and electrons may have adequate density and temperature so that upon collisions they are fused together by nuclear force, thus releasing fusion energy. Moreover, the fusion fuel plasmas that can be used with the present confinement system and method are not limited to neutronic fuels only, but also advantageously include advanced fuels.

  16. Thermal instabilities in magnetically confined plasmas - Solar coronal loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habbal, S. R.; Rosner, R.

    1979-01-01

    The thermal stability of confined solar coronal structures ('loops') is investigated, following both normal mode and a new, global instability analysis. It is demonstrated that: (1) normal mode analysis shows modes with size scales comparable to that of loops to be unstable, but to be strongly affected by the loop boundary conditions; (2) a global analysis, based upon variation of the total loop energy losses and gains, yields loop stability conditions for global modes dependent upon the coronal loop heating process, with magnetically coupled heating processes giving marginal stability. The connection between the present analysis and the minimum flux corona of Hearn is also discussed.

  17. Accuracy enhancement of laser induced breakdown spectra using permittivity and size optimized plasma confinement rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, An; Guo, Shuai; Wazir, Nasrullah; Chai, Ke; Liang, Liang; Zhang, Min; Hao, Yan; Nan, Pengfei; Liu, Ruibin

    2017-10-30

    The inevitable problems in laser induced breakdown spectroscopy are matrix effect and statistical fluctuation of the spectral signal, which can be partly avoided by utilizing a proper confined unit. The dependences of spectral signal enhancement on relative permittivity were studied by varying materials to confine the plasma, which include polytetrafluoroethylene(PTFE), nylon/dacron, silicagel, and nitrile-butadiene rubber (NBR) with the relative permittivity 2.2, ~3.3, 3.6, 8~13, 15~22. We found that higher relative permittivity rings induce stronger enhancement ability, which restricts the energy dissipation of plasma better and due to the reflected electromagnetic wave from the wall of different materials, the electromagnetic field of plasma can be well confined and makes the distribution of plasma more orderly. The spectral intensities of the characteristic lines Si I 243.5 nm and Si I 263.1 nm increased approximately 2 times with relative permittivity values from 2.2 to ~20. The size dependent enhancement of PTFE was further checked and the maximum gain was realized by using a confinement ring with a diameter size of 5 mm and a height of 3 mm (D5mmH3mm), and the rings with D2mmH1mm and D3mmH2mm also show higher enhancement factor. In view of peak shift, peak lost and accidental peaks in the obtained spectra were properly treated in data progressing; the spectral fluctuation decreased drastically for various materials with different relative permittivities as confined units, which means the core of plasma is stabilized, attributing to the confinement effect. Furthermore, the quantitative analysis in coal shows wonderful results-the prediction fitting coefficient R2 reaches 0.98 for ash and 0.99 for both volatile and carbon.

  18. Simultaneous evolution of plasma rotation, radial electric field, MHD activity and plasma confinement in the STOR-M tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreval, M.; Xiao, C.; Trembach, D.; Hirose, A.; Elgriw, S.; Pant, A.; Rohraff, D.; Niu, T.

    2008-09-01

    Radial electric field shear and poloidal plasma rotation are important factors affecting transport and confinement in tokamaks. Alteration of the electric field and plasma rotation in the vicinity of magnetic islands is also an important factor in tokamak plasma confinement. In the STOR-M tokamak, fast (~1 ms) simultaneous alterations of the radial electric field, plasma rotation (M|| = 0-0.4 in the plasma current direction), floating potential fluctuations in the periphery and MHD activity generated by rotating islands have been observed experimentally during normal ohmic discharges. The observed time and magnitude of the changes depend on the average electron density and poloidal beta at the beginning of the discharge. In discharges with high initial poloidal beta these changes are accompanied by a reduction in Hα emission and an increase in the line averaged density. Drastic decreases in Hα and increases in line averaged electron density and estimation of poloidal beta suggest that STOR-M confinement is significantly affected in ohmic discharges without an external additional energy input or biasing. MHD activity in STOR-M is damped when a negative electric field is observed at the limiter region of the plasma edge. MHD frequency is observed to decrease with the negative electric field.

  19. Impeding hohlraum plasma stagnation in inertial-confinement fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, C K; Séguin, F H; Frenje, J A; Rosenberg, M J; Rinderknecht, H G; Zylstra, A B; Petrasso, R D; Amendt, P A; Landen, O L; Mackinnon, A J; Town, R P J; Wilks, S C; Betti, R; Meyerhofer, D D; Soures, J M; Hund, J; Kilkenny, J D; Nikroo, A

    2012-01-13

    This Letter reports the first time-gated proton radiography of the spatial structure and temporal evolution of how the fill gas compresses the wall blowoff, inhibits plasma jet formation, and impedes plasma stagnation in the hohlraum interior. The potential roles of spontaneously generated electric and magnetic fields in the hohlraum dynamics and capsule implosion are discussed. It is shown that interpenetration of the two materials could result from the classical Rayleigh-Taylor instability occurring as the lighter, decelerating ionized fill gas pushes against the heavier, expanding gold wall blowoff. This experiment showed new observations of the effects of the fill gas on x-ray driven implosions, and an improved understanding of these results could impact the ongoing ignition experiments at the National Ignition Facility.

  20. Analysis of tokamak plasma confinement modes using the fast ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this article, the number of plasma modes and the safety factor q were obtained by using the mode number of q = m / n ( m is the mode number). The maximum MHD activity was obtained in 30–35 kHz frequency, using the density of the energy spectrum. In addition, the number of different modes across 0–35 ms time was ...

  1. Convective plasma stability consistent with MHD equilibrium in magnetic confinement systems with a decreasing field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsventoukh, M. M.

    2010-10-01

    A study is made of the convective (interchange, or flute) plasma stability consistent with equilibrium in magnetic confinement systems with a magnetic field decreasing outward and large curvature of magnetic field lines. Algorithms are developed which calculate convective plasma stability from the Kruskal-Oberman kinetic criterion and in which the convective stability is iteratively consistent with MHD equilibrium for a given pressure and a given type of anisotropy in actual magnetic geometry. Vacuum and equilibrium convectively stable configurations in systems with a decreasing, highly curved magnetic field are calculated. It is shown that, in convectively stable equilibrium, the possibility of achieving high plasma pressures in the central region is restricted either by the expansion of the separatrix (when there are large regions of a weak magnetic field) or by the filamentation of the gradient plasma current (when there are small regions of a weak magnetic field, in which case the pressure drops mainly near the separatrix). It is found that, from the standpoint of equilibrium and of the onset of nonpotential ballooning modes, a kinetic description of convective stability yields better plasma confinement parameters in systems with a decreasing, highly curved magnetic field than a simpler MHD model and makes it possible to substantially improve the confinement parameters for a given type of anisotropy. For the Magnetor experimental compact device, the maximum central pressure consistent with equilibrium and stability is calculated to be as high as β ˜ 30%. It is shown that, for the anisotropy of the distribution function that is typical of a background ECR plasma, the limiting pressure gradient is about two times steeper than that for an isotropic plasma. From a practical point of view, the possibility is demonstrated of achieving better confinement parameters of a hot collisionless plasma in systems with a decreasing, highly curved magnetic field than those

  2. Isotope effects on L-H threshold and confinement in tokamak plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggi, C. F.; Weisen, H.; Hillesheim, J. C.; Chankin, A.; Delabie, E.; Horvath, L.; Auriemma, F.; Carvalho, I. S.; Corrigan, G.; Flanagan, J.; Garzotti, L.; Keeling, D.; King, D.; Lerche, E.; Lorenzini, R.; Maslov, M.; Menmuir, S.; Saarelma, S.; Sips, A. C. C.; Solano, E. R.; Belonohy, E.; Casson, F. J.; Challis, C.; Giroud, C.; Parail, V.; Silva, C.; Valisa, M.; Contributors, JET

    2018-01-01

    The dependence of plasma transport and confinement on the main hydrogenic ion isotope mass is of fundamental importance for understanding turbulent transport and, therefore, for accurate extrapolations of confinement from present tokamak experiments, which typically use a single hydrogen isotope, to burning plasmas such as ITER, which will operate in deuterium–tritium mixtures. Knowledge of the dependence of plasma properties and edge transport barrier formation on main ion species is critical in view of the initial, low-activation phase of ITER operations in hydrogen or helium and of its implications on the subsequent operation in deuterium–tritium. The favourable scaling of global energy confinement time with isotope mass, which has been observed in many tokamak experiments, remains largely unexplained theoretically. Moreover, the mass scaling observed in experiments varies depending on the plasma edge conditions. In preparation for upcoming deuterium–tritium experiments in the JET tokamak with the ITER-like Be/W Wall (JET-ILW), a thorough experimental investigation of isotope effects in hydrogen, deuterium and tritium plasmas is being carried out, in order to provide stringent tests of plasma energy, particle and momentum transport models. Recent hydrogen and deuterium isotope experiments in JET-ILW on L-H power threshold, L-mode and H-mode confinement are reviewed and discussed in the context of past and more recent isotope experiments in tokamak plasmas, highlighting common elements as well as contrasting observations that have been reported. The experimental findings are discussed in the context of fundamental aspects of plasma transport models.

  3. Energy-confinement scaling for high-beta plasmas in the W7-AS stellarator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preuss, R; Dinklage, A; Weller, A

    2007-12-14

    High-beta energy-confinement data are subjected to comparisons of scaling invariant, first-principles physical models. The models differ in the inclusion of basic equations indicating the nature of transport. The result for high-beta data of the W7-AS stellarator is that global transport is described best with a collisional high-beta model, which is different from previous outcomes for low-beta data. Model predictive calculations indicate the validation of energy-confinement prediction with respect to plasma beta and collisionality nu*. The finding of different transport behaviors in distinct beta regimes is important for the development of fusion energy based on magnetic confinement and for the assessment of different confinement concepts.

  4. Formation of Multicharged Ions at Quasi-Gasdynamic Plasma Confinement in a Mirror trap

    CERN Document Server

    Golubev, S V; Semenov, V E; Smirnov, A N; Vodopyanov, A S; Zorin, V G

    1999-01-01

    It was shown in [1] that an increase in plasma density Ne in sources of multicharged ions leads to a substantial increase of ion current and improves slightly the ion distribution over charge states. Validity of this statement was verified in experiments with plasma densities not exceeding several units of 1012 cm-3. It was revealed [2] that, for the electron densities exceeding 1013 cm-3, the regime of plasma confinement in a trap changes significantly, the scaling described in [1] is no longer valid, and the quasi-gasdynamic regime of plasma confinement is realized. The plasma confinement time ti in this regime weakly depends on electron density. Consequently, the parameter governing formation of multicharged ions, Neti , grows as the electron density is increased. This means that an increase in plasma density results not only in an increase in the total ion current but also in the shift of the ion charge state distribution towards higher charge states. The present work concerns experimental investigation o...

  5. Generation and confinement of hot ions and electrons in a reversed-field pinch plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, B E; Almagri, A F; Anderson, J K; Caspary, K J; Clayton, D J; Den Hartog, D J; Ennis, D A; Fiksel, G; Gangadhara, S; Kumar, S; Magee, R M; O' Connell, R; Parke, E; Prager, S C; Reusch, J A; Sarff, J S; Stephens, H D [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Brower, D L; Ding, W X [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Craig, D, E-mail: bchapman@wisc.ed [Wheaton College, Wheaton, IL 60187 (United States)

    2010-12-15

    By manipulating magnetic reconnection in Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) discharges, we have generated and confined for the first time a reversed-field pinch (RFP) plasma with an ion temperature >1 keV and an electron temperature of 2 keV. This is achieved at a toroidal plasma current of about 0.5 MA, approaching MST's present maximum. The manipulation begins with intensification of discrete magnetic reconnection events, causing the ion temperature to increase to several kiloelectronvolts. The reconnection is then quickly suppressed with inductive current profile control, leading to capture of a portion of the added ion heat with improved ion energy confinement. Electron energy confinement is simultaneously improved, leading to a rapid ohmically driven increase in the electron temperature. A steep electron temperature gradient emerges in the outer region of the plasma, with a local thermal diffusivity of about 2 m{sup 2} s{sup -1}. The global energy confinement time reaches 12 ms, the largest value yet achieved in the RFP and which is roughly comparable to the H-mode scaling prediction for a tokamak with the same plasma current, density, heating power, size and shape.

  6. Study on discharge plasma in a cylindrical inertial electrostatic confinement fusion device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzarbaruah, N.; Dutta, N. J.; Borgohain, D.; Mohanty, S. R.; Bailung, H.

    2017-08-01

    Deuterium plasma has been produced in a cylindrical inertial electrostatic confinement fusion device using hot and cold cathode discharges and the plasma parameters are determined by employing an electrostatic probe. The plasma temperature and density are estimated at optimum experimental conditions and it is noted that the plasma temperature is 3 eV in the case of hot cathode discharge whereas 10 eV in the case of the cold cathode discharge. The plasma density as determined is two orders more in the case of the hot cathode discharge than the other. The probe is also used to observe the ion oscillation in the negative potential well that is formed in between the cathode grid and chamber (anode). The observation of spontaneous oscillation along with the harmonics has been reported.

  7. Conical targets and pinch confinement for inertial fusion: Opacity calculations of plasmas by using parametric potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velarde, P.M.; Martinez-Val, J.M.; Eliezer, S.; Piera, M.; Chacon, L. [Universidad Politecnica de Madrid (Spain). Inst. de Fusion Nuclear

    1996-12-31

    Conical microducts and minithrottles can be used to accelerate micropellets of fusionable fuel up to very high speeds ({approx}10{sup 8} cm/s). The central collision of two pellets flying in opposite directions can produce a hot plasma where fusion reactions are triggered. The main drawback of this scheme is the short confinement time provided by the external guide tube (throttle). To obtain high yield, an extra force of confinement is advisable. In this paper, the performance of fuel implosions within conical targets and the effect of ultrashort magnetic fields and pinch forces are analyzed. Although very high currents are needed to stretch the confinement time, modern technologies based on pulse-power machines and fast discharges induced by ultrashort lasers can provide a solution to this problem. (Author).

  8. Dipole configuration for confinement of positrons and electron-positron plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenson, E. V.; Saitoh, H.; Horn-Stanja, J.; Hergenhahn, U.; Paschkowski, N.; Sunn Pedersen, T.; Stoneking, M. R.; Dickmann, M.; Singer, M.; Vohburger, S.; Hugenschmidt, C.; Schweikhard, L.; Danielson, J. R.; Surko, C. M.

    2016-10-01

    Laboratory creation and confinement of electron-positron plasmas, which are expected to exhibit atypical plasma physics characteristics, would enable tests of many theory and simulation predictions (e.g., the stabilization of anomalous transport mechanisms). This is the goal of APEX/PAX (A Positron-Electron eXperiment/Positron Accumulation eXperiment). Following demonstration of efficient (38%) E ×B injection and subsequent confinement (τ = 3-5 ms) of cold positrons in a dipole magnetic field, the system is undergoing upgrades from a supported permanent magnet to a supported HTSC (high-temperature superconductor) coil, then to a levitated HTSC coil suitable for the simultaneous confinement of electrons and positrons. This contribution will report on the design and testing of the new systems and subsystems (e.g., for cooling, excitation, and levitation) and, if available, on results of upcoming experiments using a ``rotating wall'' to generate inward particle flux deeper into the confinement region. on behalf of the APEX/PAX team and collaborators.

  9. Effects of large-angle Coulomb collisions on inertial confinement fusion plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turrell, A E; Sherlock, M; Rose, S J

    2014-06-20

    Large-angle Coulomb collisions affect the rates of energy and momentum exchange in a plasma, and it is expected that their effects will be important in many plasmas of current research interest, including in inertial confinement fusion. Their inclusion is a long-standing problem, and the first fully self-consistent method for calculating their effects is presented. This method is applied to "burn" in the hot fuel in inertial confinement fusion capsules and finds that the yield increases due to an increase in the rate of temperature equilibration between electrons and ions which is not predicted by small-angle collision theories. The equilibration rate increases are 50%-100% for number densities of 10(30)  m(-3) and temperatures around 1 keV.

  10. First-principles opacity table of warm dense deuterium for inertial-confinement-fusion applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, S X; Collins, L A; Goncharov, V N; Boehly, T R; Epstein, R; McCrory, R L; Skupsky, S

    2014-09-01

    Accurate knowledge of the optical properties of a warm dense deuterium-tritium (DT) mixture is important for reliable design of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions using radiation-hydrodynamics simulations. The opacity of a warm dense DT shell essentially determines how much radiation from hot coronal plasmas can be deposited in the DT fuel of an imploding capsule. Even for the simplest species of hydrogen, the accurate calculation of their opacities remains a challenge in the warm-dense matter regime because strong-coupling and quantum effects play an important role in such plasmas. With quantum-molecular-dynamics (QMD) simulations, we have derived a first-principles opacity table (FPOT) of deuterium (and the DT mixture by mass scaling) for a wide range of densities from ρ(D)=0.5 to 673.518g/cm(3) and temperatures from T=5000K up to the Fermi temperature T(F) for each density. Compared with results from the astrophysics opacity table (AOT) currently used in our hydrocodes, the FPOT of deuterium from our QMD calculations has shown a significant increase in opacity for strongly coupled and degenerate plasma conditions by a factor of 3-100 in the ICF-relevant photon-energy range. As conditions approach those of classical plasma, the opacity from the FPOT converges to the corresponding values of the AOT. By implementing the FPOT of deuterium and the DT mixture into our hydrocodes, we have performed radiation-hydrodynamics simulations for low-adiabat cryogenic DT implosions on the OMEGA laser and for direct-drive-ignition designs for the National Ignition Facility. The simulation results using the FPOT show that the target performance (in terms of neutron yield and energy gain) could vary from ∼10% up to a factor of ∼2 depending on the adiabat of the imploding DT capsule; the lower the adiabat, the more variation is seen in the prediction of target performance when compared to the AOT modeling.

  11. Spatial distribution of atomic and ion hydrogen flux and its effect on hydrogen recycling in long duration confined and non-confined plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kuzmin

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In order to understand the atomic hydrogen distribution in different kinds of plasma and its influence on the recycling, two kinds of plasmas were used: non-confined annular electron cyclotron resonance (ECR and confined long duration plasmas. The permeation probes are used to measure directly the atomic hydrogen flux at several poloidal positions. The permeation through metals due to the ion and atom component of the hydrogen flux to the wall is indistinguishable. To estimate the contribution of the ions directly, Langmuir probes were used. The Гinc profile behind the plasma facing components (PFCs is almost constant, ∼2 ×1018 H/s/m2.

  12. Modifications of the laser beam coherence inertial confinement fusion plasmas; Modifications des proprietes de coherence des faisceaux laser dans les plasmas de fusion par confinement inertiel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grech, M

    2007-06-15

    Inertial confinement fusion by laser requires smoothed laser beam with well-controlled coherence properties. Such beams are made of many randomly distributed intensity maxima: the so-called speckles. As the laser beam propagates through plasma its temporal and spatial coherence can be reduced. This phenomenon is called plasma induced smoothing. For high laser intensities, instabilities developing independently inside the speckles are responsible for the coherence loss. At lower intensities, only collective effects, involving many speckles, can lead to induced smoothing. This thesis is a theoretical, numerical and experimental study of these mechanisms. Accounting for the partially incoherent behavior of the laser beams requires the use of statistical description of the laser-plasma interaction. A model is developed for the multiple scattering of the laser light on the self-induced density perturbations that is responsible for a spreading of the temporal and spatial spectra of the transmitted light. It also serves as a strong seed for the instability of forward stimulated Brillouin scattering that induces both, angular spreading and red-shift of the transmitted light. A statistical model is developed for this instability. A criterion is obtained that gives a laser power (below the critical power for filamentation) above which the instability growth is important. Numerical simulations with the interaction code PARAX and an experiment performed on the ALISE laser facility confirm the importance of these forward scattering mechanisms in the modification of the laser coherence properties. (author)

  13. A new ICRF scenario for bulk ion heating in D-T plasmas: How to utilize intrinsic impurities in fusion devices in our favour

    CERN Document Server

    Kazakov, Y O; Van Eester, D; Bilato, R; Dumont, R; Lerche, E; Mantsinen, M; Messiaen, A

    2015-01-01

    A fusion reactor requires plasma pre-heating before the rate of deuterium-tritium fusion reactions becomes significant. In ITER, radiofrequency (RF) heating of 3He ions, additionally puffed into the plasma, is one of the main options considered for increasing bulk ion temperature during the ramp-up phase of the pulse. In this paper, we propose an alternative scenario for bulk ion heating with RF waves, which requires no extra 3He puff and profits from the presence of intrinsic Beryllium impurities in the plasma. The discussed method to heat Be impurities in D-T plasmas is shown to provide an even larger fraction of fuel ion heating.

  14. Application of spatially resolved high resolution crystal spectrometry to inertial confinement fusion plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, K W; Bitter, M; Delgado-Aparacio, L; Pablant, N A; Beiersdorfer, P; Schneider, M; Widmann, K; Sanchez del Rio, M; Zhang, L

    2012-10-01

    High resolution (λ∕Δλ ∼ 10 000) 1D imaging x-ray spectroscopy using a spherically bent crystal and a 2D hybrid pixel array detector is used world wide for Doppler measurements of ion-temperature and plasma flow-velocity profiles in magnetic confinement fusion plasmas. Meter sized plasmas are diagnosed with cm spatial resolution and 10 ms time resolution. This concept can also be used as a diagnostic of small sources, such as inertial confinement fusion plasmas and targets on x-ray light source beam lines, with spatial resolution of micrometers, as demonstrated by laboratory experiments using a 250-μm (55)Fe source, and by ray-tracing calculations. Throughput calculations agree with measurements, and predict detector counts in the range 10(-8)-10(-6) times source x-rays, depending on crystal reflectivity and spectrometer geometry. Results of the lab demonstrations, application of the technique to the National Ignition Facility (NIF), and predictions of performance on NIF will be presented.

  15. Autowaves in a dc complex plasma confined behind a de Laval nozzle

    CERN Document Server

    Fink, M A; Schwabe, M; Thoma, M H; Höfner, H; Thomas, H M; Morfill, G E

    2013-01-01

    Experiments to explore stability conditions and topology of a dense microparticle cloud supported against gravity by a gas flow were carried out. By using a nozzle shaped glass insert within the glass tube of a dc discharge plasma chamber a weakly ionized gas flow through a de Laval nozzle was produced. The experiments were performed using neon gas at a pressure of 100 Pa and melamine-formaldehyde particles with a diameter of 3.43 {\\mu}m. The capturing and stable global confining of the particles behind the nozzle in the plasma were demonstrated. The particles inside the cloud behaved as a single convection cell inhomogeneously structured along the nozzle axis in a tube-like manner. The pulsed acceleration localized in the very head of the cloud mediated by collective plasma-particle interactions and the resulting wave pattern were studied in detail.

  16. Refraction-enhanced backlit imaging of axially symmetric inertial confinement fusion plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Jeffrey A; Landen, Otto L; Suter, Laurence J; Masse, Laurent P; Clark, Daniel S; Ross, James S; Mackinnon, Andrew J; Meezan, Nathan B; Thomas, Cliff A; Ping, Yuan

    2013-05-20

    X-ray backlit radiographs of dense plasma shells can be significantly altered by refraction of x rays that would otherwise travel straight-ray paths, and this effect can be a powerful tool for diagnosing the spatial structure of the plasma being radiographed. We explore the conditions under which refraction effects may be observed, and we use analytical and numerical approaches to quantify these effects for one-dimensional radial opacity and density profiles characteristic of inertial-confinement fusion (ICF) implosions. We also show how analytical and numerical approaches allow approximate radial plasma opacity and density profiles to be inferred from point-projection refraction-enhanced radiography data. This imaging technique can provide unique data on electron density profiles in ICF plasmas that cannot be obtained using other techniques, and the uniform illumination provided by point-like x-ray backlighters eliminates a significant source of uncertainty in inferences of plasma opacity profiles from area-backlit pinhole imaging data when the backlight spatial profile cannot be independently characterized. The technique is particularly suited to in-flight radiography of imploding low-opacity shells surrounding hydrogen ice, because refraction is sensitive to the electron density of the hydrogen plasma even when it is invisible to absorption radiography. It may also provide an alternative approach to timing shockwaves created by the implosion drive, that are currently invisible to absorption radiography.

  17. A Novel Spectrometer for Measuring Laser-Produced Plasma X-Ray in Inertial Confinement Fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Gang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the experimental investigations of inertial confinement fusion, the laser-produced high-temperature plasma contains very abundant information, such as the electron temperature and density, ionization. In order to diagnose laser-plasma distribution in space and evolution in time, an elliptical curved crystal spectrometer has been developed and applied to diagnose X-ray of laser-produced plasma in 0.2~2.46 nm region. According to the theory of Bragg diffraction, four kinds of crystal including LiF, PET, MiCa, and KAP were chosen as dispersive elements. The distance of crystal lattice varies from 0.4 to 2.6 nm. Bragg angle is in the range of 30°~67.5°, and the spectral detection angle is in 55.4°~134°. The curved crystal spectrometer mainly consists of elliptical curved crystal analyzer, vacuum configuration, aligning device, spectral detectors and three-dimensional microadjustment devices. The spectrographic experiment was carried out on the XG-2 laser facility. Emission spectrum of Al plasmas, Ti plasma, and Au plasmas have been successfully recorded by using X-ray CCD camera. It is demonstrated experimentally that the measured wavelength is accorded with the theoretical value.

  18. Magnetic field generation in Rayleigh-Taylor unstable inertial confinement fusion plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Bhuvana; Dimonte, Guy; Tang, Xian-Zhu

    2012-04-20

    Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities (RTI) in inertial confinement fusion implosions are expected to generate magnetic fields. A Hall-MHD model is used to study the field generation by 2D single-mode and multimode RTI in a stratified two-fluid plasma. Self-generated magnetic fields are predicted and these fields grow as the RTI progresses via the ∇n(e)×∇T(e) term in the generalized Ohm's law. Scaling studies are performed to determine the growth of the self-generated magnetic field as a function of density, acceleration, Atwood number, and perturbation wavelength.

  19. Rotation reversal bifurcation and energy confinement saturation in tokamak Ohmic L-mode plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, J E; Cziegler, I; Diamond, P H; Duval, B P; Podpaly, Y A; Reinke, M L; Ennever, P C; Greenwald, M J; Hughes, J W; Ma, Y; Marmar, E S; Porkolab, M; Tsujii, N; Wolfe, S M

    2011-12-23

    Direction reversals of intrinsic toroidal rotation have been observed in diverted Alcator C-Mod Ohmic L-mode plasmas following electron density ramps. For low density discharges, the core rotation is directed cocurrent, and reverses to countercurrent following an increase in the density above a certain threshold. Such reversals occur together with a decrease in density fluctuations with 2 cm(-1)≤k(θ)≤11 cm(-1) and frequencies above 70 kHz. There is a strong correlation between the reversal density and the density at which the Ohmic L-mode energy confinement changes from the linear to the saturated regime.

  20. Development of aerogel-lined targets for inertial confinement fusion experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braun, Tom [Technical Univ. Munchen (Germany)

    2013-03-28

    This thesis explores the formation of ICF compatible foam layers inside of an ablator shell used for inertial confinement fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility. In particular, the capability of p- DCPD polymer aerogels to serve as a scaffold for the deuterium-tritium mix was analyzed. Four different factors were evaluated: the dependency of different factors such as thickness or composition of a precursor solution on the uniformity of the aerogel layer, how to bring the optimal composition inside of the ablator shell, the mechanical stability of ultra-low density p-DCPD aerogel bulk pieces during wetting and freezing with hydrogen, and the wetting behavior of thin polymer foam layers in HDC carbon ablator shells with liquid deuterium. The research for thesis was done at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in cooperation with the Technical University Munich.

  1. A Freon-filled bubble chamber for neutron detection in inertial confinement fusion experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghilea, M C; Meyerhofer, D D; Sangster, T C

    2011-03-01

    Neutron imaging is one of the main methods used in inertial confinement fusion experiments to measure the core symmetry of target implosions. Previous studies have shown that bubble chambers have the potential to obtain higher resolution images of the targets for a shorter source-to-target distance than typical scintillator arrays. A bubble chamber for neutron imaging with Freon 115 as the active medium was designed and built for the OMEGA laser system. Bubbles resulting from spontaneous nucleation were recorded. Bubbles resulting from neutron-Freon interactions were observed at neutron yields of 10(13) emitted from deuterium-tritium target implosions on OMEGA. The measured column bubble density was too low for neutron imaging on OMEGA but agreed with the model of bubble formation. The recorded data suggest that neutron bubble detectors are a promising technology for the higher neutron yields expected at National Ignition Facility.

  2. Change in inertial confinement fusion implosions upon using an ab initio multiphase DT equation of state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caillabet, L; Canaud, B; Salin, G; Mazevet, S; Loubeyre, P

    2011-09-09

    Improving the description of the equation of state (EOS) of deuterium-tritium (DT) has recently been shown to change significantly the gain of an inertial confinement fusion target [S. X. Hu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 235003 (2010)]. Here we use an advanced multiphase EOS, based on ab initio calculations, to perform a full optimization of the laser pulse shape with hydrodynamic simulations starting from 19 K in DT ice. The thermonuclear gain is shown to be a robust estimate over possible uncertainties of the EOS. Two different target designs are discussed, for shock ignition and self-ignition. In the first case, the areal density and thermonuclear energy can be recovered by slightly increasing the laser energy. In the second case, a lower in-flight adiabat is needed, leading to a significant delay (3 ns) in the shock timing of the implosion.

  3. First Liquid Layer Inertial Confinement Fusion Implosions at the National Ignition Facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, R E; Leeper, R J; Kline, J L; Zylstra, A B; Yi, S A; Biener, J; Braun, T; Kozioziemski, B J; Sater, J D; Bradley, P A; Peterson, R R; Haines, B M; Yin, L; Berzak Hopkins, L F; Meezan, N B; Walters, C; Biener, M M; Kong, C; Crippen, J W; Kyrala, G A; Shah, R C; Herrmann, H W; Wilson, D C; Hamza, A V; Nikroo, A; Batha, S H

    2016-12-09

    The first cryogenic deuterium and deuterium-tritium liquid layer implosions at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) demonstrate D_{2} and DT layer inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions that can access a low-to-moderate hot-spot convergence ratio (1230) DT ice layer implosions. Although high CR is desirable in an idealized 1D sense, it amplifies the deleterious effects of asymmetries. To date, these asymmetries prevented the achievement of ignition at the NIF and are the major cause of simulation-experiment disagreement. In the initial liquid layer experiments, high neutron yields were achieved with CRs of 12-17, and the hot-spot formation is well understood, demonstrated by a good agreement between the experimental data and the radiation hydrodynamic simulations. These initial experiments open a new NIF experimental capability that provides an opportunity to explore the relationship between hot-spot convergence ratio and the robustness of hot-spot formation during ICF implosions.

  4. Onset of hydrodynamic mix in high-velocity, highly compressed inertial confinement fusion implosions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, T; Patel, P K; Izumi, N; Springer, P T; Key, M H; Atherton, L J; Benedetti, L R; Bradley, D K; Callahan, D A; Celliers, P M; Cerjan, C J; Clark, D S; Dewald, E L; Dixit, S N; Döppner, T; Edgell, D H; Epstein, R; Glenn, S; Grim, G; Haan, S W; Hammel, B A; Hicks, D; Hsing, W W; Jones, O S; Khan, S F; Kilkenny, J D; Kline, J L; Kyrala, G A; Landen, O L; Le Pape, S; MacGowan, B J; Mackinnon, A J; MacPhee, A G; Meezan, N B; Moody, J D; Pak, A; Parham, T; Park, H-S; Ralph, J E; Regan, S P; Remington, B A; Robey, H F; Ross, J S; Spears, B K; Smalyuk, V; Suter, L J; Tommasini, R; Town, R P; Weber, S V; Lindl, J D; Edwards, M J; Glenzer, S H; Moses, E I

    2013-08-23

    Deuterium-tritium inertial confinement fusion implosion experiments on the National Ignition Facility have demonstrated yields ranging from 0.8 to 7×10(14), and record fuel areal densities of 0.7 to 1.3 g/cm2. These implosions use hohlraums irradiated with shaped laser pulses of 1.5-1.9 MJ energy. The laser peak power and duration at peak power were varied, as were the capsule ablator dopant concentrations and shell thicknesses. We quantify the level of hydrodynamic instability mix of the ablator into the hot spot from the measured elevated absolute x-ray emission of the hot spot. We observe that DT neutron yield and ion temperature decrease abruptly as the hot spot mix mass increases above several hundred ng. The comparison with radiation-hydrodynamic modeling indicates that low mode asymmetries and increased ablator surface perturbations may be responsible for the current performance.

  5. Plasma viscosity with mass transport in spherical inertial confinement fusion implosion simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vold, E. L.; Molvig, K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Joglekar, A. S. [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Ortega, M. I. [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States); Moll, R. [University of California, Santa Cruz, California 95064 (United States); Fenn, D. [Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida 32306 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    The effects of viscosity and small-scale atomic-level mixing on plasmas in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) currently represent challenges in ICF research. Many current ICF hydrodynamic codes ignore the effects of viscosity though recent research indicates viscosity and mixing by classical transport processes may have a substantial impact on implosion dynamics. We have implemented a Lagrangian hydrodynamic code in one-dimensional spherical geometry with plasma viscosity and mass transport and including a three temperature model for ions, electrons, and radiation treated in a gray radiation diffusion approximation. The code is used to study ICF implosion differences with and without plasma viscosity and to determine the impacts of viscosity on temperature histories and neutron yield. It was found that plasma viscosity has substantial impacts on ICF shock dynamics characterized by shock burn timing, maximum burn temperatures, convergence ratio, and time history of neutron production rates. Plasma viscosity reduces the need for artificial viscosity to maintain numerical stability in the Lagrangian formulation and also modifies the flux-limiting needed for electron thermal conduction.

  6. Investigation of the influence of divertor recycling on global plasma confinement in JET ITER-like wall

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tamain, P.; Joffrin, E.; Bufferand, H.; Jarvinen, A.; Brezinsek, S.; Ciraolo, G.; Delabie, E.; Frassinetti, L.; Giroud, C.; Groth, M.; Lipschultz, B.; Lomas, P.; Marsen, S.; Menmuir, S.; Oberkofler, M.; Stamp, M.; Wiesen, S.; JET-EFDA Contributors,

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The impact of the divertor geometry on global plasma confinement in type I ELMy H-mode has been investigated in the JET tokamak equipped with ITER-Like Wall. Discharges have been performed in which the position of the strike-points was changed while keeping the bulk plasma equilibrium

  7. Time resolved interferometric study of the plasma plume induced shock wave in confined geometry: Two-dimensional mapping of the ambient and plasma density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choudhury, Kaushik [IITB Monash Research Academy, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai 400076 (India); Singh, R. K.; Kumar, Ajai, E-mail: ajai@ipr.res.in [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar 382428 (India); Narayan, Surya; Srivastava, Atul, E-mail: atulsr@iitb.ac.in [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai 400076 (India)

    2016-04-15

    An experimental investigation of the laser produced plasma induced shock wave in the presence of confining walls placed along the axial as well as the lateral direction has been performed. A time resolved Mach Zehnder interferometer is set up to track the primary as well as the reflected shock waves and its effect on the evolving plasma plume has been studied. An attempt has been made to discriminate the electronic and medium density contributions towards the changes in the refractive index of the medium. Two dimensional spatial distributions for both ambient medium density and plasma density (electron density) have been obtained by employing customised inversion technique and algorithm on the recorded interferograms. The observed density pattern of the surrounding medium in the presence of confining walls is correlated with the reflected shock wave propagation in the medium. Further, the shock wave plasma interaction and the subsequent changes in the shape and density of the plasma plume in confined geometry are briefly described.

  8. Improved confinement and edge plasma fluctuations in the STOR-M tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, W.; Xiao, C.; Conway, G. D.; Mitarai, O.; Sarkissian, A.; Skarsgard, H. M.; Zhang, L.; Hirose, A.

    1992-10-01

    An improved Ohmic confinement phase has been observed in the STOR-M tokamak [Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research, 1988 (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1989), Vol. 1, p. 323] after application of a turbulent heating (TH) pulse. This improved Ohmic confinement phase is characterized by (a) increased n¯e, (b) reduced Hα radiation from the edge, (c) reduced density and magnetic fluctuations at the edge, (d) a steeper density profile at the edge, and (e) a more negative radial electric field. Almost complete suppression of sawtooth oscillations during the improved confinement phase has also been observed. A linear dispersion relation describes the density and magnetic fluctuations in the frequency range up to 350 kHz. In the region r

  9. SXR-XUV Diagnostics for Edge and Core of Magnetically Confined Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stutman, Dan [Johns Hopkins University

    2014-09-10

    The present report summarizes the results obtained during a one-year extension of DoE grant “SXR-XUV Diagnostics for Edge and Core of Magnetically Confined Plasmas”, at Johns Hopkins University, aimed at completing the development of a new type of magnetic fusion plasma diagnostic, the XUV Transmission Grating Imaging Radiometer (TGIR). The TGIR enables simultaneous spatially and spectrally resolved measurements of the XUV/VUV radiated power from impurities in fusion plasmas, with high speed. The instrument was successfully developed and qualified in the laboratory and in experiments on a tokamak. Its future applications will be diagnostic of the impurity content and transport in the divertor and edge of advanced magnetic fusion experiments, such as NSTX Upgrade.

  10. Effect of Laser-Plasma Interactions on Inertial Confinement Fusion Hohlraum Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Strozzi, D J; Michel, P; Divol, L; Sepke, S M; Kerbel, G D; Thomas, C A; Ralph, J E; Moody, J D; Schneider, M B

    2016-01-01

    The effects of laser-plasma interactions (LPI) on the dynamics of inertial confinement fusion hohlraums is investigated via a new approach that self-consistently couples reduced LPI models into radiation-hydrodynamics numerical codes. The interplay between hydrodynamics and LPI - specifically stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) and crossed-beam energy transfer (CBET) - mostly occurs via momentum and energy deposition into Langmuir and ion acoustic waves. This spatially redistributes energy coupling to the target, which affects the background plasma conditions and thus modifies the laser propagation. This model shows a reduction of CBET, and significant laser energy depletion by Langmuir waves, which reduce the discrepancy between modeling and data from hohlraum experiments on wall x-ray emission and capsule implosion shape.

  11. Edge characteristics and global confinement of electron cyclotron resonance heated plasmas in the TJ-II Stellarator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tabares, F.L.; Branas, B.; Garcia-Cortes, I.; Tafalla, D.; Estrada, T.; Tribaldos, V. [Laboratorio Nacional de Fusion por Confinamiento Magnetico, Asociacion EURATOM/CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain)

    2001-08-01

    The edge parameters of electron cyclotron resonance heated plasmas in the TJ-II stellarator are reported. Data from atomic beam diagnostics and electrical probes have been used for edge and scrape-off layer characterization. Scans in heating power and plasma density for H and He plasmas have been performed, for a given magnetic configuration. A linear increase of the diffusion coefficient at the last-closed magnetic surface with the ratio of injected power to plasma density and a similar value of that parameter for the two atomic species investigated were obtained. Global particle confinement times between 3 and 15 ms have been deduced, and transition to an enhanced confinement mode in H plasmas has been observed under some conditions. The role of high-energy particle losses, due to trapping into the relatively high magnetic ripple, in the global energy balance of TJ-II plasmas is addressed. (author)

  12. Neutron emission spectroscopy of DT plasmas at enhanced energy resolution with diamond detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giacomelli, L., E-mail: giacomelli@ifp.cnr.it; Tardocchi, M. [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma “P. Caldirola,” CNR, Milano (Italy); Nocente, M.; Rebai, M.; Rigamonti, D.; Gorini, G. [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma “P. Caldirola,” CNR, Milano (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica “G. Occhialini,” Università degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, Milano (Italy); Milocco, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica “G. Occhialini,” Università degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, Milano (Italy); Chen, Z. J.; Du, T. F.; Fan, T. S.; Hu, Z. M.; Peng, X. Y. [School of Physics, State Key Lab of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing (China); Hjalmarsson, A. [Departments of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden); Collaboration: EUROfusion Consortium, JET, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

    2016-11-15

    This work presents measurements done at the Peking University Van de Graaff neutron source of the response of single crystal synthetic diamond (SD) detectors to quasi-monoenergetic neutrons of 14-20 MeV. The results show an energy resolution of 1% for incoming 20 MeV neutrons, which, together with 1% detection efficiency, opens up to new prospects for fast ion physics studies in high performance nuclear fusion devices such as SD neutron spectrometry of deuterium-tritium plasmas heated by neutral beam injection.

  13. Confinement and stability of plasmas with externally driven steady-state elevated q-profiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bock, Alexander; Stober, Joerg; Fischer, Rainer; Fable, Emiliano; Reich, Matthias [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching bei Muenchen (Germany); Collaboration: ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2015-05-01

    The helicity profile of the magnetic field lines is an important quantity for the operation of Tokamak fusion devices and can be expressed as the so-called safety factor q. It has profound influence on both the stability of the fusion plasma, as well as its confinement properties. Operation scenarios with centrally elevated and flat, or even reversed q-profiles promise fewer central instabilities and better core confinement and are thus considered potentially attractive for future fusion power plants. To verify these predictions, centrally elevated q-profiles are created using external counter current drive, with additional heating power added afterwards to explore the stability limits and transport properties of the resulting plasmas. The tailored q-profiles are calculated using magnetic equilibrium reconstruction constrained by internal motional Stark effect data to confirm to the presence of the desired helicities. They are then used as a basis for simulations of the transport properties with the gyro-Landau-fluid code TGLF. The simulation results are then compared to the experimentally measured kinetic profiles.

  14. Density-Gradient-Driven trapped-electron-modes in improved-confinement RFP plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duff, James; Sarff, John; Ding, Weixing; Brower, David; Parke, Eli; Chapman, Brett; Terry, Paul; Pueschel, M. J.; Williams, Zach

    2017-10-01

    Short wavelength density fluctuations in improved-confinement MST plasmas exhibit multiple features characteristic of the trapped-electron-mode (TEM). Core transport in the RFP is normally governed by magnetic stochasticity stemming from long wavelength tearing modes that arise from current profile peaking, which are suppressed via inductive control for this work. The improved confinement is associated with an increase in the pressure gradient that can destabilize drift waves. The measured density fluctuations have f 50 kHz, kϕρs , and propagate in the electron drift direction. Their spectral emergence coincides with a sharp decrease in global tearing mode associated fluctuations, their amplitude increases with local density gradient, and they exhibit a density-gradient threshold at R /Ln 15 . The GENE code, modified for the RFP, predicts the onset of density-gradient-driven TEM for these strong-gradient plasma conditions. While nonlinear analysis shows a large Dimits shift associated with predicted strong zonal flows, the inclusion of residual magnetic fluctuations, comparable to experimental magnetic fluctuations, causes a collapse of the zonal flows and an increase in the predicted transport to a level close to the experimentally measured heat flux. Work supported by US DOE.

  15. Symmetric inertial confinement fusion implosions at ultra-high laser energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenzer, S H; MacGowan, B J; Michel, P; Meezan, N B; Suter, L J; Dixit, S N; Kline, J L; Kyrala, G A; Bradley, D K; Callahan, D A; Dewald, E L; Divol, L; Dzenitis, E; Edwards, M J; Hamza, A V; Haynam, C A; Hinkel, D E; Kalantar, D H; Kilkenny, J D; Landen, O L; Lindl, J D; LePape, S; Moody, J D; Nikroo, A; Parham, T; Schneider, M B; Town, R P J; Wegner, P; Widmann, K; Whitman, P; Young, B K F; Van Wonterghem, B; Atherton, L J; Moses, E I

    2010-03-05

    Indirect-drive hohlraum experiments at the National Ignition Facility have demonstrated symmetric capsule implosions at unprecedented laser drive energies of 0.7 megajoule. One hundred and ninety-two simultaneously fired laser beams heat ignition-emulate hohlraums to radiation temperatures of 3.3 million kelvin, compressing 1.8-millimeter-diameter capsules by the soft x-rays produced by the hohlraum. Self-generated plasma optics gratings on either end of the hohlraum tune the laser power distribution in the hohlraum, which produces a symmetric x-ray drive as inferred from the shape of the capsule self-emission. These experiments indicate that the conditions are suitable for compressing deuterium-tritium-filled capsules, with the goal of achieving burning fusion plasmas and energy gain in the laboratory.

  16. Nuclear fission with inertial confinement

    CERN Document Server

    Koshkarev, D G

    2002-01-01

    The possibility of initiating the explosive fission reaction in a small quantity of fissile material through the heavy ions beam from the powerful accelerator-driver, developed for realization of the thermonuclear synthesis in the deuterium-tritium cylindrical targets with the direct ignition, is considered. The consequences of applying this method in the nuclear engineering are discussed

  17. Conditions for soft x-ray lasing action in a confined plasma column

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suckewer, S.; Fishman, H.

    1979-09-01

    The idea of using a multi-Z (e.g., carbon, oxygen) thin plasma column as a medium for soft x-ray lasing action is presented. A plasma confined by a strong magnetic field is first heated by a CO/sub 2/-laser, and then cools rapidly by radiation losses. This leads to a level population inversion of hydrogen-like carbon or oxygen ions. Two computational models are presented. One uses given electron temperature, T/sub e/(t), evolutions. The other uses T/sub e/(t) calculated from an energy balance equation ith CO/sub 2/-laser beam power as a parameter. According to calculations, a total gain of G > 100 is expected for 3 ..-->.. 2 and G > 10 for 4 ..-->.. 2 transitions (lambda = 182 A and lambda = 135 A, respectively) for CVI ions using a CO/sub 2/-laser beam with power approx. 5 x 10/sup 10/ W for plasma column heating.

  18. The design of a neutron generator using the inertial electrostatic confinement of deuterium plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, T.J.; Machrafi, R., E-mail: Terry.Price@gmail.com, E-mail: Rachid.Machrafi@uoit.ca [Univ. of Ontario Inst. of Tech., Oshawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2013-07-01

    A neutron generator was designed that uses the inertial electrostatic confinement (IEC) of a deuterium-based plasma to generate neutrons by the process of fusion.A two-stage high-vacuum system was designed that uses a rotary-vane pump and turbo-molecular pump.A pressure measurement system was designed that uses a Pirani pressure-gauge and an ionization pressure-gauge. A high-voltage system was designed that uses an off-the-shelf high voltage power supply and a Cockcroft-Walton voltage-multiplier circuit. A neutron detection system was designed that uses a Helium-3 neutron detector. Safety considerations in the operation of the device are discussed.It is expected this device is to be constructed in 2013-2014. (author)

  19. Probing Leader Cells in Endothelial Collective Migration by Plasma Lithography Geometric Confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yongliang; Jamilpour, Nima; Yao, Baoyin; Dean, Zachary S.; Riahi, Reza; Wong, Pak Kin

    2016-01-01

    When blood vessels are injured, leader cells emerge in the endothelium to heal the wound and restore the vasculature integrity. The characteristics of leader cells during endothelial collective migration under diverse physiological conditions, however, are poorly understood. Here we investigate the regulation and function of endothelial leader cells by plasma lithography geometric confinement generated. Endothelial leader cells display an aggressive phenotype, connect to follower cells via peripheral actin cables and discontinuous adherens junctions, and lead migrating clusters near the leading edge. Time-lapse microscopy, immunostaining, and particle image velocimetry reveal that the density of leader cells and the speed of migrating clusters are tightly regulated in a wide range of geometric patterns. By challenging the cells with converging, diverging and competing patterns, we show that the density of leader cells correlates with the size and coherence of the migrating clusters. Collectively, our data provide evidence that leader cells control endothelial collective migration by regualting the migrating clusters. PMID:26936382

  20. Probing Leader Cells in Endothelial Collective Migration by Plasma Lithography Geometric Confinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yongliang; Jamilpour, Nima; Yao, Baoyin; Dean, Zachary S; Riahi, Reza; Wong, Pak Kin

    2016-03-03

    When blood vessels are injured, leader cells emerge in the endothelium to heal the wound and restore the vasculature integrity. The characteristics of leader cells during endothelial collective migration under diverse physiological conditions, however, are poorly understood. Here we investigate the regulation and function of endothelial leader cells by plasma lithography geometric confinement generated. Endothelial leader cells display an aggressive phenotype, connect to follower cells via peripheral actin cables and discontinuous adherens junctions, and lead migrating clusters near the leading edge. Time-lapse microscopy, immunostaining, and particle image velocimetry reveal that the density of leader cells and the speed of migrating clusters are tightly regulated in a wide range of geometric patterns. By challenging the cells with converging, diverging and competing patterns, we show that the density of leader cells correlates with the size and coherence of the migrating clusters. Collectively, our data provide evidence that leader cells control endothelial collective migration by regualting the migrating clusters.

  1. Confinement and dynamics of laser-produced plasma expanding across a transverse magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harilal, S S; Tillack, M S; O'Shay, B; Bindhu, C V; Najmabadi, F

    2004-02-01

    The dynamics and confinement of laser-created plumes expanding across a transverse magnetic field have been investigated. 1.06 microm, 8 ns pulses from a neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet laser were used to create an aluminum plasma which was allowed to expand across a 0.64 T magnetic field. Fast photography, emission spectroscopy, and time of flight spectroscopy were used as diagnostic tools. Changes in plume structure and dynamics, enhanced emission and ionization, and velocity enhancement were observed in the presence of the magnetic field. Photographic studies showed that the plume is not fully stopped and diffuses across the field. The temperature of the plume was found to increase due to Joule heating and adiabatic compression. The time of flight studies showed that all of the species are slowed down significantly. A multiple peak temporal distribution was observed for neutral species.

  2. First Measurements of Fuel-Ablator Interface Instability Growth in Inertial Confinement Fusion Implosions on the National Ignition Facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, C R; Döppner, T; Casey, D T; Bunn, T L; Carlson, L C; Dylla-Spears, R J; Kozioziemski, B J; MacPhee, A G; Nikroo, A; Robey, H F; Sater, J D; Smalyuk, V A

    2016-08-12

    Direct measurements of hydrodynamic instability growth at the fuel-ablator interface in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions are reported for the first time. These experiments investigate one of the degradation mechanisms behind the lower-than-expected performance of early ICF implosions on the National Ignition Facility. Face-on x-ray radiography is used to measure instability growth occurring between the deuterium-tritium fuel and the plastic ablator from well-characterized perturbations. This growth starts in two ways through separate experiments-either from a preimposed interface modulation or from ablation front feedthrough. These experiments are consistent with analytic modeling and radiation-hydrodynamic simulations, which say that a moderately unstable Atwood number and convergence effects are causing in-flight perturbation growth at the interface. The analysis suggests that feedthrough from outersurface perturbations dominates the interface perturbation growth at mode 60.

  3. On the change in Inertial Confinement Fusion Implosions upon using an ab initio multiphase DT equation of state

    CERN Document Server

    Caillabet, Laurent; Salin, Gwenaël; Mazevet, Stéphane; Loubeyre, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Improving the description of the equation of state (EoS) of deuterium-tritium (DT) has recently been shown to change significantly the gain of an Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) target (Hu et al., PRL 104, 235003 (2010)). We use here an advanced multi-phase equation of state (EoS), based on ab initio calculations, to perform a full optimization of the laser pulse shape with hydrodynamic simulations starting from 19 K in DT ice. The thermonuclear gain is shown to be a robust estimate over possible uncertainties of the EoS. Two different target designs are discussed, for shock ignition and self-ignition. In the first case, the areal density and thermonuclear energy can be recovered by slightly increasing the laser energy. In the second case, a lower in-flight adiabat is needed, leading to a significant delay (3ns) in the shock timing of the implosion.

  4. Simultaneous usage of pinhole and penumbral apertures for imaging small scale neutron sources from inertial confinement fusion experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guler, N; Volegov, P; Danly, C R; Grim, G P; Merrill, F E; Wilde, C H

    2012-10-01

    Inertial confinement fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility are designed to understand the basic principles of creating self-sustaining fusion reactions by laser driven compression of deuterium-tritium (DT) filled cryogenic plastic capsules. The neutron imaging diagnostic provides information on the distribution of the central fusion reaction region and the surrounding DT fuel by observing neutron images in two different energy bands for primary (13-17 MeV) and down-scattered (6-12 MeV) neutrons. From this, the final shape and size of the compressed capsule can be estimated and the symmetry of the compression can be inferred. These experiments provide small sources with high yield neutron flux. An aperture design that includes an array of pinholes and penumbral apertures has provided the opportunity to image the same source with two different techniques. This allows for an evaluation of these different aperture designs and reconstruction algorithms.

  5. Dependence of the confinement time of an electron plasma on the magnetic field in a quadrupole Penning trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyavappa, B.M.; Datar, Durgesh; Prakash; Ananthamurthy, Sharath [Bangalore University, Department of Physics, Bangalore (India)

    2017-12-15

    A quadrupole Penning trap is used to confine electrons in weak magnetic fields. Perturbations due to space charge and imperfections in the trap geometry, as well as collisions with the background gas molecules, lead to loss of the electrons from the trap. We present in this work the results on measurements of the electron confinement time and its dependence on the magnetic field in a quadrupolar Penning trap. We describe a method to measure the confinement time of an electron cloud under weak magnetic fields (0.01 T - 0.1 T). This time is found to scale as τ ∝ B{sup 1.41} in variance with the theoretically expected confinement time that scales as τ ∝ B{sup 2} for trapped electrons that are lost through collisions with the neutrals present in the trap. A measurement of the expansion rate of the electron plasma in the trap through controlled variation of the trap voltage, yields expansion times that depend on the energy of escaping electrons. This is found to vary in our case in the scaling range B{sup 0.32} to B{sup 0.43}. Distorting the geometry of the trap, results in a marked change in the confinement time's dependence on the magnetic field. The results indicate that the confinement time of the electron cloud in the trap is limited by both, effects of collisions and perturbations that result in the plasma loss through expansion in the trap. (orig.)

  6. Observation of quasi-periodic frequency sweeping in electron cyclotron emission of nonequilibrium mirror-confined plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Viktorov, M E; Mansfeld, D A; Golubev, S V

    2016-01-01

    Chirping frequency patterns have been observed in the electron cyclotron emission from strongly nonequilibrium plasma confined in a table-top mirror magnetic trap. Such patterns are typical for the formation of nonlinear phase space structures in a proximity of the wave-particle resonances of a kinetically unstable plasma, also known as the "holes and clumps" mechanism. Our data provides the first experimental evidence for acting of this mechanism in the electron cyclotron frequency domain.

  7. Multi-Field/-Scale Interaction of Neoclassical Tearing Modes with Turbulence and Impact on Plasma Confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardoczi, Laszlo

    Neoclassical Tearing Modes (NTMs) are a major impediment in the development of operational scenarios of present toroidal fusion devices. The multi-scale and non-linear interaction of NTMs with turbulence has been an active field of theoretical plasma research in the past decade for its role in plasma confinement. However, little to no experimental effort has been devoted to explore this interaction. As part of this thesis, dedicated experiments were conducted utilizing the full complement of the DIII-D turbulence diagnostics to study the effect of NTM on turbulence as well as the effect of turbulence on NTM growth. The first localized measurements of long and intermediate wavelength turbulent density fluctuations and long wavelength turbulent electron temperature fluctuations modified by magnetic islands are presented. These long and intermediate wavelengths correspond to the expected Ion Temperature Gradient (ITG) and Trapped Electron Mode (TEM) scales, respectively. Two regimes were observed when tracking density fluctuations during NTM evolution: (1) small islands are characterized by steep electron temperature radial profile and turbulence levels comparable to that of the background; (2) large islands have a flat electron temperature profile and reduced turbulence level at the O-point. Radially outside of the large island, the electron temperature profile is steeper and the turbulence level increased compared to the no or small island case. It was also found that turbulence is reduced in the O-point region compared to the X-point region. This helical structure of turbulence modification leads to a 15% modulation of the density fluctuation power as the island rotates in the lab frame and this modulation is nearly in phase with the electron temperature modulation. These measurements were also used to determine the turbulence penetration length scale at the island separatrix and was found that the turbulence penetration length scale is on the order of the

  8. On the equatorial confinement of thermal plasma generated in the vicinity of the rings of Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ip, W.-H.

    1984-01-01

    Consideration of the force balance of the ring plasma generated by meteoroid impact in the rotating ionosphere of Saturn is extended to include the magnetic mirroring effect. It is found that there are modifications to the so-called siphon flow limit derived for charged particles with zero magnetic moment if the ionospheric plasma has a thermal temperature exceeding a few electron volts. The nature of the force balance is such that, instead of a sharp division between complete loss and complete reabsorption, a transition zone of partial loss appears. If part of the ions near the rings are produced by ionization of the neutral atmosphere in the vicinity of the ring system (also generated by meteoroid impact vaporization), another theoretical limit dividing the upward flow from the equatorially confined motion is located near the observed boundary between the B ring and the C ring. This new limit is very sharp, as required to explain the B-C ring boundary, which has not yet been explained by gravitational theory.

  9. Reaction rates of α-tocopheroxyl radicals confined in micelles and in human plasma lipoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanzani, Paola; Rigo, Adelio; Zennaro, Lucio; Di Paolo, Maria Luisa; Scarpa, Marina; Rossetto, Monica

    2014-08-01

    α-Tocopherol, the main component of vitamin E, traps highly reactive radicals which otherwise might react with lipids present in plasmatic lipoproteins or in cell membranes. The α-tocopheroxyl radicals generated by this process have also a pro-oxidant action which is contrasted by their reaction with ascorbate or by bimolecular self-reaction (dismutation). The kinetics of this bimolecular self-reaction were explored in solution such as ethanol, and in heterogeneous systems such as deoxycholic acid micelles and in human plasma. According to ESR measurements, the kinetic rate constant (2k(d)) of the bimolecular self-reaction of α-tocopheroxyl radicals in micelles and in human plasma was calculated to be of the order of 10(5) M(-1) s(-1) at 37 °C. This value was obtained considering that the reactive radicals are confined into the micellar pseudophase and is one to two orders of magnitude higher than the value we found in homogeneous phase. The physiological significance of this high value is discussed considering the competition between bimolecular self-reaction and the α-tocopheroxyl radical recycling by ascorbate. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Energy deposition of multi-MeV protons in compressed targets of fast-ignition inertial confinement fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdavi, M; Koohrokhi, T

    2012-01-01

    The energy loss and penetration of multi-megelectronvolt protons into a uniform deuterium-tritium (DT) plasma has been calculated. The effects of nuclear elastic scattering and Coulomb interactions are treated from a unified point of view. In general, multiple scattering enhances the proton linear-energy transfer along the initial proton direction, thus the energy deposition increases near the end of its range. The net effect of multiple scattering is to reduce the penetration from 1.20 to 1.02 g cm-2 for 12 MeV protons in a ρ=500 g cm-3 plasma at T=5 keV. These results should have relevance to proton fast ignition, specifically to energy deposition calculations that critically assess quantitative ignition requirements.

  11. Particle modelling of magnetically confined oxygen plasma in low pressure radio frequency discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benyoucef, Djilali [Laboratoire Génie Electrique et Energie Renouvelables, Chlef University (Algeria); Yousfi, Mohammed [Université de de Toulouse, LAPLACE, UMR CNRS 5213, 118 Route de Narbonne, Toulouse 31062 (France)

    2015-01-15

    The main objective of this paper is the modelling and simulation of a radio frequency (RF) discharge in oxygen at low pressure and at room temperature, including the effect of crossed electric and magnetic fields for generation and confinement of oxygen plasma. The particle model takes into account one axial dimension along the electric field axis and three velocity components during the Monte Carlo treatment of the collisions between charged particles and background gas. The simulation by this developed code allows us not only to determine the electrodynamics characteristics of the RF discharge, but also to obtain kinetics and energetic description of reactive oxygen plasma at low pressure. These information are very important for the control of the deep reactive-ion etching technology of the silicon to manufacture capacitors with high density and for the deposition thick insulating films or thick metal to manufacture micro-coils. The simulation conditions are as follows: RF peak voltage of 200 V, frequency of 13.56 MHz, crossed magnetic field varying from 0 to 50 Gauss, and oxygen pressure of 13.8 Pa. In the presence of magnetic field, the results show an increase of the plasma density, a decrease of the electron mean energy, and also a reduction of the ratio between electron density and positive ion density. Finally in order to validate, the results are successfully compared with measurements already carried out in the literature. The conditions of comparison are from 100 to 300 V of the peak voltage at 13.56 MHz under a pressure of 13.8 Pa and a gap distance of 2.5 cm.

  12. Properties of highly electronegative plasmas produced in a multipolar magnetic-confined device with a transversal magnetic filter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Draghici, Mihai; Stamate, Eugen

    2010-01-01

    electrodes on plasma parameters, the formation of the negative ion sheath and etching rates by positive and negative ions have been investigated for different experimental conditions. When the electron temperature was reduced below 1 eV the density ratio of negative ion to electron exceeded 100 even for very...... low amounts of SF6 gas. The plasma potential drift could be controlled by proper wall conditioning. A large electrode biased positively had no effect on plasma potential for density ratios of negative ions to electrons larger than 50. For similar electronegativities or higher a negative ion sheath......Highly electronegative plasmas were produced in Ar/SF6 gas mixtures in a dc discharge with multipolar magnetic confinement and transversal magnetic filter. Langmuir probe and mass spectrometry were used for plasma diagnostics. Plasma potential drift, the influence of small or large area biased...

  13. Proceeding of 1999-workshop on MHD computations 'study on numerical methods related to plasma confinement'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kako, T.; Watanabe, T. [eds.

    2000-06-01

    This is the proceeding of 'study on numerical methods related to plasma confinement' held in National Institute for Fusion Science. In this workshop, theoretical and numerical analyses of possible plasma equilibria with their stability properties are presented. There are also various lectures on mathematical as well as numerical analyses related to the computational methods for fluid dynamics and plasma physics. Separate abstracts were presented for 13 of the papers in this report. The remaining 6 were considered outside the subject scope of INIS. (J.P.N.)

  14. Threshold for the destabilisation of the ion-temperature-gradient mode in magnetically confined toroidal plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zocco, A.; Xanthopoulos, P.; Doerk, H.; Connor, J. W.; Helander, P.

    2018-02-01

    The threshold for the resonant destabilisation of ion-temperature-gradient (ITG) driven instabilities that render the modes ubiquitous in both tokamaks and stellarators is investigated. We discover remarkably similar results for both confinement concepts if care is taken in the analysis of the effect of the global shear . We revisit, analytically and by means of gyrokinetic simulations, accepted tokamak results and discover inadequacies of some aspects of their theoretical interpretation. In particular, for standard tokamak configurations, we find that global shear effects on the critical gradient cannot be attributed to the wave-particle resonance destabilising mechanism of Hahm & Tang (Phys. Plasmas, vol. 1, 1989, pp. 1185-1192), but are consistent with a stabilising contribution predicted by Biglari et al. (Phys. Plasmas, vol. 1, 1989, pp. 109-118). Extensive analytical and numerical investigations show that virtually no previous tokamak theoretical predictions capture the temperature dependence of the mode frequency at marginality, thus leading to incorrect instability thresholds. In the asymptotic limit , where is the rotational transform, and such a threshold should be solely determined by the resonant toroidal branch of the ITG mode, we discover a family of unstable solutions below the previously known threshold of instability. This is true for a tokamak case described by a local local equilibrium, and for the stellarator Wendelstein 7-X, where these unstable solutions are present even for configurations with a small trapped-particle population. We conjecture they are of the Floquet type and derive their properties from the Fourier analysis of toroidal drift modes of Connor & Taylor (Phys. Fluids, vol. 30, 1987, pp. 3180-3185), and to Hill's theory of the motion of the lunar perigee (Acta Math., vol. 8, 1886, pp. 1-36). The temperature dependence of the newly determined threshold is given for both confinement concepts. In the first case, the new temperature

  15. Dense plasma chemistry of hydrocarbons at conditions relevant to planetary interiors and inertial confinement fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Dominik

    2017-10-01

    Carbon-hydrogen demixing and subsequent diamond precipitation has been predicted to strongly participate in shaping the internal structure and evolution of icy giant planets like Neptune and Uranus. The very same dense plasma chemistry is also a potential concern for CH plastic ablator materials in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments where similar conditions are present during the first compression stage of the imploding capsule. Here, carbon-hydrogen demixing may enhance the hydrodynamic instabilities occurring in the following compression stages. First experiments applying dynamic compression and ultrafast in situ X-ray diffraction at SLAC's Linac Coherent Light Source demonstrated diamond formation from polystyrene (CH) at 150 GPa and 5000 K. Very recent experiments have now investigated the influence of oxygen, which is highly abundant in icy giant planets on the phase separation process. Compressing PET (C5H4O2) and PMMA(C5H8O2), we find again diamond formation at pressures above 150 GPa and temperatures of several thousand kelvins, showing no strong effect due to the presence of oxygen. Thus, diamond precipitation deep inside icy giant planets seems very likely. Moreover, small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) was added to the platform, which determines an upper limit for the diamond particle size, while the width of the diffraction features provides a lower limit. We find that diamond particles of several nanometers in size are formed on a nanosecond timescale. Finally, spectrally resolved X-ray scattering is used to scale amorphous diffraction signals and allows for determining the amount of carbon-hydrogen demixing inside the compressed samples even if no crystalline diamond is formed. This whole set of diagnostics provides unprecedented insights into the nanosecond kinetics of dense plasma chemistry.

  16. Measurements of the differential cross sections for the elastic n-3H and n-2H scattering at 14.1 MeV by using an inertial confinement fusion facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenje, J A; Li, C K; Seguin, F H; Casey, D T; Petrasso, R D; McNabb, D P; Navratil, P; Quaglioni, S; Sangster, T C; Glebov, V Yu; Meyerhofer, D D

    2011-09-16

    For the first time the differential cross section for the elastic neutron-triton (n-(3)H) and neutron-deuteron (n-(2)H) scattering at 14.1 MeV has been measured by using an inertial confinement fusion facility. In these experiments, which were carried out by simultaneously measuring elastically scattered (3)H and (2)H ions from a deuterium-tritium gas-filled inertial confinement fusion capsule implosion, the differential cross section for the elastic n-(3)H scattering was obtained with significantly higher accuracy than achieved in previous accelerator experiments. The results compare well with calculations that combine the resonating-group method with an ab initio no-core shell model, which demonstrate that recent advances in ab initio theory can provide an accurate description of light-ion reactions.

  17. Monoenergetic ion beam acceleration from transversely confined near-critical plasmas by intense laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, W. L.; Qiao, B.; Shen, X. F.; Chang, H. X.; Zhang, H.; Zhou, C. T.; He, X. T.

    2017-09-01

    An advanced target for production of high-energy monoenergetic ion beams by intense laser pulses is proposed, in which the near-critical plasma is transversely confined between the high-Z dense wires. It is found that the ion acceleration is significantly enhanced due to the strong magnetic dipole vortex formed at the rear of the target, where large electron current density gradients from the wires to the vacuum exist. The magnetic dipole vortex helps to realize the contraction of ion momentum phase spaces and reduction of the beam divergence so that monenergetic, highly directed, and collimated ion beams can be obtained. Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations have shown that monoenergetic proton beams with a peak energy of 105 MeV and particle number about 2.2 × 1011 are produced by using the advanced target at a laser intensity of 2.7 × 1020 W/cm2 and a pulse duration of 0.65 ps.

  18. Picosecond imaging of inertial confinement fusion plasmas using electron pulse-dilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilsabeck, T. J.; Nagel, S. R.; Hares, J. D.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Bell, P. M.; Bradley, D. K.; Dymoke-Bradshaw, A. K. L.; Piston, K.; Chung, T. M.

    2017-02-01

    Laser driven inertial confinement fusion (ICF) plasmas typically have burn durations on the order of 100 ps. Time resolved imaging of the x-ray self emission during the hot spot formation is an important diagnostic tool which gives information on implosion symmetry, transient features and stagnation time. Traditional x-ray gated imagers for ICF use microchannel plate detectors to obtain gate widths of 40-100 ps. The development of electron pulse-dilation imaging has enabled a 10X improvement in temporal resolution over legacy instruments. In this technique, the incoming x-ray image is converted to electrons at a photocathode. The electrons are accelerated with a time-varying potential that leads to temporal expansion as the electron signal transits the tube. This expanded signal is recorded with a gated detector and the effective temporal resolution of the composite system can be as low as several picoseconds. An instrument based on this principle, known as the Dilation X-ray Imager (DIXI) has been constructed and fielded at the National Ignition Facility. Design features and experimental results from DIXI will be presented.

  19. Particle Size and Pore Structure Characterization of Silver Nanoparticles Prepared by Confined Arc Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingru Zhou

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In the protecting inert gas, silver nanoparticles were successfully prepared by confined arc plasma method. The particle size, microstructure, and morphology of the particles by this process were characterized via X-ray powder diffraction (XRD, transmission electron microscopy (TEM and the corresponding selected area electron diffraction (SAED. The N2 absorption-desorption isotherms of the samples were measured by using the static volumetric absorption analyzer, the pore structure of the sample was calculated by Barrett-Joyner-Halenda (BJH academic model, and the specific surface area was calculated from Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET adsorption equation. The experiment results indicate that the crystal structure of the samples is face-centered cubic (FCC structure the same as the bulk materials, the particle size distribution ranging from 5 to 65 nm, with an average particle size about 26 nm obtained by TEM and confirmed by XRD and BET results. The specific surface area is 23.81 m2/g, pore volumes are 0.09 cm3/g, and average pore diameter is 18.7 nm.

  20. Multiplication of shearless barriers for chaotic transport in order to improve confined plasmas in tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins, Caroline G.L.; Roberto, M. [Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica (ITA/CTA), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Carvalho, R. Egydio de [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), SP (Brazil); Caldas, I.L. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Full text: We present a study that deals with meandering curves which arise after the reconnection process (or overlap) of resonances (1), that occurs only in non-twist discrete maps (2). Meandering curves formed by this kind of process play the role of barriers for chaotic transport in phase space, because inside the meandering region there is a special torus, called shearless torus, known as the strongest torus in a dynamical system (1). We introduce an extra perturbation in the Standard Non-twist Map (3), and we call this new map Labyrinthic Standard Non-twist Map (4). The labyrinthic map proposed in this work shows multiple reconnection processes of resonances, presenting multiple barriers for chaotic transport. Having applications in important areas such as the physics of thermonuclear plasmas confined in tokamaks for the extraction of clean energy. (1) D. del-Castillo-Negrete, J. M. Greene, P. J. Morrison, Physica D 91, 1 (1996) (2) A.J. Lichtenberg and M.A. Lieberman, Regular and Chaotic Dynamics (Springer, New York, 1992) (3) D. Del-Castillo-Negrete and P. J. Morrison, Phys. Fluids A 5, 948 (1993) (4) Caroline G. L. Martins; R. Egydio de Carvalho; I. L. Caldas; M. Roberto. Labyrinthic standard non-twist map. Journal of Physics A, Mathematical and Theoretical, v. 44, p. 045102 (2011). (author)

  1. Modeling Stimulated Raman Scattering in Direct-Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion Plasmas for National Ignition Facility Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maximov, A. V.; Shaw, J. G.; Myatt, J. F.; Short, R. W.

    2017-10-01

    In the plasmas of direct-drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF), the coupling of laser power to the target plasma is strongly influenced by the laser-plasma interaction (LPI) processes driven by multiple crossing laser beams. For the plasma parameters relevant to the conditions of the experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF), the threshold of the stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) is usually well exceeded because of the large scale length of the plasma density, making the study of SRS vital for the NIF ICF program. The SRS evolution starts as a convective or absolute instability, and the nonlinear saturation is determined by the ion-acoustic perturbations and kinetic effects. The LPI processes of cross-beam energy transfer and two-plasmon decay also drive the ion-acoustic modes and their interplay with SRS is analyzed. This work was supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  2. Comparison of non-neutral electron plasma confinement in harmonic and rectangular potentials in a very dense regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohamed, T. [Atomic Physics Laboratory, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Physics department, Faculty of Science, Beni-Suef University (Egypt); Mohri, A. [Atomic Physics Laboratory, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Yamazaki, Y. [Atomic Physics Laboratory, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Institute of Physics, University of Tokyo, Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan)

    2013-01-15

    Confinement of high density electron plasmas in a strong uniform magnetic field was experimentally studied in a multi-ring trap (MRT). The trap was housed inside a bore tube and surrounded by a superconducting solenoid. A 5 T magnetic field was used to provide radial confinement while an electrostatic harmonic or rectangular potential well was used for axial confinement. For trapped electrons of N = 1.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} in a harmonic potential well (HPW) with the trap length of L{sub T} = 320 mm, the plasma lifetime was about 10{sup 4} s and it became much longer at lower N = 4.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9}. Such long holding times were achieved without application of rotating electric fields. Contrastingly, in a rectangular potential well (RPW), the plasma of N = 1.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} under the same trap length expanded to cover the whole Faraday Cup within 200 s, where its radial expansion rate was {eta} = 3.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -2} mm/s, which was 20 times faster than HPW. The lifetime for RPW became shorter with increasing L{sub T} and scaled as 1/[L{sub T}]{sup 2}. This scaling found for high density plasmas is similar to the obtained one with different Penning-Malmberg traps at UC San Diego (USCD).

  3. Wave excitation by nonlinear coupling among shear Alfvén waves in a mirror-confined plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikezoe, R., E-mail: ikezoe@prc.tsukuba.ac.jp; Ichimura, M.; Okada, T.; Hirata, M.; Yokoyama, T.; Iwamoto, Y.; Sumida, S.; Jang, S.; Takeyama, K.; Yoshikawa, M.; Kohagura, J.; Shima, Y.; Wang, X. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-8577 (Japan)

    2015-09-15

    A shear Alfvén wave at slightly below the ion-cyclotron frequency overcomes the ion-cyclotron damping and grows because of the strong anisotropy of the ion temperature in the magnetic mirror configuration, and is called the Alfvén ion-cyclotron (AIC) wave. Density fluctuations caused by the AIC waves and the ion-cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) waves used for ion heating have been detected using a reflectometer in a wide radial region of the GAMMA 10 tandem mirror plasma. Various wave-wave couplings are clearly observed in the density fluctuations in the interior of the plasma, but these couplings are not so clear in the magnetic fluctuations at the plasma edge when measured using a pick-up coil. A radial dependence of the nonlinearity is found, particularly in waves with the difference frequencies of the AIC waves; bispectral analysis shows that such wave-wave coupling is significant near the core, but is not so evident at the periphery. In contrast, nonlinear coupling with the low-frequency background turbulence is quite distinct at the periphery. Nonlinear coupling associated with the AIC waves may play a significant role in the beta- and anisotropy-limits of a mirror-confined plasma through decay of the ICRF heating power and degradation of the plasma confinement by nonlinearly generated waves.

  4. Progress toward magnetic confinement of a positron-electron plasma: nearly 100% positron injection efficiency into a dipole trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoneking, Matthew

    2017-10-01

    The hydrogen atom provides the simplest system and in some cases the most precise one for comparing theory and experiment in atomics physics. The field of plasma physics lacks an experimental counterpart, but there are efforts underway to produce a magnetically confined positron-electron plasma that promises to represent the simplest plasma system. The mass symmetry of positron-electron plasma makes it particularly tractable from a theoretical standpoint and many theory papers have been published predicting modified wave and stability properties in these systems. Our approach is to utilize techniques from the non-neutral plasma community to trap and accumulate electrons and positrons prior to mixing in a magnetic trap with good confinement properties. Ultimately we aim to use a levitated superconducting dipole configuration fueled by positrons from a reactor-based positron source and buffer-gas trap. To date we have conducted experiments to characterize and optimize the positron beam and test strategies for injecting positrons into the field of a supported permanent magnet by use of ExB drifts and tailored static and dynamic potentials applied to boundary electrodes and to the magnet itself. Nearly 100% injection efficiency has been achieved under certain conditions and some fraction of the injected positrons are confined for as long as 400 ms. These results are promising for the next step in the project which is to use an inductively energized high Tc superconducting coil to produce the dipole field, initially in a supported configuration, but ultimately levitated using feedback stabilization. Work performed with the support of the German Research Foundation (DFG), JSPS KAKENHI, NIFS Collaboration Research Program, and the UCSD Foundation.

  5. Diagnosing inertial confinement fusion gamma ray physics (invited).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, H W; Hoffman, N; Wilson, D C; Stoeffl, W; Dauffy, L; Kim, Y H; McEvoy, A; Young, C S; Mack, J M; Horsfield, C J; Rubery, M; Miller, E K; Ali, Z A

    2010-10-01

    The gamma reaction history (GRH) diagnostic is a multichannel, time-resolved, energy-thresholded γ-ray spectrometer that provides a high-bandwidth, direct-measurement of fusion reaction history in inertial confinement fusion implosion experiments. 16.75 MeV deuterium+tritium (DT) fusion γ-rays, with a branching ratio of the order of 10(-5)γ/(14 MeV n), are detected to determine fundamental burn parameters, such as nuclear bang time and burn width, critical to achieving ignition at the National Ignition Facility. During the tritium/hydrogen/deuterium ignition tuning campaign, an additional γ-ray line at 19.8 MeV, produced by hydrogen+tritium fusion with a branching ratio of unity, will increase the available γ-ray signal and may allow measurement of reacting fuel composition or ion temperature. Ablator areal density measurements with the GRH are also made possible by detection of 4.43 MeV γ-rays produced by inelastic scatter of DT fusion neutrons on (12)C nuclei in the ablating plastic capsule material.

  6. Diagnosing inertial confinement fusion gamma ray physics (invited)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrmann, H. W.; Hoffman, N.; Wilson, D. C.; Kim, Y. H.; McEvoy, A.; Young, C. S.; Mack, J. M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, M/S E526, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Stoeffl, W.; Dauffy, L. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Horsfield, C. J.; Rubery, M. [Atomic Weapons Establishment, Aldermaston, Reading RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Miller, E. K. [Special Technologies Laboratory, NSTec, Santa Barbara, California 93111 (United States); Ali, Z. A. [Livermore Operations, NSTec, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2010-10-15

    The gamma reaction history (GRH) diagnostic is a multichannel, time-resolved, energy-thresholded {gamma}-ray spectrometer that provides a high-bandwidth, direct-measurement of fusion reaction history in inertial confinement fusion implosion experiments. 16.75 MeV deuterium+tritium (DT) fusion {gamma}-rays, with a branching ratio of the order of 10{sup -5}{gamma}/(14 MeV n), are detected to determine fundamental burn parameters, such as nuclear bang time and burn width, critical to achieving ignition at the National Ignition Facility. During the tritium/hydrogen/deuterium ignition tuning campaign, an additional {gamma}-ray line at 19.8 MeV, produced by hydrogen+tritium fusion with a branching ratio of unity, will increase the available {gamma}-ray signal and may allow measurement of reacting fuel composition or ion temperature. Ablator areal density measurements with the GRH are also made possible by detection of 4.43 MeV {gamma}-rays produced by inelastic scatter of DT fusion neutrons on {sup 12}C nuclei in the ablating plastic capsule material.

  7. Kinetic transport in a magnetically confined and flux-constrained fusion plasma; Transport cinetique dans un plasma de fusion magnetique a flux force

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darmet, G

    2007-11-15

    This work deals with the kinetic transport in a fusion plasma magnetically confined and flux-constrained. The author proposes a new interpretation of the dynamics of zonal flows. The model that has been studied is a gyrokinetic model reduced to the transport of trapped ions. The inter-change stability that is generated allows the study of the kinetic transport of trapped ions. This model has a threshold instability and can be simulated over a few tens confining time for either thermal bath constraint or flux constraint. For thermal baths constraint, the simulation shows a metastable state where zonal flows are prevailing while turbulence is non-existent. In the case of a flux-constraint, zonal flows appear and relax by exchanging energy with system's kinetic energy and turbulence energy. The competition between zonal flows and turbulence can be then simulated by a predator-prey model. 2 regimes can be featured out: an improved confining regime where zonal flows dominate transport and a turbulent regime where zonal flows and turbulent transport are of the same magnitude order. We show that flux as well as the Reynolds tensor play an important role in the dynamics of the zonal flows and that the gyrokinetic description is relevant for all plasma regions. (A.C.)

  8. High-Beta, Improved Confinement Reversed-Field Pinch Plasmas at High Density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wyman, M. [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Chapman, B. E. [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Ahn, J. W. [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Almagri, A. [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Anderson, J. [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Bonomo, F. [Consorzio RFX, Italy; Brower, D. L. [University of California, Los Angeles; Combs, Stephen Kirk [ORNL; Craig, D. [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Hartog, D. J. Den [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Deng, B. [University of California, Los Angeles; Ding, W. X. [University of California, Los Angeles; Ebrahimi, F. [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Ennis, D. [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Fiksel, G. [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Foust, Charles R [ORNL; Franz, P. [EURATOM / ENEA, Italy; Gangadhara, S. [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Goetz, J. [University of Wisconsin, Madison; O' Connell, R, [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Oliva, S. [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Prager, S. C. [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Reusch, J. A. [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Sarff, J. S. [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Stephens, H. D. [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Yates, T. [University of California, Los Angeles

    2008-01-01

    In Madison Symmetric Torus Dexter et al., Fusion Technol. 19, 131 1991 discharges where improved confinement is brought about by modification of the current profile, pellet injection has quadrupled the density, reaching ne=41019 m 3. Without pellet injection, the achievable density in improved confinement discharges had been limited by edge-resonant tearing instability. With pellet injection, the total beta has been increased to 26%, and the energy confinement time is comparable to that at low density. Pressure-driven local interchange and global tearing are predicted to be linearly unstable. Interchange has not yet been observed experimentally, but there is possible evidence of pressure-driven tearing, an instability usually driven by the current gradient in the reversed-field pinch.

  9. Studies of thermal energy confinement scaling in PDX plasmas: D/sup 0/. -->. H/sup +/ limiter discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaye, S.M.; Goldston, R.J.; Bell, M.; Bol, K.; Bitter, M.; Fonck, R.; Grek, B.; Hawryluk, R.J.; Johnson, D.; Kaita, R.

    1984-06-01

    Experiments were performed on the PDX tokamak to study plasma heating and ..beta.. scaling with higher power, near-perpendicular neutral beam injection. The data taken during these experiments were analyzed using a time-dependent data interpretation code (TRANSP) to study the transport and thermal confinement scaling over a wide range of plasma parameters. This study focuses on results from experiments with D/sup 0/ injection into H/sup +/ plasmas using graphite rail limiters, a = 40 to 44 cm, R = 143 cm, I/sub p/ = 200 to 480 kA, B/sub T/ = 0.7 to 2.2 T, and typically anti n/sub e/ = 2.5 to 4.2 x 10/sup 13/ cm/sup -3/. The results of this study indicate that for both ohmic and neutral beam heated discharges the energy flow out of the plasma is dominated by anomalous electron losses, attributed to electron thermal conduction. The ion conduction losses are well described to electron thermal conduction. The ion conduction losses are well described by neoclassical theory; however, the total ion loss influences the power balance significantly only at high toroidal fields and high plasma currents.

  10. Discovery of Stationary Operation of Quiescent H-mode Plasmas with Net-Zero NBI Torque and High Energy Confinement on DIII-D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrell, Keith

    2015-11-01

    Experiments this summer in DIII-D have used edge turbulence control to achieve stationary, high confinement operation without Edge Localized Mode (ELM) instabilities and with no external torque input. Eliminating the ELM-induced heat bursts and controlling plasma stability at low rotation represent two of the great challenges for fusion energy. By exploiting edge turbulence in a novel manner, we achieved outstanding tokamak performance, well above the H98 international tokamak energy confinement scaling (H98 =1.25), thus meeting an additional confinement challenge that is usually difficult at low torque. The new regime is triggered in double null plasmas by ramping the injected torque to zero and then maintaining it there. This lowers ExB rotation shear in the plasma edge, allowing low-k, broadband, electromagnetic turbulence to increase. In the H-mode edge, a narrow transport barrier usually grows until MHD instability (a peeling ballooning mode) leads to the ELM heat burst. However, the increased turbulence reduces the pressure gradient, allowing the development of a broader and thus higher transport barrier. A 60% increase in pedestal pressure and 40% increase in energy confinement result. Strong double-null plasma shaping raises the threshold for the ELM instability, allowing the plasma to reach a transport-limited state near but below the explosive ELM stability boundary. The resulting plasmas have burning-plasma-relevant betan =1.6-1.8 and run without the need for extra torque from 3D magnetic fields. To date, stationary conditions have been produced for 2 s or 12 energy confinement times, limited only by external hardware constraints. Stationary operation with improved pedestal conditions is highly significant for future burning plasma devices, since operation without ELMs at low rotation and good confinement is key for fusion energy production. Supported by the US DOE under DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  11. Numerical analysis of thermonuclear detonation in dense plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avronin, Y. N.; Bunatyan, A. A.; Gadzhiyev, A. D.; Mustafin, K. A.; Nurbakov, A. S.; Pisarev, V. N.; Feoktistov, L. P.; Frolov, V. D.; Shibarshov, L. I.

    1985-01-01

    The propagation of thermonuclear combustion from the region heated to thermonuclear temperatures by an external source to the remaining part of the target was investigated. The target was a tube of inert material (gold, lead, beryllium, etc.) filled with a deuterium-tritium mixture. It was determined analytically that thermonuclear combustion can propagate from a small portion of a nonspherical target to the remainder of the target and that a steady-state thermonuclear detonation wave can be formed. The role of various physical processes in thermonuclear detonation was investigated. Shock wave is the main mechanism underlying detonation propagation. The detonation rate and intensity of the thermonuclear reaction is influenced by the leakage of heat due to transvere heat conductivity. The critical diameter for thermonuclear detonation was determined approximately for a plasma filament encased in a housing with twice the density of the fuel.

  12. Large-aperture plasma-assisted deposition of inertial confinement fusion laser coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, James B; Kupinski, Pete; Rigatti, Amy L; Schmid, Ansgar W; Lambropoulos, John C; Papernov, Semyon; Kozlov, Alexei; Spaulding, John; Sadowski, Daniel; Chrzan, Z Roman; Hand, Robert D; Gibson, Desmond R; Brinkley, Ian; Placido, Frank

    2011-03-20

    Plasma-assisted electron-beam evaporation leads to changes in the crystallinity, density, and stresses of thin films. A dual-source plasma system provides stress control of large-aperture, high-fluence coatings used in vacuum for substrates 1m in aperture.

  13. Evolution of plasma rotation, radial electric field, MHD activity and plasma confinement in the STOR M tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trembach, Dallas; Dreval, Mykola

    2008-11-01

    Experimental results from the STOR-M tokamak detailing simultaneous behavior of plasma SOL rotation, radial electric field, main plasma column parameters, and MHD activity are presented. In the STOR-M tokamak, fast (˜ 1 ms), well correlated changes in the radial electric field, plasma rotation, and floating potential fluctuations in the periphery are observed. During the correlated phase, the radial electric field changes its sign from positive to negative, the Mach number of toroidal plasma rotation, which is co-current, decreases from M||= 0.4 to nearly 0. MHD activity in STOR-M tends to be suppressed if the radial electric field is negative. When the electric field is negative, MHD frequency decreases and increases in the average electron density and poloidal beta are observed.

  14. The regime of the improved confinement with deuterium pellet injected into plasmas of tokamak T-10 with W and Li limiters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryzhakov, D. V.; Pavlov, Yu D.; Borschegovskiy, A. A.; Gorshkov, A. V.; Kapralov, V. G.; Klyuchnikov, L. A.; Krylov, S. V.; Malzev, S. G.; Sergeev, D. S.

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, we present the first, after replacing a graphite limiter with a tungsten limiter, experimental results of the regimes of improved plasma confinement in the T-10 tokamak when injecting deuterium pellets. Comparison with the results of previous experiments with a graphite limiter shows the preservation of the improved confinement effect. Preliminary results of the experiments on the change in poloidal angle of injection of pellets allow us to say that with the central injection, the maximum effect of improved confinement is observed.

  15. On improved confinement in mirror plasmas by a radial electric field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ågren, O.; Moiseenko, V. E.

    2017-11-01

    A weak radial electric field can suppress radial excursions of a guiding center from its mean magnetic surface. The physical origin of this effect is the smearing action by a poloidal E × B rotation, which tend to cancel out the inward and outward radial drifts. A use of this phenomenon may provide larger margins for magnetic field shaping with radial confinement of particles maintained in the collision free idealization. Mirror fields, stabilized by a quadrupolar field component, are of particular interest for their MHD stability and the possibility to control the quasi neutral radial electric field by biased potential plates outside the confinement region. Flux surface footprints on the end tank wall have to be traced to avoid short-circuiting between biased plates. Assuming a robust biasing procedure, moderate voltage demands for the biased plates seems adequate to cure even the radial excursions of Yushmanov ions which could be locally trapped near the mirrors. Analytical expressions are obtained for a magnetic quadrupolar mirror configuration which possesses minimal radial magnetic drifts in the central confinement region. By adding a weak controlled radial quasi-neutral electric field, the majority of gyro centers are predicted to be forced to move even closer to their respective mean magnetic surface. The gyro center radial coordinate is in such a case an accurate approximation for a constant of motion. By using this constant of motion, the analysis is in a Vlasov description extended to finite β. A correspondence between that Vlasov system and a fluid description with a scalar pressure and an electric potential is verified. The minimum B criterion is considered and implications for flute mode stability in the considered magnetic field is analyzed. By carrying out a long-thin expansion to a higher order, the validity of the calculations are extended to shorter and more compact device designs.

  16. Extreme ultraviolet emission and confinement of tin plasmas in the presence of a magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, Amitava, E-mail: roy@fzu.cz, E-mail: aroy@barc.gov.in [School of Nuclear Engineering and Center for Materials Under Extreme Environment(CMUXE), Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); HiLASE Project, Department of Diode-pumped Lasers, Institute of Physics of the ASCR, Na Slovance 2, 18221 Prague (Czech Republic); Murtaza Hassan, Syed; Harilal, Sivanandan S.; Hassanein, Ahmed [School of Nuclear Engineering and Center for Materials Under Extreme Environment(CMUXE), Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Endo, Akira; Mocek, Tomas [HiLASE Project, Department of Diode-pumped Lasers, Institute of Physics of the ASCR, Na Slovance 2, 18221 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2014-05-15

    We investigated the role of a guiding magnetic field on extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and ion emission from a laser produced Sn plasma for various laser pulse duration and intensity. For producing plasmas, planar slabs of pure Sn were irradiated with 1064 nm, Nd:YAG laser pulses with varying pulse duration (5–15 ns) and intensity. A magnetic trap was fabricated with the use of two neodymium permanent magnets which provided a magnetic field strength ∼0.5 T along the plume expansion direction. Our results indicate that the EUV conversion efficiency do not depend significantly on applied axial magnetic field. Faraday Cup ion analysis of Sn plasma show that the ion flux reduces by a factor of ∼5 with the application of an axial magnetic field. It was found that the plasma plume expand in the lateral direction with peak velocity measured to be ∼1.2 cm/μs and reduced to ∼0.75 cm/μs with the application of an axial magnetic field. The plume expansion features recorded using fast photography in the presence and absence of 0.5 T axial magnetic field are simulated using particle-in-cell code. Our simulation results qualitatively predict the plasma behavior.

  17. Extreme ultraviolet emission and confinement of tin plasmas in the presence of a magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Amitava; Murtaza Hassan, Syed; Harilal, Sivanandan S.; Endo, Akira; Mocek, Tomas; Hassanein, Ahmed

    2014-05-01

    We investigated the role of a guiding magnetic field on extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and ion emission from a laser produced Sn plasma for various laser pulse duration and intensity. For producing plasmas, planar slabs of pure Sn were irradiated with 1064 nm, Nd:YAG laser pulses with varying pulse duration (5-15 ns) and intensity. A magnetic trap was fabricated with the use of two neodymium permanent magnets which provided a magnetic field strength ˜0.5 T along the plume expansion direction. Our results indicate that the EUV conversion efficiency do not depend significantly on applied axial magnetic field. Faraday Cup ion analysis of Sn plasma show that the ion flux reduces by a factor of ˜5 with the application of an axial magnetic field. It was found that the plasma plume expand in the lateral direction with peak velocity measured to be ˜1.2 cm/μs and reduced to ˜0.75 cm/μs with the application of an axial magnetic field. The plume expansion features recorded using fast photography in the presence and absence of 0.5 T axial magnetic field are simulated using particle-in-cell code. Our simulation results qualitatively predict the plasma behavior.

  18. Nuclear-plus-interference-scattering effect on the energy deposition of multi-MeV protons in a dense Be plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhigang; Fu, Zhenguo; He, Bin; Hu, Zehua; Zhang, Ping

    2016-09-01

    The nuclear plus interference scattering (NIS) effect on the stopping power of hot dense beryllium (Be) plasma for multi-MeV protons is theoretically investigated by using the generalized Brown-Preston-Singleton (BPS) model, in which a NIS term is taken into account. The analytical formula of the NIS term is detailedly derived. By using this formula, the density and temperature dependence of the NIS effect is numerically studied, and the results show that the NIS effect becomes more and more important with increasing the plasma temperature or density. Different from the cases of protons traveling through the deuterium-tritium plasmas, for a Be plasma, a prominent oscillation valley structure is observed in the NIS term when the proton's energy is close to E_{p}=7MeV. Furthermore, the penetration distance is remarkably reduced when the NIS term is considered.

  19. Turbulent fluctuations during pellet injection into a dipole confined plasma torus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnier, D. T.; Mauel, M. E.; Roberts, T. M.; Kesner, J.; Woskov, P. P.

    2017-01-01

    We report measurements of the turbulent evolution of the plasma density profile following the fast injection of lithium pellets into the Levitated Dipole Experiment (LDX) [Boxer et al., Nat. Phys. 6, 207 (2010)]. As the pellet passes through the plasma, it provides a significant internal particle source and allows investigation of density profile evolution, turbulent relaxation, and turbulent fluctuations. The total electron number within the dipole plasma torus increases by more than a factor of three, and the central density increases by more than a factor of five. During these large changes in density, the shape of the density profile is nearly "stationary" such that the gradient of the particle number within tubes of equal magnetic flux vanishes. In comparison to the usual case, when the particle source is neutral gas at the plasma edge, the internal source from the pellet causes the toroidal phase velocity of the fluctuations to reverse and changes the average particle flux at the plasma edge. An edge particle source creates an inward turbulent pinch, but an internal particle source increases the outward turbulent particle flux. Statistical properties of the turbulence are measured by multiple microwave interferometers and by an array of probes at the edge. The spatial structures of the largest amplitude modes have long radial and toroidal wavelengths. Estimates of the local and toroidally averaged turbulent particle flux show intermittency and a non-Gaussian probability distribution function. The measured fluctuations, both before and during pellet injection, have frequency and wavenumber dispersion consistent with theoretical expectations for interchange and entropy modes excited within a dipole plasma torus having warm electrons and cool ions.

  20. Simulation of recombination-pumped soft x-ray lasers in wall-confined laser-produced plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daido, H.; Nishihara, K.; Miura, E.; Nakai, S. (Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, 2-6 Yamada-Oka Suita Osaka 565, Japan (JP))

    1990-03-01

    We describe the physical mechanisms of the recombination-pumped laser action of the carbon VI Balmer-{alpha} line (18.2 nm), which is expected to have a gain duration of as long as 10 nsec in the cylindrical-wall-confinement plasmas produced by a CO{sub 2} laser. We present the modeling of the laser action with the combination of the one-dimensional hydrodynamic code and the multilevel atomic rate equation code. The gain coefficient derived from the calculated dynamics of the level populations is somewhat smaller than the experimental data. Additional expansion cooling may account for the discrepancy. The higher gain coefficient of the order of 5 cm{sup {minus}1} is expected when we irradiate a high-{ital Z} doped cylinder-type target.

  1. Advances in compact proton spectrometers for inertial-confinement fusion and plasma nuclear science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seguin, F H; Sinenian, N; Rosenberg, M; Zylstra, A; Manuel, M J-E; Sio, H; Waugh, C; Rinderknecht, H G; Johnson, M Gatu; Frenje, J; Li, C K; Petrasso, R; Sangster, T C; Roberts, S

    2012-10-01

    Compact wedge-range-filter proton spectrometers cover proton energies ∼3-20 MeV. They have been used at the OMEGA laser facility for more than a decade for measuring spectra of primary D(3)He protons in D(3)He implosions, secondary D(3)He protons in DD implosions, and ablator protons in DT implosions; they are now being used also at the National Ignition Facility. The spectra are used to determine proton yields, shell areal density at shock-bang time and compression-bang time, fuel areal density, and implosion symmetry. There have been changes in fabrication and in analysis algorithms, resulting in a wider energy range, better accuracy and precision, and better robustness for survivability with indirect-drive inertial-confinement-fusion experiments.

  2. Proceedings of the US-Japan workshop and the satellite meeting of ITC-9 on physics of high beta plasma confinement in innovative fusion system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goto, Seiichi; Yoshimura, Satoru [eds.

    1999-04-01

    The US-Japan Workshop on Physics of High Beta Plasma Confinement in Innovative Fusion System was held jointly with the Satellite Meeting of ITC-9 at National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS), Toki-city during December 14-15, 1998. This proceedings book includes the papers of the talks given at the workshop. These include: Theoretical analysis on the stability of field reversed configuration (FRC) plasmas; Theory and Modeling of high {beta} plasmas; Recent progressive experiments in high {beta} systems; Formation of high {beta} plasmas using merging phenomenon; Theory and Modeling of a FRC Fusion Reactor. The 15 papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  3. Accounting for Debye sheath expansion for proud Langmuir probes in magnetic confinement fusion plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsui, C. K.; Boedo, J. A.; Stangeby, P. C.; TCV Team

    2018-01-01

    A Child-Langmuir law-based method for accounting for Debye sheath expansion while fitting the current-voltage I-V characteristic of proud Langmuir probes (electrodes that extend into the volume of the plasma) is described. For Langmuir probes of a typical size used in tokamak plasmas, these new estimates of electron temperature and ion saturation current density values decreased by up to 60% compared to methods that did not account for sheath expansion. Changes to the collection area are modeled using the Child-Langmuir law and effective expansion perimeter lp, and the model is thus referred to as the "perimeter sheath expansion method." lp is determined solely from electrode geometry, so the method may be employed without prior measurement of the magnitude of the sheath expansion effects for a given Langmuir probe and can be used for electrodes of different geometries. This method correctly predicts the non-saturating ΔI/ΔV slope for cold, low-density plasmas where sheath-expansion effects are strong, as well as for hot plasmas where ΔI/ΔV ˜ 0, though it is shown that the sheath can still significantly affect the collection area in these hot conditions. The perimeter sheath expansion method has several advantages compared to methods where the non-saturating current is fitted: (1) It is more resilient to scatter in the I-V characteristics observed in turbulent plasmas. (2) It is able to separate the contributions to the ΔI/ΔV slope from sheath expansion to that of the high energy electron tail in high Te conditions. (3) It calculates the change in the collection area due to the Debye sheath for conditions where ΔI/ΔV ˜ 0 and for V = Vf.

  4. Demonstration of Ion Kinetic Effects in Inertial Confinement Fusion Implosions and Investigation of Magnetic Reconnection Using Laser-Produced Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, M. J.

    2016-10-01

    Shock-driven laser inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions have demonstrated the presence of ion kinetic effects in ICF implosions and also have been used as a proton source to probe the strongly driven reconnection of MG magnetic fields in laser-generated plasmas. Ion kinetic effects arise during the shock-convergence phase of ICF implosions when the mean free path for ion-ion collisions (λii) approaches the size of the hot-fuel region (Rfuel) and may impact hot-spot formation and the possibility of ignition. To isolate and study ion kinetic effects, the ratio of N - K =λii /Rfuel was varied in D3He-filled, shock-driven implosions at the Omega Laser Facility and the National Ignition Facility, from hydrodynamic-like conditions (NK 0.01) to strongly kinetic conditions (NK 10). A strong trend of decreasing fusion yields relative to the predictions of hydrodynamic models is observed as NK increases from 0.1 to 10. Hydrodynamics simulations that include basic models of the kinetic effects that are likely to be present in these experiments-namely, ion diffusion and Knudsen-layer reduction of the fusion reactivity-are better able to capture the experimental results. This type of implosion has also been used as a source of monoenergetic 15-MeV protons to image magnetic fields driven to reconnect in laser-produced plasmas at conditions similar to those encountered at the Earth's magnetopause. These experiments demonstrate that for both symmetric and asymmetric magnetic-reconnection configurations, when plasma flows are much stronger than the nominal Alfvén speed, the rate of magnetic-flux annihilation is determined by the flow velocity and is largely insensitive to initial plasma conditions. This work was supported by the Department of Energy Grant Number DENA0001857.

  5. Tungsten transport in the plasma edge at ASDEX upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janzer, Michael Arthur

    2015-04-30

    The Plasma Facing Components (PFC) will play a crucial role in future deuterium-tritium magnetically confined fusion power plants, since they will be subject to high energy and particle loads, but at the same time have to ensure long lifetimes and a low tritium retention. These requirements will most probably necessitate the use of high-Z materials such as tungsten for the wall materials, since their erosion properties are very benign and, unlike carbon, capture only little tritium. The drawback with high-Z materials is, that they emit strong line radiation in the core plasma, which acts as a powerful energy loss mechanism. Thus, the concentration of these high-Z materials has to be controlled and kept at low levels in order to achieve a burning plasma. Understanding the transport processes in the plasma edge is essential for applying the proper impurity control mechanisms. This control can be exerted either by enhancing the outflux, e.g. by Edge Localized Modes (ELM), since they are known to expel impurities from the main plasma, or by reducing the influx, e.g. minimizing the tungsten erosion or increasing the shielding effect of the Scrape Off Layer (SOL). ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) has been successfully operating with a full tungsten wall for several years now and offers the possibility to investigate these edge transport processes for tungsten. This study focused on the disentanglement of the frequency of type-I ELMs and the main chamber gas injection rate, two parameters which are usually linked in H-mode discharges. Such a separation allowed for the first time the direct assessment of the impact of each parameter on the tungsten concentration. The control of the ELM frequency was performed by adjusting the shape of the plasma, i.e. the upper triangularity. The radial tungsten transport was investigated by implementing a modulated tungsten source. To create this modulated source, the linear dependence of the tungsten erosion rate at the Ion Cyclotron Resonance

  6. Parametric decay instability near the upper hybrid resonance in magnetically confined fusion plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Søren Kjer; Nielsen, Stefan Kragh; Salewski, Mirko

    2017-01-01

    of the above parametric decay instability (PDI), unifying earlier treatments, and show that it may occur in underdense and weakly overdense plasmas. The PDI theory is used to explain anomalous sidebands observed in collective Thomson scattering (CTS) spectra at the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak. The theory may also...... account for similar observations during CTS experiments in stellarators, as well as in some 1st harmonic electron cyclotron resonance and O-X-B heating experiments....

  7. On the plasma confinement by acoustic resonance. An innovation for electrodeless high-pressure discharge lamps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courret, Gilles; Nikkola, Petri; Wasterlain, Sébastien; Gudozhnik, Olexandr; Girardin, Michel; Braun, Jonathan; Gavin, Serge; Croci, Mirko; Egolf, Peter W.

    2017-08-01

    In an applied research project on the development of a pulsed microwave sulfur lamp prototype of 1 kW, we have discovered an amazing phenomenon in which the plasma forms a ball staying at the center of the bulb despite gravity, thus protecting the glass from melting. In this paper, it is shown that this results from an acoustic resonance in a spherical mode. Measurements of the plasma response to short pulses are presented showing beats at the spherical resonance. It is demonstrated that the beats could result from the simultaneous excitation of two normal modes with a frequency difference of approximately 1%. One of the two frequencies matches precisely the microwave pulses repetition, a little below 30 kHz. Thus this one is due to a forced oscillation, whereas the other one is due to a free oscillation. The phase velocity of sound was calculated as a function of temperature in order to find the series of temperatures at which a resonance would occur if the bulb were an isothermal solid sphere. The mean temperature inside the actual bulb was determined from the only doublet of this series, that has characteristic frequencies close enough to cause the observed beats. In addition, one of these two modes has a spherical symmetry that can explain the plasma ball formation. The obtained mean temperature is consistent with the direct measurements on the bulb surface as well as with the temperature in the core of a similar plasma found in the literature. We have also proposed a model of the resonance onset based on the acoustic dispersion and the sound amplification due to electromagnetic coupling.

  8. Diagnostic plasma of diode discharge containing carbon particles and ex situ analysis of resulting powders; Diagnostic plasma d'une decharge diode contenant des poussieres carbonees et analyses ex situ des poudres formees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hugon, R.; Peng, Y.; Vasseur, J.L.; Bougdira, J. [Nancy-1 Univ. Henri Poincare, Laboratoire de Physique des Milieux Ionises et Applications, UMR 7040 CNRS, 54 - Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France)

    2006-07-01

    The problem of wall-plasma interaction are very important for the tokamaks development and in particular the new reactor ITER. The carbon fiber walls erosion in contact with the plasma leads to the formation of carbon particles as dust or hydrocarbon deposits, responsible of the fuel retention (deuterium, tritium). In this study, carbon dust is produced in a laboratory reactor type diode. The time dependence of the gaseous phase reactivity and its influence on the electric characteristics of the discharge and the dust formation dynamic, in function of the power and the gaseous mixture are realized with different types of diagnostic. The dust formation dynamic is studied by laser diffusion. (A.L.B.)

  9. Interchange Reconnection Associated with a Confined Filament Eruption: Implications for the Source of Transient Cold-dense Plasma in Solar Winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Ruisheng; Chen, Yao; Wang, Bing; Li, Gang; Xiang, Yongyuan

    2017-05-01

    The cold-dense plasma is occasionally detected in the solar wind with in situ data, but the source of the cold-dense plasma remains illusive. Interchange reconnections (IRs) between closed fields and nearby open fields are known to contribute to the formation of solar winds. We present a confined filament eruption associated with a puff-like coronal mass ejection (CME) on 2014 December 24. The filament underwent successive activations and finally erupted, due to continuous magnetic flux cancelations and emergences. The confined erupting filament showed a clear untwist motion, and most of the filament material fell back. During the eruption, some tiny blobs escaped from the confined filament body, along newly formed open field lines rooted around the south end of the filament, and some bright plasma flowed from the north end of the filament to remote sites at nearby open fields. The newly formed open field lines shifted southward with multiple branches. The puff-like CME also showed multiple bright fronts and a clear southward shift. All the results indicate an intermittent IR existed between closed fields of the confined erupting filament and nearby open fields, which released a portion of filament material (blobs) to form the puff-like CME. We suggest that the IR provides a possible source of cold-dense plasma in the solar wind.

  10. Inertial confinement fusion research and development studies. Final report, October 1979-August 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bullis, R.; Finkelman, M.; Leng, J.; Luzzi, T.; Ojalvo, I.; Powell, E.; Sedgley, D.

    1980-08-01

    These Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) research and development studies were selected for structural, thermal, and vacuum pumping analyses in support of the High Yield Lithium Injection Fusion Energy (HYLIFE) concept development. An additional task provided an outlined program plan for an ICF Engineering Test Facility, using the HYLIFE concept as a model, although the plan is generally applicable to other ICF concepts. The HYLIFE is one promising type of ICF concept which features a falling array of liquid lithium jets. These jets surround the fusion reaction to protect the first structural wall (FSW) of the vacuum chamber by absorbing the fusion energy, and to act as the tritium breeder. The fusion energy source is a deuterium-tritium pellet injected into the chamber every second and driven by laser or heavy ion beams. The studies performed by Grumman have considered the capabilities of specific HYLIFE features to meet life requirements and the requirement to recover to preshot conditions prior to each subsequent shot. The components under investigation were the FSW which restrains the outward motion of the liquid lithium, the nozzle plate which forms the falling jet array, the graphite shield which is in direct top view of the fusion pellet, and the vacuum pumping system. The FSW studies included structural analysis, and definition of an experimental program to validate computer codes describing lithium motion and the resulting impact on the wall.

  11. First Liquid Layer Inertial Confinement Fusion Implosions at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, R. E.; Leeper, R. J.; Kline, J. L.; Zylstra, A. B.; Yi, S. A.; Biener, J.; Braun, T.; Kozioziemski, B. J.; Sater, J. D.; Bradley, P. A.; Peterson, R. R.; Haines, B. M.; Yin, L.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Meezan, N. B.; Walters, C.; Biener, M. M.; Kong, C.; Crippen, J. W.; Kyrala, G. A.; Shah, R. C.; Herrmann, H. W.; Wilson, D. C.; Hamza, A. V.; Nikroo, A.; Batha, S. H.

    2016-12-01

    The first cryogenic deuterium and deuterium-tritium liquid layer implosions at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) demonstrate D2 and DT layer inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions that can access a low-to-moderate hot-spot convergence ratio (12 NIF utilized high convergence (CR >30 ) DT ice layer implosions. Although high CR is desirable in an idealized 1D sense, it amplifies the deleterious effects of asymmetries. To date, these asymmetries prevented the achievement of ignition at the NIF and are the major cause of simulation-experiment disagreement. In the initial liquid layer experiments, high neutron yields were achieved with CRs of 12-17, and the hot-spot formation is well understood, demonstrated by a good agreement between the experimental data and the radiation hydrodynamic simulations. These initial experiments open a new NIF experimental capability that provides an opportunity to explore the relationship between hot-spot convergence ratio and the robustness of hot-spot formation during ICF implosions.

  12. Identification of S VIII through S XIV emission lines between 17.5 and 50 nm in a magnetically confined plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, K. J.; Tamura, N.; Combs, S. K.; García, R.; Hernández Sánchez, J.; Navarro, M.; Panadero, N.; Pastor, I.; Soleto, A.; the TJ-II Team

    2018-03-01

    43 spectral emission lines from F-like to Li-like sulphur ions have been identified in the wavelength range from 17.5 to 50 nm in spectra obtained following tracer injection into plasmas created in a magnetically confined plasma device, the stellarator TJ-II. Plasmas created and maintained in this heliac device with electron cyclotron resonance heating achieve central electron temperatures and densities up to 1.5 keV and 8 × 1018 m‑3, respectively. Tracer injections were performed with ≤6 × 1016 atoms of sulphur contained within ∼300 μm diameter polystyrene capsules, termed tracer encapsulated solid pellets, using a gas propulsion system to achieve velocities between 250 and 450 m s‑1. Once ablation of the exterior polystyrene shell by plasma particles is completed, the sulphur is deposited in the plasma core where it is ionized up to S+13 and transported about the plasma. In order to aid line identification, which is made using a number of atomic line emission databases, spectra are collected before and after injection using a 1 m focal length normal incidence spectrometer equipped with a CCD camera. This work is motivated by the need to clearly identify sulphur emission lines in the vacuum ultraviolet range of magnetically confined plasmas, as sulphur x-ray emission lines are regularly observed in both tokamak and stellarator plasmas.

  13. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory annual report, October 1, 1993-- September 30, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) project is well into the experimental phase of its deuterium-tritium (D-T) program, with the objective to derive the maximum amount of experimental data on the behavior of tokamak plasmas containing a significant population of energetic alpha particles. Since the initial D-T experiments in December 1993, the operational performance of the TFTR, as well as the required tritium-handling and machine maintenance procedures in an activated environment, have improved markedly, so that D-T operation has now become essentially routine, while fully conforming with all of the safety and environmental requirements. During the D-T phase, the machine and auxiliary-systems parameters have also been increased, most notably the toroidal field (to 5.6 T) and the neutral-beam power (to 40 MW). The radio-frequency power in the ion-cyclotron-range of frequencies (ICRF) has been increased to 11 MW.

  14. The investigation of inertial fusion burning requirements of deuterium-helium3 in degenerate plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazirzadeh, M.; Khanbabaei, B.; Ghasemizad, A.

    2017-08-01

    Conditions for self-sustained burning of deuterium-helium3 as an advanced fuel in a degenerate regime have been investigated by the four temperature theory. The four temperature theory can describe the radiation field more accurately than the three temperature model. According to the four temperature theory, the photon distribution undergoes a transition from an optically thick to optically thin regime at a certain cut-off energy. The main goal of this research is to determine the critical burn-up parameter for deuterium-helium3 fuel in the degenerate regime in which the ion-electron energy exchange and the bremsstrahlung loss are smaller than those of the classic plasma. To prevent high tritium breeding via deuterium-deuterium and deuterium-tritium reactions, the utilization of equimolar deuterium-helium3 fuel is avoided.

  15. Parametric decay instability near the upper hybrid resonance in magnetically confined fusion plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, S. K.; Nielsen, S. K.; Salewski, M.; Stejner, M.; Stober, J.; the ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2017-10-01

    In this paper we investigate parametric decay of an electromagnetic pump wave into two electrostatic daughter waves, particularly an X-mode pump wave decaying into a warm upper hybrid wave (a limit of an electron Bernstein wave) and a warm lower hybrid wave. We describe the general theory of the above parametric decay instability (PDI), unifying earlier treatments, and show that it may occur in underdense and weakly overdense plasmas. The PDI theory is used to explain anomalous sidebands observed in collective Thomson scattering (CTS) spectra at the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak. The theory may also account for similar observations during CTS experiments in stellarators, as well as in some 1st harmonic electron cyclotron resonance and O-X-B heating experiments.

  16. Plasma confinement modification and convective transport suppression in the scrape-off layer using additional gas puffing in the STOR-M tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreval, M.; Hubeny, M.; Ding, Y.; Onchi, T.; Liu, Y.; Hthu, K.; Elgriw, S.; Xiao, C.; Hirose, A.

    2013-03-01

    The influence of short gas puffing (GP) pulses on the scrape-off layer (SOL) transport is studied. Similar responses of ion saturation current and floating potential measured near the GP injection valve and in the 90° toroidally separated cross-section suggest that the GP influence on the SOL region should be global. A drop in plasma temperature and a decrease in the rotational velocity of the plasma are observed in the SOL region immediately after the GP pulse; however, an unexpected increase in electron and ion temperatures is observed in the second stage of the plasma response. The decrease in floating potential fluctuations indicates that the turbulent transport is dumped immediately after the GP pulse. The GP-induced modification of turbulence properties in the SOL points to a convective transport suppression in the STOR-M tokamak. A substantial decrease in the skewness and kurtosis of ion saturation current fluctuations is observed in the SOL region resulting in the probability distribution function (PDF) getting closer to the Gaussian distribution. The plasma potential reduction, the change in plasma rotation and the suppression of turbulent transport in the SOL region indicate that the plasma confinement is modified after the GP injection. Some features of the H-mode-like confinement in the plasma bulk also accompany the SOL observations after application of the additional sharp GP pulse.

  17. Damage of actively cooled plasma facing components of magnetic confinement controlled fusion machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevet, G.; Schlosser, J.; Martin, E.; Herb, V.; Camus, G.

    2009-03-01

    Plasma facing components (PFCs) of magnetic fusion machines have high manufactured residual stresses and have to withstand important stress ranges during operation. These actively cooled PFCs have a carbon fibre composite (CFC) armour and a copper alloy heat sink. Cracks mainly appear in the CFC near the composite/copper interface. In order to analyse damage mechanisms, it is important to well simulate the damage mechanisms both of the CFC and the CFC/Cu interface. This study focuses on the mechanical behaviour of the N11 material for which the scalar ONERA damage model was used. The damage parameters of this model were identified by similarity to a neighbour material, which was extensively analysed, according to the few characterization test results available for the N11. The finite elements calculations predict a high level of damage of the CFC at the interface zone explaining the encountered difficulties in the PFCs fabrication. These results suggest that the damage state of the CFC cells is correlated with a conductivity decrease to explain the temperature increase of the armour surface under fatigue heat load.

  18. Gaussian beams for a linearized cold plasma confined in a torus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardinali, A.; Dobrokhotov, S. Yu.; Klevin, A.; Tirozzi, B.

    2016-04-01

    We consider a system of linear pde describing a cold plasma in a toroidal region in three-dimensional space. This system simulates the passage of a laser beam through the TOKAMAK, it consists of 9 equations for the electric field and the velocities of electrons and ions in a given magnetic field. Asymptotic solutions describing high-frequency Gaussian beams are constructed using the theory of Maslov complex germ in a fairly effective form. The solutions of the system are localized in the neighborhood of the beam passing through the toroidal domain (the camera). The equations for a ray take into account the density of particles in the camera and don't ``feel'' the presence of the magnetic field because of the high frequency of the Gaussian beam; the dependence on the magnetic field is contained in the amplitude of the electric field. Before the TOKAMAK camera the amplitude of the Gaussian beam is the same as in free space, but after the camera the amplitude vector rotates under the influence of the magnetic field. The formula for the angle of rotation is given explicitly. An analytical-numerical algorithm based on the asymptotic solutions is used to analyze the parameters of the magnetic field in the TOKAMAK.

  19. Tritium Plasma Experiment (TPE) - parameters and potentials for fusion plasma-wall interaction studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masashi Shimada; Robert D. Kolasinski; J. Phillip Sharpe; Rion A. Causey

    2011-08-01

    The Tritium plasma experiment (TPE) is a unique facility devoted to experiments on the behavior of deuterium/tritium in toxic (e.g. beryllium) and radioactive materials for fusion plasma-wall interaction (PWI) studies. A Langmuir probe was added to the system to characterize the plasma conditions in TPE. With this new diagnostic, we found the achievable electron temperature ranged from 5.0 to 10.0 eV, the electron density varied from 5.0 x 10{sup 16} to 2.5 x 10{sup 18} m{sup -3}, and the ion flux density varied between 5.0 x 10{sup 20} to 2.5 x 10{sup 22} m{sup -2}s{sup -1} along the centerline of the plasma. A comparison of these plasma parameters with the conditions expected for the plasma facing components (PFCs) in ITER shows that TPE is capable of achieving most (approximately 800 m{sup 2} of 850 m{sup 2} total PFCs area) of the expected ion flux density and electron density conditions.

  20. Magnetic confinement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batistoni, Paola; De Marco, Francesco; Pieroni, Leonardo (ed.)

    2005-07-01

    The Frascati Tokamak Upgrade (FTU) is a compact, high-magnetic-field tokamak capable of operating at density and magnetic field values similar to, or even encompassing, those of International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and therefore provides a unique opportunity to explore physics issues that are directly relevant to ITER. During 2004 the experimental activities were focussed on fully exploiting the lower hybrid system (for generating and controlling the plasma current) and the electron cyclotron heating system (joint experiment with the Institute of Plasma Physics of the National Research Council, Milan). With all four gyrotrons in operation, full electron cyclotron power was achieved up to a record level of 1.5 MW. By simultaneously injecting lower hybrid waves, to tailor the plasma current radial profile, and electron cyclotron waves, to heat the plasma centre, good confinement regimes with internal transport barriers were obtained at the highest plasma density values ever achieved for this operation regime (n {approx}1.5X10{sup 20}m{sup -3}). Specific studies were devoted to optimising the coupling of lower hybrid waves to the plasma (by real-time control of the plasma position) and to generating current by electron cyclotron current drive. The new scanning CO{sub 2} interferometer (developed by the Reversed Field Experiment Consortium) for high spatial and time resolution (1 cm/50 {mu}s) density profile measurements was extensively used. The Thomson scattering diagnostic was upgraded and enabled observation of scattered signals associated with the Confinement background plasma dynamics. As for theoretical studies on the dynamics of turbulence in plasmas, the transition from Bohm-like scaling to gyro-Bohm scaling of the local plasma diffusivity was demonstrated on the basis of a generalised four wave model (joint collaboration with Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory and the University of California at Irvine). The transition from weak to strong

  1. Effects of alpha stopping power modelling on the ignition threshold in a directly-driven inertial confinement fusion capsule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temporal, Mauro; Canaud, Benoit; Cayzac, Witold; Ramis, Rafael; Singleton, Robert L.

    2017-05-01

    The alpha-particle energy deposition mechanism modifies the ignition conditions of the thermonuclear Deuterium-Tritium fusion reactions, and constitutes a key issue in achieving high gain in Inertial Confinement Fusion implosions. One-dimensional hydrodynamic calculations have been performed with the code Multi-IFE [R. Ramis, J. Meyer-ter-Vehn, Comput. Phys. Commun. 203, 226 (2016)] to simulate the implosion of a capsule directly irradiated by a laser beam. The diffusion approximation for the alpha energy deposition has been used to optimize three laser profiles corresponding to different implosion velocities. A Monte-Carlo package has been included in Multi-IFE to calculate the alpha energy transport, and in this case the energy deposition uses both the LP [C.K. Li, R.D. Petrasso, Phys. Rev. Lett. 70, 3059 (1993)] and the BPS [L.S. Brown, D.L. Preston, R.L. Singleton Jr., Phys. Rep. 410, 237 (2005)] stopping power models. Homothetic transformations that maintain a constant implosion velocity have been used to map out the transition region between marginally-igniting and high-gain configurations. The results provided by the two models have been compared and it is found that - close to the ignition threshold - in order to produce the same fusion energy, the calculations performed with the BPS model require about 10% more invested energy with respect to the LP model.

  2. Successful experiments on an external MHD Accelerator: wall confinement of the plasma, annihilation of the electrothermal instability by magnetic gradient inversion, creation of a stable spiral current pattern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, Jean-Pierre; Dore, Jean-Christophe

    2013-09-01

    MHD propulsion has been extensively studied since the fifties. To shift from propulsion to an MHD Aerodyne, one only needs to accelerate the air externally, along its outer skin, using Lorentz forces. We present a set of successful experiments, obtained around a model, placed in low density air. We successfully dealt with various problems: wall confinement of two-temperature plasma obtained by inversion of the magnetic pressure gradient, annihilation of the Velikhov electrothermal instability by magnetic confinement of the streamers, establishment of a stable spiral distribution of the current, obtained by an original method. Another direction of research is devoted to the study of an MHD-controlled inlet which, coupled with a turbofan engine and implying an MHD-bypass system, would extend the flight domain to hypersonic conditions. Research manager

  3. Fusion-fission-fusion fast ignition plasma focus [rapid communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winterberg, F.

    2005-03-01

    A crucial advancement in the problem for the controlled release of energy by nuclear fusion appears possible by an autocatalytic fusion-fission-fusion microexplosion, where the deuterium-tritium (DT) fusion reaction of a dense magnetized DT plasma placed inside a thin liner made up of U238, Th232 (perhaps B10) releases a sufficient number of 14 MeV fusion neutrons which by fission reactions in the liner implode the liner on the DT plasma. The liner implosion increases the DT plasma density and with it the neutron output accelerating the fast fission reactions. Following the fast fission assisted ignition, a thermonuclear detonation wave can propagate into unburnt DT to reach a high gain. The simplest way for the realization of this concept appears to be the dense plasma focus configuration, amended with a nested high voltage magnetically insulated transmission line for the heating of the DT. The large magnetic field needed for the α-particle entrapment of the DT fusion reaction is here generated by the thermomagnetic Nernst effect, amplifying the magnetic field of the plasma focus current sheet.

  4. Studies of plasma confinement in linear and RACETRACK mirror configurations. Progress report, January 1--October 31, 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuthi, A.; Wong, A.Y.

    1986-06-30

    This report discusses research on the following magnetic mirror configurations: Racetrack; ECRH generated plasmas; RF generated plasmas; potential structures; surface multipole fields, and lamex; hot electron physics; axial loss processes; and RF induced effects.

  5. Toroidal current profile control during low confinement mode plasma discharges in DIII-D via first-principles-driven model-based robust control synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Justin E.; Boyer, Mark D.; Shi, Wenyu; Schuster, Eugenio; Luce, Tim C.; Ferron, John R.; Walker, Michael L.; Humphreys, David A.; Penaflor, Ben G.; Johnson, Robert D.

    2012-12-01

    In order for ITER to be capable of operating in advanced tokamak operating regimes, characterized by a high fusion gain, good plasma confinement, magnetohydrodynamic stability and a non-inductively driven plasma current, for extended periods of time, several challenging plasma control problems still need to be solved. Setting up a suitable toroidal current density profile in the tokamak is key for one possible advanced operating scenario characterized by non-inductive sustainment of the plasma current. At the DIII-D tokamak, the goal is to create the desired current profile during the ramp-up and early flat-top phases of the plasma discharge and then actively maintain this target profile for the remainder of the discharge. The evolution in time of the toroidal current profile in tokamaks is related to the evolution of the poloidal magnetic flux profile, which is modelled in normalized cylindrical coordinates using a first-principles, nonlinear, dynamic partial differential equation (PDE) referred to as the magnetic diffusion equation. The magnetic diffusion equation is combined with empirical correlations developed from physical observations and experimental data from DIII-D for the electron temperature, the plasma resistivity and the non-inductive current drive to develop a simplified, control-oriented, nonlinear, dynamic PDE model of the poloidal flux profile evolution valid for low confinement mode discharges. In this work, we synthesize a robust feedback controller to reject disturbances and track a desired reference trajectory of the poloidal magnetic flux gradient profile by employing the control-oriented model of the system. A singular value decomposition of the static gain matrix of the plant model is utilized to identify the most relevant control channels and is combined with the dynamic response of system around a given operating trajectory to design the feedback controller. A general framework for real-time feedforward + feedback control of magnetic and

  6. Changes in core electron temperature fluctuations across the ohmic energy confinement transition in Alcator C-Mod plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, C.; White, A. E.; Howard, N. T.; Oi, C. Y.; Rice, J. E.; Gao, C.; Ennever, P.; Porkolab, M.; Parra, F.; Mikkelsen, D.; Ernst, D.; Walk, J.; Hughes, J. W.; Irby, J.; Kasten, C.; Hubbard, A. E.; Greenwald, M. J.; the Alcator C-Mod Team

    2013-08-01

    The first measurements of long wavelength (kyρs < 0.3) electron temperature fluctuations in Alcator C-Mod made with a new correlation electron cyclotron emission diagnostic support a long-standing hypothesis regarding the confinement transition from linear ohmic confinement (LOC) to saturated ohmic confinement (SOC). Electron temperature fluctuations decrease significantly (∼40%) crossing from LOC to SOC, consistent with a change from trapped electron mode (TEM) turbulence domination to ion temperature gradient (ITG) turbulence as the density is increased. Linear stability analysis performed with the GYRO code (Candy and Waltz 2003 J. Comput. Phys. 186 545) shows that TEMs are dominant for long wavelength turbulence in the LOC regime and ITG modes are dominant in the SOC regime at the radial location (ρ ∼ 0.8) where the changes in electron temperature fluctuations are measured. In contrast, deeper in the core (ρ < 0.8), linear stability analysis indicates that ITG modes remain dominant across the LOC/SOC transition. This radial variation suggests that the robust global changes in confinement of energy and momentum occurring across the LOC/SOC transition are correlated to local changes in the dominant turbulent mode near the edge.

  7. Characterization by laser-induced photodetachment of anions formed during dust particle growth in a magnetically confined very low-pressure argon-acetylene plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makdessi, Georges Al; Hamdan, Ahmad; Margot, Joëlle; Clergereaux, Richard

    2017-08-01

    Anions in low-pressure magnetically confined Ar-C2H2 plasmas were investigated using the laser-induced photodetachment technique. In particular, the influence of the magnetic field (B) was studied. We observed that the density of negatively-charged species n - increases with B and slightly decreases when the C2H2 percentage grows. These phenomena are the result of changes in the plasma kinetics. We also observed that n - decreases as the pressure increases from 2 to 10 mTorr due to the corresponding rise of the collision frequency, which leads to enhanced losses of the negatively-charged species. In parallel, the photodetachment cross-section was deduced from the energy dependence of the photodetachment signal and was found to be close to that of C2H- anions, which indicates that these anions are likely to dominate the negative ion population.

  8. Effect of the laser wavelength: A long story of laser-plasma interaction physics for Inertial Confinement Fusion Teller Medal Lecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Labaune Christine

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Laser-driven Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF relies on the use of high-energy laser beams to compress and ignite a thermonuclear fuel with the ultimate goal of producing energy. Fusion is the holy grail of energy sources–combining abundant fuel with no greenhouse gas emissions, minimal waste products and a scale that can meet mankind's long-term energy demands. The quality and the efficiency of the coupling of the laser beams with the target are an essential step towards the success of laser fusion. A long-term program on laser-plasma interaction physics has been pursued to understand the propagation and the coupling of laser pulses in plasmas for a wide range of parameters.

  9. New technique for the direct analysis of food powders confined in a small hole using transversely excited atmospheric CO(2) laser-induced gas plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khumaeni, Ali; Ramli, Muliadi; Deguchi, Yoji; Lee, Yong Inn; Idris, Nasrullah; Kurniawan, Koo Hendrik; Lie, Tjung Jie; Kagawa, Kiichiro

    2008-12-01

    Taking advantage of the differences between the interactions of transversely excited atmospheric (TEA) CO(2) lasers with metal and with organic powder, a new technique for the direct analysis of food powder samples has been developed. In this technique, the powder samples were placed into a small hole with a diameter of 2 mm and a depth of 3 mm and covered by a metal mesh. The TEA CO(2) laser (1500 mJ, 200 ns) was focused on the powder sample surfaces, passing through the metal mesh, at atmospheric pressure in nitrogen gas. It is hypothesized that the small hole functions to confine the powder particles and suppresses the blowing-off of sample, while the metal mesh works as the source of electrons to initiate the strong gas breakdown plasma. The confined powder particles are then ablated by laser irradiation and the ablated particles move into the strong gas breakdown plasma region to be atomized and excited; this method cannot be applied for the case of Nd:YAG lasers because in such case the metal mesh itself was ablated by the laser irradiation. A quantitative analysis of a milk powder sample containing different concentrations of Ca was successfully demonstrated, resulting in a good linear calibration curve with high precision.

  10. Sandpile model with tokamaklike enhanced confinement phenomenology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, S C; Dendy, R O; Hnat, B

    2001-03-26

    Confinement phenomenology characteristic of magnetically confined plasmas emerges naturally from a simple sandpile algorithm when the parameter controlling redistribution scale length is varied. Close analogs are found for enhanced confinement, edge pedestals, and edge localized modes (ELMs), and for the qualitative correlations between them. These results suggest that tokamak observations of avalanching transport are deeply linked to the existence of enhanced confinement and ELMs.

  11. The effects of convergence ratio on the implosion behavior of DT layered inertial confinement fusion capsules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, Brian M.; Yi, S. A.; Olson, R. E.; Khan, S. F.; Kyrala, G. A.; Zylstra, A. B.; Bradley, P. A.; Peterson, R. R.; Kline, J. L.; Leeper, R. J.; Shah, R. C.

    2017-07-01

    The wetted foam capsule design for inertial confinement fusion capsules, which includes a foam layer wetted with deuterium-tritium liquid, enables layered capsule implosions with a wide range of hot-spot convergence ratios (CR) on the National Ignition Facility. We present a full-scale wetted foam capsule design that demonstrates high gain in one-dimensional simulations. In these simulations, increasing the convergence ratio leads to an improved capsule yield due to higher hot-spot temperatures and increased fuel areal density. High-resolution two-dimensional simulations of this design are presented with detailed and well resolved models for the capsule fill tube, support tent, surface roughness, and predicted asymmetries in the x-ray drive. Our modeling of these asymmetries is validated by comparisons with available experimental data. In 2D simulations of the full-scale wetted foam capsule design, jetting caused by the fill tube is prevented by the expansion of the tungsten-doped shell layer due to preheat. While the impacts of surface roughness and predicted asymmetries in the x-ray drive are enhanced by convergence effects, likely underpredicted in 2D at high CR, simulations predict that the capsule is robust to these features. Nevertheless, the design is highly susceptible to the effects of the capsule support tent, which negates all of the one-dimensional benefits of increasing the convergence ratio. Indeed, when the support tent is included in simulations, the yield decreases as the convergence ratio is increased for CR > 20. Nevertheless, the results suggest that the full-scale wetted foam design has the potential to outperform ice layer capsules given currently achievable levels of asymmetries when fielded at low convergence ratios (CR < 20).

  12. Plasma barodiffusion in inertial-confinement-fusion implosions: application to observed yield anomalies in thermonuclear fuel mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amendt, Peter; Landen, O L; Robey, H F; Li, C K; Petrasso, R D

    2010-09-10

    The observation of large, self-generated electric fields (≥10(9)  V/m) in imploding capsules using proton radiography has been reported [C. K. Li, Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 225001 (2008)]. A model of pressure gradient-driven diffusion in a plasma with self-generated electric fields is developed and applied to reported neutron yield deficits for equimolar D3He [J. R. Rygg, Phys. Plasmas 13, 052702 (2006)] and (DT)3He [H. W. Herrmann, Phys. Plasmas 16, 056312 (2009)] fuel mixtures and Ar-doped deuterium fuels [J. D. Lindl, Phys. Plasmas 11, 339 (2004)]. The observed anomalies are explained as a mild loss of deuterium nuclei near capsule center arising from shock-driven diffusion in the high-field limit.

  13. Inertial confinement fusion target component fabrication and technology development support: Annual report, October 1, 1995--September 30, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoppe, M. [ed.

    1997-02-01

    On December 30, 1990, the U.S. Department of Energy entered into a contract with General Atomics (GA) to be the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Target Component Fabrication and Technology Development Support contractor. In September 1995 this contract ended and a second contract was issued for us to continue this ICF target support work. This report documents the technical activities of the period October 1, 1995 through September 30, 1996. During this period, GA and our partners WJ Schafer Associates (WJSA) and Soane Technologies, Inc. (STI) were assigned 14 formal tasks in support of the Inertial Confinement Fusion program and its five laboratories. A portion of the effort on these tasks included providing direct {open_quotes}Onsite Support{close_quotes} at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), and Sandia National Laboratory Albuquerque (SNLA). We fabricated and delivered over 800 gold-plated hohlraum mandrels to LLNL, LANL and SNLA. We produced nearly 1,200 glass and plastic target capsules for LLNL, LANL, SNLA and University of Rochester/Laboratory for Laser Energetics (UR/LLE). We also delivered over 100 flat foil targets for Naval Research Lab (NRL) and SNLA in FY96. This report describes these target fabrication activities and the target fabrication and characterization development activities that made the deliveries possible. The ICF program is anticipating experiments at the OMEGA laser and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) which will require capsules containing cryogenic layered D{sub 2} or deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel. We are part of the National Cryogenic Target Program to create and demonstrate viable ways to generate and characterize cryogenic layers. Substantial progress has been made on ways to both create and characterize viable layers. During FY96, significant progress was made in the design of the OMEGA Cryogenic Target System that will field cryogenic targets on OMEGA.

  14. Direct asymmetry measurement of temperature and density spatial distributions in inertial confinement fusion plasmas from pinhole space-resolved spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Nagayama, T; Florido, R; Mayes, D; Tommasini, R; Koch, J A; Delettrez, J A; Regan, S P; Smalyuk, V A

    2014-01-01

    Two-dimensional space-resolved temperature and density images of an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosion core have been diagnosed for the first time. Argon-doped, direct-drive ICF experiments were performed at the Omega Laser Facility and a collection of two-dimensional space-resolved spectra were obtained from an array of gated, spectrally resolved pinhole images recorded by a multi-monochromatic x-ray imager. Detailed spectral analysis revealed asymmetries of the core not just in shape and size but in the temperature and density spatial distributions, thus characterizing the core with an unprecedented level of detail.

  15. Low-to-high confinement transition mediated by turbulence radial wave number spectral shift in a fusion plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, G. S.; Wan, B. N.; Wang, H. Q.

    2016-01-01

    A new model for the low-to-high (L-H) confinement transition has been developed based on a new paradigm for turbulence suppression by velocity shear [G. M. Staebler et al., Phys. Rev. Lett.110, 055003 (2013)]. The model indicates that the L-H transition can be mediated by a shift in the radial wave...... number spectrum of turbulence, as evidenced here, for the first time, by the direct observation of a turbulence radial wave number spectral shift and turbulence structure tilting prior to the L-H transition at tokamak edge by direct probing. This new mechanism does not require a pretransition overshoot...

  16. A novel technique for single-shot energy-resolved 2D x-ray imaging of plasmas relevant for the inertial confinement fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labate, L; Köster, P; Levato, T; Gizzi, L A

    2012-10-01

    A novel x-ray diagnostic of laser-fusion plasmas is described, allowing 2D monochromatic images of hot, dense plasmas to be obtained in any x-ray photon energy range, over a large domain, on a single-shot basis. The device (named energy-encoded pinhole camera) is based upon the use of an array of many pinholes coupled to a large area CCD camera operating in the single-photon mode. The available x-ray spectral domain is only limited by the quantum efficiency of scientific-grade x-ray CCD cameras, thus extending from a few keV up to a few tens of keV. Spectral 2D images of the emitting plasma can be obtained at any x-ray photon energy provided that a sufficient number of photons had been collected at the desired energy. Results from recent inertial confinement fusion related experiments will be reported in order to detail the new diagnostic.

  17. Tailoring electron energy distribution functions through energy confinement in dual radio-frequency driven atmospheric pressure plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Neill, C.; Waskoenig, J. [Centre for Plasma Physics, School of Maths and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Gans, T. [Centre for Plasma Physics, School of Maths and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); York Plasma Institute, Department of Physics, University of York, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom)

    2012-10-08

    A multi-scale numerical model based on hydrodynamic equations with semi-kinetic treatment of electrons is used to investigate the influence of dual frequency excitation on the effective electron energy distribution function (EEDF) in a radio-frequency driven atmospheric pressure plasma. It is found that variations of power density, voltage ratio, and phase relationship provide separate control over the electron density and the mean electron energy. This is exploited to directly influence both the phase dependent and time averaged effective EEDF. This enables tailoring the EEDF for enhanced control of non-equilibrium plasma chemical kinetics at ambient pressure and temperature.

  18. Is it possible that MHD instability triggers a transition into the improved confinement regime of toroidal plasmas?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shchepetov, S. V.; Vasilkov, D. G.

    2017-07-01

    Analyzing the experimental data from L-2M stellarator and performing appropriate theoretical analysis, the authors affirmatively answer the question raised in the title of the article. The external peeling mode is proposed as the instability triggering the transition. Peeling mode stability in magnetic-hill Mercierstable plasmas is analyzed analytically. It is shown that correctly taking into account vacuum region forbids internal peeling modes, while the external peeling mode has a threshold with respect to the plasma pressure gradient. Calculations and experimental data are in reasonable agreement.

  19. Saturation of the two-plasmon decay instability in long-scale-length plasmas relevant to direct-drive inertial confinement fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froula, D H; Yaakobi, B; Hu, S X; Chang, P-Y; Craxton, R S; Edgell, D H; Follett, R; Michel, D T; Myatt, J F; Seka, W; Short, R W; Solodov, A; Stoeckl, C

    2012-04-20

    Measurements of the hot-electron generation by the two-plasmon-decay instability are made in plasmas relevant to direct-drive inertial confinement fusion. Density-scale lengths of 400 μm at n(cr)/4 in planar CH targets allowed the two-plasmon-decay instability to be driven to saturation for vacuum intensities above ~3.5×10(14) W cm(-2). In the saturated regime, ~1% of the laser energy is converted to hot electrons. The hot-electron temperature is measured to increase rapidly from 25 to 90 keV as the laser beam intensity is increased from 2 to 7×10(14) W cm(-2). This increase in the hot-electron temperature is compared with predictions from nonlinear Zakharov models.

  20. Saturation of the Two-Plasmon Decay Instability in Long-Scale-Length Plasmas Relevant to Direct-Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Froula, D. H.; Yaakobi, B.; Hu, S. X.; Chang, P-Y.; Craxton, R. S.; Edgell, D. H.; Follett, R.; Michel, D. T.; Myatt, J. F.; Seka, W.; Short, R. W.; Solodov, A.; Stoeckl, C.

    2012-04-01

    Measurements of the hot-electron generation by the two-plasmon-decay instability are made in plasmas relevant to direct-drive inertial confinement fusion. Density-scale lengths of 400 {micro}m at n{sub cr}/4 in planar CH targets allowed the two-plasmon-decay instability to be driven to saturation for vacuum intensities above ~3.5 x 10{sup 14} W cm{sup -2}. In the saturated regime, ~1% of the laser energy is converted to hot electrons. The hot-electron temperature is measured to increase rapidly from 25 to 90 keV as the laser beam intensity is increased from 2 to 7 x 10{sup 14} W cm{sup -2}. This increase in the hot-electron temperature is compared with predictions from nonlinear Zakharov models.

  1. Deuterium-lithium plasma as a source of fusion neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirkov, A. Yu; Vesnin, V. R.

    2017-11-01

    The concepts of deuterium-tritium (D–T) fusion neutron source are currently developed for hybrid fusion–fission systems and the waste transmutation ones. The need to use tritium technologies is a deterrent factor in this promising direction of energy production. Potential possibilities of using systems that do not require tritium developments are of a significant interest. A deuterium-deuterium (D–D) reaction is considered for the use in demonstration fusion neutron sources. The product of this reaction is tritium, which will burn in the plasma with the emission of fast neutrons. D–D reaction is significantly slower then D–T reaction. Present study shows an increase in neutron yield using a powerful injection of the beam of deuterium atoms. The reactions of the deuterium with lithium isotopes are considered. In some of these reactions, fast neutrons can be obtained. The results of the calculation of the neutron yield from the deuterium lithium plasma are discussed. The estimates of the parameters needed for the realization of a source of fusion neutrons are presented.

  2. Improvement in the heating efficiency of fast ignition inertial confinement fusion through suppression of the preformed plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arikawa, Y.; Kojima, S.; Morace, A.; Hata, M.; Sakata, S.; Fujioka, S.; Kawashima, T.; Hironaka, Y.; Shigemori, K.; Abe, Y.; Zhang, Z.; Vaisseau, X.; Lee, S.; Gawa, T.; Matsuo, K.; Law, K. F. F.; Kato, Y.; Matsubara, S.; Tosaki, S.; Yogo, A.; Nagatomo, H.; Tokita, S.; Nakata, Y.; Jitsuno, T.; Miyanaga, N.; Kawanaka, J.; Fujimoto, Y.; Yamanoi, K.; Norimatsu, T.; Nakai, M.; Nishimura, H.; Shiraga, H.; FIREX GROUP; LFEX GROUP; Azechi, H.; Sunahara, A.; Johzaki, T.; Ozaki, T.; Sakagami, H.

    2017-06-01

    The study of fast electron spectrum optimization by suppression of preformed plasma in fast ignition targets is presented in this work. Integrated fast-electron spectra for electron energies below 3 MeV—the energy range responsible for core heating—are compared for different preformed plasma conditions. The pulse contrast (the ratio of peak-to-pedestal laser intensities) is compared for 108, 109 and 1011 conditions at constant laser energy (~500 J), pulse duration (2 ps), spot size (30% encircled energy on 50 µm diameter) and laser intensity (around 1  ×  1019 W cm-2). The best electron spectrum optimization, consisting of maximized electron number for energies below 3 MeV was obtained with 14 µm thick cone targets. The energy coupling efficiency from heating laser to core plasma, assuming typical core plasma parameters, was estimated to be 2%, although 0.37% was obtained with previous conditions with poor pulse contrast and a 7 µm thick cone target.

  3. Degraded Confinement in Tokamak Experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schüller, F. C.

    1994-01-01

    After a review on the state of tokamak transport theory, the methodology to derive experimental results will be described. Examples of confinement in ohmic plasmas and the deterioration with additional heating will be given. Some examples of improved confinement modes will be discussed. Fluctuation

  4. An experimental investigation of stimulated Brillouin scattering in laser-produced plasmas relevant to inertial confinement fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley, Keith Stanley [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    1993-02-11

    Despite the apparent simplicity of controlled fusion, there are many phenomena which have prevented its achievement. One phenomenon is laser-plasma instabilities. An investigation of one such instability, stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS), is reported here. SBS is a parametric process whereby an electromagnetic wave (the parent wave) decays into another electromagnetic wave and an ion acoustic wave (the daughter waves). SBS impedes controlled fusion since it can scatter much or all of the incident laser light, resulting in poor drive symmetry and inefficient laser-plasma coupling. It is widely believed that SBS becomes convectively unstable--that is, it grows as it traverses the plasma. Though it has yet to be definitively tested, convective theory is often invoked to explain experimental observations, even when one or more of the theory`s assumptions are violated. In contrast, the experiments reported here not only obeyed the assumptions of the theory, but were also conducted in plasmas with peak densities well below quarter-critical density. This prevented other competing or coexisting phenomena from occurring, thereby providing clearly interpretable results. These are the first SBS experiments that were designed to be both a clear test of linear convective theory and pertinent to controlled fusion research. A crucial part of this series of experiments was the development of a new instrument, the Multiple Angle Time Resolving Spectrometer (MATRS). MATRS has the unique capability of both spectrally and temporally resolving absolute levels of scattered light at many angles simultaneously, and is the first of its kind used in laser-plasma experiments. A detailed comparison of the theoretical predictions and the experimental observations is made.

  5. Effects of carbon impurity on deuterium retention in VPS-tungsten coatings exposed to JT-60U divertor plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukumoto, M.; Nakano, T.; Itami, K.; Wada, T.; Ueda, Y.; Tanabe, T.

    2011-08-01

    Carbon eroded from carbon armor tiles during plasma discharge was implanted into and accumulated in tungsten coating exposed to JT-60U divertor plasmas. The D/C ratio of 0.06 ± 0.02 evaluated in the tungsten coating was half to one-quarter that in carbon codeposits formed at similar temperature of the tungsten coating. These results suggest that simultaneous use of carbon and tungsten coating would enhance tritium retention in the tungsten coating in future deuterium-tritium fusion devices. To investigate the carbon diffusion mechanism in the tungsten coating exposed to JT-60U divertor plasmas, the carbon diffusion coefficient in tungsten coating was measured by tracer methods. Using the apparent carbon diffusion coefficient obtained in this study (˜8 × 10-19 m2/s), the carbon diffusion length in the tungsten coating exposed to JT-60U divertor plasmas was evaluated to ˜100 nm. This diffusion length was quite shorter than that observed in the tungsten coating exposed to JT-60U divertor plasmas. Therefore, it remains possible that diffusion of implanted carbon in tungsten coating would be enhanced by other diffusion mechanisms which did not arise in the diffusion experiments or heat loads to the tungsten coating during transient events and plasma discharges with a strike point positioned on the tungsten-coated tiles.

  6. Magnetic reconnection in plasma under inertial confinement fusion conditions driven by heat flux effects in Ohm's law

    CERN Document Server

    Joglekar, A S; Fox, W; Bhattacharjee, A

    2015-01-01

    In the interaction of high-power laser beams with solid density plasma there are a number of mechanisms that generate strong magnetic fields. Such fields subsequently inhibit or redirect electron flows, but can themselves be advected by heat fluxes, resulting in complex interplay between thermal transport and magnetic fields.We show that for heating by multiple laser spots reconnection of magnetic field lines can occur, mediated by these heat fluxes, using a fully implicit 2D Vlasov-Fokker-Planck code. Under such conditions, the reconnection rate is dictated by heat flows rather than Alfv\\`enic flows. We find that this mechanism is only relevant in a high $\\beta$ plasma. However, the Hall parameter $\\omega_c \\tau_{ei}$ can be large so that thermal transport is strongly modified by these magnetic fields, which can impact longer time scale temperature homogeneity and ion dynamics in the system.

  7. Magnetic reconnection in plasma under inertial confinement fusion conditions driven by heat flux effects in Ohm's law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joglekar, A S; Thomas, A G R; Fox, W; Bhattacharjee, A

    2014-03-14

    In the interaction of high-power laser beams with solid density plasma there are a number of mechanisms that generate strong magnetic fields. Such fields subsequently inhibit or redirect electron flows, but can themselves be advected by heat fluxes, resulting in complex interplay between thermal transport and magnetic fields. We show that for heating by multiple laser spots reconnection of magnetic field lines can occur, mediated by these heat fluxes, using a fully implicit 2D Vlasov-Fokker-Planck code. Under such conditions, the reconnection rate is dictated by heat flows rather than Alfvènic flows. We find that this mechanism is only relevant in a high β plasma. However, the Hall parameter ωcτei can be large so that thermal transport is strongly modified by these magnetic fields, which can impact longer time scale temperature homogeneity and ion dynamics in the system.

  8. Approaching to the ideal condition of plasma confinement by applying external resonant fields in IR-T1 tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meshkani, Sakineh; Ghoranneviss, Mahmood; Lafouti, Mansoureh

    2015-06-01

    For understanding the effect of resonant helical magnetic field (RHF) and bias on the edge plasma turbulent transport, the radial and poloidal electric field (Er, EP ), poloidal and toroidal magnetic field (BP, Br ) were detected by the Langmuir probe, magnetic probe and diamagnetic loop. The poloidal, toroidal and radial velocity (VP, Vr, Vt ) can be determined from the electric and magnetic field. In the present work, we have investigated the effect of the magnitude of bias (V bias = 200v, V bias = 320v) on Er, EP, BP, Bt, VP, Vr, Vt . Moreover, we applied RHF with L = 2, L = 3 and L = 2 and 3 and investigate the effect of the helical windings radius on above parameters. Also, the experiment was repeated by applying the positive biasing potentials and RHF's simultaneously. The results show that by applying bias to the plasma at t = 15 msec at r/a = 0.9, Er , BP and Bt increase while EP decreases. The best modification occurs at V bias = 200v. By applying RHF to the plasma, both the electric and magnetic field vary. Er reaches the highest in the presence of RHF with L = 3. The same results are obtained for BP, Bt, VP and Vt . While the inverse results are obtained for EP and Vr . Finally, RHF and bias are applied simultaneously to the plasma. With applied bias with V bias = 200v and RHF with L = 2 and 3, we reach to the ideal circumstance. The same results obtain in the situation with V bias = 320v and RHF with L = 2 and 3.

  9. Monte Carlo model of neutral-particle transport in diverted plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heifetz, D.; Post, D.; Petravic, M.; Weisheit, J.; Bateman, G.

    1981-11-01

    The transport of neutral atoms and molecules in the edge and divertor regions of fusion experiments has been calculated using Monte-Carlo techniques. The deuterium, tritium, and helium atoms are produced by recombination in the plasma and at the walls. The relevant collision processes of charge exchange, ionization, and dissociation between the neutrals and the flowing plasma electrons and ions are included, along with wall reflection models. General two-dimensional wall and plasma geometries are treated in a flexible manner so that varied configurations can be easily studied. The algorithm uses a pseudo-collision method. Splitting with Russian roulette, suppression of absorption, and efficient scoring techniques are used to reduce the variance. The resulting code is sufficiently fast and compact to be incorporated into iterative treatments of plasma dynamics requiring numerous neutral profiles. The calculation yields the neutral gas densities, pressures, fluxes, ionization rates, momentum transfer rates, energy transfer rates, and wall sputtering rates. Applications have included modeling of proposed INTOR/FED poloidal divertor designs and other experimental devices.

  10. Exact solutions of the Grad-Shafranov equation via similarity reductions with applications to magnetically confined plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Kaltsas, Dimitrios A

    2016-01-01

    We derive exact solutions of the general linear form of the Grad-Shafranov (GS) equation, including incompressible equilbrium flow, using similarity reduction ansatzes motivated by the ansatz-based methods of group foliation and direct reduction. The linearity of the equilibrium equation allows linear combinations of solutions in order to obtain axisymmetric MHD equilibria with closed and nested magnetic surfaces which are favorable for the effective confinenment of laboratory plasmas. Employing the afforementioned ansatzes we also obtain analytical solutions for several non-linear forms of the GS equation.

  11. High-gain inertial confinement fusion by volume ignition, avoiding the complexities of fusion detonation fronts of spark ignition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hora, H. [Univ. of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia). Dept. of Theoretical Physics; Eliezer, S. [Soreq Nuclear Research Center, Yavne (Israel); Honrubia, J.J.; Martinez-Val, J.M.; Valarde, G. [Univ. Politecnica de Madrid (Spain). Inst. de Fusion Nuclear; Miley, G.H. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Fusion Studies Lab.; Hoepfl, R.

    1995-12-31

    The main approach to Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) uses a high-temperature, low-density core and a high-density, low-temperature outer region of the laser- (or ion beam-)compressed deuterium-tritium (D-T) fuel, in order to ignite a fusion detonation wave at the interface. This is an extremely delicate, unstable configuration which is very difficult to achieve, even with a carefully programmed time dependence of the deposition of the driver energy. This approach was devised in order to reach the high gains needed for low-efficiency lasers. Since 1978, several teams have developed an alternative scheme using volume ignition, where a natural and simple adiabatic compression, starting from a low initial temperature of 3 keV or less, is used. The high gains are obtained by self-heating due to the fusion reaction products plus self-absorption of Bremsstrahlung. Fortunately, a strong deviation from LTE occurs at ion temperatures above 100 keV, with much lower electron and even lower radiation temperatures. The authors report here how the gains calculated by different groups are relatively large, and despite detailed differences in the stopping power models, do not differ greatly. The high gain can be explained by introducing an effective value for the density-radius ({rho}R) product, where the volume ignition process increases the usual value of about 3 g-cm{sup {minus}2} to an effective value of 12 g-cm{sup {minus}2} or more, due to the self-generated additional heating that occurs for beam input energies > MJ and compression over 1,000 times solid state. This result is valid for direct drive as well as for indirect drive.

  12. Inertial confinement fusion target component fabrication and technology development support: Annual report, October 1, 1997--September 30, 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibson, J. [ed.

    1998-12-01

    During this period, General Atomics (GA) and their partner Schafer Corporation were assigned 17 formal tasks in support of the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) program and its five laboratories. A portion of the effort on these tasks included providing direct ``On-site Support`` at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), and Sandia National Laboratory Albuquerque (SNLA). They fabricated and delivered over 1,200 hohlraum mandrels and numerous other micromachined components to LLNL, LANL, and SNLA. They produced more than 1,300 glass and plastic target capsules for LLNL, LANL, SNLA, and the University of Rochester/Laboratory for Laser Energetics (UR/LLE). They also delivered nearly 2,000 various target foils and films for Naval Research Lab (NRL) and UR/LLE in FY98. This report describes these target fabrication activities and the target fabrication and characterization development activities that made the deliveries possible. During FY98, great progress was made by the GA/Schafer-UR/LLE-LANL team in the design, procurement, installation, and testing of the OMEGA Cryogenic Target System (OCTS) that will field cryogenic targets on OMEGA. The design phase was concluded for all components of the OCTS and all major components were procured and nearly all were fabricated. Many of the components were assembled and tested, and some have been shipped to UR/LLE. The ICF program is anticipating experiments at the OMEGA laser and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) which will require targets containing cryogenic layered D{sub 2} or deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel. They are part of the National Cryogenic Target Program and support experiments at LLNL and LANL to generate and characterize cryogenic layers for these targets. They also contributed cryogenic support and developed concepts for NIF cryogenic targets. This report summarizes and documents the technical progress made on these tasks.

  13. A comparison of non-local electron transport models for laser-plasmas relevant to inertial confinement fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherlock, M.; Brodrick, J. P.; Ridgers, C. P.

    2017-08-01

    We compare the reduced non-local electron transport model developed by Schurtz et al. [Phys. Plasmas 7, 4238 (2000)] to Vlasov-Fokker-Planck simulations. Two new test cases are considered: the propagation of a heat wave through a high density region into a lower density gas, and a one-dimensional hohlraum ablation problem. We find that the reduced model reproduces the peak heat flux well in the ablation region but significantly over-predicts the coronal preheat. The suitability of the reduced model for computing non-local transport effects other than thermal conductivity is considered by comparing the computed distribution function to the Vlasov-Fokker-Planck distribution function. It is shown that even when the reduced model reproduces the correct heat flux, the distribution function is significantly different to the Vlasov-Fokker-Planck prediction. Two simple modifications are considered which improve agreement between models in the coronal region.

  14. Coupled plasma-neutral transport model for the scrape-off region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galambos, J.D.; Peng, Y.K.M.; Heifetz, D.

    1985-03-01

    Analysis of the scrape-off region requires treatment of the plasma transport along and across the field lines and inclusion of the neutral transport effects. A method for modeling the scrape-off region that is presented here uses separate models for each of these aspects that are coupled together through an iteration procedure that requires only minimal numerical effort. The method is applied here to estimate the neutral pumping rates in the pump-limiter and divertor options for a proposed deuterium-tritium (D-T) ignition experiment. High neutral recycling in the vicinity of the neutralizer plate dramatically affects pumping rates for both the pump-limiter and divertor. In both cases, the plasma flow into the channel surrounding the neutralizer plate is greatly reduced by the neutral recycling. The fraction of this flow that is pumped can be large (> 50%), but in general it is dependent on the particular geometry and plasma conditions. It is estimated that pumping speeds approximately greater than 10/sup 5/ L/s are adequate for the exhaust requirements in the pump-limiter and the divertor cases. Also, high neutral recycling on the front surface of the limiter tends to increase the neutral pumping rate.

  15. Development of the dense plasma focus for short-pulse applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, N.; Blasco, M.; Breeding, K.; Constantino, D.; DeYoung, A.; DiPuccio, V.; Friedman, J.; Gall, B.; Gardner, S.; Gatling, J.; Hagen, E. C.; Luttman, A.; Meehan, B. T.; Misch, M.; Molnar, S.; Morgan, G.; O'Brien, R.; Robbins, L.; Rundberg, R.; Sipe, N.; Welch, D. R.; Yuan, V.

    2017-01-01

    The dense plasma focus (DPF) has long been considered a compact source for pulsed neutrons and has traditionally been optimized for the total neutron yield. In this paper, we describe the efforts to optimize the DPF for short-pulse applications by introducing a reentrant cathode at the end of the coaxial plasma gun. The resulting neutron pulse widths are reduced by an average of 21 ±9 % from the traditional long-drift DPF design. Pulse widths and yields achieved from deuterium-tritium fusion at 2 MA are 61.8 ±30.7 ns FWHM and 1.84 ±0.49 ×1012 neutrons per shot. Simulations were conducted concurrently to elucidate the DPF operation and confirm the role of the reentrant cathode. A hybrid fluid-kinetic particle-in-cell modeling capability demonstrates correct sheath velocities, plasma instabilities, and fusion yield rates. Consistent with previous findings that the DPF is dominated by beam-target fusion from superthermal ions, we estimate that the thermonuclear contribution is at the 1% level.

  16. Masked-backlighter technique used to simultaneously image x-ray absorption and x-ray emission from an inertial confinement fusion plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, F J; Radha, P B

    2014-11-01

    A method to simultaneously image both the absorption and the self-emission of an imploding inertial confinement fusion plasma has been demonstrated on the OMEGA Laser System. The technique involves the use of a high-Z backlighter, half of which is covered with a low-Z material, and a high-speed x-ray framing camera aligned to capture images backlit by this masked backlighter. Two strips of the four-strip framing camera record images backlit by the high-Z portion of the backlighter, while the other two strips record images aligned with the low-Z portion of the backlighter. The emission from the low-Z material is effectively eliminated by a high-Z filter positioned in front of the framing camera, limiting the detected backlighter emission to that of the principal emission line of the high-Z material. As a result, half of the images are of self-emission from the plasma and the other half are of self-emission plus the backlighter. The advantage of this technique is that the self-emission simultaneous with backlighter absorption is independently measured from a nearby direction. The absorption occurs only in the high-Z backlit frames and is either spatially separated from the emission or the self-emission is suppressed by filtering, or by using a backlighter much brighter than the self-emission, or by subtraction. The masked-backlighter technique has been used on the OMEGA Laser System to simultaneously measure the emission profiles and the absorption profiles of polar-driven implosions.

  17. Plasma experiments with 1. 06-. mu. m lasers at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahlstrom, H.G.; Holzrichter, J.F.; Manes, K.R.; Storm, E.K.; Boyle, M.J.; Brooks, K.M.; Haas, R.A.; Phillion, D.W.; Rupert, V.C.

    1976-12-20

    Recent laser fusion experiments at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory have provided basic data concerning: laser beam propagation and absorption in high temperature plasmas, electron energy transport processes that transfer the absorbed laser energy to the high-density ablation region, the general fluid dynamic expansion and compression of the heated plasma, and the processes responsible for the production of 14-MeV neutrons during implosion experiments. Irradiation experiments were performed with Nd:YAG glass laser systems: the two-beam Janus (less than or equal to40 J/100 ps, approx.0.4 TW) and Argus (less than or equal to140 J, 35 ps, approx.4 TW), and the single beam Cyclops (less than or equal to70 J/100 ps, approx.0.7 TW). Two classes of targets have been used: glass microshells (approx.40 to 120 ..mu..m in diameter with approx.0.75-..mu..m-thick walls) filled with an equimolar deuterium-tritium mixture, and disks (approx.160 to 600 ..mu..m in diameter and approx. 10 ..mu..m thick) of several compositions. The targets were supported in vacuum (pressure less than or equal to10/sup -5/ Torr) by thin glass stalks. This paper reports on results related to the propagation, absorption, and scattering of laser light by both spherical and planar targets.

  18. 124Xe(n,γ125Xe and 124Xe(n,2n123Xe measurements for National Ignition Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhike Megha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The cross section for the 124Xe(n,γ125Xe reaction has been measured for the first time for neutron energies above 100 keV. In addition, the 124Xe(n,2n123Xe reaction has been studied between threshold and 14.8 MeV. The results of these measurements provide sensitive diagnostic tools for investigating properties of the inertial confinement fusion plasma in Deuterium-Tritium (DT capsules at the National Ignition Facility (NIF located at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

  19. Measurement and mitigation of X-ray shadow imprint of hydrodynamic instabilities on the surface of Inertial Confinement Fusion capsules due to the fill tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macphee, Andrew

    2017-10-01

    Indirectly-driven Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) employ a small diameter (10 μm) fill tube to supply the cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel to the capsule. Recent experimental observations characterizing the perturbation produced by this fill tube have revealed an unexpected shadow imprinted instability mechanism, whereby several of the x-ray spots formed on the inside wall of the hohlraum cast directional shadows of the fill tube onto the surface of the capsule. Reduced ablation in the corresponding umbrae of these shadows leads to a pattern of radial ridges of excess ablator material measuring 100 nm above the surrounding capsule surface. By the time the capsule has converged 2x from its original radius, the areal density (ρR) perturbation of these spoke-like features becomes comparable to that of central hole due to the fill tube itself. We report both quantitative radiographic measurements of this newly observed perturbation (for several ablator materials) as well as the results of two strategies for mitigating against such shadow imprinted instabilities: 1.) reducing the fill tube diameter and wall thickness to produce a smaller perturbation that blows down to low density more quickly, and 2.) modifying the driving laser pulse for the lower-intensity inner beams to allow more time for the fill tube to blow down to low density prior to the onset of shadow imprint, which is produced by the more-intense outer beams during the later part of the drive. Results and analysis from both focused radiographic experiments as well as the impact on the performance of layered DT ignition implosions will be discussed. Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. D.O.E. by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  20. DEUTERIUM, TRITIUM, AND HELIUM DESORPTION FROM AGED TITANIUM TRITIDES. PART I.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shanahan, K; Jeffrey Holder, J

    2006-07-10

    Six new samples of tritium-aged bulk titanium have been examined by thermal desorption and isotope exchange chemistry. The discovery of a lower temperature hydrogen desorption state in these materials, previously reported, has been confirmed in one of the new samples. The helium release of the samples shows the more severe effects obtained from longer aging periods, i.e. higher initial He/M ratios. Several of the more aged samples were spontaneously releasing helium. Part I will discuss the new results on the new lower temperature hydrogen desorption state found in one more extensively studied sample. Part II will discuss the hydrogen/helium release behavior of the remaining samples.

  1. On the bound state of the antiproton-deuterium-tritium ion

    CERN Document Server

    Frolov, Alexei M

    2012-01-01

    It is shown that the ground state in the Coulomb three-body $\\bar{p}dt$ ion is bound. This ion consists of the positevely charged deuterium $d$ and tritum $t$ nuclei and one negatively charged antirpoton $\\bar{p}$. The $\\bar{p}dt$ ion has only one bound $S(L = 0)-$state which is weakly-bound. The properties of this weakly-bound state are investigated with the use of the results of recent highly accurate computations. Very likely, the actual proparties of the $\\bar{p}dt$ ion will be different from the results of our predictions due to additional contributions from strong interactions between particles.

  2. Synthesis of selectively labeled histidine and its methylderivatives with deuterium, tritium, and carbon-14.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šamonina-Kosicka, J; Kańska, M

    2013-05-30

    Isotopologues of l-histidine and its N-methylderivatives labeled with deuterium and tritium at the 5-position in the imidazole ring were obtained using the isotope exchange method. The deuterium-labeled isotopologues [5-(2)H]-l-histidine, [5-(2)H]-N(τ) -methyl-l-histidine, [5-(2)H]-N(π) -methyl-l-histidine, and [2,5-(2)H(2)]-l-histidine were synthesized by isotope exchange method carried out in a fully deuterated medium with. The same reaction conditions were applied to synthesize [5-(3)H]-N(τ) -methyl-l-histidine, [5-(3)H]-N(π) -methyl-l-histidine, and [5-(3)H]-l-histidine with specific activity of 2.0, 5.0, and 2.6 MBq/mmol, respectively. The N(π) -[methyl-(14)C]-histamine was obtained with specific activity of 0.23 MBq/mmol in a one-step reaction by the direct methylation of histamine by [(14)C]iodomethane. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Effects of nuclear fusion produced neutrons on silicon semiconductor plasma X-ray detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Kohagura, J; Hirata, M; Numakura, T; Minami, R; Watanabe, H; Sasuga, T; Nishizawa, Y; Yoshida, M; Nagashima, S; Tamano, T; Yatsu, K; Miyoshi, S; Hirano, K; Maezawa, H

    2002-01-01

    The effects of nuclear fusion produced neutrons on the X-ray energy responses of semiconductor detectors are characterized. The degradation of the response of position-sensitive X-ray tomography detectors in the Joint European Torus (JET) tokamak is found after neutron exposure produced by deuterium-deuterium and deuterium-tritium plasma fusion experiments. For the purpose of further detailed characterization of the neutron degradation effects, an azimuthally varying-field (AVF) cyclotron accelerator is employed using well-calibrated neutron fluence. These neutron effects on the detector responses are characterized using synchrotron radiation from a 2.5 GeV positron storage ring at the Photon Factory (KEK). The effects of neutrons on X-ray sensitive semiconductor depletion thicknesses are also investigated using an impedance analyser. Novel findings of (i) the dependence of the response degradation on X-ray energies as well as (ii) the recovery of the degraded detector response due to the detector bias applic...

  4. Energetic Particle Physics In Fusion Research In Preparation For Burning Plasma Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorelenkov, Nikolai N [PPPL

    2013-06-01

    The area of energetic particle (EP) physics of fusion research has been actively and extensively researched in recent decades. The progress achieved in advancing and understanding EP physics has been substantial since the last comprehensive review on this topic by W.W. Heidbrink and G.J. Sadler [1]. That review coincided with the start of deuterium-tritium (DT) experiments on Tokamak Fusion Test reactor (TFTR) and full scale fusion alphas physics studies. Fusion research in recent years has been influenced by EP physics in many ways including the limitations imposed by the "sea" of Alfven eigenmodes (AE) in particular by the toroidicityinduced AEs (TAE) modes and reversed shear Alfven (RSAE). In present paper we attempt a broad review of EP physics progress in tokamaks and spherical tori since the first DT experiments on TFTR and JET (Joint European Torus) including helical/stellarator devices. Introductory discussions on basic ingredients of EP physics, i.e. particle orbits in STs, fundamental diagnostic techniques of EPs and instabilities, wave particle resonances and others are given to help understanding the advanced topics of EP physics. At the end we cover important and interesting physics issues toward the burning plasma experiments such as ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor).

  5. Plasma-material Interactions in Current Tokamaks and their Implications for Next-step Fusion Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Federici, G.; Skinner, C.H.; Brooks, J.N.; Coad, J.P.; Grisolia, C. [and others

    2001-01-10

    The major increase in discharge duration and plasma energy in a next-step DT [deuterium-tritium] fusion reactor will give rise to important plasma-material effects that will critically influence its operation, safety, and performance. Erosion will increase to a scale of several centimeters from being barely measurable at a micron scale in today's tokamaks. Tritium co-deposited with carbon will strongly affect the operation of machines with carbon plasma-facing components. Controlling plasma wall interactions is critical to achieving high performance in present-day tokamaks and this is likely to continue to be the case in the approach to practical fusion reactors. Recognition of the important consequences of these phenomena has stimulated an internationally coordinated effort in the field of plasma-surface interactions supporting the Engineering Design Activities of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) project and significant progress has been made in better under standing these issues. This paper reviews the underlying physical processes and the existing experimental database of plasma-material interactions both in tokamaks and laboratory simulation facilities for conditions of direct relevance to next-step fusion reactors. Two main topical groups of interactions are considered: (i) erosion/redeposition from plasma sputtering and disruptions, including dust and flake generation, (ii) tritium retention and removal. The use of modeling tools to interpret the experimental results and make projections for conditions expected in future devices is explained. Outstanding technical issues and specific recommendations on potential R and D [Research and Development] avenues for their resolution are presented.

  6. Inertial Confinement Fusion. Annual report 10/1/98 through 9/30/99

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibson, Jane

    1999-12-01

    2 or deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel. We are part of the National Cryogenic Target Program and support experiments at LLNL and LANL to generate and characterize cryogenic layers for these targets. We also contributed cryogenic engineering support and developed concepts for NIF cryogenic targets. This report summarizes and documents the technical progress made on these tasks.

  7. Degraded confinement and turbulence in tokamak experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schüller, F. C.

    1996-01-01

    After a review on the state of tokamak transport theory, the methodology to derive experimental results will be described. Examples of confinement in ohmic plasmas and the deterioration with additional heating will be given. Some examples of improved confinement modes will be discussed. Fluctuation

  8. Degraded confinement and turbulence in tokamak experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hogeweij, G. M. D.

    2012-01-01

    After a review on the state of tokamak transport theory, the methodology to derive experimental results will be described. Examples of confinement in ohmic plasmas and the deterioration with additional healing will be given. Some examples of improved confinement; modes will be discussed.

  9. Pulsed neutron generators based on the sealed chambers of plasma focus design with D and DT fillings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurkov, D. I.; Dulatov, A. K.; Lemeshko, B. D.; Golikov, A. V.; Andreev, D. A.; Mikhailov, Yu V.; Prokuratov, I. A.; Selifanov, A. N.

    2015-11-01

    Development of neutron generators using plasma focus (PF) chambers is being conducted in the All-Russia Scientific Research Institute of Automatics (VNIIA) during more than 25 years. PF is a source of soft and hard x-rays and neutrons 2.5 MeV (D) or 14 MeV (DT). Pulses of x-rays and neutrons have a duration of about several tens of nanoseconds, which defines the scope of such generators—the study of ultrafast processes. VNIIA has developed a series of pulse neutron generators covering the range of outputs 107-1012 n/pulse with resources on the order of 103-104 switches, depending on purposes. Generators have weights in the range of 30-700 kg, which allows referring them to the class of transportable generators. Generators include sealed PF chambers, whose manufacture was mastered by VNIIA vacuum tube production plant. A number of optimized PF chambers, designed for use in generators with a certain yield of neutrons has been developed. The use of gas generator based on gas absorber of hydrogen isotopes, enabled to increase the self-life and resource of PF chambers. Currently, the PF chambers withstand up to 1000 switches and have the safety of not less than 5 years. Using a generator with a gas heater, significantly increased security of PF chambers, because deuterium-tritium mixture is released only during work, other times it is in a bound state in the working element of the gas generator.

  10. During the long way to Mars: effects of 520 days of confinement (Mars500 on the assessment of affective stimuli and stage alteration in mood and plasma hormone levels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Wang

    Full Text Available For future interplanetary manned spaceflight, mental issues, as well as physiological problems, must inevitably be considered and solved. Mars500 is a high-fidelity ground simulation experiment that involved 520 days of confined isolation for six multinational crewmembers. This experiment provided a good opportunity to perform psycho-physiological and psycho-social researches on such missions. To investigate emotional responses and psychological adaptation over long-term confinement, the International Affective Pictures System (IAPS was selected as the visual emotional stimuli in this study. Additional data collected and analyzed included the Profile of Mood States (POMS questionnaire and the levels of four types of plasma hormones: cortisol, 5-hydroxy tryptamine, dopamine, and norepinephrine. The results demonstrated an obvious bias on valence rating for unpleasant stimuli with time (p<0.05, and the correlation between psychological and biochemical data was identified (p<0.05. Overall, we concluded that the confined crew tended to assign positive ratings to negative pictures with time, which might be driven by a defensive system. There was a stage-changing pattern of psychological adaptation of the Mars500 crew, which is similar to the third-quarter phenomenon.

  11. Understanding fuel magnetization and mix using secondary nuclear reactions in magneto-inertial fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmit, P F; Knapp, P F; Hansen, S B; Gomez, M R; Hahn, K D; Sinars, D B; Peterson, K J; Slutz, S A; Sefkow, A B; Awe, T J; Harding, E; Jennings, C A; Chandler, G A; Cooper, G W; Cuneo, M E; Geissel, M; Harvey-Thompson, A J; Herrmann, M C; Hess, M H; Johns, O; Lamppa, D C; Martin, M R; McBride, R D; Porter, J L; Robertson, G K; Rochau, G A; Rovang, D C; Ruiz, C L; Savage, M E; Smith, I C; Stygar, W A; Vesey, R A

    2014-10-10

    Magnetizing the fuel in inertial confinement fusion relaxes ignition requirements by reducing thermal conductivity and changing the physics of burn product confinement. Diagnosing the level of fuel magnetization during burn is critical to understanding target performance in magneto-inertial fusion (MIF) implosions. In pure deuterium fusion plasma, 1.01 MeV tritons are emitted during deuterium-deuterium fusion and can undergo secondary deuterium-tritium reactions before exiting the fuel. Increasing the fuel magnetization elongates the path lengths through the fuel of some of the tritons, enhancing their probability of reaction. Based on this feature, a method to diagnose fuel magnetization using the ratio of overall deuterium-tritium to deuterium-deuterium neutron yields is developed. Analysis of anisotropies in the secondary neutron energy spectra further constrain the measurement. Secondary reactions also are shown to provide an upper bound for the volumetric fuel-pusher mix in MIF. The analysis is applied to recent MIF experiments [M. R. Gomez et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 155003 (2014)] on the Z Pulsed Power Facility, indicating that significant magnetic confinement of charged burn products was achieved and suggesting a relatively low-mix environment. Both of these are essential features of future ignition-scale MIF designs.

  12. Plasma confinement during ECR heating with a volume power density of 3 mW/m3 at the L-2M stellarator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meshcheryakov, A. I.; Batanov, G. M.; Borzosekov, V. D.; Grebenshchikov, S. E.; Grishina, I. A.; Kharchev, N. K.; Kholnov, Yu V.; Kolik, L. V.; Konchekov, E. M.; Kovrizhnykh, L. M.; Letunov, A. A.; Logvinenko, V. P.; Malakhov, D. V.; Petrov, A. E.; Sarksyan, K. A.; Shchepetov, S. V.; Skvortsova, N. N.; Stepakhin, V. D.; Tereshchenko, M. A.; Vafin, I. Yu; Vasilkov, D. G.

    2017-10-01

    The experiments on ECR plasma heating were carried out at the L-2M stellarator at very high volume power density (up to 3.0 MW/m3). Under these conditions, non-monotonous hollow density profiles were measured. At the maximum heating power of P = 0.75 MW, the concavity in the axial region becomes drastic n e(0)/n e max = 0.5. In these experiments, plasma temperature profiles measured in the axial plasma region r/a p stellarator. The measured energy lifetime is generally consistent with that determined from the international LHD scaling.

  13. The Texas Experimental Tokamak: A plasma research facility. A proposal submitted to the Department of Energy in response to Program Notice 95-10: Innovations in toroidal magnetic confinement systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-06-12

    The Fusion Research Center (FRC) at the University Texas will operate the tokamak TEXT-U and its associated systems for experimental research in basic plasma physics. While the tokamak is not innovative, the research program, diagnostics and planned experiments are. The fusion community will reap the benefits of the success in completing the upgrades (auxiliary heating, divertor, diagnostics, wall conditioning), developing diverted discharges in both double and single null configurations, exploring improved confinement regimes including a limiter H-mode, and developing unique, critical turbulence diagnostics. With these new regimes, the authors are poised to perform the sort of turbulence and transport studies for which the TEXT group has distinguished itself and for which the upgrade was intended. TEXT-U is also a facility for collaborators to perform innovative experiments and develop diagnostics before transferring them to larger machines. The general philosophy is that the understanding of plasma physics must be part of any intelligent fusion program, and that basic experimental research is the most important part of any such program. The emphasis of the proposed research is to provide well-documented plasmas which will be used to suggest and evaluate theories, to explore control techniques, to develop advanced diagnostics and analysis techniques, and to extend current drive techniques. Up to 1 MW of electron cyclotron heating (ECH) will be used not only for heating but as a localized, perturbative tool. Areas of proposed research are: (1) core turbulence and transport; (2) edge turbulence and transport; (3) turbulence analysis; (4) improved confinement; (5) ECH physics; (6) Alfven wave current drive; and (7) diagnostic development.

  14. Physics of magnetic confinement fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner F.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Fusion is the energy source of the universe. The local conditions in the core of the Sun allow the transfer of mass into energy, which is finally released in the form of radiation. Technical fusion melts deuterons and tritons to helium releasing large amounts of energy per fusion process. Because of the conditions for fusion, which will be deduced, the fusion fuel is in the plasma state. Here we report on the confinement of fusion plasmas by magnetic fields. Different confinement concepts — tokamaks and stellarators — will be introduced and described. The first fusion reactor, ITER, and the most modern stellarator, Wendelstein 7-X, are under construction. Their basic features and objectives will be presented.

  15. Atomic structure under external confinement: effect of plasma on the spin orbit splitting, relativistic mass correction and Darwin term for hydrogen-like ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhuri, Supriya K.; Mukherjee, Prasanta K.; Fricke, Burkhard

    2017-03-01

    The effect of Debye and quantum plasma environment on the structural properties such as spin orbit splitting, relativistic mass correction and Darwin term for a few iso-electronic members of hydrogen viz. C5 +, O7 +, Ne9 +, Mg11 +, Si13 +, S15 +, Ar17 +, Ca19 + and Ti21 + has been analysed systematically for the first time for a range of coupling strengths of the plasma. The Debye plasma environment has been treated under a standard screened Coulomb potential (SCP) while the quantum plasma has been treated under an exponential cosine screened Coulomb potential (ECSCP). Estimation of the spin orbit splitting under SCP and ECSCP plasma is restricted to the lowest two dipole allowed states while for the other two properties, the ground state as well as the first two excited states have been chosen. Calculations have been extended to nuclear charges for which appreciable relativistic corrections are noted. In all cases calculations have been extended up to such screening parameters for which the respective excitation energies tend towards their stability limit determined by the ionisation potential at that screening parameter. Interesting behavior of the respective properties with respect to the plasma coupling strength has been noted.

  16. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) annual site environmental report for calendar year 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finley, V.L.; Wieczorek, M.A. [eds.

    1996-02-01

    This report gives the results of the environmental activities and monitoring programs at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) for CY94. The report is prepared to provide the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the public with information on the level of radioactive and nonradioactive pollutants, if any, added to the environment as a result of PPPL operations, as well as environmental initiatives, assessments, and programs that were undertaken in 1994. The objective of the Annual Site Environmental Report is to document evidence that PPPL`s environmental protection programs adequately protect the environment and the public health. The Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory has engaged in fusion energy research since 195 1. The long-range goal of the US Magnetic Fusion Energy Research Program is to develop and demonstrate the practical application of fusion power as an alternate energy source. In 1994, PPPL had one of its two large tokamak devices in operation-the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). The Princeton Beta Experiment-Modification or PBX-M completed its modifications and upgrades and resumed operation in November 1991 and operated periodically during 1992 and 1993; it did not operate in 1994 for funding reasons. In December 1993, TFTR began conducting the deuterium-tritium (D-T) experiments and set new records by producing over ten @on watts of energy in 1994. The engineering design phase of the Tokamak Physics Experiment (T?X), which replaced the cancelled Burning Plasma Experiment in 1992 as PPPL`s next machine, began in 1993 with the planned start up set for the year 2001. In December 1994, the Environmental Assessment (EA) for the TFTR Shutdown and Removal (S&R) and TPX was submitted to the regulatory agencies, and a finding of no significant impact (FONSI) was issued by DOE for these projects.

  17. Final Report DOE Grant No. DE-FG03-01ER54617 Computer Modeling of Microturbulence and Macrostability Properties of Magnetically Confined Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jean-Noel Leboeuf

    2004-03-04

    OAK-B135 We have made significant progress during the past grant period in several key areas of the UCLA and national Fusion Theory Program. This impressive body of work includes both fundamental and applied contributions to MHD and turbulence in DIII-D and Electric Tokamak plasmas, and also to Z-pinches, particularly with respect to the effect of flows on these phenomena. We have successfully carried out interpretive and predictive global gyrokinetic particle-in-cell calculations of DIII-D discharges. We have cemented our participation in the gyrokinetic PIC effort of the SciDAC Plasma Microturbulence Project through working membership in the Summit Gyrokinetic PIC Team. We have continued to teach advanced courses at UCLA pertaining to computational plasma physics and to foster interaction with students and junior researchers. We have in fact graduated 2 Ph. D. students during the past grant period. The research carried out during that time has resulted in many publications in the premier plasma physics and fusion energy sciences journals and in several invited oral communications at major conferences such as Sherwood, Transport Task Force (TTF), the annual meetings of the Division of Plasma Physics of the American Physical Society, of the European Physical Society, and the 2002 IAEA Fusion Energy Conference, FEC 2002. Many of these have been authored and co-authored with experimentalists at DIII-D.

  18. A Particle X-ray Temporal Diagnostic (PXTD) for studies of kinetic, multi-ion effects, and ion-electron equilibration rates in Inertial Confinement Fusion plasmas at OMEGA (invited).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sio, H; Frenje, J A; Katz, J; Stoeckl, C; Weiner, D; Bedzyk, M; Glebov, V; Sorce, C; Gatu Johnson, M; Rinderknecht, H G; Zylstra, A B; Sangster, T C; Regan, S P; Kwan, T; Le, A; Simakov, A N; Taitano, W T; Chacòn, L; Keenan, B; Shah, R; Sutcliffe, G; Petrasso, R D

    2016-11-01

    A Particle X-ray Temporal Diagnostic (PXTD) has been implemented on OMEGA for simultaneous time-resolved measurements of several nuclear products as well as the x-ray continuum produced in High Energy Density Plasmas and Inertial Confinement Fusion implosions. The PXTD removes systematic timing uncertainties typically introduced by using multiple instruments, and it has been used to measure DD, DT, D(3)He, and T(3)He reaction histories and the emission history of the x-ray core continuum with relative timing uncertainties within ±10-20 ps. This enables, for the first time, accurate and simultaneous measurements of the x-ray emission histories, nuclear reaction histories, their time differences, and measurements of Ti(t) and Te(t) from which an assessment of multiple-ion-fluid effects, kinetic effects during the shock-burn phase, and ion-electron equilibration rates can be made.

  19. Numerical analysis of the impact of the ion threshold, ion stiffness and temperature pedestal on global confinement and fusion performance in JET and in ITER plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baiocchi, B.; Mantica, P.; Tala, T.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the impact of micro-instabilities on the global plasma performance is essential in order to make realistic predictions for relevant tokamak scenarios. The semi-empirical transport model CGM is a useful tool to this scope because it depends explicitly on the threshold and the stiffne...

  20. A Key to Improved Ion Core Confinement in the JET Tokamak: Ion Stiffness Mitigation due to Combined Plasma Rotation and Low Magnetic Shear

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mantica, P.; Challis, C.; Peeters, A.G.

    2011-01-01

    New transport experiments on JET indicate that ion stiffness mitigation in the core of a rotating plasma, as described by Mantica et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 102 175002 (2009)] results from the combined effect of high rotational shear and low magnetic shear. The observations have important implicatio...

  1. Direct measurement of energetic electrons coupling to an imploding low-adiabat inertial confinement fusion capsule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Döppner, T; Thomas, C A; Divol, L; Dewald, E L; Celliers, P M; Bradley, D K; Callahan, D A; Dixit, S N; Harte, J A; Glenn, S M; Haan, S W; Izumi, N; Kyrala, G A; LaCaille, G; Kline, J K; Kruer, W L; Ma, T; MacKinnon, A J; McNaney, J M; Meezan, N B; Robey, H F; Salmonson, J D; Suter, L J; Zimmerman, G B; Edwards, M J; MacGowan, B J; Kilkenny, J D; Lindl, J D; Van Wonterghem, B M; Atherton, L J; Moses, E I; Glenzer, S H; Landen, O L

    2012-03-30

    We have imaged hard x-ray (>100 keV) bremsstrahlung emission from energetic electrons slowing in a plastic ablator shell during indirectly driven implosions at the National Ignition Facility. We measure 570 J in electrons with E>100 keV impinging on the fusion capsule under ignition drive conditions. This translates into an acceptable increase in the adiabat α, defined as the ratio of total deuterium-tritium fuel pressure to Fermi pressure, of 3.5%. The hard x-ray observables are consistent with detailed radiative-hydrodynamics simulations, including the sourcing and transport of these high energy electrons.

  2. Inertial confinement fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powers, L.; Condouris, R.; Kotowski, M.; Murphy, P.W. (eds.)

    1992-01-01

    This issue of the ICF Quarterly contains seven articles that describe recent progress in Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's ICF program. The Department of Energy recently initiated an effort to design a 1--2 MJ glass laser, the proposed National Ignition Facility (NIF). These articles span various aspects of a program which is aimed at moving forward toward such a facility by continuing to use the Nova laser to gain understanding of NIF-relevant target physics, by developing concepts for an NIF laser driver, and by envisioning a variety of applications for larger ICF facilities. This report discusses research on the following topics: Stimulated Rotational Raman Scattering in Nitrogen; A Maxwell Equation Solver in LASNEX for the Simulation of Moderately Intense Ultrashort Pulse Experiments; Measurements of Radial Heat-Wave Propagation in Laser-Produced Plasmas; Laser-Seeded Modulation Growth on Directly Driven Foils; Stimulated Raman Scattering in Large-Aperture, High-Fluence Frequency-Conversion Crystals; Fission Product Hazard Reduction Using Inertial Fusion Energy; Use of Inertial Confinement Fusion for Nuclear Weapons Effects Simulations.

  3. Miniature magnetic bottle confined by circularly polarized laser light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolka, E.; Eliezer, S.; Paiss, Y. [Israel Atomic Energy Commission, Yavne (Israel). Soreq Nuclear Research Center

    1995-09-01

    A new concept of hot plasma confinement in a miniature magnetic bottle induced by circularly polarized laser light is suggested. Magnetic fields generated by circularly polarized laser light may be of the order of megagauss. In this configuration the circularly polarized laser light is used to obtain confinement of a plasma contained in a good conductor vessel. The poloidal magnetic field induced by the circularly polarized laser and the efficiency of laser absorption by the plasma are calculated. The confinement in this scheme is supported by the magnetic forces. The Lawson criterion for a DT plasma might be achieved for number density n = 5``centre dot`` 10{sup 21} cm{sup -3} and confinement time {tau} = 20 ns. The laser and plasma parameters required to obtain an energetic gain are calculated. (Author).

  4. Numerical Study of Velocity Shear Stabilization of 3D and Theoretical Considerations for Centrifugally Confined Plasmas and Other Interchange-Limited Fusion Concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassam, Adil [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    2015-09-21

    We studied the feasibility of resonantly driving GAMs in tokamaks. A numerical simulation was carried out and showed the essential features and limitations. It was shown further that GAMs can damp by phase-mixing, from temperature gradients, or nonlinear detuning, thus broadening the resonance. Experimental implications of this were quantified. Theoretical support was provided for the Maryland Centrifugal Experiment, funded in a separate grant by DOE. Plasma diamagnetism from supersonic rotation was established. A theoretical model was built to match the data. Additional support to the experiment in terms of numerical simulation of the interchange turbulence was provided. Spectra from residual turbulence on account of velocity shear suppression were obtained and compared favorably to experiment. A new drift wave, driven solely by the thermal force, was identified.

  5. Effects of helium ash on fusion reactor operation and analogies with fission reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamelander, G. [Oesterreichisches Forschungszentrum Seibersdorf GmbH (Austria); Buerbaumer, H. [Technische Univ., Vienna (Austria). Inst. fuer Allgemeine Physik

    1999-08-01

    It is well known from early reactor physics textbooks that fission products, especially xenon 135, have an important impact on fission reactor operation. An excess reactivity must be provided to compensate the reactivity loss due to this highly absorbing isotope and power oscillations must be suppressed by the control system. In the actual paper it is shown that in a magnetically confined fusion reactor the helium emerging from deuterium-tritium reactions will have an impact on reactor operation. It is necessary to provide additional auxiliary heating. Furthermore, it is shown that under certain circumstances in the initial phase of the plasma discharge oscillations of power and temperature are possible. Such oscillations have to be suppressed by a control system. The analogies in fission and fusion systems with respect to reaction products are discussed. (orig.) [German] Es ist bereits aus den ersten Lehrbuechern der Reaktorphysik bekannt, dass Spaltprodukte, insbesondere das Xenon-135, einen wichtigen Einfluss auf den Betrieb von Reaktoren haben. Es muss Ueberschussreaktivitaet bereitgestellt werden, um den Reaktivitaetsverlust durch dieses stark absorbierende Isotop zu kompensieren, und Leistungsschwingungen muessen durch ein Regelungssystem unterdrueckt werden. Im vorliegenden Artikel wird gezeigt, dass in einem auf Magneteinschluss basierenden Fusionsreaktor das aus den Deuterium-Tritium-Reaktionen resultierende Helium ebenfalls einen starken Einfluss auf den Betrieb haben wird. Es muss zusaetzliche Hilfsheizung bereitgestellt werden. Weiters koennen unter bestimmten Umstaenden in der Anfangsphase der Plasmaentladung Leistungsschwingungen entstehen, die durch eine Regelung unterdrueckt werden muessen. Die Analogien von Fissions- und Fusionssystemen im Hinblick auf Reaktionsprodukte werden diskutiert. (orig.)

  6. Confinement Aquaculture. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaplaine School District, AR.

    The Delaplaine Agriculture Department Confinement Project, begun in June 1988, conducted a confinement aquaculture program by comparing the growth of channel catfish raised in cages in a pond to channel catfish raised in cages in the Black River, Arkansas. The study developed technology that would decrease costs in the domestication of fish, using…

  7. PLASMA ENERGIZATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furth, H.P.; Chambers, E.S.

    1962-03-01

    BS>A method is given for ion cyclotron resonance heatthg of a magnetically confined plasma by an applied radio-frequency field. In accordance with the invention, the radiofrequency energy is transferred to the plasma without the usual attendent self-shielding effect of plasma polarlzatlon, whereby the energy transfer is accomplished with superior efficiency. More explicitly, the invention includes means for applying a radio-frequency electric field radially to an end of a plasma column confined in a magnetic mirror field configuration. The radio-frequency field propagates hydromagnetic waves axially through the column with the waves diminishing in an intermediate region of the column at ion cyclotron resonance with the fleld frequency. In such region the wave energy is converted by viscous damping to rotational energy of the plasma ions. (AEC)

  8. Dynamics in geometrical confinement

    CERN Document Server

    Kremer, Friedrich

    2014-01-01

    This book describes the dynamics of low molecular weight and polymeric molecules when they are constrained under conditions of geometrical confinement. It covers geometrical confinement in different dimensionalities: (i) in nanometer thin layers or self supporting films (1-dimensional confinement) (ii) in pores or tubes with nanometric diameters (2-dimensional confinement) (iii) as micelles embedded in matrices (3-dimensional) or as nanodroplets.The dynamics under such conditions have been a much discussed and central topic in the focus of intense worldwide research activities within the last two decades. The present book discusses how the resulting molecular mobility is influenced by the subtle counterbalance between surface effects (typically slowing down molecular dynamics through attractive guest/host interactions) and confinement effects (typically increasing the mobility). It also explains how these influences can be modified and tuned, e.g. through appropriate surface coatings, film thicknesses or pore...

  9. Elastic membranes in confinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostwick, J B; Miksis, M J; Davis, S H

    2016-07-01

    An elastic membrane stretched between two walls takes a shape defined by its length and the volume of fluid it encloses. Many biological structures, such as cells, mitochondria and coiled DNA, have fine internal structure in which a membrane (or elastic member) is geometrically 'confined' by another object. Here, the two-dimensional shape of an elastic membrane in a 'confining' box is studied by introducing a repulsive confinement pressure that prevents the membrane from intersecting the wall. The stage is set by contrasting confined and unconfined solutions. Continuation methods are then used to compute response diagrams, from which we identify the particular membrane mechanics that generate mitochondria-like shapes. Large confinement pressures yield complex response diagrams with secondary bifurcations and multiple turning points where modal identities may change. Regions in parameter space where such behaviour occurs are then mapped. © 2016 The Author(s).

  10. Experimental studies of confinement in the EXTRAP T2 and T2R reversed field pinches

    OpenAIRE

    Cecconello, Marco

    2003-01-01

    The confinement properties of fusion plasmas are affected bymagnetic and electrostatic fluctuations. The determination ofthe plasma confinement properties requires the measurement ofseveral global and local quantities such as the ion andelectron temperatures, the electron and neutral densityprofiles, the radiation emissivity profiles, the ohmic inputpower and the particle and heat diffusivities. The focus ofthis thesis is the study of the plasma confinement propertiesbased on measurements of ...

  11. Plasma focus sources: Supplement to the neutron resonance radiography workshop proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nardi, V.; Brzosko, J.

    1989-01-01

    Since their discovery, plasma focus discharges have been recognized as very intense pulsed sources of deuterium-deuterium (D-D) or deuterium-tritium (D-T) fusion-reaction neutrons, with outstanding capabilities. Specifically, the total neutron emission/shot, YN, and the rate of neutron emission, Y/sub n/, of an optimized plasma focus (PF) are higher than the corresponding quantities observed in any other type of pinched discharge at the same level of powering energy W/sub 0/. Recent developments have led to the concept and experimental demonstration of an Advanced Plasma Focus System (APF) that consists of a Mather-geometry plasma focus in which field distortion elements (FDEs) are inserted in the inter-electrode gap for increasing the neutron yield/shot, Y/sub n/. The FDE-induced redistribution of the plasma current increases Y/sub n/ by a factor approx. =5-10 above the value obtained without FDEs under otherwise identical conditions of operation of the plasma focus. For example, an APF that is fed by a fast capacitor bank with an energy, W/sub 0/ = 6kJ, and voltage, V/sub 0/ = 16.5 kV provides Y/sub n/ /congruent/ 4 /times/ 10/sup 9/ D-D neutrons/shot (pure D/sub 2/ filling) and Y/sub n/ = 4 /times/ 10/sup 11/ D-T neutrons/shot (filling is 50% deuterium and 50% tritium). The FDE-induced increase of Y/sub n/ for fixed values of (W/sub 0/, V/sub 0/), the observed scaling law Y/sub n/ /proportional to/ W/sub 0//sup 2/ for optimized plasma focus systems, and our experience with neutron scattering in bulk objects lead us to the conclusion that we can use an APF as a source of high-intensity neutron pulses (10/sup 14/ n/pulse) in the field off neutron radiography (surface and bulk) with a nanosecond or millisecond time resolution.

  12. Deuterium-tritium neutron yield measurements with the 4.5 m neutron-time-of-flight detectors at NIF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, M J; Bond, E J; Clancy, T J; Eckart, M J; Khater, H Y; Glebov, V Yu

    2012-10-01

    The first several campaigns of laser fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) included a family of high-sensitivity scintillator∕photodetector neutron-time-of-flight (nTOF) detectors for measuring deuterium-deuterium (DD) and DT neutron yields. The detectors provided consistent neutron yield (Y(n)) measurements from below 10(9) (DD) to nearly 10(15) (DT). The detectors initially demonstrated detector-to-detector Y(n) precisions better than 5%, but lacked in situ absolute calibrations. Recent experiments at NIF now have provided in situ DT yield calibration data that establish the absolute sensitivity of the 4.5 m differential tissue harmonic imaging (DTHI) detector with an accuracy of ± 10% and precision of ± 1%. The 4.5 m nTOF calibration measurements also have helped to establish improved detector impulse response functions and data analysis methods, which have contributed to improving the accuracy of the Y(n) measurements. These advances have also helped to extend the usefulness of nTOF measurements of ion temperature and downscattered neutron ratio (neutron yield 10-12 MeV divided by yield 13-15 MeV) with other nTOF detectors.

  13. Deuterium-tritium neutron yield measurements with the 4.5 m neutron-time-of-flight detectors at NIF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moran, M. J.; Bond, E. J.; Clancy, T. J.; Eckart, M. J.; Khater, H. Y. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Glebov, V. Yu. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    The first several campaigns of laser fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) included a family of high-sensitivity scintillator/photodetector neutron-time-of-flight (nTOF) detectors for measuring deuterium-deuterium (DD) and DT neutron yields. The detectors provided consistent neutron yield (Y{sub n}) measurements from below 10{sup 9} (DD) to nearly 10{sup 15} (DT). The detectors initially demonstrated detector-to-detector Y{sub n} precisions better than 5%, but lacked in situ absolute calibrations. Recent experiments at NIF now have provided in situ DT yield calibration data that establish the absolute sensitivity of the 4.5 m differential tissue harmonic imaging (DTHI) detector with an accuracy of {+-}10% and precision of {+-}1%. The 4.5 m nTOF calibration measurements also have helped to establish improved detector impulse response functions and data analysis methods, which have contributed to improving the accuracy of the Y{sub n} measurements. These advances have also helped to extend the usefulness of nTOF measurements of ion temperature and downscattered neutron ratio (neutron yield 10-12 MeV divided by yield 13-15 MeV) with other nTOF detectors.

  14. Mass gap without confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faedo, Antón F.; Mateos, David; Pravos, David; Subils, Javier G.

    2017-06-01

    We revisit a one-parameter family of three-dimensional gauge theories with known supergravity duals. We show that three infrared behaviors are possible. For generic values of the parameter, the theories exhibit a mass gap but no confinement, meaning no linear quark-antiquark potential; for one limiting value of the parameter the theory flows to an infrared fixed point; and for another limiting value it exhibits both a mass gap and confinement. Theories close to these limiting values exhibit quasi-conformal and quasi-confining dynamics, respectively. Eleven-dimensional supergravity provides a simple, geometric explanation of these features.

  15. Non-linear isotope and fast ions effects: routes for low turbulence in DT plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Jeronimo

    2017-10-01

    The isotope effect, i.e. the fact that heat and particle fluxes do not follow the expected Gyro-Bohm estimate for turbulent transport when the plasma mass is changed, is one of the main challenges in plasma theory. Of particular interest is the isotope exchange between the fusion of deuterium (DD) and deuterium-tritium (DT) nuclei as there are no clear indications of what kind of transport difference can be expected in burning plasmas. The GENE code is therefore used for computing DD vs DT linear and nonlinear microturbulence characteristics in the core plasma region of a previously ITER hybrid scenario at high beta obtained in the framework of simplified integrated modelling. Scans on common turbulence related quantitates as external ExB flow shear, Parallel Velocity Gradient (PVG), plasma beta, colisionality or the number of ion species have been performed. Additionally, the role of energetic particles, known to reduce Ion Temperature Gradient (ITG) turbulence has been also addressed. It is obtained that the ITER operational point will be close to threshold and in these conditions turbulence is dominated by ITG modes. A purely weak non-linear isotope effect, absent in linear scans, can be found when separately adding moderate ExB flow shear or electromagnetic effects, whereas collisionality just modulates the intensity. The isotope effect, on the other hand, becomes very strong in conditions with simultaneously moderate ExB flow shear, beta and low q profile with significant reductions of ion heat transport from DD to DT. By analyzing the radial structure of the two point electrostatic potential correlation function it has been found that the inherent Gyro-Bohm scaling for plasma microturbulence, which increases the radial correlation length at short scales form DD to DT, is counteracted by the concomitant appearance of a complex nonlinear multiscale space interaction involving external ExB flow shear, zonal flow activity, magnetic geometry and electromagnetic

  16. Perfil hormonal de Progesterona durante o ciclo Estral em novilhas Nelore confinadas com Diferentes Ondas de Crescimento Folicular Plasma Progesterone Level during the Estrous Cycle in Nelore Heifers Confined with Two, Three and Four Waves of Follicular Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciene Lomas Santiago

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Efetuaram-se coletas diárias de sangue, de 16 novilhas Nelore confinadas, para análise de progesterona plasmática pelo método de radioimunoensaio (RIA. Os dias analisados para progesterona foram o dia zero (estro e a cada três dias até o dia -1 e o dia zero. Os animais foram divididos em dois grupos: 1 com ciclo estral de 21 dias aproximadamente (novilhas que apresentaram duas e três ondas de crescimento folicular e 2 com ciclo estral superior a 25 dias (novilhas com quatro ondas de crescimento folicular. As concentrações médias de progesterona plasmática dos animais durante o ciclo estral diferiram entre os dois grupos, sendo superiores (4,27 ng/mL para os ciclos de maior duração. A concentração média de progesterona no ciclo de aproximadamente 21 dias foi de 2,54 ng/mL. Os resultados sugerem que as novilhas que apresentam maior duração do ciclo estral necessitam de tempo adicional para que seus folículos cheguem ao estádio pré-ovulatório, havendo, dessa maneira, prolongamento e aumento da secreção de progesterona.Blood were collected daily from 16 Nelore heifers confined, for radioimmunoassay (RIA.analyses of progesterone The plasma progesterone assay were at day zero (estrus and at each three days until the -1 and the day zero.again The animals were divided in two groups: 1 with regular estrous cycle of 21 days (heifers with two and three follicular growth waves and 2 with prolonged estrous cycle, greater than 25 days (heifers with four follicular growth waves. The mean plasma progesterone level from the animals during the estrous cycle differed between the two groups, being greater (4,27 ng/mL for the extended cycles.(above 25 days; 4,27 ng/mL than for the regular estrous cycle (21 days; 2,54 ng/mL. Results suggest that those heifers which showed an extended estrous cycles, needs an additional time for the follicles to each the pre-ovulatory stadium, resulting in prolonged and increased progesterone secretion.

  17. Charged Particle Stopping Power Effects on Ignition: Some Results from an Exact Calculation

    CERN Document Server

    Singleton, Robert L

    2007-01-01

    A completely rigorous first-principles calculation of the charged particle stopping power has recently been performed by Brown, Preston, and Singleton (BPS). This calculation is exact to leading and next-to-leading order in the plasma number density, including an exact treatment of two-body quantum scattering. The BPS calculation is therefore extremely accurate in the plasma regime realized during the ignition and burn of an inertial confinement fusion capsule. For deuterium-tritium fusion, the 3.5 MeV alpha particle range tends to be 20-30% longer than most models in the literature have predicted, and the energy deposition into the ions tends to be smaller. Preliminary numerical simulations indicate that this increases the rho-R required to achieve ignition.

  18. Analysis of the Thermonuclear Instability including Low-Power ICRH Minority Heating in IGNITOR

    CERN Document Server

    Cardinali, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    The nonlinear thermal balance equation for classical plasma in a toroidal geometry is analytically and numerically investigated including ICRH power. The determination of the equilibrium temperature and the analysis of the stability of the solution are performed by solving the energy balance equation that includes the transport relations obtained by the kinetic theory. An estimation of the confinement time is also provided. We show that the ICRH heating in the IGNITOR experiment, among other applications, is expected to stabilize the power of the thermonuclear burning by automatic regulation of the RF coupled power. Here a scenario is considered where IGNITOR is led to operate in a slightly sub-critical regime by adding a small fraction of ${}^3He$ to the nominal 50-50 Deuterium-Tritium mixture. The difference between power lost and alpha heating is compensated by additional ICRH heating, which should be able to increase the global plasma temperature via collisions between ${}^3He$ minority and the background...

  19. Isotope effect on blob-statistics in gyrofluid simulations of scrape-off layer turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, O. H. H.; Kendl, A.

    2017-12-01

    In this contribution we apply a recently established stochastic model for scrape-off layer fluctuations to long time series obtained from gyrofluid simulations of fusion edge plasma turbulence. Characteristic parameters are estimated for different fusion relevant isotopic compositions (protium, deuterium, tritium and singly charged helium) by means of conditional averaging. It is shown that large amplitude fluctuations associated with radially propagating filaments in the scrape-off layer feature double-exponential wave-forms. We find increased pulse duration and longer waiting times between peaks for heavier ions, while the amplitudes are similar. The associated radial blob velocity is shown to be reduced for heavier ions. A parabolic relation between skewness and kurtosis of density fluctuations seems to be present. Improved particle confinement in terms of reduced mean value close to the outermost radial boundary and blob characteristics for heavier plasmas is presented.

  20. Parallel closure theory for toroidally confined plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Jeong-Young; Held, Eric D.

    2017-10-01

    We solve a system of general moment equations to obtain parallel closures for electrons and ions in an axisymmetric toroidal magnetic field. Magnetic field gradient terms are kept and treated using the Fourier series method. Assuming lowest order density (pressure) and temperature to be flux labels, the parallel heat flow, friction, and viscosity are expressed in terms of radial gradients of the lowest-order temperature and pressure, parallel gradients of temperature and parallel flow, and the relative electron-ion parallel flow velocity. Convergence of closure quantities is demonstrated as the number of moments and Fourier modes are increased. Properties of the moment equations in the collisionless limit are also discussed. Combining closures with fluid equations parallel mass flow and electric current are also obtained. Work in collaboration with the PSI Center and supported by the U.S. DOE under Grant Nos. DE-SC0014033, DE-SC0016256, and DE-FG02-04ER54746.

  1. Spin dependent transport in magnetically confined plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohkawa, Tihiro

    2001-05-01

    The transport in tokamaks with internal transport barrier and H-mode is described in terms of emission and absorption of quasi-particles with spin. The process is equivalent of the magnetic reconnection in the wave picture. The transport rate depends on the magnetic helicity profile. The experimental results appear to support the key features of the model. (author)

  2. Plasma confinement theory and transport simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, D.W.

    1992-04-01

    The objectives are: (1) to advance the transport studies of tokamaks, including development and maintenance of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Database, and (2) to provide theoretical interpretation, modeling and equilibrium and stability studies for TEXT-Upgrade. Recent reports, publications, and conference presentations of the Fusion Research Center are listed.

  3. Generalized superconducting flows -- Plasma confinement, organization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahajan, S.M.

    1997-01-01

    Complete expulsion of magnetic vorticity is used to characterize the superconducting flow. It is shown that a simple, intuitive, but speculative generalization can serve as a paradigm for a variety of organized flows.

  4. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Annual Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finley, V.L. and Levine, J.D.

    1999-01-10

    The results of the 1997 environmental surveillance and monitoring program for the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) are presented and discussed. The purpose of this report is to provide the U.S. Department of Energy and the public with information on the level of radioactive and non-radioactive pollutants, if any, that are added to the environment as a result of PPPL's operations. During Calendar Year 1997, PPPL's Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) completed fifteen years of fusion experiments begun in 1982. Over the course of three and half years of deuterium-tritium (D-T) plasma experiments, PPPL set a world record of 10.7 million watts of controlled fusion power, more than 700 tritium shots pulsed into the reactor vessel generating more than 5.6 x 1020 neutron and 1.6 gigajoules of fusion energy and researchers studied plasma science experimental data, which included "enhanced reverse shear techniques." As TFTR was completing its historic operations, PPPL participated with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Columbia University, and the University of Washington (Seattle) in a collaboration effort to design the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). This next device, NSTX, is located in the former TFTR Hot Cell on D site, and it is designed to be a smaller and more economical torus fusion reactor. Construction of this device began in late 1997, and first plasma in scheduled for early 1999. For 1997, the U.S. Department of Energy in its Laboratory Appraisal report rated the overall performance of Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory as "excellent." The report cited the Laboratory's consistently excellent scientific and technological achievements and its successful management practices, which included high marks for environmental management, employee health and safety, human resources administration, science education, and communications. Groundwater investigations continued under a voluntary agreement with the New Jersey

  5. Magnetic confinement fusion energy research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grad, H

    1977-03-01

    Controlled Thermonuclear Fusion offers probably the only relatively clean energy solution with completely inexhaustible fuel and unlimited power capacity. The scientific and technological problem consists in magnetically confining a hot, dense plasma (pressure several to hundreds of atmospheres, temperature 10/sup 8/ degrees or more) for an appreciable fraction of a second. The scientific and mathematical problem is to describe the behavior, such as confinement, stability, flow, compression, heating, energy transfer and diffusion of this medium in the presence of electromagnetic fields just as we now can for air or steam. Some of the extant theory consists of applications, routine or ingenious, of known mathematical structures in the theory of differential equations and in traditional analysis. Other applications of known mathematical structures offer surprises and new insights: the coordination between sub-supersonic and elliptic-hyperbolic is fractured; supersonic propagation goes upstream; etc. Other completely nonstandard mathematical structures with significant theory are being rapidly uncovered (and somewhat less rapidly understood) such as non-elliptic variational equations and new types of weak solutions. It is these new mathematical structures which one should expect to supply the foundation for the next generation's pure mathematics, if history is a guide. Despite the substantial effort over a period of some twenty years, there are still basic and important scintific and mathematical discoveries to be made, lying just beneath the surface.

  6. High-Energy Electron Confinement in a Magnetic Cusp Configuration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaeyoung Park

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We report experimental results validating the concept that plasma confinement is enhanced in a magnetic cusp configuration when β (plasma pressure/magnetic field pressure is of order unity. This enhancement is required for a fusion power reactor based on cusp confinement to be feasible. The magnetic cusp configuration possesses a critical advantage: the plasma is stable to large scale perturbations. However, early work indicated that plasma loss rates in a reactor based on a cusp configuration were too large for net power production. Grad and others theorized that at high β a sharp boundary would form between the plasma and the magnetic field, leading to substantially smaller loss rates. While not able to confirm the details of Grad’s work, the current experiment does validate, for the first time, the conjecture that confinement is substantially improved at high β. This represents critical progress toward an understanding of the plasma dynamics in a high-β cusp system. We hope that these results will stimulate a renewed interest in the cusp configuration as a fusion confinement candidate. In addition, the enhanced high-energy electron confinement resolves a key impediment to progress of the Polywell fusion concept, which combines a high-β cusp configuration with electrostatic fusion for a compact, power-producing nuclear fusion reactor.

  7. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Annual Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.D. Levine; V.L. Finley

    1998-03-01

    The results of the 1996 environmental surveillance and monitoring program for the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) are presented and discussed. The purpose of this report is to provide the US Department of Energy and the public with information on the level of radioactive and nonradioactive pollutants, if any, that are added to the environment as a result of PPPL's operations. During Calendar Year 1996, PPPL's Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) continued to conduct fusion experiments. Having set a world record on November 2, 1994, by achieving approximately 10.7 million watts of controlled fusion power during the deuterium-tritium (D-T) plasma experiments, researchers turned their attention to studying plasma science experiments, which included ''enhanced reverse shear techniques.'' Since November 1993, more than 700 tritium-fueled experiments were conducted, which generated more than 4 x 10(superscript 20) neutrons and 1.4 gigajoules of fusion energy. In 1996, the overall performance of Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory was rated ''excellent'' by the US Department of Energy in the Laboratory Appraisal report issued in early 1997. The report cited the Laboratory's consistently excellent scientific and technological achievements and its successful management practices, which included high marks for environmental management, employee health and safety, human resources administration, science education, and communications. Groundwater investigations continued under a voluntary agreement with the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection. PPPL monitored for the presence of nonradiological contaminants, mainly volatile organic compounds (components of degreasing solvents) and petroleum hydrocarbons (past leaks of releases of diesel fuel from underground storage tanks). Also, PPPL's radiological monitoring program characterized the ambient, background levels of tritium in the environment and

  8. Confinement for More Space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kipnusu, Wycliffe K.; Elsayed, Mohamed; Kossack, Wilhelm

    2015-01-01

    Broadband dielectric spectroscopy and positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy are employed to study the molecular dynamics and effective free volume of 2-ethyl-1-hexanol (2E1H) in the bulk state and when confined in unidirectional nanopores with average diameters of 4, 6, and 8 nm. Enhanced α...

  9. Confinement at Large Nc

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooft, G. 't

    2004-01-01

    A discussion is given of the confinement mechanism in terms of the Abelian projection scheme, for a general number Nc of colors. There is a difficulty in the Nc to infinity limit that requires a careful treatment, as the charges of the condensing magnetic monopoles tend to infinity. We suggest that

  10. Growing instead of confining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yang-Kook; Yoon, Chong Seung

    2017-10-01

    Confining sulfur in high-surface-area carbon is a widely adapted approach in Li-S batteries, but it often results in low sulfur utilization and low energy density. Now, controlled nucleation of discrete Li2S particles on a network of low-surface-area carbon fibres provides a possible solution to the endemic problems of Li-S batteries.

  11. Polymers under Cylindrical Confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Thomas

    2009-03-01

    Anodized alumina oxide (AAO) membranes offer a unique platform to investigate polymers under confinement. AAO membranes have been prepared where the diameters of the nanopores in the membrane have been varied from 8 to 50 nm by varying the anodization conditions. Capillary force is sufficiently large to draw high molecular weight polymers into the membrane, producing either nanotubes or nanorods. Polymer solutions can also be used place a thin film on the walls of the nanopores, forming nanotubes. With pore diameters less than the radius of gyration, a quantitative understanding of perturbations to chain dynamics due to geometric constraints was examined. We found a weak molecular weight-dependent mobility of polymers confined within AAO nanopores having diameters smaller than the dimension of the chains in the bulk. The measured mobility of polymers in the confined geometry was much higher than the mobility of the unconfined chain. Rayleigh instabilities in thin polymer films confined within nanoporous alumina membranes were also found where periodic undulations on the film surface were found to increase with time, eventually bridging across the cylindrical nanopore, resulting in the formation of polymer nanorods with a periodic array of encapsulated holes. With microphase separated block copolymers, where the characteristic period of the BCP morphology is comparable to the pore diameter, significant deviations from the bulk morphology as revealed by electron tomography. Small angle neutron scattering was also used to investigate the influence of cylindrical confinement on the order-to-disordered transition. This work was done in collaboration with T. J. McCarthy (UMass), K. Shin (Seoul National University), H. Jinnai (Kyoto University), D. Chen, J. Chen, H. Xiang, T. Kim, and P. Dobriyal, and was supported by the DOE, NSF MRSEC, NSF CHM.

  12. Spherical microwave confinement and ball lightning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, William Richard

    This dissertation presents the results of research done on unconventional energy technologies from 1995 to 2009. The present civilization depends on an infrastructure that was constructed and is maintained almost entirely using concentrated fuels and ores, both of which will run out. Diffuse renewable energy sources rely on this same infrastructure, and hence face the same limitations. I first examined sonoluminescence directed toward fusion, but demonstrated theoretically that this is impossible. I next studied Low Energy Nuclear Reactions and developed methods for improving results, although these have not been implemented. In 2000, I began Spherical Microwave Confinement (SMC), which confines and heats plasma with microwaves in a spherical chamber. The reactor was designed and built to provide the data needed to investigate the possibility of achieving fusion conditions with microwave confinement. A second objective was to attempt to create ball lightning (BL). The reactor featured 20 magnetrons, which were driven by a capacitor bank and operated in a 0.2 s pulse mode at 2.45 GHz. These provided 20 kW to an icosahedral array of 20 antennas. Video of plasmas led to a redesign of the antennas to provide better coupling of the microwaves to the plasma. A second improvement was a grid at the base of the antennas, which provided corona electrons and an electric field to aid quick formation of plasmas. Although fusion conditions were never achieved and ball lightning not observed, experience gained from operating this basic, affordable system has been incorporated in a more sophisticated reactor design intended for future research. This would use magnets that were originally planned. The cusp geometry of the magnetic fields is suitable for electron cyclotron resonance in the same type of closed surface that in existing reactors has generated high-temperature plasmas. Should ball lightning be created, it could be a practical power source with nearly ideal

  13. Field reversed configuration confinement enhancement through edge biasing and neutral beam injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuszewski, M; Smirnov, A; Thompson, M C; Korepanov, S; Akhmetov, T; Ivanov, A; Voskoboynikov, R; Schmitz, L; Barnes, D; Binderbauer, M W; Brown, R; Bui, D Q; Clary, R; Conroy, K D; Deng, B H; Dettrick, S A; Douglass, J D; Garate, E; Glass, F J; Gota, H; Guo, H Y; Gupta, D; Gupta, S; Kinley, J S; Knapp, K; Longman, A; Hollins, M; Li, X L; Luo, Y; Mendoza, R; Mok, Y; Necas, A; Primavera, S; Ruskov, E; Schroeder, J H; Sevier, L; Sibley, A; Song, Y; Sun, X; Trask, E; Van Drie, A D; Walters, J K; Wyman, M D

    2012-06-22

    Field reversed configurations (FRCs) with high confinement are obtained in the C-2 device by combining plasma gun edge biasing and neutral beam injection. The plasma gun creates an inward radial electric field that counters the usual FRC spin-up. The n = 2 rotational instability is stabilized without applying quadrupole magnetic fields. The FRCs are nearly axisymmetric, which enables fast ion confinement. The plasma gun also produces E × B shear in the FRC edge layer, which may explain the observed improved particle transport. The FRC confinement times are improved by factors 2 to 4, and the plasma lifetimes are extended from 1 to up to 4 ms.

  14. Controlling Confinement with Induced Toroidal Current in the Flexible Heliac TJ-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero, J. A.; Lopez-Bruna, D.; Lopez-Fraguas, A.; Ascasibar, E.; TJ-II Team

    2002-07-01

    A method to control plasma particle an energy confinement in the TJ-II Heliac devices is reported A small toroidal current is induced in the plasma with the aid of a 0.2 Wb air core transformer. Plasma particle and energy confinement improve (degrade) with negative (positive) plasma current. For typical TJ-II discharges plasma density and temperature broaden considerably when plasma current is sufficiently negative, accounting for a 40% increase in stored energy. The experimental results agree qualitatively with the paradigm of instability growth rate modifications with magnetic shear. (Author) 18 refs.

  15. Inertial Confinement fusion targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, C. D.

    1982-01-01

    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets are made as simple flat discs, as hollow shells or as complicated multilayer structures. Many techniques were devised for producing the targets. Glass and metal shells are made by using drop and bubble techniques. Solid hydrogen shells are also produced by adapting old methods to the solution of modern problems. Some of these techniques, problems, and solutions are discussed. In addition, the applications of many of the techniques to fabrication of ICF targets is presented.

  16. Confinement for Active Objects

    OpenAIRE

    Florian Kammuller

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we provide a formal framework for the security of distributed active objects. Active objects com-municate asynchronously implementing method calls via futures. We base the formal framework on a security model that uses a semi-lattice to enable multi-lateral security crucial for distributed architectures. We further provide a security type system for the programming model ASPfun of functional active objects. Type safety and a confinement property are presented. ASPfun thus reali...

  17. Impurity confinement and transport in high confinement regimes without edge localized modes on DIII-D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grierson, B. A., E-mail: bgriers@pppl.gov; Nazikian, R. M.; Solomon, W. M. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Burrell, K. H.; Garofalo, A. M.; Belli, E. A.; Staebler, G. M.; Evans, T. E.; Smith, S. P.; Chrobak, C. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States); Fenstermacher, M. E. [Lawerence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); McKee, G. R. [Department of Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53796 (United States); Orlov, D. M. [Center for Energy Research, University of California San Diego, 9500 Gilman Dr., La Jolla, California 92093-0417 (United States); Chrystal, C. [University of California San Diego, 9500 Gilman Dr., La Jolla, California 92093-0417 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    Impurity transport in the DIII-D tokamak [J. L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)] is investigated in stationary high confinement (H-mode) regimes without edge localized modes (ELMs). In plasmas maintained by resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP), ELM-suppression, and QH-mode, the confinement time of fluorine (Z = 9) is equivalent to that in ELMing discharges with 40 Hz ELMs. For selected discharges with impurity injection, the impurity particle confinement time compared to the energy confinement time is in the range of τ{sub p}/τ{sub e}≈2−3. In QH-mode operation, the impurity confinement time is shown to be smaller for intense, coherent magnetic, and density fluctuations of the edge harmonic oscillation than weaker fluctuations. Transport coefficients are derived from the time evolution of the impurity density profile and compared to neoclassical and turbulent transport models NEO and TGLF. Neoclassical transport of fluorine is found to be small compared to the experimental values. In the ELMing and RMP ELM-suppressed plasma, the impurity transport is affected by the presence of tearing modes. For radii larger than the mode radius, the TGLF diffusion coefficient is smaller than the experimental value by a factor of 2–3, while the convective velocity is within error estimates. Low levels of diffusion are observed for radii smaller than the tearing mode radius. In the QH-mode plasma investigated, the TGLF diffusion coefficient is higher inside of ρ=0.4 and lower outside of 0.4 than the experiment, and the TGLF convective velocity is more negative by a factor of approximately 1.7.

  18. A compact neutron spectrometer for characterizing inertial confinement fusion implosions at OMEGA and the NIF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zylstra, A B; Gatu Johnson, M; Frenje, J A; Séguin, F H; Rinderknecht, H G; Rosenberg, M J; Sio, H W; Li, C K; Petrasso, R D; McCluskey, M; Mastrosimone, D; Glebov, V Yu; Forrest, C; Stoeckl, C; Sangster, T C

    2014-06-01

    A compact spectrometer for measurements of the primary deuterium-tritium neutron spectrum has been designed and implemented on the OMEGA laser facility [T. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)]. This instrument uses the recoil spectrometry technique, where neutrons produced in an implosion elastically scatter protons in a plastic foil, which are subsequently detected by a proton spectrometer. This diagnostic is currently capable of measuring the yield to ~±10% accuracy, and mean neutron energy to ~±50 keV precision. As these compact spectrometers can be readily placed at several locations around an implosion, effects of residual fuel bulk flows during burn can be measured. Future improvements to reduce the neutron energy uncertainty to ±15-20 keV are discussed, which will enable measurements of fuel velocities to an accuracy of ~±25-40 km/s.

  19. Fusion plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelmann, F.

    1995-09-01

    In the following, a synthetic review of the information reported at the Conference will be given. No attempt is made to summarize specific contributions; rather the material contributed will be looked at from a few different angles. All areas of fusion plasma physics were represented: there were experimental results on magnetic confinement (tokamaks; stellarators; mirrors; reversed field pinches; field reversed configurations; Z-pinches, with emphasis on the dense Z-pinch; plasma focus, ect.) and on inertial confinement; related modelling and diagnolstics development; theory, as well as some technological activities (power generators; RF sources, etc.) and component (e.g. antennae) development for smaller fusion devices. In particular, fusion-related research in Latin America was exhaustively covered. In addition, large future projects in fusion research were summarized. (AIP)

  20. Confinement Contains Condensates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; Roberts, Craig D.; Shrock, Robert; Tandy, Peter C.

    2012-03-12

    Dynamical chiral symmetry breaking and its connection to the generation of hadron masses has historically been viewed as a vacuum phenomenon. We argue that confinement makes such a position untenable. If quark-hadron duality is a reality in QCD, then condensates, those quantities that have commonly been viewed as constant empirical mass-scales that fill all spacetime, are instead wholly contained within hadrons; i.e., they are a property of hadrons themselves and expressed, e.g., in their Bethe-Salpeter or light-front wave functions. We explain that this paradigm is consistent with empirical evidence, and incidentally expose misconceptions in a recent Comment.

  1. Working under confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malgaretti, P.; Pagonabarraga, I.; Rubi, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    We analyze the performance of a Brownian ratchet in the presence of geometrical constraints. A two-state model that describes the kinetics of molecular motors is used to characterize the energetic cost when the motor proceeds under confinement, in the presence of an external force. We show that the presence of geometrical constraints has a strong effect on the performance of the motor. In particular, we show that it is possible to enhance the ratchet performance by a proper tuning of the parameters characterizing the environment. These results open the possibility of engineering entropically-optimized transport devices.

  2. Hadrosynthesis and Quark Confinement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satz Helmut

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Multihadron production in high energy collisions, from e+e− annihilation to heavy ion interactions, shows remarkable thermal behaviour, specified by a universal “Hagedorn” temperature. We argue that this hadronic radiation is formed by tunnelling through the event horizon of colour confinement, i.e., that it is the QCD counterpart of Hawking-Unruh radiation from black holes. It is shown to be emitted at a universal temperature TH ≃ (σ/2π1/2, where σ denotes the string tension. Since the event horizon does not allow information transfer, the radiation is thermal “at birth”.

  3. Confinement and 4-manifolds

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2014-01-01

    In this talk I will survey a connection between two very challenging problems, one in physics and one in math. The physics problem involves quantitative understanding of confinement in a system with least amount of supersymmetry that has been studied so far and that has a wide range of applications, from semi-realistic string models to qualitatively new examples of gauge-gravity duality. Surprisingly, the rich physics of this system translates into incredibly rich mathematics of the only remaining unsolved case of the Poincare conjecture.

  4. Fusion plasma physics

    CERN Document Server

    Stacey, Weston M

    2012-01-01

    This revised and enlarged second edition of the popular textbook and reference contains comprehensive treatments of both the established foundations of magnetic fusion plasma physics and of the newly developing areas of active research. It concludes with a look ahead to fusion power reactors of the future. The well-established topics of fusion plasma physics -- basic plasma phenomena, Coulomb scattering, drifts of charged particles in magnetic and electric fields, plasma confinement by magnetic fields, kinetic and fluid collective plasma theories, plasma equilibria and flux surface geometry, plasma waves and instabilities, classical and neoclassical transport, plasma-materials interactions, radiation, etc. -- are fully developed from first principles through to the computational models employed in modern plasma physics. The new and emerging topics of fusion plasma physics research -- fluctuation-driven plasma transport and gyrokinetic/gyrofluid computational methodology, the physics of the divertor, neutral ...

  5. Polymer Conformation under Confinement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stavros Bollas

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The conformation of polymer chains under confinement is investigated in intercalated polymer/layered silicate nanocomposites. Hydrophilic poly(ethylene oxide/sodium montmorillonite, PEO/Na+-MMT, hybrids were prepared utilizing melt intercalation with compositions where the polymer chains are mostly within the ~1 nm galleries of the inorganic material. The polymer chains are completely amorphous in all compositions even at temperatures where the bulk polymer is highly crystalline. Attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR is utilized to investigate the conformation of the polymer chains over a broad range of temperatures from below to much higher than the bulk polymer melting temperature. A systematic increase of the gauche conformation relatively to the trans is found with decreasing polymer content both for the C–C and the C–O bonds that exist along the PEO backbone indicating that the severe confinement and the proximity to the inorganic surfaces results in a more disordered state of the polymer.

  6. Inertial confinement fusion quarterly report, July--September 1994. Volume 4, Number 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honea, E. [ed.

    1994-09-01

    The ICF Quarterly continues with six articles in this issue describing recent developments in the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The topics include plasma characterization, production of millimeter scale-length plasmas for studying laser-plasma instabilities, hohlraum physics, three-dimensional hydrodynamic modeling, crystal growth, and laser-beam smoothing.

  7. Comparison of hybrid and baseline ELMy H-mode confinement in JET with the carbon wall

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beurskens, M. N. A.; Frassinetti, L.; Challis, C.; Osborne, T.; Snyder, P. B.; Alper, B.; Angioni, C.; Bourdelle, C.; Buratti, P.; Crisanti, F.; Giovannozzi, E.; Giroud, C.; Groebner, R.; Hobirk, J.; Jenkins, I.; Joffrin, E.; Leyland, M. J.; Lomas, P.; Mantica, P.; McDonald, D.; Nunes, I.; Rimini, F.; Saarelma, S.; Voitsekhovitch, I.; P. de Vries,; Zarzoso, D.

    2013-01-01

    The confinement in JET baseline type I ELMy H-mode plasmas is compared to that in so-called hybrid H-modes in a database study of 112 plasmas in JET with the carbon fibre composite (CFC) wall. The baseline plasmas typically have beta(Nu) similar to 1.5-2, H-98 similar to 1, whereas the hybrid

  8. Diagnostics for magnetic confinement fusion research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weller, Arthur

    2010-11-01

    Significant progress towards the development of an attractive fusion energy source based on magnetic or inertial plasma confinement has been achieved within the international fusion energy program. High-level diagnostics capabilities are required to characterize fusion plasmas and to achieve a sound physics basis to design a fusion power plant. A large variety of different measuring techniques is used, most of them based on the detection of electromagnetic radiation in a wide range of wavelengths or of particles emitted from the plasma. Active probing by laser and particle beams permits to measure local plasma parameters directly, whereas passive measurements and imaging methods require unfolding and tomographic reconstruction techniques in order to obtain the spatial source distribution. Most diagnostics systems are limited in the accessible parameter range, in accuracy, temporal and spatial resolution, energy resolution and hardiness in a harsh environment, so that redundancy and complementarity of different methods is desirable. A considerable synergy exists between plasma diagnostics for fusion and astrophysics research. In particular, novel imaging detectors developed for the observation of astrophysical objects may be applied to fusion devices, too. An overview of diagnostics requirements, measuring techniques and selected results are presented with an emphasis of imaging diagnostics in toroidal magnetic fusion devices.

  9. Inertial-Electrostatic Confinement (IEC) Fusion for Space Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadler, Jon

    1999-01-01

    An Inertial-Electrostatic Confinement (IEC) device was assembled at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Propulsion Research Center (PRC) to study the possibility of using EEC technology for deep space propulsion and power. Inertial-Electrostatic Confinement is capable of containing a nuclear fusion plasma in a series of virtual potential wells. These wells would substantially increase plasma confinement, possibly leading towards a high-gain, breakthrough fusion device. A one-foot in diameter IEC vessel was borrowed from the Fusion Studies Laboratory at the University of Illinois@Urbana-Champaign for the summer. This device was used in initial parameterization studies in order to design a larger, actively cooled device for permanent use at the PRC.

  10. Tokamak plasma self-organization-synergetics of magnetic trap plasmas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Razumova, K. A.; Andreev, V. F.; Eliseev, L. G.; Kislov, A. Y.; La Haye, R. J.; Lysenko, S. E.; Melnikov, A. V.; Notkin, G. E.; Pavlov, Y. D.; Kantor, M. Y.

    2011-01-01

    Analysis of a wide range of experimental results in plasma magnetic confinement investigations shows that in most cases, plasmas are self-organized. In the tokamak case, it is realized in the self-consistent pressure profile, which permits the tokamak plasma to be macroscopically MHD stable.

  11. Plasma physics and fusion plasma electrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Bers, Abraham

    2016-01-01

    Plasma is a ubiquitous state of matter at high temperatures. The electrodynamics of plasmas encompasses a large number of applications, from understanding plasmas in space and the stars, to their use in processing semiconductors, and their role in controlled energy generation by nuclear fusion. This book covers collective and single particle dynamics of plasmas for fully ionized as well as partially ionized plasmas. Many aspects of plasma physics in current fusion energy generation research are addressed both in magnetic and inertial confinement plasmas. Linear and nonlinear dynamics in hydrodynamic and kinetic descriptions are offered, making both simple and complex aspects of the subject available in nearly every chapter. The approach of dividing the basic aspects of plasma physics as "linear, hydrodynamic descriptions" to be covered first because they are "easier", and postponing the "nonlinear and kinetic descriptions" for later because they are "difficult" is abandoned in this book. For teaching purpose...

  12. High beta and confinement studies on TFTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navratil, G.A.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Iacono, R.; Mauel, M.E.; Sabbagh, S.A. (Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)); Kesner, J. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States))

    1992-01-01

    A new regime of high poloidal beta operation in TFTR was developed in the course of the first two years of this project (9/25/89 to 9/24/91). Our proposal to continue this successful collaboration between Columbia University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology with the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory for a three year period (9/25/91 to 9/24/94) to continue to investigate improved confinement and tokamak performance in high poloidal beta plasmas in TFTR through the DT phase of operation was approved by the DOE and this is a report of our progress during the first 9 month budget period of the three year grant (9/25/91 to 6/24/92). During the approved three year project period we plan to (1) extend and apply the low current, high QDD discharges to the operation of TFTR using Deuterium and Tritium plasma; (2) continue the analysis and plan experiments on high poloidal beta phenomena in TFTR including: stability properties, enhanced global confinement, local transport, bootstrap current, and divertor formation; (3) plan and carry out experiments on TFTR which attempt to elevate the central q to values > 2 where entry to the second stability regime is predicted to occur; and (4) collaborate on high beta experiments using bean-shaped plasmas with a stabilizing conducting shell in PBX-M. In the seven month period covered by this report we have made progress in each of these four areas through the submission of 4 TFTR Experimental Proposals and the partial execution of 3 of these using a total of 4.5 run days during the August 1991 to February 1992 run.

  13. Small to mid-sized stellarator experiments: topology, confinement and turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, J. H.

    2004-12-01

    The very large stellarator experiments LHD (operating) and W7X (under construction) move stellarator-confined plasmas into the near-reactor regime. Continuing experiments on smaller devices operating at heating powers from kilowatts to a few megawatts are exploring the effects of magnetic configuration stability and turbulence on plasma confinement to improve stellarator performance and our understanding of general toroidal confinement physics. Key issues being explored are the relation of rational magnetic surfaces and magnetic configuration characteristics such as helical ripple to plasma transport, confinement scaling and turbulence. The robust macroscopic stability of currentless stellarator plasma is a major contributing factor to these studies. Many of the phenomena most clearly evident in stellarators are increasingly implicated in tokamak experiments as well.

  14. Reactor for boron fusion with picosecond ultrahigh power laser pulses and ultrahigh magnetic field trapping

    CERN Document Server

    Miley, G H; Kirchhoff, G

    2015-01-01

    Compared with the deuterium tritium (DT) fusion, the environmentally clean fusion of protons with 11B is extremely difficult. When instead of nanosecond laser pulses for thermal-ablating driven ignition, picosecond pulses are used, a drastic change by nonlinearity results in ultrahigh acceleration of plasma blocks. This radically changes to economic boron fusion by a measured new avalanche ignition.

  15. Gravitationally confined relativistic neutrinos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vayenas, C. G.; Fokas, A. S.; Grigoriou, D.

    2017-09-01

    Combining special relativity, the equivalence principle, and Newton’s universal gravitational law with gravitational rather than rest masses, one finds that gravitational interactions between relativistic neutrinos with kinetic energies above 50 MeV are very strong and can lead to the formation of gravitationally confined composite structures with the mass and other properties of hadrons. One may model such structures by considering three neutrinos moving symmetrically on a circular orbit under the influence of their gravitational attraction, and by assuming quantization of their angular momentum, as in the Bohr model of the H atom. The model contains no adjustable parameters and its solution, using a neutrino rest mass of 0.05 eV/c2, leads to composite state radii close to 1 fm and composite state masses close to 1 GeV/c2. Similar models of relativistic rotating electron - neutrino pairs give a mass of 81 GeV/c2, close to that of W bosons. This novel mechanism of generating mass suggests that the Higgs mass generation mechanism can be modeled as a latent gravitational field which gets activated by relativistic neutrinos.

  16. Shape and Current Profile Effects on Runaway Electron Confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izzo, V. A.; James, A. N.; Humphreys, D. A.; Granetz, R. S.; Whyte, D. G.; Olynyk, G. M.

    2011-10-01

    The potential for several MA of current carried by multi-MeV runaway electrons (REs) during ITER disruptions has motivated a variety of experiments in present-day tokamaks studying RE generation, confinement, and control. In both DIII-D and Alcator C Mod, different RE behavior is seen in limited vs. diverted plasmas, suggesting better RE confinement for limited shapes. NIMROD simulations of rapid shutdowns in both devices support this finding, and show reduced stochasticity in limited plasma shapes. Integration of RE drift-orbits also shows differences in RE strike-points that are consistent with experimental observations. In DIII-D a wide variation in RE confinement results for diverted discharges may also point to current density profile effects on RE confinement. Several DIII-D diverted discharges are modeled with NIMROD. Confined RE fractions found in NIMROD are mostly consistent with observed RE currents in DIII-D, although other effects, such as seed generation and avalanching may contribute to the experimental variation. Work supported by US DOE under DE-FC02-06ER54861, DE-FG02-05ER54809, DE-FG02-07ER54917, DE-FC02-04ER54698 and DE-FG02-04ER54762.

  17. BY FRUSTUM CONFINING VESSEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javad Khazaei

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Helical piles are environmentally friendly and economical deep foundations that, due to environmental considerations, are excellent additions to a variety of deep foundation alternatives available to the practitioner. Helical piles performance depends on soil properties, the pile geometry and soil-pile interaction. Helical piles can be a proper alternative in sensitive environmental sites if their bearing capacity is sufficient to support applied loads. The failure capacity of helical piles in this study was measured via an experimental research program that was carried out by Frustum Confining Vessel (FCV. FCV is a frustum chamber by approximately linear increase in vertical and lateral stresses along depth from top to bottom. Due to special geometry and applied bottom pressure, this apparatus is a proper choice to test small model piles which can simulate field stress conditions. Small scale helical piles are made with either single helix or more helixes and installed in fine grained sand with three various densities. Axial loading tests including compression and tension tests were performed to achieve pile ultimate capacity. The results indicate the helical piles behavior depends essentially on pile geometric characteristics, i.e. helix configuration and soil properties. According to the achievements, axial uplift capacity of helical model piles is about equal to usual steel model piles that have the helixes diameter. Helical pile compression bearing capacity is too sufficient to act as a medium pile, thus it can be substituted other piles in special geoenvironmental conditions. The bearing capacity also depends on spacing ratio, S/D, and helixes diameter.

  18. Plasma Physics An Introduction to Laboratory, Space, and Fusion Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Piel, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Plasma Physics gives a comprehensive introduction to the basic processes in plasmas and demonstrates that the same fundamental concepts describe cold gas-discharge plasmas, space plasmas, and hot fusion plasmas. Starting from particle drifts in magnetic fields, the principles of magnetic confinement fusion are explained and compared with laser fusion. Collective processes are discussed in terms of plasma waves and instabilities. The concepts of plasma description by magnetohydrodynamics, kinetic theory, and particle simulation are stepwise introduced. Space charge effects in sheath regions, double layers and plasma diodes are given the necessary attention. The new fundamental mechanisms of dusty plasmas are explored and integrated into the framework of conventional plasmas. The book concludes with a brief introduction to plasma discharges. Written by an internationally renowned researcher in experimental plasma physics, the text keeps the mathematical apparatus simple and emphasizes the underlying concepts. T...

  19. Plasmas applied atomic collision physics, v.2

    CERN Document Server

    Barnett, C F

    1984-01-01

    Applied Atomic Collision Physics, Volume 2: Plasmas covers topics on magnetically confined plasmas. The book starts by providing the history of fusion research and describing the various approaches in both magnetically and inertially confined plasmas. The text then gives a general discussion of the basic concepts and properties in confinement and heating of a plasma. The theory of atomic collisions that result in excited quantum states, particularly highly ionized impurity atoms; and diverse diagnostic topics such as emission spectra, laser scattering, electron cyclotron emission, particle bea

  20. A double-layer based model of ion confinement in electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascali, D.; Neri, L.; Celona, L.; Castro, G.; Torrisi, G.; Gammino, S.; Sorbello, G.; Ciavola, G.

    2014-02-01

    The paper proposes a new model of ion confinement in ECRIS, which can be easily generalized to any magnetic configuration characterized by closed magnetic surfaces. Traditionally, ion confinement in B-min configurations is ascribed to a negative potential dip due to superhot electrons, adiabatically confined by the magneto-static field. However, kinetic simulations including RF heating affected by cavity modes structures indicate that high energy electrons populate just a thin slab overlapping the ECR layer, while their density drops down of more than one order of magnitude outside. Ions, instead, diffuse across the electron layer due to their high collisionality. This is the proper physical condition to establish a double-layer (DL) configuration which self-consistently originates a potential barrier; this "barrier" confines the ions inside the plasma core surrounded by the ECR surface. The paper will describe a simplified ion confinement model based on plasma density non-homogeneity and DL formation.

  1. A double-layer based model of ion confinement in electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mascali, D., E-mail: davidmascali@lns.infn.it; Neri, L.; Celona, L.; Castro, G.; Gammino, S.; Ciavola, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Torrisi, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Università Mediterranea di Reggio Calabria, Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell’Informazione, delle Infrastrutture e dell’Energia Sostenibile, Via Graziella, I-89100 Reggio Calabria (Italy); Sorbello, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Università degli Studi di Catania, Dipartimento di Ingegneria Elettrica Elettronica ed Informatica, Viale Andrea Doria 6, 95125 Catania (Italy)

    2014-02-15

    The paper proposes a new model of ion confinement in ECRIS, which can be easily generalized to any magnetic configuration characterized by closed magnetic surfaces. Traditionally, ion confinement in B-min configurations is ascribed to a negative potential dip due to superhot electrons, adiabatically confined by the magneto-static field. However, kinetic simulations including RF heating affected by cavity modes structures indicate that high energy electrons populate just a thin slab overlapping the ECR layer, while their density drops down of more than one order of magnitude outside. Ions, instead, diffuse across the electron layer due to their high collisionality. This is the proper physical condition to establish a double-layer (DL) configuration which self-consistently originates a potential barrier; this “barrier” confines the ions inside the plasma core surrounded by the ECR surface. The paper will describe a simplified ion confinement model based on plasma density non-homogeneity and DL formation.

  2. Confining Strings with Topological Term

    CERN Document Server

    Diamantini, M Cristina; Trugenberger, Carlo Andrea

    1997-01-01

    We consider several aspects of `confining strings', recently proposed to describe the confining phase of gauge field theories. We perform the exact duality transformation that leads to the confining string action and show that it reduces to the Polyakov action in the semiclassical approximation. In 4D we introduce a `$\\theta$-term' and compute the low-energy effective action for the confining string in a derivative expansion. We find that the coefficient of the extrinsic curvature (stiffness) is negative, confirming previous proposals. In the absence of a $\\theta$-term, the effective string action is only a cut-off theory for finite values of the coupling e, whereas for generic values of $\\theta$, the action can be renormalized and to leading order we obtain the Nambu-Goto action plus a topological `spin' term that could stabilize the system.

  3. Impurities confined in quantum structures

    CERN Document Server

    Holtz, Per Olof

    2004-01-01

    The introduction of impurities, even in very small concentrations, in a semiconductor can change its optical and electrical properties entirely. This attribute of the semiconductor is utilized in the manifoldness of their applications. In this book, the progress on elucidating the physical properties of impurities confined in quantum structures are reviewed with an emphasis on the experimental aspects. The major results of various kinds of characterization, such as infrared spectroscopy, Raman measurements, luminescence characterization, perturbation spectroscopy and dynamical studies of the confined impurities are reviewed, but also the theoretical basis to calculate the electronic structure of the confined donors and acceptors are presented. This monograph also describes more specific aspects of the confined impurities such as the properties in the high doping regime and the effects of hydrogen passivation.

  4. New results on structure of low beta confinement Polywell cusps simulated by comsol multiphysics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Mahdavipour

    Full Text Available The Inertial electrostatic confinement (IEC is one of the ways for fusion approaches. It is one of the various methods which can be used to confine hot fusion plasma. The advantage of IEC is that the IEC experiments could be done in smaller size facilities than ITER or NIF, costing less money and moving forward faster. In IEC fusion, we need to trap adequate electrons to confine the desired ion density which is needed for a fusion reactor. Polywell is a device which uses the magnetic cusp system and traps the required amount of electrons for fusion reactions. The purpose of this device is to create a virtual cathode in order to achieve nuclear fusion using inertial electrostatic confinement (Miley and Krupakar Murali, 2014. In this paper, we have simulated the low beta Polywell. Then, we examined the effects of coil spacing, coils current, electron injection energy on confinement time. Keywords: Low beta confinement, Polywell, IEC, Comsol multiphysics

  5. Reatividade animal Confinement reactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walsiara Estanislau Maffei

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available A reatividade é definida como a reação do animal quando contido num ambiente de contenção móvel. Ela é quantificada por meio do teste de reatividade animal em ambiente de contenção móvel - REATEST®. Este teste consiste num dispositivo eletrônico acoplado à balança e num software específico. O dispositivo capta a movimentação que o animal provoca na balança, durante 20 segundos e a envia para o software que a processa determinando a reatividade do animal numa escala contínua de pontos. Pontuações maiores são de animais mais reativos (mais agressivo. A reatividade foi criada com os objetivos de solucionar os problemas até então existentes na seleção para temperamento e de permitir estimação de parâmetros genéticos mais confiáveis. Ela é uma característica objetiva que tem grande variabilidade fenotípica e é de quantificação rápida, fácil e segura, além de poder ser quantificada em qualquer tipo de balança, o que permite maior aplicabilidade. Ela não interfere nas práticas de manejo das fazendas porque é quantificada no momento da pesagem dos animais. Sua herdabilidade na raça Nelore é de 0,39 ao ano e 0,23 ao sobreano e suas correlações genéticas com ganho de peso diário são de -0,28 do nascimento até desmama e de -0,49 do desmame até ano. Já suas correlações genéticas com desenvolvimento do perímetro escrotal do ano ao sobreano variam de -0,25 e -0,41.The confinement reactivity (CR has been used as a measure of temperament in Brazil and it is defined as the animal reaction when contained in the scale. It is quantified through the animal reactivity test - REATEST®. This test consists of an electronic device coupled to the scale and of specific software. The device captures the movement that the animal provokes in the scale, during 20 seconds and sends it for the software that processes this movement and determines the animal CR in a continuous scale of points. Higher punctuations belong to

  6. Magnetic-confinement fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ongena, J.; Koch, R.; Wolf, R.; Zohm, H.

    2016-05-01

    Our modern society requires environmentally friendly solutions for energy production. Energy can be released not only from the fission of heavy nuclei but also from the fusion of light nuclei. Nuclear fusion is an important option for a clean and safe solution for our long-term energy needs. The extremely high temperatures required for the fusion reaction are routinely realized in several magnetic-fusion machines. Since the early 1990s, up to 16 MW of fusion power has been released in pulses of a few seconds, corresponding to a power multiplication close to break-even. Our understanding of the very complex behaviour of a magnetized plasma at temperatures between 150 and 200 million °C surrounded by cold walls has also advanced substantially. This steady progress has resulted in the construction of ITER, a fusion device with a planned fusion power output of 500 MW in pulses of 400 s. ITER should provide answers to remaining important questions on the integration of physics and technology, through a full-size demonstration of a tenfold power multiplication, and on nuclear safety aspects. Here we review the basic physics underlying magnetic fusion: past achievements, present efforts and the prospects for future production of electrical energy. We also discuss questions related to the safety, waste management and decommissioning of a future fusion power plant.

  7. PREFACE: Water in confined geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovere, Mauro

    2004-11-01

    The study of water confined in complex systems in solid or gel phases and/or in contact with macromolecules is relevant to many important processes ranging from industrial applications such as catalysis and soil chemistry, to biological processes such as protein folding or ionic transport in membranes. Thermodynamics, phase behaviour and the molecular mobility of water have been observed to change upon confinement depending on the properties of the substrate. In particular, polar substrates perturb the hydrogen bond network of water, inducing large changes in the properties upon freezing. Understanding how the connected random hydrogen bond network of bulk water is modified when water is confined in small cavities inside a substrate material is very important for studies of stability and the enzymatic activity of proteins, oil recovery or heterogeneous catalysis, where water-substrate interactions play a fundamental role. The modifications of the short-range order in the liquid depend on the nature of the water-substrate interaction, hydrophilic or hydrophobic, as well as on its spatial range and on the geometry of the substrate. Despite extensive study, both experimentally and by computer simulation, there remain a number of open problems. In the many experimental studies of confined water, those performed on water in Vycor are of particular interest for computer simulation and theoretical studies since Vycor is a porous silica glass characterized by a quite sharp distribution of pore sizes and a strong capability to absorb water. It can be considered as a good candidate for studying the general behaviour of water in hydrophilic nanopores. But there there have been a number of studies of water confined in more complex substrates, where the interpretation of experiments and computer simulation is more difficult, such as in zeolites or in aerogels or in contact with membranes. Of the many problems to consider we can mention the study of supercooled water. It is

  8. Development and experimental evaluation of theoretical models for ion cyclotron resonance frequency heating of tokamak plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mantsinen, M. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Espoo (Finland). Dept. of Technical Physics

    1999-06-01

    Heating with electromagnetic waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) is a well-established method for auxiliary heating of present-day tokamak plasmas and is envisaged as one of the main heating techniques for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and future reactor plasmas. In order to predict the performance of ICRF heating in future machines, it is important to benchmark present theoretical modelling with experimental results on present tokamaks. This thesis reports on development and experimental evaluation of theoretical models for ICRF heating at the Joint European Torus (JET). Several ICRF physics effects and scenarios have been studied. Direct importance to the ITER is the theoretical analysis of ICRF heating experiments with deuterium-tritium (D-T) plasmas. These experiments clearly demonstrate the potential of ICRF heating for auxiliary heating of reactor plasmas. In particular, scenarios with potential for good bulk ion heating and enhanced D-T fusion reactivity have been identified. Good bulk ion heating is essential for reactor plasmas in order to obtain a high ion temperature and a high fusion reactivity. In JET good bulk ion heating with ICRF waves has been achieved in high-performance discharges by adding ICRF heating to neutral beam injection. In these experiments, as in other JET discharges where damping at higher harmonics of the ion cyclotron frequency takes place, so-called finite Larmor radius (FLR) effects play an important role. Due to FLR effects, the resonating ion velocity distribution function can have a strong influence on the power deposition. Evidence for this effect has been obtained from the third harmonic deuterium heating experiments. Because of FLR effects, the wave-particle interaction can also become weak at certain ion energies, which prevents resonating ions from reaching higher energies. When interacting with the wave, an ion receives not only a change in energy but also a change in

  9. Plasma physics an introduction to laboratory, space, and fusion plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Piel, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    The enlarged new edition of this textbook provides a comprehensive introduction to the basic processes in plasmas and demonstrates that the same fundamental concepts describe cold gas-discharge plasmas, space plasmas, and hot fusion plasmas. Starting from particle drifts in magnetic fields, the principles of magnetic confinement fusion are explained and compared with laser fusion. Collective processes are discussed in terms of plasma waves and instabilities. The concepts of plasma description by magnetohydrodynamics, kinetic theory, and particle simulation are stepwise introduced. Space charge effects in sheath regions, double layers and plasma diodes are given the necessary attention. The novel fundamental mechanisms of dusty plasmas are explored and integrated into the framework of conventional plasmas. The book concludes with a concise description of modern plasma discharges. Written by an internationally renowned researcher in experimental plasma physics, the text keeps the mathematical apparatus simple a...

  10. Coronal Electron Confinement by Double Layers

    CERN Document Server

    Li, T C; Swisdak, M

    2014-01-01

    In observations of flare-heated electrons in the solar corona, a longstanding problem is the unexplained prolonged lifetime of the electrons compared to their transit time across the source. This suggests confinement. Recent particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, which explored the transport of pre-accelerated hot electrons through ambient cold plasma, showed that the formation of a highly localized electrostatic potential drop, in the form of a double layer (DL), significantly inhibited the transport of hot electrons (T.C. Li, J.F. Drake, and M. Swisdak, 2012, ApJ, 757, 20). The effectiveness of confinement by a DL is linked to the strength of the DL as defined by its potential drop. In this work, we investigate the scaling of the DL strength with the hot electron temperature by PIC simulations, and find a linear scaling. We demonstrate that the strength is limited by the formation of parallel shocks. Based on this, we analytically determine the maximum DL strength, and find also a linear scaling with the hot e...

  11. Plasma adiabatic lapse rate

    CERN Document Server

    Amendt, Peter; Wilks, Scott

    2012-01-01

    The plasma analog of an adiabatic lapse rate (or temperature variation with height) in atmospheric physics is obtained. A new source of plasma temperature gradient in a binary ion species mixture is found that is proportional to the concentration gradient and difference in average ionization states . Application to inertial-confinement-fusion implosions indicates a potentially strong effect in plastic (CH) ablators that is not modeled with mainline (single-fluid) simulations. An associated plasma thermodiffusion coefficient is derived, and charge-state diffusion in a single-species plasma is also predicted.

  12. Physics of Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Woods, Leslie Colin

    2003-01-01

    A short, self-sufficient introduction to the physics of plasma for beginners as well as researchers in a number of fields. The author looks at the dynamics and stability of magnetoplasma and discusses wave and transport in this medium. He also looks at such applications as fusion research using magnetic confinement of Deuterium plasma, solar physics with its plasma loops reaching high into the corona, sunspots and solar wind, engineering applications to metallurgy, MHD direct generation of electricity, and railguns, finally touching on the relatively new and difficult subject of dusty plasmas.

  13. Intrinsic Flow and Momentum Transport during Improved Confinement in MST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, D.; Tan, E.; Schott, B.; Anderson, J. K.; Boguski, J.; Nornberg, M. D.; Xing, Z. A.

    2017-10-01

    Progress in absolute wavelength calibration of the Charge Exchange Recombination Spectroscopy (CHERS) system on MST has enabled new observations and analysis of intrinsic flow and momentum transport. Localized toroidal and poloidal flow measurements with systematic accuracy of +/- 3 km/s have been obtained during improved confinement Pulsed Parallel Current Drive (PPCD) plasmas at high plasma current (400-500 kA). The magnetic activity prior to and during the transition to improved confinement tends to increase the flow and sets the initial condition for the momentum profile evolution during improved confinement where intrinsic flow drive appears to weaken. Inboard flows change in time during PPCD, consistent with changes in the core-resonant m =1, n =6 tearing mode phase velocity. Outboard flows near the magnetic axis are time-independent, resulting in the development of a strongly sheared toroidal flow in the core and asymmetry in the poloidal flow profile. The deceleration of the n =6 mode during the period of improved confinement correlates well with the n =6 mode amplitude and is roughly consistent with the expected torque from eddy currents in the conducting shell. The level of Dα emission and secondary mode amplitudes (n =7-10) do not correlate with the mode deceleration suggesting that the momentum loss from charge exchange with neutrals and diffusion due to residual magnetic stochasticity are not significant in PPCD. This work has been supported by the U.S.D.O.E.

  14. Issues in tokamak/stellarator transport and confinement enhancement mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perkins, F.W.

    1990-08-01

    At present, the mechanism for anomalous energy transport in low-{beta} toroidal plasmas -- tokamaks and stellarators -- remains unclear, although transport by turbulent E {times} B velocities associated with nonlinear, fine-scale microinstabilities is a leading candidate. This article discusses basic theoretical concepts of various transport and confinement enhancement mechanisms as well as experimental ramifications which would enable one to distinguish among them and hence identify a dominant transport mechanism. While many of the predictions of fine-scale turbulence are born out by experiment, notable contradictions exist. Projections of ignition margin rest both on the scaling properties of the confinement mechanism and on the criteria for entering enhanced confinement regimes. At present, the greatest uncertainties lie with the basis for scaling confinement enhancement criteria. A series of questions, to be answered by new experimental/theoretical work, is posed to resolve these outstanding contradictions (or refute the fine-scale turbulence model) and to establish confinement enhancement criteria. 73 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  15. Fusion an introduction to the physics and technology of magnetic confinement fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Stacey, Weston M

    2010-01-01

    This second edition of a popular textbook is thoroughly revised with around 25% new and updated content.It provides an introduction to both plasma physics and fusion technology at a level that can be understood by advanced undergraduates and graduate students in the physical sciences and related engineering disciplines.As such, the contents cover various plasma confinement concepts, the support technologies needed to confine the plasma, and the designs of ITER as well as future fusion reactors.With end of chapter problems for use in courses.

  16. Knotted DNA in Nanofluidic Confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klotz, Alexander; Doyle, Patrick

    The behavior of topologically simple semiflexible polymers such as DNA has become well-understood in the last several years. Recently, several computational analyses have predicted that certain topological features of a polymer, such as the average size of pseudo-knots and the probability of knot formation, are enhanced by confinement. Here, we extend recent work on the stretching of knotted DNA and examine diffusion, relaxation, and chain statistics of topologically complex linear DNA molecules. Topological phenomena are studied both in the bulk and under nanofluidic confinement to examine the interplay between knotting and confinement in semiflexible polymers, as well as to provide a controlled experimental interrogation of the knotted region of the polymer.

  17. Calculation of confined swirling jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C. P.

    1986-01-01

    Computations of a confined coaxial swirling jet are carried out using a standard two-equation (k-epsilon) model and two modifications of this model based on Richardson-number corrections of the length-scale (epsilon) governing equation. To avoid any uncertainty involved in the setting up of inlet boundary conditions, actual measurements are used at the inlet plane of this calculation domain. The results of the numerical investigation indicate that the k-epsilon model is inadequate for the predictions of confined swirling flows. Although marginal improvement of the flow predictions can be achieved by these two corrections, neither can be judged satisfactory.

  18. Multibeam Stimulated Raman Scattering in Inertial Confinement Fusion Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, P; Divol, L; Dewald, E L; Milovich, J L; Hohenberger, M; Jones, O S; Hopkins, L Berzak; Berger, R L; Kruer, W L; Moody, J D

    2015-07-31

    Stimulated Raman scattering from multiple laser beams arranged in a cone sharing a common daughter wave is investigated for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) conditions in a inhomogeneous plasma. It is found that the shared electron plasma wave (EPW) process, where the lasers collectively drive the same EPW, can lead to an absolute instability when the electron density reaches a matching condition dependent on the cone angle of the laser beams. This mechanism could explain recent experimental observations of hot electrons at early times in ICF experiments, at densities well below quarter critical when two plasmon decay is not expected to occur.

  19. System and method of operating toroidal magnetic confinement devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chance, Morrell S.; Jardin, Stephen C.; Stix, Thomas H.; Grimm, deceased, Ray C.; Manickam, Janardhan; Okabayashi, Michio

    1987-01-01

    For toroidal magnetic confinement devices the second region of stability against ballooning modes can be accessed with controlled operation. Under certain modes of operation, the first and second stability regions may be joined together. Accessing the second region of stability is accomplished by forming a bean-shaped plasma and increasing the indentation until a critical value of indentation is reached. A pusher coil, located at the inner-major-radius side of the device, is engaged to form a bean-shaped poloidal cross-section in the plasma.

  20. Turbulent transport in magnetized plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Horton, Wendell

    2012-01-01

    This book explains how magnetized plasmas self-organize in states of electromagnetic turbulence that transports particles and energy out of the core plasma faster than anticipated by the fusion scientists designing magnetic confinement systems in the 20th century. It describes theory, experiments and simulations in a unified and up-to-date presentation of the issues of achieving nuclear fusion power.

  1. Baryons in the plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarts, Gert; Allton, Chris; Boni, Davide de

    2018-01-01

    We investigate the fate of baryons made out of u, d and s quarks in the hadronic gas and the quark-gluon plasma, using nonperturbative lattice simulations, employing the FASTSUM anisotropic Nf=2+1 ensembles. In the confined phase a strong temperature dependence is seen in the masses of the negative...

  2. Turbulent jet in confined counterflow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The mean flowfield of a turbulent jet issuing into a confined, uniform counterflow was investigated computationally. Based on dimensional analysis, the jet penetration length was shown to scale with jet-to-counterflow momentum flux ratio. This scaling and the computational results reproduce the well-known correct limit of ...

  3. Turbulent jet in confined counterflow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The mean flowfield of a turbulent jet issuing into a confined, uniform counterflow was investigated computationally. Based on dimensional analysis, the jet penetration length was shown to scale with jet-to-counterflow momentum flux ratio. This scaling and the computational results reproduce the well-known correct ...

  4. Effective viscosity of confined hydrocarbons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivebæk, Ion Marius; Samoilov, V.N.; Persson, B.N.J.

    2012-01-01

    We present molecular dynamics friction calculations for confined hydrocarbon films with molecular lengths from 20 to 1400 carbon atoms. We find that the logarithm of the effective viscosity ηeff for nanometer-thin films depends linearly on the logarithm of the shear rate: log ηeff=C-nlog γ̇, where...

  5. Unstable vortices do not confine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Achúcarro, A.; Roo, M. de; Huiszoon, L.; Landshoff, P.V.

    1998-01-01

    Recently, a geometric model for the confinement of magnetic charges in the context of type II string compactifications was constructed. This model assumes the existence of stable magnetic vortices with quantized flux in the low energy theory. However, quantization of flux alone does not imply that

  6. Two flavor QCD and Confinement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Elia, M.; Di Giacomo, A.; Pica, Claudio

    2005-01-01

    We argue that the order of the chiral transition for N_f=2 is a sensitive probe of the QCD vacuum, in particular of the mechanism of color confinement. A strategy is developed to investigate the order of the transition by use of finite size scaling analysis. An in-depth numerical investigation...

  7. Interchange Instability and Transport in Matter-Antimatter Plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendl, Alexander; Danler, Gregor; Wiesenberger, Matthias; Held, Markus

    2017-06-09

    Symmetric electron-positron plasmas in inhomogeneous magnetic fields are intrinsically subject to interchange instability and transport. Scaling relations for the propagation velocity of density perturbations relevant to transport in isothermal magnetically confined electron-positron plasmas are deduced, including damping effects when Debye lengths are large compared to Larmor radii. The relations are verified by nonlinear full-F gyrofluid computations. Results are analyzed with respect to planned magnetically confined electron-positron plasma experiments. The model is generalized to other matter-antimatter plasmas. Magnetized electron-positron-proton-antiproton plasmas are susceptible to interchange-driven local matter-antimatter separation, which can impede sustained laboratory magnetic confinement.

  8. Experimental evidence of new tetragonal polymorphs of silicon formed through ultrafast laser-induced confined microexplosion

    OpenAIRE

    Rapp, L.; Haberl, B.; Pickard, C. J.; J.E. Bradby; Gamaly, E. G.; Williams, J.S.; Rode, A. V.

    2015-01-01

    Ordinary materials can transform into novel phases at extraordinary high pressure and temperature. The recently developed method of ultrashort laser-induced confined microexplosions initiates a non-equilibrium disordered plasma state. Ultra-high quenching rates overcome kinetic barriers to the formation of new metastable phases, which are preserved in the surrounding pristine crystal for subsequent exploitation. Here we demonstrate that confined microexplosions in silicon produce several meta...

  9. Inertial Confinement Fusion quarterly report, January--March 1995. Volume 5, No. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    The ICF quarterly report is published by the Inertial Confinement Fusion Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Topics included this quarter include: the role of the National Ignition Facility in the development of Inertial Confinement Fusion, laser-plasma interactions in large gas-filled hohlraums, evolution of solid-state induction modulators for a heavy-ion recirculator, the National Ignition Facility project, and terminal-level relaxation in Nd-doped laser material.

  10. Stability of Coulomb crystals in a linear Paul trap with storage-ring-like confinement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Niels; Mølhave, Kristian; Drewsen, Michael

    2002-01-01

    We report experiments on the stability of ion Coulomb crystals in a linear Paul trap with storage-ring-like confinement. The transverse dynamics of charged particles in a trap of this type is analogous to that of a fast beam traveling through a channel with periodic, magnetic alternating gradient...... confinement. The experimentally observed stability conditions for stationary crystals comply remarkably well with current theory of crystalline plasmas and beams....

  11. Stirring unmagnetized plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, C; Katz, N; Wallace, J; Jara-Almonte, J; Reese, I; Zweibel, E; Forest, C B

    2012-03-16

    A new concept for spinning unmagnetized plasma is demonstrated experimentally. Plasma is confined by an axisymmetric multicusp magnetic field and biased cathodes are used to drive currents and impart a torque in the magnetized edge. Measurements show that flow viscously couples momentum from the magnetized edge (where the plasma viscosity is small) into the unmagnetized core (where the viscosity is large) and that the core rotates as a solid body. To be effective, collisional viscosity must overcome the ion-neutral drag due to charge-exchange collisions.

  12. Inertial electrostatic confinement (IEC) fusion fundamentals and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Miley, George H

    2014-01-01

    This book provides readers with an introductory understanding of Inertial Electrostatic Confinement (IEC), a type of fusion meant to retain plasma using an electrostatic field. IEC provides a unique approach for plasma confinement, as it offers a number of spin-off applications, such as a small neutron source for Neutron Activity Analysis (NAA), that all work towards creating fusion power. The IEC has been identified in recent times as an ideal fusion power unit because of its ability to burn aneutronic fuels like p-B11 as a result of its non-Maxwellian plasma dominated by beam-like ions. This type of fusion also takes place in a simple mechanical structure small in size, which also contributes to its viability as a source of power. This book posits that the ability to study the physics of IEC in very small volume plasmas makes it possible to rapidly investigate a design to create a power-producing device on a much larger scale. Along with this hypothesis the book also includes a conceptual experiment propose...

  13. Confinement and stability of VH-mode discharges in the DIII-D tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, T.S.; Osborne, T.H.; Burrell, K.H.; Carlstrom, T.N.; Chan, V.S.; Chu, M.S.; DeBoo, J.C.; Doyle, E.J.; Greenfield, C.M.; Groebner, R.J.; Hsieh, C.L.; Jackson, G.L.; James, R.; Lao, L.L.; Lazarus, E.A.; Lippman, S.I.; Petrie, T.W.; Rettig, C.L.; St. John, H.; Schissel, D.P.; Stambaugh, R.D.; Strait, E.J.; Turnbull, A.D.; West, W.P.; Winter, J.; Wroblewski, D.

    1992-10-01

    A regime of very high confinement (VH-mode) has been observed in neutral beam-heated deuterium discharges in the DIII-D tokamak with thermal energy confinement times up to [approx]3.6 times that predicted by the ITER-89P L-mode scaling and 2 times that predicted by ELM-free H-mode thermal confinement scalings. This high confinement has led to increased plasma performance, n[sub D] (0)T[sub i](0)[tau][sub E] = 2 [times] 10[sup 20] m[sup [minus]3] keV sec with I[sub p] = 1.6 MA, B[sub T] = 2.1 T, Z[sub eff] [le] 2. Detailed transport analysis shows a correspondence between the large decrease in thermal diffusivity in the region 0.75 [le] [rho] [le] 0.9 and the development of a strong shear in the radial electric field in the same region. This suggests that stabilization of turbulence by sheared E [times] B flow is responsible for the improved confinement in VH-mode. A substantial fraction of the edge plasma entering the second regime of stability may also contribute to the increase in confinement. The duration of the VH-mode phase has been lengthened by feedback controlling the input power to limit plasma beta.

  14. Confinement and stability of VH-mode discharges in the DIII-D tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, T.S.; Osborne, T.H.; Burrell, K.H.; Carlstrom, T.N.; Chan, V.S.; Chu, M.S.; DeBoo, J.C.; Doyle, E.J.; Greenfield, C.M.; Groebner, R.J.; Hsieh, C.L.; Jackson, G.L.; James, R.; Lao, L.L.; Lazarus, E.A.; Lippman, S.I.; Petrie, T.W.; Rettig, C.L.; St. John, H.; Schissel, D.P.; Stambaugh, R.D.; Strait, E.J.; Turnbull, A.D.; West, W.P.; Winter, J.; Wroblewski, D.

    1992-10-01

    A regime of very high confinement (VH-mode) has been observed in neutral beam-heated deuterium discharges in the DIII-D tokamak with thermal energy confinement times up to {approx}3.6 times that predicted by the ITER-89P L-mode scaling and 2 times that predicted by ELM-free H-mode thermal confinement scalings. This high confinement has led to increased plasma performance, n{sub D} (0)T{sub i}(0){tau}{sub E} = 2 {times} 10{sup 20} m{sup {minus}3} keV sec with I{sub p} = 1.6 MA, B{sub T} = 2.1 T, Z{sub eff} {le} 2. Detailed transport analysis shows a correspondence between the large decrease in thermal diffusivity in the region 0.75 {le} {rho} {le} 0.9 and the development of a strong shear in the radial electric field in the same region. This suggests that stabilization of turbulence by sheared E {times} B flow is responsible for the improved confinement in VH-mode. A substantial fraction of the edge plasma entering the second regime of stability may also contribute to the increase in confinement. The duration of the VH-mode phase has been lengthened by feedback controlling the input power to limit plasma beta.

  15. Confinement of color and geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Di Giacomo, A

    2009-01-01

    A natural explanation of confinement can be given in terms of symmetry. Since color symmetry is exact, the candidate symmetry is dual and related to homotopy,i.e., in (3+1)d, to magnetic charge conservation. A set of r abelian 'tHooft-like tensors (r = rank of the gauge group) can be defined and the dual charge is a violation of the corresponding Bianchi identities. It is shown that this is equivalently described by non-abelian Bianchi identities.

  16. Fluctuation reduction and enhanced confinement in the MST reversed-field pinch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, Brett Edward [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    1997-10-01

    Plasmas with a factor of ≥3 improvement in energy confinement have been achieved in the MST reversed-field pinch (RFP). These plasmas occur spontaneously, following sawtooth crashes, subject to constraints on, eg, toroidal magnetic field reversal and wall conditioning. Possible contributors to the improved confinement include a reduction of core-resonant, global magnetic fluctuations and a reduction of electrostatic fluctuations over the entire plasma edge. One feature of these plasmas is a region of strong ExB flow shear in the edge. Never before observed in conjunction with enhanced confinement in the RFP, such shear is common in enhanced confinement discharges in tokamaks and stellarators. Another feature of these plasmas is a new type of discrete dynamo event. Like sawtooth crashes, a common form of discrete dynamo, these events correspond to bursts of edge parallel current. The reduction of electrostatic fluctuations in these plasmas occurs within and beyond the region of strong ExB flow shear, similar to what is observed in tokamaks and stellarators. However, the reductions in the MST include fluctuations whose correlation lengths are larger than the width of the shear region. The reduction of the global magnetic fluctuations is most likely due to flattening of the μ=μ0$\\vec{J}$∙$\\vec{B}$/B2 profile. Flattening can occur, eg, due to the new type of discrete dynamo event and reduced edge resistivity. Enhanced confinement plasmas are also achieved in the MST when auxiliary current is applied to flatten the μ profile and reduce magnetic fluctuations. Unexpectedly, these plasmas also exhibit a region (broader than in the case above) of strong ExB flow shear in the edge, an edge-wide reduction of electrostatic fluctuations, and the new type of discrete dynamo event. Auxiliary current drive has historically been viewed as the principal route to fusion reactor viability for the RFP.

  17. High-adiabat high-foot inertial confinement fusion implosion experiments on the national ignition facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, H-S; Hurricane, O A; Callahan, D A; Casey, D T; Dewald, E L; Dittrich, T R; Döppner, T; Hinkel, D E; Berzak Hopkins, L F; Le Pape, S; Ma, T; Patel, P K; Remington, B A; Robey, H F; Salmonson, J D; Kline, J L

    2014-02-07

    This Letter reports on a series of high-adiabat implosions of cryogenic layered deuterium-tritium (DT) capsules indirectly driven by a "high-foot" laser drive pulse at the National Ignition Facility. High-foot implosions have high ablation velocities and large density gradient scale lengths and are more resistant to ablation-front Rayleigh-Taylor instability induced mixing of ablator material into the DT hot spot. Indeed, the observed hot spot mix in these implosions was low and the measured neutron yields were typically 50% (or higher) of the yields predicted by simulation. On one high performing shot (N130812), 1.7 MJ of laser energy at a peak power of 350 TW was used to obtain a peak hohlraum radiation temperature of ∼300  eV. The resulting experimental neutron yield was (2.4±0.05)×10(15) DT, the fuel ρR was (0.86±0.063)  g/cm2, and the measured Tion was (4.2±0.16)  keV, corresponding to 8 kJ of fusion yield, with ∼1/3 of the yield caused by self-heating of the fuel by α particles emitted in the initial reactions. The generalized Lawson criteria, an ignition metric, was 0.43 and the neutron yield was ∼70% of the value predicted by simulations that include α-particle self-heating.

  18. Production of field-reversed mirror plasma with a coaxial plasma gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, C.W.; Shearer, J.W.

    The use of a coaxial plasma gun to produce a plasma ring which is directed into a magnetic field so as to form a field-reversed plasma confined in a magnetic mirror. Plasma thus produced may be used as a target for subsequent neutral beam injection or other similarly produced and projected plasma rings or for direct fusion energy release in a pulsed mode.

  19. Numerical modeling of the transition from low to high confinement in magnetically confined plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jens Juul; Nielsen, Anders Henry; Madsen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    including both open and closed field lines. The results reveal different types of L–H-like transitions in response to ramping up the input power by increasing the ion temperature in the edge region. For a fast rising input power we obtain an abrupt transition, and for a slow rising power we obtain a L......–I–H transition with an intermediate I-phase displaying limit-cycle oscillations (LCO). The model recovers the power threshold for the L–H transition, the scaling of the threshold with the density and with the loss-rate in the SOL, indicating a decrease in power threshold when switching from single to double null...... configuration. The results hold promises for developing full predictive modeling of the L–H transition, which is an essential step in understanding and optimizing fusion devices....

  20. Effect of Aluminium Confinement on ANFO Detonation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, Mark; Jackson, Scott; Kiyanda, Charles; Shinas, Mike; Hare, Steve; Briggs, Matt

    2013-06-01

    Detonations in confined non-ideal high explosives often have velocities below the confiner sound speed. The effect on detonation propagation of the resulting subsonic flow in the confiner (such as confiner stress waves traveling ahead of the main detonation front or upstream wall deflection into the HE) has yet to be fully understood. Previous work by Sharpe and Bdzil (J. Eng. Math, 2006) has shown that for subsonic confiner flow, there is no limiting thickness for which the detonation dynamics are uninfluenced by further increases in wall thickness. The critical parameters influencing detonation behavior are the wall thickness relative to the HE reaction zone size, and the difference in the detonation velocity and confiner sound speed. Additional possible outcomes of subsonic flow are that for increasing thickness, the confiner is increasingly deflected into the HE upstream of the detonation, and that for sufficiently thick confiners, the detonation speed could be driven up to the sound speed in the confiner. We report here on a further series of experiments in which a mixture of ammonium nitrate and fuel oil (ANFO) is detonated in aluminum confiners with varying HE charge diameter and confiner thickness, and compare the results with the outcomes suggested by Sharpe and Bdzil.

  1. High confinement dissipative divertor operation on Alcator C-Mod

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goetz, J.A.; LaBombard, B.; Lipschultz, B.; Pitcher, C.S.; Terry, J.L.; Boswell, C.; Gangadhara, S.; Pappas, D.; Weaver, J.; Welch, B.; Boivin, R.L.; Bonoli, P.; Fiore, C.; Granetz, R.; Greenwald, M.; Hubbard, A.; Hutchinson, I.; Irby, J.; Marmar, E.; Mossessian, D.; Porkolab, M.; Rice, J.; Rowan, W.L.; Schilling, G.; Snipes, J.; Takase, Y.; Wolfe, S.; Wukitch, S. [Plasma Science Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    1999-05-01

    Alcator C-Mod [I. H. Hutchinson {ital et al.}, Phys. Plasmas {bold 1}, 1511 (1994)] has operated a High-confinement-mode (H-mode) plasma together with a dissipative divertor and low core Z{sub eff}. The initially attached plasma is characterized by steady-state enhancement factor, H{sub ITER89P} [P. N. Yushmanov {ital et al.}, Nucl. Fusion {bold 30}, 1999 (1990)], of 1.9, central Z{sub eff} of 1.1, and a radiative fraction of {approximately}50{percent}. Feedback control of a nitrogen gas puff is used to increase radiative losses in both the core/edge and divertor plasmas in almost equal amounts. Simultaneously, the core plasma maintains H{sub ITER89P} of 1.6 and Z{sub eff} of 1.4 in this nearly 100{percent} radiative state. The power and particle flux to the divertor plates have been reduced to very low levels while the core plasma is relatively unchanged by the dissipative nature of the divertor. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  2. Characteristics of high-confinement modes in Alcator C Mod

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snipes, J.A.; Boivin, R.L.; Christensen, C.; Fiore, C.; Garnier, D.; Goetz, J.; Golovato, S.N.; Graf, M.; Granetz, R.S.; Greenwald, M.; Hubbard, A.; Hutchinson, I.H.; Irby, J.; LaBombard, B.; Marmar, E.S.; Niemczewski, A.; OShea, P.; Porkolab, M.; Stek, P.; Takase, Y.; Terry, J.L.; Umansky, M.; Wolfe, S.M. [Plasma Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    1996-05-01

    The regime of high particle and energy confinement known as the H mode [Phys. Rev. Lett. {bold 49}, 1408 (1982)] has been extended to a unique range of operation for divertor tokamaks up to toroidal fields of nearly 8 T, line-averaged electron densities of 3{times}10{sup 20} m{sup {minus}3}, and surface power densities of nearly 0.6 MW/m{sup 2} in the compact high-field tokamak Alcator C Mod [Phys. Plasmas {bold 1}, 1511 (1994)]. H modes are achieved in Alcator C Mod with Ion Cyclotron Resonant Frequency (ICRF) heating and with Ohmic heating alone without boronization of the all molybdenum tiled first wall. Large increases in charge exchange flux are observed during the H mode over the entire range of energies from 2 to 10 keV. There appears to be an upper limit to the midplane neutral pressure, of about 0.08 Pa above which no H modes have been observed. The plasmas with the best energy confinement have the lowest midplane neutral pressures, below 0.01 Pa. There is an edge electron temperature threshold such that {ital T}{sub {ital e}}{ge}280 eV {plus_minus}40 eV for sustaining the H mode, which is equal at L{endash}H and H{endash}L transitions. The hysteresis in the threshold power between L{endash}H and H{endash}L transitions is less than 25{percent} on average. Both core and edge particle confinement improve by a factor of 2{endash}4 from L mode to H mode. Energy confinement also improves by up to a factor of 2 over L mode. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  3. Confined space fatalities in Virginia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahli, B P; Armstrong, C W

    1992-09-01

    To better understand the frequency and characteristics of occupational confined space fatalities in Virginia, we reviewed death certificates, workers' compensation files, a Virginia Occupational Safety and Health Administration listing, and medical examiner records for all 50 fatalities (41 accidents) reported during 1979 to 1986. All fatalities were identified in medical examiner records (50), more than in any other source. The majority of decedents were male craftsmen, operators, or laborers less than 50 years old (mean 38). Drug screens of the 43 decedents tested were negative, with the exception of 2 cases where blood alcohol was detected (greater than or equal to 0.06%). Approximately 5% of "at work" civilian deaths (excluding plane, train, and motor vehicle fatalities) were confined space related. Virginia resident death rates per million employees were highest for shipbuilding and repair facilities (23.2), local government (8.9), and manufacturing other than shipbuilding (5.4%). Multiple fatalities occurred in 4 (10%) of the accidents, with 3 involving 2 fatalities each, and 1 accident involving 7 fatalities. Three fatalities (6%) were rescuers. Fifty nonfatal injuries of rescuers were known to have occurred in these accidents, 15 of co-workers and 35 of community rescue personnel (firefighters and rescue squad members). Approximately half the accidents occurred during the fourth quarter of the year and on a Thursday or Friday, and about one third occurred at night. The leading accident type was atmospheric condition, most commonly oxygen deficiency (33%) or the presence of carbon monoxide (20%). In 6 (40%) of the 15 accidents involving atmospheric condition, the toxic gas or oxygen deficiency was absent in the confined space at the time of entry.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Spatial confinement effects on spectroscopic and morphological studies of nanosecond laser-ablated Zirconium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayat, Asma; Bashir, Shazia; Rafique, Muhammad Shahid; Ahmad, Riaz; Akram, Mahreen; Mahmood, Khaliq; Zaheer, Ali

    2017-12-01

    Spatial confinement effects on plasma parameters and surface morphology of laser ablated Zr (Zirconium) are studied by introducing a metallic blocker. Nd:YAG laser at various fluencies ranging from 8 J cm-2 to 32 J cm-2 was employed as an irradiation source. All measurements were performed in the presence of Ar under different pressures. Confinement effects offered by metallic blocker are investigated by placing the blocker at different distances of 6 mm, 8 mm and 10 mm from the target surface. It is revealed from LIBS analysis that both plasma parameters i.e. excitation temperature and electron number density increase with increasing laser fluence due to enhancement in energy deposition. It is also observed that spatial confinement offered by metallic blocker is responsible for the enhancement of both electron temperature and electron number density of Zr plasma. This is true for all laser fluences and pressures of Ar. Maximum values of electron temperature and electron number density without blocker are 12,600 K and 14 × 1017 cm-3 respectively whereas, these values are enhanced to 15,000 K and 21 × 1017 cm-3 in the presence of blocker. The physical mechanisms responsible for the enhancement of Zr plasma parameters are plasma compression, confinement and pronounced collisional excitations due to reflection of shock waves. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) analysis was performed to explore the surface morphology of laser ablated Zr. It reveals the formation of cones, cavities and ripples. These features become more distinct and well defined in the presence of blocker due to plasma confinement. The optimum combination of blocker distance, fluence and Ar pressure can identify the suitable conditions for defining the role of plasma parameters for surface structuring.

  5. Frictional properties of confined polymers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivebæk, Ion Marius; Samoilov, Vladimir N; Persson, Bo N J

    2008-01-01

    We present molecular dynamics friction calculations for confined hydrocarbon solids with molecular lengths from 20 to 1400 carbon atoms. Two cases are considered: a) polymer sliding against a hard substrate, and b) polymer sliding on polymer. In the first setup the shear stresses are relatively...... independent of molecular length. For polymer sliding on polymer the friction is significantly larger, and dependent on the molecular chain length. In both cases, the shear stresses are proportional to the squeezing pressure and finite at zero load, indicating an adhesional contribution to the friction force...

  6. Weak polyelectrolytes in Confined Geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmer, Jonathan K.; Rathee, Vikramjit S.; Sikora, Benjamin

    Crucial to the behavior of recently designed charge-rejection and mosaic membranes are the conformations of polyelectrolyte brushes and oligomeric grafts used to control the membranes' surface charge. The use of pH-tunable weak polyelectrolytes with associative interactions enables fine tuning of material transport properties. Here, we apply constant-pH molecular dynamics along with free energy sampling algorithms to understand the subtle tug-of-war between pH, salt concentrations, and solvation forces in confined systems, and determine how each of these effects alters transport within the system. We further discuss the implications of our findings for the design of electrolyte separation membranes.

  7. Liquid Spreading under Nanoscale Confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Checco, Antonio

    2009-03-01

    Dynamic atomic force microscopy in the noncontact regime is used to study the morphology of a nonvolatile liquid (squalane) as it spreads along wettable nanostripes embedded in a nonwettable surface. Results show that the liquid profile depends on the amount of lateral confinement imposed by the nanostripes, and it is truncated at the microscopic contact line in good qualitative agreement with classical mesoscale hydrodynamics. However, the width of the contact line is found to be significantly larger than expected theoretically. This behavior may originate from small chemical inhomogeneity of the patterned stripes as well as from thermal fluctuations of the contact line.

  8. Plasma-chemical reactions: low pressure acetylene plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benedikt, J [Faculty for Physics and Astronomy, Research Group Reactive Plasmas, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, Universitaetsstr. 150, 44780 Bochum (Germany)

    2010-02-03

    Reactive plasmas are a well-known tool for material synthesis and surface modification. They offer a unique combination of non-equilibrium electron and ion driven plasma chemistry, energetic ions accelerated in the plasma sheath at the plasma-surface interface, high fluxes of reactive species towards surfaces and a friendly environment for thermolabile objects. Additionally, small negatively charged clusters can be generated, because they are confined in the positive plasma potential. Plasmas in hydrocarbon gases, and especially in acetylene, are a good example for the discussion of different plasma-chemical processes. These plasmas are involved in a plethora of possible applications ranging from fuel conversion to formation of single wall carbon nanotubes. This paper provides a concise overview of plasma-chemical reactions (PCRs) in low pressure reactive plasmas and discusses possible experimental and theoretical methods for the investigation of their plasma chemistry. An up-to-date summary of the knowledge about low pressure acetylene plasmas is given and two particular examples are discussed in detail: (a) Ar/C{sub 2}H{sub 2} expanding thermal plasmas with electron temperatures below 0.3 eV and with a plasma chemistry initiated by charge transfer reactions and (b) radio frequency C{sub 2}H{sub 2} plasmas, in which the energetic electrons mainly control PCRs. (topical review)

  9. Electron confinement and heating in microwave-sustained argon microplasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoskinson, Alan R.; Gregório, José; Parsons, Stephen; Hopwood, Jeffrey

    2015-04-01

    We systematically measure and model the behavior of argon microplasmas sustained by a broad range of microwave frequencies. The plasma behavior exhibits two distinct regimes. Up to a transition frequency of approximately 4 GHz, the electron density, directly measured by Stark broadening, increases rapidly with rising frequency. Above the transition frequency, the density remains approximately constant near 5 × 1020 m-3. The electrode voltage falls with rising frequency across both regimes, reaching approximately 5 V at the highest tested frequency. A fluid model of the plasma indicates that the falling electrode voltage reduces the electron temperature and significantly improves particle confinement, which in turn increases the plasma density. Particles are primarily lost to the electrodes at lower frequencies, but dissociative recombination becomes dominant as particle confinement improves. Recombination events produce excited argon atoms which are efficiently re-ionized, resulting in relatively constant ionization rates despite the falling electron temperature. The fast rates of recombination are the result of high densities of electrons and molecular ions in argon microplasmas.

  10. Atomic and molecular processes in fusion plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janev, R.K. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)

    1997-01-01

    The role of atomic and molecular processes in achieving and maintaining the conditions for thermonuclear burn in a magnetically confined fusion plasma is described. Emphasis is given to the energy balance and power and particle exhaust issues. The most important atomic and molecular processes which affect the radiation losses and impurity transport in the core plasma, the neutral particle transport in the plasma edge and the radiative cooling of divertor plasmas are discussed in greater detail. (author)

  11. Instability studies on a spherical inertial electrostatic confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyung Jin

    The spherical inertial electrostatic confinement concept offers an alternative fusion plasma confinement scheme, where charged particles are accelerated and confined electrostatically with a series of biased spherical concentric electrodes. The inertia of the accelerated ions compresses the ions and builds up the space charge at the center of the cathode grid. The space charge of the ions attracts electrons which in turn accumulate a space charge. The accumulation of collective space charge creates a series of deep "virtual" electrostatic potential wells which confine and concentrate ions into a small volume where an appreciable number of nuclear fusion reactions could occur. It is very attractive for a power plant due to its mechanical simplicity and high power-to-mass ratio. However, its beam-plasma interactions are not clearly understood. In order to evaluate the inertial electrostatic confinement concept, it is essential to develop a reliable and flexible instability analysis method for an equilibrium plasma in a potential well. Subsequently stability of this well can be studied. As a part of this study, methods are sought to avoid or suppress any destructive instabilities. Methods to be explored include modification/control of the well profile, control of the electron to ion beam density ratio, control of the angular momentum of the beam, etc. For this purpose, a perturbative (deltaf) particle simulation techniques for a kinetic analysis is applied to simulate completely the dynamic evolution of perturbed Vlasov-Poisson equations and, in addition, to achieve much more accurate simulations of the nonlinear dynamics using less simulation particles compared to conventional particle-in-cell method. This model is used to study the behavior of two-stream-like instabilities related to the trapped spherically converging ions. Results show that steady-state solutions of the self-consistent Vlasov-Poisson equation in which angular momentum of positively charged particle

  12. State-space Coil Modelling in Plasma Magnetic Confinement Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garrido Aitor J.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The need of robust and optimal control schemes is a key factor for the development of future fusion reactors. This paper has dealt with the state-space modelling of the Ultra-Low Iota Super Elongated Stellarator of the UPV/EHU, using a physical lumped parameter equivalent circuit approach. The model obtained has been validated by means of experimental output data showing an excellent matching with the real system. Besides, it has been designed a MPC scheme that has been successfully implemented both in simulation and experimentally using a real-time control platform.

  13. NSTX Plasma Response to Lithium Coated Divertor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H.W. Kugel, M.G. Bell, J.P. Allain, R.E. Bell, S. Ding, S.P. Gerhardt, M.A. Jaworski, R. Kaita, J. Kallman, S.M. Kaye, B.P. LeBlanc, R. Maingi, R. Majeski, R. Maqueda, D.K. Mansfield, D. Mueller, R. Nygren, S.F. Paul, R. Raman, A.L. Roquemore, S.A. Sabbagh, H. Schneider, C.H. Skinner, V.A. Soukhanovskii, C.N. Taylor, J.R. Timberlak, W.R. Wampler, L.E. Zakharov, S.J. Zweben, and the NSTX Research Team

    2011-01-21

    NSTX experiments have explored lithium evaporated on a graphite divertor and other plasma facing components in both L- and H- mode confinement regimes heated by high-power neutral beams. Improvements in plasma performance have followed these lithium depositions, including a reduction and eventual elimination of the HeGDC time between discharges, reduced edge neutral density, reduced plasma density, particularly in the edge and the SOL, increased pedestal electron and ion temperature, improved energy confinement and the suppression of ELMs in the H-mode. However, with improvements in confinement and suppression of ELMs, there was a significant secular increase in the effective ion charge Zeff and the radiated power in H-mode plasmas as a result of increases in the carbon and medium-Z metallic impurities. Lithium itself remained at a very low level in the plasma core, <0.1%. Initial results are reported from operation with a Liquid Lithium Divertor (LLD) recently installed.

  14. Effect of ELMs on rotation and momentum confinement in H-mode discharges in JET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Versloot, T.W.; de Vries, P.C.; Giroud, C.

    2010-01-01

    The loss of plasma toroidal angular momentum and thermal energy by edge localized modes (ELMs) has been studied in JET. The analysis shows a consistently larger drop in momentum in comparison with the energy loss associated with the ELMs. This difference originates from the large reduction...... in angular frequency at the plasma edge, observed to penetrate into the plasma up to r/a ~ 0.65 during large type-I ELMs. As a result, the time averaged angular frequency is lowered near the top of the pedestal with increasing ELM frequency, resulting in a significant drop in thermal Mach number at the edge....... An increase in profile peaking of ion temperature and angular frequency is observed. At the same time the plasma confinement is reduced while the ratio of confinement times (Rτ = τE/τ) increases noticeably with ELM frequency. This change could be explained by the relatively larger ELM induced losses...

  15. Liquefaction Mitigation Using Lateral Confinement Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. R. Azzam

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The exploration of a series of shaking tests on circular model footing with and without cellular confinement constructed around the footing with variable depths and diameters under the effect of variable net bearing stress is studied. The effect of the confinement on the liquefaction time, final settlement, excess pore water pressure, and induced building acceleration were studied. The consequences showed that installing the cell with minimum diameter closer to footing and sufficient penetration depth significantly delayed the liquefaction time. It can be considered as an alternative technique to decrease both the lateral spreading and the final settlement below the foundation during the shaking. The results demonstrated that the cell reduced the excess pore water pressure within the confined zone and the pore water pressure migration outside the confined block where the liquefaction is induced. Moreover, the peak foundation acceleration of the confined footing soil system is reduced compared with the case of without cell confinement.

  16. Spatially confined assembly of nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lin; Chen, Xiaodong; Lu, Nan; Chi, Lifeng

    2014-10-21

    an increasingly important role in the controllable assembly of NPs. In this Account, we summarize our approaches and progress in fabricating spatially confined assemblies of NPs that allow for the positioning of NPs with high resolution and considerable throughput. The spatially selective assembly of NPs at the desired location can be achieved by various mechanisms, such as, a controlled dewetting process, electrostatically mediated assembly of particles, and confined deposition and growth of NPs. Three nanofabrication techniques used to produce prepatterns on a substrate are summarized: the Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) patterning technique, e-beam lithography (EBL), and nanoimprint lithography (NPL). The particle density, particle size, or interparticle distance in NP assemblies strongly depends on the geometric parameters of the template structure due to spatial confinement. In addition, with smart design template structures, multiplexed NPs can be assembled into a defined structure, thus demonstrating the structural and functional complexity required for highly integrated and multifunction applications.

  17. Effect of cylindrical cavity height on laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy with spatial confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Junfeng; Wang, Tingfeng; Guo, Jin; Chen, Anmin; Jin, Mingxing

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we present a study on the spatial confinement effect of laser-induced plasma with a cylindrical cavity in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The emission intensity with the spatial confinement is dependent on the height of the confinement cavity. It is found that, by selecting the appropriate height of cylindrical cavity, the signal enhancement can be significantly increased. At the cylindrical cavity (diameter = 2 mm) with a height of 6 mm, the enhancement ratio has the maximum value (approximately 8.3), and the value of the relative standard deviation (RSD) (7.6%) is at a minimum, the repeatability of LIBS signal is best. The results indicate that the height of confinement cavity is very important for LIBS technique to reduce the limit of detection and improve the precision.

  18. Quark Confinement and Force Unification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stone R. A. Jr.

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available String theory had to adopt a bi-scale approach in order to produce the weakness of gravity. Taking a bi-scale approach to particle physics along with a spin connection produces 1 the measured proton radius, 2 a resolution of the multiplicity of measured weak angle values 3 a correct theoretical value for the Z 0 4 a reason that h is a constant and 5 a “neutral current” source. The source of the “neutral current” provides 6 an alternate solution to quark confinement, 7 produces an effective r like potential, and 8 gives a reason for the observed but unexplained Regge trajectory like J M 2 behavior seen in quark composite particle spin families.

  19. Frictional properties of confined polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivebaek, I M; Samoilov, V N; Persson, B N J

    2008-09-01

    We present molecular dynamics friction calculations for confined hydrocarbon solids with molecular lengths from 20 to 1400 carbon atoms. Two cases are considered: a) polymer sliding against a hard substrate, and b) polymer sliding on polymer. In the first setup the shear stresses are relatively independent of molecular length. For polymer sliding on polymer the friction is significantly larger, and dependent on the molecular chain length. In both cases, the shear stresses are proportional to the squeezing pressure and finite at zero load, indicating an adhesional contribution to the friction force. The friction decreases when the sliding distance is of the order of the molecular length indicating a strong influence of molecular alignment during run-in. The results of our calculations show good correlation with experimental work.

  20. Characterization of enhanced D{alpha} high-confinement modes in Alcator {ital C}-Mod

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenwald, M.; Boivin, R.; Bonoli, P.; Budny, R.; Fiore, C.; Goetz, J.; Granetz, R.; Hubbard, A.; Hutchinson, I.; Irby, J.; LaBombard, B.; Lin, Y.; Lipschultz, B.; Marmar, E.; Mazurenko, A.; Mossessian, D.; Sunn Pedersen, T.; Pitcher, C.S.; Porkolab, M.; Rice, J.; Rowan, W.; Snipes, J.; Schilling, G.; Takase, Y.; Terry, J.; Wolfe, S.; Weaver, J.; Welch, B.; Wukitch, S. [MIT-Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    1999-05-01

    Regimes of high-confinement mode have been studied in the Alcator {ital C}-Mod tokamak [Hutchinson {ital et al.}, Phys. Plasmas {bold 1}, 1511 (1994)]. Plasmas with no edge localized modes (ELM-free) have been compared in detail to a new regime, enhanced D{alpha} (EDA). EDA discharges have only slightly lower energy confinement than comparable ELM-free ones, but show markedly reduced impurity confinement. Thus EDA discharges do not accumulate impurities and typically have a lower fraction of radiated power. The edge gradients in EDA seem to be relaxed by a continuous process rather than an intermittent one as is the case for standard ELMy discharges and thus do not present the first wall with large periodic heat loads. This process is probably related to fluctuations seen in the plasma edge. EDA plasmas are more likely at low plasma current (q{gt}3.7), for moderate plasma shaping, (triangularity {approximately}0.35{endash}0.55), and for high neutral pressures. As observed in soft x-ray emission, the pedestal width is found to scale with the same parameters that determine the EDA/ELM-free boundary. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  1. Temporal evolution of confined fast-ion velocity distributions measured by collective Thomson scattering in TEXTOR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Stefan Kragh; Bindslev, Henrik; Porte, L.

    2008-01-01

    Fast ions created in the fusion processes will provide up to 70% of the heating in ITER. To optimize heating and current drive in magnetically confined plasmas insight into fast-ion dynamics is important. First measurements of such dynamics by collective Thomson scattering (CTS) were recently...

  2. Changes in transport and confinement in the EXTRAP-T2 reversed field pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallander, E.; Sallander, J.; Hedqvist, A.

    1999-09-01

    At the EXTRAP-T2 reversed field pinch a non-intrusive approach has been undertaken to monitor transport driven by magnetic fluctuations. Correlations are presented between fluctuations observed in the core and at the edge of the plasma. The fluctuations are characterized and their effect on the confinement of core electron energy is estimated.

  3. Physics of Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Leslie Colin

    2004-01-01

    A short, self-sufficient introduction to the physics of plasma for beginners as well as researchers in a number of fields. The author looks at the dynamics and stability of magnetoplasma and discusses wave and transport in this medium. He also looks at such applications as fusion research using magnetic confinement of Deuterium plasma, solar physics with its plasma loops reaching high into the corona, sunspots and solar wind, engineering applications to metallurgy, MHD direct generation of electricity, and railguns, finally touching on the relatively new and difficult subject of dusty plasmas. The book includes mathematical notes and 99 exercises that supplement the theory presented and thus offers the beginner an easy introduction to this exciting field. It is an equally good textbook for final year undergraduates and first year research students.

  4. Modelling enhanced confinement in drift-wave turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajjar, R. J.; Diamond, P. H.; Ashourvan, A.; Tynan, G. R.

    2017-06-01

    The results of modeling studies of an enhanced confinement in the drift wave turbulent plasma of the CSDX linear device are presented. The mechanism of enhanced confinement is investigated here using a reduced 1D, time-dependent model, which illustrates the exchange of enstrophy between two disparate scale structures: the mesoscale flow and profile, and the turbulence intensity fields. Mean density, mean vorticity, and turbulent potential enstrophy are the variables for this model. Total potential enstrophy is conserved in this model. Vorticity mixing occurs on a scale length related to an effective Rhines' scale of turbulence, and shrinks as both density and vorticity gradients steepen. Numerical results obtained from solution of the model agree well with the experimental data from CSDX showing: (i) a steepening of the mean density profile, indicating a radial transport barrier formation, (ii) the development of a radially sheared azimuthal flow velocity that coincides with the density steepening and initiates a turbulence quench, and (iii) negative Reynolds work values, indicating that fluctuations drive the shear flow. These observations as the magnitude of the magnetic field B increases are recovered using purely diffusive expressions for the vorticity and density fluxes. A new dimensionless turbulence parameter RDT-defined as the ratio of the integrated potential enstrophy transfer from turbulence to the flow, to the integrated potential enstrophy production due to relaxation of the density gradient is introduced as a turbulence collapse indicator that detects when the enhanced confinement state is triggered.

  5. Fast ignition of asymmetrically compressed targets for inertial confinement fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gus'kov, S. Yu.; Demchenko, N. N.; Zmitrenko, N. V.; Kuchugov, P. A.; Rozanov, V. B.; Stepanov, R. V.; Yakhin, R. A.

    2017-03-01

    It is shown that fast ignition can ensure the combustion of asymmetrically compressed targets for inertial confinement fusion with an efficiency close to the combustion of one-dimensionally compressed targets. This statement is valid not only for targets specially designed for fast ignition. Fast heating by an external energy source can ensure the ignition of a target designed for spark ignition, but where this ignition does not occur because inhomogeneities are formed in the temperature and density distributions owing to the development of hydrodynamic instabilities. The condition for ignition is the fast heating of the plasma in the combustion initiation region whose size is comparable with the sizes of compression inhomogeneities. Thus, fast ignition not only significantly reduces the ignition energy, but also is possibly a necessary stage in the inertial confinement fusion scheme when the spherically symmetric compression of a target requires very high engineering and financial expenses. The studies are based on the numerical simulation of the compression and combustion of inertial confinement fusion targets with one- and two-dimensional hydrodynamic codes.

  6. Two stream instabilities in degenerate quantum plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Son, S

    2013-01-01

    The quantum mechanical effect on the plasma two-stream instability is studied based on the dielectric function approach. The analysis suggests that the degenerate plasma relevant to the inertial confinement fusion behaves differently from classical plasmas when the electron drift velocity is comparable to the Fermi velocity. For high wave vector comparable to the Fermi wave vector, the degenerate quantum plasma has larger regime of the two-stream instabilities than the classical plasma. A regime, where the plasma waves with the frequency larger than 1.5 times of the Langmuir wave frequency become unstable to the two-stream instabilities, is identified.

  7. The 26th IEEE international conference on plasma science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-07-01

    Some of the sessions covered by this conference are: Basic Processes in Fully and Partially Ionized Plasmas; Slow Wave Devices; Laser-Produced Plasma; Non-Equilibrium Plasma Processing; Space Plasmas and Partially Ionized Gases; Microwave Plasmas; Inertial Confinement Fusion; Plasma Diagnostics; Computational Plasma Physics; Microwave Systems; Laser Produced Plasmas and Dense Plasma Focus; Intense Electron and Ion Beams; Fast Wave Devices; Spherical Configurations and Ball Lightning; Thermal Plasma Chemistry and Processing and Environmental Issues in Plasma Science; Plasma, Ion, and Electron Sources; Fast Wave Devices and Intense Beams; Fast Z-pinches and X-ray Lasers; Plasma Opening Switches; Plasma for Lighting; Intense Beams; Vacuum Microwaves; Magnetic Fusion Energy; and Plasma Thrusters and Arcs. Separate abstracts were prepared for some of the papers in this volume.

  8. Energy coupling in lined hohlraums (HLP1, HLP2, and HLP7)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kauffman, R.L.; Suter, L.J.; Berger, R.L. [and others

    1996-06-01

    Indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF) uses high-Z cavities, or hohlraums, to confine x rays for compressing and igniting deuterium-tritium fuel contained in spherical capsules. For laser-driven ICF, the intense laser beams enter the hohlraum through small laser entrance holes (LEHs), heating the high-Z hohlraum walls. The laser-produced radiation heats the unirradiated high-Z walls producing a nearly isotropic radiation environment for spherically compressing the lCF capsule. The radiation flux on the capsule is not completely isotropic, however, because the laser-irradiated area is generally brighter than the surrounding x-ray heated walls and the LEHs do not radiate. Furthermore, the angular distribution of flux on the capsule is time dependent because the unilluminated walls become hotter and more emissive as a function of time, and plasma dynamics cause the laser-irradiated area to move. Symmetric implosions are obtained by dynamically balancing the effects of the LEHs, wall heating, and laser-spot motion.

  9. Exercise thermoregulation with bed rest, confinement, and immersion deconditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenleaf, J E

    1997-03-15

    Altered thermoregulation following exposure to prolonged (12-14 days) of bed rest and 6 hr of head-down thermoneutral water immersion in humans, and cage confinement (8 weeks) in male, mongrel dogs resulted in occasional increased core temperature (Tcore) at rest, but consistent "excessive" increase in Tcore during submaximal exercise. This excessive increase in Tcore in nonexercising and exercising subjects was independent of the mode (isometric or isotonic) of exercise training during bed rest, and was associated with the consistent hypovolemia in men but not in women taking estrogen supplementation (1.25 mg premarin/ day) which restored plasma volume during bed rest to ambulatory control levels. Post-bed rest exercise sweating (evaporative heat loss) was unchanged or higher than control levels; however, calculated tissue heat conductance was significantly lower in men, and forearm venoconstriction was greater (venous volume was reduced) in women during exercise after bed rest. Because sweating appeared proportional to the increased level of Tcore, these findings suggest that one major factor for the excessive hyperthermia is decreased core to periphery heat conduction. Exercising dogs respond like humans with excessive increase in both rectal (Tre) and exercising muscle temperatures (Tmu) after confinement and, after eight weeks of exercise training on a treadmill following confinement, they had an attenuated rate of increase of Tre even below ambulatory control levels. Intravenous infusion of glucose also attenuated not only the rise in Tre during exercise in normal dogs, but also the excessive rise in Tre and exercising Tmu after confinement. Oral glucose also appeared to reduce the rate of increase in excessive Tre in men after immersion deconditioning. There was a greater rate of rise in Tcore in two cosmonauts during supine submaximal exercise (65% VO2 max) on the fifth recovery day after the 115-day Mir 18 mission. Thus, the excessive rise in core

  10. Exercise thermoregulation with bed rest, confinement, and immersion deconditioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenleaf, J. E.

    1997-01-01

    Altered thermoregulation following exposure to prolonged (12-14 days) of bed rest and 6 hr of head-down thermoneutral water immersion in humans, and cage confinement (8 weeks) in male, mongrel dogs resulted in occasional increased core temperature (Tcore) at rest, but consistent "excessive" increase in Tcore during submaximal exercise. This excessive increase in Tcore in nonexercising and exercising subjects was independent of the mode (isometric or isotonic) of exercise training during bed rest, and was associated with the consistent hypovolemia in men but not in women taking estrogen supplementation (1.25 mg premarin/ day) which restored plasma volume during bed rest to ambulatory control levels. Post-bed rest exercise sweating (evaporative heat loss) was unchanged or higher than control levels; however, calculated tissue heat conductance was significantly lower in men, and forearm venoconstriction was greater (venous volume was reduced) in women during exercise after bed rest. Because sweating appeared proportional to the increased level of Tcore, these findings suggest that one major factor for the excessive hyperthermia is decreased core to periphery heat conduction. Exercising dogs respond like humans with excessive increase in both rectal (Tre) and exercising muscle temperatures (Tmu) after confinement and, after eight weeks of exercise training on a treadmill following confinement, they had an attenuated rate of increase of Tre even below ambulatory control levels. Intravenous infusion of glucose also attenuated not only the rise in Tre during exercise in normal dogs, but also the excessive rise in Tre and exercising Tmu after confinement. Oral glucose also appeared to reduce the rate of increase in excessive Tre in men after immersion deconditioning. There was a greater rate of rise in Tcore in two cosmonauts during supine submaximal exercise (65% VO2 max) on the fifth recovery day after the 115-day Mir 18 mission. Thus, the excessive rise in core

  11. Confinement of charge carriers in bilayer graphene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goossens, A.M.

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis we investigate the fundamental properties of electronic transport in bilayer graphene. We do this by confining electrons to narrow constrictions and small islands. Our key result is the fabrication and measurement of nanoscale devices that permit confinement with electric fields in

  12. Structure of polymer chains under confinement

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Single chain form factor was observed both for bulk and confined chains using the condition of zero average contrast. Our measurements on neutral polymer chains are in agreement with the theoretical predictions established by Daoud and de Gennes for chains confined in a cylindrical pore when the chains are entangled ...

  13. Polymer Dynamics under Cylindrical Nano-Confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winey, Karen; Tung, Wei-Shao; Riggleman, Robert

    2015-03-01

    Polymer melts under cylindrical confinement have previously been shown to exhibit chain conformations elongated parallel to the cylinder axis and compressed perpendicular to the cylinder. Further, simulations and theory found that the number of entanglements per chain decreases as the cylinder diameter decreases. This talk presents the local dynamics and polymer diffusion under cylindrical nanoconfinement using simulations and experiments. For the molecular dynamics simulations, an entangled polymer is confined by an amorphous cylindrical confinement. Local dynamics and local packing of monomers are affected by the cylindrical confinement and an anisotropic mean-squared displacement is observed with faster motion along the cylinder axes that increases with increasing confinement. Using elastic recoil detection experiments, polymer diffusion coefficients along cylindrical nanopores were measured for deuterated polystyrene diffusing into nanoporous membranes infiltrated with polystyrene. The tracer diffusion coefficient increased with decreasing pore size, although the increase is less pronounced than found in the simulations. Results will be discussed in terms of the reptation model.

  14. Stability analysis of tokamak plasmas; Analyse de stabilite de plasmas de tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourdelle, C

    2000-10-01

    In a tokamak plasma, the energy transport is mainly turbulent. In order to increase the fusion reactions rate, it is needed to improve the energy confinement. The present work is dedicated to the identification of the key parameters leading to plasmas with a better confined energy in order to guide the future experiments. For this purpose, a numerical code has been developed. It calculates the growth rates characterizing the instabilities onset. The stability analysis is completed by the evaluation of the shearing rate of the rotation due to the radial electric field. When this shearing rate is greater than the growth rate the ion turbulence is fully stabilised. The shearing rate and the growth rate are determined from the density, temperature and security factor profiles of a given plasma. Three types of plasmas have been analysed. In the Radiative Improved modes of TEXTOR, high charge number ions seeding lowers the growth rates. In Tore Supra-high density plasmas, a strong magnetic shear and/or a more efficient ion heating linked to a bifurcation of the toroidal rotation direction (which is not understood) trigger the improvement of the confinement. In other Tore Supra plasmas, locally steep electron pressure gradients have been obtained following magnetic shear reversal. This locally negative magnetic shear has a stabilizing effect. In these three families of plasmas, the growth rates decrease, the confinement improves, the density and temperature profiles are steeper. This steepening induces an increase of the rotation shearing rate, which then maintains the confinement high quality. (author)

  15. Effect of Ambipolar Potential on the Propulsive Performance of the GDM Plasma Thruster Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The gasdynamic mirror (GDM) plasma thruster has the ability to confine high-density plasma for the length of time required to heat it to the temperatures...

  16. Suppressed ion-scale turbulence in a hot high-β plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, L; Fulton, D P; Ruskov, E; Lau, C; Deng, B H; Tajima, T; Binderbauer, M W; Holod, I; Lin, Z; Gota, H; Tuszewski, M; Dettrick, S A; Steinhauer, L C

    2016-12-21

    An economic magnetic fusion reactor favours a high ratio of plasma kinetic pressure to magnetic pressure in a well-confined, hot plasma with low thermal losses across the confining magnetic field. Field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasmas are potentially attractive as a reactor concept, achieving high plasma pressure in a simple axisymmetric geometry. Here, we show that FRC plasmas have unique, beneficial microstability properties that differ from typical regimes in toroidal confinement devices. Ion-scale fluctuations are found to be absent or strongly suppressed in the plasma core, mainly due to the large FRC ion orbits, resulting in near-classical thermal ion confinement. In the surrounding boundary layer plasma, ion- and electron-scale turbulence is observed once a critical pressure gradient is exceeded. The critical gradient increases in the presence of sheared plasma flow induced via electrostatic biasing, opening the prospect of active boundary and transport control in view of reactor requirements.

  17. Fermion Superfluidity And Confining Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Galal, A A

    2004-01-01

    We study the pairing of Fermi systems with long-range, confining interparticle interactions. We solve the Cooper problem for a pair of fermions interacting via a regularized harmonic oscillator potential and determine the s-wave spectrum of bound states. Using a model of two interacting species of fermions, we calculate the ground state energy of the normal phase in the Hartree-Fock approximation and find that it is infrared (IR) divergent, due to a combination of the sharpness of the Fermi sea and the long-range nature of the interaction. We calculate the correlation energy in the normal phase using the random phase approximation (RPA) and demonstrate the cancellation of infrared divergences between the Hartree-Fock and RPA contributions. Introducing a variational wavefunction to study the superfluid phase, we solve the BCS equations using a Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (HFB) analysis to determine the wave-function, excitation gap, and other parameters of the superfluid phase. We show that the system crosses over...

  18. Pellet injection and confinement in the tore supra tokamak; Injection de glacons et confinement dans le tokamak tore supra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maget, P

    1998-09-23

    Pellet injection in the centre of tokamak plasmas can lead to an improved confinement regime called PEP (Pellet Enhanced Performance). The present work is dedicated to the mechanisms involved in the PEP regimes obtained in the tokamak Tore Supra. A neoclassical approach of transport shows that it is the anomalous transport, due to plasma turbulence, that causes the enhanced confinement. A linear model describing electrostatic instabilities has been developed in order to study the roles of density profile and current profile during the PEP, in the limit of large growth rates. The effect ofradial shear in flows is taken into account by removing the ExB shear flow rate from the linear growth rate, as suggested by non-linear numerical simulations of turbulence. A local transport coefficient is estimated from the knowledge of the linear growth rate and the mode width. We find that the peaked density profile in PEP regime lowers the diffusion coefficient, and that the velocity shear amplifies this effect. The evolution of the current profile is also stabilizing, but this parameter is not known with sufficient accuracy, so that its role in Tore Supra PEP experiments remains uncertain. (author)

  19. A Statistical Analysis of the Scaling Laws for the Confinement Time Distinguishing between Core and Edge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peluso, E.; Gelfusa, M.; Murari, A.; Lupelli, I.; Gaudio, P.

    The H mode of confinement in Tokamaks is characterized by a thin region of high gradients, located at the edge of the plasma and called the Edge Transport Barrier. Even if various theoretical models have been proposed for the interpretation of the edge physics, the main empirical scaling laws of the plasma confinement time are expressed in terms of global plasma parameters and they do not discriminate between the edge and core regions. Moreover all the scaling laws are assumed to be power law monomials. In the present paper, a new methodology is proposed to investigate the validity of both assumptions. The approach is based on Symbolic Regression via Genetic Programming and allows first the extraction of the most statistically reliable models from the available experimental data in the ITPA database. Non linear fitting is then applied to the mathematical expressions found by Symbolic regression. The obtained scaling laws are compared with the traditional scalings in power law form.

  20. Observation of floating potential asymmetry in the edge plasma of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Edge plasma properties in a tokamak is an interesting subject of study from the view point of confinement and stability of tokamak plasma. The edge plasma of SINP-tokamak has been investigated using specially designed Langmuir probes. We have observed a poloidal asymmetry of floating potentials, particularly ...

  1. Aerofractures in Confined Granular Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksen, Fredrik K.; Turkaya, Semih; Toussaint, Renaud; Måløy, Knut J.; Flekkøy, Eirik G.

    2015-04-01

    We will present the optical analysis of experimental aerofractures in confined granular media. The study of this generic process may have applications in industries involving hydraulic fracturing of tight rocks, safe construction of dams, tunnels and mines, and in earth science where phenomena such as mud volcanoes and sand injectites are results of subsurface sediment displacements driven by fluid overpressure. It is also interesting to increase the understanding the flow instability itself, and how the fluid flow impacts the solid surrounding fractures and in the rest of the sample. Such processes where previously studied numerically [Niebling 2012a, Niebling 2012b] or in circular geometries. We will here explore experimentally linear geometries. We study the fracturing patterns that form when air flows into a dense, non-cohesive porous medium confined in a Hele-Shaw cell - i.e. into a packing of dry 80 micron beads placed between two glass plates separated by ~1mm. The cell is rectangular and fitted with a semi-permeable boundary to the atmosphere - blocking beads but not air - on one short edge, while the other three edges are impermeable. The porous medium is packed inside the cell between the semi-permeable boundary and an empty volume at the sealed side where the air pressure can be set and kept at a constant overpressure (1-2bar). Thus, for the air trapped inside the cell to release the overpressure it has to move through the solid. At high enough overpressures the air flow deforms the solid and increase permeability in some regions along the air-solid interface, which results in unstable flow and aerofracturing. Aerofractures are thought to be an analogue to hydrofractures, and an advantage of performing aerofracturing experiments in a Hele-Shaw cell is that the fracturing process can easily be observed in the lab. Our experiments are recorded with a high speed camera with a framerate of 1000 frames per second. In the analysis, by using various image

  2. Review on Recent Developments in Laser Driven Inertial Fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ghoranneviss

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Discovery of the laser in 1960 hopes were based on using its very high energy concentration within very short pulses of time and very small volumes for energy generation from nuclear fusion as “Inertial Fusion Energy” (IFE, parallel to the efforts to produce energy from “Magnetic Confinement Fusion” (MCF, by burning deuterium-tritium (DT in high temperature plasmas to helium. Over the years the fusion gain was increased by a number of magnitudes and has reached nearly break-even after numerous difficulties in physics and technology had been solved. After briefly summarizing laser driven IFE, we report how the recently developed lasers with pulses of petawatt power and picosecond duration may open new alternatives for IFE with the goal to possibly ignite solid or low compressed DT fuel thereby creating a simplified reactor scheme. Ultrahigh acceleration of plasma blocks after irradiation of picosecond (PS laser pulses of around terawatt (TW power in the range of 1020 cm/s2 was discovered by Sauerbrey (1996 as measured by Doppler effect where the laser intensity was up to about 1018 W/cm2. This is several orders of magnitude higher than acceleration by irradiation based on thermal interaction of lasers has produced.

  3. An exact solution for nonlinear electron heat conduction equation in thermal wave propagation from an instantaneous DT plane source

    CERN Document Server

    Pourtalari, A Mohammadian

    2011-01-01

    A one-dimensional nonlinear electron heat conduction equation is used to investigate the propagation of thermal wave in the solid density deuterium-tritium (DT) plasmas, which occurs when a giant laser pulse impinges onto a DT solid target. A realistic finite temperature for the electrons at the initial instant(t =0)based on Mayer-McGrath-Steele similarity solution [1] is presented. This solution corresponds to the physical problem of rapid heating of a boundary layer of material which the energy is released in a finite initial thickness. Our computations are particularly useful for the understanding of the electron temperature space profile at the initial instant(t =0), electron and ion temperature space profiles at different instants of time(t >0), maximum ion temperature, heat flux, and heating domain in the DT plasmas of inertial confinement fusion. Our results examined in view of the important effects. One of these effects is the quantum correction of the collision frequency of electrons with ions. The o...

  4. Hard x-ray (>100 keV) imager to measure hot electron preheat for indirectly driven capsule implosions on the NIF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Döppner, T; Dewald, E L; Divol, L; Thomas, C A; Burns, S; Celliers, P M; Izumi, N; Kline, J L; LaCaille, G; McNaney, J M; Prasad, R R; Robey, H F; Glenzer, S H; Landen, O L

    2012-10-01

    We have fielded a hard x-ray (>100 keV) imager with high aspect ratio pinholes to measure the spatially resolved bremsstrahlung emission from energetic electrons slowing in a plastic ablator shell during indirectly driven implosions at the National Ignition Facility. These electrons are generated in laser plasma interactions and are a source of preheat to the deuterium-tritium fuel. First measurements show that hot electron preheat does not limit obtaining the fuel areal densities required for ignition and burn.

  5. Neutron streaming studies along JET shielding penetrations

    OpenAIRE

    Stamatelatos Ion E.; Vasilopoulou Theodora; Batistoni Paola; Obryk Barbara; Popovichev Sergey; Naish Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    Neutronic benchmark experiments are carried out at JET aiming to assess the neutronic codes and data used in ITER analysis. Among other activities, experiments are performed in order to validate neutron streaming simulations along long penetrations in the JET shielding configuration. In this work, neutron streaming calculations along the JET personnel entrance maze are presented. Simulations were performed using the MCNP code for Deuterium-Deuterium and Deuterium- Tritium plasma sources. The ...

  6. Effect of electric fields and fluctuations on confinement in a bumpy torus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiroe, S.; Glowienka, J.C.; Hillis, D.L.; Wilgen, J.B.; Chen, G.L.; Cobble, J.A.; El-Nadi, A.M.; Goyer, J.R.; Solensten, L.; Casson, W.H.

    1986-06-01

    In order to understand the relationships between confinement and space potential (electric field) and between confinement and density fluctuations, plasma parameters in the ELMO Bumpy Torus Scale (EBT-S) have been measured systematically for a wide range of operating conditions. Present EBT plasma parameters do not show a strong dependence on the potential profile, but rather exhibit a correlation with the fluctuations. The plasma pressure profile is found to be consistent with the profile anticipated on the basis of the flute stability criterion for a marginally stable plasma. For a heating power of 100 kW, the stored energy density is found to be restricted to the range between 4.5 x 10/sup 13/ eV-cm/sup -3/ and 7 x 10/sup 13/ eV-cm/sup -3/. The lower limit remains constant regardless of heating power and pertains to plasmas lacking an equilibrium and/or stability. The upper limit increases with heating power and is found to result from the onset of instabilities. In between the two limits is a plasma that is in an equilibrium state and is marginally stable. Operational trajectories exist that take the EBT plasma from one limit to the other.

  7. Absence of reptation in highly confined polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, S; Basu, J K

    2009-06-14

    We present results of mechanical stress relaxation measurements on polymers confined at the air-water interface in the form of a monolayer. Systematic measurements allow, to our knowledge, for the first time, observation of the scaling of the stress relaxation time of the highly confined polymers as a function of both surface concentration and molecular weight. The observed scaling is found to be very close to that expected for motion of unentangled polymer solutions with hydrodynamic interactions. Our experimental observations thus clearly rule out the possibility of entanglement and hence reptation as a mode of relaxation in such highly confined polymeric systems.

  8. Kinetics of Phase Separation in Confined Geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puri, Sanjay

    We review analytical and numerical results for the kinetics of phase separation in confined geometries. It is often the case that a confining surface has a preferential attraction for one of the components of a segregating mixture. The equilibrium surface morphology is either partially wet or completely wet, depending on the strength of the surface potential. The dynamical interplay of wetting and phase separation is referred to as surface-directed spinodal decomposition (SDSD), and is of considerable technological importance. We discuss the modeling of SDSD at both the microscopic and coarse-grained levels. We also present results for SDSD in both semi-infinite and confined geometries.

  9. Charged particle traps physics and techniques of charged particle field confinement

    CERN Document Server

    Major, Fouad G; Werth, Günther

    2005-01-01

    This book provides an introduction and guide to modern advances in charged particle (and antiparticle) confinement by electromagnetic fields. Confinement in different trap geometries, the influence of trap imperfections, classical and quantum mechanical description of the trapped particle motion, different methods of ion cooling to low temperatures, and non-neutral plasma properties (including Coulomb crystals) are the main subjects. They form the basis of such applications of charged particle traps as high-resolution optical and microwave spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, atomic clocks, and, potentially, quantum computing

  10. Controlled fusion and plasma physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    This document presents the several speeches that took place during the 22nd European Physical Society conference on Controlled Fusion and Plasma Physics in Bournemouth, UK, between the 2nd and 7th July 1995. The talks deal with new experiments carried out on several tokamaks, particularly Tore Supra, concerning plasma confinement and fusion. Some information on specific fusion devices or tokamak devices is provided, as well as results of experiments concerning plasma instability. Separate abstracts were prepared for all the 31 papers in this volume. (TEC).

  11. BOOK REVIEW: Advanced Diagnostics for Magnetic and Inertial Confinement Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stott, PE; Wootton, A.; Gorini, G.; Sindoni, E.; Batani, D.

    2003-02-01

    This book is a collection of papers, written by specialists in the field, on advanced topics of nuclear fusion diagnostics. The 78 contributions were originally presented at the International Conference on Advanced Diagnostics for Magnetic and Inertial Fusion held at Villa Monastero, Italy in September 2001. Both magnetically confined and inertial fusion programmes are quite extensively covered, with more emphasis given to the former scheme. In the case of magnetic confinement, since the present international programme is strongly focused on next-step devices, particular attention is devoted to techniques and technologies viable in an environment with strong neutron fluxes. Indeed, in the first section, the various methods are considered in the perspective of performing the measurements of the relevant parameters in conditions approaching a burning plasma, mainly in the Tokamak configuration. The most demanding requirements, like the implications of the use of tritium and radiation resistance, are reviewed and the most challenging open issues, which require further research and development, are also clearly mentioned. The following three sections are devoted to some of the most recent developments in plasma diagnostics, which are grouped according to the following classification: `Neutron and particle diagnostics', `Optical and x-ray diagnostics' and `Interferometry, Polarimetry and Thomson Scattering'. In these chapters, several of the most recent results are given, covering measurements taken on the most advanced experiments around the world. Here the developments described deal more with the requirements imposed by the physical issues to be studied. They are therefore more focused on the approaches adopted to increase the spatial and time resolution of the diagnostics, on some methods to improve the characterisation of the turbulence and on fast particles. Good coverage is given to neutron diagnostics, which are assuming increasing relevance as the plasma

  12. Demonstration of a time-integrated short line of sight neutron imaging system for inertial confinement fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, R; Christensen, K; Danly, C; Fatherley, V E; Fittinghoff, D; Grim, G P; Izumi, N; Jedlovec, D; Merrill, F E; Skulina, K; Volegov, P; Wilde, C

    2015-12-01

    The Neutron Imaging System (NIS) is an important diagnostic for understanding implosions of deuterium-tritium capsules at the National Ignition Facility. While the detectors for the existing system must be positioned 28 m from the source to produce sufficient imaging magnification and resolution, recent testing of a new short line of sight neutron imaging system has shown sufficient resolution to allow reconstruction of the source image with quality similar to that of the existing NIS on a 11.6 m line of sight. The new system used the existing pinhole aperture array and a stack of detectors composed of 2 mm thick high-density polyethylene converter material followed by an image plate. In these detectors, neutrons enter the converter material and interact with protons, which recoil and deposit energy within the thin active layer of the image plate through ionization losses. The described system produces time-integrated images for all neutron energies passing through the pinhole. We present details of the measurement scheme for this novel technique to produce energy-integrated neutron images as well as source reconstruction results from recent experiments at NIF.

  13. Electronic Quantum Confinement in Cylindrical Potential Well

    CERN Document Server

    Baltenkov, A S

    2016-01-01

    The effects of quantum confinement on the momentum distribution of electrons confined within a cylindrical potential well have been analyzed. The motivation is to understand specific features of the momentum distribution of electrons when the electron behavior is completely controlled by the parameters of a non-isotropic potential cavity. It is shown that studying the solutions of the wave equation for an electron confined in a cylindrical potential well offers the possibility to analyze the confinement behavior of an electron executing one- or two-dimensional motion in the three-dimensional space within the framework of the same mathematical model. Some low-lying electronic states with different symmetries have been considered and the corresponding wave functions have been calculated; the behavior of their nodes and their peak positions with respect to the parameters of the cylindrical well has been analyzed. Additionally, the momentum distributions of electrons in these states have been calculated. The limi...

  14. Anisotropic hydrodynamic function of dense confined colloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nygârd, Kim; Buitenhuis, Johan; Kagias, Matias; Jefimovs, Konstantins; Zontone, Federico; Chushkin, Yuriy

    2017-06-01

    Dense colloidal dispersions exhibit complex wave-vector-dependent diffusion, which is controlled by both direct particle interactions and indirect nonadditive hydrodynamic interactions mediated by the solvent. In bulk the hydrodynamic interactions are probed routinely, but in confined geometries their studies have been hitherto hindered by additional complications due to confining walls. Here we solve this issue by combining high-energy x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy and small-angle x-ray-scattering experiments on colloid-filled microfluidic channels to yield the confined fluid's hydrodynamic function in the short-time limit. Most importantly, we find the confined fluid to exhibit a strongly anisotropic hydrodynamic function, similar to its anisotropic structure factor. This observation is important in order to guide future theoretical research.

  15. Reorientational dynamics of water confined in zeolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogarty, Aoife C; Coudert, François-Xavier; Boutin, Anne; Laage, Damien

    2014-02-24

    We present a detailed molecular-dynamics study of water reorientation and hydrogen-bond dynamics in a strong confinement situation, within the narrow pores of an all-silica Linde type A (LTA) zeolite. Two water loadings of the zeolite are compared with the bulk case. Water dynamics are retarded in this extreme hydrophobic confinement and the slowdown is more pronounced at higher water loading. We show that water reorientation proceeds mainly by large-amplitude angular jumps, whose mechanism is similar to that determined in the bulk. The slowdown upon hydrophobic confinement arises predominantly from an excluded-volume effect on the large fraction of water molecules lying at the interface with the zeolite matrix, with an additional minor contribution coming from a structuring effect induced by the confinement. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Group Velocity Engineering of Confined Ultrafast Magnons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y.-J.; Zakeri, Kh.; Ernst, A.; Qin, H. J.; Meng, Y.; Kirschner, J.

    2017-12-01

    Quantum confinement permits the existence of multiple terahertz magnon modes in atomically engineered ultrathin magnetic films and multilayers. By means of spin-polarized high-resolution electron energy-loss spectroscopy, we report on the direct experimental detection of all exchange-dominated terahertz confined magnon modes in a 3 ML Co film. We demonstrate that, by tuning the structural and magnetic properties of the Co film, through its epitaxial growth on different surfaces, e.g., Ir(001), Cu(001), and Pt(111), one can achieve entirely different in-plane magnon dispersions, characterized by positive and negative group velocities. Our first-principles calculations show that spin-dependent many-body correlation effects in Co films play an important role in the determination of the energies of confined magnon modes. Our results suggest a pathway towards the engineering of the group velocity of confined ultrafast magnons.

  17. Frost damage of concrete subject to confinement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasholt, Marianne Tange

    2016-01-01

    When internal frost damage is observed in real concrete structures, the usual pattern is cracks with a preferred orientation parallel to the exposed surface. When exposing concrete with poor frost resistance to a standardised freeze/thaw test in the laboratory, the orientations of the resulting...... cracks are more or less random. The present study is an experimental study, which aims at investigating the influence of confinement during freeze/thaw action on the developed crack pattern. Confinement is established by mounting hose clamps on cylindrical test specimens, using similar test specimens...... without hose clamps as reference. The results show that confinement can change the outcome of a freeze/thaw test as regards extent of internal cracking, crack orientations, and amount of surface scaling. Thus it seems likely that the difference in confinement (and therefore also in stress state) can...

  18. Monte Carlo simulations of confined polymer systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliet, Johannes Henricus van

    1991-01-01

    This thesis considers confined polymer systems. These systems are of considerable interest, e.g., thin polymer films, chromotography of polymer solutions, drag reduction, enhanced oil recovery, stabilization of colloidal dispersions, lubrication and biolubrication. The method used to study these

  19. The Brunt-Vaisala frequency of rotating tokamak plasmas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haverkort, J. W.; de Blank, H. J.; Koren, B.

    2012-01-01

    The continuous spectrum of analytical toroidally rotating magnetically confined plasma equilibria is investigated analytically and numerically. In the presence of purely toroidal flow, the ideal magnetohydrodynamic equations leave the freedom to specify which thermodynamic quantity is constant on

  20. Aspects of Confinement in Low Dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaseen, M. J.; Tsvelik, A. M.

    We briefly review some examples of confinement which arise in condensed matter physics. We focus on two instructive cases: the off-critical Ising model in a magnetic field, and an array of weakly coupled (extended) Hubbard chains in the Wigner crystal phase. In the appropriate regime, the elementary excitations in these 1 + 1 and quasi-one-dimensional systems are confined into `mesons'. Although the models are generically non-integrable, quantum mechanics and form-factor techniques yield valuable information.

  1. Confined Space Evaluation Student Manual, #19613

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilmot, David Ezekiel [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2016-08-29

    Many workplaces contain spaces that are considered to be “confined” because their configuration hinders the activities of employees who must enter into, work in, and exit from them. In general, the permit-required confined spaces (PRCSs) Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) standard requires that Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) evaluate the workplace to determine if any spaces are PRCSs. The standard specifies strict procedures for the evaluation and atmospheric testing of a space before and during an entry by workers. The OSHA PRCS standard provides for alternative (less stringent than full-permit) entry procedures in cases where the only hazard in a space is atmospheric and the hazard can be controlled by forced air. At LANL, all confined spaces or potential confined spaces on LANL-owned or -operated property must be identified and evaluated by a confined space evaluator accompanied by a knowledgeable person. This course provides the information needed by confined space evaluators to make judgements about whether a space is a confined space, and if so, whether the space will require a permit for entry.

  2. Methods for two-dimensional cell confinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Berre, Maël; Zlotek-Zlotkiewicz, Ewa; Bonazzi, Daria; Lautenschlaeger, Franziska; Piel, Matthieu

    2014-01-01

    Protocols described in this chapter relate to a method to dynamically confine cells in two dimensions with various microenvironments. It can be used to impose on cells a given height, with an accuracy of less than 100 nm on large surfaces (cm(2)). The method is based on the gentle application of a modified glass coverslip onto a standard cell culture. Depending on the preparation, this confinement slide can impose on the cells a given geometry but also an environment of controlled stiffness, controlled adhesion, or a more complex environment. An advantage is that the method is compatible with most optical microscopy technologies and molecular biology protocols allowing advanced analysis of confined cells. In this chapter, we first explain the principle and issues of using these slides to confine cells in a controlled geometry and describe their fabrication. Finally, we discuss how the nature of the confinement slide can vary and provide an alternative method to confine cells with gels of controlled rigidity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Laser-plasma interactions and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Neely, David; Bingham, Robert; Jaroszynski, Dino

    2013-01-01

    Laser-Plasma Interactions and Applications covers the fundamental and applied aspects of high power laser-plasma physics. With an internationally renowned team of authors, the book broadens the knowledge of young researchers working in high power laser-plasma science by providing them with a thorough pedagogical grounding in the interaction of laser radiation with matter, laser-plasma accelerators, and inertial confinement fusion. The text is organised such that the theoretical foundations of the subject are discussed first, in Part I. In Part II, topics in the area of high energy density physics are covered. Parts III and IV deal with the applications to inertial confinement fusion and as a driver of particle and radiation sources, respectively. Finally, Part V describes the principle diagnostic, targetry, and computational approaches used in the field. This book is designed to give students a thorough foundation in the fundamental physics of laser-plasma interactions. It will also provide readers with knowl...

  4. Limits on rock strength under high confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renshaw, Carl E.; Schulson, Erland M.

    2007-06-01

    Understanding of deep earthquake source mechanisms requires knowledge of failure processes active under high confinement. Under low confinement the compressive strength of rock is well known to be limited by frictional sliding along stress-concentrating flaws. Under higher confinement strength is usually assumed limited by power-law creep associated with the movement of dislocations. In a review of existing experimental data, we find that when the confinement is high enough to suppress frictional sliding, rock strength increases as a power-law function only up to a critical normalized strain rate. Within the regime where frictional sliding is suppressed and the normalized strain rate is below the critical rate, both globally distributed ductile flow and localized brittle-like failure are observed. When frictional sliding is suppressed and the normalized strain rate is above the critical rate, failure is always localized in a brittle-like manner at a stress that is independent of the degree of confinement. Within the high-confinement, high-strain rate regime, the similarity in normalized failure strengths across a variety of rock types and minerals precludes both transformational faulting and dehydration embrittlement as strength-limiting mechanisms. The magnitude of the normalized failure strength corresponding to the transition to the high-confinement, high-strain rate regime and the observed weak dependence of failure strength on strain rate within this regime are consistent with a localized Peierls-type strength-limiting mechanism. At the highest strain rates the normalized strengths approach the theoretical limit for crystalline materials. Near-theoretical strengths have previously been observed only in nano- and micro-scale regions of materials that are effectively defect-free. Results are summarized in a new deformation mechanism map revealing that when confinement and strain rate are sufficient, strengths approaching the theoretical limit can be achieved in

  5. Topology of polymer chains under nanoscale confinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satarifard, Vahid; Heidari, Maziar; Mashaghi, Samaneh; Tans, Sander J; Ejtehadi, Mohammad Reza; Mashaghi, Alireza

    2017-08-24

    Spatial confinement limits the conformational space accessible to biomolecules but the implications for bimolecular topology are not yet known. Folded linear biopolymers can be seen as molecular circuits formed by intramolecular contacts. The pairwise arrangement of intra-chain contacts can be categorized as parallel, series or cross, and has been identified as a topological property. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we determine the contact order distributions and topological circuits of short semi-flexible linear and ring polymer chains with a persistence length of lp under a spherical confinement of radius Rc. At low values of lp/Rc, the entropy of the linear chain leads to the formation of independent contacts along the chain and accordingly, increases the fraction of series topology with respect to other topologies. However, at high lp/Rc, the fraction of cross and parallel topologies are enhanced in the chain topological circuits with cross becoming predominant. At an intermediate confining regime, we identify a critical value of lp/Rc, at which all topological states have equal probability. Confinement thus equalizes the probability of more complex cross and parallel topologies to the level of the more simple, non-cooperative series topology. Moreover, our topology analysis reveals distinct behaviours for ring- and linear polymers under weak confinement; however, we find no difference between ring- and linear polymers under strong confinement. Under weak confinement, ring polymers adopt parallel and series topologies with equal likelihood, while linear polymers show a higher tendency for series arrangement. The radial distribution analysis of the topology reveals a non-uniform effect of confinement on the topology of polymer chains, thereby imposing more pronounced effects on the core region than on the confinement surface. Additionally, our results reveal that over a wide range of confining radii, loops arranged in parallel and cross topologies have

  6. Operational characteristics of the high flux plasma generator Magnum-PSI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eck, H. J. N.; Abrams, T.; van den Berg, M. A.; Brons, S.; van Eden, G. G.; Jaworski, M. A.; Kaita, R.; van der Meiden, H. J.; Morgan, T. W.; van de Pol, M.J.; Scholten, J.; Smeets, P. H. M.; De Temmerman, G.; de Vries, P. C.; van Emmichoven, P. A. Zeijlma

    2014-01-01

    Abstract In Magnum-PSI (MAgnetized plasma Generator and \\{NUMerical\\} modeling for Plasma Surface Interactions), the high density, low temperature plasma of a wall stabilized dc cascaded arc is confined to a magnetized plasma beam by a quasi-steady state axial magnetic field up to 1.3 T. It

  7. Confinement in Polyakov gauge and the QCD phase diagram

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marhauser, Marc Florian

    2009-10-14

    We investigate Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) in the framework of the functional renormalisation group (fRG). Thereby describing the phase transition from the phase with confined quarks into the quark-gluon-plasma phase. We focus on a physical gauge in which the mechanism driving the phase transition is discernible. We find results compatible with lattice QCD data, as well as with functional methods applied in different gauges. The phase transition is of the expected order and we computed critical exponents. Extensions of the model are discussed. When investigating the QCD phase diagram, we compute the effects of dynamical quarks at finite density on the running of the gauge coupling. Additionally, we calculate how these affect the deconfinement phase transition, also, dynamical quarks allow for the inclusion of a finite chemical potential. Concluding the investigation of the phase diagram, we establish a relation between confinement and chiral symmetry breaking, which is tied to the dynamical generation of hadron masses. In the investigations, we often encounter scale dependent fields. We investigate a footing on which these can be dealt with in a uniform way. (orig.)

  8. IEEE conference record -- Abstracts: 1996 IEEE international conference on plasma science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    This meeting covered the following topics: space plasmas; non-equilibrium plasma processing; computer simulation of vacuum power tubes; vacuum microelectronics; microwave systems; basic phenomena in partially ionized gases -- gaseous electronics, electrical discharges; ball lightning/spherical plasma configuration; plasma diagnostics; plasmas for lighting; dense plasma focus; intense ion and electron beams; plasma, ion, and electron sources; flat panel displays; fast z-pinches and x-ray lasers; environmental/energy issues in plasma science; thermal plasma processing; computational plasma physics; magnetic confinement fusion; microwave-plasma interactions; space plasma engineering; EM and ETH launchers; fast wave devices; intense beam microwaves; slow wave devices; space plasma measurements; basic phenomena in fully ionized plasma -- waves, instabilities, plasma theory, etc; plasma closing switches; fast opening switches; and laser-produced plasma. Separate abstracts were prepared for most papers in this conference.

  9. Comparison of edge fluctuations in toroidal confinement devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsui, H.Y.W.; Lin, H.; Meier, M.; Ritz, C.; Wooton, A.J. (Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States). Fusion Research Center)

    1991-01-01

    Tokamak, Stellarator and RFP confinement systems have similar topology but differ markedly in their equilibrium configurations. Experiments to date show that the particles and energy losses in these systems are higher than those predicted from (neo)classical theories. The anomalously high particle and energy fluxes are often attributed to turbulence-induced transport. Although experimental results indicated that fluctuation-induced fluxes are significant in the edge plasma of these systems, it is not known whether the driving mechanisms or the origins of the turbulence are the same. Here, we compare the edge fluctuations and their associated transport by applying similar Langmuir probe diagnostics and analysis techniques to discharges in TEXT Tokamak, ATF Stellarator and ZT40M RFP. (author) 5 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Strong coupling and degeneracy effects in inertial confinement fusion implosions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, S X; Militzer, B; Goncharov, V N; Skupsky, S

    2010-06-11

    Accurate knowledge about the equation of state (EOS) of deuterium is critical to inertial confinement fusion (ICF). Low-adiabat ICF implosions routinely access strongly coupled and degenerate plasma conditions. Using the path integral Monte Carlo method, we have derived a first-principles EOS (FPEOS) table of deuterium. It is the first ab initio EOS table which completely covers typical ICF implosion trajectory in the density and temperature ranges of ρ=0.002-1596  g/cm3 and T=1.35  eV-5.5  keV. Discrepancies in internal energy and pressure have been found in strongly coupled and degenerate regimes with respect to SESAME EOS. Hydrodynamics simulations of cryogenic ICF implosions using the FPEOS table have indicated significant differences in peak density, areal density (ρR), and neutron yield relative to SESAME simulations.

  11. A concept to collect neutron and x-ray images on the same line of sight at NIF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrill, F E; Danly, C R; Izumi, N; Jedlovec, D; Fittinghoff, D N; Grim, G P; Pak, A; Park, H-S; Volegov, P L; Wilde, C H

    2014-11-01

    Neutron and x-ray images are collected at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to measure the size and shape of inertial confinement fusion implosions. The x-ray images provide a measure of the size and shape of the hot region of the deuterium-tritium fuel while the neutron images provide a measure of the size and shape of the burning plasma. Although these two types of images are collected simultaneously, they are not collected along the same line of sight (LOS). One 14 MeV neutron image is collected on the NIF equator, and two x-ray images are collected along the polar axis and nearly perpendicular to the neutron imaging line of sight on the equator. Both measurements use pinhole apertures to form the images, but existing x-ray imaging provides time-resolved measurements while the neutron images are time-integrated. Detailed comparisons of the x-ray and neutron images can provide information on the fuel assembly, but these studies have been limited because the implosions are not azimuthally symmetric and the images are collected along different LOS. We have developed a conceptual design of a time-integrated x-ray imaging system that could be added to the existing neutron imaging LOS. This new system would allow these detailed studies, providing important information on the fuel assembly of future implosions. Here we present this conceptual design and the expected performance characteristics.

  12. Contribution to modelization and simulation of the ablative-like Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities for ICF; Contribution a la modelisation et a la simulation des instabilites de type Rayleigh-Taylor ablatif pour la FCI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egly, H

    2007-10-15

    This thesis deals with the dynamics of accelerated ablative front spreading in Inertial Confinement Fusion experiments. ICF is designed for the implosion of a deuterium-tritium spherical target. The outer shell, the ablator, is irradiated providing a high level pressure inside the target. During this first stage, the ablation front propagating inwards is perturbed by hydrodynamics instabilities, which can prevent the fusion reaction in the decelerated stage. We propose here a study on Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities during ablation process, in the two dimensional case. In order to obtain a numerical solution, we perform an asymptotic analysis in the limit of a high temperature ratio, between the remaining cold ablator and the hot ablated plasma. This study is divided in two steps. First, the thermo-diffusive part of the set of equations is approximated by a Hele-Shaw model, which is then perturbed by the hydrodynamics part. Using a vortex method, we have to solve the advection of a vortical sheet moving with the ablation front. We compute the numerical solution on an Eulerian mesh coupled with a marker method. The thermal part is computed by implementing the Fat Boundary Method, recently developed. The hydrodynamic part is obtained from a Finite Volume scheme. (author)

  13. Confined catalysis under two-dimensional materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haobo; Xiao, Jianping; Bao, Xinhe

    2017-01-01

    Confined microenvironments formed in heterogeneous catalysts have recently been recognized as equally important as catalytically active sites. Understanding the fundamentals of confined catalysis has become an important topic in heterogeneous catalysis. Well-defined 2D space between a catalyst surface and a 2D material overlayer provides an ideal microenvironment to explore the confined catalysis experimentally and theoretically. Using density functional theory calculations, we reveal that adsorption of atoms and molecules on a Pt(111) surface always has been weakened under monolayer graphene, which is attributed to the geometric constraint and confinement field in the 2D space between the graphene overlayer and the Pt(111) surface. A similar result has been found on Pt(110) and Pt(100) surfaces covered with graphene. The microenvironment created by coating a catalyst surface with 2D material overlayer can be used to modulate surface reactivity, which has been illustrated by optimizing oxygen reduction reaction activity on Pt(111) covered by various 2D materials. We demonstrate a concept of confined catalysis under 2D cover based on a weak van der Waals interaction between 2D material overlayers and underlying catalyst surfaces. PMID:28533413

  14. Spin quantum plasmas - new aspects of collective dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Marklund, M

    2008-01-01

    Quantum plasmas is a rapidly expanding field of research, with applications ranging from nanoelectronics, nanoscale devices and ultracold plasmas, to inertial confinement fusion and astrophysics. Here we give a short systematic overview of quantum plasmas. In particular, we analyze the collective effects due to spin using fluid models. The introduction of an intrinsic magnetization due to the plasma electron (or positron) spin properties in the magnetohydrodynamic limit is discussed. Finally, a discussion of the theory and examples of applications is given.

  15. Study of the confinement properties in a reversed-field pinch with mode rotation and gas fuelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cecconello, M.; Malmberg, J.-A.; Drake, J.R. [Department of Fusion Plasma Physics, Alfven Laboratory, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); Nielsen, P.; Pasqualotto, R. [Consorzio RFX, Padova (Italy)

    2002-08-01

    An extensive investigation of the global confinement properties in different operating scenarios in the rebuilt EXTRAP T2R reversed-field pinch (RFP) experiment is reported here. In particular, the role of a fast gas puff valve system, used to control plasma density, on confinement is studied. Without gas puffing, the electron density decays below 0.5x10{sup 19} m{sup -3}. The poloidal beta varies between 5% and 15%, decreasing at large I/N. The energy confinement time ranges from 70 to 225 {mu}s. With gas puffing, the density is sustained at n{sub e}{approx}1.5x10{sup 19} m{sup -3}. However, a general slight deterioration of the plasma performances is observed for the same values of I/N: the plasma becomes cooler and more radiative. The poloidal beta is comparable to that in the scenarios without puff but the energy confinement time drops ranging from 60 to 130 {mu}s. The fluctuation level and the energy confinement time have been found to scale with the Lundquist number as S{sup -0.05{+-}}{sup 0.07} and S{sup 0.5{+-}}{sup 0.1}, respectively. Mode rotation is typical for all the discharges and rotation velocity is observed to increase with increasing electron diamagnetic velocity. (author)

  16. Stiffness and Confinement Ratios of SMA Wire Jackets for Confining Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Eunsoo; Kim, Dong Joo; Youn, Heejung

    2014-07-01

    This article discusses the effects of the stiffness and confinement ratios of shape memory alloy (SMA) wire jackets on the behavior of confined concrete. SMA wire jackets are an effective confining material to improve concrete behavior; for example, by increasing peak strength and failure strain. The stiffness and confinement ratios of fiber-reinforced polymer jackets have been extensively discussed and their effects are well known. However, assessment of the stiffness and confinement ratios of SMA wire jackets has not previously been conducted. In this study, we investigate the effects of the stiffness and confinement ratios of steel jackets, and then compare the results with those of SMA wire jackets. In general, the stiffness ratios of SMA wire jackets are relatively smaller than those of steel jackets, and most of them have lower stiffness ratios because the Young's moduli of the SMAs are relatively small. The active confining pressure of the SMA wires does not improve the lower stiffness-ratio effect since the amount of active confining pressure is not sufficiently large.

  17. High-field penning-malmberg trap: confinement properties and use in positron accumulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartley, J.H.

    1997-09-01

    This dissertation reports on the development of the 60 kG cryogenic positron trap at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and compares the trap`s confinement properties with other nonneutral plasma devices. The device is designed for the accumulation of up to 2{times}10{sup 9} positrons from a linear-accelerator source. This positron plasma could then be used in Bhabha scattering experiments. Initial efforts at time-of-flight accumulation of positrons from the accelerator show rapid ({approximately}100 ms) deconfinement, inconsistent with the long electron lifetimes. Several possible deconfinement mechanisms have been explored, including annihilation on residual gas, injection heating, rf noise from the accelerator, magnet field curvature, and stray fields. Detailed studies of electron confinement demonstrate that the empirical scaling law used to design the trap cannot be extrapolated into the parameter regime of this device. Several possible methods for overcoming these limitations are presented.

  18. Spherical ion oscillations in a positive polarity gridded inertial-electrostatic confinement device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandara, R.; Khachan, J.

    2013-07-01

    A pulsed, positive polarity gridded inertial electrostatic confinement device has been investigated experimentally, using a differential emissive probe and potential traces as primary diagnostics. Large amplitude oscillations in the plasma current and plasma potential were observed within a microsecond of the discharge onset, which are indicative of coherent ion oscillations about a temporarily confined excess of recirculating electron space charge. The magnitude of the depth of the potential well in the established virtual cathode was determined using a differential emissive Langmuir probe, which correlated well to the potential well inferred from the ion oscillation frequency for both hydrogen and argon experiments. It was found that the timescale for ion oscillation dispersion is strongly dependent on the neutral gas density, and weakly dependent on the peak anode voltage. The cessation of the oscillations was found to be due to charge exchange processes converting ions to high velocity neutrals, causing the abrupt de-coherence of the oscillations through an avalanche dispersion in phase space.

  19. Spherical ion oscillations in a positive polarity gridded inertial-electrostatic confinement device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bandara, R.; Khachan, J. [Plasma Physics, School of Physics, University of Sydney, Camperdown, New South Wales 2006 (Australia)

    2013-07-15

    A pulsed, positive polarity gridded inertial electrostatic confinement device has been investigated experimentally, using a differential emissive probe and potential traces as primary diagnostics. Large amplitude oscillations in the plasma current and plasma potential were observed within a microsecond of the discharge onset, which are indicative of coherent ion oscillations about a temporarily confined excess of recirculating electron space charge. The magnitude of the depth of the potential well in the established virtual cathode was determined using a differential emissive Langmuir probe, which correlated well to the potential well inferred from the ion oscillation frequency for both hydrogen and argon experiments. It was found that the timescale for ion oscillation dispersion is strongly dependent on the neutral gas density, and weakly dependent on the peak anode voltage. The cessation of the oscillations was found to be due to charge exchange processes converting ions to high velocity neutrals, causing the abrupt de-coherence of the oscillations through an avalanche dispersion in phase space.

  20. Increased confinement and beta by inductive poloidal current drive in the RFP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarff, J.S.; Lanier, N.E.; Prager, S.C.; Stoneking, M.R.

    1996-10-01

    Progress in understanding magnetic-fluctuation-induced transport in the reversed field pinch (RFP) has led to the idea of current profile control to reduce fluctuations and transport. With the addition of inductive poloidal current drive in the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST), the magnetic fluctuation amplitude is halved, leading to a four- to five-fold increase in the energy confinement time to {tau}{sub E}{approximately}5 ms as a result of both decreased plasma resistance and increased stored thermal energy. The record low fluctuation amplitude coincides with a record high electron temperature of {approximately}600 eV (for MST), and beta {beta} = 2{mu}{sub 0}

    / B(a){sup 2} increases from 6% to 8% compared with conventional MST RFP plasmas. Other improvements include increased particle confinement and impurity reduction. 19 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Inhomogeneous dynamics in confined water nanodroplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dokter, Adriaan M.; Woutersen, Sander; Bakker, Huib J.

    2006-01-01

    The effect of confinement on the dynamical properties of liquid water was studied by mid-infrared ultrafast pump–probe spectroscopy on HDO:D2O in reverse micelles. By preparing water-containing reverse micelles of different well defined sizes, we varied the degree of geometric confinement in water nanodroplets with radii ranging from 0.2 to 4.5 nm. We find that water molecules located near the interface confining the droplet exhibit slower vibrational energy relaxation and have a different spectral absorption than those located in the droplet core. As a result, we can measure the orientational dynamics of these different types of water with high selectivity. We observe that the water molecules in the core show similar orientational dynamics as bulk water and that the water layer solvating the interface is highly immobile. PMID:17028175

  2. Jet characteristics in confined swirling flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, R. M. C.; Ahmed, S. A.; Mongia, H. C.

    1985-01-01

    Jets in confined swirling flow are investigated in a facility where the swirling flow in the tube is produced by a vane-type swirler. The jet is located centrally in the swirler, and the diameter ratio of the tube to the jet is about 14. Both the jet and the swirling flow are fully turbulent. Results show that the confined jet is highly dissipative in nature. Consequently, the flow in the tube does not resemble a free jet with axial pressure gradient. The presence of swirl increases the rate of dissipation and the jet decays even faster. A fairly isotropic turbulence field is observed in the confined swirling flow. However, the introduction of the jet does not significantly affect this behavior, and near isotropy of the turbulence field is again observed at about 30 jet diameters downstream.

  3. Confined space facilitates G-quadruplex formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Prakash; Jonchhe, Sagun; Emura, Tomoko; Hidaka, Kumi; Endo, Masayuki; Sugiyama, Hiroshi; Mao, Hanbin

    2017-07-01

    Molecular simulations suggest that the stability of a folded macromolecule increases in a confined space due to entropic effects. However, due to the interactions between the confined molecular structure and the walls of the container, clear-cut experimental evidence for this prediction is lacking. Here, using DNA origami nanocages, we show the pure effect of confined space on the property of individual human telomeric DNA G-quadruplexes. We induce targeted mechanical unfolding of the G-quadruplex while leaving the nanocage unperturbed. We find that the mechanical and thermodynamic stabilities of the G-quadruplex inside the nanocage increase with decreasing cage size. Compared to the case of diluted or molecularly crowded buffer solutions, the G-quadruplex inside the nanocage is significantly more stable, showing a 100 times faster folding rate. Our findings suggest the possibility of co-replicational or co-transcriptional folding of G-quadruplex inside the polymerase machinery in cells.

  4. Transition metal catalysis in confined spaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leenders, Stefan H A M; Gramage-Doria, Rafael; de Bruin, Bas; Reek, Joost N H

    2015-01-21

    Transition metal catalysis plays an important role in both industry and in academia where selectivity, activity and stability are crucial parameters to control. Next to changing the structure of the ligand, introducing a confined space as a second coordination sphere around a metal catalyst has recently been shown to be a viable method to induce new selectivity and activity in transition metal catalysis. In this review we focus on supramolecular strategies to encapsulate transition metal complexes with the aim of controlling the selectivity via the second coordination sphere. As we will discuss, catalyst confinement can result in selective processes that are impossible or difficult to achieve by traditional methods. We will describe the template-ligand approach as well as the host-guest approach to arrive at such supramolecular systems and discuss how the performance of the catalyst is enhanced by confining it in a molecular container.

  5. Density shock waves in confined microswimmers

    CERN Document Server

    Tsang, Alan Cheng Hou

    2015-01-01

    Motile and driven particles confined in microfluidic channels exhibit interesting emergent behavior from propagating density bands to density shock waves. A deeper understanding of the physical mechanisms responsible for these emergent structures is relevant to a number of physical and biomedical applications. Here, we study the formation of density shock waves in the context of an idealized model of microswimmers confined in a narrow channel and subject to a uniform external flow. Interestingly, these density shock waves exhibit a transition from `subsonic' with compression at the back to `supersonic' with compression at the front of the population as the intensity of the external flow increases. This behavior is the result of a non-trivial interplay between hydrodynamic interactions and geometric confinement, and is confirmed by a novel quasilinear wave model that properly captures the dependence of the shock formation on the external flow. These findings can be used to guide the development of novel mechan...

  6. EDITORIAL: Plasma jets and plasma bullets Plasma jets and plasma bullets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, M. G.; Ganguly, B. N.; Hicks, R. F.

    2012-06-01

    Plasma plumes, or plasma jets, belong to a large family of gas discharges whereby the discharge plasma is extended beyond the plasma generation region into the surrounding ambience, either by a field (e.g. electromagnetic, convective gas flow, or shock wave) or a gradient of a directionless physical quantity (e.g. particle density, pressure, or temperature). This physical extension of a plasma plume gives rise to a strong interaction with its surrounding environment, and the interaction alters the properties of both the plasma and the environment, often in a nonlinear and dynamic fashion. The plasma is therefore not confined by defined physical walls, thus extending opportunities for material treatment applications as well as bringing in new challenges in science and technology associated with complex open-boundary problems. Some of the most common examples may be found in dense plasmas with very high dissipation of externally supplied energy (e.g. in electrical, optical or thermal forms) and often in or close to thermal equilibrium. For these dense plasmas, their characteristics are determined predominantly by strong physical forces of different fields, such as electrical, magnetic, thermal, shock wave, and their nonlinear interactions [1]. Common to these dense plasma plumes are significant macroscopic plasma movement and considerable decomposition of solid materials (e.g. vaporization). Their applications are numerous and include detection of elemental traces, synthesis of high-temperature materials and welding, laser--plasma interactions, and relativistic jets in particle accelerators and in space [2]-[4]. Scientific challenges in the understanding of plasma jets are exciting and multidisciplinary, involving interweaving transitions of all four states of matter, and their technological applications are wide-ranging and growing rapidly. Using the Web of Science database, a search for journal papers on non-fusion plasma jets reveals that a long initial phase up

  7. A contoured gap coaxial plasma gun with injected plasma armature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witherspoon, F Douglas; Case, Andrew; Messer, Sarah J; Bomgardner, Richard; Phillips, Michael W; Brockington, Samuel; Elton, Raymond

    2009-08-01

    A new coaxial plasma gun is described. The long term objective is to accelerate 100-200 microg of plasma with density above 10(17) cm(-3) to greater than 200 km/s with a Mach number above 10. Such high velocity dense plasma jets have a number of potential fusion applications, including plasma refueling, magnetized target fusion, injection of angular momentum into centrifugally confined mirrors, high energy density plasmas, and others. The approach uses symmetric injection of high density plasma into a coaxial electromagnetic accelerator having an annular gap geometry tailored to prevent formation of the blow-by instability. The injected plasma is generated by numerous (currently 32) radially oriented capillary discharges arranged uniformly around the circumference of the angled annular injection region of the accelerator. Magnetohydrodynamic modeling identified electrode profiles that can achieve the desired plasma jet parameters. The experimental hardware is described along with initial experimental results in which approximately 200 microg has been accelerated to 100 km/s in a half-scale prototype gun. Initial observations of 64 merging injector jets in a planar cylindrical testing array are presented. Density and velocity are presently limited by available peak current and injection sources. Steps to increase both the drive current and the injected plasma mass are described for next generation experiments.

  8. Predicting high harmonic ion cyclotron heating efficiency in Tokamak plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, David L [ORNL; Jaeger, E. F. [XCEL; Berry, Lee A [ORNL; Chen, Guangye [ORNL; Ryan, Philip Michael [ORNL; Canik, John [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Observations of improved radio frequency (RF) heating efficiency in high-confinement (H-) mode plasmas on the National Spherical Tokamak Experiment (NSTX) are investigated by whole-device linear simulation. We present the first full-wave simulation to couple kinetic physics of the well confined core plasma to the poorly confined scrape-off plasma. The new simulation is used to scan the launched fast-wave spectrum and examine the steady-state electric wave field structure for experimental scenarios corresponding to both reduced, and improved RF heating efficiency. We find that launching toroidal wave-numbers that required for fast-wave propagation excites large amplitude (kVm 1 ) coaxial standing modes in the wave electric field between the confined plasma density pedestal and conducting vessel wall. Qualitative comparison with measurements of the stored plasma energy suggest these modes are a probable cause of degraded heating efficiency. Also, the H-mode density pedestal and fast-wave cutoff within the confined plasma allow for the excitation of whispering gallery type eigenmodes localised to the plasma edge.

  9. A new model of gluon confinement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novello, M.; De Lorenci, V.A. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Elbaz, E. [Universite Claude Bernard, 69 - Lyon (France). Inst. de Physique Nucleaire

    1997-06-01

    In this paper we present a model for the dynamics of a gauge field theory such that spin-one particles can be confined in a compact domain. We show that the property of confinement can be associated to the formation of a null surface identified to a horizon. This is due the presence of an effective geometry generated by the self-interaction of the gauge field that guides the wave propagation of the field. This phenomenon has a striking analog to the gravitational back hole in Einstein general theory of relativity, separating two domains of spacetime that can be trespassed only into one direction. (author) 4 refs., 1 fig.

  10. Molecular reactivity dynamics in a confined environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatua, Munmun; Chattaraj, Pratim Kumar

    2013-04-21

    Time evolution of various reactivity parameters viz. hardness, electrophilicity, chemical potential, polarizability, etc. in a confined environment has been studied through quantum fluid density functional theory formalism during time dependent processes such as proton-molecule collisions and molecule-field interaction. A Dirichlet type boundary condition has been incorporated to confine the systems. Responses in the reactivity parameters of the diatomic molecules, in the dynamical context, in ground state as well as in excited state, have been reported. Harmonic spectra are generated in the cases of the external laser field interacting with H2 and N2 molecules.

  11. Nonlinear phenomena and plasma turbulence in fusion plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hidalgo, C. [Association EURATOM/CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Balbin, R. [Association EURATOM/CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Branas, B. [Association EURATOM/CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Estrada, T. [Association EURATOM/CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Garcia-Cortes, I. [Association EURATOM/CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Pedrosa, M.A. [Association EURATOM/CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Sanchez, E. [Association EURATOM/CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Milligen, B. van [Association EURATOM/CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain)

    1995-05-01

    Recent progress in the characterization of the nonlinear nature of the broadband fluctuations in magnetically confined devices has provided a missing link between experimental measurements and theoretical turbulence models. At the same time, the study of influence of atomic physics drives (ionization and radiation) on plasma turbulence has stimulated new experimental developments. A view of the latest experimental results in these areas is presented. (orig.).

  12. Experimental confirmation of stable, small-debye-length, pure-electron-plasma equilibria in a stellarator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, J P; Pedersen, T Sunn; Lefrancois, R G; Marksteiner, Q

    2006-09-01

    The creation of the first small-Debye length, low temperature pure electron plasmas in a stellarator is reported. A confinement time of 20 ms has been measured. The long confinement time implies the existence of macroscopically stable equilibria and that the single particle orbits are well confined despite the lack of quasisymmetry in the device, the Columbia non-neutral torus. This confirms the beneficial confinement effects of strong electric fields and the resulting rapid E x B rotation of the electrons. The particle confinement time is presently limited by the presence of bulk insulating materials in the plasma, rather than any intrinsic plasma transport processes. A nearly flat temperature profile is seen in the inner part of the plasma.

  13. Strong Turbulence in Low-beta Plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tchen, C. M.; Pécseli, Hans; Larsen, Søren Ejling

    1980-01-01

    An investigation of the spectral structure of turbulence in a plasma confined by a strong homogeneous magnetic field was made by means of a fluid description. The turbulent spectrum is divided into subranges. Mean gradients of velocity and density excite turbulent motions, and govern the producti......-cathode reflex arc, Stellarator, Zeta discharge, ionospheric plasmas, and auroral plasma turbulence.......An investigation of the spectral structure of turbulence in a plasma confined by a strong homogeneous magnetic field was made by means of a fluid description. The turbulent spectrum is divided into subranges. Mean gradients of velocity and density excite turbulent motions, and govern the production...... subrange. The spectra of velocity and potential fluctuations interact in the coupling subrange, and the energy is transferred along the spectrum in the inertia subrange. Applying the method of cascade decomposition, the spectral laws k-3, k-3, k-2 are obtained for the velocity fluctuations, and k-3, k-5, k...

  14. Confinement of light in a polarizable vacuum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avinash Khare

    1983-01-01

    Full Text Available We show that an electrically polarizable vacuum with space-dependent permeability ε(r = μ−1(rexp(−αr2 can confine light whose quanta acquire a mass through interaction with this vacuum.

  15. Modulus-Pressure Equation for Confined Fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Gor, Gennady Y; Shen, Vincent K; Bernstein, Noam

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasonic experiments allow one to measure the elastic modulus of bulk solid or fluid samples. Recently such experiments have been carried out on fluid-saturated nanoporous glass to probe the modulus of a confined fluid. In our previous work [J. Chem. Phys., (2015) 143, 194506], using Monte Carlo simulations we showed that the elastic modulus $K$ of a fluid confined in a mesopore is a function of the pore size. Here we focus on modulus-pressure dependence $K(P)$, which is linear for bulk materials, a relation known as the Tait-Murnaghan equation. Using transition-matrix Monte Carlo simulations we calculated the elastic modulus of bulk argon as a function of pressure and argon confined in silica mesopores as a function of Laplace pressure. Our calculations show that while the elastic modulus is strongly affected by confinement and temperature, the slope of the modulus versus pressure is not. Moreover, the calculated slope is in a good agreement with the reference data for bulk argon and experimental data for ...

  16. Non-resonant Nanoscale Extreme Light Confinement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subramania, Ganapathi Subramanian [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Huber, Dale L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-09-01

    A wide spectrum of photonics activities Sandia is engaged in such as solid state lighting, photovoltaics, infrared imaging and sensing, quantum sources, rely on nanoscale or ultrasubwavelength light-matter interactions (LMI). The fundamental understanding in confining electromagnetic power and enhancing electric fields into ever smaller volumes is key to creating next generation devices for these programs. The prevailing view is that a resonant interaction (e.g. in microcavities or surface-plasmon polaritions) is necessary to achieve the necessary light confinement for absorption or emission enhancement. Here we propose new paradigm that is non-resonant and therefore broadband and can achieve light confinement and field enhancement in extremely small areas [~(λ/500)^2 ]. The proposal is based on a theoretical work[1] performed at Sandia. The paradigm structure consists of a periodic arrangement of connected small and large rectangular slits etched into a metal film named double-groove (DG) structure. The degree of electric field enhancement and power confinement can be controlled by the geometry of the structure. The key operational principle is attributed to quasistatic response of the metal electrons to the incoming electromagnetic field that enables non-resonant broadband behavior. For this exploratory LDRD we have fabricated some test double groove structures to enable verification of quasistatic electronic response in the mid IR through IR optical spectroscopy. We have addressed some processing challenges in DG structure fabrication to enable future design of complex sensor and detector geometries that can utilize its non-resonant field enhancement capabilities.].

  17. Enhanced heat transfer in confined pool boiling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rops, C.M.; Lindken, R.; Velthuis, J.F.M.; Westerweel, J.

    2009-01-01

    We report the results of an experimental investigation of the heat transfer during nucleate boiling on a spatially confined boiling surface. The heat flux as a function of the boiling surface temperature was measured in pool boiling pots with diameters ranging from 15 mm down to 4.5 mm. It was found

  18. Mesoscale simulations of confined Nafion thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanya, P.; Sharman, J.; Elliott, J. A.

    2017-12-01

    The morphology and transport properties of thin films of the ionomer Nafion, with thicknesses on the order of the bulk cluster size, have been investigated as a model system to explain the anomalous behaviour of catalyst/electrode-polymer interfaces in membrane electrode assemblies. We have employed dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) to investigate the interaction of water and fluorocarbon chains, with carbon and quartz as confining materials, for a wide range of operational water contents and film thicknesses. We found confinement-induced clustering of water perpendicular to the thin film. Hydrophobic carbon forms a water depletion zone near the film interface, whereas hydrophilic quartz results in a zone with excess water. There are, on average, oscillating water-rich and fluorocarbon-rich regions, in agreement with experimental results from neutron reflectometry. Water diffusivity shows increasing directional anisotropy of up to 30% with decreasing film thickness, depending on the hydrophilicity of the confining material. A percolation analysis revealed significant differences in water clustering and connectivity with the confining material. These findings indicate the fundamentally different nature of ionomer thin films, compared to membranes, and suggest explanations for increased ionic resistances observed in the catalyst layer.

  19. Subwavelength light confinement with surface plasmon polaritons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhagen, E.

    2009-01-01

    In free space, the diffraction limit sets a lower bound to the size to which light can be confined. Surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs), which are electromagnetic waves bound to the interface between a metal and a dielectric, allow the control of light on subwavelength length scales. This opens up a

  20. Structure of polymer chains under confinement

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. We observe by SANS the structure of neutral polystyrene and charged polystyrene sulphonate chains in semi-dilute solutions confined in a model nanoporous glass, Vycor. The size of the free chains in solution is always larger than the pore di- ameter, 70. The use of a suitable mixture of hydrogenated and ...

  1. Analysis of thermally-degrading, confined HMX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hobbs, M.L.; Schmitt, R.G.; Renlund, A.M.

    1996-12-01

    The response of a thermally-degrading, confined HMX pellet is analyzed using a Reactive Elastic-Plastic (REP) constitutive model which is founded on the collapse and growth of internal inclusions resulting from physical and chemical processes such as forced displacement, thermal expansion, and/or decomposition. Axial stress predictions compare adequately to data. Deficiencies in the model and future directions are discussed.

  2. Clusters of polyhedra in spherical confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teich, Erin G.; van Anders, Greg; Klotsa, Daphne; Dshemuchadse, Julia; Glotzer, Sharon C.

    2016-01-01

    Dense particle packing in a confining volume remains a rich, largely unexplored problem, despite applications in blood clotting, plasmonics, industrial packaging and transport, colloidal molecule design, and information storage. Here, we report densest found clusters of the Platonic solids in spherical confinement, for up to N=60 constituent polyhedral particles. We examine the interplay between anisotropic particle shape and isotropic 3D confinement. Densest clusters exhibit a wide variety of symmetry point groups and form in up to three layers at higher N. For many N values, icosahedra and dodecahedra form clusters that resemble sphere clusters. These common structures are layers of optimal spherical codes in most cases, a surprising fact given the significant faceting of the icosahedron and dodecahedron. We also investigate cluster density as a function of N for each particle shape. We find that, in contrast to what happens in bulk, polyhedra often pack less densely than spheres. We also find especially dense clusters at so-called magic numbers of constituent particles. Our results showcase the structural diversity and experimental utility of families of solutions to the packing in confinement problem. PMID:26811458

  3. Confined surface plasmons in gold photonic nanocavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Netti, C.; Coyle, S.; Baumberg, J.J. [Southampton Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Ghanem, M.A.; Birkin, P.R.; Bartlett, P.N. [Southampton Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Chemistry; Whittaker, D.M. [Toshiba Research Europe Ltd., Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2001-09-14

    A simple scheme to produce large-area colored metal surfaces by completely confining surface plasmons inside gold spherical nanocavities has been discovered. The negative nanocavity curvature localizes the electromagnetic fields into small volumes, which can be arranged non-periodically. (orig.)

  4. Spinal cord compression following traditional confinement massage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahathevan, R; Tan, H J; Abdullah, Suhail; Shahizon, A M M; Hamidon, B B; Raymond, A A

    2011-12-01

    We describe a case of tetraparesis in a 33-year-old woman following neck manipulation performed by a traditional confinement mid-wife. An MRI of the cervical spine revealed a fracture of the second cervical vertebra with atlanto-axial subluxation that resulted in cord compression.

  5. Capillary breakup of fluid threads within confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Guoqing; Xue, Chundong; Chen, Xiaodong

    2016-11-01

    Fluid thread breakup is a widespread phenomenon in nature, industry, and daily life. Driven by surface tension (or capillarity) at low flow-rate condition, the breakup scenario is usually called capillary instability or Plateau-Rayleigh instability. Fluid thread deforms under confinement of ambient fluid to form a fluid neck. Thinning of the neck at low flow-rate condition is quasistatic until the interface becomes unstable and collapses to breakup. Underlying mechanisms and universalities of both the stable and unstable thinning remain, however, unclear and even contradictory. Here we conduct new numerical and experimental studies to show that confined interfaces are not only stabilized but also destabilized by capillarity at low flow-rate condition. Capillary stabilization is attributed to confinement-determined internal pressure that is higher than capillary pressure along the neck. Two origins of capillary destabilization are identified: one is confinement-induced gradient of capillary pressure along the interface; the other is the competition between local capillary pressure and internal pressure. This work was supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11402274, 11272321, and 11572334).

  6. Ultrafast chemistry in complex and confined systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Self-organized molecular assemblies play a crucial role in many natural and biological processes. Recent applications of ultrafast laser spectroscopy and computer simulations revealed that chemistry in a confined environment is fundamentally different from that in ordinary solutions. Many recent examples of slow dynamics ...

  7. Effects of high sound speed confiners on ANFO detonations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyanda, Charles; Jackson, Scott; Short, Mark

    2011-06-01

    The interaction between high explosive (HE) detonations and high sound speed confiners, where the confiner sound speed exceeds the HE's detonation speed, has not been thoroughly studied. The subsonic nature of the flow in the confiner allows stress waves to travel ahead of the main detonation front and influence the upstream HE state. The interaction between the detonation wave and the confiner is also no longer a local interaction, so that the confiner thickness now plays a significant role in the detonation dynamics. We report here on larger scale experiments in which a mixture of ammonium nitrate and fuel oil (ANFO) is detonated in aluminium confiners with varying charge diameter and confiner thickness. The results of these large-scale experiments are compared with previous large-scale ANFO experiments in cardboard, as well as smaller-scale aluminium confined ANFO experiments, to characterize the effects of confiner thickness.

  8. Confined Water: Structure, Dynamics, and Thermodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Sudip; Kumar, Hemant; Dasgupta, Chandan; Maiti, Prabal K

    2017-09-19

    Understanding the properties of strongly confined water is important for a variety of applications such as fast flow and desalination devices, voltage generation, flow sensing, and nanofluidics. Confined water also plays an important role in many biological processes such as flow through ion channels. Water in the bulk exhibits many unusual properties that arise primarily from the presence of a network of hydrogen bonds. Strong confinement in structures such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs) substantially modifies the structural, thermodynamic, and dynamic (both translational and orientational) properties of water by changing the structure of the hydrogen bond network. In this Account, we provide an overview of the behavior of water molecules confined inside CNTs and slit pores between graphene and graphene oxide (GO) sheets. Water molecules confined in narrow CNTs are arranged in a single file and exhibit solidlike ordering at room temperature due to strong hydrogen bonding between nearest-neighbor molecules. Although molecules constrained to move along a line are expected to exhibit single-file diffusion in contrast to normal Fickian diffusion, we show, from a combination of molecular dynamics simulations and analytic calculations, that water molecules confined in short and narrow CNTs with open ends exhibit Fickian diffusion because of their collective motion as a single unit due to strong hydrogen bonding. Confinement leads to strong anisotropy in the orientational relaxation of water molecules. The time scale of relaxation of the dipolar correlations of water molecules arranged in a single file becomes ultraslow, of the order of several nanoseconds, compared with the value of 2.5 ps for bulk water. In contrast, the relaxation of the vector that joins the two hydrogens in a water molecule is much faster, with a time scale of about 150 fs, which is about 10 times shorter than the corresponding time scale for bulk water. This is a rare example of confinement leading to

  9. Plasma harmonics

    CERN Document Server

    Ganeev, Rashid A

    2014-01-01

    Preface; Why plasma harmonics? A very brief introduction Early stage of plasma harmonic studies - hopes and frustrations New developments in plasma harmonics studies: first successes Improvements of plasma harmonics; Theoretical basics of plasma harmonics; Basics of HHG Harmonic generation in fullerenes using few-cycle pulsesVarious approaches for description of observed peculiarities of resonant enhancement of a single harmonic in laser plasmaTwo-colour pump resonance-induced enhancement of odd and even harmonics from a tin plasmaCalculations of single harmonic generation from Mn plasma;Low-o

  10. Advances and Challenges in Computational Plasma Science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W.M. Tang; V.S. Chan

    2005-01-03

    Scientific simulation, which provides a natural bridge between theory and experiment, is an essential tool for understanding complex plasma behavior. Recent advances in simulations of magnetically-confined plasmas are reviewed in this paper with illustrative examples chosen from associated research areas such as microturbulence, magnetohydrodynamics, and other topics. Progress has been stimulated in particular by the exponential growth of computer speed along with significant improvements in computer technology.

  11. Alpha Particle Physics Experiments in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budny, R.V.; Darrow, D.S.; Medley, S.S.; Nazikian, R.; Zweben, S.J.; et al.

    1998-12-14

    Alpha particle physics experiments were done on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) during its deuterium-tritium (DT) run from 1993-1997. These experiments utilized several new alpha particle diagnostics and hundreds of DT discharges to characterize the alpha particle confinement and wave-particle interactions. In general, the results from the alpha particle diagnostics agreed with the classical single-particle confinement model in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) quiescent discharges. Also, the observed alpha particle interactions with sawteeth, toroidal Alfvén eigenmodes (TAE), and ion cyclotron resonant frequency (ICRF) waves were roughly consistent with theoretical modeling. This paper reviews what was learned and identifies what remains to be understood.

  12. Fusion Plasma Theory project summaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-10-01

    This Project Summary book is a published compilation consisting of short descriptions of each project supported by the Fusion Plasma Theory and Computing Group of the Advanced Physics and Technology Division of the Department of Energy, Office of Fusion Energy. The summaries contained in this volume were written by the individual contractors with minimal editing by the Office of Fusion Energy. Previous summaries were published in February of 1982 and December of 1987. The Plasma Theory program is responsible for the development of concepts and models that describe and predict the behavior of a magnetically confined plasma. Emphasis is given to the modelling and understanding of the processes controlling transport of energy and particles in a toroidal plasma and supporting the design of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). A tokamak transport initiative was begun in 1989 to improve understanding of how energy and particles are lost from the plasma by mechanisms that transport them across field lines. The Plasma Theory program has actively-participated in this initiative. Recently, increased attention has been given to issues of importance to the proposed Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX). Particular attention has been paid to containment and thermalization of fast alpha particles produced in a burning fusion plasma as well as control of sawteeth, current drive, impurity control, and design of improved auxiliary heating. In addition, general models of plasma behavior are developed from physics features common to different confinement geometries. This work uses both analytical and numerical techniques. The Fusion Theory program supports research projects at US government laboratories, universities and industrial contractors. Its support of theoretical work at universities contributes to the office of Fusion Energy mission of training scientific manpower for the US Fusion Energy Program.

  13. NEW GRAZING INCIDENCE SPECTROMETER FOR HOT PLASMA DIAGNOSTICS

    OpenAIRE

    Pouey, M.

    1983-01-01

    In laser induced confinement fusion or in ion driven fusion the understanding of the physical process taking place in the plasma atmosphere surrounding the target is extremely important. Plasma diagnostics require then line ratios and line broadening at very short wavelengths. This paper deals with the design of a stigmatic grazing incidence device fitted with a spherical holographic grating.

  14. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Plasma Fusion Center, Technical Research Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davidson, Ronald C.

    1980-08-01

    A review is given of the technical programs carried out by the Plasma Fusion Center. The major divisions of work areas are applied plasma research, confinement experiments, fusion technology and engineering, and fusion systems. Some objectives and results of each program are described. (MOW)

  15. Thermo-magneto coupling in a dipole plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Yoshida, Z; Morikawa, J; Saitoh, H

    2012-01-01

    On a dipole plasma, we observe the generation of magnetic moment, as the movement of the levitating magnet-plasma compound, in response to electron-cyclotron heating and the increase of $\\beta$ (magnetically-confined thermal energy). We formulate a thermodynamic model with interpreting heating as injection of microscopic magnetic moment; the corresponding chemical potential is the ambient magnetic field.

  16. Enhanced Control and Reproducibility of Non-Neutral Plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmadi, M.; Alves, B. X. R.; Baker, C. J.

    2018-01-01

    The simultaneous control of the density and particle number of non-neutral plasmas confined in Penning-Malmberg traps is demonstrated. Control is achieved by setting the plasma's density by applying a rotating electric field while simultaneously fixing its axial potential via evaporative cooling....

  17. Magnetohydrodynamic Waves and Instabilities in Rotating Tokamak Plasmas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.W. Haverkort (Willem)

    2013-01-01

    htmlabstractOne of the most promising ways to achieve controlled nuclear fusion for the commercial production of energy is the tokamak design. In such a device, a hot plasma is confined in a toroidal geometry using magnetic fields. The present generation of tokamaks shows significant plasma

  18. Experimental study of TJ-1 plasma using scattering and radiation emission techniques; Analisis experimental del plasma TJ-1 con tecnicas de scattering y emision de radiacion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pardo, C.; Zurro, B.

    1987-07-01

    The Thomson scattering system of TJ-1 is described in detail. The radial profiles of Te and ne obtained in TJ-1 discharges are presented. This data make possible to deduce characteristic parameters of the plasma confinement in this machine, as energy confinement times, Zeff B. Using also radiation measurements (global and in the visible range) we obtained the particle confinement time and Zeff without non experimental assumptions. (Author) 52 refs.

  19. Diamagnetism and neutrals depletion in a plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fruchtman, Amnon; Shinohara, Shunjiro

    2017-10-01

    Recent experimental and theoretical findings [Shinohara et al., Phys. Plasmas 23, 122108 (2016)] regarding the pressure balance between a cylindrical plasma, an axial magnetic field, and neutral gas are explored further theoretically. The length of the cylinder is assumed much larger than its radius, so that axial losses are small and cross-field transport is dominant. Conditions for either magnetic pressure or neutral pressure balancing the plasma pressure and an associated coupling parameter, which were identified in the above-mentioned recent study, are examined further. In addition, a second coupling parameter is identified which determines which is larger, the relative change in the magnetic field or the relative change in neutral density. An unexpected nonmonotonic variation of the plasma density with the plasma particle flux is demonstrated. It is shown that for plasma beta close to unity, as plasma generation and plasma particle flux increase, the plasma density surprisingly decreases. This decrease follows a decrease in plasma confinement due to an increased plasma diamagnetism. The effect of the magnetic field on neutral depletion is examined. It is shown that an increase in the magnetic field as the plasma density is kept constant results in a decrease in neutral depletion, while an increase in the magnetic field as the plasma particle flux is kept constant results in constant neutral depletion.

  20. Structural behavior of supercritical fluids under confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Kanka; Krishnamurthy, C. V.

    2018-01-01

    The existence of the Frenkel line in the supercritical regime of a Lennard-Jones (LJ) fluid shown through molecular dynamics (MD) simulations initially and later corroborated by experiments on argon opens up possibilities of understanding the structure and dynamics of supercritical fluids in general and of the Frenkel line in particular. The location of the Frenkel line, which demarcates two distinct physical states, liquidlike and gaslike within the supercritical regime, has been established through MD simulations of the velocity autocorrelation (VACF) and radial distribution function (RDF). We, in this article, explore the changes in the structural features of supercritical LJ fluid under partial confinement using atomistic walls. The study is carried out across the Frenkel line through a series of MD simulations considering a set of thermodynamics states in the supercritical regime (P =5000 bar, 240 K ≤T ≤1500 K ) of argon well above the critical point. Confinement is partial, with atomistic walls located normal to z and extending to "infinity" along the x and y directions. In the "liquidlike" regime of the supercritical phase, particles are found to be distributed in distinct layers along the z axis with layer spacing less than one atomic diameter and the lateral RDF showing amorphous-like structure for specific spacings (packing frustration) and non-amorphous-like structure for other spacings. Increasing the rigidity of the atomistic walls is found to lead to stronger layering and increased structural order. For confinement with reflective walls, layers are found to form with one atomic diameter spacing and the lateral RDF showing close-packed structure for the smaller confinements. Translational order parameter and excess entropy assessment confirms the ordering taking place for atomistic wall and reflective wall confinements. In the "gaslike" regime of the supercritical phase, particle distribution along the spacing and the lateral RDF exhibit features

  1. External confinement and surface modes in magnetized force-free jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobacchi, E.; Lyubarsky, Y. E.

    2018-01-01

    In the paradigm of magnetic launching of astrophysical jets, instabilities in the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flow are a good candidate to convert the Poynting flux into the kinetic energy of the plasma. If the magnetized plasma fills the almost entire space, the jet is unstable to helical perturbations of its body. However, the growth rate of these modes is suppressed when the poloidal component of the magnetic field has a vanishing gradient, which may be the actual case for a realistic configuration. Here we show that, if the magnetized plasma is confined into a limited region by the pressure of some external medium, the velocity shear at the contact surface excites unstable modes which can affect a significant fraction of the jet's body. We find that when the Lorentz factor of the jet is Γ ∼ 10 (Γ ∼ 100), these perturbations typically develop after propagating along the jet for tens (hundreds) of jet's radii. Surface modes may therefore play an important role in converting the energy of the jet from the Poynting flux to the kinetic energy of the plasma, particularly in active galactic nuclei. The scaling of the dispersion relation with (i) the angular velocity of the field lines and (ii) the sound speed in the confining gas is discussed.

  2. Fusion Plasma Physics and ITER - An Introduction (2/4)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2011-01-01

    The second lecture will explore some of the key physics phenomena which govern the behaviour of magnetic fusion plasmas and which have been the subject of intense research during the past 50 years: plasma confinement, magnetohydrodynamic stability and plasma-wall interactions encompass the major areas of plasma physics which must be understood to assemble an overall description of fusion plasma behaviour. In addition, as fusion plasmas approach the “burning plasma” regime, where internal heating due to fusion products dominates other forms of heating, the physics of the interaction between the α-particles produced by D-T fusion reactions and the thermal “background” plasma becomes significant. This lecture will also introduce the basic physics of fusion plasma production, plasma heating and current drive, and plasma measurements (“diagnostics”).

  3. Extra-dimensional confinement of quantum particles

    CERN Document Server

    Hedin, Eric R

    2016-01-01

    A basic theoretical framework is developed in which elementary particles have a component of their wave function extending into higher spatial dimensions. This model postulates an extension of the Schrodinger equation to include a 4th and 5th spatial component. A higher-dimensional simple harmonic oscillator confining potential localizes particles into 3-d space, characterizing the brane tension which confines Standard Model particles to the sub-manifold. Quantum effects allow a non-zero probability for a particle's evanescent existence in the higher dimensions, and suggest an experimental test for the validity of this model via particles being temporarily excited into the first excited state of the extra-dimensional potential well, in which their probability of existing in 3-d space transiently drops to zero. Several consistency checks of the outcomes of this extra-dimensional model are included in this paper. Among the outcomes of this model are: a match with the quantum phenomenon of zitterbewegung; the pr...

  4. Compaction of granular material inside confined geometries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjy eMarks

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In both nature and the laboratory, loosely packed granular materials are often compacted inside confined geometries. Here, we explore such behaviour in a quasi-two dimensional geometry, where parallel rigid walls provide the confinement. We use the discrete element method to investigate the stress distribution developed within the granular packing as a result of compaction due to the displacement of a rigid piston. We observe that the stress within the packing increases exponentially with the length of accumulated grains, and show an extension to current analytic models which fits the measured stress. The micromechanical behaviour is studied for a range of system parameters, and the limitations of existing analytic models are described. In particular, we show the smallest sized systems which can be treated using existing models. Additionally, the effects of increasing piston rate, and variations of the initial packing fraction, are described.

  5. Influence of confining layers' heterogeneity on the barometric response functions in semi-confined aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redaelli, Marco; Perulero Serrano, Raul

    2017-04-01

    It has been shown that Barometric Response Functions (BRFs) can provide a useful tool for detecting the occurrence of highly conducive bodies which span across aquifer confining layers and can potentially give rise to pathways for pollutant migration (Hussein et al 2013, Odling et al 2015). Analytical models employed to estimate BRFs from geological system properties assume homogeneity within the aquifer and its confining layer. These assumptions are rarely satisfied in practice. Our study focusses on the impact on predicted BRFs of heterogeneous distribution of high conductivity geomaterials within the confining layer. The work is grounded on a suite of three-dimensional, transient numerical computations of groundwater flow in a confining layer-aquifer system for i) a perfectly homogeneous two-layer setting where a single highly conducive block is fully penetrating the confining layer and ii) a heterogeneous two-layer system where hydraulic conductivity in the confining layer is modelled as a stochastic process. Our numerical results are interpreted through a comparison against those associated with an analytical model which assumes system homogeneity. Monitoring points located in the middle of the modelled aquifer domain, mimicking screened boreholes in field conditions, are used to extract water level records. The output is used to obtain the corresponding BRFs (in terms of gain and phase components) and compared vis-a-vis the selected analytical solution. The results show a wide variety of BRF responses, especially in the gain component, which vary from almost confined to unconfined scenarios. Our simulations show that the BRFs are a viable tool to improve understanding of the degree of spatial continuity within low permeability heterogeneous geological materials such as glacial till which is frequently found overlying water bearing units across the UK and other localities worldwide. As such, it has the potential to improve groundwater vulnerability assessment

  6. Plasma Simulation Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenwald, Martin

    2011-10-04

    Many others in the fusion energy and advanced scientific computing communities participated in the development of this plan. The core planning team is grateful for their important contributions. This summary is meant as a quick overview the Fusion Simulation Program's (FSP's) purpose and intentions. There are several additional documents referenced within this one and all are supplemental or flow down from this Program Plan. The overall science goal of the DOE Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (FES) Fusion Simulation Program (FSP) is to develop predictive simulation capability for magnetically confined fusion plasmas at an unprecedented level of integration and fidelity. This will directly support and enable effective U.S. participation in International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) research and the overall mission of delivering practical fusion energy. The FSP will address a rich set of scientific issues together with experimental programs, producing validated integrated physics results. This is very well aligned with the mission of the ITER Organization to coordinate with its members the integrated modeling and control of fusion plasmas, including benchmarking and validation activities. [1]. Initial FSP research will focus on two critical Integrated Science Application (ISA) areas: ISA1, the plasma edge; and ISA2, whole device modeling (WDM) including disruption avoidance. The first of these problems involves the narrow plasma boundary layer and its complex interactions with the plasma core and the surrounding material wall. The second requires development of a computationally tractable, but comprehensive model that describes all equilibrium and dynamic processes at a sufficient level of detail to provide useful prediction of the temporal evolution of fusion plasma experiments. The initial driver for the whole device model will be prediction and avoidance of discharge-terminating disruptions, especially at high performance, which are a

  7. Scanning gate imaging in confined geometries

    OpenAIRE

    Steinacher, R.; Kozikov, A. A.; Rössler, C.; Reichl, C.; Wegscheider, W.; Ensslin, K.; Ihn, T.

    2016-01-01

    This article reports on tunable electron backscattering investigated with the biased tip of a scanning force microscope. Using a channel defined by a pair of Schottky gates, the branched electron flow of ballistic electrons injected from a quantum point contact is guided by potentials of a tunable height well below the Fermi energy. The transition from injection into an open two-dimensional electron gas to a strongly confined channel exhibits three experimentally distinct regimes: one in whic...

  8. Confinement in anti-de Sitter space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aharony, Ofer; Berkooz, Micha; Tong, David; Yankielowicz, Shimon

    2013-02-01

    Four dimensional gauge theories in anti-de Sitter space, including pure Yang-Mills theory, exhibit a quantum phase transition between a deconfined phase and a confined phase as the gauge coupling is varied. We explore various mechanisms by which this may occur, both in a fixed background and in the presence of gravity. We also make a number of observations on the dynamics of four dimensional supersymmetric gauge theories in anti-de Sitter space.

  9. Rheology of Confined Non-Brownian Suspensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornari, Walter; Brandt, Luca; Chaudhuri, Pinaki; Lopez, Cyan Umbert; Mitra, Dhrubaditya; Picano, Francesco

    2016-01-08

    We study the rheology of confined suspensions of neutrally buoyant rigid monodisperse spheres in plane-Couette flow using direct numerical simulations. We find that if the width of the channel is a (small) integer multiple of the sphere diameter, the spheres self-organize into two-dimensional layers that slide on each other and the effective viscosity of the suspension is significantly reduced. Each two-dimensional layer is found to be structurally liquidlike but its dynamics is frozen in time.

  10. Engineered barriers for radioactive waste confinement

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández, R

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear power plants generate long-lived radioactive waste of high toxicity. The security assessment of repositories destined to definitive confinement of radioactive waste has been studied for several decades. Deep geological repositories are technically feasible and begin to be built by some pioneer countries. The scientific evaluation of interactions between the different engineered barriers is studied by laboratory experiments, natural analogues and modeling studies. The three methods are...

  11. The functionality-based application confinement model

    OpenAIRE

    Schreuders, ZC; Payne, C.; Mcgill, T.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the functionality-based application confinement (FBAC) access control model. FBAC is an application-oriented access control model, intended to restrict processes to the behaviour that is authorised by end users, administrators, and processes, in order to limit the damage that can be caused by malicious code, due to software vulnerabilities or malware. FBAC is unique in its ability to limit applications to finely grained access control rules based on high-level easy-to-unde...

  12. Comparison of electron temperature fluctuations with gyrokinetic sumulations across the ohmic energy confinement transition in Alcator C-Mod

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, C.; White, A.; Howard, N.; Mikkelsen, D.; Rice, J.; Reinke, M.; Gao, C.; Ennever, P.; Porkolab, M.; Churchill, R.; Theiler, C.; Hubbard, A.; Greenwald, M.

    2013-10-01

    Long wavelength electron temperature fluctuations (kyρs < 0 . 3) near the edge (r / a ~ 0 . 85) are reduced across the ohmic confinement transition from Linear Ohmic Confinement(LOC) regime to Saturated Ohmic Confinement(SOC) regime in Alcator C-Mod. Linear stability analysis shows that the dominant mode of long wavelength turbulence near the edge is changed from Trapped Electron Mode(TEM) to Ion Temperature Gradient(ITG) mode while the dominant mode is not changed deeper in the core (r / a ~ 0 . 5). This indicates that local turbulence changes near the edge might be responsible for the change of global energy confinement in ohmic plasmas. Further study using nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations is being performed to clarify the relation between the change of local turbulence and global ohmic energy confinement. Through nonlinear gyrokinetic simulation (GYRO), we will investigate the change of fluctuating quantities (T~ , ñ , ϕ~) and their phase relations across ohmic confinement transitions, and relate them to the change of energy transport. A synthetic CECE diagnostic for C-Mod has been developed, and it will be used to validate the gyrokinetic simulations. Research supported by USDoE awards DE-SC0006419, DE-FC02-99ER54512.

  13. Spectral confinement and current for atoms in strong magnetic fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fournais, Søren

    2007-01-01

    e study confinement of the ground state of atoms in strong magnetic fields to different subspaces related to the lowest Landau band. Using the results on confinement we can calculate the quantum current in the entire semiclassical region B<3......e study confinement of the ground state of atoms in strong magnetic fields to different subspaces related to the lowest Landau band. Using the results on confinement we can calculate the quantum current in the entire semiclassical region B

  14. Radiolysis of confined water: molecular hydrogen formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rotureau, P.; Renault, J.P.; Mialocq, J.C. [CEA/Saclay, DSM/DRECAM/SCM/URA 331 CNRS, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Lebeau, B.; Patarin, J. [Laboratoire de Materiaux a Porosite Controlee, UMR CNRS 7016, ENSCMu-UHA, 3, Rue Alfred Werner, 68093 Mulhouse Cedex (France)

    2005-07-11

    The formation of molecular hydrogen in the radiolysis of water confined in nanoscale pores of well-characterised porous silica glasses and mesoporous molecular sieves (MCM-41) is examined. The comparison of dihydrogen formation by irradiation of both materials, dry and hydrated, shows that a large part of the H{sub 2} comes from the surface of the material. The radiolytic yields, G(H{sub 2})=(3{+-}0.5) x 10{sup -7} mol J{sup -1}, calculated using the total energy deposited in the material and the water, are only slightly affected by the degree of hydration of the material and by the pore size. These yields are also not modified by the presence of hydroxyl radical scavengers. This observation proves that the back reaction between H{sub 2} and HO{sup .} is inoperative in such confined environments. Furthermore, the large amount of H{sub 2} produced in the presence of different concentrated scavengers of the hydrated electron and its precursor suggests that these two species are far from being the only species responsible for the H{sub 2} formation. Our results show that the radiolytic phenomena that occur in water confined in nanoporous silica are dramatically different to those in bulk water, suggesting the need to investigate further the chemical reactivity in this type of environment. (Abstract Copyright [2005], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  15. Radiolysis of confined water: molecular hydrogen formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotureau, P; Renault, J P; Lebeau, B; Patarin, J; Mialocq, J-C

    2005-07-11

    The formation of molecular hydrogen in the radiolysis of water confined in nanoscale pores of well-characterised porous silica glasses and mesoporous molecular sieves (MCM-41) is examined. The comparison of dihydrogen formation by irradiation of both materials, dry and hydrated, shows that a large part of the H2 comes from the surface of the material. The radiolytic yields, G(H2)=(3+/-0.5)x10(-7) mol J(-1), calculated using the total energy deposited in the material and the water, are only slightly affected by the degree of hydration of the material and by the pore size. These yields are also not modified by the presence of hydroxyl radical scavengers. This observation proves that the back reaction between H2 and HO(.) is inoperative in such confined environments. Furthermore, the large amount of H2 produced in the presence of different concentrated scavengers of the hydrated electron and its precursor suggests that these two species are far from being the only species responsible for the H2 formation. Our results show that the radiolytic phenomena that occur in water confined in nanoporous silica are dramatically different to those in bulk water, suggesting the need to investigate further the chemical reactivity in this type of environment.

  16. Chemical reactions confined within carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miners, Scott A; Rance, Graham A; Khlobystov, Andrei N

    2016-08-22

    In this critical review, we survey the wide range of chemical reactions that have been confined within carbon nanotubes, particularly emphasising how the pairwise interactions between the catalysts, reactants, transition states and products of a particular molecular transformation with the host nanotube can be used to control the yields and distributions of products of chemical reactions. We demonstrate that nanoscale confinement within carbon nanotubes enables the control of catalyst activity, morphology and stability, influences the local concentration of reactants and products thus affecting equilibria, rates and selectivity, pre-arranges the reactants for desired reactions and alters the relative stability of isomeric products. We critically evaluate the relative advantages and disadvantages of the confinement of chemical reactions inside carbon nanotubes from a chemical perspective and describe how further developments in the controlled synthesis of carbon nanotubes and the incorporation of multifunctionality are essential for the development of this ever-expanding field, ultimately leading to the effective control of the pathways of chemical reactions through the rational design of multi-functional carbon nanoreactors.

  17. Confined Tube Crimp Using Portable Hand Tools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reynolds, Joseph James [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pereyra, R. A. [LANL Retired; Archuleta, Jeffrey Christopher [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Martinez, Isaac P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nelson, A. M. [MST-16 Summer Student (2007); Allen, Ronald Scott [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Page, R. L. [LANL Retired; Freer, Jerry Eugene [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dozhier, Nathan Gus [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2016-04-04

    The Lawrence Radiation Laboratory developed handheld tools that crimp a 1/16 inch OD tube, forming a leak tight seal1 (see Figure 1). The leak tight seal forms by confining the 1/16 inch OD tubing inside a die while applying crimp pressure. Under confined pressure, the tube walls weld at the crimp. The purpose of this study was to determine conditions for fabricating a leak tight tube weld. The equipment was used on a trial-and-error basis, changing the conditions after each attempt until successful welds were fabricated. To better confine the tube, the die faces were polished. Polishing removed a few thousandths of an inch from the die face, resulting in a tighter grip on the tubing wall. Using detergent in an ultrasonic bath, the tubing was cleaned. Also, the time under crimp pressure was increased to 30 seconds. With these modifications, acceptable cold welds were fabricated. After setting the conditions for an acceptable cold weld, the tube was TIG welded across the crimped face.

  18. CATTLE PRODUCTIVE PERFORMANCE EVALUATION CONFINED SUBMITTED IMMUNOCASTRATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Maluf

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In order to evaluate the performance and carcass characteristics of cattle cross breeds ½ Aberdeen Angus x ½Nelore and Nelore confined submitted to immunocastration 218 male animals were used, feedlot, averaging 342 kg, divided into three experimental groups, T1: 117 steers ½ Angus x ½ Nelore no castrated (ANC, T2: 51 Nelore steers uncastrated (NNC and T3: 50 Nellore steers immunocastrated (NIC. The experiment lasted 144 days of confinement. The selection of animals for group formation was according to the individual weight, breed, sex condition and age. For immunocastration it wasused Bopriva® vaccine. The rating was finished according to the parameter used by the meatpacking industry ranging from 1 to 5. The experimental design was completely randomized in three groups. For the analyzes the variables studied statistics were submitted to analysis of variance (ANOVA and Tukey test both at the 5% level of significance. The results showed differences (p <0.01 at various features of productive performance and carcass between treatments. For slaughter weight, the ANC animals were higher (with 582.1 kg to Nelore, regardless of sexual condition, and the NNC were in turn heavier than the NIC, 527.4 and 503.7 respectively. Finally, it observed that the use of immunocastration in Nellore animals provided a decrease in productive performance of confined animals, but provided better finish carcass similar to crossbred (ANC.

  19. Water nanodroplets confined in zeolite pores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coudert, François-Xavier; Cailliez, Fabien; Vuilleumier, Rodolphe; Fuchs, Alain H; Boutin, Anne

    2009-01-01

    We provide a comprehensive depiction of the behaviour of a nanodroplet of approximately equal to 20 water molecules confined in the pores of a series of 3D-connected isostructural zeolites with varying acidity, by means of molecular simulations. Both grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations using classical interatomic forcefields and first-principles Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics were used in order to characterise the behaviour of confined water by computing a range of properties, from thermodynamic quantities to electronic properties such as dipole moment, including structural and dynamical information. From the thermodynamic point of view, we have identified the all-silica zeolite as hydrophobic, and the cationic zeolites as hydrophilic; the condensation transition in the first case was demonstrated to be of first order. Furthermore, in-depth analysis of the dynamical and electronic properties of water showed that water in the hydrophobic zeolite behaves as a nanodroplet trying to close its hydrogen-bond network onto itself, with a few short-lived dangling OH groups, while water in hydrophilic zeolites "opens up" to form weak hydrogen bonds with the zeolite oxygen atoms. Finally, the dipole moment of confined water is studied and the contributions of water self-polarisation and the zeolite electric field are discussed.

  20. Dynamics of Hyperbranched Polymers under Confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Androulaki, Krystallenia; Chrissopoulou, Kiriaki; Anastasiadis, Spiros H.; Prevosto, Daniele; Labardi, Massimiliano

    2015-03-01

    The effect of severe confinement on the dynamics of three different generations of hyperbranched polyesters (Boltorns) is investigated by Dielectric Spectroscopy. The polymers are intercalated within the galleries of natural Na+-MMT, thus, forming 1nm polymer films confined between solid walls. The Tg's of the polymers determined by DSC show a clear dependence on the generation whereas the transition is completely suppressed when all the polymer chains are intercalated. The dynamic investigation of the bulk polymers reveals two sub-Tg processes, with similar behavior for the three polymers with the segmental relaxation observed above the Tg of each. For the nanocomposites, where all polymers are severely confined, the dynamics show significant differences compared to that of the bulk polymers. The sub-Tg processes are similar for the three generations but significantly faster and with weaker temperature dependence than those in the bulk. The segmental process appears at temperatures below the bulk polymer Tg, it exhibits an Arrhenius temperature dependence and shows differences for the three generations. A slow process that appears at higher temperatures is due to interfacial polarization. Co-financed by the EU and Greek funds through the Operational Program ``Education and Lifelong Learning'' of the NSRF-Research Funding Program: THALES-Investing in knowledge society through the Eur. Social Fund (MIS 377278) and COST Action MP0902-COINAPO.