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Sample records for conduction implant bci

  1. Preoperative headband assessment for semi-implantable bone conduction hearing devices in conductive hearing loss: is it useful or misleading?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainsbury, James W; Williams, Blair A; Gulliver, Mark; Morris, David P

    2015-02-01

    To establish whether preoperative assessment using a conventional, percutaneous bone conducting implant (pBCI) processor on a headband accurately represents postoperative performance of a semi-implantable BCI (siBCI). Retrospective case series. Tertiary otology unit. Five patients with chronic otitis media (implanted unilaterally) and one with bilateral congenital ossicular fixation (implanted bilaterally). Semi-implantable bone conduction hearing implant. Functional hearing gain; preoperative (headband) versus postoperative (aided) speech discrimination; unaided bone conduction (BC) versus postoperative (aided) soundfield threshold. Significant functional gain was seen at all frequencies (one-tailed t test p G 0.01; n = 7). There was a 50 dB improvement in median speech reception threshold (SRT) from 70 dB unaided to 20 dB aided. Compared to the preoperative BC, aided siBCI thresholds were worse at 0.5 kHz, but at frequencies from 1 to 6 kHz, the siBCI closely matched the bone curve ( p G 0.01). The siBCI performed better than both pBCI processors on a headband at 3 to 4 kHz, except 1 kHz ( p G 0.01). BC thresholds may be a better indicator of implant performance than headband assessment. Candidacy assessment for siBCI implantation that relies on headband testing with pBCI processors should be interpreted with caution because the headband may under-represent the implanted device. This seems to be especially true at 3 kHz and above and may make it difficult for surgeons to conduct accurate informed consent discussions with patients about the realistic anticipated outcomes and benefits of the procedure.

  2. Conductivity in insulators due to implantation of conducting species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prawer, S.; Kalish, R.

    1993-01-01

    Control of the surface conductivity of insulators can be accomplished by high dose ion implantation of conductive species. The use of C + as the implant species is particularly interesting because C can either form electrically insulating sp 3 bonds or electrically conducting sp 2 bonds. In the present work, fused quartz plates have been irradiated with 100 keV C + ions to doses up to 1 x 10 17 ions/cm 2 at room temperature and at 200 deg C. The ion beam induced conductivity was monitored in-situ and was found to increase by up to 8 orders to magnitude for the ion dose range studied. Xe implantations over a similar range did not induce any changes in the conductivity showing that the increase in conductivity is caused by the presence of the C in the fused quartz matrix and not by damage. The dependence of the conductivity on implantation temperature and on post implantation annealing sheds light on the clustering of the C implants. The temperature dependence of the conductivity for the highest doses employed (1 x 10 17 C + /cm 2 ) can be described very well by lnσ α T. This is considered to be a peculiar dependence which does not comply with any of the standard models for conduction. 9 refs., 1 tab., 6 figs

  3. Embodiment and Estrangement: Results from a First-in-Human "Intelligent BCI" Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, F; Cook, M; O'Brien, T; Illes, J

    2017-11-11

    While new generations of implantable brain computer interface (BCI) devices are being developed, evidence in the literature about their impact on the patient experience is lagging. In this article, we address this knowledge gap by analysing data from the first-in-human clinical trial to study patients with implanted BCI advisory devices. We explored perceptions of self-change across six patients who volunteered to be implanted with artificially intelligent BCI devices. We used qualitative methodological tools grounded in phenomenology to conduct in-depth, semi-structured interviews. Results show that, on the one hand, BCIs can positively increase a sense of the self and control; on the other hand, they can induce radical distress, feelings of loss of control, and a rupture of patient identity. We conclude by offering suggestions for the proactive creation of preparedness protocols specific to intelligent-predictive and advisory-BCI technologies essential to prevent potential iatrogenic harms.

  4. Quality standards for bone conduction implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavilan, Javier; Adunka, Oliver; Agrawal, Sumit; Atlas, Marcus; Baumgartner, Wolf-Dieter; Brill, Stefan; Bruce, Iain; Buchman, Craig; Caversaccio, Marco; De Bodt, Marc T; Dillon, Meg; Godey, Benoit; Green, Kevin; Gstoettner, Wolfgang; Hagen, Rudolf; Hagr, Abdulrahman; Han, Demin; Kameswaran, Mohan; Karltorp, Eva; Kompis, Martin; Kuzovkov, Vlad; Lassaletta, Luis; Li, Yongxin; Lorens, Artur; Martin, Jane; Manoj, Manikoth; Mertens, Griet; Mlynski, Robert; Mueller, Joachim; O'Driscoll, Martin; Parnes, Lorne; Pulibalathingal, Sasidharan; Radeloff, Andreas; Raine, Christopher H; Rajan, Gunesh; Rajeswaran, Ranjith; Schmutzhard, Joachim; Skarzynski, Henryk; Skarzynski, Piotr; Sprinzl, Georg; Staecker, Hinrich; Stephan, Kurt; Sugarova, Serafima; Tavora, Dayse; Usami, Shin-Ichi; Yanov, Yuri; Zernotti, Mario; Zorowka, Patrick; de Heyning, Paul Van

    2015-01-01

    Bone conduction implants are useful in patients with conductive and mixed hearing loss for whom conventional surgery or hearing aids are no longer an option. They may also be used in patients affected by single-sided deafness. To establish a consensus on the quality standards required for centers willing to create a bone conduction implant program. To ensure a consistently high level of service and to provide patients with the best possible solution the members of the HEARRING network have established a set of quality standards for bone conduction implants. These standards constitute a realistic minimum attainable by all implant clinics and should be employed alongside current best practice guidelines. Fifteen items are thoroughly analyzed. They include team structure, accommodation and clinical facilities, selection criteria, evaluation process, complete preoperative and surgical information, postoperative fitting and assessment, follow-up, device failure, clinical management, transfer of care and patient complaints.

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging investigation of the bone conduction implant – a pilot study at 1.5 Tesla

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansson, Karl-Johan Fredén; Håkansson, Bo; Reinfeldt, Sabine; Rigato, Cristina; Eeg-Olofsson, Måns

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The objective of this pilot study was to investigate if an active bone conduction implant (BCI) used in an ongoing clinical study withstands magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of 1.5 Tesla. In particular, the MRI effects on maximum power output (MPO), total harmonic distortion (THD), and demagnetization were investigated. Implant activation and image artifacts were also evaluated. Methods and materials One implant was placed on the head of a test person at the position corresponding to the normal position of an implanted BCI and applied with a static pressure using a bandage and scanned in a 1.5 Tesla MRI camera. Scanning was performed both with and without the implant, in three orthogonal planes, and for one spin-echo and one gradient-echo pulse sequence. Implant functionality was verified in-between the scans using an audio processor programmed to generate a sequence of tones when attached to the implant. Objective verification was also carried out by measuring MPO and THD on a skull simulator as well as retention force, before and after MRI. Results It was found that the exposure of 1.5 Tesla MRI only had a minor effect on the MPO, ie, it decreased over all frequencies with an average of 1.1±2.1 dB. The THD remained unchanged above 300 Hz and was increased only at lower frequencies. The retention magnet was demagnetized by 5%. The maximum image artifacts reached a distance of 9 and 10 cm from the implant in the coronal plane for the spin-echo and the gradient-echo sequence, respectively. The test person reported no MRI induced sound from the implant. Conclusion This pilot study indicates that the present BCI may withstand 1.5 Tesla MRI with only minor effects on its performance. No MRI induced sound was reported, but the head image was highly distorted near the implant. PMID:26604836

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging investigation of the bone conduction implant - a pilot study at 1.5 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansson, Karl-Johan Fredén; Håkansson, Bo; Reinfeldt, Sabine; Rigato, Cristina; Eeg-Olofsson, Måns

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this pilot study was to investigate if an active bone conduction implant (BCI) used in an ongoing clinical study withstands magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of 1.5 Tesla. In particular, the MRI effects on maximum power output (MPO), total harmonic distortion (THD), and demagnetization were investigated. Implant activation and image artifacts were also evaluated. One implant was placed on the head of a test person at the position corresponding to the normal position of an implanted BCI and applied with a static pressure using a bandage and scanned in a 1.5 Tesla MRI camera. Scanning was performed both with and without the implant, in three orthogonal planes, and for one spin-echo and one gradient-echo pulse sequence. Implant functionality was verified in-between the scans using an audio processor programmed to generate a sequence of tones when attached to the implant. Objective verification was also carried out by measuring MPO and THD on a skull simulator as well as retention force, before and after MRI. It was found that the exposure of 1.5 Tesla MRI only had a minor effect on the MPO, ie, it decreased over all frequencies with an average of 1.1±2.1 dB. The THD remained unchanged above 300 Hz and was increased only at lower frequencies. The retention magnet was demagnetized by 5%. The maximum image artifacts reached a distance of 9 and 10 cm from the implant in the coronal plane for the spin-echo and the gradient-echo sequence, respectively. The test person reported no MRI induced sound from the implant. This pilot study indicates that the present BCI may withstand 1.5 Tesla MRI with only minor effects on its performance. No MRI induced sound was reported, but the head image was highly distorted near the implant.

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging investigation of the bone conduction implant – a pilot study at 1.5 Tesla

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fredén Jansson KJ

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Karl-Johan Fredén Jansson,1 Bo Håkansson,1 Sabine Reinfeldt,1 Cristina Rigato,1 Måns Eeg-Olofsson2 1Department of Signals and Systems, Chalmers University of Technology, 2Deptartment of Otorhinolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden Purpose: The objective of this pilot study was to investigate if an active bone conduction implant (BCI used in an ongoing clinical study withstands magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of 1.5 Tesla. In particular, the MRI effects on maximum power output (MPO, total harmonic distortion (THD, and demagnetization were investigated. Implant activation and image artifacts were also evaluated.Methods and materials: One implant was placed on the head of a test person at the position corresponding to the normal position of an implanted BCI and applied with a static pressure using a bandage and scanned in a 1.5 Tesla MRI camera. Scanning was performed both with and without the implant, in three orthogonal planes, and for one spin-echo and one gradient-echo pulse sequence. Implant functionality was verified in-between the scans using an audio processor programmed to generate a sequence of tones when attached to the implant. Objective verification was also carried out by measuring MPO and THD on a skull simulator as well as retention force, before and after MRI.Results: It was found that the exposure of 1.5 Tesla MRI only had a minor effect on the MPO, ie, it decreased over all frequencies with an average of 1.1±2.1 dB. The THD remained unchanged above 300 Hz and was increased only at lower frequencies. The retention magnet was demagnetized by 5%. The maximum image artifacts reached a distance of 9 and 10 cm from the implant in the coronal plane for the spin-echo and the gradient-echo sequence, respectively. The test person reported no MRI induced sound from the implant.Conclusion: This pilot study indicates that the present BCI

  8. Enhancement of electrical conductivity of ion-implanted polymer films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brock, S.

    1985-01-01

    The electrical conductivity of ion-implanted films of Nylon 66, Polypropylene (PP), Poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (Teflon) and mainly Poly (ethylene terephthalate) (PET) was determined by DC measurements at voltages up to 4500 V and compared with the corresponding values of pristine films. Measurements were made at 21 0 C +/- 1 0 C and 65 +/- 2% RH. The electrical conductivity of PET films implanted with F + , Ar + , or As + ions at energies of 50 keV increases by seven orders of magnitude as the fluence increases from 1 x 10 18 to 1 x 10 20 ions/m 2 . The conductivity of films implanted with As + was approximately one order greater than those implanted with Ar + , which in turn was approximately one-half order greater than those implanted with F + . The conductivity of the most conductive film ∼1 S/m) was almost 14 orders of magnitude greater than the pristine PET film. Except for the three PET samples implanted at fluences near 1 x 10 20 ions/m 2 with F + , Ar + , and As + ions, all implanted films were ohmic up to an electric field strength of 600 kV/m. The temperature dependence of the conductivity of the three PET films implanted near a fluence of 1 x 10 20 ions/m 2 was measured over the range of 80 K < T < 300 K

  9. Steroid therapy and conduction disturbances after transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havakuk, Ofer; Konigstein, Maayan; Ben Assa, Eyal; Arbel, Yaron; Abramowitz, Yigal; Halkin, Amir; Bazan, Samuel; Shmilovich, Haim; Keren, Gad; Finkelstein, Ariel; Banai, Shmuel

    2016-10-01

    Direct mechanical compression of the frame struts on the adjacent bundle branch with local inflammatory reaction might cause conduction system disturbances and need for pacemaker implantation following transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). We assessed the impact of preprocedural anti-inflammatory steroid therapy on the occurrence of conduction disturbances following TAVI. From a cohort of 324 patients who underwent transfemoral TAVI, 39 (12%) were pretreated with steroids because of iodine allergy (n=29) or active obstructive pulmonary disease (n=10). We compared the rate of occurrence of new conduction disturbances and pacemaker implantation between TAVI patients with (n=39) and without (n=285) steroid treatment, using Cox logistic regression estimates and proportional hazards models. The overall occurrence of new conduction defects and the need for new pacemaker implantation were similar among steroid and non-steroid-treated patients (38.4% vs 37.5% and 25.6% vs 25.3%, respectively). New conduction disturbances were more prevalent in patients treated with CoreValve prosthesis, low implantation, and smaller aortic annulus diameter (P<.001, P<.001, and P=.006, respectively). Thirty-day mortality and complication rates were similar between the groups. Although safe, steroid treatment prior to TAVI failed to reduce the incidence of new conduction defects and the need for pacemaker implantation. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. BCI using imaginary movements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohani, Darius Adam; Henning, William S.; Thomsen, Carsten E.

    2013-01-01

    Over the past two decades, much progress has been made in the rapidly evolving field of Brain Computer Interface (BCI). This paper presents a novel concept: a BCI-simulator, which has been developed for the Hex-O-Spell interface, using the sensory motor rhythms (SMR) paradigm. With the simulator...

  11. Ion implantation induced conducting nano-cluster formation in PPO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, A.; Patnaik, A.; Ghosh, G.; Dhara, S.

    1997-01-01

    Conversion of polymers and non-polymeric organic molecules from insulating to semiconducting materials as an effect of energetic ion implantation is an established fact. Formation of nano-clusters enriched with carbonaceous materials are made responsible for the insulator-semiconductor transition. Conduction in these implanted materials is observed to follow variable range hopping (VRH) mechanism. Poly(2,6-dimethyl phenylene oxide) [PPO] compatible in various proportion with polystyrene is used as a high thermal resistant insulating polymer. PPO has been used for the first time in the ion implantation study

  12. Electrical conductivity of platinum-implanted polymethylmethacrylate nanocomposite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvadori, M. C.; Teixeira, F. S.; Cattani, M.; Brown, I. G.

    2011-12-01

    Platinum/polymethylmethacrylate (Pt/PMMA) nanocomposite material was formed by low energy ion implantation of Pt into PMMA, and the transition from insulating to conducting phase was explored. In situ resistivity measurements were performed as the implantation proceeded, and transmission electron microscopy was used for direct visualization of Pt nanoparticles. Numerical simulation was carried out using the TRIDYN computer code to calculate the expected depth profiles of the implanted platinum. The maximum dose for which the Pt/PMMA system remains an insulator/conductor composite was found to be ϕ0 = 1.6 × 1016 cm-2, the percolation dose was 0.5 × 1016 cm-2, and the critical exponent was t = 1.46, indicating that the conductivity is due only to percolation. The results are compared with previously reported results for a Au/PMMA composite.

  13. Conductive polymer sensor arrays for smart orthopaedic implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micolini, Carolina; Holness, F. B.; Johnson, James A.; Price, Aaron D.

    2017-04-01

    This study proposes and demonstrates the design, implementation, and characterization of a 3D-printed smartpolymer sensor array using conductive polyaniline (PANI) structures embedded in a polymeric substrate. The piezoresistive characteristics of PANI were studied to evaluate the efficacy of the manufacturing of an embedded pressure sensor. PANI's stability throughout loading and unloading cycles together with the response to incremental loading cycles was investigated. It is demonstrated that this specially developed multi-material additive manufacturing process for polyaniline is a good candidate for the manufacture of implant components with smart-polymer sensors embedded for the analysis of joint loads in orthopaedic implants.

  14. Sound Localization in Patients With Congenital Unilateral Conductive Hearing Loss With a Transcutaneous Bone Conduction Implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyskocil, Erich; Liepins, Rudolfs; Kaider, Alexandra; Blineder, Michaela; Hamzavi, Sasan

    2017-03-01

    There is no consensus regarding the benefit of implantable hearing aids in congenital unilateral conductive hearing loss (UCHL). This study aimed to measure sound source localization performance in patients with congenital UCHL and contralateral normal hearing who received a new bone conduction implant. Evaluation of within-subject performance differences for sound source localization in a horizontal plane. Tertiary referral center. Five patients with atresia of the external auditory canal and contralateral normal hearing implanted with transcutaneous bone conduction implant at the Medical University of Vienna were tested. Activated/deactivated implant. Sound source localization test; localization performance quantified using the root mean square (RMS) error. Sound source localization ability was highly variable among individual subjects, with RMS errors ranging from 21 to 40 degrees. Horizontal plane localization performance in aided conditions showed statistically significant improvement compared with the unaided conditions, with RMS errors ranging from 17 to 27 degrees. The mean RMS error decreased by a factor of 0.71 (p conduction implant. Some patients with congenital UCHL might be capable of developing improved horizontal plane localization abilities with the binaural cues provided by this device.

  15. Electrical conductivity enhancement of polyethersulfone (PES) by ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bridwell, L.B.; Giedd, R.E.; Wang Yongqiang; Mohite, S.S.; Jahnke, T.; Brown, I.M.

    1991-01-01

    Amorphous polyethersulfone (PES) films have been implanted with a variety of ions (He, B, C, N and As) at a bombarding energy of 50 keV in the dose range 10 16 -10 17 ions/cm 2 . Surface resistance as a function of dose indicates a saturation effect with a significant difference between He and the other ions used. ESR line shapes in the He implanted samples changed from a mixed Gaussian/Lorentzian to a pure Lorentzian and narrowed with increasing dose. Temperature dependent resistivity indicates an electron hopping mechanism for conduction. Infrared results indicate cross-linking or self-cyclization occurred for all implanted ions with further destruction in the case of As. (orig.)

  16. Conduction Abnormalities and Pacemaker Implantations After SAPIEN 3 Vs SAPIEN XT Prosthesis Aortic Valve Implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husser, Oliver; Kessler, Thorsten; Burgdorf, Christof; Templin, Christian; Pellegrini, Costanza; Schneider, Simon; Kasel, Albert Markus; Kastrati, Adnan; Schunkert, Heribert; Hengstenberg, Christian

    2016-02-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation is increasingly used in patients with aortic stenosis. Post-procedural intraventricular conduction abnormalities and permanent pacemaker implantations remain a serious concern. Recently, the Edwards SAPIEN 3 prosthesis has replaced the SAPIEN XT. We sought to determine the incidences of new-onset intraventricular conduction abnormalities and permanent pacemaker implantations by comparing the 2 devices. We analyzed the last consecutive 103 patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve implantation with SAPIEN XT before SAPIEN 3 was used in the next 105 patients. To analyze permanent pacemaker implantations and new-onset intraventricular conduction abnormalities, patients with these conditions at baseline were excluded. Electrocardiograms were recorded at baseline, after the procedure, and before discharge. SAPIEN 3 was associated with higher device success (100% vs 92%; P=.005) and less paravalvular leakage (0% vs 7%; Ppacemaker implantations was 12.6% (23 of 183) with no difference between the 2 groups (SAPIEN 3: 12.5% [12 of 96] vs SAPIEN XT: 12.6% [11 of 87]; P=.99). SAPIEN 3 was associated with a higher rate of new-onset intraventricular conduction abnormalities (49% vs 27%; P=.007) due to a higher rate of fascicular blocks (17% vs 5%; P=.021). There was no statistically significant difference in transient (29% [20 of 69] vs persistent 19% [12 of 64]; P=.168) left bundle branch blocks (28% [19 of 69] vs 17% [11 of 64]; P=.154) when SAPIEN 3 was compared with SAPIEN XT. We found a trend toward a higher rate of new-onset intraventricular conduction abnormalities with SAPIEN 3 compared with SAPIEN XT, although this did not result in a higher permanent pacemaker implantation rate. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Effects of user mental state on EEG-BCI performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew eMyrden

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Changes in psychological state have been proposed as a cause of variation in brain-computer interface performance, but little formal analysis has been conducted to support this hypothesis. In this study, we investigated the effects of three mental states - fatigue, frustration, and attention - on BCI performance. Twelve able-bodied participants were trained to use a two-class EEG-BCI based on the performance of user-specific mental tasks. Following training, participants completed three testing sessions, during which they used the BCI to play a simple maze navigation game while periodically reporting their perceived levels of fatigue, frustration, and attention. Statistical analysis indicated that there is a significant relationship between frustration and BCI performance while the relationship between fatigue and BCI performance approached significance. BCI performance was 7% lower than average when self-reported fatigue was low and 10% lower than average when self-reported frustration was low. A multivariate analysis of mental state revealed the presence of contiguous regions in mental state space where BCI performance was more accurate than average, suggesting the importance of moderate fatigue for achieving effortless focus on BCI control, frustration as a potential motivating factor, and attention as a compensatory mechanism to increasing frustration. Finally, a visual analysis showed the sensitivity of underlying class distributions to changes in mental state. Collectively, these results indicate that mental state is closely related to BCI performance, encouraging future development of psychologically adaptive BCIs.

  18. Electrical conduction in 100 keV Kr+ ion implanted poly (ethylene terephthalate)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, P. K.; Kumar, V.; Gupta, Renu; Mahendia, S.; Anita, Kumar, S.

    2012-06-01

    Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) samples have been implanted to 100 keV Kr+ ions at the fluences 1×1015-- 1×1016 cm-2. From I-V characteristics, the conduction mechanism was found to be shifted from ohmic to space charge limited conduction (SCLC) after implantation. The surface conductivity of these implanted samples was found to increase with increasing implantation dose. The structural alterations in the Raman spectra of implanted PET samples indicate that such an increase in the conductivity may be attributed to the formation of conjugated double bonded carbonaceous structure in the implanted layer of PET.

  19. Thermal conductivity measurement of the He-ion implanted layer of W using transient thermoreflectance technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qu, Shilian; Li, Yuanfei [Laboratory of Advanced Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Wang, Zhigang [Department of Electronic Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Jia, Yuzhen [Laboratory of Advanced Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Science and Technology on Reactor Fuel and Materials Laboratory, Nuclear Power Institute of China, Chengdu 610213 (China); Li, Chun [School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, North China University of Technology, Beijing 100144 (China); Xu, Ben; Chen, Wanqi [Laboratory of Advanced Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Bai, Suyuan [School of Physics and Electronic Technology, Liaoning Normal University, Dalian 116029 (China); Huang, Zhengxing; Tang, Zhenan [Department of Electronic Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Liu, Wei, E-mail: liuw@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [Laboratory of Advanced Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2017-02-15

    Transient thermoreflectance method was applied on the thermal conductivity measurement of the surface damaged layer of He-implanted tungsten. Uniform damages tungsten surface layer was produced by multi-energy He-ion implantation with thickness of 450 nm. Result shows that the thermal conductivity is reduced by 90%. This technique was further applied on sample with holes on the surface, which was produced by the He-implanted at 2953 K. The thermal conductivity decreases to 3% from the bulk value.

  20. Conductive component after cochlear implantation in patients with residual hearing conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chole, Richard A; Hullar, Timothy E; Potts, Lisa G

    2014-12-01

    Changes in auditory thresholds following cochlear implantation are generally assumed to be due to damage to neural elements. Theoretical studies have suggested that placement of a cochlear implant can cause a conductive hearing loss. Identification of a conductive component following cochlear implantation could guide improvements in surgical techniques or device designs. The purpose of this study is to characterize new-onset conductive hearing losses after cochlear implantation. In a prospective study, air- and bone-conduction audiometric testing were completed on cochlear implant recipients. An air-bone gap equal to or greater than 15 dB HL at 2 frequencies determined the presence of a conductive component. Of the 32 patients with preoperative bone-conduction hearing, 4 patients had a new-onset conductive component resulting in a mixed hearing loss, with air-conduction thresholds ranging from moderate to profound and an average air-bone gap of 30 dB HL. One had been implanted through the round window, 2 had an extended round window, and 1 had a separate cochleostomy. Loss of residual hearing following cochlear implantation may be due in part to a conductive component. Identifying the mechanism for this conductive component may help minimize hearing loss. Postoperative hearing evaluation should measure both air- and bone-conduction thresholds.

  1. Interruption of Electrical Conductivity of Titanium Dental Implants Suggests a Path Towards Elimination Of Corrosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozhitkov, Alex E; Daubert, Diane; Brochwicz Donimirski, Ashley; Goodgion, Douglas; Vagin, Mikhail Y; Leroux, Brian G; Hunter, Colby M; Flemmig, Thomas F; Noble, Peter A; Bryers, James D

    2015-01-01

    Peri-implantitis is an inflammatory disease that results in the destruction of soft tissue and bone around the implant. Titanium implant corrosion has been attributed to the implant failure and cytotoxic effects to the alveolar bone. We have documented the extent of titanium release into surrounding plaque in patients with and without peri-implantitis. An in vitro model was designed to represent the actual environment of an implant in a patient's mouth. The model uses actual oral microbiota from a volunteer, allows monitoring electrochemical processes generated by biofilms growing on implants and permits control of biocorrosion electrical current. As determined by next generation DNA sequencing, microbial compositions in experiments with the in vitro model were comparable with the compositions found in patients with implants. It was determined that the electrical conductivity of titanium implants was the key factor responsible for the biocorrosion process. The interruption of the biocorrosion current resulted in a 4-5 fold reduction of corrosion. We propose a new design of dental implant that combines titanium in zero oxidation state for osseointegration and strength, interlaid with a nonconductive ceramic. In addition, we propose electrotherapy for manipulation of microbial biofilms and to induce bone healing in peri-implantitis patients.

  2. Interruption of Electrical Conductivity of Titanium Dental Implants Suggests a Path Towards Elimination Of Corrosion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex E Pozhitkov

    Full Text Available Peri-implantitis is an inflammatory disease that results in the destruction of soft tissue and bone around the implant. Titanium implant corrosion has been attributed to the implant failure and cytotoxic effects to the alveolar bone. We have documented the extent of titanium release into surrounding plaque in patients with and without peri-implantitis. An in vitro model was designed to represent the actual environment of an implant in a patient's mouth. The model uses actual oral microbiota from a volunteer, allows monitoring electrochemical processes generated by biofilms growing on implants and permits control of biocorrosion electrical current. As determined by next generation DNA sequencing, microbial compositions in experiments with the in vitro model were comparable with the compositions found in patients with implants. It was determined that the electrical conductivity of titanium implants was the key factor responsible for the biocorrosion process. The interruption of the biocorrosion current resulted in a 4-5 fold reduction of corrosion. We propose a new design of dental implant that combines titanium in zero oxidation state for osseointegration and strength, interlaid with a nonconductive ceramic. In addition, we propose electrotherapy for manipulation of microbial biofilms and to induce bone healing in peri-implantitis patients.

  3. Modifying the conductivity of polypyrrole through low-energy lead ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Booth, Marsilea Adela; Leveneur, Jérôme; Costa, Alexsandro Santos; Kennedy, John; Harbison, SallyAnn; Travas-Sejdic, Jadranka

    2012-01-01

    Interest lies in the creation of novel nanocomposite materials obtained through mixing, impregnation or incorporation techniques. One such technique is ion implantation which possesses the potential for retaining properties from the base material and implanted material as well as any effects observed from combining the two. To this end low-energy (15 keV) implantation of lead ions of various fluences was performed in conducting polypyrrole films. The presence of lead-rich particles was evidenced through transmission electron microscopy. An interesting trend was observed between fluence and conductivity. Of the fluences tested, the optimum fluences of lead ion implantation in polypyrrole films for enhanced conductivity are 5 × 10 14 at. cm −2 and 2 × 10 15 at. cm −2 . The conductivity and stability appear to result from a combination of effects: polymer degradation arising from ion beam damage, an increase in charge-carriers (dications) present after implantation and precipitation of Pb-rich nanoparticles. Monitoring conductivity over time showed increased retention of conductivity levels after lead implantation. Improvements in stability for polypyrrole open avenues for application and bring polypyrrole one step closer to practical use. A mechanism is suggested for this advantageous retained conductivity. -- Highlights: ► Implanted and characterized polypyrrole films with Pb ions at different fluences. ► Samples indicate high conductivity when implanted with particular fluences. ► Increase in charge carriers and precipitation of conductive Pb-rich phase. ► Conductivity stability is higher for some implanted fluences than for pristine polypyrrole.

  4. Bonebridge Implantation for Conductive Hearing Loss in a Patient with Oval Window Atresia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Minbum

    2015-08-01

    The occurrence of oval window atresia is a rare anomaly with conductive hearing loss. Traditional atresia surgeries involve challenging surgical techniques with risks of irreversible inner ear damage. Recent reports on Bonebridge (Medel, Innsbruck, Austria), a novel implantable bone conduction hearing aid system, assert that the device is safe and effective for conductive hearing loss. We present a case of Bonebridge implantation in an eight-year-old girl with bilateral oval window atresia.

  5. Recovery of Ventriculo-Atrial Conduction after Adrenaline in Patients Implanted with Pacemakers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cismaru, Gabriel; Gusetu, Gabriel; Muresan, Lucian; Rosu, Radu; Andronache, Marius; Matuz, Roxana; Puiu, Mihai; Mester, Petru; Miclaus, Maria; Pop, Dana; Mircea, Petru Adrian; Zdrenghea, Dumitru

    2015-07-01

    Ventriculo-atrial (VA) conduction can have negative consequences for patients with implanted pacemakers and defibrillators. There is concern whether impaired VA conduction could recover during stressful situations. Although the influence of isoproterenol and atropine are well established, the effect of adrenaline has not been studied systematically. The objective of this study was to determine if adrenaline can facilitate recovery of VA conduction in patients implanted with pacemakers. A prospective study was conducted on 61 consecutive patients during a 4-month period (April-July 2014). The presence of VA conduction was assessed during the pacemaker implantation procedure. In case of an impaired VA conduction, adrenaline infusio was used as a stress surrogate to test conduction recovery. The indications for pacemaker implantation were: sinus node dysfunction in 18 patients, atrioventricular (AV) block in 40 patients, binodal dysfunction (sinus node+ AV node) in two patients and other (carotid sinus syndrome) in one patient. In the basal state, 15/61 (24.6%) presented spontaneous VA conduction and 46/61 (75.4%) had no VA conduction. After administration of adrenaline, there was VA conduction recovery in 5/46 (10.9%) patients. Adrenaline infusion produced recovery of VA conduction in 10.9% of patients with absent VA conduction in a basal state. Recovery of VA conduction during physiological or pathological stresses could be responsible for the pacemaker syndrome, PMT episodes, or certain implantable cardiac defibrillator detection issues. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Quadcopter control using a BCI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosca, S.; Leba, M.; Ionica, A.; Gamulescu, O.

    2018-01-01

    The paper presents how there can be interconnected two ubiquitous elements nowadays. On one hand, the drones, which are increasingly present and integrated into more and more fields of activity, beyond the military applications they come from, moving towards entertainment, real-estate, delivery and so on. On the other hand, unconventional man-machine interfaces, which are generous topics to explore now and in the future. Of these, we chose brain computer interface (BCI), which allows human-machine interaction without requiring any moving elements. The research consists of mathematical modeling and numerical simulation of a drone and a BCI. Then there is presented an application using a Parrot mini-drone and an Emotiv Insight BCI.

  7. Neurofeedback Training for BCI Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuper, Christa; Pfurtscheller, Gert

    Brain-computer interface (BCI) systems detect changes in brain signals that reflect human intention, then translate these signals to control monitors or external devices (for a comprehensive review, see [1]). BCIs typically measure electrical signals resulting from neural firing (i.e. neuronal action potentials, Electroencephalogram (ECoG), or Electroencephalogram (EEG)). Sophisticated pattern recognition and classification algorithms convert neural activity into the required control signals. BCI research has focused heavily on developing powerful signal processing and machine learning techniques to accurately classify neural activity [2-4].

  8. Vague BCK/BCI-algebras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arsham Borumand Saeid

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In this note, by using the concept of vague sets, the notion of vague \\(BCK/BCI\\-algebra is introduced. And the notions of \\(\\alpha\\-cut and vague-cut are introduced and the relationships between these notions and crisp subalgebras are studied.

  9. Empathy, Motivation, and P300 BCI performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonja C Kleih

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Motivation moderately influences Brain-Computer Interface (BCI performance in healthy subjects when monetary reward is used to manipulate extrinsic motivation. However, the motivation to use a BCI of severely paralyzed patients, who are potentially in need for BCI, could mainly be internal and thus, an intrinsic motivator may be more powerful. Also healthy subjects who participate in BCI studies could be intrinsically motivated as they may wish to contribute to research and thus extrinsic motivation by monetary reward would be less important than the content of the study. In this respect, motivation could be defined as motivation-to-help. The aim of this study was to investigate, whether subjects with high motivation for helping and who are highly empathic would perform better with a BCI controlled by event-related potentials (P300-BCI. We included N=20 healthy young participants naïve to BCI and grouped them according to their motivation for participating in a BCI study in a low and highly motivated group. Motivation was further manipulated with interesting or boring presentations about BCI and the possibility to help patients. Motivation for helping did neither influence BCI performance nor the P300 amplitude. Post-hoc, subjects were re-grouped according to their ability for perspective taking. We found significantly higher P300 amplitudes on parietal electrodes in participants with a low ability for perspective taking and therefore, lower empathy, as compared to participants with higher empathy. The lack of an effect of motivation on BCI performance contradicts previous findings and thus, requires further investigation. We speculate that subjects with higher empathy were less able to focus attention on the BCI task. Good perspective takers with regards to patients in potential need of BCI, may be more emotionally involved and therefore, less able to allocate attention on the BCI task at hand.

  10. Conduction disorders in the setting of transcatheter aortic valve implantation: a clinical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraccaro, Chiara; Napodano, Massimo; Tarantini, Giuseppe

    2013-06-01

    The presence of periprocedural conduction disorders (CDs) and the need for permanent pacemaker (PPM) after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) are frequent findings in clinical practice. Notwithstanding, robust information on the prognostic and therapeutic implications of these complications are lacking. The newly occurrence of CD after TAVI seems related to the trauma of the conduction system during procedure. On the contrary, major predictors for PPM implantation after TAVI seem to be the use of CoreValve prosthesis (Medtronic, Minneapolis, MN) and the presence of CD before TAVI. An accurate pre-TAVI screening, careful valve implantation, as well as post-TAVI monitoring must be pursued to prevent avoidable PPM implantation. The aim of this report is to analyze the available data on this field and to propose some practical clinical tips to prevent or to manage these complications. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Gallium ion implantation greatly reduces thermal conductivity and enhances electronic one of ZnO nanowires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minggang Xia

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The electrical and thermal conductivities are measured for individual zinc oxide (ZnO nanowires with and without gallium ion (Ga+ implantation at room temperature. Our results show that Ga+ implantation enhances electrical conductivity by one order of magnitude from 1.01 × 103 Ω−1m−1 to 1.46 × 104 Ω−1m−1 and reduces its thermal conductivity by one order of magnitude from 12.7 Wm−1K−1 to 1.22 Wm−1K−1 for ZnO nanowires of 100 nm in diameter. The measured thermal conductivities are in good agreement with those in theoretical simulation. The increase of electrical conductivity origins in electron donor doping by Ga+ implantation and the decrease of thermal conductivity is due to the longitudinal and transverse acoustic phonons scattering by Ga+ point scattering. For pristine ZnO nanowires, the thermal conductivity decreases only two times when its diameter reduces from 100 nm to 46 nm. Therefore, Ga+-implantation may be a more effective method than diameter reduction in improving thermoelectric performance.

  12. Functional results after Bonebridge implantation in adults and children with conductive and mixed hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahne, Torsten; Seiwerth, Ingmar; Götze, Gerrit; Heider, Cornelia; Radetzki, Florian; Herzog, Michael; Plontke, Stefan K

    2015-11-01

    In patients with conductive hearing loss caused by middle ear disorders or atresia of the ear canal, a Bonebridge implantation can improve hearing by providing vibratory input to the temporal bone. The expected results are improved puretone thresholds and speech recognition. In the European Union, approval of the Bonebridge implantation was recently extended to children. We evaluated the functional outcome of a Bonebridge implantation for eight adults and three children. We found significant improvement in the puretone thresholds, with improvement in the air-bone gap. Speech recognition after surgery was significantly higher than in the best-aided situation before surgery. The Bonebridge significantly improved speech recognition in noisy environments and sound localization. In situations relevant to daily life, hearing deficits were nearly completely restored with the Bonebridge implantation in both adults and children.

  13. Surface-conductivity enhancement of PMMA by keV-energy metal-ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bannister, M.E.; Hijazi, H.; Meyer, H.M.; Cianciolo, V.; Meyer, F.W.

    2014-01-01

    An experiment has been proposed to measure the neutron electric dipole moment (nEDM) with high precision at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Spallation Neutron Source. One of the requirements of this experiment is the development of PMMA (Lucite) material with a sufficiently conductive surface to permit its use as a high-voltage electrode while immersed in liquid He. At the ORNL Multicharged Ion Research Facility, an R and D activity is under way to achieve suitable surface conductivity in poly-methyl methacrylate (PMMA) using metal ion implantation. The metal implantation is performed using an electron-cyclotron-resonance (ECR) ion source and a recently developed beam line deceleration module that is capable of providing high flux beams for implantation at energies as low as a few tens of eV. The latter is essential for reaching implantation fluences exceeding 1 × 10 16 cm −2 , where typical percolation thresholds in polymers have been reported. In this contribution, we report results on initial implantation of Lucite by Ti and W beams with keV energies to average fluences in the range 0.5–6.2 × 10 16 cm −2 . Initial measurements of surface-resistivity changes are reported as function of implantation fluence, energy, and sample temperature. We also report X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) surface and depth profiling measurements of the ion implanted samples, to identify possible correlations between the near surface and depth resolved implanted W concentrations and the measured surface resistivities

  14. Empathy, motivation, and P300 BCI performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleih, Sonja C; Kübler, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Motivation moderately influences brain-computer interface (BCI) performance in healthy subjects when monetary reward is used to manipulate extrinsic motivation. However, the motivation of severely paralyzed patients, who are potentially in need for BCI, could mainly be internal and thus, an intrinsic motivator may be more powerful. Also healthy subjects who participate in BCI studies could be internally motivated as they may wish to contribute to research and thus extrinsic motivation by monetary reward would be less important than the content of the study. In this respect, motivation could be defined as "motivation-to-help." The aim of this study was to investigate, whether subjects with high motivation for helping and who are highly empathic would perform better with a BCI controlled by event-related potentials (P300-BCI). We included N = 20 healthy young participants naïve to BCI and grouped them according to their motivation for participating in a BCI study in a low and highly motivated group. Motivation was further manipulated with interesting or boring presentations about BCI and the possibility to help patients. Motivation for helping did neither influence BCI performance nor the P300 amplitude. Post hoc, subjects were re-grouped according to their ability for perspective taking. We found significantly higher P300 amplitudes on parietal electrodes in participants with a low ability for perspective taking and therefore, lower empathy, as compared to participants with higher empathy. The lack of an effect of motivation on BCI performance contradicts previous findings and thus, requires further investigation. We speculate that subjects with higher empathy who are good perspective takers with regards to patients in potential need of BCI, may be more emotionally involved and therefore, less able to allocate attention on the BCI task at hand.

  15. First clinical experiences with an implantable bone conduction hearing aid at the University of Amsterdam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Hulst, R. J.; Dreschler, W. A.; Tange, R. A.

    1993-01-01

    A transcutaneous bone-conduction hearing aid was implanted in 11 patients who were not suitable for transcranial sound amplification. Audiological and surgical selection criteria were followed strictly. One device had to be explanted and minor revision surgery was needed in two cases for skin

  16. Middle ear implant in conductive and mixed congenital hearing loss in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Stéphane; Denoyelle, Françoise; Farinetti, Anne; Garabedian, Erea-Noel; Triglia, Jean-Michel

    2012-12-01

    Active middle ear implant can be used in children and adolescents with congenital hearing loss. The authors report their experience with the semi implantable Medel Vibrant Soundbridge(®) (VSB) in the audiologic rehabilitation of such patients. In this retrospective study, audiological and surgical data of 10 children (10.5±4 years) implanted with 12 VSB in 2 tertiary cares ENT Departments were analysed. Two children with bilateral external auditory canal (EAC) atresia and mixed hearing loss (mean air conduction (AC) thresholds=65dB HL) were bilaterally implanted. Eight children presented with microtia associated with EAC atresia bilaterally (n=3) and unilaterally (n=5). All of them had a conductive hearing loss in the implanted ear (mean (AC) thresholds were 58.75dB HL preoperatively). The Floating Mass Transducer was crimped on the long process of the incus (n=8) or on the suprastructure of the stapes (n=4). There were no intra- or postoperative surgical complications. All the children wore their implants after 5 weeks. Postoperative mean bone conduction (BC) thresholds were unchanged. The mean aided thresholds with VSB (four frequencies warble tones at 0.5, 1, 2 and 4 kHz) were 28dB HL (± 10). Word discrimination threshold in quiet conditions in free field with the VSB unilaterally activated was 50% at 38dB SPL (± 9). The results indicate that satisfaction of the children and their parents is very encouraging but surgeons should be cautious with this new approach in relation to the pinna reconstruction and to possible risks to inner ear and facial nerve. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Alpha neurofeedback training improves SSVEP-based BCI performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Feng; Nuno da Cruz, Janir; Nan, Wenya; Wong, Chi Man; Vai, Mang I.; Rosa, Agostinho

    2016-06-01

    Objective. Steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP)-based brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) can provide relatively easy, reliable and high speed communication. However, the performance is still not satisfactory, especially in some users who are not able to generate strong enough SSVEP signals. This work aims to strengthen a user’s SSVEP by alpha down-regulating neurofeedback training (NFT) and consequently improve the performance of the user in using SSVEP-based BCIs. Approach. An experiment with two steps was designed and conducted. The first step was to investigate the relationship between the resting alpha activity and the SSVEP-based BCI performance, in order to determine the training parameter for the NFT. Then in the second step, half of the subjects with ‘low’ performance (i.e. BCI classification accuracy <80%) were randomly assigned to a NFT group to perform a real-time NFT, and the rest half to a non-NFT control group for comparison. Main results. The first step revealed a significant negative correlation between the BCI performance and the individual alpha band (IAB) amplitudes in the eyes-open resting condition in a total of 33 subjects. In the second step, it was found that during the IAB down-regulating NFT, on average the subjects were able to successfully decrease their IAB amplitude over training sessions. More importantly, the NFT group showed an average increase of 16.5% in the SSVEP signal SNR (signal-to-noise ratio) and an average increase of 20.3% in the BCI classification accuracy, which was significant compared to the non-NFT control group. Significance. These findings indicate that the alpha down-regulating NFT can be used to improve the SSVEP signal quality and the subjects’ performance in using SSVEP-based BCIs. It could be helpful to the SSVEP related studies and would contribute to more effective SSVEP-based BCI applications.

  18. Wireless communication with implanted medical devices using the conductive properties of the body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, John E; Redish, A David

    2011-07-01

    Many medical devices that are implanted in the body use wires or wireless radiofrequency telemetry to communicate with circuitry outside the body. However, the wires are a common source of surgical complications, including breakage, infection and electrical noise. In addition, radiofrequency telemetry requires large amounts of power and results in low-efficiency transmission through biological tissue. As an alternative, the conductive properties of the body can be used to enable wireless communication with implanted devices. In this article, several methods of intrabody communication are described and compared. In addition to reducing the complications that occur with current implantable medical devices, intrabody communication can enable novel types of miniature devices for research and clinical applications.

  19. Engineering the heart: Evaluation of conductive nanomaterials for improving implant integration and cardiac function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jin; Chen, Jun; Sun, Hongyu; Qiu, Xiaozhong; Mou, Yongchao; Liu, Zhiqiang; Zhao, Yuwei; Li, Xia; Han, Yao; Duan, Cuimi; Tang, Rongyu; Wang, Chunlan; Zhong, Wen; Liu, Jie; Luo, Ying; (Mengqiu) Xing, Malcolm; Wang, Changyong

    2014-01-01

    Recently, carbon nanotubes together with other types of conductive materials have been used to enhance the viability and function of cardiomyocytes in vitro. Here we demonstrated a paradigm to construct ECTs for cardiac repair using conductive nanomaterials. Single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were incorporated into gelatin hydrogel scaffolds to construct three-dimensional ECTs. We found that SWNTs could provide cellular microenvironment in vitro favorable for cardiac contraction and the expression of electrochemical associated proteins. Upon implantation into the infarct hearts in rats, ECTs structurally integrated with the host myocardium, with different types of cells observed to mutually invade into implants and host tissues. The functional measurements showed that SWNTs were essential to improve the performance of ECTs in inhibiting pathological deterioration of myocardium. This work suggested that conductive nanomaterials hold therapeutic potential in engineering cardiac tissues to repair myocardial infarction. PMID:24429673

  20. Oxygen ion implantation induced microstructural changes and electrical conductivity in Bakelite RPC detector material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, K. V. Aneesh, E-mail: aneesh1098@gmail.com; Ravikumar, H. B., E-mail: hbr@physics.uni-mysore.ac.in [Department of Studies in Physics, University of Mysore, Mysore-570006 (India); Ranganathaiah, C., E-mail: cr@physics.uni-mysore.ac.in [Govt. Research Centre, Sahyadri Educational Institutions, Mangalore-575007 (India); Kumarswamy, G. N., E-mail: kumy79@gmail.com [Department of Studies in Physics, Amrita Vishwa Vidyapeetham, Bangalore-560035 (India)

    2016-05-06

    In order to explore the structural modification induced electrical conductivity, samples of Bakelite Resistive Plate Chamber (RPC) detector materials were exposed to 100 keV Oxygen ion in the fluences of 10{sup 12}, 10{sup 13}, 10{sup 14} and 10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2}. Ion implantation induced microstructural changes have been studied using Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy (PALS) and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) techniques. Positron lifetime parameters viz., o-Ps lifetime and its intensity shows the deposition of high energy interior track and chain scission leads to the formation of radicals, secondary ions and electrons at lower ion implantation fluences (10{sup 12} to10{sup 14} ions/cm{sup 2}) followed by cross-linking at 10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2} fluence due to the radical reactions. The reduction in electrical conductivity of Bakelite detector material is correlated to the conducting pathways and cross-links in the polymer matrix. The appropriate implantation energy and fluence of Oxygen ion on polymer based Bakelite RPC detector material may reduce the leakage current, improves the efficiency, time resolution and thereby rectify the aging crisis of the RPC detectors.

  1. Tools for Brain-Computer Interaction: a general concept for a hybrid BCI (hBCI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gernot R. Mueller-Putz

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to present the development of a hybrid Brain-Computer Interface (hBCI which combines existing input devices with a BCI. Thereby, the BCI should be available if the user wishes to extend the types of inputs available to an assistive technology system, but the user can also choose not to use the BCI at all; the BCI is active in the background. The hBCI might decide on the one hand which input channel(s offer the most reliable signal(s and switch between input channels to improve information transfer rate, usability, or other factors, or on the other hand fuse various input channels. One major goal therefore is to bring the BCI technology to a level where it can be used in a maximum number of scenarios in a simple way. To achieve this, it is of great importance that the hBCI is able to operate reliably for long periods, recognizing and adapting to changes as it does so. This goal is only possible if many different subsystems in the hBCI can work together. Since one research institute alone cannot provide such different functionality, collaboration between institutes is necessary. To allow for such a collaboration, a common software framework was investigated.

  2. Low power digital communication in implantable devices using volume conduction of biological tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Ning; Lee, Heung-No; Sclabassi, R J; Sun, Mingui

    2006-01-01

    This work investigates the data communication problem of implantable devices using fundamental theories in communications. We utilize the volume conduction property of biological tissues to establish a digital communications link. Data obtained through animal experiments are used to analyze the time and frequency response of the volume conduction channel as well as to characterize the biological signals and noises present in the system. A low power bandwidth efficient channel-coded modulation scheme is proposed to conserve battery power and reduce the health risks associated.

  3. Review of the BCI Competition IV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangermann, Michael; Müller, Klaus-Robert; Aertsen, Ad; Birbaumer, Niels; Braun, Christoph; Brunner, Clemens; Leeb, Robert; Mehring, Carsten; Miller, Kai J.; Müller-Putz, Gernot R.; Nolte, Guido; Pfurtscheller, Gert; Preissl, Hubert; Schalk, Gerwin; Schlögl, Alois; Vidaurre, Carmen; Waldert, Stephan; Blankertz, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    The BCI competition IV stands in the tradition of prior BCI competitions that aim to provide high quality neuroscientific data for open access to the scientific community. As experienced already in prior competitions not only scientists from the narrow field of BCI compete, but scholars with a broad variety of backgrounds and nationalities. They include high specialists as well as students. The goals of all BCI competitions have always been to challenge with respect to novel paradigms and complex data. We report on the following challenges: (1) asynchronous data, (2) synthetic, (3) multi-class continuous data, (4) session-to-session transfer, (5) directionally modulated MEG, (6) finger movements recorded by ECoG. As after past competitions, our hope is that winning entries may enhance the analysis methods of future BCIs. PMID:22811657

  4. CT pre-operative planning of a new semi-implantable bone conduction hearing device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Law, Eric K.C.; Bhatia, Kunwar S.S. [Prince of Wales Hospital, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Department of Imaging and Interventional Radiology, Hong Kong, SAR (China); Tsang, Willis S.S.; Tong, Michael C.F. [Prince of Wales Hospital, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Hong Kong, SAR (China); Shi, Lin [The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Department of Medicine and Therapeutics, Hong Kong, SAR (China); The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Chow Yuk Ho Technology Center for Innovative Medicine, Hong Kong, SAR (China)

    2016-06-15

    Accommodating a novel semi-implantable bone conduction hearing device within the temporal bone presents challenges for surgical planning. This study describes the utility of CT in pre-operative assessment of such an implant. Retrospective review of pre-operative CT, clinical and surgical records of 16 adults considered for device implantation. Radiological suitability was assessed on CT using 3D simulation software. Antero-posterior (AP) dimensions of the mastoid bone and minimum skull thickness were measured. CT planning results were correlated with operative records. Eight and five candidates were suitable for device placement in the transmastoid and retrosigmoid positions, respectively, and three were radiologically unsuitable. The mean AP diameter of the mastoid cavity was 14.6 mm for the transmastoid group and 4.6 mm for the retrosigmoid group (p < 0.05). Contracted mastoid and/or prior surgery were predisposing factors for unsuitability. Four transmastoid and five retrosigmoid positions required sigmoid sinus/dural depression and/or use of lifts due to insufficient bone capacity. A high proportion of patients being considered have contracted or operated mastoids, which reduces the feasibility of the transmastoid approach. This finding combined with the complex temporal bone geometry illustrates the importance of careful CT evaluation using 3D software for precise device simulation. (orig.)

  5. Preliminary functional results and quality of life after implantation of a new bone conduction hearing device in patients with conductive and mixed hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihler, Friedrich; Volbers, Laura; Blum, Jenny; Matthias, Christoph; Canis, Martin

    2014-02-01

    To review functional results and quality of life of the first patients implanted with a newly introduced bone conduction implant system. Retrospective chart analysis of 6 patients (6 ears) implanted for conductive hearing loss (CHL) and mixed hearing loss (MHL) in 1 tertiary referral center between July 2012 and February 2013. Implantation of a new bone conduction hearing device. Pure tone audiometry (air conduction and bone conduction thresholds, pure tone average, air-bone gap, and functional gain), speech audiometry (Freiburg Monosyllabic Test), intraoperative and postoperative complication rate, and patient satisfaction (Glasgow benefit inventory [GBI]) were assessed. Air-conduction pure tone average (PTA) was 58.8 ± 8.2 dB HL. Unaided average air-bone gap (ABG) was 33.3 ± 6.2 dB. Aided air-conduction PTA in sound field was 25.2 ± 5.1 dB HL. Aided average ABG was -0.3 ± 7.3 dB. Average functional gain was 33.6 ± 7.2 dB. Mean improvement of GBI was +36.1. No intraoperative complications occurred. During a follow-up period of 8.5 ± 2.2 months, no device failure and no need for revision surgery occurred. Audiometric results of the new bone conduction hearing system are satisfying and comparable to the results of devices that have been applied previously for CHL and MHL. Intraoperatively and postoperatively, no complications were noted.

  6. Concept of software interface for BCI systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svejda, Jaromir; Zak, Roman; Jasek, Roman

    2016-06-01

    Brain Computer Interface (BCI) technology is intended to control external system by brain activity. One of main part of such system is software interface, which carries about clear communication between brain and either computer or additional devices connected to computer. This paper is organized as follows. Firstly, current knowledge about human brain is briefly summarized to points out its complexity. Secondly, there is described a concept of BCI system, which is then used to build an architecture of proposed software interface. Finally, there are mentioned disadvantages of sensing technology discovered during sensing part of our research.

  7. A note on p-semisimple BCI-algebras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aslam, M.; Thaheem, A.B.

    1989-07-01

    In this note we prove some equivalent conditions for p-semisimple BCI-algebras. We also show that if X is a p-semisimple BCI-algebra then Hom(X), the set of all homomorphisms of X is a (p-semisimple) BCI-algebra, thus extending the class of BCI-algebras with this property as proposed. We also study some duality conditions. (author). 11 refs

  8. Active Bone Conduction Prosthesis: BonebridgeTM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zernotti, Mario E.

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Bone conduction implants are indicated for patients with conductive and mixed hearing loss, as well as for patients with single-sided deafness (SSD. The transcutaneous technology avoids several complications of the percutaneous bone conduction implants including skin reaction, skin growth over the abutment, and wound infection. The Bonebridge (MED-EL, Austria prosthesis is a semi-implantable hearing system: the BCI (Bone Conduction Implant is the implantable part that contains the Bone Conduction-Floating Mass Transducer (BC-FMT, which applies the vibrations directly to the bone; the external component is the audio processor Amadé BB (MED-EL, Austria, which digitally processes the sound and sends the information through the coil to the internal part. Bonebridge may be implanted through three different approaches: the transmastoid, the retrosigmoid, or the middle fossa approach. Objective This systematic review aims to describe the world́s first active bone conduction implant system, Bonebridge, as well as describe the surgical techniques in the three possible approaches, showing results from implant centers in the world in terms of functional gain, speech reception thresholds and word recognition scores. Data Synthesis The authors searched the MEDLINE database using the key term Bonebridge. They selected only five publications to include in this systematic review. The review analyzes 20 patients that received Bonebridge implants with different approaches and pathologies. Conclusion Bonebridge is a solution for patients with conductive/mixed hearing loss and SSD with different surgical approaches, depending on their anatomy. The system imparts fewer complications than percutaneous bone conduction implants and shows proven benefits in speech discrimination and functional gain.

  9. Players' opinions on control and playability of a BCI game

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gürkök, Hayrettin; van de Laar, B.L.A.; Plass - Oude Bos, D.; Poel, Mannes; Nijholt, Antinus; Stephanidis, C; Antona, M.

    2014-01-01

    Brain-computer interface (BCI) games can satisfy our need for competence by providing us with challenges that we should enjoy tackling. However, many BCI games that claim to provide enjoyable challenges fail to do so. Some common fallacies and pitfalls about BCI games play a role in this failure and

  10. Depth of valve implantation, conduction disturbances and pacemaker implantation with CoreValve and CoreValve Accutrak system for Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation, a multi-center study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenders, Guy D; Collas, Valérie; Hernandez, José Maria; Legrand, Victor; Danenberg, Haim D; den Heijer, Peter; Rodrigus, Inez E; Paelinck, Bernard P; Vrints, Christiaan J; Bosmans, Johan M

    2014-10-20

    Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation (TAVI) is now considered an indispensable treatment strategy in high operative risk patients with severe, symptomatic aortic stenosis. However, conduction disturbances and the need for Permanent Pacemaker (PPM) implantation after TAVI with the CoreValve prosthesis still remain frequent. We aimed to evaluate the implantation depth, the incidence and predictors of new conduction disturbances, and the need for PPM implantation within the first month after TAVI, using the new Accutrak CoreValve delivery system (ACV), compared to the previous generation CoreValve (non-ACV). In 5 experienced TAVI-centers, a total of 120 consecutive non-ACV and 112 consecutive ACV patients were included (n=232). The mean depth of valve implantation (DVI) was 8.4±4.0 mm in the non-ACV group and 7.1±4.0 mm in the ACV group (p=0.034). The combined incidence of new PPM implantation and new LBBB was 71.2% in the non-ACV group compared to 50.5% in the ACV group (p=0.014). DVI (p=0.002), first degree AV block (p=0.018) and RBBB (p<0.001) were independent predictors of PPM implantation. DVI (p<0.001) and pre-existing first degree AV-block (p=0.021) were identified as significant predictors of new LBBB. DVI is an independent predictor of TAVI-related conduction disturbances and can be reduced by using the newer CoreValve Accutrak delivery system, resulting in a significantly lower incidence of new LBBB and new PPM implantation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Evaluation of long-term patient satisfaction and experience with the Baha(®) bone conduction implant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jacob; Olsen, Steen Østergaard; Nielsen, Lars Holme

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Evaluate long-term patient satisfaction with bone-anchored hearing aids (the Baha(R), now referred to by Cochlear as a 'bone conduction implant') in our hospital clinic spanning the eighteen-year period from the inception of our Baha program. The researchers further wished to analyse t...

  12. Active training paradigm for motor imagery BCI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junhua; Zhang, Liqing

    2012-06-01

    Brain-computer interface (BCI) allows the use of brain activities for people to directly communicate with the external world or to control external devices without participation of any peripheral nerves and muscles. Motor imagery is one of the most popular modes in the research field of brain-computer interface. Although motor imagery BCI has some advantages compared with other modes of BCI, such as asynchronization, it is necessary to require training sessions before using it. The performance of trained BCI system depends on the quality of training samples or the subject engagement. In order to improve training effect and decrease training time, we proposed a new paradigm where subjects participated in training more actively than in the traditional paradigm. In the traditional paradigm, a cue (to indicate what kind of motor imagery should be imagined during the current trial) is given to the subject at the beginning of a trial or during a trial, and this cue is also used as a label for this trial. It is usually assumed that labels for trials are accurate in the traditional paradigm, although subjects may not have performed the required or correct kind of motor imagery, and trials may thus be mislabeled. And then those mislabeled trials give rise to interference during model training. In our proposed paradigm, the subject is required to reconfirm the label and can correct the label when necessary. This active training paradigm may generate better training samples with fewer inconsistent labels because it overcomes mistakes when subject's motor imagination does not match the given cues. The experiments confirm that our proposed paradigm achieves better performance; the improvement is significant according to statistical analysis.

  13. Binaural enhancement for bilateral cochlear implant users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Christopher A

    2014-01-01

    Bilateral cochlear implant (BCI) users receive limited binaural cues and, thus, show little improvement to speech intelligibility from spatial cues. The feasibility of a method for enhancing the binaural cues available to BCI users is investigated. This involved extending interaural differences of levels, which typically are restricted to high frequencies, into the low-frequency region. Speech intelligibility was measured in BCI users listening over headphones and with direct stimulation, with a target talker presented to one side of the head in the presence of a masker talker on the other side. Spatial separation was achieved by applying either naturally occurring binaural cues or enhanced cues. In this listening configuration, BCI patients showed greater speech intelligibility with the enhanced binaural cues than with naturally occurring binaural cues. In some situations, it is possible for BCI users to achieve greater speech intelligibility when binaural cues are enhanced by applying interaural differences of levels in the low-frequency region.

  14. BCI meeting 2005--workshop on technology: hardware and software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cincotti, Febo; Bianchi, Luigi; Birch, Gary; Guger, Christoph; Mellinger, Jürgen; Scherer, Reinhold; Schmidt, Robert N; Yáñez Suárez, Oscar; Schalk, Gerwin

    2006-06-01

    This paper describes the outcome of discussions held during the Third International BCI Meeting at a workshop to review and evaluate the current state of BCI-related hardware and software. Technical requirements and current technologies, standardization procedures and future trends are covered. The main conclusion was recognition of the need to focus technical requirements on the users' needs and the need for consistent standards in BCI research.

  15. Predicting BCI subject performance using probabilistic spatio-temporal filters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heung-Il Suk

    Full Text Available Recently, spatio-temporal filtering to enhance decoding for Brain-Computer-Interfacing (BCI has become increasingly popular. In this work, we discuss a novel, fully Bayesian-and thereby probabilistic-framework, called Bayesian Spatio-Spectral Filter Optimization (BSSFO and apply it to a large data set of 80 non-invasive EEG-based BCI experiments. Across the full frequency range, the BSSFO framework allows to analyze which spatio-spectral parameters are common and which ones differ across the subject population. As expected, large variability of brain rhythms is observed between subjects. We have clustered subjects according to similarities in their corresponding spectral characteristics from the BSSFO model, which is found to reflect their BCI performances well. In BCI, a considerable percentage of subjects is unable to use a BCI for communication, due to their missing ability to modulate their brain rhythms-a phenomenon sometimes denoted as BCI-illiteracy or inability. Predicting individual subjects' performance preceding the actual, time-consuming BCI-experiment enhances the usage of BCIs, e.g., by detecting users with BCI inability. This work additionally contributes by using the novel BSSFO method to predict the BCI-performance using only 2 minutes and 3 channels of resting-state EEG data recorded before the actual BCI-experiment. Specifically, by grouping the individual frequency characteristics we have nicely classified them into the subject 'prototypes' (like μ - or β -rhythm type subjects or users without ability to communicate with a BCI, and then by further building a linear regression model based on the grouping we could predict subjects' performance with the maximum correlation coefficient of 0.581 with the performance later seen in the actual BCI session.

  16. Attention-level transitory response: a novel hybrid BCI approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diez, Pablo F.; Garcés Correa, Agustina; Orosco, Lorena; Laciar, Eric; Mut, Vicente

    2015-10-01

    Objective. People with disabilities may control devices such as a computer or a wheelchair by means of a brain-computer interface (BCI). BCI based on steady-state visual evoked potentials (SSVEP) requires visual stimulation of the user. However, this SSVEP-based BCI suffers from the ‘Midas touch effect’, i.e., the BCI can detect an SSVEP even when the user is not gazing at the stimulus. Then, these incorrect detections deteriorate the performance of the system, especially in asynchronous BCI because ongoing EEG is classified. In this paper, a novel transitory response of the attention-level of the user is reported. It was used to develop a hybrid BCI (hBCI). Approach. Three methods are proposed to detect the attention-level of the user. They are based on the alpha rhythm and theta/beta rate. The proposed hBCI scheme is presented along with these methods. Hence, the hBCI sends a command only when the user is at a high-level of attention, or in other words, when the user is really focused on the task being performed. The hBCI was tested over two different EEG datasets. Main results. The performance of the hybrid approach is superior to the standard one. Improvements of 20% in accuracy and 10 bits min-1 are reported. Moreover, the attention-level is extracted from the same EEG channels used in SSVEP detection and this way, no extra hardware is needed. Significance. A transitory response of EEG signal is used to develop the attention-SSVEP hBCI which is capable of reducing the Midas touch effect.

  17. User Experience Evaluation in BCI: Mind the Gap!

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plass - Oude Bos, D.; Gürkök, Hayrettin; van de Laar, B.L.A.; Nijboer, Femke; Nijholt, Antinus

    2011-01-01

    Generally brain-computer interface (BCI) systems are evaluated based on the assumption that the user is trying to perform a specific task in the most efficient way. BCI for entertainment yields interesting applications for both patients and healthy users. Then the purpose is to create positive

  18. BCI and a User’s Judgment of Agency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlek, R.J.; Acken, J.P. van; Beurskens, E.; Roijendijk, L.M.M.; Haselager, W.F.G.; Grübler, G.; Hildt, E.

    2014-01-01

    Performing an action with the assistance of a BCI may affect a user’s judgment of agency, resulting in an illusion of control, or automatism. We analyze this possibility from a theoretical perspective and discuss various factors that might influence a user’s judgment of agency in a BCI context. We

  19. Bacteria Hunt: Evaluating multi-paradigm BCI interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mühl, C.; Gürkök, Hayrettin; Plass - Oude Bos, D.; Thurlings, Marieke E.; Scherffig, Lasse; Duvinage, Matthieu; Elbakyan, Alexandra A.; Kang, SungWook; Poel, Mannes; Heylen, Dirk K.J.

    The multimodal, multi-paradigm brain-computer interfacing (BCI) game Bacteria Hunt was used to evaluate two aspects of BCI interaction in a gaming context. One goal was to examine the effect of feedback on the ability of the user to manipulate his mental state of relaxation. This was done by having

  20. Implantable bladder volume sensor based on resistor ladder network composed of conductive hydrogel composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi Kyung Kim; Hyojung Kim; Jung, Yeon Su; Adem, Kenana M A; Bawazir, Sarah S; Stefanini, Cesare; Lee, Hyunjoo J

    2017-07-01

    An accurate bladder volume monitoring system is a critical component in diagnosis and treatment of urological disorders. Here, we report an implantable bladder volume sensor with a multi-level resistor ladder which estimates the bladder volume through discrete resistance values. Discretization allows the sensor output to be resilient to the long-term drift, hysteresis, and degradation of the sensor materials. Our sensor is composed of biocompatible polypyrrole/agarose hydrogel composite. Because Young's modulus of this composite is comparable to that of the bladder wall, the effect of mechanical loading of the sensor on the bladder movement is minimized which allows more accurate volume monitoring. We also demonstrate the patterning and molding capability of this material by fabrication various structures. Lastly, we successfully demonstrate the functionality of the multi-level resistor ladder sensor as a bladder volume sensor by attaching the sensor on the pig's bladder and observing the impedance change of the sensor.

  1. Spatial resolution and maximum compensation factor of two-dimensional selective excitation pulses for MRI of objects containing conductive implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taeseong Woo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available A quantitative diagnosis using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI can be disturbed by radiofrequency (RF field inhomogeneity induced by the conductive implants. This inhomogeneity causes a local decrease of the signal intensity around the conductor, resulting in a deterioration of the accurate quantification. In a previous study, we developed an MRI imaging method using a two-dimensional selective excitation pulse (2D pulse to mitigate signal inhomogeneity induced by metallic implants. In this paper, the effect of 2D pulse was evaluated quantitatively by numerical simulation and MRI experiments. We introduced two factors for evaluation, spatial resolution and maximum compensation factor. Numerical simulations were performed with two groups. One group was composed of four models with different signal loss width, to evaluate the spatial resolution of the 2D pulse. The other group is also composed of four models with different amounts of signal loss for evaluating maximum compensation factor. In MRI experiments, we prepared phantoms containing conductors, which have different electrical conductivities related with the amounts of signal intensity decrease. The recovery of signal intensity was observed by 2D pulses, in both numerical simulations and experiments.

  2. Investigating effects of different artefact types on motor imagery BCI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frølich, Laura; Winkler, Irene; Muller, Klaus-Robert

    2015-01-01

    Artefacts in recordings of the electroencephalogram (EEG) are a common problem in Brain-Computer Interfaces (BCIs). Artefacts make it difficult to calibrate from training sessions, resulting in low test performance, or lead to artificially high performance when unintentionally used for BCI control...... that muscle, but not ocular, artefacts adversely affect BCI performance when all 119 EEG channels are used. Artefacts have little influence when using 48 centrally located EEG channels in a configuration previously found to be optimal....

  3. Assisted closed-loop optimization of SSVEP-BCI efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacobo eFernandez-Vargas

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available We designed a novel assisted closed-loop optimization protocol to improve the efficiency of brain computer interfaces (BCI based on steady state visually evoked potentials (SSVEP. In traditional paradigms, the control over the BCI-performance completely depends on the subjects’ ability to learn from the given feedback cues. By contrast, in the proposed protocol both the subject and the machine share information and control over the BCI goal. Generally, the innovative assistance consists in the delivery of online information together with the online adaptation of BCI stimuli properties. In our case, this adaptive optimization process is realized by (i a closed-loop search for the best set of SSVEP flicker frequencies and (ii feedback of actual SSVEP magnitudes to both the subject and the machine. These closed-loop interactions between subject and machine are evaluated in real-time by continuous measurement of their efficiencies, which are used as online criteria to adapt the BCI control parameters. The proposed protocol aims to compensate for variability in possibly unknown subjects’ state and trait dimensions. In a study with N = 18 subjects, we found significant evidence that our protocol outperformed classic SSVEP-BCI control paradigms. Evidence is presented that it takes indeed into account interindividual variabilities: e.g. under the new protocol, baseline resting state EEG measures predict subjects’ BCI performances. This paper illustrates the promising potential of assisted closed-loop protocols in BCI systems. Probably their applicability might be expanded to innovative uses, e.g. as possible new diagnostic/therapeutic tools for clinical contexts and as new paradigms for basic research.

  4. Comparative study of 150 keV Ar+ and O+ ion implantation induced structural modification on electrical conductivity in Bakelite polymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aneesh Kumar, K. V.; Krishnaveni, S.; Asokan, K.; Ranganathaiah, C.; Ravikumar, H. B.

    2018-02-01

    A comparative study of 150 keV argon (Ar+) and oxygen (O+) ion implantation induced microstructural modifications in Bakelite Resistive Plate Chamber (RPC) detector material at different implantation fluences have been studied using Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy (PALS). Positron lifetime parameters viz., o-Ps lifetime (τ3) and its intensity (I3) upon lower implantation fluences can be interpreted as the cross-linking and the increased local temperature induced diffusion followed by trapping of ions in the interior polymer voids. The increased o-Ps lifetime (τ3) at higher O+ ion implantation fluences indicates chain scission owing to the oxidation and track formation. This is also justified by the X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) results. The modification in the microstructure and electrical conductivity of Bakelite materials are more upon implantation of O+ ions than Ar+ ions of same energy and fluences. The reduced electrical conductivity of Bakelite polymer material upon ion implantation of both the ions is correlated to the conducting pathways and cross-links in the polymer matrix. The appropriate energy and fluence of implanting ions might reduce the leakage current and hence improve the performance of Bakelite RPC detectors.

  5. Anisotropy of electrical conductivity in dc due to intrinsic defect formation in α-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} single crystal implanted with Mg ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tardío, M., E-mail: mtardio@fis.uc3m.es [Departamento de Física, Escuela Politécnica Superior, Universidad Carlos III, Avda. de la Universidad, 30, 28911 Leganés (Madrid) (Spain); Egaña, A.; Ramírez, R.; Muñoz-Santiuste, J.E. [Departamento de Física, Escuela Politécnica Superior, Universidad Carlos III, Avda. de la Universidad, 30, 28911 Leganés (Madrid) (Spain); Alves, E. [Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, 2695-066 Bobadela (Portugal)

    2016-07-15

    The electrical conductivity in α-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} single crystals implanted with Mg ions in two different crystalline orientations, parallel and perpendicular to c axis, was investigated. The samples were implanted at room temperature with energies of 50 and 100 keV and fluences of 1 × 10{sup 15}, 5 × 10{sup 15} and 5 × 10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2}. Optical characterization reveals slight differences in the absorption bands at 6.0 and 4.2 eV, attributed to F type centers and Mie scattering from Mg precipitates, respectively. DC electrical measurements using the four and two-point probe methods, between 295 and 490 K, were used to characterize the electrical conductivity of the implanted area (Meshakim and Tanabe, 2001). Measurements in this temperature range indicate that: (1) the electrical conductivity is thermally activated independently of crystallographic orientation, (2) resistance values in the implanted region decrease with fluence levels, and (3) the I–V characteristic of electrical contacts in samples with perpendicular c axis orientation is clearly ohmic, whereas contacts are blocking in samples with parallel c axis. When thin layers are sequentially removed from the implanted region by immersing the sample in a hot solution of nitric and fluorhydric acids the electrical resistance increases until reaching the values of non-implanted crystal (Jheeta et al., 2006). We conclude that the enhancement in conductivity observed in the implanted regions is related to the intrinsic defects created by the implantation rather than to the implanted Mg ions (da Silva et al., 2002; Tardío et al., 2001; Tardío et al., 2008).

  6. Context-aware adaptive spelling in motor imagery BCI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdikis, S.; Leeb, R.; Millán, J. d. R.

    2016-06-01

    Objective. This work presents a first motor imagery-based, adaptive brain-computer interface (BCI) speller, which is able to exploit application-derived context for improved, simultaneous classifier adaptation and spelling. Online spelling experiments with ten able-bodied users evaluate the ability of our scheme, first, to alleviate non-stationarity of brain signals for restoring the subject’s performances, second, to guide naive users into BCI control avoiding initial offline BCI calibration and, third, to outperform regular unsupervised adaptation. Approach. Our co-adaptive framework combines the BrainTree speller with smooth-batch linear discriminant analysis adaptation. The latter enjoys contextual assistance through BrainTree’s language model to improve online expectation-maximization maximum-likelihood estimation. Main results. Our results verify the possibility to restore single-sample classification and BCI command accuracy, as well as spelling speed for expert users. Most importantly, context-aware adaptation performs significantly better than its unsupervised equivalent and similar to the supervised one. Although no significant differences are found with respect to the state-of-the-art PMean approach, the proposed algorithm is shown to be advantageous for 30% of the users. Significance. We demonstrate the possibility to circumvent supervised BCI recalibration, saving time without compromising the adaptation quality. On the other hand, we show that this type of classifier adaptation is not as efficient for BCI training purposes.

  7. On the quantification of SSVEP frequency responses in human EEG in realistic BCI conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafał Kuś

    Full Text Available This article concerns one of the most important problems of brain-computer interfaces (BCI based on Steady State Visual Evoked Potentials (SSVEP, that is the selection of the a-priori most suitable frequencies for stimulation. Previous works related to this problem were done either with measuring systems that have little in common with actual BCI systems (e.g., single flashing LED or were presented on a small number of subjects, or the tested frequency range did not cover a broad spectrum. Their results indicate a strong SSVEP response around 10 Hz, in the range 13-25 Hz, and at high frequencies in the band of 40-60 Hz. In the case of BCI interfaces, stimulation with frequencies from various ranges are used. The frequencies are often adapted for each user separately. The selection of these frequencies, however, was not yet justified in quantitative group-level study with proper statistical account for inter-subject variability. The aim of this study is to determine the SSVEP response curve, that is, the magnitude of the evoked signal as a function of frequency. The SSVEP response was induced in conditions as close as possible to the actual BCI system, using a wide range of frequencies (5-30 Hz, in step of 1 Hz. The data were obtained for 10 subjects. SSVEP curves for individual subjects and the population curve was determined. Statistical analysis were conducted both on the level of individual subjects and for the group. The main result of the study is the identification of the optimal range of frequencies, which is 12-18 Hz, for the registration of SSVEP phenomena. The applied criterion of optimality was: to find the largest contiguous range of frequencies yielding the strong and constant-level SSVEP response.

  8. Functional results of Vibrant Soundbridge middle ear implants in conductive and mixed hearing losses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardeschi, Daniele; Hoffman, Caroline; Benchaa, Tarek; Labassi, Samia; Beliaeff, Michel; Sterkers, Olivier; Grayeli, Alexis Bozorg

    2011-01-01

    Our purpose was to evaluate the results of Vibrant Soundbridge (VSB) in conductive or mixed hearing loss. Twenty-five adult patients (29 ears) with a mixed or conductive hearing loss and various etiologies were included in this retrospective study. The preoperative ipsilateral pure tone average was 71 ± 3.0 dB, and the average bone conduction threshold was 42 ± 2.8 dB (n = 29). The transducer was placed on the long apophysis of the incus (n = 16), in the round window (n = 10) or on the stapes (n = 3). No complications were noted. The bone conduction threshold remained unchanged. VSB was activated in all cases. The postoperative pure tone average without VSB was 63 ± 3.9 dB (n = 24) and with VSB in free-field condition 24 ± 2.1 dB (n = 22). VSB is safe and efficacious for auditory rehabilitation in conductive and mixed hearing losses. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Classification of BCI Users Based on Cognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Firat Ozkan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain-Computer Interfaces (BCI are systems originally developed to assist paralyzed patients allowing for commands to the computer with brain activities. This study aims to examine cognitive state with an objective, easy-to-use, and easy-to-interpret method utilizing Brain-Computer Interface systems. Seventy healthy participants completed six tasks using a Brain-Computer Interface system and participants’ pupil dilation, blink rate, and Galvanic Skin Response (GSR data were collected simultaneously. Participants filled Nasa-TLX forms following each task and task performances of participants were also measured. Cognitive state clusters were created from the data collected using the K-means method. Taking these clusters and task performances into account, the general cognitive state of each participant was classified as low risk or high risk. Logistic Regression, Decision Tree, and Neural Networks were also used to classify the same data in order to measure the consistency of this classification with other techniques and the method provided a consistency between 87.1% and 100% with other techniques.

  10. Timing of Conduction Abnormalities Leading to Permanent Pacemaker Insertion After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation-A Single-Centre Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozier, Daniel; Zivkovic, Nevena; Elbaz-Greener, Gabby; Singh, Sheldon M; Wijeysundera, Harindra C

    2017-12-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is the preferred alternative to traditional surgical aortic valve replacement; however, it remains expensive. One potential driver of cost is the need for postprocedural monitoring for conduction abnormalities after TAVI. Given the paucity of literature on the optimal length of monitoring, we aimed to determine when clinically significant conduction abnormalities leading to permanent pacemaker (PPM) insertion after TAVI were first identified. We identified all patients in the Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre TAVI registry (Toronto, Canada) who underwent TAVI between 2009 and 2016, excluding those with pre-existing PPMs or those who underwent emergency open heart surgery. Through dedicated chart review, the timing and type of conduction abnormalities leading to PPM were recorded. Patients were divided according to the timing of conduction abnormality: during the procedure vs after the procedure. The overall PPM insertion rate was 15.6% (80 of 512 cases), with all but 1 patient receiving a PPM for class I indications. PPMs were inserted for complete heart block/high-grade atrioventricular block (91.3%), severe sinus node dysfunction (3.8%), and alternating bundle branch block (3.8%). Of these conduction abnormalities, 55.0% occurred during the procedure (intraprocedure; n = 44 patients). The mean time to the development of a conduction abnormality necessitating PPM was 1.2 days (interquartile range, 0-2 days), with 88.8% occurring within 72 hours of the procedure (n = 71 patients). In the entire TAVI cohort, leading to PPM. The majority of conduction abnormalities leading to PPM insertion after TAVI occur in the very early periprocedural period, suggesting that early mobilization and discharge will be safe from a conduction standpoint. Copyright © 2017 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Application of BCI systems in neurorehabilitation: a scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamdad, Mahdi; Zarshenas, Homayoon; Auais, Mohammad A

    2015-01-01

    To review various types of electroencephalographic activities of the brain and present an overview of brain-computer interface (BCI) systems' history and their applications in rehabilitation. A scoping review of published English literature on BCI application in the field of rehabilitation was undertaken. IEEE Xplore, ScienceDirect, Google Scholar and Scopus databases were searched since inception up to August 2012. All experimental studies published in English and discussed complete cycle of the BCI process was included in the review. In total, 90 articles met the inclusion criteria and were reviewed. Various approaches that improve the accuracy and performance of BCI systems were discussed. Based on BCI's clinical application, reviewed articles were categorized into three groups: motion rehabilitation, speech rehabilitation and virtual reality control (VRC). Almost half of the reviewed papers (48%) concentrated on VRC. Speech rehabilitation and motion rehabilitation made up 33% and 19% of the reviewed papers, respectively. Among different types of electroencephalography signals, P300, steady state visual evoked potentials and motor imagery signals were the most common. This review discussed various applications of BCI in rehabilitation and showed how BCI can be used to improve the quality of life for people with neurological disabilities. It will develop and promote new models of communication and finally, will create an accurate, reliable, online communication between human brain and computer and reduces the negative effects of external stimuli on BCI performance. Implications for Rehabilitation The field of brain-computer interfaces (BCI) is rapidly advancing and it is expected to fulfill a critical role in rehabilitation of neurological disorders and in movement restoration in the forthcoming years. In the near future, BCI has notable potential to become a major tool used by people with disabilities to control locomotion and communicate with surrounding

  12. Can the Hydroxyapatite-Coated Skin-Penetrating Abutment for Bone Conduction Hearing Implants Integrate with the Surrounding Skin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hoof, Marc; Wigren, Stina; Duimel, Hans; Savelkoul, Paul H M; Flynn, Mark; Stokroos, Robert Jan

    2015-01-01

    Percutaneous implants, such as bone conduction hearing implants, suffer from complications that include inflammation of the surrounding skin. A sealed skin-abutment interface can prevent the ingress of bacteria, which should reduce the occurrence of peri-abutment dermatitis. It was hypothesized that a hydroxyapatite (HA)-coated abutment in conjunction with soft tissue preservation surgery should enable integration with the adjacent skin. Previous research has confirmed that integration is never achieved with as-machined titanium abutments. Here, we investigate, in vivo, if skin integration is achievable in patients using a HA-coated abutment. One titanium abutment (control) and one HA-coated abutment (case) together with the surrounding skin were surgically retrieved from two patients who had a medical indication for this procedure. Histological sections of the skin were investigated using light microscopy. The abutment was qualitatively analyzed using scanning electron microscopy. The titanium abutment only had a partial and thin layer of attached amorphous biological material. The HA-coated abutment was almost fully covered by a pronounced thick layer of organized skin, composed of different interconnected structural layers. Proof-of-principle evidence that the HA-coated abutment can achieve integration with the surrounding skin was presented for the first time.

  13. Evaluation of long-term patient satisfaction and experience with the Baha(®) bone conduction implant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jacob; Olsen, Steen Østergaard; Nielsen, Lars Holme

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Evaluate long-term patient satisfaction with bone-anchored hearing aids (the Baha(R), now referred to by Cochlear as a 'bone conduction implant') in our hospital clinic spanning the eighteen-year period from the inception of our Baha program. The researchers further wished to analyse...... the various factors leading to patient satisfaction/dissatisfaction with their Baha. We developed a new questionnaire to obtain a comprehensive impression of individual patient practices, general satisfaction, and experiences with their Baha in respect to time spent using Baha, sound quality, annoyance from...... noise disturbance, ease of communication, cosmetic appearance, and satisfaction with the Baha amongst patient relatives, an aspect not previously investigated. Design: The study design was retrospective and executed as a postal questionnaire. The questionnaire was developed by the authors of this paper...

  14. Comparison of single and mixed ion implantation effects on the changes of the surface hardness, light transmittance, and electrical conductivity of polymeric materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, J. W.; Lee, J. H.; Lee, J. S.; Kil, J. G.; Choi, B. H.; Han, Z. H.

    2001-01-01

    Single or mixed ions of N, He, C were implanted onto the transparent PET(Polyethylen Terephtalate) with the ion energies of less than 100 keV and the surface hardness, light transmittance and electrical conductivity were examined. As measured with nanoindentation, mixed ion implantations such as N + +He + or N + + C + exhibited more increase in the surface hardness than the single ion implantation. Especially, implantation of C+N ions increased the surface hardness by about three times as compared to the implantation of N ion alone, which means more than 10 times increase than the untreated PET. Surface electrical conductivity was increased along with the hardness increase. The conductivity increase was more proportional to the hardness when used the higher ion energy and ion dose, while it did not show any relationship at as low as 50 keV of ion energy. The light at the 550 nm wavelength (visual range) transmitted more than 85%, which is close to that of as-received PET, and at the wavelength below 300 nm(UV range) the rays were absorbed more than 95% as traveling through the sheet, implying that there are processing parameters which the ion implanted PET maintains the transparency and absorbs the UV rays

  15. Classification of binary intentions for individuals with impaired oculomotor function: ‘eyes-closed’ SSVEP-based brain-computer interface (BCI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jeong-Hwan; Hwang, Han-Jeong; Han, Chang-Hee; Jung, Ki-Young; Im, Chang-Hwan

    2013-04-01

    Objective. Some patients suffering from severe neuromuscular diseases have difficulty controlling not only their bodies but also their eyes. Since these patients have difficulty gazing at specific visual stimuli or keeping their eyes open for a long time, they are unable to use the typical steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP)-based brain-computer interface (BCI) systems. In this study, we introduce a new paradigm for SSVEP-based BCI, which can be potentially suitable for disabled individuals with impaired oculomotor function. Approach. The proposed electroencephalography (EEG)-based BCI system allows users to express their binary intentions without needing to open their eyes. A pair of glasses with two light emitting diodes flickering at different frequencies was used to present visual stimuli to participants with their eyes closed, and we classified the recorded EEG patterns in the online experiments conducted with five healthy participants and one patient with severe amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Main results. Through offline experiments performed with 11 participants, we confirmed that human SSVEP could be modulated by visual selective attention to a specific light stimulus penetrating through the eyelids. Furthermore, the recorded EEG patterns could be classified with accuracy high enough for use in a practical BCI system. After customizing the parameters of the proposed SSVEP-based BCI paradigm based on the offline analysis results, binary intentions of five healthy participants were classified in real time. The average information transfer rate of our online experiments reached 10.83 bits min-1. A preliminary online experiment conducted with an ALS patient showed a classification accuracy of 80%. Significance. The results of our offline and online experiments demonstrated the feasibility of our proposed SSVEP-based BCI paradigm. It is expected that our ‘eyes-closed’ SSVEP-based BCI system can be potentially used for communication of

  16. Evaluating the ergonomics of BCI devices for research and experimentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekandem, Joshua I; Davis, Timothy A; Alvarez, Ignacio; James, Melva T; Gilbert, Juan E

    2012-01-01

    The use of brain computer interface (BCI) devices in research and applications has exploded in recent years. Applications such as lie detectors that use functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to video games controlled using electroencephalography (EEG) are currently in use. These developments, coupled with the emergence of inexpensive commercial BCI headsets, such as the Emotiv EPOC ( http://emotiv.com/index.php ) and the Neurosky MindWave, have also highlighted the need of performing basic ergonomics research since such devices have usability issues, such as comfort during prolonged use, and reduced performance for individuals with common physical attributes, such as long or coarse hair. This paper examines the feasibility of using consumer BCIs in scientific research. In particular, we compare user comfort, experiment preparation time, signal reliability and ease of use in light of individual differences among subjects for two commercially available hardware devices, the Emotiv EPOC and the Neurosky MindWave. Based on these results, we suggest some basic considerations for selecting a commercial BCI for research and experimentation. STATEMENT OF RELEVANCE: Despite increased usage, few studies have examined the usability of commercial BCI hardware. This study assesses usability and experimentation factors of two commercial BCI models, for the purpose of creating basic guidelines for increased usability. Finding that more sensors can be less comfortable and accurate than devices with fewer sensors.

  17. A Novel Approach for Configuring The Stimulator of A BCI Framework Using XML

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indar Sugiarto

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available In a working BCI framework, all aspects must be considered as an integral part that contributes to the successful operation of a BCI system. This also includes the development of robust but flexible stimulator, especially the one that closely related to the feedback of a BCI system. This paper describes a novel approach in providing flexible visual stimulator using XML which has been applied for a BCI (brain-computer interface framework. Using XML file format for configuring the visual stimulator of a BCI system, we can develop BCI applications which can accommodate many experiment strategies in BCI research. The BCI framework and its configuration platform is developed using C++ programming language which incorporate Qt’s most powerful XML parser named QXmlStream. The implementation and experiment shows that the XML configuration file can be well executed within the proposed BCI framework. Beside its capability in presenting flexible flickering frequencies and text formatting for SSVEP-based BCI, the configuration platform also provides 3 shapes, 16 colors, and 5 distinct feedback bars. It is not necessary to increase the number of shapes nor colors since those parameters are less important for the BCI stimulator. The proposed method can then be extended to enhance the usability of currently existed BCI framework such as BF++ Toys and BCI 2000.

  18. Implantable electrolyte conductance-based pressure sensing catheter, II. Device construction and testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Robert; Benharash, Peyman; Schulam, Peter; Schmidt, Jacob J

    2013-12-01

    Direct measurements of arterial blood pressure most commonly use bulky external instrumentation containing a pressure transducer connected to an ex vivo fluid-filled arterial line, which is subject to several sensing artifacts. In situ blood pressure sensors, typically solid state piezoresistive, capacitive, and interferometric sensors, are unaffected by these artifacts, but can be expensive to produce and miniaturize. We have developed an alternative approach to blood pressure measurement based on deformation of an elastic tube filled with electrolyte solution. Simple measurement of the electrical conductance of this solution as the tube dimensions change allows determination of the external pressure. The sensor is made from inexpensive materials and its miniaturization is straightforward. In vitro static testing of initial sensor prototypes mounted on a catheter tip showed a linear response with applied pressure and a resolution of 1 mmHg. In vivo sensing followed catheterization of the sensor into the femoral artery of a porcine model through a 7F catheter port. The sensor performed comparably to a commercial pressure transducer also connected to the catheter port. Due to its scalability and cost, this sensor has the potential for use in a range of pressure sensing applications, such as measurement of intracranial, spinal, or interstitial pressures.

  19. Simple communication using a SSVEP-based BCI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Guillermo; Diez, Pablo F.; Avila, Enrique; Laciar Leber, Eric

    2011-12-01

    Majority of Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) for communication purposes are speller, i.e., the user has to select letter by letter. In this work, is proposed a different approach where the user can select words from a word set designed in order to answer a wide range of questions. The word selection process is commanded by a Steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP) based-BCI that allows selecting a word in an average time of 26 s with accuracies of 92% on average. This BCI is focus in the first stages on rehabilitation or even in first moments of some diseases (such as stroke), when the person is eager to communicate with family and doctors.

  20. Simple communication using a SSVEP-based BCI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, Guillermo; Diez, Pablo F; Avila, Enrique; Laciar Leber, Eric

    2011-01-01

    Majority of Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) for communication purposes are speller, i.e., the user has to select letter by letter. In this work, is proposed a different approach where the user can select words from a word set designed in order to answer a wide range of questions. The word selection process is commanded by a Steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP) based-BCI that allows selecting a word in an average time of 26 s with accuracies of 92% on average. This BCI is focus in the first stages on rehabilitation or even in first moments of some diseases (such as stroke), when the person is eager to communicate with family and doctors.

  1. A Development Architecture for Serious Games Using BCI (Brain Computer Interface Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyhyun Um

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Games that use brainwaves via brain–computer interface (BCI devices, to improve brain functions are known as BCI serious games. Due to the difficulty of developing BCI serious games, various BCI engines and authoring tools are required, and these reduce the development time and cost. However, it is desirable to reduce the amount of technical knowledge of brain functions and BCI devices needed by game developers. Moreover, a systematic BCI serious game development process is required. In this paper, we present a methodology for the development of BCI serious games. We describe an architecture, authoring tools, and development process of the proposed methodology, and apply it to a game development approach for patients with mild cognitive impairment as an example. This application demonstrates that BCI serious games can be developed on the basis of expert-verified theories.

  2. A development architecture for serious games using BCI (brain computer interface) sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Yunsick; Cho, Kyungeun; Um, Kyhyun

    2012-11-12

    Games that use brainwaves via brain-computer interface (BCI) devices, to improve brain functions are known as BCI serious games. Due to the difficulty of developing BCI serious games, various BCI engines and authoring tools are required, and these reduce the development time and cost. However, it is desirable to reduce the amount of technical knowledge of brain functions and BCI devices needed by game developers. Moreover, a systematic BCI serious game development process is required. In this paper, we present a methodology for the development of BCI serious games. We describe an architecture, authoring tools, and development process of the proposed methodology, and apply it to a game development approach for patients with mild cognitive impairment as an example. This application demonstrates that BCI serious games can be developed on the basis of expert-verified theories.

  3. A Development Architecture for Serious Games Using BCI (Brain Computer Interface) Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Yunsick; Cho, Kyungeun; Um, Kyhyun

    2012-01-01

    Games that use brainwaves via brain–computer interface (BCI) devices, to improve brain functions are known as BCI serious games. Due to the difficulty of developing BCI serious games, various BCI engines and authoring tools are required, and these reduce the development time and cost. However, it is desirable to reduce the amount of technical knowledge of brain functions and BCI devices needed by game developers. Moreover, a systematic BCI serious game development process is required. In this paper, we present a methodology for the development of BCI serious games. We describe an architecture, authoring tools, and development process of the proposed methodology, and apply it to a game development approach for patients with mild cognitive impairment as an example. This application demonstrates that BCI serious games can be developed on the basis of expert-verified theories. PMID:23202227

  4. Comparison Study of Percutaneous Osseointegrated Bone Conduction Device Complications When Using the 9 mm Abutment Versus 6 mm Abutment at Initial Implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Sean R; LaRouere, Jacqueline S; Bojrab, Dennis I; LaRouere, Michael J

    2018-04-01

    To assess differences in the incidence, type, and management of complications encountered with implantation of percutaneous osseointegrated bone conduction devices when using a 9 mm abutment versus 6 mm abutment at initial implantation. Retrospective cohort study. One hundred thirty consecutive patients between January 2010 and December 2011 underwent single-stage percutaneous osseointegrated bone conduction device implantation using a 9 or 6 mm abutment. Clinical outcomes assessed for the two groups included the incidence, type, and management of postoperative complications. Abutment size, age, sex, indication for surgery, implant device type, duration of follow-up, and patient comorbidities were evaluated as potential factors affecting outcomes. Average duration of follow-up was 16 months (range 6-29 mo). Postoperative complications occurred in 38 (29.2%) patients. Twenty-four (18.4%) patients experienced minor complications requiring simple, local care; eight (6.1%) patients required in-office procedural intervention; and six (4.6%) patients required revision surgery in the operating room. Implant extrusion occurred in three (2.3%) patients. Eleven (8.5%) patients required placement of a longer abutment. Patients receiving the 6 mm abutment at initial surgery were significantly more likely to encounter a complication requiring in-office procedural intervention or revision surgery (p = 0.001). Minor complications after implantation of percutaneous osseointegrated bone conduction devices are common. The vast majority of these complications are due to localized skin reactions, most of which are readily addressed through local care. Patients receiving the 9 mm abutment during initial implantation are significantly less likely to require in-office procedural intervention or revision surgery postoperatively as compared with those receiving the shorter, 6 mm abutment.

  5. Classifying BCI signals from novice users with extreme learning machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodríguez-Bermúdez Germán

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Brain computer interface (BCI allows to control external devices only with the electrical activity of the brain. In order to improve the system, several approaches have been proposed. However it is usual to test algorithms with standard BCI signals from experts users or from repositories available on Internet. In this work, extreme learning machine (ELM has been tested with signals from 5 novel users to compare with standard classification algorithms. Experimental results show that ELM is a suitable method to classify electroencephalogram signals from novice users.

  6. sBCI-Headset—Wearable and Modular Device for Hybrid Brain-Computer Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsiana Malechka

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Severely disabled people, like completely paralyzed persons either with tetraplegia or similar disabilities who cannot use their arms and hands, are often considered as a user group of Brain Computer Interfaces (BCI. In order to achieve high acceptance of the BCI by this user group and their supporters, the BCI system has to be integrated into their support infrastructure. Critical disadvantages of a BCI are the time consuming preparation of the user for the electroencephalography (EEG measurements and the low information transfer rate of EEG based BCI. These disadvantages become apparent if a BCI is used to control complex devices. In this paper, a hybrid BCI is described that enables research for a Human Machine Interface (HMI that is optimally adapted to requirements of the user and the tasks to be carried out. The solution is based on the integration of a Steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP-BCI, an Event-related (de-synchronization (ERD/ERS-BCI, an eye tracker, an environmental observation camera, and a new EEG head cap for wearing comfort and easy preparation. The design of the new fast multimodal BCI (called sBCI system is described and first test results, obtained in experiments with six healthy subjects, are presented. The sBCI concept may also become useful for healthy people in cases where a “hands-free” handling of devices is necessary.

  7. Experiencing BCI control in a popular computer game

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Laar, B.L.A.; Coyle, D.; Gürkök, Hayrettin; Principe, J.; Lotte, F.; Plass - Oude Bos, D.; Poel, Mannes; Nijholt, Antinus

    2013-01-01

    Brain–computer interfaces (BCIs) are not only being developed to aid disabled individuals with motor substitution, motor recovery, and novel communication possibilities, but also as a modality for healthy users in entertainment and gaming. This study investigates whether the incorporation of a BCI

  8. BNCI Horizon 2020 : towards a roadmap for the BCI community

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brunner, Clemens; Birbaumer, Niels; Blankertz, Benjamin; Guger, Christoph; Kübler, Andrea; Mattia, Donatella; Millán, José del R.; Miralles, Felip; Nijholt, Anton; Opisso, Eloy; Ramsey, Nick; Salomon, Patric; Müller-Putz, Gernot R.

    2015-01-01

    The brain-computer interface (BCI) field has grown dramatically over the past few years, but there are still no coordinated efforts to ensure efficient communication and collaboration among key stakeholders. The European Commission (EC) has recently renewed their efforts to establish such a

  9. BNCI Horizon 2020: towards a roadmap for the BCI community

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brunner, Clemens; Birbaumer, Niels; Blankertz, Benjamin; Guger, Christoph; Kübler, Andrea; Mattia, Donatella; Millán, Jose del R.; Miralles, Felip; Nijholt, Antinus; Opisso, Eloy; Ramsey, Nick; Salomon, Patric; Müller-Putz, Gernot R.

    2015-01-01

    The brain-computer interface (BCI) field has grown dramatically over the past few years, but there are still no coordinated efforts to ensure efficient communication and collaboration among key stakeholders. The European Commission (EC) has recently renewed their efforts to establish such a

  10. Collins pine/BCI biomass to ethanol project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yancy, M.A.; Hinman, N.D.; Sheehan, J.J.; Tiangco, V.M.

    1999-01-01

    California has abundant biomass resources and a growing transportation fuels market. These two facts have helped to create an opportunity for biomass to ethanol projects within the state. One such project under development is the Collins Pine/BCI Project. Collins Pine Company and BC International (BCI) have teamed up to develop a forest biomass to ethanol facility to be collocated with Collins Pine's 12 MW, biomass-fueled electric generator in Chester, California. The Collins Pine Company (headquartered in Portland, Oregon) is an environmentally progressive lumber company that has owned and operated timberlands near Chester, California since the turn of the century. Collins manages 100,000 acres of timberland in the immediate area of the project. BCI (Dedham, Massachusetts) holds an exclusive license to a new, patented biotechnological process to convert lignocellulosic materials into ethanol and other specially chemicals with significant cost savings and environmental benefits. The project has received a California Energy Commission PIER program award to continue the developmental work done in the Quincy Library Group's Northeastern California Ethanol Manufacturing Feasibility Study (November 1997). This paper provides (1) a brief overview of the biomass and transportation fuels market in California; (2) the current status of the Collins Pine/BCI biomass ethanol project; and (3) future prospects and hurdles for the project to overcome. (author)

  11. Proprioceptive feedback and brain computer interface (BCI based neuroprostheses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ander Ramos-Murguialday

    Full Text Available Brain computer interface (BCI technology has been proposed for motor neurorehabilitation, motor replacement and assistive technologies. It is an open question whether proprioceptive feedback affects the regulation of brain oscillations and therefore BCI control. We developed a BCI coupled on-line with a robotic hand exoskeleton for flexing and extending the fingers. 24 healthy participants performed five different tasks of closing and opening the hand: (1 motor imagery of the hand movement without any overt movement and without feedback, (2 motor imagery with movement as online feedback (participants see and feel their hand, with the exoskeleton moving according to their brain signals, (3 passive (the orthosis passively opens and closes the hand without imagery and (4 active (overt movement of the hand and rest. Performance was defined as the difference in power of the sensorimotor rhythm during motor task and rest and calculated offline for different tasks. Participants were divided in three groups depending on the feedback receiving during task 2 (the other tasks were the same for all participants. Group 1 (n = 9 received contingent positive feedback (participants' sensorimotor rhythm (SMR desynchronization was directly linked to hand orthosis movements, group 2 (n = 8 contingent "negative" feedback (participants' sensorimotor rhythm synchronization was directly linked to hand orthosis movements and group 3 (n = 7 sham feedback (no link between brain oscillations and orthosis movements. We observed that proprioceptive feedback (feeling and seeing hand movements improved BCI performance significantly. Furthermore, in the contingent positive group only a significant motor learning effect was observed enhancing SMR desynchronization during motor imagery without feedback in time. Furthermore, we observed a significantly stronger SMR desynchronization in the contingent positive group compared to the other groups during active and

  12. Proprioceptive feedback and brain computer interface (BCI) based neuroprostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Murguialday, Ander; Schürholz, Markus; Caggiano, Vittorio; Wildgruber, Moritz; Caria, Andrea; Hammer, Eva Maria; Halder, Sebastian; Birbaumer, Niels

    2012-01-01

    Brain computer interface (BCI) technology has been proposed for motor neurorehabilitation, motor replacement and assistive technologies. It is an open question whether proprioceptive feedback affects the regulation of brain oscillations and therefore BCI control. We developed a BCI coupled on-line with a robotic hand exoskeleton for flexing and extending the fingers. 24 healthy participants performed five different tasks of closing and opening the hand: (1) motor imagery of the hand movement without any overt movement and without feedback, (2) motor imagery with movement as online feedback (participants see and feel their hand, with the exoskeleton moving according to their brain signals, (3) passive (the orthosis passively opens and closes the hand without imagery) and (4) active (overt) movement of the hand and rest. Performance was defined as the difference in power of the sensorimotor rhythm during motor task and rest and calculated offline for different tasks. Participants were divided in three groups depending on the feedback receiving during task 2 (the other tasks were the same for all participants). Group 1 (n = 9) received contingent positive feedback (participants' sensorimotor rhythm (SMR) desynchronization was directly linked to hand orthosis movements), group 2 (n = 8) contingent "negative" feedback (participants' sensorimotor rhythm synchronization was directly linked to hand orthosis movements) and group 3 (n = 7) sham feedback (no link between brain oscillations and orthosis movements). We observed that proprioceptive feedback (feeling and seeing hand movements) improved BCI performance significantly. Furthermore, in the contingent positive group only a significant motor learning effect was observed enhancing SMR desynchronization during motor imagery without feedback in time. Furthermore, we observed a significantly stronger SMR desynchronization in the contingent positive group compared to the other groups during active and passive

  13. Emotiv EPOC BCI with Python on a Raspberry pi

    OpenAIRE

    Patrón, José Salgado; Monje, Cristian Raúl Barrera

    2015-01-01

    The hybrid Brain-Computer Interface [BCI] system gives an insight on the development of useful interfaces for users with different backgrounds, from medical applications to video games, where standalone and wearable means accessibility for the user. Systems such as EPOC offers a simple solution for acquiring electroencephalography and electromyography signals with low price and fast setup, compared to high tech medical equipment. From the processing point of view, a computer always offers the...

  14. On left (θ,ϕ-derivations in BCI-algebras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Muhiuddin

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The notion of (regular left (θ,ϕ-derivations of a BCI-algebra is introduced, some useful examples are discussed, and related properties are investigated. Conditions for a left (θ,ϕ-derivation to be regular are provided. The concepts of a d(θ,ϕ-invariant left (θ,ϕ-derivation and θ-ideal are introduced, and their relations are discussed. Furthermore, some more interesting results are established.

  15. Classification of Movement and Inhibition Using a Hybrid BCI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmura, Jennifer; Rosing, Joshua; Collazos, Steven; Goodwin, Shikha J

    2017-01-01

    Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) are an emerging technology that are capable of turning brain electrical activity into commands for an external device. Motor imagery (MI)-when a person imagines a motion without executing it-is widely employed in BCI devices for motor control because of the endogenous origin of its neural control mechanisms, and the similarity in brain activation to actual movements. Challenges with translating a MI-BCI into a practical device used outside laboratories include the extensive training required, often due to poor user engagement and visual feedback response delays; poor user flexibility/freedom to time the execution/inhibition of their movements, and to control the movement type (right arm vs. left leg) and characteristics (reaching vs. grabbing); and high false positive rates of motion control. Solutions to improve sensorimotor activation and user performance of MI-BCIs have been explored. Virtual reality (VR) motor-execution tasks have replaced simpler visual feedback (smiling faces, arrows) and have solved this problem to an extent. Hybrid BCIs (hBCIs) implementing an additional control signal to MI have improved user control capabilities to a limited extent. These hBCIs either fail to allow the patients to gain asynchronous control of their movements, or have a high false positive rate. We propose an immersive VR environment which provides visual feedback that is both engaging and immediate, but also uniquely engages a different cognitive process in the patient that generates event-related potentials (ERPs). These ERPs provide a key executive function for the users to execute/inhibit movements. Additionally, we propose signal processing strategies and machine learning algorithms to move BCIs toward developing long-term signal stability in patients with distinctive brain signals and capabilities to control motor signals. The hBCI itself and the VR environment we propose would help to move BCI technology outside laboratory

  16. Classification of Movement and Inhibition Using a Hybrid BCI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Chmura

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs are an emerging technology that are capable of turning brain electrical activity into commands for an external device. Motor imagery (MI—when a person imagines a motion without executing it—is widely employed in BCI devices for motor control because of the endogenous origin of its neural control mechanisms, and the similarity in brain activation to actual movements. Challenges with translating a MI-BCI into a practical device used outside laboratories include the extensive training required, often due to poor user engagement and visual feedback response delays; poor user flexibility/freedom to time the execution/inhibition of their movements, and to control the movement type (right arm vs. left leg and characteristics (reaching vs. grabbing; and high false positive rates of motion control. Solutions to improve sensorimotor activation and user performance of MI-BCIs have been explored. Virtual reality (VR motor-execution tasks have replaced simpler visual feedback (smiling faces, arrows and have solved this problem to an extent. Hybrid BCIs (hBCIs implementing an additional control signal to MI have improved user control capabilities to a limited extent. These hBCIs either fail to allow the patients to gain asynchronous control of their movements, or have a high false positive rate. We propose an immersive VR environment which provides visual feedback that is both engaging and immediate, but also uniquely engages a different cognitive process in the patient that generates event-related potentials (ERPs. These ERPs provide a key executive function for the users to execute/inhibit movements. Additionally, we propose signal processing strategies and machine learning algorithms to move BCIs toward developing long-term signal stability in patients with distinctive brain signals and capabilities to control motor signals. The hBCI itself and the VR environment we propose would help to move BCI technology outside

  17. As above, so below? Towards understanding inverse models in BCI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindgren, Jussi T.

    2018-02-01

    Objective. In brain-computer interfaces (BCI), measurements of the user’s brain activity are classified into commands for the computer. With EEG-based BCIs, the origins of the classified phenomena are often considered to be spatially localized in the cortical volume and mixed in the EEG. We investigate if more accurate BCIs can be obtained by reconstructing the source activities in the volume. Approach. We contrast the physiology-driven source reconstruction with data-driven representations obtained by statistical machine learning. We explain these approaches in a common linear dictionary framework and review the different ways to obtain the dictionary parameters. We consider the effect of source reconstruction on some major difficulties in BCI classification, namely information loss, feature selection and nonstationarity of the EEG. Main results. Our analysis suggests that the approaches differ mainly in their parameter estimation. Physiological source reconstruction may thus be expected to improve BCI accuracy if machine learning is not used or where it produces less optimal parameters. We argue that the considered difficulties of surface EEG classification can remain in the reconstructed volume and that data-driven techniques are still necessary. Finally, we provide some suggestions for comparing approaches. Significance. The present work illustrates the relationships between source reconstruction and machine learning-based approaches for EEG data representation. The provided analysis and discussion should help in understanding, applying, comparing and improving such techniques in the future.

  18. A Semisupervised Support Vector Machines Algorithm for BCI Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Jianzhao; Li, Yuanqing; Sun, Wei

    2007-01-01

    As an emerging technology, brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) bring us new communication interfaces which translate brain activities into control signals for devices like computers, robots, and so forth. In this study, we propose a semisupervised support vector machine (SVM) algorithm for brain-computer interface (BCI) systems, aiming at reducing the time-consuming training process. In this algorithm, we apply a semisupervised SVM for translating the features extracted from the electrical recordings of brain into control signals. This SVM classifier is built from a small labeled data set and a large unlabeled data set. Meanwhile, to reduce the time for training semisupervised SVM, we propose a batch-mode incremental learning method, which can also be easily applied to the online BCI systems. Additionally, it is suggested in many studies that common spatial pattern (CSP) is very effective in discriminating two different brain states. However, CSP needs a sufficient labeled data set. In order to overcome the drawback of CSP, we suggest a two-stage feature extraction method for the semisupervised learning algorithm. We apply our algorithm to two BCI experimental data sets. The offline data analysis results demonstrate the effectiveness of our algorithm. PMID:18368141

  19. Conduction Abnormalities and Permanent Pacemaker Implantation After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement Using the Repositionable LOTUS Device: The United Kingdom Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampat, Rajiv; Khawaja, M Zeeshan; Hilling-Smith, Roland; Byrne, Jonathan; MacCarthy, Philip; Blackman, Daniel J; Krishnamurthy, Arvindra; Gunarathne, Ashan; Kovac, Jan; Banning, Adrian; Kharbanda, Raj; Firoozi, Sami; Brecker, Stephen; Redwood, Simon; Bapat, Vinayak; Mullen, Michael; Aggarwal, Suneil; Manoharan, Ganesh; Spence, Mark S; Khogali, Saib; Dooley, Maureen; Cockburn, James; de Belder, Adam; Trivedi, Uday; Hildick-Smith, David

    2017-06-26

    The authors report the incidence of pacemaker implantation up to hospital discharge and the factors influencing pacing rate following implantation of the LOTUS bioprosthesis (Boston Scientific, Natick, Massachusetts) in the United Kingdom. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is associated with a significant need for permanent pacemaker implantation. Pacing rates vary according to the device used. The REPRISE II (Repositionable Percutaneous Replacement of Stenotic Aortic Valve Through Implantation of Lotus Valve System) trial reported a pacing rate of 29% at 30 days after implantation of the LOTUS device. Data were collected retrospectively on 228 patients who had the LOTUS device implanted between March 2013 and February 2015 across 10 centers in the United Kingdom. Twenty-seven patients (12%) had pacemakers implanted pre-procedure and were excluded from the analysis. Patients were aged 81.2 ± 7.7 years; 50.7% were male. The mean pre-procedural QRS duration was 101.7 ± 20.4 ms. More than one-half of the cohort (n = 111, 55%) developed new left bundle branch block (LBBB) following the procedure. Permanent pacemakers were implanted in 64 patients (32%) with a median time to insertion of 3.0 ± 3.4 days. Chief indications for pacing were atrioventricular (AV) block (n = 46, 72%), or LBBB with 1st degree AV block (n = 11, 17%). Amongst those who received a pacemaker following TAVR the pre-procedural electrocardiogram findings included: No conduction disturbance (n = 41, 64%); 1st degree AV block (n = 10, 16%); right bundle branch block (n = 6, 9%) and LBBB (n = 5, 8%). LBBB (but not permanent pacemaker) occurred more frequently in patients who had balloon aortic valvuloplasty before TAVR (odds ratio [OR]: 1.25; p = 0.03). Pre-procedural conduction abnormality (composite of 1st degree AV block, hemiblock, right bundle branch block, LBBB) was independently associated with the need for permanent pacemaker (OR: 2.54; p = 0.048). The absence of

  20. Optical and electronic properties of sub-surface conducting layers in diamond created by MeV B-implantation at elevated temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willems van Beveren, L. H., E-mail: laurensw@unimelb.edu.au; Bowers, H.; Ganesan, K.; Johnson, B. C.; McCallum, J. C.; Prawer, S. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Liu, R. [SIMS Facility, Office of the Deputy-Vice Chancellor (Research and Development) Western Sydney University, Locked Bag 1797, Penrith, New South Wales 2751 (Australia)

    2016-06-14

    Boron implantation with in-situ dynamic annealing is used to produce highly conductive sub-surface layers in type IIa (100) diamond plates for the search of a superconducting phase transition. Here, we demonstrate that high-fluence MeV ion-implantation, at elevated temperatures avoids graphitization and can be used to achieve doping densities of 6 at. %. In order to quantify the diamond crystal damage associated with implantation Raman spectroscopy was performed, demonstrating high temperature annealing recovers the lattice. Additionally, low-temperature electronic transport measurements show evidence of charge carrier densities close to the metal-insulator-transition. After electronic characterization, secondary ion mass spectrometry was performed to map out the ion profile of the implanted plates. The analysis shows close agreement with the simulated ion-profile assuming scaling factors that take into account an average change in diamond density due to device fabrication. Finally, the data show that boron diffusion is negligible during the high temperature annealing process.

  1. The Evaluations of Hydrogen Permeation and Life Cycle Assessment on Nanocrystallined TiN-BCY Hydrogen Membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soo-Sun; Hong, Tae-Whan

    2016-02-01

    Recently, Membrane technologies are used for the separation of mixtures in various industries. The promising method to reduce the CO2 emission and production of H2 from the coal based power plants is membrane separation with polymer, metal, ceramic and cermet materials. In this study, TiN ceramic material was selected, that is much less expensive than Pd. Also it has resistance to acids and chemically steady. Yttrium doped barium cerate (BCY) is a proton conductor. This perovskite exhibit both high proton conductivity and thermodynamic stability. But its chemical stability is very low under real operating environments. Thus, TiN-BCY may provide'a new membrane material for application. Life cycle assessment (LCA) based on fabrication of membrane and it was carried out to evaluate the energy demand and environmental impact. The analysis is performed according to the recommendations of ISO norms 14040 and obtained using the Gabi 6 software. This LCA will contribute to optimizing the eco-design, reducing the energy consumption and pollutant emissions during the eco-profiles of the TiN-BCY membrane.

  2. PET Mapping for Brain-Computer Interface Stimulation of the Ventroposterior Medial Nucleus of the Thalamus in Rats with Implanted Electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yunqi; Xu, Kedi; Xu, Caiyun; Zhang, Jiacheng; Ji, Jianfeng; Zheng, Xiaoxiang; Zhang, Hong; Tian, Mei

    2016-07-01

    Brain-computer interface (BCI) technology has great potential for improving the quality of life for neurologic patients. This study aimed to use PET mapping for BCI-based stimulation in a rat model with electrodes implanted in the ventroposterior medial (VPM) nucleus of the thalamus. PET imaging studies were conducted before and after stimulation of the right VPM. Stimulation induced significant orienting performance. (18)F-FDG uptake increased significantly in the paraventricular thalamic nucleus, septohippocampal nucleus, olfactory bulb, left crus II of the ansiform lobule of the cerebellum, and bilaterally in the lateral septum, amygdala, piriform cortex, endopiriform nucleus, and insular cortex, but it decreased in the right secondary visual cortex, right simple lobule of the cerebellum, and bilaterally in the somatosensory cortex. This study demonstrated that PET mapping after VPM stimulation can identify specific brain regions associated with orienting performance. PET molecular imaging may be an important approach for BCI-based research and its clinical applications. © 2016 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  3. Neutrosophic Regular Filters and Fuzzy Regular Filters in Pseudo-BCI Algebras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohong Zhang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Neutrosophic set is a new mathematical tool for handling problems involving imprecise, indeterminacy and inconsistent data. Pseudo-BCI algebra is a kind of non-classical logic algebra in close connection with various non-commutative fuzzy logics. Recently, we applied neutrosophic set theory to pseudo-BCI algebras. In this paper, we study neutrosophic filters in pseudo-BCI algebras.

  4. Overcoming Inter-Subject Variability in BCI Using EEG-Based Identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Stastny

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The high dependency of the Brain Computer Interface (BCI system performance on the BCI user is a well-known issue of many BCI devices. This contribution presents a new way to overcome this problem using a synergy between a BCI device and an EEG-based biometric algorithm. Using the biometric algorithm, the BCI device automatically identifies its current user and adapts parameters of the classification process and of the BCI protocol to maximize the BCI performance. In addition to this we present an algorithm for EEG-based identification designed to be resistant to variations in EEG recordings between sessions, which is also demonstrated by an experiment with an EEG database containing two sessions recorded one year apart. Further, our algorithm is designed to be compatible with our movement-related BCI device and the evaluation of the algorithm performance took place under conditions of a standard BCI experiment. Estimation of the mu rhythm fundamental frequency using the Frequency Zooming AR modeling is used for EEG feature extraction followed by a classifier based on the regularized Mahalanobis distance. An average subject identification score of 96 % is achieved.

  5. Effects of background music on objective and subjective performance measures in an auditory BCI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sijie Zhou

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have explored brain computer interface (BCI systems based on auditory stimuli, which could help patients with visual impairments. Usability and user satisfaction are important considerations in any BCI. Although background music can influence emotion and performance in other task environments, and many users may wish to listen to music while using a BCI, auditory and other BCIs are typically studied without background music. Some work has explored the possibility of using polyphonic music in auditory BCI systems. However, this approach requires users with good musical skills, and has not been explored in online experiments. Our hypothesis was that an auditory BCI with background music would be preferred by subjects over a similar BCI without background music, without any difference in BCI performance. We introduce a simple paradigm (which does not require musical skill using percussion instrument sound stimuli and background music, and evaluated it in both offline and online experiments. The result showed that subjects preferred the auditory BCI with background music. Different performance measures did not reveal any significant performance effect when comparing background music vs. no background. Since the addition of background music does not impair BCI performance but is preferred by users, auditory (and perhaps other BCIs should consider including it. Our study also indicates that auditory BCIs can be effective even if the auditory channel is simultaneously otherwise engaged.

  6. Vascular mapping of the retroauricular skin - proposal for a posterior superior surgical incision for transcutaneous bone-conduction hearing implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perenyi, Adam; Bere, Zsofia; Jarabin, Janos; Sztano, Balazs; Kukla, Edit; Bikhazi, Ziad; Tiszlavicz, Laszlo; Toth, Ferenc; Kiss, Jozsef Geza; Rovo, Laszlo

    2017-01-17

    Passive transcutaneous osseointegrated hearing implant systems have become increasingly popular more recently. The area over the implant is vulnerable due to vibration and pressure from the externally worn sound processor. Good perfusion and neural integrity has the potential to reduce complications. The authors' objective was to determine the ideal surgical exposure to maintain perfusion and neural integrity and decrease surgical time as a result of reduced bleeding. The vascular anatomy of the temporal-parietal soft tissue was examined in a total of 50 subjects. Imaging diagnostics included magnetic resonance angiography in 12 and Doppler ultrasound in 25 healthy subjects to reveal the arterial network. Cadaver dissection of 13 subjects formed the control group. The prevalence of the arteries were statistically analyzed with sector analysis in the surgically relevant area. The main arterial branches of this region could be well identified with each method. Statistical analysis showed that the arterial pattern was similar in all subjects. The prevalence of major arteries is low in the upper posterior area though large in proximity to the auricle region. Diverse methods indicate the advantages of a posterior superior incision because the major arteries and nerves are at less risk of damage and best preserved. Although injury to these structures is rare, when it occurs, the distal flow is compromised and the peri-implant area is left intact. Hand-held Doppler is efficient and cost-effective in finding the best position for incision, if necessary, in subjects with a history of surgical stress to the retroauricular skin. This was a non-interventional study.

  7. An electro-conductive fluid as a responsive implant for the controlled stimuli-release of diclofenac sodium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijukumar, Divya; Choonara, Yahya E; Kumar, Pradeep; du Toit, Lisa C; Pillay, Viness

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an electro-responsive co-polymeric (ERP) implantable gel from polyethylene glycol (PEG), sodium polystyrene sulphonate (NaPss), polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), and diethyl acetomidomalonate (DAA) for electro-liberation of the model drug diclofenac sodium. Various physicochemical and physicomechanical characterization tests were undertaken on the synthesized drug-free gel (ERP G1) and drug-loaded gel (ERP G2). The ability of the gel to release diclofenac sodium following electrical stimulation was evaluated using a galvanostat while Molecular Mechanics (MM) simulations were performed to elucidate the experimental mechanisms. A stable electro-active gel exhibiting superior cycling stability was produced with desirable rheological properties, rigidity (BHN = 35.4 N ± 0.33 N/mm 2 ; resilience = 10.91 ± 0.11%), thermal properties (T g  ≈ 70 °C; T c  ≈ 200 °C) and homogeneous morphology. "ON-OFF" pursatile gradual drug release (37-94% from t 30 min -t 180   min ) kinetics was observed upon applying electric stimulation intermittently, indicating that drug release from the gel was electrically controlled. Overall, the galvanometric and MM evaluation ascertained the suitability of the PEG/NaPss/PVA ERP-Gel for application as a subcutaneously injectable drug delivery implant.

  8. A hybrid BCI web browser based on EEG and EOG signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenghong He; Tianyou Yu; Zhenghui Gu; Yuanqing Li

    2017-07-01

    In this study, we propose a new web browser based on a hybrid brain computer interface (BCI) combining electroencephalographic (EEG) and electrooculography (EOG) signals. Specifically, the user can control the horizontal movement of the mouse by imagining left/right hand motion, and control the vertical movement of the mouse, select/reject a target, or input text in an edit box by blinking eyes in synchrony with the flashes of the corresponding buttons on the GUI. Based on mouse control, target selection and text input, the user can open a web page of interest, select an intended target in the web and read the page content. An online experiment was conducted involving five healthy subjects. The experimental results demonstrated the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  9. Controlling a tactile ERP-BCI in a dual-task

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thurlings, M.E.; Erp, J.B.F. van; Brouwer, A.M.; Werkhoven, P.J.

    2013-01-01

    When using brain–computer interfaces (BCIs) to control a game, the BCI may have to compete with gaming tasks for the same perceptual and cognitive resources.We investigated: 1) if and to what extent event-related potentials (ERPs) and ERP–BCI performance are affected in a dual-task situation; and 2)

  10. Fast Recognition of BCI-Inefficient Users Using Physiological Features from EEG Signals: A Screening Study of Stroke Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Xiaokang Shu; Shugeng Chen; Lin Yao; Xinjun Sheng; Dingguo Zhang; Ning Jiang; Jie Jia; Xiangyang Zhu

    2018-01-01

    Motor imagery (MI) based brain-computer interface (BCI) has been developed as an alternative therapy for stroke rehabilitation. However, experimental evidence demonstrates that a significant portion (10–50%) of subjects are BCI-inefficient users (accuracy less than 70%). Thus, predicting BCI performance prior to clinical BCI usage would facilitate the selection of suitable end-users and improve the efficiency of stroke rehabilitation. In the current study, we proposed two physiological variab...

  11. Why standard brain-computer interface (BCI) training protocols should be changed: an experimental study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeunet, Camille; Jahanpour, Emilie; Lotte, Fabien

    2016-06-01

    Objective. While promising, electroencephaloraphy based brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) are barely used due to their lack of reliability: 15% to 30% of users are unable to control a BCI. Standard training protocols may be partly responsible as they do not satisfy recommendations from psychology. Our main objective was to determine in practice to what extent standard training protocols impact users’ motor imagery based BCI (MI-BCI) control performance. Approach. We performed two experiments. The first consisted in evaluating the efficiency of a standard BCI training protocol for the acquisition of non-BCI related skills in a BCI-free context, which enabled us to rule out the possible impact of BCIs on the training outcome. Thus, participants (N = 54) were asked to perform simple motor tasks. The second experiment was aimed at measuring the correlations between motor tasks and MI-BCI performance. The ten best and ten worst performers of the first study were recruited for an MI-BCI experiment during which they had to learn to perform two MI tasks. We also assessed users’ spatial ability and pre-training μ rhythm amplitude, as both have been related to MI-BCI performance in the literature. Main results. Around 17% of the participants were unable to learn to perform the motor tasks, which is close to the BCI illiteracy rate. This suggests that standard training protocols are suboptimal for skill teaching. No correlation was found between motor tasks and MI-BCI performance. However, spatial ability played an important role in MI-BCI performance. In addition, once the spatial ability covariable had been controlled for, using an ANCOVA, it appeared that participants who faced difficulty during the first experiment improved during the second while the others did not. Significance. These studies suggest that (1) standard MI-BCI training protocols are suboptimal for skill teaching, (2) spatial ability is confirmed as impacting on MI-BCI performance, and (3) when faced

  12. Continuous EEG signal analysis for asynchronous BCI application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Wei-Yen

    2011-08-01

    In this study, we propose a two-stage recognition system for continuous analysis of electroencephalogram (EEG) signals. An independent component analysis (ICA) and correlation coefficient are used to automatically eliminate the electrooculography (EOG) artifacts. Based on the continuous wavelet transform (CWT) and Student's two-sample t-statistics, active segment selection then detects the location of active segment in the time-frequency domain. Next, multiresolution fractal feature vectors (MFFVs) are extracted with the proposed modified fractal dimension from wavelet data. Finally, the support vector machine (SVM) is adopted for the robust classification of MFFVs. The EEG signals are continuously analyzed in 1-s segments, and every 0.5 second moves forward to simulate asynchronous BCI works in the two-stage recognition architecture. The segment is first recognized as lifted or not in the first stage, and then is classified as left or right finger lifting at stage two if the segment is recognized as lifting in the first stage. Several statistical analyses are used to evaluate the performance of the proposed system. The results indicate that it is a promising system in the applications of asynchronous BCI work.

  13. Fast Recognition of BCI-Inefficient Users Using Physiological Features from EEG Signals: A Screening Study of Stroke Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaokang Shu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Motor imagery (MI based brain-computer interface (BCI has been developed as an alternative therapy for stroke rehabilitation. However, experimental evidence demonstrates that a significant portion (10–50% of subjects are BCI-inefficient users (accuracy less than 70%. Thus, predicting BCI performance prior to clinical BCI usage would facilitate the selection of suitable end-users and improve the efficiency of stroke rehabilitation. In the current study, we proposed two physiological variables, i.e., laterality index (LI and cortical activation strength (CAS, to predict MI-BCI performance. Twenty-four stroke patients and 10 healthy subjects were recruited for this study. Each subject was required to perform two blocks of left- and right-hand MI tasks. Linear regression analyses were performed between the BCI accuracies and two physiological predictors. Here, the predictors were calculated from the electroencephalography (EEG signals during paretic hand MI tasks (5 trials; approximately 1 min. LI values exhibited a statistically significant correlation with two-class BCI (left vs. right performance (r = −0.732, p < 0.001, and CAS values exhibited a statistically significant correlation with brain-switch BCI (task vs. idle performance (r = 0.641, p < 0.001. Furthermore, the BCI-inefficient users were successfully recognized with a sensitivity of 88.2% and a specificity of 85.7% in the two-class BCI. The brain-switch BCI achieved a sensitivity of 100.0% and a specificity of 87.5% in the discrimination of BCI-inefficient users. These results demonstrated that the proposed BCI predictors were promising to promote the BCI usage in stroke rehabilitation and contribute to a better understanding of the BCI-inefficiency phenomenon in stroke patients.

  14. Tactile and bone-conduction auditory brain computer interface for vision and hearing impaired users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutkowski, Tomasz M; Mori, Hiromu

    2015-04-15

    The paper presents a report on the recently developed BCI alternative for users suffering from impaired vision (lack of focus or eye-movements) or from the so-called "ear-blocking-syndrome" (limited hearing). We report on our recent studies of the extents to which vibrotactile stimuli delivered to the head of a user can serve as a platform for a brain computer interface (BCI) paradigm. In the proposed tactile and bone-conduction auditory BCI novel multiple head positions are used to evoke combined somatosensory and auditory (via the bone conduction effect) P300 brain responses, in order to define a multimodal tactile and bone-conduction auditory brain computer interface (tbcaBCI). In order to further remove EEG interferences and to improve P300 response classification synchrosqueezing transform (SST) is applied. SST outperforms the classical time-frequency analysis methods of the non-linear and non-stationary signals such as EEG. The proposed method is also computationally more effective comparing to the empirical mode decomposition. The SST filtering allows for online EEG preprocessing application which is essential in the case of BCI. Experimental results with healthy BCI-naive users performing online tbcaBCI, validate the paradigm, while the feasibility of the concept is illuminated through information transfer rate case studies. We present a comparison of the proposed SST-based preprocessing method, combined with a logistic regression (LR) classifier, together with classical preprocessing and LDA-based classification BCI techniques. The proposed tbcaBCI paradigm together with data-driven preprocessing methods are a step forward in robust BCI applications research. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. A Novel Design of 4-Class BCI Using Two Binary Classifiers and Parallel Mental Tasks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Geng

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel 4-class single-trial brain computer interface (BCI based on two (rather than four or more binary linear discriminant analysis (LDA classifiers is proposed, which is called a “parallel BCI.” Unlike other BCIs where mental tasks are executed and classified in a serial way one after another, the parallel BCI uses properly designed parallel mental tasks that are executed on both sides of the subject body simultaneously, which is the main novelty of the BCI paradigm used in our experiments. Each of the two binary classifiers only classifies the mental tasks executed on one side of the subject body, and the results of the two binary classifiers are combined to give the result of the 4-class BCI. Data was recorded in experiments with both real movement and motor imagery in 3 able-bodied subjects. Artifacts were not detected or removed. Offline analysis has shown that, in some subjects, the parallel BCI can generate a higher accuracy than a conventional 4-class BCI, although both of them have used the same feature selection and classification algorithms.

  16. Differentiating closed-loop cortical intention from rest: building an asynchronous electrocorticographic BCI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jordan J.; Rouse, Adam G.; Thongpang, Sanitta; Williams, Justin C.; Moran, Daniel W.

    2013-08-01

    Objective. Recent experiments have shown that electrocorticography (ECoG) can provide robust control signals for a brain-computer interface (BCI). Strategies that attempt to adapt a BCI control algorithm by learning from past trials often assume that the subject is attending to each training trial. Likewise, automatic disabling of movement control would be desirable during resting periods when random brain fluctuations might cause unintended movements of a device. To this end, our goal was to identify ECoG differences that arise between periods of active BCI use and rest. Approach. We examined spectral differences in multi-channel, epidural micro-ECoG signals recorded from non-human primates when rest periods were interleaved between blocks of an active BCI control task. Main Results. Post-hoc analyses demonstrated that these states can be decoded accurately on both a trial-by-trial and real-time basis, and this discriminability remains robust over a period of weeks. In addition, high gamma frequencies showed greater modulation with desired movement direction, while lower frequency components demonstrated greater amplitude differences between task and rest periods, suggesting possible specialized BCI roles for these frequencies. Significance. The results presented here provide valuable insight into the neurophysiology of BCI control as well as important considerations toward the design of an asynchronous BCI system.

  17. Using Recent BCI Literature to Deepen our Understanding of Clinical Neurofeedback: A Short Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeunet, Camille; Lotte, Fabien; Batail, Jean-Marie; Philip, Pierre; Micoulaud Franchi, Jean-Arthur

    2018-05-15

    In their recent paper, Alkoby et al. (2017) provide the readership with an extensive and very insightful review of the factors influencing NeuroFeedback (NF) performance. These factors are drawn from both the NF literature and the Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) literature. Our short review aims to complement Alkoby et al.'s review by reporting recent additions to the BCI literature. The object of this paper is to highlight this literature and discuss its potential relevance and usefulness to better understand the processes underlying NF and further improve the design of clinical trials assessing NF efficacy. Indeed, we are convinced that while NF and BCI are fundamentally different in many ways, both the BCI and NF communities could reach compelling achievements by building upon one another. By reviewing the recent BCI literature, we identified three types of factors that influence BCI performance: task-specific, cognitive/motivational and technology-acceptance-related factors. Since BCIs and NF share a common goal (i.e., learning to modulate specific neurophysiological patterns), similar cognitive and neurophysiological processes are likely to be involved during the training process. Thus, the literature on BCI training may help (1) to deepen our understanding of neurofeedback training processes and (2) to understand the variables that influence the clinical efficacy of NF. This may help to properly assess and/or control the influence of these variables during randomized controlled trials. Copyright © 2018 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The Cybathlon BCI race: Successful longitudinal mutual learning with two tetraplegic users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdikis, Serafeim; Tonin, Luca; Saeedi, Sareh; Schneider, Christoph; Millán, José Del R

    2018-05-01

    This work aims at corroborating the importance and efficacy of mutual learning in motor imagery (MI) brain-computer interface (BCI) by leveraging the insights obtained through our participation in the BCI race of the Cybathlon event. We hypothesized that, contrary to the popular trend of focusing mostly on the machine learning aspects of MI BCI training, a comprehensive mutual learning methodology that reinstates the three learning pillars (at the machine, subject, and application level) as equally significant could lead to a BCI-user symbiotic system able to succeed in real-world scenarios such as the Cybathlon event. Two severely impaired participants with chronic spinal cord injury (SCI), were trained following our mutual learning approach to control their avatar in a virtual BCI race game. The competition outcomes substantiate the effectiveness of this type of training. Most importantly, the present study is one among very few to provide multifaceted evidence on the efficacy of subject learning during BCI training. Learning correlates could be derived at all levels of the interface-application, BCI output, and electroencephalography (EEG) neuroimaging-with two end-users, sufficiently longitudinal evaluation, and, importantly, under real-world and even adverse conditions.

  19. The Cybathlon BCI race: Successful longitudinal mutual learning with two tetraplegic users.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serafeim Perdikis

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available This work aims at corroborating the importance and efficacy of mutual learning in motor imagery (MI brain-computer interface (BCI by leveraging the insights obtained through our participation in the BCI race of the Cybathlon event. We hypothesized that, contrary to the popular trend of focusing mostly on the machine learning aspects of MI BCI training, a comprehensive mutual learning methodology that reinstates the three learning pillars (at the machine, subject, and application level as equally significant could lead to a BCI-user symbiotic system able to succeed in real-world scenarios such as the Cybathlon event. Two severely impaired participants with chronic spinal cord injury (SCI, were trained following our mutual learning approach to control their avatar in a virtual BCI race game. The competition outcomes substantiate the effectiveness of this type of training. Most importantly, the present study is one among very few to provide multifaceted evidence on the efficacy of subject learning during BCI training. Learning correlates could be derived at all levels of the interface-application, BCI output, and electroencephalography (EEG neuroimaging-with two end-users, sufficiently longitudinal evaluation, and, importantly, under real-world and even adverse conditions.

  20. Feasibility of BCI Control in a Realistic Smart Home Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosmyna, Nataliya; Tarpin-Bernard, Franck; Bonnefond, Nicolas; Rivet, Bertrand

    2016-01-01

    Smart homes have been an active area of research, however despite considerable investment, they are not yet a reality for end-users. Moreover, there are still accessibility challenges for the elderly or the disabled, two of the main potential targets for home automation. In this exploratory study we design a control mechanism for smart homes based on Brain Computer Interfaces (BCI) and apply it in the “Domus”1 smart home platform in order to evaluate the potential interest of users about BCIs at home. We enable users to control lighting, a TV set, a coffee machine and the shutters of the smart home. We evaluate the performance (accuracy, interaction time), usability and feasibility (USE questionnaire) on 12 healthy subjects and 2 disabled subjects. We find that healthy subjects achieve 77% task accuracy. However, disabled subjects achieved a better accuracy (81% compared to 77%). PMID:27616986

  1. Feasibility of BCI Control in a Realistic Smart Home Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataliya Kosmyna

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Smart homes have been an active area of research, however despite considerable investment, they are not yet a reality for end-users. Moreover, there are still accessibility challenges for the elderly or the disabled, two of the main potential targets for home automation. In this exploratory study we design a control mechanism for smart homes based on Brain Computer Interfaces (BCI and apply it in the Domus smart home platform in order to evaluate the potential interest of users about BCIs at home. We enable users to control lighting, a TV set, a coffee machine and the shutters of the smart home. We evaluate the performance (accuracy, interaction time, usability and feasibility (USE questionnaire on 12 healthy subjects and 2 disabled subjects. We find that healthy subjects achieve 77% task accuracy. However, disabled subjects achieved a better accuracy (81% compared to 77%.

  2. Feasibility of BCI Control in a Realistic Smart Home Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosmyna, Nataliya; Tarpin-Bernard, Franck; Bonnefond, Nicolas; Rivet, Bertrand

    2016-01-01

    Smart homes have been an active area of research, however despite considerable investment, they are not yet a reality for end-users. Moreover, there are still accessibility challenges for the elderly or the disabled, two of the main potential targets for home automation. In this exploratory study we design a control mechanism for smart homes based on Brain Computer Interfaces (BCI) and apply it in the "Domus" smart home platform in order to evaluate the potential interest of users about BCIs at home. We enable users to control lighting, a TV set, a coffee machine and the shutters of the smart home. We evaluate the performance (accuracy, interaction time), usability and feasibility (USE questionnaire) on 12 healthy subjects and 2 disabled subjects. We find that healthy subjects achieve 77% task accuracy. However, disabled subjects achieved a better accuracy (81% compared to 77%).

  3. Fast Recognition of BCI-Inefficient Users Using Physiological Features from EEG Signals: A Screening Study of Stroke Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Xiaokang; Chen, Shugeng; Yao, Lin; Sheng, Xinjun; Zhang, Dingguo; Jiang, Ning; Jia, Jie; Zhu, Xiangyang

    2018-01-01

    Motor imagery (MI) based brain-computer interface (BCI) has been developed as an alternative therapy for stroke rehabilitation. However, experimental evidence demonstrates that a significant portion (10-50%) of subjects are BCI-inefficient users (accuracy less than 70%). Thus, predicting BCI performance prior to clinical BCI usage would facilitate the selection of suitable end-users and improve the efficiency of stroke rehabilitation. In the current study, we proposed two physiological variables, i.e., laterality index (LI) and cortical activation strength (CAS), to predict MI-BCI performance. Twenty-four stroke patients and 10 healthy subjects were recruited for this study. Each subject was required to perform two blocks of left- and right-hand MI tasks. Linear regression analyses were performed between the BCI accuracies and two physiological predictors. Here, the predictors were calculated from the electroencephalography (EEG) signals during paretic hand MI tasks (5 trials; approximately 1 min). LI values exhibited a statistically significant correlation with two-class BCI (left vs. right) performance (r = -0.732, p discrimination of BCI-inefficient users. These results demonstrated that the proposed BCI predictors were promising to promote the BCI usage in stroke rehabilitation and contribute to a better understanding of the BCI-inefficiency phenomenon in stroke patients.

  4. Fast Recognition of BCI-Inefficient Users Using Physiological Features from EEG Signals: A Screening Study of Stroke Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Xiaokang; Chen, Shugeng; Yao, Lin; Sheng, Xinjun; Zhang, Dingguo; Jiang, Ning; Jia, Jie; Zhu, Xiangyang

    2018-01-01

    Motor imagery (MI) based brain-computer interface (BCI) has been developed as an alternative therapy for stroke rehabilitation. However, experimental evidence demonstrates that a significant portion (10–50%) of subjects are BCI-inefficient users (accuracy less than 70%). Thus, predicting BCI performance prior to clinical BCI usage would facilitate the selection of suitable end-users and improve the efficiency of stroke rehabilitation. In the current study, we proposed two physiological variables, i.e., laterality index (LI) and cortical activation strength (CAS), to predict MI-BCI performance. Twenty-four stroke patients and 10 healthy subjects were recruited for this study. Each subject was required to perform two blocks of left- and right-hand MI tasks. Linear regression analyses were performed between the BCI accuracies and two physiological predictors. Here, the predictors were calculated from the electroencephalography (EEG) signals during paretic hand MI tasks (5 trials; approximately 1 min). LI values exhibited a statistically significant correlation with two-class BCI (left vs. right) performance (r = −0.732, p discrimination of BCI-inefficient users. These results demonstrated that the proposed BCI predictors were promising to promote the BCI usage in stroke rehabilitation and contribute to a better understanding of the BCI-inefficiency phenomenon in stroke patients. PMID:29515363

  5. DTU BCI speller: An SSVEP-based spelling system with dictionary support

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilic, Adnan; Kjaer, Troels W.; Thomsen, Carsten E.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, a new brain computer interface (BCI) speller, named DTU BCI speller, is introduced. It is based on the steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP) and features dictionary support. The system focuses on simplicity and user friendliness by using a single electrode for the signal......) is 4.90 ± 3.84 with a best case of 8.74 CPM. All subjects reported systematically on different user friendliness measures, and the overall results indicated the potentials of the DTU BCI Speller system. For subjects with high classification accuracies, the introduced dictionary approach greatly reduced...

  6. L1-Penalized N-way PLS for subset of electrodes selection in BCI experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliseyev, Andrey; Moro, Cecile; Faber, Jean; Wyss, Alexander; Torres, Napoleon; Mestais, Corinne; Benabid, Alim Louis; Aksenova, Tetiana

    2012-08-01

    Recently, the N-way partial least squares (NPLS) approach was reported as an effective tool for neuronal signal decoding and brain-computer interface (BCI) system calibration. This method simultaneously analyzes data in several domains. It combines the projection of a data tensor to a low dimensional space with linear regression. In this paper the L1-Penalized NPLS is proposed for sparse BCI system calibration, allowing uniting the projection technique with an effective selection of subset of features. The L1-Penalized NPLS was applied for the binary self-paced BCI system calibration, providing selection of electrodes subset. Our BCI system is designed for animal research, in particular for research in non-human primates.

  7. BCI inside a virtual reality classroom: a potential training tool for attention

    OpenAIRE

    Rohani, Darius Adam; Puthusserypady, Sadasivan

    2015-01-01

    Background: A growing population is diagnosed with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and are currently being treated with psychostimulants. Brain Computer Interface (BCI) is a method of communicating with an external program or device based on measured electrical signals from the brain. A particular brain signal, the P300 potential, can be measured about 300 ms after a voluntary cognitive involvement to external stimuli. By utilizing the P300 potential, we have designed a BCI- a...

  8. How Well Can We Learn With Standard BCI Training Approaches? A Pilot Study.

    OpenAIRE

    Jeunet , Camille; Cellard , Alison; Subramanian , Sriram; Hachet , Martin; N'Kaoua , Bernard; Lotte , Fabien

    2014-01-01

    International audience; While being very promising, brain-computer interfaces (BCI) remain barely used outside laboratories because they are not reliable enough. It has been suggested that current training approaches may be partly responsible for the poor reliability of BCIs as they do not satisfy recommendations from psychology and are thus inadequate. To determine to which extent such BCI training approaches (i.e., feedback and training tasks) are suitable to learn a skill, we used them in ...

  9. Predicting Mental Imagery-Based BCI Performance from Personality, Cognitive Profile and Neurophysiological Patterns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camille Jeunet

    Full Text Available Mental-Imagery based Brain-Computer Interfaces (MI-BCIs allow their users to send commands to a computer using their brain-activity alone (typically measured by ElectroEncephaloGraphy-EEG, which is processed while they perform specific mental tasks. While very promising, MI-BCIs remain barely used outside laboratories because of the difficulty encountered by users to control them. Indeed, although some users obtain good control performances after training, a substantial proportion remains unable to reliably control an MI-BCI. This huge variability in user-performance led the community to look for predictors of MI-BCI control ability. However, these predictors were only explored for motor-imagery based BCIs, and mostly for a single training session per subject. In this study, 18 participants were instructed to learn to control an EEG-based MI-BCI by performing 3 MI-tasks, 2 of which were non-motor tasks, across 6 training sessions, on 6 different days. Relationships between the participants' BCI control performances and their personality, cognitive profile and neurophysiological markers were explored. While no relevant relationships with neurophysiological markers were found, strong correlations between MI-BCI performances and mental-rotation scores (reflecting spatial abilities were revealed. Also, a predictive model of MI-BCI performance based on psychometric questionnaire scores was proposed. A leave-one-subject-out cross validation process revealed the stability and reliability of this model: it enabled to predict participants' performance with a mean error of less than 3 points. This study determined how users' profiles impact their MI-BCI control ability and thus clears the way for designing novel MI-BCI training protocols, adapted to the profile of each user.

  10. Enhanced Motor Imagery-Based BCI Performance via Tactile Stimulation on Unilateral Hand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaokang Shu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Brain-computer interface (BCI has attracted great interests for its effectiveness in assisting disabled people. However, due to the poor BCI performance, this technique is still far from daily-life applications. One of critical issues confronting BCI research is how to enhance BCI performance. This study aimed at improving the motor imagery (MI based BCI accuracy by integrating MI tasks with unilateral tactile stimulation (Uni-TS. The effects were tested on both healthy subjects and stroke patients in a controlled study. Twenty-two healthy subjects and four stroke patients were recruited and randomly divided into a control-group and an enhanced-group. In the control-group, subjects performed two blocks of conventional MI tasks (left hand vs. right hand, with 80 trials in each block. In the enhanced-group, subjects also performed two blocks of MI tasks, but constant tactile stimulation was applied on the non-dominant/paretic hand during MI tasks in the second block. We found the Uni-TS significantly enhanced the contralateral cortical activations during MI of the stimulated hand, whereas it had no influence on activation patterns during MI of the non-stimulated hand. The two-class BCI decoding accuracy was significantly increased from 72.5% (MI without Uni-TS to 84.7% (MI with Uni-TS in the enhanced-group (p < 0.001, paired t-test. Moreover, stroke patients in the enhanced-group achieved an accuracy >80% during MI with Uni-TS. This novel approach complements the conventional methods for BCI enhancement without increasing source information or complexity of signal processing. This enhancement via Uni-TS may facilitate clinical applications of MI-BCI.

  11. Investigating the feasibility of a BCI-driven robot-based writing agent for handicapped individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syan, Chanan S.; Harnarinesingh, Randy E. S.; Beharry, Rishi

    2014-07-01

    Brain-Computer Interfaces (BCIs) predominantly employ output actuators such as virtual keyboards and wheelchair controllers to enable handicapped individuals to interact and communicate with their environment. However, BCI-based assistive technologies are limited in their application. There is minimal research geared towards granting disabled individuals the ability to communicate using written words. This is a drawback because involving a human attendant in writing tasks can entail a breach of personal privacy where the task entails sensitive and private information such as banking matters. BCI-driven robot-based writing however can provide a safeguard for user privacy where it is required. This study investigated the feasibility of a BCI-driven writing agent using the 3 degree-of- freedom Phantom Omnibot. A full alphanumerical English character set was developed and validated using a teach pendant program in MATLAB. The Omnibot was subsequently interfaced to a P300-based BCI. Three subjects utilised the BCI in the online context to communicate words to the writing robot over a Local Area Network (LAN). The average online letter-wise classification accuracy was 91.43%. The writing agent legibly constructed the communicated letters with minor errors in trajectory execution. The developed system therefore provided a feasible platform for BCI-based writing.

  12. Investigating the feasibility of a BCI-driven robot-based writing agent for handicapped individuals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syan, Chanan S; Harnarinesingh, Randy E S; Beharry, Rishi

    2014-01-01

    Brain-Computer Interfaces (BCIs) predominantly employ output actuators such as virtual keyboards and wheelchair controllers to enable handicapped individuals to interact and communicate with their environment. However, BCI-based assistive technologies are limited in their application. There is minimal research geared towards granting disabled individuals the ability to communicate using written words. This is a drawback because involving a human attendant in writing tasks can entail a breach of personal privacy where the task entails sensitive and private information such as banking matters. BCI-driven robot-based writing however can provide a safeguard for user privacy where it is required. This study investigated the feasibility of a BCI-driven writing agent using the 3 degree-of- freedom Phantom Omnibot. A full alphanumerical English character set was developed and validated using a teach pendant program in MATLAB. The Omnibot was subsequently interfaced to a P300-based BCI. Three subjects utilised the BCI in the online context to communicate words to the writing robot over a Local Area Network (LAN). The average online letter-wise classification accuracy was 91.43%. The writing agent legibly constructed the communicated letters with minor errors in trajectory execution. The developed system therefore provided a feasible platform for BCI-based writing

  13. Clinical evaluation of BrainTree, a motor imagery hybrid BCI speller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdikis, S.; Leeb, R.; Williamson, J.; Ramsay, A.; Tavella, M.; Desideri, L.; Hoogerwerf, E.-J.; Al-Khodairy, A.; Murray-Smith, R.; Millán, J. d. R.

    2014-06-01

    Objective. While brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) for communication have reached considerable technical maturity, there is still a great need for state-of-the-art evaluation by the end-users outside laboratory environments. To achieve this primary objective, it is necessary to augment a BCI with a series of components that allow end-users to type text effectively. Approach. This work presents the clinical evaluation of a motor imagery (MI) BCI text-speller, called BrainTree, by six severely disabled end-users and ten able-bodied users. Additionally, we define a generic model of code-based BCI applications, which serves as an analytical tool for evaluation and design. Main results. We show that all users achieved remarkable usability and efficiency outcomes in spelling. Furthermore, our model-based analysis highlights the added value of human-computer interaction techniques and hybrid BCI error-handling mechanisms, and reveals the effects of BCI performances on usability and efficiency in code-based applications. Significance. This study demonstrates the usability potential of code-based MI spellers, with BrainTree being the first to be evaluated by a substantial number of end-users, establishing them as a viable, competitive alternative to other popular BCI spellers. Another major outcome of our model-based analysis is the derivation of a 80% minimum command accuracy requirement for successful code-based application control, revising upwards previous estimates attempted in the literature.

  14. Effects of electrical conductivity of substrate materials on microstructure of diamond-like carbon films prepared by bipolar-type plasma based ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakao, S; Sonoda, T

    2013-01-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films are prepared by a bipolar-type plasma based ion implantation, and the structural differences between DLC films deposited on different electrical conductive substrates, i.e., conductive Si wafers and insulating glass plates are examined by Raman spectroscopy and x-ray photo emission spectroscopy (XPS). In the Raman measurements, graphite (G) and disorder (D) peaks are observed for both samples. However, the additional photo luminescence is overlapped on the spectra in the case of on-glass sample. To elucidate the structural difference, the intensity ratio of D to G peak (I(D)/I(G)), G peak position and full width at half maximum (FWHM) are obtained by curve fitting using Gaussian function and linear baseline. It is found that the I(D)/I(G) is lower, G peak position is higher and FWHM of G peak is narrower for on-glass sample than for on-Si sample. According to Robertson [1], lower I(D)/I(G) seems more sp 3 C-C bonding in amount for on-glass sample. In contrast, higher G peak position and narrower FWHM of G peak suggest less sp 3 C-C bonding in amount for on-glass sample. The results of XPS analysis with C1s spectra reveal that sp 3 ratio, i.e., the intensity ratio of sp 3 /(sp 3 +sp 2 ) is smaller for on-glass sample than for on-Si sample. The inconsistency of the trend between I(D)/I(G) and other parameters (G peak position and FWHM of G peak) might be caused by the overlap of photo luminescence signal on Raman spectrum as to on-glass sample. From these results, it is considered that sp 3 C-C bonding is reduced in amount when using insulating substrate in comparison with conductive substrate.

  15. Enhancing clinical communication assessments using an audiovisual BCI for patients with disorders of consciousness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fei; He, Yanbin; Qu, Jun; Xie, Qiuyou; Lin, Qing; Ni, Xiaoxiao; Chen, Yan; Pan, Jiahui; Laureys, Steven; Yu, Ronghao; Li, Yuanqing

    2017-08-01

    Objective. The JFK coma recovery scale-revised (JFK CRS-R), a behavioral observation scale, is widely used in the clinical diagnosis/assessment of patients with disorders of consciousness (DOC). However, the JFK CRS-R is associated with a high rate of misdiagnosis (approximately 40%) because DOC patients cannot provide sufficient behavioral responses. A brain-computer interface (BCI) that detects command/intention-specific changes in electroencephalography (EEG) signals without the need for behavioral expression may provide an alternative method. Approach. In this paper, we proposed an audiovisual BCI communication system based on audiovisual ‘yes’ and ‘no’ stimuli to supplement the JFK CRS-R for assessing the communication ability of DOC patients. Specifically, patients were given situation-orientation questions as in the JFK CRS-R and instructed to select the answers using the BCI. Main results. Thirteen patients (eight vegetative state (VS) and five minimally conscious state (MCS)) participated in our experiments involving both the BCI- and JFK CRS-R-based assessments. One MCS patient who received a score of 1 in the JFK CRS-R achieved an accuracy of 86.5% in the BCI-based assessment. Seven patients (four VS and three MCS) obtained unresponsive results in the JFK CRS-R-based assessment but responsive results in the BCI-based assessment, and 4 of those later improved scores in the JFK CRS-R-based assessment. Five patients (four VS and one MCS) obtained usresponsive results in both assessments. Significance. The experimental results indicated that the audiovisual BCI could provide more sensitive results than the JFK CRS-R and therefore supplement the JFK CRS-R.

  16. The tissue velocity imaging and strain rate imaging in the assessment of interatrial electromechanical conduction in patients with sick sinus syndrome before and after pacemaker implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaozhi Zheng

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Tissue velocity imaging (TVI and strain rate imaging (SRI were recently introduced to quantify myocardial mechanical activity in patients receiving cardiac resynchronization therapy. To clear whether atrial-demand-based (AAI (R atrial pacing can fully simulate the electromechanical conduction of physiological state and to clarify which one is more appropriate for the assessment of electromechanical activity of the heart between TVI and SRI, 30 normal subjects and 31 patients with sick sinus syndrome (SSS before and after AAI(R pacemaker implantation (PI were investigated in this study. The results showed that the time intervals (ms, P-SRa assessed by SRI (not P-Va assessed by TVI prolonged step by step from the lateral wall of the right atrium (RA, the interatrial septum (IAS and the left atrium (LA in normal subjects(5.01±0.62, 17.05±3.54 and 45.09±12.26, p<0.01. P-Va and P-SRa did not differ at the RA, IAS and LA in patients with SSS before PI (p>0.05, and they were significant longer than those of normal subjects (p<0.01. However, they shortened to normal levels in patients with SSS after PI and P-SRa showed again the trend of gradually prolonging from the RA, IAS to LA. At the same time, the peak velocities and the peak strain rates during atrial contraction also returned to normal values from lower levels. These data suggested that AAI(R atrial pacing can successfully reverse the abnormal interatrial electromechanical conduction in patients with SSS, and SRI is more appropriate for the assessment of the electromechanical activity of atrial wall than TVI.

  17. Hermetic electronic packaging of an implantable brain-machine-interface with transcutaneous optical data communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuettler, Martin; Kohler, Fabian; Ordonez, Juan S; Stieglitz, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Future brain-computer-interfaces (BCIs) for severely impaired patients are implanted to electrically contact the brain tissue. Avoiding percutaneous cables requires amplifier and telemetry electronics to be implanted too. We developed a hermetic package that protects the electronic circuitry of a BCI from body moisture while permitting infrared communication through the package wall made from alumina ceramic. The ceramic package is casted in medical grade silicone adhesive, for which we identified MED2-4013 as a promising candidate.

  18. Usage of drip drops as stimuli in an auditory P300 BCI paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Minqiang; Jin, Jing; Zhang, Yu; Hu, Dewen; Wang, Xingyu

    2018-02-01

    Recently, many auditory BCIs are using beeps as auditory stimuli, while beeps sound unnatural and unpleasant for some people. It is proved that natural sounds make people feel comfortable, decrease fatigue, and improve the performance of auditory BCI systems. Drip drop is a kind of natural sounds that makes humans feel relaxed and comfortable. In this work, three kinds of drip drops were used as stimuli in an auditory-based BCI system to improve the user-friendness of the system. This study explored whether drip drops could be used as stimuli in the auditory BCI system. The auditory BCI paradigm with drip-drop stimuli, which was called the drip-drop paradigm (DP), was compared with the auditory paradigm with beep stimuli, also known as the beep paradigm (BP), in items of event-related potential amplitudes, online accuracies and scores on the likability and difficulty to demonstrate the advantages of DP. DP obtained significantly higher online accuracy and information transfer rate than the BP ( p  < 0.05, Wilcoxon signed test; p  < 0.05, Wilcoxon signed test). Besides, DP obtained higher scores on the likability with no significant difference on the difficulty ( p  < 0.05, Wilcoxon signed test). The results showed that the drip drops were reliable acoustic materials as stimuli in an auditory BCI system.

  19. Classification of unconscious like/dislike decisions: First results towards a novel application for BCI technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wriessnegger, S C; Hackhofer, D; Muller-Putz, G R

    2015-01-01

    More and more applications for BCI technology emerge that are not restricted to communication or control, like gaming, rehabilitation, Neuro-IS research, neuro-economics or security. In this context a so called passive BCI, a system that derives its outputs from arbitrary brain activity for enriching a human-machine interaction with implicit information on the actual user state will be used. Concretely EEG-based BCI technology enables the use of signals related to attention, intentions and mental state, without relying on indirect measures based on overt behavior or other physiological signals which is an important point e.g. in Neuromarketing research. The scope of this pilot EEG-study was to detect like/dislike decisions on car stimuli just by means of ERP analysis. Concretely to define user preferences concerning different car designs by implementing an offline BCI based on shrinkage LDA classification. Although classification failed in the majority of participants the elicited early (sub) conscious ERP components reflect user preferences for cars. In a broader sense this study should pave the way towards a "product design BCI" suitable for neuromarketing research.

  20. A novel BCI based on ERP components sensitive to configural processing of human faces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Zhao, Qibin; Jing, Jin; Wang, Xingyu; Cichocki, Andrzej

    2012-04-01

    This study introduces a novel brain-computer interface (BCI) based on an oddball paradigm using stimuli of facial images with loss of configural face information (e.g., inversion of face). To the best of our knowledge, till now the configural processing of human faces has not been applied to BCI but widely studied in cognitive neuroscience research. Our experiments confirm that the face-sensitive event-related potential (ERP) components N170 and vertex positive potential (VPP) have reflected early structural encoding of faces and can be modulated by the configural processing of faces. With the proposed novel paradigm, we investigate the effects of ERP components N170, VPP and P300 on target detection for BCI. An eight-class BCI platform is developed to analyze ERPs and evaluate the target detection performance using linear discriminant analysis without complicated feature extraction processing. The online classification accuracy of 88.7% and information transfer rate of 38.7 bits min-1 using stimuli of inverted faces with only single trial suggest that the proposed paradigm based on the configural processing of faces is very promising for visual stimuli-driven BCI applications.

  1. Passive BCI in Operational Environments: Insights, Recent Advances, and Future Trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arico, Pietro; Borghini, Gianluca; Di Flumeri, Gianluca; Sciaraffa, Nicolina; Colosimo, Alfredo; Babiloni, Fabio

    2017-07-01

    This minireview aims to highlight recent important aspects to consider and evaluate when passive brain-computer interface (pBCI) systems would be developed and used in operational environments, and remarks future directions of their applications. Electroencephalography (EEG) based pBCI has become an important tool for real-time analysis of brain activity since it could potentially provide covertly-without distracting the user from the main task-and objectively-not affected by the subjective judgment of an observer or the user itself-information about the operator cognitive state. Different examples of pBCI applications in operational environments and new adaptive interface solutions have been presented and described. In addition, a general overview regarding the correct use of machine learning techniques (e.g., which algorithm to use, common pitfalls to avoid, etc.) in the pBCI field has been provided. Despite recent innovations on algorithms and neurotechnology, pBCI systems are not completely ready to enter the market yet, mainly due to limitations of the EEG electrodes technology, and algorithms reliability and capability in real settings. High complexity and safety critical systems (e.g., airplanes, ATM interfaces) should adapt their behaviors and functionality accordingly to the user' actual mental state. Thus, technologies (i.e., pBCIs) able to measure in real time the user's mental states would result very useful in such "high risk" environments to enhance human machine interaction, and so increase the overall safety.

  2. The extraction of motion-onset VEP BCI features based on deep learning and compressed sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Teng; Li, Hui; Yang, Hao; Lv, Xulin; Li, Peiyang; Liu, Tiejun; Yao, Dezhong; Xu, Peng

    2017-01-01

    Motion-onset visual evoked potentials (mVEP) can provide a softer stimulus with reduced fatigue, and it has potential applications for brain computer interface(BCI)systems. However, the mVEP waveform is seriously masked in the strong background EEG activities, and an effective approach is needed to extract the corresponding mVEP features to perform task recognition for BCI control. In the current study, we combine deep learning with compressed sensing to mine discriminative mVEP information to improve the mVEP BCI performance. The deep learning and compressed sensing approach can generate the multi-modality features which can effectively improve the BCI performance with approximately 3.5% accuracy incensement over all 11 subjects and is more effective for those subjects with relatively poor performance when using the conventional features. Compared with the conventional amplitude-based mVEP feature extraction approach, the deep learning and compressed sensing approach has a higher classification accuracy and is more effective for subjects with relatively poor performance. According to the results, the deep learning and compressed sensing approach is more effective for extracting the mVEP feature to construct the corresponding BCI system, and the proposed feature extraction framework is easy to extend to other types of BCIs, such as motor imagery (MI), steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP)and P300. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Fuzzy Tracking and Control Algorithm for an SSVEP-Based BCI System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeou-Jiunn Chen

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Subjects with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS consistently experience decreasing quality of life because of this distinctive disease. Thus, a practical brain-computer interface (BCI application can effectively help subjects with ALS to participate in communication or entertainment. In this study, a fuzzy tracking and control algorithm is proposed for developing a BCI remote control system. To represent the characteristics of the measured electroencephalography (EEG signals after visual stimulation, a fast Fourier transform is applied to extract the EEG features. A self-developed fuzzy tracking algorithm quickly traces the changes of EEG signals. The accuracy and stability of a BCI system can be greatly improved by using a fuzzy control algorithm. Fifteen subjects were asked to attend a performance test of this BCI system. The canonical correlation analysis (CCA was adopted to compare the proposed approach, and the average recognition rates are 96.97% and 94.49% for proposed approach and CCA, respectively. The experimental results showed that the proposed approach is preferable to CCA. Overall, the proposed fuzzy tracking and control algorithm applied in the BCI system can profoundly help subjects with ALS to control air swimmer drone vehicles for entertainment purposes.

  4. Brain-computer interface (BCI) evaluation in people with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCane, Lynn M; Sellers, Eric W; McFarland, Dennis J; Mak, Joseph N; Carmack, C Steve; Zeitlin, Debra; Wolpaw, Jonathan R; Vaughan, Theresa M

    2014-06-01

    Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) might restore communication to people severely disabled by amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) or other disorders. We sought to: 1) define a protocol for determining whether a person with ALS can use a visual P300-based BCI; 2) determine what proportion of this population can use the BCI; and 3) identify factors affecting BCI performance. Twenty-five individuals with ALS completed an evaluation protocol using a standard 6 × 6 matrix and parameters selected by stepwise linear discrimination. With an 8-channel EEG montage, the subjects fell into two groups in BCI accuracy (chance accuracy 3%). Seventeen averaged 92 (± 3)% (range 71-100%), which is adequate for communication (G70 group). Eight averaged 12 (± 6)% (range 0-36%), inadequate for communication (L40 subject group). Performance did not correlate with disability: 11/17 (65%) of G70 subjects were severely disabled (i.e. ALSFRS-R < 5). All L40 subjects had visual impairments (e.g. nystagmus, diplopia, ptosis). P300 was larger and more anterior in G70 subjects. A 16-channel montage did not significantly improve accuracy. In conclusion, most people severely disabled by ALS could use a visual P300-based BCI for communication. In those who could not, visual impairment was the principal obstacle. For these individuals, auditory P300-based BCIs might be effective.

  5. Audio-visual feedback improves the BCI performance in the navigational control of a humanoid robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuele eTidoni

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Advancement in brain computer interfaces (BCI technology allows people to actively interact in the world through surrogates. Controlling real humanoid robots using BCI as intuitively as we control our body represents a challenge for current research in robotics and neuroscience. In order to successfully interact with the environment the brain integrates multiple sensory cues to form a coherent representation of the world. Cognitive neuroscience studies demonstrate that multisensory integration may imply a gain with respect to a single modality and ultimately improve the overall sensorimotor performance. For example, reactivity to simultaneous visual and auditory stimuli may be higher than to the sum of the same stimuli delivered in isolation or in temporal sequence. Yet, knowledge about whether audio-visual integration may improve the control of a surrogate is meager. To explore this issue, we provided human footstep sounds as audio feedback to BCI users while controlling a humanoid robot. Participants were asked to steer their robot surrogate and perform a pick-and-place task through BCI-SSVEPs. We found that audio-visual synchrony between footsteps sound and actual humanoid’s walk reduces the time required for steering the robot. Thus, auditory feedback congruent with the humanoid actions may improve motor decisions of the BCI’s user and help in the feeling of control over it. Our results shed light on the possibility to increase robot’s control through the combination of multisensory feedback to a BCI user.

  6. Number of implants for mandibular implant overdentures: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeong-Yol; Kim, Ha-Young; Bryant, S. Ross

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this systematic review is to address treatment outcomes of Mandibular implant overdentures relative to implant survival rate, maintenance and complications, and patient satisfaction. MATERIALS AND METHODS A systematic literature search was conducted by a PubMed search strategy and hand-searching of relevant journals from included studies. Randomized Clinical Trials (RCT) and comparative clinical trial studies on mandibular implant overdentures until August, 2010 were selected. Eleven studies from 1098 studies were finally selected and data were analyzed relative to number of implants. RESULTS Six studies presented the data of the implant survival rate which ranged from 95% to 100% for 2 and 4 implant group and from 81.8% to 96.1% for 1 and 2 implant group. One study, which statistically compared implant survival rate showed no significant differences relative to the number of implants. The most common type of prosthetic maintenance and complications were replacement or reattaching of loose clips for 2 and 4 implant group, and denture repair due to the fracture around an implant for 1 and 2 implant groups. Most studies showed no significant differences in the rate of prosthetic maintenance and complication, and patient satisfaction regardless the number of implants. CONCLUSION The implant survival rate of mandibular overdentures is high regardless of the number of implants. Denture maintenance is likely not inflenced substantially by the number of implants and patient satisfaction is typically high again regardless os the number of implants. PMID:23236572

  7. An improved P300 pattern in BCI to catch user’s attention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jing; Zhang, Hanhan; Daly, Ian; Wang, Xingyu; Cichocki, Andrzej

    2017-06-01

    Objective. Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) can help patients who have lost control over most muscles but are still conscious and able to communicate or interact with the environment. One of the most popular types of BCI is the P300-based BCI. With this BCI, users are asked to count the number of appearances of target stimuli in an experiment. To date, the majority of visual P300-based BCI systems developed have used the same character or picture as the target for every stimulus presentation, which can bore users. Consequently, users attention may decrease or be negatively affected by adjacent stimuli. Approach. In this study, a new stimulus is presented to increase user concentration. Honeycomb-shaped figures with 1-3 red dots were used as stimuli. The number and the positions of the red dots in the honeycomb-shaped figure were randomly changed during BCI control. The user was asked to count the number of the dots presented in each flash instead of the number of times they flashed. To assess the performance of this new stimulus, another honeycomb-shaped stimulus, without red dots, was used as a control condition. Main results. The results showed that the honeycomb-shaped stimuli with red dots obtained significantly higher classification accuracies and information transfer rates (p  <  0.05) compared to the honeycomb-shaped stimulus without red dots. Significance. The results indicate that this proposed method can be a promising approach to improve the performance of the BCI system and can be an efficient method in daily application.

  8. Increasing BCI communication rates with dynamic stopping towards more practical use: an ALS study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainsah, B. O.; Collins, L. M.; Colwell, K. A.; Sellers, E. W.; Ryan, D. B.; Caves, K.; Throckmorton, C. S.

    2015-02-01

    Objective. The P300 speller is a brain-computer interface (BCI) that can possibly restore communication abilities to individuals with severe neuromuscular disabilities, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), by exploiting elicited brain signals in electroencephalography (EEG) data. However, accurate spelling with BCIs is slow due to the need to average data over multiple trials to increase the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the elicited brain signals. Probabilistic approaches to dynamically control data collection have shown improved performance in non-disabled populations; however, validation of these approaches in a target BCI user population has not occurred. Approach. We have developed a data-driven algorithm for the P300 speller based on Bayesian inference that improves spelling time by adaptively selecting the number of trials based on the acute SNR of a user’s EEG data. We further enhanced the algorithm by incorporating information about the user’s language. In this current study, we test and validate the algorithms online in a target BCI user population, by comparing the performance of the dynamic stopping (DS) (or early stopping) algorithms against the current state-of-the-art method, static data collection, where the amount of data collected is fixed prior to online operation. Main results. Results from online testing of the DS algorithms in participants with ALS demonstrate a significant increase in communication rate as measured in bits/min (100-300%), and theoretical bit rate (100-550%), while maintaining selection accuracy. Participants also overwhelmingly preferred the DS algorithms. Significance. We have developed a viable BCI algorithm that has been tested in a target BCI population which has the potential for translation to improve BCI speller performance towards more practical use for communication.

  9. Removal of proprioception by BCI raises a stronger body ownership illusion in control of a humanlike robot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alimardani, Maryam; Nishio, Shuichi; Ishiguro, Hiroshi

    2016-09-22

    Body ownership illusions provide evidence that our sense of self is not coherent and can be extended to non-body objects. Studying about these illusions gives us practical tools to understand the brain mechanisms that underlie body recognition and the experience of self. We previously introduced an illusion of body ownership transfer (BOT) for operators of a very humanlike robot. This sensation of owning the robot's body was confirmed when operators controlled the robot either by performing the desired motion with their body (motion-control) or by employing a brain-computer interface (BCI) that translated motor imagery commands to robot movement (BCI-control). The interesting observation during BCI-control was that the illusion could be induced even with a noticeable delay in the BCI system. Temporal discrepancy has always shown critical weakening effects on body ownership illusions. However the delay-robustness of BOT during BCI-control raised a question about the interaction between the proprioceptive inputs and delayed visual feedback in agency-driven illusions. In this work, we compared the intensity of BOT illusion for operators in two conditions; motion-control and BCI-control. Our results revealed a significantly stronger BOT illusion for the case of BCI-control. This finding highlights BCI's potential in inducing stronger agency-driven illusions by building a direct communication between the brain and controlled body, and therefore removing awareness from the subject's own body.

  10. An experimental model of an indigenous BCI based system to help disabled people to communicate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabir, Kazi Sadman; Rahman, Chowdhury M. Abid; Farayez, Araf; Ferdous, Mahbuba

    2017-12-01

    In this paper a Brain Computer Interface (BCI) system has been proposed to help patients suffering from motor disease, paralysis or locked in syndrome to communicate via eye blinking. In this proposed BCI system EEG data is fetched by NeuroSky Headset and then analyzed by the help of WPF (Windows Presentation Foundation) based serial monitor to detect the EEG signal when the eye gives a blink. This detection of eye blinking can be used to select predefined texts and those texts can be converted to speech. The experimental result shows that this system can be used as an effective and efficient tool to communicate through brain.

  11. BCI inside a virtual reality classroom: a potential training tool for attention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohani, Darius Adam; Puthusserypady, Sadasivan

    2015-01-01

    Background : A growing population is diagnosed with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and are currently being treated with psychostimulants. Brain Computer Interface (BCI) is a method of communicating with an external program or device based on measured electrical signals from...... the brain. A particular brain signal, the P300 potential, can be measured about 300 ms after a voluntary cognitive involvement to external stimuli. By utilizing the P300 potential, we have designed a BCI- assisted exercising tool targeting attention enhancement within an immersive 3D virtual reality (VR...

  12. Investigating the effects of a sensorimotor rhythm-based BCI training on the cortical activity elicited by mental imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toppi, J.; Risetti, M.; Quitadamo, L. R.; Petti, M.; Bianchi, L.; Salinari, S.; Babiloni, F.; Cincotti, F.; Mattia, D.; Astolfi, L.

    2014-06-01

    Objective. It is well known that to acquire sensorimotor (SMR)-based brain-computer interface (BCI) control requires a training period before users can achieve their best possible performances. Nevertheless, the effect of this training procedure on the cortical activity related to the mental imagery ability still requires investigation to be fully elucidated. The aim of this study was to gain insights into the effects of SMR-based BCI training on the cortical spectral activity associated with the performance of different mental imagery tasks. Approach. Linear cortical estimation and statistical brain mapping techniques were applied on high-density EEG data acquired from 18 healthy participants performing three different mental imagery tasks. Subjects were divided in two groups, one of BCI trained subjects, according to their previous exposure (at least six months before this study) to motor imagery-based BCI training, and one of subjects who were naive to any BCI paradigms. Main results. Cortical activation maps obtained for trained and naive subjects indicated different spectral and spatial activity patterns in response to the mental imagery tasks. Long-term effects of the previous SMR-based BCI training were observed on the motor cortical spectral activity specific to the BCI trained motor imagery task (simple hand movements) and partially generalized to more complex motor imagery task (playing tennis). Differently, mental imagery with spatial attention and memory content could elicit recognizable cortical spectral activity even in subjects completely naive to (BCI) training. Significance. The present findings contribute to our understanding of BCI technology usage and might be of relevance in those clinical conditions when training to master a BCI application is challenging or even not possible.

  13. Ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dearnaley, Geoffrey

    1975-01-01

    First, ion implantation in semiconductors is discussed: ion penetration, annealing of damage, gettering, ion implanted semiconductor devices, equipement requirements for ion implantation. The importance of channeling for ion implantation is studied. Then, some applications of ion implantation in metals are presented: study of the corrosion of metals and alloys; influence or ion implantation on the surface-friction and wear properties of metals; hyperfine interactions in implanted metals

  14. An efficient word typing P300-BCI system using a modified T9 interface and random forest classifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akram, Faraz; Han, Seung Moo; Kim, Tae-Seong

    2015-01-01

    A typical P300-based spelling brain computer interface (BCI) system types a single character with a character presentation paradigm and a P300 classification system. Lately, a few attempts have been made to type a whole word with the help of a smart dictionary that suggests some candidate words with the input of a few initial characters. In this paper, we propose a novel paradigm utilizing initial character typing with word suggestions and a novel P300 classifier to increase word typing speed and accuracy. The novel paradigm involves modifying the Text on 9 keys (T9) interface, which is similar to the keypad of a mobile phone used for text messaging. Users can type the initial characters using a 3×3 matrix interface and an integrated custom-built dictionary that suggests candidate words as the user types the initials. Then the user can select one of the given suggestions to complete word typing. We have adopted a random forest classifier, which significantly improves P300 classification accuracy by combining multiple decision trees. We conducted experiments with 10 subjects using the proposed BCI system. Our proposed paradigms significantly reduced word typing time and made word typing more convenient by outputting complete words with only a few initial character inputs. The conventional spelling system required an average time of 3.47 min per word while typing 10 random words, whereas our proposed system took an average time of 1.67 min per word, a 51.87% improvement, for the same words under the same conditions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Spatial Filter Feature Extraction Methods for P300 BCI Speller: A Comparison

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chiou, Eleni; Puthusserypady, Sadasivan

    2017-01-01

    Brain Computer Interface (BCI) systems enable subjects affected by neuromuscular disorders to interact with the outside world. A P300 speller uses Event Related Potential (ERP) components, generated in the brain in the presence of a target stimulus, to extract information about the user’s intent...

  16. An Asynchronous P300 BCI With SSVEP-Based Control State Detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Panicker, Rajesh C.; Puthusserypady, Sadasivan; Sun, Ying

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, an asynchronous brain–computer interface (BCI) system combining the P300 and steady-state visually evoked potentials (SSVEPs) paradigms is proposed. The information transfer is accomplished using P300 event-related potential paradigm and the control state (CS) detection is achieved...

  17. Driving a Semiautonomous Mobile Robotic Car Controlled by an SSVEP-Based BCI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stawicki, Piotr; Gembler, Felix; Volosyak, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Brain-computer interfaces represent a range of acknowledged technologies that translate brain activity into computer commands. The aim of our research is to develop and evaluate a BCI control application for certain assistive technologies that can be used for remote telepresence or remote driving. The communication channel to the target device is based on the steady-state visual evoked potentials. In order to test the control application, a mobile robotic car (MRC) was introduced and a four-class BCI graphical user interface (with live video feedback and stimulation boxes on the same screen) for piloting the MRC was designed. For the purpose of evaluating a potential real-life scenario for such assistive technology, we present a study where 61 subjects steered the MRC through a predetermined route. All 61 subjects were able to control the MRC and finish the experiment (mean time 207.08 s, SD 50.25) with a mean (SD) accuracy and ITR of 93.03% (5.73) and 14.07 bits/min (4.44), respectively. The results show that our proposed SSVEP-based BCI control application is suitable for mobile robots with a shared-control approach. We also did not observe any negative influence of the simultaneous live video feedback and SSVEP stimulation on the performance of the BCI system.

  18. Movement-related cortical potentials in paraplegic patients: abnormal patterns and considerations for BCI-rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ren eXu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Non-invasive EEG-based Brain-Computer Interfaces (BCI can be promising for the motor neuro-rehabilitation of paraplegic patients. However, this shall require detailed knowledge of the abnormalities in the EEG signatures of paraplegic patients. The association of abnormalities in different subgroups of patients and their relation to the sensorimotor integration are relevant for the design, implementation and use of BCI systems in patient populations. This study explores the patterns of abnormalities of movement related cortical potentials (MRCP during motor imagery tasks of feet and right hand in patients with paraplegia (including the subgroups with/without central neuropathic pain and complete/incomplete injury patients and the level of distinctiveness of abnormalities in these groups using pattern classification. The most notable observed abnormalities were the amplified execution negativity and its slower rebound in the patient group. The potential underlying mechanisms behind these changes and other minor dissimilarities in patients’ subgroups, as well as the relevance to BCI applications, are discussed. The findings are of interest from a neurological perspective as well as for BCI-assisted neuro-rehabilitation and therapy.

  19. Listen, you are writing!Speeding up online spelling with a dynamic auditory BCI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martijn eSchreuder

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Representing an intuitive spelling interface for Brain-Computer Interfaces (BCI in the auditory domain is not straightforward. In consequence, all existing approaches based on event-related potentials (ERP rely at least partially on a visual representation of the interface. This online study introduces an auditory spelling interface that eliminates the necessity for such a visualization. In up to two sessions, a group of healthy subjects (N=21 was asked to use a text entry application, utilizing the spatial cues of the AMUSE paradigm (Auditory Multiclass Spatial ERP. The speller relies on the auditory sense both for stimulation and the core feedback. Without prior BCI experience, 76% of the participants were able to write a full sentence during the first session. By exploiting the advantages of a newly introduced dynamic stopping method, a maximum writing speed of 1.41 characters/minute (7.55 bits/minute could be reached during the second session (average: .94 char/min, 5.26 bits/min. For the first time, the presented work shows that an auditory BCI can reach performances similar to state-of-the-art visual BCIs based on covert attention. These results represent an important step towards a purely auditory BCI.

  20. Effect of biased feedback on motor imagery learning in BCI-teleoperation system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam eAlimardani

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Feedback design is an important issue in motor imagery BCI systems. Regardless, to date it has not been reported how feedback presentation can optimize co-adaptation between a human brain and such systems. This paper assesses the effect of realistic visual feedback on users’ BC performance and motor imagery skills. We previously developed a tele-operation system for a pair of humanlike robotic hands and showed that BCI control of such hands along with first-person perspective visual feedback of movements can arouse a sense of embodiment in the operators. In the first stage of this study, we found that the intensity of this ownership illusion was associated with feedback presentation and subjects’ performance during BCI motion control. In the second stage, we probed the effect of positive and negative feedback bias on subjects’ BCI performance and motor imagery skills. Although the subject specific classifier, which was set up at the beginning of experiment, detected no significant change in the subjects’ online performance, evaluation of brain activity patterns revealed that subjects’ self-regulation of motor imagery features improved due to a positive bias of feedback and a possible occurrence of ownership illusion. Our findings suggest that in general training protocols for BCIs, manipulation of feedback can play an important role in the optimization of subjects’ motor imagery skills.

  1. Multiresolution analysis over graphs for a motor imagery based online BCI game.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asensio-Cubero, Javier; Gan, John Q; Palaniappan, Ramaswamy

    2016-01-01

    Multiresolution analysis (MRA) over graph representation of EEG data has proved to be a promising method for offline brain-computer interfacing (BCI) data analysis. For the first time we aim to prove the feasibility of the graph lifting transform in an online BCI system. Instead of developing a pointer device or a wheel-chair controller as test bed for human-machine interaction, we have designed and developed an engaging game which can be controlled by means of imaginary limb movements. Some modifications to the existing MRA analysis over graphs for BCI have also been proposed, such as the use of common spatial patterns for feature extraction at the different levels of decomposition, and sequential floating forward search as a best basis selection technique. In the online game experiment we obtained for three classes an average classification rate of 63.0% for fourteen naive subjects. The application of a best basis selection method helps significantly decrease the computing resources needed. The present study allows us to further understand and assess the benefits of the use of tailored wavelet analysis for processing motor imagery data and contributes to the further development of BCI for gaming purposes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Rapid prototyping of an EEG-based brain-computer interface (BCI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guger, C; Schlögl, A; Neuper, C; Walterspacher, D; Strein, T; Pfurtscheller, G

    2001-03-01

    The electroencephalogram (EEG) is modified by motor imagery and can be used by patients with severe motor impairments (e.g., late stage of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis) to communicate with their environment. Such a direct connection between the brain and the computer is known as an EEG-based brain-computer interface (BCI). This paper describes a new type of BCI system that uses rapid prototyping to enable a fast transition of various types of parameter estimation and classification algorithms to real-time implementation and testing. Rapid prototyping is possible by using Matlab, Simulink, and the Real-Time Workshop. It is shown how to automate real-time experiments and perform the interplay between on-line experiments and offline analysis. The system is able to process multiple EEG channels on-line and operates under Windows 95 in real-time on a standard PC without an additional digital signal processor (DSP) board. The BCI can be controlled over the Internet, LAN or modem. This BCI was tested on 3 subjects whose task it was to imagine either left or right hand movement. A classification accuracy between 70% and 95% could be achieved with two EEG channels after some sessions with feedback using an adaptive autoregressive (AAR) model and linear discriminant analysis (LDA).

  3. STATIC CODE ANALYSIS FOR SOFTWARE QUALITY IMPROVEMENT: A CASE STUDY IN BCI FRAMEWORK DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indar Sugiarto

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows how the systematic approach in software testing using static code analysis method can be used for improving the software quality of a BCI framework. The method is best performed during the development phase of framework programs. In the proposed approach, we evaluate several software metrics which are based on the principles of object oriented design. Since such method is depending on the underlying programming language, we describe the method in term of C++ language programming whereas the Qt platform is also currently being used. One of the most important metric is so called software complexity. Applying the software complexity calculation using both McCabe and Halstead method for the BCI framework which consists of two important types of BCI, those are SSVEP and P300, we found that there are two classes in the framework which have very complex and prone to violation of cohesion principle in OOP. The other metrics are fit the criteria of the proposed framework aspects, such as: MPC is less than 20; average complexity is around value of 5; and the maximum depth is below 10 blocks. Such variables are considered very important when further developing the BCI framework in the future.

  4. Images from the Mind: BCI image reconstruction based on Rapid Serial Visual Presentations of polygon primitives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís F Seoane

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available We provide a proof of concept for an EEG-based reconstruction of a visual image which is on a user's mind. Our approach is based on the Rapid Serial Visual Presentation (RSVP of polygon primitives and Brain-Computer Interface (BCI technology. In an experimental setup, subjects were presented bursts of polygons: some of them contributed to building a target image (because they matched the shape and/or color of the target while some of them did not. The presentation of the contributing polygons triggered attention-related EEG patterns. These Event Related Potentials (ERPs could be determined using BCI classification and could be matched to the stimuli that elicited them. These stimuli (i.e. the ERP-correlated polygons were accumulated in the display until a satisfactory reconstruction of the target image was reached. As more polygons were accumulated, finer visual details were attained resulting in more challenging classification tasks. In our experiments, we observe an average classification accuracy of around 75%. An in-depth investigation suggests that many of the misclassifications were not misinterpretations of the BCI concerning the users' intent, but rather caused by ambiguous polygons that could contribute to reconstruct several different images. When we put our BCI-image reconstruction in perspective with other RSVP BCI paradigms, there is large room for improvement both in speed and accuracy. These results invite us to be optimistic. They open a plethora of possibilities to explore non-invasive BCIs for image reconstruction both in healthy and impaired subjects and, accordingly, suggest interesting recreational and clinical applications.

  5. Offline analysis of context contribution to ERP-based typing BCI performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orhan, Umut; Erdogmus, Deniz; Roark, Brian; Oken, Barry; Fried-Oken, Melanie

    2013-12-01

    Objective. We aim to increase the symbol rate of electroencephalography (EEG) based brain-computer interface (BCI) typing systems by utilizing context information. Approach. Event related potentials (ERP) corresponding to a stimulus in EEG can be used to detect the intended target of a person for BCI. This paradigm is widely utilized to build letter-by-letter BCI typing systems. Nevertheless currently available BCI typing systems still require improvement due to low typing speeds. This is mainly due to the reliance on multiple repetitions before making a decision to achieve higher typing accuracy. Another possible approach to increase the speed of typing while not significantly reducing the accuracy of typing is to use additional context information. In this paper, we study the effect of using a language model (LM) as additional evidence for intent detection. Bayesian fusion of an n-gram symbol model with EEG features is proposed, and a specifically regularized discriminant analysis ERP discriminant is used to obtain EEG-based features. The target detection accuracies are rigorously evaluated for varying LM orders, as well as the number of ERP-inducing repetitions. Main results. The results demonstrate that the LMs contribute significantly to letter classification accuracy. For instance, we find that a single-trial ERP detection supported by a 4-gram LM may achieve the same performance as using 3-trial ERP classification for the non-initial letters of words. Significance. Overall, the fusion of evidence from EEG and LMs yields a significant opportunity to increase the symbol rate of a BCI typing system.

  6. Cochlear Implant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrnaz Karimi

    1992-04-01

    Full Text Available People with profound hearing loss are not able to use some kinds of conventional amplifiers due to the nature of their loss . In these people, hearing sense is stimulated only when the auditory nerve is activated via electrical stimulation. This stimulation is possible through cochlear implant. In fact, for the deaf people who have good mental health and can not use surgical and medical treatment and also can not benefit from air and bone conduction hearing aids, this device is used if they have normal central auditory system. The basic parts of the device included: Microphone, speech processor, transmitter, stimulator and receiver, and electrode array.

  7. Systematic review: a review of adolescent behavior change interventions [BCI] and their effectiveness in HIV and AIDS prevention in sub-Saharan Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mwale

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite sub-Saharan Africa [SSA] constituting just 12% of the world’s population, the region has the highest burden of HIV with 70% of HIV infection in general and 80% of new infections among young people occuring in the region. Diverse intervention programmes have been implemented among young people but with minimal translation to behavior change. A systematic review of Behavior Change Interventions [BCI] targeting adolescents in SSA was therefore conducted with the objective of delineating this intervention vis-a-vis efficacy gap. Methods From April to July 2015 searches were made from different journals online. Databases searched included MEDLINE, EBSCOhost, PsychINFO, Cochrane, and Google Scholar; Cambridge and Oxford journal websites, UNAIDS and WHO for studies published between 2000 and 2015. After excluding other studies by review of titles and then abstracts, the studies were reduced to 17. Three of these were randomized trials and five quasi-experimental. Overall interventions included those prescribing life skills, peer education [n = 6] and community collaborative programmes. The main study protocol was approved by the University of Malawi College of Medicine Ethics Committee on 30th June 2016 [ref #: P.01/16/1847. The review was registered with PROSPERO [NIH] in 2015. Results The review yielded some 200 titles and abstracts, 20 full text articles were critically analysed and 17 articles reviewed reflecting a dearth in published studies in the area of psychosocial BCI interventions targeting adolescents in SSA. Results show that a number of reviewed interventions [n = 8] registered positive outcomes in both knowledge and sexual practices. Conclusions The review demonstrates a paucity of psychosocial BCI studies targeting adolescents in SSA. There are however mixed findings about the effectiveness of psychosocial BCI targeting adolescents in SSA. Other studies portray intervention effectiveness and others

  8. Maps managing interface design for a mobile robot navigation governed by a BCI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auat Cheein, Fernando A [Institute of Automatic, National University of San Juan. San Martin, 1109 - Oeste 5400 San Juan (Argentina); Carelli, Ricardo [Institute of Automatic, National University of San Juan. San Martin, 1109 - Oeste 5400 San Juan (Argentina); Celeste, Wanderley Cardoso [Electrical Engineering Department, Federal University of Espirito Santo. Fernando Ferrari, 514 29075-910 Vitoria-ES (Brazil); Freire Bastos, Teodiano [Electrical Engineering Department, Federal University of Espirito Santo. Fernando Ferrari, 514 29075-910 Vitoria-ES (Brazil); Di Sciascio, Fernando [Institute of Automatic, National University of San Juan. San Martin, 1109 - Oeste 5400 San Juan (Argentina)

    2007-11-15

    In this paper, a maps managing interface is proposed. This interface is governed by a Brain Computer Interface (BCI), which also governs a mobile robot's movements. If a robot is inside a known environment, the user can load a map from the maps managing interface in order to navigate it. Otherwise, if the robot is in an unknown environment, a Simultaneous Localization and Mapping (SLAM) algorithm is released in order to obtain a probabilistic grid map of that environment. Then, that map is loaded into the map database for future navigations. While slamming, the user has a direct control of the robot's movements via the BCI. The complete system is applied to a mobile robot and can be also applied to an autonomous wheelchair, which has the same kinematics. Experimental results are also shown.

  9. Maps managing interface design for a mobile robot navigation governed by a BCI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auat Cheein, Fernando A; Carelli, Ricardo; Celeste, Wanderley Cardoso; Freire Bastos, Teodiano; Di Sciascio, Fernando

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, a maps managing interface is proposed. This interface is governed by a Brain Computer Interface (BCI), which also governs a mobile robot's movements. If a robot is inside a known environment, the user can load a map from the maps managing interface in order to navigate it. Otherwise, if the robot is in an unknown environment, a Simultaneous Localization and Mapping (SLAM) algorithm is released in order to obtain a probabilistic grid map of that environment. Then, that map is loaded into the map database for future navigations. While slamming, the user has a direct control of the robot's movements via the BCI. The complete system is applied to a mobile robot and can be also applied to an autonomous wheelchair, which has the same kinematics. Experimental results are also shown

  10. Exploring the use of tactile feedback in an ERP-based auditory BCI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreuder, Martijn; Thurlings, Marieke E; Brouwer, Anne-Marie; Van Erp, Jan B F; Tangermann, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Giving direct, continuous feedback on a brain state is common practice in motor imagery based brain-computer interfaces (BCI), but has not been reported for BCIs based on event-related potentials (ERP), where feedback is only given once after a sequence of stimuli. Potentially, direct feedback could allow the user to adjust his strategy during a running trial to obtain the required response. In order to test the usefulness of such feedback, directionally congruent vibrotactile feedback was given during an online auditory BCI experiment. Users received either no feedback, short feedback pulses or continuous feedback. The feedback conditions showed reduced performance both on a behavioral task and in terms of classification accuracy. Several explanations are discussed that give interesting starting points for further research on this topic.

  11. Active Bio-sensor System, Compatible with Arm Muscle Movement or Blinking Signals in BCI Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeid Mehrkanoon

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses a bionic active sensor system for the BCI application. Proposed system involves analog and digital parts. Two types of accurate sensors are used to pickup the blinking and muscle movement signals. A precision micro-power instrumentation amplifier with the adjustable gain, a sixth order low pass active filter with cutoff frequency 0.1 Hz, and a sixth order band pas filter with the bandwidth of 2-6 Hz are constructed to provide the clean blinking and arm muscle movement signals. TMS320C25 DSP processor is used for independent and unique command signals which are prepared for BCI application by a power amplifier and driver.

  12. A Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) system to use arbitrary Windows applications by directly controlling mouse and keyboard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spuler, Martin

    2015-08-01

    A Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) allows to control a computer by brain activity only, without the need for muscle control. In this paper, we present an EEG-based BCI system based on code-modulated visual evoked potentials (c-VEPs) that enables the user to work with arbitrary Windows applications. Other BCI systems, like the P300 speller or BCI-based browsers, allow control of one dedicated application designed for use with a BCI. In contrast, the system presented in this paper does not consist of one dedicated application, but enables the user to control mouse cursor and keyboard input on the level of the operating system, thereby making it possible to use arbitrary applications. As the c-VEP BCI method was shown to enable very fast communication speeds (writing more than 20 error-free characters per minute), the presented system is the next step in replacing the traditional mouse and keyboard and enabling complete brain-based control of a computer.

  13. EEG correlates of P300-based brain-computer interface (BCI) performance in people with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Joseph N.; McFarland, Dennis J.; Vaughan, Theresa M.; McCane, Lynn M.; Tsui, Phillippa Z.; Zeitlin, Debra J.; Sellers, Eric W.; Wolpaw, Jonathan R.

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify electroencephalography (EEG) features that correlate with P300-based brain-computer interface (P300 BCI) performance in people with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Twenty people with ALS used a P300 BCI spelling application in copy-spelling mode. Three types of EEG features were found to be good predictors of P300 BCI performance: (1) the root-mean-square amplitude and (2) the negative peak amplitude of the event-related potential to target stimuli (target ERP) at Fz, Cz, P3, Pz, and P4; and (3) EEG theta frequency (4.5-8 Hz) power at Fz, Cz, P3, Pz, P4, PO7, PO8 and Oz. A statistical prediction model that used a subset of these features accounted for >60% of the variance in copy-spelling performance (p < 0.001, mean R2 = 0.6175). The correlations reflected between-subject, rather than within-subject, effects. The results enhance understanding of performance differences among P300 BCI users. The predictors found in this study might help in: (1) identifying suitable candidates for long-term P300 BCI operation; (2) assessing performance online. Further work on within-subject effects needs to be done to establish whether P300 BCI user performance could be improved by optimizing one or more of these EEG features.

  14. Mushu, a free- and open source BCI signal acquisition, written in Python.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venthur, Bastian; Blankertz, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    The following paper describes Mushu, a signal acquisition software for retrieval and online streaming of Electroencephalography (EEG) data. It is written, but not limited, to the needs of Brain Computer Interfacing (BCI). It's main goal is to provide a unified interface to EEG data regardless of the amplifiers used. It runs under all major operating systems, like Windows, Mac OS and Linux, is written in Python and is free- and open source software licensed under the terms of the GNU General Public License.

  15. A gaze independent hybrid-BCI based on visual spatial attention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egan, John M.; Loughnane, Gerard M.; Fletcher, Helen; Meade, Emma; Lalor, Edmund C.

    2017-08-01

    Objective. Brain-computer interfaces (BCI) use measures of brain activity to convey a user’s intent without the need for muscle movement. Hybrid designs, which use multiple measures of brain activity, have been shown to increase the accuracy of BCIs, including those based on EEG signals reflecting covert attention. Our study examined whether incorporating a measure of the P3 response improved the performance of a previously reported attention-based BCI design that incorporates measures of steady-state visual evoked potentials (SSVEP) and alpha band modulations. Approach. Subjects viewed stimuli consisting of two bi-laterally located flashing white boxes on a black background. Streams of letters were presented sequentially within the boxes, in random order. Subjects were cued to attend to one of the boxes without moving their eyes, and they were tasked with counting the number of target-letters that appeared within. P3 components evoked by target appearance, SSVEPs evoked by the flashing boxes, and power in the alpha band are modulated by covert attention, and the modulations can be used to classify trials as left-attended or right-attended. Main Results. We showed that classification accuracy was improved by including a P3 feature along with the SSVEP and alpha features (the inclusion of a P3 feature lead to a 9% increase in accuracy compared to the use of SSVEP and Alpha features alone). We also showed that the design improves the robustness of BCI performance to individual subject differences. Significance. These results demonstrate that incorporating multiple neurophysiological indices of covert attention can improve performance in a gaze-independent BCI.

  16. Combining motor imagery with selective sensation toward a hybrid-modality BCI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Lin; Meng, Jianjun; Zhang, Dingguo; Sheng, Xinjun; Zhu, Xiangyang

    2014-08-01

    A hybrid modality brain-computer interface (BCI) is proposed in this paper, which combines motor imagery with selective sensation to enhance the discrimination between left and right mental tasks, e.g., the classification between left/ right stimulation sensation and right/ left motor imagery. In this paradigm, wearable vibrotactile rings are used to stimulate both the skin on both wrists. Subjects are required to perform the mental tasks according to the randomly presented cues (i.e., left hand motor imagery, right hand motor imagery, left stimulation sensation or right stimulation sensation). Two-way ANOVA statistical analysis showed a significant group effect (F (2,20) = 7.17, p = 0.0045), and the Benferroni-corrected multiple comparison test (with α = 0.05) showed that the hybrid modality group is 11.13% higher on average than the motor imagery group, and 10.45% higher than the selective sensation group. The hybrid modality experiment exhibits potentially wider spread usage within ten subjects crossed 70% accuracy, followed by four subjects in motor imagery and five subjects in selective sensation. Six subjects showed statistically significant improvement ( Benferroni-corrected) in hybrid modality in comparison with both motor imagery and selective sensation. Furthermore, among subjects having difficulties in both motor imagery and selective sensation, the hybrid modality improves their performance to 90% accuracy. The proposed hybrid modality BCI has demonstrated clear benefits for those poorly performing BCI users. Not only does the requirement of motor and sensory anticipation in this hybrid modality provide basic function of BCI for communication and control, it also has the potential for enhancing the rehabilitation during motor recovery.

  17. BCI-FES system for neuro-rehabilitation of stroke patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jure, Fabricio A.; Carrere, Lucía C.; Gentiletti, Gerardo G.; Tabernig, Carolina B.

    2016-04-01

    Nowadays, strokes are a growing cause of mortality and many people remain with motor sequelae and troubles in the daily activities. To treat this sequelae, alternative rehabilitation techniques are needed. In this article a Brain Computer Interface (BCI) system to control a Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES) system is presented. It can be used as a novel tool in easy setup clinical routines, to improve the rehabilitation process by mean of detecting patient´s motor intention, performing it by FES and finally receiving appropriate feedback The BCI-FES system presented here, consists of three blocks: the first one decodes the patient´s intention and it is composed by the patient, the acquisition hardware and the processing software (Emotiv EPOC®). The second block, based on Arduino’s technology, transforms the information into a valid command signal. The last one excites the patient´s neuromuscular system by means of a FES device. In order to evaluate the cerebral activity sensed by the device, topographic maps were obtained. The BCI-FES system was able to detect the patient´s motor intention and control the FES device. At the time of this publication, the system it’s being employing in a rehabilitation program with patients post stroke.

  18. Evolution of the Brain Computing Interface (BCI and Proposed Electroencephalography (EEG Signals Based Authentication Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramzan Qaseem

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available With current advancements in the field of Brain Computer interface it is required to study how it will affect the other technologies currently in use. In this paper, the authors motivate the need of Brain Computing Interface in the era of IoT (Internet of Things, and analyze how BCI in the presence of IoT could have serious privacy breach if not protected by new kind of more secure protocols. Security breach and hacking has been around for a long time but now we are sensitive towards data as our lives depend on it. When everything is interconnected through IoT and considering that we control all interconnected things by means of our brain using BCI (Brain Computer Interface, the meaning of security breach becomes much more sensitive than in the past. This paper describes the old security methods being used for authentication and how they can be compromised. Considering the sensitivity of data in the era of IoT, a new form of authentication is required, which should incorporate BCI rather than usual authentication techniques.

  19. Electroencephalography Signal Grouping and Feature Classification Using Harmony Search for BCI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae-Ju Lee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a heuristic method for electroencephalography (EEG grouping and feature classification using harmony search (HS for improving the accuracy of the brain-computer interface (BCI system. EEG, a noninvasive BCI method, uses many electrodes on the scalp, and a large number of electrodes make the resulting analysis difficult. In addition, traditional EEG analysis cannot handle multiple stimuli. On the other hand, the classification method using the EEG signal has a low accuracy. To solve these problems, we use a heuristic approach to reduce the complexities in multichannel problems and classification. In this study, we build a group of stimuli using the HS algorithm. Then, the features from common spatial patterns are classified by the HS classifier. To confirm the proposed method, we perform experiments using 64-channel EEG equipment. The subjects are subjected to three kinds of stimuli: audio, visual, and motion. Each stimulus is applied alone or in combination with the others. The acquired signals are processed by the proposed method. The classification results in an accuracy of approximately 63%. We conclude that the heuristic approach using the HS algorithm on the BCI is beneficial for EEG signal analysis.

  20. Application of a single-flicker online SSVEP BCI for spatial navigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jingjing; Zhang, Dan; Engel, Andreas K; Gong, Qin; Maye, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    A promising approach for brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) employs the steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP) for extracting control information. Main advantages of these SSVEP BCIs are a simple and low-cost setup, little effort to adjust the system parameters to the user and comparatively high information transfer rates (ITR). However, traditional frequency-coded SSVEP BCIs require the user to gaze directly at the selected flicker stimulus, which is liable to cause fatigue or even photic epileptic seizures. The spatially coded SSVEP BCI we present in this article addresses this issue. It uses a single flicker stimulus that appears always in the extrafoveal field of view, yet it allows the user to control four control channels. We demonstrate the embedding of this novel SSVEP stimulation paradigm in the user interface of an online BCI for navigating a 2-dimensional computer game. Offline analysis of the training data reveals an average classification accuracy of 96.9±1.64%, corresponding to an information transfer rate of 30.1±1.8 bits/min. In online mode, the average classification accuracy reached 87.9±11.4%, which resulted in an ITR of 23.8±6.75 bits/min. We did not observe a strong relation between a subject's offline and online performance. Analysis of the online performance over time shows that users can reliably control the new BCI paradigm with stable performance over at least 30 minutes of continuous operation.

  1. A real-time classification algorithm for EEG-based BCI driven by self-induced emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacoviello, Daniela; Petracca, Andrea; Spezialetti, Matteo; Placidi, Giuseppe

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this paper is to provide an efficient, parametric, general, and completely automatic real time classification method of electroencephalography (EEG) signals obtained from self-induced emotions. The particular characteristics of the considered low-amplitude signals (a self-induced emotion produces a signal whose amplitude is about 15% of a really experienced emotion) require exploring and adapting strategies like the Wavelet Transform, the Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and the Support Vector Machine (SVM) for signal processing, analysis and classification. Moreover, the method is thought to be used in a multi-emotions based Brain Computer Interface (BCI) and, for this reason, an ad hoc shrewdness is assumed. The peculiarity of the brain activation requires ad-hoc signal processing by wavelet decomposition, and the definition of a set of features for signal characterization in order to discriminate different self-induced emotions. The proposed method is a two stages algorithm, completely parameterized, aiming at a multi-class classification and may be considered in the framework of machine learning. The first stage, the calibration, is off-line and is devoted at the signal processing, the determination of the features and at the training of a classifier. The second stage, the real-time one, is the test on new data. The PCA theory is applied to avoid redundancy in the set of features whereas the classification of the selected features, and therefore of the signals, is obtained by the SVM. Some experimental tests have been conducted on EEG signals proposing a binary BCI, based on the self-induced disgust produced by remembering an unpleasant odor. Since in literature it has been shown that this emotion mainly involves the right hemisphere and in particular the T8 channel, the classification procedure is tested by using just T8, though the average accuracy is calculated and reported also for the whole set of the measured channels. The obtained

  2. Ion implantation into diamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Susumu

    1994-01-01

    The graphitization and the change to amorphous state of diamond surface layer by ion implantation and its characteristics are reported. In the diamond surface, into which more than 10 16 ions/cm 2 was implanted, the diamond crystals are broken, and the structure changes to other carbon structure such as amorphous state or graphite. Accompanying this change of structure, the electric conductivity of the implanted layer shows two discontinuous values due to high resistance and low resistance. This control of structure can be done by the temperature of the base during the ion implantation into diamond. Also it is referred to that by the base temperature during implantation, the mutual change of the structure between amorphous state and graphite can be controlled. The change of the electric resistance and the optical characteristics by the ion implantation into diamond surface, the structural analysis by Raman spectroscopy, and the control of the structure of the implanted layer by the base temperature during implantation are reported. (K.I.)

  3. Cybathlon experiences of the Graz BCI racing team Mirage91 in the brain-computer interface discipline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Statthaler, Karina; Schwarz, Andreas; Steyrl, David; Kobler, Reinmar; Höller, Maria Katharina; Brandstetter, Julia; Hehenberger, Lea; Bigga, Marvin; Müller-Putz, Gernot

    2017-12-28

    In this work, we share our experiences made at the world-wide first CYBATHLON, an event organized by the Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule Zürich (ETH Zürich), which took place in Zurich in October 2016. It is a championship for severely motor impaired people using assistive prototype devices to compete against each other. Our team, the Graz BCI Racing Team MIRAGE91 from Graz University of Technology, participated in the discipline "Brain-Computer Interface Race". A brain-computer interface (BCI) is a device facilitating control of applications via the user's thoughts. Prominent applications include assistive technology such as wheelchairs, neuroprostheses or communication devices. In the CYBATHLON BCI Race, pilots compete in a BCI-controlled computer game. We report on setting up our team, the BCI customization to our pilot including long term training and the final BCI system. Furthermore, we describe CYBATHLON participation and analyze our CYBATHLON result. We found that our pilot was compliant over the whole time and that we could significantly reduce the average runtime between start and finish from initially 178 s to 143 s. After the release of the final championship specifications with shorter track length, the average runtime converged to 120 s. We successfully participated in the qualification race at CYBATHLON 2016, but performed notably worse than during training, with a runtime of 196 s. We speculate that shifts in the features, due to the nonstationarities in the electroencephalogram (EEG), but also arousal are possible reasons for the unexpected result. Potential counteracting measures are discussed. The CYBATHLON 2016 was a great opportunity for our student team. We consolidated our theoretical knowledge and turned it into practice, allowing our pilot to play a computer game. However, further research is required to make BCI technology invariant to non-task related changes of the EEG.

  4. Cochlear Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... implant, including: • How long a person has been deaf, •The number of surviving auditory nerve fibers, and • ... Implant, Severe Sensoryneurial Hearing Loss Get Involved Professional Development Practice Management ENT Careers Marketplace Privacy Policy Terms ...

  5. A new hybrid BCI paradigm based on P300 and SSVEP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Minjue; Daly, Ian; Allison, Brendan Z; Jin, Jing; Zhang, Yu; Chen, Lanlan; Wang, Xingyu

    2015-04-15

    P300 and steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP) approaches have been widely used for brain-computer interface (BCI) systems. However, neither of these approaches can work for all subjects. Some groups have reported that a hybrid BCI that combines two or more approaches might provide BCI functionality to more users. Hybrid P300/SSVEP BCIs have only recently been developed and validated, and very few avenues to improve performance have been explored. The present study compares an established hybrid P300/SSVEP BCIs paradigm to a new paradigm in which shape changing, instead of color changing, is adopted for P300 evocation to decrease the degradation on SSVEP strength. The result shows that the new hybrid paradigm presented in this paper yields much better performance than the normal hybrid paradigm. A performance increase of nearly 20% in SSVEP classification is achieved using the new hybrid paradigm in comparison with the normal hybrid paradigm. All the paradigms except the normal hybrid paradigm used in this paper obtain 100% accuracy in P300 classification. The new hybrid P300/SSVEP BCIs paradigm in which shape changing, instead of color changing, could obtain as high classification accuracy of SSVEP as the traditional SSVEP paradigm and could obtain as high classification accuracy of P300 as the traditional P300 paradigm. P300 did not interfere with the SSVEP response using the new hybrid paradigm presented in this paper, which was superior to the normal hybrid P300/SSVEP paradigm. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. The user-centered design as novel perspective for evaluating the usability of BCI-controlled applications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Kübler

    Full Text Available Albeit research on brain-computer interfaces (BCI for controlling applications has expanded tremendously, we still face a translational gap when bringing BCI to end-users. To bridge this gap, we adapted the user-centered design (UCD to BCI research and development which implies a shift from focusing on single aspects, such as accuracy and information transfer rate (ITR, to a more holistic user experience. The UCD implements an iterative process between end-users and developers based on a valid evaluation procedure. Within the UCD framework usability of a device can be defined with regard to its effectiveness, efficiency, and satisfaction. We operationalized these aspects to evaluate BCI-controlled applications. Effectiveness was regarded equivalent to accuracy of selections and efficiency to the amount of information transferred per time unit and the effort invested (workload. Satisfaction was assessed with questionnaires and visual-analogue scales. These metrics have been successfully applied to several BCI-controlled applications for communication and entertainment, which were evaluated by end-users with severe motor impairment. Results of four studies, involving a total of N = 19 end-users revealed: effectiveness was moderate to high; efficiency in terms of ITR was low to high and workload low to medium; depending on the match between user and technology, and type of application satisfaction was moderate to high. The here suggested evaluation metrics within the framework of the UCD proved to be an applicable and informative approach to evaluate BCI controlled applications, and end-users with severe impairment and in the locked-in state were able to participate in this process.

  7. The user-centered design as novel perspective for evaluating the usability of BCI-controlled applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kübler, Andrea; Holz, Elisa M; Riccio, Angela; Zickler, Claudia; Kaufmann, Tobias; Kleih, Sonja C; Staiger-Sälzer, Pit; Desideri, Lorenzo; Hoogerwerf, Evert-Jan; Mattia, Donatella

    2014-01-01

    Albeit research on brain-computer interfaces (BCI) for controlling applications has expanded tremendously, we still face a translational gap when bringing BCI to end-users. To bridge this gap, we adapted the user-centered design (UCD) to BCI research and development which implies a shift from focusing on single aspects, such as accuracy and information transfer rate (ITR), to a more holistic user experience. The UCD implements an iterative process between end-users and developers based on a valid evaluation procedure. Within the UCD framework usability of a device can be defined with regard to its effectiveness, efficiency, and satisfaction. We operationalized these aspects to evaluate BCI-controlled applications. Effectiveness was regarded equivalent to accuracy of selections and efficiency to the amount of information transferred per time unit and the effort invested (workload). Satisfaction was assessed with questionnaires and visual-analogue scales. These metrics have been successfully applied to several BCI-controlled applications for communication and entertainment, which were evaluated by end-users with severe motor impairment. Results of four studies, involving a total of N = 19 end-users revealed: effectiveness was moderate to high; efficiency in terms of ITR was low to high and workload low to medium; depending on the match between user and technology, and type of application satisfaction was moderate to high. The here suggested evaluation metrics within the framework of the UCD proved to be an applicable and informative approach to evaluate BCI controlled applications, and end-users with severe impairment and in the locked-in state were able to participate in this process.

  8. Paraffin/expanded graphite phase change composites with enhanced thermal conductivity prepared by implanted β-SiC nanowires with chemical vapor deposition method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Zhaoyu; Zhang, Xiaoguang; Huang, Zhaohui; Liu, Silin; Zhang, Weiyi; Liu, Yan'gai; Wu, Xiaowen; Fang, Minghao; Min, Xin

    2018-02-01

    Expanded graphite/β-SiC nanowires composites (ESNC) were prepared through chemical vapor deposition, and paraffin/expanded graphite/β-SiC nanowires composites (PESNC) were made through vacuum impregnation to overcome liquid leakage during phase transition and enhance the thermal conductivity of paraffin. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy showed no chemical interactions between the paraffin and ESNC. Differential scanning calorimetry estimated the temperature and latent heat of PESNC during melting to 45.73 °C and 124.31 J g-1, respectively. The respective values of these quantities during freezing were recorded as 48.93 °C and 124.14 J g-1. The thermal conductivity of PESNC was estimated to 0.75 W mK-1, which was 3.26-folds that of pure paraffin (0.23 W mK-1). PESNC perfectly maintained its phase transition after 200 melting-freezing cycles. The resulting ideal thermal conductivity, good chemical stability, thermal properties and thermal reliability of PESNC are promising for use in energy efficient buildings and solar energy systems.

  9. Hilbert-Huang Spectrum as a new field for the identification of EEG event related de-/synchronization for BCI applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panoulas, Konstantinos I; Hadjileontiadis, Leontios J; Panas, Stavros M

    2008-01-01

    Brain Computer Interfaces (BCI) usually utilize the suppression of mu-rhythm during actual or imagined motor activity. In order to create a BCI system, a signal processing method is required to extract features upon which the discrimination is based. In this article, the Empirical Mode Decomposition along with the Hilbert-Huang Spectrum (HHS) is found to contain the necessary information to be considered as an input to a discriminator. Also, since the HHS defines amplitude and instantaneous frequency for each sample, it can be used for an online BCI system. Experimental results when the HHS applied to EEG signals from an on-line database (BCI Competition III) show the potentiality of the proposed analysis to capture the imagined motor activity, contributing to a more enhanced BCI performance.

  10. The SSVEP-Based BCI Text Input System Using Entropy Encoding Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeou-Jiunn Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The so-called amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS or motor neuron disease (MND is a neurodegenerative disease with various causes. It is characterized by muscle spasticity, rapidly progressive weakness due to muscle atrophy, and difficulty in speaking, swallowing, and breathing. The severe disabled always have a common problem that is about communication except physical malfunctions. The steady-state visually evoked potential based brain computer interfaces (BCI, which apply visual stimulus, are very suitable to play the role of communication interface for patients with neuromuscular impairments. In this study, the entropy encoding algorithm is proposed to encode the letters of multilevel selection interface for BCI text input systems. According to the appearance frequency of each letter, the entropy encoding algorithm is proposed to construct a variable-length tree for the letter arrangement of multilevel selection interface. Then, the Gaussian mixture models are applied to recognize electrical activity of the brain. According to the recognition results, the multilevel selection interface guides the subject to spell and type the words. The experimental results showed that the proposed approach outperforms the baseline system, which does not consider the appearance frequency of each letter. Hence, the proposed approach is able to ease text input interface for patients with neuromuscular impairments.

  11. Gaze-independent BCI-spelling using rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acqualagna, Laura; Blankertz, Benjamin

    2013-05-01

    A Brain Computer Interface (BCI) speller is a communication device, which can be used by patients suffering from neurodegenerative diseases to select symbols in a computer application. For patients unable to overtly fixate the target symbol, it is crucial to develop a speller independent of gaze shifts. In the present online study, we investigated rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP) as a paradigm for mental typewriting. We investigated the RSVP speller in three conditions, regarding the Stimulus Onset Asynchrony (SOA) and the use of color features. A vocabulary of 30 symbols was presented one-by-one in a pseudo random sequence at the same location of display. All twelve participants were able to successfully operate the RSVP speller. The results show a mean online spelling rate of 1.43 symb/min and a mean symbol selection accuracy of 94.8% in the best condition. We conclude that the RSVP is a promising paradigm for BCI spelling and its performance is competitive with the fastest gaze-independent spellers in literature. The RSVP speller does not require gaze shifts towards different target locations and can be operated by non-spatial visual attention, therefore it can be considered as a valid paradigm in applications with patients for impaired oculo-motor control. Copyright © 2013 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Sequential Probability Ratio Testing with Power Projective Base Method Improves Decision-Making for BCI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rong

    2017-01-01

    Obtaining a fast and reliable decision is an important issue in brain-computer interfaces (BCI), particularly in practical real-time applications such as wheelchair or neuroprosthetic control. In this study, the EEG signals were firstly analyzed with a power projective base method. Then we were applied a decision-making model, the sequential probability ratio testing (SPRT), for single-trial classification of motor imagery movement events. The unique strength of this proposed classification method lies in its accumulative process, which increases the discriminative power as more and more evidence is observed over time. The properties of the method were illustrated on thirteen subjects' recordings from three datasets. Results showed that our proposed power projective method outperformed two benchmark methods for every subject. Moreover, with sequential classifier, the accuracies across subjects were significantly higher than that with nonsequential ones. The average maximum accuracy of the SPRT method was 84.1%, as compared with 82.3% accuracy for the sequential Bayesian (SB) method. The proposed SPRT method provides an explicit relationship between stopping time, thresholds, and error, which is important for balancing the time-accuracy trade-off. These results suggest SPRT would be useful in speeding up decision-making while trading off errors in BCI. PMID:29348781

  13. Enhanced Performance by Time-Frequency-Phase Feature for EEG-Based BCI Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baolei Xu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We introduce a new motor parameter imagery paradigm using clench speed and clench force motor imagery. The time-frequency-phase features are extracted from mu rhythm and beta rhythms, and the features are optimized using three process methods: no-scaled feature using “MIFS” feature selection criterion, scaled feature using “MIFS” feature selection criterion, and scaled feature using “mRMR” feature selection criterion. Support vector machines (SVMs and extreme learning machines (ELMs are compared for classification between clench speed and clench force motor imagery using the optimized feature. Our results show that no significant difference in the classification rate between SVMs and ELMs is found. The scaled feature combinations can get higher classification accuracy than the no-scaled feature combinations at significant level of 0.01, and the “mRMR” feature selection criterion can get higher classification rate than the “MIFS” feature selection criterion at significant level of 0.01. The time-frequency-phase feature can improve the classification rate by about 20% more than the time-frequency feature, and the best classification rate between clench speed motor imagery and clench force motor imagery is 92%. In conclusion, the motor parameter imagery paradigm has the potential to increase the direct control commands for BCI control and the time-frequency-phase feature has the ability to improve BCI classification accuracy.

  14. Using ELM-based weighted probabilistic model in the classification of synchronous EEG BCI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Ping; Tan, Guan-Zheng; Cai, Zi-Xing; Sa, Wei-Ping; Zou, Yi-Qun

    2017-01-01

    Extreme learning machine (ELM) is an effective machine learning technique with simple theory and fast implementation, which has gained increasing interest from various research fields recently. A new method that combines ELM with probabilistic model method is proposed in this paper to classify the electroencephalography (EEG) signals in synchronous brain-computer interface (BCI) system. In the proposed method, the softmax function is used to convert the ELM output to classification probability. The Chernoff error bound, deduced from the Bayesian probabilistic model in the training process, is adopted as the weight to take the discriminant process. Since the proposed method makes use of the knowledge from all preceding training datasets, its discriminating performance improves accumulatively. In the test experiments based on the datasets from BCI competitions, the proposed method is compared with other classification methods, including the linear discriminant analysis, support vector machine, ELM and weighted probabilistic model methods. For comparison, the mutual information, classification accuracy and information transfer rate are considered as the evaluation indicators for these classifiers. The results demonstrate that our method shows competitive performance against other methods.

  15. Latent variable method for automatic adaptation to background states in motor imagery BCI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagaev, Nikolay; Volkova, Ksenia; Ossadtchi, Alexei

    2018-02-01

    Objective. Brain-computer interface (BCI) systems are known to be vulnerable to variabilities in background states of a user. Usually, no detailed information on these states is available even during the training stage. Thus there is a need in a method which is capable of taking background states into account in an unsupervised way. Approach. We propose a latent variable method that is based on a probabilistic model with a discrete latent variable. In order to estimate the model’s parameters, we suggest to use the expectation maximization algorithm. The proposed method is aimed at assessing characteristics of background states without any corresponding data labeling. In the context of asynchronous motor imagery paradigm, we applied this method to the real data from twelve able-bodied subjects with open/closed eyes serving as background states. Main results. We found that the latent variable method improved classification of target states compared to the baseline method (in seven of twelve subjects). In addition, we found that our method was also capable of background states recognition (in six of twelve subjects). Significance. Without any supervised information on background states, the latent variable method provides a way to improve classification in BCI by taking background states into account at the training stage and then by making decisions on target states weighted by posterior probabilities of background states at the prediction stage.

  16. Ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, E.

    1986-01-01

    It is the purpose of the present paper to give a review of surface alloy processing by ion implantation. However, rather than covering this vast subject as a whole, the survey is confined to a presentation of the microstructures that can be found in metal surfaces after ion implantation. The presentation is limited to alloys processed by ion implantation proper, that is to processes in which the alloy compositions are altered significantly by direct injection of the implanted ions. The review is introduced by a presentation of the processes taking place during development of the fundamental event in ion implantation - the collision cascade, followed by a summary of the various microstructures which can be formed after ion implantation into metals. This is compared with the variability of microstructures that can be achieved by rapid solidification processing. The microstructures are subsequently discussed in the light of the processes which, as the implantations proceed, take place during and immediately after formation of the individual collision cascades. These collision cascades define the volumes inside which individual ions are slowed down in the implanted targets. They are not only centres for vigorous agitation but also the sources for formation of excess concentrations of point defects, which will influence development of particular microstructures. A final section presents a selection of specific structures which have been observed in different alloy systems. (orig./GSCH)

  17. Quantitative ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gries, W.H.

    1976-06-01

    This is a report of the study of the implantation of heavy ions at medium keV-energies into electrically conducting mono-elemental solids, at ion doses too small to cause significant loss of the implanted ions by resputtering. The study has been undertaken to investigate the possibility of accurate portioning of matter in submicrogram quantities, with some specific applications in mind. The problem is extensively investigated both on a theoretical level and in practice. A mathematical model is developed for calculating the loss of implanted ions by resputtering as a function of the implanted ion dose and the sputtering yield. Numerical data are produced therefrom which permit a good order-of-magnitude estimate of the loss for any ion/solid combination in which the ions are heavier than the solid atoms, and for any ion energy from 10 to 300 keV. The implanted ion dose is measured by integration of the ion beam current, and equipment and techniques are described which make possible the accurate integration of an ion current in an electromagnetic isotope separator. The methods are applied to two sample cases, one being a stable isotope, the other a radioisotope. In both cases independent methods are used to show that the implantation is indeed quantitative, as predicted. At the same time the sample cases are used to demonstrate two possible applications for quantitative ion implantation, viz. firstly for the manufacture of calibration standards for instrumental micromethods of elemental trace analysis in metals, and secondly for the determination of the half-lives of long-lived radioisotopes by a specific activity method. It is concluded that the present study has advanced quantitative ion implantation to the state where it can be successfully applied to the solution of problems in other fields

  18. Design and simulation of virtual telephone keypad control based on brain computer interface (BCI with very high transfer rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rehab B. Ashari

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Brain Computer Interface (BCI is a communication and control mechanism, which does not rely on any kind of muscular response to send a message to the external world. This technique is used to help the paralyzed people with spinal cord injury to have the ability to communicate with the external world. In this paper we emphasize to increase the BCI System bit rate for controlling a virtual telephone keypad. To achieve the proposed algorithm, a simulated virtual telephone keypad based on Steady State Visual Evoked Potential (SSVEP BCI system is developed. Dynamic programming technique with specifically modified Longest Common Subsequence (LCS algorithm is used. By comparing the paralyzed user selection with the recent, and then the rest, of the stored records in the file of the telephone, the user can save the rest of his choices for controlling the keypad and thence improving the overall performance of the BCI system. This axiomatic approach, which is used in searching the web pages for increasing the performance of the searching, is urgent to be used for the paralyzed people rather than the normal user.

  19. A comparative study of pseudorandom sequences used in a c-VEP based BCI for online wheelchair control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isaksen, Jonas L.; Mohebbi, Ali; Puthusserypady, Sadasivan

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a c-VEP based BCI system was developed to run on three distinctive pseudorandom sequences, namely the m-code, the Gold-code, and the Barker-code. The Visual Evoked Potentials (VEPs) were provoked using these codes. In the online session, subjects controlled a LEGO® Mindstorms® robot...

  20. Single Versus Multiple Events Error Potential Detection in a BCI-Controlled Car Game With Continuous and Discrete Feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreilinger, Alex; Hiebel, Hannah; Müller-Putz, Gernot R

    2016-03-01

    This work aimed to find and evaluate a new method for detecting errors in continuous brain-computer interface (BCI) applications. Instead of classifying errors on a single-trial basis, the new method was based on multiple events (MEs) analysis to increase the accuracy of error detection. In a BCI-driven car game, based on motor imagery (MI), discrete events were triggered whenever subjects collided with coins and/or barriers. Coins counted as correct events, whereas barriers were errors. This new method, termed ME method, combined and averaged the classification results of single events (SEs) and determined the correctness of MI trials, which consisted of event sequences instead of SEs. The benefit of this method was evaluated in an offline simulation. In an online experiment, the new method was used to detect erroneous MI trials. Such MI trials were discarded and could be repeated by the users. We found that, even with low SE error potential (ErrP) detection rates, feasible accuracies can be achieved when combining MEs to distinguish erroneous from correct MI trials. Online, all subjects reached higher scores with error detection than without, at the cost of longer times needed for completing the game. Findings suggest that ErrP detection may become a reliable tool for monitoring continuous states in BCI applications when combining MEs. This paper demonstrates a novel technique for detecting errors in online continuous BCI applications, which yields promising results even with low single-trial detection rates.

  1. Selección de Canales en Sistemas BCI basados en Potenciales P300 mediante Inteligencia de Enjambre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Martínez-Cagigal

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Resumen: Los sistemas Brain-Computer Interface (BCI se definen como sistemas de comunicación que monitorizan la actividad cerebral y traducen determinadas características, correspondientes a las intenciones del usuario, en comandos de control de un dispositivo. La selección de canales en los sistemas BCI es fundamental para evitar el sobre-entrenamiento del clasificador, reducir la carga computacional y aumentar la comodidad del usuario. A pesar de que se han desarrollado varios algoritmos con anterioridad para tal fin, las metaheurísticas basadas en inteligencia de enjambre aún no han sido suficientemente explotadas en los sistemas BCI basados en potenciales P300. En este estudio se muestra una comparativa entre cinco métodos de enjambre, basados en el comportamiento de sistemas biológicos, aplicados con el objetivo de optimizar la selección de canales en este tipo de sistemas. Los métodos se han evaluado sobre la base de datos de la “III BCI Competition 2005”, reportando precisiones similares o, en algunos casos, incluso más altas que las obtenidas sin realizar ningún tipo de selección. Dado que los cinco métodos se han demostrado capaces de disminuir drásticamente los 64 canales originales a menos de la mitad sin comprometer el rendimiento del sistema, así como de superar el conjunto típico de 8 canales y el método backward elimination, se concluye que todos ellos son adecuados para su aplicación en la selección de canales en sistemas P300-BCI. Abstract: Brain-Computer Interfaces (BCI are direct communication pathways between the brain and the environment that translate certain features, which correspond to users’ intentions, into device control commands. Channel selection in BCI systems is essential to avoid over-fitting, to reduce the computational cost and to increase the users’ comfort. Although several algorithms have previously developed for that purpose

  2. Affective SSVEP BCI to effectively control 3D objects by using a prism array-based display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mun, Sungchul; Park, Min-Chul

    2014-06-01

    3D objects with depth information can provide many benefits to users in education, surgery, and interactions. In particular, many studies have been done to enhance sense of reality in 3D interaction. Viewing and controlling stereoscopic 3D objects with crossed or uncrossed disparities, however, can cause visual fatigue due to the vergenceaccommodation conflict generally accepted in 3D research fields. In order to avoid the vergence-accommodation mismatch and provide a strong sense of presence to users, we apply a prism array-based display to presenting 3D objects. Emotional pictures were used as visual stimuli in control panels to increase information transfer rate and reduce false positives in controlling 3D objects. Involuntarily motivated selective attention by affective mechanism can enhance steady-state visually evoked potential (SSVEP) amplitude and lead to increased interaction efficiency. More attentional resources are allocated to affective pictures with high valence and arousal levels than to normal visual stimuli such as white-and-black oscillating squares and checkerboards. Among representative BCI control components (i.e., eventrelated potentials (ERP), event-related (de)synchronization (ERD/ERS), and SSVEP), SSVEP-based BCI was chosen in the following reasons. It shows high information transfer rates and takes a few minutes for users to control BCI system while few electrodes are required for obtaining reliable brainwave signals enough to capture users' intention. The proposed BCI methods are expected to enhance sense of reality in 3D space without causing critical visual fatigue to occur. In addition, people who are very susceptible to (auto) stereoscopic 3D may be able to use the affective BCI.

  3. Plasma immersion ion implantation into insulating materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Xiubo; Yang Shiqin

    2006-01-01

    Plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) is an effective surface modification tool. During PIII processes, the objects to be treated are immersed in plasmas and then biased to negative potential. Consequently the plasma sheath forms and ion implantation may be performed. The pre-requirement of plasma implantation is that the object is conductive. So it seems difficult to treat the insulating materials. The paper focuses on the possibilities of plasma implantation into insulting materials and presents some examples. (authors)

  4. Bristle-sensors—low-cost flexible passive dry EEG electrodes for neurofeedback and BCI applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grozea, Cristian; Voinescu, Catalin D.; Fazli, Siamac

    2011-04-01

    In this paper, we present a new, low-cost dry electrode for EEG that is made of flexible metal-coated polymer bristles. We examine various standard EEG paradigms, such as capturing occipital alpha rhythms, testing for event-related potentials in an auditory oddball paradigm and performing a sensory motor rhythm-based event-related (de-) synchronization paradigm to validate the performance of the novel electrodes in terms of signal quality. Our findings suggest that the dry electrodes that we developed result in high-quality EEG recordings and are thus suitable for a wide range of EEG studies and BCI applications. Furthermore, due to the flexibility of the novel electrodes, greater comfort is achieved in some subjects, this being essential for long-term use.

  5. Your eyes give you away: pupillary responses, EEG dynamics, and applications for BCI (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajda, Paul

    2017-05-01

    As we move through an environment, we are constantly making assessments, judgments, and decisions about the things we encounter. Some are acted upon immediately, but many more become mental notes or fleeting impressions - our implicit "labeling" of the world. In this talk I will describe our work using physiological correlates of this labeling to construct a hybrid brain-computer interface (hBCI) system for efficient navigation of a 3-D environment. Specifically, we record electroencephalographic (EEG), saccadic, and pupillary data from subjects as they move through a small part of a 3-D virtual city under free-viewing conditions. Using machine learning, we integrate the neural and ocular signals evoked by the objects they encounter to infer which ones are of subjective interest. These inferred labels are propagated through a large computer vision graph of objects in the city, using semi-supervised learning to identify other, unseen objects that are visually similar to those that are labelled. Finally, the system plots an efficient route so that subjects visit similar objects of interest. We show that by exploiting the subjects' implicit labeling, the median search precision is increased from 25% to 97%, and the median subject need only travel 40% of the distance to see 84% of the objects of interest. We also find that the neural and ocular signals contribute in a complementary fashion to the classifiers' inference of subjects' implicit labeling. In summary, we show that neural and ocular signals reflecting subjective assessment of objects in a 3-D environment can be used to inform a graph-based learning model of that environment, resulting in an hBCI system that improves navigation and information delivery specific to the user's interests.

  6. Toward a reliable gaze-independent hybrid BCI combining visual and natural auditory stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Sara; Pires, Gabriel; Nunes, Urbano

    2016-03-01

    Brain computer interfaces (BCIs) are one of the last communication options for patients in the locked-in state (LIS). For complete LIS patients, interfaces must be gaze-independent due to their eye impairment. However, unimodal gaze-independent approaches typically present levels of performance substantially lower than gaze-dependent approaches. The combination of multimodal stimuli has been pointed as a viable way to increase users' performance. A hybrid visual and auditory (HVA) P300-based BCI combining simultaneously visual and auditory stimulation is proposed. Auditory stimuli are based on natural meaningful spoken words, increasing stimuli discrimination and decreasing user's mental effort in associating stimuli to the symbols. The visual part of the interface is covertly controlled ensuring gaze-independency. Four conditions were experimentally tested by 10 healthy participants: visual overt (VO), visual covert (VC), auditory (AU) and covert HVA. Average online accuracy for the hybrid approach was 85.3%, which is more than 32% over VC and AU approaches. Questionnaires' results indicate that the HVA approach was the less demanding gaze-independent interface. Interestingly, the P300 grand average for HVA approach coincides with an almost perfect sum of P300 evoked separately by VC and AU tasks. The proposed HVA-BCI is the first solution simultaneously embedding natural spoken words and visual words to provide a communication lexicon. Online accuracy and task demand of the approach compare favorably with state-of-the-art. The proposed approach shows that the simultaneous combination of visual covert control and auditory modalities can effectively improve the performance of gaze-independent BCIs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Fusion of P300 and eye-tracker data for spelling using BCI2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalika, Dmitry; Collins, Leslie; Caves, Kevin; Throckmorton, Chandra

    2017-10-01

    Objective. Various augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) devices have been developed in order to aid communication for individuals with communication disorders. Recently, there has been interest in combining EEG data and eye-gaze data with the goal of developing a hybrid (or ‘fused’) BCI (hBCI) AAC system. This work explores the effectiveness of a speller that fuses data from an eye-tracker and the P300 speller in order to create a hybrid P300 speller. Approach. This hybrid speller collects both eye-tracking and EEG data in parallel, and the user spells characters on the screen in the same way that they would if they were only using the P300 speller. Online and offline experiments were performed. The online experiments measured the performance of the speller for sixteen non-disabled participants, while the offline simulations were used to assess the robustness of the hybrid system. Main results. Online results showed that for fifteen non-disabled participants, using eye-gaze in a Bayesian framework with EEG data from the P300 speller improved accuracy (0.0163+/- 2.72 , 0.085+/- 0.111 , 0.080+/- 0.106 for estimated, medium and high variance configurations) and reduced the average number of flashes required to spell a character compared to the standard P300 speller that relies solely on EEG data (-53.27+/- 25.87 , -36.15+/- 19.3 , -18.85+/- 12.43 for estimated, medium and high variance configurations). Offline simulations indicate that the system provides more robust performance than a standalone eye gaze system. Significance. The results of this work on non-disabled participants shows the potential efficacy of hybrid P300 and eye-tracker speller. Further validation on the amyotrophic lateral sceloris population is needed to assess the benefit of this hybrid system.

  8. Carmustine Implant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... works by slowing or stopping the growth of cancer cells in your body. ... are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding. If you become pregnant while receiving carmustine implant, call your doctor. Carmustine may harm the fetus.

  9. Cochlear Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NIDCD A cochlear implant is a small, complex electronic device that can help to provide a sense ... Hearing Aids Retinitis Pigmentosa - National Eye Institute Telecommunications Relay Services Usher Syndrome Your Baby's Hearing Screening News ...

  10. Middle ear implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K S Gangadhara Somayaji

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hearing loss is becoming more common in the society living in cities with lot of background noise around, and frequent use of gadgets like mobile phones, MP3s, and IPods are adding to the problem. The loss may involve the conductive or perceptive pathway. Majority of the patients with conductive hearing loss will revert back to normal hearing levels with medical and/or surgical treatment. However, in sensorineural hearing loss, many factors are involved in the management. Though traditionally hearing aids in various forms are the most commonly used modality in managing these patients, there are some drawbacks associated with them. Implantable middle ear amplifiers represent the most recent breakthrough in the management of hearing loss. Middle ear implants are surgically implanted electronic devices that aim to correct hearing loss by stimulating the ossicular chain or middle ear. Of late, they are also being used in the management of congenital conductive hearing loss and certain cases of chronic otitis media with residual hearing loss. The article aims to provide general information about the technology, indications and contraindications, selection of candidates, available systems, and advantages of middle ear implants. (MEI

  11. Implantation, recoil implantation, and sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, R.

    1984-01-01

    The implantation and sputtering mechanisms which are relevant to ion bombardment of surfaces are described. These are: collision, thermal, electronic and photon-induced sputtering. 135 refs.; 36 figs.; 9 tabs

  12. Hip Implant Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Implants and Prosthetics Metal-on-Metal Hip Implants Hip Implants Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options Linkedin Pin it Email Print Hip implants are medical devices intended to restore mobility ...

  13. Breast reconstruction - implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breast implants surgery; Mastectomy - breast reconstruction with implants; Breast cancer - breast reconstruction with implants ... harder to find a tumor if your breast cancer comes back. Getting breast implants does not take as long as breast reconstruction ...

  14. An on-line BCI for control of hand grasp sequence and holding using adaptive probabilistic neural network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazrati, Mehrnaz Kh; Erfanian, Abbas

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a new EEG-based Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) for on-line controlling the sequence of hand grasping and holding in a virtual reality environment. The goal of this research is to develop an interaction technique that will allow the BCI to be effective in real-world scenarios for hand grasp control. Moreover, for consistency of man-machine interface, it is desirable the intended movement to be what the subject imagines. For this purpose, we developed an on-line BCI which was based on the classification of EEG associated with imagination of the movement of hand grasping and resting state. A classifier based on probabilistic neural network (PNN) was introduced for classifying the EEG. The PNN is a feedforward neural network that realizes the Bayes decision discriminant function by estimating probability density function using mixtures of Gaussian kernels. Two types of classification schemes were considered here for on-line hand control: adaptive and static. In contrast to static classification, the adaptive classifier was continuously updated on-line during recording. The experimental evaluation on six subjects on different days demonstrated that by using the static scheme, a classification accuracy as high as the rate obtained by the adaptive scheme can be achieved. At the best case, an average classification accuracy of 93.0% and 85.8% was obtained using adaptive and static scheme, respectively. The results obtained from more than 1500 trials on six subjects showed that interactive virtual reality environment can be used as an effective tool for subject training in BCI.

  15. Time-frequency analysis of band-limited EEG with BMFLC and Kalman filter for BCI applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Time-Frequency analysis of electroencephalogram (EEG) during different mental tasks received significant attention. As EEG is non-stationary, time-frequency analysis is essential to analyze brain states during different mental tasks. Further, the time-frequency information of EEG signal can be used as a feature for classification in brain-computer interface (BCI) applications. Methods To accurately model the EEG, band-limited multiple Fourier linear combiner (BMFLC), a linear combination of truncated multiple Fourier series models is employed. A state-space model for BMFLC in combination with Kalman filter/smoother is developed to obtain accurate adaptive estimation. By virtue of construction, BMFLC with Kalman filter/smoother provides accurate time-frequency decomposition of the bandlimited signal. Results The proposed method is computationally fast and is suitable for real-time BCI applications. To evaluate the proposed algorithm, a comparison with short-time Fourier transform (STFT) and continuous wavelet transform (CWT) for both synthesized and real EEG data is performed in this paper. The proposed method is applied to BCI Competition data IV for ERD detection in comparison with existing methods. Conclusions Results show that the proposed algorithm can provide optimal time-frequency resolution as compared to STFT and CWT. For ERD detection, BMFLC-KF outperforms STFT and BMFLC-KS in real-time applicability with low computational requirement. PMID:24274109

  16. Control or non-control state: that is the question! An asynchronous visual P300-based BCI approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinegger, Andreas; Faller, Josef; Halder, Sebastian; Wriessnegger, Selina C.; Müller-Putz, Gernot R.

    2015-02-01

    Objective. Brain-computer interfaces (BCI) based on event-related potentials (ERP) were proven to be a reliable synchronous communication method. For everyday life situations, however, this synchronous mode is impractical because the system will deliver a selection even if the user is not paying attention to the stimulation. So far, research into attention-aware visual ERP-BCIs (i.e., asynchronous ERP-BCIs) has led to variable success. In this study, we investigate new approaches for detection of user engagement. Approach. Classifier output and frequency-domain features of electroencephalogram signals as well as the hybridization of them were used to detect the user's state. We tested their capabilities for state detection in different control scenarios on offline data from 21 healthy volunteers. Main results. The hybridization of classifier output and frequency-domain features outperformed the results of the single methods, and allowed building an asynchronous P300-based BCI with an average correct state detection accuracy of more than 95%. Significance. Our results show that all introduced approaches for state detection in an asynchronous P300-based BCI can effectively avoid involuntary selections, and that the hybrid method is the most effective approach.

  17. Does the number of implants have any relation with peri-implant disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernardo Born PASSONI

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between the number of pillar implants of implant-supported fixed prostheses and the prevalence of periimplant disease. Material and Methods: Clinical and radiographic data were obtained for the evaluation. The sample consisted of 32 patients with implant-supported fixed prostheses in function for at least one year. A total of 161 implants were evaluated. Two groups were formed according to the number of implants: G1 ≤5 implants and G2 >5 implants. Data collection included modified plaque index (MPi, bleeding on probing (BOP, probing depth (PD, width of keratinized mucosa (KM and radiographic bone loss (BL. Clinical and radiographic data were grouped for each implant in order to conduct the diagnosis of mucositis or peri-implantitis. Results: Clinical parameters were compared between groups using Student’s t test for numeric variables (KM, PD and BL and Mann-Whitney test for categorical variables (MPi and BOP. KM and BL showed statistically significant differences between both groups (p<0.001. Implants from G1 – 19 (20.43% – compared with G2 – 26 (38.24% – showed statistically significant differences regarding the prevalence of peri-implantitis (p=0.0210. Conclusion: It seems that more than 5 implants in total fixed rehabilitations increase bone loss and consequently the prevalence of implants with periimplantitis. Notwithstanding, the number of implants does not have any influence on the prevalence of mucositis.

  18. Optimizing the face Paradigm of BCI system by modified Mismatch Negative paradigm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siejie Zhou

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Many recent studies have focused on improving the performance of event-related potential (ERP based brain computer interfaces (BCIs. The use of a face pattern has been shown to obtain high classification accuracies and information transfer rates (ITRs by evoking discriminative ERPs (N200 and N400 in addition to P300 potentials. Recently, it has been proved that the performance of traditional P300-based BCIs could be improved through a modification of the mismatch pattern. In this paper, a mismatch inverted face pattern (MIF-pattern was presented to improve the performance of the inverted face pattern (IF-pattern, one of the state of the art patterns used in visual-based BCI systems. Ten subjects attended in this experiment. The result showed that the mismatch inverted face pattern could evoke significantly larger vertex positive potentials (p<0.05 and N400s (p<0.05 compared to the inverted face pattern. The classification accuracy (mean accuracy is 99.58% and ITRs (mean bit rate is 27.88 bit/min of the mismatch inverted face pattern was significantly higher than that of the inverted face pattern (p<0.05.

  19. An Active RBSE Framework to Generate Optimal Stimulus Sequences in a BCI for Spelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghadamfalahi, Mohammad; Akcakaya, Murat; Nezamfar, Hooman; Sourati, Jamshid; Erdogmus, Deniz

    2017-10-01

    A class of brain computer interfaces (BCIs) employs noninvasive recordings of electroencephalography (EEG) signals to enable users with severe speech and motor impairments to interact with their environment and social network. For example, EEG based BCIs for typing popularly utilize event related potentials (ERPs) for inference. Presentation paradigm design in current ERP-based letter by letter typing BCIs typically query the user with an arbitrary subset characters. However, the typing accuracy and also typing speed can potentially be enhanced with more informed subset selection and flash assignment. In this manuscript, we introduce the active recursive Bayesian state estimation (active-RBSE) framework for inference and sequence optimization. Prior to presentation in each iteration, rather than showing a subset of randomly selected characters, the developed framework optimally selects a subset based on a query function. Selected queries are made adaptively specialized for users during each intent detection. Through a simulation-based study, we assess the effect of active-RBSE on the performance of a language-model assisted typing BCI in terms of typing speed and accuracy. To provide a baseline for comparison, we also utilize standard presentation paradigms namely, row and column matrix presentation paradigm and also random rapid serial visual presentation paradigms. The results show that utilization of active-RBSE can enhance the online performance of the system, both in terms of typing accuracy and speed.

  20. Utilizing Retinotopic Mapping for a Multi-Target SSVEP BCI With a Single Flicker Frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maye, Alexander; Zhang, Dan; Engel, Andreas K

    2017-07-01

    In brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) that use the steady-state visual evoked response (SSVEP), the user selects a control command by directing attention overtly or covertly to one out of several flicker stimuli. The different control channels are encoded in the frequency, phase, or time domain of the flicker signals. Here, we present a new type of SSVEP BCI, which uses only a single flicker stimulus and yet affords controlling multiple channels. The approach rests on the observation that the relative position between the stimulus and the foci of overt attention result in distinct topographies of the SSVEP response on the scalp. By classifying these topographies, the computer can determine at which position the user is gazing. Offline data analysis in a study on 12 healthy volunteers revealed that 9 targets can be recognized with about 95±3% accuracy, corresponding to an information transfer rate (ITR) of 40.8 ± 3.3 b/min on average. We explored how the classification accuracy is affected by the number of control channels, the trial length, and the number of EEG channels. Our findings suggest that the EEG data from five channels over parieto-occipital brain areas are sufficient for reliably classifying the topographies and that there is a large potential to improve the ITR by optimizing the trial length. The robust performance and the simple stimulation setup suggest that this approach is a prime candidate for applications on desktop and tablet computers.

  1. Bilinear Regularized Locality Preserving Learning on Riemannian Graph for Motor Imagery BCI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xiaofeng; Yu, Zhu Liang; Gu, Zhenghui; Zhang, Jun; Cen, Ling; Li, Yuanqing

    2018-03-01

    In off-line training of motor imagery-based brain-computer interfaces (BCIs), to enhance the generalization performance of the learned classifier, the local information contained in test data could be used to improve the performance of motor imagery as well. Further considering that the covariance matrices of electroencephalogram (EEG) signal lie on Riemannian manifold, in this paper, we construct a Riemannian graph to incorporate the information of training and test data into processing. The adjacency and weight in Riemannian graph are determined by the geodesic distance of Riemannian manifold. Then, a new graph embedding algorithm, called bilinear regularized locality preserving (BRLP), is derived upon the Riemannian graph for addressing the problems of high dimensionality frequently arising in BCIs. With a proposed regularization term encoding prior information of EEG channels, the BRLP could obtain more robust performance. Finally, an efficient classification algorithm based on extreme learning machine is proposed to perform on the tangent space of learned embedding. Experimental evaluations on the BCI competition and in-house data sets reveal that the proposed algorithms could obtain significantly higher performance than many competition algorithms after using same filter process.

  2. Ion implantation and bio-compatibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Yoshiaki; Kusakabe, Masahiro [Sony Corp., Tokyo (Japan). Corporate Research Labs.; Iwaki, Masaya

    1992-07-01

    Surface modification of polymers by ion implantation has been carried out to control surface properties such as conductivity, wettability, blood and tissue compatibility. Ion implantation into silicone rubber, polystyrene and segmented polyurethane was performed at 150 keV with doses ranging from 1 x 10[sup 15] to 3 x 10[sup 17] ions/cm[sup 2] to improve bio-compatibility. The platelet accumulation on ion implanted silicone rubber decreased and non-thrombogenicity of ion implanted specimens were improved. The ion implanted polystyrene and segmented polyurethane have been found to exhibit remarkably higher adhesion and spreading of endothelial cells compared to the non-implanted case. It is concluded that ion implantation into polymers is effective in controlling their bio-compatibility. (author).

  3. Congenitally Deafblind Children and Cochlear Implants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dammeyer, Jesper Herup

    2008-01-01

    There has been much research conducted demonstrating the positive benefits of cochlear implantation (CI) in children who are deaf. Research on cochlear implantation in children who are both deaf and blind, however, is lacking. The purpose of this article is to present a study of 5 congenitally...... deafblind children who received cochlear implants between 2.2 and 4.2 years of age.  Ratings of video observations were used to measure the children's early communication development with and without the use of their cochlear implants. In addition, parental interviews were used to assess the benefits...... parents perceived regarding their children's cochlear implants. Two examples are included in this article to illustrate the parents' perspectives about cochlear implantation in their deafblind children. Benefits of cochlear implantation in this cohort of children included improved attention and emotional...

  4. Implants in free fibula flap supporting dental rehabilitation - Implant and peri-implant related outcomes of a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vinay V; Ebenezer, Supriya; Kämmerer, Peer W; Jacob, P C; Kuriakose, Moni A; Hedne, Naveen; Wagner, Wilfried; Al-Nawas, Bilal

    2016-11-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the difference in success rates of implants when using two or four implant-supported-overdentures following segmental mandibular reconstruction with fibula free flap. This prospective, parallel designed, randomized clinical study was conducted with 1:1 ratio. At baseline, all participants already had segmental reconstruction of mandible with free fibula flap. The participants were randomized into two groups: Group-I received implant-supported-overdentures on two tissue-level implants and Group-II received implant-supported-overdentures on four tissue-level implants. Success rates of the implants were evaluated at 3 months, 6 months and 12 months following implant loading using marginal bone level changes as well as peri-implant indices (Buser et al., 1990). 52 patients were randomized into two treatment groups (26 each), out of which 18 patients (36 implants) of Group-I and 17 patients (68 implants) of Group-II were evaluated. One implant in Group-I was lost due to infective complications and one patient in the same group had superior barrel necrosis. There was a statistically significant increase at both time points (p = 0.03, p = 0.04 at 6 months, 12 months) in the amount of marginal bone loss in Group-I (0.4 mm, 0.5 mm at 6 months, 12 months) as compared to Group-II (0.1 mm, 0.2 mm at 6 months, 12 months). There were no clinically significant changes peri-implant parameters between both groups. Peri-implant soft tissue hyperplasia was seen in both groups, 32% of implants at 3-months, 26% at 6-months and 3% at 12-months follow-up. The results of this study show that patients with 2-implant-supported-overdentures had higher marginal bone loss as compared to patients with 4-implant-supported-overdentures. There were no clinically significant differences in peri-implant soft tissue factors in patients with 2- or 4-implant-supported-overdentures. Hyperplastic peri-implant tissues are common in the early implant

  5. Short Implants: New Horizon in Implant Dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Neha; Gulati, Manisha; Garg, Meenu; Pathak, Chetan

    2016-09-01

    The choice of implant length is an essential factor in deciding the survival rates of these implants and the overall success of the prosthesis. Placing an implant in the posterior part of the maxilla and mandible has always been very critical due to poor bone quality and quantity. Long implants can be placed in association with complex surgical procedures such as sinus lift and bone augmentation. These techniques are associated with higher cost, increased treatment time and greater morbidity. Hence, there is need for a less invasive treatment option in areas of poor bone quantity and quality. Data related to survival rates of short implants, their design and prosthetic considerations has been compiled and structured in this manuscript with emphasis on the indications, advantages of short implants and critical biomechanical factors to be taken into consideration when choosing to place them. Studies have shown that comparable success rates can be achieved with short implants as those with long implants by decreasing the lateral forces to the prosthesis, eliminating cantilevers, increasing implant surface area and improving implant to abutment connection. Short implants can be considered as an effective treatment alternative in resorbed ridges. Short implants can be considered as a viable treatment option in atrophic ridge cases in order to avoid complex surgical procedures required to place long implants. With improvement in the implant surface geometry and surface texture, there is an increase in the bone implant contact area which provides a good primary stability during osseo-integration.

  6. A Novel Hybrid Mental Spelling Application Based on Eye Tracking and SSVEP-Based BCI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Stawicki

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Steady state visual evoked potentials (SSVEPs-based Brain-Computer interfaces (BCIs, as well as eyetracking devices, provide a pathway for re-establishing communication for people with severe disabilities. We fused these control techniques into a novel eyetracking/SSVEP hybrid system, which utilizes eye tracking for initial rough selection and the SSVEP technology for fine target activation. Based on our previous studies, only four stimuli were used for the SSVEP aspect, granting sufficient control for most BCI users. As Eye tracking data is not used for activation of letters, false positives due to inappropriate dwell times are avoided. This novel approach combines the high speed of eye tracking systems and the high classification accuracies of low target SSVEP-based BCIs, leading to an optimal combination of both methods. We evaluated accuracy and speed of the proposed hybrid system with a 30-target spelling application implementing all three control approaches (pure eye tracking, SSVEP and the hybrid system with 32 participants. Although the highest information transfer rates (ITRs were achieved with pure eye tracking, a considerable amount of subjects was not able to gain sufficient control over the stand-alone eye-tracking device or the pure SSVEP system (78.13% and 75% of the participants reached reliable control, respectively. In this respect, the proposed hybrid was most universal (over 90% of users achieved reliable control, and outperformed the pure SSVEP system in terms of speed and user friendliness. The presented hybrid system might offer communication to a wider range of users in comparison to the standard techniques.

  7. Implanted-tritium permeation experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longhurst, G.R.; Holland, D.F.; Casper, L.A.; Hsu, P.Y.; Miller, L.G.; Schmunk, R.E.; Watts, K.D.; Wilson, C.J.; Kershner, C.J.; Rogers, M.L.

    1982-04-01

    In fusion reactors, charge exchange neutral atoms of tritium coming from the plasma will be implanted into the first wall and other interior structures. EG and G Idaho is conducting two experiments to determine the magnitude of permeation into the coolant streams and the retention of tritium in those structures. One experiment uses an ion gun to implant deuterium. The ion gun will permit measurements to be made for a variety of implantation energies and fluxes. The second experiment utilizes a fission reactor to generate a tritium implantation flux by the 3 He(n,p) 3 H reaction. This experiment will simulate the fusion reactor radiation environment. We also plan to verify a supporting analytical code development program, in progress, by these experiments

  8. Investigating Feasibility of Multiple UHF Passive RFID Transmitters Using Backscatter Modulation Scheme in BCI Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al Ajrawi, Shams; Sarkar, Mahasweta; Mihovska, Albena

    Building a wireless body area network (WBAN) application including implantable transceivers placed inside the human brain to collect the data from the electrodes and transmit them wirelessly to a controller placed outside the brain on the scalp faced major challenges. The transmission...... using passive RFID as the implantable transmitters and letting them operate in the UHF range. Backscatter modulation has been used as a power transfer mechanism. Investigation on the feasibility and applicability of implantable UHF Passive RFID transmitters inside the brain is done for capturing multi......-channel ECoG signals when traversing through a phantom brain model as a transmission medium for the experiments at a high data transfer rate. Detailed analysis has been done on parameters such as Received Signal Strength Indication (RSSI), signal to noise ratio (SNR), Maximum number of electrodes, Path Loss...

  9. The Role of the Interplay between Stimulus Type and Timing in Explaining BCI-Illiteracy for Visual P300-Based Brain-Computer Interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Carabalona

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Visual P300-based Brain-Computer Interface (BCI spellers enable communication or interaction with the environment by flashing elements in a matrix and exploiting consequent changes in end-user's brain activity. Despite research efforts, performance variability and BCI-illiteracy still are critical issues for real world applications. Moreover, there is a quite unaddressed kind of BCI-illiteracy, which becomes apparent when the same end-user operates BCI-spellers intended for different applications: our aim is to understand why some well performers can become BCI-illiterate depending on speller type. We manipulated stimulus type (factor STIM: either characters or icons, color (factor COLOR: white, green and timing (factor SPEED: fast, slow. Each BCI session consisted of training (without feedback and performance phase (with feedback, both in copy-spelling. For fast flashing spellers, we observed a performance worsening for white icon-speller. Our findings are consistent with existing results reported on end-users using identical white×fast spellers, indicating independence of worsening trend from users' group. The use of slow stimulation timing shed a new light on the perceptual and cognitive phenomena related to the use of a BCI-speller during both the training and the performance phase. We found a significant STIM main effect for the N1 component on Pz and PO7 during the training phase and on PO8 during the performance phase, whereas in both phases neither the STIM×COLOR interaction nor the COLOR main effect was statistically significant. After collapsing data for factor COLOR, it emerged a statistically significant modulation of N1 amplitude depending to the phase of BCI session: N1 was more negative for icons than for characters both on Pz and PO7 (training, whereas the opposite modulation was observed for PO8 (performance. Results indicate that both feedback and expertise with respect to the stimulus type can modulate the N1 component and

  10. COCHLEAR IMPLANTATION PREVALENCE IN ELDERLY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Starokha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Current paper describes an experience of cochlear implantation in elderly. Cochlear implantation has become a widely accepted intervention in the treatment of individuals with severe-to-profound sensorineural hearing loss. Cochlear implants are now accepted as a standard of care to optimize hearing and subsequent speech development in children and adults with deafness. But cochlear implantation affects not only hearing abilities, speech perception and speech production; it also has an outstanding impact on the social life, activities and self-esteem of each patient. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cochlear implantation efficacy in elderly with severe to profound sensorineural hearing loss. There were 5 patients under our observation. Surgery was performed according to traditional posterior tympanotomy and cochleostomy for cochlear implant electrode insertion for all observed patients. The study was conducted in two stages: before speech processor’s activation and 3 months later. Pure tone free field audiometry was performed to each patient to assess the efficiency of cochlear implantation in dynamics. The aim of the study was also to evaluate quality of life in elderly with severe to profound sensorineural hearing loss after unilateral cochlear implantation. Each patient underwent questioning with 36 Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36. SF-36 is a set of generic, coherent, and easily administered quality-of-life measures. The SF-36 consists of eight scaled scores, which are the weighted sums of the questions in their section. Each scale is directly transformed into a 0-100 scale on the assumption that each question carries equal weight. The eight sections are: physical functioning; physical role functioning; emotional role functioning; vitality; emotional well-being; social role functioning; bodily pain; general health perceptions. Our results demonstrate that cochlear implantation in elderly consistently improved quality of life

  11. Online adaptation of a c-VEP Brain-computer Interface(BCI) based on error-related potentials and unsupervised learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spüler, Martin; Rosenstiel, Wolfgang; Bogdan, Martin

    2012-01-01

    The goal of a Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) is to control a computer by pure brain activity. Recently, BCIs based on code-modulated visual evoked potentials (c-VEPs) have shown great potential to establish high-performance communication. In this paper we present a c-VEP BCI that uses online adaptation of the classifier to reduce calibration time and increase performance. We compare two different approaches for online adaptation of the system: an unsupervised method and a method that uses the detection of error-related potentials. Both approaches were tested in an online study, in which an average accuracy of 96% was achieved with adaptation based on error-related potentials. This accuracy corresponds to an average information transfer rate of 144 bit/min, which is the highest bitrate reported so far for a non-invasive BCI. In a free-spelling mode, the subjects were able to write with an average of 21.3 error-free letters per minute, which shows the feasibility of the BCI system in a normal-use scenario. In addition we show that a calibration of the BCI system solely based on the detection of error-related potentials is possible, without knowing the true class labels.

  12. Light on! Real world evaluation of a P300-based brain-computer interface (BCI) for environment control in a smart home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carabalona, Roberta; Grossi, Ferdinando; Tessadri, Adam; Castiglioni, Paolo; Caracciolo, Antonio; de Munari, Ilaria

    2012-01-01

    Brain-computer interface (BCI) systems aim to enable interaction with other people and the environment without muscular activation by the exploitation of changes in brain signals due to the execution of cognitive tasks. In this context, the visual P300 potential appears suited to control smart homes through BCI spellers. The aim of this work is to evaluate whether the widely used character-speller is more sustainable than an icon-based one, designed to operate smart home environment or to communicate moods and needs. Nine subjects with neurodegenerative diseases and no BCI experience used both speller types in a real smart home environment. User experience during BCI tasks was evaluated recording concurrent physiological signals. Usability was assessed for each speller type immediately after use. Classification accuracy was lower for the icon-speller, which was also more attention demanding. However, in subjective evaluations, the effect of a real feedback partially counterbalanced the difficulty in BCI use. Since inclusive BCIs require to consider interface sustainability, we evaluated different ergonomic aspects of the interaction of disabled users with a character-speller (goal: word spelling) and an icon-speller (goal: operating a real smart home). We found the first one as more sustainable in terms of accuracy and cognitive effort.

  13. Investigating Feasibility Of Multiple UHF Passive RFID Transmitters Using Backscatter Modulation Scheme In BCI Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al Ajrawi, Shams; Sarkar, Mahasweta; Rao, Ramesh

    simulatedbrain matter to a receiver located on the surface of a simulatedskull. These analyses are essential for building a brain computerinterface application. We showcase theoretical and experimentalresults based on a phantom model of the human brain usingpassive RFID as the implantable transmitter operating...... in UHFrange. Furthermore, we use backscatter modulation as a powertransfer mechanism. Investigation on the feasibility and appli-cability of implantable UHF Passive RFID transmitters insidethe brain is done for capturing multi-channel ECoG signals at ahigh data transfer rate. Detailed analysis have been done...

  14. Implantation, recoil implantation, and sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, R.

    1984-01-01

    Underlying ion-beam modification of surfaces is the more basic subject of particle-surface interaction. The ideas can be grouped into forward and backward features, i.e. those affecting the interior of the target and those leading to particle expulsion. Forward effects include the stopping of the incident particles and the deposition of energy, both governed by integral equations which are easily set up but difficult to solve. Closely related is recoil implantation where emphasis is placed not on the stopping of the incident particles but on their interaction with target atoms with resulting implantation of these atoms. Backward effects, all of which are denoted as sputtering, are in general either of collisional, thermal, electronic, or exfoliational origin. (Auth.)

  15. More-reliable SOS ion implantations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, D. S.

    1980-01-01

    Conducting layer prevents static charges from accumulating during implantation of silicon-on-sapphire MOS structures. Either thick conducting film or thinner film transparent to ions is deposited prior to implantation, and gaps are etched in regions to be doped. Grounding path eliminates charge flow that damages film or cracks sapphire wafer. Prevention of charge buildup by simultaneously exposing structure to opposite charges requires equipment modifications less practical and more expensive than deposition of conducting layer.

  16. Dental Implant Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... here to find out more. Dental Implant Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, ... to find out more. Wisdom Teeth Management Wisdom Teeth Management An impacted wisdom tooth can damage neighboring ...

  17. Helium implantation effects in SAP and aluminum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, W.; Thomas, G.J.

    1976-02-01

    A series of 300 keV He implantations of Al and SAP 930 have been conducted at temperatures between 150 and 773K. The He re-emission was monitored during implantation and the samples were examined with a scanning electron microscope after implantation. Both Al and SAP 930 were found to blister after a critical He dose was reached at temperatures above 473K, both underwent flaking below that temperature, with blistering re-appearing in SAP 930 at an implantation temperature of 150K. The surface deformation and He re-emission are strongly dependent on microstructural effects in the intermediate temperature regime

  18. Mandibular implant-supported overdentures: Prosthetic overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahad A Al-Harbi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Implant-supported overdentures are becoming the treatment of choice for the completely edentulous mandible. They significantly improve the quality of life in edentulous patients. For this review article, the literature was searched to identify pertinent studies. No meta-analysis was conducted because of high heterogeneity within the literature. Accordingly, in this review article, the author provides an update on implant-supported mandible overdentures with regard to the number of implants, type of loading, stress–strain distribution, mode of implant-to-denture attachment, occlusal considerations and complications.

  19. Performance evaluation of a motor-imagery-based EEG-Brain computer interface using a combined cue with heterogeneous training data in BCI-Naive subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Youngbum

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The subjects in EEG-Brain computer interface (BCI system experience difficulties when attempting to obtain the consistent performance of the actual movement by motor imagery alone. It is necessary to find the optimal conditions and stimuli combinations that affect the performance factors of the EEG-BCI system to guarantee equipment safety and trust through the performance evaluation of using motor imagery characteristics that can be utilized in the EEG-BCI testing environment. Methods The experiment was carried out with 10 experienced subjects and 32 naive subjects on an EEG-BCI system. There were 3 experiments: The experienced homogeneous experiment, the naive homogeneous experiment and the naive heterogeneous experiment. Each experiment was compared in terms of the six audio-visual cue combinations and consisted of 50 trials. The EEG data was classified using the least square linear classifier in case of the naive subjects through the common spatial pattern filter. The accuracy was calculated using the training and test data set. The p-value of the accuracy was obtained through the statistical significance test. Results In the case in which a naive subject was trained by a heterogeneous combined cue and tested by a visual cue, the result was not only the highest accuracy (p Conclusions We propose the use of this measuring methodology of a heterogeneous combined cue for training data and a visual cue for test data by the typical EEG-BCI algorithm on the EEG-BCI system to achieve effectiveness in terms of consistence, stability, cost, time, and resources management without the need for a trial and error process.

  20. Management of peri-implant infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K L Vandana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The ever-increasing popularity of dental implants in recent years has been associated with the reported incidence of short-term and long-term complications such as peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis. Therapies proposed for treating peri-implantitis are based on the evidence available for the treatment of periodontitis, and are aimed at reducing the bacterial load within peri-implant pockets and decontaminating implant surfaces, and, in some cases, attempting afterward to bring about bone regeneration. The treatment of peri-implant infections comprises conservative (nonsurgical and surgical approaches. This paper reviews various treatment strategies used for the treatment of peri-implant diseases. There are many approaches suggested by various authors for the treatment of peri-implant diseases, but there is no “ideal peri-implant therapy” that has been described in the literature. There is no consensus regarding the treatment protocol as the studies conducted so far have had varying study designs, small sample sizes, and short follow-up periods.

  1. Evaluación experimental y estadística de un prototipo de interfaz cerebro-computador (ICC) [Experimental and statistical evaluation of a brain-computer interface (BCI) prototype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arcos Argoty, J.; Garcia Cossio, E.; Torres Villa, R.A.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract: Nowadays, brain-computer interfaces (BCI) are designed to be used in experimental and clinical studies, and their results allow the creation of new assistive technologies for people with motor disabilities. In 2008, a prototype of a BCI was developed in the School of Engineering of

  2. Cochlear implants and medical tourism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinnon, Brian J; Bhatt, Nishant

    2010-09-01

    To compare the costs of medical tourism in cochlear implant surgery performed in India as compared to the United States. In addition, the cost savings of obtaining cochlear implant surgery in India were compare d to those of other surgical interventions obtained as a medical tourist. Searches were conducted on Medline and Google using the search terms: 'medical tourism', 'medical offshoring', 'medical outsourcing', 'cochlear implants' and 'cochlear implantation'. The information regarding cost of medical treatment was obtained from personal communication with individuals familiar with India's cochlear implantation medical tourism industry. The range of cost depended on length of stay as well as the device chosen. Generally the cost, inclusive of travel, surgery and device, was in the range of $21,000-30,000, as compared to a cost range of $40,000-$60,000 in the US. With the escalating cost of healthcare in the United States, it is not surprising that some patients would seek to obtain surgical care overseas at a fraction of the cost. Participants in medical tourism often have financial resources, but lack health insurance coverage. While cardiovascular and orthopedic surgery performed outside the United States in India at centers that cater to medical tourists are often performed at one-quarter to one-third of the cost that would have been paid in the United States, the cost differential for cochlear implants is not nearly as favorable.

  3. Complications after cardiac implantable electronic device implantations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkfeldt, Rikke Esberg; Johansen, Jens Brock; Nohr, Ellen Aagaard

    2013-01-01

    Complications after cardiac implantable electronic device (CIED) treatment, including permanent pacemakers (PMs), cardiac resynchronization therapy devices with defibrillators (CRT-Ds) or without (CRT-Ps), and implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs), are associated with increased patient...

  4. Age-Specific Mechanisms in an SSVEP-Based BCI Scenario: Evidences from Spontaneous Rhythms and Neuronal Oscillators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Ehlers

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Utilizing changes in steady-state visual evoked potentials (SSVEPs is an established approach to operate a brain-computer interface (BCI. The present study elucidates to what extent development-specific changes in the background EEG influence the ability to proper handle a stimulus-driven BCI. Therefore we investigated the effects of a wide range of photic driving on children between six and ten years in comparison to an adult control group. The results show differences in the driving profiles apparently in close communication with the specific type of intermittent stimulation. The factor age gains influence with decreasing stimulation frequency, whereby the superior performance of the adults seems to be determined to a great extent by elaborated driving responses at 10 and 11 Hz, matching the dominant resonance frequency of the respective background EEG. This functional interplay was only partially obtained in higher frequency ranges and absent in the induced driving between 30 and 40 Hz, indicating distinctions in the operating principles and developmental changes of the underlying neuronal oscillators.

  5. EEG classification for motor imagery and resting state in BCI applications using multi-class Adaboost extreme learning machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lin; Cheng, Wei; Zhang, Jinhua; Wang, Jue

    2016-08-01

    Brain-computer interface (BCI) systems provide an alternative communication and control approach for people with limited motor function. Therefore, the feature extraction and classification approach should differentiate the relative unusual state of motion intention from a common resting state. In this paper, we sought a novel approach for multi-class classification in BCI applications. We collected electroencephalographic (EEG) signals registered by electrodes placed over the scalp during left hand motor imagery, right hand motor imagery, and resting state for ten healthy human subjects. We proposed using the Kolmogorov complexity (Kc) for feature extraction and a multi-class Adaboost classifier with extreme learning machine as base classifier for classification, in order to classify the three-class EEG samples. An average classification accuracy of 79.5% was obtained for ten subjects, which greatly outperformed commonly used approaches. Thus, it is concluded that the proposed method could improve the performance for classification of motor imagery tasks for multi-class samples. It could be applied in further studies to generate the control commands to initiate the movement of a robotic exoskeleton or orthosis, which finally facilitates the rehabilitation of disabled people.

  6. Keeping Disability in Mind: A Case Study in Implantable Brain-Computer Interface Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Laura Specker; Klein, Eran; Brown, Tim; Sample, Matthew; Pham, Michelle; Tubig, Paul; Folland, Raney; Truitt, Anjali; Goering, Sara

    2018-04-01

    Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) research is an interdisciplinary area of study within Neural Engineering. Recent interest in end-user perspectives has led to an intersection with user-centered design (UCD). The goal of user-centered design is to reduce the translational gap between researchers and potential end users. However, while qualitative studies have been conducted with end users of BCI technology, little is known about individual BCI researchers' experience with and attitudes towards UCD. Given the scientific, financial, and ethical imperatives of UCD, we sought to gain a better understanding of practical and principled considerations for researchers who engage with end users. We conducted a qualitative interview case study with neural engineering researchers at a center dedicated to the creation of BCIs. Our analysis generated five themes common across interviews. The thematic analysis shows that participants identify multiple beneficiaries of their work, including other researchers, clinicians working with devices, device end users, and families and caregivers of device users. Participants value experience with device end users, and personal experience is the most meaningful type of interaction. They welcome (or even encourage) end-user input, but are skeptical of limited focus groups and case studies. They also recognize a tension between creating sophisticated devices and developing technology that will meet user needs. Finally, interviewees espouse functional, assistive goals for their technology, but describe uncertainty in what degree of function is "good enough" for individual end users. Based on these results, we offer preliminary recommendations for conducting future UCD studies in BCI and neural engineering.

  7. High-grade Angiosarcoma Associated with Ruptured Breast Implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas R. Smoll, MBBS

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Since the serendipitous discovery that implanted polymers cause sarcomas in rats, much research has been conducted to prove or disprove a link between silicone breast implants and/or polymer-based materials and breast cancer. In light of an initial report that 35% of rats implanted with a variety of polymers developed fibrosarcomas, we report a case of primary angiosarcoma found in a patient presenting with bilateral rupture of gel-filled breast implants.

  8. Retrograde peri-implantitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Jumshad

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Retrograde peri-implantitis constitutes an important cause for implant failure. Retrograde peri-implantitis may sometimes prove difficult to identify and hence institution of early treatment may not be possible. This paper presents a report of four cases of (the implant placed developing to retrograde peri-implantitis. Three of these implants were successfully restored to their fully functional state while one was lost due to extensive damage. The paper highlights the importance of recognizing the etiopathogenic mechanisms, preoperative assessment, and a strong postoperative maintenance protocol to avoid retrograde peri-implant inflammation.

  9. Individual titanium zygomatic implant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nekhoroshev, M. V.; Ryabov, K. N.; Avdeev, E. V.

    2018-03-01

    Custom individual implants for the reconstruction of craniofacial defects have gained importance due to better qualitative characteristics over their generic counterparts – plates, which should be bent according to patient needs. The Additive Manufacturing of individual implants allows reducing cost and improving quality of implants. In this paper, the authors describe design of zygomatic implant models based on computed tomography (CT) data. The fabrication of the implants will be carried out with 3D printing by selective laser melting machine SLM 280HL.

  10. Experimental study on bone tissue reaction around HA implants radiated after implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudo, Masato; Matsui, Yoshiro; Tamura, Sayaka; Chen, Xuan; Uchida, Haruo; Mori, Kimie; Ohno, Kohsuke; Michi, Ken-ichi

    1998-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate histologically and histomorphometrically the tissue reaction around hydroxylapatite (HA) implants that underwent irradiation in 3 different periods in the course of bone healing after implantation. The cylindrical high-density HA implants were implanted in 48 Japanese white rabbit mandibles. A single 15 Gy dose was applied to the mandible 5, 14, or 28 days after implantation. The rabbits were sacrificed 7, 14, 28, and 90 days after irradiation. Nonirradiated rabbits were used as controls. CMR, labeling with tetracycline and calcein, and non-decalcified specimens stained with toluidine blue were used for histological analyses and histomorphometric measurements. The results were as follows: In the rabbits irradiated 5 days after implantation, the HA-bone contact was observed later than that in the controls and the bone-implant contact surface ratio was lower than that in the controls at examination because necrosis of the newly-formed bone occurred just after irradiation. HA-bone contact of the rabbits irradiated 14 and 28 days after implantation was similar to that of the controls. And, bone remodeling was suppressed in rabbits of each group sacrificed at 90 days after irradiation. The results suggested that a short interval between implantation and irradiation causes direct contact between HA implant and bone and a long lapse of time before irradiation hardly affects the bone-implant contact, but delays bone remodeling. Therefore, it is necessary to prevent overloading the HA implants irradiated after implantation and pay utmost attention to conditions around the bone-implant contact. (author)

  11. A chemically stable electrolyte with a novel sandwiched structure for proton-conducting solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs)

    KAUST Repository

    Bi, Lei

    2013-11-01

    A chemically stable electrolyte structure was developed for proton-conducting SOFCs by using two layers of stable BaZr0.7Pr 0.1Y0.2O3 -δ to sandwich a highly-conductive but unstable BaCe0.8Y0.2O 3 -δ electrolyte layer. The sandwiched electrolyte structure showed good chemical stability in both CO2 and H2O atmosphere, indicating that the BZPY layers effectively protect the inner BCY electrolyte, while the BCY electrolyte alone decomposed completely under the same conditions. Fuel cell prototypes fabricated with the sandwiched electrolyte achieved a relatively high performance of 185 mW cm- 2 at 700 C, with a high electrolyte film conductivity of 4 × 10- 3 S cm- 1 at 600 C. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.

  12. Scalloped Implant-Abutment Connection Compared to Conventional Flat Implant-Abutment Connection: a Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starch-Jensen, Thomas; Christensen, Ann-Eva; Lorenzen, Henning

    2017-01-01

    The objective was to test the hypothesis of no difference in implant treatment outcome after installation of implants with a scalloped implant-abutment connection compared to a flat implant-abutment connection. A MEDLINE (PubMed), Embase and Cochrane library search in combination with a hand-search of relevant journals was conducted. No language or year of publication restriction was applied. The search provided 298 titles. Three studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The included studies were characterized by low or moderate risk of bias. Survival of suprastructures has never been compared within the same study. High implant survival rate was reported in all the included studies. Significantly more peri-implant marginal bone loss, higher probing depth score, bleeding score and gingival score was observed around implants with a scalloped implant-abutment connection. There were no significant differences between the two treatment modalities regarding professional or patient-reported outcome measures. Meta-analysis disclosed a mean difference of peri-implant marginal bone loss of 1.56 mm (confidence interval: 0.87 to 2.25), indicating significant more bone loss around implants with a scalloped implant-abutment connection. A scalloped implant-abutment connection seems to be associated with higher peri-implant marginal bone loss compared to a flat implant-abutment connection. Therefore, the hypothesis of the present systematic review must be rejected. However, further long-term randomized controlled trials assessing implant treatment outcome with the two treatment modalities are needed before definite conclusions can be provided about the beneficial use of implants with a scalloped implant-abutment connection on preservation of the peri-implant marginal bone level.

  13. On the use of LDA performance as a metric of feature extraction methods for a P300 BCI classification task

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gareis, Iván; Atum, Yanina; Gentiletti, Gerardo; Acevedo, Rubén; Bañuelos, Verónica Medina; Rufiner, Leonardo

    2011-01-01

    Brain computer interfaces (BCIs) translate brain activity into computer commands. To enhance the performance of a BCI, it is necessary to improve the feature extraction techniques being applied to decode the users' intentions. Objective comparison methods are needed to analyze different feature extraction techniques. One possibility is to use the classifier performance as a comparative measure. In this work the effect of several variables that affect the behaviour of linear discriminant analysis (LDA) has been studied when used to distinguish between electroencephalographic signals with and without the presence of event related potentials (ERPs). The error rate (ER) and the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) were used as performance estimators of LDA. The results show that the number of characteristics, the degree of balance of the training patterns set and the number of averaged trials affect the classifier's performance and therefore, must be considered in the design of the integrated system.

  14. Self-Paced (Asynchronous BCI Control of a Wheelchair in Virtual Environments: A Case Study with a Tetraplegic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Leeb

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to demonstrate for the first time that brain waves can be used by a tetraplegic to control movements of his wheelchair in virtual reality (VR. In this case study, the spinal cord injured (SCI subject was able to generate bursts of beta oscillations in the electroencephalogram (EEG by imagination of movements of his paralyzed feet. These beta oscillations were used for a self-paced (asynchronous brain-computer interface (BCI control based on a single bipolar EEG recording. The subject was placed inside a virtual street populated with avatars. The task was to “go” from avatar to avatar towards the end of the street, but to stop at each avatar and talk to them. In average, the participant was able to successfully perform this asynchronous experiment with a performance of 90%, single runs up to 100%.

  15. The effect of thread pattern upon implant osseointegration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuhussein, Heba; Pagni, Giorgio; Rebaudi, Alberto; Wang, Hom-Lay

    2010-02-01

    Implant design features such as macro- and micro-design may influence overall implant success. Limited information is currently available. Therefore, it is the purpose of this paper to examine these factors such as thread pitch, thread geometry, helix angle, thread depth and width as well as implant crestal module may affect implant stability. A literature search was conducted using MEDLINE to identify studies, from simulated laboratory models, animal, to human, related to this topic using the keywords of implant thread, implant macrodesign, thread pitch, thread geometry, helix angle, thread depth, thread width and implant crestal module. The results showed how thread geometry affects the distribution of stress forces around the implant. A decreased thread pitch may positively influence implant stability. Excess helix angles in spite of a faster insertion may jeopardize the ability of implants to sustain axial load. Deeper threads seem to have an important effect on the stabilization in poorer bone quality situations. The addition of threads or microthreads up to the crestal module of an implant might provide a potential positive contribution on bone-to to-implant contact as well as on the preservation of marginal bone; nonetheless this remains to be determined. Appraising the current literature on this subject and combining existing data to verify the presence of any association between the selected characteristics may be critical in the achievement of overall implant success.

  16. Self-regulation of brain rhythms in the precuneus: a novel BCI paradigm for patients with ALS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fomina, Tatiana; Lohmann, Gabriele; Erb, Michael; Ethofer, Thomas; Schölkopf, Bernhard; Grosse-Wentrup, Moritz

    2016-12-01

    Objective. Electroencephalographic (EEG) brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) hold promise in restoring communication for patients with completely locked-in stage amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). However, these patients cannot use existing EEG-based BCIs, arguably because such systems rely on brain processes that are impaired in the late stages of ALS. In this work, we introduce a novel BCI designed for patients in late stages of ALS based on high-level cognitive processes that are less likely to be affected by ALS. Approach. We trained two ALS patients via EEG-based neurofeedback to use self-regulation of theta or gamma oscillations in the precuneus for basic communication. Because there is a tight connection between the precuneus and consciousness, precuneus oscillations are arguably generated by high-level cognitive processes, which are less likely to be affected by ALS than processes linked to the peripheral nervous system. Main results. Both patients learned to self-regulate their precuneus oscillations and achieved stable online decoding accuracy over the course of disease progression. One patient achieved a mean online decoding accuracy in a binary decision task of 70.55% across 26 training sessions, and the other patient achieved 59.44% across 16 training sessions. We provide empirical evidence that these oscillations were cortical in nature and originated from the intersection of the precuneus, cuneus, and posterior cingulate. Significance. Our results establish that ALS patients can employ self-regulation of precuneus oscillations for communication. Such a BCI is likely to be available to ALS patients as long as their consciousness supports communication.

  17. Implanted ZnO thin films: Microstructure, electrical and electronic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.; Metson, J.; Evans, P.J.; Kinsey, R.; Bhattacharyya, D.

    2007-01-01

    Magnetron sputtered polycrystalline ZnO thin films were implanted using Al, Ag, Sn, Sb and codoped with TiN in order to improve the conductivity and to attempt to achieve p-type behaviour. Structural and electrical properties of the implanted ZnO thin films were examined with X-ray diffractometry (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and conductivity measurements. Depth profiles of the implanted elements varied with the implant species. Implantation causes a partial amorphisation of the crystalline structure and decreases the effective grain size of the films. One of the findings is the improvement, as a consequence of implantation, in the conductivity of initially poorly conductive samples. Heavy doping may help for the conversion of conduction type of ZnO thin films. Annealing in vacuum mitigated structural damage and stress caused by implantation, and improved the conductivity of the implanted ZnO thin films

  18. Tinnitus and Sleep Difficulties After Cochlear Implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierzycki, Robert H; Edmondson-Jones, Mark; Dawes, Piers; Munro, Kevin J; Moore, David R; Kitterick, Pádraig T

    To estimate and compare the prevalence of and associations between tinnitus and sleep difficulties in a sample of UK adult cochlear implant users and those identified as potential candidates for cochlear implantation. The study was conducted using the UK Biobank resource, a population-based cohort of 40- to 69-year olds. Self-report data on hearing, tinnitus, sleep difficulties, and demographic variables were collected from cochlear implant users (n = 194) and individuals identified as potential candidates for cochlear implantation (n = 211). These "candidates" were selected based on (i) impaired hearing sensitivity, inferred from self-reported hearing aid use and (ii) impaired hearing function, inferred from an inability to report words accurately at negative signal to noise ratios on an unaided closed-set test of speech perception. Data on tinnitus (presence, persistence, and related distress) and on sleep difficulties were analyzed using logistic regression models controlling for gender, age, deprivation, and neuroticism. The prevalence of tinnitus was similar among implant users (50%) and candidates (52%; p = 0.39). However, implant users were less likely to report that their tinnitus was distressing at its worst (41%) compared with candidates (63%; p = 0.02). The logistic regression model suggested that this difference between the two groups could be explained by the fact that tinnitus was less persistent in implant users (46%) compared with candidates (72%; p reported difficulties with sleep were similar among implant users (75%) and candidates (82%; p = 0.28), but participants with tinnitus were more likely to report sleep difficulties than those without (p explanation is supported by the similar prevalence of sleep problems among implant users and potential candidates for cochlear implantation, despite differences between the groups in tinnitus persistence and related emotional distress. Cochlear implantation may therefore not be an appropriate intervention

  19. Implantable Medical Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Implantable Medical Devices Updated:Sep 16,2016 For Rhythm Control ... a Heart Attack Introduction Medications Surgical Procedures Implantable Medical Devices • Life After a Heart Attack • Heart Attack ...

  20. Intercavitary implants dosage calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehder, B.P.

    The use of spacial geometry peculiar to each treatment for the attainment of intercavitary and intersticial implants dosage calculation is presented. The study is made in patients with intercavitary implants by applying a modified Manchester technique [pt

  1. Carbon Fiber Biocompatibility for Implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Petersen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon fibers have multiple potential advantages in developing high-strength biomaterials with a density close to bone for better stress transfer and electrical properties that enhance tissue formation. As a breakthrough example in biomaterials, a 1.5 mm diameter bisphenol-epoxy/carbon-fiber-reinforced composite rod was compared for two weeks in a rat tibia model with a similar 1.5 mm diameter titanium-6-4 alloy screw manufactured to retain bone implants. Results showed that carbon-fiber-reinforced composite stimulated osseointegration inside the tibia bone marrow measured as percent bone area (PBA to a great extent when compared to the titanium-6-4 alloy at statistically significant levels. PBA increased significantly with the carbon-fiber composite over the titanium-6-4 alloy for distances from the implant surfaces of 0.1 mm at 77.7% vs. 19.3% (p < 10−8 and 0.8 mm at 41.6% vs. 19.5% (p < 10−4, respectively. The review focuses on carbon fiber properties that increased PBA for enhanced implant osseointegration. Carbon fibers acting as polymer coated electrically conducting micro-biocircuits appear to provide a biocompatible semi-antioxidant property to remove damaging electron free radicals from the surrounding implant surface. Further, carbon fibers by removing excess electrons produced from the cellular mitochondrial electron transport chain during periods of hypoxia perhaps stimulate bone cell recruitment by free-radical chemotactic influences. In addition, well-studied bioorganic cell actin carbon fiber growth would appear to interface in close contact with the carbon-fiber-reinforced composite implant. Resulting subsequent actin carbon fiber/implant carbon fiber contacts then could help in discharging the electron biological overloads through electrochemical gradients to lower negative charges and lower concentration.

  2. Conducting Polymers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    would exhibit electronic conductivity, their conductivities (of compressed pellets) were indeed measured by others, and were found to be .... Polyaniline. Polyphenylene. Polypheny lene- vinylene. Table 1. G!NeRAl I ARTICl! structure. Maximum conductivity Stem Stability. Processability. ~. 1.5 x 105. Reacts with Film not n air.

  3. Implantable electronic medical devices

    CERN Document Server

    Fitzpatrick, Dennis

    2014-01-01

    Implantable Electronic Medical Devices provides a thorough review of the application of implantable devices, illustrating the techniques currently being used together with overviews of the latest commercially available medical devices. This book provides an overview of the design of medical devices and is a reference on existing medical devices. The book groups devices with similar functionality into distinct chapters, looking at the latest design ideas and techniques in each area, including retinal implants, glucose biosensors, cochlear implants, pacemakers, electrical stimulation t

  4. Analysis of submerged implant towards mastication load using 3D finite element method (FEM)

    OpenAIRE

    Widia Hafsyah Sumarlina Ritonga; Janti Rusjanti; Nunung Rusminah; Aldilla Miranda; Tatacipta Dirgantara

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The surgical procedure for implantation of a surgical implant comprising a stage for the implant design nonsubmerged and two stages for submerged. Submerged implant design often used in Faculty of Dentistry Universitas Padjadjaran because it is safer in achieving osseointegration. This study was conducted to evaluate the failure of dental implant based on location and the value of internal tensiones as well as supporting tissues when given mastication load by using the 3D Finite...

  5. Comparison of Reconstructive Outcomes in Breast Cancer Patients With Preexisting Subpectoral Implants: Implant-Sparing Mastectomy With Delayed Implant Exchange Versus Immediate Tissue Expander Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parabkaharan, Sangeetha; Melody, Megan; Trotta, Rose; Lleshi, Amina; Sun, Weihong; Smith, Paul D; Khakpour, Nazanin; Dayicioglu, Deniz

    2016-06-01

    Women who have undergone prior augmentation mammoplasty represent a unique subset of breast cancer patients with several options available for breast reconstruction. We performed a single institution review of surgical outcomes of breast reconstruction performed in patients with breast cancer with prior history of subpectoral breast augmentation. Institutional review board-approved retrospective review was conducted among patients with previously mentioned criteria treated at our institution between 2000 and 2014. Reconstructions were grouped into 2 categories as follows: (1) removal of preexisting subpectoral implant during mastectomy with immediate tissue expander placement and (2) implant-sparing mastectomy followed by delayed exchange to a larger implant. We reviewed demographics, tumor features, and reconstruction outcomes of these groups. Fifty-three patients had preexisting subpectoral implants. Of the 63 breast reconstructions performed, 18 (28.6%) had immediate tissue expander placed and 45 (71.4%) had implant-sparing mastectomy followed by delayed implant exchange. The groups were comparable based on age, body mass index, cancer type, tumor grade, TNM stage at presentation, and hormonal receptor status. No significant difference was noted between tumor margins or subsequent recurrence, mastectomy specimen weight, removed implant volume, volume of implant placed during reconstruction, or time from mastectomy to final implant placement. Rates of complications were significantly higher in the tissue expander group compared to the implant-sparing mastectomy group 7 (38.9%) versus 4 (8.9%) (P = 0.005). Implant-sparing mastectomy with delayed implant exchange in patients with preexisting subpectoral implants is safe and has fewer complications compared to tissue expander placement. There was no difference noted in the final volume of implant placed, time interval for final implant placement, or tumor margins.

  6. Changes in surface properties caused by ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwaki, Masaya

    1987-01-01

    This report outlines various aspects of ion implantation. Major features of ion implantation are described first, focusing on the structure of ion implantation equipment and some experimental results of ion implantation into semiconductors. Distribution of components in ion-implantated layers is then discussed. The two major features of ion implantation in relation to the distribution of implanted ions are: (1) high controllability of addition of ions to a surface layer and (2) formation of a large number of lattice defects in a short period of time. Application of ion implantation to metallic materials is expected to permit the following: (1) formation of a semi-stable alloy surface layer by metallic ion implantation, (2) formation of a semi-stable ceramic surface layer or buried layer by non-metallic ion implantation, and (3) formation of a buried layer by combined implementation of a different metallic ion and non-metallic ion. Ion implantation in carbon materials, polymers and ceramics is discussed next. The last part of the report is dedicated to macroscopic properties of an ion-implanted layer, centering on surface modification, formation of a conductive surface layer, and tribology. (Nogami, K.) 60 refs

  7. Trends in cochlear implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2004-01-01

    More than 60,000 people worldwide use cochlear implants as a means to restore functional hearing. Although individual performance variability is still high, an average implant user can talk on the phone in a quiet environment. Cochlear-implant research has also matured as a field, as evidenced by the exponential growth in both the patient population and scientific publication. The present report examines current issues related to audiologic, clinical, engineering, anatomic, and physiologic aspects of cochlear implants, focusing on their psychophysical, speech, music, and cognitive performance. This report also forecasts clinical and research trends related to presurgical evaluation, fitting protocols, signal processing, and postsurgical rehabilitation in cochlear implants. Finally, a future landscape in amplification is presented that requires a unique, yet complementary, contribution from hearing aids, middle ear implants, and cochlear implants to achieve a total solution to the entire spectrum of hearing loss treatment and management.

  8. Benefits and Risks of Cochlear Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Medical Procedures Implants and Prosthetics Cochlear Implants Benefits and Risks of Cochlear Implants Share Tweet Linkedin ... the Use of Cochlear Implants What are the Benefits of Cochlear Implants? For people with implants: Hearing ...

  9. Control of Brain Activity in hMT+/V5 at Three Response Levels Using fMRI-Based Neurofeedback/BCI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Teresa; Direito, Bruno; Lima, João; Ferreira, Carlos; Nunes, Urbano; Castelo-Branco, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    A major challenge in brain-computer interface (BCI) research is to increase the number of command classes and levels of control. BCI studies often use binary control level approaches (level 0 and 1 of brain activation for each class of control). Different classes may often be achieved but not different levels of activation for the same class. The increase in the number of levels of control in BCI applications may allow for larger efficiency in neurofeedback applications. In this work we test the hypothesis whether more than two modulation levels can be achieved in a single brain region, the hMT+/V5 complex. Participants performed three distinct imagery tasks during neurofeedback training: imagery of a stationary dot, imagery of a dot with two opposing motions in the vertical axis and imagery of a dot with four opposing motions in vertical or horizontal axes (imagery of 2 or 4 motion directions). The larger the number of motion alternations, the higher the expected hMT+/V5 response. A substantial number (17 of 20) of participants achieved successful binary level of control and 12 were able to reach even 3 significant levels of control within the same session, confirming the whole group effects at the individual level. With this simple approach we suggest that it is possible to design a parametric system of control based on activity modulation of a specific brain region with at least 3 different levels. Furthermore, we show that particular imagery task instructions, based on different number of motion alternations, provide feasible achievement of different control levels in BCI and/or neurofeedback applications.

  10. Design of an EEG-based brain-computer interface (BCI) from standard components running in real-time under Windows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guger, C; Schlögl, A; Walterspacher, D; Pfurtscheller, G

    1999-01-01

    An EEG-based brain-computer interface (BCI) is a direct connection between the human brain and the computer. Such a communication system is needed by patients with severe motor impairments (e.g. late stage of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis) and has to operate in real-time. This paper describes the selection of the appropriate components to construct such a BCI and focuses also on the selection of a suitable programming language and operating system. The multichannel system runs under Windows 95, equipped with a real-time Kernel expansion to obtain reasonable real-time operations on a standard PC. Matlab controls the data acquisition and the presentation of the experimental paradigm, while Simulink is used to calculate the recursive least square (RLS) algorithm that describes the current state of the EEG in real-time. First results of the new low-cost BCI show that the accuracy of differentiating imagination of left and right hand movement is around 95%.

  11. “Enheduanna—A Manifesto of Falling” Live Brain-Computer Cinema Performance: Performer and Audience Participation, Cognition and Emotional Engagement Using Multi-Brain BCI Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zioga, Polina; Pollick, Frank; Ma, Minhua; Chapman, Paul; Stefanov, Kristian

    2018-01-01

    The fields of neural prosthetic technologies and Brain-Computer Interfaces (BCIs) have witnessed in the past 15 years an unprecedented development, bringing together theories and methods from different scientific fields, digital media, and the arts. More in particular, artists have been amongst the pioneers of the design of relevant applications since their emergence in the 1960s, pushing the boundaries of applications in real-life contexts. With the new research, advancements, and since 2007, the new low-cost commercial-grade wireless devices, there is a new increasing number of computer games, interactive installations, and performances that involve the use of these interfaces, combining scientific, and creative methodologies. The vast majority of these works use the brain-activity of a single participant. However, earlier, as well as recent examples, involve the simultaneous interaction of more than one participants or performers with the use of Electroencephalography (EEG)-based multi-brain BCIs. In this frame, we discuss and evaluate “Enheduanna—A Manifesto of Falling,” a live brain-computer cinema performance that enables for the first time the simultaneous real-time multi-brain interaction of more than two participants, including a performer and members of the audience, using a passive EEG-based BCI system in the context of a mixed-media performance. The performance was realised as a neuroscientific study conducted in a real-life setting. The raw EEG data of seven participants, one performer and two different members of the audience for each performance, were simultaneously recorded during three live events. The results reveal that the majority of the participants were able to successfully identify whether their brain-activity was interacting with the live video projections or not. A correlation has been found between their answers to the questionnaires, the elements of the performance that they identified as most special, and the audience's indicators

  12. “Enheduanna—A Manifesto of Falling” Live Brain-Computer Cinema Performance: Performer and Audience Participation, Cognition and Emotional Engagement Using Multi-Brain BCI Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polina Zioga

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The fields of neural prosthetic technologies and Brain-Computer Interfaces (BCIs have witnessed in the past 15 years an unprecedented development, bringing together theories and methods from different scientific fields, digital media, and the arts. More in particular, artists have been amongst the pioneers of the design of relevant applications since their emergence in the 1960s, pushing the boundaries of applications in real-life contexts. With the new research, advancements, and since 2007, the new low-cost commercial-grade wireless devices, there is a new increasing number of computer games, interactive installations, and performances that involve the use of these interfaces, combining scientific, and creative methodologies. The vast majority of these works use the brain-activity of a single participant. However, earlier, as well as recent examples, involve the simultaneous interaction of more than one participants or performers with the use of Electroencephalography (EEG-based multi-brain BCIs. In this frame, we discuss and evaluate “Enheduanna—A Manifesto of Falling,” a live brain-computer cinema performance that enables for the first time the simultaneous real-time multi-brain interaction of more than two participants, including a performer and members of the audience, using a passive EEG-based BCI system in the context of a mixed-media performance. The performance was realised as a neuroscientific study conducted in a real-life setting. The raw EEG data of seven participants, one performer and two different members of the audience for each performance, were simultaneously recorded during three live events. The results reveal that the majority of the participants were able to successfully identify whether their brain-activity was interacting with the live video projections or not. A correlation has been found between their answers to the questionnaires, the elements of the performance that they identified as most special, and the

  13. "Enheduanna-A Manifesto of Falling" Live Brain-Computer Cinema Performance: Performer and Audience Participation, Cognition and Emotional Engagement Using Multi-Brain BCI Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zioga, Polina; Pollick, Frank; Ma, Minhua; Chapman, Paul; Stefanov, Kristian

    2018-01-01

    The fields of neural prosthetic technologies and Brain-Computer Interfaces (BCIs) have witnessed in the past 15 years an unprecedented development, bringing together theories and methods from different scientific fields, digital media, and the arts. More in particular, artists have been amongst the pioneers of the design of relevant applications since their emergence in the 1960s, pushing the boundaries of applications in real-life contexts. With the new research, advancements, and since 2007, the new low-cost commercial-grade wireless devices, there is a new increasing number of computer games, interactive installations, and performances that involve the use of these interfaces, combining scientific, and creative methodologies. The vast majority of these works use the brain-activity of a single participant. However, earlier, as well as recent examples, involve the simultaneous interaction of more than one participants or performers with the use of Electroencephalography (EEG)-based multi-brain BCIs. In this frame, we discuss and evaluate "Enheduanna-A Manifesto of Falling," a live brain-computer cinema performance that enables for the first time the simultaneous real-time multi-brain interaction of more than two participants, including a performer and members of the audience, using a passive EEG-based BCI system in the context of a mixed-media performance. The performance was realised as a neuroscientific study conducted in a real-life setting. The raw EEG data of seven participants, one performer and two different members of the audience for each performance, were simultaneously recorded during three live events. The results reveal that the majority of the participants were able to successfully identify whether their brain-activity was interacting with the live video projections or not. A correlation has been found between their answers to the questionnaires, the elements of the performance that they identified as most special, and the audience's indicators of

  14. Martensitic transformation in helium implanted 316 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishimatsu, Manabu; Tsukuda, Noboru

    1997-01-01

    In order to simulate surface deterioration phenomenon due to particle loading of SUS-316 steel which is one of candidate materials for nuclear fusion reactor vacuum wall structure material, helium ion implanting was conducted at room temperature, 473 K and 573 K. To martensitic phase formed as a results, implantation dose dependence, implanting temperature dependence, and annealing under 1073 K were conducted. Formation of the martensitic phase was suppressed at high implanting temperature. At room temperature implantation, the martensitic phase disappeared at more than 873 K, but at high temperature implantation, it increased abnormally near at 973 K. This showed that deterioration of materials depended extremely upon using temperature and temperature history. (G.K.)

  15. Heat conduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grigull, U.; Sandner, H.

    1984-01-01

    Included are discussions of rates of heat transfer by conduction, the effects of varying and changing properties, thermal explosions, distributed heat sources, moving heat sources, and non-steady three-dimensional conduction processes. Throughout, the importance of thinking both numerically and symbolically is stressed, as this is essential to the development of the intuitive understanding of numerical values needed for successful designing. Extensive tables of thermophysical properties, including thermal conductivity and diffusivity, are presented. Also included are exact and approximate solutions to many of the problems that arise in practical situations

  16. Dental implants in medically complex patients-a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manor, Yifat; Simon, Roy; Haim, Doron; Garfunkel, Adi; Moses, Ofer

    2017-03-01

    Dental implant insertion for oral rehabilitation is a worldwide procedure for healthy and medically compromised patients. The impact of systemic disease risks on the outcome of implant therapy is unclear, since there are few if any published randomized controlled trials (RCTs). The objective of this study is to investigate the rate of complications and failures following dental implantation in medically compromised patients in order to elucidate risk factors and prevent them. A retrospective cohort study was conducted from patient files treated with dental implantation between the years 2008-2014. The study group consisted of medically complex patients while the control group consisted of healthy patients. Preoperative, intraoperative, and post operative clinical details were retrieved from patients' files. The survival rate and the success rate of the dental implants were evaluated clinically and radiographically. A total of 204 patients (1003 dental implants) were included in the research, in the study group, 93 patients with 528 dental implants and in the control group, 111 patients with 475 dental implants. No significant differences were found between the groups regarding implant failures or complications. The failure rate of dental implants among the patients was 11.8 % in the study group and 16.2 % in the control group (P = 0.04). It was found that patients with a higher number of implants (mean 6.8) had failures compared with patients with a lower number of implants (mean 4.2) regardless of their health status (P dental implantation in medically complex patients and in healthy patients. Medically complex patients can undergo dental implantation. There are similar rates of complications and failures of dental implants in medically complex patients and in healthy patients.

  17. Electrical Conductivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershey, David R.; Sand, Susan

    1993-01-01

    Explains how electrical conductivity (EC) can be used to measure ion concentration in solutions. Describes instrumentation for the measurement, temperature dependence and EC, and the EC of common substances. (PR)

  18. Conduct Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... objections runs away from home often truant from school Children who exhibit these behaviors should receive a comprehensive evaluation by an experience mental health professional. Many children with a conduct disorder may ...

  19. Post-stroke Rehabilitation Training with a Motor-Imagery-Based Brain-Computer Interface (BCI-Controlled Hand Exoskeleton: A Randomized Controlled Multicenter Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander A. Frolov

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Repeated use of brain-computer interfaces (BCIs providing contingent sensory feedback of brain activity was recently proposed as a rehabilitation approach to restore motor function after stroke or spinal cord lesions. However, there are only a few clinical studies that investigate feasibility and effectiveness of such an approach. Here we report on a placebo-controlled, multicenter clinical trial that investigated whether stroke survivors with severe upper limb (UL paralysis benefit from 10 BCI training sessions each lasting up to 40 min. A total of 74 patients participated: median time since stroke is 8 months, 25 and 75% quartiles [3.0; 13.0]; median severity of UL paralysis is 4.5 points [0.0; 30.0] as measured by the Action Research Arm Test, ARAT, and 19.5 points [11.0; 40.0] as measured by the Fugl-Meyer Motor Assessment, FMMA. Patients in the BCI group (n = 55 performed motor imagery of opening their affected hand. Motor imagery-related brain electroencephalographic activity was translated into contingent hand exoskeleton-driven opening movements of the affected hand. In a control group (n = 19, hand exoskeleton-driven opening movements of the affected hand were independent of brain electroencephalographic activity. Evaluation of the UL clinical assessments indicated that both groups improved, but only the BCI group showed an improvement in the ARAT's grasp score from 0 [0.0; 14.0] to 3.0 [0.0; 15.0] points (p < 0.01 and pinch scores from 0.0 [0.0; 7.0] to 1.0 [0.0; 12.0] points (p < 0.01. Upon training completion, 21.8% and 36.4% of the patients in the BCI group improved their ARAT and FMMA scores respectively. The corresponding numbers for the control group were 5.1% (ARAT and 15.8% (FMMA. These results suggests that adding BCI control to exoskeleton-assisted physical therapy can improve post-stroke rehabilitation outcomes. Both maximum and mean values of the percentage of successfully decoded imagery-related EEG activity, were higher

  20. Diagnostic Principles of Peri-Implantitis: a Systematic Review and Guidelines for Peri-Implantitis Diagnosis Proposal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ausra Ramanauskaite

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To review and summarize the literature concerning peri-implantitis diagnostic parameters and to propose guidelines for peri-implantitis diagnosis. Material and Methods: An electronic literature search was conducted of the MEDLINE (Ovid and EMBASE databases for articles published between 2011 and 2016. Sequential screening at the title/abstract and full-text levels was performed. Systematic reviews/guidelines of consensus conferences proposing classification or suggesting diagnostic parameters for peri-implantitis in the English language were included. The review was recorded on PROSPERO system with the code CRD42016033287. Results: The search resulted in 10 articles that met the inclusion criteria. Four were papers from consensus conferences, two recommended diagnostic guidelines, three proposed classification of peri-implantitis, and one suggested an index for implant success. The following parameters were suggested to be used for peri-implantitis diagnosis: pain, mobility, bleeding on probing, probing depth, suppuration/exudate, and radiographic bone loss. In all of the papers, different definitions of peri-implantitis or implant success, as well as different thresholds for the above mentioned clinical and radiographical parameters, were used. Current evidence rationale for the diagnosis of peri-implantitis and classification based on consecutive evaluation of soft-tissue conditions and the amount of bone loss were suggested. Conclusions: Currently there is no single uniform definition of peri-implantitis or the parameters that should be used. Rationale for diagnosis and prognosis of peri-implantitis as well as classification of the disease is proposed.

  1. Optical effects of ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Townsend, P.D.

    1987-01-01

    The review concerns the effects of ion implantation that specifically relate to the optical properties of insulators. Topics which are reviewed include: ion implantation, ion range and damage distributions, colour centre production by ion implantation, high dose ion implantation, and applications for integrated optics. Numerous examples are presented of both diagnostic and industrial examples of ion implantation effects in insulators. (U.K.)

  2. P300-based brain-computer interface (BCI) event-related potentials (ERPs): People with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) vs. age-matched controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCane, Lynn M; Heckman, Susan M; McFarland, Dennis J; Townsend, George; Mak, Joseph N; Sellers, Eric W; Zeitlin, Debra; Tenteromano, Laura M; Wolpaw, Jonathan R; Vaughan, Theresa M

    2015-11-01

    Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) aimed at restoring communication to people with severe neuromuscular disabilities often use event-related potentials (ERPs) in scalp-recorded EEG activity. Up to the present, most research and development in this area has been done in the laboratory with young healthy control subjects. In order to facilitate the development of BCI most useful to people with disabilities, the present study set out to: (1) determine whether people with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and healthy, age-matched volunteers (HVs) differ in the speed and accuracy of their ERP-based BCI use; (2) compare the ERP characteristics of these two groups; and (3) identify ERP-related factors that might enable improvement in BCI performance for people with disabilities. Sixteen EEG channels were recorded while people with ALS or healthy age-matched volunteers (HVs) used a P300-based BCI. The subjects with ALS had little or no remaining useful motor control (mean ALS Functional Rating Scale-Revised 9.4 (±9.5SD) (range 0-25)). Each subject attended to a target item as the items in a 6×6 visual matrix flashed. The BCI used a stepwise linear discriminant function (SWLDA) to determine the item the user wished to select (i.e., the target item). Offline analyses assessed the latencies, amplitudes, and locations of ERPs to the target and non-target items for people with ALS and age-matched control subjects. BCI accuracy and communication rate did not differ significantly between ALS users and HVs. Although ERP morphology was similar for the two groups, their target ERPs differed significantly in the location and amplitude of the late positivity (P300), the amplitude of the early negativity (N200), and the latency of the late negativity (LN). The differences in target ERP components between people with ALS and age-matched HVs are consistent with the growing recognition that ALS may affect cortical function. The development of BCIs for use by this population may begin

  3. Ion implantation in semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gusev, V.; Gusevova, M.

    1980-01-01

    The historical development is described of the method of ion implantation, the physical research of the method, its technological solution and practical uses. The method is universally applicable, allows the implantation of arbitrary atoms to an arbitrary material, ensures high purity of the doping element. It is linked with sample processing at low temperatures. In implantation it is possible to independently change the dose and energy of the ions thereby affecting the spatial distribution of the ions. (M.S.)

  4. Ion implantation in semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gusev, V; Gusevova, M

    1980-06-01

    The historical development of the method of ion implantation, the physical research of the method, its technological solution and practical uses is described. The method is universally applicable, allows the implantation of arbitrary atoms to an arbitrary material and ensures high purity of the doping element. It is linked with sample processing at low temperatures. In implantation it is possible to independently change the dose and energy of the ions thereby affecting the spatial distribution of the ions.

  5. Trends in Cochlear Implants

    OpenAIRE

    Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2004-01-01

    More than 60,000 people worldwide use cochlear implants as a means to restore functional hearing. Although individual performance variability is still high, an average implant user can talk on the phone in a quiet environment. Cochlear-implant research has also matured as a field, as evidenced by the exponential growth in both the patient population and scientific publication. The present report examines current issues related to audiologic, clinical, engineering, anatomic, and physiologic as...

  6. Ion implantation technology

    CERN Document Server

    Downey, DF; Jones, KS; Ryding, G

    1993-01-01

    Ion implantation technology has made a major contribution to the dramatic advances in integrated circuit technology since the early 1970's. The ever-present need for accurate models in ion implanted species will become absolutely vital in the future due to shrinking feature sizes. Successful wide application of ion implantation, as well as exploitation of newly identified opportunities, will require the development of comprehensive implant models. The 141 papers (including 24 invited papers) in this volume address the most recent developments in this field. New structures and possible approach

  7. High energy ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziegler, J.F.

    1985-01-01

    High energy ion implantation offers the oppertunity for unique structures in semiconductor processing. The unusual physical properties of such implantations are discussed as well as the special problems in masking and damage annealing. A review is made of proposed circuit structures which involve deep implantation. Examples are: deep buried bipolar collectors fabricated without epitaxy, barrier layers to reduce FET memory sensitivity to soft-fails, CMOS isolation well structures, MeV implantation for customization and correction of completed circuits, and graded reach-throughs to deep active device components. (orig.)

  8. [Silastic implant and synovitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sennwald, G

    1989-07-22

    The silastic implant based on siloxane polymere induces granulomatous synovitis in certain predisposed individuals, a reaction which may continue even after removal of the implant. This is also true of a prosthesis of the trapezium in two of our patients, though to a lesser degree. This is probably the reason why the problem has not yet been widely recognized. The hypothesis is put forward that an enzymatic predisposition may allow chemical degradation of the fragmented silastic implant into a toxic component responsible for the pathologic condition. The slow progression of the lesions is a challenge for the future and puts in question the further use of silastic implants.

  9. Cochlear implant magnet retrofit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, N L; Breda, S D; Hoffman, R A

    1988-06-01

    An implantable magnet is now available for patients who have received the standard Nucleus 22-channel cochlear implant and who are not able to wear the headband satisfactorily. This magnet is attached in piggy-back fashion to the previously implanted receiver/stimulator by means of a brief operation under local anesthesia. Two patients have received this magnet retrofit, and are now wearing the headset with greater comfort and satisfaction. It is felt that the availability of this magnet will increase patient compliance in regard to hours of implant usage.

  10. Conduct disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buitelaar, J.K.; Smeets, K.C.; Herpers, P.; Scheepers, F.; Glennon, J.; Rommelse, N.N.J.

    2013-01-01

    Conduct disorder (CD) is a frequently occurring psychiatric disorder characterized by a persistent pattern of aggressive and non-aggressive rule breaking antisocial behaviours that lead to considerable burden for the patients themselves, their family and society. This review paper updates diagnostic

  11. Effects of melatonin implantation during the slow period of cashmere ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of melatonin implantation during the slow period of cashmere growth on fibre production in Inner Mongolian cashmere goats. It was found that melatonin implantation had no effect on the growth rate of cashmere, except from February to March when the rate of treated goats ...

  12. Awareness of dental implants among dental patients in Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to determine the level of awareness of dental implant in Nigerian patients and their willingness to choose dental implant as a tooth replacement option. A survey was conducted among patients presenting for dental treatment in 3 teaching hospitals and private dental clinics in 3 urban cities of ...

  13. Prognostic indicators for surgical peri-implantitis treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Waal, Yvonne C M; Raghoebar, Gerry M; Meijer, Henny J A; Winkel, Edwin G; van Winkelhoff, Arie Jan

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Objective of this study was to identify prognostic indicators for the outcome of resective peri-implantitis treatment, by an analysis of the pooled data of two previously conducted randomized controlled trials. Material and methods: Data of 74 patients with peri-implantitis (187

  14. Congenitally Deafblind Children and Cochlear Implants: Effects on Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dammeyer, Jesper

    2009-01-01

    There has been much research conducted demonstrating the positive benefits of cochlear implantation (CI) in children who are deaf. Research on CI in children who are both deaf and blind, however, is lacking. The purpose of this article is to present a study of five congenitally deafblind children who received cochlear implants between 2.2 and 4.2…

  15. Characterisation of Cs ion implanted GaN by DLTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngoepe, P. N. M.; Meyer, W. E.; Auret, F. D.; Omotoso, E.; Hlatshwayo, T. T.; Diale, M.

    2018-04-01

    Deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) was used to characterise Cs implanted GaN grown by hydride vapour phase epitaxy (HVPE). This implantation was done at room temperature using energy of 360 keV to a fluence of 10-11 cm-2. A defect with activation energy of 0.19 eV below the conduction band and an apparent capture cross section of 1.1 × 10-15 cm2 was induced. This defect has previously been observed after rare earth element (Eu, Er and Pr) implantation. It has also been reported after electron, proton and He ion implantation.

  16. Influence of immediate loading on provisional restoration in dental implant stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikbal, M.; Odang, R. W.; Indrasari, M.; Dewi, R. S.

    2017-08-01

    The success of dental implant treatment is determined by the primary stability at placement. One factor that could influence this stability is occlusal loading through provisional restoration. Two types of loading protocols are usually used: immediate and delayed loading. However, some controversies remain about the influence of occlusal loading on implant stability. Therefore, the influence of immediate loading on implant stability must be studied. An animal study was conducted by placing nine dental implants in the mandibular jaw of three Macaca fascicularis. Provisional restorations with various occlusal contacts (no, light, and normal contact) were placed on the implant. The implant stability was measured using the Ostell ISQ three times: immediately (baseline) and at the first and second months after implant placement. The implant stability between implants with no and normal occlusal contact as well as light and normal occlusal contact showed significant differences (p implant placement. However, no significant increase (p > 0.05) in implant stability was seen at the baseline and the first and second months after implant placement for all occlusal contact groups. Immediate loading influenced the implant stability, and provisional restoration of implant without occlusal contact showed the highest implant stability.

  17. Decontamination of titanium implant surface and re-osseointegration to treat peri-implantitis: a literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Subramani, K.; Wismeijer, D.

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: To review the literature on decontamination of titanium implant surfaces following peri-implantitis and the effect of various cleaning methods on re-osseointegration. MATERIALS AND METHODS: An electronic search of the literature at PubMed was conducted on the studies published between 1966

  18. Percutaneous and skeletal biocarbon implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooney, V.

    1977-01-01

    Review of carbon implants developed by NASA discussed four different types of implants and subsequent improvements. Improvements could be of specific interest to rehabilitation centers and similar organizations.

  19. Degradable Implantate: Entwicklungsbeispiele

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruffieux, Kurt; Wintermantel, Erich

    Resorbierbare Implantate werden seit mehreren Jahrzehnten in der Implantologie eingesetzt. Bekannt wurden diese Biomaterialien mit dem Aufkommen von sich selbst auflösenden Nahtfäden auf der Basis von synthetisch hergestellten Polylactiden und Polyglycoliden in den 70er Jahren. In einem nächsten Schritt wurden Implantate wie Platten und Schrauben zur Gewebefixation aus den gleichen Biomaterialien hergestellt.

  20. Risks of Breast Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... have a risk of developing a type of cancer called breast implant-associated anaplastic large cell lymphoma (BIA-ALCL) in the breast tissue surrounding the implant. BIA-ALCL is not breast cancer. Women diagnosed with BIA-ALCL may need to ...

  1. Ion implantation of metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dearnaley, G.

    1976-01-01

    In this part of the paper descriptions are given of the effects of ion implantation on (a) friction and wear in metals; and (b) corrosion of metals. In the study of corrosion, ion implantation can be used either to introduce a constituent that is known to convey corrosion resistance, or more generally to examine the parameters which control corrosion. (U.K.)

  2. Studies of ion implanted thermally oxidised chromium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhl, S.

    1977-01-01

    The thermal oxidation of 99.99% pure chromium containing precise amounts of foreign elements has been studied and compared to the oxidation of pure chromium. Thirty-three foreign elements including all of the naturally occurring rare earth metals were ion implanted into chromium samples prior to oxidation at 750 0 C in oxygen. The role of radiation induced damage, inherent in this doping technique, has been studied by chromium implantations at various energies and doses. The repair of the damage has been studied by vacuum annealing at temperatures up to 800 0 C prior to oxidation. Many of the implants caused an inhibition of oxidation, the greatest being a 93% reduction for 2 x 10 16 ions/cm 2 of praseodymium. The distribution of the implant was investigated by the use of 2 MeV alpha backscattering and ion microprobe analysis. Differences in the topography and structure of the chromic oxide on and off the implanted area were studied using scanning electron and optical microscopy. X-ray diffraction analysis was used to investigate if a rare earth-chromium compound of a perovskite-type structure had been formed. Lastly, the electrical conductivity of chromic oxide on and off the implanted region was examined at low voltages. (author)

  3. Ion implantation into iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwaki, Masaya

    1978-01-01

    The distribution of implanted ions in iron, the friction characteristics and the corrosion of iron were studied. The distribution of Ni or Cr ions implanted into mild steel was measured. The accelerated voltage was 150 keV, and the beam current density was about 2 microampere/cm 2 . The measurement was made with an ion microanalyzer. The measured distribution was compared with that of LSS theory. Deep invasion of Ni was seen in the measured distribution. The distribution of Cr ions was different from the distribution calculated by the LSS theory. The relative friction coefficient of mild steel varied according to the dose of implanted Cu or N ions, and to the accelerating voltage. Formation of compound metals on the surfaces of metals by ion-implantation was investigated for the purpose to prevent the corrosion of metals. The resistance of mild steel in which Ni ions were implanted was larger than that of mild steel without any treatment. (Kato, T.)

  4. Conductivity Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    The Thermal and Electrical Conductivity Probe (TECP) for NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander took measurements in Martian soil and in the air. The needles on the end of the instrument were inserted into the Martian soil, allowing TECP to measure the propagation of both thermal and electrical energy. TECP also measured the humidity in the surrounding air. The needles on the probe are 15 millimeters (0.6 inch) long. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  5. Research on ion implantation in MEMS device fabrication by theory, simulation and experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Minyu; Zhao, Yulong; Jiao, Binbin; Zhu, Lingjian; Zhang, Guodong; Wang, Lei

    2018-06-01

    Ion implantation is widely utilized in microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), applied for embedded lead, resistors, conductivity modifications and so forth. In order to achieve an expected device, the principle of ion implantation must be carefully examined. The elementary theory of ion implantation including implantation mechanism, projectile range and implantation-caused damage in the target were studied, which can be regarded as the guidance of ion implantation in MEMS device design and fabrication. Critical factors including implantations dose, energy and annealing conditions are examined by simulations and experiments. The implantation dose mainly determines the dopant concentration in the target substrate. The implantation energy is the key factor of the depth of the dopant elements. The annealing time mainly affects the repair degree of lattice damage and thus the activated elements’ ratio. These factors all together contribute to ions’ behavior in the substrates and characters of the devices. The results can be referred to in the MEMS design, especially piezoresistive devices.

  6. Top-Cited Articles in Implant Dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fardi, Anastasia; Kodonas, Konstantinos; Lillis, Theodoros; Veis, Alexander

    Citation analysis is the field of bibliometrics that uses citation data to evaluate the scientific recognition and the influential performance of a research article in the scientific community. The aim of this study was to conduct a bibliometric analysis of the top-cited articles pertaining to implant dentistry, to analyze the main characteristics, and to display the most interesting topics and evolutionary trends. The 100 top-cited articles published in "Dentistry, Oral Surgery, and Medicine" journals were identified using the Science Citation Index Database. The articles were further reviewed, and basic information was collected, including the number of citations, journals, authors, publication year, study design, level of evidence, and field of study. The highly cited articles in implant dentistry were cited between 199 and 2,229 times. The majority of them were published in four major journals: Clinical Oral Implants Research, International Journal of Oral & Maxillofacial Implants, Journal of Clinical Periodontology, and Journal of Periodontology. The publication year ranged from 1981 to 2009, with 45% published in a nine-year period (2001 to 2009). Publications from the United States (29%) were the most heavily cited, followed by those from Sweden (23%) and Switzerland (17%). The University of Göteborg from Sweden produced the highest number of publications (n = 19), followed by the University of Bern in Switzerland (n = 13). There was a predominance of clinical papers (n = 42), followed by reviews (n = 25), basic science research (n = 21), and proceedings papers (n = 12). Peri-implant tissue healing and health (24%), implant success/failures (19.2%), and biomechanical topics (16.8%) were the most common fields of study. Citation analysis in the field of implant dentistry reveals interesting information about the topics and trends negotiated by researchers and elucidates which characteristics are required for a paper to attain a "classic" status. Clinical

  7. International consensus on Vibrant Soundbridge(R) implantation in children and adolescents.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cremers, C.W.R.J.; O'Connor, A.F.; Helms, J.; Roberson, J.; Claros, P.; Frenzel, H.; Profant, M.; Schmerber, S.; Streitberger, C.; Baumgartner, W.D.; Orfila, D.; Pringle, M.; Cenjor, C.; Giarbini, N.; Jiang, D.; Snik, A.F.M.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Active middle ear implants augment hearing in patients with sensorineural, conductive, and mixed hearing losses with great success. However, the application of active middle ear implants has been restricted to compromised ears in adults only. Recently, active middle ear implants have been

  8. A critical review of cell culture strategies for modelling intracortical brain implant material reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmour, A D; Woolley, A J; Poole-Warren, L A; Thomson, C E; Green, R A

    2016-06-01

    The capacity to predict in vivo responses to medical devices in humans currently relies greatly on implantation in animal models. Researchers have been striving to develop in vitro techniques that can overcome the limitations associated with in vivo approaches. This review focuses on a critical analysis of the major in vitro strategies being utilized in laboratories around the world to improve understanding of the biological performance of intracortical, brain-implanted microdevices. Of particular interest to the current review are in vitro models for studying cell responses to penetrating intracortical devices and their materials, such as electrode arrays used for brain computer interface (BCI) and deep brain stimulation electrode probes implanted through the cortex. A background on the neural interface challenge is presented, followed by discussion of relevant in vitro culture strategies and their advantages and disadvantages. Future development of 2D culture models that exhibit developmental changes capable of mimicking normal, postnatal development will form the basis for more complex accurate predictive models in the future. Although not within the scope of this review, innovations in 3D scaffold technologies and microfluidic constructs will further improve the utility of in vitro approaches. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Influence of Palatal Coverage and Implant Distribution on Implant Strain in Maxillary Implant Overdentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Toshihito; Gonda, Tomoya; Mizuno, Yoko; Fujinami, Yozo; Maeda, Yoshinobu

    2016-01-01

    Maxillary implant overdentures are often used in clinical practice. However, there is no agreement or established guidelines regarding prosthetic design or optimal implant placement configuration. The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of palatal coverage and implant number and distribution in relation to impact strain under maxillary implant overdentures. A maxillary edentulous model with implants and experimental overdentures with and without palatal coverage was fabricated. Four strain gauges were attached to each implant, and they were positioned in the anterior, premolar, and molar areas. A vertical occlusal load of 98 N was applied through a mandibular complete denture, and the implant strains were compared using one-way analysis of variance (P = .05). The palatolabial strain was much higher on anterior implants than on other implants in both denture types. Although there was no significant difference between the strain under dentures with and without palatal coverage, palateless dentures tended to result in higher implant strain than dentures with palatal coverage. Dentures supported by only two implants registered higher strain than those supported by four or six implants. Implants under palateless dentures registered higher strain than those under dentures with palatal coverage. Anterior implants exhibited higher palatolabial strain than other implants regardless of palatal coverage and implant configuration; it is therefore recommended that maxillary implant overdentures should be supported by six implants with support extending to the distal end of the arch.

  10. Behavior of PET implanted by Ti, Ag, Si and C ion using MEVVA implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Yuguang; Zhang Tonghe; Zhang Yanwen; Zhang Huixing; Zhang Xiaoji; Zhou Gu

    2001-01-01

    Polyethylene terephthalane (PET) has been modified with Ti, Ag, Si and C ions from a metal vapor arc source (MEVVA). Ti, Ag, Si and C ions were implanted with acceleration voltage 40 kV to fluences ranging from 1x10 16 to 2x10 17 cm -2 . The surface of implanted PET darkened with increasing ion dose, when the metal ion dose was greater than 1x10 17 cm -2 the color changed to metallic bright. The surface resistance decreases by 5-6 orders of magnitude with increasing dose. The resistivity is stable after long-term storage. The depth of Ti- and Ag-implanted layer is approximately 150 and 80 nm measured by Rutherford backscattering (RBS), respectively. TEM photos revealed the presence of Ti and Ag nano-meter particles on the surface resulting from the high-dose implantation. Ti and Ag ion implantations improved conductivity and wear resistance significantly. The phase and structural changes were obtained by X-ray diffraction (XRD). It can be seen that nano-meter particles of Ti precipitation, TiO 2 and Ti-carbides have been formed in implanted layer. Nano-hardness of implanted PET has been measured by a nano-indenter. The results show that the surface hardness, modulus and wear resistance could be increased

  11. Doping of silicon carbide by ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gimbert, J.

    1999-01-01

    It appeared that in some fields, as the hostile environments (high temperature or irradiation), the silicon compounds showed limitations resulting from the electrical and mechanical properties. Doping of 4H and 6H silicon carbide by ion implantation is studied from a physicochemical and electrical point of view. It is necessary to obtain n-type and p-type material to realize high power and/or high frequency devices, such as MESFETs and Schottky diodes. First, physical and electrical properties of silicon carbide are presented and the interest of developing a process technology on this material is emphasised. Then, physical characteristics of ion implantation and particularly classical dopant implantation, such as nitrogen, for n-type doping, and aluminium and boron, for p-type doping are described. Results with these dopants are presented and analysed. Optimal conditions are extracted from these experiences so as to obtain a good crystal quality and a surface state allowing device fabrication. Electrical conduction is then described in the 4H and 6H-SiC polytypes. Freezing of free carriers and scattering processes are described. Electrical measurements are carried out using Hall effect on Van der Panw test patterns, and 4 point probe method are used to draw the type of the material, free carrier concentrations, resistivity and mobility of the implanted doped layers. These results are commented and compared to the theoretical analysis. The influence of the technological process on electrical conduction is studied in view of fabricating implanted silicon carbide devices. (author)

  12. Post-stroke Rehabilitation Training with a Motor-Imagery-Based Brain-Computer Interface (BCI)-Controlled Hand Exoskeleton: A Randomized Controlled Multicenter Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frolov, Alexander A; Mokienko, Olesya; Lyukmanov, Roman; Biryukova, Elena; Kotov, Sergey; Turbina, Lydia; Nadareyshvily, Georgy; Bushkova, Yulia

    2017-01-01

    Repeated use of brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) providing contingent sensory feedback of brain activity was recently proposed as a rehabilitation approach to restore motor function after stroke or spinal cord lesions. However, there are only a few clinical studies that investigate feasibility and effectiveness of such an approach. Here we report on a placebo-controlled, multicenter clinical trial that investigated whether stroke survivors with severe upper limb (UL) paralysis benefit from 10 BCI training sessions each lasting up to 40 min. A total of 74 patients participated: median time since stroke is 8 months, 25 and 75% quartiles [3.0; 13.0]; median severity of UL paralysis is 4.5 points [0.0; 30.0] as measured by the Action Research Arm Test, ARAT, and 19.5 points [11.0; 40.0] as measured by the Fugl-Meyer Motor Assessment, FMMA. Patients in the BCI group ( n = 55) performed motor imagery of opening their affected hand. Motor imagery-related brain electroencephalographic activity was translated into contingent hand exoskeleton-driven opening movements of the affected hand. In a control group ( n = 19), hand exoskeleton-driven opening movements of the affected hand were independent of brain electroencephalographic activity. Evaluation of the UL clinical assessments indicated that both groups improved, but only the BCI group showed an improvement in the ARAT's grasp score from 0 [0.0; 14.0] to 3.0 [0.0; 15.0] points ( p exoskeleton-assisted physical therapy can improve post-stroke rehabilitation outcomes. Both maximum and mean values of the percentage of successfully decoded imagery-related EEG activity, were higher than chance level. A correlation between the classification accuracy and the improvement in the upper extremity function was found. An improvement of motor function was found for patients with different duration, severity and location of the stroke.

  13. Beyond maximum speed—a novel two-stimulus paradigm for brain-computer interfaces based on event-related potentials (P300-BCI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, Tobias; Kübler, Andrea

    2014-10-01

    Objective. The speed of brain-computer interfaces (BCI), based on event-related potentials (ERP), is inherently limited by the commonly used one-stimulus paradigm. In this paper, we introduce a novel paradigm that can increase the spelling speed by a factor of 2, thereby extending the one-stimulus paradigm to a two-stimulus paradigm. Two different stimuli (a face and a symbol) are presented at the same time, superimposed on different characters and ERPs are classified using a multi-class classifier. Here, we present the proof-of-principle that is achieved with healthy participants. Approach. Eight participants were confronted with the novel two-stimulus paradigm and, for comparison, with two one-stimulus paradigms that used either one of the stimuli. Classification accuracies (percentage of correctly predicted letters) and elicited ERPs from the three paradigms were compared in a comprehensive offline analysis. Main results. The accuracies slightly decreased with the novel system compared to the established one-stimulus face paradigm. However, the use of two stimuli allowed for spelling at twice the maximum speed of the one-stimulus paradigms, and participants still achieved an average accuracy of 81.25%. This study introduced an alternative way of increasing the spelling speed in ERP-BCIs and illustrated that ERP-BCIs may not yet have reached their speed limit. Future research is needed in order to improve the reliability of the novel approach, as some participants displayed reduced accuracies. Furthermore, a comparison to the most recent BCI systems with individually adjusted, rapid stimulus timing is needed to draw conclusions about the practical relevance of the proposed paradigm. Significance. We introduced a novel two-stimulus paradigm that might be of high value for users who have reached the speed limit with the current one-stimulus ERP-BCI systems.

  14. Analysis of nano-meter structure in Ti implanted polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Gu; Wu Yuguang; Zhang Tonghe; Zhao Xinrong

    2001-01-01

    Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) is modified with Ti ion implantation to a dose of 1x10 17 to 2 x 10 17 cm -2 by using a metal vapor vacuum arc(MEVVA)source. Nano-meter structures in the implanted sample are observed by means of transmission electron microscope (TEM). The influence of ion dose on the structure is indicated. The results show that dense nano-meter phases are dispersed uniformly in the implanted layer. TEM cross section indicates that there is a three-layer structure in the implanted PET. It is found that a metallurgical surface is formed. Therefore the hardness, wear resistance and conductive properties of PET are improved after metal ion implantation. The mechanism of electrical conduction will be discussed

  15. Implants for orthodontic anchorage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiaowen; Sun, Yannan; Zhang, Yimei; Cai, Ting; Sun, Feng; Lin, Jiuxiang

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Implantanchorage continues to receive much attention as an important orthodontic anchorage. Since the development of orthodontic implants, the scope of applications has continued to increase. Although multiple reviews detailing implants have been published, no comprehensive evaluations have been performed. Thus, the purpose of this study was to comprehensively evaluate the effects of implants based on data published in review articles. An electronic search of the Cochrane Library, Medline, Embase, Ebsco and Sicencedirect for reviews with “orthodontic” and “systematic review or meta analysis” in the title, abstract, keywords, or full text was performed. A subsequent manual search was then performed to identify reviews concerning orthodontic implants. A manual search of the orthodontic journals American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics (AJODO), European Journal of Orthodontics (EJO), and Angle Othodontist was also performed. Such systematic reviews that evaluated the efficacy and safety of orthodontic implants were used to indicate success rates and molar movements. A total of 23 reviews were included in the analysis. The quality of each review was assessed using a measurement tool for Assessment of Multiple Systematic Reviews (AMSTAR), and the review chosen to summarize outcomes had a quality score of >6. Most reviews were less than moderate quality. Success rates of implants ranged in a broad scope, and movement of the maxillary first molar was superior with implants compared with traditional anchorage. PMID:29595673

  16. Maintenance in dental implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giselle Póvoa Gomes

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In implants, maintenance is a decisive factor for obtaining success when implant supported overdentures and dentures are used. The present stud presents, a clinical case of a patient, a 70 year-old white man, with a completely edentulous mandibular alveolar ridge, severe bone resorption with presence of basal bone only, and absence of vestibule. Initially, treatment consisted of the placement of a mandibular overdenture, supported on three implants in the anterior inter-foramen region, as the left implant was transfixed in the basal bone of 2 to 3 millimeters. Eleven years later, another two implants were placed in the anterior area and an immediate load was performed up to the first molars, for the placement of an implant supported fixed. Throughout the entire treatment, meticulous maintenance was carried out, with follow-up for fourteen years, interrupted by the patient’s death. From the third month after the opening the three implants initially placed, the presence of keratinized mucosa, definition of the vestibule, maturation of the alveolar ridge and bone formation in the mento region were observed. It was concluded that good planning, allied to mastery of the technique and adequate maintenance were the prerequisites necessary for obtaining favorable results, success of the present case, and for the patient to have a better quality of life.

  17. Nanotechnology for dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomsia, Antoni P; Lee, Janice S; Wegst, Ulrike G K; Saiz, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    With the advent of nanotechnology, an opportunity exists for the engineering of new dental implant materials. Metallic dental implants have been successfully used for decades, but they have shortcomings related to osseointegration and mechanical properties that do not match those of bone. Absent the development of an entirely new class of materials, faster osseointegration of currently available dental implants can be accomplished by various surface modifications. To date, there is no consensus regarding the preferred method(s) of implant surface modification, and further development will be required before the ideal implant surface can be created, let alone become available for clinical use. Current approaches can generally be categorized into three areas: ceramic coatings, surface functionalization, and patterning on the micro- to nanoscale. The distinctions among these are imprecise, as some or all of these approaches can be combined to improve in vivo implant performance. These surface improvements have resulted in durable implants with a high percentage of success and long-term function. Nanotechnology has provided another set of opportunities for the manipulation of implant surfaces in its capacity to mimic the surface topography formed by extracellular matrix components of natural tissue. The possibilities introduced by nanotechnology now permit the tailoring of implant chemistry and structure with an unprecedented degree of control. For the first time, tools are available that can be used to manipulate the physicochemical environment and monitor key cellular events at the molecular level. These new tools and capabilities will result in faster bone formation, reduced healing time, and rapid recovery to function.

  18. Conduct disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buitelaar, Jan K; Smeets, Kirsten C; Herpers, Pierre; Scheepers, Floor; Glennon, Jeffrey; Rommelse, Nanda N J

    2013-02-01

    Conduct disorder (CD) is a frequently occurring psychiatric disorder characterized by a persistent pattern of aggressive and non-aggressive rule breaking antisocial behaviours that lead to considerable burden for the patients themselves, their family and society. This review paper updates diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to CD in the light of the forthcoming DSM-5 definition. The diagnostic criteria for CD will remain unchanged in DSM-5, but the introduction of a specifier of CD with a callous-unemotional (CU) presentation is new. Linked to this, we discuss the pros and cons of various other ways to subtype aggression/CD symptoms. Existing guidelines for CD are, with few exceptions, already of a relatively older date and emphasize that clinical assessment should be systematic and comprehensive and based on a multi-informant approach. Non-medical psychosocial interventions are recommended as the first option for the treatment of CD. There is a role for medication in the treatment of comorbid syndromes and/or in case of insufficient response to psychosocial interventions and severe and dangerous aggressive and violent behaviours.

  19. Ion implantation for microelectronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dearnaley, G.

    1977-01-01

    Ion implantation has proved to be a versatile and efficient means of producing microelectronic devices. This review summarizes the relevant physics and technology and assesses the advantages of the method. Examples are then given of widely different device structures which have been made by ion implantation. While most of the industrial application has been in silicon, good progress continues to be made in the more difficult field of compound semiconductors. Equipment designed for the industrial ion implantation of microelectronic devices is discussed briefly. (Auth.)

  20. Optimization of dental implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dol, Aleksandr V.; Ivanov, Dmitriy V.

    2017-02-01

    Modern dentistry can not exist without dental implantation. This work is devoted to study of the "bone-implant" system and to optimization of dental prostheses installation. Modern non-invasive methods such as MRI an 3D-scanning as well as numerical calculations and 3D-prototyping allow to optimize all of stages of dental prosthetics. An integrated approach to the planning of implant surgery can significantly reduce the risk of complications in the first few days after treatment, and throughout the period of operation of the prosthesis.

  1. Vibroplasty for mixed and conductive hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luers, Jan Christoffer; Hüttenbrink, Karl-Bernd; Zahnert, Thomas; Bornitz, Matthias; Beutner, Dirk

    2013-08-01

    To summarize new application methods of an active middle ear implant (Vibrant Soundbridge) in patients with conductive or mixed hearing loss. Publications listed in the Medline/PubMed database. All publications published in English language; search term Vibrant Soundbridge AND floating mass transducer in all fields. Structured analysis of all publications. Extraction of significant findings and conclusions and audiometric data. Modern application methods of an active middle ear implant (VSB) open new therapeutic options for patients with various outer and middle ear diseases resulting in conductive or mixed hearing loss. Titanium couplers can help to couple the active middle ear implant in a standardized way to remnants of the ossicular chain or to the round window. Thus, the active middle ear implant has been established as an alternative treatment option for patients with mixed and conductive hearing. However, the heterogeneity of the studies published so far complicates the analysis of the audiometric results, and thus, the functional hearing gain after VSB implantation varies a lot.

  2. The formation of an organic coat and the release of corrosion microparticles from metallic magnesium implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badar, Muhammad; Lünsdorf, Heinrich; Evertz, Florian; Rahim, Muhammad Imran; Glasmacher, Birgit; Hauser, Hansjörg; Mueller, Peter P

    2013-07-01

    Magnesium alloys have been proposed as prospective degradable implant materials. To elucidate the complex interactions between the corroding implants and the tissue, magnesium implants were analyzed in a mouse model and the response was compared to that induced by Ti and by the resorbable polymer polyglactin, respectively. One month after implantation, distinct traces of corrosion were apparent but the magnesium implants were still intact, whereas resorbable polymeric wound suture implants were already fragmented. Analysis of magnesium implants 2weeks after implantation by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy indicated that magnesium, oxygen, calcium and phosphate were present at the implant surface. One month after implantation, the element composition of the outermost layer of the implant was indicative of tissue without detectable levels of magnesium, indicating a protective barrier function of this organic layer. In agreement with this notion, gene expression patterns in the surrounding tissue were highly similar for all implant materials investigated. However, high-resolution imaging using energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy revealed magnesium-containing microparticles in the tissue in the proximity of the implant. The release of such corrosion particles may contribute to the accumulation of calcium phosphate in the nearby tissue and to bone conductive activities of magnesium implants. Copyright © 2013 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Qualitative and quantitative observations of bone tissue reactions to anodised implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sul, Young-Taeg; Johansson, Carina B; Röser, Kerstin; Albrektsson, Tomas

    2002-04-01

    Research projects focusing on biomaterials related factors; the bulk implant material, the macro-design of the implant and the microsurface roughness are routinely being conducted at our laboratories. In this study, we have investigated the bone tissue reactions to turned commercially pure (c.p.) titanium implants with various thicknesses of the oxide films after 6 weeks of insertion in rabbit bone. The control c.p. titanium implants had an oxide thickness of 17-200 nm while the test implants revealed an oxide thickness between 600 and 1000 nm. Routine histological investigations of the tissue reactions around the implants and enzyme histochemical detections of alkaline and acid phosphatase activities demonstrated similar findings around both the control and test implants. In general, the histomorphometrical parameters (bone to implant contact and newly formed bone) revealed significant quantitative differences between the control and test implants. The test implants demonstrated a greater bone response histomorphometrically than control implants and the osteoconductivity was more pronounced around the test implant surfaces. The parameters that differed between the implant surfaces, i.e. the oxide thickness, the pore size distribution, the porosity and the crystallinity of the surface oxides may represent factors that have an influence on the histomorphometrical results indicated by a stronger bone tissue response to the test implant surfaces, with an oxide thickness of more than 600 nm.

  4. Comparison of marginal bone loss between internal- and external-connection dental implants in posterior areas without periodontal or peri-implant disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dae-Hyun; Kim, Hyun Ju; Kim, Sungtae; Koo, Ki-Tae; Kim, Tae-Il; Seol, Yang-Jo; Lee, Yong-Moo; Ku, Young; Rhyu, In-Chul

    2018-04-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study with 4-12 years of follow-up was to compare the marginal bone loss (MBL) between external-connection (EC) and internal-connection (IC) dental implants in posterior areas without periodontal or peri-implant disease on the adjacent teeth or implants. Additional factors influencing MBL were also evaluated. This retrospective study was performed using dental records and radiographic data obtained from patients who had undergone dental implant treatment in the posterior area from March 2006 to March 2007. All the implants that were included had follow-up periods of more than 4 years after loading and satisfied the implant success criteria, without any peri-implant or periodontal disease on the adjacent implants or teeth. They were divided into 2 groups: EC and IC. Subgroup comparisons were conducted according to splinting and the use of cement in the restorations. A statistical analysis was performed using the Mann-Whitney U test for comparisons between 2 groups and the Kruskal-Wallis test for comparisons among more than 2 groups. A total of 355 implants in 170 patients (206 EC and 149 IC) fulfilled the inclusion criteria and were analyzed in this study. The mean MBL was 0.47 mm and 0.15 mm in the EC and IC implants, respectively, which was a statistically significant difference ( P <0.001). Comparisons according to splinting (MBL of single implants: 0.34 mm, MBL of splinted implants: 0.31 mm, P =0.676) and cement use (MBL of cemented implants: 0.27 mm, MBL of non-cemented implants: 0.35 mm, P =0.178) showed no statistically significant differences in MBL, regardless of the implant connection type. IC implants showed a more favorable bone response regarding MBL in posterior areas without peri-implantitis or periodontal disease.

  5. Optical and Electrical Properties of Ar+ Implanted PET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rajiv; Shekhawat, Nidhi; Sharma, Annu; Aggarwal, Sanjeev; Kumar, Praveen; Kanjilal, D.

    2011-07-01

    In the present work, the effect of 100 keV argon ion implantation on the optical and electrical properties of PET has been studied. A continuous reduction in optical band gap (from 3.63 to 1.93 eV) with increasing implantation dose has been observed as analyzed using UV-Visible absorption spectroscopy. Current-Voltage (I-V) characteristics have been studied which clearly indicate the enhancement in the conductivity of PET specimens as an effect of implantation. This increase in conductivity has been correlated with the decrease in optical band gap.

  6. Electrochemical investigations of ion-implanted oxide films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultze, J.W.; Danzfuss, B.; Meyer, O.; Stimming, U.

    1985-01-01

    Oxide films (passive films) of 40-50 nm thickness were prepared by anodic polarization of hafnium and titanium electrodes up to 20 V. Multiple-energy ion implantation of palladium, iron and xenon was used in order to obtain modified films with constant concentration profiles of the implanted ions. Rutherford backscattering, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements and electrochemical charging curves prove the presence of implanted ions, but electrochemical and photoelectrochemical measurements indicate that the dominating effect of ion implantation is the disordering of the oxide film. The capacity of hafnium electrodes increases as a result of an increase in the dielectric constant D. For titanium the Schottky-Mott analysis shows that ion implantation causes an increase in D and the donor concentration N. Additional electronic states in the band gap which are created by the implantation improve the conductivity of the semiconducting or insulating films. This is seen in the enhancement of electron transfer reactions and its disappearance during repassivation and annealing. Energy changes in the band gap are derived from photoelectrochemical measurements; the absorption edge of hafnium oxide films decreases by approximately 2 eV because of ion implantation, but it stays almost constant for titanium oxide films. All changes in electrochemical behavior caused by ion implantation show little variation with the nature of the implanted ion. Hence the dominating effect seems to be a disordering of the oxide. (Auth.)

  7. Breast Reconstruction with Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your surgical options and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of implant-based reconstruction, and may show you ... Policy Notice of Privacy Practices Notice of Nondiscrimination Advertising Mayo Clinic is a not-for-profit organization ...

  8. Ion Implantation of Polymers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Popok, Vladimir

    2012-01-01

    The current paper presents a state-of-the-art review in the field of ion implantation of polymers. Numerous published studies of polymers modified by ion beams are analysed. General aspects of ion stopping, latent track formation and changes of structure and composition of organic materials...... are discussed. Related to that, the effects of radiothermolysis, degassing and carbonisation are considered. Specificity of depth distributions of implanted into polymers impurities is analysed and the case of high-fluence implantation is emphasised. Within rather broad topic of ion bombardment, the focus...... is put on the low-energy implantation of metal ions causing the nucleation and growth of nanoparticles in the shallow polymer layers. Electrical, optical and magnetic properties of metal/polymer composites are under the discussion and the approaches towards practical applications are overviewed....

  9. Precipitation processes in implanted materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borders, J.A.

    1978-01-01

    Ion implantation is a nonequilibrium process. It is possible to implant materials with impurities to concentration levels which exceed the solid solubilities. The return of the system to thermodynamic equilibrium is often accomplished by precipitation of the implanted species or a compound involving atoms of both the host and the implanted species. This may involve long time scales when taking place at room temperature or it may take place during the implantation

  10. Ion implantation for semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grey-Morgan, T.

    1995-01-01

    Full text: Over the past two decades, thousands of particle accelerators have been used to implant foreign atoms like boron, phosphorus and arsenic into silicon crystal wafers to produce special embedded layers for manufacturing semiconductor devices. Depending on the device required, the atomic species, the depth of implant and doping levels are the main parameters for the implantation process; the selection and parameter control is totally automated. The depth of the implant, usually less than 1 micron, is determined by the ion energy, which can be varied between 2 and 600 keV. The ion beam is extracted from a Freeman or Bernas type ion source and accelerated to 60 keV before mass analysis. For higher beam energies postacceleration is applied up to 200 keV and even higher energies can be achieved by mass selecting multiplycharged ions, but with a corresponding reduction in beam output. Depending on the device to be manufactured, doping levels can range from 10 10 to 10 15 atoms/cm 2 and are controlled by implanter beam currents in the range up to 30mA; continuous process monitoring ensures uniformity across the wafer of better than 1 % . As semiconductor devices get smaller, additional sophistication is required in the design of the implanter. The silicon wafers charge electrically during implantation and this charge must be dissipated continuously to reduce the electrical stress in the device and avoid destructive electrical breakdown. Electron flood guns produce low energy electrons (below 10 electronvolts) to neutralize positive charge buildup and implanter design must ensure minimum contamination by other isotopic species and ensure low internal sputter rates. The pace of technology in the semiconductor industry is such that implanters are being built now for 256 Megabit circuits but which are only likely to be widely available five years from now. Several specialist companies manufacture implanter systems, each costing around US$5 million, depending on the

  11. Estudio de técnicas de análisis y clasificación de señales EEG en el contexto de sistemas BCI (Brain Computer Interface)

    OpenAIRE

    Henríquez Muñoz, Claudia Nureibis

    2014-01-01

    Máster universitario en Investigación e Innovación en TIC. Las Interfaces Cerebro Computador (BCI) son una tecnología basada en la adquisición y procesamiento de señales cerebrales para el control de diversos dispositivos. Su objetivo principal es proporcionar un nuevo canal de salida al cerebro del usuario que requiere un control adaptativo voluntario. Usualmente los BCI se enfocan en reconocer eventos que son adquiridos por métodos como el Electroencefalograma (EEG). Dicho...

  12. Ion implantation - an introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Townsend, P.D.

    1986-01-01

    Ion implantation is a widely used technique with a literature that covers semiconductor production, surface treatments of steels, corrosion resistance, catalysis and integrated optics. This brief introduction outlines advantages of the technique, some aspects of the underlying physics and examples of current applications. Ion implantation is already an essential part of semiconductor technology while in many other areas it is still in an early stage of development. The future scope of the subject is discussed. (author)

  13. Electrodeposited silk coatings for functionalized implant applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elia, Roberto

    The mechanical and morphological properties of titanium as well as its biocompatibility and osteoinductive characteristics have made it the material of choice for dental implant systems. Although the success rate of titanium implants exceeds 90% in healthy individuals, a large subset of the population has one or more risk factors that inhibit implant integration. Treatments and coatings have been developed to improve clinical outcomes via introduction of appropriate surface topography, texture and roughness or incorporation of bioactive molecules. It is essential that the coatings and associated deposition techniques are controllable and reproducible. Currently, methods of depositing functional coatings are dictated by numerous parameters (temperature, particle size distribution, pH and voltage), which result in variable coating thickness, strength, porosity and weight, and hinder or preclude biomolecule incorporation. Silk is a highly versatile protein with a unique combination of mechanical and physical properties, including tunable degradation, biocompatibility, drug stabilizing capabilities and mechanical properties. Most recently an electrogelation technique was developed which allows for the deposition of gels which dry seamlessly over the contoured topography of the conductive substrate. In this work we examine the potential use of silk electrogels as mechanically robust implant coatings capable of sequestering and releasing therapeutic agents. Electrodeposition of silk electrogels formed in uniform electric fields was characterized with respect to field intensity and deposition time. Gel formation kinetics were used to derive functions which allowed for the prediction of coating deposition over a range of process and solution parameters. Silk electrogel growth orientation was shown to be influenced by the applied electric field. Coatings were reproducible and tunable via intrinsic silk solution properties and extrinsic process parameters. Adhesion was

  14. Contraceptive implants: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rowlands S

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Sam Rowlands,1,2 Stephen Searle3 1Centre of Postgraduate Medical Research and Education, School of Health and Social Care, Bournemouth University, Bournemouth, United Kingdom; 2Dorset HealthCare, Bournemouth, United Kingdom; 3Sexual Health Services, Chesterfield, United KingdomAbstract: Progestin-only contraceptive implants are a highly cost-effective form of long-acting reversible contraception. They are the most effective reversible contraceptives and are of a similar effectiveness to sterilization. Pregnancies are rare in women using this method of contraception, and those that do occur must be fully investigated, with an ultrasound scan of the arm and serum etonogestrel level if the implant cannot be located. There are very few contraindications to use of implants, and they have an excellent safety profile. Both acceptability and continuation with the method are high. Noncontraceptive benefits include improvements in dysmenorrhea, ovulatory pain, and endometriosis. Problematic bleeding is a relatively common adverse effect that must be covered in preinsertion information-giving and supported adequately if it occurs. Recognized training for both insertion and removal should be undertaken. Care needs to be taken at both insertion and removal to avoid neurovascular injury. Implants should always be palpable; if they are not, noninsertion should be assumed until disproven. Etonogestrel implants are now radiopaque, which aids localization. Anticipated difficult removals should be performed by specially trained experts. Keywords: contraceptive, subdermal implant, etonogestrel, levonorgestrel, progestin-only, long-acting reversible contraception

  15. Anodized dental implant surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Kumar Mishra

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Anodized implants with moderately rough surface were introduced around 2000. Whether these implants enhanced biologic effect to improve the environment for better osseointegration was unclear. The purpose of this article was to review the literature available on anodized surface in terms of their clinical success rate and bone response in patients till now. Materials and Methods: A broad electronic search of MEDLINE and PubMed databases was performed. A focus was made on peer-reviewed dental journals. Only articles related to anodized implants were included. Both animal and human studies were included. Results: The initial search of articles resulted in 581 articles on anodized implants. The initial screening of titles and abstracts resulted in 112 full-text papers; 40 animal studies, 16 studies on cell adhesion and bacterial adhesion onto anodized surfaced implants, and 47 human studies were included. Nine studies, which do not fulfill the inclusion criteria, were excluded. Conclusions: The long-term studies on anodized surface implants do favor the surface, but in most of the studies, anodized surface is compared with that of machined surface, but not with other surfaces commercially available. Anodized surface in terms of clinical success rate in cases of compromised bone and immediately extracted sockets has shown favorable success.

  16. Plasma source ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conrad, J.R.; Forest, C.

    1986-01-01

    The authors' technique allows the ion implantation to be performed directly within the ion source at higher currents without ion beam extraction and transport. The potential benefits include greatly increased production rates (factors of 10-1000) and the ability to implant non-planar targets without rastering or shadowing. The technique eliminates the ion extractor grid set, beam raster equipment, drift space and target manipulator equipment. The target to be implanted is placed directly within the plasma source and is biased to a large negative potential so that plasma ions gain energy as they accelerate through the potential drop across the sheath that forms at the plasma boundary. Because the sheath surrounds the target on all sides, all surfaces of the target are implanted without the necessity to raster the beam or to rotate the target. The authors have succeeded in implanting nitrogen ions in a silicon target to the depths and concentrations required for surface treatment of materials like stainless steel and titanium alloys. They have performed ESCA measurements of the penetration depth profile of a silicon target that was biased to 30 kV in a nitrogen discharge plasma. Nitrogen ions were implanted to a depth of 700A at a peak concentration of 30% atomic. The measured profile is quite similar to a previously obtained profile in titanium targets with conventional techniques

  17. Spectral feature extraction of EEG signals and pattern recognition during mental tasks of 2-D cursor movements for BCI using SVM and ANN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bascil, M Serdar; Tesneli, Ahmet Y; Temurtas, Feyzullah

    2016-09-01

    Brain computer interface (BCI) is a new communication way between man and machine. It identifies mental task patterns stored in electroencephalogram (EEG). So, it extracts brain electrical activities recorded by EEG and transforms them machine control commands. The main goal of BCI is to make available assistive environmental devices for paralyzed people such as computers and makes their life easier. This study deals with feature extraction and mental task pattern recognition on 2-D cursor control from EEG as offline analysis approach. The hemispherical power density changes are computed and compared on alpha-beta frequency bands with only mental imagination of cursor movements. First of all, power spectral density (PSD) features of EEG signals are extracted and high dimensional data reduced by principle component analysis (PCA) and independent component analysis (ICA) which are statistical algorithms. In the last stage, all features are classified with two types of support vector machine (SVM) which are linear and least squares (LS-SVM) and three different artificial neural network (ANN) structures which are learning vector quantization (LVQ), multilayer neural network (MLNN) and probabilistic neural network (PNN) and mental task patterns are successfully identified via k-fold cross validation technique.

  18. Index finger motor imagery EEG pattern recognition in BCI applications using dictionary cleaned sparse representation-based classification for healthy people

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Minmin; Zeng, Hong; Wang, Aimin; Zhao, Fengkui; Liu, Feixiang

    2017-09-01

    Electroencephalogram (EEG)-based motor imagery (MI) brain-computer interface (BCI) has shown its effectiveness for the control of rehabilitation devices designed for large body parts of the patients with neurologic impairments. In order to validate the feasibility of using EEG to decode the MI of a single index finger and constructing a BCI-enhanced finger rehabilitation system, we collected EEG data during right hand index finger MI and rest state for five healthy subjects and proposed a pattern recognition approach for classifying these two mental states. First, Fisher's linear discriminant criteria and power spectral density analysis were used to analyze the event-related desynchronization patterns. Second, both band power and approximate entropy were extracted as features. Third, aiming to eliminate the abnormal samples in the dictionary and improve the classification performance of the conventional sparse representation-based classification (SRC) method, we proposed a novel dictionary cleaned sparse representation-based classification (DCSRC) method for final classification. The experimental results show that the proposed DCSRC method gives better classification accuracies than SRC and an average classification accuracy of 81.32% is obtained for five subjects. Thus, it is demonstrated that single right hand index finger MI can be decoded from the sensorimotor rhythms, and the feature patterns of index finger MI and rest state can be well recognized for robotic exoskeleton initiation.

  19. Classification of EEG-P300 Signals Extracted from Brain Activities in BCI Systems Using ν-SVM and BLDA Algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali MOMENNEZHAD

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a linear predictive coding (LPC model is used to improve classification accuracy, convergent speed to maximum accuracy, and maximum bitrates in brain computer interface (BCI system based on extracting EEG-P300 signals. First, EEG signal is filtered in order to eliminate high frequency noise. Then, the parameters of filtered EEG signal are extracted using LPC model. Finally, the samples are reconstructed by LPC coefficients and two classifiers, a Bayesian Linear discriminant analysis (BLDA, and b the υ-support vector machine (υ-SVM are applied in order to classify. The proposed algorithm performance is compared with fisher linear discriminant analysis (FLDA. Results show that the efficiency of our algorithm in improving classification accuracy and convergent speed to maximum accuracy are much better. As example at the proposed algorithms, respectively BLDA with LPC model and υ-SVM with LPC model with8 electrode configuration for subject S1 the total classification accuracy is improved as 9.4% and 1.7%. And also, subject 7 at BLDA and υ-SVM with LPC model algorithms (LPC+BLDA and LPC+ υ-SVM after block 11th converged to maximum accuracy but Fisher Linear Discriminant Analysis (FLDA algorithm did not converge to maximum accuracy (with the same configuration. So, it can be used as a promising tool in designing BCI systems.

  20. Developing a Research Instrument to Document Awareness, Knowledge, and Attitudes Regarding Breast Cancer and Early Detection Techniques for Pakistani Women: The Breast Cancer Inventory (BCI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naqvi, Atta Abbas; Zehra, Fatima; Ahmad, Rizwan; Ahmad, Niyaz

    2016-12-09

    There is a general hesitation in participation among Pakistani women when it comes to giving their responses in surveys related to breast cancer which may be due to the associated stigma and conservatism in society. We felt that no research instrument was able to extract information from the respondents to the extent it was needed for the successful execution of our study. The need to develop a research instrument tailored for Pakistani women was based upon the fact that most Pakistani women come from a conservative background and sometimes view this topic as provocative and believe discussing publicly about it as inappropriate. Existing research instruments exhibited a number of weaknesses during literature review. Therefore, using them may not be able to extract information concretely. A research instrument was, thus, developed exclusively. It was coined as, "breast cancer inventory (BCI)" by a panel of experts for executing a study aimed at documenting awareness, knowledge, and attitudes of Pakistani women regarding breast cancer and early detection techniques. The study is still in the data collection phase. The statistical analysis involved the Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin (KMO) measure and Bartlett's test for sampling adequacy. In addition, reliability analysis and exploratory factor analysis (EFA) were, also employed. This concept paper focuses on the development, piloting and validation of the BCI. It is the first research instrument which has high acceptability among Pakistani women and is able to extract adequate information from the respondents without causing embarrassment or unease.

  1. Immediate implant placement into fresh extraction sockets versus delayed implants into healed sockets: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mello, C C; Lemos, C A A; Verri, F R; Dos Santos, D M; Goiato, M C; Pellizzer, E P

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to compare the survival rate of the implants and the peri-implant tissue changes associated with implants inserted in fresh extraction sockets and those inserted in healed sockets. This review has been registered at PROSPERO under the number CRD42016043309. A systematic search was conducted by two reviewers independently in the databases PubMed/MEDLINE, Embase, and the Cochrane Library using different search terms; articles published until November 2016 were searched for. The searches identified 30 eligible studies. A total of 3,049 implants were installed in a total of 1,435 patients with a mean age of 46.68 years and a minimum of 6 months of follow-up. The survival rate of delayed implants (98.38%) was significantly greater than immediate implants (95.21%) (p=.001). For the marginal bone loss (p=.32), implant stability quotients values (p=.44), and pocket probing depth (p=.94) there was no significant difference between the analysed groups. The immediate implants placed in fresh sockets should be performed with caution because of the significantly lower survival rates than delayed implants inserted in healed sockets. Copyright © 2017 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Short dental implants: an emerging concept in implant treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hashedi, Ashwaq Ali; Taiyeb Ali, Tara Bai; Yunus, Norsiah

    2014-06-01

    Short implants have been advocated as a treatment option in many clinical situations where the use of conventional implants is limited. This review outlines the effectiveness and clinical outcomes of using short implants as a valid treatment option in the rehabilitation of edentulous atrophic alveolar ridges. Initially, an electronic search was performed on the following databases: Medline, PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and DARE using key words from January 1990 until May 2012. An additional hand search was included for the relevant articles in the following journals: International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Implants, Clinical Oral Implants Research, Journal of Clinical Periodontology, International Journal of Periodontics, Journal of Periodontology, and Clinical Implant Dentistry and Related Research. Any relevant papers from the journals' references were hand searched. Articles were included if they provided detailed data on implant length, reported survival rates, mentioned measures for implant failure, were in the English language, involved human subjects, and researched implants inserted in healed atrophic ridges with a follow-up period of at least 1 year after implant-prosthesis loading. Short implants demonstrated a high rate of success in the replacement of missing teeth in especially atrophic alveolar ridges. The advanced technology and improvement of the implant surfaces have encouraged the success of short implants to a comparable level to that of standard implants. However, further randomized controlled clinical trials and prospective studies with longer follow-up periods are needed.

  3. Personalized hip implants manufacturing and testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croitoru, A. Sorin Mihai; Pacioga, B. Adrian; Comsa, C. Stanca

    2017-09-01

    Two models of Ti6Al4V personalized femoral stems for hip replacement have been designed and laser sintered with different sizes of fenestrated architecture that mimics the natural structure of bone, ensuring postoperative bone ingrowth and increasing the elasticity of the entire structure. They were tested statically and dynamically versus a commercial femoral stem. Mechanical tests were performed in order to determine the fatigue limit using the Locati method. The tests were conducted in a thermostatic bath (37°±1°) with the implants immersed in distilled water salted solution 0.91%. For probe embedment poly-methyl methacrylate (PMMA) was used. The characteristic curves of the two personalized fenestrated implants reveal an elastic behaviour by their nonlinear appearance. After dynamic tests an inverse relationship between displacements obtained in the static tests and the fatigue limit was observed. Large fenestrations conferred the desired elasticity to the implant, but contributed to a life service reduction. The fatigue limit for both implants was much above the minimum value specified by ISO 7602: 2010, so both models can be safely used in the medical practice, leading to increased life service of implants.

  4. [Esthetic analysis on immediate single-tooth implant restoration in anterior maxilla].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shao-wei; Wang, Guo-shi; Sha, Yan-zhi

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate the esthetic outcomes of immediate single-tooth implant restoration in anterior maxilla with the pink esthetic score (PES). Nine patients were treated with 9 Straumann implants by immediate single-tooth implant restoration in anterior maxilla. Assessment of PES after crown placement at 1 week (baseline) and 6 months after implantation was conducted. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS 16.0 software package. Nine implants achieved a retention rate of 100%. PES for single-tooth implant was 10.33 ± 1.50 at 1 week and 11.44 ± 0.88 at 6 months after crown placement. The difference was significant(P=0.021). This study indicates that immediate single-tooth implant restoration in anterior maxilla is predictable. Immediate single-tooth implantation can result in good clinical esthetic results in most patients with single-tooth missing in anterior maxilla.

  5. Comparison of Subgingival and Peri-implant Microbiome in Chronic Periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qian; Qin, Xue Yan; Jiang, Wei Peng; Zheng, Hui; Xu, Xin Li; Chen, Feng

    2015-09-01

    To analyse the microbia composition of 10 healthy dental implants and 10 chronic periodontitis patients. Subgingival plaque and peri-implant biofilm were sampled at the first molar site before and after implant restoration. The analysis was conducted by 454-prosequencing of bacterial V1 to V3 regions of 16S rDNA. Chronic periodontitis subjects showed greater bacterial diversity compared with implant subjects. The relative abundance of sixteen genera and twelve species differed significantly between implant and chronic periodontitis subjects. The genera Catonella, Desulfovibrio, Mogibacterium, Peptostreptococcus and Propionibacterium were present in higher abundance in chronic periodontitis subjects, while implant subjects had higher proportions of Brevundimonas and Pseudomonas species. Our results demonstrate that implant restoration changes the oral microbiota. The analysis suggests that periodontal bacteria can remain for a prolonged period of time at non-dental sites, from where they can colonise the peri-implant.

  6. Electrical properties of polymer modified by metal ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Yuguang; Zhang Tonghe; Zhang Huixing; Zhang Xiaoji; Deng Zhiwei; Zhou Gu

    2000-01-01

    Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) has been modified by Ag, Cr, Cu and Si ion implantation with a dose range from 1x10 16 to 2x10 17 ions cm -2 using a metal vapor vacuum arc (MEVVA) source. The electrical properties of PET have been changed after metal ion implantation. The resistivity of implanted PET decreased obviously with an increase of ion dose. When metal ion dose of 2x10 17 cm -2 was selected, the resistivity of PET could be less than 10 Ω cm, but when Si ions are implanted, the resistivity of PET would be up to several hundred Ω cm. The results show that the conductive behavior of a metal ion implanted sample is obviously different from Si implantation one. The changes of the structure and composition have been observed with transmission electron microscope (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The surface structure is varying after ion implantation and it is believed that the change would cause the improvement of the conductive properties. The mechanism of electrical conduction will be discussed

  7. The efficacy of short (6 mm) dental implants with a novel thread design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechara, Soheil; Nimčenko, Tatjana; Kubilius, Ričardas

    2017-01-01

    To assess efficacy of short (6 mm) implants with a novel macrostructure and thread design placed in a compromised bone situations of edentulous posterior regions of maxilla (3-4 mm of bone height under sinus floor) as compared to results of clinical situations treated with simultaneous maxillary sinus grafting and placement of long (≥10 mm) implants of the same company. Clinical cases of conducted clinical study. Patients with compromised bone height in edentulous posterior regions of maxilla were randomly divided into two groups. Short (6mm length) implant treatment conducted in the test group and simultaneous sinus lift with standard length implant placement treatment in the control group. In general implant stability quotient (ISQ) and marginal bone level (MBL) changes values in both groups were comparable. However, significant negative correlation was found between implant's diameter and MBL changes. Implant's length has little if none impact on initial implant anchorage, especially in greatly compromised residual bone situations. Results have confirmed that implant initial stability mainly depends on implant's macro-design and further its development on implant's micro-design: namely, implant diameter rather than length, tapered shape and improved thread design determines primarily acquired mechanical anchorage, while bioactive surface treatment ensures development of biological stability.

  8. PIP breast implant removal: a study of 828 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oulharj, S; Pauchot, J; Tropet, Y

    2014-03-01

    In March, 2010, the French Health Products Safety Agency suspended the sale of prefilled silicone breast implants manufactured by Poly Implants Prosthèse Prothese (PIP) because of a high failure rate and the use of an inappropriate silicone gel that did not comply with CE marking. These findings led to an international medical crisis. In France, 30,000 female patients had PIP implants. In our Department, 1150 PIP breast implants had been implanted in 630 patients since 2001. A retrospective study was conducted to define the rupture rate of these implants and the complications that arise. The women included in the study underwent implant removal from May 2010 to September 2012 for preventive or curative reasons. Data were collected from medical records that included: results of clinical examination, breast ultrasound before removal, rates of implant rupture, results of biopsy of periprosthetic capsule and pericapsule tissue and postoperative complications. A total of 828 PIP breast implants were removed in 455 patients. The rate of ruptured implants was 7.73% (64/828), corresponding to 11.6% of patients. A periprosthetic effusion was associated with rupture in 44% of cases. Breast ultrasound indicated a rupture for 87 implants; 32% were true positives and 3% were false negatives. Periprosthetic capsule biopsy demonstrated the presence of a foreign body, which seemed to be silicone, in 26% of cases and the presence of inflammation in 13% of cases. No siliconoma-type lesion was identified in the pericapsular tissue at biopsy. A total of 14 implants presented perspiration at removal. A statistically significant difference was found between the rates of rupture for texturised implants as compared to the smooth-surfaced implants. There were eight post-revisional-surgery complications (1%) and three cases of breast adenocarcinoma. The preventive explantation of PIP breast implants is justified given the high failure rate (7.73%) and given patients' exposure to silicone

  9. Simulation of peri-implant bone healing due to immediate loading in dental implant treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Hsuan-Yu; Müftü, Sinan

    2013-03-15

    The goal of this work was to investigate the role of immediate loading on the peri-implant bone healing in dental implant treatments. A mechano-regulatory tissue differentiation model that takes into account the stimuli through the solid and the fluid components of the healing tissue, and the diffusion of pluripotent stem cells into the healing callus was used. A two-dimensional axisymmetric model consisting of a dental implant, the healing callus tissue and the host bone tissue was constructed for the finite element analysis. Poroelastic material properties were assigned to the healing callus and the bone tissue. The effects of micro-motion, healing callus size, and implant thread design on the length of the bone-to-implant contact (BIC) and the bone volume (BV) formed in the healing callus were investigated. In general, the analysis predicted formation of a continuous layer of soft tissue along the faces of the implant which are parallel to the loading direction. This was predicted to be correlated with the high levels of distortional strain transferred through the solid component of the stimulus. It was also predicted that the external threads on the implant, redistribute the interfacial load, thus help reduce the high distortional stimulus and also help the cells to differentiate to bone tissue. In addition, the region underneath the implant apex was predicted to experience high fluid stimulus that results in the development of soft tissue. The relationship between the variables considered in this study and the outcome measures, BV and BIC, was found to be highly nonlinear. A three-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) of the results was conducted and it showed that micro-motion presents the largest hindrance to bone formation during healing. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. [Bilateral cochlear implants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, J

    2017-07-01

    Cochlear implants (CI) are standard for the hearing rehabilitation of severe to profound deafness. Nowadays, if bilaterally indicated, bilateral implantation is usually recommended (in accordance with German guidelines). Bilateral implantation enables better speech discrimination in quiet and in noise, and restores directional and spatial hearing. Children with bilateral CI are able to undergo hearing-based hearing and speech development. Within the scope of their individual possibilities, bilaterally implanted children develop faster than children with unilateral CI and attain, e.g., a larger vocabulary within a certain time interval. Only bilateral implantation allows "binaural hearing," with all the benefits that people with normal hearing profit from, namely: better speech discrimination in quiet and in noise, as well as directional and spatial hearing. Naturally, the developments take time. Binaural CI users benefit from the same effects as normal hearing persons: head shadow effect, squelch effect, and summation and redundancy effects. Sequential CI fitting is not necessarily disadvantageous-both simultaneously and sequentially fitted patients benefit in a similar way. For children, earliest possible fitting and shortest possible interval between the two surgeries seems to positively influence the outcome if bilateral CI are indicated.

  11. Psychological intervention following implantation of an implantable defibrillator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Susanne S.; van den Broek, Krista C; Sears, Samuel F

    2007-01-01

    The medical benefits of the implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) are unequivocal, but a subgroup of patients experiences emotional difficulties following implantation. For this subgroup, some form of psychological intervention may be warranted. This review provides an overview of current ...

  12. Doping of silicon carbide by ion implantation; Dopage du carbure de silicium par implantation ionique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gimbert, J

    1999-03-04

    It appeared that in some fields, as the hostile environments (high temperature or irradiation), the silicon compounds showed limitations resulting from the electrical and mechanical properties. Doping of 4H and 6H silicon carbide by ion implantation is studied from a physicochemical and electrical point of view. It is necessary to obtain n-type and p-type material to realize high power and/or high frequency devices, such as MESFETs and Schottky diodes. First, physical and electrical properties of silicon carbide are presented and the interest of developing a process technology on this material is emphasised. Then, physical characteristics of ion implantation and particularly classical dopant implantation, such as nitrogen, for n-type doping, and aluminium and boron, for p-type doping are described. Results with these dopants are presented and analysed. Optimal conditions are extracted from these experiences so as to obtain a good crystal quality and a surface state allowing device fabrication. Electrical conduction is then described in the 4H and 6H-SiC polytypes. Freezing of free carriers and scattering processes are described. Electrical measurements are carried out using Hall effect on Van der Panw test patterns, and 4 point probe method are used to draw the type of the material, free carrier concentrations, resistivity and mobility of the implanted doped layers. These results are commented and compared to the theoretical analysis. The influence of the technological process on electrical conduction is studied in view of fabricating implanted silicon carbide devices. (author)

  13. Management of peri-implantitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayachandran Prathapachandran

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Peri-implantitis is a site-specific infectious disease that causes an inflammatory process in soft tissues, and bone loss around an osseointegrated implant in function. The etiology of the implant infection is conditioned by the status of the tissue surrounding the implant, implant design, degree of roughness, external morphology, and excessive mechanical load. The microorganisms most commonly associated with implant failure are spirochetes and mobile forms of Gram-negative anaerobes, unless the origin is the result of simple mechanical overload. Diagnosis is based on changes of color in the gingiva, bleeding and probing depth of peri-implant pockets, suppuration, X-ray, and gradual loss of bone height around the tooth. Treatment will differ depending upon whether it is a case of peri-implant mucositis or peri-implantitis. The management of implant infection should be focused on the control of infection, the detoxification of the implant surface, and regeneration of the alveolar bone. This review article deals with the various treatment options in the management of peri-implantitis. The article also gives a brief description of the etiopathogenesis, clinical features, and diagnosis of peri-implantitis.

  14. Reevaluation of the indications for permanent pacemaker implantation after transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerre Thygesen, Julie; Loh, Poay Huan; Cholteesupachai, Jiranut

    2014-01-01

    AIMS: Conduction abnormalities (CA) requiring permanent pacemaker (PPM) are a well-known complication after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). This study aimed to determine the incidence of TAVI-related PPM and reevaluate the indications for PPM after the periprocedural period. METHO...

  15. Ion implantation control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gault, R. B.; Keutzer, L. L.

    1985-01-01

    A control system is disclosed for an ion implantation system of the type in which the wafers to be implanted are mounted around the periphery of a disk which rotates and also moves in a radial direction relative to an ion beam to expose successive sections of each wafer to the radiation. The control system senses beam current which passes through one or more apertures in the disk and is collected by a Faraday cup. This current is integrated to obtain a measure of charge which is compared with a calculated value based upon the desired ion dosage and other parameters. The resultant controls the number of incremental steps the rotating disk moves radially to expose the adjacent sections of each wafer. This process is continued usually with two or more traverses until the entire surface of each wafer has been implanted with the proper ion dosage

  16. Implantation for tribological applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leutenecker, R.; Cao-Minh, U.; Overbeck, R.

    1992-08-01

    Empirical results on the strength enhancement of steels by N- and B-implantation should be explained from a materials science point of view. The methods applied were X-ray diffractometry and element depth profiling. The investigations of N-implanted steels focussed on the nitride formation in selected model materials and, with respect to applications, in: X90 CrMoV and S 6-5-2 tool steels, austenite X10 CrNiTi189 as well as in hard chromium plates. Main topic in B-implanted steels were the transformations: crystalline Fe-phase - amorphous Fe-B-phase - crystalline boride phases. The result is an improvement in process control by first an insight into the strength enhancing mechanisms and second in into their generation depending on the materials microstructure and the process parameter. (orig.). 101 figs., 16 tabs., 15 refs [de

  17. Dental implants: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillaume, B

    2016-12-01

    A high number of patients have one or more missing tooth and it is estimated that one in four American subjects over the age of 74 have lost all their natural teeth. Many options exist to replace missing teeth but dental implants have become one of the most used biomaterial to replace one (or more) missing tooth over the last decades. Contemporary dental implants made with titanium have been proven safe and effective in large series of patients. This review considers the main historical facts concerned with dental implants and present the different critical factors that will ensure a good osseo-integration that will ensure a stable prosthesis anchorage. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Low permanent pacemaker rates following Lotus device implantation for transcatheter aortic valve replacement due to modified implantation protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krackhardt, Florian; Kherad, Behrouz; Krisper, Maximilian; Pieske, Burkert; Laule, Michael; Tschöpe, Carsten

    2017-01-01

    Conduction disturbances requiring permanent pacemaker implantation following transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) are a common problem. Pacemaker implantation rates after TAVR appear to be higher compared to conventional aortic valve replacement. The aim of this study was to analyze whether a high annulus implantation conveys the benefit of a decreased rate of permanent pacemaker implantation while being safe and successful according to Valve Academic Research Consortium 2 (VARC2)-criteria. A total of 23 patients with symptomatic severe aortic valve stenosis, an aortic annulus of 19-27 mm and at high risk for surgery were treated with the Lotus valve. In all patients the valve was implanted in a high annulus position via femoral access. The primary device performance endpoint was VARC2-defined device success after 30 days and the primary safety endpoint was the need for permanent pacemaker implantation. The mean age was 73.23 ± 7.65 years, 46% were female, 38% were New York Heart Association class III/IV at baseline. Thirty-day follow-up data were available for all patients. The VARC2-defined device success rate after 30 days was 22/23 (96%). 2/21 (10%) patients required a newly implanted pacemaker due to 3rd degree atrioventricular block. 25% of the patients developed a new left bundle branch block after valvuloplasty or device implantation. 21 of the 23 patients (96%) had no other signs of conduction disturbances after 30 days. The approach of the modified implantation technique of Lotus TAVR device was safe and effective. The incidence of need for a permanent pacemaker following TAVR could be significantly reduced due to adopted implantation protocol.

  19. Tribology of implantation bilayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pivin, J.C.

    1989-01-01

    The mechanical behaviour of implantation films must be analysed in terms of bilayer rheology (laws of mechanical behaviour). Tribology takes into account thermodynamical, chemical and metallurgical parameters to interpret the friction properties of a system as a whole. One can distinguish between alloying effects of ion implantation and structural modifications. Alloying affects the basic properties of the crystal: elasticity, cohesion, mobility of planar defects, and its surface electronic structure, which determines the reactivity with the atmosphere or the friction counterpart (adhesion). Radiation damage and phase changes act more particularly on the modes of gliding and climbing of dislocations, and fracture mechanisms. 105 refs.; 11 figs.; 1 table

  20. [Tinnitus and implants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Despreaux, G; Tison, P; Van Den Abbeele, T; Moine, A; Frachet, B

    1990-01-01

    The experience with cochlear implantation at Avicenne hospital prompted us to carry out a retrospective study on tinnitus in a population of operated patients. Improvement or disappearance of the symptoms was noted in all cases. These results, which partly match those found in the literature, are probably produced by rehabilitation inhibiting the "deafferentation" mechanisms in analogy with pain phenomena. In some precise cases, which are described, they led us to proposing implantation even though the main, if not sole, complaint of the patient was tinnitus.

  1. Recent advances in dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Do Gia Khang; Oh, Ji-Hyeon

    2017-12-01

    Dental implants are a common treatment for the loss of teeth. This paper summarizes current knowledge on implant surfaces, immediate loading versus conventional loading, short implants, sinus lifting, and custom implants using three-dimensional printing. Most of the implant surface modifications showed good osseointegration results. Regarding biomolecular coatings, which have been recently developed and studied, good results were observed in animal experiments. Immediate loading had similar clinical outcomes compared to conventional loading and can be used as a successful treatment because it has the advantage of reducing treatment times and providing early function and aesthetics. Short implants showed similar clinical outcomes compared to standard implants. A variety of sinus augmentation techniques, grafting materials, and alternative techniques, such as tilted implants, zygomatic implants, and short implants, can be used. With the development of new technologies in three-dimension and computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) customized implants can be used as an alternative to conventional implant designs. However, there are limitations due to the lack of long-term studies or clinical studies. A long-term clinical trial and a more predictive study are needed.

  2. Untreated silicone breast implant rupture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hölmich, Lisbet R; Vejborg, Ilse M; Conrad, Carsten

    2004-01-01

    Implant rupture is a well-known complication of breast implant surgery that can pass unnoticed by both patient and physician. To date, no prospective study has addressed the possible health implications of silicone breast implant rupture. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether untre...

  3. A comparative study: use of a Brain-computer Interface (BCI) device by people with cerebral palsy in interaction with computers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidrich, Regina O; Jensen, Emely; Rebelo, Francisco; Oliveira, Tiago

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a comparative study among people with cerebral palsy and healthy controls, of various ages, using a Brain-computer Interface (BCI) device. The research is qualitative in its approach. Researchers worked with Observational Case Studies. People with cerebral palsy and healthy controls were evaluated in Portugal and in Brazil. The study aimed to develop a study for product evaluation in order to perceive whether people with cerebral palsy could interact with the computer and compare whether their performance is similar to that of healthy controls when using the Brain-computer Interface. Ultimately, it was found that there are no significant differences between people with cerebral palsy in the two countries, as well as between populations without cerebral palsy (healthy controls).

  4. Two-stage implant systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, M E

    1999-06-01

    Since the advent of osseointegration approximately 20 years ago, there has been a great deal of scientific data developed on two-stage integrated implant systems. Although these implants were originally designed primarily for fixed prostheses in the mandibular arch, they have been used in partially dentate patients, in patients needing overdentures, and in single-tooth restorations. In addition, this implant system has been placed in extraction sites, in bone-grafted areas, and in maxillary sinus elevations. Often, the documentation of these procedures has lagged. In addition, most of the reports use survival criteria to describe results, often providing overly optimistic data. It can be said that the literature describes a true adhesion of the epithelium to the implant similar to adhesion to teeth, that two-stage implants appear to have direct contact somewhere between 50% and 70% of the implant surface, that the microbial flora of the two-stage implant system closely resembles that of the natural tooth, and that the microbiology of periodontitis appears to be closely related to peri-implantitis. In evaluations of the data from implant placement in all of the above-noted situations by means of meta-analysis, it appears that there is a strong case that two-stage dental implants are successful, usually showing a confidence interval of over 90%. It also appears that the mandibular implants are more successful than maxillary implants. Studies also show that overdenture therapy is valid, and that single-tooth implants and implants placed in partially dentate mouths have a success rate that is quite good, although not quite as high as in the fully edentulous dentition. It would also appear that the potential causes of failure in the two-stage dental implant systems are peri-implantitis, placement of implants in poor-quality bone, and improper loading of implants. There are now data addressing modifications of the implant surface to alter the percentage of

  5. Analysis of submerged implant towards mastication load using 3D finite element method (FEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Widia Hafsyah Sumarlina Ritonga

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The surgical procedure for implantation of a surgical implant comprising a stage for the implant design nonsubmerged and two stages for submerged. Submerged implant design often used in Faculty of Dentistry Universitas Padjadjaran because it is safer in achieving osseointegration. This study was conducted to evaluate the failure of dental implant based on location and the value of internal tensiones as well as supporting tissues when given mastication load by using the 3D Finite Element Method (FEM. Methods: This study used a photograph of the mandibular CBCT patient and CT Scan Micro one implant submerged. Radiograph image was then converted into a digital model of the 3D computerized finite element, inputted the material properties, pedestal, then simulated the occlusion load  as much as 87N and 29N of frictional Results: The maximum tension location on the implant was located on the  exact side of the contact area between the implant and alveolar crest. The maximum tension value was 193.31MPa on the implant body. The value was below the limit value of the ability of the titanium alloy to withstand fracture (860 MPa. Conclusion: The location of the maximum tension on the body of the implant was located on the exact contact area between the implant-abutment and alveolar crest. Under the mastication load, this implant design found no failure.

  6. Semiconductor Ion Implanters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacKinnon, Barry A.; Ruffell, John P.

    2011-01-01

    In 1953 the Raytheon CK722 transistor was priced at $7.60. Based upon this, an Intel Xeon Quad Core processor containing 820,000,000 transistors should list at $6.2 billion! Particle accelerator technology plays an important part in the remarkable story of why that Intel product can be purchased today for a few hundred dollars. Most people of the mid twentieth century would be astonished at the ubiquity of semiconductors in the products we now buy and use every day. Though relatively expensive in the nineteen fifties they now exist in a wide range of items from high-end multicore microprocessors like the Intel product to disposable items containing 'only' hundreds or thousands like RFID chips and talking greeting cards. This historical development has been fueled by continuous advancement of the several individual technologies involved in the production of semiconductor devices including Ion Implantation and the charged particle beamlines at the heart of implant machines. In the course of its 40 year development, the worldwide implanter industry has reached annual sales levels around $2B, installed thousands of dedicated machines and directly employs thousands of workers. It represents in all these measures, as much and possibly more than any other industrial application of particle accelerator technology. This presentation discusses the history of implanter development. It touches on some of the people involved and on some of the developmental changes and challenges imposed as the requirements of the semiconductor industry evolved.

  7. Implantable enzyme amperometric biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotanen, Christian N; Moussy, Francis Gabriel; Carrara, Sandro; Guiseppi-Elie, Anthony

    2012-05-15

    The implantable enzyme amperometric biosensor continues as the dominant in vivo format for the detection, monitoring and reporting of biochemical analytes related to a wide range of pathologies. Widely used in animal studies, there is increasing emphasis on their use in diabetes care and management, the management of trauma-associated hemorrhage and in critical care monitoring by intensivists in the ICU. These frontier opportunities demand continuous indwelling performance for up to several years, well in excess of the currently approved seven days. This review outlines the many challenges to successful deployment of chronically implantable amperometric enzyme biosensors and emphasizes the emerging technological approaches in their continued development. The foreign body response plays a prominent role in implantable biotransducer failure. Topics considering the approaches to mitigate the inflammatory response, use of biomimetic chemistries, nanostructured topographies, drug eluting constructs, and tissue-to-device interface modulus matching are reviewed. Similarly, factors that influence biotransducer performance such as enzyme stability, substrate interference, mediator selection and calibration are reviewed. For the biosensor system, the opportunities and challenges of integration, guided by footprint requirements, the limitations of mixed signal electronics, and power requirements, has produced three systems approaches. The potential is great. However, integration along the multiple length scales needed to address fundamental issues and integration across the diverse disciplines needed to achieve success of these highly integrated systems, continues to be a challenge in the development and deployment of implantable amperometric enzyme biosensor systems. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. HA-Coated Implant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daugaard, Henrik; Søballe, Kjeld; Bechtold, Joan E

    2014-01-01

    of improving the fixation of implants. Of these, hydroxyapatite (HA) is the most widely used and most extensively investigated. HA is highly osseoconductive, and the positive effect is well documented in both basic and long-term clinical research [1–6]. This chapter describes experimental and clinical studies...

  9. Delayed breast implant reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvilsom, Gitte B.; Hölmich, Lisbet R.; Steding-Jessen, Marianne

    2011-01-01

    the period 1999 to 2006; 239 one-stage procedures and 353 two-stage procedures. The postoperative course through November 2009 was evaluated by cumulative incidence adjusting for competing risks for the selected outcomes; hematoma, infection, seroma, implant rupture, severe capsular contracture (modified...

  10. Remote actuated valve implant

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKnight, Timothy E; Johnson, Anthony; Moise, Jr., Kenneth J; Ericson, Milton Nance; Baba, Justin S; Wilgen, John B; Evans, III, Boyd McCutchen

    2014-02-25

    Valve implant systems positionable within a flow passage, the systems having an inlet, an outlet, and a remotely activatable valve between the inlet and outlet, with the valves being operable to provide intermittent occlusion of the flow path. A remote field is applied to provide thermal or magnetic activation of the valves.

  11. A new testing protocol for zirconia dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanon, Clarisse; Chevalier, Jérôme; Douillard, Thierry; Cattani-Lorente, Maria; Scherrer, Susanne S; Gremillard, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Based on the current lack of standards concerning zirconia dental implants, we aim at developing a protocol to validate their functionality and safety prior their clinical use. The protocol is designed to account for the specific brittle nature of ceramics and the specific behavior of zirconia in terms of phase transformation. Several types of zirconia dental implants with different surface textures (porous, alveolar, rough) were assessed. The implants were first characterized in their as-received state by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Focused Ion Beam (FIB), X-Ray Diffraction (XRD). Fracture tests following a method adapted from ISO 14801 were conducted to evaluate their initial mechanical properties. Accelerated aging was performed on the implants, and XRD monoclinic content measured directly at their surface instead of using polished samples as in ISO 13356. The implants were then characterized again after aging. Implants with an alveolar surface presented large defects. The protocol shows that such defects compromise the long-term mechanical properties. Implants with a porous surface exhibited sufficient strength but a significant sensitivity to aging. Even if associated to micro cracking clearly observed by FIB, aging did not decrease mechanical strength of the implants. As each dental implant company has its own process, all zirconia implants may behave differently, even if the starting powder is the same. Especially, surface modifications have a large influence on strength and aging resistance, which is not taken into account by the current standards. Protocols adapted from this work could be useful. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Hearing outcomes of the active bone conduction system Bonebridge® in conductive or mixed hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnevale, Claudio; Til-Pérez, Guillermo; Arancibia-Tagle, Diego J; Tomás-Barberán, Manuel D; Sarría-Echegaray, Pedro L

    2018-05-18

    The active transcutaneous bone conduction implant Bonebridge ® , is indicated for patients affected by bilateral conductive/mixed hearing loss or unilateral sensorineural hearing loss, showing hearing outcomes similar to other percutaneous bone conduction implants, but with a lower rate of complications. The aim of this study was to analyze the hearing outcomes in a series of 26 patients affected by conductive or mixed hearing loss and treated with Bonebridge ® . 26 of 30 patients implanted with Bonebridge ® between October 2012 and May 2017, were included in the study. We compared the air conduction thresholds at the frequencies 500, 1000, 2000, 3000, 4000Hz, the SRT50% and the percentage of correct answers at an intensity of 50dB with and without the implant. "Pure tone average" with the implant was 34.91dB showing an average gain of 33.46dB. Average SRT 50% with the implant was 34.33dB, whereas before the surgery no patient achieved 50% of correct answers at a sound intensity of 50dB. The percentage of correct answers at 50dB changed from 11% without the implant to 85% with it. We only observed one complication consisting of an extrusion of the implant in a patient with a history of 2 previous rhytidectomies. The hearing outcomes obtained in our study are similar to those published in the literature. Bonebridge ® represents an excellent alternative in the treatment of conductive or mixed hearing loss, and with a lower rate of complications. Copyright © 2018 Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Cirugía de Cabeza y Cuello. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Do textured breast implants decrease the rate of capsular contracture compared to smooth implants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cifuentes, Ignacio; Dagnino, Bruno; Rada, Gabriel

    2017-08-31

    The use of breast implants for aesthetic and reconstructive purposes has become one of the most common procedures performed by plastic surgeons. Several breast implants models exist. They differ in their size, filling, shape and characteristic of the shell, which can be smooth or textured. Capsular contracture is one of the main complications of breast implants. It has been suggested that the use of textured implants could reduce the incidence of capsular contracture. To answer this question, we used Epistemonikos, the largest database of systematic reviews in health, which is maintained by screening multiple information sources, including MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane, among others. We identified 15 studies overall, of which 13 were randomized trials relevant for the question of interest. We extracted data from the systematic reviews, reanalyzed data of primary studies, conducted a meta-analysis and generated a summary of findings table using the GRADE approach. We concluded the use of textured breast implants probably decreases the risk of capsular contracture, however, they might be associated to an increased risk of anaplastic large cell lymphoma.

  14. Survival of Dental Implants Placed in Grafted and Nongrafted Bone: A Retrospective Study in a University Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Duong T; Gay, Isabel C; Diaz-Rodriguez, Janice; Parthasarathy, Kavitha; Weltman, Robin; Friedman, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    To compare dental implant survival rates when placed in native bone and grafted sites. Additionally, risk factors associated with dental implant loss were identified. This study was based on the hypothesis that bone grafting has no effect on implant survival rates. A retrospective chart review was conducted for patients receiving dental implants at the University of Texas, School of Dentistry from 1985 to 2012. Exclusion criteria included patients with genetic diseases, radiation and chemotherapy, or an age less than 18 years. To avoid misclassification bias, implants were excluded if bone grafts were only done at the same time of placement. Data on age, sex, tobacco use, diabetes, osteoporosis, anatomical location of the implant, implant length and width, bone graft, and professional maintenance were collected for analysis. A total of 1,222 patients with 2,729 implants were included. The cumulative survival rates at 5 and 10 years were 92% and 87% for implants placed in native bone and 90% and 79% for implants placed in grafted bone, respectively. The results from multivariate analysis (Cox regression) indicated no significant difference in survival between the two groups; having maintenance therapy after implant placement reduced the failure rate by 80% (P dental implant survival rate when implants were placed in native bone or bone-grafted sites. Smoking and lack of professional maintenance were significantly related to increased implant loss.

  15. The influence of implant-abutment connection to peri-implant bone loss: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caricasulo, Riccardo; Malchiodi, Luciano; Ghensi, Paolo; Fantozzi, Giuliano; Cucchi, Alessandro

    2018-05-15

    Different implant-abutment connections are available and it has been claimed they could have an effect on marginal bone loss. The aim of this review is to establish if implant connection configuration influences peri-implant bone loss (PBL) after functional loading. A specific question was formulated according to the Population, Intervention, Control, and Outcome (PICO): Does the type of implant-abutment connection (external, internal, or conical) have an influence on peri-implant bone loss? A PubMed/MEDLINE electronic search was conducted to identify English language publications published in international journals during the last decade (from 2006 to 2016). The search was conducted by using the Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) keywords "dental implants OR dental abutment AND external connection OR internal connection OR conical connection OR Morse Taper." Selected studies were randomized clinical trials and prospective studies; in vitro studies, case reports and retrospective studies were excluded. Titles and abstracts and, in the second phase, full texts, were evaluated autonomously and in duplicate by two reviewers. A total of 1649 articles were found, but only 14 studies met the pre-established inclusion criteria and were considered suitable for meta-analytic analysis. The network meta-analysis (NMA) suggested a significant difference between the external and the conical connections; this was less evident for the internal and conical ones. Platform-switching (PS) seemed to positively affect bone levels, non-regarding the implant-connection it was applied to. Within the limitations of this systematic review, it can be concluded that crestal bone levels are better maintained in the short-medium term when internal kinds of interface are adopted. In particular, conical connections seem to be more advantageous, showing lower peri-implant bone loss, but further studies are necessary to investigate the efficacy of implant-abutment connection on stability of crestal

  16. Pacemaker implantation after catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshmukh, Abhishek J; Yao, Xiaoxi; Schilz, Stephanie; Van Houten, Holly; Sangaralingham, Lindsey R; Asirvatham, Samuel J; Friedman, Paul A; Packer, Douglas L; Noseworthy, Peter A

    2016-01-01

    Sinus node dysfunction requiring pacemaker implantation is commonly associated with atrial fibrillation (AF), but may not be clinically apparent until restoration of sinus rhythm with ablation or cardioversion. We sought to determine frequency, time course, and predictors for pacemaker implantation after catheter ablation, and to compare the overall rates to a matched cardioversion cohort. We conducted a retrospective analysis using a large US commercial insurance database and identified 12,158 AF patients who underwent catheter ablation between January 1, 2005 and December 31, 2012. Over an average of 2.4 years of follow-up, 5.6 % of the patients underwent pacemaker implantation. Using the Cox proportional hazards models, we found that risk of risks of pacemaker implantation was associated with older age (50-64 and ≥65 versus pacemaker implantation between ablation patients and propensity score (PS)-matched cardioversion groups (3.5 versus. 4.1 % at 1 year and 8.8 versus 8.3 % at 5 years). Overall, pacemaker implantation occurs in about 1/28 patients within 1 year of catheter ablation. The overall implantation rate decreased between 2005 and 2012. Furthermore, the risk after ablation is similar to cardioversion, suggesting that patients require pacing due to a common underlying electrophysiologic substrate, rather than the ablation itself.

  17. Tribological studies of ion-implanted steel constituents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Ronghau.

    1990-01-01

    Tribological properties of ion-implanted ferrite and austenite were studied systematically using a unique oscillating pin-on-disc wear tester. Results show that nitrogen implantation at elevated temperatures to high doses dramatically improves the adhesive wear resistance of ferrite and the critical load at which the adhesive wear mechanism changes from mild to severe for austenite. The wear resistance of nitrogen-implanted ferrite is determined by the nitride formed. Extremely hard solid solutions of nitrogen develop on the implanted austenite surfaces and induce three orders of magnitude reductions in wear rates. The implantation conditions that should be used to produce deep, wear-resistant layers for both steels are discussed in detail. Oscillating pin-on-disc wear tests demonstrate that nitrogen does not diffuse during the wearing process although tests conducted using conventional fixed pin-on-disc test equipment could erroneously suggest this occurs. Taken together, the results show that high-dose-rate implantation at low energies yields very-high-quality implanted surfaces at low cost

  18. Efter cochlear implant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højen, Anders

    Dit barn har netop fået et cochlear implant. Hvad nu? Skal barnet fokusere udelukkende på at lære talt sprog, eller skal det også lære/fortsætte med tegnsprog eller støttetegn? Det er et vanskeligt spørgsmål, og før valget foretages, er det vigtigt at vurdere hvilke konsekvenser valget har, dels...... for den sproglige udvikling isoleret set, og dels for barnets udvikling ud fra en helhedsbetragtning. Dette indlæg fokuserer på, hvilke forventninger man kan have til cochlear implant-brugeres sproglige udvikling med talt sprog alene, hhv. med to sprog (tale og tegn). Disse forventninger er baseret på...

  19. Delayed breast implant reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvilsom, Gitte B.; Hölmich, Lisbet R.; Steding-Jessen, Marianne

    2012-01-01

    We evaluated the association between radiation therapy and severe capsular contracture or reoperation after 717 delayed breast implant reconstruction procedures (288 1- and 429 2-stage procedures) identified in the prospective database of the Danish Registry for Plastic Surgery of the Breast during...... of radiation therapy was associated with a non-significantly increased risk of reoperation after both 1-stage (HR = 1.4; 95% CI: 0.7-2.5) and 2-stage (HR = 1.6; 95% CI: 0.9-3.1) procedures. Reconstruction failure was highest (13.2%) in the 2-stage procedures with a history of radiation therapy. Breast...... reconstruction approaches other than implants should be seriously considered among women who have received radiation therapy....

  20. Piezosurgery in implant dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stübinger, Stefan; Stricker, Andres; Berg, Britt-Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    Piezosurgery, or the use of piezoelectric devices, is being applied increasingly in oral and maxillofacial surgery. The main advantages of this technique are precise and selective cuttings, the avoidance of thermal damage, and the preservation of soft-tissue structures. Through the application of piezoelectric surgery, implant-site preparation, bone grafting, sinus-floor elevation, edentulous ridge splitting or the lateralization of the inferior alveolar nerve are very technically feasible. This clinical overview gives a short summary of the current literature and outlines the advantages and disadvantages of piezoelectric bone surgery in implant dentistry. Overall, piezoelectric surgery is superior to other methods that utilize mechanical instruments. Handling of delicate or compromised hard- and soft-tissue conditions can be performed with less risk for the patient. With respect to current and future innovative surgical concepts, piezoelectric surgery offers a wide range of new possibilities to perform customized and minimally invasive osteotomies. PMID:26635486

  1. Ion implantation in metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vook, F.L.

    1977-02-01

    The application of ion beams to metals is rapidly emerging as a promising area of research and technology. This report briefly describes some of the recent advances in the modification and study of the basic properties of metals by ion implantation techniques. Most of the research discussed illustrates some of the new and exciting applications of ion beams to metals which are under active investigation at Sandia Laboratories, Albuquerque

  2. The breast implant controversy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, R R; Harrison, M C; LeVier, R R

    1994-02-01

    The breast implant issue is a "bad news/good news" story. For many women with implants, the controversy has caused a fair degree of anxiety which may or may not be resolved as further information becomes available. It has also taken its toll on Dow Corning. Whole lines of medical products have been eliminated or are being phase out. The development of new medical applications has been terminated. As a consequence, employees have lost their jobs. What the effect will be on the biomedical industry as a whole remains to be seen (11). While silicones have been an important component in various medical devices, it is likely that other materials can be used as replacements. However, suppliers of non-silicone materials are also reevaluating their role in this market. For example, Du Pont, the nation's largest chemical company, has determined that the unpredictable and excessive costs of doing business with manufacturers of implantable medical devices no longer justifies the unrestricted sale of standard raw materials into this industry. Other companies are quietly following suit. On the up side, it is possible that the research being driven by this controversy will result in a greater understanding of the immunologic implications of xenobiotics, of the importance of nonbiased observations, of the need for ready access to valid data sets, and of the opportunity for valid scientific information to guide legal decisions. Only time will tell.

  3. Does the Implant Surgical Technique Affect the Primary and/or Secondary Stability of Dental Implants? A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadid, Rola Muhammed; Sadaqah, Nasrin Rushdi; Othman, Sahar Abdo

    2014-01-01

    Background. A number of surgical techniques for implant site preparation have been advocated to enhance the implant of primary and secondary stability. However, there is insufficient scientific evidence to support the association between the surgical technique and implant stability. Purpose. This review aimed to investigate the influence of different surgical techniques including the undersized drilling, the osteotome, the piezosurgery, the flapless procedure, and the bone stimulation by low-level laser therapy on the primary and/or secondary stability of dental implants. Materials and methods. A search of PubMed, Cochrane Library, and grey literature was performed. The inclusion criteria comprised observational clinical studies and randomized controlled trials (RCTs) conducted in patients who received dental implants for rehabilitation, studies that evaluated the association between the surgical technique and the implant primary and/or secondary stability. The articles selected were carefully read and classified as low, moderate, and high methodological quality and data of interest were tabulated. Results. Eight clinical studies were included then they were classified as moderate or high methodological quality and control of bias. Conclusions. There is a weak evidence suggesting that any of previously mentioned surgical techniques could influence the primary and/or secondary implant stability. PMID:25126094

  4. Does the Implant Surgical Technique Affect the Primary and/or Secondary Stability of Dental Implants? A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rola Muhammed Shadid

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. A number of surgical techniques for implant site preparation have been advocated to enhance the implant of primary and secondary stability. However, there is insufficient scientific evidence to support the association between the surgical technique and implant stability. Purpose. This review aimed to investigate the influence of different surgical techniques including the undersized drilling, the osteotome, the piezosurgery, the flapless procedure, and the bone stimulation by low-level laser therapy on the primary and/or secondary stability of dental implants. Materials and methods. A search of PubMed, Cochrane Library, and grey literature was performed. The inclusion criteria comprised observational clinical studies and randomized controlled trials (RCTs conducted in patients who received dental implants for rehabilitation, studies that evaluated the association between the surgical technique and the implant primary and/or secondary stability. The articles selected were carefully read and classified as low, moderate, and high methodological quality and data of interest were tabulated. Results. Eight clinical studies were included then they were classified as moderate or high methodological quality and control of bias. Conclusions. There is a weak evidence suggesting that any of previously mentioned surgical techniques could influence the primary and/or secondary implant stability.

  5. Cochlear implants in children implanted in Jordan: A parental overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhamra, Rana A

    2015-07-01

    Exploring the perspective of parents on the cochlear implant process in Jordan. Sixty parents of deaf children were surveyed on the information gathering process prior to cochlear implant surgery, and their implant outcome expectations post-surgery. Whether child or parent characteristics may impact parents' post-surgical expectations was explored. Although parents used a variety of information sources when considering a cochlear implant, the ear, nose and throat doctor comprised their major source of information (60%). Parents received a range of information prior to cochlear implant but agreed (93.3%) on the need for a multidisciplinary team approach. Post-surgically, parents' expected major developments in the areas of spoken language (97%), and auditory skills (100%). Receiving education in mainstream schools (92%) was expected too. Parents perceived the cochlear implant decision as the best decision they can make for their child (98.3%). A significant correlation was found between parents contentment with the cochlear implant decision and expecting developments in the area of reading and writing (r=0.7). Child's age at implantation and age at hearing loss diagnosis significantly affected parents' post-implant outcome expectations (pparents agree on the need for a comprehensive multidisciplinary team approach during the different stages of the cochlear implant process. Parents' education about cochlear implants prior to the surgery can affect their post-surgical outcome expectations. The parental perspective presented in this study can help professionals develop better understanding of parents' needs and expectations and henceforth improve their services and support during the different stages of the cochlear implant process. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  6. Assessment of Cochlear Function during Cochlear Implantation by Extra- and Intracochlear Electrocochleography

    OpenAIRE

    Dalbert, Adrian; Pfiffner, Flurin; Hoesli, Marco; Koka, Kanthaiah; Veraguth, Dorothe; Roosli, Christof; Huber, Alexander

    2018-01-01

    Objective: The aims of this study were: (1) To investigate the correlation between electrophysiological changes during cochlear implantation and postoperative hearing loss, and (2) to detect the time points that electrophysiological changes occur during cochlear implantation. Material and Methods: Extra- and intracochlear electrocochleography (ECoG) were used to detect electrophysiological changes during cochlear implantation. Extracochlear ECoG recordings were conducted through a needle elec...

  7. Studies of phase formation in CoSi2 buried layers fabricated using ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galaev, A.A.; Parkhomenko, Yu.N.; Podgornyi, D.A.; Shcherbachev, K.D.

    1998-01-01

    The processes of the formation of cobalt disilicide buried layers in silicon are studied under different conditions of implantation with Co. In particular, the effects of the implantation dose and the postimplantation annealing temperature on the state of the Co-implanted layer are considered. Two types of heteroepitaxial Si/CoSi 2 /Si structures are obtained with the conducting layers of thicknesses 70 and 90 nm buried at the depths 80 and 10 nm, respectively

  8. Sub-meninges implantation reduces immune response to neural implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markwardt, Neil T; Stokol, Jodi; Rennaker, Robert L

    2013-04-15

    Glial scar formation around neural interfaces inhibits their ability to acquire usable signals from the surrounding neurons. To improve neural recording performance, the inflammatory response and glial scarring must be minimized. Previous work has indicated that meningeally derived cells participate in the immune response, and it is possible that the meninges may grow down around the shank of a neural implant, contributing to the formation of the glial scar. This study examines whether the glial scar can be reduced by placing a neural probe completely below the meninges. Rats were implanted with sets of loose microwire implants placed either completely below the meninges or implanted conventionally with the upper end penetrating the meninges, but not attached to the skull. Histological analysis was performed 4 weeks following surgical implantation to evaluate the glial scar. Our results found that sub-meninges implants showed an average reduction in reactive astrocyte activity of 63% compared to trans-meninges implants. Microglial activity was also reduced for sub-meninges implants. These results suggest that techniques that isolate implants from the meninges offer the potential to reduce the encapsulation response which should improve chronic recording quality and stability. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Improving osseointegration of dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, Carlos Nelson; Meirelles, Luiz

    2010-03-01

    In the beginning of implantology, the procedures adopted for treating patients were performed in two surgical phases with an interval of 3-6 months. Nowadays, it is possible to insert and load a dental implant in the same surgical procedure. This change is due to several factors, such as improvement of surgical technique, modifications of the implant design, increased quality of implant manufacturing, development of the surgical instruments' quality, careful patient screening and adequate treatment of the implant surface. The clinical results show that adequate treatment of surfaces is crucial for reducing healing time and treating at-risk patients. The surface properties of dental implants can be significantly improved at the manufacturing stage, affecting cells' activity during the healing phase that will ultimately determine the host tissue response, a fundamental requirement for clinical success. This review focuses on different types of dental implant surfaces and the influence of surface characteristics on osseointegration.

  10. A temperature sensor implant for active implantable medical devices for in vivo subacute heating tests under MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silemek, Berk; Acikel, Volkan; Oto, Cagdas; Alipour, Akbar; Aykut, Zaliha Gamze; Algin, Oktay; Atalar, Ergin

    2018-05-01

    To introduce a temperature sensor implant (TSI) that mimics an active implantable medical device (AIMD) for animal testing of MRI heating. Computer simulations and phantom experiments poorly represent potential temperature increases. Animal experiments could be a better model, but heating experiments conducted immediately after the surgery suffer from alterations of the thermoregulatory and tissue properties during acute testing conditions. Therefore, the aim of this study was to introduce a temperature sensor implant that mimics an AIMD and capable of measuring the electrode temperature after implantation of the device without any further intervention at any time after the surgery in an animal model. A battery-operated TSI, which resembled an AIMD, was used to measure the lead temperature and impedance and the case temperature. The measured values were transmitted to an external computer via a low-power Bluetooth communication protocol. In addition to validation experiments on the phantom, a sheep experiment was conducted to test the feasibility of the system in subacute conditions. The measurements had a maximum of 0.5°C difference compared to fiber-optic temperature probes. In vivo animal experiments demonstrated feasibility of the system. An active implant, which can measure its own temperature, was proposed to investigate implant heating during MRI examinations. Magn Reson Med 79:2824-2832, 2018. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  11. Low energy helium implantation of aluminum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, K.L.; Thomas, G.J.

    1976-02-01

    A series of 20 keV He + implantations was conducted on well-annealed MARZ grade aluminum at fluxes of 6 x 10 14 and 6 x 10 13 He + /cm 2 sec. Three distinct, temperature dependent He release mechanisms were found by He re-emission measurements during implantation, and by subsequent SEM and TEM investigations. At 0.08 of the melting temperature (T/sub m/) gas re-emission rose smoothly after a critical dose of 3 x 10 17 He + /cm 2 , with extensive blistering. The intermediate temperature range (approximately 0.3 T/sub m/) was characterized by repeated flake exfoliation and bursts of He after a dose of 3 x 10 17 He + /cm 2 . Rapid He evolution, with hole formation was found above 0.7 T/sub m/. No significant differences in either gas re-emission or surface deformation were found between the two fluxes employed

  12. He bubble sites in implanted copper alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreno, D.; Eliezer, D.

    1996-01-01

    Structural materials in fusion reactors will be exposed to helium implantation over a broad range of energies. The deformation and partial exfoliation of surface layers due to hydrogen isotopes and helium contribute to the total erosion of the first wall. For this reason, one of the most important criteria in the choice of materials for the first wall of fusion reactors is the material's damage resistance. Recent advances in developing nuclear fusion reactors reveal that efficient heat removal from plasma-facing components is very important. Copper and copper alloys are considered an attractive choice for transporting such a high heat flux without thermal damage as they have high thermal conductivity. In the present study the authors report on the structural changes in a copper alloy, due to the helium implantation on the very near surface area, observed by transmission electron microscopy

  13. Auditory brainstem activity and development evoked by apical versus basal cochlear implant electrode stimulation in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, K A; Papsin, B C; Harrison, R V

    2007-08-01

    The role of apical versus basal cochlear implant electrode stimulation on central auditory development was examined. We hypothesized that, in children with early onset deafness, auditory development evoked by basal electrode stimulation would differ from that evoked more apically. Responses of the auditory nerve and brainstem, evoked by an apical and a basal implant electrode, were measured over the first year of cochlear implant use in 50 children with early onset severe to profound deafness who used hearing aids prior to implantation. Responses at initial stimulation were of larger amplitude and shorter latency when evoked by the apical electrode. No significant effects of residual hearing or age were found on initial response amplitudes or latencies. With implant use, responses evoked by both electrodes showed decreases in wave and interwave latencies reflecting decreased neural conduction time through the brainstem. Apical versus basal differences persisted with implant experience with one exception; eIII-eV interlatency differences decreased with implant use. Acute stimulation shows prolongation of basally versus apically evoked auditory nerve and brainstem responses in children with severe to profound deafness. Interwave latencies reflecting neural conduction along the caudal and rostral portions of the brainstem decreased over the first year of implant use. Differences in neural conduction times evoked by apical versus basal electrode stimulation persisted in the caudal but not rostral brainstem. Activity-dependent changes of the auditory brainstem occur in response to both apical and basal cochlear implant electrode stimulation.

  14. Influence of implantation energy on the electrical properties of ultrathin gate oxides grown on nitrogen implanted Si substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapetanakis, E.; Skarlatos, D.; Tsamis, C.; Normand, P.; Tsoukalas, D.

    2003-01-01

    Metal-oxide-semiconductor tunnel diodes with gate oxides, in the range of 2.5-3.5 nm, grown either on 25 or 3 keV nitrogen-implanted Si substrates at (0.3 or 1) x10 15 cm -2 dose, respectively, are investigated. The dependence of N 2 + ion implant energy on the electrical quality of the growing oxide layers is studied through capacitance, equivalent parallel conductance, and gate current measurements. Superior electrical characteristics in terms of interface state trap density, leakage current, and breakdown fields are found for oxides obtained through 3 keV nitrogen implants. These findings together with the full absence of any extended defect in the silicon substrate make the low-energy nitrogen implantation technique an attractive option for reproducible low-cost growth of nanometer-thick gate oxides

  15. Patients' perceptions of implant placement surgery, the post-surgical healing and the transitional implant prostheses: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashbour, Wafa A; Rousseau, Nikki; Thomason, J Mark; Ellis, Janice S

    2017-07-01

    This study aimed to explore patients' thoughts, feelings about, and experiences of, implant placement surgery (IPS), the post-surgical healing stage and the immediate post-surgical transitional implant prosthesis (TIP) (fixed and removable). A qualitative study design was chosen and 38 semi-structured telephone and face-to-face interviews were conducted with 34 patients at different stages of implant treatment. The interviews were transcribed verbatim; the data collection and coding process followed the principles of thematic analysis, which was facilitated through the use of NVivo10. Patients anticipated that surgery would be painful and unpleasant but were prepared to accept this temporary discomfort for the expected benefits of implant treatment. However, a key finding was that patients felt they had overestimated the trauma of surgery but underestimated the discomfort and difficulties of the healing phase. A number of difficulties were also identified with the TIP phase following implant surgery. Existing research has tended to focus on the longer term benefits of dental implant treatment. This qualitative study has investigated in-depth patients' perceptions of dental implant surgery, including their experiences related to sedation, and of transitional implant restoration. While patients felt their concerns were overestimated in relation to the implant surgery, they experienced greater morbidity than they expected in the healing phase. Recommendations are made for relatively small changes in care provision which might improve the overall patient experience. Partial dentate patients treated with a fixed transitional prosthesis experienced advantages more quickly than patients with an overdenture. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Immediate Direct-To-Implant Breast Reconstruction Using Anatomical Implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Eun Kim

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundIn 2012, a new anatomic breast implant of form-stable silicone gel was introduced onto the Korean market. The intended use of this implant is in the area of aesthetic breast surgery, and many reports are promising. Thus far, however, there have been no reports on the use of this implant for breast reconstruction in Korea. We used this breast implant in breast reconstruction surgery and report our early experience.MethodsFrom November 2012 to April 2013, the Natrelle Style 410 form-stable anatomically shaped cohesive silicone gel-filled breast implant was used in 31 breasts of 30 patients for implant breast reconstruction with an acellular dermal matrix. Patients were treated with skin-sparing mastectomies followed by immediate breast reconstruction.ResultsThe mean breast resection volume was 240 mL (range, 83-540 mL. The mean size of the breast implants was 217 mL (range, 125-395 mL. Breast shape outcomes were considered acceptable. Infection and skin thinning occurred in one patient each, and hematoma and seroma did not occur. Three cases of wound dehiscence occurred, one requiring surgical intervention, while the others healed with conservative treatment in one month. Rippling did not occur. So far, complications such as capsular contracture and malrotation of breast implant have not yet arisen.ConclusionsBy using anatomic breast implants in breast reconstruction, we achieved satisfactory results with aesthetics better than those obtained with round breast implants. Therefore, we concluded that the anatomical implant is suitable for breast reconstruction.

  17. Dental implants in growing children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S K Mishra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The replacement of teeth by implants is usually restricted to patients with completed craniofacial growth. The aim of this literature review is to discuss the use of dental implants in normal growing patients and in patients with ectodermal dysplasia and the influence of maxillary and mandibular skeletal and dental growth on the stability of those implants. It is recommended that while deciding the optimal individual time point of implant insertion, the status of skeletal growth, the degree of hypodontia, and extension of related psychological stress should be taken into account, in addition to the status of existing dentition and dental compliance of a pediatric patient.

  18. Printing of Titanium implant prototype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiria, Florencia Edith; Shyan, John Yong Ming; Lim, Poon Nian; Wen, Francis Goh Chung; Yeo, Jin Fei; Cao, Tong

    2010-01-01

    Dental implant plays an important role as a conduit of force and stress to flow from the tooth to the related bone. In the load sharing between an implant and its related bone, the amount of stress carried by each of them directly related to their stiffness or modulus. Hence, it is a crucial issue for the implant to have matching mechanical properties, in particular modulus, between the implant and its related bone. Titanium is a metallic material that has good biocompatibility and corrosion resistance. Whilst the modulus of the bulk material is still higher than that of bone, it is the lowest among all other commonly used metallic implant materials, such as stainless steel or cobalt alloy. Hence it is potential to further reduce the modulus of pure Titanium by engineering its processing method to obtain porous structure. In this project, porous Titanium implant prototype is fabricated using 3-dimensional printing. This technique allows the flexibility of design customization, which is beneficial for implant fabrication as tailoring of implant size and shape helps to ensure the implant would fit nicely to the patient. The fabricated Titanium prototype had a modulus of 4.8-13.2 GPa, which is in the range of natural bone modulus. The compressive strength achieved was between 167 to 455 MPa. Subsequent cell culture study indicated that the porous Titanium prototype had good biocompatibility and is suitable for bone cell attachment and proliferation.

  19. Cochlear implantation in Mondini dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneshi, Ahmad; Hassanzadeh, Saeid; Abasalipour, Parvaneh; Emamdjomeh, Hessamaddin; Farhadi, Mohammad

    2003-01-01

    The use of cochlear implantation to treat patients with inner ear malformations such as Mondini dysplasia has been increasingly successful. Until now, conventional hearing aids in these patients have not performed well. Consequently, the hearing problem for patients with this condition has been somewhat improved with the use of cochlear implants. Various results of cochlear implantation have been reported in these patients so far. This is a report of 5 patients with Mondini malformation who have undergone cochlear implant surgery. Copyright 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel

  20. Implant-retained maxillary overdentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, Steven E; Carr, Alan B

    2004-07-01

    Overdentures supported by osseointegrated implants overcome many of the complications observed with overdentures supported by natural teeth. Dental implants are free of biologic consequences associated with natural teeth, such as dental caries and periodontal disease. Bone undercuts adjacent to implants do not mimic those found adjacent to natural tooth roots. Implants are used to provide predictable retention, support, and stability for overdenture prostheses. When lip or facial support is required, the overdenture is the treatment of choice. Likewise the overdenture may improve phonetic deficiencies associated with alveolar bone loss.

  1. Cochlear implants in Waardenburg syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, Robert D; Zdanski, Carlton; Roush, Patricia; Brown, Carolyn; Teagle, Holly; Pillsbury, Harold C; Buchman, Craig

    2006-07-01

    Waardenburg syndrome is an autosomal-dominant syndrome characterized by dystopia canthorum, hyperplasia of the eyebrows, heterochromia irides, a white forelock, and sensorineural hearing loss in 20% to 55% of patients. This patient population accounts for approximately 2% of congenitally deaf children. The purpose of this retrospective case review was to describe the outcomes for those children with Waardenburg syndrome who have undergone cochlear implantation. Pediatric cochlear implant recipients with documented evidence of Waardenburg syndrome underwent retrospective case review. All patients received their cochlear implants at the study institution followed by outpatient auditory habilitation. Charts were reviewed for etiology and duration of deafness, age at time of cochlear implantation, perioperative complications, duration of use, and performance outcomes. Results of standard tests batteries for speech perception and production administered as a part of the patients' auditory habilitation were reviewed. Seven patients with Waardenburg syndrome and cochlear implants were identified. The average age at implantation was 37 months (range, 18-64 months) and the average duration of use was 69 months (range, 12-143 months). All of these patients are active users of their devices and perform very well after implantation. There were no major complications in this small group of patients. Children with congenital sensorineural hearing loss without other comorbidities (e.g., developmental delay, inner ear malformations) perform well when they receive cochlear implantation and auditory habilitation. Patients with Waardenburg syndrome can be expected to have above-average performance after cochlear implantation.

  2. Modification of polyethyleneterephtalate by implantation of nitrogen ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svorcik, V.; Endrst, R.; Rybka, V.; Hnatowicz, V.; Cerny, F.

    1994-01-01

    The implantation of 90 keV N + ions into polyethyleneterephtalate (PET) to fluences of 1 x 10 14 --1 x 10 17 cm -2 was studied. The changes in electrical sheet conductivity and polarity of ion-exposed PET were observed and the structural changes were examined using IR spectroscopy. One degradation process is a chain fission according to the Norrish II reaction. The sheet conductivity due to conjugated double bonds was increased by ten orders of magnitude as a result of ion implantation. The surface polarity of the PET samples increases slightly with increasing ion fluence

  3. Ion-implanted PLZT ceramics: a new high-sensitivity image storage medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peercy, P.S.; Land, C.E.

    1980-01-01

    Results were presented of our studies of photoferroelectric (PFE) image storage in H- and He-ion implanted PLZT (lead lanthanum zirconate titanate) ceramics which demonstrate that the photosensitivity of PLZT can be significantly increased by ion implantation in the ceramic surface to be exposed to image light. More recently, implantations of Ar and Ar + Ne into the PLZT surface have produced much greater photosensitivity enhancement. For example, the photosensitivity after implantation with 1.5 x 10 14 350 keV Ar/cm 2 + 1 x 10 15 500 keV Ne/cm 2 is increased by about four orders of magnitude over that of unimplanted PLZT. Measurements indicate that the photosensitivity enhancement in ion-implanted PLZT is controlled by implantation-produced disorder which results in marked decreases in dielectric constant and dark conductivity and changes in photoconductivity of the implanted layer. The effects of Ar- and Ar + Ne-implantation are presented along with a phenomenological model which describes the enhancement in photosensitivity obtained by ion implantation. This model takes into account both light- and implantation-induced changes in conductivity and gives quantitative agreement with the measured changes in the coercive voltage V/sub c/ as a function of near-uv light intensity for both unimplanted and implanted PLZT. The model, used in conjunction with calculations of the profiles of implantation-produced disorder, has provided the information needed for co-implanting ions of different masses, e.g., Ar and Ne, to improve photosensitivity

  4. Pure visual imagery as a potential approach to achieve three classes of control for implementation of BCI in non-motor disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Teresa; Amaral, Carlos; Andrade, João; Pires, Gabriel; Nunes, Urbano J.; Castelo-Branco, Miguel

    2017-08-01

    Objective. The achievement of multiple instances of control with the same type of mental strategy represents a way to improve flexibility of brain-computer interface (BCI) systems. Here we test the hypothesis that pure visual motion imagery of an external actuator can be used as a tool to achieve three classes of electroencephalographic (EEG) based control, which might be useful in attention disorders. Approach. We hypothesize that different numbers of imagined motion alternations lead to distinctive signals, as predicted by distinct motion patterns. Accordingly, a distinct number of alternating sensory/perceptual signals would lead to distinct neural responses as previously demonstrated using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). We anticipate that differential modulations should also be observed in the EEG domain. EEG recordings were obtained from twelve participants using three imagery tasks: imagery of a static dot, imagery of a dot with two opposing motions in the vertical axis (two motion directions) and imagery of a dot with four opposing motions in vertical or horizontal axes (four directions). The data were analysed offline. Main results. An increase of alpha-band power was found in frontal and central channels as a result of visual motion imagery tasks when compared with static dot imagery, in contrast with the expected posterior alpha decreases found during simple visual stimulation. The successful classification and discrimination between the three imagery tasks confirmed that three different classes of control based on visual motion imagery can be achieved. The classification approach was based on a support vector machine (SVM) and on the alpha-band relative spectral power of a small group of six frontal and central channels. Patterns of alpha activity, as captured by single-trial SVM closely reflected imagery properties, in particular the number of imagined motion alternations. Significance. We found a new mental task based on visual motion

  5. The Survival of Morse Cone-Connection Implants with Platform Switch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassetta, Michele; Di Mambro, Alfonso; Giansanti, Matteo; Brandetti, Giulia

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this prospective clinical study was to evaluate the survival up to 5 years of Morse cone-connection implants with platform switch considering the influence of biologically relevant, anatomical, and stress-related variables. STROBE guidelines were followed. Seven hundred forty-eight implants were inserted in 350 patients. Follow-up visits were scheduled at the time of stagetwo surgery (2 months later) and at 6, 12, 24, 36, and 60 months. All implants were initially loaded with a cemented provisional acrylic restoration. The definitive metal-ceramic restorations were cemented at the 6-month follow-up. Implant cumulative survival rates (CSRs) were calculated using life table actuarial method. Survival data were also analyzed by the log-rank test and Cox regression. The statistical analysis was conducted at the patient level. P ≤ .05 was considered as an indicator of statistical significance. During the follow-up (mean: 40 months; SD: 20.27), 28 patients were considered failed (8%). The CSR and its standard error (SE) was 92% ± 2.17%. Patients with implant-supported single crowns had a CSR of 90%, whereas those with implant-supported fixed dental prostheses had a CSR of 93%. The implant diameter (P = .0399) and implant length (P = .0441) were statistically significant. The probability of failure was almost 75% lower for patients with wide rather than standard implants, 91% lower for patients with long implants, and 69% lower for patients with standard implants compared with short implants. The use of Morse cone-connection implants with platform switch is a safe and reliable treatment method. Stress-related variables influence the risk of failure confirming the importance of biomechanical factors in the longevity of osseointegrated implants; thus, the clinician may obtain better results if attention is paid to these factors.

  6. Amorphous GaP produced by ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimada, T.; Kato, Y.; Shiraki, Y.; Komatsubara, K.F.

    1976-01-01

    Two types of non-crystalline states ('disordered' and 'amorphous') of GaP were produced by using ion implantation and post annealing. A structural-phase-transition-like annealing behaviour from the 'disordered' state to the 'amorphous' state was observed. The ion dose dependence and the annealing behaviour of the atomic structure of GaP implanted with 200 keV -N + ions were studied by using electron diffraction, backscattering and volume change measurements. The electronic structure was also investigated by measuring optical absorption and electrical conductivity. The implanted layer gradually loses the crystalline order with the increase of the nitrogen dose. The optical absorption coefficient α and electric conductivity sigma of GaP crystals implanted with 200 keV -N + ions of 1 x 10 16 cm -2 were expressed as αhν = C(hν - E 0 )sup(n) and log sigma = A -BTsup(-1/4), respectively. Moreover, the volume of the implanted layer increased about three percent and the electron diffraction pattern was diffused halo whose intensity monotonically decreases along the radial direction. These results indicate that the as-implanted layer has neither a long range order or short range order ('disordered state'). In the sample implanted at 1 x 10 16 cm -2 , a structural phase-transition-like annealing stage was observed at around 400 0 C. That is, the optical absorption coefficient abruptly fell off from 6 x 10 4 to 7 x 10 3 cm -1 and the volume of the implanted layer decreased about 2% within an increase of less than 10 degrees in the anneal temperature. Moreover, the short range order of the lattice structure appeared in the electron diffraction pattern. According to the backscattering experiment, the heavily implanted GaP was still in the non-crystalline state even after annealing. These facts suggest that heavily implanted GaP, followed by annealing at around 400 0 C, is in the 'amorphous' state, although as-implanted GaP is not in the 'amorphous' state but in the

  7. Age at implantation and auditory memory in cochlear implanted children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikic, B; Miric, D; Nikolic-Mikic, M; Ostojic, S; Asanovic, M

    2014-05-01

    Early cochlear implantation, before the age of 3 years, provides the best outcome regarding listening, speech, cognition an memory due to maximal central nervous system plasticity. Intensive postoperative training improves not only auditory performance and language, but affects auditory memory as well. The aim of this study was to discover if the age at implantation affects auditory memory function in cochlear implanted children. A total of 50 cochlear implanted children aged 4 to 8 years were enrolled in this study: early implanted (1-3y) n = 27 and late implanted (4-6y) n = 23. Two types of memory tests were used: Immediate Verbal Memory Test and Forward and Backward Digit Span Test. Early implanted children performed better on both verbal and numeric tasks of auditory memory. The difference was statistically significant, especially on the complex tasks. Early cochlear implantation, before the age of 3 years, significantly improve auditory memory and contribute to better cognitive and education outcomes.

  8. Ionic Conductivity of Polyelectrolyte Hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chen-Jung; Wu, Haiyan; Hu, Yang; Young, Megan; Wang, Huifeng; Lynch, Dylan; Xu, Fujian; Cong, Hongbo; Cheng, Gang

    2018-02-14

    Polyelectrolytes have many important functions in both living organisms and man-made applications. One key property of polyelectrolytes is the ionic conductivity due to their porous networks that allow the transport of water and small molecular solutes. Among polyelectrolytes, zwitterionic polymers have attracted huge attention for applications that involve ion transport in a polyelectrolyte matrix; however, it is still unclear how the functional groups of zwitterionic polymer side chains affect their ion transport and swelling properties. In this study, zwitterionic poly(carboxybetaine acrylamide), poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine), and poly(sulfobetaine methacrylate) hydrogels were synthesized and their ionic conductivity was studied and compared to cationic, anionic, and nonionic hydrogels. The change of the ionic conductivity of zwitterionic and nonionic hydrogels in different saline solutions was investigated in detail. Zwitterionic hydrogels showed much higher ionic conductivity than that of the widely used nonionic poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate hydrogel in all tested solutions. For both cationic and anionic hydrogels, the presence of mobile counterions led to high ionic conductivity in low salt solutions; however, the ionic conductivity of zwitterionic hydrogels surpassed that of cationic and ionic hydrogels in high salt solutions. Cationic and anionic hydrogels showed much higher water content than that of zwitterionic hydrogels in deionized water; however, the cationic hydrogels shrank significantly with increasing saline concentration. This work provides insight into the effects of polyelectrolyte side chains on ion transport. This can guide us in choosing better polyelectrolytes for a broad spectrum of applications, including bioelectronics, neural implants, battery, and so on.

  9. Ion-implantation induced defects in ZnO studied by a slow positron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Z.Q.; Maekawa, M.; Kawasuso, A.; Sekiguchi, T.; Suzuki, R.

    2004-01-01

    Introduction and annealing behavior of defects in Al + -implanted ZnO have been studied using an energy variable slow positron beam. Vacancy clusters are produced after Al + -implantation. With increasing ion dose above 10 14 Al + /cm 2 the implanted layer is amorphized. Heat treatment up to 600 C enhances the creation of large voids that allow the positronium formation. The large voids disappear accompanying the recrystallization process by further heat treatment above 600 C. Afterwards, implanted Al impurities are completely activated to contribute to the n-type conduction. The ZnO crystal quality is also improved after recrystallization. (orig.)

  10. Ion-implantation induced defects in ZnO studied by a slow positron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Z.Q.; Maekawa, M.; Kawasuso, A. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Gunma (Japan); Sekiguchi, T. [National Inst. for Materials Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Suzuki, R. [National Inst. of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2004-07-01

    Introduction and annealing behavior of defects in Al{sup +}-implanted ZnO have been studied using an energy variable slow positron beam. Vacancy clusters are produced after Al{sup +}-implantation. With increasing ion dose above 10{sup 14} Al{sup +}/cm{sup 2} the implanted layer is amorphized. Heat treatment up to 600 C enhances the creation of large voids that allow the positronium formation. The large voids disappear accompanying the recrystallization process by further heat treatment above 600 C. Afterwards, implanted Al impurities are completely activated to contribute to the n-type conduction. The ZnO crystal quality is also improved after recrystallization. (orig.)

  11. Influence of implant rod curvature on sagittal correction of scoliosis deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmingo, Remel Alingalan; Tadano, Shigeru; Abe, Yuichiro; Ito, Manabu

    2014-08-01

    Deformation of in vivo-implanted rods could alter the scoliosis sagittal correction. To our knowledge, no previous authors have investigated the influence of implanted-rod deformation on the sagittal deformity correction during scoliosis surgery. To analyze the changes of the implant rod's angle of curvature during surgery and establish its influence on sagittal correction of scoliosis deformity. A retrospective analysis of the preoperative and postoperative implant rod geometry and angle of curvature was conducted. Twenty adolescent idiopathic scoliosis patients underwent surgery. Average age at the time of operation was 14 years. The preoperative and postoperative implant rod angle of curvature expressed in degrees was obtained for each patient. Two implant rods were attached to the concave and convex side of the spinal deformity. The preoperative implant rod geometry was measured before surgical implantation. The postoperative implant rod geometry after surgery was measured by computed tomography. The implant rod angle of curvature at the sagittal plane was obtained from the implant rod geometry. The angle of curvature between the implant rod extreme ends was measured before implantation and after surgery. The sagittal curvature between the corresponding spinal levels of healthy adolescents obtained by previous studies was compared with the implant rod angle of curvature to evaluate the sagittal curve correction. The difference between the postoperative implant rod angle of curvature and normal spine sagittal curvature of the corresponding instrumented level was used to evaluate over or under correction of the sagittal deformity. The implant rods at the concave side of deformity of all patients were significantly deformed after surgery. The average degree of rod deformation Δθ at the concave and convex sides was 15.8° and 1.6°, respectively. The average preoperative and postoperative implant rod angle of curvature at the concave side was 33.6° and 17.8

  12. Comparison of Carina active middle-ear implant with conventional hearing aids for mixed hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savaş, V A; Gündüz, B; Karamert, R; Cevizci, R; Düzlü, M; Tutar, H; Bayazit, Y A

    2016-04-01

    To compare the auditory outcomes of Carina middle-ear implants with those of conventional hearing aids in patients with moderate-to-severe mixed hearing loss. The study comprised nine patients (six males, three females) who underwent middle-ear implantation with Carina fully implantable active middle-ear implants to treat bilateral moderate-to-severe mixed hearing loss. The patients initially used conventional hearing aids and subsequently received the Carina implants. The hearing thresholds with implants and hearing aids were compared. There were no significant differences between: the pre-operative and post-operative air and bone conduction thresholds (p > 0.05), the thresholds with hearing aids and Carina implants (p > 0.05), or the pre-operative (mean, 72.8 ± 19 per cent) and post-operative (mean, 69.9 ± 24 per cent) speech discrimination scores (p > 0.05). One of the patients suffered total sensorineural hearing loss three months following implantation despite an initial 38 dB functional gain. All except one patient showed clinical improvements after implantation according to quality of life questionnaire (Glasgow Benefit Inventory) scores. Acceptance of Carina implants is better than with conventional hearing aids in patients with mixed hearing loss, although both yield similar hearing amplification. Cosmetic reasons appear to be critical for patient acceptance.

  13. Ações de fomento à pesquisa científica na FaBCI/FESPSP: panorama do período de 2008 a 2010Actions of scientific development research at FaBCI/FESPSP: overview of the period 2008 to 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wellington Ferreira Rodrigues

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Apresenta e descreve as ações de incentivo à pesquisa científica desenvolvidas na Fundação Escola de Sociologia e Política de São Paulo - FESPSP entre os anos de 2008 e 2010. O foco do trabalho é a participação dos alunos da Faculdade de Biblioteconomia e Ciência da Informação – FaBCI nestes programas e a produção apresentada nestes anos. Além disso, são apresentados os resultados obtidos pelo programa de Monitoria Científica, aplicado em 2010 apenas no curso de Biblioteconomia e Ciência da Informação da FESPSP, entre os meses de abril a dezembro de 2010. Palavras-chave: Pesquisa científica. Iniciação científica. Instituição de Ensino Superior. Abstract This paper presents and describes activities to encourage scientific research developed at Fundação Escola de Sociologia e Política de São Paulo (FESPSP between 2008 and 2010. The main focus of this study is the participation of students of the School of Library and Information Science (FaBCI in these programs and their production throughout these years. Moreover, we present the results of the program of Scientific Monitoring, applied exclusively in the course of Library and Information Science of FESPSP between April and December 2010. Keywords: Scientific research. Undergraduate research. College Education Institution.

  14. Cluster Implantation and Deposition Apparatus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanif, Muhammad; Popok, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    In the current report, a design and capabilities of a cluster implantation and deposition apparatus (CIDA) involving two different cluster sources are described. The clusters produced from gas precursors (Ar, N etc.) by PuCluS-2 can be used to study cluster ion implantation in order to develop...

  15. Porous metal for orthopedics implants

    OpenAIRE

    Matassi, Fabrizio; Botti, Alessandra; Sirleo, Luigi; Carulli, Christian; Innocenti, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Porous metal has been introduced to obtain biological fixation and improve longevity of orthopedic implants. The new generation of porous metal has intriguing characteristics that allows bone healing and high osteointegration of the metallic implants. This article gives an overview about biomaterials properties of the contemporary class of highly porous metals and about the clinical use in orthopaedic surgery.

  16. [The impact of dental implants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, G.J.

    2013-01-01

    The importance of the introduction of dental implants can only be understood when the historical context is clarified. In the past, the main treatment carried out by dentists consisted of filling or, in unfortunate cases, removal of painful teeth. Only since the introduction of dental implants did

  17. Sequential provisional implant prosthodontics therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinner, Ira D; Markovits, Stanley; Jansen, Curtis E; Reid, Patrick E; Schnader, Yale E; Shapiro, Herbert J

    2012-01-01

    The fabrication and long-term use of first- and second-stage provisional implant prostheses is critical to create a favorable prognosis for function and esthetics of a fixed-implant supported prosthesis. The fixed metal and acrylic resin cemented first-stage prosthesis, as reviewed in Part I, is needed for prevention of adjacent and opposing tooth movement, pressure on the implant site as well as protection to avoid micromovement of the freshly placed implant body. The second-stage prosthesis, reviewed in Part II, should be used following implant uncovering and abutment installation. The patient wears this provisional prosthesis until maturation of the bone and healing of soft tissues. The second-stage provisional prosthesis is also a fail-safe mechanism for possible early implant failures and also can be used with late failures and/or for the necessity to repair the definitive prosthesis. In addition, the screw-retained provisional prosthesis is used if and when an implant requires removal or other implants are to be placed as in a sequential approach. The creation and use of both first- and second-stage provisional prostheses involve a restorative dentist, dental technician, surgeon, and patient to work as a team. If the dentist alone cannot do diagnosis and treatment planning, surgery, and laboratory techniques, he or she needs help by employing the expertise of a surgeon and a laboratory technician. This team approach is essential for optimum results.

  18. Piezosurgery in implant dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stübinger S

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Stefan Stübinger,1 Andres Stricker,2 Britt-Isabelle Berg3,4 1Hightech Research Center of Cranio-maxillofacial Surgery, University of Basel, Allschwil, Switzerland; 2Private Practice, Konstanz, Germany; 3Department of Cranio-maxillofacial Surgery, University Hospital Basel, Basel, Switzerland; 4Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY, USA Abstract: Piezosurgery, or the use of piezoelectric devices, is being applied increasingly in oral and maxillofacial surgery. The main advantages of this technique are precise and selective cuttings, the avoidance of thermal damage, and the preservation of soft-tissue structures. Through the application of piezoelectric surgery, implant-site preparation, bone grafting, sinus-floor elevation, edentulous ridge splitting or the lateralization of the inferior alveolar nerve are very technically feasible. This clinical overview gives a short summary of the current literature and outlines the advantages and disadvantages of piezoelectric bone surgery in implant dentistry. Overall, piezoelectric surgery is superior to other methods that utilize mechanical instruments. Handling of delicate or compromised hard- and soft-tissue conditions can be performed with less risk for the patient. With respect to current and future innovative surgical concepts, piezoelectric surgery offers a wide range of new possibilities to perform customized and minimally invasive osteotomies. Keywords: implantology, piezoelectric device, piezosurgery, maxillary sinus elevation, bone grafting, osteotomy, edentulous ridge splitting

  19. Labyrinthectomy with cochlear implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwolan, T A; Shepard, N T; Niparko, J K

    1993-05-01

    Numerous reports indicate that the cochlea remains responsive to electrical stimulation following labyrinthectomy. We report a case of a 47-year-old woman with a severe to profound sensorineural hearing loss from birth, who developed episodic vertigo with symptoms suggestive of delayed onset endolymphatic hydrops. Following 8 months of failed medical and vestibular rehabilitation management, a right-sided labyrinthectomy combined with cochlear implantation was performed without complication. Postoperatively the patient was free of vertigo. Attempts to activate the patient's device between 4 to 12 weeks after surgery were unsuccessful as stimulation of the electrodes resulted in discomfort. However, all 20 electrodes elicited comfortable hearing sensations 16 weeks postsurgery. One year after the successful activation, the patient demonstrated improved sound awareness and speech recognition with the implant when compared with preoperative performance with a hearing aid. This case study suggests that electrical detection thresholds with prosthetic stimulation may be unstable in the recently labyrinthectomized ear but supports and extends prior observations of preserved cochlear responsiveness after labyrinthectomy.

  20. Developing a Research Instrument to Document Awareness, Knowledge, and Attitudes Regarding Breast Cancer and Early Detection Techniques for Pakistani Women: The Breast Cancer Inventory (BCI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atta Abbas Naqvi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available There is a general hesitation in participation among Pakistani women when it comes to giving their responses in surveys related to breast cancer which may be due to the associated stigma and conservatism in society. We felt that no research instrument was able to extract information from the respondents to the extent it was needed for the successful execution of our study. The need to develop a research instrument tailored for Pakistani women was based upon the fact that most Pakistani women come from a conservative background and sometimes view this topic as provocative and believe discussing publicly about it as inappropriate. Existing research instruments exhibited a number of weaknesses during literature review. Therefore, using them may not be able to extract information concretely. A research instrument was, thus, developed exclusively. It was coined as, “breast cancer inventory (BCI” by a panel of experts for executing a study aimed at documenting awareness, knowledge, and attitudes of Pakistani women regarding breast cancer and early detection techniques. The study is still in the data collection phase. The statistical analysis involved the Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin (KMO measure and Bartlett’s test for sampling adequacy. In addition, reliability analysis and exploratory factor analysis (EFA were, also employed. This concept paper focuses on the development, piloting and validation of the BCI. It is the first research instrument which has high acceptability among Pakistani women and is able to extract adequate information from the respondents without causing embarrassment or unease.

  1. Modification of electrical properties of polymer membranes by ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dworecki, K.; Hasegawa, T.; Sudlitz, K.; Wasik, S.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental study of the electrical properties of polymer ion irradiated polyethylene terephthalate (PET) membranes. The polymer samples have been implanted with a variety of ions (O 5+ , N 4+ , Kr 9+ ) by the energy of 10 keV/q up to doses of 10 15 ions/cm 2 and then they were polarized in an electric field of 4.16x10 6 V/m at non-isothermal conditions. The electrical properties and the changes in the chemical structure of implanted membrane were measured by conductivity and discharge currents and FTIR spectra. Electrical conductivity of the membranes PET increases to 1-3 orders of magnitude after implantation and is determined by the charge transport caused by free space charge and by thermal detrapping of charge carriers. The spectra of thermally induced discharge current (TDC) shows that ion irradiated PET membranes are characterized by high ability to accumulate charge

  2. When Not to Go SOLO? Contraindications Based on Implant Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollersheim, Laurens W; Li, Wilson W; Kaya, Abdullah; van Boven, Wim J; van der Meulen, Jan; de Mol, Bas A

    2016-11-01

    Because of the design and specific implantation technique of the stentless Freedom SOLO bioprosthesis, patient selection is crucial. The aim of the study was to discuss the contraindications to this prosthesis based on the authors' implant experience. Between April 2005 and February 2015, one surgeon at the authors' center performed 292 aortic valve replacements using a bioprosthesis, with the initial intention of implanting a SOLO valve in every patient. A search was conducted for all of these patients and data collected on whether a SOLO valve was used, or not. A SOLO valve was implanted in 238 patients (82%), and a stented bioprosthesis in 54 (18%). The predominant reasons not to implant a SOLO valve were asymmetric commissures (26%) and a large aortic annulus (24%). Only one patient had structural valve deterioration, and none of the patients had to undergo reoperation because of aortic valve insufficiency or paravalvular leakage. Asymmetric commissures, large aortic annulus (>27 mm), calcified aortic sinuses, dilated sinotubular junction, aberrant location of coronary ostia and whenever the stent of a stented bioprosthesis is useful, were contraindications to implant a SOLO valve. When these contraindications were taken into account, a very good durability could be achieved with the SOLO valve during mid-term follow up.

  3. Ion implantation damage annealing in 4H-SiC monitored by scanning spreading resistance microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suchodolskis, A.; Hallen, A.; Linnarsson, M.K.; Osterman, J.; Karlsson, U.O.

    2006-01-01

    To obtain a better understanding of the damage annealing process and dopant defect incorporation and activation we have implanted epitaxially grown 4H-SiC layers with high doses of Al + ions. Cross-sections of the samples are investigated by scanning spreading resistance microscopy (SSRM) using a commercial atomic force microscopy (AFM). The defects caused by the implanted ions compensate for the doping and decrease the charge carrier mobility. This causes the resistivity to increase in the as-implanted regions. The calculated profile of implanted ions is in good agreement with the measured ones and shows a skewed Gaussian shape. Implanted samples are annealed up to 400 deg. C. Despite these low annealing temperatures we observe a clear improvement of the sample conductivity in the as-implanted region

  4. Immediate implants in extraction sockets with periapical lesions: an illustrated review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur B. Novaes Jr.

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim Immediate implantation has gained great attention since first proposed. Immediate implants in replacement of teeth with periapical lesion is, to date, an issue of discussion. The aim of this study is to perform an illustrated literature review of immediate implants in sockets exhibiting previous periapical lesions.Materials and methods A search on medline/EMBASE database was done for the literature review which is presented together with two case reports illustrating the state of the art of immediate implants on sockets with periapical lesions. Both cases are presented in areas with great aesthetic demands and a periapical lesion of considerable size. The two cases were conducted following strict granulation tissue removal and careful rinsing and pre-operative antibiotics, followed by good primary stability of the dental implant.Results and conclusion Both cases represented successes in aesthetics and function, describing a successful protocol for immediate implant installation in areas exhibiting periapical lesions.

  5. Influence of implant rod curvature on sagittal correction of scoliosis deformity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salmingo, Remel A.; Tadano, Shigeru; Abe, Yuichiro

    2014-01-01

    of the implant rod’s angle of curvature during surgery and establish its influence on sagittal correction of scoliosis deformity. STUDY DESIGN: A retrospective analysis of the preoperative and postoperative implant rod geometry and angle of curvature was conducted. PATIENT SAMPLE: Twenty adolescent idiopathic......BACKGROUND CONTEXT: Deformation of in vivo–implanted rods could alter the scoliosis sagittal correction. To our knowledge, no previous authors have investigated the influence of implanted-rod deformation on the sagittal deformity correction during scoliosis surgery. PURPOSE: To analyze the changes...... scoliosis patients underwent surgery. Average age at the time of operation was 14 years. OUTCOME MEASURES: The preoperative and postoperative implant rod angle of curvature expressed in degrees was obtained for each patient. METHODS: Two implant rods were attached to the concave and convex side...

  6. Influence of Different Implant Geometry in Clinical Longevity and Maintenance of Marginal Bone: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovatto, Sabrina Telles; Bassani, Rafaela; Sarkis-Onofre, Rafael; Dos Santos, Mateus Bertolini Fernandes

    2018-03-26

    To assess, through a systematic review, the influence of different implant geometries on clinical longevity and maintenance of marginal bone tissue. An electronic search was conducted in MEDLINE, Scopus, and Web of Science databases, limited to studies written in English from 1996 to 2017 using specific search strategies. Only randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that compared dental implants and their geometries were included. Two reviewers independently selected studies, extracted data, and assessed the risk of bias of included studies. From the 4006 references identified by the search, 24 were considered eligible for full-text analysis, after which 10 studies were included in this review. A similar behavior of marginal bone loss between tapered and cylindrical geometries was observed; however, implants that had micro-threads in the neck presented a slight decrease of marginal bone loss compared to implants with straight or smooth neck. Success and survival rates were high, with cylindrical implants presenting higher success and survival rates than tapered ones. Implant geometry seems to have little influence on marginal bone loss (MBL) and survival and success rates after 1 year of implant placement; however, the evidence in this systematic review was classified as very low due to limitations such as study design, sample size, and publication bias. Thus, more well-designed RCTs should be conducted to provide evidence regarding the influence of implant geometry on MBL and survival and success rates after 1 year of implant placement. © 2018 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  7. Ion implantation and amorphous metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hohmuth, K.; Rauschenbach, B.

    1981-01-01

    This review deals with ion implantation of metals in the high concentration range for preparing amorphous layers (>= 10 at%, implantation doses > 10 16 ions/cm 2 ). Different models are described concerning formation of amorphous phases of metals by ion implantation and experimental results are given. The study of amorphous phases has been carried out by the aid of Rutherford backscattering combined with the channeling technique and using transmission electron microscopy. The structure of amorphous metals prepared by ion implantation has been discussed. It was concluded that amorphous metal-metalloid compounds can be described by a dense-random-packing structure with a great portion of metal atoms. Ion implantation has been compared with other techniques for preparing amorphous metals and the adventages have been outlined

  8. Ion implantation: an annotated bibliography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ting, R.N.; Subramanyam, K.

    1975-10-01

    Ion implantation is a technique for introducing controlled amounts of dopants into target substrates, and has been successfully used for the manufacture of silicon semiconductor devices. Ion implantation is superior to other methods of doping such as thermal diffusion and epitaxy, in view of its advantages such as high degree of control, flexibility, and amenability to automation. This annotated bibliography of 416 references consists of journal articles, books, and conference papers in English and foreign languages published during 1973-74, on all aspects of ion implantation including range distribution and concentration profile, channeling, radiation damage and annealing, compound semiconductors, structural and electrical characterization, applications, equipment and ion sources. Earlier bibliographies on ion implantation, and national and international conferences in which papers on ion implantation were presented have also been listed separately

  9. Microstructures of group III-nitrides after implantation with gallium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kench, P.J.

    2001-05-01

    High doses of gallium have been implanted into layers of aluminium nitride (AIN), indium nitride (InN) and amorphous silicon nitride (a-SiN x ) in an attempt to bond gallium with nitrogen and form binary or ternary alloys. The microstructure of the resultant layers have been characterised using, principally, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The implantation of a high dose of Ga ions into AIN was successful in synthesising a GaN/GaAlN compound. The resultant layers were largely uniform but contained aluminium precipitates near the surface. These precipitates were pure Al and were most common in the region associated with the maximum Ga concentration. Deconvolution of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy peaks indicated that Ga existed in a number of chemical states, including the nitride. Electron diffraction patterns from the implanted layers were closely indexed to both AIN and GaN. A further N implant was used to reduce the concentration of the aluminium precipitates and increase the concentration of GaN bonds. The yield of Ga-N bonds dramatically increased and a reduction in the concentration of Al precipitates was observed. Laser and thermal annealing was performed on the implanted AIN substrates. The near surface regions of the implanted specimens appeared to free of precipitates and bubbles. Laser annealing did have a noticeable effect on the electrical and optical properties of the layers. After laser annealing the conductivity of the Ga implanted layer was lower, indicating that the quality of the material had improved. PL measurements showed that a new PL peak at 2.6 eV appeared after laser annealing. It has been found that implanting InN with gallium can yield Ga-N bonds. However, Ga implants into InN were not as successful at synthesising GaN compounds as those by implanting Ga into AIN, due to the low thermal stability of InN. The implanted InN layers were very irregular and contained large indium precipitates and

  10. Tribological properties of nitrogen implanted and boron implanted steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kern, K.T.

    1996-01-01

    Samples of a steel with high chrome content was implanted separately with 75 keV nitrogen ions and with 75 keV boron ions. Implanted doses of each ion species were 2-, 4-, and 8 x 10 17 /cm 2 . Retained doses were measured using resonant non-Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry. Tribological properties were determined using a pin-on-disk test with a 6-mm diameter ruby pin with a velocity of 0.94 m/min. Testing was done at 10% humidity with a load of 377 g. Wear rate and coefficient of friction were determined from these tests. While reduction in the wear rate for nitrogen implanted materials was observed, greater reduction (more than an order of magnitude) was observed for boron implanted materials. In addition, reduction in the coefficient of friction for high-dose boron implanted materials was observed. Nano-indentation revealed a hardened layer near the surface of the material. Results from grazing incidence x-ray diffraction suggest the formation of Fe 2 N and Fe 3 N in the nitrogen implanted materials and Fe 3 B in the boron implanted materials. Results from transmission electron microscopy will be presented

  11. Cochlear implantation in late-implanted adults with prelingual deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most, Tova; Shrem, Hadas; Duvdevani, Ilana

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of cochlear implantation (CI) on prelingually deafened participants who were implanted as adults. The effect of the CI was examined with regard to the following variables: communication, family, social skills, education, and work satisfaction with one's life, loneliness, and self-esteem. Thirty-eight adults participated. Four self-report questionnaires were used at 2 points in time: before and after CI. The research findings show significant differences in the reports of most variables before and after implantation. The participants felt better with regard to communication, social skills, education, and work and satisfaction with one's life after implantation in comparison to their feelings before implantation. Furthermore, they felt less lonely after implantation. However, there were no significant differences before and after implantation regarding their feelings within the family and regarding their self-esteem. The results demonstrated the need to evaluate the benefits resulting from the CI not only with traditional clinical measures but with additional measures as well. Furthermore, they demonstrated the benefit of the CI on the positive psychosociological implications of prelingually deafened adults. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Multisensory Integration in Cochlear Implant Recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Ryan A; Sheffield, Sterling W; Butera, Iliza M; Gifford, René H; Wallace, Mark T

    Speech perception is inherently a multisensory process involving integration of auditory and visual cues. Multisensory integration in cochlear implant (CI) recipients is a unique circumstance in that the integration occurs after auditory deprivation and the provision of hearing via the CI. Despite the clear importance of multisensory cues for perception, in general, and for speech intelligibility, specifically, the topic of multisensory perceptual benefits in CI users has only recently begun to emerge as an area of inquiry. We review the research that has been conducted on multisensory integration in CI users to date and suggest a number of areas needing further research. The overall pattern of results indicates that many CI recipients show at least some perceptual gain that can be attributable to multisensory integration. The extent of this gain, however, varies based on a number of factors, including age of implantation and specific task being assessed (e.g., stimulus detection, phoneme perception, word recognition). Although both children and adults with CIs obtain audiovisual benefits for phoneme, word, and sentence stimuli, neither group shows demonstrable gain for suprasegmental feature perception. Additionally, only early-implanted children and the highest performing adults obtain audiovisual integration benefits similar to individuals with normal hearing. Increasing age of implantation in children is associated with poorer gains resultant from audiovisual integration, suggesting a sensitive period in development for the brain networks that subserve these integrative functions, as well as length of auditory experience. This finding highlights the need for early detection of and intervention for hearing loss, not only in terms of auditory perception, but also in terms of the behavioral and perceptual benefits of audiovisual processing. Importantly, patterns of auditory, visual, and audiovisual responses suggest that underlying integrative processes may be

  13. What do patients expect from treatment with Dental Implants? Perceptions, expectations and misconceptions: a multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jie; Li, Ming; Tang, Hua; Wang, Peng-Lai; Zhao, Yu-Xiao; McGrath, Colman; Mattheos, Nikos

    2017-03-01

    While research in terms of patient-centered care in implant therapy is growing, few studies have investigated patients' initial perceptions prior to consultation with the implant dentist. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to capture patients' initial information level, perceptions, as well as expectations from the implant therapy. A 34-item questionnaire was developed to investigate patients' preoperative information, perceptions and expectations from treatment with Dental Implants. The study was conducted in three locations (Hong Kong, SiChuan and JiangSu) during 2014-2015 with 277 patients. The main information source about implant therapy was the dentist or hygienist for less than half of the patients (n = 113, 42%). About 62.8% of participants considered that they were in general informed about implants, but only 17.7% felt confident with the information they had. More than 30% of the sample appeared to maintain dangerous misperceptions about Dental Implants: "Dental Implants require less care than natural teeth"; "Treatment with Dental Implants is appropriate for all patients with missing teeth"; "Dental Implants last longer than natural teeth"; and "Treatments with Dental Implants have no risks or complications." Patients were divided when asked whether "Dental Implants are as functional as natural teeth" (agreement frequency = 52.7%). Expectations from treatment outcome were commonly high, while there was a significant correlation between the overall mean of perception scores and outcome expectation scores (r = 0.32, P dental team would need to diagnose and correct prior to initiating implant treatment. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Maxillary Implant-Supported Fixed Prosthesis: A Survey of Reviews and Key Variables for Treatment Planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallucci, German O; Avrampou, Marianna; Taylor, James C; Elpers, Julie; Thalji, Ghadeer; Cooper, Lyndon F

    2016-01-01

    This review was conducted to provide information to support the establishment of clinical guidelines for the treatment of maxillary edentulism using implant-supported fixed dental prostheses. Initial efforts were directed toward a systematic review with a defined PICO question: "For maxillary edentulous patients with dental implants treated using a fixed prosthesis, what is the impact of prosthesis design on prosthesis survival and complications?" Following a title search of more than 3,000 titles identified by electronic search of PubMed, 180 articles were identified that addressed the clinical evaluation of maxillary dental implant prostheses. The broad methodologic heterogeneity and clinical variation among reports precluded this approach for a systematic review. The information was extracted using a standardized extraction table by two pairs of investigators, and the reported outcomes were then summarized according to reported outcomes for implant prostheses supported by four, six, or eight implants using unitary or segmented prostheses. This review indicated that high prosthetic survival is observed using all approaches. The advantages of using fewer implants and a unitary prosthesis are revealed in the surgical phases, and complications commonly involve the fracture or detachment of acrylic teeth and reduced access for proper oral hygiene and related biologic complications. Using six implants typically involved grafting of posterior regions with advantages of reduced cantilevers and redundancy of implant support. Reduced prosthesis survival in these cases was associated with poor implant distribution. Segmented prostheses supported by six or more implants offered greater prosthetic survival, perhaps due to posterior implant placement. Advantages of a segmented prosthesis included pragmatic issues of accommodating divergent implants, attaining passive fit, combining prosthetic materials, and relative simplicity of repair. The existing literature demonstrated

  15. A Retrospective Analysis of Ruptured Breast Implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woo Yeol Baek

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundRupture is an important complication of breast implants. Before cohesive gel silicone implants, rupture rates of both saline and silicone breast implants were over 10%. Through an analysis of ruptured implants, we can determine the various factors related to ruptured implants.MethodsWe performed a retrospective review of 72 implants that were removed for implant rupture between 2005 and 2014 at a single institution. The following data were collected: type of implants (saline or silicone, duration of implantation, type of implant shell, degree of capsular contracture, associated symptoms, cause of rupture, diagnostic tools, and management.ResultsForty-five Saline implants and 27 silicone implants were used. Rupture was diagnosed at a mean of 5.6 and 12 years after insertion of saline and silicone implants, respectively. There was no association between shell type and risk of rupture. Spontaneous was the most common reason for the rupture. Rupture management was implant change (39 case, microfat graft (2 case, removal only (14 case, and follow-up loss (17 case.ConclusionsSaline implants have a shorter average duration of rupture, but diagnosis is easier and safer, leading to fewer complications. Previous-generation silicone implants required frequent follow-up observation, and it is recommended that they be changed to a cohesive gel implant before hidden rupture occurs.

  16. Systematic review of the effectiveness of polyurethane-coated compared with textured silicone implants in breast surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duxbury, Paula J; Harvey, James R

    2016-04-01

    Silicone gel implants are used worldwide for breast augmentation and breast reconstruction. Textured silicone implants are the most commonly placed implant, but polyurethane-coated implants are increasingly being used in an attempt to ameliorate the long-term complications associated with implant insertion. This systematic review was conducted according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses guidelines. Electronic searches of MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library and www.ClinicalTrials.gov were undertaken in March 2014 using keywords. Following data extraction, 18 studies were included in the review, including four core studies of textured silicone implants and five studies reporting outcomes for polyurethane-coated silicone implants. There are no clear data reporting revision rates in patients treated with polyurethane implants. In the primary reconstructive setting, capsular contracture rates with silicone implants are 10-15% at 6 years, whilst studies of polyurethane implants report rates of 1.8-3.4%. In the primary augmentation setting, core studies show a capsular contracture rate of 2-15% at 6 years compared with 0.4-1% in polyurethane-coated implants; however, the polyurethane studies are limited by their design and poor follow-up. The use of polyurethane implants should be considered a safe alternative to textured silicone implants. It is likely that an implant surface does influence short- and long-term outcomes; however, the extent of any benefit cannot be determined from the available evidence base. Future implant studies should target the short- and long-term benefits of implant surfacing by procedure with defined outcome measures; a head-to-head comparison would help clarify outcomes. Copyright © 2016 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. [Maintenance care for dental implant].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamoi, K

    1989-10-01

    Dental implant has tried at the early stage in 19th century recovering an oral function and esthetics. Technological revolutions in biochemical and new materials have developed on the remarkable change in the dental implants, nowadays we call the three generation therapy for dental implantology. There are many kinds of methods and techniques in dental implants, however a lot of troublesome complication on the process of surgical phase, construction of prothodontics and prognosis of maintenance care. In the proceedings of this symposium, I would like to propose you how to manage the maintenance care for various kind of dental implants through the methodology and case presentations. Tendenay and future for dental implants The current outlook of dental implant has increasing supply and demand not only dentists but also patients. According to Japanese Welfare Ministry's report in 1987, average missing teeth over sixty years old generations are approximately 42% in accordance with NIDR (U.S.A.) research. They are missed on ten over teeth in full 28th teeth dentitions owing to dental caries and periodontal diseases. Generally speaking, latent implant patients are occupied on the same possibility of needs for dental implants both Japan and U.S.A. Management of maintenance care The patients hardly recognized the importance of plaque control for the maintenance care in the intraoral condition after implantation. Dentists and dental staffs must be instruct patients for importance of plaque removal and control, because they already had forgotten the habit of teeth cleaning, especially in the edenturous conditions. 1) Concept of establishment in oral hygiene. Motivation and instruction for patients include very important factors in dental implants as well as in periodontal diseases. Patients who could not achieve on good oral hygiene levels obtained no good results in the long term observations. To establish good oral hygiene are how to control supra plaque surrounding tissues

  18. Beam Profile Disturbances from Implantable Pacemakers or Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gossman, Michael S., E-mail: mgossman@tsrcc.com [Tri-State Regional Cancer Center, Medical Physics Section, Ashland, KY (United States); Comprehensive Heart and Vascular Associates, Heart and Vascular Center, Ashland, KY (United States); Medtronic, Inc., External Research Program, Mounds View, MN (United States); Nagra, Bipinpreet; Graves-Calhoun, Alison; Wilkinson, Jeffrey [Tri-State Regional Cancer Center, Medical Physics Section, Ashland, KY (United States); Comprehensive Heart and Vascular Associates, Heart and Vascular Center, Ashland, KY (United States); Medtronic, Inc., External Research Program, Mounds View, MN (United States)

    2011-01-01

    The medical community is advocating for progressive improvement in the design of implantable cardioverter-defibrillators and implantable pacemakers to accommodate elevations in dose limitation criteria. With advancement already made for magnetic resonance imaging compatibility in some, a greater need is present to inform the radiation oncologist and medical physicist regarding treatment planning beam profile changes when such devices are in the field of a therapeutic radiation beam. Treatment plan modeling was conducted to simulate effects induced by Medtronic, Inc.-manufactured devices on therapeutic radiation beams. As a continuation of grant-supported research, we show that radial and transverse open beam profiles of a medical accelerator were altered when compared with profiles resulting when implantable pacemakers and cardioverter-defibrillators are placed directly in the beam. Results are markedly different between the 2 devices in the axial plane and the sagittal planes. Vast differences are also presented for the therapeutic beams at 6-MV and 18-MV x-ray energies. Maximum changes in percentage depth dose are observed for the implantable cardioverter-defibrillator as 9.3% at 6 MV and 10.1% at 18 MV, with worst distance to agreement of isodose lines at 2.3 cm and 1.3 cm, respectively. For the implantable pacemaker, the maximum changes in percentage depth dose were observed as 10.7% at 6 MV and 6.9% at 18 MV, with worst distance to agreement of isodose lines at 2.5 cm and 1.9 cm, respectively. No differences were discernible for the defibrillation leads and the pacing lead.

  19. Antibiotics in the treatment of peri-implantitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Winkelhoff, Arie Jan

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To review and discuss current literature on the use of systemically administered or locally delivered antibiotics in the treatment of peri-implantitis. Materials and methods: A literature search was conducted using MEDLINE through the Pub Med database of the US National Library of Medicine

  20. Ion implantation apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forneris, J.L.; Hicks, W.W.; Keller, J.H.; McKenna, C.M.; Siermarco, J.A.; Mueller, W.F.

    1981-01-01

    The invention relates to ion bombardment or implantation apparatus. It comprises an apparatus for bombarding a target with a beam of ions, including an arrangement for measuring the ion beam current and controlling the surface potential of the target. This comprises a Faraday cage formed, at least in part, by the target and by walls adjacent to, and electrically insulated from, the target and surrounding the beam. There is at least one electron source for supplying electrons to the interior of the Faraday cage and means within the cage for blocking direct rectilinear radiation from the source to the target. The target current is measured and combined with the wall currents to provide a measurement of the ion beam current. The quantity of electrons supplied to the interior of the cage can be varied to control the target current and thereby the target surface potential. (U.K.)

  1. Implantable biochemical fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richter, G; Rao, J R

    1978-01-05

    Implantable biochemical fuel cells for the operation of heart pacemakers or artificial hearts convert oxidisable body substances such as glucose on the anode side and reduce the oxygen contained in body fluids at the cathode. The anode and cathode are separated by membranes which are impermeable to albumen and blood corpuscles in body fluids. A chemical shortcircuit cannot occur in practice if, according to the invention, one or more selective oxygen electrodes with carbon as catalyst are arranged so that the mixture which diffuses into the cell from body fluids during operation reaches the fuel cell electrode through the porous oxygen electrode. The membranes used must be permeable to water. Cellulose, polymerised polyvinyl alcohol or an ion exchanger with a buffering capacity between pH5 and 8 act as permeable materials.

  2. Implant materials modified by colloids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zboromirska-Wnukiewicz Beata

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in general medicine led to the development of biomaterials. Implant material should be characterized by a high biocompatibility to the tissue and appropriate functionality, i.e. to have high mechanical and electrical strength and be stable in an electrolyte environment – these are the most important properties of bioceramic materials. Considerations of biomaterials design embrace also electrical properties occurring on the implant-body fluid interface and consequently the electrokinetic potential, which can be altered by modifying the surface of the implant. In this work, the surface of the implants was modified to decrease the risk of infection by using metal colloids. Nanocolloids were obtained using different chemical and electrical methods. It was found that the colloids obtained by physical and electrical methods are more stable than colloids obtained by chemical route. In this work the surface of modified corundum implants was investigated. The implant modified by nanosilver, obtained by electrical method was selected. The in vivo research on animals was carried out. Clinical observations showed that the implants with modified surface could be applied to wounds caused by atherosclerotic skeleton, for curing the chronic and bacterial inflammations as well as for skeletal reconstruction surgery.

  3. Basic research on maxillofacial implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsui, Yoshiro [Showa Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Dentistry

    2001-11-01

    Osseointegrated implants have begun to be used not only in general practice in dentistry but also in various clinical situations in the maxillofacial region. The process has yielded three problems: the spread of application, new materials and diagnostic methods, and management for difficult situations. This paper presents basic data and clinical guidelines for new applications, it investigates the characteristics of the materials and the usefulness of a new diagnostic method, and it studies effective techniques for difficult cases. The results obtained are as follows: Investigations into the spreading application. The lateral and superior orbital rim have sufficient bone thickness and width for the implant body to be placed. Osseointegrated implants, especially by the fixed bridge technique, are not recommended in the craniofacial bone and jaws of young children. Implant placement into bone after/before irradiation must be performed in consideration of impaired osteogenesis, the decrease of trabecular bone, and the time interval between implantation and irradiation. Investigations into materials and diagnostic methods. Hydroxyapatite-coated and titanium implants should be selected according to the characteristics of the materials. A dental simulating soft may also be applicable in the craniofacial region. Investigations into the management of difficult cases. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBO), bone morphogenetic protein (BMP), and tissue engineering should be useful for improving the quality and increasing the quantity of bone where implants are placed. Soft tissue around implants placed in the reconstructed area should be replaced with mucosal tissue. The data obtained here should be useful for increasing the efficiency of osseointegrated implants, but further basic research is required in the future. (author)

  4. Basic research on maxillofacial implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsui, Yoshiro

    2001-01-01

    Osseointegrated implants have begun to be used not only in general practice in dentistry but also in various clinical situations in the maxillofacial region. The process has yielded three problems: the spread of application, new materials and diagnostic methods, and management for difficult situations. This paper presents basic data and clinical guidelines for new applications, it investigates the characteristics of the materials and the usefulness of a new diagnostic method, and it studies effective techniques for difficult cases. The results obtained are as follows: Investigations into the spreading application. The lateral and superior orbital rim have sufficient bone thickness and width for the implant body to be placed. Osseointegrated implants, especially by the fixed bridge technique, are not recommended in the craniofacial bone and jaws of young children. Implant placement into bone after/before irradiation must be performed in consideration of impaired osteogenesis, the decrease of trabecular bone, and the time interval between implantation and irradiation. Investigations into materials and diagnostic methods. Hydroxyapatite-coated and titanium implants should be selected according to the characteristics of the materials. A dental simulating soft may also be applicable in the craniofacial region. Investigations into the management of difficult cases. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBO), bone morphogenetic protein (BMP), and tissue engineering should be useful for improving the quality and increasing the quantity of bone where implants are placed. Soft tissue around implants placed in the reconstructed area should be replaced with mucosal tissue. The data obtained here should be useful for increasing the efficiency of osseointegrated implants, but further basic research is required in the future. (author)

  5. Surface modifications of dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanford, C M

    2008-06-01

    Dental implant surface technologies have been evolving rapidly to enhance a more rapid bone formation on their surface and hold a potential to increase the predictability of expedited implant therapy. While implant outcomes have become highly predictable, there are sites and conditions that result in elevated implant loss. This paper reviews the impact of macro-retentive features which includes approaches to surface oxide modification, thread design, press-fit and sintered-bead technologies to increase predictability of outcomes. Implant designs that lead to controlled lateral compression of the bone can improve primary stability as long as the stress does not exceed the localized yield strength of the cortical bone. Some implant designs have reduced crestal bone loss by use of multiple cutting threads that are closely spaced, smoothed on the tip but designed to create a hoop-stress stability of the implant as it is completely seated in the osteotomy. Following the placement of the implant, there is a predictable sequence of bone turnover and replacement at the interface that allows the newly formed bone to adapt to microscopic roughness on the implant surface, and on some surfaces, a nanotopography (<10(-9) m scale) that has been shown to preferably influence the formation of bone. Newly emerging studies show that bone cells are exquisitely sensitive to these topographical features and will upregulate the expression of bone related genes for new bone formation when grown on these surfaces. We live in an exciting time of rapid changes in the modalities we can offer patients for tooth replacement therapy. Given this, it is our responsibility to be critical when claims are made, incorporate into our practice what is proven and worthwhile, and to continue to support and provide the best patient care possible.

  6. Scalloped Implant-Abutment Connection Compared to Conventional Flat Implant-Abutment Connection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Starch-Jensen, Thomas; Christensen, Ann-Eva; Lorenzen, Henning

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The objective was to test the hypothesis of no difference in implant treatment outcome after installation of implants with a scalloped implant-abutment connection compared to a flat implant-abutment connection. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A MEDLINE (PubMed), Embase and Cochrane library search...... of suprastructures has never been compared within the same study. High implant survival rate was reported in all the included studies. Significantly more peri-implant marginal bone loss, higher probing depth score, bleeding score and gingival score was observed around implants with a scalloped implant-abutment...... loss around implants with a scalloped implant-abutment connection. CONCLUSIONS: A scalloped implant-abutment connection seems to be associated with higher peri-implant marginal bone loss compared to a flat implant-abutment connection. Therefore, the hypothesis of the present systematic review must...

  7. Implantable cardioverter defibrillator implantation in children in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ten Harkel, ADJ; Blom, NA; Reimer, AG; Tukkie, R; Sreeram, N; Bink-Boelkens, MTE

    To evaluate the indications, underlying cardiac disorders, efficacy and complications involved with implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) in paediatric patients in The Netherlands, the records of all patients aged 18 years or younger who underwent ICD placement were reviewed

  8. Implantable cardioverter defibrillator implantation in children in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Harkel, A. Derk Jan; Blom, Nico A.; Reimer, Annette G.; Tukkie, Raymond; Sreeram, Narayanswami; Bink-Boelkens, Margreet T. E.

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate the indications, underlying cardiac disorders, efficacy and complications involved with implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) in paediatric patients in The Netherlands, the records of all patients aged 18 years or younger who underwent ICD placement were reviewed

  9. Nitrogen implantation in steel with an impulsive ion implanter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feugeas, J.N.; Gonzalez, C.O.; Hermida, J.; Nieto, M.; Peyronel, M.F.; Sanchez, G.

    1990-01-01

    This work describes the results of steel implantation with nitrogen, with a pulsed accelerator which provides a continuous ion energy spectrum giving a uniform profile of nitrogen without changing its operative conditions. (Author)

  10. Case presentation of florid cemento-osseous dysplasia with concomitant cemento-ossifying fibroma discovered during implant explantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlach, Robert C; Dixon, Douglas R; Goksel, Tamer; Castle, James T; Henry, Walter A

    2013-03-01

    A 39-year-old African American woman presented for treatment of a symptomatic mandibular right first molar with a large, periapical radiolucency. After initial attempts at endodontic therapy, this tooth was ultimately extracted owing to unabated symptoms. The extraction site underwent ridge preservation grafting, implant placement, and restoration. After 26 months of implant function, the patient returned with clinical symptoms of pain, buccal swelling, and the sensation of a "loose" implant. This case report details a diagnosis of 2 distinct disease entities associated with the implant site, a cemento-ossifying fibroma and florid cemento-osseous dysplasia of the mandible. This diagnosis was determined from clinical, surgical, radiographic, and histopathologic evidence after biopsy and removal of the previously osseointegrated implant following postinsertion failure by fibrous encapsulation. Before implant therapy, it is essential to conduct a thorough radiographic evaluation of any dental arch with suspected bony lesions to prevent implant failure. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  11. Ion implantation in semiconductor bodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badawi, M.H.

    1984-01-01

    Ions are selectively implanted into layers of a semiconductor substrate of, for example, semi-insulating gallium arsenide via a photoresist implantation mask and a metallic layer of, for example, titanium disposed between the substrate surface and the photoresist mask. After implantation the mask and metallic layer are removed and the substrate heat treated for annealing purposes. The metallic layer acts as a buffer layer and prevents possible contamination of the substrate surface, by photoresist residues, at the annealing stage. Such contamination would adversely affect the electrical properties of the substrate surface, particularly gallium arsenide substrates. (author)

  12. Hardness of ion implanted ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliver, W.C.; McHargue, C.J.; Farlow, G.C.; White, C.W.

    1985-01-01

    It has been established that the wear behavior of ceramic materials can be modified through ion implantation. Studies have been done to characterize the effect of implantation on the structure and composition of ceramic surfaces. To understand how these changes affect the wear properties of the ceramic, other mechanical properties must be measured. To accomplish this, a commercially available ultra low load hardness tester has been used to characterize Al 2 O 3 with different implanted species and doses. The hardness of the base material is compared with the highly damaged crystalline state as well as the amorphous material

  13. An introduction to single implant abutments.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Warreth, Abdulhadi

    2013-01-01

    This article is an introduction to single implant abutments and aims to provide basic information about abutments which are essential for all dental personnel who are involved in dental implantology. Clinical Relevance: This article provides a basic knowledge of implants and implant abutments which are of paramount importance, as replacement of missing teeth with oral implants has become a well-established clinical procedure.

  14. Cochlear implantation in a bilateral Mondini dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turrini, M; Orzan, E; Gabana, M; Genovese, E; Arslan, E; Fisch, U

    1997-01-01

    We report the speech perception progress and programming procedures of a case of congenital profound deafness and bilateral Mondini dysplasia implanted with a Nucleus 20 + 2 cochlear implant at the age of six. Unclear relations between electrodes array and cochlear partition made implant programming difficult and non-standard procedures were set. Cochlear implantation may give excellent rehabilitative results also in cochleae with malformation.

  15. Implant retention systems for implant-retained overdentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laverty, D P; Green, D; Marrison, D; Addy, L; Thomas, M B M

    2017-03-10

    Implant retained overdentures are being increasingly utilised in both general and specialist practice to rehabilitate patients with missing teeth, particularly those that are edentate. This article aims to inform the reader of a variety of retention systems that are available to retain an implant overdenture and to understand how these systems work, their advantages and disadvantages and to outline some of the clinical and treatment planning considerations involved in selecting the most appropriate retention system for patients.

  16. Implant Materials Generate Different Peri-implant Inflammatory Factors

    OpenAIRE

    Olivares-Navarrete, Rene; Hyzy, Sharon L.; Slosar, Paul J.; Schneider, Jennifer M.; Schwartz, Zvi; Boyan, Barbara D.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design. An in vitro study examining factors produced by human mesenchymal stem cells on spine implant materials. Objective. The aim of this study was to examine whether the inflammatory microenvironment generated by cells on titanium-aluminum-vanadium (Ti-alloy, TiAlV) surfaces is affected by surface microtexture and whether it differs from that generated on poly-ether-ether-ketone (PEEK). Summary of Background Data. Histologically, implants fabricated from PEEK have a fibrous connectiv...

  17. Multidimensional Heat Conduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rode, Carsten

    1998-01-01

    Analytical theory of multidimensional heat conduction. General heat conduction equation in three dimensions. Steay state, analytical solutions. The Laplace equation. Method of separation of variables. Principle of superposition. Shape factors. Transient, multidimensional heat conduction....

  18. Structure of ion-implanted ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naramoto, Hiroshi

    1983-01-01

    The variation of structure of LiF, MgO, Al 2 O 3 and TiO 2 accompanying annealing after ion implantation is explained. The analysis of structure is usually made by the perturbed gamma ray angular correlation, the internal electron Moessbauer method, or the ion scattering method. The results of analyses are discussed for alkali ion implantation, Fe-ion implantation, In-ion implantation, Au-ion implantation, Pt-ion implantation, Pb-ion implantation and transition metal ion implantation. The coupling of the implanted elements with lattice defects and matrix elements, and the compatibility between deposited elements and matrix crystal lattice were studied. The variation of physical properties due to ion implantation such as phase transition, volume change, the control of single crystal region, and the variation of hardness near surface were investigated, and the examples are presented. (Kato, T.)

  19. [Radiotherapy and implantable medical device: example of infusion pumps].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrous-Anane, S; Benhassine, S; Lopez, S; Cristina, K; Mazeron, J-J

    2013-12-01

    Indication for radiotherapy is often questioned for patients equipped with implantable medical devices like infusion pumps as the radiation tolerance is poor or not known. We report here on the case of a patient who we treated with pelvic radiotherapy for cervical cancer and who had an infusion pump in iliac fossa. We conducted a series of tests on five identical pumps that insured that the treatment protocol is harmless to the implanted device. Copyright © 2013 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Does antibiotic prophylaxis at implant placement decrease early implant failures? A Cochrane systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Marco; Grusovin, Maria Gabriella; Loli, Vasiliki; Coulthard, Paul; Worthington, Helen V

    2010-01-01

    Marco Esposito is the first author of two of the included studies; however, he was not involved in the quality assessment of these trials. This review is based on a Cochrane systematic review entitled 'Interventions for replacing missing teeth: antibiotics at dental implant placement to prevent complications' published in The Cochrane Library (see http://www.cochrane.org for more information). Cochrane systematic reviews are regularly updated to include new research, and in response to comments and criticisms from readers. If you wish to comment on this review, please send your comments to the Cochrane website or to Marco Esposito. The Cochrane Library should be consulted for the most recent version of the review. The results of a Cochrane Review can be interpreted differently, depending on people's perspectives and circumstances. Please consider the conclusions presented carefully. They are the opinions of the review authors, and are not necessarily shared by the Cochrane Collaboration. To assess the beneficial or harmful effects of systemic prophylactic antibiotics at dental implant placement versus no antibiotic/placebo administration and, if antibiotics are of benefit, to find which type, dosage and duration is the most effective. The Cochrane Oral Health Group's Trials Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE and EMBASE were searched up to 2 June 2010 for randomised controlled clinical trials (RCTs) with a follow-up of at least 3 months comparing the administration of various prophylactic antibiotic regimens versus no antibiotics to patients undergoing dental implant placement. Outcome measures were prosthesis failures, implant failures, postoperative infections and adverse events (gastrointestinal, hypersensitivity, etc.). Screening of eligible studies, assessment of the methodological quality of the trials and data extraction were conducted in duplicate and independently by two review authors. Meta-analyses were

  1. Synergistic effects of iodine and silver ions co-implanted in 6H-SiC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhudzai, R. J.; Malherbe, J. B.; Hlatshwayo, T. T.; van der Berg, N. G.; Devaraj, A.; Zhu, Z.; Nandasiri, M.

    2015-12-01

    Motivated by the aim of understanding the release of fission products through the SiC coating of fuel kernels in modern high temperature nuclear reactors, a fundamental investigation is conducted to understand the synergistic effects of implanted silver (Ag) and iodine (I) in 6H-SiC. The implantation of the individual species, as well as the co-implantation of 360 keV ions of I and Ag at room temperature in 6H-SiC and their subsequent annealing behaviour has been investigated by Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS), Atom Probe Tomography (APT) and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). SIMS and APT measurements indicated the presence of Ag in the co-implanted samples after annealing at 1500 °C for 30 h in sharp contrast to the samples implanted with Ag only. In samples implanted with Ag only, complete loss of the implanted Ag was observed. However, for I only implanted samples, some iodine was retained. APT of annealed co-implanted 6H-SiC showed clear spatial association of Ag and I clusters in SiC, which can be attributed to the observed I assisted retention of Ag after annealing. Such detailed studies will be necessary to identify the fundamental mechanism of fission products migration through SiC coatings.

  2. In vitro biological outcome of laser application for modification or processing of titanium dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindy, Ahmed; Farahmand, Farzam; Tabatabaei, Fahimeh Sadat

    2017-07-01

    There are numerous functions for laser in modern implant dentistry including surface treatment, surface coating, and implant manufacturing. As laser application may potentially improve osseointegration of dental implants, we systematically reviewed the literature for in vitro biological responses to laser-modified or processed titanium dental implants. The literature was searched in PubMed, ISI Web, and Scopus, using keywords "titanium dental implants," "laser," "biocompatibility," and their synonyms. After screening the 136 references obtained, 28 articles met the inclusion criteria. We found that Nd:YAG laser was the most commonly used lasers in the treatment or processing of titanium dental implants. Most of the experiments used cell attachment and cell proliferation to investigate bioresponses of the implants. The most commonly used cells in these assays were osteoblast-like cells. Only one study was conducted in stem cells. These in vitro studies reported higher biocompatibility in laser-modified titanium implants. It seems that laser radiation plays a vital role in cell response to dental implants; however, it is necessary to accomplish more studies using different laser types and parameters on various cells to offer a more conclusive result.

  3. Surface microhardening by ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Amarjit

    1986-01-01

    The paper discusses the process and the underlying mechanism of surface microhardening by implanting suitable energetic ions in materials like 4145 steel, 304 stainless steel, aluminium and its 2024-T351 alloy. It has been observed that boron and nitrogen implantation in materials like 4145 steel and 304 stainless steel can produce a significant increase in surface hardness. Moreover the increase can be further enhanced with suitable overlay coatings such as aluminium (Al), Titanium (Ti) and carbon (C). The surface hardening due to implantation is attributed to precipitation hardening or the formation of stable/metastable phase or both. The effect of lithium implantation in aluminium and its alloy on microhardness with increasing ion dose and ion beam energy is also discussed. (author)

  4. Dental-Implantate und ihre Werkstoffe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newesely, Heinrich

    1983-07-01

    Some new trends in materials for dental implants, which also effect in the operative techniques and implant design, are described. Advantages and shortcomings of the different material types are exemplified and correlated with their bioinert resp. bioactive functions. The practical interest in metallic implants focussed in titanium resp. oxide ceramics in the ceramic field, whereas the special goal of implant research follows from the improvement of the bioactive principle with loaded calcium phosphate implants.

  5. Biodegradable Implants in Orthopaedics and Traumatology

    OpenAIRE

    YETKIN, Haluk

    2014-01-01

    Biodegradable implants are an alternative to metallic implants and have the advantage of not being necessary to remove once the fracture has healed. Twenty-two patients with fractures were treated with biodegradable implants. There were osteolysis in eleven patients; however, no serious complication was encountered. Although biodegradable implants are expensive, a second surgical procedure to remove the implants is not necessary, relieving the patient of the related costs and risks.

  6. Basics of clinical diagnosis in implant dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manu Rathee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Implant-based prosthetic rehabilitation requires an understanding of associated anatomical structures. The ultimate predictability of an implant site is determined by the existing anatomy as related to dentition and the associated hard and soft tissues. Meticulous clinical assessment helps in determining the suitability of the potential site for implant placement. The purpose of this article is to present the clinical assessment for dental implants' placement to modulate peri-implant tissue characteristics in individual clinical need.

  7. Conducting polymer coated neural recording electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Alexander R.; Morgan, Simeon J.; Chen, Jun; Kapsa, Robert M. I.; Wallace, Gordon G.; Paolini, Antonio G.

    2013-02-01

    Objective. Neural recording electrodes suffer from poor signal to noise ratio, charge density, biostability and biocompatibility. This paper investigates the ability of conducting polymer coated electrodes to record acute neural response in a systematic manner, allowing in depth comparison of electrochemical and electrophysiological response. Approach. Polypyrrole (Ppy) and poly-3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene (PEDOT) doped with sulphate (SO4) or para-toluene sulfonate (pTS) were used to coat iridium neural recording electrodes. Detailed electrochemical and electrophysiological investigations were undertaken to compare the effect of these materials on acute in vivo recording. Main results. A range of charge density and impedance responses were seen with each respectively doped conducting polymer. All coatings produced greater charge density than uncoated electrodes, while PEDOT-pTS, PEDOT-SO4 and Ppy-SO4 possessed lower impedance values at 1 kHz than uncoated electrodes. Charge density increased with PEDOT-pTS thickness and impedance at 1 kHz was reduced with deposition times up to 45 s. Stable electrochemical response after acute implantation inferred biostability of PEDOT-pTS coated electrodes while other electrode materials had variable impedance and/or charge density after implantation indicative of a protein fouling layer forming on the electrode surface. Recording of neural response to white noise bursts after implantation of conducting polymer-coated electrodes into a rat model inferior colliculus showed a general decrease in background noise and increase in signal to noise ratio and spike count with reduced impedance at 1 kHz, regardless of the specific electrode coating, compared to uncoated electrodes. A 45 s PEDOT-pTS deposition time yielded the highest signal to noise ratio and spike count. Significance. A method for comparing recording electrode materials has been demonstrated with doped conducting polymers. PEDOT-pTS showed remarkable low fouling during

  8. Retrospective success and survival rates of dental implants placed after a ridge preservation procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apostolopoulos, Peter; Darby, Ivan

    2017-04-01

    Ridge preservation is any procedure that takes place at the time of, or shortly after an extraction, to minimise resorption of the ridge and maximise bone formation within the socket. The aim of this project is to investigate the outcome of implant treatment following ridge preservation and compare it to an ungrafted implant control group. Following ethics approval, an electronic and manual search of patient records was conducted, and appropriate cases of implant placement following a ridge preservation procedure were identified. Forty-two patients with 51 implants at ridge-preserved sites were examined by one author (PA) with the following parameters assessed at each implant: pocket probing depth, bleeding on probing, presence/absence of plaque and radiographic bone loss. Clinical and radiographic findings were compared to an ungrafted implant control group and analysed by years in function. There was a 100% survival rate of implants in ridge-preserved sites. In the majority of cases, ridge preservation was performed in the anterior maxilla with a flap raised and the use of deproteinised bovine bone mineral and collagen membrane materials. The mean time in function was 31 (±24) months with a range of 2-102 months. Differences in the mean PPD, BOP, plaque index and radiographic bone loss were not statistically significant between implants at ridge-preserved or ungrafted sites. The overall success rate was around 58% for ungrafted implants and around 51% for implants in ridge-preserved sites. However, this difference was not statistically significant. In this retrospective study, implant placement at ridge-preserved sites was a predictable procedure that led to very high survival rates and similar success rates to implant placement at ungrafted sites. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Dopant site location in dual-implanted GaP using (111) planar channeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parikh, N.R.; Kao, C.T.; Lee, D.R.; Muse, J.; Swanson, M.L.; Venkatasubramanian, R.; Timmons, M.

    1990-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that dual implantation can efficiently introduce group IV dopant onto selected sub-lattice sites in III--V compound semiconductors, thus enhancing electrical activation. The authors have studied this phenomenon in GaP using Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy (RBS) to determine the lattice location of Sn atoms. The authors used single crystals of GaP (100) which had been implanted at 400 degrees C with 120 Sn + following previously implanted 69 Ga + or 31 P + . Energies were selected for equivalent projected ranges, and all species were implanted with doses of 1 x 10 15 atoms/cm 2 . Asymmetry in the angular scan of the {111} planar channel was then used to determine the sub-lattice location of the implanted Sn. RBS results indicated that for all implants Sn atoms were substituting Ga and P sites equally. However, Hall effect measurements gave p type conduction for GaP implanted with Sn alone, while those with prior implants of Ga or P resulted in n-type conduction. RBS and Hall effect results are explained by a vacancy complex model

  10. Effects of residual hearing on cochlear implant outcomes in children: A systematic-review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiossi, Julia Santos Costa; Hyppolito, Miguel Angelo

    2017-09-01

    to investigate if preoperative residual hearing in prelingually deafened children can interfere on cochlear implant indication and outcomes. a systematic-review was conducted in five international databases up to November-2016, to locate articles that evaluated cochlear implantation in children with some degree of preoperative residual hearing. Outcomes were auditory, language and cognition performances after cochlear implant. The quality of the studies was assessed and classified according to the Oxford Levels of Evidence table - 2011. Risk of biases were also described. From the 30 articles reviewed, two types of questions were identified: (a) what are the benefits of cochlear implantation in children with residual hearing? (b) is the preoperative residual hearing a predictor of cochlear implant outcome? Studies ranged from 04 to 188 subjects, evaluating populations between 1.8 and 10.3 years old. The definition of residual hearing varied between studies. The majority of articles (n = 22) evaluated speech perception as the outcome and 14 also assessed language and speech production. There is evidence that cochlear implant is beneficial to children with residual hearing. Preoperative residual hearing seems to be valuable to predict speech perception outcomes after cochlear implantation, even though the mechanism of how it happens is not clear. More extensive researches must be conducted in order to make recommendations and to set prognosis for cochlear implants based on children preoperative residual hearing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Awareness, knowledge, and attitude of patients toward dental implants - A questionnaire-based prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosadurga, Rajesh; Shanti, Tenneti; Hegde, Shashikanth; Kashyap, Rajesh Shankar; Arunkumar, Suryanarayan Maiya

    2017-01-01

    In developing nations like India awareness and education about dental implants as a treatment modality is still scanty. The study was conducted to determine the awareness, knowledge, and attitude of patients toward dental implants as a treatment modality among the general population and to assess the influence of personality characteristics on accepting dental implants as a treatment modality in general and as well as treatment group. A structured questionnaire-based survey was conducted on 500 randomly selected participants attending the outpatient department. The study was conducted in 2 parts. In the first part of the study, level of awareness, knowledge, and attitude was assessed. In the second part of the study, interactive educational sessions using audiovisual aids were conducted following which a retest was conducted. The participants who agreed to undergo implant treatment were followed up to assess their change in attitude towards dental implants posttreatment. Thus pain, anxiety, functional, and esthetic benefits were measured using visual analog scale. They were further followed up for 1 year to reassess awareness, knowledge, and attitude towards dental implants. A total of 450 individuals completed the questionnaires. Only 106 individuals agreed to participate in the educational sessions and 83 individuals took the retest. Out of these, only 39 individuals chose implants as a treatment option. A significant improvement in the level of information, subjective and objective need for information, was noted after 1 year. In this study, a severe deficit in level of information, subjective and objective need for information towards, dental implants as a treatment modality was noted. In the treatment group, a significant improvement in perception of dental implant as a treatment modality suggests that professionally imparted knowledge can bring about a change in the attitude.

  12. Microscopic Study of Surface Microtopographic Characteristics of Dental Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sezin, M.; Croharé, L.; Ibañez, J.C.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine and compare the micro topographic characteristics of dental implants submitted to different surface treatments, using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Materials and Methods: Implants were divided into 7 groups of 3 specimens each, according to the surface treatment used: group 1: Osseotite, BIOMET 3i; group 2: SLA surface, Institut Straumann AG; group 3: Oxalife surface, Tree-Oss implant; group 4: B&W implant surface; group 5: Q-implant surface; group 6: ML implant surface; group 7: RBM surface, Rosterdent implant. The surfaces were examined under SEM (Carl Zeiss FE-SEM-SIGMA). Image Proplus software was used to determine the number and mean diameter of pores per area unit (mm). The data obtained were analyzed with the Mann-Whitney test. A confocal laser microscope (LEXT-OLS4100 Olympus) was used to conduct the comparative study of surface roughness (Ra). Data were analyzed using Tukey's HSD test. Results: The largest average pore diameter calculated in microns was found in group 5 (3.45 µm+/-1.91) while the smallest in group 7 (1.47µm+/-1.29). Significant differences were observed among each one of the groups studied (p<0.05). The largest number of pores/mm2 was found in group 2 (229343) and the smallest number in group 4 (10937). Group 2 showed significant differences regarding the other groups (p<0.05). The greatest roughness (Ra) was observed in group 2 (0.975µm+/-0.115) and the smallest in group 4 (0.304µm+/-0.063). Group 2 was significantly different from the other groups (p<0.05). Conclusion: The micro topography observed in the different groups presented dissimilar and specific features, depending on the chemical treatment used for the surfaces.. PMID:27335615

  13. Attachment systems for mandibular implant overdentures: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ha-Young; Lee, Jeong-Yol; Bryant, S. Ross

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this systematic review was to address treatment outcome according to attachment systems for mandibular implant overdentures in terms of implant survival rate, prosthetic maintenance and complications, and patient satisfaction. MATERIALS AND METHODS A systematic literature search was conducted using PubMed and hand searching of relevant journals considering inclusion and exclusion criteria. Clinical trial studies on mandibular implant overdentures until August, 2010 were selected if more than one type of overdenture attachment was reported. Twenty four studies from 1098 studies were finally included and the data on implant survival rate, prosthetic maintenance and complications, patient satisfaction were analyzed relative to attachment systems. RESULTS Four studies presented implant survival rates (95.8 - 97.5% for bar, 96.2 - 100% for ball, 91.7% for magnet) according to attachment system. Ten other studies presented an implant survival rate ranging from 93.3% to 100% without respect to the attachment groups. Common prosthetic maintenance and complications were replacement of an assay for magnet attachments, and activation of a matrix or clip for ball or bar attachments. Prosthetic maintenance and complications most commonly occurred in the magnet groups. Conflicting findings were found on the rate of prosthetic maintenance and complications comparing ball and bar attachments. Most studies showed no significant differences in patient satisfaction depending upon attachment systems. CONCLUSION The implant survival rate of mandibular overdentures seemed to be high regardless attachment systems. The prosthetic maintenance and complications may be influenced by attachment systems. However patient satisfaction may be independent of the attachment system. PMID:23236571

  14. Body Implanted Medical Device Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdandoost, Kamya Yekeh; Kohno, Ryuji

    The medical care day by day and more and more is associated with and reliant upon concepts and advances of electronics and electromagnetics. Numerous medical devices are implanted in the body for medical use. Tissue implanted devices are of great interest for wireless medical applications due to the promising of different clinical usage to promote a patient independence. It can be used in hospitals, health care facilities and home to transmit patient measurement data, such as pulse and respiration rates to a nearby receiver, permitting greater patient mobility and increased comfort. As this service permits remote monitoring of several patients simultaneously it could also potentially decrease health care costs. Advancement in radio frequency communications and miniaturization of bioelectronics are supporting medical implant applications. A central component of wireless implanted device is an antenna and there are several issues to consider when designing an in-body antenna, including power consumption, size, frequency, biocompatibility and the unique RF transmission challenges posed by the human body. The radiation characteristics of such devices are important in terms of both safety and performance. The implanted antenna and human body as a medium for wireless communication are discussed over Medical Implant Communications Service (MICS) band in the frequency range of 402-405MHz.

  15. Implantation damage in silicon devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicholas, K.H.

    1977-01-01

    Ion implantation, is an attractive technique for producing doped layers in silicon devices but the implantation process involves disruption of the lattice and defects are formed, which can degrade device properties. Methods of minimizing such damage are discussed and direct comparisons made between implantation and diffusion techniques in terms of defects in the final devices and the electrical performance of the devices. Defects are produced in the silicon lattice during implantation but they are annealed to form secondary defects even at room temperature. The annealing can be at a low temperature ( 0 C) when migration of defects in silicon in generally small, or at high temperature when they can grow well beyond the implanted region. The defect structures can be complicated by impurity atoms knocked into the silicon from surface layers by the implantation. Defects can also be produced within layers on top of the silicon and these can be very important in device fabrication. In addition to affecting the electrical properties of the final device, defects produced during fabrication may influence the chemical properties of the materials. The use of these properties to improve devices are discussed as well as the degradation they can cause. (author)

  16. The vestibular implant: Quo vadis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond eVan De Berg

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available AbstractObjective: to assess the progress of the development of the vestibular implant and its feasibility short-term. Data sources: a search was performed in Pubmed, Medline and Embase. Key words used were vestibular prosth* and vestibular implant. The only search limit was language: English or Dutch. Additional sources were medical books, conference lectures and our personal experience with per-operative vestibular stimulation in patients selected for cochlear implantation.Study selection: all studies about the vestibular implant and related topics were included and evaluated by two reviewers. No study was excluded since every study investigated different aspects of the vestibular implant. Data extraction and synthesis: data was extracted by the first author from selected reports, supplemented by additional information, medical books conference lectures. Since each study had its own point of interest with its own outcomes, it was not possible to compare data of different studies. Conclusion: to use a basic vestibular implant in humans seems feasible in the very near future. Investigations show that electric stimulation of the canal nerves induces a nystagmus which corresponds to the plane of the canal which is innervated by the stimulated nerve branch. The brain is able to adapt to a higher baseline stimulation, while still reacting on a dynamic component. The best response will be achieved by a combination of the optimal stimulus (stimulus profile, stimulus location, precompensation, complemented by central vestibular adaptation. The degree of response will probably vary between individuals, depending on pathology and their ability to adapt.

  17. Long-wavelength germanium photodetectors by ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, I.C.; Beeman, J.W.; Luke, P.N.; Hansen, W.L.; Haller, E.E.

    1990-11-01

    Extrinsic far-infrared photoconductivity in thin high-purity germanium wafers implanted with multiple-energy boron ions has been investigated. Initial results from Fourier transform spectrometer(FTS) measurements have demonstrated that photodetectors fabricated from this material have an extended long-wavelength threshold near 192μm. Due to the high-purity substrate, the ability to block the hopping conduction in the implanted IR-active layer yields dark currents of less than 100 electrons/sec at temperatures below 1.3 K under an operating bias of up to 70 mV. Optimum peak responsivity and noise equivalent power (NEP) for these sensitive detectors are 0.9 A/W and 5 x 10 -16 W/Hz 1/2 at 99 μm, respectively. The dependence of the performance of devices on the residual donor concentration in the implanted layer will be discussed. 12 refs., 4 figs

  18. High-temperature superconductors induced by ion implantation. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenwald, A.C.; Johnson, E.

    1988-08-01

    High dose oxygen ion implantation (10 to the 17th power ions per sq. cm.) at elevated temperatures (300 C) has been shown to adjust the critical temperature of gamma-Y-Ba-Cu-O and Bi-Ca-Sr-Cu-O materials. These results are in marked contrast to earlier work which showed complete destruction of superconducting properties for similar radiation doses, and marked reduction in superconducting properties at one-tenth this dose in the 1-2-3- compound only. Experiments also showed that the superconducting materials can be patterned into conducting and nonconducting areas without etching by ion implantation, allowing maintenance of planar geometries required for microcircuit fabrication. Experiments on deposition of thin films of high temperature superconductors for use with the ion implantation experiments showed that ion beam sputtering from a single target could achieve the correct stoichiometry. Variations of composition with ion beam energy and angle of sputtered ions were studied

  19. Imaging of common breast implants and implant-related complications: A pictorial essay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Amisha T; Jankharia, Bijal B

    2016-01-01

    The number of women undergoing breast implant procedures is increasing exponentially. It is, therefore, imperative for a radiologist to be familiar with the normal and abnormal imaging appearances of common breast implants. Diagnostic imaging studies such as mammography, ultrasonography, and magnetic resonance imaging are used to evaluate implant integrity, detect abnormalities of the implant and its surrounding capsule, and detect breast conditions unrelated to implants. Magnetic resonance imaging of silicone breast implants, with its high sensitivity and specificity for detecting implant rupture, is the most reliable modality to asses implant integrity. Whichever imaging modality is used, the overall aim of imaging breast implants is to provide the pertinent information about implant integrity, detect implant failures, and to detect breast conditions unrelated to the implants, such as cancer.

  20. Why are mini-implants lost: the value of the implantation technique!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Fabio Lourenço; Consolaro, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    The use of mini-implants have made a major contribution to orthodontic treatment. Demand has aroused scientific curiosity about implant placement procedures and techniques. However, the reasons for instability have not yet been made totally clear. The aim of this article is to establish a relationship between implant placement technique and mini-implant success rates by means of examining the following hypotheses: 1) Sites of poor alveolar bone and little space between roots lead to inadequate implant placement; 2) Different sites require mini-implants of different sizes! Implant size should respect alveolar bone diameter; 3) Properly determining mini-implant placement site provides ease for implant placement and contributes to stability; 4) The more precise the lancing procedures, the better the implant placement technique; 5) Self-drilling does not mean higher pressures; 6) Knowing where implant placement should end decreases the risk of complications and mini-implant loss.

  1. Why are mini-implants lost: The value of the implantation technique!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Lourenço Romano

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The use of mini-implants have made a major contribution to orthodontic treatment. Demand has aroused scientific curiosity about implant placement procedures and techniques. However, the reasons for instability have not yet been made totally clear. The aim of this article is to establish a relationship between implant placement technique and mini-implant success rates by means of examining the following hypotheses: 1 Sites of poor alveolar bone and little space between roots lead to inadequate implant placement; 2 Different sites require mini-implants of different sizes! Implant size should respect alveolar bone diameter; 3 Properly determining mini-implant placement site provides ease for implant placement and contributes to stability; 4 The more precise the lancing procedures, the better the implant placement technique; 5 Self-drilling does not mean higher pressures; 6 Knowing where implant placement should end decreases the risk of complications and mini-implant loss.

  2. Imaging of common breast implants and implant-related complications: A pictorial essay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amisha T Shah

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The number of women undergoing breast implant procedures is increasing exponentially. It is, therefore, imperative for a radiologist to be familiar with the normal and abnormal imaging appearances of common breast implants. Diagnostic imaging studies such as mammography, ultrasonography, and magnetic resonance imaging are used to evaluate implant integrity, detect abnormalities of the implant and its surrounding capsule, and detect breast conditions unrelated to implants. Magnetic resonance imaging of silicone breast implants, with its high sensitivity and specificity for detecting implant rupture, is the most reliable modality to asses implant integrity. Whichever imaging modality is used, the overall aim of imaging breast implants is to provide the pertinent information about implant integrity, detect implant failures, and to detect breast conditions unrelated to the implants, such as cancer.

  3. Comparison of of Interleukin 23 Level in Gingival Crevicular Fluid between Peri-implantitis and Healthy Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Esfahanian

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Peri-implantitis is characterized by irreversible lesions that are caused by microbial plaque, involving not only the soft tissue around the implant, but also the implant-supporting bone. In the peri-implant diseases, some cytokines are increased, and inflammatory mediators, which are observed in peri-implantitis, induce the activation of osteoclasts and bone resorption. The aim of this study was to compare the level of interleukin 23 (IL-23 in patients with peri-implantitis and those with healthy peri-implant tissue. Materials & methods: This clinical trial was conducted on 19 patients with peri-implantitis and 19 patients with healthy peri-implant tissue. The samples were collected from sulcular fluid/gingival pocket fluid by paper cone and placed in vials. The level of IL-23 was determined using ELISA reader. Furthermore, the relationship of IL-23 levels with bleeding, probing depth, and pus formation was analyzed. Data analysis was performed using independent t-test, Pearson correlation coefficient, and Spearman test. Results: According to the results, the level of IL-23 in the patients with peri-implantitis was significantly higher than that in the group with healthy peri-implant tissue (P

  4. Conducting compositions of matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Tito (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    The invention provides conductive compositions of matter, as well as methods for the preparation of the conductive compositions of matter, solutions comprising the conductive compositions of matter, and methods of preparing fibers or fabrics having improved anti-static properties employing the conductive compositions of matter.

  5. C-V and G-V characteristics of ion-implanted MOS structures depending upon the geometrical structure of the implanted region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zohta, Y.

    1977-01-01

    It is found that the capacitance-voltage (C-V) and conductance-voltage (G-V) characteristics of MOS capacitors, into which ions of the opposite conductivity type are implanted, depend strongly upon the geometrical structure of the ion-implanted region. This phenomenon can be analyzed in terms of lateral current flow which connects an inversion layer formed in the ion-implanted region to a surrounding nonimplanted substrate. On the basis of this model, the C-V and G-V characteristics are calculated using a simple equivalent circuit, and general relationships inherent in this model are obtained. MOS capacitors with an ion-implanted layer of different geometries have been prepared to measure their C-V and G-V characteristics. Comparison of experimental measurements with theory substantiates the lateral current flow model

  6. Implantate in der Augenheilkunde

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dresp, Joachim H.

    Im Bereich der Augenheilkunde findet sich die weltweit am häufigsten ausgeführte chirurgische Massnahme, die operative Behandlung des Grauen Stars: die Katarakt. Bei der Katarakt handelt es sich um eine Eintrübung der natürlichen Augenlinse, die sich je nach Stadium der Erkrankung leicht opak, über milchig bis zu bräunlich präsentiert. Mit dieser Zunahme der Undurchlässigkeit für das sichtbare Licht geht eine Abnahme des Sehvermögens einher, die bis zur totalen Erblindung führen kann. Bedingt durch die sehr eingeschränkten chirurgischen Möglichkeiten in den Ländern der Dritten Welt ist die Katarakt die Erblindungsursache Nummer 1 in der Welt. Ganz im Gegensatz hierzu ist in den industrialisierten Ländern Europas, Amerikas und Asiens die Katarakt-OP die sicherste chirurgische Intervention. In der Augenheilkunde werden Implantate aller drei Aggregatszustände verwendet.

  7. Paediatric Cochlear Implantation in Patients with Waardenburg Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Nierop, Josephine W I; Snabel, Rebecca R; Langereis, Margreet; Pennings, Ronald J E; Admiraal, Ronald J C; Mylanus, Emmanuel A M; Kunst, Henricus P M

    2016-01-01

    To analyse the benefit of cochlear implantation in young deaf children with Waardenburg syndrome (WS) compared to a reference group of young deaf children without additional disabilities. A retrospective study was conducted on children with WS who underwent cochlear implantation at the age of 2 years or younger. The post-operative results for speech perception (phonetically balanced standard Dutch consonant-vocal-consonant word lists) and language comprehension (the Reynell Developmental Language Scales, RDLS), expressed as a language quotient (LQ), were compared between the WS group and the reference group by using multiple linear regression analysis. A total of 14 children were diagnosed with WS, and 6 of them had additional disabilities. The WS children were implanted at a mean age of 1.6 years and the 48 children of the reference group at a mean age of 1.3 years. The WS children had a mean phoneme score of 80% and a mean LQ of 0.74 at 3 years post-implantation, and these results were comparable to those of the reference group. Only the factor additional disabilities had a significant negative influence on auditory perception and language comprehension. Children with WS performed similarly to the reference group in the present study, and these outcomes are in line with the previous literature. Although good counselling about additional disabilities concomitant to the syndrome is relevant, cochlear implantation is a good rehabilitation method for children with WS. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Efficacy of Ozurdex implant in treatment of noninfectious intermediate uveitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swetha Palla

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To report our experiences using Ozurdex, a biodegradable implant, containing 0.7 mg of dexamethasone in the treatment of noninfectious intermediate uveitis. Settings and Design: Retrospective study design. Methods: We conducted a retrospective study of medical records of patients with noninfectious intermediate uveitis having either cystoid macular edema (CME or vitritis who were not responsive to standard treatment and subsequently received Ozurdex implant from March 2011 to April 2013. The outcomes measured were best-corrected visual acuity, central retinal thickness (CRT, and vitreous haze score. Statistical Analysis Used: Paired t-test was used to test the significance of difference between quantitative variables. A P < 0.05 is taken to denote significant relationship. Results: Twenty eyes of 15 patients with mean age of 39.8 years who received Ozurdex implant were included in the study. The mean baseline visual acuity improved from 0. 666 logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution (logMAR units to 0.479 logMAR units at 6 weeks after the implant. The mean CRT improved from 536.1 to 361.4 microns at 6 weeks postimplant both parameters were statistically significant. The ocular inflammation was controlled in almost all the patients. Cataract and raised intraocular pressure were documented complications. Conclusion: Ozurdex implant is a promising treatment option and efficient in controlling the inflammation and CME in cases of noninfectious intermediate uveitis not responding to standard treatment.

  9. [Cochlear implant in patients with congenital malformation of inner ear].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Dong-yi; Wu, Wen-ming; Xi, Xin; Huang, De-liang; Yang, Wei-yan

    2004-02-01

    To study surgical difficulty and key of the cochlear implant in patients with congenital malformation of inner ear. The cochlear implantations were performed in our department from Jan. 2001 to Apr. 2003 for 18 patients with the malformation of inner ear. In this series, there were 11 cases of large vestibular aqueduct syndrome (LVAS), 3 cases of Waardenberg syndrome, 3 cases of Mondini malformation, and 1 case of Usher syndrome. All 18 patients accepted the Nucleus 24-channel cochlear implantations, including Nucleus straight electrode in 13 cases but Contour implantation in 5 cases of LVAS. During operations, leakage of perilymph but not cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from the open of scala tympani occurred in 11 cases of LVAS, however, the electrode was inserted successfully. The abnormalities of round window occurred in one of 3 cases of Waardenberg syndrome and 3 cases of Mondini malformation, respectively. The cochlear implant could be conducted successfully for the LVAS, and the postoperative effect was same as the ones for the deafness persons with normal development of inner ear. However, for the patients with Mondini syndrome and common cavity, it is important to accurately assess the extent of abnormalities in the inner ear and accompanied malformation before operation, and to evaluate the full extent of difficulties of the operation in order to minimize the risk of CSF leakage and meningitis.

  10. Does platform switching really prevent crestal bone loss around implants?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiyuki Hagiwara

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available To maintain long-term implant stability, it is important to minimize bone loss around the implant. Several clinical studies have shown a mean marginal bone loss around dental implants of 1.5–2 mm in the first year after prosthetic restoration. Currently, concepts to prevent bone loss around dental implants have been reported as the platform switching (PLS. This technique use of prosthetic abutments with reduced width in relation to the implant platform diameter seems to have the greatest potential to limit the crestal resorption. However, there are only a few reports on the mechanism of action or the extent of bone loss prevention, and as such, it is difficult to say that the effect of PLS has been thoroughly examined. Excluding case reports, articles on PLS can be broadly categorized into: (1 radiographic evaluation of crestal bone level in humans, (2 histological and histomorphometrical analysis in animals, or (3 finite element analysis. This review revealed a shortage of published data for above three categories related PLS. Researchers have attempted to explain the mechanism of action of PLS; however, it is necessary to conduct further studies, including histological studies using animals, to clarify the mechanism fully.

  11. Definitive diagnosis of breast implant rupture using magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, C Y; Shaw, W W; Narayanan, K; Gorczyca, D P; Sinha, S; Debruhl, N D; Bassett, L W

    1993-09-01

    Breast implant rupture is an important complication of augmented and reconstructed breasts. Although several techniques such as mammography, xeromammography, ultrasound, thermography, and computed tomographic (CT) scanning have been proven to be useful to detect implant rupture, they have several disadvantages and lack specificity. In the current study, we have established magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a definitive, reliable, and reproducible technique to diagnose both intracapsular and extracapsular ruptures. The study was conducted in 100 symptomatic patients. Our imaging parameters were able to identify ruptures in implants with silicone shells. All the ruptures showed the presence of wavy lines, free-floating silicone shell within the gel ("free-floating loose-thread sign" or "linguine sign"). We had a 3.75 percent incidence of false-positive and false-negative results. The sensitivity for detection of silicone implant rupture was 76 percent, with a specificity of 97 percent. In addition, we also were able to identify the artifacts that may interfere with the definitive diagnosis of implant rupture.

  12. Cochlear Implants and Psychiatric Assessments: a Norrie Disease Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacques, Denis; Dubois, Thomas; Zdanowicz, Nicolas; Gilain, Chantal; Garin, Pierre

    2017-09-01

    It is important to perform psychiatric assessments of adult patients who are candidates for cochlear implants both to screen them for psychiatric disorders and to assess their understanding and compliance with the procedure. Deafness is a factor of difficulty for conducting in-depth psychiatric interviews, but concomitant blindness may make it impossible. After a description of Norrie disease, a rare disease in which blindness and deafness may occur together, we propose a case report of a patient suffering from the disease and who consulted in view of a cochlear implant. Early information on cochlear implants appears to be necessary before total deafness occurs in patients suffering from Norrie disease. An inventory of digital communication tools that can be used by the patient is also highly valuable. Research should be supported for a more systematic use of psychiatric assessments prior to cochlear implants. In the special case of Norrie disease, we recommend early screening for mental retardation and related psychotic disorders and, depending on the patient's level of understanding, preventive information on the benefits and limits of cochlear implants before total deafness occurs.

  13. Heat generated by dental implant drills during osteotomy-a review: heat generated by dental implant drills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Sunil Kumar; Chowdhary, Ramesh

    2014-06-01

    Osseointegration is the more stable situation and results in a high success rate of dental implants. Heat generation during rotary cutting is one of the important factors influencing the development of osseointegration. To assess the various factors related to implant drills responsible for heat generation during osteotomy. To identify suitable literature, an electronic search was performed using Medline and Pubmed database. Articles published in between 1960 to February 2013 were searched. The search is focused on heat generated by dental implant drills during osteotomy. Various factors related to implant drill such effect of number of blades; drill design, drill fatigue, drill speed and force applied during osteotomies which were responsible for heat generation were reviewed. Titles and abstracts were screened, and literature that fulfilled the inclusion criteria was selected for a full-text reading. The initial literature search resulted in 299 articles out of which only 70 articles fulfils the inclusion criteria and were included in this systematic review. Many factors related to implant drill responsible for heat generation were found. Successful preparation of an implant cavity with minimal damage to the surrounding bone depends on the avoidance of excessive temperature generation during surgical drilling. The relationship between heat generated and implant drilling osteotomy is multifactorial in nature and its complexity has not been fully studied. Lack of scientific knowledge regarding this issue still exists. Further studies should be conducted to determine the various factors which generate less heat while osteotomy such as ideal ratio of force and speed in vivo, exact time to replace a drill, ideal drill design, irrigation system, drill-bone contact area.

  14. Highly Stripped Ion Sources for MeV Ion Implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hershcovitch, Ady

    2009-06-30

    Original technical objectives of CRADA number PVI C-03-09 between BNL and Poole Ventura, Inc. (PVI) were to develop an intense, high charge state, ion source for MeV ion implanters. Present day high-energy ion implanters utilize low charge state (usually single charge) ion sources in combination with rf accelerators. Usually, a MV LINAC is used for acceleration of a few rnA. It is desirable to have instead an intense, high charge state ion source on a relatively low energy platform (de acceleration) to generate high-energy ion beams for implantation. This de acceleration of ions will be far more efficient (in energy utilization). The resultant implanter will be smaller in size. It will generate higher quality ion beams (with lower emittance) for fabrication of superior semiconductor products. In addition to energy and cost savings, the implanter will operate at a lower level of health risks associated with ion implantation. An additional aim of the project was to producing a product that can lead to long­ term job creation in Russia and/or in the US. R&D was conducted in two Russian Centers (one in Tomsk and Seversk, the other in Moscow) under the guidance ofPVI personnel and the BNL PI. Multiple approaches were pursued, developed, and tested at various locations with the best candidate for commercialization delivered and tested at on an implanter at the PVI client Axcelis. Technical developments were exciting: record output currents of high charge state phosphorus and antimony were achieved; a Calutron-Bemas ion source with a 70% output of boron ion current (compared to 25% in present state-of-the-art). Record steady state output currents of higher charge state phosphorous and antimony and P ions: P{sup 2+} (8.6 pmA), P{sup 3+} (1.9 pmA), and P{sup 4+} (0.12 pmA) and 16.2, 7.6, 3.3, and 2.2 pmA of Sb{sup 3+} Sb {sup 4 +}, Sb{sup 5+}, and Sb{sup 6+} respectively. Ultimate commercialization goals did not succeed (even though a number of the products like high

  15. Accuracy of Implants Placed with Surgical Guides: Thermoplastic Versus 3D Printed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Caitlyn K; Sahl, Erik F; Kim, Yoon Jeong; Rice, Dwight D

    This study was conducted to evaluate the accuracy of implants placed using two different guided implant surgery materials: thermoplastic versus three-dimensionally (3D) printed. A cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scan previously obtained and selected for single-tooth implant replacement was converted into a Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) file. All models were planned and exported for printing using BlueSkyBio Plan Software with the DICOM files. A total of 20 3D-printed mandibular quadrant jaws replicating the CBCT were printed by Right Choice Milling, as was the control model to accept the control implant. Previously, 10 thermoplastic and 10 3D-printed surgical guides had been made by the same lab technician at Right Choice Milling. One Nobel Biocare implant with a trilobe connection was placed per guide and replica jaw model pair. Implants were placed using the thermoplastic and 3D-printed surgical guides, representing the two test groups, following the Nobel Biocare guided surgical protocol. A total of 21 CBCT scans were then taken, one for the control implant and one for each test implant. The CBCT volume was converted to a DICOM file and transferred to Invivo5 software version 5.4 (Anatomage). The DICOM file of each test implant was superimposed over the DICOM file of the control. The deviation of the head of the implant, the deviation of the apex of the implant, and the angle of deviation were evaluated from measurements on the superimposition of the control and test implants. Mann-Whitney U test was used to test the null hypotheses at α = .05 and a confidence interval of 95%. Descriptive statistics were used for the average ± standard deviation. The implants placed with the thermoplastic surgical guides showed an average of 3.40 degrees of angular deviation compared to 2.36 degrees for implants placed with the 3D-printed surgical guides (P = .143). The implants placed with the thermoplastic surgical guides showed an average of 1

  16. Comparison of oxidation resistance of copper treated by beam-line ion implantation and plasma immersion ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An Quanzhang; Li Liuhe; Hu Tao; Xin Yunchang; Fu, Ricky K.Y.; Kwok, D.T.K.; Cai Xun; Chu, Paul K.

    2009-01-01

    Copper which has many favorable properties such as low cost, high thermal and electrical conductivity, as well as easy fabrication and joining is one of the main materials in lead frames, interconnects, and foils in flexible circuits. Furthermore, copper is one of the best antibacterial materials. However, unlike aluminum oxide or chromium oxide, the surface copper oxide layer does not render sufficient protection against oxidation. In this work, in order to improve the surface oxidation resistance of Cu, Al and N were introduced into copper by plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) and beam-line ion implantation (BII). The implantation fluences of Al and N were 2 x 10 17 ions cm -2 and 5 x 10 16 ions cm -2 , respectively. The implanted and untreated copper samples were oxidized in air at 260 deg. C for 1 h. The X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), as well as X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results indicate that both implantation methods can enhance the oxidation resistance of copper but to different extent. PIII is superior to BII in enhancing the oxidation resistance of copper. The effects and possible mechanisms are discussed.

  17. Precision of fit between implant impression coping and implant replica pairs for three implant systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicoll, Roxanna J; Sun, Albert; Haney, Stephan; Turkyilmaz, Ilser

    2013-01-01

    The fabrication of an accurately fitting implant-supported fixed prosthesis requires multiple steps, the first of which is assembling the impression coping on the implant. An imprecise fit of the impression coping on the implant will cause errors that will be magnified in subsequent steps of prosthesis fabrication. The purpose of this study was to characterize the 3-dimensional (3D) precision of fit between impression coping and implant replica pairs for 3 implant systems. The selected implant systems represent the 3 main joint types used in implant dentistry: external hexagonal, internal trilobe, and internal conical. Ten impression copings and 10 implant replicas from each of the 3 systems, B (Brånemark System), R (NobelReplace Select), and A (NobelActive) were paired. A standardized aluminum test body was luted to each impression coping, and the corresponding implant replica was embedded in a stone base. A coordinate measuring machine was used to quantify the maximum range of displacement in a vertical direction as a function of the tightening force applied to the guide pin. Maximum angular displacement in a horizontal plane was measured as a function of manual clockwise or counterclockwise rotation. Vertical and rotational positioning was analyzed by using 1-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). The Fisher protected least significant difference (PLSD) multiple comparisons test of the means was applied when the F-test in the ANOVA was significant (α=.05). The mean and standard deviation for change in the vertical positioning of impression copings was 4.3 ±2.1 μm for implant system B, 2.8 ±4.2 μm for implant system R, and 20.6 ±8.8 μm for implant system A. The mean and standard deviation for rotational positioning was 3.21 ±0.98 degrees for system B, 2.58 ±1.03 degrees for system R, and 5.30 ±0.79 degrees for system A. The P-value for vertical positioning between groups A and B and between groups A and R was <.001. No significant differences were found for

  18. N+ ion-implantation-induced defects in ZnO studied with a slow positron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Z Q; Sekiguchi, T; Yuan, X L; Maekawa, M; Kawasuso, A

    2004-01-01

    Undoped ZnO single crystals were implanted with multiple-energy N + ions ranging from 50 to 380 keV with doses from 10 12 to 10 14 cm -2 . Positron annihilation measurements show that vacancy defects are introduced in the implanted layers. The concentration of the vacancy defects increases with increasing ion dose. The annealing behaviour of the defects can be divided into four stages, which correspond to the formation and recovery of large vacancy clusters and the formation and disappearance of vacancy-impurity complexes, respectively. All the implantation-induced defects are removed by annealing at 1200 deg. C. Cathodoluminescence measurements show that the ion-implantation-induced defects act as nonradiative recombination centres to suppress the ultraviolet (UV) emission. After annealing, these defects disappear gradually and the UV emission reappears, which coincides with positron annihilation measurements. Hall measurements reveal that after N + implantation, the ZnO layer still shows n-type conductivity

  19. Wear life of sputtered MoSx films extended by high energy ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okazaki, Yasufumi; Fujiura, Hideo; Nishimura, Makoto

    2000-01-01

    The tribological characteristics of sputtered MoSx films have been reportedly improved by inert gas ion implantation. We tried to extend their wear life by introducing indium, carbon and gallium ion implantation. Pin-on-disk testers were used to measure friction coefficient and wear life in a vacuum, dry and humid air. Comparing with the unimplanted films, we found that the indium ion implanted films showed marked improvement in wear life in a vacuum. Carbon ion implanted films showed improvement in wear life in high humid air. Implantation was effective when it was conducted with maximum concentration at the interface between film and substrate rather than at the neighborhood of the interface inside a film. (author)

  20. Feedback characteristics between implantable microphone and transducer in middle ear cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arman Woo, S H; Woo, Seong Tak; Song, Byung Seop; Cho, Jin-Ho

    2013-10-01

    With the advent of implantable hearing aids, implementation and acoustic sensing strategy of the implantable microphone becomes an important issue; among the many types of implantable microphone, placing the microphone in middle ear cavity (MEC) has advantages including simple operation and insensitive to skin touching or chewing motion. In this paper, an implantable microphone was implemented and researched feedback characteristic when both the implantable microphone and the transducer were placed in the MEC. Analytical and finite element analysis were conducted to design the microphone to have a natural frequency of 7 kHz and showed good characteristics of SNR and sensitivity. For the feedback test, simple analytical and finite element analysis were calculated and compared with in vitro experiments (n = 4). From the experiments, the open-loop gain and feedback factor were measured and the minimum gain margin measured as 14.3 dB.